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W4 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

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W2 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

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Sales • Lease • Management Your Richmond Specialist www.interlinkrealty.ca email: info@interlinkrealty.ca 604.271.3888 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016 n Around 80 aspiring chess players, aged five years and up, took part in the Kiwanis Club of Richmond’s sixth annual Youth Chess Tournament on Saturday at C4 (City Centre Community Centre). More pictures in The Pulse on page 25. Photo by Gord Goble/Special to the News

What’s inside:

NEWS: Unhappy racquetball players serve it up to the city

3

YVR tightens security Graeme Wood

n Passengers at Vancouver Airport were met with an increased police presence Tuesday, in light of the terror attacks in Brussels, Belgium earlier the same day. Photo by Graeme Wood/ Richmond News

Staff Reporter gwood@richmond-news.com

R

ichmond RCMP bomb-sniffing dogs were put to work Tuesday afternoon at Vancouver International Airport, after officials raised the level of security following terrorist attacks in Brussels, Belgium. The airport’s CEO, Craig Richmond, told media that YVR was on a “heightened level of security,” although there was no specific directive from the federal government after The Islamic State (IS) group reportedly took responsibility for killing 30-plus people in two separate attacks in Brussels, including one at the country’s international airport. Richmond had a scheduled public announcement to draw attention to the airport’s new contract with China`s Xiamen Airlines. He began the event with a moment of silence for the victims of the attacks, which occurred around 12 a.m. PST. YVR does not have any direct flights to Belgium and no flight delays were reported out of the airport on Tuesday. Meanwhile, Metro Vancouver Transit

Police stated Tuesday the agency had taken extra security precautions along the transit system. On Tuesday, Hon. Ralph Goodale, Canada`s Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, reported no credible threat to the country. “Canadians can be assured that when the security and intelli-

gence sector receives a credible threat, they work with the appropriate partners to ensure the safety of our citizens,” said Goodale. “At this moment, we have no reason to change Canada’s threat level. I encourage Canadians to stay alert and stay vigilant, and to report any unusual or suspicious behaviour to local police.”

COMMUNITY: Find out where and when the best Easter egg hunts are 19

SPORTS: Midget Blues wrap up an exciting season 27

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A2 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

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INGREDIENTS 1 cup cooked chickpea 3 tablespoons tahini 4-5 tablespoons olive oil Juice of ½ lemon 1 big garlic clove, grated 1 teaspoon cumin Salt and pepper, to taste Paprika, to taste Water, ¼ cup or as needed for desired consistency Bean Sprouts, optional Carrot, peeled and thinly sliced DIRECTIONS 1. In a blender, mix together cooked chickpea, tahini, olive oil, lemon, garlic, cumin, salt, pepper, and paprika. Blend together all the ingredients until it is smooth and thick. Once done, adjust the seasoning to your desired taste. 2. Peel the carrot, and with a veggie peeler, shave the carrot. You will now have thin slices of carrots. 3. To assemble, add ½ teaspoon of hummus onto each carrot slice, making sure each end of the carrot slice has ample amount of hummus in order to keep the roll together. Gently roll the carrot while applying some pressure to make sure the roll holds together. 4. Add bean sprouts on top if desired.

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

A3

NEWSin the City

Centre's ball players making a racquet ALANCAMPBELL Staff Reporter

ACAMPBELL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

B

etween their quintet, they boast 141 years of playing a sport they fear is on its last legs in Richmond. The group — Patrick Fung, Ed Teranishi, Shawn Ho, Dave Breen and Murray Iseli — are five of a 25-strong crowd who play racquetball at South Arm Community Centre’s two courts up to four times a week. Demand for the 66-year-old sport, which is very similar to squash, has waned over the last few years and the community centre now has the city’s two remaining racquetball courts. And with South Arm Community Association and the City of Richmond currently considering a plan to increase fitness floor space, at the expense of one of the courts and a squash court, the racquetball community is fighting for the future of its sport. “We’re down to the last two courts in the city and to take one of them away would be very damaging to the sport,” said one of the five, Teranishi, who has been playing for 37 years, 25 of which at South Arm. “It won’t affect squash as much, because there are plenty of other squash courts around Richmond. “There used to be a league based out of South Arm, but it folded a few years ago; people are getting older, I guess, and not as many younger ones coming through.” Teranishi said there used to be other courts across the city but now everyone travels from all over Richmond to South Arm and some come from the Marpole area

to play. Teranishi and his fellow racquetball players have spent the last few weeks putting together a petition with more than 200 signatures pleading for the courts to be saved. That petition was handed to City of Richmond staff during a meeting with the players last week. “We didn’t know the community centre was considering this until very recently,” added Teranishi. “We met two weeks ago with city staff and gave them our input and we were told they’re going to look at it again.” Both the city and the community association are justifying the direction being taken based partly on a gradual decline in racquetball bookings over the last few years. However, Teranishi said the bookings don’t tell the full story of the number of players still involved in the sport in Richmond. “There are sometimes 12 or 13 people using those two courts, playing doubles and whatever,” he said. “So it may look like one booking, but there are many of us playing at the same time. “This could kill the sport in Richmond. It’s a very social sport; afterwards we all go to the Pioneer Pub. But this will make it very hard to get court time.” City spokesperson Ted Townsend said the demand for fitness facilities has grown beyond the capacity of the existing centre. “At the same time, there is shrinking demand for the four courts and we’re looking at eliminating one of each to allow the expansion to happen,” Townsend added. “We understand the users of those courts

n These racquetball players, from left, Patrick Fung, Ed Teranishi, Shawn Ho, Dave Breen and Murray Iseli, are among a 25-strong group that fears for the future of racquetball at South Arm Community Centre if planned renovations go ahead. Photo by Alan Campbell/Richmond News

are concerned about that and they’ve had meetings with the city. But nothing has been determined at this point…the association is still looking at all the options.” Rob Dodman, community association president, said that, although the city owns the building, the association is “listened to,” as they operate the programs. “We’re always trying to optimize the space that we have and the space is very limited,” explained Dodman. “We’ve had some concerns for a number of years that the (racquetball court) usage has dropped significantly. “Whereas, the fitness space is crammed

and people are wanting more space and our numbers are showing that.” Dodman said, as well as looking at the bookings numbers and drop-ins, recommendations from the staff at the centre are also taken into account. He added consultants have been called in to help with the proposed renovations, but no funding has been approved. “So, the price we have in mind is still very much unknown. It may be a phased approach, depending on the funding.” Dodman said the association is “still looking and still trying to do what’s best for everyone in the community.”

English not under threat: Civil liberties group GRAEMEWOOD

TransLink not about to follow Richmond down bus shelter ad path

GWOOD@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

stations and on the back of buses. TransLink told the News there is no legislation in the province or any municipality to enforce signage or ads in any of Canada’s two official languages, English or French. Ergo, “TransLink has no authority to deny advertising on that basis. If people want to advertise, as long as it meets our own advertising guidelines, we accept it,” noted TransLink spokesperson Cheryl Ziola. Those guidelines were heavily influenced by a 2009 Supreme Court of Canada decision that ruled TransLink is a public agency that is subject to an

Staff Reporter

T

he B.C. Civil Liberties Association says constitutional questions may arise over the City of Richmond’s decision to require some English on city-owned bus shelter ads. The city has stated its new contract with an advertising company (potentially Pattison Outdoor Advertising) will stipulate there should be bilingual messaging on its ads, found on bus stop benches and shelters. This is in stark contrast to TransLink’s insistence that it cannot regulate language on its own ads, such as at Canada Line

individual’s right to freedom of expression under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The decision was made after TransLink had refused to place a political ad on its property and was subsequently taken to court for not doing so. The city contends it can regulate its own signs and ads, as opposed to enforcing language requirements on private business signs via a bylaw, which it decided not to do last year following public consultation. “I see this being very akin to the TransLink situation,” stated Josh Paterson, executive director for the B.C. Civil Liberties Association.

TransLink could place language requirements in its advertising policy, however it would be subject to a court challenge, and thus the public transportation agency would need to prove, under Section 1 of the Charter, that there are demonstrably justified reasons to limit freedom of expression. Similarly, city council was advised that it could create a language bylaw for business signs, however, it was a matter of whether or not it could be proved that the English requirements were a reasonable limitation on the Charter (specifically, See Starchuk page 4


A4 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

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Richmond City Hall. But Paterson said it was his associawhether Chinese-only signs are harmful to tion’s opinion that English was not under community harmony). threat in the province or in Richmond. Paterson said the city could face a “I’m not sure anyone is making a credsimilar type of challenge regarding its bus ible argument that English as a language shelter ads and thus may need to prove of commerce is under threat in B.C,” said its English requirements Paterson, who questioned are justified limits on the how the city could demCharter. onstrate language requireEnglish speakers The city’s decision was, ments at city-owned bus however, welcomed by stops are justified limitations aren’t being shut out community activist Kerry to the Charter. Starchuk, who is questioning of these products. “English speakers aren’t why TransLink won’t follow being shut out of these These kinds of restricthe City of Richmond’s suit. products,” added Paterson. Starchuk said she and many tions aren’t justfied... “These kinds of restricother Richmond residents tions aren’t justified and we – Josh Paterson, are frustrated by the growing think, in our legal opinion, prevalence of Chinese-only B.C. Civil Liberties that they’re constitutionally or predominantly-Chinese vulnerable. Association advertisements at public “I’m not sure what purtransit stops. pose (the city) could point “I pay property taxes to to and say, ‘Gosh, that fund TransLink and want a refund. I do Budweiser ad has got to be in English.’ not support signage that is not inclusive to What is the public purpose there?” asked all cultures,” said Starchuk, via an email Paterson, who noted English requirements to the Richmond News. for public signs for health and safety or Notably, in January, Coun. Chak Au directions would likely demonstrate a expressed his disappointment in a mostly- justified limitation, if they were ever chalChinese Budweiser beer ad in front of lenged.

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

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A6 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

NEWSin the City

City`s constant gardener marks century Green-fingered Kay Sakata attributes her longevity to being happy PHILIPRAPHAEL

Staff Reporter

PRAPHAEL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

C

hances are, there’s a little bit of Kay Sakata’s green-thumbed handiwork gracing a lot of Richmond gardens. The Steveston resident — who turned 100 on March 11, although her official birthday was on Monday (March 21), the date her birth was actually registered — has been known for decades as the person behind a lush green spot in the heart of the historic fishing village. According to family members, who helped her celebrate the landmark, trips to places such as London Heritage Farm would often leave her with a smile of delight on her face. “She’d say, ‘Oh, I’ve got flowers like that in my garden,’” said Lise Mercier, Sakata’s daughter-in-law. “And she did, because Kay would give away plants and cuttings from her own garden that ended up in places like London Farm over the years.” The beauty of Sakata’s garden outside the family home on First Avenue became so well known, that it became a regular stop for countless people, who would stroll by and have a word with the “gardener.” It became a regular thing that when a friend — just about anybody qualified for that status with the affable Sakata — dropped by, they would leave with a plant. That love for the outdoors and cultivating a rich and colourful landscape came from growing up on her family’s seven-acre farm that was located on Garry Street, near the village. She went to elementary school at nearby Lord Byng, and later graduated from Richmond High in 1933. When her family was interned during the Second World War in the B.C. interior, she ended up meeting a handsome, young fisherman, Shozo Sakata, and the two were married in Grand Forks in 1949. The couple moved back to Steveston shortly afterwards and moved into the First Avenue house, where she still lives today. They had two children, Carol-Lyn and Adam. A good part of her working life, through the 1960s and ‘70s, was spent at the local

n Left, Kay Sakata, a born-and-raised Rich-

mondite, turned 100 on March 11. Above, Kay Sakata married Shozo in Grand Forks, B.C., where her family was interned during the Second World War. Below, Sakata enjoys her garden in her home on First Avenue, where she has been living since the 1950s. Photos submitted

cannery (B.C. Packers). And as a skilled seamstress, she would teach sewing at the local Buddhist temple and on the second floor of the Hepworth building in Steveston Village. But it was her love of gardening that shined through.

