Page 1


1

5.1:. '

4

‘33:? 9—7; gym/”,jgélgfilry

Two Officers of the Light

Horse Volunteers of

London and Westminster Circa 1805 Manoeuvring

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The BLUE & ROYAL VOL.

1

NO.

3

I972

Colonel-invChief: Her Majesty The Queen. Colonel and Gold Stick: Field-Marshal Sir Gerald Templer, K. G., GO B,

G,C.M.G,, K.B.E., D.S.O., D

cL

Deputy Colonel: General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick, G.C.B., BS. 0., MS E

M.C., A.D.C The Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding The Hdusehold Cavalry and Silv e r St/ck: Colonel |. B. Baillie.

Commanding Officer: Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. C. G. Eyre. Officer Commanding Household Cavalry Regiment (Mounted): Lieutenant-Colonel D. J. Daly.

BATTLE HONOU RS Tangier (1662-1680), Dettingen, Warburg, Beaumont, Willems, Fuentes d’Onor, Peninsular, Waterloo, Balaklava, Sevastopol, Egypt (1882), Tel el Kebir, Relief of Kimberley, Piaardeberg, Relief of Ladysmith,

FOREWORD

South Africa (1899-1902). SPRING 1972 Le Cateau, Marne (1914), Messines (1914), Ypres (1914), Gheluyelt, Ypres (1915), Frezenberg, Loos, Arras (1917), Ypres (1917), Somme (1918), Amiens, Hindenburg Line, Cambrai (1918), Sambre, Pursuit to Mons, France and Flanders (1914-1918).

Souleuvre, Brussels, Nederrijn, Rhine, N. W. Europe (19441945), lraq (1941), Palmyra, Syria

(1941), Knightsbridge, El Alamein, Advance on

Tripoli, North Africa (1941-43), Sicily (1943), Italy (1943-1944).

CONTENTS Diary of Events 1971 A Squadron

B Squadron C Squadron

Mounted Squadron Mounted Sports The Band HCTS 1971 BAOR Driving Championships

This issue of ‘The Blue and Royal‘ reports the enormous variety of tasks undertaken by this regiment during the past year. We have converted from tanks to armoured cars. Two squadrons have carried out operational tours in Northern Ireland. C Squadron has moved complete to Cyprus. A Squadron has exercised in Norway and Greece. The Mounted Squadron continues to set its high standard in London. The Household Cavalry Training Squadron has trained more recruits than in the three previous years. This great activity is not unusual. it is the normal pattern of events of the British Army today. The enthusiasm and success with which it has been tackled reflects the high standards to which serving and retired members of The Blues and Royals Association are accustomed.

Regimental Stables

The Weser Vale Hunt Standards and Guidons of the Blues and Royals Governor General‘s Horse Guards The Royal Canadian Dragoons

C KCLY Sharpshooters Squadron

Commanding Officer Lieutenant Colonel J. A. C. G.

a very tasty . . . Blue Oman The Household Cavalry Coach Polo Waterloo Museum Notes The National Army Museum

The next year will see a similar pattern of high activity. By the end of 1972 we will already have begun our conversion on to the new series of armoured vehicles of which Scorpion is the first.

The Handsome Giants of the Horse Guards The Blues and Royals Association Report The Blues and Royals Association Balance Sheet Obituaries

The focal point of 1972 will be the afternoon of Friday 14th July when Her Majesty the Queen, our Colonel-in-Chief, will present a new Guidon to the Regiment in Windsor Great Park, and the old Regimental Standard and the old Regimental Guidon will parade for the last time. I very much hope that on this unique occasion as many members of the Regimental Association as possible with their families will be able to attend.

Visit to Zandvoorde Letters to the Editor

Nominal Roll

“The Blue and Royal" printed and published by Service Publications Ltd. Caxton House, Shoreham—bySea, Sussex.

The Cover Depicts the Band of the

Blues

Schloss Gardens.

&

Royals in the

Detmold


DIARY OF EVENTS

The Colonel presents Long Service and Good Conduct

Corporal Waddock, Corporal Arnold, Lieutenant Couper and Corporal

Medals to SCM Varga and S/Cpl. Hunt B.E.M.

Farrow escorting the Eagle to the National Army Museum

Top—Lieutenant Matthews winning the Regimental Four Hundred Metres

R.C.M. Tucker

Bottom—Stalwart Troop swimming at 0hr Park

1971 has been a year of moves. It has involved two regimental moves. the most important being that of the return

Despite the late time of year for troop training it was surprisingly cold for the first week and apart from frost, and

from Germany to Windsor.

the usual unpleasant Soltau climate, there was even a little snow. Soltau certainly seemed a very long way from Hyde Park on

January started with the movement of the Regiment from Cavalry Memorial Sunday on 2nd May. Sadly the Regiment was Hobart Barracks to Lothian Barracks in Detmold. Although a distance of only a mile was involved. it made an enormous difference to the Regiment because for the first time since

not able to be strongly represented, and only the Commanding Officer and Assistant Adjutant managed to return for the

occasion. amalgamation we were in a barracks on our own with no outsiders. For everyone concerned this was a welcome change.

Show in the Barracks. This was extremely well attended and a large number of German entries appeared. no doubt encouraged

in preparation for our return later in September. The remainder of the Regiment buckled down to the enormous task of preparing

by the generous prize money. Fortunately a small profit was

their vehicles and the barracks for the handover to The Life Guards on 3rd September. For the remainder of the Regiment in Detmold August was a busy month of packing and clearing

made, which was donated to a local charity.

June commenced with another visit. this time from our Deputy Colonel. General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick D/SACEUR. This coincided with the Rhine Army Horse Show held as usual

The

Divisional

Commander, General David Fraser, visited

on Sennelager Training Area. Both he and Lady Fitzpatrick us on 3rd May, by which time Spring had arrived and the The next major event was the departure of A Squadron on

the AMFtL)

Exercise

in

Norway.

There then

followed

a

period of individual training and the usual winter activities of skiing and a little bit of leave. At the beginning of March. with A

Hardfall, there guards and the Advance Party commence their

began the usual round of study of B Squadron tour in B'AOR.

Squadron back from

tedious chores of SAS Site periods. On 15th March the The Life Guards arrived to An unusual swop had been

arranged which enabled The Life Guards squadron to get oil"

trees were starting to come out in the warm weather. On 7th May the Regiment was glad to return once more to Detmold.

success. before his departure on 6th. May started with a visit by the Colonel of the Regiment, Field Marshal Sir Gerald Templcr. who arrived on 10th and departed on 14th. having brought with him a week of lovely warm weather. He kindly presented the prizes at the Regimental Athletics held on 12m. On 19th May the Regiment lent a Chieftain Tank to 11 Squadron RCT, who supported us so well during our period in Germany. Having arrived at Duisberg on a railway flat, it then

to a good start with a summer season of training in Germany proceeded to drive through the streets to the RCT barracks. whilst our A Squadron. fresh from Norway. proceeded to Northern which

Ireland to begin an arduous tour on Internal Security duties. On 16th April B Squadron The Life Guards commenced training

certainly

caused

inhabitants of the

a

great

deal

of

interest

amongst

the

town. who had not seen a British tank

motoring on its tracks since the end of the Second World War, in Chieftains at Stapel Training Area. On 23rd April the Regiment made its first bi-annual pilgrimage to Soltau Training Area.

12

spent some time visiting the Show and the General captained the Regimental Clay Pigeon Shooting Team. regrettably without

The next fortnight in June was taken up with the usual hectic preparation for Annual Firing at Hohne. which started on

up. puncuated by farewell visits on 25th and 26th August from the Divisional Commander and the Brigade Commander. On lst September the first plane-load of Life Guards arrived from

England and on the following day The Blues and Royals stated their

much

looked

forward

to

return

to

Windsor.

On

their

arrival virtually the whole Regiment. with the exception of the Advance Party. went on leave for the month of September. Ironically. this was probably the only time during their tour at Windsor when the whole Regiment will be together in England.

let June and continued until 2nd July. This was immediately

On 20th September C Squadron‘s Advance Party left to go to

followed

Cyprus. followed by their main body on 7th October. In the meanwhile. B Squadron had been warned off for a tour in

by a

fortnight of Battle Group training once again

on Soltau.

Northern Ireland which took them to Belfast on 10th and llth On 9th July 21 large contingent of Life Guards. headcd by

the Commanding Othcer. arrived at Hanover Airport to see how life at Soltau should be conducted. During their stay they certainly learnt how dirty one can become in a very short time in the Soltau area. 011 16111 July the Regiment Detmold. having been away very nearly a month.

returned

10

November for a four month tour. The end of November brought a visit from General Fitzpatrick and the RAC Conference. December found the Regiment catching up on trade training. and A Squadron drawing up their Volvos and preparing to go to Norway in January 1972.

Christmas lunch was held on 23rd December. after which On 20th May, Ascension Day, the Regiment held a Horse

On 26th July the Regimental Advance Party left for Windsor

the whole Regiment went on leave until the New Year.


In 1971 A squadron joined the NATO Force which exists to operate on the flanks of NATO. Oflicially we are the Force Reconnaissance Squadron of the ACE

A detachment of A Squadron led by Lieutenant P. B. Flo ers f k' ' Nato Parade for The Regent of Greece 9 ’ a ing part In 3

Mobile Force (Land Component). When the

year started we were an armoured squadron equipped with Chieftain tanks. By the time we went on block leave in October we had converted

ourselves

into

an

airportable

armoured reconnaissance squadron. carried out arctic training in Norway, completed a four month tour in Northern Ireland and participated in a major exercise in Greece.

Training in the Rain Major-General Berg and two of his Staff Officers watching a Battle Run near Bergen (February 1971). General Berg commands District Command West in whose district a composite Squadron of the Household Cavalry trained in January and February, 1971

Having moved from Hobart to Lothian

Barracks at Detmold about two thirds of the

squadron

January.

flew

to

England

At Windsor we

on

formed

llth

with

C

Lance-Corporal Allsopp on traffic control duty A Squadron The Blues and Royals in Greece

Squadron The Life Guards a composite squadron for training in Norway. Exercise

Trooper Allan and Cornet Massey by a road block in Belfast (June 1971)

HARDFALL is an annual British exercise held in Norway for the British contingent. The possibility of fighting in the Arctic

Photograph: Brian Pearson

five

is not to be taken lightly; our aim in 1971

was to learn from The Life Guards as much as we could about fighting in extremes of cold and about the equipment which is used.

a

light

covering

of

slush

when

we

sailed on Friday. 15th January. Two days later we landed at Bergen in a downpour of rain and no snow in sight. Our first task, and one that was never satisfactorily

completed, was explaining to our Norwegian instructors why British troops travelled from England to Norway in a ship with a Chinese crew.

0 S.C.M. (now R.C.M.) Lane covers Mr. Armitage on a road block in Ulster (May 19th) us something of the skills that they had

a

camp

at

Ulven.

about

fifteen

miles

from Bergen and about two from a small fishing village called Os. The camp is normally used by Norwegian infantry battalions and it was well equipped with wood burning stoves. a good cookhouse

developed.

and

for

everyone

to

have

an

attempt at skiing. Our time in Norway proved both useful and enjoyable. Meanwhile our rear party at Detmold. organised into main<

and a modern sauna bath. Our chief memory of this time in Norway is of the rain and of Norwegian hospitality. Winter 1970/71 was one of the mildest of the century and Norway was no exception. For The Blues and Royals this

was very little problem as we were able to catch up on some much needed armoured car training. Fortunately there was just enough snow for The Life Guards to show

14

the

introduction

of

tenance teams. had been struggling. in conditions no less severe than those we had met in Norway. to prepare our tanks

for handover. After an extremely happy period together the composite squadron broke up. The Blues and Royals flew from Bergen to Gutersloh in a Hercules aircraft of RAF Air Support Command. The Life

Major Hugh—Smith and Captain Lewis sct oil to pay a brief visit to Belfast. We spent four weeks at Detmold during March. Somehow We succeeded in training ourselves for Northern Ireland. preparing the tanks for inspectione -we got an excellent report—repacking up and handing over to B Squadron The Life Guards. Back

in

England

we snatched

a

fcw

days leave and by the middlc of the month

we were at RAF Aldcrgrovc. ten miles west of Belfast. taking over from the RAC Parachute

Squadron.

It

was

nice

to

see

SCM Kcrsting. who is serving with them.

Guards element returned to England. with

all the vehicles and equipment by sea. while

Our four months in Ulster ended some

the

decision

to

Greece From left to right—Captain Birdwood (A.D.C. to the Deputy Colonel), The Deputy Commander Allied Forces, Southern Europe, Trooper Stephenson, General Fitzpatrick, Lance Corporal Nelson, Major Hugh Smith.

atmosphere prevailed. we were reminded of the realities of the situation when we heard that a sniper had killed a soldier from the [st Royal Green Jackets in another part of the town

were providing escorts to bring them from

battalions

the

deployed

in

Belfast.

and

to

It did not seem long after we had said goodbye to Corporal Major Kersting and the RAC Parachute Squadron that we Quayside

to

Aldergrove.

We

arrived

mnintnin 11 military presence in the Police

back at Windsor to find The Life Guards

District that surrounds Belfast. with its headquarters in Antrim. We also had some Aldergrovc

deeply involved in the pregarations for Battle Royal. Feeling that we had done enough we quickly went on leave before

civil airport which involved Squadron Headquarters. the Admin troop and the LAD in special patrols and in searching

anyone could think of something for us to do. but not before we had said goodbye to SCM Lane who handed over to SCM

passengers coming off selected flights; this task was very popular. Everyone. whatever their normal job. at one time or another was involved in operational tasks.

Woods.

for

security

at

Trooper Mazurkiewifcz

Visit of General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick to A Squadron on Exercise Hellenic Express in

more cups of tea than they could ever hope to drink. While we were engaged in an urea where a holiday and rather drunken

Throughout our time in Ulster we had it minimum of six troops under command. the extra troops coming first from the Royal Hussars and later from the 14th/20th Hussars. Our role was to supply four troops to operate under command of the infantry

responsibility

We were based for the next five weeks in

before

terrorism that led to introduce internment.

Detmold had about nine inches of snow when we left. and even Southampton had

days

internment, and the upsurge of violence that has occurred since. Looking back it is cztsy now to see the gradual increase in

port

On 12th July the squadron was given ol‘ the route of the main Orange

On rcnssembling after leave we started

inking over the vehicles and equipment left behind by C Squadron of The Life Guards and preparing for Exercise Hellenic

procession in Belfast to safeguard. Although

Express. the NATO exercise Thcsc preparations included

the day started badly when some members of the Orange Order from Glasgow. who

trnining at Stanford in Norfolk. during which we tried to forget the tactics of the

had landed at Larnc, made trouble in a

and terrorist operations of Northern Ireland, and rc»le;trn snake patrols and troop loops.

Catholic housing estate there. the processions all passed ofl quietly. Our part of thc processional route was in 11 Protestant part of the town and everyone was given

in Greece. five days

Without any previous experience we also had to prepare our movement by air.

armoured

cars

for


The Exercise in Greece was for everyone both a useful training exercise and a new and most enjoyable exercise. Both the journeys out and back went off without incident. and we were complimented

upon

the

way

our

vehicles

had

been

prepared and on the efficiency with which the vast amount of paper work which an air move involves had been completed.

this was more than one could say for most of our visitors while we were in Greece.

Admiral

At the conclusion of the exercise a parade was held in Sersai before the Regent of Greece. This has since attracted unfavourable political comment. but for this we could not be blamed. The turnout

Generals .

surprisingly

British—One

Greek—Two Turkish—One

was

On our return to England we had time

together and the hospitality of the Greek

to clean the armoured cars and for the first time this year, time to think about hum drum routine matters. Before we went on a fortnight‘s leave in October. Major H. O.

villagers

Hugh—Smith handed over command of the

and

cold

the

everyone

weather returned

brown. It was amusing to watch soldiers from seven different Nations working

enjoyed

never a

visit

flagged.

We

by

Deputy

our

particularly Colonel.

General Fitzpatrick, who was accompanied by his ADC. Captain Birdwood. Although bad flying weather cut down the time that

Lieutenant Generalsi-

armoured cars were much admired.

very

marvellous

BritishfiTwo Greek~0ne

of the soldiers and the appearance of the

Apart from three days which were wet

and

USA7011e

squadron to Major J. D. Smith-Bingham. We are now busily preparing for our second winter in Norway and after that another four months in Ulster.

he was able to spend with us at least he

Finally some statistics on some of our

stayed long enough to make it worthwhile for his helicopter to close down its engine;

various visitors throughout the year broken down by rank and nationality:

Major Generals~ British—Two Italian—One Norwegian~0ne

American—One Greek*0ne Brigadiers~

British—Five Norwegian—One Greek—Two Total number of stars~—48

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B SQUADRON ~ TOUR IN ULSTER NOVEMBER 1 971—MARCH 1972

Riot control practice in Slough.

Trooper Mellor and Corporal Lane Riot training in Slough

During disembarkation leave from Germany news was received that B Squadron was to be operational in Northern Ireland, relieving the Parachute Squadron RAC by 9th November, 1971. Conversion training from tanks to armoured cars was cut to a minimum and the squadron, on return from leave, set about fitness training, Browning and small arms firing, culminating in two exercises in conjunction with the police in parts of Slough Trading Estate. 80 successful was this training that, as events have proved, it was rougher and tougher than a great deal that has been experienced on the streets of Belfast. The Advance Party moved over to Belfast on 4th November and spent several invaluable days operating with the Parachute Squadron RAC troops. This meant that by the time that the squadron arrived most officers and senior NCOs knew a little about their task. As Major T. N. P. W. Burbury, B Squadron leader was away for the training period and for the first month in Ulster, Major T. C. Morris, the Second in Command, was responsible for the training of the squadron and for initially setting the squadron up on its arrival, and the high standard and correct assessment of training that has carried the squadron through a very successful tour is largely due to him, The squadron in Belfast has two main jobs. Firstly they are the only armoured reconnaissance squadron supporting 39 Infantry Brigade with its responsibilities covering Belfast City and most of Co. Antrim. In normal circumstances this is sufficient except that as the one and only squadron nobody can afford to relax in case he is called for. This pressure can tell a lot on the crews over this period

of time. The primary role is supporting the infantry battalions operating in the city and the secondary role, but equally important, is patrolling and gathering of information in the country. Within the city the squadron operates normally with three troops supporting infantry battalions within the battalion areas. On arrival in Northern Ireland the squadron was in support of fst Battalion Scots Guards where the troop concerned was also the Brigade Reserve Troop and operating in the city for 24 hours at a time. In addition the squadron supports, with a troop each, the 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers and 12th Light Air Defence Regiment Royal Artillery. In January 1972 battalion areas were changed within the city and the Brigade Reserve troop’s responsibility was transferred to the 1st Battalion The Gloucestershire Regiment. All three battalion areas have given the squadron a great variety of tasks and it has been found that battalions, even companies, seldom employ the armoured cars in a similar manner. The city of Belfast is not natural armoured car territory with lurking around the narrow unlit streets by night a main task. However, we have never been seriously misemployed except for short periods when it has been operationally necessary. We have always had nothing but help and assistance from the battalions, and troop leaders advice is always taken. It is difficult for the troops to assess their value as they patrol the streets with little glamour in their lives and with plenty of stones, and paint-filled bottles in return for their effort, but the mere fact that the infantry feel more secure in their much more difficult task is justification alone for our employment in the city. Apart from endless patrolling, our ability to report

and watch is invaluable to the infantry as the armoured reconnaissance patrol has the ability to assess the temperature of an area quickly. If feelings are running high the appearance of a pair of whippets, as the Ferret is known to the citizens of Belfast, can create an immediate reaction. In short, the value of the Ferrets is as follows: morale value to the infantry, a good ‘thermometer‘ for battalion or company commanders, good radio and accurate reporting, a quick reaction force that will either draw the gunman out or deter him from his original objective and, lastly, but never as yet employed. thankfully, a very powerful machine gun that could be employed in support of infantry. The remaining two troops in normal times are employed in the country, one escorting lorries taking gelignite to the quarries, and the other patrolling and visiting houses and farms in the coutryside. The troops have been much abused by the local people, mainly in the Roman Catholic urban areas, since arrival, and this is probably due to fear and the belief that the cars will never fire unless the situation is desperate. At the start of the tour everyone was quite amused by being stoned and bottled consistently but this soon wore off and at times it has taken a great deal of self control not to open

fire.

