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It was a sunny afternoon and plenty of people were playing along the West Dyke Trail. Alexander Ponomaryov, of Burnaby, and Timur Sorokin, of Coquitlam, were having a great time tossing rocks and hunks of dirt into the water on the trail at Blundell.

City joins in to pressure feds for housing strategy Coun. Linda Barnes advocates “Fixing Canada’s Housing Crunch” campaign

BY YVONNE ROBERTSON

yrobertson@richmond-news.com

Affordable housing creates a ripple effect of benefits — cutting costs in health care, public safety and other sectors. Despite this proven fact, the federal government has failed to develop a national housing strategy since it was nixed in the mid-1990s. In the latest effort to get the Conservatives to adopt a strategy, Richmond city councillor Linda Barnes will recommend the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) campaign at Tuesday night’s planning committee meeting. The campaign, Fixing Canada’s Housing Crunch, launched last week and calls on the federal government and all political parties to work with provincial, territorial and municipal leaders, as well as the private sector, to

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develop a credible long-term housing plan. “The Conservative government is all about fiscal responsibility,” said Barnes. “It’s been proven that affordable housing reduces the costs in other areas.” More However, today’s Conservatives about camhave been increasingly criticized paign, for putting their ideology ahead of crisis facts and empirical evidence when it comes to policy-making. It has many people questioning whether they will listen to calls for such a strategy — especially since the original strategy was cut under a Liberal, and arguably more socially conscious, government. “You know, I’m ever hopeful that they will listen,” said Barnes. “I think it’s more likely with a campaign such as this. They’ll see

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it’s a broad-based, concerted effort from the ground up.” This is the first time the federal municipalities have come together in one campaign, according to Barnes. The City of Richmond claims to have affordable housing as one of its highest priorities, but without the financial support of senior governments, the money put toward its initiatives aren’t enough, said Barnes. Developers must contribute to either an affordable housing fund or their developments need to incorporate affordable housing units. The fund, which almost has $9.5 million, is used to build units that are mixed with other developments, said Barnes, so they aren’t segregated.

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The recent rezoning proposal of the Sportstown facility in Richmond has the developer promising to provide $1 million for the city’s leisure facilities reserve fund, while only $279,000 goes into the affordable housing fund. “We encourage developers to put in as much as possible, but we look at each application individually,” said Barnes. “With that particular one, it has always been providing facilities for a number of leisure activities. I’m assuming staff felt since it was already providing this, it should continue to do so in the future.” Although Barnes agrees the city has a responsibility to help provide affordable housing, it can’t go it alone. see Canada page 4

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A2 November 6, 2013 The Richmond News

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The Richmond News November 6, 2013 A3

$80m pool, senior centre to shift westward INTERACTIVE PRINT

Plan means no closures, pavilion to be demolished, baseball diamond turns multi-use

old Minoru Sports Pavilion would be incorporated within the new building, The proposed new combined aquatic and but the pavilion itself will seniors centre has been moved to a new locabe demolished. tion, but still in the Minoru precinct. The new direction, up The near $80 million project looks in price from $65 set to be built immediately to the west For a million in June link of the current Minoru running track, on to $79.6 million to the this week, was top of the “Minoru 2” artificial turf socreport presented among cer field and pavilion. Earlier this year, city council was four options to city considering simply rebuilding the council on Monday. Minoru pool and seniors centre on their curDespite the near $15 rent sites. However, that plan was deemed million increase, many on IMAGE SUBMITTED unworkable due to disruption to services and council were surprised the The combined aquatic and seniors centre is now proposed to be safety factors. option — approved unanibuilt immediately to the west of the current Minoru running track. The artificial soccer field lost to the new mously — wasn’t given to facilities — a 68,000 square foot aquatic them earlier this year. Aquatic Services Board, was also in strong centre and 33,000 square foot seniors centre “I’m very much in favour of this option, support of the new site, while Coun. Bill — would slide directly north, along with the it provides no disruption to services, that’s McNulty urged city staff to consider an grass field, to where the baseball diamond sits. huge,” said Coun. Derek Dang. see McNulty page 4 The facilities offered by the near 50-yearIan MacLeod, chair of the Richmond BY ALAN CAMPBELL

acampbell@richmond-news.com

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Former Boyd football star charged with sex assault BY SUE MONTGOMERY The Province

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Join the discussion on www.richmond-news.com.

A former high school football star from Richmond is among three members of McGill University’s football team facing sexual assault charges. Brenden Carriere will be in a Quebec Court next month for a preliminary hearing on charges of sexual assault with a weapon and forcible confinement of a former Concordia University student. Carriere played for the Hugh Boyd Trojans between 2006 and 2009 and was named junior provincial MVP in 2006. The students, in their fourth year at McGill, were charged 15 months ago and continue to play for the McGill Redmen this season, according to the university’s website. The victim in the case was not able to return to school after the alleged attack and ultimately left Montreal. She is now living and studying in another province. The university claims it only learned of the

incident in May. The Montreal she wasn’t a McGill student, so there Gazette contacted McGill in the was no way for us to know about weeks following the alleged attack in it,” he said in an interview Thursday. September 2011. “Right now, all we know is that there Carriere, Ian Sheriff of Toronto, was an alleged incident involving and Guillaume Tremblay of Calgary McGill students.” were all arrested April 26, 2012, in He said the university will wait for connection with the alleged attack on the outcome of the judicial process Sept. 9, 2011. They were arraigned before deciding whether the three Brenden Carriere July 4, 2012. students should be charged under the The night of the alleged attack, the students’ code of conduct. woman and a friend went to a bar where they met One option for students who violate the code is two of the three accused men. The women went expulsion, he confirmed. back to the players’ apartment. That’s when they But by the time the case goes to trial and were allegedly joined by the third football player. there’s a verdict, the three football players will The victim woke up about six hours later with probably have graduated. little recollection of what had happened. Dyens, who has been deputy provost three In the following days, as her memory returned, months, said that after the students were arrested, she went to police to report she had been sexually they told their coach, who advised them to tell assaulted, the victim’s family told The Gazette. their parents and get a lawyer. McGill’s deputy provost of student life and The present coach of the team, Clinton Uttley, learning, Olivier Dyens, said the university only said he wasn’t coach when the alleged incident learned about the charges in May. happened. “It didn’t happen on the McGill campus and For more stories, go to www.theprovince.com.

