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THE

ACORN

SPRING Vol. I

I968 No.


THE ACORN THE ACORN

REGIMENTAL MAGAZINE

REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS

of

THE LIFE GUARDS CONTENTS FOR SPRING NUMBER

1968

.

CTOBER saw the regiment (less B Squad— 0 ron) on conventional armoured car tactics as we, normally practise them in Europe. The ulu of Negri Scmbilan was transformed into a Westphalian Plain round whose roads the ar— moured cars did battle. Both A and C Squadrons did Troop Training in the area and a Command Post Exercise was held on 11 and 12 October. The main exercise, lasted from

Regimental

17 — 10 October

and involved an advance to contact and withdrawal from Kuala Lumpur to Malacca.

Headquarters

with their music. The highlight of their visit for us was a display which was given in Selarang Barracks on 10th December.

They were here over Christmas which helped to make the holiday swing. Main activities over the holiday were a children's party and of course Brick Hanging at which the Commanding Officer officiated. The wives also had a brick hanging ctrtmony (their first) at which RQMC Rodger's aunt presided!

HQ Squadron November had most of the regiment running round Singapore on their Battle Efficiency Tests. The Silver Stick, Colonel H. S, Hopkinson visited us during this month and was in the Far East from 12 fi 21 November. we were very pleased to see him with us.

A Squadron B Squadron

C Squadron Air Squadron Regimental

Sport

Battle Efficiency 1067 by Cpl Berryman W05 and CsoH Mess

— The Major General inspecting the Quarter Guard during

Household Cavalry Regiment

— his visit to the Regiment on the 29th January.

Dutyman goes East Left to Right:

Household Cavalry Training Squadron

Capt G. R. Petherick, Major H.A.M. Pyman, The Major General,

CoH

Hunt,

Tptr

White,

LCpl

Cusick,

Tpr

The Second-in-Command leads the Silver Stick, Com-

The

Band manding Officer,

Adjutant and

RCM

round

barracks.

Nelson, Tpr Borrett, Tpr Hamson.

The Band Visit to the Far East by Major W. Jackson C Squadron Adventure Training C Squadron Detachment in Australia by 2L1 A.H.B. Imbert—' George Carter

The next visitor was General Sir Geoffrey Baker who came to Selarang on the 8th Decem— ber. His ADC. Captain J. D. Siniteringham. Royal Horse Guards, came with him and tried extremely hard to project his ‘international' image across to us.

South Pacific 1067 by Captain S. l" Meredith—Hardy The Trucial Oman Scouts by CoH Charlett Serving Nominal

Personality Rolls

December was largely taken up with courses but from the 15th A 25th December Major W'. Jackson and his team of artistes entertained us

We welcomed Major General BOP Eugster on 20th January. He stayed with us all day and had dinner in the Officers Mess that evening. On 1st February he saw C Squadron off to Hong Kong on the LST Empire Kittiwake and the next day went to Hong Kong himself. LieutColonel Ghika, the Brigade Major. managed to indulge out. get to Hong Kong and back and return to England for nothing. We were very pleased to see them.


THE ACORN

THE ACORN

In February we said goodbye to 42 LAD Bty RA who returned to join their Regiment in England having shared Selarang Barracks with

us since April 1067.

As we go to press the regiment is once, more. practising for a large exercise: this time A and C Squadrons~ are fighting against the guerilla tactics of the 2/2 Gurkha Rifles who may prove more of a challenge to them than they did to each other.

The Major

General

talking

to

CoH

Johnson.

HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON WING to very small mention of Head— quarters Squadron in the last edition, it is time to mention some of the other activities of the I53 men who make up this Squadron. During October, Exercise Eastern Trumpet 11 took place in Malaya involving some, 81 soldiers from HQ Squadron and the Air Squadron. The usual trade training started up in Novem~ her and December with Tprs Wicks, Willis and Smith 270 passng their Class 111 Radio test, Cpl Dean, Tprs Meakin and Frazer passing their Class III D 85 M., Tprs Hill, Burrows and Curzon passing the Gunnery Class 111 test.

Major W. R. Edgedale has left us to become Instructor at the RAC Tactics School Lulworth and his place has been taken by Major C. W. Wordsworth. Captain G. R. Petherick has

The cancellation of the expected move of C Squadron from Paroi to Selarang Barracks hit the guard roll a hard blow below the belt, and to add to our trouble; the return of 42 Light Air Defence Battery to the UK left Selarang very empty and Several administrative jobs vacant. Owing to this situation RHQ Troop had to be disbanded to provide Cpl Collins, Tprs Scott and job from driving a Ferret to become a barman in the Officers’ Mess, Tpr Smith took up driving B vehicles and works on the MT staff, Tpr Ashton went to work for the QM caretaking the empty barrack blocks, On top of this we had to train Tpr Ryder to handle war dogs and Cpl Whelan went to help work the Tiger pumps in the WO’s and NCOs Mess.

taken over as Adjutant from Captain S. V. Gilbart— Denham who has gone to Hong Kong and ZLt. B. M. L. Stephen has left to become 1 Leader C Squadron.

November and December were spent doing Battle Efficiency, swimming and annual classifica— tion with a final score of 102 soldiers passing.

Wicks for the Provost staff, Tpr Willis changed his

GSO 2

Exercise Stoney Castle then came into play: this involved the changeover of B and C Squa— drons for a month, C Squadron went to Hong Kong and B Squadron came down to do some training in Malaya. All benefited from the change and it was good to see B Squadron with us again if only for a short time.

Father Christmas played by LCOH Shotton, who landed by helicopter, and to the delight of the children handed out toys and games.

Troop

Sig Hall, Cfn Woodard, ng Smith, Cpl Stokes helping in the party games!

The Christmas season started (arly with a large Children’s party for the 6 to 11 year olds in December when Htadquartt‘rs Squadron laid on the film. magician. ie: crtam, teas and a

Exercise Stoney Castle, the change over of B & C Squadrons for a six week period, meant that we had to accomodate and feed the two Squadrons on their way through Selarang, during those few busy nights many members of HQ Squadron acted as, hosts and showed B Squadron the 50/50 delights of Bugis Street and how to kill a few Singapore "Tigers” While A & B Squadrons were firing at Asahan Ranges ch1 Creighton, Tprs Johnson 533, Burrows and Ryder joined the sabre Squa— drons to do their annual shoot on the 76 mm. Every month a party of about fifty go by boat to f’ulau Tekong to improve their skill at the SLR, Browning and LMG, So far the scores have been well above average although two men were discovered who had never seen a LMG before. Major C. W. Wordsworth has left the squa— dron to become Second—iirCommand of the Regi— ment, and we welcome Major j. W. F. Fuller. as Squadron Leader in his place.

SELARANG RAILWAY — NAAFI — COOKHOUSE LINE

CHRISTMAS Waiters:

L. to R.

LUNCH

AT

SELARANG.

Capt Sanf, Major Wilmer, The Commanding Officer, SCM Turtle, LI' Sheffield, Lt MorrisseyPaine.

Tpr Ryder, Cpl LOH’, Tpr Bevan and Tpr Shufflebotham riding “Shotgun“ at HQ Sqn Children's Christmas Party.

At the time of writing, most people are trying to cram in leave before the big Regimental Exercise in April.


THE ACORN THE ACORN fi’i‘

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ASQUADRON IN September the efforts of the Squadron were devoted to preparing the vehicles for their annual inspection. The back of the vehicle park was soon covered with empty beer cans, old maps and some of the more unappetising tins of compo which have been found to have no bartering value with the local inhabitants. Mechanical faults which had been insoluble for months

U) K O

< CL 0 O 0 LL 0 0. 2 O O LLI D. >. *—

i ll] Z IJJ U) 0 I

were

rectified

overnight;

wireless

sets

which had been ‘on net’ to the local radio station for weeks were quickly de-tuned, and at the end of it we received an excellent report. To crown our efforts an all party group of both Houses of Parliament visited the Squadron, and were so impressed by what they saw that they scarcel§ had time to angle for votes.

tonnu‘, but eventually everything was going more or less as it should. After a day’s rest at Paroi Camp, Squadron Headquarters and the Troop Leaders were out again on a Command Post Exercise. A Regimental Exercise then followed when the Squadron managed to destroy each of C Sqn's vehicles, including their Headquarters and Echelon, several times. Doubtless C Sqn have a different tale to tell. but all differences were conveniently forgotten at an (xcellent barbecue given by the C Squadron VVOs and NCOs Mess when we returned to Paroi. November and the early part of December wcrc occupied with individual trade training but there were one or two highlights.

Early in October we crossed the causeway to Colonel Hopkinson visited the Squadron on

Malaya (less those vehicles that had already broken down) and started Squadron Training in the Malacca area. S/Sgt Snowden with his LAD

maintenance, and saw the wireless, classes under

instruction during his visit on 12 November.

1 “I

Section, and Tpr Cousins with the ‘binner’ had a busy time collecting and repairing vehicles from a variety of places, and pulling Mr Greenway’s Saladin out of a padi field; however, at the end of the. week all our vehicles were ‘on the road'. CoH Hunter was unfortunately taken to hospital soon after the training started, and the SQMC had to be called out of retirement to control the forward link. CoH Hunter has since recovered and has left to rejoin The Blues at Windsor. The

'—

Second—in—Command was a bit confused by the

new voice procedure which had changed yet again while he was away at Knightsbridge, and Tprs Mitchell, Hanson and Mountford were confused by the whole thingr having recently left the Queen’s Life Guard roll. Mr Morrisey-Paine woke. up one morning with a snake round his foot, a certain member of 2 Troop confused North with South on one occasion with dramatic results: ch1 Mad— dock 7 ACC enquired about a transfer as he preferred travelling in a Ferret to the cooks' 3

The Silver

Stick

with

Tpr

Flounders.

Probably the less said about the Squadron Smoker in the Cookhouse on 10 November the better. Let it suffice that everyone seemed to enjoy it according to their own lights, one or two songs were sung. and not everyone was able to stay to the end for one reason or another.

Callsign

13A included.


THE ACORN THE ACORN

The squadron fund disappears overnight at November smoker.

the

The local inhabitants were givcn much amuse» mint by the sight of the Squadron completing their Battle Efficiency Tests. In spite of CoH Hunt who was out to break a record everyone managed to complete them in the time allowed. The Squadron Leader bruised a heel, the ZIC’s blisters went into double figures, and the SCM, exempt due to length of service, offered mock

January saw the Troops out for a few days on troop training, classifying at Pulau Tckong with the. SLR, and laying on a demonstration for the Major General during his visit at the. end of the month, On the 24th, two troops, SHQ and Echelon. assisted by the rest of the Squadron, (*mbarkrd by LCMs. 011 HMS Intrepid, which was. lying off Singapore. CoH Venn and CoH Poynter will testify as to the hospitality received from the Royal Nayy whilst aboard, and by the afternoon when we disembarked some members of the Squadron were not quite themselves.

February was gunnery month. The, 21C (who is also Gunnery Officer) went on leave, returning

Our time, was equally divided between firing,

At the time of writing we are preparing to

putting out range fires caused by the firing and

Set out on Exercise ‘March Hare', a squadron

assuaging the thirst generated by fire—fighting.

exercise which will be reported in the next issue. The. changes in

Our return to camp was marred by several

numerous,

the Squadron have been

Mr Greenaway has joined us from

breakdowns, the most unfortunate being when

C Sqn, Ssgt Weeks, has taken over the LAD and

Tpr Hanson managed to put two cars of 3 Troop

CoH Juleff heads the list of those arriving from

off the road within sight of the ranges.

the Mounted Squadron~

He has

Since applied to return to Knightsbridge.

For»

tunately Staff Sergeant Weeks was able to cope with all the faults, and on our return to barracks

Mr Morrissty—Paine has returned to the 10th Hussars, S/Sgt Snowden has left the LAD and

we were pleased to find that the Squadron Leader

CsoH Fincken, Thompson and Hunter have also

was also ‘back on the road'.

left.

just in time for the field firing at Asahan, and

the Squadron Leader retired to bed with mumps. leaving for a time the SCM in solo charge. The firing was most successful, and we managed to destroy all the targets which B Sqn, who had fired before us. had been unable to hit.

There were

often cries of “Firing now e Target”, quickly

sympathy on our return. followed by

”Target,

rubbishl”,

or some such

cry from the 21C and the SQMC. Christmas was as ever a hectic period, the only military duty being the running of the Childrens' Christmas Party in the Cookhouse.

The Silver Stick talks with SQMC Struttord, SCM Turtle and the RCM.

' a.

The CGS designate enjoys a joke with CoH the tank) Waterworth.

(Tiger in

Tpr Bishop, watched by an anxious Tpr Barwick, pre— pares for his third helping at the Christmas dinner.


THE ACORN

THE ACORN

BSQUADRON

Two important visitors to the Squadron have bEEn Colonel H. .3. Hopkinson, the Silver Stick, in

a

LTHOUGH B Squadron has remained busy,

the situation in Hong Kong has become a lot less tense since last December.

On 14 October Senior Inspector Knight of the Hong Kong Police, a good friend of the Squadron, was abducted over the Man Kam To bridge into China, Mr. Going’s 4 Troop was sent to the bridge at an early stage while Mr. Knight was still on the Hong Kong side of the bridge negotiating with some pretty belligerent coolies. Together with a platoon of the lst/7th Gurkha Rifles, their task was to prevent Mr. Knight from

being dragged into China. The Chinese Army showed some interest and Rocket Launchers were reported on the other side. In the early stages of negotiations, which were continued by Mr. Kinghom, the District Commissioner New Terri— tories, Mr. Knight was some 25 yards from the

end of the bridge. A plan was made, the key to which was to get Mr. Goings Saladin onto the bridge before the coolies could drag Mr. Knight away. The Saladin would effectively block the bridge and therefore make it difficult for Mr. Knight (a large man in height and girth) to be dragged over. Regrettably the plan was not implemented until Mr. Knight was a few yards only from the bridge. As soon as Mr, Going's Saladin accelerated to make its dash for the bridge Mr. Knight was stampeded into China by the coolies. Mr. Going's Saladin ended up on the bridge as planned but — too late, By this time it was dark and a very good target the Saladin made, particularly as the, lights on the bridge wtre controlled by the Chinese. Man Kam To bridge was then closed by a huge: metal wall, appropriately nick—named “Hadrian”, and re~ maincd closed until after Mr. Knight had escaped from China on 20 November. When Mr. Knight returned he spoke to the whole Squadron about his escape, and clearly had forgiven us for failing in the rescue attempt! On 9 December a policeman was murdered in Kamtin. Another policeman managed to wound the assassin, who was later captured and brought into the MRS at Sek Kong. Cpl Page was the duty medical orderly and successfully revived a man with 5 bullet holes in him.

£53..

A I‘t. g

Senior Inspector Knight with coolies at Mon Kam To.

Village F‘tnetration Patrols have. continued. We had a major success on 9 February when a jcint patrol led by CoH Harding successfully arrested a top Communist by the name. of Li Hon. A large cordon and search operation had been mounted on a village where it was thought Li Hon was hiding. CoH Harding's patrol was some three miles from this operation, and the Police Corporal recognised Li Hon and hence his arrest. Minimum force was used ,L bayonet's had to be fixed! This success makes the many miles tram— ped over the past months seem wortlm'hile. Li Hon was awarded 0 months imprisonment,

November, and the Major General in February. The Band was here in January and appeared to enjoy themselves.

Regrettably they could only

stay with us for a short time as most of their engagements were in Kowloon or on Hong Kong Island.

On January 29 we held a Farewell Parade for Brigadier Peter Martin.

It took the form of an

Inspection and Drive Past on the airstrip.

Few

Brigadiers can have gained as much admiration and respect from soldiers as Brigadier Peter, and his farewell address to the Squadron after the Tpr Goodall on a village Penetration Hong

Patrol with

the

Parade will be remembered by all those who

Kong Police.

were privileged to hear it. sorry to see him go. Christmas was celebrated in the traditional manner. The Gunners produced a very good Christmas lunch, and B Squadron proved that they could out—sing everyone else! The Brigade Sgts Mcss Christmas Draw and New Years Eve Dance were both a huge success. Most of the entertainment Committee seemed to be members of the Squadron. An excellent Childrens’ party was held and Father Christmas arrived by helicopter.

We were very, very

In his place we welcome

Brigadier E. J. S, Burnett, DSO. OBE, MC.

Brigadier Peter Martin takes the solute as SHQ drives past.

In December the UEI team descended and dug us out.

Everyone in the Squadron, and the

LAD in particular. is to be congratulated on the first class report received. A party in 48 Brigade Sgts' Mess.


THE ACORN THE ACORN

On Tuesday targets were erected on the Ranges by the hardworking Assault Troop. The next two days were spent by the armoured car troops destroying them, Ferret crews did a Battle Run, the highlight of which was Tpr Wade’s attempt at dcposing the Commanding Officer who cut his chin on the back of his Ferret. The Assault Troop reaped great benefit from the Jungle Ranges. The experts proved to be Tprs Hodson and Mc— Greary,

both of whom gained more marks for

alertness than the Squadron Leader! During this time the Assault Troop disappeared with Mr. D'Oyly for 36 hours and did something or other in the Jungle. They thought they were really in the Ulu, which amused SCM Levet who volun~ teered the information that the nearest Ulu was some 200 milts away, This was generally accepr ted by all without further reconnaissance.

B SQUADRON SENIOR NCO’s — JANUARY 1968 Standing: Sitting:

L. to R.:

L. to R.:

CoH Bayiiss, CoH Reed, CoH Payne, CoH Mitcheson. SSgt Tracey, CoH Casey, SCM

Levet, BEM, Major Gooch, SQMC Skinner, CoH

Harding,

CoH Johnson.

Just before Christmas a signal arrived telling us that Exercise ‘Stoney Castle' was on. It had been cancelled at the time of the Silver Stick’s and Commanding Officer’s visit some weeks pre— viously. The exercise involved C Sqn relieving us in Hong Kong, while we went to Singapore and Malaysia. After some changes in date, B Squadron and all its vehiclts embarked on the LSL ‘Sir Bcdivere’ at Shamshuipo on 12 February. ‘Sir Bcdivtrc’ is a modcrn £2 million ship with drive—on and drive—off facilities, air~conditioned throughout and has a closed~circuit television sys— tem. Depending on the wind and current con— ditions she has a speed of 15 #17:} knots. We had a comfortable leisurely voyage and arrived in Singapore early on 16 February. We disemv barked on maxi—floats (which took some time) and were escorted in convoy to Selarang Barracks

by the Singapore Police and RMP. The weekend was spent by most in the vicinity

of Singapore’s Bugis Street which, for those who have not been there, contains some “very funny men”_ This description was given by chl Mack who was the only Hong Kong soldier we could cheek taking with us.

Dowell were trapped inside by radio batteries which had broken loose. Petrol and acid were everywhere. After about ten very anxious minutes all climbed out with no lasting injuries. Assistance for recovery was requested, but none came before our own indefatigable quartet, Sgt Chapman, ch1 Thomson, (iiddins and the Scammel. As usual the, recovery was completed quickly with some loss of sweat. The ACV subsequently drove back to Singapore, from Sercmban.