Many of the flowers she grew were displayed in her many entries to the annual Steveston Salmon Festival’s Ikebana (Japanese flower arranging) competitions. She also served as parade marshal at the Salmon Festival in 2006. Now in a wheelchair, Sakata has had

to give up hands-on involvement in her garden. Family members have chipped in to keep things tidy. But Sakata hasn’t stopped leading an active life. She was in her ...Kay would give 8 when she 80s d declared to away plants and cutf family that she tings from her own w wanted to see t world. And the garden that ended s far, she’s so up in places like s seen most of it, s save for South London Farm over A America. the years. She recently had her pass– Lise Mercier, port renewed in hopes of one daughter-in-law d travelling day a again. Asked if s had any she s secrets to her longevity, Sakata laughed and said, “I don’t really know. I never imagined getting to be 100. I guess being happy helped.”

City may relax tap bans during Stage 2 water restrictions Graeme Wood

Staff Reporter gwood@richmond-news.com

I

t was one of the most punitive municipalities in Metro Vancouver during the 2015 drought when it came to enforcing water restrictions, but now the City of Richmond is proposing to relax its own water use bylaws, for practical purposes. In a report to Richmond city council’s public works committee Wednesday, city planners are proposing to lift a ban on all aesthetic window washing during Stage 2 water restrictions. The reason for the change, out-

lined in the report, is that because the Greater Vancouver Water District Board (Metro Vancouver) approved water use by commercial cleaning services for aesthetic purposes last month, city staff believe enforcement would be difficult as bylaw officers would be required to determine if the cleaning service was performed commercially or privately prior to issuing a ticket. Furthermore, the city contends the new GVWD amendments are unfair to residents who cannot afford professional cleaning services. “This causes the issue of

financial disparity and presents unfair treatment to low-income residents,” noted the report. It’s noted that Metro Vancouver prefers to have its rules align with those of each municipality, however it is not able to issue fines or penalties to municipalities applying discretion. Metro Vancouver conducted a review of its water restrictions in November, following an unprecedented drought in the region, last summer. One of the problems discovered, via consultation with municipalities and businesses, was monitoring and enforcement challenges.

“Local government staff noted that inconsistency in monitoring and enforcing the restrictions resulted in confusion for residents and businesses, which hindered compliance with the regulations,” noted a Metro Vancouver report. Meetings were held with businesses associated with water use, such as golf courses, window washers, turf farms, irrigation companies and nurseries. Another major concern raised was the financial impact to such businesses. In addition to the immediate lift on aesthetic cleaning during Stage 2 restrictions, the board will also

allow exemption permits to water new lawns or for treatment to control the European chafer beetle during Stage 3 restrictions. In 2015, the City of Richmond came down hard on water wasters during the summer’s recordsetting heatwave — to the tune of $208,200 in fines. On the back of 50 written warnings, a total of 407 violation tickets at $500 each were issued, mostly in August, by city bylaw officers during Stage 3 restrictions, which banned lawn sprinkling of any kind. The proposals must still be endorsed by Richmond city council.


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

A7

NEWSin the City

Two arrests after bust Jessica Kerr

Delta Optimist

A

TO MO RR OW

raid on a Richmond home by Delta Police last week was part of a multi-city drug bust that led to the discovery of a large fentanyl lab in Burnaby. Delta officers executed three search warrants in Burnaby, Surrey and Richmond last Thursday, according to Acting Sgt. Sarah Swallow, of the Delta Police Department. Officers searched a home in the 10800 block of No. 5 Road, finding “items consistent with drug trafficking,” according to Swallow, who could not release more details. Two men, Scott Pipping and Adam Summers, both of Richmond, appeared in Surrey provincial court Friday afternoon. The men are facing a total of 17 charges, including trafficking in a controlled substance and possession for the purposes of trafficking, as well as possession of a restricted/prohibited firearm and possession of a restricted/prohibited firearm without a licence. The two men remain in police custody and are scheduled to appear in court again next week. “During the search of the Burnaby location officers discovered a large clandestine lab used to produce what appears to be the drug fentanyl,” said Swallow. “This lab is believed to be one of the largest fentanyl labs seen to date in B.C. in terms of drug production.”

Swallow said any risk to the public was low and the RCMP’s CLEAR (Clandestine Laboratory Enforcement and Response) team was on site to dismantle the operation with assistance from Burnaby RCMP and fire department. Swallow said it is not uncommon for Delta police to investigate across municipal boundaries. She noted all officers in B.C. are sworn in provincially and have such powers. Swallow said Richmond RCMP provided logistical support for the bust. Police have not said yet how much of the drug has been seized, however, Swallow said the bust “puts a huge dent” in the production of the drug that has proved deadly. In 2015, in Canada there were 471 deaths directly linked to fentanyl and in the first two months of 2016 there have already been 132 fentanyl-related deaths, three of which occurred in Richmond, according to the B.C. Coroners Service. “Without question, this seizure will save lives,” said Delta Police Chief Neil Dubord. “Fentanyl is a deadly drug that is colourless and odourless and for which there is no test. “This drug is impacting the lives of everyday people, including those who may use drugs recreationally without understanding its consequences.” This month Richmond Fire-Rescue was handed a new drug, Naloxone, to combat fentanyl overdoses while on duty. — with a file from Graeme Wood/ Richmond News

DO YOU AGREE WITH THIS RESULT? Based on what I have learned about the options for a Richmond police force, I believe the following model would be best for the City of Richmond: Current model (RCMP) Independent Richmond police force Not sure/ Undecided *

1. The result is only the summary for all 45 surveys applied at Feb 26th “Peter Liu Community Voice”. 2. All these 45 surveys has been apply to Richmond City Hall at Feb 29th already.

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Federal Post Budget Event with the Hon. Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

Thursday, March 24, 2016 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Pacific Gateway Hotel

Don’t miss the opportunity to ask your questions directly to the Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities. Minister Sohi will deliver a brief address before hosting an engaging Q&A session with attendees.

Location:

Pacific Gateway Hotel, 3500 Cessna Drive, Richmond, BC (Red Cedar Ballroom) Tickets: General Admission $25 + GST: Chamber Members: $ 10 + GST. Register at: General registration and event info is available at:

RichmondChamber.ca

For more information call our office

604-278-2822

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A8 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

LETTERSto the Editor Published every Wednesday and Friday by the Richmond News, a member of the Glacier Media Group.

200-8211AckroydRd.Richmond,B.C.V6X3K8 Call:604.270.8031Web:richmond-news.com

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Reporters: Alan Campbell

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Graeme Wood

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It’s time to put the trees to the top Open letter to Richmond city council, I humbly ask that you consider taking serious steps to save mature trees in Richmond from being chopped down to make way for mega homes. It starts with trees but it goes so much farther. In the past five years, thousands of trees have been removed. Just this week, a beautiful and strong four-storey tree with a base diameter of three feet was chopped down as it was only just inches outside the protected zone from the property front. Trees give us oxygen, shade, privacy, buffer/block noise and remove toxins from the air. Kids climb on trees, people sit under them and animals live in them. However, they are currently expendable to make way for unaffordable homes to even the above-averageearning Richmondite. In a world of finite resources and higher pollution levels, why on Earth is our society okay with wasting solid 2,800-square foot homes and the surrounding trees, for multimillion dollar mega homes for international buyers? It is turning into workers living farther from work, parents spending more time commuting than with their kids and major waste. It’s bad enough thousands of coffee cups are disposed of daily but now houses and trees are disposable? I’m sorry, but replacing mature trees with small ornamental and low maintenance trees doesn’t cut it. Bernard Soong Richmond

Enrol teachers for English Dear Editor, Re: “ESL wait list set to grow,” News, March 16. It has come to my attention that many of our recent arrivals are awaiting English lessons and the waiting list is increasing. I also am very well aware that many trained and qualified teachers (retired, parttime, casual) are eager and ready to volunteer but have been turned away. There is something flawed in this system! I realize that there is a process in place, but it is too slow. Is there a reason that qualified teachers could not vol-

unteer with English sessions for individual families while they are waiting for the formal classes to begin? I realize that the teacher must have qualifications and police checks. That’s easy! These refugees need people to help them in a casual, but informative way. I am delighted to be working informally with a Syrian family through a church contact. We talk and laugh and learn together. I help them with what they need to know, not in a formal way. I am a qualified, retired

teacher who has also done consulting work. Three of my friends, retired teachers, also volunteer with recent arrivals. If laymen can facilitate this help, surely a large experienced organization can do so. I sincerely believe that volunteers with a teaching background can fill this ever-widening gap as the organizations are becoming overwhelmed and need help. Refugees need qualified volunteers, not just from a learning standpoint, but also as a way of meeting Canadians. L.P Ritchie Richmond

Be very careful about using the 'R' word Dear Editor, Over the years, I have read a few letters in this publication that seem to imply that racism is demonstrated by only one particular group in our society. These letter writers are either confused about the definition of racism, or they are doing nothing more than playing the race card as a means of silencing or getting their own way at the expense of others. We all know that, in fact, racist attitudes are not exclusive to any one racial, ethnic, or cultural group and in a multicultural society, we sometimes have to deal with prejudices that are tolerated or endemic to some of the cultures we immigrants come from, but are antithetical to Canadian values and principles. From the British and French who first colonized this country, through the constant influx of

refugees and immigrants in the 19th and 20th centuries from every European country, to the current welcoming of Syrian refugees and large numbers of Asian newcomers, we have always faced the challenge of helping new citizens transcend any prejudices they may have been exposed to in their cultures of origin. We have embraced the concepts of tolerance, respect and inclusivity that define our Canadian society. And we should all understand that, far too often, we confuse what could be called ‘culturism’ with racism — a confusion that exacerbates whatever problems we might encounter trying to encourage better understanding of and communication between various ethnic/cultural groups. The first most important point in this regard is that we do not learn our values and ways of

thinking and behaving by way of the colour of our skins — we learn them from our cultures. And while racism is a despicable human attribute, ‘culturism’ is very common and often justifiable. Cultural practices that are accepted in some cultures can be unacceptable, condemned, or even illegal in others. We should be extremely careful in using the terms racist and racism. These are powerful terms that can either be used in a positive way to expose and solve problems, or in cynical ways to hide and deepen them. We should not shy away from addressing and challenging authentic instances of racism, but we should also make sure that we are not manufacturing racism-related issues where none actually exist. And we should have little

patience with claims that are, in fact, based on disagreements and problems we might have with certain cultural beliefs and practices, as opposed to ones that are related to real racial prejudice and intolerance. And we should also recognize that racism is not incubated in the petri dish of just one society or culture — it can be cultivated in every part of the world and in the minds of many different people. Jewish theologian Abraham Joshua Herschel once waned that: “Racism is man’s greatest threat to man — the maximum hatred for the minimum of reason.” We should heed his warning and think carefully about the reasons we might be tempted to apply the terms racist or racism to any person or situation. Ray Arnold Richmond


