The Voice Spring 2018

Page 1

British Cleaning Council

The Voice of the Cleaning Industry

SPRING2018

THE VOICE

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE BRITISH CLEANING COUNCIL

A BRIGHT FUTURE FOR CLEANING?

WE EXPLORE THE IMPLICATIONS OF OUR LATEST RESEARCH INTO THE UK CLEANING MARKET ALSO INSIDE:

LEVELLING THE PLAYING FIELD FOR PROCUREMENT - WHY THE BCC IS BACKING THE EFCI’S NEW BEST VALUE GUIDE THE ROYAL TOUCH - IS IT TIME THE CLEANING INDUSTRY SOUGHT CHARTERED STATUS? HIT THE NORTH - MANCHESTER CLEANING SHOW PREVIEW PLUS INDUSTRY NEWS AND VIEWS FROM BCC MEMBERS AND PARTNERS


A WELCOME FROM OUR CHAIR Welcome to this special edition of The Voice, the British Cleaning Council’s official magazine. Since elected Chair of the BCC, which is now in its 36th year, I have been asked by many of our members - and by many within the wider cleaning industry- where I think we are as a sector, and what are the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. Whilst I have personal views about the priorities and issues we face, I’d much rather let the cold hard facts about cleaning speak for themselves. That’s why the BCC commissioned one of the most in-depth pieces of research ever undertaken into the commercial cleaning sector last year. We wanted to understand the full scale and economic significance of what still remains a largely ‘hidden’ industry in the UK, and also find out its potential for growth. Skills and employment was another area we wanted to explore, including getting a grasp on what Brexit might mean in terms of us losing workers from overseas. You can read about the main findings from the report, and some of the conclusions reached by the consultants who undertook the research, on pages three and four. However, one thing I am passionate about is the raising of professional standards in the cleaning sector,

which is why we’ve commissioned two articles linked to this subject from BCC members in this edition. On page seven you’ll find a piece by my BICSc colleague, Dr Sally Messenger, about progress on a new Apprenticeship for Cleaning Hygiene Operative, and also why the government’s new ‘T Levels’ could transform vocational training. And on pages ten and eleven we have a feature by Philip Morris of the Worshipful Company of Environmental Cleaners regarding the possibility of the cleaning profession securing Royal Chartered status. Another area where I and the BCC are keen to see more reform is in procurement, and on page eight you can read why the BCC’s Deputy Chair, Paul Thrupp, believes everyone should get behind the principles of the EFCI’s Best Value handbook which the BCC contributed to. A need for more consistency and better standards across cleaning is also something that BCC member the CHSA is highly committed to, and on page six you will find an update on their highly successful accreditation schemes for distributors and manufacturers of soft tissue, plastic refuse sacks and cotton mops.

INFO@BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG PAGE 2

Finally, I’m very proud that the BCC will soon be helping to deliver the second Manchester Cleaning Show in April. Some of the highlights of the two-day event can be found on page nine, along with details of how to register for a free pass. The BCC and many of our members will also be either exhibiting or speaking so if you’re making the trip to Event City on April 11th or 12th please do stop by and say hello. And if do visit the show, be sure to also check out the FWC’s window cleaning challenge which once again will feature the undisputed king of the squeegee Terry ‘Turbo’ Burrows. If you fancy having a go yourself, you might also walk away with £250. More details can be found on page six.

Stan Atkins, Chair of the British Cleaning Council

British Cleaning Council

The Voice of the Cleaning Industry


THE VOICE OF THE CLEANING INDUSTRY

WHERE ARE WE NOW, AND WHERE ARE WE GOING? enable individuals to balance a job with studying or a family or caring responsibilities. Looking forwards, there are a number of challenges and opportunities for employers in the sector. Industry growth is expected to continue, with employment growth of 9.5% anticipated between 2014 and 2024. Much of the growth will be for higher level occupations, including managers, professional occupations, and associate professionals and technical roles. Consequently, the industry will see a shift towards people holding higher qualifications.