The squadron

has been

soldiers living conditions in Belfast. The advantage is that we regularly see the countryside, which so many do not for months on end, and have excellent

garage and workshop facilities. The scout cars are on the whole very old and the 30 miles daily run in and out of the city takes its toll. However, AQMS Guthrie and the LAD team have done a magnificent job keeping us on the road and able to meet our commitments. There are many people in situations like this who get no glory but only dull monotony, but without them none of us could operate. They are the SQMCs department, the cooks, the clerks and technical storeman, the MT and LAD, and all those lumped together under the loose term of Administrative Troop. To them goes much of the credit. At the end of our tour it is difficult to single out anyone in the squadron who has done better than the next. All that can be said is that the team has been successful and the squadron has received many kind words from many people. There cannot be many who did not look forward to A Squadron relieving us in March and We WISh them all good luck during their tour.

extraordinarily

lucky and has only received minor injuries during the tour, except for CoH. Sibley, who received an eye injury in February. We wish him well and hope to see him back at duty in the very near future.

Our base in RAF Station Aldergrove, whilst not luxurious, is a great deal better than the majority of

Finally SCM Clarke, who has been B Squadron's SCM for the last two years, has left us to take up his new appointment as RSMI at the Royal Military College of Science. We wish him the very best of luck and look forward very much to seeing him on our return to Windsor. 19

18


Top—Trooper Measor, Trooper Ollin, Cornet Corry Reid and Corporal Muff

c SQUADRON

Polo was flourishing on our arrival but has since stopped because of the wet weather, and restarts in March. We hope to encourage some of the soldiers to play next year, as it is an ideal place for beginners.

The

PERGAMOS

ponies

in

the

Saddle

Club.

The whole squadron is now working very well together, and are much looking

forward

to

the

Summer

when

more

activities, such as sailing, water skiing, aqua lung diving. etc. begin. Life in Cyprus will then be rally enjoyable, although

many

members

of

the

squadron

have

numbering 36. are completely triple purpose. being used for pony club. hunting and polo. and we are trying to buy more

recently been enjoying themselves on snow skis on Troodos—we provide instructors for the ski courses and it has been a great

locally on the island. If one is driving through the island in a car and you see a

advantage having had a few soldiers with previous training at Silberhutte in Germany.

likely looking animal. you stop, try it, and

if suitable. buy it on the spot. The Saddle Club secretary was seen riding an animal

with

no

bridleiand

being

carted~in

combat kit when firing with his troop on PYLA ranges. We bought the horse!

The

Squadron

Leader

and

Cornet

Corry Reid hope to tour Kenya with a Cyprus Polo Team in late February for 2 weeks.

The Christmas festivities went off well. with Christmas parties, both for our own

children and for 75 of the Turkish children Top—Dhekelia Saddle Club from the local village, all ranks dances and Christmas draws and lunches. Everyone appeared to enjoy themselves.

Trooper Guy, Lance-Corporal Barden Lance-Corporal

Benn

Bottom—Trooper Manning

and

We were very pleased to see Colonel and Mrs. Eyre out here early in December, and hope that on the next occasion they will be able to stay longer and see more of

Trooper Wyatt

the sun. The Regimental Lieutenant Colonel. Colonel Baillie and Major Hamil-

ton Russell arrive for a week in February The squadron. suitably boosted in strength by members of HQ Squadron and various people rejoining from ERE

was very pleasant. similar to an English summer. and it was not until just before Christmas that it began to get colder. with

sionalism of Hohne. is worth a guinea a

appointments.

in

the months of January and February being

October after a month‘s leave in England. Most families were able to come with their husbands, and are now accommodated either in Pergamos Camp or in the nearby town of Larnaca. Those families who were unfortunate enough not to be able to move straight into a house arrived in Cyprus within a month or so.

the most unpleasant. although even then we had some lovely hot days like Spring

to keep the range clear of the locals and their flocks of sheep and goats is well nigh impossible. However. there have been no reports of decapitated locals.

arrived

in

Cyprus

wly

in England.

The squadron settled in very well and naturally

we

had

the

normal

quota

of

visitors which. in the first month, included the C65. General Sir Michael Carver.

Bottom—Corporal minute.

As

fast as

Williams,

Trooper

one erects targets the

locals move in to pinch them, and trying

Savage, Trooper Stretion, Corporal More. Trooper Wright and Trooper Buckle.

family fairly often.

One troop took to sea on a landing raft. and caused consternation in SHQ when asked to give its position. reported a GR 7

Brigadier

miles out to sea. The SHQ operator was

totally non-plussed and asked for verifica-

Bright has been awarded his Army Fencing

Pergamos Camp is situated 5 miles out of Dhekelia. the headquarters of the Eastern

son. GOC NEARELF, Major General M. W. Holme. and our immediate boss.

tion. eventually informing the troop leader he could not be at sea. whereupon the

colours in Cyprus.

Sovereign

Brigadier R.

troop leader told him that the troop was at that location. had been at sea for 2

One of our main tasks outside military activities is the running of the Dhekelia Saddle Club. which is capably organised by Cornet C‘orry Reid and CoH. Catlin. It has a membership of about 100#Wl‘.65. children. local civilians. etc. and caters for

and

15 miles from

C.

Windsor-Clive.

Famagusta. the main holiday resort on the south coast of Cyprus. It is an ex-RAF camp With excellent facilities, and has the great advantage of having 40 tied married quarters within the camp for the members

of the resident squadron. We were slightly surprised on arrival to find ourselves taking over. not only the camp but also 3 peacocks

who

have

complete

run

One is extremely restricted in tactical movement in Cyprus due to not being

4 hoursfisHQ thought that Suez was being permitted

to

exercise

outside

the

SBA. invaded

which only has two postage stamp sized training areas: therefore we concentrate on trade training. sport and many other

activities such as rallyingfithe latter very capably organised by that great enthusiast

of the

camp and are inclined to wake families up by perching on the roof and making unearthly noises very early in the morning. The weather in October and November

hours. and was remaining there for another again!

Sport has been a major part of the squadron’s lifcfiwe take part in soccer.

hunting. polo. pony club instruction and normal hacking out in the surrounding

countryside. Cornet Leslie King is kennel running.

etc.

huntsman

the ruggcr club run by Sgt. Evans RAPC.

recruit firing on

range

been brilliant. by next year we should have

early in November. This, after the profes-

very good teams in all these sports. CoH.

and

is shown

although

by all. especially

PYLA

and are very grateful for all his help both with the squadron and the Saddle Club.

Mrs. Olivier has run a flourishing wixes club. with the assistance of many of the squadron wives; they worked like beavers

over

Christmas

organising

the

children's

parties. and we are most grateful for all the hard work we know they put into it.

and

on

the

departure

of

the

in

Brigadier in February he and Cornet Corry Reid became joint masters. They hunt a

Our LAD section. commanded by Stafi

field of about 30~and have produced some

Sergeant Waterman. has been kept busy. unfortunately on occasions with people having accidents on rallies—but luckily

excellent sport.

little human damage.

the results as yet have not drag

the local

Commander

Tremendous

Captain Marsh. However. each troop has managed to complete the basic tactical drills of an armoured car regiment and we had

enthusiasm

WindsorrClive.

Dhekelia Area. has been of the greatest assistance to the squadron during our stay in Pergmos and we are all very sad to lose him in February—we wish him and his

wife the best possible wishes for the future

ruggcr. hockey. basketball, squash. fencing.

cross—country

and no doubt from then onwards through the Summer there will be a steady flow of visitors coming for a sunny holidayfiall are most welcome.

Major Wilkinson has arrived as a Staff Ofl‘ice in Episkopi and we see him and his

CBFNE. Air Marshal Sir Derek Hodgkin—

Base Area.

Middle—Cornet Corry Reid, CoH. Garvey, Trooper Evans and Trooper Measor

line

once

a

Week.

normally with

a

Evans

and

Trooper


Mounted Squadron l97l The squadron has enjoyed several highlights of an eventful year. Undoubtedly one of the chief was our most successful visit to York on the occasion of Her Majesty’s visit at the end of June. This was memorable due to the hospitality shown us and the enthusiasm of the North for the Household Cavalry; very different from the average London crowd who see us every day!

In July we were honoured by a visit from Her Royal Highness Princess Margaret who inspected the barracks and stables. During the same month the squadron went into camp at Pirbright for an all too short ten days where we were able to get in some long rides and as much jumping as possible. As always both men and horses benefited from the change of air.

Battle Royal at Aldershot saw a troop demon~ strate their skill by charging with great panache and no casualties. Unfortunately we were unable to entertain the comrades at Camp this year but hope they enjoyed themselves at Kensington Palace Field in September where the squadron put in a great deal of hard work to make the day a success. We have had two State visits at the end of this year, by the Emperor of Japan and the King of Afghanistan. Finally the new Major General visited us in December. This year has produced at long last a heartening increase in trained men reaching us from the depot, and thus we may hope that the dutyman’s lot will be eased. Much credit is due to the troopers and junior NCO’s of the squadron tor the hard work they have put in during 1971. Her Royal Highness Princess Margaret 8: R.C.M. Clark

Trooper Gardner Stoney Castle

Douglas

Her Royal Highness Princess Margaret; Captain The Earl of Normanton; Major J.

in

S.

Crisp

and

CoH.

Preece

The Queen’s Cite Guard turned out on the State Visit ol The Emperor of Japan

occasion of the

Trooper Malinouski competing in the Blues and Royals Squadron Hunter Trials, during their annual camp at Stoney Castle

L/Cpl. Twinn and Troopers Hague and Foley pulling in the Mounted Tug of War, Stoney Castle

The Otticers ot the Mounted Regiment

Courage’s visit to the Mounted Squadron


HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT

This past year was as busy a one as ever for the Band,

The BAND

with

more Mounted duties than usual. The formation of a

combined Household Cavalry Band of 24 Musicians from each

MOUNTED SPORTS

Regiment

for

The

Queen‘s

Birthday

Parade,

made

a

great

improvement to our tonal qualities and volume of sound, despite causing slight equestrian movement problems.

The 1971 horse show and event season began with the Crookham Horse Trials in March. Cpl. Roberts riding Ukelele was 3rd in the Novice Section and the same pair were 2nd in a similar event at Liphook Horse Trials in April. At the Windsor Horse Trials Capt. Wilkinson on Templer and L/Cpl. McGregor riding Unicorn were both placed in a Novice Section. However, Cpl. Roberts, competing in the Intermediate class on Ukelele were not so fortunate. They parted company at the water jump and Ukelele decided to go for a swim and could not be persuaded to leave the lake for some five minutes. The first horse show we went to, was Epsom, where SCM Doxey and Cpl. Roberts were both placed in Foxhunter competitions. However our first major success was to come at the Royal Windsor Horse Show, when SCM Doxey riding Usk was a member of the winning team in Her Majesty The Queen’s Cup. Later in May, SCM Doxey and L/Cpl. McGregor formed part of the winning services team at the Aldershot Horse Show. Capt. Wilkinson and Cpl. Roberts were in the second team in the same competition. Individual successes at this show also included 2nd prize by SCM Doxey in the Open Services competition. Capt. Wilkinson and L/Cpl. McGregor, were 3rd and 4th respectively in the Services Grade ‘C’ Jumping. SCM Doxey on Usk later won the Foxhunter Competition at the Woolwich Horse Show in June. During the summer Tprs. Maddams and Johnson took part in numerous tent pegging displays and were in the winning team competing at Stoke Poges. Tpr. Maddams had the distinction of drawing every peg in this competition. At the RMA Sandhurst show SCM Doxey on Usk won the Services Jurrping competition. Tpr. Church on Una and Tpr. Moseley riding Tiffany were in the team which won the inter-unit Combined Training competition. This was a fine effort by relatively inexperienced riders. In an Inter-Riding Club One Day Horse Trials held at Caterham, L/Cpl. McGregor and Unicorn won the individual event and with CoH. Stubley riding Tiara, formed part of our winning team. Cpl. Roberts riding Ukelele was third at the Wokingham Hunter trials in September. L/Cpl. McGregor and Unicorn were again placed at Eridge, Stockenchurch and the Army One Day Horse Trials. At the latter Event, SCM Doxey was beaten into 2nd place on time in the intermediate class but won the Combined Training Cup for the best Service result. At the Army Hunter Trials held at Larkhill Lt. Wetherly on Ringlett was 3rd in the Novice Class and Lts. Brennan and Couper riding Rozinante and Sandown were 2nd in the team event. Finally to draw this successful season to a conclusion Capt. Wilkinson on Unisex and Cpl. Roberts on Ukelele won the team Hunter Trial at Hickstead. 24

The Musical

same

combined

Band

performed

Pageant before some 30,000

at the Wembiey

people,

and also took

part in the Beating Retreat before Her Majesty The Queen on the Horse Guards Parade. The past year found us taking a

major part in the Household Cavalry Recruiting Drive, playing and marching in many parts of the country, including Bradford, Leeds, Glasgow, Stoke, Brighton and along the south coast.

In

May we made our last visit to The

Regiment before

their return to Windsor. The highlight of this trip was the playing at the Detmold Horse Show, which was run by The Regiment. We alternated with the Band of the 9/12th Royal Lancers in providing music, and in conclusion, much to the delight of all, and S.C.M. Doxey on Usk, winner of the Combined Services Cup

The Detmold Schloss Gardens

especially the

Germans

present,

performed

a

Marching

Display Ceremony. We also played a musical programme for

at the Army one day Horse Trials the

local

Germans

in

the

Schloss

Gardens,

and

provided

entertainment for The Regiment in Barracks.

During the year we bid farewell to BCM Battine retiring, and

to

L/Cpl.

Bandmasters

Watts,

course

at

who

has

Kneller

commenced

Hall.

We

wish

a

Student

them

both

SUCCESS.

A welcome to newcomers; Musicians Atkinson, Davidson,

Cooper and Marsh.

BERLIN VISIT: 29th January—8th February The Blues and Royals Mounted Band and Trumpeters of The

Life Guards. 39

Musicians,

40

horses and

grooms flew

out to Berlin in 3 planes and performed at the International Horse Show in the Deutshland-Halle for 7 days. The Band were exceptionally well received by large audiences, and the Berliners,

seeing a Mounted Band again, were enraptured. The GOC Berlin, Major General The Earl of Cathcart, D.S.O., M.C., who saw the show at least twice, congratulated us and said that a great impression

had

been

made

on the Germans,

most

of

whom were the ‘horsey type‘.

A coloured film of the act with magnetic sound tape, was presented

to

The

Band

before

leaving

Berlin,

and

can

be

loaned to anyone interested and owning a 16mm projector.

L.P. RECORD: Our latest L.P. recording is released, and will be able to be

purchased from The Band, and will be on sale at the Annual Trooper Moseley riding Tiffany in the Combined Services Team competition

Show

at

the

Royal

Military Academy

Sandhurst

Horse

International Horse Show. Berlin 1971

Reunion of The Regimental Association.


the BIiOR and Army . Driving Championships Back Row—L/CoH. _Forrester, T/S's. Grant, Birchall, L/Cpls. Howard, Bunyan, Howard, Vince, L/CoH. Broderick, T/S's. Scully, Eastwood, Middlemas, L/CoH. Butler, L/CoH. Liddell Middle Row—T/S. Reece, L/CoH. Strattord, Tpr. Cartlidge, L/Cpls. Lister, Gillingham,

Palmer, T/S. Leach, L/CoH. Meldrum, L/CoH. Ingram, T/S’s. Cooper, Quinn, L/Cpl. Percy, T/S. Wasp, L/CoH. Balls Bottom Row—CoH. Martin, CoH. Howells, CoH. Aucutt, Capt. Robertson, SQMC. Matthew Major 8. V. Gilbart-Denham, Col. I. B. Baillie, SCM. Peck, Major J. G. Hamilton-Russell,

S/C. Ellis, Lt. T. J. W. Howleti, L/CoH. Daniels, CoH. Donnelly it has been an extremely busy year at the Guards Depot. We started the year

of The

of

The highlight of the year was possibly

Normanton had a brief tour as second in

El Alamein day. This is the day which the

with little over 30 recruits and we are

command and has now gone on to the Mounted Regiment. He was succeeded by

Training Squadron celebrates with siderable gusto. We had the usual

about to go on Christmas leave with 140 recruits in training here, and a further 24 on strength who are at Catterick. From these figures above it can

be seen that

the workload has been heavy. There are six troops in training at one time and twelve have been passed out during the year—one pass—out parade having been taken by the Commanding

Life

Guards. Captain the

Earl

Captain J. Robertson who saw the year

indulgence

out and becomes a civilian in 1972. Lt. P. Rogers was relieved in the spring by

formidable display of military equipment

Lt. D. Reed-Felstead. We welcomed the return of SCM J.

helicopters, a Chieftain, a Fox and a Scorpion as well as displays mounted by

Peck to the squadron who must now be

the Mounted Regiment and The Blues and Royals at Windsor. It was a great success and we are extremely grateful for the outside help we received.

considered an old depot soldier—he succeeds in keeping everyone on the

Officer of the Regiment. There has been

straight and narrow. We have said goodbye

an important innovation in the programme

to SQMC Mathews. who has gone back to his much loved sharp end soldiering. During the summer we welcomed the

in

that each

troop

now

does

a

4

day

exercise at Thetford. Hitherto there had been a two day exercise in the Pirbright area which had been far from satisfactory. Major J. D. Smith-Bingham relin~ quished command of the squadron in August after a comparatively short but highly successful tour. The squadron is

now lead by Major 8. V. Gilbart—Deniham

con— over

arrival of CoH.

Donnelly, who is another

old depot man, and L/CoH. Butter, who both arrived from Knightsbridge. CoH.

which

at

lunch

included

four

accompanied different

by

types

a of

We have had no outstanding sporting successes although our overall standards have been quite high. We have two recruits who play for the Depot, Bryant a goal-

keeper

and

Sanderson

who

is

in

the

Pomroy also paid us one of his lightning

Rugger XV.

visits to sort out the weapon training and after a six months tour he has returned to the Regiment.