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

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LETTERSto the Editor

Hit driver where it hurts Snow geese were sight to see Dear Editor, Re: “Distracted driver flouts road rules — 14 times,” News, March 18. With B.C. awaiting increased penalties for cell use and other distractions occurring for individuals (and companies) when driving, may I suggest we lead by example and implement the heaviest penalties in North America! The existing penalties are not a deterrent, but merely a cash cow, and in fact, the low penalties have continued to contribute to too many road deaths in this province. Suggested penalties for B.C.: First offence: Cell phone confiscated; 30-day driving ban;

Fine of $500 or 60 days imprisonment. Second offence: Cell phone confiscated; 90-day driving ban; Fine of $1,500 or 120 days imprisonment. Third offence: Cell phone confiscated; 120-day driving ban; Vehicle of driver confiscated (if driver does not own vehicle, then $10,000 payable by actual owner); Fine of $1,500 or 24 months imprisonment. If new penalties similar to this do not drop charges by 50 per cent in the first 12 months then…double the penalties! Enry Rose Richmond

Letters Policy

Send your letters to editor@richmond-news.com. Include your name and city. The editor reserves the right to edit letters for brevity, taste and legality. The Richmond News does not publish anonymous letters.

Dear Editor, Thousands of the white snow geese on their way to the Arctic tundra, a distance of nearly 3,800 kilometres, blanketed the entire park near Blundell elementary on Sunday, March 20. These magnificent flying birds usually make their stopover at the George C. Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary in Delta on their return to their Arctic breeding grounds from their winter haven in the southern U.S.

As to whether or not they did this time around is a guess for this author. It would not be surprising if the entire flock has grown too large for one location. Certainly, it was an incredible sight to see them occupy an entire field in the city of Richmond. The stopover appeared to be just for a day as they had dispersed before nightfall. Ernie Mendoza Richmond

Not the beetle mania we want Dear Editor, We first noticed it in the fall; crows and nocturnal creatures picking and clawing at a patch of grass in our front yard. A very specific patch of grass, replaced by the city after a water main replacement. Further observation of other lawns in our neighbourhood had the same problem. It was chafer beetle damage on lawns, but only where the city had done work and replaced

the grass. After a few calls to the city, someone finally came to look at the damage. They told us the problem was the European chafer beetle (which we already knew), and that it was just a coincidence that it was on the only piece of lawn the city had replaced. They refuse to take responsibility for the issue. Is there anything anyone can do to help? Rose Rutsch Richmond

Island City is now Concrete City plete and can be counterproductive if corresponding development in areas of education and health services are not kept pace with. All these years I have seen the city expanding, but I cannot recall witnessing an iota of corresponding development in the most essential areas of healthcare and education. Such single-minded focus on so-called development (widening of tax base/cash grab) has resulted in the most deplorable and lowest standards of healthcare and education with any comparable city. Can the situation be salvaged before it becomes irreversible? Khushnuma Dar Richmond

Rescue our rabbits Dear Editor, Re: “The Rabbit Rescuers,” News, March 18. Excellent follow-up to the ongoing, glaringly unacceptable tragedy concerning defenseless abandoned rabbits in our city. I am blessed with two very young Richmond granddaughters for whom I bought Cindy Howard’s Rabbits Rescuers book. One day very soon I’d like to be able to tell them that this shameful situation is indeed headed toward a happy ending. A terrific resource is the Richmond Animal Protection Society.

That facility, however, is severely compromised in terms of inadequate space and physical condition. Coun. Linda McPhail informs that a replacement structure will be built at some point. First, such a project must successfully compete with other “priorities,” and win the battle to become a reality. If you agree that it’s more than high time to resolve this despicable blight in our community, let our elected officialdom know by emailing. Happy Easter to every-bunny. Jerry Pickard Richmond

The City of Richmond invites your input on the future renewal of the

Steveston Community Park Playground The planning process for the future renewal of this popular playground is in its early stages and we want to hear from you. A series of three progressing open houses will lead to the development of a preferred concept plan for Council approval. Please share your ideas with us. Open House Phase 1: March 26, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Steveston Community Centre, 4111 Moncton Street The focus will be on gathering input from the community about the condition of the existing playground and identifying the community’s needs, ideas and feedback to use towards the development of concept options.

Chatham Street Chatham Street No. 1 Road

Dear Editor, Re: “Malcolm in the Middle,” News, March 18. I have been a resident of Richmond for the past 19 years and my decision to live here was based on it being an “Island of Nature.” In the above referenced article, it was boldly emphasized that Mr. Brodie oversaw a record year of construction in the city in 2015, with his goal being to continue developing the downtown core. Kudos! So, an “Island by Nature” is now nothing but a “Concrete Jungle.” On one hand, his ambition to develop the city (downtown core) may be well founded. However, the so-called development cannot be com-

Study Area

Moncton Street

Open House

Open House Phase 2: May (date and location to be confirmed) Concept options will be presented for community feedback. Open House Phase 3: July 1, Steveston Village, as part of the Steveston Salmon Festival The Preferred Concept Plan will be presented. Attend one or more of the drop-in style public open house for one-on-one interaction with City staff, to review display boards, participate in hands-on activities and complete the survey. Bring your kids: There will be activities for children to share their ideas about what they would like to see in a new playground.

Visit www.LetsTalkRichmond.ca from March 26 to midnight, Sunday, July 15, 2016 for the open house information, to learn more about the process, review project updates and complete the survey. For more information, contact the Parks Department at 604-244-1208 or visit www.richmond.ca/parksprojects

www.richmond.ca


A10 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

City Notice Board

City of Richmond

Development Permit Panel Meeting Notice of Intent to Dispose of Land Wednesday, March 30, 2016 (Statutory Right of Way) 3:30 p.m. in Council Chambers Agenda Items:

The City of Richmond intends to grant a Statutory Right of Way of approximately 323.1 square 1. 3868, 3880, 3900 Steveston - DP 15-713779 - Urban Design1Group Ltd. 4 meters over a portion of Dyke Highway Road legally know as Lot 1 Section Block Architects 4 North Range & BWestminster Estates Ltd.) - District To permit the 46040 construction of a one-storey commercial development 3868, West(G New Plan to Greater Vancouver Water District for $10atfor the 3880 and 3900 Steveston Highway on a site zoned “Neighbourhood Commercial (ZC36) – Steveston”; purposes of a water main line.

COFFEEwith...Dean Saldanha

Scrabble ace still having fun with the tiles

n Dean Sald danha recorded 1 points in 185 a single turn b playing the by w word “exordiu um” at a Scrabb tournament ble i Richmond in e earlier this m month. Photo b Matthew by H Hoekstra

and vary section 22.36.7.1 of Richmond Zoning Bylaw 8500 to increase the maximum building height from 9.0 m to 10.4 m for localized architectural feature elements.

For information please contact: 2. 6740Allen Cooney Road and 6731, 6751 Eckersley Road - DP 10-516068 - Andrew Cheung Architects Inc. Michael on behalf of 1044577 BC Ltd. - To permit the construction of approximately 41 apartment units and Manager, Services eight Property (8) townhouse units at 6740 Cooney Road and 6731, 6751 Eckersley Road on a site zoned Mid City of Richmond Rise Apartment & Townhouse (ZLR26) – Brighouse Village (City Centre). 6911 Road PleaseNo. call 3 604-276-4395 for further information. Richmond, BC V6Y 2C1 | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000 City of Richmond 604-276-4005 Direct 604-276-4162 Fax

www.richmond.ca

City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

Matthew Hoekstra Contributor

R

ain is sprinkling and the afternoon air has dropped below 10 degrees outside a Seafair coffee shop. Dean Saldanha orders an iced chocolate beverage — cold like the chill his opponents must feel at the Scrabble table. His wife, Sonia, knew all about his letter game smarts — the anagram ambush, the triple word score strike — but she agreed to play the longtime B.C. champion nonetheless. “We played once and never played again,” laughs the affable Saldanha, 33. “She said, ‘I’ll play any other board game against you but I won’t play Scrabble.’ I’m trying to get her back into it because she liked the game before she met me.” A competitive player since the age of 10, Saldanha’s tournament schedule has quieted since the arrival of his two young children, but he still finds time for competitions. Earlier this month Saldanha participated in the Vancouver Scrabble Club tournament in Richmond, where he played the highest scoring word of his career. Laying down the tiles to spell “exordium” (the beginning or introductory part, according to the Oxford Dictionary), he recorded 185 points. Until then his highest point total for a single word was 176. Of the event’s two tournaments, he walked away with one win and one second-place prize.

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“It was a good weekend,” he says from a high table looking on to No. 1 Road. Although born in India, Saldanha grew up in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. His father, Norbert, and mother, Miriam, were regular kitchen table Scrabble players but a newspaper ad changed that. It advertised a Middle East Scrabble tournament four hours away. They drove there and Norbert returned with a win. Not bad for his first tournament. Next, they started a Scrabble club, which soon outgrew the family living room. Soon enough a young Saldanha, at age nine, wanted to get in on the game. He was tired of watching only the adults score points. “They would ask me to set up the board quite often. It’s not that tedious of a process, but of course it was back then for me as a young kid. So one day I asked my mom if I could play,” he says. “I almost beat her, which was surprising to her at the time.” Three or four games later, he handed mom a loss. Saldanha soon realized he had a keen ability to find anagrams by rearranging the letters of a word to form another word. “I don’t know how I came about it. I would be anagramming street signs, car names and that kind of thing. It just grew from there.” He became a student of the game, reading books, thumbing through the See Saldanha page 11


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

COMMUNITYin Focus

DeWitt`s latest is good strange Though the novel’s basic plot is an adventurous coming-of-age story, it creeps toward that genre’s conventions only to twist away at the last second. The book is full of both a certain sweet wistfulness and a despairing darkness. Paragraphs are short, and often break off into side stories of minor characters. It wasn’t clear or obvious where the story would eventually end up. Both dialogue and description are fast-paced and witty, giving the novel a snappy quality that never undersells its intelligence. The elderly majordomo, Mr. Olderglough, is brilliantly portrayed and his weirdly warm conversations with Lucy give the novel much of its charm. The novel offers no easy ending, no clear resolution, and maintains a tension throughout even its funniest moments. I’ll definitely be checking out deWitt’s prior novels, especially the critically acclaimed The Sisters Brothers (I’ve already put it on hold), and I suspect I have a new writer to add to my list of

RACHELROSENBERG Book Club

P

atrick deWitt’s Undermajordomo Minor is a strange book. But wait, don’t put it away — it’s the good kind of strange, the type that makes you marvel at deWitt’s imagination while attempting to make sense of the world into which he’s dropped you. The titular undermajordomo (the assistant to the assistant) is Lucy Minor, a lonely young man who leaves his disinterested family to take a job in the mysteriously derelict Castle Von Aux. Lucy is a pathological liar, a coward and not well liked in his small town — we meet him when he’s sickly and half-dead, yet his parents don’t care. DeWitt’s language is reminiscent of surreal fairy tales and his characters surprise you at almost every turn — none of them behave exactly as you’d expect. They are based on clear stereotypes: young hero, elderly assistant, aloof baron, gruff cook, etc., but deWitt throws enough curveballs for even the most blasé reader.

favourites. If you like fairy tale humour or just general eccentricity, this is an excellent choice for you. Rachel Rosenberg is originally from Montreal. Her favourite novels include Ali Smith`s Hotel World and David Sedaris` Dress Your Family In Corduroy and Denim. She is a library technician at the Richmond Public Library`s Ironwood branch.