Last year the British Cleaning Council commissioned one of the most in-depth pieces of research into the UK cleaning sector. Here the report’s chief analyst, Gwenn Winters, director of research and data management for FireDog Research, looks at some of the key findings. FireDog Research Ltd. have brought together a wealth of labour market intelligence (LMI) to produce The British Cleaning Council’s Research Report – Preparing for the Future. The report demonstrates that the cleaning industry provides a vital service to the UK economy but is one that is often overlooked. If you think about it, every business in every industry needs a cleaner. Every premise needs some sort of cleaning system or equipment, otherwise the whole area would become dirty, messy, unsanitary and unsafe. As a diverse sector, covering a range of activities and support activities, it contributes £24.4bn to the economy, with 700,000 individuals working in the sector. Competition is fierce: Many firms outsource cleaning services as a way

to reduce costs and there has been significant growth in the number of businesses operating and competing for contracts. In 2011, 30,900 firms operated in the industry, but this now stands at more than 40,300: an increase of 27%. Overall employment grew 10% between 2010 and 2015. Nearly nine in ten (87%) firms are micro businesses, employing less than 10 individuals. These types of microbusinesses may come under immense pressure when the supply chain as a whole is exposed to business behaviours which are ultimately unsustainable. This was recently seen with the collapse of Carillion. They provided facilities management services, including cleaning, in both the private and public sector and Carillion’s liquidation has seen uncertainty for many workers and smaller firms. Barriers to entry into the industry can be low for workers, while the part-time working that the industry offers can be an advantage to many. For example, the hours can

By 2024, 50% of people employed in the industry are expected to be qualified at level 4 and above, whilst the proportion of people with no formal qualifications is expected to fall to just 4%. Key partners in the sector are working together to bring new training standards forward and increase levels of skills and professionalism across all cleaning disciplines. For example, a number of new apprenticeship standards are in development. Encouragingly the majority of companies support staff to undertake training. But some firms see no business need for training. But with technological changes, environmental pressure and political drivers (i.e. Brexit), the type of services being delivered are set to look very different to what we see today. TO REQUEST A COPY OF FIREDOG’S FULL REPORT PLEASE EMAIL THE BCC ADMIN@ BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG

PAGE 3 WWW.BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG


THE UK CLEANING SECTOR IN NUMBERS

THE UK CLEANING WHERE WE ARE, AND SECTOR WE ARE GOING WHERE IN NUMBERS £

WANT TO KNOW MORE?

£24.4bn

How much the UK cleaning sector is worth

700,000

The number of people employed in cleaning in the UK

Gwenn Winters from FireDog Research will be exploring in more the depth the report’s findings - and its implications for the cleaning industry – at The Manchester Cleaning Show on April 11th.

40,300

The number of cleaning companies in the UK

87%

27% Increase in number of cleaning firms since 2011

Number of cleaning firms employing less than 10 people

21% Turnover increased within cleaning companies since 2010

84,000

The anticipated increase in new jobs set to be created within the cleaning industry by 2024

10%

50%

The increase in The proportion of employees jobs within who will be qualified to cleaning since 2010 Level 4 or above by 2024

383,000

The anticipated number of existing jobs which will need filling by 2024 as people retire

Data fromthethe British Cleaning & Support ServicesReport Industry Data from British Cleaning Council’sCouncil’s Cleaning & Cleaning Support Services Industry Research 2017. Research Figures based onon industry data collected in 2015. in 2015. Report 2017. Figures based industry data collected

INFO@BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG PAGE 4

EVENT DETAILS: THE BRITISH CLEANING COUNCIL’S RESEARCH REPORT – PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE 10.15AM, PRESENTATION THEATRE, EVENT CITY, APRIL 11TH During this presentation FireDog will present the key findings of the research it conducted for the British Cleaning Council in 2017. It will identify where the sector is likely to grow in the future, how employers can better focus their training budget spending, where providers should concentrate on developing new interventions, and how policy makers can support the industry’s efforts to enhance productivity. Lots of takeaways, insight and analysis stemming from this detailed market research report. FireDog Research is an insight agency that supports government, trade associations and employers seeking to understand challenges and predict future trends relating to employment and skills development. More information at firedogresearch.com


