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This weekend’s Great Northwest Showcase will provide U.S. college hockey players Sean Bonar and Troy Stecher an opportunity to play in front of family and friends.

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The Richmond News January 1, 2014 A3

N E W S

News

Teresa Wat defends mission, Chinese apology BY ALAN CAMPBELL

acampbell@richmond-news.com

INTERACTIVE PRINT

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For this week’s news stories, visit www.richmond-news.com and join the discussion.

Got a story or pictures you want to share with the Richmond News and its readers? Email us editor@ richmond-news. com

Rookie MLA reflects on new life during Q & A session

Question: You’ve been in the job eight months now, what’s life been like for you? Answer: It’s been hectic, for sure. I came into politics by accident after being approached by the Premier last year and I’m different from other politicians, many of whom prepare for this for many years. It’s been a big learning curve, not just becoming an MLA, but also getting used to the (B.C. Legislature) and the cabinet job, all at the same time. It’s been a total change; I spend more time in Victoria now than I do with my family. I live with my elderly parents, who are aged 89, and I’m lucky that they’re both still healthy. My neighbour calls in to check on them when I’m in Victoria and my mom complains to her that her daughter doesn’t talk much when she gets home. I think I’m just so exhausted and I’ve done so much talking during the day, that I’ve got nothing left to say. Q: Were you surprised to get your dual cabinet post as Minister for International Trade and Minister Responsible for the Asia Pacific Strategy and Multiculturalism? A: Yes, I was. I had hoped to get a position like this in a few years, but not straight away. Even though I know the Premier values my background and experience, I was totally taken by surprise, but also very honoured. It’s been very demanding of me, but I’m determined to prove the Premier was right to appoint me. Q: What’s been the most surprising aspect of your role as an MLA? A: I expected life as a politician to be very hectic, but not as hectic as it has actually been! Q: What has challenged you the most? A: The amount of functions I’m required to attend. There’s simply not enough time in the day to be at all these places and I’d still like to have a balanced life in there as well. Actually, it will be my New Year’s resolution to lead a more balanced life and I’ll try to spend at least one day a week with my parents, they’re not here forever. Q: Why go on the recent trade mission to Asia? A: We have to promote our products to the Asia Pacific; we are the province’s sales people. We can’t put all our eggs in one basket with the U.S. and we need to continue to broaden our reach. Q: Who did you meet on the mission?

Tell us how you think Teresa Wat is doing? PHOTO SUBMITTED

Richmond Centre MLA Teresa Wat, pictured above and right on her recent trade mission to China, has found her new life as a politician very hectic, especially all the functions she’s required to attend. A: Petroleum and bank bosses mainly. The Bank of China is now moving its international finance centre from Toronto to Vancouver; that kind of thing is why we go there. We’re trying to make B.C. and Vancouver the Asia Pacific hub. My ability to speak fluent Cantonese and Mandarin is also one of the reasons I got this post and I go on these trips.

Q: How can you justify the cost of these trips? A: We’re working over there from morning to evening, even through jet lag, meeting people every hour of every day. It’s very important that we’re in the face of the Chinese government and industry. The more we promote our exports to the likes of China, the more revenue will be generated and, with that, more jobs. If we don’t go out to these places, they won’t know we exist. Government to government relationships are so important because the private sector tends to follow on from that. Q: You were in Kamloops recently to talk

to people about the government’s upcoming apology to B.C.’s Chinese community for discriminations that were outlawed almost 70 years ago. Is it too late to say sorry? A: We’re working on a meaningful apology for the historic wrongs committed on the Chinese community here. There have been more than 100 examples of discrimination against the Chinese people: They couldn’t vote, they weren’t allowed to do certain jobs, they couldn’t own property. Is it too late? Any time is a good time. I feel proud to be a Canadian, but history can help us learn. Many non-Chinese people at the meeting in Kamloops didn’t even know what went on more than 100 years ago, right up until the ‘40s. We’ve apologized to the Japanese community and the Indo-Canadian community, but not to the Chinese community. It’s time to put that right.

