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THE EAGLE The Regimental Journal of

THE ROYAL DRAGOONS

TIDWORTH

CONTENTS EDITORIAL ab = .— M s: .= c .a >. .e w e: .= .5 cut a. o

Editorial Tercentenary Parade

Parade State A Squadron B Squadron

.: 4-1

C Squadron

E o h

HQ Squadron

[at

The

Ni x: a H

Band

Light Aid Detachment, REME

I-

Q)

.n o

Dragoon in Kenya

1-!

D

O

Sergeants’ Mess

0

a: a: )-

Tidswell’s Grave

C3

Q1

a L: d.) r:

Corporals’ Mess

Medals

for

War

Service

(The

Dragoons) 1811-1960

in!

G) U

The Regimental Association

5': H KCLY (Sharpshooters) Big Game Fishing Games and Sports Obituary Births, Marriages Regimental Gazette Extra Regimental Employment

Royal

N the Royal Armoured Corps today Regiments are expected to accept unfamiliar equipment and tasks at fairly short notice, and this we surely have done over the Cyprus crisis. Our conversion from armoured ears to tanks is only 18 months old, yet it was not easy to revert two squadrons to the wheeled role. This in itself speaks well for both the extent of our recruiting in recent months and of our progress in mastering the Centurion. Inevitably much of this Eagle concerns Cyprus and the exploits of A and C Squadrons, and I am most grateful to them for making time to send me copy. The rest of us have not been idle however; B Squadron is to the fore in improving tank lore, HQ Squadron has frequently practised its field role, and even those of us in RHQ, including our enterprising doctor, Lionel Henderson, have discovered new hazards on Salisbury Plain. I have therefore tried to balance Cyprus, Tidworth, and the excellent material submitted by ever-critical Old Royals and those at ERE. I particularly commend Lt Col North’s article on medals. Nowhere else has this chronicle of Regimental awards been recorded; it is therefore of historical interest. Thanks also to Major David Wilkinson for his light-relief article on Kenya. Congratulations to Tony Nash, ex-National Service subaltern, who won Britain’s only gold medal bob—sleighing in the Winter Olympic Games. Well done also, our hockey and crosscountry teams, who took the respective 3 Divi— sion cups. Well done as well, the cookery team who reluctantly entered yet triumphed in the 3 Division competition. Somehow the inner— man seems to feature in this edition! The eight silver trumpets depicted at the head of Band Notes include the latest three donated by Brigadier Timbrell, Lt Col Worsley, and the Regimental Association. Shown also are


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the replicas of the original Colonel’s, Lt Col’s and Captains’ Guidons, bearing the emblems of the Tudor Monarchs. I would appreciate notification of changes of addresses of subscribers, and am grateful to Home Headquarters for their help over this. As ever, visitors have been many, and we were honoured and pleased to see them. To mention a few: General Sir Robert Bray, who dropped in informally on relinquishing Southern Command; General Sir Kenneth Darling, his successor; Brigadier Greenwood, who with his staff, headed by Major Bay Hodgson, guided us through 1963 and conversion, and “ dug us out ” on the Admin Inspection; Brigadier WardHarrison who succeeded him as Commander RAC of 3 Division; and Mr. Wainwright, M.P., who temporarily vacated his seat in the House

for one in a tank, and enjoyed his day with us. May I voice the congratulations of Royals everywhere on the New Year OBE awarded to the Commanding Officer. During his previous appointment as senior staff officer of 3 Division he had to deploy much more than just two squadrons—worth of the Strategic Reserve in which we are so proud to serve, and we are fortunate to have had the benefit of his experience over the recent crisis. Finally, in thanking all contributors, a word on my predecessor as Editor, Major John Evans, who produced two editions and had “grown into ” the task. He handed over to me at breakneck speed whilst his Ferret engine was warming outside to the call of Cyprus. With his spadework we have managed to produce what I hope is an accurate and interesting account of our life in this challenging year.

TERCENTENARY OW that the excitement is over, a review of this memorable parade is not only fitting, but of future significance.

PARADE

About 1960 an application was submitted to the Lord Mayor of London that the Privileges of the City should be granted to the Regiment.

emphasised drummer—practice, and those extra volunteer drummers became every bit as good as an Infantry Corps of Drums. The Guidon Party—the RSM, TQMS, RQMS and SSM Ranson, held their own little rehearsals, and very smart they were too.

This was no mere formality, nor was it approved until a scrutiny had been made by the City authorities into the Regiment’s historical connection with London. Our real pride, therefore, is that we have been found worthy of, and granted, an honour bestowed by the greatest City in the World, and exclusive to six Regiments only. Thus we may take heart in the knowledge that, though Tercentenary is past, Privilege

Towards the end of September Colonel N. F. B. Shaw, CBE, 1330, Private Secretary to the Right Honourable The Lord Mayor, held two meetings, attended by Superintendent Webster of the Metropolitan Police, and the Regimental Adjutant, Major D. S. A. Boyd, representing the Colonel of the Regiment. From these we determined the form of parade and order of march, as follows :

goes on.

Commanding Officer Adjutant

We started rehearsals in early September, having “ tucked under our belts ” the successful Old Comrades’ Reunion on 24th/25th August and a week’s tank‘shooting at Lulworth. One of the first things was to get the dress right, and priority was put on the fitting and tailoring of uniforms. Next step was to get the soldiers skilled in the drill-movements of the Sterling sub-machine gun, especially the angle of carry with the bayonet fixed. Soon parties of men appeared all over the square and throughout the barracks, practising. Simultaneously we officers did sword drill, the RSM taking us, usually in the early morning mist. Meanwhile the Band

}

Mounted.

Band A and B Squadrons in files of six. Guidon and Escort. C and HQ Squadrons in files of six. We are indebted to so many people, but chiefly to the Civic Staff and to the Metropolitan and City Police for their help and co-operation from the outset. In early October Regimental parades, rather than squadron, became the rule, and about that time we received a breath (or perhaps blast) of

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fresh air in the form of Drill Sgt Lewis of the Grenadier Guards. Most Royal Dragoons normally shun square—bashers, and think of the square as a hockey-pitch-cum—MT-park, but under Drill Sgt Lewis we started positively to enjoy our drill and knew that we were going to knock London for six. What a fine example he was, every inch a Guardsman, even when, standing on the saluting base, his dazzling left boot came crashing down and he disappeared amongst splintering timber. Nobody laughed harder than he, but seconds later we were at it again—“ Reach up, up, up, up-up and down the City Road. . . .” Then the horses came. Two chargers from the Household Cavalry Mounted Squadron, and soon Colonel and Adjutant had them accustomed to the Band and words of command. About this time also some of us “walked the course ” in London, and got to know the distance fairly accurately. We were now ready for dress rehearsals “ over the distance,” and it was on the first of these that Brigadier Greenwood inspected us, and at the Colonel’s suggestion, allowed it to count for “ the Admin ” l I think we all enjoyed those parades. Somehow it was fun swinging along on those crisp October mornings, the spectacle itself arresting the traffic, and pre-war Tidworth stirring to a glimpse of mounted cavalry. On the second dress rehearsal we were honoured to be inspected by the Colonel of the Regiment, Brigadier A. H. Pepys, Dso. He, who accepts nothing second-rate, pronounced us fit for the job, and suddenly it was D—I. Speculation as to who was to command the convoy to London was cut short by the Colonel, who deemed it such a vital task that “ no—one less than the Second—in-Command shall do it,” i.e. me! (I dared not remind him that my last comparable mission was the Regimental baggage party from Durham to Ashford, Kent, in 1944, when I lost two 3 - tonners in Leicester!) I slept in the Mess that night, or rather tried to sleep—such was the excitement in the barrack blocks. At 0330 ch1 Smith brought in a large mug of tea, and at 0400 I had another in the cookhouse, where the soldiers were eating huge breakfasts. It was teeming with rain. All squadron armouries were doing a roaring trade in SMGs, and we were up to time. At 0528 we rolled out of Tidworth; eight coaches, the mini— bus with RSM’s party and Guidon, 3-.tonner for band instruments, spare 3 —tonner for emergencies, and the Chief Clerk and I in a private car in the rear. It was dark, wet, and

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3

cold, as I followed those tail lights through Ludgershall, Andover and on to the Basingstoke bypass, 15 mph up—‘hill and 60 down. We had one halt of two minutes on the edge of Blackbushe—to admire the dawn! Then on through slightly increasing traffic to Camberley and the Staines by-pass, where at 0715 we met our Metropolitan police escort—bang on time and place. The drive into London brought one or two heart-failures and maddening rush-hour hold-ups. On Victoria Embankment we picked up our City police escort, then “lost” two coaches somewhere near the Bank. But by now I was past caring, and in fact they pulled into Armoury House, City Road, only a few minutes after the rest of us at 0930. The HAC, whose guests we were, had kindly provided excellent changing facilities, car parking, and canteen, and we were able to get on parade refreshed and unhurried. Above all it was a fine clear morning. As H Hour approached there was a build—up of spectators outside the City Road gate, among whom I recognised several Old Royals. Then the gates opened and we were again honoured to receive the Colonel of the Regiment. He carried out a formal inspection and left, with Capt Mark Black, ADC for the day, to take his stand beside the Lord Mayor at the Mansion House, flanked by markers paraded by RSM Vowles. The first words of command and drill move— ments were something of an anti-climax, in a strange barracks, and somewhat cramped for space. Then as we swung through the gate, and caught the band’s echo from the buildings opposite, all London burst in on us and carried us along with obvious warmth and pleasure. My impressions from the very rear of the parade are a kaleidoscope of “ corner—of—eye ” sights and a hubbub of half recognised sounds . . . people running with cine—cameras . . . traffic on the uplane . . . TV car going against it . . . my name . . . must keep my interval . . . sword upright . . . can’t hear CO . . . must be now. . . sixth sense . . . halt! (The Regiment is challenged at Ropemaker Street by the City Marshal) . . . off again . . . by God, there he is, pace-stick and all . . . “up, up, up, up” . . . “listen for the drum” . . . “ we’re going somewhere, lads ” . . . look him in the eye” . . . “ when the time comes” . . . back of the Bank . . . Regimental March . . . 5 to 12 . . . Royal Exchange, hundreds of Old Comrades . . . and now for it . . eyes left . . . look him in the eye . . . and we’ve done it . . . eyes front, crowds thinning . . . River Thames . . . coaches . . . halt! . . . Royals will unfix . . .


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march off the Guidon. It was practically over. The weeks of careful preparation had paid off, and we were, and are, Privileged. The Lord Mayor very kindly entertained a party of us to sherry, whilst the main party went off in the coaches to Albany Street for a wellearned pint and an excellent meal arranged by Major Lewis of Home HQ, C Squadron KCLY, QM Baker, and 20 Coy RASC. All the suitcases had arrived with Ssgt Brooker from Armoury House, and there appeared not to have been a hitch. Meanwhile in the Mansion House, with its magnificent decor and furnishings, the greatness of the honour bestowed on us was borne in upon every one of us present. The

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splendour of the day was completed by the sending and receiving of two messages: “ The Royal Dragoons exercising their Right of entering the City for the first time send humble and loyal greetings to Your Majesty.”

THE

* ”momawmvrowwwvz/ovmu

it

And the gracious reply : “Please convey to All Ranks of The Royal Dragoons the sincere thanks of The Queen for their kind and loyal message of greeting, which Her Majesty much appreciates.” A Royal Occasion indeed, enhanced by the delightful presence that night of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother at the Regimental Ball in the Mansion House.

CHRISTMAS 1 963 (Right).

The Command-

ing Officer replenishes Tpr Mowbray

(left)

and

(appropriately) Tpr Beers. (Below). (daughter

Valerie of the

Clark

RQMS)

and Father Christmas, im-

PARADE STATE personated by WOII Enzer (LAD), much fortified.

Colonel of the Regiment Brigadier A. H. Pepys, DSO Commanding Officer Lieutenant Colonel R. E. Worsley. OBE Second—in—Command Major I. A. Dimond, MC Adjutant Major D. S. A. Boyd Quartermaster Lieutenant A. S. Ayrton Regimental Sgt Major

Bandmaster W0 I G. E. Evans, ARCM

RSM I. D. Bradley

Guidon Bearer W0 II (TQMS) F. Fletcher Escort to The Guidon

wo II (RQMS) J. s. Clark A Squadron Major S. E. M. Bradish-Ellames Captain T. P. Hart Dyke Lieutenant B. H. Coode Lieutenant C. M. Barne 2nd Lieutenant A. H. Scott W0 II (SSM) C. C. F. Crabb SQMS D. Leese C Squadron Major I. B. Evans Captain ]. A. Aylen Lieutenant D. H. Spencer 2nd Lieutenant M. A. E. Casey 2nd Lieutenant D. P. L. Hewson SQMS P. C. Woods

W0 II (SSM) P. G. Ranson B Squadron Major P. D. Reid Captain I. I. F. Scott Lieutenant C. E. T. Eddison Lieutenant N. M. B. Roberts 2nd Lieutenant J. M. Shepherd-Cross W0 11 (SSM) J. Paul SQMS H. Buiko, BEM HQ Squadron Captain A. B. T. Davey Captain B. J. Lockhart Captain C. B. Amery Lieutenant J. H. Lloyd Lieutenant D. G. Hanmer W0 II (SSM) H. A. S. Blackallar SQMS D. Cameron

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A SQUADRON The author of these notes didn't know where to begin: he therefore asked the troops to submit some notes. The result has not been helpful : each troop claims firstly to feed better than the others, and then to have had more bullets fired at them. This latter com— petition has to be closely judged, and only genuine strikes are counted. Misses are the cause of much jollity. For those of you with your heads in the sand, the Royals are in Cyprus. A Squadron did the pathfinding, and C Squadron came and joined us three weeks later. Despite the famous telephone call from Joint Force HQ in Nicosia which demanded the location of A, B and C Squadrons, and then requested the grid reference of Tidworth; and their signals in the early stages referring to those left behind in England as A Squadron’s “ unit rear party,” we are very sorry indeed that more of the Regiment has not been able to join us. Maybe they will yet. It all seems rather a rush in retrospect. That glorious day in the City of London on 22nd October when we marched proudly through seems in a different age. The administrative and CIV inspections were successfully nego— tiated—but did it really take seven long weeks of preparation to clean our tanks sufficiently? Christmas block leave was very welcome, and on our return we happily threw ourselves into practising being infantrymen on Internal Security duties. Hardly had the flap died down and we started once more to do troop training on the Plain, when the Squadron was given one week to reorganise for Cyprus. We were to take over vehicles from the Ist Guards Independent Parachute Company, and produce five recce troops each of two Ferrets and two landrovers. It may take a year to convert to tanks: it only took two days in Cyprus to re-convert to our old friends. But in serious vein, it is surprising what a turnover in men and experi— ence occurs during a year (only two trooper operators had tried before to work HF radios at night, as one example). Before leaving England we welcomed lots of reinforcements from the other squadrons, including a large part of Recce Troop who formed our fifth troop. All are now so much part of the Squadron that it is very difficult to remember who were once strangers; anyway within 12 hours they had been made to buy the Squadron dark blue scarf. All too soon we saying good—

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byes at Gatwick, and then very early on 4th February we landed at Akrotiri airfield—in pouring rain. The Guards shook us warmly by the hand at Episkopi, leapt into our buses and had all left within ten minutes. But the advance party had done sterling stuff, and the vehicles were in immaculate order. It is indeed rare when one Regiment taking over from another has never a grouse and always a fresh compliment for those who have left. Thank you, very sincerely. By that evening every one knew his place in the complex situation and in the new Squadron. Next morning 4th and 5th Troops were operational under command of the Paras, whilst the rest of us did long range recces. And at 0545 hours the following morning, 48 hours exactly after arriving, we were all of us rushing to control a nasty situation in Ktima at the south— west corner of the island. This was the beginning of an extremely happy relationship with the Ist Battalion The Parachute Regiment, which lasted some three weeks before they were “given a rest in Nicosia.” (Inter—zonal allegiances get rather heated and sometimes acrimonious here. I am glad to say the Paras have since warmed up their area and are enjoying

themselves there too!) However, no praise can be too high for the Battalion: they were kind and very hospitable, they showed us how to do one or two things, and they worked us bloody hard. I know we enjoyed every moment of it, and are very grateful to them. We managed to keep the Pegasus on our vehicles for quite a long time!

We have, in fact, been under command the Paras, the Glosters, the Life Guards, HQ RA 3rd Division and then reverted to the Glosters: all in the space of nine days. All that has just been said about the Paras applies equally to all; we have been looked after in the kindest possible way. Our longest association has been with the Ist Battalion The Gloucestershire Regiment, and our relationship has, as far as we are concerned anyway, been extremely happy indeed. And the Life Guards have asked to be considered as “nanny” should we want anything at any time; and they have been mar— vellous at getting all the anythings. The job we have been doing requires a book, not notes. However, basically it is to save life and stop fighting between the two sides, the Greek and Turkish Cypriots. This has meant a great variety of tasks. We have, of course, done lots of routine patrols and route recces,

Above: Greek-Cypriot Armoured Bulldozer in Limassol. Below:

Ist Troop A Squadron patrolling a Cypriot village


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both in the country and in the towns. We have negotiated the return of hostages, both two—footed and four—legged—once even driving the goats back with a low flying helicopter. We have escorted Generals and potatoes. We have put up road blocks, and requested the removal of hundreds of others. We have dismantled for— tifications; bad luck, tst Troop, no one had authorised it and back went the sand into the bags! \Ve have practised first aid on all and sundry. We have been spat at, and have returned the compliment accurately: well done, Tpr Willson. We have taken in weapons and ammunition from surrendering Turks, and to date still hold some Russian automatics, 1917 Lee Enfields and ancient Spanish shot guns. Sadder, we have organised removal of the injured and burial of the dead. But most difficult of all, we have had to sit and watch the fighting, sometimes at very close quarters, un— able to do anything but report: there is no point in starting a three—cornered fight through— out the island. ’ We have been present during fighting in Limassol, Ktima (the earlier battle: the second one we merely listened from close outside and dodged the overs, whilst C Squadron earned great glory), Polis and Mallia and many little villages. We have had Squadron Headquarters operating from such unlikely places as the top of Mount Troodos and the middle of Limassol. All—in-all we have been busy, interested, excited, amused, sad and proud. Our sadness was very acute when Cpl Middleton was killed when his Ferret dropped down a steep bank. He was a fine member of the Squadron, and we miss him very much. We all join in sending our heartfelt condolences to his mother. General Mike Carver, General Peter Young and Brigadier Donald Crane have visited us officially in camp, and each inspected a troop guard of honour: we have also met many times under less stereotyped conditions. The Com— manding Officer is about to come and look us over, which will be the greatest fun. The Recce Squadron of the Royal Canadian Dragoons has just paid us a visit in their light blue berets: this was a great occasion and resulted in their leaving singing a filthy cockney song, whilst our members sang “Allouette”: it is presumed neither understood the words they had just learnt! The RCD returned four members of A Squadron this morning from a night’s visit looking somewhat ill—but carrying challenges for the future in soft-ball and cricket.

