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GORD GOBLE SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

Richmondites came out in droves to Richmond Country Farms Thanksgiving weekend in search of the perfect pumpkin. The weekend included performances by The Pumpkin Patch Orchestra and hay rides.

See page 14 for a full page of pumpkin patch photos.

Richmond ‘rows’ its way into Guinness World Records Title officially handed to city after 180 participants broke record for most singing nursery rhyme relay The 10th Annual Richmond Maritime Festival has officially row, row, rowed its way into the Guinness World Record To see books. a video The record of the book’s head record office in London, being set U.K. recently confirmed the Richmond Maritime Festival achieved a new Guinness World Record under the category of “Most people in a nursery rhyme singing relay.” “This is another great example highlighting Richmond on the international stage,” said Mayor Malcolm

Brodie. “Each participant, along with everyone in our community, should be proud of this record-breaking achievement. We can now proudly say we are part of an elite group of Guinness World Records title holders.” To launch this year’s Maritime Festival, 180 participants gathered at Britannia Shipyards National Historic Site on Friday, Aug. 9 to sing Row, Row, Row Your Boat. Each person had to sing just one word of the song. As a group, the participants had to sing the song repeatedly in correct sequence with no mistakes and in time to musical accompaniment.

Popular comedian David C. Jones entertained the crowd as emcee while official local judges, Richmond’s own Olympic rowing silver medalist Darcy Marquardt and seven-time Olympic judo judge Jim Kojima, presided over the event. After a few practice rounds, the singers sailed to victory by completing the task without any missteps and on tempo — smashing the previous nursery rhyme relay record of 154 participants. An official Guinness World Record certificate confirming the Richmond Maritime Festival’s status is on its way to Richmond.

GORD GOBLE/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

180 participants showed up at the Maritime Festival to break a Guinness World Record last August.


A2 October 16, 2013 The Richmond News

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T H E

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Upfront

The Richmond News October 16, 2013 A3

Anti-poverty lunch prepared for PM BY ALAN CAMPBELL

acampbell@richmond-news.com

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Richmond cyclists are taking issue with Coun. HalseyBrandt’s comment that no one bikes to grocery shop. Join the discussion at www.richmond-news.com.

More charity not the answer, people need living wage

In its place, they want It’s a simple brown people to help them urge lunch bag containing just Harper to take a proactive an apple and a profound approach to eradicating message addressed to the poverty and hunger for the Prime Minister. 882,000 people nationwide But anti-poverty camwho resort to food banks paigners in Richmond are each month. hoping it’s enough to grab “Inside the bag will Stephen Harper’s attention be an apple and a postfor even a few moments. card addressed to Stephen The volunteers — taking part in the International Harper; demanding a federal poverty reduction stratDay for the Eradication egy,” said of Poverty De Whalen, — will be chair of the handing out Richmond the bags Poverty during an Response impromptu Committee. “lunch “If people line-up” at want to Richmond take a few Brighouse moments and Library on sit down and Thursday write a mes(Oct. 17). sage, then Between we’ll make 11:30 a.m. PHOTO SUBMITTED sure the postand 1 p.m., “Richmond Chew on card is sent as part This!” event encourages peo- off to Mr. of their Harper. “Richmond ple to rethink food charity. “There’s Chew on got to be a better way than This!” event, they’ll be food banks. Food banks encouraging people to were supposed to be a temre-think food charity as porary measure and now a means of tackling hunthey’re part of the landger in the city and across scape.” Canada.

BY ALAN CAMPBELL

acampbell@richmond-news.com

FILE PHOTO

Richmond Food Bank workers sort food in boxes and bags. Food banks were supposed to be a temporary measure but are now part of the landscape. All levels of government have abdicated responsibility on poverty, said Whalen. And, instead of raising wages, she said there is far too much reliance on food banks to feed needy families. “The minimum wage of $10.25 an hour is not going to feed a family,” she added. “If they’re having to spend so much money on rent, then something’s got to give and it’s usually the

food. “There’s a systemic problem that can only be fixed by the people who we put in power. “We’re trying to move from charity to justice, because people have the right to feed their kids properly.” A national poverty action plan is the main recommendation in “Poverty Trends Highlights: Canada 2013,” a report by Citizens for Public Justice.

MDA on a mission to Mars

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Richmond firm will provide the drive system for the rover vehicle in the ExoMars 2018 program.

Richmond high-tech firm MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (MDA) is on a mission to Mars. Last week, the European Space Agency announced the company will provide the drive system for the rover vehicle in the ExoMars 2018 program. The rover’s main task will be to search for evidence of life, past or present, beneath

Men in black suspected of arson

the surface of the Red Planet. “After landing on the Martian surface it will be MDA’s contribuScan tion that gets the for a mission rolling video to undertake surface operations,” said MDA’s Don Osborne, Vice President responsible for this business at MDA. The value of MDA’s contract is approximately $2.5

million. The ExoMars program will send several spacecraft to Mars on two launches. First up in 2016 are the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) and EDM stationary lander. The stationary lander will map the sources of methane on Mars and other gases, and in doing so, help select the landing site for the ExoMars rover to be launched in 2018.

Mounties are probing a suspected arson at a packaging firm after two men dressed in black were seen running away from the scene. Richmond FireRescue called in police at around 10 p.m. last Thursday to the Brighouse West Business Park at 6691 Elmbridge Way after hearing reports of the men running away from CFC Packaging. A preliminary investigation by the fire department and the RCMP arson team also uncovered an accelerant they suspect was used to start the fire. On Tuesday, one of the company’s large cargo doors was boarded up, but smoke-stained blackened edges could be seen behind. The investigation team is also trying to track down video surveillance of the area. Richmond RCMP’s Cpl. Stephanie Ashton said on Tuesday that the investigation is still in its early stages and asked for anyone with information to come forward and call 604 278 1212 or Crimestoppers anonymously at 1 800 222 8477. CFC Packaging makes the likes of plastic bags, protective packaging, pizza and cake boxes, foam trays and flowerpots, distributing them across North America.