THE VOICE OF THE CLEANING INDUSTRY

SHINING A LIGHT ON WORK RELATED ILLNESS IN CLEANING This year one of the BCC’s key partners, the HSE, has reinvigorated it’s focus on work related ill health by launching a new national campaign ‘Go Home Healthy’. The campaign aims to reduce the number of working days lost across Great Britain by enabling employers and employees - including those from within the cleaning sector - to do the right thing, protecting their health from workplace activities today and for the future. Work related ill-health continues to be a problem. Latest statistics show 1.3 million workers suffered ill health because of their work in 2016/17, costing around £9.7 billion to our economy. Lung disease, likely linked to past exposures at work, continues to account for around 12,000 deaths a year. The ethos of health and safety legislation is prevention – stopping a person from becoming ill is better for the individual and makes business sense for the employer. But to make a real difference everyone needs to play their part The ‘Go Home Healthy’ campaign focusses on three priority topics, all of which are pertinent to the cleaning industry: OCCUPATIONAL LUNG DISEASE STRESS & MENTAL HEALTH MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS The health and safety seminars at the forthcoming Manchester Cleaning Show will touch on some of these topics, providing an insight into

managing the risks, and outlining ongoing research. Workshops and sessions will also include specific focuses on number of issues including: HEALTH AND SAFETY IN THE CLEANING INDUSTRY This session will touch on some of the main health priorities for HSE over the next couple of years, many of which are known issues for the cleaning industry. Also covered will be details of HSE’s continued engagement with representatives from the cleaning industry as well as useful sources of information for anyone employed in this industry sector. PREVENTING SLIPS AND TRIPS This session will cover why it is important to tackle slips and trips; what makes floors slippery; why good cleaning is important; and what can be done to improve cleaning practices. MUSCULOSKELETAL RISK ASSESSMENT AND DEBATE This presentation will outline the latest developments at the Health and Safety Executive and Laboratory on the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). The presentation will detail amendments to the Manual Handling Operations Regulations and the various risk assessment tools that have been developed to assist in

assessing MSD risk in the workplace. This will be followed by a specific workshop looking at the MSD risks of using long reach water fed poles in cleaning. OCCUPATIONAL RESPIRATORY HEALTH IN CLEANING HSE research has aimed to better understand the UK cleaning industry and the evidence for occupational asthma and respiratory symptoms in relation to professional cleaning and the use of cleaning products, drawing from published studies and industry sources. In its research it has been focusing on the use of environmental disinfectants in healthcare settings by cleaning operatives and nurses. It has also been looking at the transfer of safety and hazard information down the supply chain to the end users. The HSE aims to identify best practice to minimise exposure and raise the profile of respiratory occupational health across healthcare cleaning. So, if you are interested in finding out more about any of these subjects and how they relate to the cleaning industry please do join the team from the HSE at The Manchester Cleaning Show on the afternoon of Thursday April 12th ALTERNATIVELY, GENERAL INFORMATION ON ALL TOPICS IS AVAILABLE FROM HSE’S WEBSITE WWW.HSE.GOV.UK.

PAGE 5 WWW.BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG


HELP US TO GIVE CLEANING THE PROFESSIONAL STATUS IT DESERVES Philip Morris, Deputy Master of the Worshipful Company of Environmental Cleaners, outlines the Company’s work and its aim to secure Royal Chartered status for cleaning professionals The Worshipful Company of Environmental Cleaners (‘WCEC’), a British Cleaning Council member, is a “modern” livery company within the City of London which operates nationally.

Naturally, their role over the past 800 years has narrowed and now concentrates on representing and promoting the interests of their sectors, particularly in the fields of charity and education.

The WCEC draws its membership from the environmental cleaning industries, including contract cleaning, waste management, chemicals and machinery supply, and building services management.

The WCEC has two primary objectives.

Livery companies (or Guilds as they were historically known) were once prevalent across the entire UK and mainland Europe in all the major commercial trading centres managing trading standards for their specific trade while providing industrial education and support for all their members, but most have disappeared as commerce has evolved.