There have been no startling changes in Hong Kong while we were away, and our tasks remain the same with a Troop standing by in Gallipoli Barracks daily,

Road Blocks,

Escorts,

and Village Penetration Patrols, which may reduce the ovcrall weight of the Armoured Car crews while the Assault Troop is away. We have now done 491 road blocks. Not all are as boring as they might be as this extract from our Sitrep of 17 November shows: ”1 Tp Road Block at Grid 101836 from 0320 to 0625 hrs. One car load of bar girls was held up by the Police for 45 minutes for interrogation. The military as— sisted but Troop Fund could not rise to the occasion. "

There then followed some training for Euro— pean warfare in South East Asia, This took place in the Ctntral Manotuvrc Area, The Squadron had to provide its own enemy, and split up to do battle against itself under Captain S.V. Gilbar’e Denham and Captain C.H. Churton. We then drove to a beach at Port Dickson and relaxed for two days before returning to Singapore. “’0 came back to Hong Kong 011 'Sir Bedivere', minus

the Assault Troop which was transferred to A Squadron on 6 March, three days before we sailed.

A JOINT POLICE/MILITARY ROADBLOCK "Somewhere in

the

The following have been posted in: Captain S. V. Gilbart—Denham

On Monday we moved to Asahan Ranges. It was an interesting move which circled finally at 0320 hrs on Tuesday with an ACV upside down in a stream near the range camp. It was a nasty moment as Cpl Page, Cpl Allen and chl

1 1.

Lieut M. A. McCormick

2Lt W. J. Grandy COH Bayliss CoH Mitcheson CoH Perkins

CoH Bentley Cpl

Hollinrake

Cpl Cpl

Russell Speed

chl Baxter

Promotions To CoH LCoH Reed

To LCoH Cpl Hutchings

REME RAPC

Lepl chl chl chl Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Cfn

Maugham Hugman Pearson Dowel] ACC Chapman Dutton Howard Imrie Jones 507 Dawdry REME

Cfn

McDonald REME

To Cpl chl Marsh chl Phillips l.cpl Lloyd

New Territories."


THE ACORN

THE ACORN

The following have left B Squadron: The Assault Troop.

C SQUADRON

This will be temporary.

.V‘lajor J. W. F. Fuller To HQ Squadron Captain C. H. Churton 17/21L 8 Int Bde Lieut C. W'. Going Q/lZL 0/12 L Lieut P. C. Bickmore Retired ZLt J. J. Astor HCR ZLt R. S, Thompson Guards Depot CoH Bowden MONS OCS CoH Thompson HCR CoH Brady HCR CoH Miles HCR CoH Dean HQ Squadron Cpl Henderson HQ Squadron Cpl Harding Release Cpl Tozer Release Cpl Lloyd Guards Depot Cpl Forrester RHG RHG Cpl Hicken RAPC HQ Squadron Cpl Ferguson REME CAD Bramley Brown REME Z Armd Engr Sqn LAD, BFPO 36 Doherty REME l2 Coy RCT. BFPO 33 McCall ACC Release Christensen Medevac Dibden C Squadron Dugmore Discharged Grey Transfer to RAPC Holmes Transfer to Int Corps Ikins C Squadron johnson A Squadron Leach C Squadron Lloyd HCR Mitchell HQ Squadron Mackenzie Discharged Trench C Squadron Tomlinson HQ Squadron Tunnard Medevac White A Squadron Williams Discharged Byme Discharged Nieman 4 Anna Wksp. BFT’O 41 Tallons 33 Fd Sqn RE

)

N October the Regimental exercise. ”Eastern ITrumpet H," was held on our home ground and we were able to act as hosts to Regimental Headquarters and A Squadron in Seremban. The exercise consisted of a hard day’s driving from

Kuala Lumpur to Malacca in pursuit of A Squadron, followed by a morning when we were pursued by them into a rubber (state. where the exercise ended before too much damage had been

Slim Lines in the Cameron Highlands. Many miles were covered both on the road and in the jungle. The weather was wet and cold. particularly at over 6000 ft just before first light, and the standard of jungle navigation at times fell below the desirable minimum. However the map reading of the woman and three children who were lost in the same area for three days a short while later was even worse so we were not alone.

done to the trees.

We then had a most entertaining weekend that caused the inhabitants of Sercmban to remark that they did not remember when the place had been so gay. We took this opportunity of saying goodbye to Captain G. R. Petherick who gave up his appointment as squadron second—in—command and disappeared to England on prolonged leave. later to return as Adjutant. His place has been taken by Captain JB, Emson who has, joined us from The Parachute. Regiment and whose experience and enthusiasm are going to be a great asset to the Regiment. Mr. Imbert—Terry and his party. who accompaincd the 1st Battalion Kings Shropshire Light Infantry to Australia. returned in early November, full of stories some of which are recounted elsewhere in this issue. The Squadron then had a period of block leave. alternating with adventure training on an island off the East Coast of Malaya. This is also the subject of a scperate article on another page. A small detachment under Mr. HarcourtSmith represented the Commonwealth Services at the National Memorial in Kuala Lumpur on Remembrance Day. After a short period re—united with the armoured cars, the Squadron spent a week at

Soon after this we were faced with the serious business of Christmas. We managed to make this last for eleven days and our enjoyment was greatly increased by the presence of the Band of the Regiment from Boxing Day to New Years Day. The festivities included an All Ranks Dance organized by Corporal of Horse Thomas. a childrens party managed by the Quarter Master and his staff, and Corporal of Horse York, for which the Wives Club did the decorations. and a picnic lunch with the inevitable ”funny" football matches, for which the hard work was done by Corporal of Horse Young.

The Band gave us an excellent concert in the 2 Flight hangar. ending with the 1812 Overture played virtually impromptu and with great virtuosity. They later gave a concert at Terendak and finally played to ntarly five hundred people in the Sercmban Town Hall. in aid of local charities. Their visit which entailed being away from home all over Christmas. gave us all much pleasure and was~ greatly appreciated.

January was spent discussing rumours and counter rumours about our future locations. In the event we did relieve B Squadron temporarily in Hong Kong. but did not move pennanently to Singapore. The latter move was not cancelled. however. until most of our equipment had already been packed.


THE THE ACORN

Exercise Stoney Castle. the short term rotation of B and C Squadrons. was first mooted in May 1067 but the emergency in Hong Kong in the late Summer resulted in the project being temporarily abandoned. With the quietening down of the situation it was decided that B Squadron should spend three wteks training in Malaya and

C Squadron should take their place in Hong Kong.

Mr. E. G. Thompson supervises shooting practice aboard The ’Kitfiwoke.’

The Empire Kittiwake had no sophisticated navigating aids. and since the stars had not been seen for 3 days the captain was asked how he would know which of the hundreds of the islands in the Hong Kong area were Chinese, and which British. He replied (we hope in jest) “Its easy. they shoot at you from the Chinese ones!” OFF TO THE FRONT! C Squadron embark for Hong Kong.

We left Seremban on 28111 January and had a virtually uneventful drive to Singapore where we spent the Chinese New Year holiday and were visited by the Major General. The Squadron embarked in the LST Empire Kittiwake on 1 February. and an advance party of Second—in— Command. Squadron Quartermaster Corporal and one officer or non commissioned officer per tr00p flew to Hong Kong next day.

Despite the predictions of the ship’s officers most of the voyage was in calm. sunny weather and everyone had a pleasant and constructive time. Many "bags vomit” were shot up over the taffrail and Corporal Tappenden spent many hours a day showing a variety of films. Radio and Browning classes were also run. During the last thirty-six hours the wind got up and the LST rolled viciously. However by then most of the Squadron had found their sea-legs and only relatively few were sea sick. (Which was fortunate since there were no “bags vomit" left.)

The ’Empire Kitriwake’ bound for Hong

Kong.

We arrived at 5 pm. on 0 February, a cold. grey day and were met by the advance party who conducted us through the dark to Sek Kong. 1 Troop cleaned and (lo—greased their guns and bombed up that night. and at 6.30 next morning were Off to Gallipoli Barracks on frontier stand—by. 5 Troop went out on the first dismounted Village Penetration Patrol (Vl’l‘) and 3 Troop did the first road block that night.

Mr Goodhew and CoH Kelly, 4 Troop manning a road block on Route 1. Tpr Meldrum and L/Cpl Saunders or the Hong Kong Regiment’s Open

From that time the pattern was very similar to the activities of B Squadron in recent months. but our armoured car troops had to do the Vi’P's as C Squadron has no 6 Troop. 3 Troop have won the prize for causing the most accidents at a road block one evening (five) and Squadron Headquarters thinks it is the first of its kind to carry out a road block with two Armoured Command Vehicles. We await the letters to the Editor from all regimental historians.

Among the most interesting and constructive of our activitics were the, foot patrols into the remote villages but there were considerable lan— guage difficulties since the village head—man's English was elementary and our Cantonese non~ existent. they would answer ‘yes’ to almost every question, and one left the village having been told all kinds of stories. which one had in fact dreamed up oneself

The language difficulties were eventually resolved by the attachment to the Squadron of several members of the Hong Kong Regiment. In return we provided a Saladin for the Regiment's Open Day on Hong Kong island.

Day.

Artillery target indication is something we seldom have an opportunity to practice, but during our tour in Hong Kong we were fortunate enough to Spend two afternoons with 18 Light Regiment Royal Altillery controlling a live shoot, Most of the engagements were directed quite well but on one occasion it was fortunate (for the inhabi— tants of a nearby fishing village) that the gunners were checking our calculations. We were able to cany—out a considerable amount of infantry and armoured car training in the New Territories both by day and night. The. Ha Tsuen field firing range was used by the Squadron on several occasions and demonstrations of locating fire battle innoculation. and Browning firing in a night defensive fire task role were put on.

We threw 36 grenades in a tactical setting in the open field range followed by a 'fighting with— drawal down a sterling alley. The grenade throw— ing tended to make thrower and instructor alike burrow extremely close to mother earth. In addition almost every soldier fired the 2 inch iVlortar.


THE ACORN

THE ACORN

Postings In By night the Squadron rehearsed leaguers on the Sek Kong AirStrip and later put it into practice with live ammunition on the field firing

range.

When 2 Troop discovered a massive enemy was approaching our leaguer the night sky over Castle Peak would have made Blackpool illu» minations look pretty mimsing.

Perhaps the climax of our night activities, excluding those sought by the bachelors in Hong Kong and Kowloon. was a compass march across some very rugged terrain by the whole Squadron divided into 6/7 man patrols. The object of this operation was to catch refugees illegally entering Hong Kong, and the boat owners who were assisting them. However, apart from two noctur— nal o‘arsmen caught by 1 Troop no suspects were found, It was heard remarked that if the refugees managed to cross the same piece of country that we did by night they deserved to get away!

Cpl Westcar and Tpr

Richardson

Patrol — Hong

(I Tp)

on

frontier

Kong.

The return journey aboard the LSL Sir Bodi— vere was luxurious compared with the outward voyage. The accommodation was air conditioned, and films were shown on the ship’s Closed circuit television system 7 quite a difference from the spray soaked screen of the Kittiwakel

Second Lieutenant B. M. L. Stephen Second Lieutenant A. ]_ McNeilage Corporal of Horse Reynolds Corporal of Horse Lumb Lance Corporal of Horse Crawford Corporal Price Lance Corporal Mole Trooper Smith 265 Trooper Taylor Trooper Trench Trooper Leach Trooper Dibden Private Kerr Trooper Clark Trooper Mills Trooper Cameron—Wilson Trooper Jobling Trooper de Eyle Cole Trooper Gunning Trooper Meldrum Trooper Roxburgh Trooper Strickland Trooper Creighton Trooper Daniels Trooper McLaughlin Trooper RO-wley Trooper Tinkler Trooper Ikins Trooper Ward Trooper Fincken Trooper ’l‘heobal-d

from RHQ RAAC HCTS MO‘NS OCS HQ Sqn A Sqn A Sqn 3 Sqn RCT HQ 8qu B Sqn B 8qu

B Squ A Sqn Recruit Recruit

Recruit Recruit Recruit Recruit Recruit

Recruit Recruit Recruit Recruit Recruit Recruit Recruit

B Sqn HCR JLR RAC JLR RAC

Postings Out Captain (l. R. Petherick Litutt‘nant )l. R. (l. Gamble Second Lieutenant W. D. Burgher Corporal of Horse Shergold Corporal of Horse Skyring Corporal of Horse Tonkings Lance Corporal of Horse Venn Lance Corporal of Horse Theobald Corporal Friend Cmporal johnson Board the ”Empire Kittiwoke” in Singapore Harbour.

RHQ 3 DG RAAC JLR RAC Air 8qu Air Sqn B Sqn HQ Sqn HCR HCR


18

THE ACORN THE

Corporal Newens Lance Corporal Harnett Lance Corporal Parkins

RHE HCR Gunnery School RHE B Sqn B Sqn HQ Sqn HQ Sqn B Sqn HQ 8qu HQ Sqn RHE SAS Course Air 8qu Air Sqn Air 5qu

Lance Corporal Boult Lance Corporal Hugman Lance Corporal Mangham Lance Corporal Digney Lance Corporal TayIOr Trooper Wisbey Trooper Parsley Trooper Taylor Trooper Scobell Trooper Darby Trooper johnson Trooper Wilson Trooper Gilbey

EXTRACT FROM A LETTER OF EXPLANATION CONCERNING 3 TROOP C SQUADRON THE LIFE GUARDS NOCTURNAL

ACTIVITIES

by The Late C Squadron Traffic Controller

I

ROM the period 3000 tp 0200 hrs my troop was manning a road block on the, west bound carriageway of the Castle Peak Road. The road was. well lit and in good repair.

At approximately 0100 I was standing on the central reservation contem~ plating the beauties of the night sky when I heard what I thought was: the sqeal of tyres. On looking round I realised that a Dollar Taxi was having a certain amount of difficulty in stopping. Showing great presence of mind and making a quick appreciation of the situation. with particular emphasis on ground and likely courses I dived behind a lamp post, and did my well known imitation of an ostrich.

Promotions Z/Lt Goodhew Lance Corporal of Horse Shergold Lance Corporal Maxwell Lance Corporal Whyte Lance Corporal Daly Lance Corporal Tappenden Trooper Mangham Trooper Hugman Trooper Davis Trooper Brown

Lieutenant

Acting Corporal of Horse

Trooper Golding

Acting Acting Acting Acting Acting Acting Acting Acting Acting

Trooper Lundic Trooper Slater Trooper Saunders

Acting Lance Corporal Acting Lance Corporal

Corporal Corporal Corporal Corporal Lance Corporal Lance Corporal Lance Corporal Lance Corporal Lance Corporal

Acting Lance Corporal

Births Corporal of Horse York Corporal of Horse Clough Corporal Hoskin Trooper Whetton I’rivate Ackers

ACORN

a a ' ' '

son daughter son daughter son

The impending impact failed to materialise. the taxi merely nudging the Police. Halt Sign. With a sigh of relief I picked myself up, removed my head from the. monsoon drain and rapidly brushed the dust off my well pressed trousers thus rcassuming that look of quiet tfficiency for which I am so well known. At this stage I felt that it would be better if I personally controlled the oncoming traffic so as to ensure there would be no more incidents. Unfortunately no sooner had I positioned myself in the road with one hand raised in an Imperial gesture of defiance to the oncoming hordes when I again took refuge in the ditch as yet another taxi foolhardily choose to disobey me. He also managed to stop in time and I was just rtmoving myself from the ditch which was now becoming rather uncomfortable as the clear night sky was depositing rath<r a nasty drizzle when there was a loud bang followed by a splash as once more I took cover. E Type Jaguars are lovely cars but should not be driven fast into the back of a dual purpose van. Having once again climbed out of the ditch. )rushed down my trousrrs and restored the nap on my suede shoes I proceeded to take command of the situation. Advancing up the road towards the scene of contlict I noticed three Hong Kong l‘olice had the situation well in hand and were examining the bonnet of the 17. Type. To my horror I noticed another taxi advancing rapidly from the rear and once again took refuge in the ditch. As ditches go. this was a. delightful example of the ditch diggcr's art and if by any chance its creator should read this he has my hearty thanks. From this position of refuge I was then privileged to watch that exciting spectacle The Waltz of the Chinese Coppers,


THE ACORN 20

THE

ACORN

AIR SQUADRON This is a native fertility dance devoted mainly to the autocar and consists of three Chinese Policemen, two innocent onlookers, one saddened E Type and a partridge in a pear tree being bodily hurled into the air by the forward move— ment of an E Type Jaguar when violently and indcccntly assaulted from the rear by a taxi. This entire spectacle laviShly produced in Super 70mm and full Stereophonic sound starring John \i’Vayne as the hard talking and indeed hard hitting taxi driver lasted two seconds. Once more I climbed out of the ditch. brushed down my trousers and retrieved my hat from some urchin who. with scant regard for my position had. placed his flip flop on it where it fell during my somewhat hurried. but still

tactical withdrawal. Excitement for some people is the very essence of life but not I fear for me. and I sped to the rear of a Saladin where I partook of a large cup of coffee and something. On my gentle and much fortified return I ordered my driver to make good the damage. This he did by virtually removing the entire Jaguar bonnet with a crowbar paying scant attention to the agonised yelps of the owner.

!

S usual it has been go—go—go for the young active Air Squadron. Our bi-annual pilgramage to the Cameron Highlands took plac.‘ in Stptember. and for once all six aircraft were ‘burning and turning' at the same time. We managed to get far more flying in than last time. due to less cloud. and our stay was also more enjoyable since there were no flies. The whole of the Squadron took to the field (or Padi) in October, to add tone to the Regi— mental exercise ‘Eastem Trumpet II’. The first day of the exercise was highlighted by the vision of the commanding officer returning from a sortie in one of the helicopters by landrover, the failing light having forced the. aircraft to land some ten miles away. The last night of the exercise saw us camped in the grounds of a girls school near the, town of Jasin. Some of the more randy of the

Squadron

were noticeably

absent;

no

one

Prior to the move, the Detachment managed to train three new obselyersz- L/Cpl Taylor, Tpr Wilson and Tpr Gilbey. Meanwhile back in Singapore. Tpr Booth, freshly arrived from Seremban lost no time in breaking all known records as an ‘Hour-Hog', He even exceeded Tpr Woodley in this professional greed. and had to be temporarily grounded. The rest of the Squadron are all for these excesses since it guarantees a steady flow of beer as each observer passes the, 50 and 100 hours mark. Tpr Johnson received notoriety when he set up the Paroi strip for a night landing, and was scen waiting to marshal—in what finally turned out to be a three-tonner. It appeared that he was incorrectly informed of the travel facilities of Staff Sgt Welch. and had thought that he was travelling by Sioux!

could suggest where they might bel Eventually the road was cleared and I returned to the ditch to await the grand finale, This was not long in coming. A sound in the distance similar to a supercharged tractor heralded the approach of a TRZ which proceeded to drive through the halt sign causing it to land by the side of the ditch. (Would the ditch digger please note he did not provide overhead cover and I have a healthy respect for shrapnel etc). He then procceded to engage in mortal combat with a Saladin and suffered an (xccedingly bloody nose. Once more I climbed out of the ditch, dusted myself down and retired to the rear of the engagement to partake of a large cup of something and a dash

of coffee, To my complete consternation I found the only fatal casualties were the bottle of something and fiask of coffee. Abandoning all attempts at dignified nonchalance I ordered the troop to withdraw to Sek Kong at a speed not exceeding 4 MPH. and my operator to walk in front carrying a red tlag.

The ‘C' Detachment said goodbye to Captain P. J. Salter after what seemed like at least ten farewell parties in the crew—room. We were all vciy sorry to see him go: latest news from the home front suggests that he considers his new car only just exceeds the London Birds in sex appeaL Captain T. M. Hickman succeeded Captain Salter as Detachment Commander and was imme— diately presented with the problem of moving down to join Big Brother in Singapore. It had been decided that the Air Squadron was to be united with RHQ and 'A' Squadron on the move of ‘C' Squadron to Hong Kong.

a iii: * jiiii..7...

