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SPRING/SUMMER 2020

N E W S A N D N OT E S F R O M R E Y N O L DA G A R D E N S AT WA K E F O R E S T U N I V E R S I T Y


S TAY C O N N E C T E D

TELEPHONE

336.758.5593 EMAIL

DIG

in

EDUCATION

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Maps... and oh, bats! Science at Reynolda by Amanda Lanier and Traci Porters

gardens@wfu.edu BLOOMS SOCIAL

/ reynolda.gardens @reynoldagardenswfu WEB

reynoldagardens.org

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Coming up Roses

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Giant Zinnias, Giant Success

by Forrest Allred

by Michelle Hawks

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Horticulturalist’s Corner by Forrest Allred

Getting to Know Porterweed by Jon Roethling

NEWS

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Moving and Shaking: The Playhouse Gets a New Roof by John Kiger

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Donor and Volunteer Spotlight


FROM

the D I R E C T O R

It fills me with great pleasure to write my inaugural director’s letter for our seasonal Friends publication at Reynolda Gardens. Since joining the team in December of 2018, I have experienced the Gardens through a full cycle, and while my aim was to sit back and observe, I could not help but jump in headfirst and become an engaged and active steward of this magnificent place. We’ve seen many changes throughout the past year in the Gardens. Our team removed a giant privet hedge between the Gardens and the House and completed the much-needed pruning of the boxwood hedges surrounding the lower formal gardens, which introduced new views into the Gardens. Late October welcomed the return of Meadowfest to our calendar, and families were delighted to celebrate fall at Reynolda with this special event. In November, we had our first Gardens luncheon fundraiser and raised critical funds for drainage infrastructure. We closed out 2019 with the retirement of Operations Manager John Kiger, who spent 26 hardworking and dedicated years with the Gardens. With clarity in sight, 2020 has already brought restoration attention to the lower Historic Rose Garden. Drainage, irrigation, and pathway improvements are nearing completion in the upper gardens, as well as the rehabilitation of our two herb gardens, thanks to a generous gift. We also welcomed two new members to our team in February, Amy Dixon, assistant horticulturist, and Colin Eads, landscape technician. You may have noticed improvements to the way in which we are presenting our programs and plant sales in our calendar—first by transitioning to a new format and now by coming together with the House and Village to present the full slate of happenings throughout all of Reynolda. While we have had an uncertain, and difficult, period in recent weeks, we are excited to cultivate new opportunities ahead. While this has not been the spring that we’ve imagined, it has allowed so many of you to find joy and respite in the beauty of the formal and greater gardens at Reynolda. We can’t wait to see you in the Gardens! Sincerely,

Jon Roethling


R E Y N O L DA G A R D E N S & WA K E F O R E S T C O N N E C T FA L L 2 0 1 8

EN V 2 01 . EN V I RO N ME N TA L I S SU E S

Maps and... by Amanda Lanier

Small group research project on Meadow maintenance and care F YS 100. FI RST YEAR SEM INAR

L A K E K AT H A R I N E W E T L A N D

Small group project on Lake Katherine and ecological health. Small group project Campus Garden Rain Garden installation SPRING 2019

A N T 3 5 8. NAT I VE P E O P L E S O F NO RTH A MERI C A .

During a first-year seminar class, “The Vocation of Healing,” student partners were asked to give a thorough history of Lake Katharine, including its current importance as an operational wetland. This aquatic oasis serves many purposes that our student partners highlighted through the creation of a Story Map. The development of this piece highlights the Wetlands preservation and will be a valuable component for educating our greater community on the Wetlands many benefits.

Research and Class Tour Native American landscapes: Forest, Meadow and Wetlands

THE MEADOW

E GR 11 1 . I N T RO DUCTI O N TO

The “Environmental Issues” class included a student group that researched the management of our meadow. This project analyzed the viability of the Meadow restoration project and also developed a long-term plan that will allow staff to perpetuate the ecological benefits gained in the restoration project. These benefits include enriching wildlife habitats, reducing stormwater runoff, and decreasing emissions in and around the meadow, improving the overall health of the ecosystem.

ENG I NEERI NG TH I N KI NG A N D P RAC TI C E .