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The future. As these notes are written we know we will be back either next week, or next month, or next year—but sometime. The rumours tickle our sense of humour and our varied wishes, many to stay, some to return. Meanwhile the girls at home are doing us proud with new male reinforcements for Sgt Evans, Sgt Bell and Cpl Burroughs. Congratulations to their wives, and in fact to all wives left in England for supporting us so well in your letters. More babies are expected shortly, and others arrived before we left. Names of all boys to Major “Spud” Lewis please. Sports have suffered from lack of time. However, everyone has had the chance of ski-ing — that delightfully easy sport — Emburey’s leg is getting on quite well; and we have managed a troop ski-ing at the same time as another cooled off in the sea. Lt Haworth-Booth came an excellent third in the RAF point—to—point, which was watched by the whole Squadron including the duty troop—on duty of Course, Emmett and Coleman kept up Regimental traditions by operating a very efficient bar by the finishing post from the back of the Squadron Leader’s landrover, whereby the officers were able to return a little of the hospitality we have received. There is a rumour of go—kart racing on Easter Monday: why not legalise scout car racing as well? First Troop claim the following: 42 villages visited within four days of being in Cyprus. The most accurate spitting. Thomson under fire whilst in that embarrassing position. Lt Barne hoisting a Union Jack under fire, and then re— moving it under fire because he had chosen a Greek police station’s flag pole. Sgt Bell, when told to lead a convoy of ambulances, unarmed, into the battle of Limassol, saying over the radio “ Hull 11A for 11, I’m not chicken, but do you really mean it? ” chl Norman and Cpl O'Dwyer can now ski. The whole troop providing some really excellent PR photographs for recruiting. Second Troop seem to have trouble with their food. They are always moved just as a side of beef is half cooked; although one Greek family, perhaps intimidated by Cpl Falvey, did kill, pluck, stuff and cook an enormous chicken in very quick time. Cpl Roberts and Sibley have evidence of bullets striking their Ferret in Limassol. And Lewis with a sten gun really frightened a Greek policeman. Some of us might agree! They also own the only 19 set in the Squadron, with which SQMS Simpson

Tpr Aldridge and a young Turkish-Cypriot


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and Blazier successfully prove the excellence of the old days. Third Troop were the first to come under fire —by a few minutes—but Lt Hanmer and Harman have no scars to show for it. Dawson and his camera are to be seen everywhere, and together they make a most unmilitary sight. Sgt Evans has returned to England after tremen— dous work in the Troop: we believe the Greeks are heartily thankful he has gone since his impartiality was liable to strain. Harman appears to cook well (he uses Nescafe). Sgt McMahon is now Troop Sergeant, and thoroughly enjoying his temporary release from Royal Signals duties. Fourth Troop even have difliculty catching their food, since Borley and Scott scattered the Press when chasing two wretched chickens through Mallia — to return to the rightful owners, of course. Tpr Dusty has been recruited young as a mascot, and is well cared for by “ master ” Thomas. Fox is living a peaceful life in hospital after an operation, while Maton drives his landrover. Fifth Troop, together with Fourth, were the first into action, setting up road blocks with ex— cellent effect outside Ktima. Sgt Rainger, Love and Savage terrified the locals. Tpr Crowley was guarding a Ferret in a lonely spot when Cpl Bennett sneaked up and stuck a “gun” in his back and said “OK, Johnny, come on out.” “All right,” says Crowley. Gadd is the cook here, and his so—called “ pye dog stew ” is excellent. Pentecost was heard to complain bitterly about C Squadron’s “reveille by firing ” when we stayed with them at Ktima. chl Johnson

and Barr have eventually been credited with a bullet scar—which took them two days to find. Squadron Headquarters and Administrative Troop of course do all the work and get all the blame. However, SQMS Leese’s canteen does provide all our wants, and promises some football kit for us when we get back. ch1 Roddis is an orderly room all on his own, Cpl Ward, RAPC, is a very good intelligence—pay—accounts clerk (and likes Canadians), chl Robson and Pte (note that, he’s changed) Salter cook under any conditions. ch1 Guerrinvi keeps us as fit as he can do, and fixes us when we fail him, and the Royal Signals, with Cpl Middleton and Pearce, are proving extremely proficient with a variety of sets. Cpl Burroughs and Taylor have been having a rest in hospital after inverting a Ferret, but will soon be fit again. Sgt Louch, Starling and Docherty keep our stores in immaculate order (or so they say). Why do the REME always come last? Ssgt Porter’s section have done marvels. They have

Back Numbers of the Eagle The Editor would welcome old copies of The Eagle, that is for 1960 or earlier years. This request comes originally from the National Army Museum at Camberley, where any such back-numbers would be carefully preserved.

Flashback

Recruiting Poster We congratulate Tpr Baylis of HQ Squadron, who designed the new Regimental recruiting poster now being displayed in Army Information Offices.

even electrified our vehicles “just for kicks," although only the British have been suckers enough so far to try them out. Cpl Beeby and chl Nicholson regularly fill crewing vacancies in the troops. Sgt Day runs the “ B ” vehicles as MTO, and Cfn Docherty is now an expert signaller. There is never enough room to mention all those who deserve mention—and in this case all do. However, a word for Sgt Cummings, who must be eating his heart out in London, and a goodbye to chl Dunn and Hanratty: enjoy yourselves; we are. Episkopi, 1964.

“I ADORE WAR. It is like a big picnic without the objectlessness of a picnic. I have never been so well or so happy. Nobody grumbles at one for being dirty. I have only had my boots off once in the last 10 days, and only washed twice.” CAPT THE HON JULIAN HENRY FRANCIS GRENFELL,

DSO

(The

Royal

Died of wounds 26th May, 1915.

Dragoons). Aged 27.

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B SQUADRON We seem to have been very busy this past year but without the previous year’s highlights. A review of our activities seems to consist of getting ready for CIV and Cyprus, and driving over that Plain. But in reality we have achieved a lot, worked hard, and enjoyed ourselves. We finished our troop-training last April with an inter-troop rally for all troops in the Regi— ment. This was very hard work and taught all of us a surprising amount in a very few hours. Lame tanks, lost tanks, and “ given-up-all-hope ” tanks were seen all over the Plain. It was a successful rally from the management’s point of View; for no matter how hard the Tank Crews Track—Bashing Union tries to convince the management that it takes one day to break a track, the management now knows it can be done in twelve minutes! Lt Roberts and 3rd Troop won the rally and a silver cup, and Lt Sturge and list Troop came second. We had a good week training with the Jocks, the Ist Battalion The Royal Scots, and by the end of the week understood their difficulties and respected them enormously for the cheerful way in which they overcame them. This week’s training showed us what a lot there was to learn in the tank game and made us appreciate our tanks. We did three small exercises; a night attack with ”the School of Infantry; providing tank sup— port to 45 Commando RM; and acting as enemy to the Ist Bn The Parachute Regiment, North Somerset Yeomanry, and “ Cyclops,” 2nd RTR with their anti-tank missiles. This was a Squadron success; having over-run a para company and put a squadron of tanks to flight we were halted and made to wait an hour or two while the other side reorganised. On the next leg we manged to outwit “Cyclops,” and the exercise came to an end about a day early. Our last exercise of note was in the nature of an experiment. Having heard that the Russians do a lot of night training we did our best to copy them. With much help from the Quarter— master’s department, the cookhouse and the MT, we turned night into day and vice versa by simply working at night and sleeping by day. We did all our field training by night and all our maintenance and replenishment was done in hides by day. Sgt Chambers and a number of others were agreeably surprised with their map reading and “28 ” was like a Cheshire cat. Like everyone else we enjoyed our march through the City of London and felt very proud

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of ourselves; and to be honest the practice parades were quite fun, but thank goodness there is a Brigade of Guards! CIV really was a hurdle, not like the old days when a troop drove to the nearest Mercedes garage and had a steam bath and massage for 45 DMs. However, we survived and got a good report. We also got three new tanks. But possibly best of all, we now felt we had tried most

things that a tank soldier is asked to do, and had done them well. Throughout our training this year and during our preparation for CIV the Squadron has been wonderfully supported by Ssgt Brooker and Sgt Fordham and all the other members of our fitter section. They have done wonders on our behalf and we take this opportunity in thanking them. Christmas came and went and when we arrived back from leave the whispers and rumours came thick and fast—“ We’re off”— “ Cyprus ”—“ We’re going to Cyprus ”—“ We’re going to Cyprus as Infantry”—and then we were being issued with rifles and packing kit bags and having inoculations and packing cookers and hurricane lamps and blancoing equipment. Morale was going sky high; “ We’re off, we’re oil.” We learnt as much as we could about IS, and gave a demonstration of crowd dispersal—Tpr Campbell, who lives in a tribal area anyway, was unanimously elected as “ The man in the yellow turban.” We weighed ourselves for air transportation, and it came as a shock to some of our senior ranks when they realised that a man and his kit must not weigh more than 250 lbs! But then the excitement died down; no more infantry required but it was possible that a scout car squadron would be required. Hopes rose again, but alas, A Squadron went to Cyprus; we wished them luck and gave all the help we could, but we envied them. Then We heard that another squadron was wanted and our hopes began to rise again, but no, C Squadron were to be the lucky ones. However, we were to provide one troop. So Lt Roberts, Sgt Woods, Cpl Searle, chl Wilkins and Tprs Cokayne, Smoker, Dodman and Bailey were in luck. So once again B Squadron used one of the more common military expletives, spat on its hands and went back to track—bashing. In the sporting world we won no gold medals although we were second in the athletics and cross—country running, and 1st and 2nd troops were runners—up in the inter—troop football. We were beaten by A Squadron after a good evening’s boxing in the novices competition.


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We seem to have had a General Post so far as our officers and sergeants are concerned this year. Capt Aylen went to C Squadron, Lt Eddison to the Army Apprentices School, Lt Sturge to the City, Sgt Poulter to Bovington, Sgt Brooks, after a nasty accident to his hand whilst on training, to become the QM’s righthand man! We wish all of them good luck. Our newaomers include Lts Coode and Brooksbank and finally Maj Hodgson who took over the

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Squadron from Maj Reid early in March; the latter goes to Cloud Cuckoo land for the next two years where we wish him two good feet planted firmly on the ground! Sgt Wallace joined the Squadron before Christmas in order to redress the balance between the Jocks and the Sassenachs. We hope that all our newcomers will enjoy themselves in the Squadron and are very pleased to have them.

C SQUADRON It is as well that these notes were required no earlier as they could not have been written during the tempo of our operations during the past month. As it is an uneasy lull exists in this part of the Island, allowing time to think back to the beginning of August last year when our last report was written. In fact on the 26th July the Squadron took its summer holidays with the Squadron Leader editing The Eagle by the sea in North Wales. Immediately after our return from leave, those crews who had not fired earlier in the year underwent a week’s concentrated training before shooting at Lulworth from the 25th to the 29th. With the October events looming up we began to prepare the tanks for CIV about the 10th September. It was as well that we did, for we barely had enough time to get them ready by Ioth November—not nearly enough time, many will say, remembering evenings in the hangars, silver paint everywhere and those something bazooka plates that never fitted any— where. As a change from such monotony the Squadron carried out an endurance and map reading exercise early in the month when tank crews were dropped off very early in the morning to the North West of Chippenham. They first had to make their way in darkness to breakfast points on the Marlborough—Calne road and then across the downs to crossing points over the Kennet—Avon Canal and to RVs for return home. About 15 miles, and it was as well that some were dissuaded from following their noses—Cpl Gentile and Tpr Toogood to note; we also wondered how Cpls Clark and La Roche found a pub on the second leg. Above: Sgt Wood, Tprs Baker and Thompson enjoying a day on the Plain. Below: The Squadron Leader, Maj P. D. Reid, receives a fair-weather barometer from SSM Paul, watched by Sgt Tucker, Tprs Summerfield, Moon and Pearce

The Squadron won the novices boxing in October by beating HQ in the semi—final 7—4 and A Squadron 9-2 in the final. The team

included Sgt Cox, Cpls Best, Byrne and Jones, ch1 Birt and Tprs Sussex 546, Sussex 766, Toogood, Jordan 784, Frost, Avery and Freund. In November we won the Inter—Squadron Cross—Country Competition and produced most of the runners for the Regimental team. Among those who ran were Sgt Corcoran, Tprs Budgen, Carthy, Dixon, Golding, Hill 765, Hill 547 and Dutschak. Sgt Cox, Cpl Glister and chl Freeman regularly played rugger for the Regi— ment. ch1 Livingstone and chl Birt were in the football team. Preparations for the October parade relieved the monotony of cleaning tanks, and even if we did not win the drill competition a high standard was reached with no cribbing to speak of. A rare tribute to Drill Sgt Lewis of the Grenadier Guards who instructed us. The tanks were ready by the 10th November—just! And a very satisfactory report was gained. Ssgt Willison and his fitters are to be congratulated on their extremely hard work for this. It was not long before the tanks were used again. On the 2nd December eight were handed over to young officers from RAC Centre, including Mr. Bols, for forty—eight hours on the Plain. We were surprised to see them all return the next day as many had not exactly gone where intended. After Christmas we spent a week training as Infantrymen, Tpr Sussex 776 showing us that he could shoot as well as anyone, but the flap died down and reluctantly we returned to tactical training whilst A Squadron left for Cyprus. However, to our joy on the zrst Feb— ruary a second armoured car squadron was called for and within 96 hours we had changed our vehicles, radios packed, and were arriving in the first of sixteen aircraft in Nicosia. A Squadron met us with a guard of honour, 2Lt


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Bucknall’s bullet—scarred Troop. We had diffi— culty finding the holes but were to have some of our own before long. We owe a great debt of gratitude to A Squadron whose reputation was very high and who put every assistance and benefit of their experience at our disposal. We were vastly impressed by their efficiency, smoothness and alertness. At this point we must welcome new arrivals in the Squadron. Fourth Troop complete from B Squadron, and all those from Headquarters Squadron, now so essential a part of our organisation. We had a quiet few days after arrival with our every need met by the Royal Engineers in Slim Barracks, Dhekelia. Here we had time to organise ourselves, to start patrolling in the Larnaca area and to draw up essential stores. Within four days we had our marching orders to join A Squadron in Western Zone and arrived at Ktima fully operational on the 28th February. The first task was to get to know

On the 7th March heavy firing broke out in Ktima with a Turkish spoiling attack. First, Third and an ad hoc Troop of Squadron Leader, SSM, SQMS and Sgt Cameron, were quickly in the town manoeuvring between both sides, and later when a cease—fire came, assisted in the evacuation of casualties and trapped civi— lians in the town centre. An uneasy truce fol— lowed until the Sunday evening with constant patrolling in the town by three troops. \Vith the announcement of a hostage-exchange that evening tension eased, and while two troops were left in the town the remainder returned to base, and Fifth Troop (Sgt Corcoran), who had been in Episkopi when the battle started, were able to claim their vehicles back. Monday morning saw the start of a major Greek attack at first light, using rocket launchers, mortars, grenades as well as armoured bulldozers. Third 2Lt B013) and Fifth Troops, who were so rudely interrupted at breakfast in the town, were

the area fully, and at the same time to build

quickly joined by First Troop (2Lt Hewson),

Waterloo Camp from scratch on our dusty hill, with only a few tent-bases dating back to the days of the Emergency. Within a few days we had the tents up, the deep holes dug, the wire round us and were settling in to a long routine of daily patrolling. We came under command of 26 Regiment RA whom we have come to admire enormously. Fourth Troop were detached at Polis for three weeks until we could replace them with Second Troop. Second Troop, and later Third Troop, were under command of the battery responsible for Ktima town, whilst the remainder with a troop of Gunners and the occasional helicopter under command, had responsibility for the majority of the countryside of Paphos Civil District. We quickly visited every village in the area and amassed a wealth of information, ably put together in files by the IQ, Sgt Cameron. It was not long before we had our first blooding. On the 3rd March the Squadron Leader and half of Fifth Troop under Sgt Matthew, were rushed to stop fighting between two villages up-country. This was quickly ac~ complished, but for the next four days two troops and a section of Gunners had to remain in the area to keep the peace by occupying the hill between them. On the 6th March Sgts Wood and Cameron, who had temporarily relieved Lt Roberts an hour before, were successful in stopping fighting at a village near Polis. They earned a special commendation for their

but by 0630 hours no further movements into or out of the town was possible owing to road blocks, and this state of affairs continued until Thursday evening. 2Lt Casey was fired at, breaking through a road block at 0630, and had two tyres punctured. The three troops in the town had a thoroughly unpleasant day motoring between both sides with buildings disintegrating on all sides. For the first hour they were allowed to slow up the tempo of the fighting by getting in the way and in particular by blocking the armoured bulldozers. This they did extremely successfully, and at 0720 hours ch1 Kennedy was forced to fire at a bulldozer that refused to stop and came very close to him, firing over his head. It retreated hastily. After this orders were changed and troops were no longer required to interfere with the fighting but to observe and report on it, which they did admirably until fire ceased at about 4 pm. From then until the First Troop could be relieved on Thursday afternoon, these three troops remained on night-and—day watch—and-patrol in the town, supplied by helicopter only. It is a credit to them that they came out cheerful and alert at the end of it. During this period firing broke out again many times, and on Monday the 9th, Cpl Wilkinson and Cpl Cook came under fire from an anti-British sniper who was quietened by two rifle shots from Cpl Wilkinson. As these notes are completed we are back to our peace—keeping duties in the countryside with one troop only in the town. Moderation

skilful and quick action from Lt Col Bethell, C0 of 26 RA.