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Saldanha: Best in B.C., No. 5 in Canada From page 10 dictionary and memorizing word lists. Scrabble became a family affair. His sisters, Dion and Dielle, also started playing tiles. Saldanha moved to Richmond with his family as a teenager, finishing his last two years of high school at Hugh Boyd secondary before completing a business and marketing degree at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. A sports nut and hockey player, Saldanha now works for BC Hydro and continues to play his favourite game with the Vancouver Scrabble Club each week. He’s played thousands of games in his career, including one memorable tournament match in which he scored a whopping 673 points, a result of scoring a triple-triple (a play that covers two triple word squares) and a double-double (covering two double word squares in one turn) in the same game. “I’ve always said if I’m not having fun at it anymore then I’ll stop playing. But I just haven’t stopped having fun. I still love the challenge of winning every game,” he says. “I still enjoy the anagramming, the word-finding and the strategic aspects of the game, so I keep playing. It keeps bringing me back.” Saldanha now sits at No. 5 in the Canadian Scrabble player rankings and 20th in North America. Scrabble Day is April 13, and for a player seeking to get serious, Saldanha recommends playing online where many of the current top players got their start. He also suggests learning the 101 two-letter words of the game, and coming to the Vancouver Scrabble Club, which meets Thursday nights for friendly matches in the basement of Oakridge Lutheran Church in Vancouver. “Scrabble continues to be one of those games where almost anybody can play,” he says. “You can have a meaningful game between a young person and someone in their 80s or 90s.”

A11

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A12 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

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COMMUNITYin Focus

How do we define ourselves post-retirement? SHELLEYCIVKIN Retirement For Beginners

O

nce we retire, we’re no longer our job title. But how do we give up a career that’s defined us for years? During our lifetime, people over 55 are more likely to have had only one or two careers, and our sense of self is inextricably tied to our job. When a person leaves the workforce they’re giving up a large part of their identity. Considering we spend most of our waking hours at work, that’s a huge chunk. So, if I’m no longer Shelley Civkin the librarian, who am I? When we meet someone for the first time we usually ask: “What do you do?” We don’t ask, “What kind of person are you?” or “What are your interests and hobbies?” We want to know what defines them, and that’s usually their work. So, in retirement, it’s impor-

tant to consider what else defines you. It could be your faith, your hobbies or your volunteer work. It could be your status in a family — wife, husband, aunt, whatever. But something else will replace your career as your “new” identity. Don’t be in a hurry though; it takes time to figure out exactly where you fit in to this new retirement cosmos. Before retirement, I identified as Shelley, the outgoing librarian. I loved being around people all day and helping them. Whether it was with library customers or colleagues, I was engaged in constant social interaction. And even though I’m comfortable with solitary pursuits, I thrive in social settings. Now that I’m retired, I have to consciously seek that out, because I know it’s what makes me happy.

Small grants deadline approaching T

he Vancouver Foundation’s Neighbourhood Small Grants program application deadline is fast-approaching for anyone interested in organizing a community event. The small grants of up to $500 are intended for neighbourhood projects or events, such as a community barbeque, cooking classes at a community centre, a community cleanup of invasive species or a block party. Richmond Cares Richmond Gives (RCRG) administers the program and distributes the grants in Richmond, on behalf of the Vancouver Foundation. Last year, Richmond residents had 22 projects that received $13,858, according to Ed Gavsie, president and CEO of RCRG. Every grant must facilitate a free project that is open to the public. Money can go toward goods and/or services. A notable project in 2015 was a block party at McKinney Neighbourhood Park, attended by Richmond RCMP officers and Richmond Fire Rescue firefighters. The deadline is April 4. There are other conditions, which can be reviewed online at NeighbourhoodSmallGrants.ca.

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The thought of living a solitary, quiet life of retirement might seem like nirvana to some. But those who flourish in a social setting might flounder when faced with solitude. Mind you, if you have a partner who’s also retiring, you could always spend more time with them. However, a

24/7 spouse is a lot different than an evening-and-weekend spouse. Consider widening your social circle by joining a club or taking a course with likeminded individuals. Retirement is a time for trying new things and living outside your comfort zone, so embrace the process of

exploration. Like Lyndsay Green, author of the new book Ready to Retire, says: “Be open to what speaks to you.” You have all the time in the world to try new things. So, get out there and start showing up for life. And remember — you’re more than just your former

job title. Finding new meaning and purpose in life can be extremely fulfilling and has the potential to open up an exciting new world to you. Go ahead, stretch yourself. I guarantee it will be worth the effort. Shelley Civkin is a former communications officer with the Richmond Public Library

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Ready to rumble at Olympic Oval n The Women’s Flat T Track Derby Associat tion will be holding one oof its tournaments at tthe Richmond Olympic Oval. It will be the first O ttime an international rroller derby event is held in Canada. Photo h ssubmitted

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or the first time, an international roller derby event is being held in Canada and the Richmond Olympic Oval will be the host. The Women’s Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA) announced one of its seven international roller derby tournaments will be held in Richmond this fall, with Vancouver’s WFTDA-affiliated league and the Richmondbased Terminal City Rollergirls team hosting the Sept. 16 to 18 playoff event. The WFTDA Playoffs and Championships tournament series, in its 11th year, brings together the most talented, highly-trained

skaters from member leagues for game play that pushes the limits of the sport worldwide. Whether participating on the track, cheering in the stands or watching on WFTDA.tv, the tournaments provide everyone who loves roller derby an opportunity to witness the most anticipated match-ups of the year. For the Terminal City Rollergirls, hosting this event could not have come at a better time, as the league is celebrating their tenth anniversary. They will share the hosting duties with Montreal Roller Derby in 2016. See wftda.com/tournaments for more information.

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from prices for vehicles shown include Consumer Cash Discounts and do not include upgrades (e.g. paint). Upgrades available for additional cost. ● $1,000 Vancouver Auto Show Bonus Cash is available on select new 2015/2016 Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram and FIAT models purchased at participating Vancouver dealers between March 18 and 29, 2016 including the following: 2015/2016 Chrysler 300/300C, 2015/2016 Chrysler Town & Country, 2015/2016 Dodge Charger & Challenger (excluding SRT

plus applicable taxes at lease termination. See your dealer for complete details. ≥3.49% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on select new 2016 models to qualified customers on approved credit through RBC, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Example: 2016 Chrysler 200 LX (28A) with a Purchase Price of $23,998 financed at 3.49% over 96 months with $0 down payment equals 416 weekly payments of $66 with a cost of borrowing of $3,514 and a total obligation of $27,512. §Starting

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deposit and $336/$325 due at delivery (includes first payment and lien registration) equals 60 monthly payments of $276/$265 with a cost of borrowing of $2,820/$2,505 and a total obligation of $16,627/$15,934. Kilometre allowance of 18,000/year. Cost of $0.16 per excess kilometre plus applicable taxes at lease termination. See your dealer for complete details. «2.49% lease financing for up to 60 months available through SCI Lease Corp. to qualified customers on applicable new 2016 models

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A16 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

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hen inventor Thomas Alva Edison first came to Fort Myers, Florida, in 1885, with plans to make it his winter home, the people who ran the place were singularly unimpressed. The local paper reported only that, “Thomas A. Edison, the electrician, is visiting here.” Later, after Edison had perfected the light bulb (he didn’t invent it: English and French scientists had made primitive bulbs much earlier), he couldn’t even interest Fort Myers in electricity. He offered to build a power station and light the streets, but city council turned him down on the grounds that the lights would keep cows awake and cut milk production. The snubs are ironic today, since Edison is one-half of Fort Myers’ biggest single tourist attraction. The other half is Henry Ford. In 1916, Ford purchased the home next to Edison’s. The inventor and the auto magnate were already friends. The two holidayed together in Fort Myers regularly until Edison’s death in 1931. The side-by-side houses and grounds to which Edison and Ford fled to escape the north’s chill are now the Edison & Ford Winter Estates, a National Register Historic Site, restored to look as they would have in 1929. The first thing that visitors see when they come to the estates is a huge banyan tree, brought from India as a sapling about 1925; it now covers nearly half a hectare and guides say it is the second-largest banyan tree in the world. (The largest is in Maui, Hawaii.) The banyan tree is part of the eighthectare botanical garden Edison planted. It still contains more than 1,000 plants from around the world. In the guided tours and self-guided audio tours, visitors see exhibits that chronicle the lives of these two industrial geniuses, and wander through places where Edison and Ford entertained the likes of Harvey Firestone, the rubber magnate, Ransom E. Olds, of the Oldsmobile auto empire, and presidents Teddy Roosevelt and Warren G. Harding. The centrepiece of one exhibition is Edison’s 1914 Model T Ford that the auto man gave to Edison. Ford wanted to customize the car by adding side windows, but Edison refused. He liked it as it was because he didn’t need to roll down the window to spit out the tobacco he chewed on. The Edison Ford Museum shows many of Edison’s inventions, such things as stock tickers, storage batteries, motionpicture equipment and, of course, the phonograph. In all, the guides say, he took out U.S. patents for 1,093 inventions or improvements on earlier inventions. Not bad for a man who had only three months of formal schooling. His mother, angry that his teacher in Milan, Ohio had said the boy “would never amount to anything,” yanked him from school and taught him herself. n For more information, go online to EdisonFordWinterEstates.org, and VisitFlorida.com.

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ALL PRICES IN EFFECT THURSDAY, MARCH 24 TO THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2016 UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. CHECK YOUR STORE FOR HOLIDAY HOURS.