Small group project Greenhouse evaluation FA L L 2 0 1 9

REL 34 1. REL I G IO N AND EC O LO GY. Small group project Nature Rx Program EGR 111. INTRO DUC T IO N TO ENGINEERING T H INK ING AND PRACTI CE. Project Greenhouse Baselines Small group project Deer Tracking and Deterrence ENV201 . ENVI RO NM ENTAL ISSUES Leaf Pack Analysis for Stream Ecology SPRING 2020

BIO37 9. INTRODUC TIO N T O GEOGRAPH IC INF O R M AT IO N SYSTEM S (GIS) EGR 111. INTRO DUC T IO N TO ENGINEERING T H INK ING AND PRACTI CE. ENV201 . ENVIRO NM ENTAL ISSUES Leaf Pack Analysis for Stream Ecology

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Several classes have attended either through lab/research over the past two years. A list of them are located to the left.


SCIENCE

at R E Y N O L D A

and Traci Porters

White-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that has killed millions of insecteating bats in the U.S. and Canada, made its way into the Piedmont region of North Carolina in the winter of 2015-2016. What are the consequences for the bat species that are susceptible to the white-nose syndrome, and also for the bat species that are resistant to the disease? Since 2015, Traci Porter, associate professor of biology and chair of the biology department at Salem College, has been spending her summers surveying bats in the Piedmont. To assess the health and reproductive status of the bats, she and her team catch bats in mist nets, which are fine-mesh nets strung across bat flyways. After a few quick measurements and health assessments, they release the bats unharmed. To determine what other species are active in the area, Porter and her team also record bat echolocation calls and then use computer software to analyze what species made each of the calls. One site that’s been rich in bat activity has been here at the Gardens. Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) are especially common among the both the captures and echolocation recordings; they have been reported as having some resistance to white-nose syndrome. Also present are eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis) and evening bats (Nycticeius humeralis), which do not seem to be affected by white-nose syndrome, and tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus), which are particularly susceptible to the disease. Species more rarely detected in the recordings are silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans), Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis), and hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus). You can find more about bats, and even download plans for making a bat house, at batcon.org.

E D U C AT I O N

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VA R I E T Y

R AT I N G

RECO.

DESCRIPTION

‘Ivor’s Rose’ Flamenco Rosita

10/10

Biltmore

Old fashioned Shrub rose with a light, sweet frangrance

‘Bartholomew’ Miracle on the Hudson ®

10/10

Biltmore

Spectacular Shrub rose with red, lightly fragrant flowers from spring to fall

‘Meijocos’ Pink Drift®

10/10

8.75 / NYBG

Low-growing ground cover Shrub rose with a deep pink,soft, faded center bloom

‘Wekphorn’ Pink Home Run®

10/10

8.1 / NYBG

Shrub rose with deep pink flowers

‘Korfloci46’ Roxanne Veranda®

9/10

Kordes

Compact bush with dark red double blooms. Ideal for containers and small gardens.

‘Meimirrot’ Apricot Drift®

9/10

8.1 / NYBG

Low-growing ground cover shrub with double apricot flowers.

‘Darlow’s Enigma’

9/10

9/ NYBG

Rambling rose with pure white semi-double small blooms that open flat to golden centers produced in clusters. Fragrant, shade tolerant.

‘HARpageant’ Easy Does It™

9/10

7.5 / NYBG

Floribunda rose with shades of mango-orange, peachpink, and honey apricot 3” scalloped blooms. Slight frangrance.

‘Monsieur Tillier’

9/10

Biltmore

Tea rose with a mixture of salmon and purple double flowers with petals that overlap. Very fragrant, similar to spicy herbal tea

RAT ING : Reynolda Gardens Rating, 2019 NYBG : Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden Rating, 2010.

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In 2017, our South Rose garden was finally transformed from an All-America Rose Selection Garden to a lower maintenance rose garden with the aim of introducing the public to roses we would recommend as disease tolerant and lower maintenance. During the five year transformation process we consulted the following rose research facilities, breeders, and gardens: EarthKind Roses, David Austin, Kordes, Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden, and Biltmore. It has been the desire of these institutions to introduce to the public beautiful roses that are disease tolerant, cold-hardy and low maintenance. Based on our own observations from 2019, here are some of our roses we believe fit this criteria.

Coming up roses by Forrest Allred

Giant zinnias, giant success by Michelle Hawks

With their long, thick stem and dahlia-like flowers, the zinnias in the cottage garden were total awesomeness last summer. Looking through the seed catalog last winter, I noticed the giant zinnias. Sometimes the pictures in plant catalogs make the plants look larger than they actually are so I was hesitant to order them. Now, I am so glad that I did! We planted Benary’s giant zinnia from Johnny’s Selected Seeds catalog. (www.johnnyseeds.com). These zinnias will make a great addition to any garden. They are amazing as a cut flower, they bloom all summer long and apparently they love to be neglected just a little. I recommend fertilizing and staking them up. The giant zinnia is one flower that will continue to stand tall and bloom in the garden for years to come. This summer be on the lookout for the giant zinnia once again at Reynolda Gardens, along with the lime, carmine rose, and yellow flame zinnias.