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The Squadron Leader, Maj J. B. Evans, negotiates with the Turkish schoolmaster in the village of Axylou, and prevents an outbreak of Violence.

Below: 5th Troop of C Squadron and men of 26th Regiment RA relax outside Axylou. Scout Car: Sgts Corcoran and Matthew. Right Scout Car: Cpl Byme and Tpr Bacon.

Left


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Tpr Ratley watches every move between Axylou (Turkish) and Eledhiou (Greek) villages

Cpl Birt, C Squadron PT

“L‘stening-Out” near the village of Eledhiou


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appears to reign in Paphos District temporarily but there are endless calls on us to assist both communities. We congratulate Sgt Matthew and chl Livingstone on their promotions, and we welcome Cpl Ayles, Tprs Peckett and Haighton

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who have just joined us. We offer our sympathy to Sgt Chalky Wight, who was such a tower of strength to us and so calm and collected at the most hectic moments, on his ill— ness, and hope that he will recover very soon.

HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON Before he left for the Staff College in October, Capt Boucher, our previous Squadron Leader, presented a silver shaped bowl and plinth, now known as the Boucher Trophy, for inter—departmental football. The competitive spirit thus aroused should ease Sgt Lloyd’s task of selecting and training a Squadron team for the 1964 winter season. Squadron hockey has benefited from a successful six—a—side competi— tion run by the Bandmaster. TQMS Fletcher takes and trains a party of non—swimmers every

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week at Southampton Baths. So all—in—all we have a fairly “ sporty” outlook. After winning the inter-Squadron drill competition in October we carried out three winter exercises, which established our ability to supply the Regiment in adverse weather. We practiced control of echelons by helicopters and found them most effective, weather per~ mitting. One of these exercises was across land owned by a descendant of one of the Balaclava Brigade Commanders! During the summer we

aim further to improve our concealment and traffic control and use of small arms.

hour between Imber Village and Strip Wood (three miles).

The departure of SSM Blaokallar to KCLY in December was a sad moment for the Squad— ron. He takes the good wishes of us all with him. We welcome SSM Titmarsh, who carries on the tradition of firmness and good humour so necessary in our large empire of departments. Sgt K. Webster and Cpl Jones have joined the stores side, on which we still have chl Melbourne, Tprs Bickmore and McNicho— las. Cpl Strudwick replaces Sgt Best as the signaller mainstay, Sgt Best having gone to Cyprus with C Squadron. chl Deane, Tprs Brownless and Munro comprise an effective Squadron office staff. News of the other departments appear separately in this edition. To them all we wish continued happiness and success.

After Christmas we acted as enemy to the echelon in a four-day exercise which culminated in a prima beat-up of RHQ in the field with Browning blanks. We are now in Cyprus as 5th Troop A Squadron and Sgt Rainger has taken over the Troop. The Troop is basically the same although some have left to fill the gaps in the Squadron. We left the vehicles behind at Tidworth (surprisingly they were all on the road), but have since discovered that C Squadron have brought them out with them.

RECCE TROOP Our last notes ended with the episode at Porton where we were drenched all day whilst “repelling” the CND disarmers. Since then the Troop has remained almost unchanged. At the end of the summer we had a good week at Hay—on-Wye in Wales, acquainting ourselves with the vital statistics of every bridge for 20 miles around. We then had an exercise with some helicopter student pilots of whom we saw very little owing to a possibility of fog! In December the Troop was affected by courses. The Troop Leader went on 21 Forward Air Controllers Course and now talks about knots and air speed, etc. Sgt Rainger went on a Ground Defence Course. We don’t know what this means, but he has since been seen in Cyprus with evil—smelling containers chanting “ Gas Masks on, Gas Masks off,” etc., etc. Tprs Pentecost, Crowley and Thomas (now chl.) went on a radio course and came back talking airily of “400 miles on I30 feet of wet string ” and “increased range with a dipole coupled to a triangular boomer,” all of which could not get them four miles across SPTA. Tpr Sibley

became a BI also, in D 8: M, but his work was obviously so secret that he can tell us nothing about it.

HQ SQUADRON CONTROL STAFF Munro, Back row (left to right): Tpr Brownless, chl Deane, Tprs Ody, Biekmore, MeNiehoIas, Baylis, SSM Titmarsh, chl Melbourne. Front row (left to right): Cpl Strudwick, Sgt Webster, Capt Davey, Cpl Jones

Meanwhile, back at camp . . . basic training was carried out on Salisbury Plain with a view to (I) finding Tpr Love’s cooker-pricker which he lost last year at GR 123456 and is sure he can find again, and (2) to improving chl Johnson’s time of three—quarters of an

MT TROOP MT Troop has undergone an extensive change this year, from 70 vehicles to a fairly manageable “taxi rank” of 30 vehicles. This has been due to many of our drivers being in Cyprus, but more of that later. Many of the old firm are still with us; Sgt Remfrey, going steadily balder, due to his efforts in sorting out parade states; Sgt Bosher managing to cope with the spanners and socks, although Regi— mental tool checks have been known to erase his otherwise permanent grin; Cpl “Hop-along” Bull* with his own filing system, which has been known to produce a letter when required; Cpl. Howell, or what is visible of him under the oil, succeeding admirably in keeping most of the vehicles on the road and generally doing a first-class job. During the year, a useful amount of both individual and Squadron training has taken place. chl Grinyer, Tprs Shorter and Tread— away are to be congratulated on passing their Driving Standard I due to much work by Sgt Heath (C Squadron). Tprs David, Downes and Austin have passed upgrading courses, and Downes can even “tick” down a radio set. Education has been tried by some, but they have, on the whole, found it unnecessary for driving 3-tonners. Others are due to go to Catterick on upgrading courses, and when this is completed everyone should be at least Standard II, which is a satisfactory state of affairs. Echelon exercises have been fairly frequent, and we know Salisbury Plain fairly well now, but darkness still produces its problems. ch1 Wiflin hit a tree, a wire fence and another tree within 50 yards, but got there in the end. Other major activities were the Drill Compe-

tition, for which, in spite of SSM Blackallar’s


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REGIMENTAL ORDERLY ROOM ORDERLY ROOM The ever—energetic, ready-to-please, clerical staff look back on a bumper paper-mill year. The many changes that have taken place include a new Commanding Officer and a new “mounted” Adjutant, Capt Arkwright. chl Theed and Tpr Kirby have also joined us. We say goodbye to chl Deane and Tpr Brownless to Headquarters Squadron, complete with their spare ink roller. We wish Major and Mrs Boyd good luck in their new location and success to Major Boyd on his course. Whilst Adjutant his untiring efforts and shrewd guidance did much to keep us on the straight and narrow during a hectic year. Capt HamiltonRussell, the Assistant Adjutant, left us in January 1964, to boost the Staff in Cyprus, and into his steps Capt Black has followed from C Squadron. Capt Black is at present delving deeply into the intricacies of Military Law, and will, we hope, prove as versatile a QC as his predecessor.

We appear to have been omitted from the Documentation Inspection this year, so past results have now caught up on us, but with the help of all SSMs, not least SSM Blackallar (whose clerical documentation almost made him a runner for the Chief Clerk’s job) we have managed to remain above water. Clangers have usually been successfully diverted or obscured. Our motto to please remains Fixity of Purpose and Flexibility of Method—an invention of the Chief Clerk no doubt. The laugh-and—tear—up file records many moments of humour, from naked signal— men being posted—in with blank AF H1157, an echelon exercise which presented the Adjutant with a driver who was on trials in Aden, a Signal Sergeant posted in yet “missing” since 1936, to suspicious sick notes with mysterious doctors’ signatures.

THE BAND In this year of “Beatle-mania,” the “Hippy Hippy ” shake and all the attributes of the other music channel we as a military band have remained unperturbed and pressed on with our own particular medium, and I think we can safely say we have scored some HITS! The Back row (left to right): Tprs Ramsay. Fiske, Swannell, Kirkby, Lane, chl Theed. right): Ssgt Hall, Capt Arkwright, Cpl (now Sgt) Wennell

Front row (left to

—but that’s all part of the game. We have lost ch1 Beddingfield, Tprs Welford, Young and Simpkins on detachment and we wish them luck in their new jobs. We welcome Tprs. Fox3 Ingram, Maton, Callaghan, Hadfield and Augustine to the “gang.” Finally, we say this for ourselves (no one else will do it for us): we are the people who “ without their help and devotion to duty, this would never have happened," maybe ambiguous, but almost true.

*Since writing these Notes we have to report with deep regret the death of Cpl Bull on Ioth April, 1964, in BMH Tidworth from cerebal causes. Cpl Bull was the mainstay of MT over many years and a most loyal Royal Dragoon and comrade. The heartfelt sympathy of all ranks goes out to Mrs. Bull, his wife, to his mother, and to his son (serving in the Regiment), and daughter.

wQawaAI-K “arm

views, we take much of HQ Squadron’s credit; and, of course, the Tercentenary Parade, for which we carried many men and much kit to and from London on time and safely. The annual horrors of CIV and Administrative Inspection came round. We emerged with good results in spite of appalling weather and no hangars to work in. We now have three large shelters on the square, thanks to 3 Division Engineers and the QM. Christmas block leave over, Cyprus arrived. We knew that if Cyprus was to be sorted out they would need MT Troop. First ch1 Brown, Tprs Chapman, Fox, Honeysett, Harding, Ingram, Maton, Lawson, Stocks 575, Snell, Tolhurst and Beers were sent to show A and C Squadrons what to do, and when later Tprs Hanley, Parsons and Parkes arrived, the Cypriots gave up. When these drivers had gone, we managed to get rid of many of our vehicles, although we are still meant to do a high quota of “ details ”

Dance Orchestra has moved with the trend and endeavoured to provide the beat for the Shake, the Stomp, and even the Charleston. The Twist I understand is rather old fashioned. A new gimmick or addition to our concert programmes is that of the Male Voice Choir (in the modern


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idiom). However more about individual items later. In retrospect of this very short Eagle-year we can say that undoubtedly the significant event was the Freedom of the City of London, where the Band with the Regiment were able to establish themselves firmly and finally in an out— standing performance and one that will be remembered for a long time. We had an opportunity to cover the same ground and a lot more at the Lord Mayor’s Show which followed soon after. The Freedom of the City parade was the first occasion on which the Bandmaster had marched behind horses—with the Commanding Ofiicer and Adjutant mounted. The problem here was Whether the Bandmaster would be able to steer his normal middle course all the way. However, the horses behaved well and we all got to the dispersal point in good order. These two major events ended a busy year of tattoos and displays in various parts of the country, which of course did not do the Band Fund much good, but we did our job, and on occasions turned out in full dress, which makes a good picture in floodlit performances and the envy

of some of our counterparts. At the latter part of 1963 We gave a per— formance in the Garrison Church in aid of OXFAM where we introduced our singing Band President, Maj Dimond. This is a unique combination and probably the only one that exists in the British Army. We are delighted to have him at the helm and are fortunate to have such a musical Band President. The early part of the winter months have been spent in preparing programmes for a varied summer engagement programme which starts with the Cavalry Memorial Parade on 2nd May, immediately followed by a recruiting tour of Kent, lasting about ten days, and calling at Chatham, Gravesend, Margate and Canterbury. We continue with a few local concerts in the Andover and Salisbury area. In June we are playing at the Bath and West Show in Swindon; at The Royal Richmond Show; and at Plymouth. In July (I6th—18th) Horsham Festival, (19th-25th) Bournemouth, (26th) Tunbridge Wells, and various one—day engagements. This may give readers an idea of where to find us during the summer months and we are always delighted to see old acquaintances and do a little reminiscing. Personnel changes have almost been non— existent except for the return of Bdsm Moloney and Brittain from their courses at Kneller Hall.

Bdsm Cohen finally gave up the ghost on the clarinet and has taken up the Eb Bass. We are not yet certain if he has chosen this for medical reasons and will in fact use the Eb Bass as an artificial lung and take in air instead of expending it. He may even consider cutting down his smoking; anyway we hope he will make the grade eventually. We were sorry to lose Bdsm Cotton who was medically discharged after a short stay with us. It was felt that he would have made an excellent bandsman, and we wish him every success in the future. Bdsm Creavin is at Kneller Hall on a pupil’s course and being the only one from us we hope he will meet with the measure of success that has come to Royals bandsmen previously.

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In sport we are very active, and the accent is on hockey, the predominating Regimental sport at present. We have only once been defeated by an outside minor unit. The Bandmaster, chls Trachy and Watts have earned their places in the Regimental team. Band football is rather a joke at present, having been defeated by double figures on a few occasions. I suppose

we must have our weaknesses. What we are strong in is, of course, the continuance of the family line. It may be the Tidworth air and the semi—rural atmosphere. Whatever it is we are very happy to report the following first—borns to Cpl and Mrs. Burgess (son), Bdsm and Mrs. Shearn (daughter) and Bdsm and Mrs. Craft (daughter). T/M Fisher also has increased his family with another daughter. As forecast, Cpl Burgess has produced some future musical talent in the form of a “Pot/J/Bdsm.” Looking on woefully at this scene of matrimonial bliss is chl Meikle, who has joined the anti—marriage league, but these recent events might soften his heart. His colleagues are certainly giving him every

encouragement. Socially we have managed to have a tri— partite games evening in the practice room with our neighbours, 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards and The Royal Scots. This was a great success and we now look forward to a few more social nights and possibly days in the coming

year.

REGIMENTAL PROPERTY We acknowledge with thanks a gift of books on military topics, presented to the Regiment by Major-General Carver, GOC 3 Division.

Left to right: Cpl Manley, Cfn Butcher, Kinley and Hunter

The LAD has had a fairly uneventful year which in itself is a good indication of the Regi— ment’s progress in converting from armoured cars to tanks. The CIV in November went well and without too much overtime during the preparation stage. In fact it passed off so quietly that we wondered what on earth we had forgotten to do. The report, however, proved that all was well and we look forward to an equally smooth passage this year. Capt Till was given a good send-ofi and Cap! Mair a hearty welcome at a party at the Queen’s Head in Ludgershall which almost literally “killed ” both birds with one stone. In Lt Jones’ place as second officer we now have 2Lt Newby who in turn is due to move to the Royal Military College of Science to complete his qualifications. Ssgt Porter and his merry men moved with A Squadron to Cyprus in January. C Squadron followed in February, but unfortunately Ssgt Willison, our oldest inhabitant and regular C

Squadron fitter—section leader, was unable to go as he was due to ‘fade away ’ in May. We wish him all the best in his new career as a civilian. In his place went Sgt Fordham with a selection of “ Ferrety—minded ” fitters. C Squadron moved off to Abingdon Airfield during what must have been the coldest night of the winter. The LAD set up a recovery post on top of a hill just south of Wantage in case anything went wrong at the last minute. We litva tremendous fire and sat huddled around it. Even Cfn Kinley couldn’t sleep, so that gives an indication of how cold it was. The only cheering events of that night were that no one broke down and we were able to trade two cups of tea and a place at the fire for half a bottle of whisky with two Pakistani students who were travelling in the middle of the night on a motor cycle. The only comment they made was “ Eng— land too bloody cold,” and no one disagreed. The LAD has not done well at sport this year, having been knocked out of the Crafts— man’s Cup in the first round after a close game


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with the Water Transport Group Workshop. We are, however, keeping the flag flying on the judo mats with the intrepid Ssgt Atkinson, our “volunteer—in—chief” who reached the quarter— finals of the Army Judo Competition, an achievement only marred by his too brief appearance in a horizontal posture during the TV presentation of the same quarter—finals. 2Lt Newby, Ssgts Atkinson and Brooker, Cpls Glister and Bryant, and Cfn Jones and Taylor have all played in the Regimental rugger team this season. At Regimental football we have been represented by Cfn Edge, Stonham, Wishart, Postma and Warren. Cfn Dunn and Munday have represented the LAD in Regi-

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mental hockey. So all-in-all, although we have not put ourselves on the sporting map as an LAD, we have provided excellent support to the Regimental teams—that’s what we like to think anyway. Our final event was rather a sad one and it was with great regret that we said farewell to ASM and Mrs. Jenno in April this year. Mr. Jenno was commissioned on 2nd April and we

all wish him the best of luck in his job at SEME, Bordon. Other departures have been Cpl ‘ Paddy’ Keenan, chl Corbett, Cfn Shaw, Picker, Browning, Pennington and Fell, to whom we wish all success and happiness.

NEWS FROM ROYALS EXTRA-REGIMENTALLY EMPLOYED Fighting Vehicle Research and Development Establishment, Chertsey We hear that Sgt Acton and ch1 have settled down well and are doing job. We congratulate ch1 Cooper substantive promotion and trust that fully recovered from his car accident.