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A4 November 6, 2013 The Richmond News

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Continued from page 1 “Housing is an issue that has traditionally been a federal mandate and they’ve abdicated that responsibility,” said Barnes. “So anything we can do to remind them of that is worth it.” Canada is the only G8 country without a national housing plan. Estimates for the country’s homeless population range from 150,000-300,000. On top of that, one in four Canadians is paying more than they can afford for housing causing the mortgage debt held by Canadians

to stand at just over $1.1 trillion, according to the campaign. This also puts the national economy at risk. As Canadians are being priced out of the housing market, rental buildings only account for about 10 per cent of new construction. “Compounding these problems is the coming expiry of $1.7 billion annually in federal affordable housing dollars with the greatest drop in funding, $500 million a year, ending between 2014 and 2019,” wrote the campaign’s press release.

McNulty: Wants Olympic-size pool Continued from page 3 Olympic-sized pool when it comes to out-fitting the new facility. The city’s major capital project team lead, Laurie Bachynski, told McNulty and the rest of council that the scope and layout within the new building can easily be changed during the public consultation and design phase next year. If the project goes ahead as expected, the aforementioned consultation could be in 2014 and subsequent construction could begin in 2015 with a 2017 completion. The option favoured by staff and council has: $69.8 million going toward the combined aquatic and seniors centre; $3.7 million to incorporate the pavilion; $5.7 million to relocate the fields; $0.4 million for temporary washrooms.

Any work to relocate the soccer fields would be carried out during the off-season, said city staff. However, baseball on the current diamond at Minoru, which will converted to a multi-use feild for both soccer and baseball, would be sacrificed for the 2014 season. The current Minoru pool and seniors centre buildings would be demolished under the plan, leaving a number of options for site usage open to the city. Among suggestions from staff, council and the public are additional parking and green space. To help pay for the new facilities — as well as a new $22 million Firehall No. 1 just west of the proposed pool — city council has agreed to borrow more than $50 million at what city staff say are very attractive lending rates.

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The Richmond News November 6, 2013 A5

News

MLA expenses topped $30,000

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Richmond veteran Linda Reid came in fourth

MLAs’ travel expenses involve several components, including a set allowance for travel within their constituency based Some B.C. MLAs racked up more than on how large their riding is, a housing $30,000 in travel expenses during the past allowance to help them afford a place in six months while others barely Victoria, and a per diem for cracked $3,000, according to every day they spend in the new figures released this week capital. by the Legislature. MLAs are also allowed to Not surprisingly, the data expense the cost of travelling suggest MLAs in large, remote around the province and can ridings have the most expenses bring along a travel companwhile those whose ridings are ion for up to 12 trips a year. near Victoria have the lowest. An all-party committee Doug Donaldson, NDP agreed last year to begin MLA for Stikine, had the releasing more details on highest expenses overall at MLA expenses after a damnMLA Linda Reid $33,202, followed closely by ing report by auditor-general Liberal MLAs Terry Lake John Doyle found significant (Kamloops-North Thompson) at $33,147 deficiencies in how MLA expenses had and Pat Pimm (Peace River North) at been tracked and reported. $31,604. An interactive graphic at vancouverLinda Reid, Liberal MLA for sun.com breaks down the travel expenses Richmond East, came in fourth at for each MLA by category. $30,771, but more than a third of her For more stories, go to www.vancouexpenses involved travel duties related to versun.com her role as Speaker.

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BY CHAD SKELTON The Vancouver Sun

www.westrichmondsmiles.com MONDAY - FRIDAY 10AM - 6PM

604-241-0707

Wrong turn sends car into river BY MATTHEW ROBINSON The Vancouver Sun

A man took an unexpected dip Monday night after he drove his car into the Fraser River, according to Richmond Fire-Rescue. The driver, who was not from the Lower Mainland and was unfamiliar with the area, simply took a wrong turn while driving on Dyke Road near Graybar Road and plunged his car into the river, said Gord Graebel, the on-duty battalion chief. “He must have gone right when he should have gone left,” said Graebel. The man was able to get out of the car, but it is not clear whether he opened the

door or broke a window. Once he made it to shore in East Richmond, an ambulance arrived and he was treated for exposure to the cold. Meanwhile, the car continued to float downstream with the current and eventually submerged and grounded itself on the bottom. The man told emergency responders that he was alone in the car when it went in, but a coast guard dive team went down to make sure. “We wanted to do our due diligence,” said Graebel. There were no injuries reported. For more stories, go to www.vancouversun.com

Steveston off-ramp to be extended BY ALAN CAMPBELL

acampbell@richmond-news.com

Work will get underway this month to lengthen the northbound Steveston offramp on Highway 99. The provincial government claims the move will improve the flow of traffic exiting the Massey Tunnel northbound. The off-ramp will be lengthened by approximately 650 metres to 1,100 metres, increasing the offramp’s vehicle capacity, in a bid to alleviate congestion on the highway by removing more cars from the Highway 99 queue. A $1.2-million contract has been awarded to Jacob Bros. Construction of Surrey for the work.

Construction is expected to begin in early November, with completion scheduled for May 2014. The B.C. government said the work is a temporary move to hopefully improve safety and reduce Highway 99 congestion for motorists until the replacement for the Massey Tunnel is completed. “During our consultation on this project in the year since the George Massey Tunnel replacement was first announced, we heard that this improvement was a high priority for the short term,” Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Todd Stone said in a press release. “It will provide some relief for the 80,000 vehicles per day that use this cross-

ing while we work on the permanent solution.”

Constituency Office 300 - 8120 Granville Ave., Richmond, BC, V6Y 1P3 Phone: (604) 775-0754 teresa.wat.mla@leg.bc.ca

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I had the pleasure of participating in the Richmond Hospital Foundation’s Community Cares Day 2013. More than 100 volunteers participated in the event, many of them braving the heavy rain to wave signs outside to raise awareness. Since founded in 1987, Richmond Hospital Foundation has raised over $40 million towards improving local healthcare. The foundation is dedicated to serving our diverse and growing community. Richmond Hospital Foundation works closely with hospital leadership, as well as our doctors, nurses, and health care teams to ensure donations are directed to areas of greatest need. Recently, on October 26th, I also had the pleasure of attending the Richmond Centre for Disability’s Annual Fundraising Gala at the River Rock Casino right here in Richmond. The Richmond Centre for Disability (RCD) is not-for-profit, disability-led and community-based, providing service to entire communities on disability issues. In Richmond, we are so fortunate to have such dedicated organizations working hard every day for our community; I would like to give my most sincere gratitude to the volunteers and staff who continue to make such a positive impact in our community.