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Horticulturalist’s corner by Forrest Allred

Zephyranthes R A I N L I LY, Z E P H Y R L I LY, A N D F A I R Y L I LY

DA H L I AS

Dahlias come in a rainbow of colors, shapes and sizes. They are available in border sizes under two feet tall or varieties that grow four to five feet tall and need to be staked and are grown from small, brown tubers planted in the Spring. They are only truly winter hardy in USDA zones 8 to 11. In zones 2 to 7, gardeners will need to dig them up and store them for the Winter. On the other hand, if the Winter is not too severe in zone 7, they may survive. I recommend the following that we had success with in the Lower Formal Gardens: ‘All Triumph’ Lovely 4" pure white blooms on good stems. Very attractive, compact 2 1/2' bush. Early bloomer. Recommended as a cut flower. Semi-Dwarf. ‘Little Blessings’ Multiple 2 ½” blooms of lavender/ pink petals. Compact grower at 12”. Great variety for containers, borders, or areas where space is limited! Dwarf. 8

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Zephyranthes has the common name rain lily for an interesting reason, in that they will bloom after a rain or, as we have noticed, with a little encouragement from irrigation. The rain lily is great for bridging the gap between Spring and Fall crocus in that they resemble the flower of crocus and bloom during the summer into the fall. They are a narrow grass-like foliar bulb growing six to twelve inches tall; perfect when used in a border or rock garden. Their colors range from yellow to pink to white. They are hardy to USDA zones 7-10, though they generally need some winter protection in zone 7.


The spring of 2019 brought with it a stretching of my imagination and a coloring outside the lines. It is not that we have never colored outside the lines at Reynolda Gardens, but not to the extent we ventured in the Lower Formal Gardens. I have many favorite plants from the spring of 2019 that I look forward to sharing with you this year.

Gladiolus murielae

Gaillardia ×grandiflora

ABYSSINIAN GLADIOLUS PEACOCK GLADIOLUS

‘MESA YELLOW’ BLANKET FLOWER

These plants are a perfect addition to any historical garden, having been introduced in 1896. Abyssinian gladiolus are sweetly scented, pure star-shaped white blooms curved downward with a purple/mahogany center on a spike. The flower spike stands twice as tall as the sword-like leaves at 18-24” tall. We found that they do not have to be staked like most common gladioli if planted deep or supported by other strong, sturdy plants. USDA hardiness zone 7-10. Depending on the winter, in zone 7 it is recommended they should be planted deep and mulched. Bloom time - July to September.

‘Mesa Yellow’ blanket flowers would be a great addition to any garden. Unlike the Gaillardia ‘Dazzler’ that flops, the ‘Mesa Yellow’ will grow upright at 14 to 16 inches tall. Blanket flower enjoys full sun, in average, medium, well-drained soil. They have few disease or insect problems, and are rarely eaten by deer.

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Getting to know porterweed by Jon Roethling

One thing I love to do is to really take a deep dive into a particular species or group of plants and learn as much as possible. This past Summer a group of plants commonly called porterweed (Stachytarpheta sp.) grabbed my attention. The common name refers to a foaming, porter-like brew similar to beer, made from a species in the Bahamas. Maybe we could get a limited run brewed locally? Other common names include snakeweed, vervain, and the ever marketable, rat’s tail. Porterweed (Stachytarpheta) hails from the same family as verbena (Verbenaceae) and its inflorescence looks as if you took the flower cluster of verbena and stretched it out with all the individual flowers now along a stalk instead of clustered tightly together. The individual flowers begin at the bottom of the flower spike and gradually open along the way up. While it will never compete with other mainstream annuals such as petunias or marigolds for volume of color, they do have a subtle quality that comes with an added bonus. Porterweed tends to accessorize with butterflies and other pollinators. The individual flowers may be small but they are nectar rich and a favorite of butterflies, hummingbirds, and other pollinators making them a haven for aerial activity in the garden. Its color ranges from a salmon-coral to deep red, light blue to deep purple. One species, Stachytarpheta orubica, hailing from Columbia and northwest Venezuela, has nearblack flowers, but to my knowledge it is not currently in cultivation. If you have seeds, let’s talk! 10

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Stachytarpheta microphylla ‘Compacta’

The Gardens has grown a few different selections in the past, most notably, Stachytarpheta mutabilis (coral porterweed), S. microphylla ‘Compacta’ (dwarf red porterweed), and S. ‘Lavender’ but due to the fact that I am a plant addict I sought out as many selections as possible. Almost Eden, a wonderful mail-order nursery out of Louisiana, was a great source on several selections that we didn’t possess. Two other selections made their way from my mentor’s garden way out in Oklahoma, Tulsa Botanic Garden. And most recently, a new addition came back with me from Florida. In total, we now have nine different taxa of porterweed in our collections.


