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Pilots may have survived

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Transportation Safety Board, again, calls on Transport Canada to implement changes that could reduce chances of crashrelated fires.

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A2 August 2, 2013 The Richmond News


T H E

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The Richmond News August 2, 2013 A3

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Upfront

Editorial enquiries? Please contact The Richmond News 5731 No. 3 Road V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-270-8031 Fax: 604-270-2248 E-mail: editor@richmond-news.com

Fatal crash possibly survivable: TSB BY PHILIP RAPHAEL

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Pilots of a Northern Thunderbird Air flight that crashed short of the runway at YVR in October 2011 likely would have survived if Transport Canada had acted on the Transportation Safety Board’s suggestions that could limit post-crash fires. That was the view of Bill Yearwood, lead investigator with the TSB, who Wednesday mornFor video ing presented a report into the crash that injured seven passengers and claimed the lives of two pilots. Yearwood said the TSB had recommended in 2006 that Transport Canada implement regulations reducing ignition sources after a crash. The Beechcraft King Air A100 belonging to Northern Thunderbird Air had just taken off from YVR on Oct. 27, 2011 for a flight to Kelowna when the pilots noticed an oil leak in the left engine. They turned the plane around to return to YVR, but crashed on Russ Baker Way just outside the perimeter fencing for the south runway. The impact caused a fuel leakage that was ignited. Passersby, many of them drivers and passengers from cars on the roadway, came to the rescue of the passengers and crew. Yearwood said there was evidence of live battery circuits after the impact and fire where the wiring was concentrated in the cockpit. “It’s clear that their (pilots’) injuries, their deaths, were caused from the fire,” he said. “Their physical injuries were likely survivable. So, we can say, ‘yes, the fire is the cause of their deaths.’” Post-crash fires can be triggered by a number of things, Yearwood said, adding electrical arcing from wiring is one situation that can be addressed, and is something the automotive industry already

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Bill Yearwood, lead investigator with the TSB, presented a report into the crash.

Report again calls for changes limiting post-crash fires PHOTO SUBMITTED

The wreckage of the Northern Thunderbird Air flight that crashed on Russ Baker Way in October 2011.

does. “There is room to improve the survivability of an aircraft crash where there’s fuel spills,” Yearwood said. “If you remove that heat source from arcing, you’ve done well.” The changes are doable, he added. “It would be easier to design a battery to disconnect on impact than to retrofit the whole aircraft.” Yearwood did say Transport Canada does agree with the TSB’s recommendations, “However, I can’t say why they haven’t acted, and the board has assessed their response as unsatisfactory.” Asked whether he found inaction on the TSB’s recommendations frustrating, Yearwood said, “It’s difficult when you’re talking to the loved ones to explain that. We have the push. And, you can see from the report, the board is taking a further stand and explaining their concerns, being somewhat direct. That’s the only force we have.” The TSB’s report also found the reason the pilots returned to YVR was because the plane’s oil reservoir cap on the left engine had not been secured. When an oil leak became visible, the flight crew reduced power to that engine and made for YVR. However, the investigation determined the leak was minor and the engine would have continued to function normally until the oil pressure had decreased enough to force the pilots to shut it down. That would have then triggered a series of emergency procedures the pilots had been

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trained to undertake. “This was a crew stuck in a grey area between a normal flying aircraft and anticipating a problem,” Yearwood said. Reducing the power to the oil leaking engine increased the drag on the aircraft since the left side propeller was not feathered — it’s pitch angled. When the plane was on its final approach to the runway, the report indicates it slowed below its minimum landing speed. And when power was reapplied, likely to just the right engine, the aircraft rolled left and pitched — Bill Yearwood down. With insufficient altitude to recover, the plane crashed into the ground. Pilots, 44-year-old Luc Fortin and Matt Robic, 26, died of their injuries later in hospital. Six of the surviving passengers are suing the charter airline, alleging its staff ignored a pool of leaking oil under the plane’s wing before taking off. The lone passenger not taking legal action told the media immediately after the horrific crash she owed her life to the heroic efforts of the two pilots and countless other people who saved her.

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A4 August 2, 2013 The Richmond News

News

THERE’S MORE TO THIS PAGE THAN MEETS THE EYE

Mediation talks break down at Ikea BY PHILIP RAPHAEL

praphael@richmond-news.com

Mediated talks aimed at resolving a long-running labour dispute at Ikea’s Richmond location reached an impasse Monday. The two sides entered discussions July 13. According

to the employer, officials representing Teamsters Local 213 were presented with an amended proposal July 17 that eliminated a two-tier wage system. In its place was a system providing automatic increases, plus increases tied to the furniture store’s performance. In a press release from Ikea, the proposal allowed Ikea to address the Union’s expressed leading concern, while also addressing the store’s poor performance. According to Ikea, the Richmond store, just one of two unionized locations in Canada — the other is in Quebec — has consistently been the lowest performing store in Canada for sales and productivity, while having the highest staff costs.

