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Hometown bouts

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This weekend’s B.C. Silver Gloves Boxing Championships at the Richmond Sports Club will include a couple of local fighters making their 21 amateur debuts.

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Tax cut bid beaten down

Santa sails into town

Majority of city council stand by near 3 per cent property tax hike BY ALAN CAMPBELL

acampbell@richmond-news.com

A bid to slice one per cent off next year’s property tax increase was quashed by Richmond City Council Monday evening. Coun. Bill McNulty, backed by fellow councillors Ken Johnston and Derek Dang, argued that shaving the single point down from a 2.96 per cent rise would be a token gesture and would acknowledge the financial strain being felt by the taxpayers. The rest of council, however, stood firm, adding the one per cent in question — which was recommended by staff to go into the city’s reserves — is vital to help the city continue to deal with future infrastructure replacement. “We’re not giving the taxpayer a break at all,” said McNulty. “Their salaries have not gone up for years; people’s incomes are frozen and there are other sources out there that can go into — Coun. Bill the reserves. McNulty “Staff have spent about 10 pages (in the report) telling us how difficult the economy is, and we should think about that for the taxpayer.” People across Richmond are facing no wage increases, lay-offs and cutbacks, according to Johnston. “One per cent is not the end of the world, and I’d like to send a message; call it a ‘reserve holiday’ if you like. “People’s hydro, sewer, everything is shooting up; the taxpayer is getting pounded. We’re not going to save everybody’s life with this, but it’s time to put some reins on it.” Dang chimed in on the same note, saying the city in previous years has been “prudent in making sure money has been going into the reserves.” see Brodie page 4

“We’re not giving the taxpayer a break at all.”

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY NANCY JOSLAND DALSIN

The big man himself, Santa Claus, made an entrance, Steveston-style, on Sunday, courtesy of the ceremonial Steveston Lifeboat. To the cheers of hundreds of excited children, Santa then went for a wander on the boardwalk at Steveston Harbour as part of the village’s festive celebrations.

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A2 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

Part of


T H E

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N E W S

News

The Richmond News November 8, 2013 A3

PHOTOS SUBMITTED

Richmond Fire-Rescue raised more than $6,000 for prostate cancer research during Movember last month. To mark the end of the campaign, it hosted a Movember Shave-Off at Richmond City Hall last Friday. Above, Capt. Cory Parker gets a shave from Steveston Barber’s Jared. Right, mascot Blaze says goodbye to his ’stache.

Gender violence stems from culture, economics BY YVONNE ROBERTSON

yrobertson@richmond-news.com

Look for Layar on pages: 3, 7 10, 16 and on several ads.

For this week’s news stories, visit www.richmond-news.com and join the discussion.

Two events raise awareness around violence against women

(Dec. 4). The controversial song, Blurred A couple of days later, Kwantlen’s Lines, topped the charts, rape Richmond campus will hold a chants erupted in frosh weeks vigil for the National Day of across Canada, American media Remembrance on Friday (Dec. 6), in lamented the fate of the rapists in honour of the 14 women who the Steubenville case For videos were murdered at the L’Ecole — with little attention of movie Polytechnique in Montreal 24 to the victim — and a Finding years ago. spate of sexual assaults Dawn Although cases of assault have plagued the UBC trailer seem to be emerging at a campus. rapid pace, both the missing It seems the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence women and Montreal massacre attest gender violence is nothing new. campaign is needed more than ever. “The media has the power to The campaign launched on highlight these issues, which is why Nov. 25 (International Day Against people are noticing it now,” said Violence Against Women) and ends Dec. 10 (International Human Rights Kwantlen sociology professor Seema Ahluwalia. “But it’s not just a light Day), including significant dates in between to link gender violence with that flipped on all of a sudden, these are deep-rooted issues. human rights. “For decades now, pop culture Three Richmond women’s groups has become increasingly pornified, joined to co-host the screening of and sex and violence are becoming Finding Dawn about the families of increasingly conflated. We’ve northe missing and murdered women malized portrayals of violence and in the Downtown Eastside tonight

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degradation.” Rather than looking at Canadian culture as a whole, people are quick to point fingers at specific groups, such as the South Asian community, says Ahluwalia. These biases hinder the discussion about deep-seated issues like gender inequality and an economic system that allows what she calls “a rape culture” to flourish. “It only seems to capture the imagination of the mainstream when incidents rise within mainstream culture,” said Ahluwalia. “The reality is, the most vulnerable have always been struggling. Native women have been talking about these issues for decades. They were holding marches 10 years before the police started investigating the missing women. “It shouldn’t be a surprise these issues are starting to seep into more privileged communities now, especially if you look at pop culture.” Ahluwalia points to studies linking “predatory economic practices”

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to violence against women. “We’re dominated by war economics and the control of resources,” she said. “It’s how powerful countries base their GDP. Our country has been born out of violence. We’ve used it to intimidate and destroy cultures.” Bringing the conversation to a global level, not just one that blames cultural differences, is something that needs to happen to improve the situation. “We keep intensifying inequality,” she said. “There’s no way we can address the rape culture without looking at the inequalities that allow it to flourish. Ultimately, this doesn’t help the privileged either, men aren’t benefiting from this.” De Whalen, chair of the Richmond Poverty Response Committee adds, “It’s still a man’s world out there, when you look at legal services available or the justice system.” see Whalen page 4

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A4 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

News

Brodie: Reserves need top up Continued from page 1 However, leading the resistance against the reduction, Coun. Evelina Halsey-Brandt reminded council the city’s infrastructure is ageing all the time and Richmond’s population continues to grow. Coun. Harold Steves also jogged people’s memories with the anecdote of previous councils not putting money away. “It took many years to build those reserves back up and our buildings are getting old,” said Steves. “If we don’t keep putting money away, we will have to borrow it.” Mayor Malcolm Brodie said it was “extremely important” to keep topping up the city’s reserve fund, which stands at around $200 million.

“There’s going to be a dramatic decrease (in the reserves) already because of infrastructure improvements,” added Brodie, referring to the replacement of the Minoru Seniors Centre and pool. “There was a reason we adopted this strategy of putting money into the reserves; in the ’90s we had low taxes, which resulted in the reserves going on a downward slope and into perilous territory.” To maintain the current levels of service across the city, staff recommended an increase of $3.42 million in spending. However, the additional one per cent — $1.74 million — for reserves adds up to a total property tax increase of 2.96 per cent.

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with the city’s three MLAs to reiterate council’s concerns. Mayor Malcolm Brodie, however, said such a meeting might be futile, adding that “The jet fuel is the foot in the door.” one of them (Teresa Wat) is in China, one is That was the stark warning from Coun. the Speaker of the House (Linda Reid) and Harold Steves, as city council made one last one is a parliamentary secretary (John Yap) noise in opposition to the proposed jet fuel they don’t often speak out against governdelivery plan for YVR. ment policy. The long-awaited decision on whether to Coun. Bill McNulty also expressed his grant the airline consortium proponents an environmental certificate is due in a matter of disappointment that none of the MLAs turned up at a press conference at Garry Point Park days from the B.C. government. last week, which was organized by local proSteves, however, said a green light from test group VAPOR. the province would open the floodgates to “I’ve yet to hear from other pending proposals one citizen that we’re affecting the Fraser River. wrong in our opposition to “If this is approved, this,” added McNulty. we can expect the Kinder Brodie, several city Morgan proposal and councillors and Deltathe coal shipments to be South MLA Vicki approved,” Steves told felHuntington joined VAPOR low councillors Monday — Harold Steves members last week on the afternoon. banks of the Fraser River “…what we’re witnessing is the industrialization of the Fraser River. to make one last appeal to the government’s environment minister, Mary Polak, to refuse The tunnel replacement is the next step.” the certificate. Coun. Evelina Halsey-Brandt went a Polak is due to announce the government’s step further and accused the province of environmental review decision on or before “totally ignoring” council and the people of Dec. 24, almost three years into what was Richmond in their staunch opposition of the supposed to be a 180-day process. plan to barge aviation fuel up the south arm Plan proponent VAFFC has cited the curof the Fraser, offload it at a terminal in southrent supply to the airport — via truck tanker east Richmond and then pipe it up Highway from Washington State and a pipeline from a 99 and across the city to YVR. Burnaby refinery — is unreliable and insufA suggestion was made by Coun. Linda ficient to meet future demands. McPhail to arrange an 11th-hour meeting BY ALAN CAMPBELL

acampbell@richmond-news.com

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Whalen: ‘Cycle of violence’ Continued from page 3 In recent years, Whalen has noticed more community action. For her, tonight’s screening provides another opportunity for public education. Organized by CHIMO, the Canadian Federation of University Women Richmond, and the Richmond Women’s Resource Centre, Cherry Smiley (Indigenous Women Against the Sex Industry) and Chris McDowell (Remember Our Sisters

