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BRITISH CLEANING COUNCIL

THE VOICE

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE BRITISH CLEANING COUNCIL

YOUR INDUSTRY • YOUR VOICE

SPRING2019

STEVE ASHKIN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW HOW TO DO WE GET CLEANING TO GO GREENER?

ALSO INSIDE:

BCC MEMBERS LAUNCH NEW PLASTICS PLEDGE

THE STATE OF OUR SECTOR

find out what it is, who’s behind it, and why it’s important

discover the trends and challenges revealed by the BCC’s latest industry research

LENDING A HELPING HAND TO DOMESTIC CLEANING hear how a BCC grant gave the DCA and the domestic cleaning sector a boost

A BIGGER AND BETTER CLEANING SHOW our guide to the threeday expo which brings the whole industry together


CHAIRMAN’S INTRODUCTION Welcome to The Voice, the British Cleaning Council’s official magazine. For this edition, which once again coincides with the forthcoming Cleaning Show expo in London, we have decided to look at the theme of sustainability which remains one of the biggest challenges to our sector. To help highlight the issues around greener and cleaner cleaning practices we have an exclusive interview with Steve Ashkin on pages 4-5. Steve, who is based in California, is the Executive Director of the Green Cleaning Network and co-founder of the Green Cleaning University (GCU) - an intensive professional development programme for American cleaning operatives who want to specialise in green and ecofriendly solutions.

undertaken, and the results are really quite astonishing in terms of the significance of what we do and the massive contribution we make to the UK economy. See the page opposite for more details, including how to get a free copy of the full report.

You’ll also find on pages 8 and 9 more about what to expect at The Cleaning Show this year including some recommended speaker sessions and details of some of the new sectorspecific zones we have created at Excel for the first time.

We also have a feature on a new sustainability initiative aimed at tackling the use of plastic in the cleaning supply chain. It’s been developed by three BCC members (CHSA, CSSA and WAMITAB) and it has the wholehearted support of the BCC. Find out more on pages 6-7. This issue also includes another exclusive which is analysis of the BCC’s latest research into the size and value of our sector. For the first time this year we have also broadened the scope of the report and have included figures for waste management and FM activities. This means it is the most in-depth piece of research into the overall commercial cleaning, waste and FM sectors we have ever

And on pages 10 and 11 you can read about a special BCC-funded workshop - delivered by the Domestic Cleaning Alliance- which helped owners of small domestic cleaning businesses address a range of key issues. I think this is a great example of the BCC’s grant funding programme in action and shows how innovation and professional development does not have to

INFO@BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG PAGE 2

involve a massive investment to be effective. Finally, as this will be my last edition of The Voice as BCC Chair, can I just say thank you to all of the BCC’s members, industry partners, friends and colleagues for their support, encouragement and interest in our work. Or, as Henry Ford once said, “If everyone is moving forward together then success takes care of itself.”

Stan Atkins, Chair of the British Cleaning Council

BRITISH CLEANING COUNCIL

YOUR INDUSTRY • YOUR VOICE


YOUR INDUSTRY • YOUR VOICE

SKILLS, SICK DAYS AND SURVIVAL RATES What Does The BCC’s New Research Report Tell Us About The Health Of Our Sector? The British Cleaning Council continues to invest in research to better understand the size and value of the UK’s cleaning, waste management and FM sectors as well as identify the opportunities, challenges and risks we face as an industry. Here Gwenn Winters - from data analysts Firedog - looks at some of the headline findings of our latest Annual Research Report and explains how the baseline has been expanded this year to include additional occupations.

2016, 5,745 new businesses opened in the sector.

Building on the 2017 report Preparing for the Future – this year we have expanded the analysis to include information on the Management of Waste and Resources. This is a key function for the industry.

Nearly nine in ten (88%) firms are microbusinesses, employing less than 10 individuals. These types of microbusinesses may come under immense pressure when the supply chain as a whole is exposed to business behaviours which are ultimately unsustainable.