Teresa Wat MLA Richmond Centre

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A6 November 6, 2013 The Richmond News

News

HAMILTON

Richmond’s forgotten ’hood BY GRAEME WOOD Special to the News

GRAEME WOOD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

Agnes Shinkarik (left) stands next to her friend and produce supplier Susan Ng.

When the Richmond News published a special feature on 17 neighbourhoods in Richmond on Oct. 23, the reaction was largely positive and appreciative. The only problem was the feature didn’t included Hamilton. The neighbourhood may as well have been located in Southern Ontario or some kind of magical land of wizards. “I opened the newspaper and said, ‘We’re not even on the map!’” exclaimed Agnes Shinkarik, describing her moment

Richmond Remembers

Monday, November 11

Take some time to remember our brave veterans at the Remembrance Day service at Richmond City Hall, 6911 No. 3 Road. 10:20 a.m.:

Military parade starts marching from Minoru Park toward the Richmond City Hall cenotaph.

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Approx. noon: Free public reception begins in City Hall Galleria. Everyone is invited. New this year, Richmond’s Remembrance Day service will be simulcast into City Hall Council Chambers. Everyone is welcome inside but space is limited. First seating preference will be given to those who may not be able to stand outside for the duration of the service. For more information, please contact 604-276-4000.

of rejection. As Shinkarik noted in her subsequent letter to the editor, she is one of about 5,100 Hamilton residents. But, so what? Well, the News visited this sleepy community last weekend and it turns out there are a lot of nice people living there and, yes, they are Richmondites, triedand-true. For a video Hamilton is where Westminster of Hamilton’s Highway is a quiet two-lane road, off-leash dog River Road ends unceremoniously park and street signs are their familiar green with white trim. The neighbourhood has two distinct areas: One where relatively new modern homes are tightly packed into a square subdivision and the other where older homes — some still on septic tank services — hide beneath tall trees and large front lawns lined with ditches. Both are served by the recently renovated and expanded Hamilton Community Centre where people meet and play. Born of homes built under the Veteran’s Land Act, eponymous school board trustee Alexander Hamilton founded the neighbourhood’s first school in 1936, which is now attached to the community centre. But despite the similarities to other parts of Richmond, let’s be honest: It’s still easy to miss Hamilton. Unless, of course, you take a wrong exit from highways 91 or 91A. Even Shinkarik admits this. “Most people don’t know where it is. I have to say, ‘You know the Walmart in Queensborough.’ “Either you’re here because you’re lost or you live here,” joked the mother of two and Hamilton resident of four years. Shinkarik cites the area’s quietness and affordability as two major reasons she enjoys living in Hamilton. She also enjoys its accessibility given its central location to several other municipalities. “My neighbours are really nice. Within two days we knew everyone.…We actually talk to our neighbours and know their names,” added Shinkarik. The one problem Shinkarik said she does encounter is a local place to shop. With so few people living in such a remote area, the local PriceSmart closed two years ago at Bridgeview Centre shopping plaza. It caused a fury in the community and underscored the city’s desire to densify Hamilton. According to the city’s Official Community Plan, increasing the population to at least 10,000 is required to support a more robust shopping centre. Updated densification proposals could see as many as 17,000 residents within 20 years. Shinkarik’s favourite local place to shop for produce is, in fact, in Queensborough, Hamilton’s rival community on Lulu Island’s peninsula, but a critical component to its residents’ livability. At Yin Leong Farms is where Shinkarik met 66-yearold owner Susan Ng, who, after arriving from Hong Kong in 1969, farmed in Hamilton for six years until moving to Queensborough to accommodate her four children in a larger home. To get to Ng’s produce stand, one must drive underneath the 91A East-West Connector, a strip of road Ng and Hamiltonites are not too fond of. see Townhouses page 7

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The Richmond News November 6, 2013 A7

News

GRAEME WOOD SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

Float homes in Annacis Channel along Dyke Road offer a unique way of living in Hamilton. The homes are connected to Richmond’s water and sewer systems and owners pay property taxes.

Townhouses: Taken from ALR Continued from page 6 “It’s a mess,” said Ng before speaking for minutes on end about how complicated the highway interchange is and how its construction has shaped the Hamilton and Queensborough communities. “You have to be very mindful of traffic. You have to listen to the traffic radio station,” added Shinkarik. Ng recalls a much simpler time on her three-acre plot, before freeways plowed their way through. “I remember the bushes at the back of the farm and then (after moving) I turned around and I don’t believe it: They built the townhouses,” said Ng, speaking of the major housing developments that replaced family farms like hers in the late 1980s. Such land was controversially taken from the Agricultural Land Reserve as a so-called exception in order to increase the neighbourhood’s original population so that it could support a school and businesses. Ergo, between 1991 and 2001, Hamilton’s population ballooned from about 800 to 4,100, according to the city. Ng recalled that in the 1970s Japanese fishermen docked their vessels in Annacis Channel and women fixed

nets on a daily basis along Dyke Road. Today, million-dollar homes with yacht docks can be bought adjacent to the bridge that connects to Annacis Island, and not too far down the road is a unique row of float homes that offers perhaps the most unique living experience in Richmond proper. While the fishing industry has declined on the river, Annacis Channel remains a bustling venue for industry, which serves as backdoor entertainment for float home residents like Eric Urquhart, who lives with his wife in one of six strata float homes at “Floatville.” “We’re living on the beach, you can see the seagulls and the swans and we’ve got eagles and a beaver that swims by. We’re living in a park!” bursted Urquhart, who technically has an address on Dyke Road. “I call this road Number Nine and Three Quarters Road,” he said, alluding to Harry Potter’s platform and his home’s hidden nature. Not far down the road is Tugboat Annie’s Pub and Restaurant, the neighbourhood’s riverfront watering hole where you can enjoy a pint and a burger and, appropriately enough, watch tugboats go by.