In 1972 recruiting is likely to fall off a bit but we anticipate another energetic

yeah

TUG-OF-WAR Last year the Regiment had a good Tug of War season, reaching the finals of the BAOR Championships. The season started with the Regimental Athletics in which B Squadron team easily won the competition and were selected, en bloc, to represent the Regiment in the Brigade Championships. Here the Regiment only came third but due to the withdrawal of the 1RHA team were selected to go forward to the Divisional finals. There followed three weeks hard training with much appreciated help from 1RHA. in the Divisional Championships the team pulled better than ever and lost only one pull, giving us 2nd place behind 35 Engineer Regiment RE, We were well pleased as the first two went forward to the BAOR finals. These unfortunately took place during the Annual Firing fortnight at Hohne, which resulted in some restrictions on our final training and preparation. Nevertheless, fifth place did not disgrace the Regiment: the team had shown great improvement between the Regimental Athletics and

the BAOR finals, and acquitted themselves well. 26

We started practising for the Army Driving Championships while we were on Regimental Training at Soltau. Three rallies were organised by Captain Marsh to improve our standard of navigation and night driving and the two teams, consisting of two Landrovers,

each read

through the German Highway Code books and learnt all there was to learn on this dull subject. Various departments generously lent their Landrovers for the practice rallies; most of them regretted their action—especially the RCM who lent his immaculate Landrover to Tpr. O’Connell for one of the high speed cross-country phases and had it returned very much the worse for wear. During this phase a heavy towchain lying on the floor in the back of the Landrover was transformed into a snake possessed by the devil, and reduced all the RCM’s personal kit and a sleeping bag to ribbons. Two batteries turned upside down and emptied themselves. which didn’t help. Eventually the day arrived and the teams drove down to a new German Army Camp in Bad Lippspringe which was to become our home for four long days.

8 Squadron tug of war team representing the Regiment S.O.M.C. Greenwood

(Coach), Trooper Garrett, Lance-Corporal Murray,

Trooper Chamberlain, Corporal Gibbs, Trooper Welsh, Trooper Donnelly, Trooper Brown, Trooper Gambrell and Trooper Riley

The 22] contestants assembled there for scrutineeringieach Landrover was thoroughly checked to ensure none had been “breathed on” or that any extras had been fitted. Hopes of slipping on some Ferret wheels for the cross-country phase vanished fast when we foud that all the Landrovers went into a very wellguarded and brightly-lit compound (similar to an lnternment Camp. but more secure?) No competitor was able to touch his vehicle, or leave the camp. between the four phases of the Rally. Each Regiment was given an All Ranks. eight-man room. and the teams lived together and ate centrally. The Germanic washroom. complete with cold running water from taps 3 feet above the communal trough. guaranteed a thorough and cold drenching

from the waist up. Further functions were performed in a communal hut with no partitions where one bid one’s neighbour ‘Good Morning’ through gritted teeth! All competitors were obliged to pass the ‘Tick Test’ on the German Highway Codeimore of a problem to the 8 teams which had driven over from England. Failure to pass this on the second attempt lead to disqualification. We were then issued with sufficient l" to the Mile maps of Germany to carpet the Courtyard at Windsor Castle, which we stuck together with innumerable rolls of cellotape. After a briefing, each Landrover departed on the first stage. This consisted of about 250 miles, which

included 6 special sections. We departed at one-minute intervals, and it was encouraging to find that in many cases other competitors’ map reading was worse than one’s own: within an hour one began passing Landrovers going in the opposite direction with rival Navigators glowering at each other. The special Sections consisted of high speed stretches over varying road surfaces, mainly gravel tracks in the German forests. All these routes had to be done as fast as possible and the route was marked with arrows. No map reading was necessary so the navigator merely hung on and prayed. One of the best teams on these sections was undoubtedly the Padre’s. whose navigators employed these tactics with great success! (Outside Help?) Despite an exploratory journey amongst the trees by Wilkinson. the 4 Regimental Landrovers survived the ordeal and returned to base. refuelled centrally (no chance of smuggling in the Avgas). and congratulated each other in surviving. Of the 22l starters. only 94 were

eligible for the second phase: the others having fallen by the wayside.

Four hours later the teams were on their way again. In the darkness, the special sections became even more exciting, and on two of these the phantom ‘Route Alterer’ struck again, changing round the arrows in order to misdirect the competitors behind him. This guaranteed utter bedlam, with Landrovers going in every direction trying to pass each other on narrow forest tracks. Unfortunately, several Landrovers never received an amended grid reference of the refuelling point; so much time was lost by them trying to find it. This put Captain Barne’s Landrover an hour overdue at the next Check Point, which disqualified him for the next 2 stages, so the hopes of the B Team were dashed. After a 10 hour break the remaining teams, which still included Captain Marsh and CoH. O’Halloran, set out on the third 250 mile stage, which included about 12 Special Sections. At the start of one of these. L/CoH. Scammell accelerated away with such wheelspin that he showered the Landrover behind him with gravel, knocking out one of their headlights, which dangled from its socket like an eyeball. The remaining teams were very tired by the start of the final phase, however the A Team succeeded in completing the 1,000 miles most successfully and won the RAC Trophy. being the highest-placed Household Cavalry or RAC team in the Championships. Not to be outdone, the B Team, by diligently studying the German Highway Code, were awarded the BAOR Road Safety Trophy and the RoSPA Trophy. A Team

Captain Marsh, Tpr. O‘Connell, CoH. O’Halloran. L/CoH. Scammell. B Team

Captain Barne. Tpr. Wilkinson. CoH. Smith. Tpr. Robinson. 27


Regimental Stables The Black horses continued during the year to give full value to the Regiment in Germany. The stable strength increased by two during the Summer so that a full stable of eighteen horses should enable recreational riding and hound exercise to continue uninterrupted during the Riding Courses in the Winter. In the BAOR competitive world the Regiment managed to keep up the large number of entries, and although results were not so satisfying as in 1970 a fair amount of success came our way.

Corporal Partridge at the R.A.V.C. Show Sennelager

Major Crawford, The Colonel and the CoH. Burton-Johnson

28

The season started with the QRIH Hunter Trials at Paderborn, at which our best result was the third place in the Novice pairs event achieved by L/Cpl. Partridge on Urchin and L/Cpl. Lees on Sefton. Minor placings were also achieved at the RAVC Handy Hunter Competition, the BAOR Hunter Trials and the Weser Vale Hunter Trials by L/Cpl. Sherwin on Nymphet, Captain Tweedie on Sefton and Captain Haworth-Booth on Uhlan. On 20th May the Regiment ran the Detmold Horse Show, the first Regimental Horse Show since Herford. Owing to the efforts of the Secretary, Captain Hickman (LG), a total of nearly 300 entries were received for the four different classes, the great majority being German entries. Jumping started at 8 am. and finally finished just after 7.30 pm, classes having followed each other without a break. This event took place on a German holiday and was watched by over twelve hundred spectators. The best Regimental result was obtained by Sefton, ridden by Captain Tweedie, who came third in the Class L jumping, and the Regiment won the Inter Regimental team prize. The BAOR horse show took place during the first week-end in June. Thoe most satisfying results here were in the soldiers Prix Caprilli Dressage Competition, which was divided into Novice and Open classes. L/Cpl. Claridge won the Novice Class and L/Cpl. Partridge won the Open class, in which L/Cpl. Catlin came second. The Regiment also came first and second in the team competition. This was an extremely satisfying result, especially so as L/Cpl. Catlin and L/Cpl. Claridge were riding polo ponies for whom dressage was a new phenomenon. In the Show jumping classes Sefton and Outlaw won minor placings, and the Regiment won the Inter Regimental team competition with Major Crawford on Urchin, Captain Hickman on Outlaw and Captain Tweedie on Sefton. Our final effort in Germany before returning to Windsor was to hold a Regimental Cross Country race for all ranks, to compete for the trophy presented by Major C. V. C. Booth-Jones. Although open to all horses only the Blacks were available. Thanks to the kindness of the Bielefeld Riding Club we were able to run this over their three-day event steeplechase course, suitably modified to the capabilities of the Black horses. The course was over a mile and a half and sixteen fences, and eight starters came under orders. The first four or five fences were thoroughly frightening as the bumping and boring threatened to unseat most jockeys, but an incident~free race was won by Tpr. Nisbet on Sefton, five lengths clear of Major Crawford on Valkyrie. Surgeon Major Page, encouraged by the enthusiastic support of the spectators. was a close third on Ursula. The Commanding Officer had generously offered a bottle of champagne to each finisher; this probably cost him more than he bargained for as all eight finished the course. Major Wright‘s book went down a packet on Captain Tweedie’s winning forecast. Unfortunately the Regimental Stable has now come to an end as it has been inherited by The Life Guards. However, most of the staff have accompanied C Squadron to Cyprus where they are running the Dhekelia Saddle Club Stables and Tpr. Johnson has inherited a new pack of Hounds—the Dhekelia pack, for which the squadron is also responsible,

The Weser Vale

1970-7i

Hunt

DO YOU RECALL? Regimental Headquarters Household Cavalry has been asked by Mr. Philip Silvester of 70 Wellington Court, St. Johns Wood, London, NW8 if they can trace a Corporal of The Blues who left the safety of a pill-box on the morning of November 6th, 1917 to

help Mr. Silvester, who was then serving in The Royal Artillery, to right a mess cart which he was in charge of and which had overturned. If the former NCO concerned is still alive or if there is anybody else who remembers the incident Mr. Silvester would very much like to hear from him and he may be contacted at the above address. Captain Stringer and the CoH. Burton-Johnson leading the field

By the 1970/71 Hunting Season the Weser Vale Hunt had grown from its tiny origins to become a fully established aspect of BAOR life. Throughout the season four and a half couple of huntable hounds were avail~

able

and

three

couple

of

puppies are growing up. Last winter the German weather was much kinder than previously and very few days were lost to ice and snow. Except for a fortnight from Christmas the Hunt met every Saturday and fitted in several mid-week bye»days when work permitted, The fields grew throughout the season in both the English and the German following, the master on one occasion being dazzed by the sight of 180 horses follow.ng hounds. The last meet of the season also gave one of the best day's hunting, at Neuhausin-Solling, across some of the biggest fences and stone walls we had met, which resulted in one or two spectacular but injury-free falls. It was on this occasion that we were VlSlted by Major J. N. P. Watson. formerly of The Blues_and Royals, who wrote an inter— esting article on the Weser Vale for “Country Life". The Hunt Ball was held in March at Lothian Barracks

bv kind permission of the Commanding Officer and was a great success, though the number of guests was unfor-

tunately not as great as was hoped owing to many possible guests being in Northern Ireland. This year a Hunt Dinner was also held, organised by Captain Barne. Fifty English and German guests attended and, on behalf of the Hunt Members, the Corps Commander presented the Master, Captain W. A. Stringer, with a silver Bloodhound statuette and a copy of the BBC film of the Hunt to mark his retirement. After dinner Captain Stringer gave a spirited exhibition of dressage in the dining room, To the Regiment in Germany the Weser Vale Bloodhounds gave a very great deal of enjoyment and all who took part in any way, either on horse or on foot, owe a oreat debt of gratitude to Captain Stringer and all those who helped him provide such en‘oyment: CoH, Burton—Johnson, the first whipper-in, Tpr. Johnson, the Kennelman, and the stable staff who gave up most of their week-ends. The Life Guards have now taken over the Weser Vale as a Regimental Pack. We wish them as much fun and success as we had.

HOUSEHOLD DIVISION SOCIAL CLUB It is intended to establish a Household Division Social Club in the Midlands, probably based at Birmingham. Would any member who is interested in joining please contact N. L. Measey Esq., Hon. Secretary,

The Coldstreamers Association, 2 Studley Croft, Solihull, Warwicks.


in this year when the Regiment is to be honoured by the presentation of a new Guidon by our (‘nlnnel in (‘hiel I feel it IS appropriate to revrew the Standards and Guidons carried in both The Blues and The Royals since loo]. The l~louseholtl Cavalry Museum has prepared the following which I hope will he of interest to you.

THE BLUES

T

1717

HE ROYALS 1751

9 crimson Standards:— 1. The Royal Arms, (borne on the Sovereigns Standard ever Since). 2. Royal Cypher, crowned, The remaining 7 Standards bear the Union Badge, crowned. From 1707 to 1801 the Linton badge was composed of Rose and Thistle on single stem. After 1801 it includes the Shamrock.

Review oi the Standards and Cuidons oi the

~

BLUES and ROYALS

)3 (fm/r/v'lfir‘v'r' 0" (

‘\\ HHJJ/r”

THE BLUES 1661

TH E ROYALS 1661

Said to have had one large crimson Standard and seven smaller ones, but no drawings or records of badges are to

Raised as a Troop of Horse may be assumed to have had a single, rectangular Standard but no records are now

be found.

extant. Sovereign’s Standard, The Blues similar to

1 684 8 crimson Standards with following badges:—

1.

crimson Guidons with badges as iollows:— Royal Cypher, crowned. Rays of Sun issuing from Cloud, crowned. Top of a Beacon with Flames, crowned. Two Ostrich Feathers, crowned. Rose halved with Pomegranate, crowned. Phoenix, crowned.

The Crown. Royal Cypher, crowned. As for 2 but with a Flame in top corner of hoist. Rose, crowned.

Thistle, crow-nerd. Fleur de Lys, crowned. Harp, crowned. Royal Oak, crowned.

King’s Guidon, The Royals, 1751 (Crimson)

Ami/5771 . Iran/J

the 1717 pattern s...

.

,. .\\~\\. an...

. , /,)/t 1 {/11/'(J,!)/4"

12/; 41‘an

exam”:

,- .

.

-

)

‘fl/hf ///ur/..Ifl‘/.n 4M at

()1/ u' I"! .r/nv

_.__

Squadron Guidon, The Royals,

1751 (Blue)

2nd or Royal Cypher Standard The Blues, circa 1751

‘5,mamltlliltliilllmll‘gflnrumm ' ' \ux-L,‘c“\ \g.¢<-.: .

WWW-H”illlllitiii MW , ‘

.‘

1 //1/:1 ’{47/n jr‘i/‘r”

K/x ’r/fl/li‘zr ’. R’ :‘

()hulz‘rlnfr 2

"‘ NU” “ W‘—

I

I w V‘ '1 (Siva/rend); 1‘» 1'

it it!“ ’ Squadron Guidon, The Royals,

lift! )e/fin/X b ‘ . m : mar/f .

1751 (Blue)

\ 04 r/errmv

3rd (or Major’s Troop, The Blues, 1684) By gracious Permission of Her Majesty The Queen

Guidon, Colonel’s Troop, The King’s Own Royal Regiment ol Dragoons, 1685

crimson Standards:— Royal Cypher, crowned, Royal Motto,

1685

939N539???)

3rd or Union Guidon, The Blues, circa

(Dieu et mon

Dr-oiit, on scroll), 3 small crowns below Cypher.

Crown, surmounted by Crowned Lion. Rose, crOWned. Thistle, crowned. Fleur de Lys, crowned. Harp, crowned. Royal Oak, crowned.

8 crimson Guidons:— 1. Royal Cypher, “C", reversed and interlaced, crowned. (See illustration). Crown and a Carbuncle.

1751 By kind Permission of the Director, National Army Museum

Crossed Ostrich Feathers, crowned. Rose halved with a Pomegranate, crowned. Rays of Sun issuing from Cloud, crowned. A Beacon and Flames, crowned. Spotted Leopard, crowned. Phoenix, crowned.

A Portcullis, crowned. Cross of St. George within Garter, crowned.

By gracious Permission of Her Majesty The Queen

1778 1758

1704

1704 9 crimson Standards, each with crowned and the Royal motto.

Queen

Anne‘s

Cypher,

(From 1687 until 1751 (there are no precise records of the Standards or Guidons of The Royal Dragoons).

‘Union' Standard ranked second to the Sovereign‘s Standard, the Royal Cypher Standard became the third and junior Standard.

Apparently possessed two rectangular Standards, one crimson with the centre badge, (Le. King's Crest within a crowned Garter) of the Squadron Guidons of 1751, the second Standard was blue. A King‘s Guidon—with Union badge—could have been carried as well.

31


THE BLUES 1873

THE BLUES

THE ROYALS

THE ROYALS

Royal Cypher Standard was discontinued. (Victorian pattern

1794

illustrated below).

1858 Were reduced to an issue of a single Guidon with the remainder of the Cavalry of the Line. The finals. (heads) of Standard and Guidon Lances were altered from a spearhead to the Royal Crest, (i.e. Crown surmounted by a crowned Lion).

1807 3 Guidons,

one

King’s and two Squadron.

1820 Carried a King's and Squadron Standard—without Eagle, which was granted as a badge in 1838.

the

..

V

as

Ministry of Defence Photograph By kind Permission of the Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding

Were augmented to four Squadrons and a Regimental Cypher Standard, (see above) was issued. This ranked

Household Cavalry

fourth.

1924 Battle honours for 1914-18 War granted.

1953 Standards presented to The Blues by Her Majesty the Queen The Regimental Standard discontinued.

1909

1963 13th August 1832

Standards

presented

to

The

Blues

by

Her

Majesty

the Standards of both The Blues and Royals do not bear the battle honours of "Warburg", “Beaumont" and “Willems” until 1910. The honours were granted only in 1909.

Queen. Presented with the William IV Guidon, carried in addition to the Sovereign's, Union, Royal Cypher and Regimental Standards.

1924 Battle honours for 1914-18 War granted and added to the reverse side of the Guidon.

1954 The last Guidon to be presented to the Royals before amalgamation with The Blues was presented at Tidworth, April, 1954.

King’s Standard

Ministry of Defence Photograph

Sovereign‘s Standard, Royal Horse Guards (The Blues)

1963

By kind Permission of the Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding

By kind Permission of the Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding

Household Cavalry

Household Cavalry

Since 1788 the size of Standards and Guidons and their lances have been regulated.

STANDARDS Hoist,

1768 1873 1898 1936

1 863

29 ins. 30 29) 29‘;

GUIDONS_

_

Hoist.

Lance to slit in tail

27 ins. 27

41 ins 41

27

41

Lances for both Standards and Guidons were'reduce‘d from 9 feet, including the Queen‘s Crest, to 8 feet 8 inches in

The War Office took over the responsibility from the Lord Chamberlain’s Office, for the purchase of Household

Cavalry Standards.

Fly (less fringe)

Squadron Standard

1873.


GOVERNOR CENERAUS HORSE GUARDS

REGIMENTAL REPORT 1970-1971 CO

BY APPOiNTMENT to HER MMESYY THE QUEEN

av APPOINTMENT TO N M QUEEN ELlZABEYH m: QUEEN MOTHER

SILVERSMITHS A- JEWELLERS

JEWELLERS 61 SILVERSMlTHS

ESTABLISHED 1780

L/Coi. H. K. Forbes, CD, ADC

(DUHHNGTON

Major D. E. Friesen, CD Captain C. R. Ahrens

CWO H. G. Busch, CD

Makers of fine pieces of Silver to Famous Regiments

Blues and Royals Brooch

The training season 1970-71 has proved to be another successful year for the Regiment. The many diverse activities continue to foster excellent Esprit De Corps among the Regiment, the Band. Cavalry Squadron, and Cadets. Training had just begun when a Change of Command Parade took place at the Coliseum of the Canadian National Exhibition. The Honorary Colonel of the Regiment, The Governor General of Canada, Roland Michener, officiated at the official

change-over from L/Col. M. B. W. Davis, CD, ADC, to L/Col. H. K. Forbes, CD, ADC. There was a large turnout from the Toronto Units as well as Toronto spectators. The Cavalry Squadron provided a Musical Ride that was well received by those in attendance.

to ensure that the Regiment performed well at Summer Concentration in CFB Petawawa. Through the excellent cooperation of the VIII Canadian Hussars the Unit had the opportunity to utilize the regular force vehicles and equipment during the first half of the week followed by a 36 hour exercise involving all of the Units at camp. This exercise saw the Horse Guards commanding the Screen and the Counter Attack Force. For the first time in a number of years, the Armoured Regiments operated as Armoured Units and not Reconnaissance. The Horse Guards had a large number of personnel on ARTS courses and attachments. Including the Cadets, the Regiment had in excess of 170 personnel undergoing training during the Summer months. This training consisted of Summer Concentration, SSTP, Clerk Adm, Small Arms, Dvr. Trg, Comm. Trg, ROSC, Capt. Qua], Lt. Qual, ROUTP, Sr. NCO. Jr, NCO, Leadership Courses at locations such as Toronto, Borden, Petawawa, Kingston, Shilo. USA. Germany and France.