For example, Local Authority collected waste consists of all waste from households, street sweepings, municipal parks and gardens, beach cleansing and waste resulting from the clearance of fly-tipped materials plus some commercial or industrial waste. Without those working in this area, and other cleaning services, the country and premises would become dirty, messy, unsanitary and unsafe. As a diverse industry, covering a range of activities and support services, it contributes £49.9bn to the economy, with nearly 915,000 individuals working in the industry. Competition is fierce. Barriers to entry can be low as there is very little expensive equipment needed and minimum training required for employees in some areas – so new competitors spring up all the time. In

However, the five-year survival rate for businesses is low. Just 33% of firms which began operating in 2011 were still active in 2016.

There are numerous employment opportunities in the industry. At the time of a recent survey, one in five (19%) of employers in the industry reported having at least one vacancy, with a total of 18,000 opportunities reported. Over half (54%) were for elementary roles i.e. cleaners and domestic operatives, window cleaners, refuse and salvage occupations. However, three in ten of these vacancies were considered to be hard-to-fill, meaning employers face challenges filling these roles.

While the majority of firms report having a fully proficient workforce 12% do report having skills gaps, with 4% of all workers not considered fully proficient in their role. Employers are reporting that these skills gaps have a major impact on their organisation’s performance, including increased workload for other staff and higher operating costs. Steps undertaken to improve efficiency, or skills of staff with skills gaps, include increasing training activity. Across the industry we see 60% of firms providing training, but this is lower than the UK all sector average (66%). With an estimated 239,000 days off work taken by cleaners and domestic operatives due to self-reported illness caused, or made worse by their current or most recent job in a year, the industry needs to continue to look after its workforce. On a more positive note, the cleaning sector enjoyed an 8% rise in turnover since the last BCC research report was published. This is double the average turnover increase experienced by other UK industrial sectors in the same period. To request a free PDF copy of the full BCC research report email info@ britishcleaningcouncil.org For more details of Firedog visit

www.firedogresearch.com

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GIVING THE GREEN LIGHT TO MORE SUSTAINABLE CLEANING AN INTERVIEW WITH STEVE ASHKIN

The Voice caught up with Steve before he made the trip across the Atlantic to attend The Cleaning Show to learn more about his vision for a ‘greener’ cleaning industry globally.

Steve Ashkin is renowned in the USA as the country’s leading ‘Green Cleaning Guru’. He is Executive Director of the Green Cleaning Network and co-founder of the Green Cleaning University (GCU). The GCU is an intensive professional development programme for American cleaning operatives who want to specialise in green and eco-friendly solutions.

WHAT DOES ‘GREEN CLEANING’ MEAN TO YOU AS A PHILOSOPHY? The underlying principal recognises that modern practices allow us to clean effectively using high-performing and costcompetitive products that reduce negative health and environmental impacts when compared to conventional cleaning. Why are we still using cleaning chemicals that contain ingredients that cause cancer and other health problems when other products are available that work equally as well, are cost effective, and reduce health impacts? Why do we still use paper made from 100% virgin fibres when we can use paper products made from 100% post-consumer recycled fibres, rapidly renewable fibres or from sustainably managed forests? As an industry we can be better than this. Not only is Green Cleaning better for our environment, it is better for our people and the bottom line.

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WHAT ARE THE MAIN BARRIERS REGARDING US ADOPTING A MORE SUSTAINABLE APPROACH TO COMMERCIAL CLEANING? I have been working to “green” the U.S. cleaning industry since 1990. What I observe to be the biggest barrier has nothing to do with technology, capabilities or cost as the tools and processes for implementing Green Cleaning are now well developed. Rather, I have found that the primary barrier is simply change itself. In the U.S. many companies are struggling to grow, and their people are overwhelmed with things to do. So, while they are capable of implementing Green Cleaning, they often have other priorities and ‘fires to put out’ that simply take precedent. But it is not hard if they have the will to do it.