Mitchell Smyth

In the March 18 flyer, page 11, the Samsung 50”, and 55” 4K Tizen Smart LED TV’s were advertised with incorrect prices. The 50” 4K Tizen Smart LED TV’s (WebCode: 10363472) correct price is $1499.99, the 55” 4K Tizen Smart LED TV’s (WebCode: 10363473) correct price is $1599.99. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

VOICESon Wellness

Pay attention to your heart DAVIDICUSWONG, M.D. Healthwise

W

ith every beat, your heart keeps every cell of your body alive, pumping blood freshly oxygenated by your lungs. If your heart stopped pumping or an artery was blocked, you would suffer a stroke, blindness, organ failure or the loss of your legs. So take a moment to think about your heart. What have you done for it lately? You can increase your odds for a long and happy life by thinking about your heart as you should your most important relationships. Are you paying attention? Are you showing care each day? Are you working to make it great? 1. Listening (for trouble) Sometimes, it’s obvious when something is wrong — irregular heart beats with lightheadedness; pain or pressure on exertion in your chest, throat or arms. Sometimes the signs are subtle and mistaken for normal aging: fatigue or exhaustion, feeling out of shape and short of breath, calf pain while walking, and decreased

sexual function. But before self-medicating, see your doctor. 2. How do you care for your heart? The best predictors of your future health are the health of your parents and the habits you practise today. If a parent or sibling had heart surgery, a heart attack or heart failure, you should ask your doctor to assess your personal risk factors, including high cholesterol, diabetes and high blood pressure. Care for your heart by limiting salt, alcohol and a lazy, leisurely lifestyle. Don’t sacrifice long term health for short-term pleasure. Eat more fruits and vegetables and other foods that really make you feel good. If you can sit, stand. If you can stand, walk. If you can walk: run, swim or cycle. Butt out, get outside and live. 3. Make a good thing great Why settle for good enough when you can get great? You don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone, and you

don’t know great ‘til you’ve got it. Your heart is another muscle you can train. Unless you’ve already been a worldclass athlete, none of us knows what we can achieve. When you’re fit and strong, everyday life is easier. You’ll have plenty of energy to shop, clean, mow the lawn, get out and dance. Everyday tasks — climbing a flight of stairs, lifting and moving — become effortless and fast. For those with heart disease or its risk factors, Healthy Heart programs in your community can safely move you to your fittest state. Be the best you can be today. To learn more about heart disease, come to my next free public lecture on behalf of the Burnaby Division of Family Practice’s Empowering Patients series. I’ll be speaking on Wednesday, March 30 at 7 p.m. at the Alan Emmott Centre at 6650 Southoaks Crescent in South Burnaby. Register online with LCullen@DivisionsBC.ca or call Leona at 604-259-4450. Davidicus Wong is a family physician. See his website at www.davidicuswong.

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A17


A18 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

VOICESon Finance

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Finance

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he independent research and consultancy firm ETFGI confirms 2015 was another banner year for the global exchange traded funds/exchange traded products (ETFs/ETPs) industry, with $372 billion (U.S.) in net new assets — a 10 per cent increase over the 2014 record of US$338.3 billion. Global assets under management grew from US$2.784 trillion to US$2.992 trillion. The number of ETFs/ETPs increased from 5,550 to 6,146; and the number of providers expanded from 239 to 276. Ernst and Young says institutional investors outside the U.S. have been responsible for most global ETF industry growth in recent years. An E&Y survey showed clear potential for stronger institutional take-up of ETFs, especially among pension funds and insurers. Active and enhanced beta funds are areas of interest, and E&Y notes that strong liquidity is key to attracting institutional money. Investors often misunderstand ETF liquidity. Trading volumes have a negligible effect on ETF liquidity. ETFs have three levels of liquidity with the natural first one occurring on the stock market exchange where buyers and sellers match up. The second is through the activity of designated brokers responsible for ensuring an orderly market. The third level involves underwriters who create or redeem ETF units. An ETF’s true liquidity is linked to that of the underlying securities. The BMO S&P/TSX Equal Weight Banks Index ETF (ZEB) is a good example. Its un-

derlying holdings are the six major Canadian banks. Although the ETF usually doesn’t trade many shares in a day, the bank stocks regularly trade in the millions. The daily trading volume of the banks is so huge, significant trade orders can be placed for the ETF without affecting its price. A quick way to assess an ETF’s liquidity is by checking the spread between buying and selling prices. A large spread between bid and ask generally indicates that its underlying securities may be less liquid. ETFs must publish all of their holdings on a daily basis which means investors can examine the individual securities and assess their liquidity. Investors should be particularly mindful of this with ETFs exposed to the junk bond space or emerging markets debt and bank loans. Prudent ETF investors will follow simple rules such as using limit orders on ETF trades. These allow them to set limits on the prices at which they are willing to buy or sell. Investors trading in international, commodity, or currency ETFs should make certain the underlying markets are open. If trades are made when the underlying market is closed, investors risk buying or selling at prices different than the ETF’s net asset value. Trading ETFs near the open or close of the market should be avoided. An ETF’s price depends on the value of its portfolio content, and it can be a few minutes after market open before the underlying securities start trading. Similarly, movement in the underlying portfolio can be volatile near market close. Kim Inglis, CIM, PFP, FCSI, AIFP, is an investment advisor with Canaccord Genuity Wealth Management, a division of Canaccord Genuity Corp.


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

A19

EASTERin Focus

Hop to it this weekend for some egg fun PHILIPRAPHAEL Staff Reporter

PRAPHAEL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

T

he days are steadily getting longer. The daffodils are in full bloom in most places. The temperature is edging upwards. And it’s just about time to start the annual search for Easter eggs. In Richmond, there’s plenty of ways to do that as community centres across the city are offering the chance to have some fun while embarking on a quest to find some sweet treats. But in Steveston this coming Saturday and Sunday (March 26 and 27), there’s a special type of Easter egg hunt that is held each year, one that’s very much in keeping with the fishing village’s history. And while it involves the collection of a treat at the end, like most other egg hunts, the special journey at the Gulf of Georgia Cannery is packed with loads of information and fun. It’s also when the “Easter Salmon” pays a visit. “Yes, we have the Easter Salmon drop by on the weekend to greet everyone,” said Mimi Horita, spokesperson at the cannery, adding the sight of a salmon sporting a pair of bunny ears and whiskers is an immediate hit with all visitors. “It’s a lot of fun.” So, too, is the special “salmon egg” hunt conducted inside the 122-year-old national historic site that used to be one of the largest canneries in Richmond. “We get the kids to go in search of clues for salmon that are in different stages of life,” Horita said. “They start out with eggs, then go up to alevin — the stage where they still have an egg sac attached to their body — then it’s on to the fry stage. “It’s all meant to be fun, as well as educational.” Once the salmon egg hunters have completed their tasks and discovered all the salmon life stages, they can trade them in for a treat.

The hunt at the cannery (12138 Fourth Ave.) is open for youngsters from age two to 12 and runs every half hour from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost is $3.90 for young egg hunters. Regular admission of $7.80 applies to adults. While wee egg hunters are waiting for their turn there will be a host of arts and crafts to keep them busy. And new this year is a spring salmon obstacle course to challenge them. “The kids can try out being a salmon that’s swimming upstream, trying to get around things like log booms,” Horita said. n Elsewhere in Richmond, there is a host of more traditional Easter egg hunts, most of them hosted at local community centres. The West Richmond Community Centre (9180 No. 1 Rd.) is holding its Easter “Eggstravaganza” on Sunday from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. During that two-hour window youngsters 12 and under can scour the playground area for Easter eggs. Afterwards, they can enjoy a lunch of pizza, veggies and fresh fruit, said organizer Stephanie Nesbitt. In addition to the hunt there will be a raffle for a child’s bike, and plenty of arts and crafts. There is space for 100 Easter egg hunters. Registration is required. Cost is $10 per child and includes lunch for one child and an adult caregiver. Extra lunch tickets are available. To register, call 604-238-8400. Over in east Richmond at the Hamilton Community Centre Saturday (March 26) is the day for hunting Easter eggs. The fun gets started at 10 a.m. and runs until noon. Cost is $10 per child and includes arts, crafts and a special visit from a certain long-eared guest. The Easter egg hunt is split into two age groups. The one to five-year-olds start at 10:45 a.m., and the six to eight-year-olds get going at 11:15 a.m.

n The Easter salmon

(left) is set to make its annual appearance at the Gulf of Georgia Cannery this weekend where a host of salmon-themed activities will be held. Photo by Gord Goble/Special to the News

See Easter page 21

CHURCH

DIRECTORY

St. Alban

an Anglican parish in the heart of Richmond Services at 8:30 10:00 School am Services at 8:30 and 10:00 amand • Sunday 10:00 am Rev. John Firmston Sunday School 10:00 am 7260 St. Albans Road, Richmond 604-278-2770 • www.stalbansrichmond.org

STEVESTON UNITED CHURCH

3720 Broadway Street (at 2nd Ave.) Please join10am us at Worship 10am Sunday, 2015School Please join us for ServiceJuly and19, Sunday with Service Rev. Brenda Miller School for Worship and Sunday 604-277-0508 • www.stevestonunitedchurch.ca A caring and friendly village church

Richmond United Church 8711 Cambie Rd. (near Garden City Rd.) 604-278-5622

March 25th, Good Friday worship service: 10am to 11am March 27th, Sunday Easter worship service: 10am to 11am

Rev. Dr. Warren McKinnon Founded 1888. Richmond’s Oldest Church

CHRIST-CENTERED CHRISTIAN CHURCH

St. Anne’s - Steveston Anglican Church 4071 Francis Road, Richmond, BC

The Rev. Brian Vickers, Rector

Sunday 8:30 a.m. - Contemplative Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Family Eucharist with Church School Wednesday 10:00am. Eucharist, 11:00am Bible Study www.stannessteveston.ca • 604-277-9626

(J.D. MURDOCH HALL)

Family-Oriented Fellowship, Everyone Welcome 8151 Bennett Road, Richmond • (604) 277-9157 Pastor Ed Arquines • Cell (604) 644-9364

In Tagalog & English

Baptist Church Broadmoor Baptist Church A safe place to connect with God and fellow travellers on your spiritual journey

8140 Saunders Road, Richmond, BC 604-277-8012 www.bbchurch.ca Interim Pastor - Micah Dr. Tim Colborne - Lead Smith Pastor.

Worship Service.....12:20 p.m. Sunday School.....2:00 p.m. 8151 Bennett Road, Richmond • 604-271-6491

GILMORE PARK UNITED CHURCH

APOSTOLIC PENTECOSTAL CHURCH Sunday Service 1:30-3:30 pm, Fellowship Follows.

www.cccc-richmondbc.com COME AND JOIN US IN OUR CELEBRATION OF REDEMPTION!

Worship - 10:30 a.m. Sonshine Adventures for10:30AM Kids GOOD FRIDAYService SERVICE 7:30PM • EASTER SUNDAY SERVICE

8060 No. 1 Road (corner of No. 1 & Blundell) 604.277.5377 www.gilmoreparkunited.ca Rev. Maggie Watts-Hammond, Min. of Word, Sacrament & Pastoral Care Rev. Yoko Kihara – Min. of Christian Development & Outreach Worship and Children’s Program Sundays. 10:30 am

Evensong Service Maundy Thursday

Easter Services

March16th 7:00 pm Palm Sunday March 20th March 24th 7:00 pm Good Friday March 25th Easter Sunday March 27th 10:30 am For more information, please check our website or call the office Everyone is welcome!

