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WEST MICHIGAN’S ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE FOR 30 YEARS

» JANUARY 2018

FREE!

ALSO INSIDE: Also Inside: The Pixies, Demetri Martin, Halloween Events, City Built Brewing Co. West Michigan Wedding Guide

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Michigan Brewers Guild

Enthusiast Membership

Anatomy of a Craft Beer Enthusiast Well-Developed Taste Buds

High IQ

Limited-Release Brew Receiver

Impressive Wardrobe Promotes Beer Through Enthusiasm and Education

Bar Stool Warmer

Not Gender Specific

MEMBER BENEFITS INCLUDE:

If the above is a description of you and you have enthusiasm for Michigan beer, perhaps it is time to make your status official. Join as a Michigan Brewers Guild Enthusiast Member today and receive these great benefits: • MiBrew – a NEW quarterly magazine exclusively for Enthusiast Members

• Custom designed Enthusiast t-shirt, available exclusively to Enthusiast members

• VIP status on a festival ticket during Enthusiast presale; two days prior to public on-sale ticket days • One hour early entry to MBG festivals

Purchase your Enthusiast Membership at MiBeer.com


MICHIGAN BREWERS GUILD Supporting MI Breweries ~ Promoting MI Beer

13th Annual

20 18 FRIDAY TIC STILL AVAILKETS ABLE! G

E T TH E M W T H E Y L A S T H IL E !

FRIDAY

Feb 23 Feb 24 5 TO 9 P.M.

SATURDAY

RDAY SATU OUT SOLD

1 TO 6 P.M.

F ift h T hird Ballpark • Com sto c k Pa r k , M i An outdoor celebration of Michigan beer, featuring over 1000 beers from more than 115 breweries. Dress for winter weather and let the hearty winter brews warm your soul. Snow, rain or shine. ADMISSION: Saturday tickets are expected to sell out very quickly, cost is $50. Friday tickets are $45 in advance; $50 at the gate, if available. TICKETS: Tickets are limited; advanced purchase encouraged. No refunds. Tickets available online only at MiBeer.com. Ticket purchase includes 15 beer tokens which are available as you enter the festival. Beer tokens are required for beer samples. Sample size is 3 ounces. Additional tokens available for purchase inside festival. BEER TOKEN POLICY: To comply with Michigan Liquor Control Commission rules, tokens must be exchanged for beer samples. Any attempt to obtain beer samples without the appropriate exchange of tokens is a violation of MLCC rules and may result in removal from the festival. Must be 21 and over. I.D. is required. For tickets, information and updates, visit MiBeer.com.

#MiWBF #MiBeer

Friday tickets still available at MiBeer.com

IGE ATNT .. CG H I EA M E TH

R

T BE

RS A E


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WINTER FESTIVAL

REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

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18+

JANUARY 5 BOY BAND REVIEW

JANUARY 25 CANDLEBOX

18+

18+

JANUARY 10 BLACK LABEL SOCIETY

w/ Corrosion of Conformity, Eyehategod

JANUARY 26 KATHLEEN MADIGAN Boxed Wine & Bigfoot

JANUARY 18

BLACK VEIL BRIDES & ASKING ALEXANDRIA w/ Crown The Empire

JANUARY 27 JIM NORTON

18+

18+

JANUARY 19 THE DAN BAND

JANUARY 28 BØRNS w/ Charlotte Cardin, Mikky Ekko

JANUARY 20 SQUIRREL NUT ZIPPERS

JANUARY 21 DIRTY HEADS

FEBRUARY 2 BLUES TRAVELER

FEBRUARY 3 GEORGE CLINTON & THE P-FUNK ALLSTARS

w/ Los Colognes

18+

FEBRUARY 5 NF

FEBRUARY 18 MARILLION

MARCH 9 MOTIONLESS IN WHITE

w/ Every Time I Die, Chelsea Grin, Ice Nine Kills

FEBRUARY 7 MARILYN MANSON

FEBRUARY 23 CHASE RICE

MARCH 10 “WEIRD AL” YANKOVIC w/ Emo Philips

FEBRUARY 9 PANAMA

FEBRUARY 10 THE VERVE PIPE

Van Halen Tribute

w/ Sponge

w/ Black Map, Palaye Royale

FEBRUARY 25 JEEZY

FEBRUARY 26 SABATON & KREATOR

FEBRUARY 27 ANI DIFRANCO

w/ Tee Grizzley

MARCH 18 WALK OFF THE EARTH

MARCH 22 RON WHITE

FEBRUARY 15 POP EVIL

w/ Gracie and Rachel

MARCH 29 SYLVAN ESSO

11 OTTAWA AVE NW • DOWNTOWN GRAND RAPIDS • 20MONROELIVE.COM

10 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018

FEBRUARY 16 STONE SOUR

MARCH 2 THE MUSICAL BOX The Exclusive Re-creation of Genesis

APRIL 6 DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL w/ Beach Slang


WHAT’S INSIDE

January 2018 | Volume 30, Issue 1

SCENE 14

What’s Going On

16

Biz Beat

SOUNDS 19

Local/On Tour: BORNS

20

Local: 10 Bands to Watch

24

Local: Shane Tripp

SIGHTS:

32

27

Style Notes

28

Comedy: Kevin Farley

29

Comedy: Jim Norton

REVUE ARTS: 1A

Visual arts, classical and jazz music, theater, arts event previews and more. (See the center of this issue)

FEATURES: 32

Revue Turns 30!

38

Fitness

DINING & DRINKING:

20

54

51

Restaurant Guide

54

Healthy Dining

56

Beer: Coffee Beer Taste-off

58

Last Call: One Bourbon


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

W

ell, the Earth has made its way around the sun once again, which means everything is going to be totally different, for sure. You’re going to start hitting the gym five times a week. The daily news cycle will be totally unremarkable and no one will talk about it. And your constant existential dread is going to dissipate into nothingness, leaving only hope and tranquility behind. That’s right, 2018 will be unlike 2017 in every way. If next year comes around and I turn out to be wrong, we’ll make Revue FREE in 2019 — you can hold me to that. Speaking of years, this one marks Revue’s 30th anniversary!!! How about that? This magazine is two years older than the person writing this, which is an impressive feat, because he feels pretty old. In this issue, we take a look back at the history of both Revue and West Michigan alike — after all, they go hand in hand. Thirty years ago, there was no craft beer beat. Founders, Dark Horse, Short’s, New Holland, Arcadia; they were all a decade away from even existing. Only Bell’s was on the scene, then known as The Kalamazoo Brewing Co. Meanwhile, eateries were a shadow of what they are today. That’s not to say great restaurants didn’t exist — many of them are going

strong to this day — but the variety and rate at which they’re opening now is unmatched by any other time in West Michigan history. The music scene, however, was in a very special place in 1988, and that’s why Doug Fast founded Music Revue. Flip to our anniversary section for how the local music scene has changed, and the magazine with it. Of course, it’s also New Year’s resolution time, so we have our special section on fitness with advice from Christian Roberts, voted best personal trainer in 2017’s Best of the West, and workout options for all different kinds of people. You’ll also find our top 10 local bands to keep an eye (or ear) on, an interview with local-gonebig artist BØRNS, our taste-off of locally brewed coffee beers, and more. As we look back on 30 years of Revue, we’re also looking forward, thinking about how we can change, improve and evolve. Let’s hope 2018 helps us out. ’Til next time,

W E S T M I C H I G A N ’ S E N T E RTA I N M E N T G U I D E

EDITORIAL Publisher Brian Edwards Associate Publisher Rich Tupica / rich@revueholding.com Editor Joe Boomgaard / joe@revuewm.com Managing Editor Josh Veal / josh@revuewm.com Copy Editor Claire Boomgaard DESIGN Creative Director Kim Kibby / kim@revuewm.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Missy Black Kelly Brown Dana Casadei Cliff Frantz Dwayne Hoover Lindsay Patton-Carson Nick Macksood

Marla R. Miller Eric Mitts Samara Napolitan Jane Simons Elma Talundzic Kayla Tucker

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Katy Batdorff ADVERTISING / 616.608.6170 / sales@revuewm.com Kelli Belanger / kelli@revuewm.com Joe Langlois / joelanglois@revuewm.com DIGITAL EDITORS Kim Kibby, Josh Veal

FIND US ONLINE! Josh Veal, Managing Editor Website: revuewm.com Twitter: twitter.com/revuewm Facebook: facebook.com/revuewm Instagram: instagram.com/revuewm

UPCOMING IS SUE S FEBRUARY: Wintertime Blues

MARCH: Cooking Issue

In February, we're really in the thick of it. We'll help you escape the doldrums and appreciate winter for what it has to offer with activities inside and out.

You shouldn't always have to go out for your favorite dish. We're exploring where to find cooking classes, equipment and ingredients for the home. We'll also look into cooking's liquid cousin: homebrewing.

REVUE is published monthly by Revue Holding Company. 65 Monroe Center, Ste. 5, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 Office: 616.608.6170 / Fax: 616.608.6182 ©2018, Revue Holding Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part granted only by written permission of the publisher in accordance with our legal statement, fools.

ON THE COVER: Revue celebrates 30 years! Cake by Cakabakery, photo by Katy Batdorff. See story on page 32.

TO ADVERTISE: Call (616) 608-6170 or email sales@revuewm.com. Space reservation is the 10th of the month before publication.

12 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018


THE BEST BUFFET. Upscale American favorites, Asian specialties, Mexican classics, traditional Italian, and more — our new Harvest buffet will have it all! We can’t wait for you to come try it out. GUNLAKECASINO.COM Families welcome to dine at Gun Lake Casino. Those under 21 must be accompanied by an adult at all times. Must be 21 or older to game. ©2017 Gun Lake Tribal Gaming Authority.

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/// BEST BETS

WHAT’S GOING ON THIS MONTH | Compiled by Revue Staff

1/1 First Hangover of

2018 Celebration

Buffalo Traders Lounge 950 Fulton St. NE, Grand Rapids Jan. 1, 12-4 p.m., $10 facebook.com/buffalotraderslounge There’s no better way to kick off the new year than immediately drinking more and eating some food in your pajamas. Head to Buffalo Traders Lounge for a laidback party with music curated by AB and some cheap deals, including $7 build-your-own mimosas, $3 Fernet and $2 High Life and Stroh’s. We don’t know the food options yet, but the lounge says tacos are in the cards.

1/11 Beer & Doughnuts

Grand Rapids Public Museum 272 Pearl St. NW, Grand Rapids Jan. 11, 6:30 p.m., $12 members, $22 non-members grpm.org

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

Visiting the museum is always fun, but it’s exponentially better when your ticket includes four beer and doughnut samples from Founders and Robinette’s. The class will allow participants to pair the food and drink together in different combinations, testing and evolving their palettes. A cash bar is also going to be available.

1/12-13 B-93.7 Beer City Music Festival

Deltaplex Arena 2500 Turner Ave., Grand Rapids Jan. 12-13, $24-$39 deltaplex.com Indoor tailgating, craft beer, life-size adult drinking games, ESPN sports coverage, a pub, and two days of live country music — that’s the gist of B-93.7’s first ever Beer City Music Festival. The national country

14 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018

line-up for this 20,000-square-foot party includes Michael Tyler, High Valley, Chase Bryant, Lindsay Ell and more.

1/13

Winter Wheat Festival

The Intersection 133 Grandville Ave. SW, Grand Rapids Jan. 13, 1 p.m., $20 wheatlandmusic.org Ever y year, the Wheatland Music Organization holds a smaller, winter version of its massive summer music festival. The event is pretty straightforward: there’s bands on bands on bands. The lineup includes Gasoline Gypsies with Native Howl, The Journeyman, the Joshua Davis Trio, Peat in the Creel, the Michigan Mafia String Band, Jake Kershaw and more.

1/13

Tunde Olaniran

The Pyramid Scheme 68 Commerce Ave. SW, Grand Rapids Jan. 13, 8 p.m., $8 pyramidschemebar.com

The last two times Tunde Olaniran has come to Grand Rapids, the shows have sold out. Since then, the singer and musician has played with Sleigh Bells, Robyn, Diplo and more. Olaniran’s music defies categorization, as he’s worked on rock, electro-pop and hip-hop projects, and his multi-octave voice often slips from soulful crooning into smooth rapping and back again.

1/14

Avenged Sevenfold

wsg. Breaking Benjamin and Bullet For My Valentine Jan. 14, 6:15 p.m., $25-$75 vanandelarena.com Back in 1999, when Avenged Sevenfold came on the scene, the band helped es-

Tunde Olaniran at The Pyramid Scheme, Jan. 13 tablish what metalcore and heavy metal has become today. The California group hit its height of mainstream success in the 2000s with albums like Waking the Fallen and City of Evil. Opening are the hard-rock band Breaking Benjamin, known for hits like The Diary of Jane, and Bullet For My Valentine, a Welsh heavy metal band.

1/18 Brian Regan

FireKeepers Casino 11177 E. Michigan Ave., Battle Creek Jan. 18, 7 p.m., $49 firekeeperscasino.com Brian Regan is the clean stand-up who’s witty, observational and sarcastic enough that you don’t even notice you’re seeing a family-friendly show. Regan made a record 28 stand-up appearances on the Late Show with David Letterman, and his Nunchucks and Flamethrowers special is on Netflix now. Vanity Fair called him “the funniest stand-up alive.”