YOUR INDUSTRY • YOUR VOICE

WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST OPPORTUNITIES THAT GREEN CLEANING CAN OFFER THE SECTOR? There are numerous opportunities, but the two biggest are business growth, along with the ability to further protect the health of our workers. This can also lead to reduced health care costs and improved ability to attract new workers. In my opinion, if we remain on the current path we should only expect more downward pressure on costs. We must do things differently if we want to thrive and Green Cleaning can be a pathway to a better future. HOW IMPORTANT IS THE GENERAL PUBLIC’S ATTITUDE TOWARDS ‘GREENER’ CLEANING IN TERMS OF CHANGING THE WAY THE CLEANING INDUSTRY OPERATES? The data seems clear that Millennials and GenXers care about health and environmental issues, as well as things like corporate responsibility. So, while the trend is hard to see at this time, as these younger people become more influential in terms of both their professional stature and their personal affluence, they will increasingly impact which companies they want to work for and who they do business with. If the real question is will ‘green’ change how the average citizen thinks about cleaning, I think Green Cleaning will help. One of their first actions will be to buy cost competitive, third-party certified green products because this is easy and they want to do the right thing. CAN YOU GIVE US AN EXAMPLE OF A GENUINE, COST-EFFECTIVE AND 100% SUSTAINABLE GREEN CLEANING SOLUTION CURRENTLY AVAILABLE IN THE MARKETPLACE? Some products are relatively easy to consider green such as paper products made with a high percentage of post-consumer recycled content or made from rapidly renewable fibres along with dispensers that reduce waste and sizing liners that fit the containers and are the correct thickness.

We are also starting to see some exciting innovation in cleaning chemicals. One of my favourites is daily-use chemicals produced ‘onsite’ which significantly reduces the environmental impacts associated with conventional chemicals. Finally, some of my favourite green products are really simple things like floor pads, entryway mats, buckets, plastic liners and other materials made from recycled materials. Converting to these products is easy and ‘closing the loop’ by purchasing products with recycled content is better for the environment than using conventional products made from virgin materials. WHAT IMPACT WILL AUTOMATION, IoT AND AI ETC. HAVE ON THE GROWTH OF THE GREEN CLEANING INDUSTRY? I believe these new technologies will increase efficiencies, eliminate waste and product misuse, all of which will directly reduce environmental impacts while also saving money. For example, if we only clean what and when necessary we will reduce the use of chemicals. If our dispensers are ‘smart’ we will reduce paper waste. If the information helps us do a better job on equipment maintenance, we can extend the life of our equipment. WHERE IS THE UK AND EUROPE UP TO ON THIS ISSUE COMPARED TO THE USA? The UK and Europe have done outstanding work on green issues in general, and in many cases are ahead of the U.S. such as on chemical policy and the adoption of extended producer responsibility. Specifically to Green Cleaning, I believe the UK and Europe have everything in place to really capitalise on these efforts and become global leaders. What is needed is for the UK and European cleaning industry to develop a comprehensive and standardised approach to Green Cleaning to make it easy for building owners, property and facility managers to buy these products and services with confidence.

IF WE DON’T EMBRACE GREENER CLEANING, WHERE DO YOU THINK THAT WILL LEAVE US? I think this is somewhat the wrong question as it suggests that Green Cleaning may not be embraced. I believe Green Cleaning is inevitable because manufacturers, service providers and distributors are all looking for ways to increase their market share and Green Cleaning gives them the opportunity to do so. This is what we experienced in the U.S. and I think the UK will follow the same path. And now that the products are proven to be both cost competitive and perform comparably to conventional products, it is just a matter of time before this becomes a substantial trend in the UK. IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE YOU’LL BE ADDRESSING IN YOUR PRESENTATION AT THE CLEANING SHOW IN LONDON? I am excited to be invited to The Cleaning Show in London to learn more details about the current state of the cleaning industry, and to meet with both industry leaders and building owners to help accelerate the adoption of Green Cleaning. We can make a big difference not only for our companies and employees, but for future generations to come.

STEVE ASHKIN WILL BE OFFICIALLY OPENING THE CLEANING SHOW EXPO AT LONDON’S EXCEL ON MARCH 19TH AND WILL BE THE KEYNOTE AFTERNOON SPEAKER AT THE CLEANING SHOW’S CONFERENCE ON MARCH 20TH. MORE DETAILS ABOUT THE CLEANING SHOW, WHICH IS CO-PRODUCED BY THE BRITISH CLEANING COUNCIL, CAN BE FOUND AT WWW.CLEANINGSHOW.CO.UK.