Cooper a good on his he has

have had some pleasing course results. We were sorry to see Lt Eddie York in hospital here in Tidworth a month or so ago, and trust that he is now recovered. *

*

*

to Reece Flight, 365 Light Aircraft Squadron *

*

*

Sgt B. Hayes is in touch with us from this Flight in Malaysia, and reports:

Junior Tradesmen’s Unit, Troon SQMS Clarke and his family are firmly settled in this remote spot and interpreting the local language. *

i

*

Royals here getting much fun with both fixed wing and rotary light aircraft. Before we came out we trained in Devon, North Wales, and (a monntain~survival exercise) in the Tay Valley of Scotland. Looking forward to catching up with the news in The Eagle.

3rd Royal Tank Regiment, Catterick ‘A’

Sgt Baillie-Hamilton keeps in touch from this, our reinforcement Regiment, where all our recruits are trained and processed. Visits to 3rd Royal Tanks have been made by Major Lewis of Home Headquarters, and Capt Davey, HQ Squadron. We are grateful for the special courses run to upgrade our B vehicle drivers. Cpl Goodwin has guided some of our clerks through the RAC Clerical Training Wing on learner and upgrading courses. We appreciated a visit from our “link ” ofiicer, 2Lt Woodward, just before Christmas. *

t

*

RAC Centre, Bovington and Lulworth Liaison continues to be good with the Schools and Junior Leaders Regiment RAC, and we

*

*

COLOURED PRINTS 0F TERCENTENARY PARADE AND BALL The order-list is now ofl'lcially closed (30th June, 1964). However, if any Royal Dragoon, past or present, has inadvertently been omitted from distribution of the brochure, he may still obtain details by writing to the Second-inCommand of the Regiment at Tidworth, Hants. This special concession is open until 3Ist July, after which we must declare the list finally closed.

A lot of Americans would give their eye— teeth (and a lot of dollars) to visit Kenya. Many do—certainly as far as the dollars are concerned. However, I went ‘without the option,’ as the phrase goes—at Her Majesty’s expense and at three weeks’ notice. The news of my impending translation to a Staff Oflicer’s appointment in Nairobi came ten minutes be— fore l was due to take the south—bound Dakota from Ipoh to Malacca, and three weeks later, to the day, I was sitting in a first—class air-con— ditioned compartment, bound for Singapore and Africa, and wondering what I had left behind. All this was two years ago and five thousand miles away. Still, even at this range, one can’t escape the quietly insistent voice—or rather pen —-of the Editor of The Eagle, so, in the happy position of being reasonably certain that no— one is able to contradict me, I have jotted down some impressions of Kenya. An important thing to get straight is the Equator. I know it is straight, seen from above —on the map it’s just another grid line and the second half of one’s grid reference if one is on it—but sideways on it climbs from sea level at the Somali coast up to 11.000 feet on the northern slopes of Mount Kenya and stays between 5,000 and 9,000 feet right across the Country almost to the shores of Lake Victoria,

Consequently, the temperature in Kenya, which straddles the Equator, varies very considerably from a hot and humid tropical coastline to the extreme cold of the high altitudes round Mount Kenya. Because of this, a simple week—end excursion often involves filling the car alter— nately with sunhats, gumboots, bathing costumes and thick jerseys, until one seems well enough kitted to drive from the Cape to Cairo. Population and vegetation seem to reflect these very varied climatic conditions. The coast is much the same as tropical coastline anywhere— though no regiment has a private beach here. Inland, much of Kenya is extremely arid scrubland, inhabited by colourful nomadic cattlerearing tribes who still engage in constant skirmishes, stealing cattle and wives indiscriminately from their neighbours. The Central Highlands of Kenya are by contrast highly cultivated, and here lives the greater part of the native population centred on the cosmopolitan capital city, Nairobi. Here also the European settlers farm, and this is the area in which British troops are still stationed. The climate is ideal, with hot days, log fires by night and beautiful gardens growing English and semi—tropical flowers throughout the year— daffodils, bougainvillca and Chrysanthemums all flowering together. Higher still are thick


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receive full protection. These parks range from the small Nairobi National Park, where one can see lion, leopard, giraffe, zebra and many kinds of antelope within a twenty-minute drive from the centre of the city, to the huge Tsavo Park lying astride the Mombasa road, where a recent aerial count revealed 15,000 elephant in the 15,000 square mile area 9f. the park. There is plenty of game outside the parks, and much of Kenya is divided into'enormous shooting blocks where there are opportunities to shoot anything from guineafowl to elephant—the latter,

however,

at

great

We are indebted to Lt Col R. North for

“A Sergeant of the Regiment c.1875.” The date should read 1855. This is a reproduction

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A Reconnaissance Regiment of the Reserve Army Affiliated to The Royal Dragoons

expense.

Keeping a horse is about as inexpensive in Kenya as anywhere in the world. Not a practical proposition in Nairobi (large animals are forbidden within the city boundary; someone was keeping a lion in his garden last year until the City Council told him it was too big to be classed as a domestic pet), but there is polo to be played; three packs of hounds which provide great sport after the most improbable quarry; and both amateur and professional racing. One could go on for ever. The more you see of Kenya, the more you want to see. One wishes the Regiment could be stationed here, but, of course, that will now never be, and by the end of this year there will be no British troops left in this part of Africa. I have been one of the lucky ones. In the last two years I have been able to watch more of the develop— ment of Kenya and to see as much of the animals as any tourist—and I was paid to

Ex-Regular and National Service Soldiers whose homes are in London or the Home Counties, are invited to join the Yeomanry. Full pay of your rank while soldiering, with a tax free bounty of up to £20 a year.

RADIO

SHOOTING DRIVING MOTOR CYCLING

::

Good Clubs

Social Events

Dances

"isit us or write to us at .‘

HILL HOUSE, BROMLEY, KENT.

RA Vensbourne 6571

come. Squadrons at

Errata

pointing out errors to captions on two of the colour-plates reproduced in the 1961 (Tercentenary Edition) Eagle :—

OF

KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY

Kenya is a fisherman’s paradise. There are plenty of rivers stocked with trout, and the fishing is excellent; wet fly is used and the biggest fish run up to six or seven pounds, though at this size they are hard to get, and an average would be about »}lb. or so. By contrast, at the coast there is some of the finest big-game fishing 'in the world, and at Lake Rudolf, in the extreme north of Kenya, there is fishing for Nile Perch, as well as smaller fish.

forests, and above the forest line stretch vast tracts of uninhabited moorland. Mount Kenya itself rears up above the surrounding moors, often shrouded in clouds and permanently covered with snow. The highest peak is just over 17,000 feet and it is one of the most beautiful sights in Kenya, visible in clear weather well over a hundred miles away. The wild life is of course the greatest attraction the country ofiers, and although there is now far less than the early settlers found sixty years ago, there is no lack of game outside the heavily populated native reserves. Many areas are set aside as game parks, in which visitors can see animals in their natural state and stay in simple accommodation without camping. In them no shooting is allowed, and the animals

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of a water-colour by a French General Pajot, painted in the Crimea. Colour—plate facing page 20. The caption should read “ The Royal Dragoons. Inspection of the Regiment by H.M. Queen Victoria on its return from the Crimean War. Aldershot. 17th June, 1856.”

‘A' SQN: TA CENTRE, BOXLEY ROAD, MAIDSTONE, KENT.

‘B‘ SQN: TA CENTRE, MITCHAM ROAD, CROYDON, SURREY. Tel: CROydon 2138.

Tel: Maidsrone 2228.

And at TA CENTRE, ST. PETERS LANE, CANTERBURY.

‘C’ SQN: TA CENTRE, ALBANY STREET LONDON N.W.l. Tel: EUSIon 3471.

Tel: Canterbury 63457.


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SERGEANTS’ MESS When Eagle notes are mentioned all possible reporters disappear from the scene on roving commissions, nevertheless our combined efiorts

are as follows:— Many members and their families have taken the golden opportunity of visiting long—lost relatives during the Regiment’s stay in Tidworth although at present we have 20 members of the Mess detached in Cyprus. Retracing our events since October, 1963, the Mess entertained the Royal Scots on their successful win in the finals of the 3rd Division Inter—Regimental Boxing Competition. On 7th December the Mess held their second Ter— centenary Ball in the Garrison Theatre, which enabled all members and their wives and friends to attend a full evening of entertain— ment without administrative worries. (Cliff Crabb did the honours by organising the Ball and was well supported by his Committee.) (P) An extensive buffet was presented on the balcony by “7011 Smith ACC, whose elforts and reputation at this form of presentation are becoming a household word during his four years with the Regiment. Many Association members attended the Ball and concluded by staying the weekend, with particular thanks to the Mess Members who kindly accommodated them. Special thanks must go to Mrs. Bradley, Mrs. N. Woods, Mrs. Cooke, Mrs. Heath and Mrs. Chambers for their assistance in accommodating our guests. 19th December was the evening of the Christmas Draw which was organised by SSM “Paddy” Paul. This was a first—class success with many valuable prizes from radiograms to toilet rolls. Some 6,000 tickets were sold and well over £150 spent on prizes. A most enter— taining band followed the draw with ‘ get-with— it’ music, which brought out some strange re— actions in hitherto seemly ‘ quiet’ members who reacted to guitar rhythms with obvious relish. Again WOII Smith completed the evening with a successful buffet. The single members’ Christmas Dinner went off well with merit to the staff and cooks who presented a good meal which was well attended. The absence of a certain SSM now at ERE was most noticeable but peace was not to last as his top place for stories and sandcastles was taken by Ssgt Tompkins, Royal Signals, who at the end of the final course had just hardly completed his soup—and a keen waiter who had

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tried to remove it whilst he stopped for breath came away with a sharp rap over the knuckles. Needless to say due note was taken of Tompkins’ advice and he has since spent many days in the Nlessing Niember’s chair. Later in January, 1964, the Regiment were entertained by the Royal Naval Air Station, Yeovilton, and a representative party from the

Mess attended. A most interesting and success— ful day resulted and we look forward to the opportunity of giving RNAS Yeovilton a return

invitation. A new tenant has moved into residence in the Durrington Walls area and Mr. “Taffy” Cole-Evans, DCM, pays frequent visits to the Mess with our good friend and welcome guest, Jerry, both of whom have given ample hospitality to members at their homes in Durrington on many occasions. Tidworth is indeed well served with Cavalry, since 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards and the 10th Royal Hussars are now also sta— tioned here. A well-planned tour of gamesnights will soon come into force starting with the 10th Hussars. As always we must end our notes with a sincere feeling of loss of members like John Williams (Royal Signals), Harry Blackallar, Stan Cummings and Ernie Weller. Ernie Weller moved to BAOR to take up an LS appointment at Sennelager and we are happy to see him well settled—down in his new occupation. Very best wishes to him and Mrs. Weller for the future. We welcome to the Mess Ssgt Tompkins and Sgt McMahon, Royal Signals. Also WOII Leech and Sgt Millett who have rejoined the Regiment since our last notes. We congratulate WOII Prince, REME,

Ssgt Atkinson, REME, and Ssgt Portsmouth, RAPC, on the award of their Long Service and Good Conduct Medals. Congratulations also to Sgts Evans, Edwards, Quigley, Traynor, Cox, Owen, Matthew, Bell, Wennell, Melia and Greatrex on their promotions to Sergeant since our last publication. To ASM Jenno and his good lady we say goodbye and every good wish for the future on his commission. Last, but by no means least, we say “bon voyage ” to Ssgt Willison who leaves the Regiment and the Army in 1964. His quiet approach and loyalty to the Mess will be missed, but all good wishes go to his success in Civvy Street.

Above:

581V} [gnu]. Welcoming newly-promoted members to the Mess—Sgt Melia. RSM Bradley. Mess GueSts. Greatrex. Sgt Wennell. Below: The RSM “Shows How ” to Sgt Wennell. "


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TIDSWELL’S GRAVE BSERVANT Royal Dragoons will have noticed the recent public interest, through newspaper correspondence, etc., in the grave of an old Royal who was buried overseas. Eight hundred miles up the River Nile, near the Sudan frontier, is Abu Simbel, the area of the two temples of Ramses II, who ruled Egypt 3,200 years ago. Abu Simbel is affected by the proposed Aswan High Dam, which would improve the fertility of this desert region. It is feared that the heightened waterline would submerge the temples and much of the 65-feethigh sandstone figures which guard them. The cost of re-erecting on a new site above the waterline would be about £22,c00,ooo. Beside the larger temple is a grave with this inscription: “ Sacred to the memory of Major Benjamin Ingham Tidswell, The Royal Dragoons, born May 11th, 1850, died June 18th, 1885, while serving with the Heavy Camel Regiment with the Nile Expedition.” Clearly a flooding of Abu Simbel would engulf this grave also.

I am grateful to the Editor of Soldier, the British Army Magazine, for allowing me to quote from a letter from Miss M. R. Bull in the December, 1963, issue: “One wonders why a Christian was buried in such pagan surround— ings, especially if there was enough money avail— able to transport the (grave)-stone from England

to Abu Simbel. . . . Why was his body not taken back to Cairo, for instance, to be buried in a Christian cemetery there ? Members of the Coptic Church at one time used this ancient temple as a place of Christian worship, so perhaps it was considered consecrated ground in 1885 1 Near the grave, carved in pink limestone, is the world’s first recorded peace treaty, that between the Pharaoh Ramses II and the King of the Hittites.” Though Miss Bull’s questions remain apparently unanswered, her letter prompted an interesting development recorded in the February, 1964, issue of Soldier. Mr. Joseph Rochford, an ex-Coldstream Guardsman of Leeds, spent 15 years as an RSM-adviser to the

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Egyptian Army, and has written to President Nasser, asking him to take a personal interest in saving the grave. Further, during the visit to Egypt of President Tito of Yugoslavia, “A1 Ahram,” the Egyptian newspaper, published an article which suggested that Tidswell’s grave would indeed be preserved . . . “ The respon— sible authorities replied (to his relatives) not to worry . . . he will be lifted high up as he is buried . . . at the same time as the level of the whole temple . . .” The April, 1964, issue of Soldier contains a letter by R. C. Cooke, of Finchingfield, Essex, which quotes from Cook’s Handbook of Egypt and the Sudan, and describes how the grave has virtually been twice removed since 1885, as a safeguard against sand—inundation and Nile

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flooding. Mr. Cooke, also, has written to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to save the grave. These recent pleas amplify a request made to the War Office over two years ago by the Colonel of the Regiment, Brigadier A. H. Pepys, DSO, on behalf of Mrs. Phylis M. Tidswell, widow of Benjamin Tidswell’s great—nephew. It would seem that hope will not be dismayed, and Mrs. Tidswell and all others interested may perhaps draw comfort from this attempt to inform Major Tidswell’s Regimental successors of his pre— dicament. (Later Note: Work has now started to raise the temples above the high-water mark by Cutting them into blocks, the work being carried out by an international consortium).

CORPORALS’ MESS During the late summer of 1963 we had the pleasure of entertaining Corporals of the KCLY for a weekend. Everybody enjoyed it and a good time was had by all. Shortly after this we were visited by the members of the Regimental Association who spent a very enjoyable time with us. In November the Administrative Inspection took place and a great sigh of relief was raised by everyone after it had been completed. At Christmas we lost one of our stalwarts in the Mess, Joe (Baffs) Taylor, who finally departed for civilian life after some 30 years’ service. Joe will be remembered by us all for his keen patronage of the Mess. He took part in all forms of sport. When a Regimental game was being played you could always see “ Baffs ” with his first—aid bag or his score book. We wish him all the best and success in civilian life.

December also saw the departure of Cpl Williamson to an ERE appointment in Germany, where no doubt we will meet up with him again next year. It was with deep regret that we learnt of the death of Cpl. Paul Middleton in a traffic accident in Cyprus. All members wish to take this opportunity of expressing our sincere condo— lences to Mrs. Middleton on the loss of her son, who was also a popular and active member of the Mess. We welcome back to the Mess Cpl Ken Morley, who, having enjoyed the sun in the Arabian Peninsula, now works in the absorbing atmosphere of the QM (Tech) Department. Our congratulations to all other new members and to all those who have recently been promoted to the Sergeants’ Mess.

MEDALS FOR WAR SERVICE AWARDED TO THE ROYAL DRAGOONS 1811 to 1960 Introduction Medals may be classified in four distinct groups: 1. Those for gallantry in action, or for saving life in peace. Those for war service. Commemoration medals. Abu Simbel.

Tidswell’s Grave, not visible here, lies lower left, and the rock wall.

between the left-hand

sandstone

figure

Those for conduct.

long

service

and

good

The medals in Group 2 are the subject of this short note. As a preliminary, it may be noted that medals for war service were not issued generally to all the officers and men engaged until the middle of the nineteenth century. Throughout the Peninsular War (1808—14) medals were only conferred upon certain senior officers, and it was not until 1848 that the Military General Service Medal, with bars for the Peninsular


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and other campaigns and battles, was issued to the surviving officers and other ranks present in these campaigns. The only exception to this was the Battle of Waterloo, for which a medal was issued in 1816 to all officers and men who had taken part in the battle. In the ‘forties ’ of the last century it became the custom to grant a medal to all ranks who had taken part in a campaign. At first the name of each major battle was inscribed on the medal itself, usually on the reverse side. This was un— satisfactory as, by inspecting a recipient’s medal with the obverse to the fore, it could not be determined whether he had been present in one battle only, or in two or more. The system was therefore adopted of issuing label-shaped bars for attachment to the medal, on which were inscribed the names of major engagements. campaign theatres, or, in some cases the dates covering a campaign. The bars were attached to the clasp of the medal in chronological order, the earliest being fixed immediately above the clasp. Examples of campaign theatre bars are “ Natal,” “ Cape Colony,” “ Orange Free State,” or “ Transvaal,” issued with the Queen’s South

Africa Medal (1899~1902) to those who had served in these territories within certain dates, but who had not received a bar for a specific engagement fought in that territory. These are sometimes referred to as “Colony Bars.” Terms used to describe different parts of a medal are:—

Until the end of the Great War (1914—18) the particulars of the recipient were usually engraved on the rim of the medal, or, in the case of awards in the shape of a star (officially termed decora— tions), on the reverse. Medals and stars awarded for service in the World War (1939—45) were issued unnamed, and, except in the instances noted in the tabulated list, they were issued without bars, as was the case with the British War Medal (1914—20). In the case of minor campaigns the custom of engraving the recipient’s name, etc., still obtains.