Irate Adjutant (to Regimental Policeman): Regimental I'oliceman:

Why the ...... didn't you salutt?

Sorry sir but I thought you were Slmffleliotham.

The Second—in—Command puts a few Senior Officers in the picture.

On January 19th the Paroi Detachment moved to Singapore. Now that we are all together, the Selarang helipad complex has very nearly as many air movements as our neighbours, RAF Changi. New P. S. P. pads have been built behind the existing ones, and we even have a new hard standing for the vehicles. Now that the crew-room seems to be always full of pilots and scroungers drinking coffee and reading back copies of ‘Playboy'. the place is out of bounds to the rest of the Squadron. As a farewell fling for Major The Hon. P. H. Lewis. we set forth on a six—ship mission to the island of Tioman. which is approximately forty miles off the east coast of Malaya We spent two nights there, swimming. fishing. and generally rela— xing. The senior N.C.0’s of the Squadron spent a noisy night fishing off a pier. and the more sceptical of the party expected their catch to consist chiefly of empty beer cans, however CoH Skyring did manage to catch some fish which he swore were not paid for. Major Lewis finally left early in February. and the care of the Squadron was handed over to Major P. E. Stonor, fresh from Middle Wallop where he had taught tactics and who is an old hand at Far East survival, having served with us in 1066. As is customary with all change—overs of executives. he was determined to effect a transformation of Squadron adminis— tration, starting with the setting—up of ‘Bird of the Week' in the pilots crew—room. At the going to press the current female is called ‘Optimarse'.


THE ACORN

REGIMENTAL SPORT We have now been alloted all the tasking for the Jungle. Warfare School at Ulu Tiram, and

this is

a

welcome

addition

to

our

many .

flying roles.

. ,w‘ ‘ ' ”Hymnwm‘mwx

i

HROUGHOUT our tour in the Far East it has been difficult to organise sport on a Regimental basis and this has been particularly true of the period under review which has included a Regimental Exercise, Christmas, and the change

Since September we have lost many old hands. Sgt Fleming, Cpl Lott, L/Cpl’s Taylor. Booth and Woodley, L/Cpl Digney. and Troopers White and Curzon have all gone. L/Cpl Booth and L/Cpl Woodley, who are both car com— manders, should be very high powered at map reading having been taught by the patient pilots almost up to their own standard.

over between B and C Squadrons in Hong Kong. It has been mostly left to those who are genuinely interested and prepared to take the trouble to organise themselves to take part in Sport. Water Skiing is to SQMC Stratford’s from A Squadron, to achieved a modicum

We are very pleased to welcome to the Air Squadron Cpl Rundle R.E.M.E. and Troopers Bridger, Faulds, Mitchell and Johnson.

With the

future of the Squadron being anihilation in Octo— ber of this year all, the Life Guards ground per— sonnel will be posted to normal Armoured Car Squadrons, but the pilots have all managed to secure the postings they had hoped for_

Cpl Quirke talking to the Major General while

Major Stoner

looks on.

now definitely NOT an officer only sport: this is largely due enthusiasm and determination to get soldiers, particularly ‘have a go’ : needless to say, once they have tried it and of success they are anxious to continue.

We are of course fortunate in having our own excellent Garrison Swimming Pool. and led by AQMS Carew and Sergeant Cook the Regimental \Vater Polo Team continues to maintain its excellent record: this tcam still rcmai unbeaten by any Army team in Singapore, and is currently competing in the RAF Changi Summer League. Other stalwarts in the team include Signalman Bowers, SCM Clark. Tpr Lister and Corporal Miller. Rugby has been largely the prerogative of C Squadron at Seremban. During the current season SQMC Lerwell. Corporal of Horse Young. Corporal Whyte and Lance Corporal Davis have played regularly for Negri Pirates in the Selangor League which they won without losing a match. They have also appeared for the Negri/Malacca state team on numerous occasions. In January Corporal of Horse Young and Corporal Whyte were selected for a Combined Services Game in Singapore.

DAILY TELEGRAPH Thursday October 26th 1967

Peterborough’s Column — Better Sure Than Sorry

My reference yesterday to The Life Guards presence in Singapore has brought me from a Liecestershire cavalryman a description of his attempt to find the correct postal address of a friend serving with them.

This season we, are again cntcring the soccer team in the Singapore District League Division II: the, difficulties in producing a worthwhile team in competition with largely static units are considerable but we will be very happy if we achieve last year’s result when we finished in 6th position having played 18 games, won 7, drawn 3 and lost 8, Last year two players, Trooper Birch and Lance Corporal Pearce, were given a trial for Singapore Army team. \Vc have great hopes for our team when the Regiment reunites and we return to England.

Motor Rallying has been popular and we have had some considerable success in this field: a separate article appears on this sport. He first telephoned London District at Horse Guards,

to the War Office.

They referred him

“Have you." asked the War Office. “tried London District?" The Singapore element of the Regiment has acquircd Z “Snipes" from

Eventually my correspondent was put through to a woman secretary at

the Nufficld Trust, and although they are rather old and battered. they are sailed

the War Office who said: “Are The Life Guards a regiment in the British Army?".

enthusiastically whenever they are scaworthy. \Ve entered a team in the Singapore inter—unit championships but unfortunately encountered a very strong team in the first round, and did not progress further.

This converted his exasperation into pure delight.


THE ACORN

THE

As individuals however, we have been more successful; and deserving of Special mention are Musn. Rendell and Tpr Jewell, both having sailed for the Army in the inter service championships. Unfortunately Musn. Rendell has now returned to the Band, and he will have to get the following past the customs:—

ACORN

MOTOR SPORT

2 Tankards Rose Bowl Ashtrays Whisky measure Spoon (Not Wooden) . >t<

*

*

TEN PIN BOWLING T began as fun, but as we improved we played more in earnest. Eventually, after having a run of successful games in which the ball did NOT go down the gulley nine times out of ten, we got together and formed a team which we named "The Acorns”.

The team is at present in the 1830 hrs Forces

Bowling League at “Jackies Bowl" Katong which plays on Wednesday nights.

The league consists of 14 teams; 13 RAF, and The Acorns as the sole Army representatives. Each team in the league plays each other twice. Three games are played and the team with the greatest

plicated for me to explain here, however when we were asked what our handicap was, one person was heard to remark ‘Pudding Head Knowles'. Four people play in each team, but tight players are nominated at the start of the season, therefore the player with the lowest score is dropped next match, thus we are able to field a better team each week, the eight are Cpls Cummins, Knowles, Kenton—Barnes, Bennett, Nolan, Whelan, Robson and Henderson. Cpl Whelan. at the time of writing, is the only player in the team to have scored over 200 in a league match, those who have played in a league match will know just how difficult that is, league and practice matches are vastly different.

overall pinfall for the three games wins the extra game, therefore a team could win 4 7 0, while actually only playing 3 games.

We have not had a great deal of success, firstly it is quite expensive to play for practice, secondly most of the teams we play against seem to be of a higher standard and have played in league bowls before. Our claim to fame has been our ability to beat the top teams and to lose to the bottom teams in the league. This is due probably to the handicap system. which is far too com—

The other team within the Regiment is called The Scamoor Slaves and they play in the Q O’Clock Thursday Night League. From what I have seen it is a far higher standard of play, having mostly locals in the teams, however the team have

hit

form,

having won

their last

3

games, which is no mean task. The top players being Tpr Lister average of 157, Cpl Kenton—

SGT MINTO/SQMC PATTINSON AT SPEED ON THE SOUTH MALAYSIAN RALLY OCT. 67.

0 far there have been no motor Sport events S organised in the area,

for military vehicles

only, This puts the serwice enthusiasts at a great disadvantage, having to compete with standard military vehicles against ‘hotted up’ private entrants or works prepared cars.

Following our initial success in the Tengah Teaser Rally when Sgt Minto and SQMC Pattinson were first overall and ZLt Hazelrigg RA and RQMC King were 2nd overall and CoH Poynter and SQMC Stratford finished 8th overall, all dri~ ving Mark 0 Land Rovers, there has been a great deal more interest shown from the Regiment, especially by some of the younger members who have shown great promise.

Sgt Minto/SQMC l‘attinson; Cpl Veal/Cpl Bennett; Cfn VVoodard/Cfn Shaw; Capt Sharman/ RQMC King; Cpl Dean/Cpl Rhodes. This was a much easier Rally than the South Malaysian, basically designed for novice crews and run over a hundred and twenty miles of latcrite roads during daylight. However a strong contingent of civilian cars were entered. as well

Event.s entered since the last publication are as follows:

as 10 more Land Rovers

On the 7/8 October 1067 a team of 3 Mk 0 Land Rovers in the South Malaysian Rally. These \‘(hiclcs wrre (‘rcwcd by:

Capt Sharman and RQMC King finished 2nd overall and 1st in Class. This was a particularly good effort as it was Capt Sharman’s first Rally out here

Barnes 141, chl Bennett 136 81 Cpl Whelan 135.

They are now standing 10th in the league out of 14 teams.

S/Sgt Mathieson/SCM Clarke 7 who unfor— tunately ran out of time and were classed as non— finishers, although they completed the route. This was a particularly stiff rally. held over 500 miles of mainly lateritc and estate roads against strong opposition from works entries. New Year Rally on the, 7th january 1068 — the Regiment entered 5 Mk 0 Land Rovers crewed by:

Sgt M into/SQMC T’attinson

5th overall i 1st

in Class

ZLt Hazclrigg RA/RQMC King 8th overall — 2nd in Class

Cpl Veal and Cpl Bennett were 6th overall and 2nd in Class Cpl Dean and Cpl Rhodes were

7th overall and 3rd in Class. on their first Rally,

Both crews were


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28

THE ACORN

THE ACORN

was the "idle" one which just flopped. Thtse would serve as sweat rags. sun shades. or as now, protectors from the cool drizzle. Suddenly the voice of Col-l Bill barked out. and the group was marching across the square. between the sacred lawns, along the road past the, grandiose frontage of ‘n1igl1t31’ RHQ (protected by the ever watchful duty clerk). past the offices of Fagin and his cronies. the post Corporal gives a longing glance at his ‘1‘cst liouse’ and then plods 011 with the others past BILL-'s shiny ‘hotel'. and out on to the open road. free. and with a song in their hearts (9?). Now the men may take their individual times. they know that they have an hour and forty five minutes to complete the cours3. They quickly spread out. Some eager to get ahead immediatel3 break in to a trot.

Others who carry

a little more 'beer weight straggle a bit and lose interest in anything bar their already aching limbs heaving lungs and the discomforture caused by their perspiration soaked clothes. The runners now have to slow down to a march, their packs weigh heavily 011 their backs. The sun begins to shine through, despite the persisting light rain. Most have a jaunty step as they pass through RAF Changi. There are a few wistful glances towards the gleaming VC 10 which awaits its long flight to the UK. Soon it is left far behind, and faces are turned towards the South China Sea Blue and calm, it looks very inviting to the profusely perspiring band. Some have lost interest in their surroundings. Their feet and a few yards of road in front of them are all that they can see as their heads bow under the strain. A few of the fitter men are still managing a bar or two of the ribald songs they have been singing. but mcst are silent. Campers by the road Side give calls of greeting (or otherwise) and the plodders plod 011. Now the leaders can see across the airfield from the other side. There are whispers suggesting taking a short cut, but these are soon cast aside when remembering that somewhere on the road remains a checkpoint unpassed; ”Besides,” say the 337hispere1's, "it would be too great a risk." After a couple more strenuous miles, a turn in the road towards the third leg of the journey can be seen. Marked by a Landrover it provides a definite objective, and the pace increases slightly. The sun is now shining brightly, the rain has stopped. the heat of the day is added to the fight Sometimes the odour from a kampong (accent 011 the 'PONG) is overpowering. Children come out and giggle pointing at the ‘mad' English. ”Hello Johnnie,” comes from the lips of a two feet tall, berry—brown Malay child; the C131 is taken 11p by his equally gay little companions. Their elders 100k on, expressionless. perhaps even with a bit of malice. very rarely 21 smile crosses their faces. The turn is made, the more energetic choose to run down the slope. it is encouraging to know that the last leg of the journey is ahead, but there, is still a long way to go. There is no singing now. teeth grit as the struggle to maintain the pace gets harder. Those still aware of their surroundings would notice, when passing the foot of the airstrip. that the landing lights are on, and that the dots of light were so bright that they sttmed to outshine (ven the sun. The top of a red bus is seen passing along the horizon, and they realise that the crossroads is ahead. The agony for the leaders will soon be over. Half an hour behind are the gasping wrecks of the more corpulent. and less active members of the, party. These are the ones who will be trying again in the near future to race the clock which marks the minutes that they fail the test by.

lrrto camp swings the leader.

his face.

29

He is greeted by a COH with a frown on

The leader. on bcing given his instructions. lightly mounts the eight

loot high wall, and proceeds to complete, the remaining obstacles, which are con— trived to tax the muscles of the strongest. The wall was specifically built for the Charles Atlas' of our time. It stands there, daring anyone without above— average fitness to mount it. Some of the late—con ers experienced its vindictiveness. A quick run. a leap, and the candidate is left clutching the top with grazed elbows and broken fingernails, 011131 to slip to the base with a sickening thud. A sniggcr is heard from the watching crowd. The victim swears that the wall took a pace backwards just as he leapt. The next candidate swaggers up. braces himself, runs and jumps. The wall and he meet face to fac:. This time the wall has moved forward. And so th( wall mounts up its victories against man.

Next there is the 6 feet ditch to leap. The candidates are advised to bend their legs on impact to prevent injury (as if the advisers care). Up shambles one of the wall’s victories. a sort of half»hearted hop (the effort required for even this is tremendous); whilst flying through the air, the candidate realises that

his leg muscles will not work. He hits the ground with a bone jarring crash. his toes have seemingly been crushed as his feet try to escape from his boots through the. toe~cap. A miserable cripple. he moves to the Scottish Corporal who is supervising this, the penultimate stage, of the body-wrecking torture.

”Pick him up and carry him to the. third lamp post." comts the brogue instruction. The candidate looks at the heavind. soaking, live—weight he has to carry, and does a very good impression of a dying swan. When revived, he bends down to enable his load to lean over his neck. The candidate then grasps a leg and an arm, he summons all his reserye forces and, with the perspiration dripping from him, he lifts. Nothing happens. He lifts agarri.‘bala11ce.1s lost, both slump to the ground in a soggy mass. They t131 and try agam. workmg foot by foot around the 400 yard circuit. Our victims now go to the range from 33here can be heard the intermittant hammering of Ste1lings being fir.ed Here is wheIe. with slippery shaking hands 10 1oundsb must be fired in as many SttOXlCls at a small target 10 yards away. Sterling's are raised to the shouldtI. and 011 the command. >‘pr'a3 the geneial area of the targets Some of the candidates a1e better at this than otl1e1s.some assist others by aiming at the wrong targets through their steam: d 11p e3eballs. Despite this most of the 6candidates manage to stupass the mandat013' minimum of 5 holes.

Released at last from the PTl's clutches. arms are returned to the store. and tired. limp, men slo33l3 mount the stairs to their rooms Some put this off by going to the Chai Vt allah s and indulging in a gallon 01 so 01 Squash which their bodies i111111tdiattl13 1ejett through illt11 ports. At last. with c31tain glorious ceremony, boots a1e 1(1.110\t(l

(moans of tcstacy 'dlt heard throughout the block.

Showers are, 11111, shouts of pain are l1ea1d as blisters burst. but soon all is quiet again. Breakfast is bad by those who can make the struggle downstairs. otherwise beds a1e, covered 33itl1ttht bodies of men who lick their wounds with 11 fi\ed. glazed stare in their cyts.


THE ACORN THE ACORN V ._ that]

W05 5' CsoH MESS 8 previously forecast, the past quarter pro— duced an absolute ‘medley’ of social events, (D

the end product being that the ‘Stayers’ are now taking what can only be described as an extensive course of dehydration, Throughout the

.E '—

With the arrival of our Band on December we had the great pleasure many old faces, This was the Band's to the Regiment abroad since BAOR in

the 16th of seeing first Visit 1962 and

(D

greater part of October and November we were

E (U

happy to be hosts to the Senior Ranks of 51 Squadron RE who were at the time actively engaged in a pipe laying project at Changi. A very pleasant and, we hope, lasting relationship was formed. Their stay culminated in a massive Games evening, a presentation of plaques and a new bar in the Mess.

U) Q) .C [.—

< L (D .C (D C) O U) x C “3

DC L

.9 C Q)

U’) (1) .C .—

I4-

0 U) L (D L (U 3

G (1) (D L .C

('B' Sqn Are Wearing Scheme Kit)

'—

Early in October we followed up the ex— tremely popular ‘Come As You're Caught' Dance of the previous month with a 'Fancy Dress’ evening and Barbequc. This in turn was closely followed by the traditional ‘Halloween Ball'.

All

three parties were successful and creditable to the hard pushed entertainments committee.

Over a fairly liquid lunch on the 1st Novem— ber we said goodbye to an old friend. Major W. R_ Edgedale; we wish him the best of luck

in his new appointment and look forward to con— tinued ’discussions’ on our return to the Royal Borough.

l—

l C

.9 U) f0 0 O

O Q) 3

.S’ C

3 Major W. R.

Edgedale and

the

RCM.

they certainly ‘pulled out all the stops', official Mess functions being complimented by extraordinary musical evenings throughout the Christmas season. The dance section under the guidance of Hon L/CoH Dodson played for us on the 16th December and what a delight it was to have a first—class Band after the various ‘guitar and drum’ efforts that we normally have to contend with. The Commanding Officer and officers invited all Mess members and their wives to an excellent party in the Officers Mess on the 21st December. Very much later the same evening, Trumpet Major ‘Ernie’ Madden produced a delightfully in— formal concert for us in our mm ‘establishment', the highlights of this particular part of the: evening being the RCM informing some of the more effusive ladies to ‘Shut—up' or words to that effect; and the orchestral piece conducted by SQMC Jim Morris. On the 22nd December we ‘Hung the Brick’; the ceremony being performed very professionally by the Commanding Officer who receives all our thanks and also congratulations in obtaining a bar to his ‘Brick Hangers Mcdal'! Following custom. the Mess Draw was held on Brick Hanging day and our thanks are extended to SQMC Stratford and his committee for their hard work in producing a very excellent display. The following day, having consumed liberal amounts, of Seletaris. Epsom Salts and Gin we plunged headlong into crrr Formal Christmas Ball which the Commanding Officer, together with the officers and their ladies attended. This again turned out to be a first—class party; particular thanks must go to COH Dodson and his boys for playing so stoutly throughout the evening; the PMC and his committee who produced such a splendid ‘Ballroom’ and of course the Master Cook who always rises to the occasion.


THE ACORN

The original idea of having a Christmas Ball in lieu of a New Year's Eve Ball was fortunate: the weather broke with a vengeance and poured constantly for three days; however this in no way prevented our lesser ‘indoor' production. a New Year's Eve Dance and Draw. from taking place although flooding did inconventently prevent the Band from arriving from ‘Up Country‘. At the 'twelfth hour' the RCM somehow rustled 11p a group and if it was wet and miserable out— doors it certainly wasn’t so in the Mess. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed themselves; at midnight our thoughts were very much with comrades old and new and all our many friends, The artistes of a visiting CSE show were entertained for a brief but amusing period on the 11th January.

On

THE ACORN

Opportunity of wishing him well in his new ap~ pointment as Commander Hong Kong Land Forces,

THlIZ Squachon mess has continue d ve1V happ11V (\(1 the past quarter with a number of Mess functions all of which we1e very sue— ccssful. l(1haps the most hilarious was the "Do it Yourself” night to paint the mess, which seemed to result in the mess members and their

wives painting themselves. Although they still managed to make an excellent job of the mess and are to be congratulated 011 the result.