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A4 October 16, 2013 The Richmond News

News

Richmond gets set to drop, cover and hold on It’s no secret that the “Big One” is going to hit us all some time soon.

BY ALAN CAMPBELL

acampbell@richmond-news.com

So, why not prepare yourself as much as possible and take part in Thursday’s province-wide “ShakeOut” simulated earthquake drill. On Oct. 17 For a video at 10:17 with a.m., the instruc- City of tions Richmond will be one of the official participants in ShakeOut. City staff across Richmond will take part by dropping to the ground, seeking cover and then holding on until the “shaking” stops. “The City of Richmond is engaging in this exercise as part of our ongoing emergency preparedness program,” said Mayor Malcolm Brodie. “The ShakeOut BC drill is something everyone in the community should participate in. It is a great way for you and your family to learn how to survive and recover quickly from big earthquakes.” Here are three tips: ! Drop to the ground (before the earthquake drops you) as if a major earthquake were happening (stay down for at least 60 seconds)

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The City of Richmond staff will be takin gpart in Thursday’s province-wide ShakeOut drill to practice earthquake preparedness. ! Cover yourself by getting under a sturdy desk or table. (While still under the table, or wherever you are, look around and imagine what would happen in a major earthquake. What would fall on you or others? What would be damaged? What would life be like after? What will you do before the actual earthquake

BY ALAN CAMPBELL

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They do not recommend standing in a doorway or running outside. B.C. is just one region participating in this worldwide drill. Currently, more than 640,000 British Columbians have pledged to “Drop, Cover and Hold On” this Thursday. For more information and to register, visit www.ShakeOutBC.ca.

Driver walks away from rollover

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happens to reduce losses and quickly recover?) ! Hold on to your desk/ table it until the shaking stops. Emergency management experts and other official preparedness organizations agree those three actions are the most appropriate to reduce injury and protect lives during an earthquake.

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acampbell@richmond-news.com

The driver of a rollover car miraculously walked away uninjured after a Thanksgiving Day crash on

No. 3 Road. The accident happened around 3 p.m. involving two cars traveling in opposite directions on No. 3 Road near Park Road. Richmond RCMP said

a red Honda Civic flipped while attempting to avoid the other vehicle. Cpl. Stephanie Ashton said neither driver was injured, but a violation ticket was issued to the driver whose car didn’t flip..


The Richmond News October 16, 2013 A5

News

Discrimination disguised as tradition doesn’t wash BY CHERYL CHAN The Province

The smell of freshly steamed buns wafted through the air at a Richmond Chinese bakery. An impatient lineup stretched out to the pavement. Suddenly, an elderly Mandarin-speaking woman elbowed in to the front of the line. Scan “These mainlanders,” sniffed a for the complete woman to her companion in Hokkien, story and a Chinese dialect usually spoken by to post people from China’s Fujian province comments and other southeast Asian countries like Singapore, Taiwan and the Philippines. “They don’t know how to behave.” The pair then launched into a whispered tirade about how mainland Chinese people were country bumpkins with no class or nouveau riche who dress in designer labels. “It’s not really their fault,” the companion said magnanimously. “What do you expect, living all those years under Communist rule?” The exchange, rife with stereotypes, was overheard by a journalist a few months ago. It is not uncommon. To an outsider’s eyes, the Lower Mainland’s ChineseCanadian community might seem homogeneous. But within this community there are invisible divisions marked by differences in language, countries of origin, class, politics, values, even length of time in Canada. According to the 2011 census, about 432,680 people in Metro Vancouver, or almost 19 per cent, identified themselves as having Chinese ethnicity. Most Chinese immigrants are from Hong Kong, and more recently, mainland China. But there are also many ethnic Chinese from countries such as Taiwan, the Philippines, Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia. Among residents who report having a Chinese mother tongue, 138,845 say they speak Cantonese, which is the dialect from Hong Kong and

JASON PAYNE/PNG

David Wong runs a blog called the Ugly Chinese Canadian, which he started after seeing politicians pandering to the ethnic vote.

Guangzhou province. About 96,400 speak Mandarin, predominantly spoken in mainland China and Taiwan, while another 125,580 speak a Chinese language not specified, which, according to Statistics Canada, could also include Hakka, Taiwanese, Chaochow, Fukien and Shanghainese. David Wong, a Vancouver-born architect, is sensitive to these invisible divides. Seven years ago, he started an irreverent blog in a fit of fury, after what he saw as politicians pandering to new immigrants and neglecting Chinese-Canadians who have lived in B.C. for generations. The blog, called The Ugly Chinese Canadian, explores the “unspoken thoughts and politics within the Asian-North American community” from “a ‘banana’s’ perspective.” One entry riffs on tensions between Hong Kong Chinese, who came over in great waves before the 1997 Hong Kong hando-