Stachytarpheta ‘Lavender’ Stachytarpheta mutabilis

T A X A C U R R E N T LY in the C O L L E C T I O N S at R E Y N O L D A G A R D E N S

Stachytarpheta frantzii (purple porterweed) Stachytarpheta cayennensis, syn. S. indica (blue porterweed) Stachytarpheta mutabilis (coral porterweed) Stachytarpheta mutabilis ‘Mercedes Magic’ (variegated coral porterweed) Stachytarpheta mutabilis var. violacea ‘Henlea’s Hummingbird Heaven’ (porterweed) Stachytarpheta microphylla ‘Compacta’, syn. S. sanguinea (dwarf red porterweed) Stachytarphet ‘Lavender’ (porterweed) Stachytarphet ‘Nectarwand Red’ (porterweed) Stachytarphet ‘Blue Beauty’ (porterweed) Stachytarpheta cayennensis

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In the spring of 1997, Reynolda Gardens re-roofed the Playhouse, which was needed because the cedar shakes had deteriorated. Houck Roofing provided the skills necessary to replicate the “wavy” pattern of the original shakes, which was meant to resemble a thatch roof. Twenty years later, the nails holding the shakes in place were rusting away, causing the cedar shakes to loosen and fall to the ground. In early 2017, we decided to re-roof the Playhouse once again.

Playhouse after Ice Storm, circa 1920, Estate Archives.

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Doug and Robert Durham, co-owners of Durham Carpentry, located in Troutman, North Carolina, won the bid for the project. Synthetic materials were considered, but due to the structure’s historic significance, cedar


Moving and shaking T H E P L AY H O U S E G E T S A N E W R O O F

by John Kiger

shakes were used once again. However, Doug suggested we use a thicker cedar shake, citing the ones in place were generally used for walls. Unable to find the thicker shakes locally, he ordered them from a company in Vancouver, Canada.

Before installation of the cedar shakes began, Doug Durham suggested we install cedar breather material under the shakes, which is a vinyl mesh that allows the shakes to have air flow underneath, thereby airiding in drying the shingles during and after rain and snow.

In late August 2017, the Durham brothers removed the old cedar shakes and nails, copper flashing, and the underlying felt material, exposing the structure to a very sound roof.

Reinstalling the shingles was a very slow process. After each row was laid, the Durhams traced the “wavy” pattern onto the new shingles, using a template saved from the re-roofing in 1997. The Playhouse roof project was completed successfully in February of 2018.

Specific materials were intentionally selected to prolong the life of our new roof on the Playhouse. Roofing professionals from Wake Forest University suggested we use a number-one-grade, sawed-cedar shingle, which we had upgraded at Doug’s suggestion, and stainless steel nails for the entire roof. To add further protection, the entire roof was covered with 30-pound felt and an additional snow and ice guard was added to the hip and ridge. To allow heat to escape, we also installed a vinyl ridge vent, capped with copper.

Originally, the roof of the Playhouse was stained green, a solid color stain. Choosing the color wasn’t too difficult because we had examples of older shingles. In April of 2018, Resource Painting was hired to repaint the exterior walls and re-stain the new roof. It is our hope that this new roof will continue to be one of our most treasured places in the Gardens and will serve as a joy to all who pass by.

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Donor spotlight Pat Michal, a long-time Friend of Reynolda Gardens and a Wake Forest University alumni, expressed an interest in making a special gift to the Gardens from her IRA. After meeting with Jon Roethling and learning about some of the major needs and priorities for the Gardens, she decided to make a gift to help restore the herb garden. Thanks to her generosity, this Spring our staff will begin to reestablish the soil, redesign the plant beds, and replant the herb displays. Pat will be recognized with a sign in the restored herb garden once the work is complete. The herb garden is sure to delight visitors and pollinators alike! To learn more about how you can support Reynolda Gardens through your estate, please contact Stephan Dragisic at stephan@reynolda.org or 336.758.5595.