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Everywhere) will lead a discussion after the screening. “I worry a little bit about the lasting impact of these types of awareness weeks, but hopefully this provides a place to start and people can create their own year-round projects,” said Whalen. Richmond has a strong network of groups, according to Whalen. Currently, studies are being conducted into much needed second stage housing for women in Richmond. Although Nova House exists, it’s often full and very temporary. “There’s nowhere for women to go after,” Whalen said. “They basically have

to get referrals, legal aid and income assistance in a short amount of time. When they leave, they end up going back to their abusive housing situation because they don’t have other options. The cycle of violence continues.” Community town halls provide another way to create inclusive discussion. But Ahluwalia said these need to be organized on a government level that listens to vulnerable communities. The screening takes place at the Ralph Fisher Auditorium in Richmond Hospital from 6:30-9 p.m. Kwantlen’s event begins at noon on Friday, Dec. 6.

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The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A5

EDUCATION

News

District scrambles for hydro savings BY PHILIP RAPHAEL

praphael@richmond-news.com

Richmond School District staff are hoping to find a few more energy efficiencies to help take a bite out of coming BC Hydro rate increases expected to cost an additional $150,000 to $200,000 annually. Tracy Blagdon, the district’s manager of energy and sustainability said the task will be difficult since there have already been many initiatives implemented to cut down on electricity, as well as natural gas, consumption in local school buildings. That, coupled with a steady decrease in enrolment — and the government funding that goes with it — leaves the district with a problem funding the nine per cent hydro hike starting in April 2014 and will amount to a 25.5 per cent jump after five years. “In the past we’ve been pretty aggressive in cutting consumption,” Blagdon said, adding that since 2008 the district has been able to avoid power and heating costs of roughly $1.16 million — $842,000 in electricity and $321,000 in natural gas savings. That was achieved through a combination of simple reinforcement such as reminders for staff to ensure office lights have been shut off when not required, and more complex items such as retrofitting school buildings with more efficient heating and cooling systems. The district has even added three, new electric-powered vehicles for its information/technology staff to replace gas-burning vans used for school site visits. Despite all those measures, the district has set an electricity usage decrease for 2014 at three per cent. “That’s a pretty aggressive target,” Blagdon said, adding as the BC Hydro rates start to rise — which is

intended to pay for upgrades to the utility’s aging infrastructure — achieving that goal will be harder to attain. Also making the task harder is the delay waiting for technology to catch up and provide further, economically viable efficiencies to replace the already frugal systems and initiatives now in place. Blagdon said she is always keeping an eye on the development of new solar and wind technologies to see if they would be a good fit. “But in terms of financial payback, even with rates going up, we’re not at that financial tipping point yet.” One easy and cost effective strategy that could make a difference is examining closer how to more efficiently heat and light school buildings during school breaks, and after regular school hours when many community groups use the facilities. Blagdon said school holiday periods are when much maintenance work can be performed. And those schools containing daycares remaining open around the Christmas holidays require the utilities to be left on. More efficient booking of community groups into one designated wing of a school building where the heat and light can be consolidated, is one possible answer. But with higher power costs mapped out for the foreseeable future, the bottom line is the increases could end up impacting the classroom, said school board chair Donna Sargent. “Since the increase starts in April we are looking at finding $30,000 to cover this school year, then for every year afterwards we have to find another $150,000 to $200,000,” Sargent said. “We don’t know exactly where that will come from. But when 92 per cent of your budget covers staff, it’s not hard to see where that impact will be felt.”

Canada Line gets artsy Committee approves public art BY YVONNE ROBERTSON

yrobertson@richmond-news.com

Brighouse Sky Train Station moved a step closer to being adorned with public art, as the general purposes committee endorsed two concept proposals for the plinth at the end of the tracks. The artworks were approved with little discussion Monday night, according to the city’s public art planner Eric Fiss and will go before council next Monday. “I was quite excited when I saw them,” said Fiss. “They really work in the context and make you think about the surrounding environment. “The committee wanted something site-specific, that would be fun and engaging, and would speak to the context of the Canada Line and Richmond in some way.” Pieces of painted driftwood intricately intertwine to resemble a beaver’s dam for SkyDam, a work by Nathan Lee, Sarah Siegel, Erika Mashig and Aline Meylan. Bright red beavers, constructed using rigid foam,

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inhabit the dam, which symbolizes the industriousness of Richmondites. It speaks to the amphibious nature of Richmond’s history, as a city based on the fishing and agriculture industries, according to the artists. “Whenever I look at the Canada Line, I see it as an incredible engineering feat,” said Fiss. “It almost reminds me of a viaduct in ancient Rome, so it’s cool that there’ll be a dam at the end of it.” Artist Carlyn Randle’s work consists of a cluster of brightly coloured recyclable aluminum tubes, emerging out of the end of the train tracks. Inspired by fibre optics, Roost provides an active experience for a viewer, where approaching the sculpture head-on is different from approaching it from the side, according to Randle. “They’re both playful pieces that will get people talking,” said Fiss. Before endorsing, the committee raised questions about how they would gauge the public response for the pieces. see Councillors page 6

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We want to know how you’re finding information about our services – what’s working, what isn’t, and how we can best provide you with this information. Find the 10 minute survey at: letstalkrichmond.ca Survey deadline: Tuesday, December 17 City

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A6 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

News

Councillors: Raised questions about how to gauge public response

News Online @

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Just a Click Away!

Continued from page 5 Coun. Evelina HalseyBrandt suggested a like/dislike button near the station, to which city staff said there would be signs around the piece to indicate how residents can provide feedback. Coun. Chak Au, on the other hand, was concerned about too much feedback from birds who might confuse SkyDam as a nest or fly inside Roost’s tubes. Fiss said perhaps the birds’ interaction would only prove a

greater engagement between art and nature. The two proposals were chosen out of 77 submissions. Funding for the project is $80,000 ($45,000 for SkyDam and $35,000 for Roost) and was approved as part of the 5-Year Financial Plan. Each piece will stay on the plinth for a minimum of six months and maximum of a year, and installation begins early 2014. — with a file from Alan Campbell

IMAGES SUBMITTED

SkyDam shows red beavers industriously working on a dam. Above, right, Roost is comprised of recyclable aluminum tubes, reminiscent of fibre optics.

Backstage Pass

N E W S F ROM B E H I N D T H E S C E N E S

The Kids in the (Rehearsal) Hall

G

ateway Holiday Musicals always include talented young performers, but this year a record breaking number of them take the stage. 21 incredible kids are in The King and I—and with 38 actors in the show, more than half that talent comes in a pint sized package!