ver, and the newly wealthy mainland Chinese, who are now the most populous immigrants arriving in B.C. “We assume H.K. expats do not like being outdone by the wealth flaunted by their once impoverished mainland brethren,” it said. “And golly, are these once back-country yokel farmers without taste! There isn’t a day we (don’t) hear H.K.ers complain of how loud and obnoxious the new mainlanders are.” It echoes similar tensions simmering in Hong Kong, where locals complain about mainlanders jaywalking, spitting, cutting in line and eating on the subway; of pregnant women flocking to their hospitals to give birth, taking up precious medical resources; and of wealthy investors driving up realestate prices (sound familiar?) Despite the tone of the blog, Wong said the fractures within the community sadden him. “It breaks my heart to see,” he said. “It’s not healthy ... to dislike a certain group because of their characteristics.” Wong acknowledges it’s inevitable immigrants bring their customs, traditions, values and behaviour as they start to rebuild their life in a new place — but some of those traditions should be let go. Alden Habacon, director of intercultural understanding at the University of B.C., said tension between groups of the same ethnicity are not new. One way this plays out is in friction between new immigrants and Canadian-born descendants of immigrants who have lived in Canada for generations. Habacon believes multiculturalism has been misunderstood and used as a convenient excuse to keep imported traditions that smack of bigotry. He gives a scenario. If your sweet old-fashioned grandmother tells you to marry your own kind, what do you do? It’s awkward, he said, because on one hand it’s something your elders insist is tradition, or just how things are done in your family, yet it does not embody the values of acceptance, diversity and inclusivity Canadians are about. Read more on The Province’s series, called “Racism in B.C.” at www.theprovince.com.

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A6 October 16, 2013 The Richmond News

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The Richmond News October 16, 2013 A7

News

EDUCATION

Special needs school plugs funding gaps BY PHILIP RAPHAEL

praphael@richmond-news.com

when purchasing

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Glen Eden offers one-on-one support for its students who have a variety of special needs. The school almost shut its doors around that time, but an anonymous donor stepped forward after publicity about the school’s plight was raised and provided the bulk of a $258,000 donation. “That literally saved the school,” Martin said, adding, “We see kids with all sorts of special needs, from autism to behavioural issues, and everything in between.” Many of Glen Eden’s students are excluded from the public education system due to medical or emotional challenges, and the school is their only

EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30 2013

EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30 2013

After transplanting its roots from Vancouver to Richmond last year, a school focusing on special needs students is looking to To link grow its enrolment numbers. to the school’s Glen Eden website Multimodal Centre had been located in Vancouver since 1984 and enjoyed many years of operation until a drop-in government funding three years ago forced the school to lower its operating costs and find more affordable premises. Funding from the province’s Community Link grant, worth $220,000 annually, was reduced. “That money was used for extra things that tuition did not cover,” said Leanne Martin, whose 12-year-old daughter has been at the school for the past four and a half years. Martin — a board member of the school, who now organizes the majority of its fundraising efforts — said the grant was cut in half in 2010. And in 2011, it was discontinued. “We relied on that pretty heavily, so last year we were forced to leave our Vancouver site and had students in a temporary location.”

option, Martin said. Thankfully for the students and their families, this past school year, Glen Eden was able to find a space at Fraserview Church to continue offering classes. “Now, we’ve just moved the students into a new school facility on Vanier Place across from Cambie secondary school,” Martin said. The shift to a more permanent spot has helped enrolment reach 16 students, and hopes are the new space that can accommodate 30 will be full for the coming school year. Accreditation by B.C.’s Ministry of Education provides special needs funding for each student. But the hole left by the cancelation of its government grant will continue to require several fundraisers each year. Part of that is the Growing and Going Places gala planned for Nov. 16 at the Best Western Abercorn Inn, where Sonia Beeksma from Global News will emcee the event, and Variety’s Got Talent! winner from 2011 Shylo Sharity will perform. Tickets are $75 each or $675 for a table of nine. For more information about the event, purchase a ticket or make a donation, call 604-821-1457. Much of the money raised will go towards the school’s current renovations at the new location, as well as some new classroom equipment.

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A8 October 16, 2013 The Richmond News

Opinion T H E

Published every Wednesday & Friday by the Richmond News, a member of the Glacier Media Group. 5731 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-270-8031 Fax: 604-270-2248 www.richmond-news.com

EDITORIAL OPINION

Publisher: Gary Hollick ghollick@ richmond-news.com

Editor: Eve Edmonds editor@richmond-news.com Sports: Mark Booth mbooth@ richmond-news.com Reporters: Alan Campbell acampbell@ richmond-news.com Yvonne Robertson yrobertson@ richmond-news.com Philip Raphael praphael@ richmond-news.com

Director of Advertising: Rob Akimow rakimow@ richmond-news.com Sales Representatives: Shaun Dhillon sdhillon@richmond-news.com Stephen Murphy smurphy@ richmond-news.com Angela Nottingham anottingham@ richmond-news.com Kristen Ross kross@ richmond-news.com Lori Kininmont lkininmont@ richmond-news.com Lee Fruhstorfer lfruhstorfer@ richmond-news.com Danny Cheng dcheng@ richmond-news.com Georgia Storey gstorey@ richmond-news.com Digital Sales: Olivia Hui ohui@ glaciermedia.ca Sales Support: Kelly Christian kchristian@ richmond-news.com Administration: Joyce Ang jang@richmond-news.com

Delivery: 604-942-3081 distribution@richmond-news. com Classified: 604-630-3300 Fax: 604-630-4500 classified@van.net The Richmond News is a member of the Glacier Media Group. The News respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at www.richmond-news.com. The Richmond News is also a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulartory body. The council considers complaints from the public about conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint, contact the council. Your written concern with documentation should be sent to 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. www.bcpresscouncil.org.

R I C H M O N D

N E W S

Definitions of demeaning

T

his week, the B.C. Court of Appeal ruled that Canada’s laws against assisted suicide are constitutional. They may very well be, but it does not make them just. The government’s argument in appealing a lower court ruling that struck the law down was that assisted suicide would “demean the value of life” and open up vulnerable people to risk of abuse. Laws against assisted suicide have their origins in early Catholic Church doctrine, which viewed suicide as an interference with God’s plan. Several church groups appeared as interveners during the appeal. For some who have watched a loved one die slowly and in agony with no hope of respite, let alone recovery, law and doctrine is impossible to accept. The fact is, sometimes we’re ready to leave the party before our bodies are. A law that forces people to live in progressively worse pain as their dignity dwindles away until they inevitably die demeans life. The practice is no longer outlawed in more progressive jurisdictions where rigorous fail safes are in place to make sure no one ever goes through with it unless they are of sound mind. To be clear: We are not advocating assisted suicide as some form of state-sponsored solution to severe depression or as one of a series of treatment options. But, for the sake of a few who live in constant pain or face a demeaning death with no prospect of relief, it is time to move the conversation into a new light. It’s unfortunate that our federal government does not wish to take the lead on such an initiative.