Two men charged in early morning armed robbery Richmond RCMP have charged a pair of men with robbery with a firearm following an early morning attack on a man at the Brighouse Canada Line station. The victim said the two men who robbed him on Dec. 12, hit him and used a gun in the robbery, took his cell phone and other personal belongings. Police managed to track the suspects to

the area of Westminster Highway and Cooney Road, where they were taken into custody. Charged are 21-year-old Abdullah Cogo and Mahamed Halane, 23, both of Richmond. The victim’s belongings were located along with other items, which have been identified as stolen, including at least one cell phone located on the “blacklist.” “The officers investigating this incident

acted quickly in identifying and controlling the alleged suspects,” said Richmond RCMP spokeswoman Cpl. Stephanie Ashton. “If you lose your phone or it is stolen from you, go to the blacklist website and register it because it could lead police to a suspect and potentially get it back to you.” —Philip Raphael, Richmond News


A4 January 1, 2014 The Richmond News

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Staff at the Richmond Centre White Spot location donated their time and tips on Christmas Day to help raise $10,228 for the Richmond Hospital Foundation. Staff at the restaurant have been carrying out the charitable tradition for 15 years.

Get chippy with your Christmas tree When the time comes to take down your Christmas tree, bring it to the Richmond Firefighters Association Charity Chipping event or recycle your tree with your curb side Green Cart collection. Residents with curb side Green Cart collection can cut up and bundle their tree and place it at the curb side on their regular collection day, ensuring all the tinsel and decorations are removed.

Alternatively, join the Richmond Firefighters Association at their annual charity tree chipping events on Saturday, Jan. 4 and Sunday, Jan. 5. Bring your family and your tree on either day, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., to Garry Point Park (corner of Moncton Street and 7th Avenue) or to South Arm Community Centre (8880 Williams Rd). Donations are welcome for the Richmond Firefighters’ Society charities.

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The Richmond News January 1, 2014 A5

That was 2013 REVIEW

City hall protest, hockey coach jailed, Wat wins January

Tony Lloyd demonstrated his invention called the Practice Hit at the Minoru Park courts which allows players to improve their strokes and footwork without the need of a partner or chasing down tennis balls.

Troubled that many of their concerns about a jet fuel pipeline proposal have been left out of an environmental assessment, city council demanded a meeting with provincial ministers. Chief among the concerns was adequate fire protection for the project’s accompanying tank farm to be situated at the southern foot of No. 7 Road.

A group of Richmond farmers rolled along to city hall in a convoy to protest dumping demolition waste on a Finn Road farm in mid-January. The action spawns the group Farm Watch BC as its members set up a vigil outside the property. The group also rolled the convoy right to Premier Christy Clark’s office, which at the time was in Kitsilano.

FILE PHOTOS

Farmer Ray Galawan, left, led a protest to city hall against illegal dumping on agricultural land. Above, former minor hockey coach Martin Tremblay. Highway 99 was delayed for hours after a car slammed into the guard rail of the Steveston Highway overpass, dislodging it and leaving a section dangling over the highway.

A shooting at the Riverside Banquet Hall sends four people to hospital. Police arrested a suspect not far from the site which was hosting a gathering of about 150 longshoremen. Vancouver resident Sukhdeep Singh Sandhu is later charged with attempted murder and aggravated assault.

A minor hockey coach was jailed after being found guilty of tripping two Richmond players during a post-game handshake. Martin Tremblay was handed a 15-day sentence following the incident at the UBC Thunderbird Arena in June 2012.

The RCMP recover human skeletal remains on the west dyke near Blundell Road. Work crews in the area made the grisly discovery and called police.

Richmond-Stevston MLA John Yap resigned his cabinet post as Multiculturalism Minister pending a review into the so-called “Ethnic-gate” controversy. The scheme involved the BC Liberal Party’s strategy to gain ethnic votes that was devised by government staffers.

February

Dozens of community social service workers, including those from the Developmental Disabilities Association, staged a one-day strike to protest low wages. One DDA official said some workers are making less than the clients they serve.