YOU CAN FIND OUT MORE ABOUT STEVE’S WORK BY VISITING WWW.ASHKINGROUP.COM

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BCC MEMBERS COMBINE TO LAUNCH NEW ‘PLASTICS PLEDGE’

Stephen Harrison, Chair of the CHSA

Doug Cooke, Chair of the CSSA

Chris James, CEO of WAMITAB

Three British Cleaning Council members, the Cleaning & Hygiene Suppliers Association (CHSA), the Cleaning Support Services Association (CSSA) and the Waste Management Industry Training & Advisory Board (WAMITAB), have come together to help tackle the use of plastic in the cleaning and hygiene supply chain through a new ‘Plastics Pledge’. Here Stephen Harrison, Chair of the CHSA, Doug Cooke, Chair of the CSSA, and Chris James, CEO of WAMITAB, explain what the pledge is, and why it is needed. Plastic is embedded in every part of the cleaning and hygiene supply chain, from the manufacture of plastic sacks and the bottles containing cleaning chemicals to the packaging of individual products. This is why we have come together to address the challenge – an effective solution is only possible through cross sector collaboration. The broadcast of the BBC’s Blue Planet triggered a powerful emotional response to plastic, the general public almost immediately adopting the binary position that plastic is bad and anything that avoids the use of plastic is good. Politicians had to act.

The Rt. Hon. Michael Gove, Secretary of State for Environment has been vocal, saying he will ban plastic straws and stirrers and wants to introduce a deposit return scheme for plastic bottles. His commitment and energy are to be welcomed but those of us working in the cleaning and hygiene industry understand the issue is complex. Our member companies are run by and employ members of the general public. From a personal perspective, they genuinely want to do the right thing for the planet but, when faced with hard commercial reality, it’s not easy to know what that is. We can’t simply say we will switch from plastic to another material for chemical containers or bin liners. In many circumstances other materials will not work or will introduce new, potentially unforeseen, environmental challenges.

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We – the CHSA representing manufacturers and distributors of cleaning & hygiene products, the CSSA representing the UK’s contract cleaners, and WAMITAB, developing qualifications for those working in waste management and recycling, cleaning and street cleansing, facilities management and parking – have come together to tackle this issue head on. We are developing a cleaning industry standard on plastics around the mantra reduce, reuse, recycle: The Cleaning Industry’s Plastics Pledge. The pledge will contain information on how to reduce plastic use and waste; advice on the best practice for plastic use, including information on the most appropriate plastic type for the task or job in question; and best practice for recycling, including advice on which labels to use.


YOUR INDUSTRY • YOUR VOICE

Our approach to the Plastics Pledge is mirroring the way in which the CHSA developed its four Accreditation Schemes, for Manufacturers of Soft Tissue, Plastic Refuse Sacks and Industrial Cotton Mops and for Distributors. We are evaluating the challenge, will then define the pledge, and finally assess our members to verify they are holding true to the pledge. Today, there is no clear, agreed understanding of the amount or type of plastic in the supply chain. There is no clear understanding of what happens to plastics through the supply chain and there is no knowledge about whether or not there is consistency in approach. There is also no common understanding of best practice. In response, members of the CHSA have been surveyed to get an insight into the use of plastics in the manufacture and distribution of cleaning and hygiene. We researched the types of plastic used in the supply chain, why they are used and what is done with them after use.

The initial results are encouraging. By far the majority of plastics used in the manufacture and packaging of the CHSA’s manufacturing members’ products are reuseable and recyclable and there is no reported use of the most damaging type. The survey also found distributor members are already active in the recycling of plastic waste – 88% reported they recycle plastic. There is also an ambition to do more – 88% also asked for more information on recycling schemes. Furthermore, the CSSA’s recent survey into green issues in the cleaning industry highlighted strategies employed by members to reduce plastics. These include innovations including the use of hyper-concentrates, measured dosing systems and single dose capsules. CSSA members also clearly recognise products that shed plastic fibres or use microplastic beads have had a detrimental effect on the environment and that products based on products such as bamboo are likely to be increasingly common.