Volunteer spotlight Gardens volunteers are a special gift to the Gardens, and Karen Sterling is no exception. The WinstonSalem native has been a volunteer for the past year and is a self-described “plantaholic.” She has been a plant lover for more than 20 years, and her favorite plants are orchids and cacti. She retired from the City of WinstonSalem in 2018, where she worked in landscaping for 29 years. Karen volunteers in the Gardens once a week and said that she could live in the Greenhouse. She has three children and four grandchildren and enjoys animals and antiques in addition to plants and nature. “I once had over 100 turtles at once,” she said. “They called me the turtle lady.” Karen said she loves the staff and rich history of the Gardens and feels like she is part of the team. Thank YOU, Karen, for all that you do - we are lucky to have you!

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Thanks for helping us grow INDIVIDUAL Virginia Adams Sandra Adams Judy Albers Jane Albright Marcia Baker Sarah Blackwell Cynthia Blair Elizabeth Blair Wilba Brady Wendy Brenner Jack Bryant Anne Butler Bobbi Caldwell James Carlson Vince Cimmino Penn Craver Charlotte Croft-Hudgens Judith Crow Karen Daugherty Inez Davis Cynthia Dearmin Thomas Deese Carol DeVries Virginia Diseker Carol Dolge Jane Dougherty Anne Dowell Doris Eller Lynne Emken Nancy Franklin Janelle Frazier Barbara Gerhard Lisa Gould Martha Haire LeighAnn Hallberg Mrs. John Hammon Myra Hannah Beth Hano Richard Harris Marcela Heinrich Deirdre Herrington

Meg Hilleary Sandra Hoback Gaynelle Hoban Mrs. Gene Hooks Frances Huetter Priscilla Ivester Jane Jackson Pat Jacques Gina Jarrett Barbara Jernigan Betty Johnson Catherine Johnson Kathleen Johnson David Kelly Anne Kent Nancy Kilstrom Ruthie Kirk Patsy Kirkland Will Knott Gabriela Lee Verlyn Luther Brenda Maready Maggie Martin Marnie Matthews Mary Lou McCormick Carroll McCullough Lisa McDonall Mary McLaughlin Trena McNabb Jean Messick Eva Miller Carol Moore Nancy Nading Florence Norris Carol O'Keefe Susan Overman Carolyn Park Joyce Peters Pine Valley Garden Club Kay Pratt James Ralston Michelle Reeder Pam Ripsom Tori Roemer

Gilda Schneider Lee Schrader Brian Smeeton Alan Snow Helena Spangler Bill Stewart Judie Swain Lisa Swarthout Tracey Syvertson Georgie Thompson Deborah Thompson Janine Tillett Jeri Trotter LeClare Turner Frances Vazquez Carolyn Walker Nancy Watkins Dannie Weber Weeds and Seeds Garden Club Maribeth Weinman Westwood Garden Club Becky Wheeler Elizabeth Williams Karen Wilson Windsor Garden Club Barbara Wrappe Mary Anne Yarbrough D U A L / F A M I LY Melanie and Terry Almengual Susan Andrews Arbor Vitae Garden Club Phil Archer Lisa and Nathan Atkinson Zanne and Bud Baker Sarah Barnhardt Louise and Bill Bazemore Sandra and Rick Belmont Kay and Don Bergey Kim and Steve Berlin Elizabeth Berry Linda and Lee Bettis Lori Bodwell and Gene Gustafson Heidi Bond

FRIENDS OF REYNOLDA GARDENS

2018 HONOR ROLL


Laura and Dean Bonsall Cynthia and Ed Bouldin Betty and James Brewer Stewart Butler Agnes and Albert Butler Susan Chappell Emily Collins Nancy and Bill Colvin Bonnie Cook Joan and David Cotterill Mary and Bucky Dame Patricia and Joseph Dean Dr. and Mrs. Andrew Diebler Joyce and Jim Dickerson Kriss Dinkins and Stephan Dragisic Jean and Clarence Dixon Dogwood Garden Club Cay Drury and Thom Bell Shirley Duncan Lu Dunkelberg Debbie and Mike Essic Becky and Bill Faircloth Roddy and Vic Flow Flower Lore Garden Club Shirley Fly Forest Garden Club Sharon Fortner Julia and Tom Fredericks Janet and Gene Frekko Elizabeth Gamble and Peter Lichstein Greensboro Rose Society Donna and Gary Hamilton Ann and Borden Hanes Sally and Steve Harper Lynne Hart Virginia Hart Annette and Robin Hastie Eugene Heise and Harriet May-Heise Daryl Henshaw Anne and Marcus Hester Carol and Chip Holden Nancy and Melvin Holland Natalie and George Holzwarth Amy Hough Grace and Eric Hoyle Robbie and Dave Irvin Dale Jaeger Nan Janeway Leigh and Rashid Janjua Mr. and Mrs. James Jones Warren Jones Pam and Fred Kahl Marilyn and Karl Karlson Maxine and Robert Kelly