1/19

The Dan Band

20 Monroe Live 11 Ottawa Ave. NW, Grand Rapids Jan. 19, 8:30 p.m., $10+ 20monroelive.com There’s no one quite like The Dan Band, a cult-hit comedy group created by actor and comedian Dan Finnerty. The band caught the public eye after singing a foulmouthed version of Total Eclipse of the Heart at a wedding in the film Old School. Finnerty then went on to have similar performances in Starsky & Hutch and The Hangover. The group is known for its covers of female-performed pop songs, tossing in obscenities whenever the moment’s right.

1/20 HopCat 10th

Anniversary

HopCat Grand Rapids 25 Ionia Ave. SW, Grand Rapids Jan. 20, 11 a.m.-11:50 p.m. facebook.com/hopcat It’s time to celebrate 10 years of HopCat with a cornucopia of Crack Fries. The party starts with six hours of free Crack Fries, from 11 a.m.-6 p.m., with any other purchase. There will also be 10 HopCat

beers on tap, many never brewed before. Then at 3 p.m., the annual Crack Fry Eating Contest begins. Put in a $5 entry fee and you’ll be given six minutes to eat as many fries as you possibly can, judged by weight. Whoever takes home the gold will also receive a HopCat prize package valued at $500 and a chance to compete for $2,000 at the World Championship Crack Fries Eating Contest.

1/25 Music in the Stacks: Lipstick Jodi

Grand Rapids Public Library 111 Library St. NE, Grand Rapids Jan. 25, 7 p.m. grpl.org What better way to browse the library’s collection than with a backing score from Grand Rapids’ very own Lipstick Jodi, a four-piece indie alt-pop group with a knack for catchy melodies and lyrics. The band has been making waves since the release of its first EP, Good Not Great, and its debut self-titled LP only solidified that, appearing on our top five local albums of 2017.


1/26

36-Hour Film Challenge

Woodbridge N. Ferris Building 17 Pearl St. NW, Grand Rapids Jan. 26, 8 p.m., $100 registration fee grfilmfestival.com The Grand Rapids Film Festival’s 36-Hour Film Challenge is back yet again, and the name pretty much speaks for itself. Participants are given thematic elements to work with at the launch reception and then have 36 hours to script, shoot, edit and submit their six-minute short. Then, on Feb. 2, select films will be screened before a live audience at Celebration Cinema! North. A total of $1,500 will be awarded to the winners.

1/27 Pure Ludington Brrrewfest

Ludington Rotary Park 500 W. Ludington Ave., Ludington Jan. 27, 1-6 p.m., $25 visitludington.com

the solo male and female categories will take home some cash, with first-place winning $250. The first 250 people registered will receive a custom Farmhand Fat Bike Race pint glass.

At least 16 breweries, cideries and meaderies are visiting Ludington to warm up festival attendees with their craft libations. One ticket gets you six drink tokens and a five-ounce commemorative tasting glass. Some participants include Arbor Brewing Co., Jamesport Brewing Co., Great Mead Hall & Brewing Co. and Virtue Cider.

1/27

Crawl of Thrones

Grand Rapids Jan. 27, 1-9 p.m., $50 bit.ly/crawlofthrones

1/27 Farmhand Fat Bike Race

Game of Thrones is off the air until 2019, so we all need a way to pass the time somehow. Traverse the Seven Kingdoms as a king, queen, wildling, member of the Night’s Watch or even a White Walker with this pub crawl around Grand Rapids. You don’t have to dress up, but why wouldn’t you? Stops include Harmony Brewing, Billy’s Lounge, Mulligan’s Pub, Anchor Bar, New Holland’s Knickerbocker and Steel Cat Bar. One ticket gets you seven drinks, and access to drink specials and challenges throughout the crawl.

Cannonsburg Ski Area 6800 Cannonsburg Rd. NE, Belmont Jan. 27, 12-3 p.m., $45-$60 bikereg.com/farmers-fat-bike-race If you want to burn some calories, drink some beer and potentially win some cash, this is the winter race for you. All you’ll need is a bike with tires at least 3.7 inches wide and a whole lotta leg strength. It’s a timed, multi-lap race around a loop of hilly single-track, double-track and snow. Each racer will receive a free pint of Brewery Vivant beer and the top three finishers in

PHOTO: STEVE MCNICHOLAS

STOMP This month, check out an all-ages show for the whole family with STOMP at both DeVos Performance Hall and Miller Auditorium. Both Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo are hosting the unforgettable eight-member troupe that specializes in dance, music and theatrical and acrobatic performance. The performers make rhythm and music out of anything, like their bodies, trash cans, Zippo

lighters and brooms. An experience unlike any other, it’s unforgettable. —Kayla Tucker DeVos Performance Hall 303 Monroe Ave. NW. Grand Rapids Jan. 18-20, $38+ devosperformancehall.com Miller Auditorium 1341 Theatre Dr., Kalamazoo Jan. 23, $30+ millerauditorium.com

1/4

Lighting Matches 1/6

Abigail Stauffer 1/11

Robin Connell Trio 1/13

Thirsty Perch Blues Band 1/18

SCENE SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING

Kathy Lamar 1/20

Electric Tunas 1/25

Channing and Quinn T U E - W E D 1 1 AM - 1 0 PM T H U R - F R I 1 1 AM - 1 1 PM S A T 5 PM- 1 1 PM & S U N 1 1 AM- 4 PM

1/27

Natchez Trace

REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

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/// NEWS

WEST MICHIGAN

BIZ BEAT

A Roundup of Openings, Closings and other Local Business News

OPENED: Wiki Wiki Poke Shop (1146 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids) opened its doors at the corner of Wealthy and Fuller, so far serving nothing but poke. The Hawaiian dish has been described as “deconstructed sushi,” with raw fish being the key ingredient. Stop in for bowls like The O.G., with marinated ahi tuna, avocado, cucumber, sweet onion, furikake, wasabi, pickled ginger, seaweed salad and soy sauce.

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

That’s not the only place to get your poke fix though. In the same month, Citizen (2115 Plainfield Ave. NE, Grand Rapids) also opened, up in Creston. The Polynesian restaurant and tiki bar is serving up delicious food from across the Pacific, such as the Fire Scallop Poke bowl, Pork Belly Ramen and Spiced Seitan Banh Mi. As for

16 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018

drinks, you’ll find a wide variety of tiki cocktails that come in fun glassware, like a cat or parrot.

Greg Mackeller, co-owner of Big Lake Brewing in the new downtown Holland location.

Big Lake Brewing’s new spot at 13 W. 7th St., Holland is ready to visit. You’ll find small plates, sandwiches, pizza and more, plus some dang good beer, including a coffee stout that won our beer taste-off this month.

world, such as the Czech Goulash, with braised sirloin, onion, paprika and a special blend of spices, served with mashed potatoes. You can get your goulash on a plate for dinner or in a garlic bread cone for lunch.

The Basque-inspired Zoko 822 incorporated its address, 822 Ottawa Ave. NW, Grand Rapids, into its name. Offering more than 30 varieties of gin, the restaurant also has small plates ranging from patatas bravas to Spanish sandwiches and empanadas, available during brunch, lunch and dinner.

CLOSED:

West Michigan’s first goulash-centric restaurant has arrived. Gouleese (1635 Beidler St., Muskegon) is serving up variations of the meaty stew from all over the

Crooked Goose (355 Wilson Ave. NE, Grand Rapids) has closed up shop after six years in Standale. The sister restaurant to Twisted Rooster will become a new concept: Taco Vista, a cali-mex taqueria, due to open in April. Under the direction of Executive Chef Justin Large, the new place will feature a variety of tacos with house-made tortillas, as well as inventive takes on other cali-mex favorites.

COURTESY PHOTO

OTHER CHANGES: The Søvengård (443 Bridge St. NW, Grand Rapids) is taking over The Conscious Collective’s old digs, just upstairs. With this move, the restaurant will add 70 to 80 extra seats, doubling its capacity, as well as a second bar. The Scandinavian-inspired restaurant plans to complete this project during January. —Compiled by Josh Veal

If you have any closings, openings or other business news for REVUE, e-mail josh@revuewm.com.


REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

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/// ON TOUR

REBØRN IN THE NEW YEAR Grand Haven native Garrett Borns celebrates new LP with sold-out GR show

BØRNS

| by Eric Mitts

G

What does it mean to you personally to return to West Michigan and perform for the first time in years? Well, I think it’s a little past due. I’m really excited to get back and play. There always feels like there’s just such a great energy in Michigan. Every time I’m there, I’m just home. I can’t wait to be back and feel the Michigan love. It’s been way too long.

I learned to work with nerves at a young age. I feel like magic and music are kind of synonymous in a way. They’re both kind of this production of something from nothing. Like the illusion of sound and lights making you feel emotional. It’s all kind of a magic show. Has spending so much of your life now on the road and onstage been inspirational to you, in its own unexpected way? In a few different ways. Being in different environments all the time, especially touring environments, where there’s different languages and customs and traditions and people, and everything’s different. It’s always kind of keeping you on your toes and making your brain work differently. I like what that does to my thoughts. And also just performing a lot. I toured more than I ever have in my entire life these past couple years, and I just learned so much from it — as a performer, and where creative energy comes from, and how to keep the flow going and not burn yourself out. Why did you decide to call the new album Blue Madonna? Well, Blue Madonna is the name of this painting by this artist named Carlo Dolci and I was really fascinated by his paintings because they’re all portraits and most of them have the subject looking off and out into somewhere in the distance. Almost like they’re in a trance and they have a little bit of fear in their eyes. And in a way, Blue Madonna represents this lost innocence, and that’s kind of what the album’s about. There’s a lot of themes of love and supernatural phenomena and this lost innocence.

REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

SCENE | SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING

ROWING UP IN A CREATIVE HOUSEHOLD NE A R the shores of Lake Michigan, Garrett Borns always dabbled in something. From his days as a 10-year-old magician wowNow that you’ve been away from West Michigan for so long, ing at parties and the prestigious Colon Magic is there anything you didn’t think you’d miss that you pine Festival; to his adolescent aspirations in the visual for now? arts at Kendall College of Art and Design; to his emergent Yeah, there’s a lot of things. I think just the environment that success as a musical mainstay at Spring Lake’s Seven Steps I grew up in was just very serene and beautiful and calming. I Up — the pure West Michigan talent followed his own feel like that’s always the state of mind that I go to when I need muse wherever it took him. So in 2013, when he ventured to drift off to my tranquil place. Just like, sand dunes and Lake out to New York and later jetted off to Los Angeles, friends Michigan, and family and friends. Every season has so much and family back home knew he was up to something big. intensity there. I just can’t wait to go back for the holidays and Renaming his musical project BØRNS, he quickly broke hopefully get some snow. out, signing on with Universal Music’s Interscope Records and later landing a massive, platinumI’ve got to ask about the time you spent as a young selling hit in 2015 with his single Electric Love. He magician. Was that essentially your first introducBØRNS tion into public performance? soon earned fans worldwide — including the likes wsg. Charlotte Cardin, Yeah, it was. It was kind of my first experience as a Mikky Ekko of Taylor Swift who called his debut EP Candy an frontman, putting together a show and having to SOLD OUT “instant classic.” After spending nearly two years 20 Monroe Live, 11 keep people interested and keep people entertained. on the road, Borns returned to L.A. last year where Ottawa Ave. NW, Grand So it was always a challenge for me, and I always he recorded his second LP, Blue Madonna (due out Rapids wanted to make my show better and better. I always Jan. 12). Jan. 28, 7 p.m. liked the feeling of feeling nervous. I always really 20monroelive.com, Revue talked with Borns about the new album, enjoyed that when I was younger. I don’t know, (844) 678-5483 his start here in West Michigan, and coming home there was just this sort of electricity there. I think after all this time.

PHOTO:CHUCK GRANT

19


/// LOCAL MUSIC

10 Local Bands to Watch in 2018

Tiger and Frame

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

Formerly named after frontman David Stout, this buzzy band found the missing piece with a new name and four-song EP, Puzzles, last year. Lead single Novocain took the edge off with a gorgeous video featuring Grand Rapids Ballet dancers. This year, the band is kicking into a high gear with the release of its new single, Mechanic, leading into a massive national tour and more new music.

WuZee As a member of West Michigan’s Almighty Foot Clan, WuZee has earned his place in the local hip-hop scene with a steady series of well-timed hits over the last few years. This year, he’s following up on his strong 2016 solo release, Tomorrow Never Dies, with an even stronger new album, Dead Planets and God Jewels. With his eyes on the crown, the sky’s no limit for this intergalactic MC soaring into 2018.

20 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018

Hometown: Grand Rapids Genre: Indie rock, alternative Recommended If You Like: Catfish & the Bottlemen, The Cars Listen: tigerandframe.com

Hometown: Grand Rapids Genre: Rap, hip-hop Recommended If You Like: Wu-Tang Clan, MF Doom Listen: wuzeedagod. bandcamp.com

Hannah Rose & the GravesTones Fresh off celebrating frontwoman Hannah Rose Graves’ birthday at Founders, alongside the release of the long-awaited new EP Awake In A Dream, this talented outfit just keeps getting better. Already Jammie Award winners, Graves has the sort of voice that leaves listeners stunned, while her band knows when to get lost in a groove and when to knock your socks off with pure, polished playing. Fully woke with passion and soul, this band’s dreams should soon become reality.