WCEC does this by encouraging the maintenance of already high standards of good commercial practice and integrity through social and professional meetings with leading professionals within the industry; encouraging and supporting the advancement of industry-wide training of industry practitioners and encouraging industry research and development.

The first is to improve the public’s perception of the professionalism and importance of the environmental cleaning industry.

INFO@BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG PAGE 6

WCEC, under the auspices of its Royal Charter, is also currently finalising a major educational project that will benefit the entire environmental cleaning industry – establishment of a Chartered Practitioners Register of Environmental Cleaners (‘Register’). This Register will provide a new recognised professional standard (Chartered Member and Chartered Fellow) that will definitively identify and distinguish the industry’s leading and most professional practitioners. It is also envisioned that by working in co-operation with leading educational bodies, such as City & Guilds, and industry bodies like the British Cleaning Council, the industry for the first time will have a structured learning and career pathway from an apprentice, to supervisor, through to a manager or director. And as part of


THE VOICE OF THE CLEANING INDUSTRY

that journey individuals can join at an appropriate non-chartered level and through the structured learning process progress to Chartered Member. The Company’s second objective is carried out by through its Charitable Trust, which makes grants and donations in support of personal hardship, industrial education and training for the advancement of hygiene in the community, and other kindred charities.

The Trust works on behalf of the environmental cleaning industry and warmly welcomes contributions from all practitioners whether a member or not to support its general aims. Indeed, the founders of WCEC established the Trust to be the environmental cleaning industry’s central charitable body and those businesses engaged within the environmental cleaning industry considering

establishing a Foundation or Charitable Trust should contact the WCEC to discuss how our Charitable Trust could help them achieve those objectives more quickly and easily. If you are interested in finding out more about our work or our proposed Chartered Practitioners initiative please contact the WCEC’s Clerk clerk@wc-ec.com or visit www.wc-ec.com

PAGE 7 WWW.BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG


Mike Stubbs, Chairman , Accreditation Schemes.

BOXING CLEVER HOW THE CHSA IS DRIVING COMPLIANCE ACROSS THE CLEANING SUPPLIES SECTOR

HAVE YOU GOT WHAT IT TAKES TO WIPE OUT TERRY’S RECORD? Terry ‘Turbo’ Burrows, still officially the world’s fastest window cleaner 20 years on from first appearing on BBC1’s Record Breakers, is challenging window cleaners from across the UK to try and take his crown when he comes to The Manchester Cleaning Show on April 11th and 12th.

British Cleaning Council member, the Cleaning & Hygiene Suppliers Association’s (CHSA) analysis of the performance of its Accreditation Schemes in 2017 revealed high levels of conformance, with more products audited than ever before.

Terry’s best-ever performance, which saw him clean three 1.143m high windows in just 9.14 seconds, took place in Blackpool in 2009. Now Terry is returning to the North West and is throwing down the gauntlet to any window cleaners who might fancy their chances.

The results are more evidence that the only way buyers of cleaning and hygiene products can be certain ‘what’s on the box is what’s in the box’ is to look for the marques of the CHSA Accreditation Schemes for Distributors and Manufacturers of Soft Tissue, Plastic Refuse Sacks and Industrial Cotton Mops.

The world record window cleaning challenge itself is adjudicated on behalf of The Guinness Book of Records by BCC member the Federation of Window Cleaners.

Every Member of every Scheme was inspected by an Independent Inspector. In particular he audited 50 distributors during 2017. Around 97% of all relevant soft tissue, plastic refuse sacks or industrial cotton mops were from members of one of the CHSA Manufacturing Standards Accreditation Scheme or found to comply fully with Scheme requirements.

“The introduction of the Accreditation Scheme for Distributors in January 2017 has had a very positive impact. “All the main distributors in the sector applying and then passing the auditing process,” said Mike Stubbs, Chairman of the Accreditation Schemes. “It has also driven up membership of our Manufacturing Standards Accreditation Schemes. Distributors joining the Scheme are demanding their suppliers adhere to the same high standards to which they ascribe, who in turn are applying for membership.” FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.CHSA.CO.UK.