At the other end of the supply chain, users of cleaning and hygiene products want more and better information on what they should be demanding of their suppliers in terms of plastic use and the best methods for re-use and recycling. Our next step in the development of the Cleaning Industry Plastics Pledge is to understand better the way in which the plastics are used so we can develop a route map involving all in the cleaning and hygiene sector toward the most sustainable plastics and their re-use and recycling. Once developed and widely adopted, the Cleaning Industry Plastics Pledge will enable us to bring together and accelerate the good work already being done in our sector to make sure our use of plastic is sustainable. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE WORK OF OUR RESPECTIVE ORGANISATIONS VISIT WWW.CHSA.CO.UK WWW.CSSA-UK.CO.UK WWW.WAMITAB.ORG.UK

TYPES 1 OF 2 HDPE (High Density Polyethylene): commonly used for, for example, in cleaning chemical cans, milk bottles etc. PLASTIC: PP (Polypropylene): used in the manufacture of car bumpers, crates and bottle tops.

RANKING ACCORDING TO EASE OF RE-USE AND THEN RECYCLABILITY

3 4 5 6 7

LDPE (Low Density Polyethylene): commonly used, for example, as a protective film around drink cans and food packaging. PVC (Poly Vinyl Chloride): can be flexible or rigid and used, for example, for window frames, bottles and blister packaging etc. PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate): is commonly used, for example, in water bottles. Its decontamination requires harmful chemicals and if repeatedly reused can leach carcinogens. It can be reprocessed into new PET bottles or polyester fibre. PS (Polystyrene): used, for example, in the manufacture of plant pots and coffee cup lids. It also comes in the form of expanded polystyrene for the protection of electrical components.

Other (Polycarbonate PFC, Nylon PA, Acetal POM, Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene ABS, Polybutylene terephthalate PBT, Styrene Acrylonitrile SNA).

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HOW TO BE CLEANER AND GREENER

THE CLEANING SHOW 2019WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR The 2019 Cleaning Show at London’s Excel (19-21 March), is once again set to be packed with exhibitors from around the world, leading industry experts and thousands of visitors who are involved in the cleaning, waste management and FM sectors. You can find more details of all the brands and businesses that will be exhibiting, and the full seminar schedule, at www.cleaningshow.co.uk (where you can also register for your free ticket). However, here are some of things that caught the attention of The British Cleaning Council, which co-produces the event, which we think are worth checking out if you’re visiting.

www.cleaningshow.co.uk INFO@BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG PAGE 8

There’s a strong sustainability theme running through this year’s event which is exemplified by our keynote speaker, the USA’s ‘Green Cleaning Guru’ Steven Ashkin. Steve is Executive Director of the Green Cleaning Network and co-founder of the Green Cleaning University (GCU), an intensive professional development programme for American cleaning operatives who want to specialise in green and eco-friendly solutions. Don’t miss his opening remarks which officially open the show at 11.00am on March 19th and his presentation at 2.00pm on March 20th. This year The Cleaning Show will also be featuring The Green Zone, a space offering advice and solutions to those looking to reduce their environmental impact and offer more sustainable services. A special Resource Management exhibition area, which will focus on waste management and recycling, is another new feature.

THE CARPET CLEANING VILLAGE In recognition of the massive contribution carpet cleaning makes to the wider cleaning industry, the 2019 Cleaning Show will feature for the first time a Carpet Cleaning Village dedicated to the sector. The space has been designed for anyone connected to the carpet cleaning industry and will give them the chance to try out the latest products, attend workshops and meet with fellow carpet cleaners and carpet cleaner equipment providers. BCC member the National Carpet Cleaning Association (NCCA) will also be present in the Carpet Cleaning Village and will be on hand to answer any questions you have about this growing industry sector.


YOUR INDUSTRY • YOUR VOICE

SEMINARS, SPEECHES AND DISCUSSIONS There’s another packed speaker programme this year which will cover issues which impact on every aspect of the cleaning, waste management and FM sectors together with niche industry topics.