Taking fuel aboard in the WOs and CsoH Mess. Left to Right: Lt Col J. N. Ghika, RCM D. Charles, The Major General, WOII Lowe, Irish Guards, RQMS McGuire, Irish Guards.

Wednesday 14th February we said our

We. have said our Good—byes to: good—byes to theSenior NCOs of 42 LAD Batterv RA who have been extremely pleasant guests for the better part of a year. We wish them all the very best of fortune amongst the sheep farming fraternity of Wales.

Exercise ‘Stoney Castle’ gave us the oppor~ tunity of seeing C Squadron briefly in transit and B Squadron for a very enjoyable two weeks stay, the MESs duty free beer allocation only just coping under the pressure. B Squadron’s stay at Selarang produced one of the rare occasions when at most three—quarters of the Mess members could be in one place at the same time and therefore the opportunity was. taken to stage a Dinner Party with the Commanding Officer, Second in Command and Major Arthur Gooch as our guests.

We were delighted to have the Silver Stick. Colonel H. S Hopkinson, MBE, with us on the

13th November and look forward to seeing him again on our return in the autumn. The other distinguished presence in the Mess recently was Major General B.O. P. Eugster. whom we all thoroughly enjoyed meeting again and take this

C SQUADRON WO's 8' NCO’s MESS

CoH Hunter to RHG

CoH Jeffery to D & M School, Bovington COH Brady to HCR We welcome back to the fold CoH Juleff from HCR CoH Lumb from Mons OCS CoH Miteheson from HCTS CoH Bentley from HCR (H) CoH Reynolds from HCTS CoH Perkins from HCTS. Our heartiest congratulations to CsoH Hoare, Fettes, Kelly. Reed, Shergold and L/CoH Hut— chings on their promotions.

This was followed on October 28th by the non commissioned officers of the Light Aid De— tachment Section running a Barbecue and Dance in honour of the REME birthday. There was plenty of good food and it is believed that Sergeant Hulley is very likely to be installed as Squadron master cook, his baked potatoes are a byword in Seremban now. The recipe can be purchased from Staff Sergeant Simmons (mess treasurer) at very low cost. The Christmas festivities started on the 15th December with the Christmas Draw and dance. We are indebted to Sergeant Hulley for organising the draw. A great number of games of chance had been played since the beginning of August, and consequently there were a large number of very good prizes. Unfortunately we broke with tradition and Captain Thomson (lid not win any hair brushes. Corporal of Horse York, who didn't

Our present senior members are: RCM D. Charles RQMC C. J. Rodger RQMC (Tech) J. H. King WOII (Serving Personality) A. W. Beales SCMs A. D. Clarke, D.A. Turtle, D. C. Miller and O. R. Levct. BEM. ORSQMC (7}. B. Charters—Rowe SQMCS D. Pattinson. L. D. Stratford, A.

Gibson. G. E. Skinner, J.L. Morris. Bradwell and W. B, Lcrwell.

The highlight of the quaiter has been without doubt the formal dinner and dance 011 September 23rd. This was a most successful and enjoyable evening. Corporal of Horse Jeffrey and his committee must have a special mention for the enor— mous amount of work that they put in.

F.

win any hair brushes either. organized the dance. He has convinced us all that no dance is complete without at least half an hour of “Limbo". Brickhanging was of course as usual a great

Leader, who as the readers will know is not exactly a good ballistic shape suffered from ”Drift" during a game of “Strike the Light” missed the target and landed on his head on the stone floor damaging it rather badly (his head not the floor). This gave us a very nasty moment but he soon revived after First Aid in the shape of a couple of very large whiskies. The Squadron Leader hung the brick for us in masterly fashion. The mess members would like to take this oppor— tunity of thanking him. Well and truly hung Sir! We promise that we will not continue with the tradition of dropping the Brickhanger on his head.

The annual football match on Boxing Day started off as officers and senior non commissioned officers versus junior non commissioned officers and seemed to develop into eve1yone in the Squadron being in fancy dress and playing. There was equal confusion about the rules and the score. The junior non commissioned officers gave it as their opinion that it was unfair to have sight screens across the goalmouth and two goalies because the wheels had jammed 011 their sight screen and they were unable to get it into place before the kick off. After one or two references to the Guard Roll by the Squadron Corporal Major, agreement was reached. At the end of the afternoon we all retired to the Mess to await the arrival of the band.

The band certainly made a difference in the mess. They played for us three times including New Years Eve and on each occasion were a great success. particularly for the, New Years Eve Ball when they did splendidly; the highlight being a rather inebriated Harry Dunsmore blowing in the New Year 011 his Post Horn. Despite the fact that the band had to leave by bus for Singapore at 0600 hrs they continued to play until 0230 hrs which was very much appreciated by all.

success: Squadron Quartermaster Corporal Lcrwell

ran a very successful draw. Hair brushes were again conspicuous by their absence. Captain Thomson can be sure this will be rectified next time All the usual games were played and the usual number of bruises sustained.

The Squadron

The mess has had to close for two months whilt tht Squadron is in Hong Kong, but we all hope that by the time this is in print we will be open again and in full swing.


THE ACORN

THE

HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT

which proved a great success. Towards the end of October occurred the first of the Winter Season

Dances which were great fun. Colonel Sir Henry EVERY offering from the Household Cavalry Regiment to either the "Household Brigade Magazine" or to the ”Acorn" seems to start off "This has been a fairly quiet quarter ....... ” Well. so does this one. Since Pirbright. and the brief foray of the Mounted Squadron into the gilded world of the Cinema, life settled down to its normal routine. In early November we had a hectic week when the Arrival of the President of Turkey for a State Visit clashed with the Opening of Parliament. On the Tuesday we had the Opening of Parliament, the Squadron providing two divisions for the Blues Escort, followed by the Arrival Escort from Victoria to Buckingham Palace on the Wednesday; tradition— alists being cheered by the familiar sight of the Surgical Goods Store. Major R. I. Ferguson and Captain N. S Lawson took up suitable positions on the 2nd Carriage.

The Queen who was due to pass through The Horse Guards, Arch. The Royal Rolls Royce broke down directly in front of the Guard com— manded by CoH Burton-Johnstone, RHG. Her Majesty while transfering to the second car intimated to the Guard Commander that perhaps his mount might have been a more reliable form of transport.

Abel—Smith paid

)

a short visit

in October

ACORN

35

CoH Stewart. CoH Brady and CoH Fincken have arrived from the: Regiment and COH Fletcher from the D 81 M School at Bovington.

CoH Brady a speedy recovery from the wounded was greatly welcomed. arm honourably received through the agency of Colonel St, George hung the brick on the 23 December in his usual inimitable manner.

a black horse and the Riding School Tan!

With the New Year well under way, steam is being built up for the projected tour of the Musical Ride in America. Despite being con— stantly pointed out as no holiday, there has been no problem in finding people. who are keen to go. As a foretaste to this frenetic activity we have also learned that the next escort will be at Windsor on July 16 together with a Staircase Party and a Mounted Band so there is a fair chance that the next article for the Acorn will

3rd and 4th Divisions of the Sovereign’s Escort for the Opening of Parliament found by The Life Guards.

— or perhaps this would be a better caption —

From 2nd Life Guards Letter Book.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR 2ND LIFE GUARDS AT THE CORONATION OF QUEEN VICTORIA.

3rd and 4th Divisions of the Sovereign's Escort for the Opening of Parliament found by

The Life Guards moving off from Wellington

Christmas was then upon us with everybody enjoying the Christmas Lunch except the poor Queen’s Life Guard. who at one point thought they had been forgotten. Luckily morale was retained by Lieut H. D. E. Boyt carrying out a “mercy dash" in a car laden with goodies. An amusing incident happened earlier in this

quarter, when a Short Guard turned out for H. M.

“ Memorandum for Officers Commanding the Troops attending the Coronation, 28th June 1838.

Barracks.

not begin “This has been a fairly quiet quarter

“ The greatest forbearance and temper must be shown by the officers and men under their orders.

WOs & NCOs Mess The Wos & NCOs Mess has been splendidly redecorated since the last issue of "Acorn”, with a new bar and a new carpet. In late September a Mystery Coach Tour was run to Brighton

We wish

and

The, men must be strictly cautioned against striking any lndrvrdual whatever. nor to allow their horses to Trample on airy Person.

at The men must not attend to any Personal abuse that may be levelled n them, nor must they mind any Missile that may be thrown at them


THE ACORN

THE ACORN

DUTYMAN GOES EAST

The only laughs that I got were seeing the Second-in—Command trying to learn the new voice procedure (he hadn't quite succeeded) and passing an exKnightsbridge Corporal of Horse who had broken down by the side of the road with no rations.

OF

AN OPEN

37

LETTER TO THOSE LEFT BEHIND by Sharp—end Soldier The Squadron Leader always seems to lead us from behind, which was a bit tricky as you never knew when he was going to suddenly appear and breath

SoME time last year I had a bad week: I was booked by the Adjutant for dusty jack—boots on Guard mounting (if he had to sfamp around in jack—boots with all those footies raising the dust in Wellington, he would have seen my point) and booked by the Troop Cinoral of Horse for allegedly being idle on stable guard. After an interview with the Squadron Leader (at his request) when I lost a certain amount of my pay, I had another with him (at my request) when I asked for a transfer to the Armoured Car Regiment. Since the Leader had a little experience with the Armoured Cars. he saw my point, and after a very involved course at Catterick, the subject and details of which unfortunately elude me at the moment, I found myself on an aeroplane for Singapore.

My hopes of a new deal and a fresh start were shattered soon after arrival, when I found that I was posted to a squadron which contained both the Adjutant and the Corporal of Horse with whom I had so recently had a difference of opinion. They did not seem to bear me any malice however, so, pretending that I bore no grudge. I tried to enter into the spirit of the life.

down your neck: the Colonel, who is as God~like as the one up town, takes it

literally out here, and is always dropping in from the skies by helicopter which can catch you in very awkward situations. Troop Leaders, who rarely used to give trouble unless you gave them a tread on watering order, tend to know rather too much about which oil goes, where in the cars, Instead of having a set of full kit, horse furniture and grooming kit on charge, most people have .an armoured car and enough tools to start a garage, on their signature, all of which are very expensive as I know to my cost. Mitchell and Bridger have the right idea as' they have gone to the Air Squadron where all they do is look down on us from. a great height and lob it up to no mean tune.

As Napoleon said, or was it Corporal Major Brainmer, it takes a great man to admit when he is wrong. I must get on with a letter that I have to write.

A Squadron My initial shock was to find several Blues in the squadron,

As everyone

The Life Guards

knows, in London, Blues are segregated from us down at the other end of the

Selororig Barracks

yard where their officers can watch them closely from the Officers' Mess, but when it comes to actually having them in the same troop as yourself. that is a different matter. Then there were the armoured cars themselves. We all used to complain about looking after the blacks, but when you come to think about it, all they needed was a bit of grooming, shoc—ing by CoH Brown occasionally and the odd jab from Colonel Dean, and you were there, Not so these things. The gun was a bit dodgy for a start. Depending on how you assembled it, it would either work or not work, and if it didn’t, people tended to ask why. I had made the mistake of thinking that the radio, as different from my transistor as chalk from cheese, was a means by which I could talk to my friends, rather like a telephone. Not a bit of it: you have to talk in some strange jargon, and any deviation from the accepted method and someone (the Corporal of Horse from up town for instance)

is violently rude to you. After an attempted period of rc—adjustment in Barracks, we went off on a scheme. This again was a rude shock as I was expecting something on the lines of Stoney Castle, Alas, no parties. no Sports Day, no (well not much) drink. but very little sleep and constant driving about in a temperature that made a kit ride under Corporal Major Ferric in August seem like an Eskimo in midwinter who has forgotten how to build an igloo.

"t GPO Singapore Dear Major Ferguson.

Doubtlcss you remember me born when \\t last met in your office ii ‘ bec om e disen— “ > i‘ cost‘ 11Mr fin'* pounds.' I ha\e" I(C(fltl_\ which ‘ ' August, an intchiew to me keeping chanted with this squadron as the Sccondein~Command objected

troop Corporal of Horse bc20mc violent my . kit bag, and my t in my . field dressing vehiclt s radiator. I am writing to my into when I inadveitantly poured petrol for me on the forthcoming tour of vacancy a ask therefore if there is possibly first chicks was my normal relief that the Musical Ride in America? I know a Iowe the ofi‘a ttw pounds.‘ thit " ' mattti ' ' ' the small on guard, and that there, Is y) but amicabl resolved be certain. Mounted Squadron fund, (which can. I am ...... feel that I have something to offer. .........


THE ACORN THE

ACORN

HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY TRAINING SQUADRON 55 recruits have passed through the Squadron since the last edition of the Acorn; this is slightly

1055 than usual but an inevitable result of the Defence Cuts. The shortage of recruits in LCoH

Patterson’s Troop resulted in their combining forces with an under—strength Welsh Guards squad;

this is the first time we have had to arnalgamate w to or ). (I < 3 [I [1] LL] U. I Z O [I O < 3

with outside squads. Although not ideal, it is surprising how well it works! The initial shock of the Defence Cuts is now abating and recruiting is slowly picking up again. Kimberley Day, on 15th February, was celeb— rated in great style by the Squadron. The band, in fine tune after their Far East tour, played in the Cookhouse whilst the officers and Senior NCOs served a magnificently prepared lunch. In the afternoon the Riding Master supported by dutymen and recruits from HCR provided a riding display. This was not only first class entertain— ment, but aimed at giving the recruits some idea of what to expect when they arrive at Wellington Barracks. We were very pleased to welcome. Lt

O

Colonel Sir James Scott,

Bart,

who visited us

U) (D Z Z < [I

that day; also the Italian Military Attaché who watched the afternoon display. The latter re—

turned to Italy taking with him a Household Cavalry forage cap which had been run through by a lance during the tent pegging display. One wonders what stories he will be able to build

J—

around this trophy! Other visitors have included

>. [I

the Lieutenant

5:> <( 0 D _J O I LLI U) 3 O I

Colonel

and

the

enough, with colours llying, They almost broke the Depot record for the March and Shoot com—

petition, missing it by only 0.8%. This. is particularly creditable when one remembers that House— hold Cavalry Troops have only about half as long a time as Foot Guard Squads in which to train for this event. Sporting—wise we have held our own. We fought hard to retain the Brownlow Boxing Cup which we won last year, but despite some very plucky efforts, particularly from Rct Hunt in the heavy—weight final, were only placed third. We have had regular representations in the Depot Soccer and Rugger teams, and LCoH McGlough— lin and Rct Wright have both distinguished themselves in the latter. Wright has also represented Aldershot Services. The Squadron beat all the other recruit companies in the Depot Cross Country Race, only being beaten by the Junior Guards— smen’ Company, who have almost ten times the numbers to choose from. Lt McCormick left for Hong Kong in Novem— ber, and we wish him all good fortune there.

He

has been replaced by 2 Lt J. J. Astor. We have also said goodbye to CsoH Reymolds, Mitcheson and Perkins to the Far East, Tpr Henderson to HCR, and Tpr Brown to the RAMC.

LCoH Mc—

Gloughlin has joined from the Regiment and Cpl Lloyd is due to arrive shortly after completing his cadre course.

Commanding

Officer of the Royal Dragoons, Lt Colonel P. D. Reid. We expect to see the first Royals here in July. Also two distinguished visitors to the Guards Depot, Rear Admiral M. C_ Morgan—Giles, DSO, OBE, GM, MP and the Minister of Defence for

Libya watched Household Cavalry recruits on training.

It is hoped that the sight of LCoH

McGloughlin’s Troop, swinging through the trees on the Confidence Area, will inspire the latter to purchase plenty of British military hardware.

The old LMG has at last been replaced by th( GPMG. It is hoped that by the time recruits, now being trained, pass out, both Regiments will

have the (lI’MG. This apart, it is a similar weapon to the Browning and so of much more value to a recruit than the LMG. The last Troop to be trained on the. LMG went out. appropriately

4th

Week

Adiutant’s

Inspection

of

L/Sgr.

Roger’s

Squad, Tp Ldr., 2 Lt. J. J. Astor, Isl' Combined House— hold Cavalry and Welsh Guards Squad.


THE ACORN

THE ACORN

THE

41

We have just completed another LP for ‘Liberty' records. Among the music

BAND

recorded was ”Crown Imperial", “Le Prophete” march and Handel’s “Fireworks Music”,

In addition, Harry Dunsmore can be heard playir’rg a very up-to—date

UCH has happened since our last notes. we have been kept so busy since version of ”Post Horn Gallop". The record might not reach the Top of the Pops M then that it seems such a long time ago that we tool' part in the Berlin but we think it is good enough for music lovers in general and in particular Tattoo. It was during the latter part of September when we went to Berlin Military and Brass Band enthusiasts.

and many hours were spent in rehearsals before the Tattoo proper took place. However, the free hours of sightseeing and sampling Berlin night life helped to We are being kept reasonably busy with duty and paid engagements up

make the visit a pleasant one.

to the middle of July.

Our last official duty before we prepare for the North

American Tour is as a mounted band in Windsor for a State Visit on 16th july. At the conclusion of the Berlin Tattoo most of the Bands who took part along with ourselves moved to Brussels.

The Board of Trade were holding a

”British Week” and we helped to show the flag.

This indeed was a very busy

time for all concerned and the local food didn't help matters by causing a few upset stomachs.

At the conclusion of this trip the Band were glad to be back

home and to have a few days rest.

From early August onwards we combine with the Royal Horse Guards and prepare for the visit to the USA. Only about half the Band will be involved and those chosen are very happy about the tour and those not gomg are a wee bit envious. Our three film cameramen are taking part in the visit to North Anurica and no doubt they will bring back to noteworthy record on film of places visited. etc.

Back in London we had the usual duties and engagements involving Trum» peters and the Band taking part in one or two broadcasts with the BBC.

Must

mention the Lord Mayor's Show in which it was our turn for duty as a Mounted Band:

In conclusion. it is perhaps worth recording that within the space of a \‘C’dl' most members of the Band will have travelled as far east as Hong Bong

It must have been one of the few occasions that it had been held in and as far west as North America.

Also a visit to Berlin and Brussels.

Surely

brilliant sunshine; the day was more in keeping with Spring rather than November.

. a rich experience that mav not be possible in a few years: time as a Ecrvrceman Preparations for our visit to the Regiment were getting under way and one could sense a little excitement as, flight details and other items of interest concerning our tour began to arrive in the Band Office.

l"

At last the day of departure duly arrived and an air of expectancy could be sensed as the Band waited at Knightsbridge Air Terminal for the coach to London Airport. The Regimental Adjutant, Major Gooeh. and the Band Secretary.

CoH Gunn, were at Knightsbridge to see the Band off on what was to turn out to be a very happy tour of the Far East,

A more detailed report of the tour

appears elsewhere in the magazine. Members of the Band who were lucky enough to be on the tour have spoken of the many sights and wonderful experiences they had.

John \Nalthew, Derek Halstead and Keith l’ollitt took cine cameras with

them on the tour and have captured the mood of the Band and the many interesting places they visited.

Since their return to London they have been busy cutting

and preparing their films and at times. a stranger could be excused if he thought a great Hollywood epic was in the making! However, these boys have done a good job and we are all awaiting the Prtmiere. far cry from Hyde Park.