INFO@BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG PAGE 8

Andrew Lee, Chair of the FWC, said:

“Terry has done amazingly well to hang on to his record for this long but there’s always a chance of an upset in April. Lots of our members have already told us they are planning to take a crack at his record, and some are in training right now. “Having said that, when you see Terry on video or cleaning live he moves so quickly it’s hard to imagine someone will ever manage a sub-nine second time even if they try and copy his technique. So, we’ll have to wait and see if anyone can match him when the competition comes to Manchester.” And even if Terry’s remarkable record stays intact, the fastest window wiper on each day of the show will win £250. Anyone interested in entering can register for free at www.cleaningshow.co.uk/manchester


THE VOICE OF THE CLEANING INDUSTRY

BLAZING A TRAIL FOR NEW VOCATIONAL TRAINING IN CLEANING The British Institute of Cleaning Science’s Head of Education, Dr Sally Messenger, reports on progress on an Apprenticeship for Cleaning Hygiene Operative and explains how the new ‘T Levels’ could transform vocational training. In 2012 the Government established a review of apprenticeships which concluded that significant change was required. One key change was the introduction of an employer levy from April 2017. The 0.5% levy is paid by organisations with an annual pay bill of £3 million and above. The new system puts employers firmly in the lead through the creation of Trailblazers - groups of employers that come together as the creators of new apprenticeship standards. Focused on the specific knowledge, skills and behaviours for their sector, they work together, supported and guided by the Institute for Apprenticeships (IfA), to develop new programmes of learning that will directly impact their workforce. In October 2016 the Trailblazer for the Cleaning Industry was formed. The first step was preparing a proposal to develop a level 2 apprenticeship which once approved moved to the development of the standard for the proposed ‘Cleaning Hygiene Operative’. The standard was designed to provide core knowledge, skills and behaviours, with the requirement to also follow one of three options: interiors, public space or healthcare and biohazard. The standard was submitted to the IfA towards the end of 2017 and following discussions it

Dr Sally Messenger, Head of Education, The British Institute of Cleaning Science

has unfortunately been concluded that the Level 2 will not be approved. One of the challenges of providing an apprenticeship for a largely part time workforce is enabling the IfA requirement for 20% off the job training to be met. The Trailblazer is however, currently investigating the potential for the development of an apprenticeship standard focussed within the health sector. BICSc will keep you informed of discussions on this front. Interestingly some employers would like the ‘Apprenticeship Levy’ to be repurposed as the ‘Skills Levy’ enabling monies to also be spent on other forms of high quality training, rather than being solely focused on apprenticeships. For the Cleaning industry broadening the ‘reach of the levy’ could enable cleaning operatives, mainly working on a part-time basis, to gain established industry recognised and respected professional development. It would also ensure a proportion of the levy is being invested in individuals who are the ‘backbone of the industry’ and deserving of a pathway to develop their skills. It is proposed that the future could, therefore be some levy support for apprenticeship access programmes. Last year the government announced the introduction of the first ‘T levels’ which could transform technical education in the UK.

The idea is that these will be Level 3 Technical qualifications which would be an equivalent to A levels, sitting alongside Apprenticeships within a reformed skills training system. ‘T level’ programmes are intended to be substantial and of high quality. They are likely to be equivalent in size to a 3 ‘A’ level programme and will have more teaching time built in to enable students to acquire more and better knowledge, skills and behaviours than can be achieved through other vocational qualifications currently offered. The plan is for all ‘T level’ programmes to include a substantial work placement with an employer, away from the individuals’ learning environment, to help students put into practice the knowledge and skills they have learnt in the classroom. The first three T levels to be brought forward are focussing on the Digital, Construction and Education and Childcare sectors and will be taught from 2020, with the full set of T levels introduced by 2022. Whatever the initiative it is important that we work together to ‘raise the game’ with regard to technical skills education and training – and BICSc and its partners across the sector will be working very hard to ensure cleaning is very much part of the conversation. www.bics.org.uk

PAGE 9 WWW.BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG


SELECTING BEST VALUE A GUIDE FOR PRIVATE AND PUBLIC ORGANISATIONS AWARDING CONTRACTS FOR CLEANING SERVICES

TO STOP THE RACE TO THE BOTTOM WE NEED TO RETHINK OUR APPROACH TO PROCUREMENT Paul Thrupp, Deputy Chairman of The British Cleaning Council, highlights why he’s backing the EFCI’s Selecting Best Value principles.