Performing in a massive musical is no easy feat, but thanks to training programs like the Gateway Academy, the kids are ready to rock the stage. Thirteen of the young cast members come from the Academy and choreographer Harriet Chung couldn’t be happier with the results: “I have to tell you, your [Academy] students are really amazing. … Everybody is so friendly and willing to learn.” A veteran performer and choreographer on numerous productions of The King and I, Harriet knows this show like the back of her ballet slipper—her seal of approval is the ultimate high praise! Mentorship is also being provided by Director, Chris McGregor, and Musical Director, Christopher King. Christopher confirmed that the kids “are really doing their homework—they’re really coming along in their roles.” This hard work is definitely made easier when you have strong guidance: Chris McGregor regularly teaches kids in the summer musical theatre program “Gotta Sing, Gotta Dance” and Barb Tomasic [Anna] is also a regular Gateway Academy instructor. With the unparalleled mentorship these young performers are receiving, they’ll be stars before you know it. To see these kids light up The King and I, book your tickets now at tickets.gatewaytheatre.com.

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The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A7

News

NOW PLAYING

REAL ESTATE

Jaw-dropping luxury for gob-smacking price River Green still has room for lottery winners BY ALAN CAMPBELL

acampbell@richmond-news.com

The winner of Wednesday’s nights Lotto 649 jackpot could be sitting on a sweet $19 million jackpot. And it’s that kind of good fortune the average Richmondite might just need if he or she is to partake of the more high-end units still on sale at the River Green complex in the shadow of the Olympic oval. The six towers of River Green’s phase one are now complete and if you’re in luck Wednesday, you could slip into one of their jawdropping, four-bedroom, river-facing, three-level, 3,650 square-foot villas — complete with 24-feet high, floor-to-ceiling windowed living room and private, water-surrounded gazebo — for a mere $3.58 million. Or if that’s too much legroom, you could downsize to a 1,420 square-foot, two bedroom version for just under a million dollars. Some units have their own water-surrounded patios and gazebos. No matter what you

choose, most have luxury Italian fixtures and fittings, from leather sofas to custom kitchens. Even the doorsills are made of marble. And every owner has access to a 24-hour concierge, complimentary shuttle service For more to the city centre, phoa sound-proofed tos movie room with a 100-inch screen, a virtual golf room, children’s indoor play area, adult reading room, three study rooms (some with balconies), a piano room, a billiards room, sauna, steam room and a luxurious 25metre pool, which would not look out of place in a 7-star Dubai hotel. Around 100 of the 457 units built in phase one of developer Aspac’s River Green are still up for sale. But Aspac’s vice-president of development, John Ryan, has no concerns about shifting them, despite the Lower Mainland housing market’s stagnation. “In my view, there’s a certain level of our units that will sell right away,” Ryan told the News during a media tour Tuesday morning.

ALAN CAMPBELL/RICHMOND NEWS

The six towers of the River Green’s phase one are now complete and most units include Italian fixtures and fittings, from leather sofas to custom kitchens. Doorsills are made of marble.

“The rest (of the buyers) tend to wait until they can feel and touch the properties.” River Green has “raised the bar” in Richmond, said Ryan, in terms of the level of luxury and attention detail of the finishes. “People that are buying are generally moving in,” said Ryan, when asked if there were a lot of foreign investment buyers. “Some of them are re-selling, but that’s natural with a complex this size.” In 2010, River Green set a real estate sales record for

Richmond when 150 units sold out at $145 million in a matter of hours, surpassing the purchase price of the land ($141 million). That opening weekend also saw four penthouses sold at over $3.4 million each (more than $1,000 per square foot), setting Richmond sales records for single condominium sale price and price per square foot. The full 2,600-unit, 28-acre luxury waterfront community is expected to take another 10 years to complete.

Give old school artifacts to Richmond Museum

The City of Richmond is asking people to dig deep into their cupboards, attics and garages to help with community artifacts for Richmond Museum’s new exhibition. For the upcoming Language of Learning exhibition that opens Feb. 25, 2014, the public is invited to share, by loaning or donating, objects or photos related to learning in Richmond. They could be items that represent a time when you attended an independent school or participated in religious, cultural or language studies. Or they could be ceremonial objects, certificates, art supplies, specialty books, interactive learning tools, audio visual aids, costumes, or that old uniform you have hung on to. Particular items include: from the ’90s to present day:

Ice Age: A Mammoth Christmas™ & © 2013 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All rights reserved.

Graduation cap and gown, athletic and band uniforms; ’70s and ’80s: lunch boxes, backpacks, elementary school supplies, a child’s jacket, world maps; ’30s to ’60s: photographs of activities that would have taken place in a Richmond elementary school gymnasium, such as assemblies, clubs, sports and theatre performances. Contact 604-247-8331 or rforrest@richmond.ca.

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A8 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

Opinion T H E

Published every Wednesday & Friday by the Richmond News, a member of the Glacier Media Group. 5731 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-270-8031 Fax: 604-270-2248 www.richmond-news.com

EDITORIAL OPINION

Publisher: Gary Hollick ghollick@ richmond-news.com

Editor: Eve Edmonds editor@richmond-news.com Sports: Mark Booth mbooth@ richmond-news.com Reporters: Alan Campbell acampbell@ richmond-news.com Yvonne Robertson yrobertson@ richmond-news.com Philip Raphael praphael@ richmond-news.com

Director of Advertising: Rob Akimow rakimow@ richmond-news.com Sales Representatives: Shaun Dhillon sdhillon@richmond-news.com Stephen Murphy smurphy@ richmond-news.com Angela Nottingham anottingham@ richmond-news.com Lori Kininmont lkininmont@ richmond-news.com Lee Fruhstorfer lfruhstorfer@ richmond-news.com Danny Cheng dcheng@ richmond-news.com Georgia Storey gstorey@ richmond-news.com Digital Sales: Olivia Hui ohui@ glaciermedia.ca Sales Support: Kelly Christian kchristian@ richmond-news.com Administration:

Joyce Ang jang@richmond-news.com

Delivery: 604-942-3081 distribution@richmond-news. com Classified: 604-630-3300 Fax: 604-630-4500 classified@van.net The Richmond News is a member of the Glacier Media Group. The News respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at www.richmond-news.com. The Richmond News is also a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulartory body. The council considers complaints from the public about conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint, contact the council. Your written concern with documentation should be sent to 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. www.bcpresscouncil.org.

R I C H M O N D

N E W S

Transit vote wrong turn

T

he provincial government is driving forward its promise of holding a referendum on TransLink. Or perhaps, “driving forward” isn’t the correct euphemism in this case. There’s a lot to be said for Transportation Minister Todd Stone’s reiteration of Premier Christy Clark’s election campaign promise to put TransLink under direct public scrutiny through a referendum. The very idea of politicians actually keeping a promise is always refreshing. But the advantages of “direct democracy” through government-by-referendum are sometimes vastly overstated. Elections allow us to “hire” politicians to work for us, to take the time necessary for in-depth research and consideration needed to make important decisions about how government and its agencies serve us. Some of those decisions require understanding of complex levels of information beyond the abilities of most folks, who have jobs of their own, to do the research fully. Admittedly, they are also the types of decisions that tend to draw the most public reaction, usually from people whose limited understanding leaves them vulnerable to the loudest, not always wisest, voices. That’s the problem with TransLink funding: is the average public person able to get past vocal claims of bloated and overpaid administration and ineffective, skewed service levels to choose appropriate taxation modes and levels? And then there’s the matter of getting people to vote at all. This one smacks of the politicos ducking an unpopular necessity. Sometimes, the politicians should just do the job they were hired to do, instead of proposing referenda to hand off difficult decisions. Then they can take the heat for bad calls, not just the credit for the good ones. Business people who “lost” the HST referendum surely know what we mean.