Sojii Relative newcomers to West Michigan’s music scene, lo-fi sludge rock band Sojii centers around frontwoman Valerie Salerno, who reassembled the trio when she relocated to GR from Brooklyn. Now backed by bassist Danny Sein and drummer Donny Olin, the band sounds absolutely monstrous on its seven-song EP released late last year and mixed by the legendary Steve Albini. Road warriors through and through, look for the group to blast its grimy noise everywhere this year.

Hometown: Grand Rapids Genre: Blues, funk, rock Recommended If You Like: Norah Jones, ZZ Ward Listen: hannahrosegraves. com

Hometown: Grand Rapids Genre: Post-punk, trench funk Recommended If You Like: Savages, PJ Harvey Listen: sojii.bandcamp.com


There’s no better time than the New Year to discover some great new music. West Michigan continues to overflow with an absolute wellspring of creative talent and the abundance of artists on the brink of breaking out has never been greater. Our strong and diverse music scene continues to make a name for itself all across the state, the web and beyond. So as you’re making New Year’s resolutions to broaden your horizons and welcome 2018 with fresh eyes and ears, take note of some of the names on this list — you might just end up listening all year. BY ERIC MITTS

PHOTO: LEIGHANNE STURGIS

Boy From School 2018 is the year to fall in love with Boy From School. The band deserves your attention with its ultra-catchy synth-hooks that you can’t get out of your head. The group has tons of recently released music, a music video in the works, and plans for its first full-length LP this year.

Hometown: Grand Rapids Genre: Indie, dance Recommended If You Like: Two Door Cinema Club, St. Lucia Listen: boyfromschool. bandcamp.com

Reggie Local music fans might already know Reggie frontwoman Samantha Andrade from her solo work as the amazing ambient folk-punk artist Charlie Darling. Last year, she teamed up with bassist Nauman Mangla and drummer Ben Patrick to form Reggie, and if their early material is any indication, the group is onto something special. Shimmery yet staggering, the songs have a nervous energy that drip with anticipation and only hint at the busy year the band has planned, with a Midwest tour lined up and a debut release in the works.

Hometown: Grand Rapids Genre: New-garage, dream-pop Recommended If You Like: Bully, Alvvays Listen: reggietheband. bandcamp.com

PHOTO: CRAIG VANDER LENDE

It doesn’t get more devastating than Dead Eyes Always Dreaming — or D.E.A.D. as it’s known to a growing cult of fans. Fully alive, the five-piece has demolished stages all over, opening for some of the heaviest hitters on the hardcore scene. Playing gut-wrenchingly heavy music with a fearsome ferocity and frenzied fretwork that few can match, the band looks to release a new self-titled album sometime this year alongside several nationwide tours.

Hometown: Battle Creek/ Kalamazoo Genre: Progressive deathcore Recommended If You Like: Whitechapel, The Black Dahlia Murder Listen: facebook.com/ deadeyesalwaysdreaming

Cassidy Bisher Singer-songwriter Cassidy Bisher released his debut EP, Skin, late last year and already he’s become something of a chameleon capable of changing when the mood and atmosphere strike him. A finalist in the 2016 International Songwriting competition, he’s partnered with the exclusive distribution platform Stem (which has worked with the likes of Frank Ocean) for the release of Skin and plans to follow it up with more new music and a tour this spring.

Hometown: Grand Rapids Genre: Art rock, ambient pop Recommended If You Like: David Bowie, Massive Attack Listen: cassidybisher.com

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Dead Eyes Always Dreaming

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/// LOCAL MUSIC

GLAMA the great lakes acoustic music association

presents

10 BANDS TO WATCH, continued

sat FEB 3 radisson

plaza kalamazoo PHOTO: CHLOE GRIGSBY

CATHY FINK & MARCY MARXER MICHAEL CLEVELAND AND F L A M E k e e p e r the don julin trio

p er fo r ma nces an d w o r k sh o ps f ro m 11: 0 0 a m u n t i l m i d n i gh t event information:

greatlakesacoustic.org

Cloudlight Ultra-delicate, like a lakeshore sunset over ice, the music of Cloudlight escapes easy description and demands absolutely rapt attention. It features the haunting voices of Jessica Fogle (also known for her solo work as Jessica In The Rainbow) and Bryan Ralph over sparse ukulele and keyboard parts, along with the magic of Mackenzie Carlson on electric mandolin. Lose yourself to the sky â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and discover some other great artists â&#x20AC;&#x201D; when the band plays the Local Showcase at The Pyramid Scheme on Jan. 19.

Hometown: Grand Haven Genre: Psych-folk, shoegaze Recommended If You Like: School of Seven Bells, Fleet Foxes Listen: cloudlightmusic. bandcamp.com

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

PHOTO: HANNAH ELIZABETH

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Lushh Made up of musicians with ties to Western Michigan University, this eclectic five-member ensemble ignores all the rules, like all great jazz acts should, and just creates its own sound. Most recently, the band recorded a full-length album live at a mixed-media event where visual artists and a live audience interacted with the improvisational flow. Inspired by everything from video games to electronica, metal and soul, expect the unexpected from these freethinkers.

Hometown: Kalamazoo Genre: Jazz fusion Recommended If You Like: Thundercat, BadBadNotGood Listen: lushh.bandcamp.com


TIME TO RAISE THE CURTAIN

BRIAN REGAN

THURSDAY, JANUARY 18

PAT BENATAR & NEIL GIRALDO CHEAP TRICK FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9

A VERY INTIMATE ACOUSTIC EVENING FRIDAY, APRIL 6

Tickets available now at the FireKeepers Box Office, FireKeepersCasino.com or 877.FKC.8777.

Must be 21 or older. Tickets based on availability. Schedule subject to change. REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

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/// LOCAL MUSIC At The B.O.B. Grand Rapids, MI 616.356.2000 thebob.com

STRANGE TRIPP

Psychedelic musician explores his own eclectic mind on experimental new LP | by Eric Mitts

PETE LEE -6

January 4

RO

B LITTLE Januar y 11-13

JAMIE LEE

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

January 18-20

JOHN H

JanuaryEF2FR5O-2N 7 #drgrins

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OCAL ROCK ARTIST SHANE TRIPP IS THE KIND OF MUSICIAN WHO creates simply because he’s got songs trapped inside his head, eager to escape out into the world. And he’s been that way for almost as long as he can remember. “I think I wanted to rock ‘n’ roll ever since I was a little kid,” Tripp told Revue. “I discovered this Yamaha keytar that my grandparents kept in their closet when I was maybe eight years old. I messed around with it so much that they just gave it to me.” Growing up in the suburban outreaches of Wyoming and Grandville, Tripp took his early influences from alternative rock radio, listening to the likes of Bush, Oasis, Smashing Pumpkins and Soundgarden. He soon asked for a guitar and started taking lessons as a reward for good grades. By the time he was 13, he had begun writing some of his own songs and he hasn’t stopped since. “I have played in like nine different bands since high school,” Tripp said. “Some of them had a good run, some of them not so much, but I enjoy getting to play different styles and switching instruments. I can kind of influence my own songwriting by being in these multiple projects.” Now 30, Tripp has become something of a figurehead in Grand Rapids’ psych-rock scene. From first moving to GR at 19 to his current solo work and involvement with garage rockers Suzies, his unique sounds, self-taught approach and signature touch have become a ringing element in West Michigan’s ever-expanding local music scene. “Since I moved here, I feel like the music scene has gotten way better,” Tripp said. “As a teenager, my friends and I were playing our indie space rock music in like a sea of hardcore metal bands. Now, there are a shit-ton of talented bands popping up all over the place.” For his solo work, Tripp has played with the same live band for the past three years, enlisting guitarist Dan Fisher, drummer

Shane Tripp Ben Weissenborn and bassist Jonny Bruha to bring his sounds to life onstage. He has released three records under his own name, leading up to his most recent, Brain Drip. “I think my songwriting has matured a lot over the years,” Tripp said. “My newest record is the most eclectic album I’ve done so far. I think it makes for a more interesting and hopefully engaging listening experience. The last thing I want to do is bore my audience.” An avid vinyl fan, Tripp said he welcomes the challenge of creating an album that listeners in the digital age will still listen to from start to finish. “I’ve always just wanted to make albums that make people feel like (Radiohead’s) OK Computer or (Bob Dylan’s) Blonde on Blonde made me feel when I discovered them,” he said. For the Jan. 6 release of Brain Drip, Tripp will share the event with his close friends in Grand Rapids band The Howlers, also releasing a new LP, Bone Dry.

PHOTO: JAIMIE SKRIBA

“The release show is probably going to be the happiest night of my life thus far,” Tripp said. “Maybe I’ll be crying tears of joy. The Pyramid Scheme is such a great venue, it feels like home to me. It’s just gonna be perfect.” Looking ahead, Tripp has a tour planned in support of Brain Drip, with a two-and-ahalf week excursion lined up for the East Coast and Midwest later this year. But even that won’t stop the new songs from dripping out of his brain. “After that, I suppose I’ll have to write another record,” he said.

SHANE TRIPP

Brain Drip Album Release wsg. The Howlers (Bone Dry Album Release) The Pyramid Scheme 68 Commerce Ave. SW, Grand Rapids Jan. 6, 8 p.m., $8 advance pyramidschemebar.com, (616) 272-3758


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H y p e r Op t i k 1134 Wealthy Street 6 1 6 . 3 0 1 . 1 9 1 1 www.hyper-optik.com


by Missy Black

STYLE NOTES

Original. Progressive. Fresh.

T

HESE THREE WORDS DESCRIBE THE ODDEST SUPPLY CO., and they can show you the path to be a little more daring in the new year. The Oddest Supply Co., an independent, interactive lifestyle brand, is a platform for creative experimentation and idea development. The showroom at the Downtown Market in Grand Rapids offers mostly unisex streetwear styles, such as jogger sweatpants, tops, hoodies, fleece jackets and a popular waterproof jacket. Accessories include beanies, backpacks and some patches. Inspiration comes from luxury labels such as Gucci, Louis Vuitton and Balenciaga, as well as traveling, movies and old comic books. The handcrafted apparel has evolved to collaborating with artists, companies, and other brands providing design and creative services. With a focus on experiences and interactivity, the brand has partnered with Breakaway Music Festival, designing apparel for the event. “We don’t overproduce clothing. When something sells out, it’s out,” said owner Edgar Hernandez. “We’ll continue to reproduce some Michigan-themed staple designs, but we keep things at very small runs so not a ton of people are wearing the same thing.” The Oddest Supply can also be found at the Gerald R. Ford International Airport, so the next time you catch a flight, you can still stay fly. Get shopping at theoddestco.com.

MOKAYA PHOTO: LEIGH ANN COBB

Simple and minimalistic jewelry continues to trend. This sterling silver geometric cuff has clean lines and makes a big impact, $109 at Lisa Lehmann Designs in Grand Haven.

Y’all, the world needs some Brain Dust in the new year. From the brand Moon Juice, this adaptogenic elixir can be added to nut milk, coffee or tea for superior states of clarity, memory, creativity, alertness and a capacity to handle stress, $22 at Black Lamb in Grand Rapids.

REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

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See life differently with Matsuda’s M3044 frame in navy and silver, channeling ’90s Japanese style to a Millennial world, $625 at Cascade Optical in Grand Rapids.

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by Eric Mitts

COMEDY

Brotherly Laughs Kevin Farley talks family, bringing his own comedy to Muskegon

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H E N E V E R AC TO R / COM E DI A N K EV I N FARLEY STEPS onstage, he has to admit one thing almost immediately: Yes, he is Chris Farley’s brother. There’s no denying the family resemblance between Kevin and his beloved Saturday Night Live star brother, Chris, who passed away in 1997 after a decade-long comedy career that included timeless characters and hit movies like Tommy Boy. Born a year after Chris, Kevin frequently refers to his brother as his “Irish twin.” Together, they were the eldest two of four Farley brothers born in Madison, Wisc., where they endured many long Midwestern winters together, often copying their dad’s distinct mannerisms for laughs. “We didn’t have a lot of entertainment options, so we entertained ourselves, and I think a lot of our comedy came from that,” Kevin Farley told Revue. “We had a big house growing up and it was the boys down in the basement. So a lot of times we would just try to make each other laugh down there, and that’s what was so fun about it. (Our) sister Barb had her own room, and her own section of the house, but we were treated like animals.” After growing up laughing together, Kev in followed Chr is to Ma rquet te University, where he took his father’s advice and majored in business. From there, he followed Chris down to Chicago where his brother had already started making a name for himself at the famed Second City Theatre. “I think I just followed Chris because it seemed like a lot more fun than business,” Farley said. In those days, Kevin worked at the Chicago Board of Trade during the day and took classes at Second City at night. There, he saw not only his brother’s rise to stardom,

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but also the beginnings of many great comedians’ careers, including Tina Fey, Amy Poehler and Stephen Colbert. As part of the Second City’s travelling troupe, Kevin Farley went around to colleges, sharing his love for improv theater and sketch comedy while still cutting his teeth onstage. “I loved the whole lifestyle,” he said. “Because I love improvisational theater and I love sketch comedy, Second City had a really huge influence on me back then. ... It’s kind of where I started and I just never stopped.” He quickly entered the world of comedic acting, landing roles in his brother’s hit movie Black Sheep and the popular Adam Sandler flick The Waterboy before later joining MTV’s boy band parody, 2ge+her, in 2000. Starring as the character Doug Linus, Kevin did an MTV movie and subsequent series chronicling the group’s music and misadventures. “I loved my boy band era,” he said, citing the role as his favorite of his career. “I really had fun playing that character with those guys. We came up with two albums. We had dance routines, and we had a nice little run on our own TV show.” Since then, he’s appeared on such TV series as Just Shoot Me!, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Hawaii Five-O, Drunk History and others. His latest projects include the indie comedy Crowning Jules and the upcoming Frat Pack. In 2015, he also co-executive produced the feature-length biographical documentary I Am Chris Farley about his brother’s life.