“Despite our efforts to address the two tier system, the union rejected Ikea’s offer,” said Ikea’s public relations manager Madeleine Löwenborg-Frick in a press release. Mediation has concluded and the parties remain at an impasse. Teamsters representative Anita Dawson said the company’s offer that included an initial two per cent raise was rejected because subsequent annual percentage increases tied to the store’s performance would take workers 22 years to achieve the top rate. “That wasn’t going to work,” Dawson said, adding, “There’s not a lot of trust there that those sales goals and numbers are attainable. Therefore, it was going to

be very hard to say that you could actually get to those numbers with any kind of consistency.” As for the company’s comments on the store’s productivity and sales performance, Dawson said, “They are the ones managing the store. “They control the ordering and how the store runs. So, trying to pin it all on the workers that the productivity isn’t there is not fair.” As a result of the breakdown in talks, the labour dispute, which began in mid May, will continue. No further talks have been scheduled, and the store will continue to be operated on reduced hours.

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Vancouverites are some of the biggest bookworms in Canada, according to sales data from Amazon that show residents bought the most books in print and electronic form over the past year. Richmond, on the other hand, made the Top 20 list at 15. Two other B.C. cities — Burnaby and Surrey — are at eleventh and seventeenth spots, respectively. Amazon.ca released on Tuesday its first list of the top book purchasers in Canada on a per-capita basis, with Vancouver in No. 1 spot, followed by Calgary, Saskatoon, Edmonton and Regina to round out the Top 5. Toronto was No. 7 and Montreal wasn’t included among the Top 20, but that could indicate that not as many consumers shop at the mega online bookseller or they prefer

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buying reading material elsewhere. Vancouver consumers are shopping mostly for business and investing books, according to Amazon. The top title purchased overall by Vancouverites was StrengthsFinder 2.0 by Tom Rath. They are also are buying the most travel books, along with readers in Calgary and Toronto. Folks in Saskatoon bought the most titles by Canadian authors and the most books on Kindle. While Vancouverites were snapping up copies of 103 Hikes in Southwestern British Columbia by Jack Bryceland, the most popular order for their Toronto counterparts was The New York Times 36 Hours: 150 Weekends in the USA & Canada by Barbara Ireland. — The Vancouver Sun

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The Richmond News August 2, 2013 A5

News

BIKE PATH

Richmondites happily rolling along Railway BY PHILIP RAPHAEL

praphael@richmond-news.com

Despite not being completely finished, the new Railway Avenue Greenway is getting plenty of use — to mostly favourable reviews when the Richmond News paid a visit to a section Thursday afternoon. For video City work crews have finished laying down a black ribbon of asphalt that winds 3.7 kilometres from Granville Avenue to Garry Street. And now work is beginning to install signage, improve crossings at intersections, construct access to adjacent transit stops and paint markings to delineate the north-south traffic along the four metre-wide trail. One rider the News asked during a stop at the intersection of Railway and Blundell Road said he thought the project was a “complete waste of taxpayers’ money.” The rider, who did not want to be named, said that although he was using the trail, it would have been better to have revamped the existing bike lanes that run along Railway Avenue. He added the land along the route should have been used for a rapid transit rail link to Steveston. Delighted with the new trail was Jenny Foster, who had her three young children,

aged seven, five and two, along for the ride with her — two on their own bikes, and one snuggled into a carrier on hers. “I’ve used it twice now.” “We’re going right up to Steveston, and we live in Burkeville. Today, we just started at Granville (Ave.), left the car at the Thompson Community Centre and riding to Steveston, bribing them (children) with (ice) Screamers.” Foster said she likes not having to ride along the dedicated bike lane, adding the separation from the car traffic on the new pathway provides a greater degree of safety for her children. Also happy with the new route was Steveston resident Michael Levan who was on the trail just for fun Thursday, but uses the route for his daily commute to work at SaveOn-Foods at Cambie Street and 7th Ave. in Vancouver. “I absolutely love it,” he said, adding he used to use Railway Avenue’s bike lane, but now finds the new trail much better. “This makes it, man, I feel so relaxed.” And even though more needs to be done to finish the trail, Levan has already noticed the positive impact it is having on the community. “We never saw families before out,” he said. “And now you see people walking every day. It’s the best thing that ever happened.” One thing he would like to see in place, though, is a better treatment at the intersec-

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Mike Redpath, senior manager of parks, and fellow parks staff member, dismount their bikes, according to instruction (above).

tions where temporary barricades have been set up. Levan said some bike routes in Vancouver have specially designed and located pedestrian activation buttons that do not make riders dismount when they stop at cross streets. “I can just reach out, hit it (button) and get ready to go again.” While it won’t be exactly like that, improvements are on the way, said Mike Redpath, Richmond’s Senior Manager of Parks who was out on the trail with fellow parks department staff Thursday. Redpath said permanent barriers will be

erected at the intersections to stop walkers and riders from crossing the street in the wrong area, while a series of bollards will funnel trail users to the crosswalk where bike riders will be instructed to dismount and walk their bikes over the crosswalk. In addition, green painted surfaces along the trail’s intersections and crosswalks will provide strong visual cues for trail users to follow the designated route. Paint will also be used to delineate the trail between north and south traffic flows. As for what will be installed along the route where it gets wider, Redpath said those uses are still undecided, but will focus on recreational opportunities.