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A8 November 6, 2013 The Richmond News

Opinion T H E

Published every Wednesday & Friday by the Richmond News, a member of the Glacier Media Group. 5731 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-270-8031 Fax: 604-270-2248 www.richmond-news.com

EDITORIAL OPINION

Publisher: Gary Hollick ghollick@ richmond-news.com

Editor: Eve Edmonds editor@richmond-news.com Sports: Mark Booth mbooth@ richmond-news.com Reporters: Alan Campbell acampbell@ richmond-news.com Yvonne Robertson yrobertson@ richmond-news.com Philip Raphael praphael@ richmond-news.com

Director of Advertising: Rob Akimow rakimow@ richmond-news.com Sales Representatives: Shaun Dhillon sdhillon@richmond-news.com Stephen Murphy smurphy@ richmond-news.com Angela Nottingham anottingham@ richmond-news.com Lori Kininmont lkininmont@ richmond-news.com Lee Fruhstorfer lfruhstorfer@ richmond-news.com Danny Cheng dcheng@ richmond-news.com Georgia Storey gstorey@ richmond-news.com Digital Sales: Olivia Hui ohui@ glaciermedia.ca Sales Support: Kelly Christian kchristian@ richmond-news.com Administration:

Joyce Ang jang@richmond-news.com

Delivery: 604-942-3081 distribution@richmond-news. com Classified: 604-630-3300 Fax: 604-630-4500 classified@van.net The Richmond News is a member of the Glacier Media Group. The News respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at www.richmond-news.com. The Richmond News is also a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulartory body. The council considers complaints from the public about conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint, contact the council. Your written concern with documentation should be sent to 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. www.bcpresscouncil.org.

R I C H M O N D

N E W S

Patrons not saints

W

e have character, just like Ben Stewart! Just sayin’ — in case our premier has any other $150,000 jobs in Asia waiting to be filled without notice. Unfortunately, we don’t speak Mandarin, Cantonese or any other Asian language, but apparently that is not a requirement to be B.C.’s trade commissioner in China. Having character and Christy Clark’s telephone number are more important. Stewart stepped aside in June so Clark could run in his safe B.C. Liberal riding of Westside-Kelowna. No inducements necessary, according to Clark, because Stewart had so much darned character. It is surely not coincidence that just four months later, Stewart — a winery operator by trade — is best suited for a brand new trade and investment portfolio. It’s not the worst patronage appointment ever dispensed, but it serves as a closer-to-home illustration of why rewarding political allies may not get you the best man or woman for the job. Take the Canadian Senate — please — where the government of the day appoints loyalists, not independent thinkers, to the chamber of sober, second thought. The best thing about the ongoing expenses scandal featuring Stephen Harper appointees, Mike Duffy, Pamela Wallin and Patrick Brazeau, is that Canadians have finally noticed they are paying 105 political appointees to feed at the public trough. Whatever happens to them and the prime minister’s deniability, polls show the status quo won’t stand. Opinion is split between abolition and reform, with a court ruling expected on the former. Either way, the public’s regard for politics is always tarnished by patronage.

CHOICE WORDS

Where did Halloween go? The Editor, My wife and I have lived in Richmond for about 10 years now and we’ve noticed a sharp decline in the number of kids coming to our house to trick-or-treat. From speaking with other friends in the community, it seems we’re not alone. In thinking that it might be a wider trend, I asked my brother in Squamish, and my father in Victoria, but they confirmed Halloween is still very much alive and well in their communities. Every year, we decorate, carve a pumpkin, buy lots of candy and rush home from work looking forward to having the smiling kids come by in their costumes. But every year, the number of knocks continue to decrease (only five times this year). I can’t imagine it’s due to parents being concerned with big city safety issues, as kids don’t go out alone, and the young ones would certainly have their parents with them. I have heard of a trend whereby parents are taking their kids to the malls where stores hand out candy. If that’s the case, how sad is that? When I was kid, Halloween was one of my favourite holidays. I used to dress up, deal with the weather, feel a little scared hearing all the fireworks in the distance, and push on. It was always an “experience,” and I feel sad that the kids in our community are losing out on that. Jim Bennett Richmond

Letters policy The editor reserves the right to edit letters for brevity, clarity, legality and good taste. Letters must include the author’s telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters.

Send letters to The Editor, Richmond News, 5731 No. 3 Road Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Fax: 604-270-2248 or e-mail: editor@richmond-news.com

Fraser Health funding isn’t enough

Governments like to release bad news on Fridays and a prime example of that was last week’s announcement that the Fraser Health Authority was in trouble. Of course, the official news release didn’t actually frame it in those words. Instead, it said that Health Minister Terry Lake was “directing a strategic and operational review” of Fraser Health, and it was a review designed to “assist” the health authority. But the key line that was buried in the news release was this: “It is anticipated Fraser Health will require additional funding from the ministry of health to meet its service requirements.” I hate to be one of the “I told you so” types, but there are many of us who predicted back in February the funding increase for the health care system was well short of what was required just to maintain the status quo when it comes to service delivery. The funding lift was about $620 million, which brought the overall health ministry budget to $16.5 billion. But as large as the funding increase was, it was significantly lower than previous years’ increases. A number of observers concluded the health care system was underfunded by at least $250 million, and said there were going to be inevitable cuts i. And that is exactly what seems to happening, at least in the Fraser Health region, which is the fastest growing of all the health authorities.

Keith Baldrey IN THE HOUSE

It serves more than 1.6 million people in an area that extends from Burnaby to Boston Bar. To be clear, spending gobs more money on health care isn’t necessarily a good thing. B.C. has the country’s best health “outcomes” in a variety of measuring sticks, but trails a number of provinces in per capita health care spending. And it is clear that pouring hundreds of millions of dollars in increased funding for health care every year is a fool’s errand. Eventually, government services in other areas will be cut or taxes will have to rise. But the sudden belt tightening over the course of a single year obviously has a significant impact on a complex system that is used to spending more money. Fraser Health was given an additional $135 million more in funding this year, but clearly that was not enough. The health authority spends about $7 million each and every day, which shows just how expensive solving this funding problem may be. This all undoubtedly makes Finance Minister Mike de Jong very nervous. Balancing the budget is the key, dominant part of the

B.C. Liberal government’s agenda, and right now it is balanced on a proverbial razor’s edge. The last fiscal update projected a miniscule surplus of less than $200 million on a budget of $44 billion. There is precious little room for error, and even a tiny bump in health care funding could quickly turn that small surplus into a very real deficit.