KEVIN FARLEY

Relay for Life Fundraiser for the American Cancer Society Back Alley Comedy Club 1531 W. Sherman Blvd., Muskegon Jan. 12 & 13, $27 (Friday fundraiser and show), $17 (Sat. show) shermanbowlingcenter.com, (231) 755-1258

Kevin Farley Looking back on his brother’s legacy now, 20 years after his passing, Kevin said he’s surprised by how much it keeps growing. “I think his humor was timeless because he was kind of a clown,” he said. “Just the kind of humor he was doing was very different from anyone else’s. The physicality of it all, and the yelling and the screaming and the unique characters. He used to say he only did one character at different volumes, but if you look closely, they’re very different.” Kevin Farley’s own comedy is very different from his brother’s as well, and he only recently entered the world of stand-up about

PHOTO: RUSSELL BAER

five years ago. Finding his voice onstage at places like The Comedy Store in L.A., Kevin can’t help but bring out some classic Farley mannerisms, but his act is his own. “There’s no shortcut for stand-up,” he said. “You have to just do it, or don’t do it, and that kind of process I really enjoy. Every time I’m onstage, I learn a new thing or I see a new bit that I want to do, and that’s the process of stand-up that I’ve really started to enjoy. I get a thrill every time I do a show.”


by Rich Tupica

COMEDY

Jim Norton

PHOTO: JASON BEAVER

No Jokes Barred

Comedian Jim Norton returns to Grand Rapids the country and he soon after landed a spot on the Opie and Anthony radio show. In 2017, his career hit another benchmark when he crossed the pond for the first time. “I just started doing Europe,” Norton told Revue from a Chicago hotel room. “It’s such a great time. (Comedian) Bill Burr talked me into it. I credit Bill completely. The last thing you want is Bill Burr yelling, ‘You’re stupid!’ at you. He was right. I’ve enjoyed Europe very much — the crowds are incredible.” This month, Norton brings his Kneeling Room Only Tour to Grand Rapids. The show

REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

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HILE THE AV ER AGE PERSON PREFERS TO TAKE THEIR BIZARRE SE C R E TS and cringeworthy perversions to their grave, standup comedian Jim Norton morphs his taboo tales into public works of art. Norton has no problem sharing his browser history or less-than-conventional sex life with packed auditoriums — it’s actually been the basis of the 49-year-old’s successful career that started back in 1990. After Andrew Dice Clay took him on the road in 1997, Norton’s act reached audiences across

includes some new material slated for his like every comedian in New York City, I go next special, which he plans to release next down to the Comedy Cellar almost every year. After seven specials stocked with selfnight — I’m on stage about six nights a week. deprecating black comedy, his followers I keep busy, anything to not have to deal with may wonder if he’ll soon run out of warped myself, alone, in a dark room.” personal anecdotes. Rest assured, Norton’s The Jim and Sam Show has been on the got a stockpile of freaky tales to draw from. air for more than a year now. It’s a steady “In natural human experience, there are full-time job for Norton, in which he casually always things happenconverses with a stream ing that are interesting of Hollywood celebrities or unusual,” he said. and fellow comedians “Sometimes I’ll take alongside Sam Roberts, experiences I haven’t who he met back in “Sometimes I’ll take talked about yet and 2005. The co-hosts preexperiences I haven’t t r y t hem out. But I viously worked together never feel the pressure on t he now-def unct talked about yet and to outdo myself. If you Opie and Anthony Show, try them out. But I try to out-outrageous hosted by controversial never feel the pressure yourself, you’re going radio vets Gregg “Opie” to run out of material Hughes and Anthony to outdo myself. If you very fast.” Cumia. Roberts is a bit try to out-outrageous Beyond his ow n younger than Norton’s yourself, you’re world of weirdness, past co-hosts, but the which includes his contwo have chemistry. going to run out of stant fear of contracting “Sam is about 34, material very fast.” HIV (Note: he does but looks about 62,” not have HIV), Norton Norton said. “He looks isn’t afraid to delve into l i k e some t h i ng out other sensitive subjects. of Whoville, like the A couple of his classic bits tear Bill Cosby Grinch or something. He’s a really strange and Casey Anthony to shreds, a style he borlooking character but we have a very good rows from the late Joan Rivers, his comedic relationship, there’s no weirdness. I love doidol. ing the show. In his 2015 specia l, Contextually “Plus, the advantage of being up at Inadequate, Norton professed his admiration SiriusXM is that so many people come to the for Rivers: “She was the most brutal comic I building, so it’s easy to get them to stop by. ever saw perform,” he said. “She made fun of But some people, like Ricky Gervais, come AIDS, she made fun of 9/11 … she never said specifically to do our show.” she was sorry. She was more fearless than any Chatting it up with interesting people comic. That’s what they do in this era — they over the airwaves isn’t such a bad gig, but catch you saying something and then they does it chew up valuable bit-writing hours? hound you until you say you’re sorry.” “It does not hinder my standup at all,” Aside from mirroring Rivers’ knack for he said. “It’s really fun to do. It keeps you offensive pop-culture commentary, Norton thinking, so it probably makes my standup also keeps as busy as her, working in a variety better. I’m always thinking and talking about of mediums. When he’s not on the road, topical stuff — then I go into the Comedy he records his SiriusXM radio show, the Cellar that night and talk about it.” Jim & Sam Show, five days a week. He’s a two-time New York Times Bestselling author and has a long list of television and movie JIM NORTON Kneeling Room Only Tour credits. Norton also heads two podcasts, 20 Monroe Live, 11 Ottawa Ave. NW, Grand Rapids UFC Unfiltered and his own Chip Chipperson Jan. 27, 7 p.m., $37-$88 Podcast, a show featuring Norton in character 20monroelive.com, 1-844-678-5483 as the unbalanced Chip. It makes for a long day. “I wake up at 7 a.m., I do the radio show from 8-11 a.m., I do the UFC podcast two days a week and do the Chip podcast one night a week,” Norton said. “Of course,

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IT’S SOME KIND OF WONDERFUL!

Photo: Joan Marcus

— NY1

FEBRUARY 13- 18 | DeVos Performance Hall | ON SALE NOW! BROADWAYGRANDRAPIDS.COM or 1-800-745-3000 • TICKETMASTER.COM visit

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west michigan symphony SCOTT SPECK | MUSIC DIRECTOR

westmichigansymphony.org 231.726.3231 $25-$57 • Student tickets $10

Join Diane Penning, Paul Langford, and the WMS for a survey of the most treasured movie memories. Diane and Paul return to sing a variety of titles on the American Film Institute’s list of “100 Best Songs From Movies.” Songs include Over the Rainbow, Luck Be a Lady, Beauty and the Beast, Way We Were, and Love is an Open Door from the motion picture Frozen.

The Oblivion Project is dedicated to the exploration and performance of the over 3000 Nuevo Tango works of Argentine tango master Astor Piazzolla. The group is blazing trails as they visit The Block on their Midwest tour. theblockwestmichigan.org • 231.726.3231 $25-$35 • Student tickets $10


HISTORY DETECTIVES SLEUTHING FOR LOCAL HISTORY Saturday, January 20 9:30 am – 4:00 pm Main Library 111 Library St NE A day-long event made up of six programs exploring various aspects of Grand Rapids history. Presented by area historians and members of historical and cultural organizations, topics are varied and reflect the unique heritage of West Michigan. For more details, visit www.grpl.org/historydetectives.

MARK YOUR 2018 CALENDAR

Tuesday, January 23 7:00 pm The Pyramid Scheme 68 Commerce SW

Breaking News: NPR’s From the Top with host Christopher O’Riley will be on site during the 2018 Competition, creating a documentary episode to be broadcast at a later date.

Relive your 80s and 90s childhood with GRPL at the Pyramid Scheme! Make arts and crafts that you loved as a kid, including shrinky dinks, friendship bracelets, spirographs, and more. All supplies provided.

SATURDAY, MAY 19 | 12:30 pm Stulberg Master Classes Dalton Center, WMU Judges Aaron Dworkin, Anthony Ross, and Scott St. John

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FRIDAY, MAY 18 | all day – evening 43rd Stulberg International String Competition

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 18 | 4 pm 2017 Bronze Medalist Karisa Chiu, violin and the Kalamazoo Junior Symphony Orchestra

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LIPSTICK JODI Thursday, January 25 7:00 pm Main Library 111 Library St NE

EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 616.988.5400 WWW.GRPL.ORG Funded by the Grand Rapids Public Library Foundation



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SPECIAL FEATURE

30 YEARS IN REVUE Where we came from, who we are now and how we got here | by Josh Veal

R

< C A K E BY C AK AB AK E R Y, PHO T O BY K AT Y B AT DOR F F

Sarah McLachlan and many more. Over the years, it became a sort of local, miniature Rolling Stone. Fast-forward to 2005: Fast grew tired of publishing and sold the company to local radio salesman Bruce Law, who immediately shifted course in a radical way. The magazine’s name changed to Revue and the tone became more clean, proper and structured. It went from Fast and loose to Law-abiding citizen. For example, many topless bar ads got the boot and Law focused on driving sales with more family-friendly establishments. Revue did well, but the environment became “pretty boring” compared to Fast’s “sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll” mentality, according to former employees. Then, in March 2008, the company was bought by a group of investors under the name REVUE Holding Co. and Brian Edwards became editor and publisher. Our current creative director, Kim Kibby, was brought on for a full redesign of the magazine, building the framework for what Revue is today. Special sections were introduced, interviews were ramped up and a focus was put on local talent. A deliberate effort was made to bring some of the tone and humor from Music Revue back into the magazine with the help of Managing Editor Lindsay Patton-Carson, Revue’s first Minion (a.k.a. intern). Op-eds were introduced, including Stad Di Ponzi’s Mean & Sober, a scathing critique of just about everything in West Michigan, from ArtPrize to restaurants, religion and government. We also had Emails to Blighty, a column written by a British expat back to his homeland. Revue Holding Co. has brought multiple other publications into the fold as well. In 2009, we launched Revue Mid-Michigan, based out of Lansing, which lasted until 2012. Then, in 2013, Revue purchased Recoil, a local music and satire magazine launched in 2001 by Cliff

and Kimber Frantz, former editors of Music Revue. That publication was put to bed in 2014. In 2011, the company acquired MiBiz, a bi-weekly business newspaper which shares an office with Revue to this day. A ll t hat to say, we’ve changed quite a bit. Just one year ago, we launched Revue Arts in an effort to cover the local arts scene with solid journalism and critical reviews. Since then, we’ve covered more than 90 arts organizations and reviewed more than 80 theater, dance and music performances, and we’re not about Whining and Dining column, to slow down. Two years ago, we also circa 1994 launched Best of the West, our readerdriven poll of the greatest restaurants, bars, artists, beers and whatever else you can think of in West Michigan. Former managing editor Paul Jendrasiak said of Grand Rapids: “A lot of the fruit you see coming to bear now is from seeds that were planted back in the late ’80s, early ’90s.” That’s true for Revue as well. At 30, we’re in our prime. Expect to see more of the food, beer, music, event and arts coverage you’ve come to know and love, but we’re also always trying to change and evolve. Is there a podcast on our horizon? Who knows. Will we pivot to video? Probably not, but do check out our Last Call cocktail tutorials on Facebook. Are we bringing back Minions? Yes, so feel free to point any bright, talented, reliable college students our way. Am I using rhetorical questions even though it goes against our style guide? Maybe. Whether you’ve been picking up Revue for 30 years, five years or one day, thanks for reading and making this all possible.