A6 August 2, 2013 The Richmond News

News

METRO VANCOUVER

Sewage cost looms, cities debate BY JEREMY SHEPHERD North Shore News

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Who’s going to pay for this crap? That’s the question being bandied about Metro Vancouver cities regarding plans for a new Lions Gate Secondary Wastewater Treatment Plant. The new sewage plant will come with a hefty price tag. Depending on which design is chosen, the plant could cost between approximately $400 million and $700 million, adding up to a financial strain for North Shore residents. That could be eased if neighbouring municipalities chip in, say local political leaders. But lobbying for funding from other municipalities may be challenging, as the plant would only benefit the North Shore. With the projected $1 billion upgrade of the Iona wastewater plant in Richmond scheduled for 2030 and other improvements slated for the near-future, the issue of funding for large infrastructure projects has been hovering in the background for Metro politicians. For the last two decades, the benefiting municipality has typically shouldered about 30 per cent of the capital costs of a secondary waste-

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water plant, but that formula may “We’re hoping that we can come be revised, according to Richmond up with a formula that recognizes Mayor Malcolm Brodie. the contributions of those municipal“My guess, I’m sure there will ities that gave a bit more last time: be some regional absorption of the the Burnabys, the Surreys, and the costs,” he said. New Westminsters.” “The current formula is harder While the North Shore did not on the people in the North Shore,” pay as much for the Annacis plant, said City of North Vancouver Mayor that was partially due to the changDarrell Mussatto. “We’re trying to ing formulas that have been used to get one formula like determine sewage we do with water, costs, he said. for example. Water, The price tag it’s all one region, will weigh heavit’s all one utilily when designity, we all pay the ing the treatsame.” ment plant, said Asking for too Mussatto. — Malcolm Brodie much from nearby Slated to be in cities may cause an operation by the impasse, according end of the decade, to Delta mayor Lois Jackson. the Lions Gate plant would use a “Those of us on the south side of biological process to remove about the river basically constructed the 90 per cent of dissolved material very large Annacis Island treatment from liquid waste. plant,” she said. “Because the north The secondary treatment process side of the river: Richmond, New will be an environmental step up West, Burnaby, Vancouver, weren’t from the current primary treatment, a part of that, I guess we’d have to which only filters out solid material. look at that in terms of what fairness A third stage of tertiary treatment is.” is designed to remove contaminants Mussatto said he’s still hopeful a missed in the secondary stage, more equitable funding system could but Mussatto said that may be too be devised. pricey.

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A8 August 2, 2013 The Richmond News

Opinion T H E

Published every Wednesday & Friday by the Richmond News, a member of the Glacier Media Group. 5731 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-270-8031 Fax: 604-270-2248 www.richmond-news.com

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The Richmond News is a member of the Glacier Media Group. The News respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at www.richmond-news.com. The Richmond News is also a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulartory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern with documentation should be sent to 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. www.bcpresscouncil.org.

L

R I C H M O N D

N E W S

In Russia, no love

ooking back on the 2010 Olympics, there was a lot for us to be proud of, like our haul of gold and our remarkably smooth running of the games. But this week, one other thing stands out in hindsight. Among the dozens of international pavilions set up for athletes, fans and everyone else was a happy addition — Pride House. This was the first time the Olympic Games included a special place to welcome and celebrate the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. The tradition was carried on in London for the 2012 Summer Games, but sadly no such place will exist in Sochi when the torch is lit in less than six months. Instead, Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed into law new “anti-propaganda” regulations that will allow police to arrest and detain for up to 15 days anyone they suspect of being gay, lesbian or pro-gay. That includes foreign athletes, media and visitors. This type of homophobic thinking belongs in a century that is rapidly disappearing in our rearview mirror and it certainly doesn’t belong in the Olympics, the most visible symbol the world has of international openness and friendship. If, as the cynics say, the Games are really about politics, let’s see some political action to correct this anomaly. It is incumbent on our federal government, the International Olympic Committee and their well-heeled sponsors to put pressure on Russia to let them know this isn’t becoming of a host nation. Or an acceptable position in any civilized society.

CHOICE WORDS

Discuss farmland openly The Editor, Re: “‘Soil cops’ need sustainable funding,” News, July 26. Hats off to Thomas Loo for having the courage to speak up about failures in governing the protection of farmland. I know in conversation with Loo during the election that he’s experienced first hand and up close the pain of a system in crisis and he is clearly passionate about what he believes is needed to improve it. As only one of two enforcement officers for the entire province, we should all listen and learn from him to build a better future. We should also give kudos to FarmWatch for bringing this important issue to the public’s attention and, through personal sacrifice of it's volunteers, continue to highlight to British Columbian’s what is happening to valuable farmland in our communities and the apparent dis-interest from our MLAs. As I said during the election, we all know the difference between right and wrong and dumping unregulated fill, often loaded with construction materials, many of which contain known toxins on farmland, regardless if it’s in the ALR or not is simply wrong and should be stopped. Credit should be given to the City of Richmond for taking steps in the right direction on this. Is there room for improvement? Likely. Maybe instead of some public feedback on a pre-determined approach it’s time for a real community forum discussion where all interests and views could be discussed and heard. Maybe then our MLA’s will bring this issue to the provincial level where appropriate penalties can be formulated and local governments can be properly empowered and funded to deal with it. The province took leadership in dealing with scrap metal dealers and it’s time to take a similar stance against those intentionally damaging our most valuable farmland entrusted to us for future generations. It’s our collective responsibility to force our political leaders to govern protection of our farmland before it is too late. Jerome Dickey Richmond