The Squadrons under Major J. Burns, CD, and Major D. MacIntyre, CD, proceeded into intensified individual and collective training. The courses consisted of General Military Training, Crewman. Advanced Crewman as well as Junior and Senior NCO. As a Reconnaissance Regiment using wheeled vehicles the Unit conducted many exercises to improve their skills in tactics, radio communications, gunnery, harbouring as well as improving the quality of leadership at all levels. Insufficient and mechanically unfit vehicles continues to be a problem in maintaining maximum training standards. If nothing else, this problem surely ensures that the personnel are trained to exercise maximum flexibility.

The Band continues to perform to its normal excellent standard under Captain FitzGerald. In addition to its regular support at all Regimental functions, it had the complete week at the Royal Winter Fair in the Fall and attended the Kapuskasing Centennial over the Dominion Day weekend. These were in addition to the many other functions they attended throughout the year.

Courses and exercises conducted throughout the year did a great deal

The Cavalry Squadron under Captain Constantinides, demonstrated

34

White Gold

throughout the year that the many comments of praise they have received are indeed justified. They started the year with a Musical Ride at the Change of Command. During the year three Escorts were provided for the Honorary Colonel of the Regiment, The Governor General of Canada, The Royal Winter Fair, The Queen’s Plate, and the official opening of the CNE. They also provided a Mounted Escort for the Lt.Governor for the Opening of the Ontario Legislature. Their expertise has made it SOP that they should be asked to perform at all of these functions. The coming year will prove to be even more interesting. Another important function took place on 2nd February. 197], with the change of Honorary Lieutenant Colonels. After having served the Horse Guards for four decades, L/Col. G.

Allan

Burton, DSO, ED,

Blue Enamel Set with Brilliant Diamonds (actual size)

REGIMENTAL JEWELLER AND SlLVERSMlTH

130 Regent Street, London, W.l Telephone: 01-734 3727

For Service and Satisfaction

MFH,

turned over to L/Col. John W. Graham, ED, 0C. L/COI. Graham assumed his new position on the 40th anniversary of having received his commission in the Regiment. At the parade was every officer that had commanded the Regiment since the Second World War and a past Honorary Lieutenant Colonel. Lt. Col. C. Sifton, CD, QC.

VV.].FEENEY (of Bisham Nurseries)

HIGH CLASS FRUITERERS Local Grown Vegetables. Flowers and Plants

WIDE RANGE OF ENGLISH AND FOREIGN PRODUCE To support community activity the Horse Guards provided the “Horse Guard Shoe” trophy for the second year, for the Miles For Millions Walk. A total of 110 personnel from 8 Units participated in the 32.7 mile Walk raising money for a good cause. The Royal Regiment of Canada won with the best points. The Regiment staffed and provided the communication network for the complete circuit,

Week—end orders delivered

Quality Frozen Foods

SPECIAL RATES FOR CATERERS

91 CLEWER HILL ROAD Tel: WINDSOR 65901


The

C KCLY Sharpshooters Squadron

ROYAL CANADIAN

THE ROYAL YEOMANRY

197l

DRACOONS

The Squadron ended 1971 having convinced at least itself of its professional ability and having achieved a certain renown as the “Show-biz." Squadron.

which followed us on the programme—a Lancashire Mobile Bath Unit. The Squadron then turned to serious soldiering for the main

This year marked the first

Camp of Munsingen in Swabia.

complete one as an operational unit of Central Army Group. Our close association with the

This training area. though rather small. proved extremely useful and equates to Sen— nelager. Unfortunately there were no French armoured units training at that time with

British Army. which goes back to the last century. has at times been taken for granted due to

similiarities in organization. methods and equipment. It was with some nostalgia that we embarked

on

this

activities. so different those of the past.

year‘s

from

whom

a

liaison

could

be

established. The Regiment has. however. been contacted by the nearest French armoured regi-

ment

known

as

the

two are worthy of note. Ex Pig Iron was a rear security operation

Having rcshufi‘led the squadron at the beginning of the year. the first three months were devoted to troop training so that by the time the Regiment went to Camp in May each troop had gained a little experience in working together.

Hussars who drove across the Plain in a westerly direction during the day and in an easterly direction during the night. the main

organised by 44 Paratroop Brigade covering the whole of Salisbury Plain. It was the first time that an exercise of this type had been attempted. Apart from a squadron of Royal

threat came from the air. Many drops of both men and equipment

took place during nhe weekend and we soon learnt that we had to react very quickly to be effective under these circumstances. The Regiment went to Camp in Castlemartin. The emphasis of the camp was on gunnery both static and battle runs. The Squadron in general was very successful and this was no little due to the many Sunday mornings that commanders and gunners had spent during the early part of the year in the FMR at

12th

Cuirassier. stationed some thirty

In January. our Centurions rumbled into Grafenwohr for

exercise season. Of the various exercises in which we took part.

We began the year with a jolt with FFR taking place in January. Luckily the weather was good for the time of year and we were able to put on a good display of troop training.

kilometers from Lahr. with whom it is hoped to develop a useful association.

a three week gun camp. amid

Problems inevitably arise in the effort of moving speedily across the Plain to 3 DZ as 4th Troop found out. Alfa‘s Saladin got bogged. Bravo‘s Ferret broke down and Tail—End Charley

disappeared from view. The troop leader arrived alone at the edge of the DZ. went otf on a foot recce and while he was away

the stares of curious American and German soldiers. This camp is administered by the US. Army and roughly com—

The first of July celebrations marking the Confeder-

Windsor. We can new report that our own FMR in Croydon

ation of Canada were celebrated

is complete and this should not only help us improve still more. but also overcome the need for us to descend on Windsor early

pares to Hohne.

Troop hosted

A whole new dictionary of

in great fashion by Helicopter

of C their

military terms. a very different

Fly—in Breakfast". Where does one find room for eight

hundred aviators from seven countries with one hundred

considerable

Helicopter Troop Leader is still trying to figure out how it was accomplished.

comment.

party

officer

(An is

a

property book officer. 1% tons is really 5/4 tons. a withdrawal is actually a retrograde movement‘the Americans got as

much enjoyment terms as we did

from our from their

terms). We derived little enjoy»

ment from the fact that Grafenwohr was the coldest place in January.

Germany

during

On reurn from Grafenwohr to home station in Lahr. the Regiment continued to settle in

to

its

new

and

still

rather

strange quarters (formerly occupied by French and Canadian jet aircraft).

To

the

rather

normal

and eighty

In moved Reims.

on Sunday mornings.

Squadron who “Fifth Annual

set of range procedures and rather complicated administrative arrangements resulted in advance

his Saladin was ordered out of the area by a senior umpire!

odd

aircraft?

Colonel of the Regiment, Brigadier-General E. A. C. Amy, D.S.O., O.B.E., M.C., C.D., inspeCts B Squadron during his first official visit to The Regiment (May 1971)

The

The second week of Camp was devoted to a regimental inter-troop competition. This was a continuous 3 day exercise and covered all phases of war. Happily we can report that 5th

Troop won the competition outright with 1st Troop not far behind. On aggregate C Squadron ended up well ahead of the other squadrons.

August. A Squadron to Mourmelon near France to train with

a very successful ski slopes of the region for twelve each squadron. In

week on the Black Forest members of fact. a large

number of Regimental person— nel have taken region is not its own right. to the great ski

up skiing as this only famous in but very close areas of France.

Switzerland and Austria. Late spring found us again

the Day" and extracts of our performance were included in the

late

36

against

Leeds

and

proved

how

programme

to

illustrate

how

Crystal

Palace

dealt

with

we soon

learnt

that

though it was

one company of the R6] retired on Saturday evening. and the message arrived in the Comms Centre “We are breaking off the

engagement and returning to base owing to the wetness of the soldiers."

their In October about 20 members of the Squadron helped umpire

the 4 Div. FTX Ex Forefront. For this we drove our Ferrets We then participated in the Wembley Tattoo and enjoyed much publicity both during the performance and on the BBC T.V. re-run by mounting the RTR Cambrai Band on our Ferrets. thus providing a new concept in mounted bands.

At

the

Aldershot

Army

Week

our theme

was

"Weekend

The year has been an unusual and unforgettable one for the Dragoons. Our ques— tions of “how things are likely

a London Transport bus next to a Saladin with the message that

to be in the South” are now

weekends. The BBC news team echoed the feeling of many that the sight of 21 double decker bus in the midst of the armoured

Motoring with a Difference“ and we illustrated this by placing

from Croydon to Detmold over the weekend and then went on to the exercise area. It was a great experience for us to take part in that type of exercise and we gave a good account of ourselves in the eyes of most of the units we met.

Our training year finished with our annual march around the city of Croydon on Remembrance Sunday and following this we turned to the serious problem of getting the vehicles ready for U.E.l.

one

answered. When the seventyfirst anniversary of the action

can

drive

the

bus

during

the

week

and

the Saladin

at

display made a vivid impression.

at Leliefontein was celebrated this year on 7th November. there was perhaps a general feeling of satisfaction that the Regiment now considers Lahr home in a way which could

not be felt on arrival thirteen

Army

match

covered.

months ago.

German

home

opposition.

return to Lahr till 15th October. Thus was the bulk of 1971

in the field. this time in the and

Palace

efficient Browning ~30 blank and Thunderfiashes are at silencing

August. unit and formation training commenced in the US. Army Camp of Honenfels in Bavaria. This was coupled with two “FTX’S” involving 2nd German Corps and 7th US. Corps. 4CMBG. of which the Regiment is a part. did not

French

imaginable. but

staged a pitched battle during the half time interval of the Crystal

winter occupations of refresher

and trades training. was added

Ex Final Folly was a battle in the Henley area against the Royal Greenjackets. It took place during one of the wettest wet for us. it was much wetter for the infantry. Because of this.

fall

In

to treat all infantry as enemy. regardless of which side they

were on. We look forward to repeating this exercise next year.

weekends

a crowd. That particular match had been chosen as “Match of

period.

first of its kind: contact reports flowed in quickly and efficiently. communications across the length of the Plain were excellently maintained. and we reacted quickly to the various threats presented. Probably the worst feature of all was our readiness

After camp we tried our hand at “Show Biz". 51h Troop

the First Battalion. Royal 22nd Regiment. This ten day training period proved of great value in preparation for the marathon

training

None the less. the exercise overall was a great success as the

Lelielontein 1971. The Guidon Party with the Guard of Honour in the background

To cap all our publicity efforts. the BBC programme “Man Alive“ featured the Squadron for IS minutes or more in its programme entitled “The Army Game". We felt happy at the way the programme portrayed our enthusiasm and professionalism

but. feared that for many it was somewhat marred by the unit

On lst November Major Boris Mollo gave up command of the Squadron. He has been succeeded by Major Rupert Bowlby. During the year we also saw the departure of CoH. Acton who had been PSI of D & M since the amalgamation of the Regiment 4 years ago. and a PSI with the KCLY even before

that. We shall miss him greatly and we wish him well in his new appointment. I-lis place has been taken by CoH. Thurston whom we hope will enjoy itn equally happy time with us.


by Major J. M. Carew, MC Royal Horse Guards 1940-42

. . . Blue

a very tasty

The Blues were very good for me but I was not very good for the Blues. As Corporal Jack Twidle neatly phrased it, I stuck out like a punch in the mouth: the rest of the squad. horrible as they were, were rendered still more frightful by my presence. It all started on a balmy summer afternoon in September, 1940. A short week before. in a fit of patriotism induced by a surfeit of mild ale, I had presented myself to a recruiting office in Exeter. A persuasive man, was that recruiting sergeant and it took him but a very short time to ‘con’ —1 can really use no other expression with any accuracy~me into the Royal Horse Guards. I later learned that a recruit for the Household Cavalry earned the recruiting sergeant one poundfil reckon I represented an easy quid. In the fullness of time I found myself at Combermere Barracks. I was wearing my best suit (handed down from my elder brother): it was a very nice suit and had been worn once at a cocktail party and once at a race meeting. I was to bitterly regret putting it on. Presiding over the guardroom with glowering menace was the Two Bar, Corporal ‘Ding’ Bell. He regarded me in the manner of a man who contemplates a bad egg at close range and said: ‘What d’you want‘.”

‘Ding‘ Bell moment. “Well, said at length, Would that this

considered this for a you can go away,’ he “we don’t want you.’ had been true . . .

But whether ‘Ding’ Bell liked it or not, I had joined the Royal Horse Guards and was soon made blindingly and deafeningly aware of the fact. Lurking furtively in a barrack room, I was espied by the eagle eye of Corporal -0f—Horse Binnie Hale who told me to get down to the stables and move my

bloody self. He indicated a stall occupied by a horse. which had left ample evidence of its tenancy. ‘Clean that out.’ said Binnie Hale, scarcely more than conversationally. ‘Certainly,’ I said~l was always pathetically anxious to please in the Blues. and much good it did me— ‘where can 1 find a spade?’ “God made hands before he made bloody spades.’ said Binnie Hale. and used the well worn Household Cavalry phase which I was to hear for many a weary month ‘MOVE YOUR BLOODY SELF!’ I suppose we sometimes ate, slept and went out on the town in Windsor. but I can only remember the square. the riding school. the gymnasiumfiand rifting. endlessly rifting. ‘Rifting’ did not come easily to me. because prior to my enlistment I had never cleaned anything except my teeth. Now, suddenly and brutally, I

‘I’vc come to join the Royal Horse Guards,’ I replied civilly. 38

was confronted with boots, buttons. chinstraps, bandoliers. saddles, bridles,

stirrups, bits, curb chains, surcingle buckles, sabres, rifles, spurs and God alone knew what else. On these items I expended metal polish by the gallon, blackng by the ton and all the spittle of my nineteen years. It made no difference to any piece of equipment: everything, declared R.C.M. Jobson, S.C.M. Poupart, Corporal of Horse ‘Chick’ Collier and Corporal Jack Twidle was ‘filthy dirty’: so. by the same token was I——I was, in fact, what Blues and Life Guards in their homely and Chaucerian way call ‘a Tasty Bastard.’ Quite early in my service I found myself in the guardroom and this was the way of it. On a drill parade Mr. Jobson intimated that I should have a haircut that very day. But the day was Thursday and the regimental barber. a colourful character called Corporal ‘Nippy’ Daniels was always closed on Thursdays. I should, of course. have gone to make sure but I didn’t. One more day. I thought in my innocence. could hardly matter and in any case my hair was cropped practically to the bone already. The next day Mr. Jobson struck again. ‘Did I or did I not order you to have your hair cut‘?’ he demanded in a voice like a Chevrolet truck in low gear. ‘Couldn’t. sir.” I said promptly and with confidence in the tightness of my case. ‘Barber closed, sir.’

Then things happened hideously quickly. From a distance of six inches Mr. Jobson bawled ‘fall in two men,’ and with Corporal-Major Wally Christie baying in my ear like a demented Alsatian I doubled to the guardroomias they say in the Household Brigade, my feet never touched the ground. I was, in truth, arraigned on a fearsome array of charges: by my attentive reckoning I would have received five hundred lashes a century earlier. and even in the enlightened year 1940 seemed to rate a guaranteed twenty-eight days detention. The charges. in the grey words of the Army Act read as follows: 1.

Will’ully disobeying an order, in that when ordered to have my hair cut I had failed to do so. Will‘ully stating a falsehood. in that I stated that the barber’s shop was closed when in fact it was open (that bloody Daniels, I thought. just let me meet him on a dark night). Being in a disgustingly filthy condition on parade (in my case.

this charge was approximately a once weekly occurrence). lnsubordination to a Warrant Ofliccr (presumably because I said anything at all).

I was lucky in my officers in the Blues, if nothing else. The Squadron Leader. Major Jackie Ward, ruled that I had not wilfully disobeyed an order: I had not wilfully stated a falsehood and he did not seem to think that I had been insubordinate~ just behind me I heard a choking noise which proclaimed that Mr. Jobson was fighting for breath, as indeed was S.C.M. Torn Poupart. But I had undoubtedly been in a disgustingly filthy condition on parade, and for that I would be confined to barracks for three days. I was a lucky man, indeed. Corporal Jock Neil told me afterwards ihe would even go so far as to say that if I fell into a dungheap (and I normally gave the impression that I had) I would come out in state kit. which is praise.

The Blues put up with me for nearly two years: they moulded me into shape at Windsor, taught me how to drive a truck at Pirbright and an armoured car in Catterick and despaired of doing anything with me at all in Bulford. When a notice appeared on ‘B’ Squadron notice board saying that volunteers were wanted for training as parachutists, I fell in outside, ready to die the sorest of deaths. ‘And what the bloody hell do you want?’ demanded Tom Poupart. ‘Volunteer for parachute troops. sir.’ I said. Surely my enterprise would earn the admiration of someone, I thought, as near to unmanly tears as I

had

been

ever

since

September,

1940. How the names come back: Tom Poupart. with his feet: Mr. Jobson. with the light of battle in his eye. striding from his lair by the barrack gate with that fearsome whip under his arm: Sam Coles, stripped to the waist even in mid-winter. urging us to greater efforts on the floor of the N.C.O.‘s Mess: Trooper Jack Hammond. who although his province was exclusively lavatories, was the smartest soldier I have ever seen: ‘Nova’ Pilbeam. Charlie Sands and ‘Shoey’ Wakelin gossiping in Nippy Daniels‘s shop: the dreadful pronouncements of CorporaLot-Horse Plaskett in the riding school . . . but this could go on for pages and become not so much a story as a nominal roll.

For some reason that I could never understand, Tom Poupart always addressed troopers with his face just three inches from theirs: this was hardly necessary, because his voice was clearly audible at five hundred paces on a clear day. ‘Your name’s gorn in already.’ he told me: did I imagine it. or did I detect a slight softening in his expression. even a hint of approval? I doubt it. but the thought has sustained me for over thirty years. And so departed for the Parachute Regiment. but I’ll tell you about that some other time . . .


Captain J. w. Wyburd

Oman? You have probably never heard of the country which is not surprising considering its remoteness and lack oi contact with the outside world. However. with the overthrow of the old Sultan, Said bin Taimour, in July 1970 by his son

(Sultan's Armed Forces 197071)

Qabus,

Oman

is

beginning

to

emerge

from

its

isolation.

Furthermore. in Dhofar to the south west a guerrilla war is being fought between the ‘Peoples Front for the Liberation of the Occupied Arab Gulf’ (or more simply PFLOAG) and the

Sultan's Armed Forces.