**** A lot of ink was spilled last week over two blatant patronage appointments by Premier Christy Clark, but should anyone be surprised? Appointing ex-B.C. Liberal MLA Ben Stewart as the new trade commissioner to Asia was an obvious reward for him giving up his Westside Kelowna seat. And giving former party leader Gordon Wilson a government contract connected to the liquefied natural gas file seemed derived from the fact he endorsed her party. Certainly, the qualifications of both appointees can be questioned, and there is at least some irony with Wilson’s appointment (he clashed with Clark in the past, and recently expressed doubt about the prospects of LNG actually taking off). But spare me the howls of outrage from critics. Patronage appointments are an inevitable by-product of pretty well any political system and all political parties engage in that activity. Keith Baldrey is Global BC’s chief political reporter.


The Richmond News November 6, 2013 A9

Letters

Stop ignoring rising sea levels The Editor, We all agree the climate is changing — sea levels are rising (1.6 mm per year and land movement) and global temperature is increasing (0.7 degrees Celsius per century). You don’t need to predict two metres of sea level rise (SLR) by the end of the century to be “alarmed.” Even the current rate extended over the next 100 years will cause significant infrastructure problems and cost trillions of dollars to fight. Our current strategy is to pretend that we can hold the shoreline in place forever. The message that we should be spreading is this: whether SLR accelerates dramatically or not, every single coastal hazard, coastal vulnerability, erosion rate and problem area will be worse in the future, and more costly to deal with. And, in British Columbia, especially in our Lower Mainland/Delta region comprising Tsawwassen, Ladner, Richmond, etc., we have not come to grips with this fact, nor do we have any provincial plan or vision for coping with it. Any amount of SLR represents an “increased threat.” The suggestion that it may not accelerate rapidly in the near future is no cause for celebration. It is not a victory. It is still a clear indication that every coastal hazard will only get worse and that holding the shoreline in place will continue to be more costly. This is the reality of coastal policy and management that so many

choose to ignore. If there is another financial crash (and from all accounts the reform of the banking sector was weak), continuing to subsidise the value of investment properties in high risk areas is not likely to be a big priority for the wider community. “Wait-and-see” seems like a pretty high risk strategy given existing prognoses, vis-a-vis sea level rise and the economy. Suppose climate change deniers were correct and sea level rise is no more than historic rates. The people and investment already at risk from coastal storms would still be phenomenal. All the costs of storm recovery are resources that could have been used to increase national wealth, improve health and human services, clean up the environment, safeguard natural resources and build social equity. Instead, we increasingly direct scarce resources to rebuild assets that were demolished because we ignored “natural processes.” Any sea level rise only makes this worse. Richmond, Tsawwassen, Ladner — it’s time to act — instead of waiting for the next “storm,” let’s do some brain-storming ourselves to minimize the effects of any catastrophe, which may come our way (and it will). Rommel R. Coelho Richmond

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A10 November 6, 2013 The Richmond News

Letters Extend blacktop path on Railway

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The Editor, I went for a walk the other day to check out the extension of the Railway Avenue Greenway path from Moncton Street through to the Heritage Village on the Steveston waterfront. This is supposed to be a user-friendly path (according to the city website) for cyclists, roller-bladers, skateboarders, etc. I imagine it would also include, though not mentioned, handicapped people in wheelchairs, toddlers on trikes, kids on two-wheeled trainers, mothers pushing baby carriages, elderly folks who use walkers or canes and people who have to use crutches, etc. The surface of the paths, one of which goes passed the taxpayer-owned community gardens and the other, which goes through the Homma schoolyard is large aggregate gravel. Actually, it’s more like rocks, some of which are as big as golf balls, only with jagged edges and completely userUNFRIENDLY to everyone except pedestrians wearing sturdy footwear. There aren’t even any access ramps cut in the sidewalk to accommodate anything on wheels. I spoke with one woman on a mobility scooter who told me she’s had two

The Editor, I’d like to thank the fine folks at the West Richmond Community Centre for putting on a wonderful Halloween fireworks show last Thursday night. I thought they did a great job. They served complimentary popcorn and coffee, and once the first few warning shots were fired in the air, people (of all ages) got excited. The display was fantastic and families went home with smiles on their faces. It’s these kinds of events that Richmondites love — getting together as a community and enjoying the time we spend with our friends and families. The city and city council would be wise to allot more resources to these kinds of events that enrich lives and bring people together. Ramesh Ranjan Richmond

• N A I L C A R E • WA X I N G • FA C I A L S •

D SOL

The Editor, Very glad to see John Yap and the Liberal Party start to review those old liquor laws. People may not realize that liquor laws, which eliminate competition from pubs and private stores has resulted in higher prices, less supply and limited choice. This defines a monopoly. With no, or limited, competitors, a few business owners can set a higher price with much higher profit margins as customers have no choice but to accept. It is the rightful action that the B.C. government restore the liquor market to its natural state — free competition. This is a step to cross over the tiny red line and stand on the side of public interest. Cliff Wei Richmond

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tire punctures while riding on the path and was chastised by a city employee for riding her scooter on the grass — something she fully intends to keep on doing. I measured the width of the path that goes through the Homma schoolyard — it’s approximately 10 feet wide. The usable area for the path that goes passed the community gardens is 20 feet wide from the raised beds to the ditch on the other side — more than enough room to accommodate a smaller blacktop path which could be laid far enough away from the vegetable beds to address the contamination concerns of the community gardeners. Why is a 10-foot wide path deemed adequate for one path and not for the other? I would urge the city’s powers-that-be, especially Coun. Harold Steves, to check out the paths. Use some common sense and correct something that obviously discriminates against a large section of potential users. There should be a blacktop pathway along the entire length of the Greenway from River Road to Steveston for the enjoyment of everyone. Graham Corrigan Richmond

Liquor law review good

The Editor, Thank you to the City of Richmond for the fireworks on Halloween. What a show, the best yet. And the three towers overlooking the park all had a great view. Madeleine Bates Richmond

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The Richmond News November 6, 2013 A11

News

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Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Friday, November 8 through Thursday November 14, 2013 only. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stoc s last. Actual items may vary slightly from illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Canada Safeway Limited. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is defined by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the specified advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

NOVEMBER 8

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Prices in this ad good through November 28th

Prices in this ad good until Nov. 14th.