Add cycling to cycle of learning Practically every day I see cyclists pedalling along the highways and byways that take me from home to work and back. Practically every day I see them breaking the rules of the road - in fact, it’s rare that I don’t have a cyclist in my line of sight for more than 20 or 30 seconds without witnessing the shattering of one traffic law or another. Practically every day I see stupid motorists nearly fulfilling a cyclist’s apparent ambition to see tomorrow from a hospital bed - or not see tomorrow at all. And I think to myself... “More people should ride bicycles.” In fact, I wish more people would spend more time riding bikes before ever getting behind the wheel of a car, as opposed to under one - which happens far too often, as things currently stand. I’m not a sadist, and I’m not hoping I can snap a gory photo of a mangled cyclist to fill a corner of the newspaper. And it has nothing to do with my basic belief that the world would be a better place with fewer people in it (provided, of course, that I’m one of those “fewer people”). On the contrary, I believe that if there were more people riding bicycles to and fro, there would be less carnage in the long run. Potential motor vehicle drivers should be required to spend a couple hundred hours on a bicycle before

Bob Groeneveld ODD THOUGHTS

applying for a learner’s licence. And it shouldn’t be just some recreational riding around a quiet neighbourhood, around the local park a few times, or mountain biking along some backwoods trails. More cyclists rolling along with traffic (not against traffic, like pedestrians... which they are not — probably the most common Motor Vehicle Act transgression perpetrated by cyclists) would create a “safety in numbers” scenario. Motorists would be more aware of cyclists in their midst, because there would be more cyclists to remind them to pay attention. Motorists would also gain from the experience of having ridden a bicycle amongst idiot drivers who eat, drink, comb their hair, fix their make-up, and otherwise occupy themselves with endangering the lives of the people around them. You cannot truly understand the concept of “defensive driving” until you’ve ridden a bicycle alongside the stupidest, most oblivious creatures populating the face of the earth: the texting driver (followed closely by the cellphone-addicted driver - and don’t give me

that “hands-free” nonsense, as studies clearly show that hands-free cellphone use, while not illegal, is equally as dangerous as using handheld devices). And having had the benefit of experiencing the stupidity of the average steelenclosed motorist first-hand from the panoramic vantage point of a bicycle seat, the newly licensed driver is less likely to want to become one of those average idiots. Understanding would also flow both ways, as more and more cyclists become motorists - and they begin to teach their children how to ride safely, instead of actually teaching them dangerous behaviour. It is disconcerting in the extreme to see young cyclists follow their ignorant parents straight through stop signs and red lights, and passing lines of slow traffic on the right, sneaking up on the unsuspecting guy who doesn’t realize it has suddenly become dangerous to make his right turn. Parents on bicycles lead their kids along sidewalks, putting pedestrians at risk and creating the danger of uncertainty in the minds of motorists who, faced with such unruly behaviour, can’t know what the next move will be. They lead their kids against traffic lights through crosswalks where they have no business being. And when they get hit... stupid motorists! Bob Groeneveld is the editor of the Langley Advance.


The Richmond News August 2, 2013 A9

Letters BIKE PATH

See bigger picture NIMBYs The Editor, Re: “Asphalt isn’t green,” Letters, July 31. I want to reply to the NIMBYs who are upset about the bike path being constructed as the last part of the Railway Greenway trail, directly behind the Railway Community Gardens. I would first like to remind them that their “backyard” really belongs to all of the citizens of Richmond — not just the few that are fortunate enough to use public lands to grow food. I think it is wonderful that the city has many of these gardens in Richmond, but once the people start using them, they do not become their property. I am 65 years old and since this greenway has been built, I now go to Steveston on my bike rather than drive. I also have noticed that very quickly families are now using the greenway with their children. That can only be a good thing. You can now ride your bike from Westminster Highway to the boardwalk in

Steveston (except for the gravel part that is left, which the NIMBYs have claimed as their own) in a safe environment for all Richmond citizens. This greenway construction was not a surprise and did not happen at the last minute. If the NIMBYs had read the local newspapers over the past year, the greenway was mentioned many times with the route clearly marked. The city has made a great effort to get people out of their cars and on bikes, but the NIMBYs do not see the big picture. They only want to protect their piece of turf that belongs to all of the citizens of Richmond. I am also very disappointed that city hall rolled over so quickly on this issue, especially Coun. Harold Steves. I hope city hall changes their mind and paves this last section so that all of the citizens of Richmond and their families can ride safely on the whole path. Ken Schultz Richmond

Letters policy

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A10 August 2, 2013 The Richmond News

the

Friday Feature

Farmers look to sustain Richmond

and lease it back to prospective farmers, longterm. Another solution for him would be requiring developers pay residential taxes unless they farm the land. Both solutions are to be discussed as Metro Vancouver moves into the next steps following the release of its study, according to Steves. While Bennett admits he’s looking at the ALR to help save the government $50 million, the Minister of Agriculture and Lands, Pat Pimm, said the province would need to add 90,000 hectares of irrigated farmland for the province to regain food security. “If you take that 28 per cent of unused land, along with nurseries, gardens, golf course, etc., it all adds up.” The city is particularly looking to buy land along No. 5 Road and golf courses for agricultural purposes.