Jean and Jeff Kelly Elen Knott Pat Lackey Claudine Legault and Ginny Weiler Cynthia and Monty Leonard Paula and Dan Locklair Jody and Kurt Lohman Sheilah and Paul Lombardo Madelyn London Elizabeth and Gene Lowder Mary Allen and Jim Martin Elizabeth Martin Elizabeth Mayo Carolyn and Bill McCall Loy and Paul McGill Fred McGuirt Susan Melville and Charles Monroe Gayle Meredith Wendy Miller Geri Ann and Tom Milner Nancy Moltman and John Skipper Bev and Alan Moore Anne and John Morehead Deanna Moss Ruth and Tom Mullen Leigh Myers Susan Nash Louise and Dillon Neaves Mary and Fred Newman Aubrey and Patrick O’Rourke Linda and James Pepper Antoinette Petersen Roberta and Jim Pettit Jennifer and Robert Pierce Sandy and Gary Poehling Janice Purdy and John Keyes Mr. and Mrs. Jobie Redmond Cal Reynolds Dawn and Jim Rodgers Ellen and Hans Roethling Jane Rogers Mr. and Mrs. Seth Rohde Penny and Samuel Rothrock Pat Rovere Connie and Ray Roy Ann and Ron Rudkin Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rutter Catherine and Omar Sangueza Kelli Sapp and Herman Eure Margaret Savoca and Bruce Bradford Judy Scurry Diane Simmerson David & Hazel Sink Elizabeth Sloan

Leigh and Gray Smith Roberta and Don Smith Sara and Bruce Smith Mary and Jack Smith Susan and Ken Sommerkamp Spade and Trowel Garden Club Margaret and Gene Stewart Phyllis and Terry Stewart Kathleen and Conelius Sullivan Susan Surratt Marcia Szewczyk Gwynne and Dan Taylor Lynda and Gerald Taylor Thomas Taylor Nancy and Charlie Thomas Arlene Edwards Thompson Frances Vaughn Sharon Vinsant Gail Wall Laura Warren Suzanna Watkins and Jeffrey Wilson Mary and Doug White Camilla Wilcox Frankie and Vernon Winters Anne and Larry Wise Tracey Young SPONSOR American Public Gardens Association Gayathri and Ram Baliga Jim Barefield Barbara Bryant Mary Chervenak and Paul Jones Denise and Tim Creef Robin Davis Frank Driscoll Pat and James Eisenach Margaret Foster Jodi Turner and Bill Gifford Emily and Dick Glaze Ruby Griffin Gretchen and Duane Haines Jane and Redge Hanes Jack Stack Properties Lynn and Winton Jennette Sharon Johe Lucinda and Christopher Jones Ruth and Keith Kooken Charles McCall Cathy and Ray Owen Reggie and Ken Pasterczyk Allison Perkins and Cliff Dossel Cyndi and Bill Rabil Ellen and Andy Schindler


PATRON Anonymous Anne and Bruce Babcock Mary and Jon Bolton Mary Louise and John Burress Karen Ciener Elizabeth and Bill Dixon Garden Club Council of WinstonSalem Suzanne Hanes Susie and David Jackson Grace and John McKinnon Cathy and Harold Pace Reynolds American, Inc. Catherine Rolih and Richard Weinberg Lorre and Jim Ruffin Carol Strittmatter Town and Country Garden Club Robin and Robert Weisner Lynn and Jeff Young BENEFACTOR Anonymous Betty and Jim Becher Dr. and Mrs. Malcolm Brown Claire and Hudnall Christopher Robbin and Don Flow Laura Hearn Little Greens Garden Club Shannon and Charles Neal Abbie and F.D. Pepper Susan Pfefferkorn Dee Ann and Larry Robbs Nancy and Jim Spencer Kay Triplett