The Living Wage, Brexit, recruitment, apprenticeships, automation and taking a more sustainable approach to commercial cleaning will all be covered, as will subjects like dealing with food waste, hygiene in healthcare

THE WINDOW CLEANING WORLD CUP Similar to the carpet cleaners, the window cleaning industry will this year have its own ‘village’ that will focus on every aspect of the window cleaning trade. Facilitated by BCC member the Federation of Window Cleaners (FWC), this space will also be host to the first ever Window Cleaning World Cup. Sponsored by Unger, and adjudicated by the FWC, window cleaners from around the world have been invited to enter and they’ll get the chance to win the first ever international window cleaning contest (and a prize of £1,000). To take part they will need to clean three 114.3 x 114.3 cm office windows - and wipe the sill – in fastest time with a 300mm long squeegee and 9 litres of water. Any smears will result in time penalties.

The FWC hopes that by attracting more global participants that someone may finally come close to beating Terry ‘Turbo’ Burrows 10year world record of 9.14 seconds. In addition, organisers are looking to encourage more women cleaners to take part, highlighting that Deborah Morris’ record time of 16.28 seconds has now stood for over eight years.

settings, surface contamination and food poisoning. There will also be a special panel discussion on FM and Estates Management, and a session on reputation management in a crisis.

REWARDING INNOVATION

Once again in 2019 The Cleaning Show will be hosting the Innovation Awards. These are a series of prizes for the best products and services being exhibited at the show and will offer delegates the opportunity to see a number of new and innovative products which have never been seen in the UK before. An expert panel will be judging the most innovative products on Tuesday 19th March with the winners being announced that afternoon at 4.30pm.

SO, THAT’S JUST A SNAPSHOT OF WHAT’S HAPPENING AT THIS YEAR’S CLEANING SHOW. IF YOU ARE ATTENDING, YOU’LL ALSO FIND THE BCC THERE ON STAND C40 – SO PLEASE DO SWING BY AND SAY HELLO. WWW.CLEANINGSHOW.CO.UK PAGE 9 WWW.BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG


HELPING SECTORS TO HELP THEMSELVES - BCC GRANT FUNDING IN ACTION In September last year the British Cleaning Council funded a pilot workshop which was designed to support the owners of small domestic cleaning businesses. Founder of the Domestic Cleaning Alliance – Stephen Munton – who devised and delivered the event, explains what happened. The British Cleaning Council has always had a grant funding programme which uses profits from The Cleaning Show to help to develop big ideas which can potentially lead to major changes across the sector. Often these need to be match funded by board members and can involve quite considerable sums of money. However, recently the BCC also introduced some lower tier grants to support smaller, agile and more innovative projects, and I’m very proud that the DCA were one of the first Council members to be awarded one of these more modest grants.

Stephen Munton

When we applied, our idea was simple. We had identified that many owner-managers of small domestic cleaning businesses struggled to recruit and retain reliable staff, were unsure about what to charge for different services, and needed guidance to better manage and promote their company. After consulting with our members, the DCA concluded that a face-toface workshop could really help address some of these issues, and that’s when we applied to the BCC to support a pilot scheme. Having never done anything like this before, and with no examples of other similar workshops to base ours on, we thought hard about what would give participants the most practical and valuable ‘takeaways’ from the day.

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To start with we needed to demonstrate we understood their situation and issues, so the people leading the training had to be credible and experienced. Fortunately for the DCA we have a fantastic patron, Delia Cannings, who was happy to help us. Like myself Delia is also a British Cleaning Council member and she runs a training and education consultancy called 3ees which is focused on commercial cleaning and hygiene. Delia also has extensive experience within the housekeeping and healthcare cleaning industries and is an incredibly engaging presenter, so I was delighted when she agreed to host our event in her offices in Birmingham. Also in attendance was DCA Senior Panel Member & co-founder, Diane Greenwood, owner of Freshly Maid, Wetherby, and leading management consultant Jane Brookes of HOW Management Matters. This team, together with myself, proceeded to work with 30 ownermanagers of domestic cleaning businesses across a range of themes and activities which impacted on all of their businesses. We divided everyone into groups and asked each to perform a SWOT analysis on the domestic cleaning industry, an exercise many had never undertaken before. Each group in turn then presented to the room


YOUR INDUSTRY • YOUR VOICE

The DCA workshop their findings, and a very vocal and passionate discussion took place amongst all attendees. With that and other discussions taking up most of the morning, the afternoon session was based on a very specific challenge to our sector staff retention. Led by Jane Brookes, this lasted around three hours and consisted of individual introductions to the room, presentations, group exercises and discussions, as well as a Q&A session.