BY YVONNE ROBERTSON

yrobertson@richmond-news.com

T

hree hundred people regularly descend on Richmond’s community gardens with seeds and shovel in hand, ready to quite literally reap what they sow. Each plot can yield an average of one bag of vegetables and herbs a week, enough to feed a family of four. Well over 100 wannabe farmers anxiously wait for a spot to open up, as all of the city’s 10 gardens operate at capacity. “Food has become quite sexy,” says Colin Dring, executive director of the Richmond Food Security Society. “People are beginning to have a better understanding of food. And with things like the 100-Mile Diet coming out of the Lower Mainland and the rise of Jamie Oliver’s kitchen on a celebrity level, it’s become more popularized.” As issues surrounding climate change and overpopulation see the global food supply dwindle, people have been looking for ways to reduce their ecological footprint and support their local markets. “They recognize that we’re running out of agricultural land worldwide and food prices are getting higher,” says Coun. Harold Steves, a longtime farmer, who believes an interest in local food to be more than a fad. “They want to support local farmers. You can no longer trust import food. You have no idea what chemicals are put in it or what you’re eating.” On a small scale, community gardens are a direct result, where people produce what they eat and are guaranteed healthy produce at a cheaper price. Dring says the concept of a community garden can be expanded in an urban context, that it’s not too late for Richmond to return to its agricultural base, despite what others believe. “That kind of thinking assumes, and I think wrongly, that the pattern of suburban development and densification can’t be taken back and converted back into agricultural systems,” he says. He cites efforts made by the city to put rooftop gardens on, or some form of community garden space for, new developments. “Some more innovative developers are even incorporating this right into the apartment unit with built-in planters or things like that,” he says. “We can turn to places like Tokyo where there are some real creative things happening. So it’s a matter of to what degree we want to take it.”

Vacant farmland

The preliminary results from the Agricultural Land Use Inventory study, done by Metro Vancouver and the Ministry of Agriculture and Lands, states 28 per cent of land in the Agricultural Land Reserve is currently not being farmed. Approximately 1,921 hectares of Richmond’s 4,993 hectares of ALR land is not being used for farms. Most of this land has been zoned for agricultural purposes, but has been bought by residential developers in the hopes the city will

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A matter of dollars and cents

JOHN CORREA/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

Richard Reiner tends his garden at Terra Nova. Below, Colin Dring, executive director of the food security society. eventually change the zoning to accommodate for Richmond’s projected population growth. “The developers are hanging from dead trees like vultures,” says Steves. When developers buy farmland, they are not required to build a farm; rather the land generally sits unused. He can, however, build a “farm household”, which has resulted in the rise of large mansions, with untouched land behind them. “Hopefully, the city can take a more progressive stance to make sure the land will be farmed,” says Dring. “The suburban sprawl is the area to focus densification and transit. Leave the farmland as it is, or, heaven forbid, expand it. Add more acres. That would be incredible.” But it seems the province is looking to go the other way. On Wednesday, Premier Christy Clark announced Minister of Core Review Bill Bennett would examine ways to find savings of $50 million a year over the next two years. Bennett said he will look at the Agricultural Land Reserve — which protects almost five per cent of the province’s land for agricultural use — and the Agricultural Land Commission for extra funds. “It’s shocking that’s the direction they’re planning to take,” says Steves, who proposes the city buy the threatened land

Although more farms would create a more sustainable environment, indulging in the local food movement comes at a price. “Ultimately, it comes down to dollars and cents,” says longtime farmer Bill Zylmans at W&A Farms. “People will look outside if the price is lower. We live in one of the most expensive places in North America. Transportation costs, fuel, wages, cost of living, the input costs are much higher than in other places, so buying local here will always cost more.” Over the years, Zylmans has seen big supermarkets and processors change their priorities from supporting the local family farm to wanting an efficient, one-stop shop where they can get all their product from one place. “I would like to see (the processors) have a little bit more ruling to support local farms,” he says. “Producing 30 cases of something is a big deal for me, but only a drop in the bucket for them. They want to go somewhere where they can get their full order. It cuts costs and is easier to trace back if there are any problems.” Dring, on the other hand, says more farms could help to drive down the prices of buying local. “Farmers can then start co-ops or food hubs, where they can work together to store and pack produce, cutting back on the costs of the middleman. They’d still need to hire people, but it’d become more of a nonprofit, social enterprise.” For Zylmans, the decision rests on the consumer. “Price dictates what people are going to buy. And if local people aren’t going to support me, how can I run a successful farm?”