2019 HONOR ROLL INDIVIDUAL Virginia Adams Judy Albers Bud Baker Kay Baldridge Sarah Barnhardt Carol Bauguess Betty Becher Cynthia Blair Wilba Brady Betty Brewer Jack Bryant Stewart Butler Anne Butler Robert Cash Vince Cimmino Jessica Coleman Bonnie Cook Charlotte Croft-Hudgens Thomas Deese Carol DeVries Virginia Diseker Bonnie Doerr Carol Dolge Jane Dougherty Shirley Duncan Daughn Eagan Flowers and Friends Garden Club Shirley Fly Nancy Franklin Eileen Frost Barbara Gerhard Martha Haire LeighAnn Hallberg Sandy Hamner Beth Hano Shawn Harber Sally Harper Virginia Hart Deirdre Herrington Sandra Hoback Sara Hooks Shannon Hurley Priscilla Ivester Jane Jackson Pat Jacques Betty Johnson Belinda Jorgenson Pam Kahl Nancy Kilstrom Ellen Kirby Susan Layman Debbie Linville Janet Loew

Anne Long Verlyn Luther Maggie Martin Mary Lou McCormick Lisa McDonall Kay McKnight Mary McLaughlin Trena McNabb Sandra Meadwell Marianne Meyer Pat Michal Eva Miller Mary Lou Moore Carol Morrissey Deanna Moss Florence Norris James Nottke Walter O’Briant Carol O’Keefe Susan Overman James Ralston Gary Ritz James Rodgers Mary Roemer Tori Roemer Pat Rovere Sandra Sheldon Brian Smeeton Sabrina Smith Jack Smith Spade & Trowel Garden Club Rick Spangler Susan Surratt Judie Swain Thomas Taylor Georgie Thompson Michael Thull Janine Tillett Kellon Tippett Kay Triplett Jeri Trotter Sallie Tucker Linda Turner LeClare Turner Claire Tuttle Tricia Vaughn Laura Warren Nancy Watkins Dannie Weber Maribeth Weinman Mary Louise Wilson Karen Wilson Sheila Wolfe Wally Wu

FRIENDS OF REYNOLDA GARDENS

Anne Skinner Kelley and Jack Stack Susan Starr Preston Stockton Stella Surratt Pat and Jim Toole Jodi Turner and Bill Gifford Village Tavern, Inc. Jim Walter Judy and Bill Watson Mona and Wally Wu JoAnn Yates


D U A L / F A M I LY Marge Asel Lisa and Nathan Atkinson Aaron and Holmes Ayer Louise and Bill Bazemore Janet Beavers Frankie Bell Sandra and Rick Belmont Kay and Don Bergey Lori Bodwell and Gene Gustafson Heidi Bond Stephanie and Michael Brooks Barbara Bryant Agnes and Albert Butler Nancy and Bill Colvin Marilyn Cook Joan and David Cotterill Thorns and Perry Craven Carey and Ralph D’Agostino Joseph and Patricia Dean Joyce and Jim Dickerson Jean and Clarence Dixon Luci and Dek Driscoll Mary and Frank Driscoll Cay Drury and Thom Bell Mary Dudley Lu Dunkelberg Melanie and Robert Dunn Pat and James Eisenach Susan Elster Lynne Emken Becky and Bill Faircloth Kitty Felts Roddy and Vic Flow Flower Lore Garden Club Lori and Steffen Fohn Janelle Frazier Julia and Tom Fredericks Janet and Gene Frekko Nella Fulton Jane Gehring Michelle Gibson Martin & Susan Gilmore Emily and Dick Glaze Daniela and Michael Grady Greenbrook Garden Club Gretchen and Duane Haines Donna and Gary Hamilton Dr. and Mrs. John Hammon Ann and Borden Hanes Suzanne Hanes Lynne Hart Annette and Robin Hastie Eugene Heise and Harriet May-Heise 18

Tiffany and Daryl Henshaw Anne and Marcus Hester Carol and Chip Holden Leslie Hollan Natalie and George Holzwarth M.R. and Rog Howard Grace and Eric Hoyle Vickie and David Huckaby Francie Huffman Kathleen and John Hutton Robbie and Dave Irvin Rashid and Leigh Janjua Barbara Jernigan Mr. and Mrs. James Jones Marilyn and Karl Karlson Maxine and Robert Kelly Jean and Jeff Kelly Elen Knott Ruth and Keith Kooken Pat Lackey Sally Lacy Claudine Legault and Ginny Weiler Cynthia and Monty Leonard Bingle and Doug Lewis Paula and Dan Locklair Jody and Kurt Lohman Sheilah and Paul Lombardo Jan and Tony Ma’luf Mary Allen and Jim Martin Elizabeth Martin Carolyn and Bill McCall Nancy and Sid McCullers Loy and Paul McGill Susan Melville and Charles Monroe Gayle Meredith Susan and John Mickey Wendy Miller Geri Ann and Tom Milner Anne and John Morehead Ruth and Tom Mullen Leigh Myers Andrew Namen Susan Nash Anne and Will Nelson Mary and Fred Newman Andrea Nugent Aubrey and Patrick O’Rourke Ruthlee Orr Bev and T.J. Patrick Jeanne Patterson Linda and James Pepper Roberta and Jim Pettit Jennifer and Robert Pierce Sandy and Gary Poehling