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EVUE HAS GROWN QUITE A BIT I N 30 Y E A R S , BU T TO U N DE RSTA ND HOW, W E H AV E TO GO BACK TO THE BEGINNING. In 1988, Doug Fast created Music Revue to fill a hole in journalism. The publication was born in an entirely different time and place compared to the West Michigan we know today — craft beer hardly existed, the local restaurant scene was a shadow of what it is today, and the founder of ArtPrize was only six years old. However, the local music scene was absolutely thriving. Dozens of venues hosted live music around the region, from tiny bars to huge arenas and everything in between. Yet, only a couple publications were even attempting to cover the scene, and they weren’t doing well. That’s where Fast came in. Even in its infancy, Music Revue was edgy, irreverent and on the cutting edge. Its goal was to inform readers of what was going on in town, acting as a one-stop source for happenings every day of every month. It quickly evolved from a black-and-white newspaper format to the magazine style it is today, with designer Victoria Upton (who now owns Women’s Lifestyle) bringing some color into the mix. Under 18 years of Fast, the tone was energetic, full of character and far from inoffensive, featuring some jokes and stories that would never be published today. The Whining & Dining column in particular had a knack for being explicit and pissing off local restaurants. Music Revue interviewed hundreds of famous musicia ns coming t hroug h tow n (or at least Michigan), including Gene Simmons, Jon Bon Jovi, Ozzy Osbourne, Green Day, Aerosmith,

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REVUE TURNS 30

MUSICAL MEMOIRS How West Michigan’s music scene has changed over 30 years | by Cliff Frantz, former Music Revue editor

It’s been three decades since Revue started charting the evolution of West Michigan’s local music scene. Our editors have been assigning stories, printing reviews and lending our covers to local and national bands in an ongoing effort to enrich our ever-changing music scene. Grand Rapids alone has added landmark venues like Van Andel Arena, The Pyramid Scheme, Frederik Meijer Gardens and 20 Monroe Live to keep up with the increasing demand for live indie, rock, hip-hop, country, metal and psychedelic music in West Michigan. How different is today’s scene compared to 1988, when [Music] Revue magazine first started printing?

Far more shows There are more live music venues in West Michigan than ever before. For every sorely missed old-school room like The Reptile House, Skelletones and Club Soda, one or two fresh venues has come along to take its place. And some of our best new venues came with microbreweries attached! Founders, Elk Brewing, Harmony Hall and many of the new Michigan brewpubs are set up to showcase local and national bands playing originals and covers. West Michigan’s new casinos feature live music from local rock bands and sets by live DJs. The Intersection is adding two more clubs beneath the main level of its new downtown location. Even coffee shops and record stores bring in local talent to perform in-house. “Ten or 15 years ago, the scene couldn’t support even two shows on the same night,”

said Jeff VandenBerg, co-owner of The Pyramid Scheme in Grand Rapids. “Now you’ll look and it’s amazing — sometimes there will be four or five shows going on at the same time. There are also a lot of house shows happening right now, where a house will just pop up and have bands for a while.” “People have access to so many tools for making music: Pro Tools, loopers, BeatBuddy’s, apps, Appleton. There are endless ways to create now,” said Michael McIntosh, singer for the band Drop 35. “I even know an iPad band. That’s what they use for instruments! They sound great and I don’t think you could have an easier setup and teardown.” McIntosh added that while opportunities are smaller and the pay is less, the cost of entry has dropped significantly. “Twenty years ago, my bands had to use a giant truck to carry everything; giant

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MUSIC REVUE TO REVUE: Cover looks and topics over the years

1988

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1992

1993

1994

1995

2001

2003

2004


PAs, huge PAR can light shows that used a bunch of electricity,” he said. “Now, you can make music from your phone if you are so inclined.”

The Intersection’s big move In 2003, The Intersection moved into its new location downtown, leaving a hole in Eastown that’s never been properly filled. Billy’s Lounge remains a versatile Eastown room and Mulligan’s Pub added a band room to showcase original bands, but a lot of folks miss The Intersection’s old location. “The Reptile House was cool, but it was also kind of a shithole,” said VandenBerg when asked what clubs he misses most. “I really liked the old Intersection. It had more of a college feel.” Also gone is Aris’ Hometown Rock Music Search, one of two big annual GR band battles that enjoyed 13 years of popularity at The Orbit Room. The Rock Search was a tremendous monthlong local music showcase that brought about 25 bands a lot of attention, prizes and radio play.

Jen Lorenski agreed the metal scene has slowed in recent years: “There are definitely less shows and fewer metal bands in West Michigan,” Lorenski said. “Fewer venues welcome heavier bands. We also don’t have mainstream media support like we used to. It’s a DIY heavy metal culture these days.”

community station WYCE has remained diligent in playing local bands’ original recordings on the air, and hands out awards at its annual Jammie Awards Show.

The Verve Pipe

Radio silence The sudden decline of the metal scene is in part due to the loss of radio station WKLQ , whose heavy music rotation had been one of the driving elements of West Michigan’s metal scene. It went off the air in 2009 after a long run of cutthroat competition with its rival, WGRD. Both stations used to make an effort to stoke the local music scene, often playing local releases as part of their everyday programing. However,

We can’t talk about the West Michigan music scene without mentioning the success of The Verve Pipe during the mid-to-late nineties. Arguably the most successful band to emerge nationally from the West Michigan scene, it is still led by singer Brian VanderArk as it continues to record and tour 20 years after the Lansing-based band managed to get the

Where we are now “Right now is a peak time for the local music scene,” said VandenBerg, whose live music club The Pyramid Scheme in downtown GR has been responsible for bringing all kinds of national artists to West Michigan and acted as a home for original bands and tribute shows. “But most local bands aren’t making much money.” Career musician McIntosh agreed: “When I started, I could play every day of the week. I recall playing almost 300 days one year. The money was much higher as well. Now it is incredibly hard to make a living doing it and close to impossible to not have some other source of income to supplement.”

Metal’s descent West Michigan had been long known to the national music industry as one of the hottest U.S. markets for heavy metal. That’s slowed down in recent years, especially with the loss of the Intersection’s Heavyweight Championship, an annual winter showcase where as many as 30 local metal bands would compete for the yearly title and prizes. Local metal promoter

2007

r Eastown location The Intersection in its forme

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

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2006

support of RCA to record its first nationally released album, 1996’s Villains. That album’s third single, The Freshman, became a number one song on the national billboard charts. The band’s rise to national fame gave a lot of area bands hope that they could still make it in music without moving to a larger market.

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REVUE TURNS 30

A MANAGING EDITOR’S TOP REVUE MOMENTS | by Lindsay Patton-Carson

prepared for this interview unlike any before. My questions had to be good. I needed to impress Kathy. By that time, I had gotten used to interviewing entertainers. For Kathy, though, my heart was pounding and my hands were shaking. I was star struck. Of course, Kathy was a professional. She was punctual, charming and gave me plenty of good soundbites.

Access to music festivals

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

After spending seven years at Revue, narrowing down my top moments for the anniversary issue wasn’t a simple task. If we wanna crunch some numbers, I’ve attended dozens of concerts, managed around 300 writers and minions, wrote (probably) a million words and had at least 25 people barge into the office to ask if we were a pizza place. (We weren’t.) That was just a long, masturbatory way of saying, “I’ve seen some shit.” And yes, that includes literal shit, which I will divulge on later. Revue was my home, my family, my creative outlet and an incredible launching pad for my career. Being part of the 30th anniversary issue is special to me. I’m proud to be part of the magazine’s history. It’s still surreal to know that thousands of people saw my ideas and words every single month. Even more surreal is going through memories — and there were lots of them — to pull out my top moments.

Ryan Phillippe and 50 Cent crashing our office

Purchasing a blow-up doll for work purposes

There was a short period where Grand Rapids was a prime filming location, thanks to hefty tax credits. Detours, camera crews and celebrity spotting were ordinary, which is why I like telling this story. People — especially my East Coast friends — find it hard to believe that 50 Cent and Ryan Phillippe ran into the office, where it was only me and a minion. We all looked at each other, every person as confused as the next. They said, “Hey,” and walked back out. Later, the director had to come in and apologize. My boss asked me why I didn’t ask for a photo. Um, because when celebrities burst into the office, my first thought isn’t, “Hey guys! Let’s get a photo!”

OK, this one is tougher to explain than I thought. Creative Director Kim Kibby and I came up with a grand photoshoot idea where we would capture a writer going on a “date” with a blow-up doll. I’ve since moved and can’t locate the issue or figure out WHY we did it, but it happened, and Kim and I spent a good chunk of our afternoon blowing her up and making sure she was appropriately dressed for her big date.

36 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018

Escorting people out of our stairwell Ah, here’s where we get to the literal shit. One of our offices was extremely clandestine.

Its entrance was down an unmarked stairwell, the building lined with tinted windows. Due to it being so nondescript, people took it upon themselves to take senior portraits, engagement photos and bathroom breaks in our stairwell. Yes, human feces that we were responsible for cleaning up. Now that I think about it, I’m a little pissed I never got a “human waste” bonus from the company.

Interviewing Kathy Griffin By the time I turned 25, I had racked up an impressive list of entertainers interviewed. In seven years, I had interviewed so many people, I can barely remember a tenth of them. My most memorable, though, was one of my comedy idols: Kathy Griffin. I

Guys. I had a job where I could get into music festivals FOR FREE. Granted, I had to do work while at the festivals, but it was work I loved. For a few years, I was going to so many that I could rank each festival’s press tent (Lollapalooza was the best). These opportunities allowed me to see incredible acts like Lou Reed, Charles Bradley, Soundgarden, Depeche Mode, Arcade Fire, The Flaming Lips and more. I don’t know how I got so fortunate, but I never questioned it.

Creating lifelong friendships The hardest part about leaving Grand Rapids was leaving the people that are in my life because of Revue. I didn’t just make friends, I had a family. To this day, I still text my former colleagues on a weekly basis and check in on former writers and minions. Without Revue, I wouldn’t be friends with Nick Manes — who writes for Revue’s sister publication, MiBiz — and can you even imagine what a tortured life that would be?! So, there you go. Currently, I live in Philadelphia and am working as the vice president of customer engagement for PiperWai Natural Deodorant. (@LindsayPatton for updates and dank memes if you’re on Twitter.) Despite years and miles between us, I still can’t seem to get away from Revue. I’m OK with it.


Stacked line-up. Stacked tap list. A perfect combination. For our full event schedule and further venue details, visit bellsbeer.com/events

KALAMAZOO, MI

SCENE SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

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/// FITNESS

s Christian Robert

Training session

Personal Training 101 A conversation with West Michigan’s “best” personal trainer by Kelly Brown / photos by Brian Kelly

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In 2017, Christian Roberts was voted best personal trainer in Revue’s Best of the West. He grew up playing rugby, boxing and surfing in Wales, then began training professionals from boxing, ballet, MMA and more. Since moving to America, Roberts has developed Street Fit Coaching, his own Grand Rapidsbased business. We asked Roberts about how to stay motivated, how to pick your trainer and how a trainer really helps.

We all know personal training as “1-on-1 training,” but how would you describe it? I think true personal training is helping somebody meet their specific goals based on a customized approach. And I’ve learned over the years that it must be fun and enjoyable too. A personal trainer must be able to adjust the program according to how the client is on that day. It’s being flexible in your approach to health and fitness and people.

38 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018

A good trainer has a true understanding of the client and the client’s goals. Who benefits from personal training? Some people come and see me who want to get started and don’t feel confident going into a group class. We spend time getting them strong and confident to where they can go into any group class and not feel overwhelmed. Some people come who have injuries and need help with rehabilitation, strengthening specific muscle groups. Even people who have exercised for years can benefit from the accountability and programming provided by personal training. I’ve been working out for more than 25 years and I have a coach/trainer who I go to see more than once a week. I think a lot of people associate personal trainers with people who are wealthy, like celebrities. Is that really the case? I think personal training and coaching has become a lot more accessible to everyday people, rather than just the wealthy and celebrities. There’s not a huge difference between the price of a trainer and group classes, but I think it comes down to the client’s specific goal. A personal trainer can concentrate more specifically on that client

versus a group instructor who has 20 people to take care of. In my experience, that person will hit their goals a lot faster working 1-on-1. The average cost ranges from $60/hour to $150/hour. Most trainers offer a free initial consultation where you can meet them and go over your goals. Do you take clients of all levels and how should someone pick a personal trainer? Yes, I work with all levels of fitness; people just getting started, new moms that want to get their bodies back, college athletes, high school athletes. There are a lot of great personal trainers in Grand Rapids, but my advice would be to find someone that you enjoy spending time with. Find out their background, ask for references from clients, and check out their reviews. Look for someone who is knowledgeable, certified, friendly and organized. Most of all, a trainer should be able to customize a plan to your goals and not give you a cookie-cutter program or train you the way they would train themselves. For more information about Christian Roberts, personal training and corporate wellness programs, visit streetfitcoaching.com.

CHRISTIAN’S TOP TIPS MOTIVATION: I think when you start hitting your goals, that keeps your motivation going. As I said earlier on, it has to be fun and fresh or you won’t stick with it. Pick a trainer who is upbeat and encourages you, not belittles you. Don’t be too hard on yourself — nobody is perfect. Surround yourself with people who you want to be like and who enjoy working out. NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS: Start with manageable goals. Don’t overwhelm yourself. Sit down and talk to your trainer and work out an achievable plan that’s realistic. A lot of people want to try and go from not working out to working out everyday, and get disappointed when they can’t keep up with it or don’t see results. They end up giving up. Start small and work your way up. EARLY AM WORKOUTS: Set your alarm and get your workout clothes ready to go the night before. If you have a trainer, you have an appointment you’re not likely to break. Or, if you’re going to the gym, get a workout buddy that you’ll meet there. Accountability is key! Go to bed early, get a good night’s sleep, and prioritize this time for yourself. NUTRITION: Keep it simple. Start with small changes that you’re likely to maintain. I know everybody cringes at this, but food prep is key. It will save you money in the long run and you won’t be tempted at the drive-through when you have a meal already put together. Pack healthy snacks for work and drink a lot of water. Cut back on sugar and soda!