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the

Friday Feature

The Richmond News August 2, 2013 A11

JOHN CORREA/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

Emily Pearson works on the Urban Edibles farm. Far left, Pearson’s mother, Marianne, visits the farm and helps out for the day.

GMO crop ban stalled BY YVONNE ROBERTSON

yrobertson@richmond-news.com

New crop of farmers tilling the land BY YVONNE ROBERTSON

yrobertson@richmond-news.com

A couple of decades ago, it’d be rare to study for four years, get a degree and then settle on a vast stretch of land to till the soil. Farming was instead largely relegated to another, slower, time, before globalization and mass development. But now a new generation of farmers is cropping up, those who’ve never existed in a predeveloped world, in a way to get in touch with the rapidly disappearing land. “We moved too far in the opposite direction,” said Emily Pearson, a farmer in her mid-20s who works at Urban Edibles. “As a generation, we’ve grown up aware of the rapid growth of cities and our struggle to feed the world. Now, we’re starting to ask, ‘well, how can I feed myself?’”

In the Lower Mainland, and Richmond in particular, a growing number of young people are turning to the farm and careers in the agricultural sector, as a way of supporting a more sustainable environment. Four years ago, Kwantlen University opened the Richmond Farm School, a 10-month program providing training to such aspiring farmers with a focus to sustainability. Growing up all too aware of a laundry list of the world’s problems —the affects of climate change and overpopulation; the consequences of chemical use on one’s health and the environment; and the overall need to reduce one’s ecological footprint — are some of the reasons prompting this change, according to Pearson. For Pearson, who has aspired towards a life in agriculture since she was a child, her ultimate dream would be to live in a self-sustaining

“We can have really successful farms, but we have to work together and look to co-ops for the production side.” — Emily Pearson

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Richmond. “I think it can happen,” she said. “We can bring the animals back and really localize the food here. I’ve decided to not take my food off the island. I want to grow it in Richmond and use it to feed Richmond.” In May, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency changed the definition of local to mean anything grown within a province or 50 kilometres outside a province, as opposed to anything grown within 50 kilometres of where the food is sold. The change, which will take two years to enact, was criticized for being signed to allow big companies to jump on the local movement and label their food as local, even if it comes from north Washington, for example. “I’d like it to stay within the borders of the country, but whether we define community as 100,000 people or as within the province, we should all be working together to support it.” Instead, Pearson sees the change as an opportunity to discuss labeling in general, as local can be vague and confusing, particularly with foods that contain a variety of ingredients. “I’d rather see something more specific, like B.C.-grown, or Okanagan-grown,” she said. “But having it incorporate the whole province also helps the farmers up in northern B.C. where there aren’t as many people up there who will buy their product.” Unlike these northern communities, the Lower Mainland has an abundance of people that farms can serve, making Pearson’s dream of a self-sustaining Richmond more of a possibility to her. “We can have really successful farms, but we have to work together and look to co-ops for the production side,” she said. “Being a young farmer, we’ve come from this competitive environment, growing up in a capitalist economy where competition drives it. But rather than compete with each other, we need to use our competitive nature to push forward together.

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Last year, the City of Richmond made a groundbreaking decision to ban the growth of genetically engineered crops in the city. Although the city doesn’t have power to enforce such a ban, as GE crops are federally regulated, proponents said it sent a stronger message to the government. A year later, council has been writing letters to the higher levels of government to seek stronger labeling requirements in supermarkets, according to Coun. Harold Steves. “GMO (genetically modified organism) bans are now happening across B.C. so it’s up to the province and the federal government to enact a ban,” said the proponent of organic farming. “It shows people at a local level want it. But the federal government is funded by big companies like Monsanto.” Steves added the matter will be discussed at this September’s Union of British Columbia Municipalities (UBCM) Convention in Vancouver. “There’ll be some resolutions at the meeting,” he said. “So it’s going to be an interesting fall.” At the time council passed the ban, it was also said the city would integrate education about consumer choice and awareness of the issue into public outreach programs. Although the city hasn’t approached this yet, strides in attaining farmland will incorporate a major educational program. Steves anticipates with the opening of new farms and agricultural programs, education and a discussion of GMOs and organic agriculture will be incorporated.

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A12 August 2, 2013 The Richmond News

Arts&Culture BOOK REVIEWS

Evil witches, loving frogs, flying cats keep pages turning

Shawn Chang

Title: Raven’s Gate Reviewed by: Shawn Chang Age: 13 This book is about a troubled 14-year-old named Matthew Freeman, also known as Matt, who is sent to live in a foster home in a remote Yorkshire village with a creepy woman named Jayne Deverill.

He uncovers an evil plot involving witchcraft and the site of an ancient stone circle. I like this book because there are witches and evil creatures involved. Even though a lot of people die in the story, it’s still extremely interesting. I really enjoyed the part where Jayne Deverill,

Matthew’s new foster parent, turns out to be a witch and tries to kill him and use his blood to awaken some “king of the old ones.” Like a lot of teenage guys, I really loved it when the witch, also known as Mrs. Deverill, met the end of her malicious life by sinking into a tank full of acid, and, of course, she drowned.