CHOICE WORDS

Walmart doesn’t fit West Cambie Area Plan The Editor, Re: “Boxed In?” News, Oct. 11. The West Cambie Area Plan, which Richmond city council approved in , states the maximum floor area for the anchor store in the Alexandra Neighbourhood mall should be 100,000 square feet. In contrast, the Walmart anchor store that’s actually proposed for the mall there has a larger floor area of 161,188 square feet. Just the increase alone is bigger than an American football field — including end zones and with lots of space for teams on the sidelines. Similarly, the whole Walmart mall is larger than the West Cambie Area Plan had led us to expect. Oddly, though (and this is hard to get one’s mind around), city staff wanted the mall developers to build much more square-footage than that, more than twice as much in fact. In short, the Walmart mall does not fit with the official plan for a “balanced community” in the Alexandra Neighbourhood. However, neither Walmart nor its partner should be the ones shouldering most of the blame. Jim Wright Richmond

Letters policy The editor reserves the right to edit letters for brevity, clarity, legality and good taste. Letters must include the author’s telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters.

Send letters to The Editor, Richmond News, 5731 No. 3 Road Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Fax: 604-270-2248 or e-mail: editor@richmond-news.com

Solution starts with providing home Each homeless person has his or her own life circumstance that led to homelessness. It could be anything from employment loss or general economic downturn, to fire, illness, physical disability, family breakdown, abuse, mental illness, or drug addiction. Homelessness can happen to anyone regardless of income, status, education, lifestyle, age, race, or gender. Few people realize that some 80 per cent of homeless people don’t even live on the street. They’re known as the invisible homeless. These are people who live in their cars, in church basements, in temporary shelters, or on the floors and couches of friends. A home is more than just a roof that keeps you dry — it is a place of safety, nourishment, refuge, comfort and dignity. A safe and stable home is necessary for food security, health, self-sufficiency and positive relationships with others. Home makes a healthy and productive life possible. I’m incredibly proud to serve as chair of the Greater Vancouver Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH), which organizes Homelessness Action Week (Oct. 13-19) each year, along with hundreds of volunteers, to engage our residents in homelessness and its solutions. We believe the solution is to start with “home” — providing secure, per-

Deb Bryant G U E S T S H OT

manent housing to persons without it. Once people are securely housed, the support services that may be required to maintain their housing become much more effective in helping them to permanently end their homelessness. We know this has proven effective in other cities in Canada. We’ve found that seniors, youth, families and Aboriginal peoples are over-represented in the homeless population. In the 2011 Metro Vancouver Homeless Count, 27 per cent of the surveyed homeless population was of Aboriginal ancestry — a figure that has varied only slightly since 2005. During that same count, 397 youth under the age of 25 were found to be homeless, a full quarter of them homeless for more than a year. And we encountered the highest ever number of homeless families: 56 in total with 54 children. Further, it was alarming to find that the number of homeless seniors (age 65 and up) tripled from 2002 to 2011. We need to do better. The RSCH brings together the region’s leading organizations, government agencies, funders and community task forces to col-

laboratively investigate and plan to end homelessness. We develop and maintain a Regional Homelessness Plan and sponsor a regional Count of the homeless population every three years. The very nature of invisible homelessness makes it challenging to quantify. While we get a sample of those living in temporary shelters, we do not capture everyone who may be invisibly homeless. Many informally pay rent by doing survival sex work, chores or other types of labour. Often one has to give an address to access support services such as food banks or shelter allowances. A family or friend’s address is sometimes used, which keeps their homelessness hidden. That is why we continue to foster collaboration among more than 100 organizations that work on homelessness day in and day out: to enrich our understanding of the true extent of this issue. Research done by the United Way of the Lower Mainland shows the number of seniors waiting for social housing increased by 45 per cent from 2009-2012. To learn how you can help and get involved in Homelessness Action Week visit stophomelessness.ca. Deb Bryant is the chair of the Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness and the director of Community Impact and Investment, United Way of the Lower Mainland.


The Richmond News October 16, 2013 A9

Letters

Phones create brave new world The Editor. Nothing demarcates some of the essential differences between what I call the “old world” (pre-1980s) and the plugged-in, teched-up one we live in now than the following: seeing a cell-phoneengaged mother fail to notice her three year-old daughter has wandered several aisles away in a crowded store while she engages in a loud, animated conversation about Oprah’s hair styles; witnessing a young woman so engrossed in texting that she steps off a curb on a red light and only avoids serious injury or death by the grace of an attentive driver’s quick reactions; watching a family of four, each totally absorbed in their separate handheld devices, go through an entire meal without talking to each other; and having a meal at a nice restaurant where all the

middle-aged and older patrons are talking with each other, laughing together, and generally celebrating the joys of the occasion, while two separate younger couples spend almost their entire times together bent over their respective Smartphones and paying no attention to each other. These are not uncommon sights, so add to the list as you will. All I know is that if such behaviours represent the values and priorities of the “new world,” I can only be increasingly content with the fact that I grew up in, and lived a large portion of my adult life, during a time when being “connected” meant something entirely different than it does now. Ray Arnold Richmond