Regiment.

now

no

longer

in

being,

was

ordered

to

attack

Balad Sell on the southern edge of the Jebel Akdar. Unhappily, due to their poor state of training at the time, they were repulsed and forced to withdraw to south of Nizwa, So in July the Sultan asked the British Government for help and a force consisting of a company from the Cameronians, a troop of the 15/19th Hussars, the Northern Frontier Regiment, and three squadrons of the Trucial Oman Scouts was assembled. In August this force successfully captured the towns to the

north and south of the Jebel Akdar but were unable to clear

F “IAN and her armed forces . . . Geographically the Sultanate of Oman

extends from the

eastern borders of the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen (PDRY)

north

along

the

coast

a

thousand

miles

to

the

Musandam peninsular at the entrance to the Persian Gulf, where it borders with the Trucial States. Inland it borders with

minim 512m

////l‘°W

““5“"

fiflr

Saudi Arabia in the Rub al Khali, the empty quarter of the Arabian desert. Between the coast and the desert the Sultanate is divided by gravel plains and the eastern extension of the Rub al Khali into two separate provinces, Northern Oman and Dhofar. Northern Oman is dominated by a crescent shaped mountain range, the Hair, running south east from the edge

/

mum //////lu 5mm ““5““

the sea in the east and west but set back in the centre where the Salalah plain intervenes between the jebel and the coast. The main difference between it and Northern Oman is climatic.

Rub M Km

OMAN

of the Trucial States almost to the Arabian Sea, of which the Jebel Akdar, over 10,000 ft. high in places, is the most impressive. Dhofar also has as its main feature a mountain range, the Jebel Qara, 3,000 ft. high running to the edge of

V

Dhofar has a monsoon from June to September providing up to

Plasma"

30 inches of rainfall on the Jebel Qara which is cultivated and densely freed especially in the steep wadis.

"M.1

0'

W .m G'am’

INDIAN

it“ 0 ”I,. 5357 5m»

ocean:

Oman has been ruled by the present Sultan‘s family since the middle of the eighteenth century, but progress has not accompanied this unusual record of stability for Arabia, Last year there were six miles of tarmac road in a country nearly as large as Great Britain, and only two small hospitals, one run by the American Mission for a population of about half a million. Travel abroad was limited and there were other restrictions. Qabus, the new Sultan, is now presented with the problem of developing the country almost from scratch, handicapped by the war in Dhofar and the uncertainty after British withdrawal from the Gulf. The main source of revenue for development is oil, this year expected to earn about £54

the jebel itself. In April 1958 therefore, Colonel D. de C. Smiley of The Blues was appointed Commander Sultan’s Armed Forces and by the end of the year two squadrons of the Special Air Service and a squadron of The Life Guards had arrived to supplement the Sultan’s Armed Forces, After an assault led by the SAS up the side of the Jebel Akdar, a route so steep that at times climbing ropes had to be used, the plateau on

A view from Nizwa Fort

the Jebel Akdar was taken with the assistance of The Life Guards, some of whom to their surprise were called on to operate on foot with their Brownings dismounted. The rebels capitulated although Talib, true to form, escaped with his

brother the Iman, now deposed for a second time, The Jebel Akdar campaign and subsequent events in Dhofar have resulted in a complete reorganisation of the Armed Forces, The main army units now are the Muscat, Northern Frontier, Desert, and Jebel Regiments with the Oman Artillery and Armoured Car Squardon in support, The air force is

equipped with BAC strikemasters for close air support, various transport aircraft, and

helicopters for casevac and

heliborne

operations. Garrison duties in Northern Oman and Dhofar are carried out by the Oman and Dhofar Gendarmeries. The soldiers are remarkably cheerful and hardworking. The official force language not unnaturally is Arabic, but as many of the officers are British and many of the soldiers are

Baluchi, the language is varied and often incomprehensible to an outsider whatever his nationality. To a new British officer arriving on secondment or contract it can be bewildering and conversation mainly consists of sign language to begin with, The soldier will never admit to not having understood something, as he feels to do so would be bad manners, This produces interesting results, Eventually the officer settles in and gets to know his soldiers for whose welfare, training, and control he is completely responsible. The company officer is in fact remarkably free from irksome restrictions and is left to his own devices. During his tour he will certainly see action in Dhofar and he may well find himself commanding a company having only arrived as a substantive Lieutenant.

million. At present battalions alternate every nine months between The first army unit, the Muscat Levy Corps, was raised in 1913 with a strength of a hundred. This later became the Muscat Infantry and was manned by Baluch and Arab soldiers. From this the Army has developed to well over brigade strength,

Where Suleman bin Himyar, Sheikh at The Bani Riyam Tribe, lived until the R.A.F. bombed him out

40

Dhofar and the Northern Oman, The tour in the Northern Oman,

assisted by an Air Force and Navy. It first saw action during the Buraimi Crisis, when Saudi Arabia attempted unsuccessfully to annex the Buraimi oasis for its oil in 1952. But the first major campaign it was involved in occurred on the Jebel Akdar. In 1955 the old Sultan successfully unseated the Imam of the interior, Ghalib bin All, who had been intriguing with the Saudis, when the army took the towns of Nizwa and Rostaq.

with occasional exceptions, tends to be fairly quiet, and the battalion devotes its time to retraining and leave prior to its next Dhofar tour. The army is popular throughout most of this area, and the main military activity consists of vehicle and foot patrols to the village and towns. An officer leads these patrols and in each village he stops for coffee with the wall (headman) or sheikh, which is a fairly elaborate procedure. But the army’s main commitment is in Dhofar. The first incident occurred in 1964 when it became clear that a tribal rebel movement was establishing itself on the Jebel Qara. In August

Unfortunately the Imam's brother, Talib, the more devious of

an airman from the RAF base at Salalah was killed when his

the two, escaped and in June 1957 he returned with an armed force of about a hundred landing by night from a dhow on the Batinah coast. They made their way inland to the jebel and released the deposed Ghalib from confinement to his village. His courage revived, Ghalib declared himself to be reinstated as the Imam, and the paramount sheikh of the powerful Bani Riyam tribe, Suleman bin Himyar, joined forces with him. Not surprisingly this caused consternation at the newly formed headquarters at Bait al Falag near Muscat. The Oman

vehicle was mined. There were other incidents directed against the small RAF station, which is maintained in a reciprocal agreement allowing the RAF to use the island of Masirah as a staging post. Vehicles from the American Mecom oil company travelling north from Salalah to their camp at Midway were mined and occasionally ambushed. Even so it was a reasonably relaxed affair at this stage, and the Italian drivers of the oil company trucks used to hand out sausages and hams to the British officers responsible for their escort to encourage

t_

’L

3f.“ ., .

.l

,.

‘ five. ‘ x, .i Q .1 Slatf-Sargeant Hamed Hamden of The Northern Frontier Regiment

41


The Household Cavalry His Royal Highness The Sultan of Oman, Qabus bin Said,

visits The

Northern

Frontier

Regiment on

the

Coach l97l

Jebel Dhofar

POLO in the summer of 1971 the Regiment, itself largely in Germany, achieved the distinction of winning the Inter< Regimental Polo Tournament in England with a team of four

Staff Officers. This event, unprecedented in the Army, occurred

The season this year started slowly owing to the horses having wintered badly. Thus our first appearance was at the Centenary Meet and Dinner of the Coaching Club at Hampton Court Palace in June. This was attended by Prince Philip who told us in his speech that he intended to take up driving when his polo days were over. We attended most of the subsequent coaching events with considerable success, the coach being driven by Major Crisp, Major Morris, Mr. Cowdrey (who over the years has done so much for the coach) and Cpl. Henderson. To the latter and Tprs. Bolachala and Hutt we owe a great debt for their hard work and enthusiasm.

greater military alertness. By the end of the year the rebel group had retired to Saudi Arabia and temporarily the jebel was quiet again. Early in 1965, however, the rebels, restyled as the Dhofar Liberation Front, returned. At this time there were some genuine grievances as the old Sultan, Said bin Taimour, would not allow the jebali to travel, or give him free access to the Salalah plain. His control over the Jebel Qara had always been tenuous. The Jebali for centuries had led an independent existence, and his origins are different from those Arabs inhabitating the Salalah plain and Northern Oman. The rebels having the support of the jebali were able to establish themselves firmly in the deep wadis and dense treeline, hiding

and ambushing army patrols that searched for them. Since 1965 the war has steadily escalated in spite of continuous operations by the army. In 1968 the Dhofar Liberation

main

arms

supplier.

Currently

two

infantry

regiments,

the

support weapons. they split up into small groups that probe the battalion position from all sides searching for a weak point where they can outflank a platoon or half company. The success of the operation depends on whether they can find this weak point or not. If they do they immediately concentrate their forces to bring heavy fire down on the half company

concerned. Usually, barring a mistake in map reading by night by one of the half ccmpany officers, they are not successful and the operation develops into a prolonged firefight, the battalion having the advantage of artillery and strike aircraft in support. After a while the rebels break off contact and the battalion withdraws. The withdrawal tends to be more lively than the approach and has to be done carefully to avoid ambush on the way back. It is difficult to say whether a particular operation has been successful or not, but a series of them tends to wear the rebels down and allows the army to use more mobile tactics and to patrol deeper into the rebel area.

Armoured Car Squadron, two troops of Artillery, and a large

detachment of the Sultan’s Air Force, are operating in Dhofar. The rebels are equipped with modern Chinese weapons ranging from 75 mm recoilless guns and 82 mm mortars to light automatic weapons. Their estimated strength is over a thousand including militia as well as hard core communists. They employ standard guerilla tactics well suited area in which they operate. This year has seen prolonged contacts and casualties on both sides than ever before. Because of the communist nature

to the jebel some close are greater of PFLOAG,

the lifting of restrictions by the new Sultan and the beginning

of civil development on the plain have done little towards a political solution. The main operations on the jebel are battalion strength with intensive patrolling in between. The battalion usually moves out to secure an area by night and providing there are no problems during the approach it is dug in and hidden by first light. First contact is normally made when the rebel group concerned sends forward a small party on a daily reconnaissance of its area. More often than not this patrol is ambushed

and it withdraws to call for reinforcements and to carry out a detailed visual search of the area. When the rebels have assembled as many as they can, and have brought up their

It is not easy to see an immediate end to the Dhofar war.

It has gradually escalated

over the years

in

As can be seen, the Sultan is faced with some difficult problems, but because Dhofar and Northern Oman are geographically separated by the Rub al Khali, there is little danger of the war in Dhofar spreading directly to the Northern Oman where the country's economic future lies, lf stability and progress can be maintained in Northern Oman and if the Dhofar war can be fought to a successful close, there is every possibility that in the long term Oman will develop into a prosperous and democratic country. its army now is almost certainly the most proficient although not the largest in Arabia. An eighteen month secondment to it provides a valuable and broadening experience.

The Coach leaving Hampton Court Palace

No. 3——Major J. H. Pitman Back ——Major W. S. H. Boucher Great difficulty was experienced in arranging for the four players, stationed respectively at Bovington, London, Sandhurst

and Tidworth, to meet for the practice essential to victory. However, after earlier rounds against the Coldstream and Grenadier Guards, the Final was reached and the 14th/20th Hussars, respected rivals from previous years in BAOR, were defeated by 5 goals to 3 in front of a fine crowd of spectators at Smith's Lawn, Windsor Great Park on 29th May, 1971. As the winning team in the United Kingdom, the Regiment competed against the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, the winners

victors. The Regiment has now firmly established itself among the leaders of Army Polo and we very much hope that we shall

find it possible to continue our tradition of succes on the Polo field in 1972.

spite of the

stalemate between the army and the rebels. Because it has developed gradually, to bring it to a close may be a slow process. The main hope for an indication that the end is in sight lies in the newly formed military units called firqats, These consist of jebalis who have chosen to side with the new Sultan and are, often for religious reasons, tired of the communist grip of the rebels. They are now operating independently of the army on the jebel and because they are working on home ground they are able to employ guerilla tactics against the rebels and have as a result met with considerable success.

No. 2—Captain A. H. Parker-Bowles

of the Rhine Army Inter-Regimental Tournament, for the United Services Challenge Cup. At Windsor on 15th August, 1971, a good, hard-fought match was much enjoyed by both players and spectators and the visiting team, playing well together, deservedly won 7-3 after a close game. The following week, on 22nd August, the final military match of the season was played at Lippspringe in Germany. This was the Ranelagh Cup for the best teams available in the United Kingdom and Germany, and is played, alternating with the United Services, in England and Germany. Two members of the Regiment, Major J. H. Pitman and Captain A. H, Parker-Bowles, were chosen to represent the Army in the United Kingdom and interestingly the BAOR team included two of the members of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards team. On this occasion the form was reversed, and we won a very exciting game quite convincingly. Again it was the visiting team, on borrowed and strange ponies who were the

Front restyled itself PFLOAG, and the organisation has taken on a communist aspect with China superseding Russia as the

as a result of the more experienced players, three out of the four of whom had been in the winning Inter-Regimental team in BAOR in 1969, currently carrying out staff appointments in England. The team was: No. 1—Major B. J. Lockhart

Fencing The Regiment has had another successful year’s fencing in 1971. The season started with the 4 Division Championships at Sennelager on 25th and 26th March. The Regiment entered the individual events, and as a result of these the team was picked, which achieved 2nd place in the Championships, and entry to the BAOR finals. These were held on the 5th-8th April, and again were divided into individual and team competitions. In the former L/Cpl. Norton came 3rd in the foil and CoH. Barnes 4th in the Sabre events. In the team competition the Regiment was unfortunately narrowly beaten into 3rd place, and so missed the chance of returning to England for the Army finals, which they managed in 1970. Representing the Regiment were:— Foil: CoH. Barnes and L/Cpl. Norton, Epee: CoH. Fitzgerald (LG) and CoH. Shaw (LG). Sabre: Cpl. Frampton and Cpl. Bright.

wt.

..

at;

Major B. S. Lockhart, Captain A. M. Parker-Bowles, Lady Howard-Vyse, Major W. S. M. Boucher and Major J. H. Pitman

43 42


Charge 01 the Household Cavalry at Waterloo Retreat 01 the French pursued by the English Cavalry and Infantry

THE BLUES and ROYALS at

WATERLOO by SCM C. W. FREARSON

The Duke of Wellington‘s ‘Waterloo Despatch‘ states; “The enemy repeatedly charged our infantry with his cavalry, but

the Royal Dragoons describes the situation of the Royals as follows: “We found ourselves in

these attacks

were

uniformly

our place in

unsuccessful

close column behind the second line of and afforded opportunities to our cavalry to charge. in one of which. Lord E. S-omerset’s brigade. consisting of The Life Guards.

Royal

Horse

Guards

and

First

Dragoon Guards, highly distinguished themselves: as did that of Major General Sir

W.

Ponsonby,

having

taken

infantry. fetlock deep in mud; no baggage for the officers, and neither provisions nor water for the men. though some stray

many

cattle small before might

had been killed and eaten. and a supply of spirits had a short time been found on the road. so that we be said to go ‘coolly‘ into action.

prisoners and an eagle." for every man was wet to the skin." At daybreak on

the

18th June

1815,

(1768-1854). later lst Marquess of Anglesey.

who had commanded a regiment of infantry, raised for his father‘s Staffordshire tenants, at the age of 25. His first commission in the regular army was dated 1793 as Lieutenant in the 7th Foot. He went from Lieutenant to full Colonel in 15 months and commanded the 16th Light Dragoons

There is no precise chronology about Waterloo. Wellington said that the battle

began at 11 am. but General Lord Rowland Hill,

(later

Colonel of

the

Blues).

of battle was a mere four square miles which, at the end of that Sunday evening. was streWn with the bodies of upwards of 60.000 dead horses and men. The strengths

of the armies at the beginning of the day was; Allies. 67.000 men. including 24.000 British troops. among which were 7,000 British

cavalry

in

7

Brigades.

French,

71,000 men including 11.000 cavalry. The majority of both sides had slept to a violent electric rain, when day broke

officers and men on in the open, exposed storm and torrential on Sunday 18th June.

on Brussels by the Charleroi-Brussels road which intersected the centre of the two armies. Brussels. the French objective was about 10 miles north of the Duke of Wellington's headquarters.

at the age of 26 in 1794.

defence caused Napoleon to turn on the centre of Wellington‘s line. along the strip

One absentee from Waterloo was Cornet Lord William Pitt Lennox of the Blues. This officer left Westminster School in 1813 to study military duties. In 1814

of the Brussels—Charleroi road which led to the objective of the battle. Brussels. and either side of the road stood the two ‘heavy‘

At approximately 1.30 pm. the infantry

corps of D'Erlon. some 16.000 strong. ranged in battalions 500 strong and in 8 columns. with 5 paces between the flanks

horse

of

the

morning

of

the

battle.

He

began

immediately,

battalions—barely to

fill.

began

enough to

advance

for

the

on the

Captain

Pon»

July. from hospital in Brussels. “In the beginning of the day I had my nose very

the Household Cavalry Brigade. The original line up was. Union Brigade. right.

roughly handled by another ball"—(Kennedy Clarke was wounded more severely at

aloft

the

road.

to

signal the Union

the

about seven thirty that night)~‘but that is

Inniskillings on their left. The Greys, who had been in support. almost immediately rode up on the left of the Inniskillings.

the

Royals.

with

quite well and has scarce left any mark

The Household Brigade had an original front of 1st Life Guards on the extreme right. with King’s Dragoon Guards in the centre. 2nd Life Guards on the left. nearest the road and therefore adjacent to the Royals. with the Blues in support.

Allied infantry left of the Brussels road.

abreast

the Household Cavalry Brigade. (lst and

age of 15.

Their advance was barely checked. Uxbl‘idge was at this time over to the right of the

Brigade and the French cavalry had swept beyond La Haye Saintc farm and were

Allied position and saw the advance, right of the road. of a large force of French cavalry. which swept through the Allied

partly up the ridge when the two heavy cavalry Brigades swept over the sky-line and the ‘Charge‘ was blown. Witnesses report the distinctive sound of the clash. Thc Houscltold Brigade had some 1.200 Silhl‘CS. the Union about 900.

D'Erlon‘s of the

infantry

Corps

were

infantry below the

. . . I am sorry to tell you that the first

horse I had killed was my old favourite black horse that I showed you at Sittingbourne. and who carried me all through Spain and Portugal. He. however. lived to

carry his master to the standard bearer of the 105th regiment of French infantry. whom I staked. and your friend’s sword had the honour of giving one out of the two

Duke of Wellington‘s staff at the ripe old

now

Eagles that were laid at the feet of His

Union Royal

Edward Somerset. later Colonel of the Royals. and Sir William Ponsonby‘s ‘Union’ Brigade. (Royals. Greys and Inniskillings) and

Household on the right of the road. They

the age of 9 in the lst Life Guards. His

were

bugle is in the Household Cavalry Museum.

were

posted, on

the

Union northern

on

the

left

slope of the ridge

Legion.

held

around

by

the

the

farm

King's

German

buildings

and

gztrdcns of L11 Httyc Sainle.

On the French side. Napoleon, Soult. Lobau and Kellerman were all 46

and ordered them to advance to within 100

years old whilst all other French generals of note were younger.

to the movement of the Household Cavalry

commanded by Captain Alexander Kennedy Clarke. struck the leading column of Donzelot‘s Division at an angle. which must

Ney.

yards of the crest of the ridge and conform

Prince

Regent . . . I

Spain was Child‘s play compared with

Waterloo." In a letter to Lord Uxbridge. then Marquess of Anglesey. in 1817, he wrote “I perceived and led my Squadron against an enemy‘s “Eagle“. the bearer of which.

an The centre Squadron of the Royals.