LIST OF CAMPAIGN MEDALS AWARDED TO THE ROYAL DRAGOONS Medal Military General Service Medal, 1793—1814

Bars “ Toulouse ” “ Vittoria ” “ Fuentes d’Onor ”

Notes 79 bars to survivors of Fuentes d’Onor, 110 to survivors of Toulouse. . Lt Col A. B. Clifton received the small gold medal for Fuentes d’Onor, with a bar for Vittoria.

Crimea Medal 18 54-56

Bars

“ “ “ “ “ “

(b) King Edward’s South Africa Medal, 1901—02

“ South Africa 1902 ” “South Africa 1901 ”

The Great War 1914—18 1914 Star with bar 1914 Star 1914—15 Star British War Medal Victory Medal

General Service Medal 1918

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Notes . Presented by the Khedive of Egypt to all ranks who had received the British Medal (a).

Cape Colony ” Transvaal ” Laings Nek ” Relief of Ladysmith ” Orange Free State ” Tugela Heights ”

“ 51h Aug-22nd Nov., 1914 n

. Ribbon: green, white, orange. 2. This medal was given to all those actually serving in S. Africa on or after 1st January, 1902, provided they had completed 18 months war service on that date, or afterwards completed it before Ist June, 1902. Those who did not qualify for this medal were eligible to receive the bars with their Queen’s medal.

The bar to the 1914 Star was awarded to those who actually served under enemy fire in France and Belgium between the qualifying dates. In undress uniform, recipients of the bar wear a small silver rose on the ribbon.

“ Palestine ”

. This bar was awarded for ser— vice in Palestine and/or Trans]ordan between 19th April, 1936, and 3rd September, 1939.

“ Arabian Peninsula ”

. Awarded for service of 30 days or more in Aden (including Protectorate) or the Trucial States between Ist January, 1957, and 30th June, 1960.

“ 8th Army ”

. In undress uniform the bar “ 8th Army ” is represented by a small silver 8 on the ribbon. . Defence medal to those qualified by the conditions of award.

Nil “ Sebastopol ” “ Inkermann ” “ Balaklava ”

281 medals were awarded to the Regiment; 215 all ranks received the Inkermann bar. . Two NCOs received the bar for “Alma,” Sgt T. Clements, orderly to Lord Lucas, and Cpl W. Bald, clerk to Lord Paulet, A.A.G.

(a) Egyptian Medal 1882-89

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(a) Queen’s South Africa Medal, 1899—1902

Capt C. Purvis was awarded the small gold medal for Vittoria and the M.G.S. medal with two bars; “ Fuentes d’Onor” and “ Toulouse.” Water-loo Medal 1815

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Medal (b) Khedive’s Bronze Star

OBVERSE AND REVERSE: The front and rear faces respectively. THE CLASP: An ornamental attachment by means of which the medal is suspended from the ribbon.

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“ Abu Klea ” “The Nile 1884-85 ”

. Awarded to the Royal Dragoons contingent, composite Heavy Cavalry Regiment, for service South of Assuan.

World War 1939-45

I939-45 Star Africa Star Italy Star France and Germany Star Defence Medal War Medal AUTHORITIES :

Taprell Dorling : — Brigadier-General Sir Ernest Makins :— Atkinson:— Army Order No. 9 of 1961

“Ribbons and Medals,” 1941 Edition. Manuscript notes on medals in his possession awarded to the Regiment. “ History of The Royal Dragoons.” 1934.


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EXERCISE “ FIRST STEPS ” — MARCH, 1964

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EXERCISE “FIRST STEPS”—MARCH, 1964 Above: “ Who’s for Compo?” Tprs Bickmnre, Bardon and Callaghan. Below: “Slaving over a hot oven.” Tpr Hine. Cpl Jetferies ACC. Tpr Shorter, Cpls City and _Thomas, Royal Signals, chl Kendrick (Scots

Above: Cpls City and Thomas, Royal Signals.

Below: Sgt K. Webster, “I’ve tasted worse”

Greys), Tpr Davxd


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Soldiering on Salisbury Plain *

Commanding Olficer Adjutant Tpr Brooks

ECHELON ORDERS

“ He can’t possibly mean it !” Sgt Remfrey, The QM, ZLt Newby, REME,

and Remfrey).

“ Nothing

Bottom right: “Bloody scrim” (Sgts Bosher

*

Top right: Sgt Sarll, Tprs Plumb and Summer-

Sgt Webster, Tprs Hurd and Ody.

0

“ THAT’S BETTER LADS ”

Top left QM “ Doughy ” Baker. up my sleeves.”

*

Sold ierlng on Salisbury Plain

Capt Davey, and SSM Titmarsh


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THE REGIMENTAL ASSOCIATION Honorary Secretary: Maior C. W. J. Lewis, MBE, Home Headquarters. The Royal Dragoons,

ASSOCIATION MEMBERS WHO ATTENDED THE ANNUAL RE-UNION AND DINNER 1964

Hill House, Beckenham Lane, Bromley, Kent.

Tel.: Widmore 1939 It is with the deepest regret that we have to report that since our last notes our Chairman for the past 12 years, Maj Kenneth Balfour, MC, has resigned from this appointment. The Regimental Association owes a great deal to Kenneth Balfour for his hard work during his period of office, and a great deal of the credit must go to him for the very strong and flourishing Association that we have today. We were all delighted that during his last year of office he was our Chairman when the Regiment exercised its privilege of marching through the City of London on 22nd October, and we know that it must have been a very proud moment for him also. Whilst he has retired from the Chairmanship we are sure that he will be a very keen member of the Association and we shall we know require his assistance and advice from time to time. Thank you, Kenneth, for a most excellent job! The confirmation of Capt Peter Miles as our new Chairman was given at the recent Annual General Meeting and we are most fortunate in being able to have such an able successor to Major Kenneth Balfour, and we have already noted his regular attendances at the various functions organised by the Association. His appointment will be much appreciated by some

of the older members who will well remember his father, Col Billy Miles, who commanded the Regiment in Egypt and India in 1927-31. We are delighted with the appointment and hope that we shall be honoured to have him as our Chairman for many years to come. In our last notes We stated that our member— ship was rising and was then a total of 435 and that our target was 500. That target was reached and at the end of 1963 our membership was a total of sit—most gratifying. This year we hope still to increase our membership and look to all present members to enlist one more Old Royal each during 1964. Last August the Association were the guests of the serving Regiment at Tidworth and approximately 120 of our members, including their families, took advantage of this most kind invitation and visited the Regiment. Those who attended were most impressed with the kindness and hospitality they received from all ranks. We should like to take this opportunity of thanking the Commanding Officer, Lt Col Dick Worsley, and all ranks of the Regiment for a wonderful weekend which will be talked about

for many years to come. Those of us who were fortunate to be able to

attend the parade in London on 22nd October, 1963, when the serving Regiment marched through the City of London, felt extremely proud of the most wonderful display put up by the Regiment and extremely proud that we had served in the Regiment. It was a most memorable day and although delayed by two years, due to the Regiment being in Malaya, it was a day well worth waiting for. The Social Club has gone from strength to strength and we have already held two functions this year, and we have arranged that our next function will be on 20th June, when we shall celebrate the Battle of Waterloo. We should like to take this opportunity of thanking all members of the Association who have supported our annual Sweepstake on the Grand National and as a result we are now financially sound and we hope that even more members will attend these functions. It is a most wonderful way of meeting your old friends. Wives, families and friends are invited. If you are unable to attend the Annual Reunion these functions are ideal to meet those friends whom you missed. These notes are being prepared prior to the Annual Reunion but we have arranged with the Editor that the names of all those attending the Reunion will in future be published at the end of the Association notes, and not held over until the following year. Do make certain that your name is amongst those attending. The com— mittee have agreed that wives, sons and daughters, up to a total of three per member, can now attend and we hope that you will support the committee in their task. In the last News Letter we published that Mr. G. A. Jones, now living in Bulawayo, was the oldest member, but we have now received

information that Mr. G. Abbott, of Guildford, is the present oldest member and is 92 years of age. We all wish Mr. Abbott the very best of luck and good health and hope that he will remain our oldest member for many years to

come. We should like to take this opportunity of thanking those members of the serving Regiment at present in Cyprus for all the most excellent reports that have come back to us, and they may rest assured that all members are very proud of the very high standard which they have set. The following is a complete list of those who attended the annual Reunion Dinner held in London on 2nd May, 1964:

Brigadier

A.

H.

Pepys,

D50 Rev. R. W. Miles

(Presiding) Lt J. H. Lloyd Brigadier R. H. Heathcoat Amory, Lt T. W. P. Connell

MC Brigadier G. T. A. Armitagc, MBE Lt Col R. B. Moseley Lt Col H. W. Lloyd

Lt Col P. B. Fielden, MC

Mr. J. C. Lycett Mr. J. Locke

Lt A. J. D. Nash . and Mrs. W Albin . and Mrs. G. Acres

Mr. H. A. Lambert Mr. and Mrs. R. A. McBride

. and Mrs. E. H. Baker

M . A. Cole—Evans, DCM

Mai and Mrs. D. M. Rogers

. J. Edwards

Capt and Mrs. P. T. Miles Capt and Mrs. W. G. Baker

. and Mrs. B. J. Foster . and Miss Griffin

Capt Capt Capt Capt

. . . .

N. D. E. J.

H. Morgan, MVO, MM Miller L. Payne G. Hamilton—Russell

Capt P. W. F. Arkwright Capt Capt Capt Capt

and and and and

Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs.

H. Grace J. Happs J. Heselton F. Heselton

. and Mrs. S. Harris

A. B. T. Davey L. R. Burnside J. J. F. Scott W. M. G. Black

Mr. and Mrs. F. Lewis

Lt T. C. Farmer

Lt Col A. B. Houstoun, MC . and Mrs. J. Brown Mrs. M. A. Miles . and Mrs. J. W. Bird Maj A. D. N. Hadden—Paton, DL and Mrs. J. Baillie—Hamilton Maj V. Whitworth SSM H. A. S. Blackallar Maj J. E. R. Bowlby . J. W. Coupland and Son Mai K. G. F. Balfour, MC . D. Crook Maj R. H. Carr-Ellison . F. G. Coleman Maj J. A. Dimond, MC A. S. R. Cummings Maj J. B. Evans . and Mrs. B. C. Damon Mai C. W. J. Lewis, MBE . and Mrs. P. Drinnan Maj S. N. Kent—Payne . and Mrs. A. G. Drury Maj D. S. A. Boyd . W. Delangty Maj and Mrs. M. B. Noble . R. Daugherty Maj and Mrs. S. E. M. Bradish— . S. Darling

Ellames

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. R. Lavington

. Mr. Mr. Sgt

H. M. Healey J. Hatherhill P. J. Henson W. Hales

Capt W. H. Yates

chl G. Harris

Capt D. H. Barrington—Browne

Cpl and Mrs. D. Hore

Capt J. M. Loyd

Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Johnson

Capt G. N. A. Mandelson Capt H. De Pinna Weil

Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Kmnane Mr. and Mrs. J. Lyons

Mrs. J. Murdoch and Guest Mrs. E. Mander

Mr. P. C. Moreton Mr. J. C. Moreton

Mr. F. Milner Mr. A. Mcleod and Guest Mr. H. Norris Mr. Sgt Mr. Mr. Mr.

J. Ovens G. R. Plumbly E. Pearson and Mrs. A. J. Rowe and Mrs. H. Sullivan and

Guests Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Spafford

Mr. and Mrs. N. Slade Mr. and Mrs. P. Slade Mr. J. Stares Mr. R. W. Siriet Mr. G. J. Skeets

Cpl J. Straw Mr. Mr. Mr. Sgt Sgt Mr. Mr. Mr.

C. Taylor W. Turp, RVM C. H. Thomas and Mrs. N. S. Thorpe and Mrs. T. W. Tucker and Mrs. J. Wayte and Mrs. G. Wayte and Guests and Mrs. W. E. Wright and

Guests Mr. A. E. Wilkinson and Guests Mr. S. E. Wood SSM W. Wartorski SSM J. Warren

GUESTS OF THE ASSOCIATION Lt C01 and Mrs. R. E. Worsley (Commanding Officer) The Very Rev. Joost de Blank Lt Col H. S. L. Tottenham (Commanding Sharpshooters)

Sgt Sgt Sgt Sgt Sgt

Brooks Tucker Owen Matthew Cooke and Guest

Maj H. Mathews (Sharpshooters’ Sgt Sarll

chl Judd chl Murphy chl Theed

Tpr McGowan Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Gardner Webber Westall Ramsay

Association) RSIM and Mrs. E. Vowles RSM and Mrs. J. D. Bradley

Sgt Briggs Sg Whellans T/M Fisher

RM and Mrs. G. E. Evans

Mr. Willison

Sgt MacKay RQMSl Clark SSM Paul SQMS Buiko

Sgt Cpl Cpl Cpl

Ssgt E. Hall

Cpl Ellsmore

Tpr Leaney Tpr West Tpr Wilson

Ssgt P. Tompkins and Guest Ssgt Darling

Cpl Strudwrck Cpl Hunt

Tpr Parker Tpr Salter

Sgt Lloyd

Cpl Petterson

Sgt Bosher Webster SS: Wallace

EpllLD Roche cp eane ch1 and Mrs. Wiflin

Tpr Garvey Mr. E. H. Vaughan

Rainger Wickenden Sweeney Hildred

Tpr Lane Tpr Swannell Tpr Bickmore

Tpr Bolt

Ten Members of the Regimental Band


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KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY (SHARPSHOOTERS) Our notes closed last year with the account of our successful parade for the Presentation of the Guidon by H.R.H. Princess Alexandra, and the Permanent Staff about to go on their wellearned block leave. By comparison this year seems to have been very quiet, though there has been plenty of work for all ranks. Our first public function was the Royal Armoured Corps (TA) Recruiting Exhibition at Charing Cross Station in September. We manned this Exhibition together with the Berk— shire and Westminster Dragoons and the Inns of Court and City Yeomanry. Our newlyacquired Guidon was on show in turn with those of the other two Regiments, and we also showed the short film of the actual Presentation of the Guidon. A large number of people

Above : At a recent Social Club Function. Below : The Honorary Secretary, Maj C. W. J. Lewis, MBE, congratulating Capt Peter Miles on his appointment as (hairman. Ex-Sgt Evans. DCM, also offering his congratulations.

visited the stands and we gained a few recruits. At the end of that month the Warrant Officers and Sergeants of the Regiment held a most successful Guidon Ball in B Squadron’s TA Centre at Croydon, It was a memorable occasion and a very enjoyable evening. The glowing praise which the Ball attracted from many quarters was fully deserved by all those who had a hand in its organisation. October is usually a busy month on the ranges when those members who have not fired their annual classification in order to qualify for their bounty are frantically trying to remedy the matter. This year was no exception. In spite of this we were able to run a weekend exercise — Exercise “ Autumn Colours ” — in Kent between A and C Squadrons. Much ground was

Guidon Parade, Maidstone. 1963


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covered, many lessons were learnt —— and relearnt — and the weather was kind to us. A fitting end to the training year. The 1963—64 training year opened with two successes in local motor rallies. B Squadron came second in Exercise “Wally’s Folly VI,” which was run by 263 (SYQM) Regiment RA (TA), and A Squadron, not to be outdone, came third in the 133 Infantry Brigade MT Trials. During December the Hon Colonel, Major— General G. P. B. Roberts, CB, DSO, MC, visited all squadrons in turn on their Bounty Nights. During these visits he presented the various awards won by members of the Regiment dur— ing the year. We congratulate Majors Aston and Rooke on receiving the Territorial Efficiency Decoration, SSM Turner, Sgts Tufts, R. A. Pointer and Crawley, and Cpls Ashbee and Bailey on their Efficiency Medals, and SQMS Pointer, Sgts Kendall and Wood and Cpl Stokes on being awarded Meritorious Service Certifi-

cates. The early part of the year is traditionally reserved for the CIV Inspection, visits by docu— mentation teams, technical advisers and any other inspecting agency that one cares to think of. All these culminate in the Annual Inspec— tion, which this year was carried out by Brigadier J. M. D. Ward—Harrison, OBE, MC, and his Staff, at the end of February. The completion of these visits and inspec— tions is the signal for getting out and about on training in the surrounding countryside— weather permitting. All squadrons held weekend training of one kind or another, and as these notes are being written we have just completed our first Regimental exercise—Exercise “Spring Stakes ”—involving A and B Squadrons. Dur-

ing this weekend we were visited by Mr P. M. Kirk, MP, the Under-Secretary of State for War. At the very beginning of February a most successful and enjoyable week-end was arranged for us by the RAC Tactical School at Lulworth. This was attended by all available officers in the Regiment down to the senior subaltern. We are indebted to Maj T. W. Muir, QDG, for giving up so much of his week—end in order to refresh us in the art of reconnaissance. The inevitable changes in personalities throughout the year seem to be less than last year, although this may only be because we have still another six months to go. SSMs Blackallar and Watorski and Sgt Thorpe have joined the ranks of the P815 to replace SSMs Brennan and Titmarsh and Sgt Haworth (15th/19th King’s Royal Hussars). Capt Baker handed over the chair of QM to Maj Kent-Payne in order to return to the Royals as QM, Majors Aston and Pezzani retired and Majors Lyte and Clayton transferred to the unattached list. One could go on like this for another page, but for obvious reasons cannot. We hope that those not men— tioned by name will forgive us if we merely wish a warm welcome to the newcomers and “happy landings” t0 the departed. There is one person who is both a “departed” and a “newcomer” and who deserves a special wish. SSM Brennan, having completed his time as a Regular soldier and PSI of B Squadron, has now joined the TA and HQ Squadron, and in the same breath ended his bachelor days by marrying 1 For the future we look forward to annual camp, which is to be held at Westdown Camp, close to the Royals from 11th to 25th July.