Spare us snow geese complaints The Editor, The snow geese have started arriving again. So please will all those who hunt, spare us their entreaties to have hunting opened up on the West Dyke. We should feel privileged that we have the great good fortune to see these magnificent flocks in our neighbourhood. Furthermore, let’s not hear the old excuse that they are ruining the playing fields and turn the dogs loose on them. We have watched these fields all summer and they are green and lush, thanks to the fertilizer the geese bring with them. So okay, for a few short weeks when

they are here, they deposit their poop on these fields. But if it doesn’t rain, the poop dries to dust and if it does rain, which is the most likely scenario, the fields turn muddy and it is washed into the ground. What kid wants to play on a muddy wet field at that time of year anyway. Let’s not try to sterilize everything we touch or walk on. We all have to eat our “peck of dirt” in order to build up our immune system. Not that we’re suggesting that we should take that literally. So let’s enjoy the birds while they’re here. Patricia and Patrick Gannon Richmond

Located in the heart of the village, The Steveston Historical Museum and Visitor Centre has continually served our community. First constructed in 1905, the building served as Richmond’s first bank. It is now a museum commemorating Steveston’s rich history as a major fishing village, with a post office and tourist information centre. It is an important reminder of Steveston’s cultural and historical identity. This historic site is also an important tourist destination, drawing visitors from across the Lower Mainland and Canada and boosting Steveston’s local economy. It has helped to unify our community through hosting several events with assistance from organizations like Tourism Richmond. For example, I was recently called on to judge at a BC Culture Days “pietasting contest” held at the Museum. At the event, I had the opportunity to connect with many constituents and discuss the importance of preserving Steveston’s historical sites. Other events the Museum has held recently include “Picnic in the Past: Japan Style”, “Styling in the Past” and “Washing in the Past.” These activities attracted some 1,500 visitors from Steveston and surrounding areas, and couldn’t have happened without the help of the museum’s dedicated volunteers. I would like to thank The Steveston Historical Society for their outstanding service to the people of Steveston through their management of the centre. The sense of stewardship amongst all their members is exemplary. I would especially like to thank Tracy Lakeman of Tourism Richmond, and Loren Slye, Chair of the Steveston Historical Society for their vision, leadership and support to our community.

John Yap, MLA Richmond-Steveston

Thanks Canada Line staff The Editor, At about 2:45 p.m on Monday, Sept. 30, I was travelling on the Canada Line from Waterfront to Bridgeport Station. As the train left the station on its way to Brighouse I realized that I’d left my bag with course material and other personal informa-

tion on my seat. The TransLink “Green Coat” man at the station phoned ahead to see if my bag had been found. About 20 minutes later another TransLink employee returned with my bag, which she saw as she was leaving the train at Brighouse station.

Make handrails mandatory The Editor, I thoroughly enjoyed The Metropolitan Opera’s HD Live production of Eugene Onegin at SilverCity. We are so lucky to have access to these special events at SilverCity in Richmond! The theatre was full, and I suspect that everyone there was mightily impressed with the close to four hours of entertainment. What added to the enjoyment of the event for me was how helpful the SilverCity staff were. However, I did notice that for many “opera-goers” it was a challenge to go up and

down the stairs in the theatre because there is no handrail. (I’ve noticed the same situation at Gateway.) Perhaps it’s time all public facilities with stairs be mandated to include handrails. The 70-plus crowd loves to get out and enjoy themselves as much as those who are younger, and it is easier for them to do so if they know that stairs aren’t a potential hazard to their safety. Thanks to SilverCity staff for an excellent time! Janet Oakes, Richmond

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A10 October 16, 2013 The Richmond News

Food&Nutrition

Spicy ginger-carrot soup perfect for the season In September, Matthew McNair Secondary School launched its participation in the BC School Fruit & Vegetable Nutritional Program (BCSFVNP), which is a collaboration between Healthy Families BC and the BC

Ministry of Health. It’s administered through the BC Agriculture in the Classroom Foundation, a nonprofit organization that is devoted to “working to bring BC’s agriculture to our students.”

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Last week was our third delivery of local B.C. produce and we received individual packages of baby carrots. As I distributed them to my Culinary Arts students, most students FOOD MATTERS eagerly took them, but a few who like only cooked carrots declined. Today, I am sharing a recipe for Ginger-Carrot Soup, which combines delicious spices as well as one ingredient many young people love: peanut butter. If there are people in your household who are allergic to peanuts, you can substitute any nut butter, and if anyone is allergic to nuts, just omit the peanut butter altogether. Also, if you are cooking for people who cannot tolerate the heat of red chili flakes or ginger, feel free to reduce the amount of these ingredients. The recipe is adapted from Sid Goldstein’s The Wine Lover’s Cookbook: Great Recipes for the Perfect Glass of Wine. For the adults in your household, the luscious flavours of coconut milk, peanuts and Asian spices pair beautifully with the floral-spiciness of a Gewurztraminer, Pinot Gris, or Viognier. If you are looking for the perfect wine pairing, I would highly recommend seeking the expertise at Sip Wines, Richmond’s only VQA wine store. It is a great place to go to try new wines and learn about particular varietals or blends, and they offer Thursday themed-tastings as well as Saturday single winery tastings. see Directions page 11

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The Richmond News October 16, 2013 A11

Food&Nutrition Directions: Ingredients can be tweaked for nut allergy 3 Tbsp.