Highness the

never was in such a fire. Anything I saw in

Hc gttllopcd over to the Union Brigade

and could see nothing of the enemy until the time of their involvement came.

of British cavalry was the Earl of Uxbridgc,

positions.

to

to

hat

was even then. in 1815. a member of the

Trumpeter John Edwards was destined

wrote

advance as Uxbridge went forward with

and right of the CharleroiiBrussels road.

to blow the Charge of the Household Cavalry Brigade. He was Lord Somerset‘s Field Buglcr and was aged 15 also. He was quite an old soldier. having ’listed at

Clarke

cocked

officers

2nd Life Guards, Royal Horse Guards and King‘s Dragoon Guards.) under Lord

Kennedy

William Vallance of Sittingbourne on 10th

Close to the Duke's headquarters, left

The commander of the seven brigades The ‘Journal’ of Major Radclyfie of

Movement

Brigades. the Household and the Union.

mother. the Duchess of Richmond's famous ‘Eve of Waterloo Ball” and missed the battle of Waterloo by falling from his on

fire, nonetheless. the front rank of French infantry gave them a volley.

sonby‘s A.D.C.. De Lacey Evans, raised his

nearest

he was a member of Wellington‘s staff at the Congress of Vienna. He attended his

have been ideal for stemming it’s counter

timed

the first French shot by his stopwatch at 11.50 am. The British Foot Guards fought throughout the day at Hougomont on the right and refused to budge. Their resolute

The French army had been advancing

the Allied and French armies were separated by about two miles of muddy plain, with the Allies on the ridge of St. Jean and the French on the plain below them. Both armies fronts extended some two miles from east to west. The area of the field

Brigade. He gave no orders as to the extent of the charge and returned to place himself at the head of the Household.

officer.

1

ran through

the

body.

in

consequence of which the “Eagle" of the lOSth Regiment was taken. it falling across

me against the horse of Corporal Stiles, I ordered him to carry it at once to the rear,

45


was

suddenly

surrounded

by

a

party of Cuirassiers. who wounded him in the SWOI‘drflI‘m. whereupon. Trooper Tom Evans. a man who the Colonel had once

Infantry at Salamanca in 1812 and those

considered too fat to take to war. left the ranks. felled four cuirassiers and used the

of the 45th and 105th Infantry Regiments

hilt of his broken sword as a knuckledustcr

at Waterloo.

on the fifth man. He then led the Colonel

/ it was now about 3 p.m. and both Brigades were retiring. it being the only alternathe as French lanccrs threatened.

Dada/ls"

.I.aHaio Saj to“ _./‘?qurw/Lers . l, g\ 1 ,

and there was no possibility to reform in the midst of the enemy‘s position. They retired by the extreme left and right flanks

if

infantry. Only four ‘Eagles‘ were taken by the British during the Napoleonic Wars. they were those of the 8th Grenadier Regiment at Barossa in 1811. the 62nd

Colonel

howexer. to effect his escape. and the nc\t morning. rejoined his regiment".

I

of the line of the original charge. but the

out of the fight. Major Christopher Packe,

At the same time as the ‘Union' were riding over D'Erlon‘s infantry, the House— hold Cavalry Brigade had met the French

commanding the right hand Squadron was

Saivnte. both sides galloping into each other in straight lines. The clash, wrote a spectator. “Was like the sound of so many

of enemy for the only time that day as the two heavy Brigades swept on to the rising

anvils

mounted

struck".

The

elite

regiments

Cavalry

wore

functional

as

opposed

to

‘ceremonial’ cuirasses for the last time in 1794. Apart from Uxbridge. who had elected to lead the Brigade. a veteran Blue of the Peninsula War. Major General Sir John Elley also joined in. This officer had risen through every rank in the Regiment.

ground before them on which Ney had his

‘Great

Battery‘

of

74

rode

his

old

charger.

a

mare

called

‘Salamanca‘ for which. in later life he made the surprising claim that she ‘bit and kicked her way through the French horses'. The First Life Guards struck the enemy first. while because of the nature of the ground ahead of them, and because they began

hunting

the

French

as

they

fell

back, the 2nd Life Guards and part of the K.D.G. went off at an angle from the front line. crossing the road and riding

close to the Royals. Colonel Sir Robert Hill. commanding the Blues in support, now

command of what was left of the Union Brigade passed to Lieutenant Colonel Clifton of the Royals. Once back on the ridge. the two Brigades filled a defensive role for the next

two

hours

as

wave

after

wave

of

French cavalry attacked the Allied line.

guns.

At about 5 p.m.. the first contingent more than a quarter of all Napoleon's artillery. In both Brigades. Squadrons had now split up in triumphant pursuit of the enemy. they even rode through the gun

t

2

i

i

\

fresh. began arriving on the left flank and

‘ ‘

‘\

t2 {Q1 L;

Mum/«(hays

fiqya/s

.

2/“ Uzi

from this time on. further German troops began to arrive until 7 pm. On 19th

French Lancers formed beyond the guns and these approached towards the Union. At this point. both Ponsonby and his ADC.

cal/fir Guards

34:06.9 Greys

December 1903. Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany created a furore in the English

a:.c._,

'

[42 ***** ‘

It“ Qragoon Guards i“. “.

Z 12‘ Ii‘lifi: Guard;

(21 [Zr press when he congratulated the German Legion “on having saved the British army

B/ues

dnc/ttr/Qf/wfc Scale darn/res m a .7730

were killed. at Waterloo". Battle Order and disposition at Waterloo The

Blues

had

been

kept

in

some

reasonable order as they had not taken the brunt of the first clash with the cavalry. Uxbridge was in no position to get his Brigades together again. This was the stage

at which most casualties were suffered. Lieutenant Tathwell of the Blues seems to have been the only one out of line, for he “rushed on a French standard bearer, tore the eagle from his hands and was carrying

it off in triumph, when his horse received a mortal wound. and the Lieutenant was taken prisoner. He had the good fortune.

The two hours between 3 and 5 p.m. must have been grim indeed for the Allied troops of the centre. formed in ‘squares’ and without the power to launch any more attacks such as that of the heavy cavalry brigades earlier in the afternoon. The Blues and Royals were temporarily amalgamated at this stage when the remnants of the Household and Union Brigades were formed into a single Squadron.

this attack. Uxbridge led the Squadron formed now by the two heavy brigades. in an attack on a large column of French

cavalry. arresting its progress but failing to drive it back. Men said that the smoke over the battlefield hung like a pall. so that it was impossible to judge the time of day. It seems pretty well authenticated that the final. dramatic attack by the Imperial Guard began at 7.30 p.m. and when it failed. the

French army began to roll back beyond La Belle Alliance. soon this became headlong flight as the sun set over the dismal plain. At this point. Wellington. spy-glass in hand and Lord Uxbridgc were riding together when a burst of grape-shot shattered Uxbridge‘s right thigh.

it was almost the last casualty of the day. [Kcnncdy Clarke received :1 ball at about this time which smashed his leg at French Eagle captured by The Royal Dragoons at Waterloo

MUSEUM NOTES

The Penultimate Phase was the attack launched by Ney at 6 p.m. on the centre. which went on until about 7.30 pm. During

46

j

g7. 12’] r27

of Prussian troops. about 16.000 strong. but

positions and beyond. but a large body of

having enlisted as 21 Trooper. At Waterloo he

2nd Life Guards and K.D.G. retired with the Union. The Union was now commanded by Colonel Muter of the Inniskillings and finally. after this officer was wounded. the

The Allied Troops on the slope witnessed that the slope was entirely clear

being

Dubo/s

killed as the Blues approached La Haye.

heavy cavalry on the slope to the right of the Brussels road, a little above La Haye

of French cavalry were the Cuirassiers. who at Waterloo wore cuirasses. The Household

z

~(—-..———»s *_____ __._

Corporal Stiles was rewarded with the immediate award of a commission in the

brought the Regiment into the gap so the Blues were now in the front line of the charge. The small. frail figure of the

t

which he did, while I remained in command of my Squadron,"

the

ankle).

Visitors. 1,737 visitors signed the book between Ztst October,

1970,

and

2tst

October,

1971.

This

figure does not include hundreds of cadets and schoolchildren, in more or less organised parties, who visited the building during visits connected with the recruiting drive. Among important visitors were, Major General P. R. C. Hobart, Director Royal Armoured Corps; Major General F. J. C. Bowes Lyon, G.O.C. London District and General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick.

Acquisitions. Major acquisitions included a William W Gold Stick and a George II Silver Stick, given by Major Hon. A. H. G. Broughton and a pair of George W trumpet banners given by Brigadier Lord Tryon,

Undertakings. Loans were made to a number of London and provincial museums and exhibitions

but no overseas exhibitions have been undertaken during the past year. Research for a number of minor publications in UK. and USA was carried out. Colonel Langley discovered a bound manuscript in lreland which proved to be the ‘case book’ of the Blues medical officer, covering his service with the Regiment at Dettingen and Fontenoy—it is among the earliest of such works. A review of the work is being published by the Journal of the R.A.M.C., it is quite a gruesome work and the MD. (Dr. James Buchanan) details his treatment of both Officers, Men and horses. We also gave some assistance in the way of research to a childrens programme on Harlech T.V., Bristol. Annexe. The extension should have been well on the way by now, but while numberless people have appeared with papers and rulers etc, there is as yet, no sign of the first brick-layer.


The National

REPRODUCED BY COURTESY OF THE NEWS OF THE WORLD

The Handsome Giants of the Horse Guards

ARMY MUSEUM

EXTRACT FROM THE NEWS OF THE WORLD—10th APRIL, 1870.

When the National Army Museum’s new building in London was opened by Her Majesty the Queen on 11th November 1971, the exhibits included an acquisition received only two weeks before. This was the French eagle, tricolour and sash captured at Waterloo by Captain Alexander Kennedy Clarke and Corporal Styles of the Royal Dragoons. From 1835 the trophy was preserved in the museum of the Royal Hospital Chelsea. It has now been entrusted to the National Army Museum where it forms the centrepiece of a case of French trophies of the Napoleonic Wars. Previously the Royal Dragoons had been unrepresented in this museum’s collections. Not so the Royal Horse Guards. Oils of two colonels of the regiment hang in the museum’s picture gallery on the second floor. Field Marshal John Louis ist Earl Ligonier (1680-1770) wears the uniform of colonel of the Blues in a portrait by Sir Joshua Reynolds. Another by T. Jackson after Reynolds portrays John Manners, Marquess of Granby, as does a narrative painting by Edward Penny, RA showing the marquees giving aims to a sick soldier.

Largely thanks to the energy, skill and enthusiasm of Field Marshal Sir Gerald Templer, Chairman of the Executive Committee and originator of the concept of an army museum in central London, over a million pounds has been raised to cover the capital costs of the building. This has paid for the first phase of the building, representing more than three-quarters of the plan. The whole, containing additional exhibition galleries, a restaurant and storage for reserve collections will be completed once a further £350,000 have been raised. The museum is open from 10.00 am. until 5.30 pm. weekdays, 2.00 pm. until 5.30 pm. Sundays. Admission is at present free. Charges may be introduced to conform with the recent White Paper. Elizabeth Talbot Rice

not, the proportion of men who have been under fire

is still smaller. For fifty years they have never left the country, but have alternated between Windsor and London, with their most arduous duty the task of escorting the Sovereign and the Right Honorable the Lord Mayor when he rides in State. But so severe are these duties deemed, together with the minor obligation of guarding the obstinate citadel of the dual government which Mr. Cardwell seems powerless to overthrow, that each regiment in turn spends a whole year at Windsor, doing absolutely nothing, in order, no doubt, that the men may in that purer air recruit their giant frames after the enervating and exhaustive labours of their London life. The accoutrements of the

In the adjacent gallery a chronological display of uniforms shows their evolution towards comfort and camouflage. Once again Blues’ colonels are represented. The accoutrements worn by Field Marshal Viscount Gough 01865 were presented to the museum by the present Viscount. The tunic of King Edward VII when Colonel-in-Chief of the Royal Horse Guards shows the uniform of 1901. Another portrait of Earl Ligonier, executed in 1754 by an unknown artist, hangs here. Among the family collection of decorations and medals are the orders of St. Patrick, the Bath and of St. Michael and St. George awarded to Field Marshal Lord Wolseley and Lady Wolseley’s order of Chastity.

48

force are so weighty, and the men are themselves so heavy, that ordinary horses cannot carry them at a reasonable speed, and lighter troops are of necessity employed to carry despatches, or perform such errands as require a maximum speed of more than six miles an hour. They have not been in battle for half a century and it would be an act of shocking cruelty to expose them to the fire of modern arms of precision. It is of course clear that for executing a strategic manoeuvre their crawling pace would render them almost useless. Their very size is an immense element of weakness: they would present an easy mark and they would be likely to cumber the hospitals, for overgrown men are rarely of hardy constitution. But it is useless to speculate on their performances abroad when it is certain that they will stop at home. They are not allowed, nor likely to be allowed, to leave England. We have then to consider whether there is any sufficient reason for retaining the Household Cavalry as part of the standing army of the country. There is no Court in Europe in which there is so little public show of grandeur as our own, yet there is none in which three regiments. unfit for foreign service, are maintained solely for a display, which is never made except on the rare occasion of a Royal review. A hurried march to York would be utter defeat to the Household Cavalry. They cannot even perform the duty of escorting Her Majesty from the Great Western Railway Station to Buckingham Palace. The Queen’s pace is too much for these great tax-eaters, and we are informed that a detachment of Lancers or Hussars is consequently kept at the Kensington Barracks in order to relieve the Household Cavalry from such hard work.

18,000 Iimbless Ex-Servicemen need your help

The main permanent exhibition on the middle floor illustrates chronologically the history of the British Army up to 1914, of the Indian Army up to 1946 and of the colonial forces. A script outside each case gives the salient facts of campaigns and battles and describes the developments in the army’s organisation, equipment and techniques, its victories and defeats, and its professional and social activities. Among the obiects in the case devoted to Field Marshal Lord Wolseley are a pastel by William Strong of the Viscount in the 1908 uniform of a colonel of the Royal Horse Guards and the gold stick made for him in 1906. A reading room is available to researchers using the museum’s extensive collection of books, military manuscripts. prints and early photographs. The Department of Weapons‘ reserve collection may be seen by prior arrangement but the reserve nollections of the Department of Uniform, including badges and medals, are not yet available to students.

Whenever we see those enormous men keeping guard over the arenas of pipeclay at Whitehall, and pacing up and down in all the gorgeous panoply of steel breastplates and seven-league boots, we irresistibly admire their looks. No doubt their buckskins do credit to the tailor that built them, but as an actual substantive part of our forces, of what use are the Household Cavalry? We have nine hundred of these giants, and another hundred officers to command them. They draw nearly a hundred thousand a year from the national purse in pay alone, and perhaps another fifty thousand in general expenses. They occupy three large barracks at Regent’s Park, at Windsor, and at Knightsbridge, and they have 700 horses to ride upon. But where is their utility? What have they ever done, or what is there the smallest probability that they ever will do; We believe that we could count on the fingers of a single hand all the officers of these three regiments who have ever smelt gunpowder burnt in battle, and, if we mistake

We urgently need money to help these men to conquer their handicap. And to equip and maintain homes in which they convalesce and are given care and comfort in their old age. We are not aided by the State. So we depend on you. These veterans gave much when they lost arms or legs or eyes fighting for their country. Now won’t you give something? Please, please help. the Earl of Please remember them in your will and send a donation to Major . London Ancaster. KCVO. TD, Midland Bank Limited. 60 West Smithfield EC1A 9DX Wolseley Case in “The Story of the Army" Gallery

BRITISH

LIMBLESS EX-SERVICEMEN'S ASSOCIATION


THE BLUES and ROYALS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL

REPORT

1971

ECKERSLEY HICKS & CO. LTD. Membership

Cavalry Memorial Service The Combined Cavalry Old Camrades‘ Service will be held in Hyde Park on Sunday, 7th May, 1972. Dress: Lounge Suit (Overcoats). Medals will be worn. Assemble at 10.50 am. on Regimental Marker in Broad Walk East, The Association Banner will head the contingent. Members are requested to ensure a large turnout. The Colonel will be taking the salute. After the Parade, Members will be welcome with the Household Cavalry Regiment at Hyde Park Barracks.

The Membership of the Association is now:

Officers Life Members

426 1023

Life Members (Serving) Annual Members

644 77

2,170

Annual Reunion

Subscriptions (Annual Members only) The annual subscription of 37p is now due. Please complete

the enclosed subscription).

21 College Hill Cannon Street

proforma.

(Life

Members

do

not

pay

this

Details of the Annual Reunion will separate letter in due course.

be the subject of a

Queen’s Birthday Parade Addresses All Members are reminded that it is their responsibility to keep the Hon. Secretary informed of any change or address.

London EC4 2RP

An extremely limited number of free tickets for this Parade on Saturday, 3rd June, 1972, and for the Final Rehearsal on Saturday, 27th May, 1972, are normally available to the Association. The majority of tickets are for the Inner Line of Sentries (standing). Applications are not acknowledged.

Annual General Meeting

Telephone 01-248 9307 & at Lloyds

This will be held in the W0 and NCOs Mess Hyde Park Barracks, at 6 pm. on Saturday, 6th May, 1972. All members are entitled and encouraged to attend. The Agenda will be: 1.

Minutes of the Annual General Meeting held on 1st May,

1971.

Field of Remembrance The Field Thursday, 9th Churchyard at the Colonel at

of Remembrance will be opened November, 1972. Assemble in 11.30 am, The Badge Cross will 11.45 am. Dress: Lounge Suits.

at 12 noon on St. Margaret‘s be planted by Medals will be

Points arising from these minutes.

worn. Confirmation

of

the

Accounts

for

year

ending

31st

December, 1971.

Christmas Cards Committee. (a) Under Rule 13 the following members of the Committee are due to resign: 1. Surg/Colonel E. W. Hayward, OBE. 2.

Members requiring The Blues and Royals order through: PRI, The Blues and Royals,

Card should Combermere

Barracks, Windsor, Berks.

Mr. H. Grace.

Notices (b)

Insurance Brokers to THE BLUES and ROYALS

In accordance with Rule 13 the undermentioned members of the Association are recommended by the Committee to be appointed members of the Committee:

1. 2. 3.

Mr. 2. A. Goodacre. Mr. J. Edwards. Mr. C. C. F. Crabbe.

1.

1 HCR Dining Club The Twenty-Sixth Annual Dinner will be held in London on

Saturday, 28th

October,

1972. All

Quiney (Assistant Hon. Secretary), llford, Essex. (Tel: 01-478 3452).

enquiries to: 54

Francis

Mr. A. Avenue.

Any other business. Association Badge

Lapel badges for the Association are available from the

Annual Dinner Joint Hon. Secretaries price 13p. The Annual

Dinner will

be held at

Hyde

Park

Barracks Association Visit to Zanvoorde

at 7 pm. on Saturday, 8th May, 1972. Dress: Lounge Suit. No decorations. Bars will be open at 6 pm. Applications for tickets on the enclosed proforma to the Hon. Secretary by

Saturday, 22nd April, 1972. Tickets will be limited to one per member and an overall number of 260. There will be no guests. Tickets will be issued on a first come first served basis and no tickets will be on sale at the door.