10:30 am 10:00 am

Fujian Evangelical Church welcomes you to Sunday Worship Services • English Services: 9:00 & 10:45 a.m. • Mandarin Service: 9:00 a.m. • Minnanese Service: 10:45 a.m. 12200 Blundell Road, Richmond, B.C., V6W 1B3 Phone 604-273-2757 • www.fujianevangelical.org

To advertise in the Church Directory, please call 604-249-3335.


A20 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

A21

EASTERin Focus n There’s plenty in store for

everyone to help celebrate the Easter weekend in Richmond — from egg hunts, to arts and crafts. Photos submitted

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Easter: Egg hunts aplenty From page 19 In the gym, there will be a host of Easterthemed arts and crafts, as well as activities that include pin the tail on the bunny and egg relay races, said organizer Kevin Nasiri. At 10:30 a.m., the community centre’s hip hop dance group will perform and the Easter Bunny will make an appearance. The Hamilton Community Centre is located at 5140 Smith Dr. To register, call 604-718-8055. Saturday is also the day for Easter fun at the South Arm Community Centre (8880 Williams Rd.). The “Eggstravaganza” starts at varying times, depending on the age group. One to three-year-olds go from 9:30 –

10:30 a.m. For those three to six years old, the hunt runs from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. And those seven to 12 years old, the hunt is from 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Price is $7 per child and parent participation is required. After the hunting is done, the celebrations continue with arts and crafts in the gym where youngsters can make an Easter egg basket or a paper bag bunny. There will also be a jelly bean count contest, a cookie decorating table and colouring station, said organizer Winnie Wong. To register, visit online at richmond.ca/register or call the South Arm Community Centre at 604-238-8060.

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A22 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

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What’s Easter without an egg hunt? The Hamilton Community Centre (5140 Smith Dr.) will have that, and more, ready on March 26 from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Price: $10/child. Celebrate with a fun-filled morning that includes an Easter egg hunt, arts and crafts, activities and a visit from a very special guest. For ages one to eight. Register by calling 604-7188055. If you live in the South Arm Community Centre area, March 26 is the day for an Easter egg hunt. The event breaks down into various age categories. For those one to three-years-old, the hunt goes from 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Three to six-year olds run from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. And seven to eight-year-olds are from 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Parent participation required. Cost: $7 per child. Register at richmond.ca/register or by calling 604-7188060 or 604-276-4300. Easter is more than just an egg hunt for those visiting the Gulf of Georgia Cannery in Steveston Village on March 26 and 27. It’s an opportunity to learn more about the life cycle of the salmon during an “Easter

salmon egg hunt” from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Collect clues about salmon as you search through the historic building and turn them in for a treat. Other crafts and games will keep everyone entertained. Admission: $3.90 for those two to 12-years-old. Adults $7.80. Seniors $6.55. Family $19.60. For more info, call 604-664-9009. Elegance in a tea cup will be served at London Heritage Farm on March 26 when the historic site (6511 Dyke Rd.) serves up a special tea from 12 – 5 p.m. Cost: $12.50 per person. Enjoy their own blend of London Lady tea, home-baked scones, London Farm jam/ jelly and homemade goodies. Tea room tables are set with table clothes, fine bone china tea cups, tea pots dessert plates and silverware. Coffee hot chocolate and juice are also available. Reservations recommended. Call 604-271-5220.

n Sunday

Bring the whole family to celebrate Easter at the West Richmond Community Centre (9180 No. 1 Rd.) on March 27. There will be activities for all ages, including craft tables, games, raffle prizes, meeting the Easter Bunny

and a fun-filled Easter egg hunt for those 10 and under from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Parent participation is required. Lunch for child and one caregiver is covered with $10 registration. Extra lunch tickets available while supplies last.

n Upcoming

Trouble talking about your health problems? The Richmond Hospice Association presents How to Talk to your Doctor on March 30 from 7 – 8:30 p.m. at Richmond Caring Place (7000 Minoru Blvd.) The free event is part of the ongoing Richmond Hospice Association Education Series. For more information, call 604-279-7140. PechaKucha Night Richmond, Vol. 14 on March 31 at the Melville Centre for Dialogue (8771 Lansdowne Rd.). The free event, from 7 – 9 p.m., is hosted by Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Wilson School of Design. PechaKucha Night is a casual and energetic celebration of the art of live storytelling. Speakers share their unique stories told through 20 slides that are shown for twenty seconds at a time. Come and experience these 10 remarkable narratives.

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Hon. Linda Reid, MLA Richmond East 604-775-0891 www.lindareidmla.bc.ca

Hon. Teresa Wat, MLA Richmond Centre 604-775-0754 www.teresawatmla.ca


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

A23

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A24 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

ted Limi time offer

Who wants a FREE 50" TV? Get a FREE 50" Samsung Smart TV when you sign up for Optik TV and Internet for 2 years.* ®

Make the switch. Go to telus.com/freetv, call 310-MYTV (6988) or visit your TELUS store.

*Offer available until March 31, 2016, to residential customers who have not subscribed to TELUS TV or Internet in the past 90 days. Offer available while quantities last and cannot be combined with promotional prices. Offer includes Optik TV Essentials and Internet 25. Not available with Internet 6 or Lite. A cancellation fee applies for early termination of the service agreement and will be the value of the promotional gift received in return for your term commitment, multiplied by the number of months remaining in the term (with a partial month counting as a full month), divided by the total number of months in the term, plus applicable taxes. TELUS reserves the right to substitute an equivalent or better product without notice. Offer available with a 2 year service agreement. A retail value of $799 for the 50” Samsung Smart TV, based on the manufacturer’s suggested retail price, plus a 2 year extended warranty, provincial government eco fees and shipping. A cancellation fee applies for early termination of the service agreement and will be the value of the promotional gift received in return for your term commitment, multiplied by the number of months remaining in the term (with a partial month counting as a full month), divided by the total number of months in the term, plus applicable taxes. Downgrading to Lite after accepting a promotional offer will trigger the cancellation fees associated with the promotion and the free installation and equipment rental. TELUS reserves the right to modify channel lineups and packaging, and regular pricing, without notice. HDTV-input-equipped television required to watch HD. Minimum system requirements apply. Final eligibility for the services will be determined by a TELUS representative. The Essentials or Lite is required for all Optik TV subscriptions. Internet access is subject to usage limits; additional charges apply for exceeding the included data. Service installation, a $300 value, includes connection of up to 6 TVs and is free with a service agreement or purchase of a digital box or PVR. If new outlet/phone jacks are required, the charge will be $75 for the first one and $25 each for the others. Free installation and equipment rental is not available with Lite. If you downgrade to Lite, regular rental fees will apply starting in the month of the downgrade, and cancellation fees will apply as above. TELUS, the TELUS logo, Optik, Optik TV, telus.com and the future is friendly are trademarks of the TELUS Corporation, used under licence. All rights reserved. All copyrights for images, artwork and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.. All rights reserved. © 2016 TELUS.

BREAKING NEWS ... PHOTO GALLERIES ... TRAFFIC JAMS ... LOCAL ADS To your doorstep Wednesdays & Fridays and online 24/7 www.richmond-news.com


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

A25

THEPULSE WE’VE GOT OUR FINGERS ON IT CHECK MATES

n Around 80 aspiring Bobby

Fishers, aged five years and up, took part in the Kiwanis Club of Richmond’s sixth annual Youth Chess Tournament Saturday at C4 (City Centre Community Centre). The competition was challenging as players went five rounds to determine gold, silver and bronze medal winners. Photos by Gord Goble/ Special to the News

KUDOS n Ryan Chin (right), a Grade 1 student at Lord Byng, along with his younger brother, Andrew, added up how much was collected in a recent coin, bottle and can drive at his school in support of Variety. The coin drive netted $350.47, while the bottle and can drive Ryan embarked on with Grade 2 friend Ayden Mendoza raised another $276.35. In total, the fundraising efforts donated $626.82 for Variety, which provides help to children in B.C. with special needs. Photo submitted

n Flight Sgt. Kunal Kumar from

692 BCIT Aerospace Squadron, Richmond won the gold medal in the Lower Mainland Wing Effective Speaking competition held March 6 at the Boundary Bay Airport. Competing against seven other compelling speakers, Kumar emerged victorious and will now compete at the provincial Effective Speaking competition on April 10. Photo submitted


A26 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

SPORTSBeyond the Scores Marlins play down to the wire in consolation game Mark Booth

Sports Editor mbooth@richmond-news.com

I

t was only fitting the McNair Marlins and Cambie Crusaders closed out their fine seasons with games that went right down to the wire. Playing in the shadow of their city rival, Steveston-London, reaching the provincial final, the Marlins and Crusaders were busy at the Langley Events Centre in consolation play at the BC Boys Basketball Championships. After three tough losses, the Marlins got a free throw from Nathan Schroeder with two seconds remaining to trim Prince Rupert’s Charles Hays Rainmakers 77-76. The Crusaders allowed a seven-point third quarter lead to evaporate in their 96-86 loss to the South Okanagan Hornets to settle for 10th place in the AA side of the draw. Three days earlier, both teams had quarter-final berths within their grasp. The 14th AAA seeded Marlins stormed back from a 17-point half-time deficit and were tied with No. 3 seed Rick Hansen with three minutes remaining. However, they couldn’t complete what would have been a huge upset, falling 73-63. A difficult time from the perimeter proved to be the team’s undoing, going 3-20 from three-point range. It was an even tougher pill to swallow for the No. 7 seed AA Crusaders. They took a nine-point lead into the

n McNair Marlins’ Ryan Angala goes to the basket in his team’s win over Charles Hays in consolation play at the B.C. AAA Boys Basketball Championships. The Grade 12 standout averaged more than 25 points per game at the provincials. Photo by Mark Booth

final quarter against No. 10 Abbotsford Christian but surrendered a whopping 35 points in a 98-85 loss. It was another potential victory that had slipped out of their grasp — similar to an opening round loss to Palmer at the city championships and a heartbreaking defeat to St. Pat’s in the Lower Mainland final.

Cambie bounced back with wins over Smithers and Pacific Academy to reach the ninth place game. McNair also hung tough with No. 6 Wellington before falling 80-74, then dropped a 74-65 decision to Bodwell. All signs point to both teams being solid bets to join Steveston-London at the 2017 provincials.

While the Sharks are No. 1 in the 201617 AAA pre-season rankings, the Marlins hold down the No. 9 spot. That’s the same position as the Crusaders in the AA rankings. The Marlins will bring back four starters, including Schroeder who is just in Grade 10. Their bench was also loaded with G Grade 10 and 11s. With so much experience, McNair won’t ssurprise anyone either, like they did with a an upset win over Windermere in the Mainland playoffs that secured a provinc cial berth. They will also need someone to pick up the scoring slack with the departure o of Ryan Angala who was simply superb d during the last two months. The Grade 12 w wing averaged 25 points per game at the provincials. Coach Jessy Dhillon is anxious to begin w work for next season soon. The Crusaders will bring three starters back, including Zak Hassen and Kevin Dhillon who were their top scorers at provincials. Hassen’s athleticism could make him a match-up nightmare next season if he keeps improving. Offence was rarely a concern for the Crusaders. Instead, head coach Chris Mattu will focus on his team doing a better job of protecting the ball in the late going and avoiding potential defensive lapses. The team will miss seniors Riley Paulik and Tarn Dhaliwal who provided leadership, scoring and were the team’s top rebounders.