CHOICE WORDS

More traffic action needed The Editor, Re: “Tragic weekend on Richmond roads,” News, Nov. 27. I feel for the families of the latest tragedies on Richmond roads. What we don’t seem to face up to is the fact that our roads seem to set their own speed limits. Steveston Highway is a free for all, with the norm being 70 kilometres per hour and not the posted 50 kilometres per hour. The secondary routes such as Francis Road, Williams Road and Blundell are no better with speeds far exceeding posted maximums. Pedestrians are no better, as they are consumed by what’s on their phones or iPods, and don’t even give a second look to the oncoming traffic. What is needed is a comprehensive traffic plan in which our local RCMP target speeders, inattentive pedestrians and other traffic violators on a full time basis. A couple of traffic blitzes a year or the occasional fly the flag traffic stop just doesn’t cut it anymore. How many more people have to die in Richmond before we, as a city, stand up and say enough is enough? David Neil Richmond

Letters policy The editor reserves the right to edit letters for brevity, clarity, legality and good taste. Letters must include the author’s telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters.

Send letters to The Editor, Richmond News, 5731 No. 3 Road Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Fax: 604-270-2248 or e-mail: editor@richmond-news.com

Week challenges Families First agenda Well, the past week wasn’t exactly a stellar one for Premier Christy Clark’s Families First agenda. I’ve long thought the slogan was a risky one, given families rely on government services to varying degrees and it’s pretty impossible for any government to meet the demand at every turn. So a government is always vulnerable to charges it’s being unfairly hard on things like, well, families. And the events of the past week show just how true that can be. Just a few days after cutting back B.C. Ferry services for ferry-dependent communities, her government unveiled increases in B.C. Hydro rates that, over the next five years, will cost the average family an additional $300 or so in electricity bills. On the same day as the hydro announcement, a report was released by an advocacy group that mapped out the depths of poverty in B.C. It concluded B.C. ranked highest in the country when it came to child poverty rates. A day later, Finance Minister Mike de Jong presented an update on the government’s fiscal situation that, while far from bleak, nevertheless showed the chances of the government spending more money on services to help families were slim and none. His quarterly financial report also showed Clark’s much-emphasized job

Keith Baldrey IN THE HOUSE

creation program has gone nowhere. Employment growth has been nearly flat for the first 10 months of this year and there has been a net loss of 2,600 jobs. Still, it was the report on child poverty that provided the sharpest and bleakest contrast to what is supposed to be a “families first” approach from government. To be sure, reports by advocacy groups have to be viewed somewhat warily, as they tend to support whatever particular goal the group is trying to achieve. And measuring poverty is an inexact science, as statistics can sometimes prove to be misleading. Nevertheless, the report by First Call: the B.C. Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition is fairly disturbing. Using Statistics Canada data, it concluded almost one-fifth (18 per cent) of children in B.C. live below the poverty line (where that line sits, admittedly, is the subject of some debate). That works out to about 153,000 children living in poverty, an increase of 34,000 in just one year. Alarmingly, the poverty in single-mother homes more than doubled, from 21.5 per cent in 2010 to a staggering

49.8 per cent in 2011. Grim findings such as these call out for some kind of action by the provincial government, but there is not much evidence that is happening. Children and Family Development Minister Stephanie Cadieux has insisted her government’s approach to solving the poverty problem is to grow the economy and create jobs, but not much progress is being made on either. And until the economy picks up significantly, average families will feel the pain of government cutbacks and rate increases. Until the B.C. government finds a magic pot of gold, its number one goal of balancing the budget each year necessitates making moves that will hurt families, especially those at the lower end of the income scale. That advocacy group on poverty suggests, among other things, adopting a $10 a day child care plan and increasing welfare rates. Neither of those things is going to happen, as a cashstrapped government tries to wrestle a budget deficit. Perhaps it is time for the premier to find a new slogan to wrap her government’s stated agenda around, because “families first” just isn’t working and won’t until the economy gets out of its sluggish, neutral state. Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC.


The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A9

Letters

Ship coal to Prince Rupert Writers show bravery The Editor, Let me start by saying I do not support the burning of coal, it pollutes the air we breathe and the water we drink. The transport of coal in populated areas poses a direct risk to health. Some studies claim a higher rate of asthma in populated areas near coal storage and facilities. I understand if you inhale coal dust, most of it is trapped by the moist areas of your upper respiratory tract and expelled. However, any coal dust that makes it to your lungs is there forever and may cause serious disease. How much coal dust is too much? It is like asking how many cigarettes can I smoke before it gets dangerous. There was a time when we thought only smokers were at risk from smoking, now we know the risks associated with second hand smoke. I find the plan to ship coal through the most populated areas of B.C. by rail, then barging it from Surrey to Texada Island, where it will be transferred from the barges to ships, an unnecessary risk to public health.

If the coal were shipped directly to Prince Rupert, it would pass through fewer populated areas and those areas have a lighter population density. The Port of Prince Rupert is already handling coal and they plan to expand their facilities. Prince Rupert is closer to Asia, by up to three days travel by ship and their port is the third deepest port in the world — thereby eliminating the need to transfer the coal from river barges to ships. The less you handle coal, the less dust you stir up. As for the two dozen jobs that would be created in Prince Rupert rather than Surrey, you would create more jobs if you open a Tim Hortons. Richmond is a beautiful and safe place to live, and a great place to raise a family. Let’s keep it that way! Moving the coal through Prince Rupert is the lesser of two evils, my apologies to the folks in Prince Rupert. Ultimately, one has to ask why we are taking risks to allow an American railroad to ship Wyoming coal to Asia. Scott Stewart Richmond

Thank you for Philippines support The Editor, The Richmond Oxfam Committee would like to thank all of those who donated last week at the Richmond Centre Mall. We collected almost $4,000 over five days, which will mean $8,000 to those helping “on the ground” in

the Philippines, when supplemented by the Canadian government. Here are some examples of how your donations could help: $45 could provide 10 Oxfam buckets designed to keep water safe; $85 could provide 100 emergency health kits; $200 could pro-

vide shelter for a family made homeless. The citizens of Richmond have once again come to the fore in helping the less fortunate. Carol Rennie and Orval Chapman Richmond Oxfam Committee

The Editor, Re: “New voices dispel old myths,” Letters, Nov. 22. Richmond Public Library would like to thank Mr. Ling (James) Hung for his inspiring and kind words regarding the Writerin-Residence program at the library. The 11 ESL writers who diligently took three-hour writing classes with writer-in-residence Nancy Lee for four weeks, read from their works to a large and enthusiastic audience. The chapbook they produced, New Voices II, is a stunning and brave collection of fic-

tion and memoir from writers whose first language is not English. Bravo to you all! Having read the chapbook myself, I can tell you it’s an insightful read that mirrors the joyful, sad and uplifting experiences of writers from nine different countries. I encourage everyone to read it. You can borrow it from the Brighouse branch or read it online at https://create.yourlibrary.ca/active_ textbooks/68. Shelley Civkin, communications Richmond Public Library

The Senate - Reform or Abolish? ~ A public forum ~ Seeking solutions for the future of Canada’s Senate

Friday December 6th - 7pm Richmond Cultural Centre The purpose of this meeting is not to revisit past events, but to consider and respectfully discuss the future of the senate. Although sponsored by the Richmond Liberal Riding, it is not intended to be a political event. Please leave party politics at the door, as we work together seeking solutions to a challenging issue. All concerned citizens are WELCOME to attend.

PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT UNDER the Liquor Control & Licensing Act

An application has been received by the Liquor Control & Licensing Branch by the City of Richmond from: Plaza Premium Lounge B.C. Ltd., doing business as Distinguished Visitor Lounge Unit C2315, Level 2, International & USA Arrivals 3211 Grant McConachie Way The intent of the application is to apply for a new Liquor Primary Licence. The proposed operating hours will be: Monday to Sunday: 9:00am to 2:00am Residents and owners of business may comment on this application by writing to: City of Richmond Business Licence Division Liquor Licence Applications 6911 No. 3 Road Richmond, B.C., V6Y 2C1 To ensure the consideration of your views, your written comments must be received on or before December 29, 2013. Your name, address and phone number must be included with your comments. Please note that your comments may be made available to the Applicant and Local Government officials where disclosure is necessary to administer the licensing process.

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A10 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

Community

McRoberts video in running for dry grad contest BY PHILIP RAPHAEL

praphael@richmond-news.com

A group of Grade 12 students at McRoberts Secondary are hoping a video

they produced will reinforce the message that drinking and driving is a bad idea. The one and a half minute clip, titled It was Just a Few, is one of five finalists in

BCAA’s Dry Grad Video Challenge. The entries judged to be in the top three will be awarded cash prizes to be used for that school’s dry grad event. First place gets $6,000, second receives $4,000 and third place takes home $2,000. But the award is secondary to the awareness the students hope to create about the choices facing teens and young adults as they deal with everything from underage drinking, peer pressure and the all too often tragic results. “On a personal level, drunk driving has affected my family,” said Tyler Yip, one of the students involved For with the video producvideo clip of It tion. “My mom is a was Just police officer and she’s seen what’s happened a Few when people drink and drive. Yip said the aim of the video is to show how anyone, regardless of age or gender, can get involved in a drunk driving incident. “You don’t even have to be the driver; anything can happen,” he said. “You have to always try and be safe.” That’s why the video rarely shows the main character’s face as he arrives at a party that’s in full swing and gets swept up in the moment, begins to drink, then drives home and is involved in a crash.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

A screen shot from the short video It was Just a Few addresses the perils of drinking and driving.

The video was shot last month and involved a large group of Grade 12 students from the school, said Arthur Belair who filmed and edited the fast-paced piece which is filled with jumpy cuts between action. “That was done on purpose to make the viewer feel like they were under the influence,” he said. Voting in the video challenge — which ends today (Dec. 4) — can be done by visiting bcaa.com/campaigns/dry-grad/view/ vote-now.

Youth invited to shape city’s future Richmond’s teens are being asked to help shape the future for the city’s youth. If you’re aged 13 to 18, you can join in for fun, food and prizes in a series of upcoming free workshops. Participants will create a city map of important places, resources and activities that show what is meaningful to them about Richmond.

Youth are encouraged to register for one of the following workshops: Where Youth Thrive: Richmond Talks Monday, Dec. 9 at Richmond City Hall, 6911 No. 3 Rd. from 4 to 6 p.m. or Wednesday, Dec. 11 at South Arm Community Centre, 8880 Williams Rd. from 4 to 6 p.m. The City of Richmond is in the process of updating

the Youth Service Plan for 2014-2018 and would like feedback from youth. Those interested in attending are asked to RSVP (indicating which workshop they will attend) by Dec. 6 to communityservices@richmond.ca. Bus tickets will be available as needed. For more information, visit www.richmond.ca/ parksrec/youth/strategy.

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The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A11

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A12 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

12026979

Community

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Amelia and Jack Triance help decorate a boat for the Richmond Yacht Club’s 15th Annual Parade of Lights that takes place Saturday and Sunday Dec. 7 and 8 with vessels lighting up the waters between the Dinsmore Bridge and the Moray Channel Bridge from 6-8 p.m. on both nights. Hot dogs, hot chocolate and cookies will be served, and donations of toys and food will be collected for the Richmond Christmas Fund and Richmond Food Bank.

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The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A13

NOW UNTIL JANUARY 22


A14 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

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The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A15

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A16 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

ThePulse "'&(' %!* !), +#%', !# $* HATS OFF

PHOTO SUBMITTED PHOTO SUBMITTED

Richmond Chrysler donated $5,100 to the Richmond Food Bank. From left, Margaret Hewlett of the food bank, Barry Wingo, Mike Gignac and Richard Rand.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Feed-U-Cate 38, a program which seeks to provide healthy meals and nutritional awareness for Richmond students received $5,000 from the Noah Yelizarov Memorial Hockey Tournament this summer. From left, tournament organizers Don and Wendy Taylor, Glenn Kishi, Feed-U-Cate organizer, and Lori and Michael Yelizarov.

Two Richmond companies received a 2013 CME BC Export Award. White Water West Industries Ltd. (above, left) took home the Manufactured Products Award and Paper Excellence Canada Holdings Corporation (above, right) received the Natural Resources Award. Geoff Chutter and Darren Taylor (above, left) and Buyung Wahad and Shaun Stevenson (above, right) stand with MLA Teresa Wat.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Twenty-nine Richmond CA students passed the national Uniform Evaluation, which was written in September. From left, Dennis Au, Meghan Lee and Mikhail Kuzmin joined nine other B.C. students who made the National Honour Roll.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

The Governor General of Canada, David Johnston, honoured teachers and other outstanding Canadians for furthering an interest in Canadian history at the Governor General’s History Awards Ceremony. Two Richmond students, Brett Dowling and Margaret Lin received the Begbie Canadian History Contest award.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

The Richmond News mascot, Minoru the Raccoon, was at Lansdowne Centre to sell colouring books of his rascally adventures. All proceeds went to charity.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

The Richmond Sunrise Rotary Club donated a container of medical equipment and supplies for shipment to Cebu and Bohol, Philippines last month.

For a video of the 2012 Herring Sale

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Fishermen Helping Kids with Cancer (above and left) held its annual Herring Sale last weekend. More than $60,000 went to B.C. Children’s Hospital. Lineups started around 5 a.m.


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The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A17

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A18 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

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The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A19

Community

Seniors know how to celebrate the season

C

hristmas is coming and I will never be ready in time. Cards are arriving and I haven’t even started to write mine. My calendar is filling up fast with five parties written on it, and I see two potluck lunches as well. I may be busy, but I certainly won’t be hungry. My first two parties are at local secondary schools, Hugh Boyd and J.N. Burnett. My friends and I love to visit the schools where the students are so eager to please. From the moment we arrive, we are attended to by handsome young men, some of whom are almost bouncing with excitement as they meet us at the car, or the HandyDART, to take our arm and escort us inside, where girls are ready to hang our coats. We are shown to a table and asked if we would like tea or coffee, which comes, held by the cup handle, at great risk to life and limb. Our menus are all handmade offering us soup and sandwiches followed by sweets. One year, it was the other way around for a few of us — oops. But no matter, it was part of the fun. At one school, we’re serenaded by pre-schoolers, and there’s always one little tyke who steals the show. I also expect the school band will be getting our heart rates up with an electric guitar and drum jam session. It touches me that they do all these preparations themselves and seem so proud to welcome us to their school. We are just as proud to be there, bridging the gap between teenagers and seniors. And we get a strangely young Santa Claus thrown into the bargain. The Rotary lunch in the Steveston Community Centre is one I don’t like to miss. The Rotarians do a wonderful job of serving turkey with all of the trimmings to a lot of seniors. We have music and singing and may get a gift from Santa. They really know how to make us feel good for a day. I hope the Rotarians know how much they are appreciated. If you’d like to go to any of these parties next

Olive McDonald SENIORS SCENE

year, look for phone numbers, or ask around to find a fellow senior who knows who to call. You just have to give your name. The parties are all free. Phone numbers are usually posted on community boards, or you could call the school for dates. So keep it in mind and try to come join us — especially if Christmas

is a lonely time for you. All you need is a good appetite. Another of my favourite things is to drive around town at night to see the Christmas lights. Burkeville is well worth a visit, as is Steveston, where the villagers put on a good show. Don’t miss the beautiful display at the corner of Fentiman Place and Garry Street, and Richmond City Hall is a joy to behold with its many brightly decorated trees. The highlight of my Christmas season so far was at the Steveston

chocolate. Come to the bazaar next year. You, too, may be lucky! One thing about the Christmas season is it’s busy, and, as we seniors know, the key to managing a busy schedule is pacing. For me, that means stopping at the Steveston Bakery for a bowl of soup, coffee and a treat — alright, an Eccles cake,

United Church annual bazaar on Nov. 16. I bought a ticket for the raffle as I planned to win the “everything chocolate” basket — and I did! My positive thinking worked. I proudly walked home through the village with the big, be-ribboned basket balanced on my walker, and whoever gave me a surprised look was told that it was full of

my favourite. The crisp pastry and the sugar will propel me home in no time at all. Whatever end of the village you are shopping in, there will be a place to rest your weary legs while you sup on a good cuppa. Olive McDonald is an active senior who lives in Steveston.