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/// FITNESS

If You’re Broke – Running

You know what’s great about running? It’s free! Lace up your shoes and head outside for a run. So what if it’s the middle of winter. Make sure you’re safe and running on solid (not icy) ground and go for it. Try a walk/run combination to get you started. Now is the time to start training for your first 5k. Running and walking is a great way to begin your fitness journey and gain the endurance and confidence to try a gym membership or group fitness class.

Marathon Runners – Barre Seva Yoga class

Your Workout Rx Exercise suggestions for every kind of person

The Energizer Bunny – Kickboxing

by Kelly Brown

We all know the cycle of creating New Year’s resolutions, breaking them, then waiting for the next year to come around and pressing repeat. It’s time to break the cycle and find the training program that will work for you and stick. How you behave in everyday life can play a significant role in your workout routine. Research shows our personalities and moods can dictate the type of workouts we enjoy.

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The Overworked Office Rat – CrossFit

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If your swamped at work and you can only workout a few times a week, you might as well make it the most beneficial for your body. CrossFit, a workout designed for anyone at any level, is a total body workout that incorporates traditional Olympic lifting and strength training with metabolic conditioning. Each class will challenge your body by utilizing different movements like box jumps, push-ups, rope climbs, sled pushes and more. CrossFit will burn calories, build muscle, and help prevent injury from everyday tasks like lifting a bag of dog food or a box over your head. Where to go: CrossFit616, CrossFit Lake Effect

The Friend Who Kills It On The Dance Floor – Pole Fitness

No, you don’t have to have prior dance experience to join pole fitness. But if you already love dance, why not make it part of your exercise

If you’ve got tight hips, it might just be that all that running is turning your hip muscles into knots. Barre is a great workout for runners or anyone who walks/stands for most of their day. Each class involves five segments: warm-up, arms, thighs, seat (glutes) and core. The thigh and seat work focus heavily on glute and hip activation. Moves like “pretzel” will have your hips on fire. A long stretch at the end of class allows you to lengthen your muscles and find relief for tight hamstrings, quads and glutes. Bonus: An hour of barre will burn around 250 calories! Where to go: Beer City Barre, Daily Method

routine? Classes begin with a meditation, slow stretching, floor work and transition into standing “pole work,” which involves an assortment of tricks, spins and f lips on the stationary poles. Pole is for men and women alike, and the main goal of each class is not only to make you stronger, but more confident as well. Where to go: Flirt Fitness Grand Rapids

If You’re Bored Easily – Gym Membership

Do you get bored of literally everything a week after you start? Try a gym membership to a club that offers numerous group class options. Change up your schedule each week from kickboxing, to Zumba, to swim class, etc. Constantly varying your routine will keep you on your toes and your mind intrigued. Plus, challenging your body in different ways can have HUGE effects on your fitness goals. Where to go: Allegro Coaching, YMCA Clubs of West Michigan

If you’re a “wake up at 5 a.m. and don’t need a cup of coffee” type of person, kickboxing is for you. This energetic hour-long fitness class will have you dripping in sweat and moving the entire time. Plank, jump and punch your way to a better you with this intense workout. Where to go: CKO Kickboxing

Music Buffs – Spin Class

If there’s one thing about spin class, it’s that EVERY class has the best music. If you’re pushed in your workouts by the beat of your favorite songs, then take a seat and start spinning. Spin classes TORCH calories. Plus, the group environment keeps you motivated. Your favorite music will help you climb to the top and sprint to the finish. Where to go: Fzique, Yen Yoga & Fitness (Traverse City)

The Soccer Mom – Yoga

Yoga is awesome because it’s great for everyone. Connecting movement with breath and your mind is a sure-fire way to calm yourself down. A deep savasana at the end of a hectic day (or week) allows stress to simply melt away. If you can’t take one more PTA meeting or sitting at another basketball game, then schedule yourself a night out and relax in one of the wonderful yoga classes in West Michigan. Moving with music and to your breath will help you re-center and re-focus for another week of busy schedules. Where to go: Seva Yoga, Kula Yoga


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S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

Grand Rapids | Grand Haven | Holland

Specializing in Women's Brazilians & Brows

701 Bagley, East Grand Rapids | 616-309-0561 | ilovewaxology.com


S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

WEDDING GUIDE

Getting Hitched, 2018 Style

T

he holidays are over and your

day. “Whatever your budget, bring someone on

schedule is clear — cue the

as your coordinator for the day so you can enjoy

search for hip ideas and happy

the work you put in,” Kirby said. “It’s insurance

and fresh feelings for your

on your investment. The day-of coordinator

wedding. There’s so many

tends to all details, so couples and families

ways to go about it, so we asked Heyday Lab,

can focus on the experience they spent so

a local wedding planning service, about what’s

much time curating.” Peek into the process on

chic and what will make this day perfectly you.

Instagram at heydaylab or at heydaylab.com.

“A heyday is a period of greatest popularity or success,” said Jamie Kirby, owner and founder of Heyday. “Like hammer pants in the ’80s and

TREND TALK

scrunchies in the ’90s, we believe that with the right preparation, coordination and tenacity, any day can be yours.”

Elopement and Destination Elopements

With projects ranging from weddings to

“I’ve definitely seen an increase in styled elope-

conferences, Heyday Lab wants to make your

ments and destination elopements,” Kirby said.

event an experience guests will talk about on

This is a great opportunity to have an intimate

the ride home. To ensure a good time is had

celebration of your love. Local resources include

by all, let’s talk wedding planners and day-of

The Elopement Co. and Get Hitched Quick,

coordinators.

offering easy, curated packages that take

“It’s about different levels of service,” Kirby said. Some couples hire a wedding planner for

the stress and expense out of planning little celebrations.

their knowledge and experience, then hand the

Top and center: A brunch wedding and mountaintop elopement destination. PHOTOS: LINDSEY BOLUYT, @LINDSEYBOLUYT

Bottom: Bridal bouquet featuring anthurium flowers. PHOTO: ASHLEY SLATER PHOTOGRAPHY,

whole day over. Kirby works a little differently.

Non-traditional Times

“I’m a lot more collaborative. I’m more of a guide

“A non-traditional time can be useful both

— they pick tasks and I pick tasks,” she said.

as a cost savings and to snag that venue you

A day-of coordinator is a service all wedding

wanted that is booked out forever,” Kirby said.

planners offer. It’s a role that takes a client-

Consider an off-season wedding in December or

ready project and helps execute it on the big

(Continued)

@ASHLEYSLATERPHOTOGRAPHY

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S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

WEDDING GUIDE

unexpected times of the week like a Thursday

CHILL NEW SERVICE

or Sunday.

“Tori Lee Yoga is offering Wedding Yoga, which

Brunch Weddings

I think is an absolutely brilliant way to ensure you’re present and centered for your big day,”

“A personal favorite, it allows one to switch up

Kirby said, “This girl is such a ray of light.” The

the expected wedding menu and frees up the

service attempts to offset tensions that tempt to

afternoon for other activities with the group

throw you off balance and away from the mo-

like kayaking, hiking, exploring or going to the

ment. Consider setting a relaxed, peaceful tone

beach,” said Kirby, who recalls a brunch wed-

for the wedding day, bridal shower, bachelorette

ding with picture perfect moments. “They did

or bachelor party. Yoga sessions are created to

sunrise photos — a breathtaking opportunity,

leave couples, friends and family feeling calm,

and brunch is my favorite meal. I love that it

balanced and mindful for the day’s most special

gets over earlier and you have a whole part of

moments.

the day to spend with people.”

FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS

MICHIGAN WEATHER PREDICTOR

“Anthurium (a.k.a. Flamingo Flower) is taking

“Plan for it, plan for it, plan for it,” Kirby said. “If

the coasts by storm and will be starring in so

you’re having an outdoor event — for the love of

many arrangements and bouquets in 2018,”

all things dry — have a Plan B.” It’s important

Kirby said. This bold, tropical statement bloom

to have a tent, an indoor space or a pavilion

comes in a wide array of colors to complement

if the weather changes. It’s incredibly risky to

different palettes and styles. Also popular are

plan an event exclusively outdoors without a

the “wild, unruly and unstructured arrange-

backup plan. If the wind picks up or a rainstorm

ments” currently ruling Instagram. Fresh

appears, embrace it. “Dance in it. Have a cute

predictions going forward include wedding

umbrella on hand. It’s your one day and rolling

wreaths — the updated version of the wedding

with the punches is the best thing you can do,”

arch.

Kirby said.

FINESSE TO IMPRESS

A few details to make your day stand out Kenley Event Design suggests personal charcuterie boards Custom neon. Try a big dance floor backdrop with an announcement like, “Love made me do it.” Switch up attire, like completely original wedding jackets. Color creates a mood. Pantone’s color of the year is Ultra Violet, so consider joining the movement or pick your own hue. Spring Sweet in Holland showcases breathtaking dresses and the experience is unmatched.

Top: Weather preparedness. PHOTO: AMY CARROLL PHOTOGRAPHY, @AMYCARROLLPHOTOGRAPHY

Center: Wedding jackets. PHOTO: ALYSSA MCELHENY PHOTOGRAPHY, @ALYSSAMCELHENYPHOTOGRAPHY Bottom: Custom neon sign by Kenley Event Design. PHOTO: KENLEY EVENT DESIGN, @KENLEYEVENTDESIGN

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S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

E XPO Sunday, january 14th 11:30am to 3:30pm

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S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

WEDDING GUIDE NEW VENUE ALERT

but if something about those things really

“One new venue that I’m super excited

speaks to you or is part of your story, I

about is Wind + James,” Kirby said. The

always encourage clients to include it.” For

modern and colorful event space and art

Kirby, the process is about creating expe-

studio in Schoolcraft is open for business

riences that make guests feel like they’ve

right at the start of the new year and is

had a peek into the lives, souls and hearts

fresh and bright, the perfect blank canvas

of the bride and groom. “Whatever it is

for planning a unique experience. It’s nice

that makes them who they are is the

to jump on untapped venues like this to

coolest thing they could include in their

create a destination atmosphere and

special day,” she said.

imaginative space for your photographers to get creative.

ALTERNATIVE SWEETS Black cakes — they sound weird, but look

THE OVER-IT LIST

beautiful. “The Cakabakery is basically

Some trends and themes seem a bit passé,

perfect in every way,” said Kirby, who also

but if you really love something, it’s never

digs unexpected treats at weddings. “This

out of style. “Burlap, mason jars, rose gold

summer at a beach wedding, we served

everything, table garlands — they’ve all

Mexican paletas and guests loved it.”

been done more times than I can count,

—by Missy Black

Wedding planner Jamie Kirby of Heyday Lab. PHOTO: SHUTTER SAM, @SHUTTERSAM


S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

3#+!  !+!+'-*(',

'3,3, -+#'&'-&,*1$-4


S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

WEDDING GUIDE

Wedding Resources BEAUTY: Waxology 701 Bagley Ave. SE, Grand Rapids (616) 309-0561 ilovewaxology.com

BOUTIQUES: Connieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bridal Boutique 1735 28th St. SW, Wyoming (616) 455-5233 conniesbridalboutique.com Renee Austin Wedding 1555 Plainfield Ave. NE, Grand Rapids (616) 224-0092 reneeaustinwedding.com Spring Sweet 56 E. 8th St., Holland (616) 355-1433 springsweet.com

BRIDAL EXPO: Southwest Michigan Wedding & Party Planning Expo

4419 S Westnedge Ave., Kalamazoo (269) 492-9111 swmichiganbridalshow.com

CAKES: Cakabakery 919 E. Fulton St., Grand Rapids (616) 319-1611 thecakabakery.com Cakabakery West 48 E. Lakewood Blvd., Holland (616) 392-3258 thecakabakery.com

CATERING: Above & Beyond 1120 Knapp St. NE, Grand Rapids (616) 558-6518 above-beyond.com Trillium Catering & Event Center 17246 Van Wagoner Rd., Spring Lake (616) 842-8260 trilliumevents.com

DJ: Tom Briggs DJ Entertainment (616) 532-7059 tombriggs.webs.com

RENTALS:

FLORAL: Eastern Floral -2836 Broadmoor Ave. SE, Grand Rapids -11595 E. Lakewood Blvd., Holland -556 N Beacon Blvd., Grand Haven GR location phone: (616) 466-5868 easternfloral.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: Heather Dixon Photography 446 Grandville Ave. SW, Ste. 282, Grand Rapids (616) 401-3022 heatherdixonphotography. photoreflect.com

Grand Valley Rental Co. 3046 Pettis Ave. NE, Grand Rapids (616) 915-0811 grandvalleyrentalco.com

VENUES:

(All offering on-site catering) CityFlatsHotel â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Grand Rapids 83 Monroe Center St. NW (616) 451-1892 cityflatshotel.com CityFlatsHotel â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Holland 61 E. 7th St., Holland (616) 796-2100 cityflatshotel.com DoubleTree By Hilton Grand Rapids Airport

4747 28th St. SE, Grand Rapids (616) 957-0100 grandrapidsairport.doubletree. com Muskegon Country Club 2801 Lakeshore Dr., Muskegon (231) 755-3737 muskegoncc.com Trillium Catering & Event Center 17246 Van Wagoner Rd., Spring Lake (616) 842-8260 trilliumevents.com These businesses made REVUEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first-ever Wedding Guide possible. Please consider supporting these local establishments.