McMath star prepares to play at university level this fall Mark Booth

Sports Editor mbooth@richmond-news.com

A

fter having a leading role in helping the McMath Wildcats senior girls basketball team reach the B.C. AAA championship game for the first time in school history, Jessica Zawada will be taking her game to the CIS level next fall. The versatile forward has committed to the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) Cascades. “I’m excited to play at the next level with UFV because the team is positive and inviting, the

coaches are great, and academically, I like the school,” said Zawada, who plans to major in science at UFV. “My goals for my time at UFV are to train hard for the competitive university environment and to always play with tenacity.” Zawada was not only a thirdteam all-star at provincials, she earned the prestigious Quinn Keast Foundation scholarship, given to the “most complete” player at the tournament. She was also among five recipients of a Telus scholarship. Earlier, she was a first-team all-star at the Crehan Cup Lower

n Jessica Zawada

Mainland Championships and the Richmond Championships.

neighbourhood small grants

She was also recognized in the Province newspaper’s Super 16 players’ list. “I think she’ll be a great f forward in Canada West,” UFV head coach Al Tuchscherer said. “She’s got the ability to put the ball on the floor, she’s a great rebounder, and she’s a very good mid-range shooter. “It’s almost cliché to say, but s she’s a great kid, too. “You can see it in how she interacts with her teammates on t floor, and how she’s interactthe ed with us during the recruiting process. “She’s a real personable kid,

and anybody who talks to her is excited that she’s on board with our program next year.” Earlier in her career, Zawada was a first team all-star at the 2014 junior girls provincials as McMath won the bronze medal. Zawada is part of a recruiting class for the Abbotsford school that includes: Katherine Holden (GW Graham), Victoria Jacobse (WJ Mouat) and Jessica Cameron (Western Canada HS, Calgary). McMath teammates Jessica Jones (SFU) and Bobbi-Jo Colburn (Calgary) have also signed with university teams.

Apply for a grant of up to $500 for a project that makes Richmond more connected and engaged Deadline to apply is April 4th Learn more at

neighbourhoodsmallgrants.ca

vancouverfdn


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

A27

SPORTSBeyond the Scores

Blues wrap up exciting season

n Richmond Ri h d Mid Midgett A1 Bl Blues produced d d seven straight t i ht playoff l ff victories i t i tto capture t th the P Pacific ifi C Coastt Amateur Hockey Association President’s series banner. Photo submitted

R

ichmond Midget A1 Blues wrapped up their season in style by producing seven straight playoff victories to decisively capture the Pacific Coast Amateur Hockey Association (PCAHA) President’s Series banner. The Blues were hoping to take a serious run at the provincial championship this season, but a few bad breaks along the way didn’t help their chances. Following an outstanding 14-2-2 start to the season, the Blues levelled off and finished league play with a respectable 7-7-4 record and were excited to kick-off the PCAHA playoffs with a fresh start. Unfortunately, the hockey gods had other plans. Just prior to their single knock-out elimination playoff game, goaltenders Jordan Allen and Jacob Head went down with concussions and were sidelined for two to three weeks.

Subsequently, the Blues lost a heartbreaking game to North Vancouver 6-5. The defeat was a tough pill to swallow, especially for the 12 graduating players but they committed to excellence and went on a tear to finish the season. During the seven-game winning streak, Richmond Minor allowed just nine goals and Allen and Head each backstopped 1-0 shutout victories to clinch the banner. The team was captained by Mason Rai, Gabe Mu, James Houston and Paris Jeyarchandran. The balance of third-year graduating players included Matt Lam, Byron Leong, Jin Woo Lee, Brady Wang, Jovan Jankovic, Cole MacKenzie, Allen and Head. Returning players include James Sings, Matt Ast, Andrey Krasnoperov, Josh Freeland, Magnus Cheung, Jonah Cheung and Evan Yang.

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A28

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Your Community

MARKETPLACE Book your ad ONLINE:

classifieds.richmond-news.com

Or call to place your ad at

604-630-3300

Email: classifieds@van.net

Phone Hours: Mon to Fri 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Office Hours: 9 am to 5 pm

LEGAL

EMPLOYMENT

IN MEMORIAM

LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICES

GENERAL EMPLOYMENT

.

IN LOVING MEMORY OF

Tristan Brooke Esson

July 24, 1981-March 21, 2002 Deeply loved and truly missed,

volving a 1999 Toyota Camry and a Pontiac, please contact Spraggs@ Co. Law Corporation at 604−464−3333 604−464−3333 www.spraggslaw.ca

Always in our thoughts, Forever in our hearts. Her loving family.

GENERAL EMPLOYMENT

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&+ 2013#0( &50 7345/+-2 "0!')

7+%&0 $+%-26(30'

COLLINS, Barbara Dalgliesh 1946 — 2016

“Bonnie was a member of the Steveston ANAF 284 Ladies Auxiliary” Collins, Barbara “Bonnie” Dalgliesh. Passed away suddenly on March 14, 2016 at Richmond General Hospital at age 69 after a lengthy but courageous battle with Cancer. Predeceased by her parents, Doug and Margaret Inglis, and her first husband, Don Collins. Survived by one sister, two nieces, her loving common—law husband, Jack Tremeer, and her two beloved cats. Much loved and sadly missed by her many friends and relatives. There will be no service held at her request. Donations to BC Cancer Society in her memory would be appreciated.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENETS

All advertising published in this newspaper is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services offered are accurately described and willingly sold to buyers at the advertised prices. Advertisers are aware of these conditions. Advertising that does not conform to these standards or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any reader encounters non-compliance with these standards we ask that you inform the Publisher of this newspaper and The Advertising Standards Council of B.C. OMISSION AND ERROR: The publishers do not guarantee the insertion of a particular advertisement on a specified date, or at all, although every effort will be made to meet the wishes of the advertisers. Further, the publishers do not accept liability for any loss of damage caused by an error or inaccuracy in the printing of an advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by the portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. Any corrections of changes will be made in the next available issue. The Richmond News will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion with liability limited to that portion of the advertisement affected by the error. Request for adjustments or corrections on charges must be made within 30 days of the ad’s expiration.

For best results please check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Refunds made only after 7 business days notice!

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SPROTTSHAW.COM

BUSINESS SERVICES

REMEMBRANCE

BLAIR SPRAGGS WITNESS TO MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENT 1.01181X2 ON JANUARY 20, 2016 Anyone witnessing or having any information relating to a motor vehicle accident, which RIC000637 - 493174 occurred on January 20, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. on Westminster LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICES Highway and Boundary Road in City of Richmond, B.C. in−

PRACTICAL NURSING

LAWN CREW

Richmond company is seeking PRODUCTION WORKERS Must be strong and energetic as job involves heavy lifting. Starting $11/hr. Send resumes to: sales@soojerky.com or fax: 604-272-0901

MARKETPLACE

ANTIQUES WE BUY ANTIQUES Generous prices paid for Fine Art, Silver, Jewellery, Military Medals, Militaria, Coin Collections, pre 1910 Furniture & Lighting, etc. Est. in 1990. We make house calls. Call David 604-716-8032 www.britishfineart andantiques.ca

APPLIANCES KITCHENAIDE SS 24inch single wall oven, w/true convection $1,200. 604-836-9311

FOR SALE - MISC POLE BARNS, Shops, steel buildings metal clad or fabric clad. Complete supply and installation. Call John at 403-998-7907; jcameron@ advancebuildings.com REFORESTATION NURSERY SEEDLINGS of hardy trees, shrubs, & berries for shelterbelts or landscaping. Spruce & Pine from $0.99/tree. Free Shipping. Replacement guarantee. 1-866-873-3846 or www.treetime.ca SAWMILLS from only $4,397 Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT

To advertise call

604-630-3300

For Landscape business in Tsawwassen. Must have Drivers License. Knowledge of Ladner & Tsawwassen an asset. Local applicants pref’d.

@

is available, if you are a homeowner, today! We can easily approve you by phone. 1st, 2nd or 3rd mortgage money is available right now. Rates start at Prime. Equity counts. We don’t rely on credit, age or income. CALL ANYTIME 1-800-639-2274 or 604-430-1498 Apply online at www.capitaldirect.ca

HIP OR KNEE Replacement? Arthritic Conditions/COPD? Restrictions in Walking/ Dressing? Disability Tax Credit $2,000 Tax Credit $20,000 Refund. For assistance! 1-844-453-5372. NEED a Loan? Own Property? Have Bad Credit? We can help! Call toll free 1-866-405-1228 www. firstandsecondmortgages.ca

FRANCHISES

place ads online @

classifieds.richmond-news.com PETS

* %54", $"@-,>5-"+ &5"@6.-34 #;;>5,A@-,:

:*JJI=. 5L=8L0J9 8+G+JI+ HF -K<1AAA3-EKA1AAA :$0J> 0JG+5L,+JL =5 .HD =5 -2A?A 8+;> :&I=8=JL++/ 4.+=J0J9 4HJL8=4L5 :"8HF+550HJ=. L8=0J0J9 B8HG0/+/ :'0J=J40J9 =G=0.=7.+ :#J9H0J9 5IBBH8L '>@,"6, '>?45"++ >2 (' * !+5B+4L+/ @H8./D0/+ %+=/+8 0J '8=J4605+/ #FC4+ (.+=J0J9)

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ALL SMALL BREED PUPS Local, Non-Shedding and Vet Checked. 604-590-3727 www.puppiesfishcritters.com MULTI-POO pups, 4-6lbs. hypo allergenic, non shed, vet cert. $1400. 604-341-1445

BUSINESS SERVICES

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Healthcare Documentation Specialists in huge demand. Employers prefer CanScribe graduates. A great workfrom-home career! Contact us now to start your training day. www.canscribe.com. 1.800.466.1535. info@canscribe.com MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get the online training you need from an employer-trusted program. Visit:CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-7683362 to start training for your work-at-home career today! NEW EXCITING MINI VLT’S. Produce Buckets of Cash Monthly. Attracts Customers Like Money Magnets. Locations Provided. Ground Floor Opportunity. Full Details CALL NOW 1-866-668-6629. WWW.TCVEND.COM

TRAVEL SAVE 30% on our Heart of the Arctic adventure. Visit Inuit communities in Greenland and Nunavut aboard the comfortable 198-passenger Ocean Endeavour. CALL FOR DETAILS! 1-800-3637566 or visit www.adventure canada.com (TICO#04001400)

REAL ESTATE

DUPLEXES FOR SALE SXS LARGE strata duplexes up & down rented $5,000/mth $1.2m Buy 1 or both.#4 Rd & Arvida. 604-836-6098

HOUSES FOR SALE

?FC:8B ?><H:E @FI: ;GD9=AAA T]NS[ fbQS[gbc ScO \[]NN[ SaaNSfM YiLL \^XS]N jbb[P [Vb fNWNf hbeN_ UNS[X]N\ Z RNO]bbe\ Xa\[Sg]\P Z RNOd ]bbe\ ObVc\[Sg]\P Y_i RS[h\_ 3;F@5L5@H5H= C>E?70>??.BB<.K.?/6:2>A 42J>869B.4<>I?.8:2>A1KD.I1 H5M; TIRED OF CITY LIVING? Two choice homes on Texada Island, West Coast, BC one ocean front; one on lake, private sale, for details 604.414.8109, 604.486.7838


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

APARTMENTS/ CONDOS FOR RENT

EXCAVATING

.