Anyone interested contact Mr. A. C. Millin, 92 Southcoast Road. Peacehaven, Sussex. (Tel: 07914 4140).

PRI Shop Ties, Blazer Badges, Car Badges and Ash Trays can be

supplied on application. ‘


$328,919.82

814.21

228,105.61

at 31st

NET ASSETS

£33,132; 1970 £26,891)

(Valuation October 1971

Services Trustees, Combined Charitable Fund at cost

22,886 (1970 22,886) Shares In United

INVESTMENTS

LESS: CURRENT LIABILITIES Auditors' Remuneration

Cash at Bank Cash in Hand

CURRENT ASSETS Stock-in-hand Members Badges at cost

DECEMBER 3Ist 1971

1970

30.00

£1,525.28 1,319.98

—— ‘— £2,701.85 £2,875.26

7.26

£1,270.40 1,424.19

1971

of

Regular

EXCESS OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE for the year

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

Annual Report and Magazine: Cost of Magazine Less: Sales

Printing, Stationery and Postage Miscellaneous Expenses Reunions, Wreaths, etc. less Miscellaneous Receipts

Auditors' Remuneration

Annual Dinner: Cost of Dinner Less: Sale of Tickets

St. George's Church, Ypres Combined Cavalry—Old Comrades Royal Hospital, Chelsea Royal Hospital Holy Trinity Church

Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen

British Legion National Association

Subscriptions and Donations:

Grants and Assistance to Members

EXPENDITURE

£401.43

22 300.42

779.33

£646.76

1970

£814.21

22,061.05

982.47

1047.17 63.70

304.45

113.30

50.00

212.96

499 96 287.00

55.56

5.25 500 1000 20.06 ——

10.00

£5.25

£342.31 ——

1970

228,919.82

26,849.65

2,070.17

50.00

2,120.17

——

1,846.26 4.41

£269.50

HOGG, BULLIMORE, GUNDRY & CO.

2779.83 .50

2458.85 417.25

5.25 5.00 20.25 —— 250.00

——

£5.25

27,849.12

1,472.13

50.00

229,321.25

1971

— £1,552.13

1971

1,243.36 3.06

£275.71

«1

,4

V‘

W‘iWy‘»$<}$. 7

2t

$VVV¢V av r has , ’9 ) ,

.

.

..

.

.

. . . . . . .

.

<

.

. (r.,.,. .,;.4.;¢‘ r ”)9 r r r.) »

Major K. W. G. SHENNAN, M.B.E., 3.71. Major J. H. D. WARD, 29.4.71. Major E. W. MITCHELL, 2.1.72.

Served: 1921-45. Died: 4.8.71. A member of the Committee.

Died: 21.8.71.

30421 1

304385 F/Cpl. H. N. HARVEY I‘n-Pensioner Royal Hospital, Chelsea. Served: 1919-38, 1939-41. Died: 9.4.71.

304473

304333 1

Born: 9.7.00. Served: 1918—45.

7953255

6132072 Tpr. A. G. MAPLEY 120 Cressingham Road, Reading, Berks. Born: 24.8.03. Served: 1922-27.

1736 Tpr. T. w. DOBBY.

Born: 28.7.95. Served: 1914-17.

2684

S.Q.M.C. J. CHRISTIE 510 Ermine Road, Ladywell, S.E.13. Born: 14.8.02.

2261

Tptr. S. CHURCHILL

Tpr. H. J. HARRINGTON. M.M.

306035

6 Willow Tree Close, lckenham, Middlesex. Born: 16.5.91.

Served: 1914-30. 305447

1940

22556019

L/Sgt. C. G. IRVING

39 Overland Road, Cottingham, Yorks.

305158

6 Alexander Avenue, Gillingham, Kent. Born: 21.1.37.

48 Capel Crescent, Newport, Mon. Born: 1.1.35. Served: 1952-65.

Died: 196.71. A/WO.1 A. S. MUNDON, B.E.M. 29 Browning Way, Heston, Middx. Born: 1916.

Served: 1935-57. Died: 11.12.71.

A

0-4”“ é.‘éfi IDIAAAA fi

Tpr. R. J. PONTER

Served: 1957-60. Died: 7.1.70.

vvv

23215567

v

THE BLUES AND ROYALS ASSOCIATION OBITUARIES

rv

er,

304493

AA 4,» V.

H

.,,$ f9v¢$$$$§§ \r"‘£”-}x’\rv-) ‘

"4+ 4 1.4 I 4’~?\ «(’9‘ («w 4‘4 It

)9

We have examined the above balance sheet as at 31st December, 1971, together with the income and expenditure for the year ended on that date and compared them with the boons and vouchers of the Assoc1at|on and we certify them to be in accordance therewith,

39-45 Finsbury Square, E.C.2.

City Gate House.

Badges

$229,321.25

401.43

228,919.82

1970

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT for the year ended 3131 DECEMBER 1971 Subscriptions and Donations Dividends on Investments (Gross)

INCOME

the year

Balance at 1st January, 1971 Excess of Income over Expenditure for

REPRESENTED BY ACCUMULATED FUND

1971

BALANCE SHEET

THE BLUES & ROYALS ASSOCIATION

XXX;<5$$¢$$$$fl$$’)$‘)$$<;$$9‘.

299 Main Road, Dovercourt Bay, Harwich,

COH. H. SANSOM

Died: 6.11.70.

29 Violet Road, Lower Bridgford, Notts.

Died: 7.8.71. P. G. SEATON Fairlawn, Leicester Road, Market Harborough,

Leics. Died: 12.7.71.

Cpl. J. G. SIMPSON, O.B.E. Flat 2, 17 Marlborough Road, Bournemouth, Ha-nts.

4 Balmoral Road, Salisbury, Wilts.

Tpr. L. B. SNELL 2 Chamberlain Way, Pinner, Middx. Born: 22.10.06.

Served: 1942-46. Died: 30.9.70.

Tpr. S. THORNTON c/o Ince Castle, Saltash, Cornwall. Born: 20.1.16. Served: 1939-46.

Tpr. P. R. HEXTER 65 Perrycroft, Windsor, Berks. 39 Amber Avenue, Walthamstow, E.17.

F. TAYLER

Tpr. C. E. B. INGHAM

Died: 19.10.71. W. WALLIS

Died: 14.6.71.

Rectory Cottages, Cliddesden, Basingstoke,

Died: 13.7.71.

2 Bridhurst Road, Wigmore, Gillingham, Kent.

Died: 27.2.71.

Tpr. B. J. WOODHOUSE


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Combined LG and

Junior Guardsman Burt

RHC/D Associations Visit

and ex-Trumpet—Major

Dozin

to Zandvoorde 1971 By A. C. MILL/N 23 Twyford Gardens, Durrington. Sussex. The 1971 visit was Associations in August.

made

by

a

small

party from

both

Dear Sir.

I thought that you The Household Cavalry Memorial at Zandvoorde (see photograph) was found to be in good order and it appeared that the lettering had been cleaned since our visit last year. We held a wreath laying ceremony in memory of the fallen at

would be interested the following.

My Grandson Junior

Guardsman E. Burt has enlisted in the Blues and

which Musician Davidson RHG/D sounded Last Post and Reveille. Messines, Hollebeke and Zillibeke were also visited. At

the

latter

village

a

reception

was

given

by

Royals: my son Dennis J. Dozin and my nephew Ivan Peart both served in the Blues.

the

Burgomaster and l was able to relate to the assembly tales of the Household Cavalry in the trenches in that area during the Great War. Zillibeke Church was visited in which is the magnificent window dedicated to the late Colonel St. George’s brother, and in the churchyard the grave of Lt. Col. Gordon Wilson, Blues. During the visit Dr. Caenepel of Ypres acted as

in

I joined the ‘Blues’ at Knightsbridge Barracks on the 18th May. 1911. and served in the 1914/18 war as Trumpeter to Lt.

Col. Lord Twecdmouth. Yours sincerely. J. DOZIN. ex Trumpet Major.

interpreter and we are indeed grateful to him for his help and

“They’re only here for the beer—it’s Double Diamond”

friendship. We spent two days in Paris and afterwards returned to Ypres for a service in St. George‘s Church at which i read the lesson. Musician Davidson once again sounded Last Post and Reveille. A reception was given by the Burgomaster of Ypres on the last day and a great welcome was given to the Associations. On the 10th August we returned home to England. in all a most enjoyable trip and our thanks are due to the Associations for their generous financial support.

: :

AVENGER ESTATE

: :

., .1...

1100

copies Nos. 23. 27 and 28. and the two issues of 1970 and 1971. I send my kindest regards to all ‘Old Comrades‘ and sewing members of the Regiment. Yours sincerely. 62 Cefit Road. Bonymaen. Swansea. Glamorgan. Enlisted June 1927. Discharged December 1945.

HUNTER SCEPTRE

Dear Sir. I enclose . ~€.J)‘5‘3 xvii; . » ‘

:

AUTOMATIC

(19284937) Nos. 1. 7. 8. 9. 11. 12. 19. 20. 25. 28, 36. After 1940. Nos. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6 and copies after No. 10 excluding

S. DARLING. Ex 401447 The Royals.

SELF DRIVE CARS MINI

Dear Sir. I would like to obtain the under mentioned copies of “The Eagle‘. the Regimental Journal of ‘The Royal Dragoons’, and I would indeed be most grateful if this application could be published in the next issue of the Journal of ‘The Blues and Royals'.

AND 3 SIZES OF VANS AND MINI BUS

WINDSORIAN

a

photograph

taken

Castle

Camp

A. C. MILLIN. 92 South Coast Road. Peacehaten. Newhaven. Sussex.

TeI.: 63421 TeI.: 29539

AND

1a GLYNWOOD HOUSE, BRIDGE AVENUE

Stoney

The photograph depicts the intake of recruits for 1910 and early 19] lisome of these fell in the Great War but it is possible there may be a few survivors. Can any of your readers put names to this photograph. Yours faithfully.

Stoney Castle Camp—Pirbright, 1911

103 ARTHUR ROAD, WINDSOR 383 WILLIAM STREET, SLOUGH

at

Pirbright in 1911. which was given to me by the widow of the late Col—l. Harris. who is on the photograph.

TeI.: Maidenhead 34022

WINDSORIAN COACHES LTD. 17-19 ALMA ROAD, WINDSOR (TEL. 63421) FOR YOUR PRIVATE COACHES Zanvoorde, 1971


NOMINAL ROLL as at 3Ist January 1971

TESLSTIIERS o

SILVER, JEWELLERY and OBJETS D‘ART

REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS LI. Col. J. A. C. G. Eyre

Major T. C. Morris

A SQUADRON

3rd Troop

Squadron Headquarters Troop

Ct. N. G. Scott CoH. Patterson, M. A. L/CoH. Harris, D. F. L/CoH. Haine, M. N.

Malor J. D. Smlth-Bingham Captain J. w. 5. Lewis SCM Wood, N. L. P. CoH. Adams. K. G. L/CoH. Docherty, J. L/CoH. Smith, D. A. L/CoH. Triggs, J.

L/Cpl. Cartwright, R. T. Tpr. Price, B. S. Tpr. Bunting, C. R. K. Tpr. Reid, P. Tpr. Goulding, S. Tpr. Beynon, K. E. Tpr. Allen, H. R.

Administration Troop SOMC Stephenson, A. K. CoH. Cain, P. F. M. CuH. Norman, 8. M. L/CoH. Birt, R. V. L/CoH. Feldwick, N. L. L/Cpl. Nelson, K. W. L/Cpl. Doubttlre, B. R. CoH. Midwinter, J. C. L/CoH. Cousins, P. J. L/CoH. Brown, M. R.

L/Cpl. Ratclitte, H. pr. Cooper, J. E. Tpr. Morley, G. M. Tpr. Callaghan, K. J. Tpr. Aysoough, F. W. Tpr. Chillingworth, K. Tpr. Grimes, F. C Tpr. Ellis, K. W. Tpr. Gardiner, R. L. Tpr. Walden, S.

1st Troop Ct. A. M. W. Armitage CoH. Lloyd, W. J. L/CoH. Robinson, A. T. L/Cpl. Dodsworth, R. G.

A Silver Model of a Hunter

Captain E. N. Brooksbank

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Haley, C. Brown, D. I. Hall, L. S. Mazurkiewltz

RCM Lane, B.

. . . .

MoGreary, A. W. Greer, R. D. Shaw, I. D. Gardiner, T. E.

L/Cpl. Gellatly, w. Y. 4th Troop Ct. H. P. D. Massey CoH. Pearce, D. A. L/CoI-I. Villers, L. L/Cpl. Henchion, M.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Harding, D. Shields, P. A. Bowhay, D. A. Smith, A. K.

Tpr . Tpr. Tpr . Tpr.

McLeod, M. Mead , l . Gambrell, R. C. Redman, G. J.

5th Troop Lt. C. H. Boone CoH. Pomroy, H. S. J. L/Cpl. Patrick, W. S. L/Cpl. Palmer, |. F.

LAD S/Sgt. Hughes, B. Sgt. Mittens, J. L/Sgt. Pearson, T. J. L/Sgt. Turner, R. D. L/Cpl. Buxton, C.

L/Cpl. Maher. P. G. L/Cpl. Cobey, G. C. Ctn . Littledyke, S. Cin . Grltiiths, D. W.

RAPC Sgt. Cartwright, G. J.

26 NEW BOND STREET, LONDON, W.1 TELEPHONE 01-629 0458 CABLES TESSIERITE LONDON W.l MEMBER OF THE BRITISH ANTIQUE DEALERS‘ ASSOCIATION LTD.

2nd Troop CoH. Hill, J. M. L/CoH. Jones, N. W. L/Cpl. Tompkins, S. F. L/Cpl. Chessher, R. J.

ACC Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Ford, M. J. Buckman, N. A. Butler, J. W. Hinton, J. G.

Squadron Headquarters Troop

GANE & CO. 125 HIGH STREET

L/Cpl. Suffolk, M. K. Pte. Tucker, A. J.

L/Cpl. Hill, B. G.

3rd Troop

w Major T. N. P. W. Burbury Captain c. M. Barne Captain J. W. L. Bucknall SCM Clarke, J. A. SCM Rainger, P. D. CoH. O'Halloran, D. A. L/CoH. Maskell, W. L. L/CoH. Back, R. L/CoH. Hill, 3. B.

Sgt. Inman, D. A. L/Cpl. Conway Lee, M. C.

L/COH. Wall, B. G. L/CoH. Carroll, W. L/Cpl. Hennessy, W. L/Cpl. Stevenson, N. V. Tpr. Kennard, S. D. A. Tpr. Rogers, W. Tpr. Page, I. Tpr. Lanchester, N. E. Tpr. Kempster, I. K.

Lt. R. N. O. Couper CoH. Weeks, N. L/CoH. Robinson, D. L/Cpl. Longhurst, D. G. L/Cpl. Whyte, J. A.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Batchelor, M. Thornburrow, F. H. Gambrell, D. C. Scales, R. A. Ridden, A. E. G.

4th Troop Ct. A. R. Browning CoH. Burton Johnson, H. L/CoH. Gibbs, D. A. G. L/CoH. Stacey, M. B. L/Cpl. McGowan, G. M.

Tpr. Brown, J. H. Tpr. Owen, R. P. Tpr. Watson, J. M. Tpr. Ha'kness, P. J. Tpr. Lee, M

Administration Troop

ETON

SQMC Harty, J. L. L/CoH. O'Dwyer, J. A. L/CoH. Gregory, D.

L/Cpl. .Dean, R. J. Tpr. Trust-Collins, R. C.

L/CoH. Scammell, J. A. c. MT Tr00p

TEL. WINDSOR 66284

CoH. Cook, K. W. L/CoH. Stevenson, D. L/Cpl. Standen, D. C.

L/Cpl. Young, D. P. L/Cpl. Evenden, R. D. Tpr. Fairbrother, J. J. G. P.

151 Troop

2+¥¥4¥¥¥4¥¥¥¥¥4¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥4¥¥¥¥

5th Troop Staff Cpl. Jamieson, M. S. CoH. Melbourne, D. W

CL A. S. Lukas CoH. Livlngstone, J. A. L/CoH. Hughes, K. C. L/CoH. Lane, E. L. L/Cpl. Mitchell, P.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

McAnulty, R. E. Shakespeare, T. H. French, C. J. Mellor, D. Smith, I. E.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Clews, J. A. Chamberlain, D. A. Young. D. P. Riley, B. L. Storer, P. B.

L/Cpl. Murray, B. L/Cpl. Welsh, M.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Smith, N. A. Summers, J. M. D. Copsey. R. J. Barrett, A. L. Barker, K. H.

LAD W0.2 Guthrie, W. Sgt. Lewis, K. G. Sgt. Cassar, A. Sgt. Pratt, K. G. W. L/Sgt. Bools, D. G. L/Cpl. Harding, M.

L/Cpl. McKeen, W. R. L/Cpl. Love, R. L/Cpl. Henderson . W. Ctn . Munn, M W . CIn . Farley, J. CIn . Smith, P.

RAPC 2nd Troop

ALL TOWN and COUNTRY SHOES, SPORTS SHOES and RIDING BOOTS

Lt. J. W. Matthews CoH. Sibley, S. F. L/CoH. Harman, B. R. L/Cpl. Williams, R. J. L/Cpl. Kemp, I. G.

CATALOGUE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

C SQUADRON

L/Sgt. Vearncombe, B. J.

FULL REPAIR SERVICE

L/Cpl. March, A. Tpr . Bray, P. N

1st Troop

Squadron Headquarters Troop

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ACC L/Sgt. Norton, A. L/Cpl. Mulgrove, F.

Major B. H. F. Wight Captain J. S. Olivier SCM Heath, J. M. CoH. La Roche, M. J. CoH. Pinks, M. CoH. Sproats, R. J. L/CoH. Morris, W. L/CoH. Elmslie, I. G. S. L/Cpl. Lyons, T. L/Cpl. Salisbury, R. A. L/Cpl. Perry, S. J.

L/Cpl. Stephenson, W. L/Cpl. Davts, J. Tpr. Sowerby, J. Tpr. Shell, J. J. Tpr. Rose, _C. W. Tpr. Meredith, L. T. Tpr. Hutton, R. Tpr. Cuth_bert, M. H. Tptr. DaVIdson, J. M. Tptr. Hempseed, R. I.

Lt. A. J. T. Carter CoH. Chapman, L. C. L/CoH. Benn, T. F. L/Cpl. Claridge, D. J. L/Cpl. Thomson, S. P.

. . . .

Skinner, H. J. Walsh, N. Stephen, T. Padgett, J. T.

2nd Troop Ct. T. B. R. Leslie-King CoH. Fortt, R. L/CoH. Reid, H. L/Cpl. Williams, B. R. L/Cpl. Buckle, R. M. G.

L/Cpl. Norris. E. J. Tpr . Savage, W. D. Tpr. Blake, J. M. Tpr . Stretton, P. Tpr . Wright, J. A

S.


3rd Troop

PRI

Ct. S. C. De Chair

L/Cpl. Steel, P. D.

L/CoH. Hayes, G. V.

L/CoH. Fisk, P. E. L/CoH. Bright, n. J.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Stables

L/Cpl. Stickels, J. L/Cpl. Chaloner, G. H.