THE OLDEST ROYAL Since going to Press we learn with regret that the Mr. Abbott mentioned in the Regi-

mental Association Notes died at his home in April, 1964.

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BIG GAME FISHING The Editor is indebted to Colonel P. L. Wilson for this fascinating article on fishing in the Bahamas. NE must take one’s hat off to the American big-game fishermen for the equipment with which they now catch the big fish. Having been in close contact with this big-game fishing for the past ten years it is surprising to me how the technique improves from year to year, and, of course, the cost also. The reason being competition. They fish in tournaments for prizes—the crew for cash and professional kudos, but the owner for the glory. Points to count being registered per lb. of fish caught, with a bonus for lightweight tackle. Recently at Cat Cay, in the Bahamas, during the Spring run of giant Tuna (average 4001b), eight and nine fish were caught in a day to a boat, averaging 14 minutes per fish. It used to take 1% hours on heavy 34 thread (1001b. test) linen line ——now they use 681b, test dacron. But the reels might have been made by Rolls Royce; they have gem bearings, even so water has to be often poured on them as they get too hot. Of course, the cost is out of most of our reckoning. A big 12.00 reel costs $250. A modern top-class fishing boat with equipment (rods, reels, etc.) costs about $100,000; then a good captain and mate and fuel, dock dues, etc., comes to about $1,000 a month. How does anyone do it! There are four different varieties of big—game fish which count: (1) The giant Tuna; (2) The Blue Marlin; (3) The Swordfish; (4) The Make Shark. The giant Tuna appear in early May on the east edge of the Gulf Stream, and run (estimated at 50,000 per 24 hours) for a month. Nowadays most fish caught are tagged and released—last year a fish tagged in May was netted 65 days later in Norway. They appeal to many people because of their size and power. You have to fight the fish from the strike—once let him sound and get a second wind and he’s the winner, or the sharks are. It is all a question of equipment, experience and team work between angler and crew, Blue Marlin—the king of the angler’s ocean —once hooked they are more out of the water than in. No quick means to boat this fish— you use a light rod and line (Golb. test) to take a 5001b. fish and average an hour to do it. And when you do get the fish to the boat watch out

till the crew get a rope round his tail (up to 54in. from tip to tip), and he can put his bill through 2in. of teak planking. In these waters I have seen amazing sights—fights between blue marlin and sharks, and whales and giant octopus. Swordfish are a great prize but dull to fish. They go up to 6oolb., but are considered a great prize and sell to the restaurants at 4/6 a lb. Mako Shark never know when they are beat —they fight on top of the water and are the best eating of all these fish, fished on the same tackle as blue marlin, and sell as swordfish. Medium fish include sailfish (average weight I8lb. in these waters) and white marlin (average 4olb.). They are fished on medium tackle (15 to 251b. test), as are many other very sporting fish such as dolphin, wahoo, kingfish. Light tackle fish (61b. to 15lb. test) in the creeks and shallow waters include tarpon, bone—


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fish, ladyfish and snook. All very good fighters. I had the luck to act as dockmaster for two years at one of these fishing centres in Andros. There I met the big—game fishing fraternity and got to learn a little of the trade. The big fish that I have caught have all been as a guest. I learnt also to have unbelievable sport alone in a 16ft. skiff with an outboard motor. It gets quite exciting trying to fight a fish (up to solb.) and manage the motor at the same time, and eventually to gaff and boat the fish. We are now trying to start a new centre on an at present entirely undeveloped island, the waters round it never having been fished other than by research fishermen. Many people ask me what is done with all the big fish when caught. Nowadays more and more use is being made: some are suitable for immediate food—a 4001b. blue marlin will be cut up on the dock and disappear to the local inhabitants in a matter of minutes; others are cut up and put into deep freeze; some are smoked—but more and more every year are brought to the boat, tagged and released. So little is known of their life history and movements, and tagging is beginning to produce results. (The tags are supplied by and return— able to the Woods Hole, Massachusetts, Research Institute and attached to a tiny barbed hook shot into the fish’s shoulder). The big fish are all inhabitants of the deep water anywhere outside the 100 fathom line. Inside that line and along the barrier reefs the fish have to be seen to be believed. I thought we had it good in Andros, but keen skin divers tell me that this island (Cat Island) beats anything in the Caribbean if you can dive in comfort to 20ft.; this is becoming a popular

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sport to make home underwater cinema films along the coral reefs. The Atlantic sharks present no problems to humans, although they are numerous and of many varieties. There is no authentic record of an attack on a live human by sharks or barracuda. The latter look threatening and are inquisitive I so wish I had known what I do now when the Regiment was in stations where ocean fishing must have been just as good as here. I might have been able to help. Perhaps some of my old friends in the forge and armourer’s shop in Egypt may remember efforts to help me out when I was trying to catch fish in the Red Sea off Abu Zenaima—when I used to get my hooks pulled out straight by fish I never saw. I have said nothing about what I call kitchen fish. Very few fish in these subtropical waters compare with our northern cold water ones. Possible exceptions are groupers —up to 3olb.—and barracudas, when eaten straight out of the sea. Crawfish—remembered from Egypt as “Bint el Marabaan” (the daughter of the Lighthouse Keeper) are quite an industry as a sale to America; they run from 2 to Iolb. Ardent Venturer (right) jumps the last fence at Windsor with Sir Daniel

From a fisherman’s point of View it is your own fault if you suffer a dull moment, but you quite often get rather frightened when out solo. The fish may so easily be rather bigger than you, but Adam Lindsay Gordon had the answer to that one, so did Mouse Tomkinson— when I knocked him down on the polo field and two weeks later when we met again after respective periods on our backs in hospital—I a subaltern and he C.O.—“Peter—I am so glad you didn’t pull off—3’

GAMES AND SPORTS

Bradish—Ellames and Philip Arkwright set out to replace him, and made a much published purchase at the October Ascot Sales; Ardent Venturer, the horse who had never fallen, so the catalogue informed us. It omitted to men— tion that his total experience was three point—to— points and a hurdle race! Regrettably after a promising first appearance at Windsor, when he was second, he dis— appointed and in spite of running well at New— bury before dislodging his jockey, and giving a good account of himself in the National Hunt at Cheltenham, he failed to get in the first three again. In the Grand Military he was particularly disappointing, only finishing fifth to that good horse Threepwood. Nevertheless, hope springs eternal and with Molly Sivewright taking the

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horse under her wing for a few weeks, and Tim

This season the Regiment had three guns in the Salisbury Plain shoot, and without any startling results it provided a lot of fun. Problems of keepering so large an area with so much movement all the year round cannot make the task easier, although prospects for next year are good—even viewed from the Eastern Mediterranean.

The racing season has been a disappointing one for the Regiment. It started on a gloomy note with the news that Simon Bradish—Ellames’ Monarch’s Thought, who was second in the Grand Military last year, had heart trouble, and certainly couldn’t run for at least a year; bad luck, for he must have been a useful horse this season. Undaunted, however, Simon—

Forster, a recently retired IIth Hussar, training

him, we hope for better things next year. Christopher Haworth—Booth was unfortunate in that he went to Cyprus with A Squadron, and had to sell the horse which he had planned to run in the Grand Military Hunters Chase at Sandown. We are now beginning to look ahead to our move to Germany, and are already thinking about building up the basis of a racing stable. There are a number of potential owners, and those of us who remember the golden days of Wesendorf and Herford paint glowing pictures of easily won races and well organised betting coups. “ Don’t you remember.” we say, “how Col Philip Fielden used to have a new car every six months—always the same type, colour and number plate so that no one should know?” It won’t be the same, though, without him and the irreplaceable Cpl Beeforth.


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EQUITATION Polo came to a halt last year at the end of July mainly through injured ponies, the score being two blistered and one pin—fired, having cost its owner £1 for every three seconds played! And so, after a disappointing season, the ponies went out and the horses came in. Capt Aylen was very kindly given a hunter by Maj Bill Scott, which has given him a lot of fun and Sgt Cooke a lot of worry with its legs. Lts Hewson and Casey each produced hunters, Hewson having bad luck with the Squire who Went lame, but later in the season he acquired a nice 5—year—old from Ireland who should do well next year. Lt Haworth-Booth got a potential point-to—pointer which he was entering at Sandown, but he ended up in Cyprus in— stead, so had to sell him. All of these have hunted this season, mostly with the V.\V.H. Cricklade, less frequently with the Duke of Beaufort’s, and all have enjoyed themselves, and have been made very welcome by the hunts. So here we are again now at the beginning of the summer with the ponies starting to be brought up from grass. Lt Coode has returned from Germany and has got two ponies, one of which is schooled, the other being very young, but should eventually make a polo pony. This brings our total to eight which is hardly enough, but Lt Hewson who is at present in Cyprus is joining the “polo union,” and we are hoping he will be back in time to play. So the prospects are not quite so dismal as at the same time last year, and if we can get just one or two more players, and some more ponies, we should have lots of fun. The stable staff of Sgt Cooke, chl Parnwell, Tprs Boyce, Paramor, Stocks and Williams are, as ever, giving yeoman service. Unfortunately chI Parnwell leaves us soon for “Civvy Street,” and will be very hard to replace. He has been in the stables now for six years—in Germany, Aden, Malaya, and now in England, and during this time has been a pillar of reliability. loyalty and hard work. He has helped to build new stabling in Herford, Little Aden, Ipoh, and now at Tidworth; he has spent the night in a field with a sick horse in Ipoh, he has been given dinner by a Chinese millionaire in Penang whose horse he brought up from Ipoh, countless other stories too numerous to relate all go to show how much of a loss he will be to the Regimental stables. Tprs Boyce and Paramor have been on a riding course at Windsor, and are both much the better for it. Boyce can now be seen in the

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SKIING In August a somewhat diffident approach was made to the Commanding Officer in an attempt to persuade him that to allow six of his officers to spend two months of the winter in the mountain playgrounds of Europe was a basically sound idea. The aim was a first attempt at entering a Regimental team for the Army Downhill Skiing Championships and the problem was lack of material for advertisement; other than Hanmer and Hart Dyke, both of whom were fairly known quantities for compe— tition skiing~ Barrie and Shepherd-Cross between them had totalled some twenty—five weeks of strictly casual pottering, for relaxation only, Coode had spent a short while floundering in frozen wastes during an activity of acute discomfort known as Winter Warfare Training and Aylen had done lots of fox hunting—skiing to him was little more than a rumour.

and Sgt Heath, who was to become the team

As always, Sgt Cooke stands at the head of this Empire, and suffice it to say the horses always look extremely well and fit, and the stables clean and tidy.

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captain. Several friendlies were played against teams from Bulford and Tidworth Garrisons. The opening match against Bulford Garrison was a win, as were our matches against Cyclops 2 RTR and the Band of the “ Skins.”

Sgt Cooke has now started up the Cooke/Parnwell Building Corporation and we should see their results in about mid-April when our new stables will be open to the public (and also to the horses). With the backing of HQ RAC we took over an old stable block which had been converted into a barrack store, and with the help of the Engineers from down the road we are building 14 horse boxes. What I have said in 17 words has in fact taken, and still is taking, a lot of extremely hard work to accom— plish; wood from an old Cavalry Barracks at Aldershot — wood from the derelict Matthew Barracks in Tidworth which perhaps has happy memories for some more senior Royal Dragoons —cement and sand from some undisclosed source, and a thousand-and—one other items which all have their own individual problems. But it is now beginning to take shape, and we hope to have it finished by mid-April in time for a photograph to be included with this article.

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It was decided in September that the Regiment should enter a team for the 3 Divisional Basketball Championship. Nobody, it seems, had thought about basketball since the Regiment returned from Malaya so several trials were held before a worthy team could be raised. During the period October to December many inter—squadron matches were played with a View to selecting a Regimental team. These matches were closely watched by SI Freeman

mornings riding one and leading two when last year riding one would have been quite enough. We welcome Tpr Williams back to the stables after an absence of two years. We have also been joined by chl Lamie of 15th/ 19th Hussars, and will shortly have Tpr Carter of The Queen’s Own Hussars, who will both be looking after their own ponies. We were very sorry to lose Tpr Catlin to the RMA Sandhurst, and we hope that anyone passing through Camberley will look in at the stables to see if he is alright.

THE

In the first round of the competition on December 10th we came up against 247 Gurkha Signal Squadron whom we beat, much to their surprise. In the second round our luck did not hold and we were closely beaten by the Royal Scots who had a powerful side: It was a very exciting match, producing a score of 37~ 33. The departure of many of the team for Cyprus meant an early end to the season. Next year one hopes that there will be no such interruption and that we will progress beyond the opening rounds.

RALLYING Since our last issue, too much has been going on for much rallying to take place. However, the Regiment entered a team for the Army Driving Championships at the beginning of October. This consisted of two Land Rovers and I x3 ton vehicle. During the course of this event, some 2,000 miles were covered and the route circumnavigated a large part of England, Wales and Scotland as well as a number of driving tests, hill climbs and cross country sections. The weather was moderately kind and the course not too arduous to prevent some appreciation of the many places visited—at least for those taking part if not the local inhabitants. While not being in the money the team finished complete, in itself an achievement. Those taking part were Capt Hamilton— Russell, Sgt Remfrey, Cpl Williamson, Cpl Macey, chl Beddingfield (who whilst driving at night north of the border triumphed in an argument with a mobile haggis), ch1 Cole, Cfn Avery, Tpr Stocks and Tpr Saunter.

This was the proposed team. Hart Dyke later rather mixed his priorities, became grossly over-excited during the Tercentenary Celebrations and, as I write, is due to be married. It is hoped that by later this year he will have calmed down enough to join us on the slopes— that is if “us ” are allowed to go. The remaining five could hardly be put forward as a training team which could assure anything other than a mild embarrassment; but the sum of our several potential impacts was compared to the total effectiveness of the Regiment’s contribution to the Strategic Reserve and on December 7th we left England, snowbound . . . . by intention anyway. But last winter was a bad one for snow, as was effectively publicised by the Winter Olympic Games, and the immediate problem was finding enough to keep us off the grass. Training started in St. Anton—am-Arlberg, Austria, where we stayed with Frau Dr. Schmidt in her warm comfortable house, very much the picture—postcard chalet, on the edge of the village. David Hanmer, who undertook our training, engaged Romain from St. Anton Ski Schule, an excellent one, and off we went to look for snow; some nine miles away, at St. Christof and Zurs, there was enough. Romain, of course, didn’t know our standards but quickly discovered them. A difficult mountain, bitterly cold after a numbing ascent in a chair lift, a few brief moments of desperately futile activity for most, assured poise for one and the Regimental skiing team at its outset was revealed


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in public; two spastics, one lame, one com— petent and one good. Reasonably we should have become blanketed by despondency; the races were six weeks away and, as a rough guide to the task, few would ride at Sandown having collapsed in a hideous tangle at a meet on Boxing Day! But Romain, a man of seasoned patience and tireless persistence (and the mad— dening repetition of, “bend at ze knees, like when you kneel down, huh? . . . . huhP”) had, two weeks later, extorted from the worst a pattern of activity distantly related to our objective and the possibles were beginning to look probable. A few days after we had arrived at St. Anton, ninety British girls squeezed into the village and our training programme was flexed slightly; the “in bed by II p.m.” rule was abandoned on moral grounds but the “ on the slopes by 8 am.” remained. Our blatant need to improve on ski— ing surely justified the ghastly eyeball pains as the early morning sun ricocheted off the snow onto the retinae. On zlst December we gave a small party and moved to St. Moritz and into a brand—new box of a house at the West end of the lake— compact G—plan with all gadgets, but it was far enough away from the night clubs for them to be unobtrusively available. With five weeks in the place ahead of us, this was ideal. We were enormously lucky to get hold of Walter Kleger as our instructor, a delightful person of a firm conviction that the best English was spoken in Dundee. He had trained the last Army team and did so again this year. But he did have a few rather tricky habits—an unfail— ing attraction to precipices, ice, and deep snow all of which had forecastable eflects and limited amusement. However, through instincts of simple self-preservation improvement was rapid. In the middle of our training at St, Moritz we had one week when things went badly. Four pairs of skis were broken; Shepherd-Cross’s knee behaved painfully and he put it and him— self in the hands of a delicious masseuse; Coode lost a ski on a steep traverse and the loose ski chased its owner down the hill and hit him squarely between the eyes — some of course found this funnier than others; Hanmer’s hands froze and wouldn’t thaw; Aylen complained on negligible evidence of an injured shoulder and booked space with the masseuse, and Barne had his hair cut.

As the other Regimental teams arrived, inevitably we took a good look at them and back at ourselves. Walter did the same and said nothing. There were twenty teams entered for the championship and each team was of four starters, the best three to count, except in the Slalom for which the three starters all counted —a troublesome thought, our Slalom performances being so indifferent that to complete the course was remarkable. The first race was the Grand Slalom on 17th January and we finished 7th. An encouraging surprise. The Downhill and Slalom races fol— lowed on the 21st and 22nd and the mathematical nastiness of calculating the complicated points-system was such that the other results all came out with a rush. Our final placing, dis-

covered by somebody’s slide rule, was 5th. Not in the money but good enough, we hope, to encourage continuity. David Hanmer had done enormously well in the championships and was selected for the Army team. The final words are our thanks to ’City Aylen who worked much too hard in running the housekeeping and ensured a reasonable level of table manners.