THE ACORN THE ACORN

TOUR OF THE FAR EAST BY

THE

BAND

ttw years ago it would have seemed in— A conceivable that a Houschold Cavalry Band would ever be called upon to venture fur— ther abroad than Europe. With the posting of The Life Guards to FARELF the question of a visit by the Baud was raised and agreement was reached with the Ministry of Defence that The Life Guards Band would tour the Far East in December 1067, visiting Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong. The itinerary was cxtrcmzly well thought out by Major C. W. Wordsworth who was appointed temporary ‘Band President’ for the duration of the tour. \Vith some two tons of baggage the Band departed from London Airport on the night of

Bond

TV'

TO FULFIL A HONG KONG ENGAGEMENT.

TO NEGOTIATE THE FLOODED MALAYAN ROADS IN AN ENDEAVOUR

BAND OF HM LIFE GUARDS MAKING A VALIENT BUT VAlN ATTEMPT

MAJOR W. JACKSON, ARCM.

of

the

the 14th December for Singapore in a 'Biitannia' chartered from British Eagle. We, all looked for— ward to seeing Instanbul and Bombay which were the stopping places en route, but were disap» pointed to find both places rather miserable, wet,

deserted and in darkness.

The Band arrived at Singapore at 7.30 am. on Saturday 16th December into what was the cnd of a long period oi rain, We were fortunate

to be based with the Regiment (HQ 8: A Squadrons) at Stlarang Barracks and on Sunday began our long list of (ng‘agements by playing at three of the Garrison Churchcs, History was made here, as this was the first occasion The Life Guards Band appeared in the No. 3 Dress. ‘Bcating Retreat’ on Monday 18th December was the main feature of our Visit to Singapore This was a tremendous: success, mainly due to the co—optration of Major Dinty Moore, Director of Music of the 2nd Gurkha Rifles, who joined forces with us and with only one rehearsal pro— duced a very good show, Rehearsal was arranged for 0930 hrs, not realising what the steaming heat of Singapore was really like. The Gurkha band‘ smen appeared quite indifferent to 100C in the

Life

Guards.

sun but as can be imagined this was something new to us. The answer to the problem may have looked rather comic but the object was achieved 7 a good rehearsal and no casualties from the blistering sun. We must have looked very unmilitary figures on the square that morning 7 lightweight civilian clothes with white hand— kcrchiefs in place of hats. My old trilby did a splendid job that day, much to the amusement of all.


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45

THE ACORN

January Qth to 0550 hrs january 10th. As we were on the Hong Kong side of the water. we had to cross to Kowloon before the last ferry. so we had to spend the whole night in the departure lounge at Kai Tak Airport We eventually got away after a further delay and arrived at our first stop — Singapore, Here we were veiy pleased to see Colonel Ian Baillie. Major Wordsworth and RCM Charles there to meet us and say a last farewell. The next staging post was Bombay. where we had another delay because of the weather ahead. We should have made for Istanbul next. but had to land at Kara— chi to re—fuel (apparently because of very strong head winds). At Karachi we were delayed for a further two hours and once again started for Istanbul. This proved to be the worst part of the flight: the weather ahead was very bad and a heavy snow storm was in progress at Istanbul

and the temperature —70. The Captain made one attempt to land. but on second thoughts decided

THE

he would have to go to Athens which would mean another delay of at least 24 hours, Soon after we had gained height I was informed (as OC Flight)

ACORN

c sQuADRoN ADVENTURE TRAINING PULAU PERHENTIAN BESAR

that the Captain had been in contact with a colleague at the control tower who thought there was a good chance to make a landing. The first touch down on the snow was a very anxious moment but the aircraft was brilliantly handled and we landed safely in a blizzard. At Istanbul we had to cool our heels for about 5 hours while the plane was de—iced and the runway cleared. We landed at Heathrow in a rather exhausted state after travelling for 50 hours s a flight which was scheduled for 29 hours. To round the trip off, the baggage. some 2 tons of it, was moved to the. customs hall on the small baggage cscalator. Some of the large hampers got stuck and the result was absolute chaos. After all this the Customs Officers might have been more sympa» thetie, Several of us had to reach for our cheque books, but it was good to be home.

OWARDS the end of September it was decided that the time had come for the Squadron to have some leave, and at the same time do some adventure training. Owing to the routine camp administration at Paroi it was inevitable that the whole Squadron could not be awav at one time and thus it was planned that the period October 25th to November 19th should be put aside for adventure training and leave. The aim was that while half the Squadron was on leave the other half should go to the island of Pulau Perhcntian Besar which is twelve miles off the coast of Trengganu. and spend two weeks there taking part in three main activities under the instruction of the troop leaders. These acti— vities were to be canoeinv, surveying, and 21 Robin» son Crusoe survival period. Owing to the lack of serviceable canoes available the first activity had to be abandoned and instead, life saving, swimming lessons and various construction tasks were carried on. The first party arrived on 30th October under Corporal of Horse Shergold to find the advance party had set up a camp just off the beach in a large Sheltered bay. They had no tents with them but only standard ”jungle kit”. They were then split up into groups of four and five under a junior NCO and alternated between the various

activities.

The Robinson Crusoe survival proved the most unpopular as the only kit allowed was a fishing line, two hooks, a box of matches and a gollock. The party was moved off by assault boat to a neighbouring beach and expected not only to survive, but make themselves comfortable for the following four days. Most groups managed fairly well, although there is no doubt that many a passing fisherman was bribed to help supplement their meagre diets of fish baked in banana leaves. One group is even rumoured to have tried swim— ming to the kampong on the next island in search of food and was only forced to return by the numerous jellyfish in the channel between the islands.

The second party under Corporal of Horse Venn proved themselves to be great engineers and built an excellent aqueduct which carried water about fifty yards from a fresh water stream to a showerhead on the beach, Unfortunately no sooner had it been built than it began to rain solidly day in day out and it lost its usefulness. A very good chopper pad was also built for the Air Squadron who paid a fleeting visit with the Squadron Leader. This cost the locals eight palm trees and us $8/~ a tree!

N0 beer was taken to the islands (except a 11 small amount by the directing staff”) but in spite of this there were some lively smokers in the evenings and several trials were held including one at which Tpr Hulbert was acquitted on the charge of “Eating the amount of food required by two men and yet only doing the work of one."

Curtain

"Adventure Training” The Beach-head Pulau Perhentian Besar.


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THE

ACORN

GEORGE CARTER 50

The

THE ACORN

Drummer in

Munnings’

Picture.

The Royal Australian Armoured Corps is basically composed of three regi— merits, one being purely armoured using Centurions, another being the Cavalry regiment employing either Ferrets and Saladins or Ferrets and Mll3’s mounting a 50 calibre Browning and the last being an Armoured Personnel Carrier mounted squadron although calling itself a regiment, each troop having about ll carriers commanded by a captain with a subaltern 21C. The Infantry Battalion Group we 1n:t consisted of 3rd Battalion Royal Australian Regiment supported by one troop of the Cavalry Regiment, a troop of Armoured Personnel Carriers, a battery of guns and an tngineer field troop. This apparently is the normal Vietnam type establishment. And so to the exercise. The KSLI were required to build and man a series of Vietnamese style hamlets and build a fortified village complete with food and arms caches, tunnels and booby traps and a Viet Cong training camp, all of which the Australians, one hopes ably assisted by six members of C Squadron,

were to clear.

This they successfully did and we moved on to the second and

almost the most exhausting stage of our stay. This was a 48 hour Battalion exercise involving an advance to contact acrcss some very hard country, the bush in this area consisting of mile upon mile of soft sand underfoot with a prolific growth of gum trees and some very steep hills. Although it was now October it was extremely hot by day with the temperature dropping sharply by night. The Author found himself an tnemy platoon commander with Cpl Mitchell as one of his section commanders; the remainder of the platoon consisted of

The Life Guards detachment and an assortment of bottle washers kindly loaned by HQ Company. We found that walking for forty—eight hours did not really agree with us and all felt that we were better employed in armoured cars. For all this we greatly enjoyed ourselves and felt we had given the KSLI something to think about as we outwalked a lot of regular infantrymen. After this there followed a large number of cocktail parties and Happy Hours about which none cf the party are prepared to comment. Suffice, it to say that at a Happy Hour given to half the Australian Battalion by the KSLI £711 of beer was drunk. At the end of this period The Life Guards’ party moved south to Brisbane and then the Gold Coast, the Mecca of Queensland surfers, while the Battalion carried out Public Duties in Brisbane. The Gold Coast was a fascinating place and made a very pleasant ten days leave. Amongst the many attractions was a porpoise. pool similar to the ones in America and various wildlife sanctuaries wrere kangaroos, koala bears and laughing jackasses could be setn in their natural habitat, if one hadn’t already seen them in the exercise area which was full of wildlife. Australian beer although not the same as our own was easily adapted to and many were the friends made whilst on the coast which made our departure to Singapore all the more unwelcome, but eventually we all returned by RAF Argosies on the 19th October having spent a most worthwhile six weeks in Australia.

e

. of Wales. ( later ‘ the, Prince ‘ ‘ 0 Carter watched i small boy Geor A VII) 01:; the Blackwall gTunnel. The Mounted Band of the lst Llfe was on ‘ parade and he ma de up his mind that when he grew up he would the drummer. “I. "th the Scots V a ‘ ' 1902 and hayiiigsewed the Army ' in ' He, ' orned

the Commanding Offictr of the KSLI, who made the trip possible and to Lieutenant F. Dewar, Royal Australian Armoured Corps who had the dubious problem of fitting six Life Guards into his already full troop.

Guards become. , Guards

as the kettle and Line Cavalry finally transferred to the 1st Life Guards in 1010

drummer.

Our thanks inevitably must go to Lieutenant Colonel j. Ballenden, MC,

Edward

He left the Regiment in 102/.

Hospital He became a Chelsea Pensioner in later life, but left the Royal marry. to 80. of age the at last year. 1n ‘ front of the picture of . him his 'i ‘ _\\ife V 1 with lltlt ' ‘ hotoviaphed He is Regiment painted by Nilrnnin‘gs which now hangs 1n the Household Cavalry Barracks. Wellington at Officers Mess


THE ACORN

SOUTH By

Capt.

PACIFIC

S. P.

I967

MEREDITH — HARDY

Faleolo is twenty—two miles from Apia, the capital and chief population centre of Western Samoa, I travelled in the refrigerated comfort of the New Zealand High Commissioner’s car i and was told a little about the island and its people. Western Samoa has a population of

115,000, whose average annual income per capita is £16.0.0d., although food of all sorts is in abundance, and so this does not represent a realistic figure in terms of living standards. Samoa has a long and colourful history, much of which is buried in myth and fable, as the Samoans, in

common with other peoples of the Pacific, had no means of written communication or record before the arrival of the Europeans. Discovered in

1721/22 by the Dutchman, Jacob Roggeveen, annexed by Germany in 1899, she was occupied

The Samoan himself is not the warrior he once was, and now has a typically Polynesian, easy-going outlook on life_ As a race they are

tall men, average height is 5 foot 10 inches, and they are strikingly handsome. However. it is not for nothing that they are called the Irish of the Pacific, and there is many a wharfside inn— keeper between Sydney and San Francisco who will vouch for it,

And so to Apia, uninspiring after the vividly exciting scenery of the past few miles, past the famous Aggie Grey's Hotel and out towards Vailima,

the official residence of the

Head of

State. Vailima stands on high ground above Apia and is approached up a drive of young teak trees. The house was built in 1890/94 by Robert Louis

by New anland in 1914, and was administered Stevenson, and it is here that he spent the last

0 you know where Rarotonga is? Could you pinpoint Western Samoa on a map of the Pacific Ocean? Eighteen months ago I certainly could not; I barely knew that the Cook Islands existed. The following is an excerpt from a letter which I wrote during a tropical downpour in Rarotonga in May 1067. I was at that time Aide» de~Camp to Brigadier Sir Bernard Fergusson, late Governor General of New Zealand and accom— panying him on a lightning farewell visit to some

of New Zealand’s former Pacific Dependencies. 8.5.67. — New Zealand High Commission. Rarotonga, Cook Islands. Early on Wednesday, 3rd May we left Allele land by R.N.Z.A.F. D.C. — 6 for Western Samoa and Rarotonga. We had been in Auckland for the previous three months and the operation of packing to go to the Pacific and simultaneously packing the rest of the luggage to go to Welling ton, to which we are returning, was a mammoth

task. Eventually, after many farewells we set off, abandoning the Comptrolltr to deal with the house moving, twenty domtstie staff, nine cars and all the stores and furniture necessary to make Government House operate for three months,

The party, consisting of Their Excellencics, Sir Bernard and Lady Fergusson, Geordie, their (ltVE‘n year old son, Alexander, 21 nineteen year old ncphew out working on a sheep station in Hawkc's. Bay, David Williams, the Official Secretary on the trip with his wife Anne, Catriona Gordon, the very attractive Lady—in—“Iaiting, Captain James Osborne, The Black Watch, my brother A.D.C., and I. took off at 7.30 a.m. from Whenuapai. Auckland’s military air base, The flight was uneventful and we landed in Western Samoa at 4 pin. on Tuesday, 2nd May, having crossed the International Date Line. We taxied to a halt at Falcolo Airport in brilliant sunshine. with the. tern},>eraturt up in the eighties and the grass still sttarriing from a recent downpour, Soaring above the l’acific we had changed from our lightweight suits to trcpical uniform, by no intans an (.21ch operation in the ccnfintgl space of a D.C.—6, one A.D.C, pulling on the others overalls while struggling with a kilt. at the same time trying to avoid sitting on the Governor (itncral's cocked hat. Now, the doors, swung ()IX'II. and the Governor (itniral, followed by his staff, stepped cautiously down thr prtcipitous gangway and on to Samoan soil. llaving been wtlcomed by thr Head of State, llis Highmss Malittoa 'l‘anuniafili, ll, CHE” His. Excellency was asked to inspect the Guard of Honour, each mrmher of which had a Very p.rsonal interpre— tation of arms drill.

by her until January lst, 1962, when she became an independent state. We passed through innu— merable small villages along the Coast Road, where most of the population live and where fishing is a way of life, together with the growing of copra, cocoa and bananas. These townships

were all that one expects to find on a Pacific island, clusters of large, open—sided buildings with

thatched palm roofs, and strangely enough, huge stone churches, a relic of the German colonisation. The coastline is strikingly beautiful, but in every village one sees long wooden jetties on stilts pro— jccting into the sea, with a tin shack on the end. It took me a very short time to decide that I would not be going for a swim.

Avarua harbour — A shipwreck in the distance.

years of his life and where he died. He is buried on the summit of Mount Vaea, a 1,500 foot peak which rises from behind the house. Until Inde— pendence in 1962 Vailima was the New Zealand High Commissioner's residence; however at the

moment it is empty, having only recently been repaired after a severe hurricane, but Malietoa is going to move in within the next few months. Without being large, Vailima is reasonably spa— cious, and surrounded by open verandahs, in typical Pacific colonial style. The men sleep one side of the house. the women the other — very simple.

Vailima


THE ACORN

T HE ACORN

in the bay at Ngatangiia. the warriors strutting That evening there was a feast in honour of the Governor General; very good food even if one was not sure what it was! I for one was taking no chances and stoked up with ‘tummy' pills before I began. The feast had not started at a specific time, and was obviously not going to stOp for some hours: however. at about 10.30 pm. we found ourselves on the front lawn of Vailima watching native Samoan dancing by torchlight. It is quite unlike other Maori or Tahitian dancing but curiously graceful; very ghostly in the moonlight with jungle noises in the background and long wooden drums beating out crotic rhythms. Eventually, after much whisky we climbed into bed around 1 am. Next morning David Williams, jamcs Osborne. Alexander Fcrgusson, I’hilip (Butler), and I got up at 6 a.m. and climbed Mount Vaea to visit Robert Louis Stevenson’s grave, What a climb! We had two local guides who went up in leaps and bounds like goats, and we followed; there was no path, it had been washed away in a hurricane some months previously, and one had to scramble up, clawing for hand and foot holds. Blowing like whales we arrived at the summit just in time to see the sun rising over the Pacific. One moment we were in the half light of dawn, next an orange ball rose ponderously over the horizon and it was day, Stevenson’s grave is very simple, but quietly impressive: what a

After breakfast His Excellency was invited to drink the ‘Royal Kava of Welcome' — the rarest and most significant honour which Samoa can btstow upon a visiting Head of State. The Governor General had to sit barr- hcadcd under the tropical sun, surrounded by Samoan dignitaries for well ovcr an hour; the soltmnity of the occasion being broken only by Malittoa, who lit a cigarette half way through the ceremony, close"

followed

by

Sir

Bernard.

Soon,

On the way down we bathed in the Vailima Stream —~ bitterly cold and wonderfully refre» shing.

nuts, paw paw.

.

bananas and gourds of water;

little children everywhere laughing and playing; young girls excitedly examining their reflections in the still water of the lagoon.

after

I am writing this letter at the High Com— rnissioncr’s s:aside cottage. The sun has just come out at last, and I can see a little boy right at the top of one of the palm trees, picking a coconut. There is a white sandy beach and about a mile away, out across the lagoon, a long white line of surf, thundering down on the reef in twenty foot rollers — I can hear the noise from here_ There are sevtral islanders fishing off the reef, their outrigger canoes anchored just beside them. As yet, few tourists have been here; however, once the new airstrip is opened in a few years time, I suppose they will come

”two hundred spcar bearing strongs from Faleata District” had done their stuff and gifts of food

flooding in.

Sad really,

had been made, removed and eaten, it was sadly

I could go on and on about the islands. about the FEEL and the surf. about wrecks on the reef, I can see two from here, but I must stop. I should love to come back one day for another brief visit; who knows, prrhaps one will. But life here, is not all sunshine and hula girls: it is raining again now. a pritst was drowned on the rctf a few days ago and the Govcrnment is wondering where it can get some money from.

tim: to lcave.

We retraced our way back to Falcolo, climbed aboard the D.C. —6, swooped once over the airstrip, dipping our wings in salute, and were gone.

Rarotonga is the capital and administrative centre of the Cook Islands, a group centred some (:00 miles west of Tahiti, and formerly a New Ztaland Dependency. The Islands now have internal self government (since 1065) with New Zealand remaining responsible, for defence and external affairs, and still making a substantial financial grant cach ytar. We landed in pouring rain and it has hardly stopped since. The air— slrip is under three feet of water, and we should have left two days ago, but we shall be able to leave tomorrow. all being well.

wonderful place to be buried. Under the wide and starry sky Dig the grave and let me lie. Glad did I live and gladly die. And I laid me down with a will. This be the verse you grave for me; ’Here he lies where he longed to be; Home is the sailor. home from sea. And the hunter home from the hill.

about. the women laden with bundles of coco—

One has always heard stories of Pacific Islands is here they are almost true. As we landed, licautiful girls appeared and covered us in gar— lands of hibiscus flowers, planting wet kisses on our cheeks. The Cook Islanders are a very attractive fun—loving people, closely related to the New anland Maori in language and in culture, The fabled canoes of the great migration from the mythical Hawaiiki to Aotearoa. the Land of the Long White Cloud, now known

A

future

recruit

from

Rarotcnga

perhaps?

We are staying at the Residency, the home of the New Zealand High Commissioner. a very interesting and extremely able man. and his charming Anglo—Samoan wife. There has been the usual round of official welcomes and recep— tions, and Investiture and a tour of the Island. On two days we have been to an Umukai or feast. We all sit down with the local chiefs at a low horse—shoe shaped table and gorge ourSelvrs, eating only with our hands; melons, paw paw,

pears.

mangos,

coconuts,

taro

root

and

avocado

Incidentally. there is even an avocado pear

or more in the fourteenth century. One can still

tree outside my bedroom window, While thls is going on, the dancing girls appear; they (juite Spoil my app'gtitc, and they are far more exciting than any night—club turn; they have about them a wonderful air of good humour and sponta-

visualise the scene of their departure as one stands

neous gaity.

as New Zealand, stopped there for a generation

Pacific

Sunset

Two days later: the Captain of the aircraft teed up his D.C. — 6 bthind the largest bunker on the golf course. which doubles as an airstrip, hopped it onto the runway. and. as the New Zraland racing

commentators

say.