The Richmond News, along with other community papers belonging to Glacier Media, launched the incorporation of Layar in their publications. The smart phone app bridges print with digital media allowing readers to access websites, photo galleries and videos by scanning page of the newspaper. The Scotiabank Hockey Day came to the Richmond oval and brings with it a celebrity ball hockey game featuring Vancouver Canucks’ first ever captain Orland Kurtenbach.

March

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An 80-year-old local inventor shared his creation with the News ahead of the broadcast of his appearance on TV show Dragon’s Den he hoped would revolutionize the way tennis players practise.

May

The News kicks off its Friday Feature section with reporter Alan Campbell’s look at the contentious Chinese signage issue. see Ikea staff page 7

Dr. Ben Partovi, DDS Dr. Kara Ellis-Partovi, DDS Dr. Alison Fransen, DMD

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FILE PHOTO

Teresa Wat celebrates her May victory in the provincial election. Later in the month, Yap declared he will not step down and he intends to run in the May provincial election.

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A Richmond runner was stripped of his medal after video after eye witness evidence caught him cheating in the Vancouver Sun Run. Mohammed Razak, who had placed first in the 55-59 age category, was judged to have taken a short-cut along the course.

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A local travel agency shut its doors, leaving its customers’ holiday plans in ruin and out of pocket. In mid-April, Alameda Travels Ltd. shut down without warning.

A pair of Richmond residents appealed to city council that the predominance of Chinese-only signage in Richmond should be addressed. Kerry Starchuk and Ann Merdinyan presented council with a 1,000name petition supporting their concerns. Later in the month, city council backed away from introducing a bylaw to regulate the inclusion of English on local business signage.

April

A Richmond runner managed to escape injury after bombs were exploded close to the finish line at the Boston Marathon. Steveston Athletic Association member Tracy Marshall, 48, had completed the course and was seeking treatment in a first aid tent about five minutes before the blasts went off, killing three and injuring hundreds more at the world famous event.

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A6 January 1, 2014 The Richmond News

Opinion T H E

Published every Wednesday & Friday by the Richmond News, a member of the Glacier Media Group. 5731 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-270-8031 Fax: 604-270-2248 www.richmond-news.com

EDITORIAL OPINION

Publisher: Gary Hollick ghollick@ richmond-news.com

Editor: Eve Edmonds editor@richmond-news.com Sports: Mark Booth mbooth@ richmond-news.com Reporters: Alan Campbell acampbell@ richmond-news.com Yvonne Robertson yrobertson@ richmond-news.com Philip Raphael praphael@ richmond-news.com

Director of Advertising: Rob Akimow rakimow@ richmond-news.com Sales Representatives: Angela Nottingham anottingham@ richmond-news.com Lori Kininmont lkininmont@ richmond-news.com Lee Fruhstorfer lfruhstorfer@ richmond-news.com Danny Cheng dcheng@ richmond-news.com Georgia Storey gstorey@ richmond-news.com Digital Sales: Olivia Hui ohui@ glaciermedia.ca Sales Support:

Joyce Ang jang@richmond-news.com

Delivery: 604-942-3081 distribution@richmond-news. com Classified: 604-630-3300 Fax: 604-630-4500 classified@van.net The Richmond News is a member of the Glacier Media Group. The News respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at www.richmond-news.com. The Richmond News is also a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulartory body. The council considers complaints from the public about conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint, contact the council. Your written concern with documentation should be sent to 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. www.bcpresscouncil.org.