Now, drowning in a tank full of acid is very common if someone happens to fall in one. (Epic fail.) Anyway, I still like the book and I just finished the last book in the series, Oblivion.

Tiana Liu

Claire Olan Title: The Prince of the Pond Reviewed by: Claire Olan Age: 8 This book is about a frog named Pin. He is in love with a frog named Jade. They get tadpoles. Pin is a very crazy frog. Will Jade want to stay with Pin? Will pond life ever be the same again? I like this book because

0

when Jade falls in love with Pin, all the pond dwellers think it is weird. I also like it because Jade is very funny, cute, and sweet.

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Title: Caramba Reviewed by: Tiana Liu Age: 9 This book is about a cat that can’t fly, although all the others can fly; but he found out that he could swim so he was happy. I like this book because it’s about cats and I Iike cats, and it is funny that cats fly. And the most important part is that Caramba can’t fly, and it’s good to be different!

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The Richmond News August 2, 2013 A13


A14 August 2, 2013 The Richmond News

Arts&Culture

Nation’s Cup spurs memories of Belfast champ With the Nation’s Cup Trafford ground for a trial. But feeling homesick, it being played in Richmond turned out he didn’t like it recently, I thought it might be a good idea to write about too much and he caught the one of the world’s greatest boat back to Belfast without soccer players, George Best, telling anyone who turned out for Ireland at Luckily, father figure Richmond’s Hugh Boyd Park THE BEAT MERCHANT Matt Busby, United’s manin 1984. My good friend ager knew that Best was a David Milner was lucky diamond in the rough and enough to get his autograph. eventually got him back and settled in At the age of 15, Best was discovered Manchester. by scout Bob Bishop in Belfast and was Making his debut in a Manchester United brought over to Manchester United’s Old shirt in 1963 at the age of 17, he looked too

Frankie Nielson

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skinny and fragile for the Football League, but nobody on the opposite side, West Bromwich Albion, could get near him. Playing on the wing alongside the likes of Denis Law and Bobby Charlton, this was the start of a new era at United after the tragic air crash at Munich in 1958 that claimed the lives of so many of the “Busby Babes.” If the club had sold one of these players in the ’60s, the crowd would have torn the ground down, that’s how high in esteem these players were held. The day United went to play Benfica in the European Cup quarter final in 1966 in Lisbon was when Best’s star exploded. After scoring two goals and playing out of his socks, he was dubbed with the name “El Beatle” by the media because of his great natural talent, good looks and Beatles hair cut. But this boy was more than a pretty face, he could play a bit as well! On the field he was poetry in motion, off the field, unlike David Beckham, was another story. He always made the headlines, drinking, which began to take its toll, but he left us some fine moments to remember. When on international duty for Northern Ireland, he sometimes single-handedly demolished the opponents — especially England, Scotland and Wales. Two occasions stand out for me watching him play — first against Chelsea at Old Trafford with Peter Bonetti in goal for Chelsea.

The keeper threw the ball out to full back Eddie McCreadie who couldn’t quite control it properly and Best whips in and with superb balance lobs it over McCreadie’s head and runs round the side of him, collecting the ball and neatly lobbing it over Bonetti’s head and into the back of the net. The second occasion was against poor old Northampton Town at their small ground in the FA Cup. Best had been banned for six games and this, is his comeback, game, he scores six goals. He graciously received the match ball signed by the Northampton team. What would Best be worth today, I wonder! He was European Player of the Year in 1968 after winning the European Cup. He could beat two defenders at once, ride their tackles wait for them to catch up and beat them again. Eat your heart, Cristiano Ronaldo. In 1974, at the ripe old age of 27, Best quit Manchester United for the last time after many runaways, his final game being on Jan. 1, 1974 against Queens Park Rangers at Loftus Road As one of the first celebrity footballers, Best led a rather wild lifestyle. Unfortunately, this led to progressively serious problems with alcoholism, which finally led to his death in November 2005 at the age of 59. Over a quarter of a million people lined the streets of Belfast for his funeral. Georgie Georgie — they call him the Belfast Boy! Frankie Nielson owns The Beat Merchant Record Store in Steveston.


The Richmond News August 2, 2013 A15

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Sports

T H E

Provincials next up for Roadrunners

The Richmond Roadrunners are headed back to the Provincial Intermediate “A” Lacrosse Championships after surviving a playoff series scare from the Langley Thunder. The Roadrunners booked their ticket into this weekend’s four-team tournament in Maple Ridge with an 11-4 win over the Thunder in the deciding game of the best-of-three series on Tuesday night at Minoru. The match-up looked to be lopsided on paper as Richmond cruised to a 15-3 regular season record while Langley finished at 8-10. The Roadrunners rolled to a 19-5 victory in game one but the Thunder responded with a 12-11 game two win at home to send the series to the limit. Langley jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the deciding game before Richmond standout goaltender Ryland Hood, who missed game two, shut the door. The hosts pulled away by outscoring the Thunder 7-1 over the final 40 minutes. Braeden Jensen, Josh McLaughlin and Tysen Stoddart each netted hat tricks. Regular season scoring champion Tyler Vogrig finished with six points, including a pair of goals. Spencer Bromley, Jayden Campbell, Travis Grant and Stoddart added two assists each. Single helpers went to Connor Davidson, Brad Hoffman and McLaughlin. Richmond is making its third consecutive trip to provincials but have yet to win a medal, despite back-to-back regular season championships. The boys get a huge test right out of the gate today against the Maple Ridge Burrards who took both meetings from the Roadrunners during the regular season. The locals also face Coquitlam on Saturday and Victoria Sunday. The gold and bronze medal games will take place on B.C. Day.