The time passed quickly, but we covered a lot of ground and there was a real sense in the room that they had all learned a great deal - not only from the trainers and consultants but from each other. Indeed the peer-to-peer support, and the fact so many participants realised they were not alone in feeling frustrated and unsure if they were going about running their business in the right way, was one of the biggest benefits of the whole exercise. One of the participants, Randolf Kho from Solihull’s Clean Your World, summed it up when he said: “As a new business owner you feel alone most of the time, but I recently joined the DCA and the information

and support from the workshop was superb. I met many people who run businesses like mine, and the workshop has given me the confidence to grow my business.” Delia’s feedback was also very encouraging. She said: “The DCA’s workshop demonstrated that many people who start out on their own in the cleaning sector can need a great deal of support and guidance. Often it is a lack of confidence that gets in the way of growth, and events like this one really helped the participants believe they were on the right track towards building a professional and profitable business.” Comments like that are exactly what I hoped we would get out of the pilot workshop and I am delighted that the work of the DCA - with the help of people like Delia, Diane, and Jane –along with the financial support of the BCC – has been so effective throughout this project.

Delia Cannings

Hopefully the success of the pilot will see us develop more events like this, and if you are interested in registering for future workshop, contact us via www.domesticcleaningalliance.co.uk

Jane Brookes

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OUR MEMBERS THE ASSOCIATION OF BUILDING CLEANING DSPS THE ASSOCIATION OF HEALTHCARE CLEANING PROFESSIONALS THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR CHEMICAL SPECIALITIES THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR CLEANING IN HIGHER EDUCATION THE BRITISH INSTITUTE OF CLEANING SCIENCE

ABOUT THE BCC Established in 1982, the British Cleaning Council (BCC) is the authoritative voice of UK cleaning, a sector worth over £24bn a year to the country’s economy and one which employs over 700,000 people. The Council’s membership is made up of over 20 trade and membership associations which are all linked to the cleaning and hygiene professions. From contract cleaning to waste management, pest control to housekeeping, training providers to machine manufacturers, chemical suppliers to wheelie-bin washers – the BCC coordinates, campaigns and supports the affairs of the whole of the UK’s cleaning industry. Key priorities for the BCC and its membership include raising professional standards, employee health and wellbeing, career development and training, improved quality control and better procurement practices. They are also committed to promoting higher levels of cleaning and hygiene across all environments – commercial, domestic and public.

BRITISH CLEANING COUNCIL

THE BRITISH TOILET ASSOCIATION THE BRITISH PEST CONTROL ASSOCIATION THE BUSINESS SERVICES ASSOCIATION THE CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH THE CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF WASTES MANAGEMENT THE CLEANING & HYGIENE SUPPLIERS’ ASSOCIATION THE CLEANING & SUPPORT SERVICES ASSOCIATION THE DOMESTIC CLEANING ALLIANCE THE FEDERATION OF WINDOW CLEANERS THE INDUSTRIAL CLEANING MACHINE MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION KEEP BRITAIN TIDY THE NATIONAL CARPET CLEANERS ASSOCIATION THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF WHEELED BIN WASHERS THE UK CLEANING PRODUCTS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION THE UK HOUSEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION

YOUR INDUSTRY • YOUR VOICE WAMITAB

Find out more: Online at www.britishcleaningcouncil.org Email info@britishcleaningcouncil.org Via Twitter @BritishCleaning On Facebook search “British Cleaning Council”

THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANERS

FOR DETAILS ON EACH MEMBER AND A LINK TO THEIR WEBSITE VISIT WWW.BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG/MEMBERS

Profile for Richard Bond

The Voice Spring 2019  

The official magazine of the British Cleaning Council

The Voice Spring 2019  

The official magazine of the British Cleaning Council

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