The Richmond News November 6, 2013 A13

Help us bring your ideas to life You’ve shared your dreams and visions with us for the future of the Garden City Lands. We’ve used your ideas to develop three proposed design options for new park and community space on these precious lands. Now it’s your turn to tell us what you like and don’t like about these concepts. Join us for a Public Open House from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. in the rotunda at Lansdowne Centre to learn more about the proposed concepts and share your ideas as we continue to develop a plan for this 55-hectare (136-acre) jewel in the heart of Richmond. Learn more about the concepts at www.creategardencitylands.ca or by contacting the City’s Parks Division at 604-244-1208. Additional public input opportunities will be available online at www.letstalkrichmond.ca beginning November 7.

Garden City Lands Vision The Garden City Lands, located in the City Centre, is envisioned as an exceptional legacy open space for residents and visitors. Visible and accessible from many directions, the Lands are an impressive gateway into Richmond’s downtown, and a place of transition and transformation from the rural to the urban. Its rich, diverse and integrated natural and agricultural landscape provides a dynamic setting for learning and exploration. It is inclusive with a range of spaces, amenities and experiences that encourage healthy lifestyles, social interaction and a strong sense of community pride.


A14 November 6, 2013 The Richmond News

ThePulse We’ve got our finger on it HATS OFF

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Richmond East MLA Linda Reid (right) took Minister of Agriculture Pat Pimm (left) on a tour of the Ocean Spray receiving station in Richmond. The two stand with Todd May of Ocean Spray.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Panther Cheer Athletics participated in the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Canada’s ‘Light the Night Walk’ last month and helped raise almost $2,000 as a group. Members Dawn Silver and Shaelyn Martin are both survivors.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

River Rock Casino donated $2,500 to support Family Services of Greater Vancouver’s work in Richmond. From left, Lisa Whittaker, vice president of FSGV, Daniel Lay, assistant general manager at River Rock, Jim Wall, general manager at River Rock, Kareen Hudson, program manager, and Heather Scott, director of development at Family Services. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Touchstone Family Association held its annual general meeting earlier this fall. Present was the board of directors, and presentations were made by MLA Linda Reid and Coun. Linda McPhail.

Walk the wall

PHOTOS SUBMITTED

Richmond Christian School took part in a walk to raise funds for abandoned and disabled children in the care of International China Concern. The students walked the West Dyke Trail.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Youth volunteers helped out at the Friends Whale of a Book Sale last month held at the Thompson Community Centre. There was a good turnout and all proceeds went towards the Richmond Public Library. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Coast Capital Savings invested $9,000 in Richmond youth as part of its annual Education Awards to B.C. youth this year, which totaled more than $144,000. Victoria Yang received the Citizenship Award for her outstanding volunteer work. The awards, valued at $5,000 each, help with post-secondary expenses.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

MLA John Yap presented a $10,000 gaming funds cheque to the Vancouver Wooden Boat Society in Steveston. From left, Jan Bellamy, executive director, Yap, Terry Friesen, director, and Elaine Graham, secretary-treasurer.

For a video of patient John Roberts’ journey, shown at gala

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Juno Award winning singer Chantal Kreviaszuk brought cheer to cancer patient Kwong-Sun Lui (left) and his son Patrick Lui at Richmond Hospital. She performed at Richmond Hospital Foundation’s Starlight Gala last month. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Rick Hansen received a Special Achievement Award from the Board of Governors of Excellence Canada for his contribution to the quality of life of Canadians and for raising awareness of the potential of those with paralysis after spinal cord injury. The award is one of the most prestigious in Canada.


The Richmond News November 6, 2013 A15

Food & Wine DINING

Thai dinners pop up at Gudrun’s every month Eric Hanson SIPS HAPPEN

Pop-up? That happened at 6:30 p.m. last Sunday (Nov. 3) at Gudrun Tasting Room in Steveston. Owner Patrick Tubajon has invited his friend, Chef Tai Keattivanichvily, to cook a five-course dinner at Gudrun on the first Sunday of every month, with its

debut last weekend. Unlike those annoying pop-up ads on your computer, this restaurant pop-up is a pleasant culinary surprise. “We want to revive Steveston, it gets dull here in the evening,” Tubajon said. Keattivanichvily added, “We want to tell people that Steveston isn’t just fish and chips!” Keattivanichvily certainly has the right stuff to make this event a success. He grew up in Bangkok and operates two Bob Likes Thai Food restaurants in Vancouver. I recently joined the pair at Gudrun for a tasting of the meal, which was served with a delicious bottle of Kettle Valley Gewurztraminer. The set menu began with Miang, a traditional snack from northern Thailand. It’s nice to know there’s more to Thai food than just pad Thai! A pair of cups lined with cha plu leaves are filled with fresh coconut, limes, peanuts, ginger with tamarind palm sugar sauce and rillettes of pork and rabbit.

Pairing basics for the perfect meal Many of us may have been lucky enough to experience “that meal.” You know the one. The food was incredible, the drink pairings were perfect, and the company, I’m sure, was exactly right. RAISE A PINT Usually, these meals come with a pretty hefty price tag and most of us just simply can’t afford to do it on a regular basis. But here’s the good news, with a few little tips you can do this at home, too! 1. Quality and complexity Don’t be afraid of the language used here, what we are really talking about is that there should only be one star at a meal. Complex wine, simple food, complex food, simple wine. The quality of the food should match the wine. 2. Weight Remember to choose partners that won’t overpower each other. A glass of scotch whisky or a full-bodied Napa Cabernet would completely dominate a delicate whitefish dish to the point where you wouldn’t even really taste it. 3. Acidity and carbonation Beverages high in acid are natural partners for food because acid refreshes and cleanses the palate. When paired with dishes high in fat, sweetness, and salt, carbonation can also provide the same effect, readying the mouth for the next bite of food. 4. Sweetness Wines with varying levels of sweetness can often be versatile partners with food, so don’t be afraid to try an off-dry Riesling or late harvest white. Beverages with sweetness are also good for taming spicy dishes. When pairing sweet wines with desserts you must make sure that the wine is as least as sweet or sweeter than the dish it is to be served with. Further reading: What You Eat With What You Drink by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page; The Flavour Bible by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page; Perfect Pairings by Evan Goldstein Ryan Lewis is a sommelier and beer, wine and spirits professional, writer and consultant with 20 years’ experience in the industry in the Lower Mainland and internationally.