“we

were

on

the

journey" Seven hours and a certain amount of gin later we were back in \Vcllington. w1th half an hour's rest bcforc the first ofiicial engagement.


THE ACORN

THE TRUCIAL OMAN SCOUTS BY

C o H CHARLETT INCE leaving the Regiment in the spring of S67. I was fortunate enough to have my application for secondment to the T. O. S. granted. I haw seen some changes in the Force whilst I have been here. the main one being the move from the old camp in Sharjah. which many members of the regiment will remember. The new camp is on the border of Ajman and is called Mu'askcr Al Murqaab (camp of the watchtower).

On board the Force Dhow (the Author is on the right).

It is a modem camp in the true sense of the word, in that it is being erected around us whilst we att(mpi. to do our normal chores which are frequently interrupted by variations on the theme i.(; the water is off. the electricity is off, the drains are blocked and any combination of the above. The "Sticks and Bricks" do a grand job of causing alarm and dcspondcncy from time to time, with their usual rcpartce of ”cock ups" such as being called from our pits on our only day off to borrow some water bowsers from the RAF and BTS bicause the water being pumped from Sharjah at the rate of 200 gpm was disap— pearing into the sand en route. It was subse-

quently discovered that the main valve had been shut off at the Guardroom by w» yes. you can guess but no prizes given ,, MPBW. Another was the hingcing of doors on the wrong side necessitating fitting of locks upside down. This apparently trivial oversight nearly caused the early demise of a young corporal who had been celebrating his arrival in the bar until the early hours. He finally dragged himself away to his bed. where—upon he lit a cigarette. He woke up to find the room in flames and unaided by his fogged brain tried to lock a locked door. Fortunately the bunk next door was occupied by a non-drinker who was awakened by his screams and he broke down the, door. Still after a few days in the hospital the corporal made a cornplete recovery. he is a sadder and wiser man now but still a very lucky chap indeed. We have also combined both the Sergeants" Mess and the Corporals' Club and there is great rivalry as to who are the biggest drinkers. This finalises into a series of drinking bouts in the guise, of darts matches and games evenings which I suppose can be classed as successful because no one seems to remember who wins or even what the scores looked like at half time. The Mess building is suffering from teething troubles, one of which is the air conditioning unit which doesn’t. It is still undergoing trials and is used as part of the steeple chase, course. So far, it remains firmly anchored to the ceiling, A case of the last man through it, gets the round in, Another change. taking place all the time, is the gradual arabisation of the Force, although what will happm after all the “Brits" leave is anyone's guess. The arab of the Trucial States is a friendly and courteous chap with an easy going attitude to life and a complete rogue to boot. He

THE ACORN

normally cannot write even his own language. so the validity of a 1033 etc rests on his thumb» print. His friendliness which is a two edged sword, can be turned against his superiors when he: is discovered doing something stupid or very often doing nothing at all, When one becomes frustrated by their antics and attempts to deliver a rebuke, it is firstly delayed by a discussion about the state of ones health. followed by a discussion about the weather etc; when the meat of the conversation is reached and you are ready to go to town, his replies vary between ”Maalaysh" (it doesn’t matter), “Baadain” (later), “Yimkin” (may be) of ”Inshallal” (the will of Allah). all of which means, in a polite way, that if you want the job doing, do it yourself. But his good points outweigh his bad and in spite of his frugal upbringing, is quite hardy and continually will walk miles across the desert to visit relatives at a brisk pace. They find it no problem to know their where-abouts even if they havn’t been in the area for some time, whilst we try to struggle with maps which are useless owing to the continual change of the contours. The only things that remain constant are. the Jebaal.

The, breakdown of the Force is 5 Rifle Squad— rons, 1 Training Squadron and a Support Group backed by FHQ and S & T Squadron where in— cidently I am employed. We also have a Boys Squadron for educating and training our future soldiery. They are paid a small wage and are used as runners and morse—key operators at which they are adept, averaging 25 wpm. We have a very good pipe band and that is frequently used whenever the “Brass Hats" decide to pay us a visit, But it is a little disconcerting when an Arab is seen and heard to play "A Scottish Soldier”. The Pipe Major “Bobbie MacPhce" doesn't need a lot of persuading to bring his pipes into the mess and does so on such occasions

as St. Andrew's Day and St. I’atrick’s Day. but he has beened warned that St, George’s Day is in the open season for bag pipes and he brings

them in at his peril.

57

The Rifle Squadrons are distributed to various parts of the States, changing their location from time to time and are deployed to meet “Bush Fires” as and when they occur. They are com— manded by British Officers and who work closely with the BIOS and lead a nomadic life. But in spite of the loneliness, these Officers are in their

element with almost the same powers as the Sheikhs. They tend to be more “Bedu” than the normal Arab and have various eccentricities. One has enormous sideburns and is known as the ”Old Man of the Hills" and another called to mind is a RCT officer who sports a magnificent white beard and is frequently seen wearing an "Edwardian" frock coat and a white shemagh. (Lawrence would be proud of them). Others take to carrying Shepherds Crooks with attachments for sighting a mortar. The Supplies and TranSport Squadron are equipped with Bedford RL’S, rovers Mk 8 & 9 and Dodge Power Wagons (which find the travelling over sand dunes quite easy but the big drawback with them is the high cost of spares). They have a very flexible chassis with a fairly powerful engine which tears the bodies to pieces. and much time is continually spent patching them up. We have had on desert trials with the Scouts. the 1 ton Forward Control Rover which did not come up to expectations. We, are also responsible for the Force Dhow which is used for dhow chasing and it can outrun most of them. It is captained by an Arab who is resolute in character and has a defect in his sight, who will. if he gets no responss to ”heave to" ram the offender with the steel bowsprit lashed to the bows. The Trucial Coast was well known a few years ago as a great pirate coast and in spite of constant patrol— ling by Royal Navy frigates. it is as rife as ever. Drug smuggling. slave running, transporting illegal immigrants (yes the UK aren’t the only ones) and bullion smuggling are just a few of the activities carried out. Even though this is an Arab Army, it is run

on the same basis as a normal British Army Unit.


THE ACORN

We too have our parades, duties, Admin in—

spections and Cornsec visits which occur during our cool period, which reminds me that we have been notified after several false starts that the UEI is to be in August this year. when the day temperature is frequently IZOOF (in the shade). Some our in Bahrain has slipped up rnethinks. I had an interesting trip to a place called Khor Fakkan on the shores of the Indian Ocean and hemmed in by a range of mountains which run north to south of the peninsular. The only way in was through the \Nadi Ham. which by the way, is subjected to flash floods, so when travelling through it. a weather eye must be kept out for the odd rain cloud. There have been several Revers and Three tonncrs washed away in the solid wall of water that roars down it and one of our “Neguibs” (Ssgt) received the George Medal for rescuing the occupants of one such un» lucky vehicle,

The outstanding personality in the Force is Major ”Billy" Budd who has been with the Scouts for 13 long years and enjoyed every minute of it. so he tells us. When visiting the Officers’ Mess or more frequently when the Officers visit our Mess he usually comers me to relate the instance of the time when a TOS vehicle made the round trip to Buraimi whilst the Armoured cars hadn’t got halfway, and also a graphic description of the armoured car which was blown up by a land— mine in a certain street that it was advisable to avoid. But in spite of the Life Guards’ barracking that I am subjected to, he concedes that they were the best Armoured Car Squadron to be attached to the Scouts and would like to be remembered to those who served here. Personality No 2 is RQMS “Jock" Tollemetti who is well known to the Life Guards although he is a ”Blue” or what do they call themselves these days? I am sure that The Life Guards could choose one for them but it may well 1001' peculiar as a shoulder-title. He would like to be. rtmimbcred to all who worked with him in “Singers' , . He states categorically, that there is no truth

in the rumour that he will take over as the. next Sheikh, even after a gift had been made to the present Sheikh of some old .303 “ammo" by the orders of higher authority.

A

Didn't

the

typical

desert fort.

Regiment

lose

a

Saladin

in

a

similar flood. whilst stationed in Aden?

At the start of every day I had to be ready to issue. at 0700 hours on the Firing T‘oint.

Regretfully I had to move back to the ”luxuries" of camp life in Al Murqaab.

drivers supplemented their ration allowance and

were subsequently jailed and discharged from the Force, (They were im‘idently my day guard).

“White Merceneries"

(as the

ting on a dune close to me was a group of tribcsmt‘n who insisted on discharging a “Foi de Joi" everytime their local lad won, which I may add was fairly frequently. One competitor was stopped three times on the run down for the

are doing a worthwhile job in helping the Arabs to resist the attentions of trouble makers of the variety with which the British Army has had to deal in the not too distant past, to the detriment of the civil populace. One continually hears about the despotic rule of the Sheikhdom system but when any of my staff fail to appear for duty I am frequently told that he has had a dispute with his neighbour or that thieves have broken into his house and he goes off to the Sheikh who must see him_ The Sheikh will then offer advice or make a ruling and in the case of robbery will often give the victim a sum of money. What some of us would give to be able to have such an audience with Harold Wilson, or obtain a ”sub” from the Chancellor of the Exchequer. I would also add that life at the top has its draw— backs and to quote the instance of nearby Abu Dhabi, when the Sheikh died some years ago and left several sons. The eldest son inherited. After some years of his Sheikhdom a brother asked him

falling tiles, because he insisted on having one. up the spout and his safety catch off. He com— plained that he had always done it before, but in spite of his protests he was made to conform to our rules and was led back to the firing point amid howls of laughter from the opposition. The meeting concluded with a Camel Race. This was quite exciting (specially when several of the Officers decided to show the locals how it should be done. Unfortunately the camels decided otherwise and despite the use of foul language, disappeared to all points of the compass. We were rather anxious about the Medical Officer who was still missing when the meeting broke up and a Rover \\ as despatched to find him. He got in just before light failed with the plea that his camel had taken the wrong course, but we rather suspect that he had ”dismounted" several times judging by the slate of his clothes.

A Rifle mccting was held in November which was rather hectic to say the least and would have put years on any Range Safety Officer. I was detailed to transport and issue 8,000 rounds of .303 together with some mortar bombs and

On arrival, I found that I could not secure my stock as it was required to be transportable, and would be left in the trucks, The snag was that it proved to be a little too transportable which resulted in a complete stock—take morning and evening. It was as well, as both of my

being

Defence Minister refered to us), we feel that we

machine gun ammo. Anyway I finally arrived at my dcstination which was a pleasant little cove on the shores of the Indian Ocean and had a most enjoyable stay whilst working on the DIO’s vehicles and "chore—horse" battery chargers. He told me that in the summer, the place is a virtual Cauldron and all the locals move out of their houses into "Barusti” dwellings as the houses are untenable.

far from

Sit—

A small

camel

train.

put To conclude this article I would like to the point of view held by the British Ranks. that

to dinner; as the Sheikh left after dinner his brother

followed him down the stairs and, having shot him in the back. reigned in his stead. After a short interval, a s:cond brother asked the new Sheikh to dinner. and, as the Sheikh left after dinner and proceeded down the stairs, his host also seized on the happy occasion, and having shot him in the back, reigned in his stead. This man went in constant fear of his life and was expected to last for only a year. In fact he lived for 18 months. He was also asked to dinner by a bro— ther, who. however, did not shoot him in the back: the Sheikh came upon an ambush on his way home and was shot in the front! The last brother was. a wise man and put his nephew on the throne. The sons of the. last murdered man were constantly making plans to murder the new Sheikh, This however never materialised as Sheikh Shakhbut bin Sultan, Ruler of Abu Dhabi is still living but was deposed for his despotic rule.


THE ACORN THE ACORN

SERVING PERSGNALITY won A. w. BEALES WOll (Master Cook) Albert William Beales — known to his friends as Charlie — was born on 12th August 1927 at Great Massingham in Norfolk, He ioined The Life Guards in March 1945. He had originally been accepe ted for the Navy in August of the previous year, but when it became obvious that the Senior Service had no urgent need of him he took a plunge which he has never regretted, His early service was fairly standard for these days, that is to say a week at Combermere Barracks doing fatigues, followed by three months with the General Service Corps at Warley Barracks, Brent» wood, doing his initial training, and then back to Windsor having all that he had previously learned knocked out of him in order to learn how to do things in our way. A considerable time was then spent teaching him how to drive and when this was completed he was promptly sent to Knightsbridge to learn how to ride a horse. While under training there, his head and that of the horse he was riding made contact, the horse won and the result was a few weeks in hospital. After his discharge from hospital he worked as a groom for a few months and then somebody had the bright idea that he should be trained as a cook, so to Mill Hill he went and he has worked in the Cook house ever since.

His first taste of overseas service was in Palestine in l947 and l948, and when the Regiment returned he became Master Cook when Corporal Major Hartley was killed in 1950. When he finally retires he will have been Master Cook for nearly l9 years, serving in Germany 52 , 53, Egypt 54 — 56 Windsor 56 ~ 58, Aden 58 ~ 59, Knightsbridge 60 - 65 and back to the Regiment in time to go abroad again to Malaya anoI Singapore

There are many stories about him, some printable, some not, but one that sticks in the author’s mind was him swimming across the Great Bitter Lake from Fayid on Christmas morning l954, after being up all night doing Christmas Dinners, It was also in Egypt that he married Miss Anne Flanagan, his reception being held at the NCOs’ Mess, a party ref membered by all who attended it.

During his many years as Master Cook he has presided in many different Cook houses varying from the sublime here at Selarang Barracks, to the ridiculous in Balaclava Camp, Fanara and Combermere Camp, Little Aden. He has remained a true Life Guard to the end, having refused to transfer to the Army Catering Corps and it is true to say that the Regie mental Cook House will never be the same again once he has departed.

W. BEALES.


THE

ACORN

THE

HQSQUADRON R. H. Q. Lt. Col. LB. Baillie Major C. W. Wordsworth

Captain G. R. Petherick WOI lRCM) D. Charles SQMC

Morris

Tpr Tomlinson Tpr Turner Tpr Richardson

Medical Centre Surg.

S. H. Q.

Lt.

Col.

G.H.

SQMC Gibson Cpl Henderson LCpl Creighton LCpl Theakston LCpl Balls RHG Tpr Creech Tpr White 78l

Tpr Hotton Tpr Taylor 59l Officers Mess SQMC Pattinson Cpl Collier LCpl Armer LCpl Benstead RHG

Q. M.

LCpl Budd ACC

Captain (QM) E, Sant (UFO) RQMC Rodger CoH Millar COH Dean (Families) Cpl Dean LCpl Nolan LCpl Veal Tpr Ashton Tpr Jewell Tpr Jones 747 lFamilies) Tpr Morris

Tpr Alexander Tpr Willis

Q. M.

(E)

Lt. R. G. Sheffield (RSO) RQMC King CoH Cornish Cpl Shotton Cpl McCorkell LCpl Digney LCpl Edge Tpr Lister Tpr Meakin

Orderly Room ORSQMC

Charters—Rowe

COH Henderson Cpl Englishby Cpl White 757 LCpl Morgan LCpl Knowles (Post) Tpr Etches

WQs and CsoH Mess

CoH Whittle Cpl Whelan

SHQ Major H. A. M. Pyman Capt. W. T. V. Loyd

P. E. Stoner (OOH) C. N. Haworth—Booth (Royals) T. M. Hickman C. S. Harcourt—Smith A. D. Gordon (AAC)

Tankins Cummins Lott Faulds Gilbey Johnson 272 Wilson Bridger Mitchell ZlO

COH Johnson

SSgt Welsh Sgt Cook (RAF)

Dog Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Collins Knowles Johnson 533 Scott Wicks Rendell White Whitworth

Cpl Cpl Cpl Cpl Cpl Cpl Cpl Cpl

1

2

Burrell Bennett Day Goitanoglou Grundy Hopkinson Rundle Quirke

Cookhouse lMaster Cook)

LCOH Theobald Regtl. M. T. Cpl Ford LCpl Randle

LCpl Smith LCpl Rickis Pte DaVis Pte Floyd Pte O'Neil Pte Sandford

L. A. D.

Sgt Parnell

Cfn McConaghy Cfn Shaw Pay Office

Cfn Taylor

Major M. S. Wilmot WO || Tweedie Cpl Craig

Cfn Woodard Cfn Thomas Cfn Sissons

TROOP

Z Lt. J. G. McAlIister CoH Waterworth LCpl James L Cpl Mountford Tpr Gash Tpr Diamond Tpr Vickers Tpr Dunn Tpr Ross Tpr Whetman

Capt, A.G. Sharman WOI tASM) Ailes WO ll Carew Sgt Skinner (Royal Cpl Metcalf Cpl Kenton~Barnes Cpl Stokes Cpl Robson Cpl Fenner Cpl Lockyer Cpl Murray LCpl De—Beoux LCpl Bennett LCpl Rich LCpl Thomas Cfn Ewens

TROOP

COH Fettes LCOH Bailey LCpl Allen LCpl Woodley Tpr Rowley Tpr Wareing Tpr Brennan Tpr Aberly Tpr Webb Tpr Barnes

Handlers Bevan Curzon Frazer Ryder Sheppard Shuftlebotham

COH Juleff Cpl Jenkins Cpl Burnard L Cpl Hay L Cpl Leivers Tpr Bush Tpr Jones Tpr Kime Tpr Birch Tpr Redford

COH Skyring CoH Cpl Cpl Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Air Techs

Cpl Cpl Tpr Tpr Tpr Tptr Tptr Tptr

SCM Turtle

Squadron

Major Capt. Capt. Capt. Zth.

Provost and Trumpeters

WO ll Beales

SQMC Bradwell Cpl Mclvor Tpr Archibald Tpr Burrows Tpr Burvill Tpr Crawford Tpr Crellin Tpr George Tpr Hill Tpr Mitchell 248 Tpr Mole Tpr Parsley Tpr Smith 270 Tpr Swallow

Royal Signals Sgt Brownlie LCpl Griffiths LCpl Cartwright Sig Coughtrey Sig Hall Air

Fuller

S. C. M. Clarke

ASQUADRON

Bulow

LCoH Gook Major J. W. F.

ACORN

Signals)

3 TROOP 2 Lt R. S. G. Baillie CoH Hunt Cpl Rhodes L Cpl Beel Tpr Hickling Tpr Hanson Tpr Mayo Tpr Griffiths Tpr Borret Tpr James 4

LCpl Sprigg Tpr Hayter Tpr Nisbett Tpr Flounders Tpr Gibson Tpr OutterSide Tpr Magwre S

TROOP

COH Poynter Cpl Miller Cpl Moss—Norbury LCpl Stangroom Tpr Vansanten Tpr Kelly Tpr Lea Tpr Barker

6 TROOP Lt M. R. Routledge RHG Tpr Reece 1

Section

COH Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr 2

Harding Stanham Mosling Burke Thomas Dobson Harrison Lawton McLeod

Section

L Cpl Bishop Tpr Milne Tpr Goodall Tpr Carter Tpr Churcher Tpr Talbot Tpr Critchley Tpr Gallacher 3

Section

L Cpl Dickson Tpr Wearing Tpr Charlwood Tpr Morton Tpr Dickson Tpr Butler Tpr Boots Tpr McGreary

TROOP

2 Lt J. M. B. Greenaway

4

CoH Hoare

LCpl Booth

L Cpl Taylor

Section

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Mead Harkness Powell Maitland Berk Bunyan Hodson

ECHELON SQMC Stratford COH Venn Cpl Davis Cpl Lodwick Cpl Elward Cpl Berryman LCpl Maddock Tpr Staniforth Tpr Mead Tpr Nelson Tpr Bishop Tpr Thorpe Tpr Wassung Tpr Doyle Tpr Slade Tpr Cousins Pte Glover Pte Deegan Pte Kerr

LAD Ssgt Weeks, D. J. Cpl Brown, L. G. Cpl Owen, J. E. L. LCpl Pearce, J. LCpl Walbyoff, J, LCpl Hammond, B. M. LCpl Kavanagh, J. LCpl Richards, H. W. C. LCpl Burnham, R. G. Cfn Barker, R. Cfn Debbage, M. E. Cfn McGivney, B. M. Cfn Sinton, N. R. Cfn Cochrone, B. J.