R I C H M O N D

N E W S

Sales make historical sense

F

or the record, nobody alive today really knows for certain where Boxing Day came from – or how it got its name. Mostly recognized in countries that, like Canada, belong to the Commonwealth of Nations (formerly known as the British Commonwealth, in recognition of their birth in subservience to Mother Britain), versions of Boxing Day are also marked in a number of European countries. Whether traced back to Britain or Europe or elsewhere, Boxing Day has origins that go back to the Middle Ages… or still more centuries beyond that. Somehow and at some time (and for whatever reason) the day after Christmas was a time for employers and gentlemen – business owners and landholders – to give gifts or (in today’s parlance) monetary bonuses to their servants and any contractors who provided them with services, such as delivering milk or bread, or did odd jobs, for instance window-hangers or chimney sweeps. The traditions may well go back beyond Medieval times, indeed beyond the beginning of Christmas itself, to the midDecember celebration of Saturnalia in ancient Rome. The Saturnalia festivities, as in many of the related Medieval traditions, involved affluent folks filling alms boxes with money to be dispersed among their poor and needy neighbours. Generally, most of the traditions that have arisen from the day-after-Christmas celebration continue to involve people who have more acceding some of their wealth to those who have less, either through direct gifts, or simply by making goods or alms more accessible on Boxing Day than they would be any other time of the year. And in that sense, perhaps the Boxing Day sales that are so pervasive in retail commerce these days are not entirely out of place. They’re actually just another manifestation of a tradition that is at least centuries – and perhaps millennia – old.

CHOICE WORDS

Train our own tradespeople The Editor, Recently, we read about Canada sending a trade fair to Ireland to recruit tradespeople. We have facilities right here in Richmond which could be utilized as a trade school. Steveston Secondary School has been lying empty for years. All the student facilities are already in place. A new technical school would cost a lot more than it would cost to convert the facility mentioned into a full-time technical school for male and female students. Training our own apprentices would, in time, eliminate the need to trek around the world, embarrassing ourselves, looking for tradespeople we could, with a little imagination, have trained ourselves. For years, we hear Jim Sinclair, leader of The Federation of Labour, complaining about the government’s inability to provide enough tradespeople to meet the needs of our industries. Well, now is the opportunity for him and his powerful federation to run their own trade schools to their own specifications. We are going to need all the help we can get if we are going to meet the future needs of our ever-expanding industries. Vincent Murray Richmond

Letters policy The editor reserves the right to edit letters for brevity, clarity, legality and good taste. Letters must include the author’s telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters.

Send letters to The Editor, Richmond News, 5731 No. 3 Road Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Fax: 604-270-2248 or e-mail: editor@richmond-news.com

Forget the past, look to mega future There’s not much point at looking back at the big political stories of the past year. The stunning result of the May provincial election pretty well dwarfs everything else. The election result almost redefined B.C. politics, or at least many of its conventions. The future of the NDP is now very uncertain, political polling may no longer be reliable, older voters appear to hold a disproportionately high level of political power because they actually cast ballots, and a lot of issues and controversies the media and political opposition make hay over don’t seem to count with many voters. So instead of dwelling on the past, let’s look ahead at what are expected to be some key issues and decisions in the coming year: 1. To build or not to build: megaprojects are everywhere! The federal government will announce sometime this spring whether the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline will get the green light to proceed. Although the project has been met with overwhelming opposition from First Nations and much of the general public, it is commonly thought the Harper government strongly backs the idea of building a pipeline through remote northern wilderness to hook up with oil tankers along a pristine coastline that has never seen a tanker. In the coming year, focus will also shift towards the other big pipeline pro-

Keith Baldrey IN THE HOUSE

posal: Kinder Morgan’s plan to twin its existing pipeline. The bigger issue here is the five-fold increase in tanker traffic that will result from the new pipeline, but Kinder Morgan has done a better job of “selling” its project than Enbridge did when it comes to garnering public support for it. Nevertheless, look for a lot of public protests and demonstrations targeted at Kinder Morgan over the next year. Other big projects to take significant strides forward this coming year include a number of mines, and expansion of port facilities in Metro Vancouver. The B.C. Liberals will support all of them, while the NDP will tie itself in knots as it tries to accommodate both the environmental movement and the private sector unions. Speaking of the NDP: 2. Doesn’t anyone want this job? NDP leader Adrian Dix announced back in September he would step down to make way for a new leader, and so far the only thing notable about a contest to replace him is the fact that no one seems to want the job. The number of potential candidates has dwindled to just a handful, with longtime MLA Mike Farnworth