CROSS—COUNTRY RUNNING We started the season by selecting a Regi— mental team from the results of an inter— Squadron race which was won by C Squadron. The course was 7% miles and proved to be far longer than expected. We then underwent a month’s vigorous trainin under SI Freeman, APTC, for the 3 Divisional Championships which we won on 5th February with Tpr Dixon 3rd and Budgen and Dutschak coming 5th and 6th. The team was presented with a silver ashtray each, much to the annoyance of the team captain who had been trying to prevent them from smoking. Having won the 3rd Divisional Championships we were then eligible for the Southern Command Championships which took place the following week, but the competition of The Parachute Brigade and the Engineers was too great and after a very fast 6§ miles we finished 5th. The team then broke up on the departure of A and C Squadrons to Cyprus. Team: Lt Roberts, Sgt Tucker, Tprs Dixon, Budgen, Dutschak, Hill 547, Hill 765, West, ch1 Austin, Tprs Golding and Bull.

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FOOTBALL Regimental football this season got off to a good start~ the team entering for three major competitions, the Army Cup, the Cavalry Cup, and the 3 Division Cup, and there was no shortage of players to fill the positions. Training started, and the task of final selection of the first eleven was made difficult by the considerable talent on display. A serious blow to our hopes came when with the departure of A and C Squadrons to Cyprus went seven first team players (would not have happened in the old days!). Also the additional duties created by the absence of the two Squadrons interfered with training and there was little time to organise the replacements into a smooth and disciplined soccer machine. In the first round of the Army Cup we were drawn against 16 Battalion RAOC at Bicester. Our few supporters were treated to a soccer treat, the Regiment winning in a convincing manner 3 —o. In the second round we played against 23 Gp RPC. It was our turn to be the hosts and preparations were made accord— ingly. This team had beaten 6 Regiment RA 16—1 in the first round and were considered to be a very good side. In view of our first round success we too felt confident, and so when the teams met a very good game was witnessed by the many spectators; fortunes went this way and that, and after being in the lead twice we lost 4 - 6. In the 3 Division Cup we were drawn against the 1/6 QEO Gurkha Rifles, a match which was not played as they had to return to their native country. In the second round, we were drawn

HQ

Squadron

“Admin”

(Winners

Competition)

Inter-Troop

B Squadron “ Bl ” (Inter—Troop Runners-up)

at home to 5 Regiment RA, and on a bitterly cold day after a very hard fought match we lost 4 — I. The Cavalry Cup competition captured the interest of not only the Regiment but the Garri— son as a whole, for with three Cavalry Regiments in Tidworth stakes were running fairly high, especially in the various Sergeants’ Messes. In the first round we drew a bye, and in the second round were drawn against our old rivals the 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards. Our opponents were kind in allowing us time to re— organise after the second Cyprus Squadron had left, and we eventually went to battle on the 8th April, convinced that we stood a fair chance of winning. It was a pleasant day and a good number of supporters from both sides turned out, and to the accompaniment of music pro— vided by the “ Skins ” Band, vociferously stated what their respective teams would do to the other. In true Cavalry Cup atmosphere the game began. In the first half we more than held our own and our disappointment was great when at I - I we Were disallowed what looked a perfectly good goal. A bustling wind made the ball hard to control, and we turned round at half-time down by one goal, the Score being 2 — I. In the second half we continued to press, and it seemed as though we must get on equal terms, but then an injury to left—half Cfn Stonham rendered him a passenger on the right wing, and from then on we saw little of our attack. Our opponents piled on the pressure, and had it not been for the magnificent goalkeeping of Sgt Greatrex the number of goals against us would have been many. Eventually training and stamina prevailed and the Skins stormed to win 6 — I. But


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Sgt Greatrex watched by Sgt Brooks (right) averts a dangerous moment (Cavalry Cup. v. “ Skins ”)

let it be said we put up a magnificent fight against odds. The team for this match was Sgts Lloyd, Brooks, Greatrex, Cpl Murphy, ch1 Theed, Tprs Bardon, Moon, Munro, Taylor, Cfn Stonham and Rose. Sgts Lloyd and Brooks have been persuaded to come out of retirement and again are taking an active part in Regimental

soccer. Credit goes to Sgts Hearn and Wood, Cpls Glister and Bennett, Cpl Birt, chls Cheetham and Austin, Tprs Livingstone, Sexton, Voce and Parsons, among those who have represented the Regiment in recent seasons.

HOCKEY The season started with as many as forty players trying for a place in the Regimental team. We thank them for turning up and helping the Hockey Officer to select the best team to represent the Regiment. A League was not run but we played friendly games once or twice a week. The only matches lost were to 5 RA (twice), 3 Divisional HQ and Signal Regiment,

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and to the RAPC Training Centre and Depot in the first round of the Army Cup. The latter match came early in the season when we had not settled down not gained competition-steadiness and we would undoubtedly have Won it on later form. The 3 Divisional Competition remained open to us. With hard training and two games a week the team rapidly gained the experience and confidence they needed. We beat the Royal Scots 2—0 in the first round after a hard and exciting game. In the second round we found the Skins much stronger than our 11—0 victory over them earlier in the season, and in a hard duel won by the odd goal. In the final we were drawn against 5 RA who had beaten us twice at the beginning of the season. There was no result after extra time, although we had been Winning 2—1 a minute from time. In the first half three of our shots had hit the two uprights and the crossbar. In the replay two days later We played really good open hockey for the first three—quarters of the game and were leading 3—1. Then a downpour came and in the final 20 minutes we battled desperately in a quagmire to keep the other side out who scored one more goal but fortunately no more before the final whistle. The team usually consisted of WOII Parsons (goal), Sgt Owen and chl Austin (backs), Cfn Dunn, Maj Evans and BM Evans (half—backs), Tpr Smoker, Cfn Munday, Cpl Harden, ch1 Melbourne and Cpl Home (forwards). Umpire, the indefatigable WOII Enzer. Cpl Trachey, Cpl Addison, Tpr Murphy, Tpr McEvoy and Sgt McMahon also played frequently and with distinction. This has been one of the most successful seasons ever for the Regiment and with most of the talent available next year we look forward to an even better season then. A and C Squadrons are about to produce a combined team in the Cyprus championships.

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CORPORAL PAUL STANLEY MIDDLETON The Regiment learned with extreme regret of the death of Cpl Paul Middleton, killed when the Ferret scout car which he was commanding overturned during a patrol in Cyprus with A Squadron on 6th February, 1964. Cpl Middleton enlisted on a nine-year engagement in January, 1959, and qualified as a signaller. In July, 1959, he joined the Regiment in Herford, BAOR, and was posted to A Squadron. He later served with the Squadron in Sharjah, Persian Gulf, until April, 1960. He then transferred to the QM Group, where he quickly qualified as a BII Technical Storeman. He was promoted chl in November, 1961, became B1 Technical Storeman in April, 1962, and a Corporal in May, 1962. He served in Malaya for the full Regimental tour in 1961 and 1962, returning to UK. in October, 1962, with the advance party as A Squadron Technical Storeman. In February, 1963, he qualified as a tank driver, and was a most useful NCO in furthering the Regiment’s conversion to tanks in early 1963. Cpl Middleton was one of the selected few NCOs earmarked for training as a helicopter pilot, and had progressed favourably towards this goal when the Cyprus emergency occurred in January, 1964. He was a most popular and constructive member of the Corporals’ Mess, and was under consideration for promotion to Sergeant, when his untimely accident cut short his promising career. The Regiment has lost a most able and well— 1iked NCO, and our sympathy goes out at this time to Mrs Middleton, his mother. EX-RSM (JOE) MANDER

@hituarp ALLAN THOMAS TAYLOR, AGED 3 MONTHS The infant son of Cfn and Mrs. W. G. Taylor died on 27th February, 1964, and was

buried at Tidworth Military Cemetery. The Commanding Officer and All Ranks extend sympathy to Cfn and Mrs. Taylor on their sad loss.

Joe Mander joined the Royal Scots Greys in 1909 and later that year was posted to the Royals, who at that time were stationed in Muttra in India. He served continuously in the Regiment from that time until he retired in the latter part of 1932 when the Regiment was again in Seeunderabad in India. Most of his early service was with A Squadron and as an instructor in the Regimental Riding School. On outbreak of the First World War he was promoted Sergeant, and was in all the engagements in which the Regiment took part until June 1917 when he was wounded during an attack on the German Lines. He rejoined

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SI

the Regiment in 1918 and was then promoted Warrant Officer in charge of Musketry in the Regiment, and later became SSM of B Squadron when the Regiment was stationed in Ireland. In 1923 he was promoted RSM, a position that he held until he retired in 1932. After retirement he became an Inspector of the NSPCC. During the whole of his service Joe Mander was a great personality, and was ever willing to help in any way, to improve either the efficiency or the happiness of the Regiment. As RSM his Warrant Officers’ and Sergeants’ Mess was always noted for their hospitality, and on joining the Mess a newly-promoted Sergeant was always made most welcome. His advice was always respected and anyone wanting help could rely that if he approached Joe Mander he would leave a very satisfied customer. The Regiment has indeed lost a very true and staunch friend and he will be sadly missed in the Regimental Association; his loss is sadly felt by us all and will be felt very much by Mrs. Mander after a very successful partnership of 46 years of married life.

MAJOR HUGH HARRY ROBERTSON AIRMAN, D.L., LP. The last Cornet of Horse died on 23rd January, 1964, in his 98th year. We are most grateful to Miss Loydall, Maj Robertson Aik— man’s secretary, for helping us to record, albeit in barest outline, the landmarks of this long and full career. Born in 1866, he was educated at Eton and Oxford Military College, the nephew of Col Frederick Robertson Aikman—a VC of Luck— now. He was gazetted to the Black Watch in 1885, and joined the Royals in 1886. In 1894 the German Emperor visited Aldershot, and this note appears in Hugh Harry’s Scrapbook: “The Artillery which no Army can better for dash and workmanlike appearance went by in splendid style; The Scots Greys, The 9th Lancers and a Company of Royal Dragoons— the Emperor’s own Regiment, whose uniform he wore—the Cavalry Arm of the Service found representatives which did it honour and justice, nay, the prettiest and most striking incident of the Review was the first appearance of the Emperor’s escort of Royal Dragoons in the front of the saluting point—when the Emperor, discarding for a minute his Imperial character, rode a gallant figure at their head as Colonel of the Regiment. Capt H. H. Robertson Aikman led the escort.” In 1895 he left the Army, and was instituted


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J.P. in 1896. In the First World War he was with the First British Remount Commission in Canada and served three years in France in a Remount Depot. In 1932 he was made Deputy Lieutenant of Leicestershire, and was an original member of the Cavalry Club. As a young man he was a keen rider under National Hunt rules, and a good cricketer. Later his pursuits centred on hunting and golf. He was also a talented artist, an ancestor—William Aikman—having been a celebrated Scottish painter. He was Church Warden at Dunton Bassett, Leicestershire, for over sixty years. A colourful and respected character, this staunchest of Royal Dragoons lived and “ made ” much of the history of which we are so proud. The Regiment will not be quite the same without “ The Cornet.”

COLONEL R. A. HERMON, DSO, OBE Robert Arthur Hermon was born in 1906 and was gazetted to The Royal Dragoons from Sandhurst on 81h August, 1926. Soon after joining he was sent to the Equitation School at Weedon where he passed out with a “Distinguished” award, and then served almost continuously with the Regiment throughout its tours in Egypt and India. He returned with them to England in 1936 and went abroad once more to Palestine in 1938, by which time he was a Squadron Leader; this appointment he retained throughout the period of mechanisation and the first eighteen months of operations in the Western Desert. Then, in October, 1942, he was appointed to command the King’s Dragoon Guards and he subsequently served away from the Regiment until returning to take command in Germany in May, 1946. In February, 1947, he left to take command of the 13th/18th Hussars, and finally retired in 1949. During the course of the war he earned the awards of the D50 (in the Middle East) and the 0312. Such, briefly, was his military career, and it is not hard to deduce from it that Bob Hermon was, above all, a Regimental officer, and he typified all that was best in that description. Against a background of complete loyalty to his Regiment he took an intense interest in whatever his command might be, from his early days as a troop leader until he became Commanding Officer. He, in his turn, inspired real loyalty from those under him and it was impossible not to sense and appreciate his transparent honesty and sincerity. In the early and critical days in the Western Desert he proved himself an outstanding Squadron Leader, and it is a tribute to

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his qualities that when peace came he was as good a leader as he had been in war. If not, perhaps, the most elegant of horsemen he was undoubtedly a most effective one and he rode with a dash and boldness that made him an extremely impressive performer across a country. Many of us will remember watching him out hunting with envy and admiration. He seemed to have, and indeed had, an instinctive knowledge of wild life; few could anticipate better than he the line a fox would take or the flight of duck. A genuine and gifted sportsman who was also a true countryman he loved the country and everything that goes with it, and when he retired from the Army he and his wife went to live in Aberdeenshire where they were able to enjoy it to the full. We shall remember Bob Hermon on many counts, but most perhaps as a most loyal friend and a devoted Royal Dragoon.

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MARRIAGES Tpr Allen to Mavis Pauline Barnes, at Leices— .161“, on 27th April, 1963. Bdsm Craft to Maureen Rice, at Southport, on 13th August, 1963. Tpr Frost to Patricia May Gillions, at St. Albans, on 14th September, 1963. Tpr Bailey to Winifred Hunter, at Carlisle,

on 21st September, 1963.

Emeritus Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford, Author of “ History of The Royal Dragoons, 1661 — 1934 ”

Tpr Welford to Winifred Nelly Cooper, at Barnsley, on 5th October, 1963. Tpr Fountain to Phyllis Barbara Baker, at Leytonstone, on 5th October, 1963. chl Traehy to Maureen Patricia Brown, at Andover, on 5th October, 1963. ch1 Melbourne to Kathleen May Botham, at Bradley, on 5th October, 1963. Tpr Tyler to Pauline Margaret James, at Norton, on 5th October, 1963. chl Renkevic to Elizabeth Mckeown Nolan, at Wishaw, Scotland, on 12th October, 1963. Tpr Wainwright to Margaret Wendy Allinson, at Startforth, Yorks, on 26th October, 1963. Tpr Haighton to Roberta Blake, at Salisbury, on 30th October, 1963. Tpr Johnson to Irene Shirley Russell, at Romford, on 23rd November, 1963.

Mr. C. T. Atkinson died in February, 1964, at the age of 89. It is out of no discourtesy to him that we omit to publish the long and impressive list of his academic achievements. Suffice to say that he was one of the foremost historians of his time, whose style was clear and without frills. He was also a first-class teacher and examiner, an active member of the University OTC, and, during the 1939-45 War, an enthusiastic Home Guard. Almost up to the time of his death he was frequently being called upon for help by both college tutors and military writers, and invariably responded with the same interest and grasp of essentials that so clearly marks all his work. Apart from “History of The Royal Dragoons," for which the Regiment will always be indebted to him, he played no small part in establishing the Regimental “case” to be considered as a Privileged Regiment of the City of London. Among his many other works those which stand out as of direct interest to us as soldiers are “History of Germany, 1715-1815,” and “Marlborough,” published in 1921. We can say in truth, and with regret, that we have lost the greatest authority on our Regimental history, and are grateful for his written legacy of our glorious past.

Tpr and Mrs. Harman, a son, Kenneth, on 15th May, 1963. Sgt and Mrs. Melia, a daughter, Jane Anne, on 8th June, 1963. Cpl and Mrs. Hunt, a daughter, Paula, on 11th June, 1963. Tpr and Mrs. Morris, a daughter, Karen Leslie Louise, on 4th September, 1963. Tpr and Mrs. Browuless, a son, Paul Christian, on 151h September, 1963. Tpr and Mrs. King, a daughter, Jacqueline Stacey, on 16th September, 1963. Cpl and Mrs. Syms, a daughter, Dawn Marie, on 23rd September, 1963. Cpl and Mrs. Carter, a son, Michael George, on 91h October, 1963. Sgt and Mrs. Webster, a daughter, Angela Stella, on 91h October, 1963. Tpr and Mrs. Bickmore, a daughter, Jacqueline, on 10th October, 1963.Tpr and Mrs. David, a daughter, Lynne Anne, on 28th October, 1963. chl and Mrs. Roberts, a son, Stephen, on 13th November, 1963. Cpl and Mrs. Wilkinson, a son, Paul Alfred, on 13th November, 1963.

CHRISTOPHER THOMAS ATKINSON

THE

Cpl Fox to Patricia Mary Goff, at Herne Hill, London, on 23rd November, 1963. Tpr Shaw to Gillian Francis Collins, at Salisbury, on 7th December, 1963. Tpr Hill to Dorothy Margaret Pearson, at Halifax, on 21st December, 1963. Tpr Simpkins to Kaye Slater, at Nottingham, on 28th December, 1963. Tpr Jee to Doreen Patricia Fullerton, at Wandsworth, London, on 28th December, 1963. Bdsm Roberts to Margaret May Cox, at Wandsworth, on 3tst December, 1963. Tpr Ratley to Koon Tiat Lim, at Salisbury, on Ijth February, 1964. Tpr Howell to Eileen Betsy Gillam, at Croydon, on 29th February, 1964. Tpr Savage to Elaine Ruby Ask, at Nottingham, on 14th March, 1964. Tpr Hutt to Patricia Ann Treadaway, at Kensington, on 26th March, 1964. Tpr Mowbray to Christine June Fitkin, at Kings Langley, Herts, on 28th March, 1964. Tpr Bardon to Patricia Murphy, at Battersea, London, on 31st March, 1964. Tpr Fairey to Philomena Bernadette Dolan, at Westham, Surrey, on 3rd April, 1964.

BIRTHS chl and Mrs. Marsh, a daughter, Melanie Dawn, on 26th November, 1963. Bdsm and Mrs. Shearn, a daughter, Heidi Nicola, on 24th December, 1963. Tpr and Mrs. Williams, a daughter, Sally Esther, on 1st January, 1964. Sgt and Mrs. Evans, a son, Paul Bryan, on 21$t January, 1964. Sgt and Mrs. Fisher, a daughter, Lorraing Evethe, on 23rd January, 1964. Cpl and Mrs. Burgess, a son, Andrew John, on 27th January, 1964. SQMS and Mrs. Leese, a son, Raymond Steven, on 315t January, 1964. Tpr and Mrs. Simmons, 3 daughter, Beverley Anne, on 22nd February, 1964. Tpr and Mrs. Frost, a daughter, Martine, on 18th March, 1964. Sgt and Mrs. Heath, a son, Stephen James, on 19th March, 1964. Cpl and Mrs. Burge, a son, David Maurice, on 21st March, 1964. chl and Mrs. Melbourne, a daughter, Victoria Karen, on 29th March, 1964.