SOLDIERS EMPLOYED THE SQN Provost

OUTSIDE

Tpr Coleman Tpr Bell

Officers Mess

Tpr Grant Tpr Barwick

QM's Dept

Tpr Sheffield

Range NCO

Cpl Leighton

Course Guards Depot

L Cpl CLiSick


THE

BSQUADRON SHQ Major A. B. S. H. Gooch Capt S. V. Gilbart—Denham WOII Levet, B.E.M. CoH Bayliss Cpl Cherrington Cpl Page Cpl Allen Cpl Newby REME LCpl Bourne LCpl Dowell ACC Tpr Managhan Tpr Lancaster Tpr Inglis Tpr Howlett Tpr Craig Tpr Reeve Sig Bowers

LCpl Mangham Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

CSQUADRON

Townsend Anderson Finney Jones 470 Bamtorth

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Crombie

Pte Johnson

LAD SECTION SSgt Tracey

5 TROOP

Cpl Phillips LCpl Muir Tpr Hughes Tpr Riches Tpr Doehren Tpr Marshall Tpr Heeks Tpr Snell

CoH LCpl LCpl Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

2 TROOP

ECHELON

Lt C. J. D’Oyly Bentley Pearson Land Rimmer Clowery Hookham Upton

MGJOI' H. D. A. Langley] MBE Captain J. B. Emson

SCM Miller

ACC

4 TROOP

2Lt H. K. Lewxs LCOH Hutchings

SHQ

Dutton Cowell Gaskell Jones 507 Crosby Phillips

ZLt W. Grandy CaH Payne Cpl Orr LCpl Baxter Tpr Jones 320 Tpr Daraz Tpr Hall Tpr Denton Tpr Imrie Tpr Wade

I TROOP

Sgt Chapman Cpl Voce Cpl Russell LCpl Collins LCpl Thomson LCpl McCall LCpl Bools

I TROOP

Cfn Giddins Ctn Stone Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn Cfn Ctn

Lt M. A. McCormick

SQMC Skinner

CoH Casey

LOB Course UK Bde QM's Dept

Z Lt CoH LCpl LCpl Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

B. M. L_ Stephen York Westcar Saunders Moody Skingley Leach Stay Richardson Rennie Meldrum

Cpl Goodyear LCpl Lewis Tpr Barrett Tpr Rogan Tpr Norman Tpr Jewell Tpr Howard Tpr Neal

CoH Johnson LCOH Venn Cpl Nicole Cpl Speed RAPC Cpl Thompson Cpl Hollinrake LCpl Richards LCpl Hugman Tpr Pearce 462 Tpr Green Tpr Twnne Tpr Hoh Tpr Long Tpr Jennings Tpr Read

3 TROOP CoH Mitcheson COH Perkins Cpl Marsh

HKOR’s LCpl Mack LCpl Yau LCpl Liu Tpr Chan Tpr ChOi Tpr Chung Tpr Kwok Tpr Kwan Tpr Lee Tpr Tang '40] Tpr Tang lI67 Tpr Tse Tpr Tu Tpr Yan Tpr Yip Tpr You

LCpl Slater Tpr Dearden Tpr Meakin Tpr Frape Tpr Purves Tpr Perry Tpr Howard Tpr Theobald

Cpl Murnan LCpl Daws Tpr MenZies Tpr Ward Tpr Thoms Tpr Scales Tpr Pattison Pte Bate-Jones

4 TROOP

LAD SECTION

Lt V. A. L. Gaodhew

SSgt Simmons Sgt Hulley Cpl Frow Cpl Smith Cpl Hoskiri Cpl Price LCpl Hepton LCpl March Cln Laverty Ctn Maryan Ctn Manicom

Col-I Kelly Cpl

Daly

LCpl Tpr Tpr Tpr

Lundie Hartnell Hindley Hulbert

Tpr O'Grady

Evans McDonald Hall Sproat Gray Dawdry

Cpl Knowles LCpl Webster

CoH Lumb Cpl Maxwell LCpl Hooper LCpl Golding LCpl Brown Tpr Collard Tpr Hutchinson Tpr Wheatland Tpr Rowley Tpr Daniels Tpr Roxburgh

Z TROOP

CoH Reed

ACORN

Z Lt E. G. Thompson COH Holes

Tpr Tinkler Tpr Cameron—Wilson Tpr Creighton

Ctn McMath Clri Mason 5 TROOP ZLt CoH Cpl LCpl Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

A.J. McNeilage Reynolds Mitchell Cozens Park Lee Long Kitching

Tpr de

Eyle

Cole

Cpl Whyte Cpl Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Alderson Gunning Broderick Banks Strickland Marshall McGlaughlin Fincken

3 TROOP Z Lt A. H. B. COH Young Cpl Hooper

Al ECHELON CoH Jeffrey

CoH Thomas Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Dibden Dougall Warner Jobling Trench Taylor

RAAC

Ctn Turner CIn Watters

CAMP ADMIN STAFF Captain (QM) A. G. Thomson SQMC Barnfield CoH Clough LCOH Crawford

Cpl Nicholson Cpl Watson Cpl Tappenden LCpl Barnacle LCpl Skelly LCpl Male Tpr Vickers Tpr Whetton Tpr lkins Pte Ackers Pte Lucas

Pte Smith 895

LOB

All ECHELON

CSMI Beaton Cpl WEH’

lmbert-Terry SQMC Lerwell


THE

ACORN

THE

H EADQUARTERS SQUADRON

THE LIFE GUARDS IN HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT Lt Col Sir James Scott, Bart. Capt N‘S. Capt

Lawson

(QM)

D. A. Meakin

Major J. M. Stewart

CO Adjt

ACORN

Z/Lt Atkinson WO ll

HOLDEES

Course/Bovington

Phillips

Release

H/WO ll Mahon

Att

SQMC

Recruiting

DA Vientiane

QM Blake

Leeds

RMO RM

CoH Jeffreys

Lt J. W. Greaves

OC HQ Sqn

CoH Holmes

Recrumng

WO |l Gardner

RQMC

CoH Wardell

Recrutting Birmingham

SQMC Holland

ORSQMC CoH Parsons

Release

SQMC Humphries

Full Dress Stores

SQMC Thompson A‘ SQMC Harger

Ollrs Mess Steward

Lt A.

Jackson

Riding

CoH Batey

IC

CoH Fletcher CoH Richards

LG Sqn

Instr‘

Recruiting Windsor

H/COH Blake

Palace Orderly/Clarence House

Recruits

Saddler

L/COH Clark

Eqpt Clerk

Cpl Friend

Lr'CoH Scamadine

MT

NCO

Cpl Bates

MI

Room

Cpl Churn Cpl Dawes

NCOS Mess Ollrs Mess

Cpl Woodland

Post Cpl

Medically

Release

L/Cpl Walls

A"Cp| Pennick

Accm NCO

L,« Cpl Eade

Riding

Tpr Barker

L/Cpl

Clerk

Medically

RP Stalt

A/L/Cpl Brooks

Rat Stores

A,»L/Cp| Gellatley

Full

A L Cpl Rowlands

Forage Stmn

Awaiting Course Graded

Med Board

Medically

Li’Cpl Young

Chapel Orderly

L/Cpl Boult

Tpr Atyeo

Instr.

Recruiting Sheffield

Hatto

Cpl Harrison

Graded

Graded HCTS

Tpr Chaplin

Awaiting Posting

Dress Stores Medically

Graded Awaiting Posting, Interwew

Offrs Orderly

Tpr Chadburn

Windsor/Stable NCO NCOs Mess

Tpr Clarke

Oflrs Orderly

Tpr Cole

Remount Rider

L, Cpl Hunter

Tpr Cox Tpr Covbett

Tp

SAS Course SAS Course

Clerk

Lotd Show

Holberry

QM Storeman

Room/Driver

Tpr King

Remount Rider

Tpr Mathews

Clerk

Tpr Mussett

MT Driver

Med Report Medically

Graded

Tunnard Medically

Graded

Med Board

Eqwtation Troop Windsor Walton Medically

Ollrs Orderly RP Staff

Armourer’s Asst

Tpr Tippett

NCOs Mess

Tpr Rumble

Windsor Groom

Tpr Reynard

MT Driver

Foley

HCTS, Tailor

RP Staff

MI

Tpr Culley

Coles

Arr Gds Depot

Fisher

Scully

Graded

Bielby

Goldsmith

Tpr Simpson

Medically

Gajdus

NCOs Mess

Otton

RMA/Groam Med Report

Tpr Brown

Tpr Christensen L Cpl Gale

Leeds

COH Walley

Cpl

Kendrick

Course DGM

Forage Stmn Otlrs Orderly

Graded


THE

ACORN

MOUNTED SQUADRON SHQ Major R. l. Ferguson Cootain V. R. A. S. Low SCM Harlow A. H. L/L/Lpi Sercumbe C. T. Tpr Savage D. l.

ONE TROOP Lieut

N.

Percy—Daws

CoH Bate R. H. COH Miles J. Cpl Savage E. A. LiCpl Leverton K. W.

A/L'Cpl Nicklin T. AJL Tpr Tpr Tpr

’Cpl Tedbury J. E. Blackburn J. Carruthers T. F. D. Cavendish A. D.

Tpr Ellard C. R. Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Ellis R. E. Gries D. J. Hutsby D. A. King M. J. Kirby P. B. Lowton M. L. Pond B.T. Pratt J. Redi'earn D. L. Reynard F. K. Smith D. A.

TWO TROOP Lieut H. D. E. Boyt

COH Hewett P. M. Cpl Giles F. H. A/Cpl Daysmith H. A. R. L/Li'Cpl Herbert M. P. G. L/Cpl Robinson R. A/L,’Cpl Williams M, H. Tpr Barners C. E. Tpr Brownlee R. E. Tpr Cruddace J. C. Tpr d'Este M. R. Tpr Fowles L. H. Tpr Hill R. A. Tpr Jennings J. Tpr McDonald R. D. Tpr Palmer J. Tpr Rose B. A. Tpr Trench, C. Tpr Upton D. J. Tpr Wilson J. J. THREE TROOP

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Coulson l, B. Franklin LG. George G. W. Jones E. Kirby D. Lawrence R. Leather R. K. McCutcheon M. S. Moyes C. J. O'Rourke E. Tyrrill D. J. Weller J.A. Williams D. K.

FOUR TROOP Lieut S. T. C. Hanbury CoH Fincken J. H. CoH Gibbs L. COH Brady K. Cpl Rillin T. D. P. Ai'Cpl Stevens D. L,"‘Cpl Malpass T. A L/Cpl Daniels C. M. L,iL,x’Cpl Ingram C. G. W. Tpr Convey N. Tpr Cosgrove, J. Tpr Dukes S. R. Tpr Hale D. Tpr Henderson D. Tpr Hogan B. M. Tpr Howell P. A. Tpr Hudson 0. S. Tpr Kissock R. F. Tpr Sears B. A. Tpr Swain M.J. Tpr Truswell F. T. Tpr Watts C. A. Tpr Williams C. J. L. Tpr York T.

OFFICERS’ ORDERLIES Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Edwards R. C. lddon RA. Kotarba P. R. Mitchell P. P. Wear D. Murphy K. B.

SQN STORES

Major N. V. S.

SQMC Gilliland J. B. Li’Cpl Voy R. R. Tpr Thain T.

Z Lt J. J. Astor

Tp Ldr

Z Lt

Tp Ldr

OFFICERS' GROOMS

LCoH Fitzgerald

WT

Instructor

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

LCoH Osgood

WT

Instructor

LCoH Show

Drill

Instructor

LCoH McGloughlin

Drill

Instructor

Cpl York

Tailor

chl

Storeman

Culley R. J. E. Love R. H. Morris W. G. T. Plant A. G.

FARRIERS COH Cpl Cpl Farr Farr

Brown A. H. King R. D. Stewartson W. E. Rail P. A. Siddle R. J.

Tpr Simpson B. F.

A/L/Cpl Ellerby G. A.

Tailor

Tpr Coles

Orderly

Tpr lvin

:‘k:

THE Major

BAND

(Dot M)

T/M Madden SICK LINE GROOM Tpr Cracker D.

REMOUNT RIDER COURSE COH Varley A. T. A/Cpl McKie B. J.

Jackson

DRUM

Mus Barnes

H/SQMC Dunsmore

Bending

COH McDonald

Colman

COH Chessmon

Cooper

L"CoH Gunn HORSE GROOM

Dean

L/CoH Downs

Edwards

L/COH Walthew

Graham

Tpr Lockwood W. J. H.

RECRUITS Cp

ONE

Tpr Barrass J. W. Tpr Barrett R. J. Tpr Hallworth R. TWO Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Dodson

TROOP

TROOP

Abbott T. Dawson R. H. Kenningtan P. R. Pepper P.

TROOP

Camp G. H. Flinton M. M. Henderson P. Lloyd R. L. MacMillan P.

Harmon

L/C Henslet

Holstead

L/C Frost

Lucas

L/C Close

Lund

L/C Marsden

McQueen

L/L/C Baker

Moore

L/L/C Hocking

Nelson

LyL/C Eden

Nichols

L L/C Worthington

Pinnell

L’L/C Dawes

Pollitt Robinson

L L/C LCQQC

TROOP

L/L/C Walthew

Spencer

L/L/C Fletcher

Taylor Webb

L, L ’C Rose

Tpr Meade B. R. Tpr Sutherland G. R. Tpr Taylor T.

Wood L L C Jolley

R.A.P.C. Cpl Mullins D.J.

Bielby

Ldr

Tpr Bilney R.J.

FOUR

L/Cpl Wood J.VV.

Thompson

MAJOR THOMPSON’S GROOM — MELTON

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

REMOUNT GROOM — WINDSOR

San

Tpr Jefferies M. A.

Tptr Watts P. A. Tptr Robinson C.

Tpr Brooks B. R. Tpr Leishman J. W.

R. S.

Paravicini

SCM’s GROOM

THREE

COH Griffiths M. B. COH Stewart J.

A/L/Cpl Rymer A. S. A/Li'Cpl Vincent CM. Tpr Bronney R. A.

HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY TRAINING SQUADRON STAFF

TRUMPETERS

REMOUNT GROOMS

THE ACORN

NOT ALLOCATED TO TROOPS A Cpl

Johnson

C.D.


THE

MEMBERS OF

ACORN

THE

REGIMENT

EXTRA REGIMENTALLY EMPLOYED

Cp

Blake

Palace Orderly

Cp

Rhodes

Cp

Harrison

FVRDE Chertsey Holdee Strength RAC Centre AClO Sheffield Holdee Strength

Cpl

Baker

Colonel E. M. Turnbull, O.B.E,

HQ '-l DIVISIon

Cp

Hatto

Colonel J. P. Fane, M.C.

Fort Leavenworth

Cp

Friend

Major J. W.

HQ Southern Command

Cp

Dutton

RAC Trg Regt

Major W. R. Edgedale

RAC Centre Lulworth

Cp

Buckingham

H Cav Hosp

Major M. A. L. Young

HQ FARELF

Cp

Galloway

Major T. R. S. Gooch

Cpl Rands

Major S. C. Cooper

RHQ Household Cavalry Staff College

Cpl Newens

Holdee Strength

Major A. J.

HQ London

ACpl

Guards Para

Major

Barnes

Hartlgan

(RM)

W. L, Thompson,

Dlstnct

(QM)

L’Captaln

D. G. Roberts

S. P.

WOI Jones

Meredlth»Hardy

RAC Centre

RAC Centre

LCpl Steed

CME

ADC New Zealand

LCpl Walls

Household Cav Regt

lHoldee)

ALCpl Harnett

Household Cav Regt

(Holdee)

ALCpl Parklns

Gunnery School

Tpr Borthwick

RAC Centre

Tpr Bottomley

RAC Centre

HQ llBR)

RHQ Household

Sch of Armour Gnry School

Vowles Jones MacDonald Iveson

Cavalry

Tpr Doodney

RAC Centre

Tpr Hollingdale

RAC Centre

Household Cavalry Records

JLR RAC RYR

SQMC Robertson

DfJM School

HWOll Mahon

LAOS JLR RAC

SQMC MCGOhan

Singapore

Corps.

Lister

WOII WOII WOII SQMC

Guards Depot

LCpl Smith

WOII Thompson

WOI

Hodgson

ACpl York

RAVC Centre

M.B.E., D.C.M. Major

FVRDE Chertsey Gnry School

GUARDS PARA COMPANY Tpr Bradbury

SQMC Oxberry

Household

SQMC Howells SQMC Singleton

RYR JLR RAC

Cavalry Records

SQMC Blake

ACIO Leeds

ASQMC Orme

RAC Centre

COH Mellor

Palace Orderly

CoH Holmes

ACIO

COH Wakefield

AA College

CoH Betts

DOM School

Tpr Wareham Tpr Wright Tpr Lloyd

22 SAS Nottmgham Tpr Clark Tpr Loid Tpr Gadjus COH Jeltery

DGM School

COH Warne

Gnry School

COH Smith

Palace Orderly

COH CoH COH CoH COH

ACIO

Painter Cottee Walley Parsons Taylor

' lel lljll ll lll ll IllI lI‘lI lIl Illl lI m l

Bournemouth

RAC Trg Regt Recrulting Ofllce Wrndsor Holdee Strength

RHG RAC Trg Regt

COH Theakston

ACIO

CoH Bowden

Mons OCS

COH Wardell

AClO

ACOH

Truoal Oman Scouts

Charlett

94-C, NATHAN ROAD, KOWLOON, HONG KONG. Tel. Nos. 666720, 666732

CoH Reynolds

LCoH Harwood

AMBASSADOR COMPANY

Liverpool

Burmlngham

Household Cavalry Records

AMBASSADOR WATCH COMPANY KONG. AMBASSADOR HOTEL ARCADE, KOWLOON, HONG Tel. Nos. 667909, 668507.


72

THE ACORN

THE

ACORN

IIIIII IIIIIIII IIIIII II IIIIIIIIIIII IIIIHI I'I‘IIIIIIlI. I I I III‘ I Ill‘l IJ‘I‘II I II III! I II ‘5 I!‘ I I! I Sml I! ‘l I I II III I I I I I I I III I

WITH

THE

(‘():IH’LI.IIE.\"['H

()1"

M. TAJ DIN TAILORING AND GENERAL (TON'I‘RAUTUR TO HOI‘SEHIHJ) BRIGADE I'Nl'I's

(PAST & PRESENT) AND (I'I‘HICRS

IN THE

TAILORINI;

FAR

()RDERs CONTINUE To I'NITED

EAST

BE ACCEPTED

FROM THE

KINGDOM

A DDBEIS'IS'EIH' HEA 1) OFF] ( 7E

M. TAJ

DIN

M. TAJ

5893 SUNGEI UDANG ROAD

‘70 'C' Sqn

DIN

1],} M5.