heading the list. Others may include rookie MLAs David Eby, Judy Darcy and George Heyman. But none of these candidates appear to scare the B.C. Liberals whatsoever. Farnworth, if he wins, will be painted by them as a nice guy who is controlled by the special interest groups who control the NDP. Heyman and Darcy are former leaders of public sector unions, which are hardly viewed as representative of most peoples’ interests. And Eby has a laundry list of unpopular positions he took when he ran the B.C. Civil Liberties Association. 3. Everyone wants more transit but doesn’t want to pay for it. That, in a nutshell, is the conundrum that Translink finds itself forever mired in. But next fall’s pivotal referendum on how to fund transit operations may finally provide some clarity. We haven’t seen the question yet, and Premier Christy Clark and Transportation Minister Todd Stone seem to be on different pages on the issue. Nevertheless, the transit referendum has the potential to have more impact on Metro Vancouver than any single municipal election. 4. Enough of the talk, let’s see some results. As in, just one contract signed, sealed and delivered to build a liquefied natural gas plant in B.C. would be nice. Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC.


The Richmond News January 1, 2014 A7

That was 2013 REVIEW

Ikea staff begin fight, badminton players brawl Continued from page 5 A high-speed collision involving multiple vehicles claimed one life and critically injured three others along Westminster Highway at Knight Street. According to police, a speeding Aston Martin convertible slammed into a stationary SUV. Godzilla stomped his way through Steveston as film crews shot a segment of the feature film reboot of the famous character that first appeared on screen in 1954. The streets of the historic fishing village were transformed into a veritable war zone for the shoot with burned out cars strewn across Moncton Street.

A local acupuncturist was alleged to have bilked B.C.’s medical services plan out of more than $1 million after investigators for the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners discovered the clinic had been over billing. At one point, Mu Bai Enterprises Corp., run by Dr. Mubia Qiu, claimed to have seen 461 patients in a single day.

June

While Richmond voters did the anticipated and voted back in three BC Liberal candidates, the party under Premier Christy Clark stunned the political pundits by posting a big win over the BC NDP on election night. Retaining the Liberals’ grip on Richmond were incumbents Linda Reid (Richmond East) and John Yap (Richmond-Steveston), while political newcomer Teresa Wat earned a pair of cabinet posts that come with the lengthy titles of Minister of International Trade and Minister Responsible for Asia Pacific Strategy and Multiculturalism. Unionized workers began walking the picket line outside the east Richmond loca-

tion of Ikea. Among the issues keeping the 350 or so employees from working are a tiered wage system and benefit eligibility.

A stretch of sunny summer weather produced a bumper crop of strawberries about two weeks earlier than normal. The sunshine forced some local farmers to open their Upicks early.

The city announced a $110 million list of building plans to replace the Minoru Aquatic Centre, Minoru Place Senior’s Centre and Firehall No. 1. All three facilities were considered to be ageing and in need of replacement.

Richmond-East MLA Linda Reid landed the role of Speaker of the House in the B.C. Legislature. Reid previously served as deputy speaker and was selected tops from a list of 14 candidates.

July

The union representing picketing workers at Richmond’s Ikea store expelled a group of its members after they returned to work. The labour dispute at the Swedish home furnishing giant started in mid-May after the company and union could not come to a contract agreement. The badminton court could have easily been mistaken for a boxing ring after a pair of elite players taking part in a tournament at the Richmond Oval dropped their racquets and put up their dukes. Bodin Issara and Maneepong Jongjit,

The sun and the crowds came out to Steveston for Canada Day and Salmon Festival celebrations on July 1. Temperatures soared to 28 degrees as an estimated 100,000 took in the events.

see Dogs dumped page 11

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The Richmond News January 1, 2014 A11

That was 2013 REVIEW

Dogs dumped, legion flags stolen, Walmart gets green light Continued from page 7 former teammates who represented Thailand, were disqualified for their antics. A video of the incident went viral on Facebook and Youtube.

FILE PHOTO

38 dogs were dumped overnight at the Richmond Animal Protection Society’s shelter on No. 5 Road in September.

The 13-acre site of Steveston Secondary school was finally sold to a developer, although the price paid was not immediately made public. But in October it was revealed the price tag paid by Polygon Pacific Homes Ltd. was $41 million.