R I C H M O N D

The Richmond News August 2, 2013 A17

N E W S Editorial enquiries? Please contact The Richmond News 5731 No.3 Road V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-998-3615 (ext: 3615) Fax: 604-270-2248 Email: mbooth@richmond-news.com

MARK BOOTH/RICHMOND NEWS

Connor Davidson and the Richmond Roadrunners are heading to this weekend’s Provincial Intermediate “A” Lacrosse Championships in Maple Ridge after surviving a scare from the Langley Thunder in their qualifying series. The Roadrunners won the deciding game 11-4 on Tuesday night at Minrou Arena. The provincials start today.

Kajaks a force at B.C. Track and Field Championships

Richmond Kajaks members produced quite the medal haul at the recent B.C. Track and Field Championships in Kamloops. Georgia Lam swept all sprints for 14-year-old women with gold medals in 100m, 200m and 300 events. Camryn Rogers Toney also collected her share of medals, winning gold in shot put and sliver in hammer and discus. Distance runner Nathan Loewen was a surprise winner in the midget men’s 300m sprint. Gurleen Bhandal was a gold medalist in midget women’s discus. Chanell Botsis was a double gold medalist in women’s ham-

mer and javelin. Her best effort in the hammer was a meet record. She also added a bronze in the discus. Valerie Wideski collected her share of medals, winning gold in discus, silver in shot put and bronze in hammer. Recent transfer Marie Louise Forsyth picked up two medals — silver in long jump and a bronze in triple jump. Youth and Juniors also took home some hardware with Pauljit Bhandal winning gold in the junior men’s hammer and shot put. He also won silver in discus. Mark Kalmykov fin-

Valerie Wideski

ished with a bronze medal in junior men’s hammer throw. Following in her sisters footsteps, Autumn Covington was a bronze medalist in hammer. Serena Graf won silver in shot put and hammer and Eva Merenyi bronze in shot put. Curtis Moss once again retains his championship status by repeating as B.C. senior javelin champion. Newcomer Christine Ausman became the B.C. senior women’s champion. Kajaks Trey Henderson, who now trains in Kamloops, picked up the silver medal in men’s hammer and Samantha Kennedy also earned silver in

women’s hammer. Andy White had a one of his better throws of the season finishing with a silver medal in men’s javelin. All other Kajaks athletes that participated in the championship made the finals in their respective events. Catherine Ylo in both 100 and 200m, Merel Shuurman Hess in 100m and 200m with great performances. Nathan Loewen finished fourth in midget 800m, fifth in 1200m and fourth in the 2000m. In the 2000m, 300m, 800m and 1200 he had personal best in each of his events with a total combined time of over 16 seconds off his previous PBs.

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A18 August 2, 2013 The Richmond News

Sports

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Whitecaps Girls Elite team members Justin Do (left) and Summer Clarke are joined by their longtime youth coach Clive Clarke after the team’s Pacific Coast Soccer League championship win last weekend. Both girls played for Clarke on the Richmond Red Hot Selects before joining the Whitecaps program.

A pair of Richmond soccer standouts helped the Vancouver Whitecaps FC Girls Elite squad complete a dominating season in style. Striker Summer Clarke and fullback Justine Do were in the starting 11 as the Whitecaps defeated the Kamloops Heat 7-2 on Sunday to win the Dave Fryatt Challenge Cup. They also become the first ever Canadian-based team to win the PCSL treble — the PCSL Women’s Premier regular season title, the Challenge Cup, and the McAdams Cup contested

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between clubs from British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. In addition, Clarke received to PCSL Golden Boot Award as the league’s top scorer, finishing with 19 goals. She was also prominent in the final, showcasing her outstanding speed to set up a pair of goals. Earlier this month, the Girls Elite squad captured the Gothia World Youth Cup in Gothenburg Sweden, beating top teams from countries such as Sweden, Spain, and Norway in the process. In addition,

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the girls won the Metro Women’s Soccer League (MWSL) regular season and cup titles while also impressing in a number of elite showcase tournaments. Next up for the Girls Elite team is a trip to Sherbrooke, Quebec, to represent Team BC at the 2013 Canada Summer Games. “The team was extremely motivated to have their last performance of the PCSL season be a great one,” said Whitecaps FC Girls Elite head coach Jesse Symons after the match. “They’ve really come together this year and have played a very attractive style of soccer, looking to be creative and positive with the ball and they definitely brought it out in today’s final.” Clarke will be continuing her promising career at Louisiana State University and leaves this weekend to prepare for her freshman season. Do has committed to Yale University in 2014.

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