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REGIMENTAL GAZETTE (As at April 1964, A and c Squadrons in Cyprus) REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS .

332$ 82:2...

Cpl Jones

Tpr Baylis

Tpr Bickmore Tpr Brownless

Tpr McNicholas Tpr Munro Tpr Ody Tpr Walton

Tpr Hanlon

$113; 19mm

332$ $320,,

E33 $52?"

Bdsm Keys Bdsm Maytum

ch1 R'oberts Butcher

.

W011 I. c. Smith

ggakd

ngr’: Pym. y

Difminson

Cpl Barrett

RSM, wo I (RSM) J. D. Bradley.

Bdsm Roberts

C91 Jefieries chl Hagen

Bdsm Shearn

Hayward

Bdsm Skews

Hunter Jones James

chl Robson

Tpr Fiske

Cpl Newton

Tpr Kirkby

Cpl Hunt ch1 Mitchell Tpr Heal (527) Tpr Heal (84o) Tpr Provost

Tpr Lane

Tpr

Ramsay

OFFICERS’ MESS STAFF Sgt Jubb Cpl Wiskow

ch1 Smith Tpr Batchelor Tpr de Carteret Tpr Demon Tpr Hawes Tpr Pedder Tpr Proctor Tpr Stamper

Tpr Thompson Tpr Barber

Tpr Taylor Tpr Yendell

Tpr McDermott Tpr Pain Tpr Rantell Tpr Simmons

COOKS ch1 McGill Tpr Bowditch

Tpr Webber Tpr McGowan

Tpr Chesterton Tpr Durling

Tpr Hastings Tpr Kay

Tpr Westall

Tpr Freeman

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

MI ROOM

Cpl Tatham

Cpl Medd

Tpr Brookes

Tpr Grifliths Tpr Johnson Tpr Leaney

Tpr Callagan (562)

RMO, Capt L. Henderson,

RAMC

Tpr Kestle Tpr Smith (599) Tpr Townsend

Tpr Ward Tpr Wade

Tpr Ashford Tpr Glover

EQUITATION TROOP

MT TROOP

Sgt Cooke chl Parnwell Tpr Boyce

Tpr Paramor Tpr Williams PROVOST STAFF Sgt McCormick Cpl Sweeney ch1 Judd

Sgt Remfrey Sgt Bosher Cpl Howell chl Grinyer chl Wiflin chl ShoLter Tpr Abbott Tpr Augustine

Tpr Austin Tpr Bardon

WOII A. E. Prince

Maj S. E. M. Bradish-Ellames

MEDICAL ORDERLY

Bdsm Brittain Bdsm Cleveland

Capt T. P. Hart Dyke

Capt 'C. B. Amery Lt C. M. Barne 2Lt A. H. Scott

chl Guerrini IST TROOP

2Lt J. W. L. Bucknall

Sgt Bell Cpl O’Dwyer

2Lt J. M. Shepherd-Cross

Lepl Reed

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

4TH TROOP

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

2ND TROOP

Sharkey Emmett Vallins Smith

Charman Collins Barrratt Thomson

Tpr Blazier

Cpl Hildred

Cpl Wickenden

Tpr Chesson

Tpr Parkes Tpr Tolhurst Tpr Fox

Tpr Ingram Tpr Glass Tpr Lewis

TECHNICAL SECTION

Sgt Priestman ch1 Thomas T r Borley

Tgr Wilkins

Tpr Hanley Tpr Parson

Saunter Treadaway Woollard Swannell

Tpr Coleman

Tpr Dawson

Cpl Brown (405)

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Cpl Aitchison Cpl Ellsmore

Tpr Robins Tpr Chapman Tpr Taylor (608)

Sgt Edwards Cpl Brown (062) chl Roddis chl Norman

MT SECTION

Sgt Webster (284) Sgt Brooks

3RD TROOP Cpl Burroughs chl Reeves ch1 Sexton Tpr Harman

SQMS D. Leese

Tpr Quinnell

TQMS F. Fletcher

Ssgt P. J. Tompkins Cpl Thomas Cpl Curnow Cpl City ngn Paton ngn Scott

Tpr Coram Tpr Pimm

SSM C. C. F. Crabb

Tpr Sibley Tpr Beers

RQMS J. S. Clark

ROYAL SIGNALS

Tpr Aldridge Tpr Crowley Tpr Willson

SHQ TROOP

Tpr Pearce

Tpr Downes

WOII J. C. Leech

Callaghan Carpenter Collins David

Cfn Barrett

A SQ UADRON

Tpr Starling

Lt (QM)A. S. Ayrton

chl Theed

Po stma Bryant Munday Johnson

Capt W. H. Mair 2Lt M. R. Newby WOII J. L. Enzer

Tpr Hurd Tpr Hutt Tpr Kenyon

Capt (QM) W. G. Baker

Tpr Tibbles Tpr Trowell

Ssgt B. Hall Sgt Wennell

REME

Bdsm Cohen

Bdsm Atkinson

Phillips Richardson Robertson Rose Shaw Taylor Wishart

Ssgt A. D. Atkinson Sgt Church Sgt Quigley Sgt Traynor Cpl Addison Cpl Clark Cpl Freeman Cpl Manley

ch1 Watts

Stuart Norman

Capt E. Brookes RAPC Ssgt T. A. F. Portsmouth Sgt Rowland Cpl Home

Sgt Louch Tpr Docherty

QM GROUP

ORDERLY ROOM

Sgt Whellans Cpl Burgess Cpl Everson Cpl Syms chl Meikle chl Trachy

Farrant

Pickering Pond

SQMS F. A. Simpson Cpl Falvey Cpl Harry Cpl Roberts Cpl Macey chl Mullins

Tpr Garvey

Tpr Parker Tpr Salter

Tpr Morris

Sgt Briggs

Lt J. H. Lloyd

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Tpr West Tpr Wilson

Tpr Antrobus

Tpr Jones

chl McGinn

Tpr Adams Tpr Bolt

RAPC

BAND

Tpr Fairey Tpr Enticknap

Cpl Petterson

chl Marsh Tpr Wainwright

WOI G. E. Evans, ARCM Ssgt R. W. Darling Sgt Fisher

Sgt Owen Tpr Bocio

Sgt Lloyd

Capt B. J. Lockhart

Bdsm Warwick Bdsm Williams

Tpr Gardner Tpr Jackson Tpr Jordan (223)

Bdsm Tenderowitz Bdsm Thorn Bdsm Turpin

TRAINING WING

Tpr Hine Tpr Jordan (784)

Sgt Millett chl Read Tpr Ashmore

RHQ TROOP

.

R80 81 Assrstant Adjutant, Capt W. M. G. Black.

SERGEANTS’ MESS STAFF

Tpr Schooley Tpr Stocks (092)

Cpl Robertson mi May...“

335m $3123

ADMINISTRATION TROOP

King Lines Norman Partridge

DRAGOONS

ACC

Sgt Webster (776)

ch1 Deane chl Melbourne

ROYAL

Tpr Mose

Pte Saxby

Cpl Strudwic-k

THE

Adjutant, Capt P. w. F. Arkwright HQ SQ UADRON SQUADRON HQ Capt A. B. T. Davey Lt T. W. P. Connell SSM C. T. Titmarsh

OF

$3 90...... ry

Commanding Officer Lt Col R. E. Worsley OBE Second-in-Command: Mai J. A. Dimond, Nit:

JOURNAL

Tpr Holmes

Tpr Maton Tpr Blake

Tpr Baker Tpr Lawson

Tpr Neafsey Tpr Cooper

Tpr Scott Tpr Taylor (674) 5TH TROOP

Cpl Bennett ch1 Johnstone Tpr Love


THE

Sb

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS THE

Tpr Barr

REME

Tpr Honeysett

Ssgt Porter

Tpr Pentecost

Cpl Beeby chl Nicholson Cfn Docherty

Tpr Gadd Tpr Gill

Tpr Emburey Tpr Savage Mai B. J. Hodgson

RAPC chl Ward B SQUADRON Tpr Reid

Capt J. J. F. Scott Lt B. H. Coode Lt J. N. Haworth—Booth 2Lt E. N. Brooksbank

Tpr Davis

2Lt J. F. Mackie

4TH TROOP

rsr Taoop Sgt Chambers Cpl Hayworth Cpl McLaren

Tpr Weaver Tpr Pearce

ACC chl Robson Pte Salter ROYAL SIGNALS Sgt McMahon

Quarman Lisney Dunn (646) Baker

chl SAustin T r

avage

'I‘gr Webb

chlShort Tpr Greenfield

Tpr Putland Tpr Palin

pr Hamilton

Tpr Kearns

5TH TROOP Sgt Rainger

Sgt Heath Cpl Elmslie

UNCREWED chl Budgen

Tpr Haighton

Cpl Kennedy Tpr Bloomfield

Sgt Wight

MEDICAL ORDERLY

Golding Ratley

Cpl Kinstrey

ISDaVis ussex Cooxs Cpl Reid. ACC

Sgt Matthew Cpl Wilkinson

Tpr Hayward

ch1 Livingstone Tpr Dickinson Tpr O’Driscoll Tpr Curtis Tpr Hill (765)

Cpl Searle. ch1 Wilkins Tpr Smoker Tpr Bailey Tpr Cokayne

REME

Cfn Stirk

2ND TROOP Sgt Cox

5TH TROOI

Cpl Clark LCpl Freeman

Sgt Corcoran Cpl Byrne

Tpr Dufton Tpr Gibbs

Tpr Budden

Cpl Smith

UNCREWED

Tpr Pearce

Cpl Birt

Tpr Howell Tpr Crittenden

I'pr Bailey

Sgt Evans Sgt Edwards

Tpr Gray Tpr Williams (452)

SHQ TROOP

Tpr Hi11 (547)

2ND Tnoov

Tpr Dunkin Tpr Ward

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Sgt Murtagh

Tpr Ford Tpr Emery

Tpr Bull Tpr Clark

Tpr Stratford Tpr Pulford Tpr Wilson

Tpr Rushbrook Tpr Black Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Why Coggins Smithers Tyler Frost

Tpr Dunn (360) 3RD Taoop

FSC TROOP SSM J. A. Paul

Sgt Sarll Cpl La Roche

SQMS H. Bujko, BEM

Cpl Murphy

chl Lee Tpr Tibbenham

Tpr Grooms

Tpr Lee

Tpr Kent Tpr Summerfield Tpr Dyer

Tpr Shaw Tpr Ash

Cfn Whiting

RAPC Cpl Tucker

Roach Cook Dutschak Freund

ROYAL SIGNALS Cpl Blackburn S gmn S winho e

0llicers and Soldiers at Extra Regimental ' Employment

Sgt Hollis Cpl Hammill

Cpl Thomas chl Willis ch1 Curry chl Levitt chl Byrne

OFFICERS MINISTRY OF DEFENCE Maj C. E. Winstanley

HQ EAST AFRICA COMMAND Mai D. J. S. Wilkinson

Capt (QM) E. L. Payne

Cfn Greenfield Cfn Kinley Cfn Laing

THE MILITARY ATTACHE VIENTIANE

ARMY OPERATIONAL RESEARCH ESTABLISHMENT

Lt Col C. A. Banham, MC

Cfn Lackey Mai O. J. Lewis Cfn Quinn

Cfn Stuart Cfn Stonham Cfn Warren Cfn Edge

HQ BAOR Maj T. A. K. Watson KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY (SHARPSHOOTERS) TA

Tpr Best

Tpr Moon Tpr Farmer

Cpl Glister Cfn Cogan Cfn Piers Cfn Rushby

Cpl Burge Tpr Dean

LAD Ssgt Brooker, BEM

Sgt Fordham Cpl Davis

Tpr Dodman

Tpr Thompson

chl Weeks

Tpr Cook (385) Tpr Budden

[TH TROOP 4 Sgt Wood

Tpr Baker

chl Kingshott

Tpr Toogood Tpr Moor Tpr Avery

IST TROOP

Tpr Youngs

Cpl Shirley

DRAGOONS

Sgt Cameron Cpl Best

Tpr Unsworth

Tpr Doubtfire Tpr Plumb Tpr Blackley

ROYAL

3R1) Taoop

Tpr Sussex Tpr Thomhill Tpr Reilly

Sgt Greatrex

THE

Cpl Morley Tpr Jordan

ngn Pearce

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

OF

TECHNICAL SECTION

Cpl Middleton

Tpr Smith (780) Sgt Wallace Sgt Melia

JOURNAL

ADMINISTRATIVE TROOI’ Cpl Bryant C SQUADRON

RAPC chl Hobson

Cpl Cain Tpr McEvoy

ADMINISTRATIVE TROOP SQMS P. C. Woods

Tpr Stocks

Tpr Harding

Tpr Rudge

Tpr Jee Tpr Fountain

Mai M. B. Noble Maj S. N. Kent-Payne Lt D. S. Barrington—Browne

RAC CENTRE Mai P. D. Reid Maj W. R. Wilson Fitzgerald Capt D. Miller

ADC TO THE GOVERNOR OF TASMANIA Capt P. M. R. Brook

Mai J. B. Evans Capt J. A. A len

Capt J. G. amilton-Russell Lt N. M. B. Roberts 2Lt A. N. D. 8015 2Lt M. A. E. Casey

2Lt D. P. L. Hewson

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Dixon Fullick Carthy Adams

MT SECTION

Tpr Snell

Sgt Best

CONTROL ROOM OPERA-Ions Tpr Hayes

Cpl Fox

Tpr Peckctt

SAF MUSCAT Capt A. F. Woodward

Tpr Hodges Tpr Williams (079) Tpr Allen

AAC BAOR Lt P. A. Arnison—Ncwgass

JUNIOR LEADERS REGIMENT RAC

Capt J. M. Loyd

Cpl Ayles

ch1 Brown SHQ TROOP SSM P. G. Ransom

COMBRITBOR, FARELF Capt P. T. Keightley

RMCS SHRIVENHAM

Lt E. C. York Lt A. P. G. Stanley—Smith

Maj D. S. A. Boyd

STAFF COLLEGE CAMBERLEY Capt W. S. H. Boucher

ARMY APPRENTICES SCHOOL CARLISLE Lt C. E. T. Eddison


THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

SOLDIERS KENT AND COUNTY OF LONDON YEOMANRY (SHARPSHOOTERS) TA W01 E. E. G. Vowles W‘OII H. A. S. Blackallar W011 W. L. W’atorski Sgt Dawson Sgt Mackay

AAC BAOR WOII F. H. Kimble

G. THOMAS

HQ SINGAPORE BASE DISTRICT (Hairdressers) Ltd Sgt Heller

Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Court Hairdresser

2 ARMOURED DELIVERY SQUADRON

Sgt Thorpe Cpl Straw Cpl Hore ch1 Scott

Cpl Carter Cpl Cairney

11 DUKE STREET, ST. JAMES LONDON, s.w.1

FVRDE CHERTSEY

Tpr Basson Sgt Acton

RAC CENTRE Cpl Jackson ch1 Harris Tpr Russell

chl Cooper

And at 19 HIGH STREET, ETON

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Cpl Sowerby

Officers of THE ROYAL DRAGOONS

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D 8: M SCHOOL W011 W. Warren Sgt Thornton

HQ 20 ARMOURED BRIGADE GROUP Cpl Williamson

Cpl Squires 10 RECCE FLIGHT AAC

Tpr Simpkins

Tpr White

Sgt Hayes

Tpr Dawson

Tpr Hawes

Cpl Bayne Cpl Campbell

Tpr Gange Tpr Lawrence

ch1 Hennessy chl Stimson Tpr Allison

Tpr McDonald Tpr Murphy Tpr Richings

RAC SIGNAL SCHOOL Sgt Poulter

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‘CELLARCRAET’ has been expertly practised for over 120 years to ensure that our

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EQUIPMENT TRIALS WING RAC Tpr Deckey

ROGERS, JOHN JONES LTD.

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(MILITARY

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Cpl Goodwyn

Sporting and Mufti Tailors 468 GROUND LIAISON SQUADRON BAOR

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47 INFANTRY BRIGADE (TA) 7UNIOR TRADESMEN SCHOOL TROON SQMS R. C_larke

ch1 Collingwood

ARMY INFORMATION OFFICE STRAND

Tpr Smith (401)

Regimental Outfitters to The Royal Dragoons

RMCS SHRIVENHAM Sgt Cummings

33, BRUTON ST., MAYFAIR, LONDON, W.l

RMA SANDHURST Tpr Catlin

ARMY INFORMATION OFFICE BRIGHTON Sgt Routley

Telephone: MAYfalr 7303 London. P (‘5’ E ESTABLISHMENT SHOEBURYNESS 4—

Tpr Howell

Telegrams: Rogers. MAY. 7303 London.


(iX) By Appointment to

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THE ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENT PAGES. 67/68 IERMYN STREET, ST. JAMES'S, S.W.‘l. TEL. WHITEHALL 1504

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Produced for the Editor,‘"I‘he Eagle,” The amof The Royal 1‘ u

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Iermyn Su-eet, St. Jamcsfis London, SUV 1. Printed in Great Britain by F. 1. Parsons, Ltd., The Adelphi, John AdamStrea Landon, W.C.2, and Hunting nnd Folkcnonc. Advertisement Agents: Service Newspapers, Ltd, 67-68, Jermyn Street, S...Wx

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The eagle royal dragoons magazines the eagle 1964