Bates, P. Davies, D. Vaughan, R. Mowbray, P.

L/CoH. Catlin, D. G. I. L/CoH. Partridge, R. S. L/Cpl. Niabot, T. R. J.

THE BLUES AND ROYALS SQUADRON, HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT SHQ Tpr. Hayward, N. Tpr. Johnson, K. G.

4th Troop Ct. M. A. Corry-Reid CoH. Garvey. J.

L/CoH. Mutt, A. E. L/Cpl. Seddon, .I. C. L/Cpl. Phillips, G. A.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Manning, M. Evans, B. R. C. Wischhusen, D. J. Measor, J. Ollin, M.

Support Troop

LAD S/Sgt. Waterman, P. J. . Seear, S. w. . Carr, J. W. . Holmes. P. R. . Little, A. J.

. Welch, D. R. Captain A. N. D. Bots Captain w. R. Marsh SOMC Greenwood, C. E. CoH. Anslow, R. J. L/CoH. McKenna, D. L/Cpl. Jones, K. M.

L/CoH. Bradley, A. L/Cpl. Wood, M. .I. L/Cpl. McGlnlay, G. D. Tpr. Hardgrave, S. Tpr. Bramble, D. R. Tpr. Rochford, A.

. Sissons, G. I. . Melton. R. E. L/Cpl. Carr, R. D.

L/Cpl. Merritt, R. C. L/Cpl. Smurthwalte, w. L/Cpl. Massey, R. T. Cfn. Booth, J. C. Cfn. Scott, A. J. Cfn. Wormstrup, H. Cln. Barratt, M. G. CIn. Taylor

CoH. Smith, G. L/CoH. Lisney, G. M. L/Cpl. Edwards, G. M. Tpr. Marshall, J.

Seager, C. O‘Connell, J. Hewltt, J. W. Scarrott, J. P.

WO’s & CsoH. Mess L/Cpl. Fisher, D.

Lt. C. T. Goodall CoH. Hawley

L/Sgt. Evans, D. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Tpr. Piper, S.

L/Cpl. Grifflths

ACC L/Sgt. L/Sgt. L/Cpl. L/Cpl.

Freeman, 5. T. McCue Hewitt, C. M. Hatfield

L/Cpl. Broomlield, T. Pte. Reed, L. Pte. Duckett, R. W. Pte. Spenceley, R. J.

L/Cpl. Shillabeer Tpr. Chambers Tpr. Cross Tpr. Currah Tpr. Douglas

L/CoH. White Tpr. Baines Tpr. Beecham Tpr. Fletcher

HQ SQUADRON

RHQ Troop

SHQ

Captain I. M. D. L. Weston

W0.2 Bell, P. G. CoH. Forrester, R. L. Tpr. Bird Tpr. Gray, R. E. Tpr. Hannant, B. J. L/Cpl. Taylor, K. A.

L/Cpl. Bond, a. T.

0M Captain 0. M. Price ROMC Martin, K. E. S/Cpl. Preece, D. C. F. CoH. Clay, K CoH. Howick, D. A. L/CoH. Craig, A. L/CoH. Woollard, R.

L/CoH. Barrett, J. A.

QM(T) Captain T. J. Williams ROMC Handley, J. G. S/Cpl. Hunt, H. CoH. MacDougalI, W. R. L/CoH. Crowley, P. F. L/Cpl. Godding, D.

L/Cpl. Pritchetl, J.

L/Cpl. Smaldon, L. A. Tpr. Pearce, D. J. Tpr. Howard, J.

Hunter, . Lake, M. R. . Lloyd, M. W. . Sedgwick, G. G. Crocolt, G. S.

Tpl. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Brady Stainsby, D. J. Gibletie, J. E. Blomqulst, I. R.

Hows Hutt Kelsey MacFarlane MacGregor O'Gorman Reynolds Rougvie Spurs True Urquhart Watson Williams

Tpr. Tor. Tor. Tor. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. .

Dykes Gardner Gowllng Kilpatrick Lewis Ogilvle Rainger Watson

. . . . . . . .

Foley Goff Mosley McBryan Salisbury Sideboltom Slevin Tucker

O.R.S. Cpl. Cross L/CoH. Chi ngworth L/Cpl. Lees 882

SHQ Captain R. R. Giles S.C.M. Cooper

Lt. P. R. L. Walker-Okeover CoH. Clayton L/CoH. Waddock L/Cpl. Lees 483 Tpr. Ackerman Tpr. Barber Tpr. Bourne Tpr. Campbell Tpr. Cummlngs

. . . . . . . . .

Dane Innes Malinowski Perrin Roberts Slade Williams Wilson Wood

. . . . .

Jervis Laflan Love Millward Mitchell

Trainees Tpr. Tpr. Tor. Tpr. Tpr. Tor. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tor. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Aucker-Howtetl Bell Best Blackman Bowden Brasshill Burness Burton Cooper Edwards Fenton Frankland Gilbert Hobson Holbrook Horsley

. Murray . . . . . . . . .

Plank Popple Protopapa Robinson Swindlehurst Toghill Walters Wells Youdale

Captain W. A. Stringer CoH. Murtagh L/CoH. Weslwood L/CoH. Mansfield L/CoH. O‘Sullivan

L/Cpl. Lazenby L/Cpl. White Tpr. Thompson Tpr. Waterman

L/Cpl. France

Guardroom

MT

WOs & CsoH Mess CoH. Williams, R. T. L/CoH. Black, I. Tpr. Collett Tpr. Birch, L.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Cooke, L. Dearden, J. P. Ikins, T. R. Maskell, P. M.

L/CoH. Slaveley L/Cpl. McWilliams Tpr. Boardman

Post NCO/PR! L/CoH. Kearns. B. J.

. Fry . Gratton

CoH. Lawson L/Cpl. Hyett

Tpr. Manners Tpr. Smith

NCOs’ Mess Eqn Staff L/Cpl. McGregor Tpr. Johnson

L/Cpl. Haighton, B.

L/Cpl. White. M. J.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON, THE HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT QUARTER MASTER DEPT. RHQ Lt. Col. D. J. Daly Captaln R. C. Wilkinson R.C.M. D. H. Clark

Officers Mess S/Cpl. Mella, P. B. L/Cpl. Greany, D. P. L/CoH. Stratford, J. W. Tpr. Davidson, T. W. T. Tpr. Hall, J. F.

L/Cpl. L/Cpl. L/CpL Tpr. Laycock, P. Tpr. Russell, L. G.

Tpr. Henessy

Two Troop Lt. P. B. Rogers CoH. Preece CoH. Belles L/CoH. Henderson

Major J. C. M. L. Crawford W0.2 Hearn, B. SOMC Hague, M. L/CoH. Freeman, E. S. P. L/CoH. Freeman, K. R.

Three Troop Tpr. Drogomireckl Tpr. Flude

One Troop

RAPC MT Troop

Malor J. S. Crisp Captain Lord Normanton SCM Doxey SOMC Sellars CoH. Holt CoH. Idle CoH. Marchington CoH. Smart L/CoH. Ayres L/Cpl. Smith L/Cpl. Thornton L/Cpl. Twlnn L/Cpl. Waldron Farr. Williams Tpr. Amey Tpr. Church

. Maddams . Hague

Medical Centre

L/Cpl. Sammons Tpr. Coffey

Tpr. Jeffries

Officers Mess

L/Cpl. MacKenzie Tpr. Strevens

ACC Pharmacy W0.2 Hestle Sgt. lnman

MED CEN Major J. P. A. Page

L/CoH. Pitt, D. A. J.

L/Sgl. Boyce Ple. Bray

F.O.M.C. Woodman

L/CoH. Warren

Regtl Barber

L/CoH. Fisher

HOLDEES GYM L/Cpl. Lloyd, C. U.

APTC L/Cpl. Gregory, J.

CSMI Pollock

L/Cpl. O'Callaghan, A. J. Tpr. Cotter Tpr. Reeve, A. D. Tpr. Wainwright, J. H.

RAPC Captain I. C. Clarke S/Sgl. Jones

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

James, G. R. Marriott, A. D. Nixon, R. J. Perkins, P. Sanderson, T.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Mountfort, L. I. Northover Ricketts, H. B. Robinson. R. D. Scannell, T. J. Scott, C. A. Tonay, J. Eastwood, P. Wilkinson Russell, P. F.

Captain J. W. Wyburd Captain J. F. Mackie Tpr. Atyeo, D. W.0.1 Cowdrey, J. S. W.0.2 Frearson, C. W.

0RD ROOM S/CpI. Yates, R. B. CoH. Lee, P. A. L/CoH. Greene, B. F. L/CoH. Weston, A. J.

PROVO CoH. Sweeney, J. L/CoH. Cooksey, P. D. L/Cpl. Sherwood Tpr. Anyon, A. Tpr. Gimblett, K.

Gymnasium L/CoH. Arnold

L/Sgl. Fitzgerald

Transitees Appleyard, I. Armlshaw, P. D. Birchall Brzozowski Hilsden

. . . . .

Lampard Reeks Rees Wright York

MT S/Cpl. Hunt, C. W. M.. B.E.M. CoH. Tribe, K. E. L/CoH. Hester, E. R. L/CoH. Frampton, D. J. L/Cpl. Morris, D. Tpr. Finnie, J. F. Tpr. Carolan, T. W. Tpr. Moylan, J. Tpr. Graves, T. J. Tpr. Harding, J. Tpr. Houghton, D.

L/CoH. Murphy, H. J. A. CoH. Norman, 8. M. L/Cpl. PenIlIh. A. W.0.1 Tucker

LAD Captaln A. G. Plait ASM Greer AOMS Lennox S/Sgt. Althorp Sgt. Watklns L/Sgl. Bennett . Ramsden . Lawler . Bennett . Inder

L/Cpl. Smurthwaite L/Cpl. Wildman Cfn. Billles Cfn. Garter Cfn. Eccleston Cfn. Hartley Cfn. Henshaw Cfn. Lockyer Cfn. Plenaar Cfn. Smith

BAND OF THE BLUES AND ROYALS Director of Muslc: Major E. W. Jeanes Musn. Jaskulski, C. Musn. Brammer, M. Musn. King, P. CoH. Blogg, G. Musn. (Loo. L/Cpl.) Leslie, J. CoH. Briggs. E. L/Cpl. Mansfield, R. L/Cpl. Bull, M. Musn. Marsh, P. CoH. Commins, T. S/Cpl. Middleton, R. L/Cpl. Cheaters, M. Cpl. (L/CoH.) O'Donnell, D. CoH. Daniels, D Musn. (Loo. L/Cpl.) Orrlll, C. Musn. Frew, J. L/Cpl. Parsons, A Musn. Graver, P. Musn. Parker, R. Cpl. (L/CoH.) Hayne. G. Musn. Healey, A.

Musn. (Loo. L/Cpl.) Philp. R.

L/Cpl. Platl, s. CoH. Riddell, G. Musn. Rougvle, M. Musn. Rowden, R. Cpl. (L/Cpl) Sowter, R. Musn. Spurs, D Musn. Stephens, K. Musn. Sabourln, S. L/Cpl. Tanner, R.

cu. (L/CoH.) Todd, R.

Musn. (Loc. L/Cpl.) Turner, H. Musn. Watts, P. L/Cpl. Whennell. R. S/Cpl. (Tpt. Mai.) Wilson. P. CoH. Wise. P Musn. Griffiths, E. Musn. Baines. S. Musn. Cooper, J. Musn. Frosser, K.

Musn. Watson, D. Musn. Williams, P.


THE BLUES AND ROYALS PERSONNEL AT ERE

N01 (Gds) INDEP PARA COY

RHQ Household Cavalry

Captain R. D. G. Corbett L/CoH. Banham, D. W. G.

Major J. G. Hamilton-Russell S/Cpl. Desborough. J. A.

L/CoH. Sturrock. V. L/CoH. Oakes, W.

CoH. Maskell, W. A. G. Tpr. Jones, T.

Royal Yeomanry CoH. Deshorough, W. C. CoH. Kelsall, C. G.

CoH. Thurston, D. R. A. a.

Guards Depot (HCTS) Lt. D. M. Reed-Felstead CoH. Aucutt, G. A. L/CoH. Barden, F. T. L/CoH. Butler, R. Tpr. Cartlidge, T. Tpr. Cooper, B. CoH. Donnelly, J. M. S/Cpl. Ellis, D. Tpr. Ford, P. D. L/CoH. Forester, R. W.

LL/Cpl. Gillingham, s. N. Tpr. Howard, J. CoH. Howells, D. P. Tpr. Hughes, M.

LL/CDI. Hulett. A. J. L/COH. Liddell, J. A. Tpr. Marshall, H. O. CoH. Martin, M. A. L/CoH. McLean, S. C. W0.2 Peck, J. Tpr. Proost, P. J. C. E. L/CoH. S‘tutwell. R. A. L/CoH. Strattord, B. J. Tpr. Wasp, G. Tpr. Williams, B. J. L/CDH. Wills-Smith, J. J. V. S/Cpl. Wright, J. G. M.

1772 4972

MV & EE (Kirkcudbright) Captain F. Fletcher Tpr. Curtis. A.

W0.2 Mackay. J. S/Cpl. Robson, P.

WILKINSON SWORD... CRAFTSMEN FOR 200v ARS

MONS OCS CoH. Brown, D. J.

Armd Delivery Squadron CoH. Buckingham, P. A.

S/Cpl. Cox, W. G.

Ftheindahlen Garrison W0.2 Hunter, J. R.

Berlin lnlantry Brigade Guards Depot (JGW) Major D. V. Smiley Captain P. M. R. Brook

CoH. Deacon, E. 8. Captain G. H. Tweedie CoH. Sayer, C. J.

Hong Kong Regiment W0.2 Simpson. F. A.

Palace Orderlies CoH. Acton. G. R.

CoH. Vaudin, S. H.

RAC Training Regiment CoH. Straw, N. S. CoH. Wight, E. W.

Household Cavalry Hospital

CoH. Wilkins, G.

S/Cpl. Fielding, D. R.

Junior Leaders‘ Regiment(RAC)

Army Air Corps CoH. Ball, E. N. M. CoH. Cox, B. R. S/Cpl. Denny, J. E.

. Strudwick, J. . Wilmolt, R. D. J.

Lt. The Pen. M. S. A. Agar S/Cpl. Hales, N. J. W0.2 Storey, J. E.

CoH. Tucker, J. R. S/Cpl. Wennell, D. J.

Kuwait Liaison Team AAC Chepstow

W0.2 Hayes, B. W. G.

Major J. A. Dimond, M.C.

7E Cadet Trg Team

AAC Arbortield CoH. Elaylay, D. N. CoH. Edwards, J. A.

CoH. Davis, J. . Owen, W.

BOBC W0.2 Woods, P. C.

H0 Northumbrian District Captain L. T. de C Messel L/CoH. Calcralt, B.

L/CoH. Mannering, V. G. H.

H0 Southco Lt. Col. T. A. K. Watson

RAC Centre 247 Pro Coy Major B. J. Lockhart

Cantaln H. W. Davies S/Cpl. Burroughs, M. G. CoH. Ford. D. N.

CoH. Grinyer, R. V. c. CoH. Ollington, M. J. S/Cpl. Scriven, R. J.

W0.2 Varga, G.

7 Armd Bde

S/Cpl. Wilkinson, v. MOD Major B. S. Hodgson

19 Panzer Grenadier Brigade Major P. T. Kefghtley

H0 London District Major H. O. Hugh—Smith

HQ Household Division

HO DRAC

Major A. H. Parker-Bowles

Lt. Col. J. B. Evans

667 Avn Squadron

RMAS

Captain J. C. Leech

Major J. H. Pitman

RM School ol Music RMCS

CoH. Shearn, L. D.

CoH. Watts, 5. A.

JSIS Near East

RAC Gunnery School S/Cpl. Hayward, P. M. F.

CoH. Thomas, L. H.

Major D. J. S. Wilkinson

CoH. Stacey, M. P.

Lt. Col. D. S. A. Boyd

BFllXMIS

SHAPE

Major D. Miller Captain G. T. R. Birdwood L/CoH. Collett, R. E. J.

CoH. Proctor, B. E.

lFVME Major A. B. T. Davey

British Army Advisory and Commissioning Team lran

HO RAC 3DIV

Major J. J. F. Scott

Major W. s. H. Boucher

Stall College

Recruiters CoH. Chamberlain, D. E. CoH. Emery, A. W. CoH. Sampson, W. H. J.

This year Wilkinson Sword celebrates exactly 200 years of craftsmanship in fine steel. NowWiIkinson Sword has been honoured by the Grant of a Coat of Arms. This tradition of excellence, com—

Major J. A. Aylen CoH. Whitworlh, B. L/CoH. McEvoy

Durham University Ct. J. M. M. Carr-Ellison

1 Division HO 8t Signals Regiment

bined with the scientific advances of the 20th

The Lile Guards S/Cpl. Whittington, D. Captain Captain L/CoH. L/CoH.

RAC Para Squadron W0.2 Kersting, A. W.

C. J. Simpson»Gee H. W. Havward Brandon, S. Howell, J.

Tpr. Kendon, R. L/Cpl. Mills. K. L/CoH. Sherwin, L/CoH. Dunn, J.

C. O. P. C. A. W.

century, has enabled Wilkinson Sword products to lead in markets throughout the world.

/ /

Wl\LKINSON " tws/WOINQ

Long Service List W.0.1 Kidman, J. F. W.0.1 Godlrey-Cass, D. L.

w.o.2 Kimble, A.

CoH. McLachlan-Kitchen, A. R.

CoH. Weller, E. H


CODOLETTE

PROGRAMME

FOR

BLOODSTOCK

CODOLETTE CRUMBS

(14lb. drums)

TO BALANCE VITAMIN INTAKE The easiest method ol leeding Cod Liver Oil and Malt Extract

POLIENTA TONIC FEED ADDITIVE

(56lb. bags)

TO BOOST PERFORMANCE For extra health, vigour, growth and vitality.

POLIENTA SALTS

(11Ib. buckets)

TO MAINTAIN AT PEAK CONDITION A palatable Physic, Conditioning and Blood Salt

Ior all-the-year-round condition.

Write or Iolophone for details to:

THE POLIENTA COMPANY

Telephone: Northampton 32645 (STD Code 0604)

2 Woodland Avenue, Northampton, NN3 ZBY

we PRINT and PRINT and PRINT and PRINT A complete printing service is offered to those kept busy worrying about things that printers should attend to.

As printers, publishers and advertising contractors we can deal with print from the rough visual stage through to

final printing in either monochrome or lull colour. We offer extremely competitive terms, a free advisory service and can deal

with

catalogues,

the layouts and presentation aspect of leaflets, booklets

and publicity material,

etc.

Moreover

we can arrange for the preparation of art work and blocks at very economical rates.

SERVICE PUBLICATIONS LIMITED CAXTON HOUSE SHOREHAM-BY-SEA, SUSSEX. BN4 60D

If your present printing arrangements are proving to be an expensive burden—don‘t feel sorry for yourself—contact

us

We do assure you that no effort will be spared in

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TELEPHONE 4536 (Iour lines)

PUBLICATIONS PAMPHLETS

HOUSE MAGAZINES PROGRAMMES

——

BROCHURES

DIRECTORIES

TOWN GUIDES YEAR BOOKS

BOOKLETS STREET PLANS


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The blue and royal the blue and royal 1972  
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