FILE PHOTO/CHUNG CHOW

The Rotary Club holds a seniors Christmas lunch at the Steveston Community Centre every December.

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A20 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

Community

Challenge faced by the sandwich generation While expecting our third son, my wife asked our secRichard ond born what he thought of his new role as middle child. Vetter He replied: “I’ll be the cream in the Oreo — everyone likes the cream!” Today’s sandwich genWEALTH eration is also like the Oreo cookie, sandwiched between children who haven’t quite flown the coop and parents who are perhaps beginning to need some help. There are valuable life lessons to learn at this stage, it’s a chance to teach the younger generation the value of family and to show gratitude to the older generation for all the work they did to get us to this stage. Having a positive mindset is critical. Although the juggling act is not easy,

there are ways to manage sandwich generation stress. The key strategy is to know what to expect, to prepare financially and to take care of yourself as well as your loved ones, especially the other side of the “Oreo” SMARTS — your children. As parents age, they may need a range of supportive services, perhaps involving home renovations to facilitate safe movement throughout the household when reduced mobility or disability become an issue. The next step may involve arranging home care, involving various health professionals, help with bathing, dressing, meal preparation, medication navigation and light housekeeping. For those over 65, 43 per cent will, at

some point, require long-term care and this may also involve moving into a retirement residence or long term care community. This is where the costs begin to mount. The range of care options varies, but can run to more than $5,000 per month for in-home care or for facility care. This can be a serious issue, especially where the senior is not quite ready to sell the family home yet. Rather than worrying about this, I’d recommend a pro-active approach. Have a family meeting and begin talking openly about the issues, perhaps involving your financial advisors in the discussion. It’s important to take an inventory of financial resources and expectations should long term care support be required. As part of the plan, consider the benefits of long term care insurance. In its simplest

form, this coverage provides a monthly cheque to offset the costs of in-home or facility care when a person cannot perform at least two of the six basic activities of daily living — i.e. bathing, eating, dressing, toileting, transferring position or maintaining continence. It’s important, of course, to be able to qualify for this coverage while you’re still healthy, so make sure to raise the issue with your financial advisor. As we face continued challenges in our public health care system, it’s important to look at ways of planning independently for quality health care in the senior years. The opinions expressed are those of Richard Vetter, BA, CFP, CLU, ChFC. Vetter is a certified financial planner and owner of WealthSmart Financial Group in Richmond (www.wealthsmart.ca).

Around Town Wednesday

The Richmond Hospice Association will put on a free presentation, Grief and the Holidays, on Wednesday, Dec. 4 at 7 p.m. at the Caring Place (Room 340, 7000 Minoru Blvd). The evening is hoping to bring solace

to those who have lost a loved one and are facing the first holiday without them. Register by calling 604-279-7140. CHIMO Community Services, the Canadian Federation of University Women Richmond and the Richmond Women’s

Resource Centre co-host the screening of Finding Dawn on Wednesday, Dec. 4 in recognition of the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence (until Dec. 10). The screening takes place at the Ralph Fisher Auditorium in Richmond Hospital from

6:30-9 p.m. Cherry Smiley from Indigenous Women Against the Sex Industry and Chris McDowell from Remember Our Sisters Everywhere will speak after the screening. The event is free. The Minoru Chapel Opera series closes

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its fall 2013 season on Wednesday, Dec. 4 with a concert by Vancouver Opera. The holiday concert features arias, duets and ensemble numbers. It takes place at Minoru Chapel, 6540 Gilbert Rd. Tickets can be purchased in advance or at the door. Call 604-276-4300 (quote #436308 for 2 p.m. show and #436358 for the 7 p.m. show). Admission is $20 for adults, $18 for students/seniors. The Richmond Public Library offers residents its latest digital service: eVideo @yourlibrary. Cardholders now have free access to a variety of online movies and television shows. Cardholders can borrow up to eight items a month, and can stream the videos on their computer or download them. The library is featuring an eVideo booth at Ironwood, Cambie and Steveston branches until Sunday, Dec. 8. For more information, visit any branch, call 604-231-6413 or visit www.yourlibrary. ca/hoopla.

Thursday

Financial Consultant Raman Gill from Desjardins Financial Independent Network will be hosting a free RESP workshop called Build Your Child’s Future on Thursday, Dec. 5 from 7–8 p.m. at the Brighouse (Main) Branch library in the 2nd floor Community Place, 7700 Minoru Gate. To register, visit any branch of Richmond Public Library, call 604231-6413 or register

online at www.yourlibrary. ca/progs. Quote program # 980. Richmond Fire-Rescue will be opening their doors to the community for the annual Lighting of the Fire Halls event until Friday, Dec. 6. People can meet Blaze, the mascot and local fire fighters, as well as learn about fire safety. The Hamilton Fire Station, 22451 Westminster Hwy., opens its doors on Thursday, Dec. 5 and the Shellmont Fire Station, 9400 No. 4 Rd., on Friday, Dec. 6. Both days are from 3:30-5 p.m. There’ll be refreshments, crafts and a bouncy castle. For more information, call 604-278-5131.

Friday

The Kwantlen Faculty Association will be hosting a National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women on Friday, Dec. 6 at noon. Ceremonies will take place at each campus, including in Richmond, 8771 Lansdowne Rd. The day coincides with the death of 14 young women tragically killed because of their gender at l’Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal. The Richmond Cultural Centre will hold a public forum on Senate Reform or Abolition on Friday, Dec. 6 from 7-8:45 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.) The purpose is to look at solutions. For more information, contact Doug Symons at 604-277-2674.