WITH FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF

Last year the British Cleaning Council was asked by the European Federation of Cleaning Industries (EFCI) and UNI Europa, the umbrella body for European trade unions, to contribute to a new publication called Selecting Best Value. Supported by the EU, the aim of the document was to assist procurement teams when reviewing tenders to choose the best cleaning and hygiene suppliers based on the overall quality of product, service and delivery, rather than simply focusing in on price. Upon publication the document received a modest amount of attention within the UK, but many seemed to view it as something which was someone else’s job to get their head round, and certainly not theirs. Fast forward to 2018 and the shockwaves of the Carillion collapse has brought the issue of procurement, tendering and the role of the supplychain into very sharp focus for many in cleaning and FM. This is why I would encourage everyone to look again at this document, regardless of whether they are in procurement or not. For starters you’ll probably be surprised to learn that despite having been produced by a number of European partners with EU funding, the 45-page Selecting Best Value guide is packed with common sense and practical advice which is accessible and clear to understand. It spells out what best value really looks like, and how to go

about ensuring that contracts and contractors are all on the same page when either buying or bidding for cleaning services. It also includes sets of best value scoresheets which enable procurement teams to map out their requirements and score each section against the importance criteria they have specifically identified. Another thing the document does well is highlight the holistic nature of customer and supplier relationships. It illustrates that, to procure effectively, buyers must consider all factors when selecting a contract, including the financial standing and the technical and professional ability of an organisation. Just as important are the management and support structures for the contract, and the pay rates and general terms and conditions for staff. I genuinely believe that the Selecting Best Value Guide is a real asset to our sector, and I urge you to seek out a copy. After all, many of you already play a major part in influencing many thousands of procurement teams across the UK and beyond, and you can help ensure that services procured are absolutely aimed at achieving a best quality cleaning provision for all stakeholders, including of course our front-line teams. Of course, we also need to support the whole concept of Best Value by not submitting cheap proposals ourselves, and ensure that correct costs are allocated to supporting a quality service delivery.

If we ignore this, it will result in reducing margins and staff being neglected by not being supported in their development or core skill competencies. Meanwhile management and supervisory teams will run themselves ragged – which all adds up to an unhappy customer who will continually have problems with the cleanliness and hygiene of their premises. And that’s even before we’ve got into the issues of wafer-thin margin issues and unsustainable bids which undoubtedly contributed to Carillion’s problems To find out more about the Selecting Best Value guide we’ll be exhibiting at the forthcoming Manchester Cleaning Show and can talk you through its principles

You can also download the Best Value guide for free via the BCC’s website (www. britishcleaningcouncil. org). Just click on the first link in our Information section and you’ll find more details.


THE VOICE OF THE CLEANING INDUSTRY

With an overarching conference theme focussed on the future of cleaning, the two-day Manchester Cleaning Show will be hosted at Event City in Trafford on April 11th and 12th 2018.

THE MANCHESTER CLEANING SHOW 2018 – WHAT TO EXPECT The Manchester show - which now alternates annually with The Cleaning Show at Excel in London - is coproduced by the British Cleaning Council, and it will commence with an address from Stan Atkins, the Chair of the British Cleaning Council (BCC). Stan will be outlining the issues he believes are the most pressing in the sector as well as highlighting the recent in-depth research report which was undertaken by the BCC to get a clearer picture the UK cleaning market. This will be followed by a kick-off session called Preparing for the Future which will explore the report’s findings. Following this snapshot of where the cleaning sector is, and where it is potentially heading, will be a series of themed sessions from a diverse range of speakers and organisations. Health and safety will be high on the agenda, with a presentation from the Federation of Window Cleaners (FWC) about the risks of working at height together with a series of specific workshops facilitated by the HSE. Staffing, recruitment and employee wellbeing are other key topics due to be discussed, with presentations from BACHE, BICSc and CERATA all set to be linked to staff recruitment, retainment and development.