Continued from page 10

Ginger-Carrot Soup

Yield: 6 servings Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 2 stalks celery, ends trimmed and diced 1 lb. carrots, peeled and diced 3 Tbsp. fresh ginger, peeled and minced 3 cloves garlic, minced 1/4 tsp. red chili flakes 1/2 tsp. ground coriander 1/2 tsp. turmeric 4 1/2 cups chicken stock 1 Tbsp. + 2 tsp. Thai fish sauce

fresh lime juice (from about one large lime) 2 tsp. rice wine vinegar 2 Tbsp. smooth peanut butter 2 Tbsp. brown sugar 1/2 tsp. toasted sesame oil 1/2 cup coconut milk 1/2 cup milk kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper garnish: chopped fresh cilantro Directions: 1. In large stockpot, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add onions, celery, carrots and ginger and sauté for four minutes. Add garlic and continue sautéing

PHOTO BY FLICKR: SWEETBEETANDGREENBEAN

A variation of the ginger-carrot soup recipe. until onions are translucent, about another two minutes. Add red chili flakes, coriander and turmeric and cook until fragrant.

2. Add chicken stock, fish sauce, lime juice, vinegar, peanut butter, brown sugar, sesame oil, coconut milk and milk and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 30 minutes. 3. Using a handheld immersion blender, pureé soup until smooth. (Alternatively, you can pureé the soup in batches in a food processor or blender.) Season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Garnish with chopped fresh cilantro before serving. (Adapted from Sid Goldstein’s recipe Spicy Gingered-Carrot Soup. The Wine Lover’s Cookbook: Great Recipes for the Perfect Glass of Wine. California: Chronicle Books, 1999.)

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A12 October 16, 2013 The Richmond News

YVR

The Richmond News October 16, 2013 A13

INSIDER

A MONTHLY LOOK AT WHAT’S NEW AND NEWSWORTHY AT YVR.

I S S U E N U M B E R 13 O CTO B E R 2 0 1 3

(RE-)INTRODUCING LARRY BERG FLIGHT PATH PARK After months of planning and construction, the Airport Authority is delighted to welcome our neighbours to the all-new Larry Berg Flight Path Park. The park is named in recognition of our former President & CEO Larry Berg, who led the development of Vancouver International Airport from 1998 to 2013.

WE’RE PROUD OF THIS COMMUNITY GATHERING PLACE AND HOPE YOU ENJOY IT.

A FAVOURITE PLANESPOTTING LOCALE,

Larry Berg Flight Path Park is located at the corner of Russ Baker Way and Airport Road, at the end of the South Runway.

PACK A LUNCH AND ENJOY ONE OF THE NEW PICNIC TABLES

on a sunny afternoon this fall, or dig out your boots for a puddle splash on a drizzly day.

THE PARK’S NEW FEATURES INCLUDE RAISED VIEWING AREAS, runway-style paths, interpretive panels packed with cool YVR info and a central plaza featuring a giant climbable globe, perfect for charting routes that connect YVR to destinations around the world.

Let us know what you think of the park. Tweet us @yvrairport


A14 October 16, 2013 The Richmond News

ThePulse We’ve got our finger on it PUMPKIN PICKING

GORD GOBLE/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

Orange was all the rage at Richmond Country Farms where many flocked to pick a pumpkin last weekend. There were performances by bands such as The Pumpkin Patch Orchestra (above) as well as hay rides and hay tossing.

Send your pictures to editor@richmond-news.com with ThePulse in the subject line. For more photo galleries, visit www.richmond-news.com.


The Richmond News October 16, 2013 A15

Community FINANCES

Insure your most valuable asset against disability Judging by the real estate open houses and traffic in our local car dealerships, malls and WEALTH megastores, we sure do spend a lot of time shopping! Do you want to know the first thing we also buy before the sale is finished, or immediately afterward? Yup, we make sure our stuff gets insured! From the comprehensive umbrella policies that we take out on our homes to the car insurance and extended warranty packages on our consumer goods, we sure do like to protect ourselves from risk. Just when you think you’ve done an awesome job insuring the valuables, I’m about to tell you that there may be a gaping hole in your risk management plan. Let’s start by adding

Richard Vetter

up all the money you will make over the years. For example, take the case of a SMARTS 35-year-old who makes $60,000 per year and increases that income by five per cent each year as a result of promotions and inflationary increases. By retirement at age 65, he/she will have earned a total of $3,986,331. That’s a lot of money riding on the assumption that this income earner stays healthy! I would not feel comfortable with those odds, when the statistics tell us that a 35-year-old has a 50 per cent chance of being disabled for at least 90 days before age 65! Let’s be clear on this — the length of a disability, on average, is at least 90 days. Some disabilities could last as long as 30

years using this example. I asked one insurance company to provide me with examples of claims that they have been paying. That’s when I realized that the risk is very real! For instance, a salesman has received $690,000 to date from a brain injury sustained in 1988. A dentist who has been suffering from thoracic outlet syndrome since 1998 has received a total of $1,438.544. A business owner with a herniated disc has received $189,187 since 2008. Ironically, a financial advisor suffering from depression has received a total of $185,059 since 2009 (Hmmm, I wonder what could have triggered that). These are real people with real disabilities and none of them saw it coming. However, all of them made a plan to deal with it. Disability insurance is not as easy to apply for as life insurance. When the

risks are so high, it is only natural that the insurance company is going to ask a lot more questions. Underwriting a disability income policy is tricky and you really should work with an experienced and

qualified financial advisor. Your most valuable asset is looking back at yourself in the mirror every day. Please, don’t play Russian roulette with your income. Take the steps right now to insure it.

The opinions expressed are those of Richard Vetter, BA, CFP, CLU, ChFC. Vetter is a certified financial planner and owner of WealthSmart Financial Group in Richmond (www. wealthsmart.ca).

Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project

Invitation to Participate in Pre-Design Consultation October 7 – November 12, 2013

Proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2

DELTA

Existing Roberts Bank Terminals

An artist’s rendering of the proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project, adjacent to the existing Roberts Bank terminals.

Port Metro Vancouver is conducting Pre-Design Consultation regarding the proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project. The Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project is a proposed new three-berth container terminal at Roberts Bank in Delta, B.C. that could provide 2.4 million TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units) of container capacity.