August

A Transportation Safety Board investigation ruled that a Thunderbird Air plane crash in October 2011 short of a runway at YVR was survivable. The judgement was based on TSB’s suggestions to limit post-crash fires.

A group of 180 dedicated volunteers who could hold a tune smashed a Guinness Book of World Records mark for singing a song in series during the Maritime Festival in Steveston.

September

The Richmond Animal

Protection Society was left scrambling to care for 38 dogs dropped off in cages at its facility in dead of night. A picture of a young boy urinating into a garbage can at Richmond Centre went viral and caused a storm of controversy on social media. Some of the sheep a local landscaper had used to keep a central Richmond property from being overgrown were stolen. Sandy Chappel had 31 sheep on the lot adjacent to the McDonald’s on Alderbridge Way and had been ordered by animal welfare officials

to remove them since their presence contravened city bylaws. Mayor Malcolm Brodie decried the province’s plan to build a bridge replacing the George Massey Tunnel. Brodie said a new span would only shift the traffic congestion a short distance along Highway. 99 to the south end of the Oak Street Bridge.

October

A central Richmond gym was the target of a late evening shooting Oct. 7. RCMP investigators believed the exterior of the Westminster Highway location of Steve Nash Fitness World was hit

with as many as six bullets. Staff were inside the gym at the time, but no one was injured in the incident.

Police raided a Steveston home in connection with a suspected stolen toy ring. Boxes of toys were removed from the residence. The goods were believed to have been sold through a Facebook page. A wealthy couple in Texas claim they were duped into loaning a family member of an award-winning Richmond printing firm $8.5 million and launched a lawsuit to try and retrieve the funds. Several family members who own Blanchette Press were named in the legal action and launched a defence of their own soon after.

November

Despite having a collection of their flags stolen, members of the Royal Canadian Legion on Bridgeport Rd. marched in the annual Remembrance Day parade, thanks to an outpouring of help from numerous groups to replace some of what was taken by thieves. The new Target department

store opens its doors at Lansdowne Centre to customers.

The long-awaited Walmart anchored shopping mall in the west Cambie area is given the nod from city council in a 6-2 vote. The plan, 10 years in the making after being mulled by city hall over issues such as traffic and its effect on the environment, is expected to produce 1,000 jobs and open in 2016.

December

A man was shot outside a Bridgeport Road tile business on Dec. 6, but managed to get across the street and seek help from employees at an adjacent store. Police said the incident did not appear to be a random event. The province approved a jet fuel delivery plan by a consortium of airlines developing a new source for YVR. Opposition group VAPOR condemned the decision to bestow environmental approval for the project that will see large tankers ply the waters the Fraser River’s south arm and has vowed to fight the matter in court.


A12 January 1, 2014 The Richmond News

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Showcase puts Stecher & Bonar back on home ice

North Dakota and Princeton hockey teams make rare north of the border appearance to face UBC and Simon Fraser A pair of former Greater Vancouver Canadians standouts will get the rare opportunity to play on home ice this weekend at the Great Northwest Showcase in Burnaby. The four-team event features Simon Fraser University and UBC hosting a pair of high-profile NCAA Division One schools — University of North Dakota and University of Princeton. SFU faces Princeton on Friday (4 p.m.) and UBC battles North Dakota at 7 p.m. The Showcase concludes Saturday with UBC taking on Princeton at 4 p.m. and SFU facing Princeton at 7 p.m. All games take place at Bill Copeland Arena. Ticket prices range from $10-20 and are available at the door. For Sean Bonar and Troy Stetcher, the tournament means they will be playing in front of family and friends for the first time since their days in the B.C. Hockey League. For Stetcher, the wait hasn’t been too long. The standout blueliner from Richmond is in his freshman season at North Dakota after three productive seasons in the BCHL with the Penticton Vees. He has already been recognized for his play — earning National Collegiate Hockey Conference (NCHC) Defenceman of the Week honours last month. The Richmond Minor Hockey Alumni was considered a bluechip collegiate prospect after having a leading role in the Vees capturing the RBC Cup national junior “A” championship in 2012. He was named top defenceman of the playoffs and captained Penticton last season before heading south