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S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

Providing you with an intimate backdrop, personable staff will indulge you and cater to helping you find that perfect gown. We take the time to get to know all of our brides, so your unique personality can be complimented with your dream gown.

PIC TU RE - P E R F E C T CHOOSE EVENTS @ CITYFLATSHOTEL FOR YOUR NEXT EVENT LOCATION

CITYFLATSHOTEL.COM / 616 608 1720

1555 Plainfield Ave NE, Grand Rapids 616-224-0092 • reneeaustinwedding.com

Lashes · Brows · Makeup (616)-427-5394

HONORABLE MENTION

B O O K M E N O W AT

616.532.7059 tomthedj50@yahoo.com W E B : tombriggs.webs.com PHONE: EMAIL:

217 Grandville Ave SW Suite 102, Grand Rapids info@sirenandproper.com sirenandproper.com


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Restaurant listings arranged by region

GRAND RAPIDS Angel’s Thai Café 136 Monroe Center NW. 616-454-9801 THAI. This downtown restaurant makes your order fresh, fast, and hot. You can order your entree with your choice of meat and spice level, or create your own. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Thai Steak and Yum Talay. Anna’s House Multiple locations BREAKFAST/LUNCH. Anna’s House recently went through a dramatic makeover, going from an already-beloved breakfast hot spot and neighborhood staple to an ever-growing concept with five locations across West Michigan. Why all the success? The menu is unique, but accessible. The interior design is refreshing, and the service is great. » SERVING: Breakfast, Lunch OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Inventive breakfast specials. Bistro Bella Vita 44 Grandville Ave. SW. 616-222-4600 ITALIAN. One of Grand Rapids’ best dining experiences, featuring Mediterranean-inspired country cuisine, a swanky yet comfortable downtown atmopshere and personable service. BBV’s culinary team creates authentic, housemade recipes made with locally grown produce, fresh seafood and rotisserie roasted meats. Specialty gluten-free menu, and can prepare custom dishes for lactose intolerant, vegetarian, and vegan diets. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Mediterranean Country Cuisine and Martinis.

Butcher’s Union 438 Bridge St. NW 616-551-1323 AMERICAN. Butcher’s has its fortes — meat and whiskey — but it’s not exactly niche. Expertly-crafted cocktails (made with every kind of spirit) are here at a refreshingly affordable price, along

with a high-end food menu for carnivores and vegheads alike. The historic building sets the mood, giving off an “old fancy-bar in London” vibe. » SERVING: Lunch, Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Meat, whiskey, cocktails.

Thai cuisine, but also made to accommodate health conscious and special diets. Not too strong, not too weak, like harmony and melody. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Peanut Curry Noodles.

Brewery Vivant 925 Cherry St. SE. 616-719-1604 FRENCH/BELGIAN. Housed in a refurbished funeral chapel, this brewery won Best Ambiance in Revue’s Best of the West with its stained glass windows and European beer hall setup. Along with farmhouse style beers, the LEED-certified BV is known for its French-Belgian cuisine, from duck nachos to roasted bone marrow. » SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: The Burger (2nd place Best of the West).

Founders Brewing Company 235 Grandville SW. 616-776-1195 BREWPUB. A beerlover’s paradise with a national reputation for flavorful, award-winning beers. Likewise, the brewpub’s menu consists mainly of flavorful handcrafted deli sandwiches that can stand up and complement the beers (or vice versa). » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Award-winning beer, handcrafted sandwiches.

Chapbook Café 2660 28th St. SE, Grand Rapids. 616-942-0595. CAFE. Take a break from browsing the shelves at Schuler Books with a homemade selection of soups, sandwiches and quiches. Soups are prepared in-house daily and served with fresh baked bread to accompany a small-but-elegant sandwich menu. Try a quiche or traditional Italian Panini grilled on fresh ciabatta bread, or for a quick bite, grab a bagel or scone from the dessert case. » SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days GO THERE FOR: Homemade soups and sandwiches CitySen Lounge 83 Monroe Center St. NW. 616-608-1720 AMERICAN. CitySen Lounge, located in the heart of downtown Grand Rapids, is a bar with a big-city feel, offering exciting options for lunch, dinner and breakfast on the weekends. The focus is on fresh ingredients and a full bar with local brews, wine and creative cocktails. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner (Breakfast on weekends). OPEN: Open 7 days GO THERE FOR: Daily happy hour The Cottage Bar 18 Lagrave Ave. SE. 616-454-9088 AMERICAN. The Cottage Bar is the oldest operating restaurant and bar in downtown Grand Rapids. Come in for the Cottage Burger, smothered with green olives, bacon, lettuce, tomato, hickory mayonnaise and Swiss and American cheeses. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sundays GO THERE FOR: The Cottage Burger. Erb Thai 950 Wealthy St. SE #1A. (616) 356-2573. Additional locations at 4160 Lake Michigan Dr. NW, Suite B, and 820 Michigan St. NE. THAI. Food rooted in traditional

G.R.P.D. (Grand Rapids Pizza and Delivery) 340 State St. SE. 616-454-9204 ITALIAN. The current location opened in 2004 as the first established pizzeria in Heritage Hill A common meeting spot for local folks, business professionals and college students, a place where one could gather for a quick meal or a reflective lunch. It offers both hand-tossed pizza and Chicago-style stuffed pizza, as well as pasta, sandwiches, salads, and wings. Online ordering, too. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza. Grand Woods Lounge 77 Grandville Ave. SW. 616-451-4300 AMERICAN. The restaurant’s interior exudes a warm, casual ambiance reminiscent of the great eateries of the Pacific Northwest; the outdoor porch features two outdoor bars and a fireplace. Menu stocked with affordable appetizers great for sharing, plus salads, sandwiches, and entrées. Lots of domestics and microbrews, plus an array of martinis including the “Woodstini,” a tasty mix of Stoli Orange Vodka, mandarin oranges and raspberries. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Cocktails. Graydon’s Crossing 1223 Plainfield NE. 616-726-8260 TAVERN. An authentic take on the English Pub, with a huge selection of beers on tap and a menu that includes classic English dishes like Fish & Chips, Shepherd’s Pie and Irish Stew, as well as Indian specialties like Tandoori Chicken and Tikka Masala. A great casual atmosphere for drinking and dining. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer and authentic pub food. Harmony Brewing Company 1551 Lake Dr. SE (616) 233-0063 BREWPUB. Harmony features 12 craft-brewed beers in addition to signature

root beer for the kiddos. Named one of the top-five brewpub menus in West Michigan by yours truly, Harmony offers 10” rustic wood-fired pizzas and great soups and sandwiches. Check out their new location, Harmony Hall, at 401 Stocking Ave. NW. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza and brews. Lindo Mexico Restaurante Mexicano 1742 28th St. SW. 616-261-2280 MEXICAN. One of the less-discussed Mexican eateries is also one of the most popular, especially on the weekends. The atmosphere? Very communal, occasionally with excellent live music. The food? Full of flavor on the cheap. The service? Always friendly, always helpful. » SERVING: Lunch, Dinner OPEN: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Unique margaritas made fresh. Marie Catrib’s 1001 Lake Dr. 616-454-4020 ECLECTIC. The East Hills eatery makes everything from scratch with local ingredients, and there are plenty of vegetarian and vegan options. Get there early for lunch, as there is almost always a wait. » SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Salads, soups and sandwiches. One Trick Pony 136 E. Fulton. 616-235-7669 AMERICAN. One Trick Pony unveiled a new menu last April with the tagline “Fresh, Local Fare with a Beat.” The restaurant is a part of FarmLink and supports local growers and remains focused on sustainability. Connected to the Cottage Bar, the menu spans pizza, salads, homemade soups, smoked prime rib and more. Pair the food with live music, which OTP features weekly. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Eclectic pizzas. The Pita House 1450 Wealthy SE, 3730 28th Street, 4533 Ivanrest SW (Grandville). 616-454-1171 MEDITERRANEAN. Gyros so big you can club someone with them, the smoothest hummus in town and other Mediterranean fare, including kibbe, kafta and falafel. Additional locations on 28th Street and Kalamazoo SE. Sandwiches are made to order with fresh vegetables and ingredients. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Fresh pita wraps. Reserve Wine & Food 201 Monroe Ave. NW (616) 855-9463 ECLECTIC. With 102 wines available by the glass and more than 300 by the bottle, paired with an ever-changing food menu influenced by West Michigan grown foods, Reserve promises diners a

REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

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The B.O.B. 20 Monroe Ave. NW. (616) 356-2000 ECLECTIC. If you’re not sure what kind of dining you want, you can just head into The B.O.B., where you can choose from one of its several venues. Go into Gilly’s, where you can dine on seafood or B.O.B.’s Brewery, the restaurant’s in-house brewery. You can dress down for some pizza at Bobarino’s or dress it up for a steak at Judson’s Steakhouse. For after dinner, take in a show at Dr. Grins or enjoy live music at H.O.M.E. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer and numerous dining options.

REVUE’s dining listings are compiled by staff and minions. This is not intended to be a comprehensive list of restaurants in the region. For an expanded list, be on the lookout for new and improved dining changes on our website, revuewm.com. The listings are not intended to be reviews of West Michigan restaurants, although we will inject some opinions into the listings based on staff experiences and personal preferences. To submit or to correct information in a dining listing, e-mail editor@revuewm.com.

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DINING

unique experience. Cocktails and craft beers add depth to the primarily wine-centered menu. » SERVING: Lunch, Dinner OPEN ON: Closed on Sunday GO THERE FOR: Wine and food pairings, charcuterie, happy hour.

we’ve finished breakfast. » SERVING: Breakfast Lunch OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Breakfast all day.

Rockwell-Republic 45 S. Division Ave. 616-551-3563 ECLECTIC. Menu offerings range from sushi to burgers and everything in between. The craft cocktail menu runs the gamut from classics like the Manhattan to more modern concoctions and the beer and wine menus are nicely curated. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Specialty cocktails, broad menu, lively atmosphere.

KALAMAZOO/BATTLE CREEK

The Sovengard 443 Bridge St. NW 616-214-7207 NEW NORDIC. There’s really nothing like The Sovengard. The menu changes with the seasons, but the quality doesn’t. Expect innovative, beautiful dishes in the Scandinavian tradition. It’s not cheap, but you get what you pay for. The West Side restaurant also boasts an excellent taplist, perfect for sipping in the biergarten. » SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Something special. Wolfgang’s Restaurant 1530 Wealthy St. SE. 616-454-5776 BREAKFAST. The bustling Eastown breakfast spot is home to some of the heartiest breakfast dishes and funniest menu descriptions. Courteous staff never fails to offer a cup of coffee to go after

Arcadia Brewing Co. 701 E. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo. 269-276-0458 BREWPUB. You’ll find some of the usual suspects on the brewpub’s menu, including some of the best barbecue in the region. But you’ll also find some delightful surprises on the menu, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Handcrafted ales and barbecue. Central City Taphouse 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall. (269) 492-0100 TAPHOUSE. If Central City doesn’t have the kind of beer you want on tap, you’ll probably find it with the 75+ bottles. OH, you say you’re not a beer drinker? Well, Central City offers 20 wine ‘taps’ and a full bar. If you’re not the drinking type, that’s cool too. There are a number of food options to pick from, including a raw menu, a pizza menu and the all-day menu, which features burgers, soups and entrees. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Diverse beverage selection.

Fieldstone Grille 3970 W. Centre St., Portage. 269-321-8480 AMERICAN. Lodge-retreat atmosphere overlooking the Moors Golf Club natural wetlands. The “field-to-plate” menu features burgers, pizzas, steaks and some eclectic items like quail. Try the FSG chips, a combination of potato, beet and sweet potato chips. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Blue Burger, Almond Crusted Walleye, FSG Chips. Food Dance 401 E. Michigan Ave. 269-382-1888 AMERICAN. Food Dance is committed to building a thriving and sustainable local food system, supporting artisans who practice craft food processes. It’s about the connection with people and places the food comes from. Offering private dining space, catering and delivery, while an on-site market offers humanely raised meats, artisan cheeses, fresh bread and pastries. » SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Fresh Local Foods.

Olde Peninsula 200 E. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo 269-343-2739 BREWPUB. Downtown brewpub serves up the expected (e.g., steaks, ribs), the authentic (e.g., London Broil) and some pleasant surprises (e.g., extensive vegetarian offerings, Italian food). Offers a range of beers brewed on the premises and served on tap, plus a full bar. Check out the seasonal porters on tap right now, including the Vanilla Porter (5.5% ABV) and Stout Chocula (5.25% ABV). » SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer-B-Que Ribs, London Broil.

Union Cabaret & Grille 125 S. Burdick St., Kalamazoo. 269-384-6756 AMERICAN. A partnership with WMU, Union features eclectic food and cocktails, plus live jazz music performed by WMU faculty and students. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sunday. GO THERE FOR: Portabella Fries, Bloody Maries with infused vodkas.