“Leave worry behind” www.carfixbc.ca on the Canada Line @ Lansdowne Station

The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A21

Sports

T H E

R I C H M O N D

N E W S Editorial enquiries? Please contact The Richmond News 5731 No.3 Road V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-998-3615 (ext: 3615) Fax: 604-270-2248 Email: mbooth@richmond-news.com

Richmond boxers ready to step into hometown ring B.C. Silver Gloves Boxing Championships will feature two cards of bouts this weekend at the Richmond Sports Club BY MARK BOOTH

mbooth@richmond-news.com

It’s never too late to chase your dream. Just ask Soheil Biniaz. On Saturday night, the 32-year-old will make his amateur boxing debut as part of the B.C. Silver Gloves Championships, which is being hosted this weekend by Lights Out Boxing at the Richmond Sports Club. Biniaz has always had a passion for the sport but never had the time to step in the ring. The construction worker has since found the right balance in his life to train three times a week. He has enough knowledge of the sport to even serve as a mentor to some of the club’s younger fighters. “My dad used to box and I have been a fan of boxing all my life,” explained Biniaz. “I offer them tips and encourage them on the whole idea of doing it at a young age. “It was my childhood dream (to step into the ring) but just never had the chance to. Even in my early 20s I was busy with work. Now I have the time and energy to do something I really wanted to do. (Laughing) my mom wants this to be my one and only fight but we will see how it goes. (Coach) Ken (McInnis) has 30 years of experience and told me I would do okay.” Biniaz is one of three Lights Out athletes fighting for the first time. Thomas Thiessen joined the club soon after graduating from McRoberts secondary in July. With about two months of hard training, the 17-year-old says he is ready to compete in front of his family and friends. “I have been a fan of marital arts since I was 12 and I have always thought of boxing as a classier sport,” said Thiessen who attends Kwantlen University. “It’s a good price (to join the club), a lot of fun and a great workout. It really has become my passion. “I wouldn’t be going into the ring if I wasn’t prepared for it. I don’t want to do

MARK BOOTH/RICHMOND NEWS

Lights Out Boxing will be well-represented this weekend when the local club hosts the B.C. Silver Gloves Championships at the Richmond Sports Club. Scheduled to compete include (left to right) Usman Shahzad, Soheil Biniaz and Thomas Thiessen. something half ass and I’m taking this seriously, especially knowing there will be people coming to watch me.” At 16, Usman Shahzad already has five bouts under his belt and shows plenty of promise. The Grade 11 student at McRoberts is scheduled to be taking on a fighter from Quesnel. “I want to take (boxing) as far as I can go,” smiled Shahzad. “I thought about other martial arts but this is real fighting with your hands and there is a lot more competition out

there. I love to train and just getting into the ring each time.” The B.C. Silver Gloves is for fighters with less than 10 amateur bouts. Lights Out Boxing coach and event organizer Ken McInnis is expecting about 15 bouts each day with clubs from as far away as Williams Lake and Nanaimo being represented. “We will have some open (experienced) boxers on the card too,” explained McInnis. “That’s just the way it these days. There are some good fighters in B.C. right now. Six

went to youth nationals and three came back with gold. That hasn’t happened in a long time.” The B.C. Silver Gloves Championships takes place at the Richmond Sports Club — #150-2251 No. 5 Road. The card gets underway at 7 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $20 for each day and are available at the door. For more information on the show or the Lights Out Boxing Club and its program, call Ken McInnis at 604-754-8658.

Wozney hat trick leads Sockeyes to easy win over Mission Saturday night home games suit the Richmond Sockeyes just fine. Playing a rare weekend tilt at Minoru Arena, the Sockeyes cruised to a 9-3 victory over the Mission City Outlaws. Richmond struck for five goals in the open-

ing 20 minutes and never looked back in recording its 13th win of the season to pull within six points of Tom Shaw Conference leaders Delta with three games in hand. Richmond Minor product Jacob Wozney led the way with a hat trick. Liam

for the win. The Sockeyes return to their regular Thursday night home slot when the Abbotsford Pilots visit at 7 p.m. The teams are also slated to meet in Abbtsford on Dec. 13

Lawson added two goals and one assist, while Dominic Centis, Mac Colasimone, Nicholas Patey and John Wesley also scored. Captain Adam Nishi chipped in with three assists. Kurt Russell made 17 stops

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A22 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

Sports SENIOR BOYS VOLLEYBALL

Sharks cap great season with fourth place at provincials BY MARK BOOTH

mbooth@richmond-news.com

MARK BOOTH/RICHMOND NEWS

Richmond slipped past Delta 9-8 in U14 Lower Mainland Ringette League action last week at the Richmond Ice Centre.

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Steveston-London Sharks senior boys volleyball team capped its best season in school history with a fourth place finish at the Provincial AAA Championships in Kelowna. The Sharks finished exactly where they were ranked much of the season, after falling 3-0 (30-28, 25-21, 25-22) to Kelowna’s Mt Boucherie on Saturday afternoon. The two schools had met three weeks earlier at the Thompson Rivers University Tournament in Kamloops where StevestonLondon came away victorious. “They have improved a lot over the last couple of weeks,” said Sharks coach Edmond Mah. “They also had a 6-foot-8 guy who was a tough match-up for us.” The Sharks opened the tournament on Wednesday by going 1-2 in power pool play which determined the final seedings heading into the playoff round. They opened with a 2-0 (22-25, 16-25) loss to Earl Marriott, then got past Kelowna 2-1 (25-15, 20-25, 19-17) before falling 2-0 (22-25, 2025) to Mt Boucherie. The Lower Mainland zone champions then moved onto the round of 16 where they made short work of David Thompson

(25-22, 25-16, 25-13). A 3-1 (21-25, 25-17, 25-14, 25-17) quarter-final win over Dover Bay set the stage the fifth meeting of the season with Earl Marriott. The Sharks hung tough with the South Surrey school but it was still the same result as the four previous encounters with the Mariners prevailing 3-0 (25-22, 25-21, 25-21). Marriott went on to defeat Kelowna in three games to capture the provincial title. “We played very well again and some of the games were really close,” said Ma. “The difference was their size. They have one guy who is 6-foot-6 and even their setter is 6-foot-7. We just have a real hard time matching up with that.” The Sharks still came away with plenty of hardware led by Grade 12 twin standouts Ethan and Gabriel Freund being named first team all-stars. Mitchell Jesson was an honourable mention. “Mitchell really stepped up his game,” added Ma. “He is normally a libero but had to play left side and played very well for us.” The Sharks roster also includes: Nicholas Chan, Adrian Cheng, Max Kwan, Sam Lee, Xing Tian Li, Eric Mo, Jack Murakami, Zachery Pang, Isaac Sy, Lenny Tabakman and Marcus Yeung.

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Spend $50 or more and get a FREE Steveston boat 4GB flash drive to store your holiday memories.

RICHMOND’S FINEST DESTINATION FOR ALL YOUR SOCCER NEEDS SPORTSTOWN SOCCER SHOP

4991 No. 5 Road (between Westminster Hwy. & Cambie Rd.) 604-273-7366 www.sportstownbc.com

Join the Sportstown Soccer Shop group on Facebook & “Like” our Sportstown BC page at www.facebook.com/sportstownbc.

Tourism Richmond Visitor Centre and Post Office is located in Steveston at Moncton and First Avenue. Hours of operation: Monday - Saturday 9:30am - 5:00pm; Sunday noon - 4:00pm tourismrichmond.com/visitorcentre *Spend $50 or more (before tax) on any product/service at the Steveston Visitor Centre/Post Offices before Dec 13th to receive your free 4GB flash drive. Quantities limited, no cash value, only one bonus offer per person per day. While supplies last.


The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A23

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A26 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

Browns Socialhouse is proud to support the 4th Annual Presented by:

RAISING THE BAR FOR EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER SERVICE IN RICHMOND

Congratulations to:

Balwinder Brar On Sunday December 8th, 2013 bring in a pair of NEW kids PJ’s, robes or slippers (newborn to 16yrs old) + we’ll take 50% off* your food bill. Help support your local Christmas Bureau in the community! “ I look forward to seeing Balwinder during my stays at the Days Inn in Richmond. She always ensures that my room is ready and made up to her high standards. Thanks!”

For more details, visit our Facebook page facebook.com/The.Christmas.Pyjama.Drive Susan Pun, Balwinder Brar, Tracy Lakeman

The monthly and annual Service Awards recognize people, businesses or companies who demonstrate outstanding service or hospilality

Enjoy a Lions Winter Ale for only $5 a sleeve during #YESvember. As part of their #YESvember promotion which supports community causes, Granville Island Brewing is donating 10¢ from the purchase of each Lions Winter Ale at Browns Socialhouse to support the Christmas Pyjama Drive.

www.richmondserviceawards.com PARTNERS *Bring in a minimum of 1 pair of PJ’s per 2 people + you receive 50% off your food bill on December 8th, 2013 only. Not valid with any other promotional offers. No cash value. Valid at participating Browns Socialhouse locations.