to play for one of the top programs in U.S. collegiate hockey. The Fighting Sioux regularly sell out their games at the 11,000 seat Ralph Engelstad Arena in Grand Forks. North Dakota alumni Jonathan Toews, Zach Parise and TJ Oshie. Like Stetcher, Bonar was named the Canadians most valuable player before going to Penticton where he enjoyed a couple of outstanding seasons between the pipes. The Tsawwassen native compiled a 39-15 record and six shutouts over two seasons and was tournament MVP for Team Canada West at the World Junior A Challenge. His stellar play not only earned him an opportunity at Princeton, he was invited to the LA Kings and Philadelphia Flyers training camps. Even more impressive is how Bonar has juggled his studies at a world renowned Ivy League school. He is a three-time All-Academic Team Conference selection and will earn a degree in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering when he graduates in June. The plan is to pursue pro hockey opportunities once his senior season has concluded. He is looking forward to his first game in B.C. since 2010 and is expected to start in both games. “It’s going to great,” said Bonar. “The last time I played (in the Lower Mainland) was probably against the good old Surrey Eagles,” he laughed. “This is something I have been looking forward to for a while.” Being home with his family for Christmas didn’t mean Bonar was waiitng for his teammates to arrive in Vancouver.

SHELLEY M. SZWAST/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

Sean Bonar is in his senior year at Princeton University. He will be playing in B.C. for the first time in four years this weekend at the Great Northwest Showcase. He flew out on Boxing day to rejoin Princeton for the Florida College Hockey Classic. They played a pair of games on the

weekend then headed north in time to practice at the Burnaby Winter Club tomorrow afternoon.

Major Midget Canadians take momentum into new year Greater Vancouver Canadians will enter the new year playing their best hockey of the season. The B.C. Major Midget Hockey League squad closed out the 2013 portion of their regular season schedule by earning a split with perennial powerhouse and defending champion Vancouver Northwest Giants. The Canadians roared back with five answered third period goals to win the series opener 6-4 at the Richmond Olympic Oval before dropping the return match by the identical score.

The split leaves them in fifth place in the league standings with a 13-12-1 record — an impressive feat after a tough stretch in October which saw them drop eight of 10 games. They are three points back of the Valley West Hawks and will resume action Jan. 11-12 against the third place Valley West Hawks. The Canadians looked to be on their way to a third consecutive loss to the Giants when the visitors opened up a 4-1 lead in the early stages of the third period. However, the hosts then came to

life with goals from Owen Seidel, Justin Schwartz and Josh Murphy within a four minute span to pull on even terms. Sean Gillespie then completed the comeback with 5:09 remaining and Seidel added an insurance tally 1:24 later. Murphy also scored twice, while Dante Hannoun and Kyle Uh chipped in with three assists each. The second game saw Greater Vancouver trail 4-2 after 40 minutes before making things interesting on Alex Whitwham’s goal

with 9:47 remaining. However, the Giants responded 45 seconds later and the visitors would get no closer. Whitwham finished with a pair of goals, while Gunnar Wegelitner and Gillespie had the others. Uy capped a productive weekend with three more assists. Icing.... Canadians alumni Glenn Gawdin (Richmond) and Adam Musil (Delta) are playing Team Pacific at the World Under 17 Hockey Challenge in Cape Breton.

HOCKEY NIGHT IN RICHMOND! MISSION ICEBREAKERS KODIAKS SOCKEYES VS ALDERGROVE Richmond's Premier Sports Team Since 1972

The B.C./Alberta combined squad opened against Team Quebec and team West before closing out round-robin play on Wednesday against the Czech Republic and Thursday versus Sweden. The tournament concludes with the gold medal game on Saturday. Gawdin has 15 points, including five goals, in 38 games so far in his rookie season in the Western Hockey League with the Swift Current Broncos. Musil has 13 points, with five goals, with the Red Deer Rebels.

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The Richmond News January 1, 2014 A15

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Writing menus is no different than writing music. And cooking is no different than playing it.

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Richmond News January 1 2014