Mr. and Mrs. Jobie Redmond Judith and Andrew Reed Karen and Dillon Robertson Lane Roemer Jane Rogers Penny and Samuel Rothrock Ann and Ron Rudkin Diana and Glenn Salmons Catherine and Omar Sangueza Kelli Sapp and Herman Eure Gilda and Bill Schneider Judy Scurry Talmadge and Ian Silversides Hazel and David Sink Roberta and Don Smith Sara and Bruce Smith Susan and Ken Sommerkamp Gerrii Spach Susan Starr Margaret and Gene Stewart Linda and Jim Strong Trish and Jerry Sumners Gwynne and Dan Taylor Lynda and Gerald Taylor Nancy and Charlie Thomas Arlene Edwards Thompson Town and Country Garden Club Jodi Turner and Bill Gifford Nancy and Harry Underwood Kathleen and Gustavo Vargas Frances Vaughn Village Tavern, Inc. Sharon Vinsant Gail Wall Ilene Wasilauskas Jessica and Brian Wells Dorothy and Kim Westmoreland Mary White Mary and Doug White Camilla Wilcox Natalie Woodland Susan and Richard York Tracey Young SPONSOR Melanie and Terry Almengual Anonymous Gayathri and Ram Baliga Jim Barefield Kim and Steve Berlin Mary Chervenak and Paul Jones Larrie and Jo Dawkins Margaret Foster Ruby Griffin


Thank you, volunteers!

PATRON Claire and Hudnall Christopher Patricia and Bill Dixson Forest Garden Club Lisa and Bob Gfeller Susie and David Jackson Lynn and Winton Jennette Little Greens Garden Club Grace and John McKinnon Allison Perkins and Cliff Dossel Reynolds American, Inc. Dee Ann and Larry Robbs Carol Strittmatter Connie and Bill Weeks Catherine Rolih and Richard Weinberg Robin and Robert Weisner Westwood Garden Club BENEFACTOR Anonymous Anne and Bruce Babcock James A. and Evelyn S. Belleman Fund Dr. and Mrs. Malcolm Brown Lee and Craig Eisenacher Robbin and Don Flow Garden Club Council of WinstonSalem Laura Hearn Andrea and Patrick Michel Shannon and Charles Neal Drewry and Christoph Nostitz Susan Pfefferkorn Cynthia Zuluaga

Marge Asel Lauren Barnhill Sandra Belmont Lynda Bryant Ariel Butler Jean Dixon Anne Dowell Mike Essic Becky Faircloth Bill Faircloth Dana Hall Anita Harvell Sarah Herring Sidney Lavender Cynthia Leonard Tony Ma’luf Maggie Martin Martina Moore Fred McGuirt Petra McLean Anne Morehead Susan Nash Mary Newman Reggie Pasterczyk Howard Pearre Mitzi Royster Judy Scurry Betty Sink Roberta Smith Alan Snow Jack Stack Karen Sterling Kate Sullivan Jake Vinten-Johansen Becky Wheeler Jayne Williams

FRIENDS OF REYNOLDA GARDENS & VOLUNTEERS

Jane and Redge Hanes Jack Stack Properties Lucinda and Christopher Jones Bev and Alan Moore Dina Nieuwenhuis Cathy and Ray Owen Cathy and Harold Pace Reggie and Ken Pasterczyk Cyndi and Bill Rabil Ellen and Andy Schindler Nancy and Jim Spencer Kelley and Jack Stack Preston Stockton Stella Surratt Jim Walter Judy and Bill Watson JoAnn Yates Lynn and Jeff Young


P L E A S E R E C YC L E

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REYNOLDA VILL AGE

WINSTON-SALEM NC

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Profile for Reynolda House Museum of American Art

Cultivate /// Spring/Summer 2020  

News and notes from Reynolda Gardens at Wake Forest University

Cultivate /// Spring/Summer 2020  

News and notes from Reynolda Gardens at Wake Forest University

Profile for rhmaa
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