The Richmond News December 4, 2013 A27 ®

SPEND $200, EARN

100 BONUS

300 BONUS

AIR MILES® reward miles*

AIR MILES® reward miles*

*With coupon and a minimum $100 Safeway grocery purchase made in single transaction.

9

Coupon valid from December 6 - 8, 2013

00000 51133

Coupon valid from December 6 - 8, 2013 Limit one Bonus Offer per transaction. Purchase must be made in a single transaction. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. AIR MILES® coupons cannot be combined with any other discount offer or AIR MILES® coupon offer including Customer Appreciation Day & Senior’s Day. Not valid at Safeway Liquor Stores. Coupon excludes prescriptions, diabetes merchandise, insulin pumps, insulin pump supplies, blood pressure monitors, tobacco, transit passes, gift cards, enviro levies, bottle deposits and sales tax. Other exclusions apply. Please see Customer Service for complete list of exclusions. Cashiers: Scan the coupon only once to activate the Bonus Offer. Do not scan more than once.

®TMTrademarks ofAIR MILES InternationalTrading B.V.Used under license by LoyaltyOne,Co.and Safeway.

Limit one Bonus Offer per transaction. Purchase must be made in a single transaction. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. AIR MILES® coupons cannot be combined with any other discount offer or AIR MILES® coupon offer including Customer Appreciation Day & Senior’s Day. Not valid at Safeway Liquor Stores. Coupon excludes prescriptions, diabetes merchandise, insulin pumps, insulin pump supplies, blood pressure monitors, tobacco, transit passes, gift cards, enviro levies, bottle deposits and sales tax. Other exclusions apply. Please see Customer Service for complete list of exclusions. Cashiers: Scan the coupon only once to activate the Bonus Offer. Do not scan more than once.

0

3DAYSONLY!DEC.6-8,2013!

*With coupon and a minimum $200 Safeway grocery purchase made in single transaction.

0

9

BonusAIRMILES® rewardmiles*

00000 51133

earn up to

SPEND $100, EARN

®TMTrademarks ofAIR MILES InternationalTrading B.V.Used under license by LoyaltyOne,Co.and Safeway.

300 ®

®

Turkey P Starts Toricing day!

TUGRRKADEEYA S

Under 7 kg . Fr WEEKLY H ozen. O LIMIT ONE USEHOLD . With minim um purchase of Dec. 4 thru $50.00. Dec. 12.

/lb. 2.18/kg

7 DAYS OF

SUPER COUPONS

SUPER COUPON

Nabob Coffee

Assorted varieties. 915 to 930 g. HOUSEHOLD LIMIT TWO Combined varieties.

SUPER COUPON

Big Tin !

99

6

Russet Potatoes

10 lb. Bag. Product of Canada,U.S.A. No. 1 Grade. HOUSEHOLD LIMIT TWO BAGS.

ea.

EXTREM PRICE O S NLY!

E

7 DAY PRICE CLUB

SUPER COUPON

10 lb. Bag !

99

2

ea.

EXTREM PRICE NLY! O 7 DAYS E CLUB PR

Safeway Farms Peeled Carrots

E

¢

99

454 g. HOUSEHOLD LIMIT THREE.

ea.

EXTREM PRICE ! LY N O S

7 DAY PRICE

IC

CLUB

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013

Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

®

SUPER COUPON Nature Valley Granola Bars Or General Mills Cereal Treats. Assorted varieties. 120 to 230 g. HOUSEHOLD LIMIT FOUR - Combined varieties.

®

00000 54470

0

2

0

SUPER COUPON Pantry Essentials Sliced Side Bacon

$

4for

YS ON 7 DAPRI CE

500 g.

99

2

$

2for

ea.

! YS ONLY 7 DAPRI CE

LY!

CLUB

Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

00000 54469

0

6

00000 54372

Or Chocolate, White, or Black Forest. 1/2 slab.

Or Assorted varieties. 907 to 1134 g.

!

00000 54435

1

9

ea.

LY!

YS ON 7 DAPRI CE

0

00000 54361

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013 Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

0

3

00000 54362

0

SUPER COUPON Herbal Essences

2

300 mL. Or Styling Products. Select varieties and sizes. LIMIT SIX Combined varieties.

5

! YS ONLY 7 DAPRI CE

!

CLUB

CLUB PRI

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013 Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

00000 54387

$

3for

en. per doz retail r Regula $15.99

0

LY!

CLUB

$ OFF

CLUB PRI

5

149

ea.

Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

LY 7 DAYSCEON

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013

00000 54437

1

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013

SUPER COUPON Premium Rose Dozen

129

Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

0

Assorted varieties. 150 g.

99

YS ON 7 DAPRI CE

6

LY! 7 DAYSCEON

CLUB PRI

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013 Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

0

00000 54373

0

6

SUPER COUPON Open Nature Wafer Thins

CLUB

Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

9

9 199 LY 7 DAYSCEON

5

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013

SUPER COUPON Artisan Entertaining Cheesecake Sampler

SUPER COUPON Bakery Counter Carrot Valu Cake

Assorted varieties. 100 g.

CLUB

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013

00000 54498

0

SUPER COUPON Deli Counter Rice Crackers

! YS ONLY 7 DAPRI CE

CLUB

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013

0

®

3

SUPER COUPON The Butcher’s Cut Beef Sausage

500 g.

6

00000 54501

E

3

COUPON VALID DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013 Limit one coupon per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other discount coupon. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Purchase must be made in a single transaction.

0

Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Wednesday, December 4 through Thursday, December 12, 2013 only. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stocks last. Actual items may vary slig htly from illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Co. and Safeway. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is defined by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the specified advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

00000 54355

2

DECEMBER 4

5

WED THUR

6

7

8

FRI

SAT

SUN

9

10 11 12

MON TUES WED THURS

Prices in this ad good until DEC. 12TH.


A28 December 4, 2013 The Richmond News

Steveston Village #105-12231 1st Ave (On Bayview beside Waves Coffee House)

604-284-5212 info@blissgifts.net www.blissgifts.net

@BlissSteveston

.com/BlissSteveston

BLISS HOLIDAY HOURS (Dec 1 – 23) MONDAY - TUESDAY WEDNESDAY - FRIDAY

10 AM – 6 PM 10 AM – 7:30PM

SATURDAY

10 AM – 6 PM

SUNDAY

10 AM – 5 PM

DEC 24 (CHRISTMAS EVE): 10 AM – 4 PM CLOSED DEC 25 & 26 FREE PARKING*

*There is no need to circle around the block when you shop with us this Holiday Season; We will cover 1HR of pay parking (up to $3) when you spend $30+ during your visit. Bring in your parking receipt and we will put it towards your purchase. (Large pay parking lot located at the corner of 1st Ave and Bayview)

Sterling silver charms from $29

Free PANDORA Ornament with $150 purchase of PANDORA Jewellery.* November 30–December 8 *Receive a PANDORA holiday ornament (a $25 CDN retail value) with your PANDORA purchase of $150 or more. Before taxes. While supplies last, limit one per customer. See store for details.

Discover the new

LIMITED EDITION “Let it Snow” Charm* Available starting November 29, the Limited Edition 2013 Black Friday charm* *While supplies last. See store for details.

Forget sugar plums. DREAM ABOUT PANDORA.

INTRODUCING THE WINTER 2013 COLLECTION FEATURING THE SNOW ANGEL DANGLE EXCLUSIVELY AT SELECT PANDORA DEALERS


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Blundell Centre Merchants

Richmond News December 4 2013  

Richmond News December 4 2013

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