The potential impact of Brexit on employment will also be discussed, while the consequences of the UK leaving Europe from a more commercial perspective will be examined. Doing better business and increasing productivity are other areas which will be under the spotlight across both two days. In the exhibition area, which will be over 25% larger than the first Manchester show, leading brands, manufacturers and specialist providers will be demonstrating their newest products. Specialist sectors, including retail and leisure, transport, public buildings and window cleaning will also be well represented, as will clinical and healthcare hygiene.

Association, The Cleaning & Hygiene Suppliers’ Association, WAMITAB and The Association of Building Cleaning Service Providers. The British Cleaning Council itself, and The British Institute of Facilities Management who combined represent nearly every industry which works across the UK’s cleaning, hygiene, waste management and FM sectors, will also have dedicated stands. For more details of the Manchester Cleaning Show, or to register for a free pass, visit www.cleaningshow. co.uk/manchester - and we look forward to seeing you there.

In addition, Jangro have confirmed that they will be bringing their popular double decker bus to Manchester, which was debuted at The Cleaning Show in London last year. Trade and membership associations in Manchester will include the AHCP, the British Institute of Cleaning Science, the British Pest Control Association, the Domestic Cleaning Alliance, The British Toilet

PAGE 11 WWW.BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG


OUR MEMBERS & PARTNERS THE ASSOCIATION OF BUILDING CLEANING DSPS THE ASSOCIATION OF HEALTHCARE CLEANING PROFESSIONALS THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR CHEMICAL SPECIALITIES THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR CLEANING IN HIGHER EDUCATION THE BRITISH INSTITUTE OF CLEANING SCIENCE THE BRITISH TOILET ASSOCIATION THE BRITISH PEST CONTROL ASSOCIATION

ABOUT THE BCC

THE CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

Established in 1982, the British Cleaning Council (BCC) is the authoritative voice of UK cleaning, a sector worth over £24bn a year to the country’s economy and one which employs over 700,000 people.

THE CLEANING & HYGIENE SUPPLIERS’ ASSOCIATION

The Council’s membership is made up of over 20 trade and membership associations which are all linked to the cleaning and hygiene professions. From contract cleaning to waste management, pest control to housekeeping, training providers to machine manufacturers, chemical suppliers to wheelie-bin washers – the BCC coordinates, campaigns and supports the affairs of the whole of the UK’s cleaning industry. Key priorities for the BCC and its membership include raising professional standards, employee health and wellbeing, career development and training, improved quality control and better procurement practices. They are also committed to promoting higher levels of cleaning and hygiene across all environments – commercial, domestic and public.

British Cleaning Council

THE CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF WASTES MANAGEMENT

THE CLEANING & SUPPORT SERVICES ASSOCIATION THE EUROPEAN FEDERATION OF CLEANING INDUSTRIES THE DOMESTIC CLEANING ALLIANCE THE FEDERATION OF WINDOW CLEANERS THE INDUSTRIAL CLEANING MACHINE MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION KEEP BRITAIN TIDY THE NATIONAL CARPET CLEANERS ASSOCIATION THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF WHEELED BIN WASHERS THE UK CLEANING PRODUCTS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

The Voice of the Cleaning Industry

Find out more: Online at www.britishcleaningcouncil.org Email info@britishcleaningcouncil.org Via Twitter @BritishCleaning On Facebook search “British Cleaning Council”

THE UK HOUSEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION WAMITAB THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANERS

FOR DETAILS ON EACH MEMBER AND A LINK TO THEIR WEBSITES VISIT WWW.BRITISHCLEANINGCOUNCIL.ORG/MEMBERS