You are invited to provide feedback and learn more about the project by: • Attending a small group meeting or open house (see schedule below) • Reading consultation materials and providing feedback online (consultation materials and an online feedback form will be available at www.portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2 on October 7, 2013) • Visiting Port Talk (www.porttalk.ca) and participating in a discussion forum • Calling 604.665.9337 • Providing a written submission through: Email: container.improvement@portmetrovancouver.com Fax: 1 866.284.4271 Mail: Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project, 100 The Pointe, 999 Canada Place, Vancouver, BC V6C 3T4

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Take notice that the Regional Director Election for Region 9 will take place on Saturday, November 16, 2013. Every member in good standing on or before Friday, October 4 who resides in the Region (Delta, Richmond, Surrey) has the right to vote at any one of the following locations and times: Richmond – Voting 9:00-11:00 AM Cambie Community Centre 12800 Cambie Road, Richmond Delta – Voting 12:30-2:30 PM Town & Country Inn 6005 Highway 17A, Delta Surrey – Voting 4:30-6:30 PM Eagle Quest Golf Course 7778- 152 Street, Surrey Non-resident members of the riding associations are not entitled to vote. Please remember to bring 2 pieces of ID: one with photo and one with your address.

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SMALL GROUP MEETINGS & OPEN HOUSE SCHEDULE Date Tuesday, October 8

Event Type Small Group Meeting

Time 5:00pm-7:00pm

Wednesday, October 9

Small Group Meeting

5:00pm-7:00pm

Thursday, October 10

Small Group Meeting

1:00pm-3:00pm

Tuesday, October 15

Small Group Meeting

1:00pm-3:00pm

Tuesday, October 15

Small Group Meeting

5:00pm-7:00pm

Wednesday, October 16

Small Group Meeting

9:00am-11:00am

Wednesday, October 16

Open House

5:00pm-8:00pm

Thursday, October 17

Open House

5:00pm-8:00pm

Tuesday, October 22

Open House

5:00pm-8:00pm

Thursday, October 24

Open House

5:00pm-8:00pm

Saturday, October 26

Open House

10:00am-1:00pm

Location Coast Tsawwassen Inn 1665 56 Street, Delta Coast Hotel & Convention Centre 20393 Fraser Highway, Langley Delta Town & Country Inn 6005 Highway 17, Delta Surrey Arts Centre 13750 88 Avenue, Surrey UBC Boathouse 7277 River Road, Richmond SFU Morris J. Wosk Centre 580 West Hastings Street, Vancouver UBC Boathouse 7277 River Road, Richmond Surrey Arts Centre 13750 88 Avenue, Surrey Coast Hotel & Convention Centre 20393 Fraser Highway, Langley Delta Town & Country Inn 6005 Highway 17, Delta Coast Tsawwassen Inn 1665 56 Street, Delta

*To register for a small group meeting, please email container.improvement@portmetrovancouver.com or call 604.665.9337. Please provide your name and specify the date and time of the meeting you wish to attend. Pre-registration for open houses is not required.

How Input Will Be Used - Input received will be considered, along with technical and economic information, in developing project designs or plans, including engineering and environmental mitigation plans, for the proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project. p o r t m e t r o v a n c o u v e r. c o m / R B T 2


A16 October 16, 2013 The Richmond News

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The Richmond News October 16, 2013 A17

Sports

T H E

R I C H M O N D

N E W S

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Editorial enquiries? Please contact The Richmond News 5731 No.3 Road V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-998-3615 (ext: 3615) SCAN TO VIEW Fax: 604-270-2248 WITH LAYAR Email: mbooth@richmond-news.com 02 +"% &/2/)/ 1!2% * 1/2-)0'2% (+/+!02

Seafair dominates at home in Icebreaker tourney Host association nearly sweeps all four tier one titles including an impressive performance by Pee Wee A1 team BY MARK BOOTH

mbooth@richmond-news.com

From a dominating performance to a pair of arch rivals meeting in the championship game, the 11th annual Seafair Icebreaker Tournament served up a Thanksgiving feast of action over the long weekend at the Richmond Ice Centre. The event provides a steady dose of competition for rep teams as they get their season into full swing. The host association more than held their own as Seafair Hockey took three of the four tier one titles and settled for silver in the other. The organization’s top Pee Wee team lived up to its early season hype by showing why its the No. 1 ranked squad in the province. The Islanders rolled five straight victories to take home gold, including a 5-0 triumph over a shorthanded Victoria Racquet Club team in Monday afternoon’s championship game. The team, coached by Vancouver Giants

assistant and Seafair’s director of hockey operations Yogi Svejkovsky, earlier produced lopsided round-robin wins over Phoenix (10-0), North Vancouver (9-0) and Surrey (14-0) before finally being tested in a 3-1 victory against Juan de Fuca in the semi-finals. VRC also put up a determined fight, trailing 3-0 after 40 minutes, then running out of steam in the final period. The most intriguing and exciting final was served up at the youngest age level as Seafair trimmed Richmond Minor 3-2 in overtime to capture the Atom Tier One title. The Islanders enjoyed a 2-0 second period lead when the Blues pulled within one, then tied it in the early stages of the third. Richmond appeared to have the advantage heading into overtime when Seafair was accessed a tripping penalty in the final minute of regulation. However, the Islanders struck just 12 seconds into the extra frame for the dramatic win. Seafair had defeated

Richmond 6-0 in earlier round-robin action. The Blues rebounded with a win over Nanaimo (4-3) to nail down a playoff spot, then beat the same Island team again (8-3) in the semi-finals. Seafair blanked Juan de Fuca 70 in the other final four match-up. Richmond Minor’s coaching staff includes UBC head coach Milan Dragicevic who works as an assistant to Kirk Darbyshire. There was more drama in the Midget Tier One final as the Islanders needed a shootout to slip past Vancouver Minor 3-2. All the scoring was done through 40 minutes, as a scoreless third period was followed by five minutes of four-on-four overtime hockey which couldn’t produce a winner. Both teams entered the championship game with perfect records, as Steve Robinson’s squad dumped Cloverdale 7-4 in the semis, after earlier wins over Seattle (5-0), Juan de Fuca (3-1) and Vancouver MARK BOOTH/RICHMOND NEWS

Seafair’s Vincent Thrum battles with Victoria Racquet Club’s Seam Ramsey during the Pee Wee Tier One championship game at the Seafair Icebreaker Tournament on Monday. Seafair showed why its the top ranked Pee Wee A1 team the province with a dominating performance that was capped by a 5-0 win over VRC.