NEWLY RENOVATED Ready for March SEAFAIR APARTMENTS 3851 Francis Road, Richmond 3 BR • 1300sf Apts starting @ $1900/mo Upgrades include: In-suite Washer/Dryer, laminate floor, carpet (bdrms), stone countertops, new appliances, 1 full bathroom + 3 piece en-ste (sink, toilet, shower), upgraded balcony’s, fixtures. Outdoor pool, exercise room, parking avail. Some pets ok. •Family Friendly Complex• Resident Manager

Call 604-448-0842

AUTOMOTIVE

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

/56 1!3",,63

CALL THE EXPERTS

HOME SERVICES

RENTALS

#1 Backhoes & Excavators Trenchless Waterlines Bobcats & Dump Truck & All Material Deliveries

Drainage, Video

Inspection, Landscaping, Stump/Rock/Cement/Oil Tank & Demos, Paving, Pool/Dirt Removal, Paver Stones, Jackhammer, Water/Sewer, Line/Sumps, Slinger Avail, Concrete Cutting, Hand Excavating, Basements Made Dry Claudio’s Backhoe Service

604-341-4446

GUTTERS GUTTER CLEANING ROOF CLEANING WINDOW CLEANING POWER WASHING 30 yrs experience For Prompt Service Call

Simon 604-230-0627 A & B GUTTERS Also power washing. Best rates! 604-202-3893

MOVING ABE MOVING & Delivery & Rubbish Removal $30/HR per Person• 24/7. 604-999-6020

TCP MOVING 1 to 3 men from $40.Lic & Ins local & storage. Ca & US long distance 604-505-1386 604-505-9166

ABBA MOVERS bsmt clean 1-5 ton Lic, senior disc, 1 man $35, 2 men from $40/hr, 24/7, 26 yrs 604-506-7576

PAINTING/ WALLPAPER

@

#1 FREE Scrap Vehicle Removal

Ask about $500 Credit!!!

$$ PAID for Some 604.683.2200

DELTA SCRAP VEHICLE REMOVAL

FREE CASH FOR SOME!

HOME SERVICES

APPLIANCE REPAIRS

SERVICE & PARTS. Licensed & Insured. Washer. Dryers. Stove, Fridge, Dishwashers. 604-346-8925

CLEANING EUROPEAN DETAILED Service Cleaning www.puma-cleaning.ca Sophia 604-805-3376

ELECTRICAL www.jcbrownelectric.com LOW RATES Lic’d. Bonded. Expert trouble shooter. 24/7 30 yrs exp. 604-617-1774 YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call. Lic#89402. Fast same day service. Insured. Guar’d. We love small jobs. 604-568-1899

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place ads online @

classifieds.richmond-news.com

ROOFING

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A-1 Contracting & Roofing NEW & RE-ROOFING All Types • Concrete Tile Paint & Seal •Asphalt • Flat All Maintenance & Repairs WCB. 25% Discount. • Emergency Jobs • .

QUAYSIDE PAINTING Wall paper/Text/repairs. Cleaning Insured • WCB 604-727-0043

$>!& 5&;*#52 5&A>-*/#>A2 #A2/*""*/#>A2 'FGC 8I.),D ".)CG)CED 'FGC 5.746D (FGECED %I+B+G6CCED #G?IBCED

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778-892-1530

PATIOS

: *+2)/<2) &!4/; (;0397 : $2<9;;)7 !<5 "/<5;.7 : *+2)/<2) %!/+/<176 #/<,+ '38-/<1 3(++ !'&* %#('!$&'$%""

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PLUMBING 1ST CALL Plumbing & Heating Ltd. Local, Prompt & professional Service,Lic’d, Bonded, Ins. (604)868-7062

POWER WASHING A & B POWER WASHING Also gutters, “best rates”. 604-202-3893 Mr Sidewalk Powerwashing. sidewalks, driveways, patios Local Free est. 604-802-9033

POWER WASHING

GUTTER CLEANING SAME DAY SERVICE AVAIL

Ian 604-724-6373

Power washing, gutter, roof & window cleaning. Prompt professional service, 30 yrs exp. Simon 604-230-0627

LANDSCAPING

RENOS & HOME IMPROVEMENT

@9;'"-3)6 #34%)A-.$ *8 ((( 6&.3-7$ 1&?- %A.0.63/$ &"6&."$ >6A-" 5"#7"0.6""$ B, ="&64 %)/>1"." 7&6#"-3-7$ 3-4A6"# <6"" "4.$ (6&# 22! 99B ,+::

A1 Contracting. Bsmt, bath, kitchen cabinets, tiling, painting & decks. Dhillon, 604-782-1936

WCB • Fully Insured • Exc Ref Senior’s Discount • Work Gtd Free Est. On Time Service. BBB.

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savemoreroofing.ca

RUBBISH REMOVAL

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A+ LAWN & GARDEN 1.50000X2 • Residential / Commercial • Complete R0011174271 - 492850 • Rotary / Reel Cutting Fertilizing Programs Call the Experts • Trimming • Hedge

• Edging

Trimming / Pruning

• Aeration / Power Raking • Pressure Washing

604-908-3596

Call to advertise in

Home Services

$>!& 5&;*#52 5&A>-*/#>A2 #A2/*""*/#>A2

Complete Lawn & Garden "Hedging "Pruning Call Bill 604-377-7587

'FGC 8I.),D ".)CG)CED 'FGC 5.746D (FGECED %I+B+G6CCED #G?IBCED

MOVING

9H:1@<@1=030 '+#),%+#*!##(*"&!#$*!%

604.630.3300

.,- !)) ("#' $*%!/+& -'*.(& !.%)(#*$ "'$$'& /+$' 0&'' 1%$.,+$' &#!'"##'$##%

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A0)?C60?6001 1PRO MOVING & SHIPPING Across the street, across the world Real Professionals. Reas. Rates. Best in every way! 604-721-4555

"+HC !+.C3<C+CB< %+;?<C.C6 ) =G+C3.C6 =AH<; :+,< ) @I<;8<<? *<;+3.AC ) -+;? 'G<+C12> $<?6< 5;.EE.C6

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LAWN & GARDEN A & B LANDSCAPING AWARD WINNER! Replace dead cedars.Trim/prune hedges, trees. 604.202.3893

D D D D D

.

Call Jag at:

Specializing in New Roofs Re-Roofs and Repairs

Call 604-649-1627 www.deltascrap.ca

To advertise call

!BATHROOM SPECIALIST! Tiles, tub, vanity, plumbing, paint, framing, From start to finish. Over 20 years exp. Peter 604-715-0030

HANDYPERSON

Serving the Delta area since 1986

604-630-3300

INT/EXT Renovations additions & repairs, strata improvements. fencing, decks, kitchens, windows, concrete formwork, hardwood, finishing, painting. For all your reno needs!

*"3./1*4!3"2'!,0

*+$' (#! +%% ")'&*%)$ B?

VECTOR RENO’S

604-690-3327

1!3", !"3 * /3-!4 360.+"2

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RENOS & HOME IMPROVEMENT

Bath, Kitchen, Basement & More Grade A+, Licensed & Insured RenoRite.com, 604-365-7271

RUBBISH REMOVAL "Free Est " Seniors Disc Call Bill 604-377-7587

GLACIER CLASSIFIEDS PROMO ACCOUNT 2.25000X3 R0121174043 - 492839 AUTO MISCELLANEOUS

TODAY'S PUZZLE ANSWERS

A29


A30 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

SUDOKU

MARCH 31 – APRIL 3

FB RR E E AC E L E T WITH YOUR $125 PANDORA PURCHASE

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a Sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes.

PUZZLE ANSWERS ON SEPARATE PAGE

T H E PA N D O R A S T O R E A T

RICHMOND CENTRE 604.270.7221

*Free bracelet ($75 value). In store only. Valid at participating retailers. Void where prohibited. Not valid with prior purchase. While supplies last. Excludes gift card purchases. Additional spend required for 14K gold and two-tone bracelets. Prices before taxes. See store for details. Snake Chain Bracelet System (U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,507) • © 2015 Pandora Jewelry, LLC • All rights reserved

NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

ACROSS

1. Brave act 5. Ejects saliva 10. A vale 14. Expression of surprise 15. Feels concern 16. Saddle horse 17. Emerald Isle 18. Silly 19. Female child 20. Cyprinids 22. Comedienne Gasteyer 23. National capital 24. Court game 27. Tooth caregiver oyz jcgvfbreve }rit

DOWN

1. Unreal 2. River in Norway 3. Long poem 4. Cygnus star mz  € |eq~it{ 6. Known for its canal 7. A citizen of Iran 8. Inhabited 9. Midway between south and southeast 10. Semitic fertility god 11. __ Clapton, musician 12. Lawman 13. City 3000 B.C. 21. They hold valuables

31. Small amount 32. Degree of loudness 34. Wore down 36. Upper-class young woman (abbr.) 37. Actor Pitt 39. Red mineral 40. Have already done 41. Asian antelope 42. Forms over a cut 43. Performer __ Lo Green 44. Pressed against 45. An alternative 46. 5th note of a major scale 47. Tell on

48. Patti Hearst’s captors 49. Breaks apart 52. Russian country house 55. Female grunts 56. Type of sword 60. Ottoman Empire title 61. Emaciation 63. He was Batman 64. Nonmoving 65. Group in China 66. A thought 67. Withered 68. Worldly mosquitoes 69. Tide

23. Department of Defense 25. Begetter 26. Check 27. Early union leader 28. Lawmaker 29. About Sun 32. Negligible amounts 33. Roll 35. Just a little bit 36. Small, spotted cubes 37. Founder of Babism 38. Father 40. Blue Hen State npz j~dre€ve noz khqrwv hu€wvf

44. Digital audiotape 46. Covers most of Earth nlz xihfvewviwv 49. Find this on hot days 50. Fanatical 51. Absorption unit 52. Sitcom “My Two __” 53. Phil __, former CIA 54. Partially burn 57. __ farewell 58. Ancient Greek City 59. A way to derive 61. Women’s social organization 62. Female sibling

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Richmond News March 23 2016  

Digital Edition - Richmond News

Richmond News March 23 2016  

Digital Edition - Richmond News

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