Ryan Lewis

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Gudrun’s Tasting Room is holding monthly pop-up Thai dinners on the first Sunday of the month. My mission was to grab the leaf and place the contents in my mouth, not my lap. Mission accomplished! Then it was papaya salad, or as they say in Thailand, “Som tam.” Almost a meal in itself, the base of the salad is shredded green papaya, which I initially thought were rice noodles. Som tam literally means “sour pounded;” lime juice is pounded in the mortar with other ingredients of the dressing. Thai food is based on a harmony of its ingredients; the salad’s sour lime, hot chili, salty anchovy and the sweet palm

sugar provides complexity and balance. It was the spiciest dish of the evening. I thought it was medium hot, but Chef Keattivanichvily said he had toned down the heat for North American palates. What was really amazing was how the wine’s beautiful lychee and rose flavour was amplified by the salad as it cooled down the chili heat. Next was a Khao tang tod, homemade rice crackers with lots of crunch to dip into a minced pork coconut milk Panang curry. This thick cool dip made a refreshing change of pace after the spicy salad. The main feature was a jungle red curry, kaeng pa, with B.C. prawns fresh from the Steveston docks. In it was a wonderful assortment including Thai eggplant, holy Thai basil, with tiny leaves and an enchanting flavour, plus tiny branches of fresh green peppercorns, along with lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, galangal, and crunchy crispy salami for an extra surprise. And if that wasn’t enough, there was global rice, with grains from Thailand, Egypt, Italy, Africa and India. As a feast finale, Keattivanichvily served a sweet, baked pudding, made of taro root and coconut with Gudrun’s toffee sauce along with deep fried shallots. Sweet yet savoury, a fitting end to an exotic evening where each course had hidden treasures. Tickets are $65 a person for the five courses including a shared bottle of Gewurtraminer for two. Available at Gudrun Tasting Room, 150-3500 Moncton Street (604-272-1991). Eric Hanson is a life-long Richmond resident and a retired teacher and wine educator.

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For more information, visit fortisbc.com/choice. *Chart shows gas marketers’ rates for a range of fixed terms, valid as of November 1, 2013. Marketers typically offer a variety of rates and options. Check gas marketers’ websites or call to confirm current rates. **Residential variable rate valid as of October 1, 2013. FortisBC’s rates are reviewed quarterly by the British Columbia Utilities Commission. A gigajoule (GJ) is a measurement of energy used for establishing rates, sales and billing. One gigajoule is equal to one billion joules (J) or 948,213 British thermal units (Btu). The Customer Choice name and logo is used under license from FortisBC Energy Inc. This advertisement is produced on behalf of the British Columbia Utilities Commission.

13-053.7


A16 November 6, 2013 The Richmond News

COMMUNITYForMATTERS the good of our community

THE RICHMOND AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY

T

he Richmond Agricultural and Industrial Society was originally formed in 1891 by a group of Steveston farmers and merchants, many of whom were also Richmond’s founders. Some years later “The AG” lost its status as a Society, but was re-established in 1965 by the Steveston Community Society to retain its historical significance, and continues today as one of the oldest societies in BC. In keeping with its agricultural theme, the Steveston Salmon Festival, Steveston Farmers & Artisans Market, and Steveston Educational Garden are all managed under the umbrella of “The AG” Society. The Steveston Community Society was founded in 1946. The two societies have shared a common board of directors since 1965, and have a long history of community service together. The Steveston Community Society’s heritage is firmly rooted in grassroots community involvement, dating back 24 years even before the Society was officially incorporated. In May 1922, five Steveston residents petitioned the municipality to provide a playground by buying the original piece of park property near No. One Road and Moncton, where the current children’s playground and tennis courts are now located. Proceeds from tickets sold for a “Queen Contest”, organized by community volunteers, went to supplement the $700 the municipality committed to

UPCOMING EVENTS Steveston Farmers & Artisans Market

Sundays, bi-weekly, November 17; December 1, 15; February 9, 23; March 9, 23; April 6 10:00am to 3:00pm Gulf of Georgia Cannery National Historic Site 12138 4th Avenue, Richmond. www.sfam.ca

acquire the land. In May 1944, a small group of Steveston residents got together to talk about the state of recreational facilities in their community. They pressed the municipality to buy nine lots on Broadway Street to establish a new children’s playground. Their fundraising efforts started with a sports day event on Dominion Day in 1944, an event that was a great success not only in fundraising, but also in drawing the community together. That event evolved into the annual Steveston Salmon Festival. In 1956, the Steveston Community Society turned over title to their park and $440,000 in trust funds to the municipality to allow for the Steveston Community Centre to be built. That money, together with $15,000 generously donated by the Japanese Canadian Citizenship Association, formed the basis upon which the Community Centre was funded. It opened in November 1957, signifying the realization of the long-standing dream of a group of committed citizens in the Steveston community. This tremendous community spirit demonstrated by the founding members of both societies has been carried on by the generations that followed, and the pioneering spirit of our founders continues today with a new generation of people working together for the good of our community.

Did you know... The Richmond Agricultural and Industrial Society is one of the oldest established Societies in BC, having been originally formed in April, 1891, by many of Richmond’s founders including: William Herbert Steves, William Crawford, James Cornwallis Forlong, George Blake, Manoah Steves, and Alfred Trites.

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The Richmond News November 6, 2013 A17

Community

Please fill

Every dollar is a serious one Because logic and data tell me that my chances of losing to most forms of gambling are extremely high, I don’t gamble a dime. It goes back to a valuable lesson I learned as a child. The first PNE my parents WEALTH took us to was around 1970. Because I was too scared to go on most of the rides, my dad gave me a few quarters to spend in the arcade. The claw crane within a clear bin of capsuled toys caught my eye and I thought I’d give it a try. I dropped a quarter into the slot, cranked the crane and it came up empty. I tried another quarter and lost again. I was traumatized and the experience actually drew some tears. Even then, I did not like to be taken advantage of. I’ve avoided gambling ever since. The gambling industry’s own numbers tell me you will lose money in the long run. All legal gambling activity must flow through BC Lottery Corporation (BCLC) and their most recent financial statements are available online. What they tell us is that 23.8 per cent of your gambling dollars get paid out in prizes and 31.8 per cent of your bets pay for the expenses of running the gambling industry. After GST and HST, that leaves 41.3 per cent that goes toward programs in our community. The average British Columbian gambles $596 per year. Oh, the things I would do with an extra $596 per year! Here are a few options:

Richard Vetter

1. Buy one goat every month for a family in a developing rural community on the other side of the world. This will provide them with an extra source of food and fertilizer for their crops. 2. Support your favourite SMARTS charity. They need your help and you’ll get a tax-reducing charitable contribution slip that you won’t get from the casino or your lottery vendor! 3. Invested at six per cent over 30 years, $596 per year will add $49,946 into an RRSP and pay for a whole lot of cool vacations or a nice sports car! If I reinvested an assumed $200 in annual tax refunds from those contributions back into the RRSP, it would add another $16,760. 4. Pay an extra $596 down on your mortgage each year. You’ll have a clear title a lot sooner than you planned. 5. Invest $596 into a child’s future through a Registered Educational Savings Plan (RESP) and the government will add $119 through the CESG. In my world, every dollar is a serious one. Just because we have disposable income does not mean we should throw it in the trash. Collectively, we have the ability to change our world through a more responsible deployment of available cash. The opinions expressed are those of Richard Vetter, BA, CFP, CLU, ChFC. Vetter is a certified financial planner and owner of WealthSmart Financial Group in Richmond (www.wealthsmart.ca).

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A18 November 6, 2013 The Richmond News

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Sports

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N E W S Editorial enquiries? Please contact The Richmond News 5731 No.3 Road V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-998-3615 (ext: 3615) Fax: 604-270-2248 Email: mbooth@richmond-news.com

Host Connaught look to defend title at B.C./Yukon Sectional Championships

CHUNG CHOW/RICHMOND NEWS

Connaught’s Mitchell Gordon will be skating on home ice this week at the B.C./Yukon Sectional Championships at Minoru Arena.

The Connaught Skating Club has the rare opportunity to defend its title on home ice when the Skate Canada B.C./Yukon Sectional Championships get underway on Thursday at Minoru Arena,. Last year, the Richmond organization captured the Club Champion aggregate award for the first time in a decade and is in an excellent position to do so again. The trophy is presented to the club that accumulates the most points based on results throughout the competition. “We have over 10 possible medalists,” said Connaught Director of Programs Keegan Murphy of his team of 30 skaters that will be competing. “We just have to see where the cookies are going to crumble. “There are two different generations of skaters we have right now. Some are building towards nationals where we don’t want them to be peaking right now.

This is just a really nice platshow Skate Canada they deserve form for them. (For our younger invites to compete at the Junior skaters) this is a really big show World Championships. It’s a feat where they are nervous and Gordon managed to pull off a everything. It’s fun that way in year ago. the older kids are mentoring the The top four finishers in younger ones. Pre-Novice, Novice, Junior and “We would love every single Senior earn the opportunity one of them to have a personal to represent B.C at the Skate best performance. Canada Challenge in Where that result puts Regina, Dec. 4-8. SCAN WITH them we’re not in The competition control of. They have concludes Sunday aftertrained very hard and TO REVEAL VIDEO noon with the senior are looking forward to women’s free skate. going out and showing Connaught’s executive their talent.” and volunteers have been workLeading the Connaught coning hard to insure the Sectionals tingent are Larkyn Austman are a big hit on and off the ice. and Mitchell Gordon. Austman Admission is free for all four is the defending 2013 national days. women’s junior champion, while “The organizing commitGordon earned the junior men’s tee has been amazing,” added honours in 2012. Both will be Murphy. “I hope the community competing at the senior level comes out to watch. To have this weekend and look to build Olympic hopefuls compete in momentum towards nationals your backyard doesn’t happen where they will be trying to very often.”


The Richmond News November 6, 2013 A19

Sports SWIMMING

Rapids shine in Victoria

Richmond Rapids Swim Club had another weekend of racing, with the age group program heading to UBC for a sprint event, and the National Development squad traveling to Victoria for the Swim B.C. Senior Circuit meet. UBC’s event, hosted by the Vancouver Pacific Swim Club, was entirely focused on short distance sprints — 50 or 100 meters. All swimmers competed in nine events over the weekend, and were ranked according to aggregate times. “There’s an element of fun to this meet,” said Rapids Head Age Group Coach Dennis Silva. “Not only are the kids swimming events that they usually wouldn’t, but the emphasis on racing is increased for all events. Our swimmers were motivated to finish at the top of the aggregate lists, and that encouraged them to increase their effort every single time they got on the blocks.” That motivation resulted in a high number of top-10 finishers (see list below). The National Development program attended the year’s first Senior Circuit meet, part of a system of events designed to increase the regularity of competition between B.C.’s national-level swimmers. Rapids swimmers achieved 26 new personal best times, and one new club record. David Ng held the club record for the 50 breaststroke for only a few heats, until Kevin Ye broke the newly-minted time. Ng’s swim was good enough to qualify him for

Western Nationals. “This was a great opportunity for earlyseason exposure to varsity level swimming,” said Head Coach Rob Pettifer. “The junior members of our National Development group had the opportunity to race against swimmers from the University of Victoria, Simon Fraser, and UBC.” Nicolaas Dekker won three events - the 50 and 200-meter butterfly, and the 100 IM. Brandon de Costa came home with a win in the 50 backstroke. The Rapids go back to training for several more weeks before their next outing, as they look forward to Fastswim Classic, a home meet with an upper level provincial draw. For more information on the Richmond Rapids Swim Club, visit their website at richmondrapids.com, or send an email to swim@richmondrapids.com. UBC top finishers: Cecilia Soroco (5th - 10 year old girls), Josh Quon (3rd - 11 year old boys), Dimitri Volchkov (6th - 11 year old boys), Darren Ge (7th - 11 year old boys), Amanda McCallum (6th - 11 year old girls), Matthew Crawford - 6th - 12 year old boys), Ethan Chan (8th - 12 year old boys), Adrian Hsing (2nd - 13 year old boys), Austin Berry (6th - 13 year old boys), Benjamin Zhuo (7th - 13 year old boys), Rich Rakchtis (8th - 13 year old boys), Angela Gu (6th - 13 year old girls), Michael Ge (3rd - 14 year old boys).

MARK BOOTH/RICHMOND NEWS

Richmond Sockeyes Carson Rose brings the puck up ice during Monday’s 4-3 overtime loss to the North Delta Devils in junior “B” hockey action at Minoru Arena.

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A22 November 6, 2013 The Richmond News

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A24 November 6, 2013 The Richmond News

Richmond News November 6 2013  

Richmond News November 6 2013

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