MARK BOOTH/RICHMOND NEWS

Seafair Islanders’ Jaden Christian Uy is turned away on this scoring attempt by Richmond Blues goalie Mateo MasonZolotoochin during the Atom Tier One championship game at Seafair Minor Hockey’s 11th annual Icebreaker Tournament. The hosts needed a shorthanded goal in overtime to defeat their rival 3-2.

SCAN WITH TO REVEAL PHOTOS

Minor (3-2). The Ryan Weber coached Seafair Bantam A1 team rolled off four straight wins before falling 4-1 to Cowichan in the final. The Island squad opened up a 2-0 lead after 20 minutes and added one more in each of the final two periods to deny the Islanders a fourth consecutive tournament title.

HOCKEY NIGHT IN RICHMOND! SOCKEYES VS ALDERGROVE KODIAKS Richmond's Premier Sports Team Since 1972

Seafair did manage to win a fourth championship, as the Islanders dominated the Atom Tier 2 division, capping a perfect run with an 11-0 win over Saanich in the final. Other division champions included Saanich winning the Bantam and Midget Tier 2 titles, while Whitehorse captured the Pee Wee Tier 2 crown.

MINORU ARENA

7511 Minoru Gate NEXT HOME GAME

Thursday, Oct. 17 @ 7pm GREAT HOCKEY ACTION! FAMILY FRIENDLY!

www.richmondsockeyes.com

Adults $10 • Students & Seniors $6


A18 October 16, 2013 The Richmond News

Sports FEMALE HOCKEY

Midget Ravens make it back-to-back titles at Kelowna tourney The Richmond Ravens Midget AA girls hockey team made the most of its trip to the Okanagan last weekend by capturing a tournament in Kelowna for the second straight year. The two-time defending B.C. champions, coached by AJ Sander, defeated the Vancouver Island Impact 5-2 in the championship game. The Ravens power play connected four times, including a third period hat trick by Sabrina Shigeoka. Yvonne Mikulcik also scored.

The result avenged a 3-2 opening game loss to the Impact. Kaitlyn Yan and Mikulcik had the Richmond goals. The girls bounced back with a 4-2 victory over the Salmon Arm Silvertips. After falling behind 2-0 five minutes into the contest, the Ravens went to work by pulling even on goals by Briana Trottier and Emily Chau. Power play tallies by Holly Gill and Trottier completed the comeback. Richmond then cruised to a 5-1 victory against the host Kelowna Rockets. Kaelon

Baker, Kiki Richardson, Mikulcik, Gill and Chau were the goalscorers. The Ravens’ power play was exceptional throughout the tournament, accounting for 13 of their 17 goals. Richmond received strong play on the blueline, led by captain Tamara Wong, Ross, Baker, Misa Sekawa-Luding, Alicia Voss and assistant captain Shigeoka. Injured defenceman Alexandra Cafik-Irwin and Hartley McCallum cheered the team on from the stands.

Up front, assistant captain Gill, Yan, Mikulcik, Trottier, Richardson and Emily Chau helped with getting goals while being supported by forwards Marisa Chau, Carey Ogryzlo, Athena Rados and Eveyln Tran. Goaltenders Harmony Sander and Dominque D`Amour also enjoyed a stellar weekend. The result made it five consecutive tournament wins in October for the midget “A” program. Richmond won the Mid Island Extreme Tournament three times (2009-11) before enjoying success in Kelowna.

Lonely seniors die sooner.

Do something about it. TransLink and United Way are preventing senior isolation. Join us. uwlm.ca/preventisolation

Jane Smith 696056789

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The Richmond News October 16, 2013 A19

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The Richmond News October 16, 2013 A23

®

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Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Friday, Oct. 18 through Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013 only. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stocks last. Actual items may vary slightly from illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Canada Safeway Limited. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is defined by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the specified advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

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A24 October 16, 2013 The Richmond News

WEEKLY SPECIALS OCT. 16 - 20, 2013

UFC Spaghetti SauceSweet Filipino Blend 1kg

Fresh Pork Loin Chops

Russet Potatoes

新鮮豬L

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2 ea 39 lb 49

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9

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Yellow Yam 黃心蕃薯

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Ligo Sardines (Tomato / Hot Chili Sauce) 155g 力高沙丁魚(番茄/辣味)

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Fresh Pork Shoulder Butt (Bone in) (2 Pcs Up) 新鮮西施骨(二塊以上)

99

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Sunrise Smooth Tofu 700g 日昇鮮裝滑滑豆腐皇

1

6

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Searay Squid Rings 300g 海威N魚圈

Manila’s Best FFW Milkfish 800g Up 大牛~魚

Singapore Fish BallsAssorted 200g~250g 新加坡QQ魚丸

熱狗香腸-多款

79

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Pinoy Delight Cheesy Dog Regular/Cocktail/ Jumbo 375g

69

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69 lb ¢

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撿手油菜芯

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Richmond News October 16 2013