THE LIFE GUARDS

MALACCA.

PAROI CAMP

SEREM BAN. I)’11’ A N (7'11E S

M. TAJ DIN 7; THE LIFE GUARDS SELARANG BARRACKS SINGAPORE.

IIuIIl‘IIIII'I‘IIIIIIIIIIIII‘IIIIIII IIIIl-II‘IIIIIII

IIIIII'IIIIIIIIIIIII

M. TAJ DIN 7,. I KSLI TERENDAK CAMP MALACCA.

IIIII‘II‘IIIIIIIIIII‘IIIII‘II‘I‘I I I In

IIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIII IIIIIII‘

IIIIIIIIIIII‘IIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIII‘IIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII‘IIIIIIIIIIIIII'IIIIIII

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OF

COVENTRY

'

W

ENGLAND


THE ACORN

THE ACORN

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TROIH'J-I

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Telephones 23286/7 x 25980 6' 361613 NO PARKING PROBLEM Just Dri ve Up the Ramp to the Roof Top or take the lift up.

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THE ACORN

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Iwish to use the Naafi Car HP Scheme ‘

NOT requtred

lWlSh to traderin my present car ii passrble

Make

Year

_ (3) Rank: Name (Block Letters) (b) Address for reply (Block Letters)

TEL. 4296l.

’u ‘v'éfiCsfiéQQQQé-Eéééfiééééiéééés.

By Appointment to l

139)) >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>9D>>D

THE HIIllIlIIl‘I‘I5IKIII}!EE!I‘B‘J!Ilfilllflllllllllll‘!lllllZlilllliliillll‘llilll‘ll

l


00

THE ACORN

ll I‘l‘l I I I I I I I I I I‘lrllll‘lllllll‘llll I I‘I‘l I I‘ll‘l lllHl'lIrIHI‘mTIJIHITI "I‘llr‘ll'r. Ill I‘Ill‘ll‘llrl I I Ir L ll Il‘InIlJ I I1 I ‘ll‘ll ll IMIT ll‘ll Il‘lthIHll I‘ l I‘ I l‘ I‘ I‘ ll I‘llilll‘ll.ll‘l“ll

BERNARD WEA THEE/ll [TD. ()I" 55, Conduit Street, London, WJ. and 47 High Street, Aldershot.

Civil Military & Sporting Tailors. Ladies' Tailors Habit 81 Breeches Makers;

M. AKHTAR BROS. Tailors {2' Army Contractors 27 COLEMAN STREET ~

SINGAPORE, 6 rt

TELEPHONE: 33485

HIGH CLASS GENTS {r LADIES TAILORING EXECUTED AT MODERATE PRICES

BREECHES & JOHDPURS A SPECIALITY. (IN/[Vi I/H’ s'II/u'zw/x/«m of Uri/u (Hm/um [UH/fr. ,/./’.) I

'_lll‘lllll‘rl1lllllllllellllflllllllIII‘I‘ll‘IlI‘EIIII‘I’JIIIllIlllhlr‘lrlrl‘lI‘lrlrlllrlllllhlll

lllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllIIIlllllIillIllllIlllllllllillltllilll‘lIII:IIl‘llllllllrlwlllllllllil‘l‘llllrlll‘

\I

THE ACORN \IHIHI‘ILIWI I‘IHI‘I l‘lwl I I Ill I I all i. I I II‘I! II‘I I i I I I‘I I I I i I I . i i‘lll I I‘lrllininlll‘lhl I‘ll‘l‘l‘I‘I E‘

-|HIMIHI\IlIulImI‘wIwI‘. IHI‘WIA

hlull a

Imiru

H'I’l‘ll

E I I

I

D I

E

7‘)

I flrfl‘fi‘lhlrlllll I

I

I‘lllll‘lll‘J I

I

Illll lllllll

I

=l‘l‘ll‘l

HEN)" ('(Hll’lllJIEN’I’N

from,

$uoty OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY FOR

TAXIS

NEW 8 LINGWOOD LTD. Telephone: Windsor 66286 (Incorporating W‘ V. Brown of Eton & Bays and Son of Cambridge) 118 HIGH STREET: ETON

HATTERS, HOSIERS and SHIRT TAILORS ETON OUTFITS [mm/(m il(/(/I'<’.<.~': 53 Jermyn Street, St. James's, London, S.W.l. Telcphonez-

01-493 9621

'

A

cusmmers WO'Ted ”Don by

ointment

pp

('(Im/H I'd/(w ‘ldn’rcww': II

King’s Parade, Cambridge Telephone: 50191

_ ,_ ‘IIIIIITI‘I‘I‘IIIIIIlIIIlIIII‘IIIEIEIHIIII!"IIIIFE.uillllfilll‘llllnlllll-


81

THE ACORN

THE ACORN

_1lIlI|1I11I‘I-1IHIll1l1|l17li I11l11l illillllll I IliI ll '1 I 1! ll ill I I1I11I I I ll 1I1I1 I 1| 1| I I I I tl‘liltil i'llll'llllll lltllulrl 1I1I11I1‘I‘1I.1l11l1‘I

,1It1l11lllIHIHIHIH“ "Human. i. ‘1 mm .11 all l11l 1I11I11l 1I1 IHI ‘I I in 1 I iI.iI. Il‘l‘lltll‘lll :1 I L I llilllllhilll 1| ‘5 I1!ili!1!1"tfl‘fltlt! 5‘ a

llni Ilill I1 I1 I I I» I1 l1 I1 I1

80

ll'fz‘lzv the ('mnplz'menfs of

UNICORN Co. THE POLLY SHOE CO., Sek

Kong

Filling

Station. Shoes of Luxe for Fashion {7 Comfort

UN

Tel:

C7 Riding, Polo, Racing Boots.

6446.

LONG

The

1171-11

('(,,,,/_)][',WmtN

Neg/N's Leading Department Store

0f

SEREMBAN SILK STORE

SAM’S TAILOR

129, PAUL STREET, SEREMBAN, N. S. 8A

Granville

Road,

mm“ 3544

Kowloon. TeI: Kowloon 636423

SHER KHAN MOTOR GARAGE & CO., TAXIS TEL:

491555

SERVICE

24

HOURS

Ofliee (V \Vorkshtip‘t Phone No: 491551 5 Residence “3058 Changi Service

Ext. 0255

IST CLASS MOTOR TAXIS f: SUPPLIERS OF ELECTRICAL SPARE PARTS 6' MOTOR CAR REPAIRS.

itlltIJ ‘I I‘ I tl 1I1 lul ll I1I1I1I1I‘I1I1I‘I liI I ll ‘I11I11I1I1I11I1l iIiiIaI ll iIiiI ‘ll I‘ll 1| I

‘(tMlit‘e 0; \Vnrkshnp, g'liaxis only, 491208

and on the \Vith Modern equipment, Electronic wheel halaneinp; with engine tuning lllzlll‘linf‘s of ears etc, ett‘. spot automatic Battery charging and welding, painting, cushion covers, repair

('IIU'I'HIXU

SUPPLY OF TYRES — NEW AND RETREAD li_\i>ucs

AND

(hex'rs

'l‘Aimiis

509, liAS'l'CIIllRCII ROAD, RIAI‘, STATION (‘IIA‘NGL SINGAPORE, 17.

Also at SHER KHAN 8C SONS Yankit Village, 11.‘_. Milestone, Tel, No. 191011 Singapore 17.

PRICE

88

NATHAN

COMFORT Tel:

ROAD

BUILDING ARCADE. Kowloon 667736

I

I I‘Iilulilhllllltlil I I IuI lillllililllllill‘l IiI I Illtl Iiliil I Illtl I I I i IiEtI I: I I l‘llllltl'r I I IiI‘I11I11I‘1I1I I I I

LIST

Civilian Taxis — R.A.F. Changi 13v Agreement between the ()1tieer Commanding l\’.1\.l<‘. (‘hangi and following: is a list of prices for eivilian taxis operated 11y the Sher l(.;\.l“. (‘hangL l’rom Selarang to Changi Village 77 80 1‘15. or ($l/A or Selarang to I<.:\.l<‘. (‘hangi W 80 (ts. ($l/» The following charges are authorised:— Civilian Taxis — R.A.F. Changi .. ., Single journey in the station ., RAF. (Malaya) QuarterS. ’l‘elok I’aku Srni Field) 15 . . .. Teloll; l’aku 1.<l*a\'e lamp, and jungle Survival .. .. 205 Sqn., Cheshire Home ,. Red X llome 1F ORDERED BY TELEPHONE ZO CTS. EXTRA. From village to:— lllnyil Leas and 'I‘oh Estate ._. Mariam (‘lnse l. \VaitingI time is eharge at 25 cents tor 13 Illl!11|l('>‘,. NU'l'lCS: Charges are increased hr 50% hetween (11.00 and (10.00 3 to .‘11 ()ur tax’ at the Changi Village stand are authorised

Samtani'o

Illll‘l‘llillllilllll

I“I1l11ItI‘I

I‘l<()1’l<IE’l‘()l<, SHER KHAN

Still;

‘l‘Il‘llll‘t lllliillI1I1I1I“Iill‘illllilllil11Illllll’lllil‘lllllllll

ll iIHI. I E I :I ill liilhlllllll‘l Ill 1| 1| 1| 1| 1I1 I1 .1 I l'rlllill I‘ It I Iai 1| l I It I I I I I It I I1 Ihll I1 I1‘I1 I I

7, COLEMAN STREET, SINGAPORE, 6.

the (‘oiitraeton the Khan Taxi Service, hy Phone) by Phone)

, .. ’

.itlcts. .tiUctsi , ‘ . ‘le'ls' $1.00 $1.40cts.

$1.00 $1.20 cts.

hours. enter the ramp.

Illl‘ll’lll‘lhllllllllllllllll'lll‘W‘I

I

I

It‘lli


ll'if/z

Hie

('omp/inu'nls

of

G. C. De SILVA & BROS. JEWELLERS 3 RAFFLES PLACE, SINGAPORE, 1. Tel.

77252

Telephone: Windsor 6509]

HILLS & SAUNDERS OF ETON LTD. Regimental

and

Group

Photographs.

109 HIGH STREET, ETON, WINDSOR,

BERKSHIRE.

MEE CHOW & CO., TAILORING No. no, BIRCH ROAD, SEREMBAN. Tel: 3287. We have in Hock the lirsbclass (lacron and wool cloths made in Europe, Germany and America.

We xpeciu/lj/ Mia/re [III/[IFWIHNN fum'li/(mublw Nil/TN.

Visit GIFT — EMPORIUM (SILKS) 1370, CHANGI VILLAGE, SINGAPORE-I7. Tel:

49lll3.

American “Cannon" Sheets Towels Etc. and “Noritake” Chinaware. 0 Big Selection in "Noritake Chinaware” Dinner 8; Tea Sets, Combined. 0 Real Chinese Brocade & Embroidtries. 0 Indian & Chinese Arts & Curios,

Special Service Rendered for Sending Giff Parcels to Anywhere.

Tel: 491340

Estd. I933

Established 1878

8.)

ACORN

Illlilllllllllil‘lllll ll‘ll‘llllllllilllili Ii Ii Ii ii IiiIi IiiI iIi I II‘ I I I I L I I i Ii Elillliki E I I E . Uiillllllii I I i li‘lilllliillll‘l I Ii

(A. T. G. &Co.)

COLES

LTD.

A. T. GNANAPRAKASAM & CO.,

Shirt um] l’j/jrlmil JIM/remDressing Gowns Hosiery Pullovers Gloves Neckwear I3] Sloane Street, London, S.W.l Phone 730 7564 And I47 Knighfsbridge, London, S.W.l Phone: 539 4798

[fey/niwnlzi/

H/iii‘i‘mu/ri'ius'

589 8552

{0

Tina

I‘ll-‘l’.

lil'AItIiS.

136l, CHANGI POINT, SINGAPORE—l7. News Agents, Booksellers. Stationers, I’rinters. Book Binders. and Rubber Stamp Makers, Etc.

Nfoe/i‘ixz‘s li'm': (laines, Toys and tireetine‘ Cards for all (ieeasiiins. Leading News Suppliers in R,A.F Changi.

EASTERN SUPPLY COMPANY MALAYSIA REPTILE HOUSE

(MOTOR

DIVISION)

87, Stamford Road, Singapore, 6.

Cable: "CROCGAVIAL"

Tel: 29797 'I‘annu‘y: \Vnrksliop:

23/23A, Kevan Road, Singapore,

Vl'e can liuy. Insure or I\’Lpair your Second Hand (111'. All (iaruee Servius tan lie provided by us.

19.

2nd Floor, 87, Stamford Road, Singapore, 6.

Specialists in Manufacturing Crocodile Lizard, I‘ytlion, Tiger and Various Types of Skim~ from Malaysia and Indonesia. Ladiea and Gents Shoes, Hand Bags, Wallets Belts I‘Itc., and Dealers in All Kinds of Raw and Tanned Skins.

l445-I45l UPPER CHANGI ROAD (I412 Ms). (OPP CHANGI CREEK HOTEL) RAF CHANGI, SINGAPORE 17. Tel: 491110

Iil‘l IiIiIiIiIiI I Ii Illill a I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I l I I i l l I Hill I Ilillll‘lil‘l I I I I I I‘I Illll! IiluliliIiIiiIiiIiiIili‘lil I I IiI lllllillllllllllll‘l I I IiIlIlIlIl‘IiI

THE

ACORN

Illllll‘lill‘ll‘l :iI Ii.|ii| llillll iIi in i in I ii I i i riIii Ii I ‘Il I iI‘ Ii Ii I il in lllll‘il‘lli I‘ll ‘I I‘ill Iiil llilll Illlllllllllll‘lllllllllliili ll.“ll'|'lI'll

IiIiIiiI‘iliiIiiliiIiilil IiliiIiI ll‘Illlllllllzllilldllllllil l I II I I I I I I I I I lil I IiI“Il'IllI

THE

82

iEIiIIiIIIl‘IlIiI‘IliIIIlllIlIII5L7II!Illil‘!I‘llilll‘llilililllll D

I I I IiI‘IlIl‘IlIlIlI‘llilllilllillillilil ll |ii| IiIiI Illll‘lll‘lllillil I I I Illlil I I In I IiiIiI Iil I I IiiI IiIiiI I I Ililllil‘lil


THE ACORN

THE ACORN

I413, CHANGI VILLAGE SINGAPORE-I7. (Near Changi Bus Terminus) Tel: 49I508 Extrusive St‘ltction of Hand Tools C\‘ Hardware Necessities, Power Drills & Equipment. Electrical Appliances 8; Fittings. All Kinds of Colour Paint, Emulsion Paint & Marine Paint. “Duralex” 8; “I’yrtx” (ilastare, 'r’icnicware & Folding Chairs. Kitchen L'ttnsih~ C\' (antral Household Eta, Etc.

KHIAN WHATT PROVISION STORE 1389, CHANGI VILLAGE, SINGAPORE, I7. Tel: 491597 Self Service, Air—Conditioned. Delivery Service. Accomn‘rodation Agent. Wine and Provision. Green Grocer. Cold Storage Supplier.

lfmf

('(I/I/p/I'n/wnfx

II'i'm/l

TONG KEE MOTORS so BIRCH ROAD, SEREMBAN.

I'ISI’I' SEN FOO TAILOR lI'm':

Ladies and (Rents lliLI‘lI (‘lass 'l‘ailm'ine‘

. Quick

SerVIce

.

_

Sotlsfoctlon

Guaranteed

No. I370, CHANGI VILLAGE, SINGAPORE, I7. I‘iII‘IEIIIIIIiEEiLLiIIILIuEEIEIIIELHIDIIlIIIlIIIIIIIISIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

IIn ewpensz've — Ezclum‘w ll().\'(l

MENU

ll'E/X'UJIEH

'l‘IIII; IIll’lC (il'AlilIS ’l'II SIXIIAIIIIIIII:

HONG HENG CO., LTD. (Incorporated In the State of Singapore)

Ill-A,

Nee Soon Village,

SINGAPORE 26.

Tel: 59123 6' 59982. Always call on us. for reliable used cars At Moderate Prices. SPECIAL CONCESSION FOR FORCES

You are cordially invited to Inspect our large s:lection of cars at Our nCw spacious

The Easy Chair No, EiCi702/KD~ “ KNOCKEDDOWN" Construction Ideal f°" taking HOME-

CALTEX

SERVICE

STATION

(12‘ HIAP

HOE

FURNITURE

CO.,

No.

73,

Nee

Soon

Village.

116, BIRCH ROAD, SEREMBAN.

”7”)

H“,

TRIPP/zone 4261.

('Ulil/I/I'HII’HIN of

flirt

$-

g

[2‘12

i ,

»

When .

You III'(’ in SPIY’Hl/HIN.

S'l'zll' (Hid ULVE in

biiiIBL; = $433 fit}.+miifcillwek Ifififiiéfi'lfifiififfi‘Zl—S uu Iflzfri‘fii’itti“.Iij‘vmfii fl

MANDARIN HOTEL (Formerly Carlton Hotel

RS WELDING R LgEclviqTO oa d , Seremban _ a ang - ,

Telephone No. 2245.

Now

under

JALAN

New

Management)

TUAN

SHEIKH.

SEREMBAN,

\Ve undtrtake to I’cpair all Motor Vehiclea and all such repairs are done ' by our highly trained and Skilled worl;~ men, “7e also do 1’e».~'p1‘a}‘ing on 'l‘exlileg 4 I, GwhHl >. MIMI (111d

MALAYSIA. Tel: 3323

Lee “M“ Jew-

I I II I II IIIII I III II I I IIIIIIIIIIIIEF II II II II I II I I II II II II III II IIII II II II IIII II I III II II II II IIIII IIII I IIIIIIII In I II II lI‘l III IIIII IIIIIII‘IIIIIIIIII.IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII II II II IIIIIIII

SINCERE SUNDRY SHOP

I‘IIII‘IIIII‘II‘IIIIIIIIIIIIIII"IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII.IIIIIIIII‘IIIIIIII“l

7

”THE HANDYMAN’S STORE“

ll’I'f/I

85

I I III I IIIIIIII‘I‘I I IIIIIIIIIIIIII‘IIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJIII I

I'IIIIII'IIIIIIII'II l‘IIII‘II‘IIII‘Il I I l‘l‘l I I I I IIIII I1 I I I I I I I I‘I I I I I III I I I IIIIII I IIIIIIIII'I‘II‘IIIIIIII

IIII‘IIIIII‘I IIIIII I IIII‘I I III‘I I I II I I I i I 59:15:

||IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII‘IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII‘IIIIIIII‘II‘IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII‘IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII‘IIII

(7;;

4

IIIIII-IIIIIIIIIIII'II

IIIIIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIII‘IIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIII I I I I II I IIII IIII'I I II IIIII II I I III II III II4IKII|IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII


THE ACORN

P. 0, BOX No. 95

TELEPHONE No. 4I5I

)5 2% W $- 31 % X @rienial (qrflflsel

BOOK

flillwgraplters,

BINDERY:

28-H Hose Road,

@7‘655

OFFICE 84 PRESS:

Seremban.

4|, Birch

Road, Seremban.

OPTICAL DEPARTMENT:

A comprehensive range

Lenses

is

carried

in

stock to suit all requirements.

lilIIIIIIIiIITI‘TI‘Ii

II‘IIIIIIHIIIIlIIIIII‘llIIIIIIITII‘lIillllliIlliIIlilli Prifi‘aj \ [-33.

llllllllllll

of Spectacle Frames &


The acorn the acorn spring 1968