LAKESHORE

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8th Street Grille 20 W. 8th St., Holland. 616-392-5888 AMERICAN. This eclectic grille offers a mix of draft and bottled craft beers and a variety of pub classics and new, American beerinspired dishes. Happy hour includes half-off appetizers and $1 off drafts. » SERVING: Lunch, Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: 28 taps of craft beer.

52 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018

CityVu Bistro 61 E 7th Street, Holland. 616-796-2114 AMERICAN. A distinctive rooftop dining experience in downtown Holland with fresh gourmet flatbreads and an array of seasonal entrees. The contemporary-yet-casual atmosphere, full bar and unique menus make it the ideal spot for lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. » SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days GO THERE FOR: Flatbreads. Everyday People Cafe 11 Center St., Douglas. 269-857-4240 AMERICAN. REVUE Publisher Brian Edwards calls Everyday People Café his favorite restaurant along the lakeshore. The atmosphere is casual and upbeat, the staff knows its stuff about wine and

food, and the seasonal menu is filled with meticulously prepared, eclectic comfort food like Butternut Squash Risotto, Braised Lamb Shank and Ahi Tuna. A great wine list and tremendous desserts. » SERVING: Brunch (Weekends) Lunch Dinner OPEN: Thurs.–Sun. during winter. GO THERE FOR: Gorgonzola Pork Chop, Greek Salad with Grandma Gigi’s Dressing (Edwards).

Fricano’s Pizza Tavern 1400 Fulton Ave., Grand Haven. 616-842-8640 ITALIAN. Claims to be the first pizzeria in Michigan, but customers care less about its longevity than the amazingly crispy thin crust and simple ingredients atop its much-lauded pies. Four other locations around West MI, including Comstock Park, Muskegon, Holland and Kalamazoo. » SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza. Kirby House 2 Washington, Grand Haven. 616-846-3299 AMERICAN. Formerly a historic hotel, The Kirby House retains its oldworld charm while providing all the pleasantries of new world fare, with a diverse but primarily American-influenced menu. Check out the new island bar with 5 HDTVs and walk to Lake Michigan right after. The Kirby House also hosts The Grill Room and a pizzeria (complete with pool tables) called K2. The lower level has also been renovated to include a wine cellar and a premier nightclub, Dark. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Nightlife. New Holland Brewing Company 66 E. 8th St., Holland. 616-355-6422 BREWPUB. One of West MI’s premier microbreweries serves up better than average pub grub, including savory sandwiches chock full of Michigan ingredients, plus a seasonal entree menu. Also try their artisan spirits. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Mad Hatter IPA, Dragon’s Milk. Phil’s Bar & Grille 215 Butler St., Saugatuck. 269-857-1555 AMERICAN. This cozy (some would say “small”) bar and grille in downtown Saugatuck is one of those unassuming spots you might easily overlook, though locals in Saugatuck will tell you about their love affair with Phil’s. Eclectic menu is all over the place, but in a good way, and the staff is super-friendly. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Portabella Mushroom Fries. Salt of the Earth 114 East Main St., Fennville. 269-561-7258 AMERICAN. Salt of the Earth is a farm-to-table-inspired restaurant, bar, and bakery located in the heart of SW Michigan farm country in Fennville. Focuses on fresh, seasonal, and local ingredients whenever possible. Also serves up live music on weekends. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: House made rustic cuisine. Saugatuck Brewing Company 2948 Blue Star Highway. 269-857-7222 BREWPUB. Enjoy a traditional Irish-style pub that features quality beer, wine, food and service. Try one of 12 unique brews that are served in the pub and bottled and distributed throughout the Midwest. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer in a family friendly pub environment.

To submit or to correct information, e-mail editor@revuewm.com.


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SCENE | SOUNDS | SIGHTS DINING REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

53


by Nick Macksood

DINING

New Year, New You It’s time to eat some salad

Well, it’s January. It’s a new year. We’ve all white-knuckled our way through the first full year of our 45th President, and perhaps our self-care routines have lapsed a little? I know mine have! So let’s eat right. Personally, greens are the very last thing that I’m thinking about December through February, but my girlfriend is adamant that the verdant, leafy stuff has all kinds of important vitamins and nutrients that keep your body and mind in good form. Personally, I’d rather sneak some kale into a winter pasta with Italian sausage, or some casserole or soup — something to warm my bones! Regardless, I decided to expand my horizons and venture out on a one-day tour of salads from around Grand Rapids. Here’s my experience, some from rookie establishments and some old favorites, but there’s a lot of ground left uncovered here. If you’re looking to get healthy in the New Year, get out and make your own list, you masochists.

NEW HOTEL MERTENS

35 Oakes St. SW, Grand Rapids

DINING SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

NHM is one of Grand Rapids’ latest establishments, and it’s just all right. Don’t feel like you have to spend too much time here … ugh, who am I kidding? It’s GORGEOUS in here and you’re going to love it. I guess it will never be my own private French bistro. I had the Salad Lyonnaise, because Lyon is, apparently, the gastronomic capital of France. (Eat your heart out, Paris.) This one has some bitter greens tossed with a BLiS sherry dressing — a nice winter flavor — tossed with warm lardons and toasted garlic. Then, they throw a poached egg and croutons on top! I’ll be back.

LITTLE BIRD GR

95 Monroe Center NW, Grand Rapids

Top: Little Bird GR Cauliflower Kale Caesar with sardines, Bottom: New Hotel Mertens Salad Lyonnaise.

54 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018

NEW HOTEL MERTENS PHOTO: PHIL ARTZ

This is my first time at Little Bird, and there are some really awesome sounding dishes here. Kimchi hash browns? Eggs In Purgatory? And a full English breakfast? That’s pretty neat, even if baked beans are, in my opinion, a weird breakfast food.

Salad-wise, I tried the simple Torn Lettuce, as I was also filling up on the Pork Katsu breakfast sandwich. The salad was very light, as you might expect with the simple combination of garden greens, radish, carrot and balsamic vinaigrette. No ingredients overpowered the other. In fact, it feels like I consumed negative calories. I really wanted to try the Cauliflower Kale Caesar with sardines (there’s potato chips and gouda on there!), but I just couldn’t quite justify it with a breaded pork sandwich also on my plate.

UNCLE CHEETAH’S SOUP SHOP

1133 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids

I’ve actually never been to Uncle Cheetah’s, either. I used to think the idea of a soup restaurant was bizarre, but boy was I wrong about that. All the soups sound great, but I went with a half Wayward Son salad. This one is an organic mixed green salad with roasted Brussels sprouts and sweet potatoes — two of the best winter veggies — and toasted pumpkin seeds.


There’s an agua faba ancho dressing and I had to ask what that was. I’m told it’s made with the thick liquid that comes from soaking legumes in water for a while. It’s great!

TERRA

of the fiber). Plus, I’m told the squash, especially its skin, is super high in nutrients. On top of that, I’m finding I want to try more of Terra’s salads, despite my green fatigue. There’s a miso kale salad, a roasted beet salad with goat cheese and a real rusticsounding apple and cheddar salad.

1429 Lake Dr. SE, Grand Rapids On the way to Terra, I Googled, “Can you eat too much lettuce?” It turns out, you really can’t. I stumbled on this vegan blog where somebody was concerned that their constant cravings for lettuce would harm their body. The consensus was that as long as you save some room to consume some form of protein/fat, you can eat virtually all the lettuce you want. I’m enjoying these salads, but I am glad that my body doesn’t constantly crave lettuce. Terra’s doing a winter kale salad, the first time the robust green has appeared in front of me today. It’s all local: the kale, the roasted delicata squash, the pumpkin seeds and the cherry vinaigrette. This is a hearty salad — it feels warm and filling (because

CHOP HOUSE

190 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids I used to work at the Chop House. In fact, I was the one making the salads there at one point, so I know all about these. They’re classic salads: The Wedge, Grilled Hearts of Romaine, Caesar, etc. I also know all of the dressings are made in-house and that many of them taste so good because there’s stuff like brandy in there. They don’t mess around at the Chop House. But, I just can’t eat any more salad today. For better or worse, in 2018 I’ll be looking at the salad options a little differently from last year.

SCENE | SOUNDS | SIGHTS DINING REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018 |

55


by Joe Boomgaard

BEER

Bottle Shop & Bar n Downtow

GR’s

ER E B T S E LARG ION SELECT Over 800 Beers 20 Drafts Growler Fills Weekly Events Free Tastings Happy Hour: Mon.–Fri, 12–6 pm

Free 30-minute parking across the street

JAVA JUNKIES Michigan coffee beers, rated

T

HE TOP-RATED SELECTION IN A BLIND TASTING OF MICHIGAN-MADE COFFEE-THEMED BEERS HAPPENS TO BE from a lakeshore brewery that’s making some waves of its own. Darkstar Stout from Holland-based Big Lake Brewing LLC earned top honors in the Revue coffee beer taste off. The beer, a seasonal offering that’s brewed with Kona and Sumatra coffee and then aged on cacao nibs, slightly edged out selections from Short’s Brewing Co. and Muskegon’s Pigeon Hill Brewing Co. For Big Lake Brewing, the victory came just as the company opened the doors of its new and expanded taproom in downtown Holland. The company invested $1.25 million into fixing up the 7,000-square-foot space at 13 W. 7th St., the site of the former Serafina’s Bar and Grill. The move also allows the brewery to offer a food menu at its new site, which seats 160 people. That new menu includes appetizers, small plates, sandwiches and pizza, among others. “For us, it really is all about the beer, but when we expanded into this new location, we knew the key to our success was having the right chef and the right menu,” co-owner Travis Prueter said in a statement. While the company continues to brew at its existing off-site production space, it has vacated its former north-side pub at 977 Butternut Dr. In 2016, Big Lake sold 634 barrels of beer in Michigan, up more than 39 percent from a year ago, according to data from the Michigan Liquor Control Commission. In May, the company also started distributing several of its packaged beer brands in the Ohio market.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED Darkstar Stout

DINING SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

Big Lake Brewing Co., Holland ABV: 8 percent Pours black with an awesomely thick tan head. The roasty flavors pair with a slight coffee bitterness on the finish, but it’s the lovely roast that stays with you. Nice full body. It’s the one we didn’t want to ever stop sipping. SCORE: 90.5

Cup A Joe Coffee Creme Stout Short’s Brewing Co., Bellaire ABV: 8 percent

404 IONIA AVE. SW (616) 350.9170 grandrapids.craftbeercellar.com

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A lovely deep tan head sits atop a black abyss. The creaminess definitely comes through on this one, and it features a deliciously chewy body. It drank more like cold-brew coffee with cream, with less-pronounced coffee notes. SCORE: 89.5

Walter Gets Buzzed

Arabicadabra

Pigeon Hill Brewing Co., Muskegon ABV: 5 percent

Bell’s Brewery Inc., Galesburg ABV: 5.5 percent

Its blonde looks belie its roasty flavors. Pours with a thick cream-colored head. This beer exudes aromas of flavored coffee with just a hint of zest — lemon, perhaps. Flavors were a goldilox blend of coffee and cream. SCORE: 88.5

This beer has a nice roasty aroma, but doesn’t overdo it on the coffee. It’s likable, but a little more coffee might have been better. SCORE: 73.5

RECOMMENDED Breakfast Stout

Founders Brewing Co., Grand Rapids ABV: 8.3 percent Plenty of lacing and great roasted coffee aromas. Nice and chewy, but the coffee adds some bitterness to the finish. SCORE: 77.5

ALSO TASTED Morning Nightcap Arcadia Brewing Co., Kalamazoo Brewtus Coffee Porter ELK Brewing, Comstock Park Coffee Flavored Milkshake Stout Rochester Mills Beer Co., Auburn Hills


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SCENE | SOUNDS | SIGHTS DINING

YEAR ROUND BROWN

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Last Call by Nick Macksood / photo by Katy Batdorff

WICKED & FUNKY COLD MEDINA One Bourbon, 608 Bridge St. NW, Grand Rapids

If your 2018 resolution was to drink more whiskey, you’re in luck. Megan Freriks and her partners at One Bourbon are ringing in what is hands down the worst month of the year (Editor’s Note: The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect that of this publication.) with not one, but two cocktails to make an unsympathetic January go down smoother. A double feature — Happy New Year!

WICKED

SEE HOW THEY'RE MADE: Check out revuewm.com for an exclusive video tutorial.

58 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2018

FUNKY COLD MEDINA

1/2 oz. rye whiskey 1/4 oz. Cherry Heering 1/4 oz. Chartreuse Yellow Dash of Angostura orange bitters Prosecco, to finish

2 oz. Rebel Yell ginger whiskey 1 oz. lemon juice 1/2 oz. simple syrup Cranberries, muddled Crushed ice

Pour rye, Cherry Heering (a cherryflavored liqueur), Chartreuse Yellow (a liqueur made of 130 herbs and plants) and bitters into an iced mixing glass. Give it a stir, then strain into martini glass. Top with Prosecco.

Muddle cranberries at the bottom of a rocks glass. Pour whiskey, lemon juice and simple syrup into a shaker. Shake vigorously, then strain into rocks glass. Top with crushed ice.


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Revue Magazine, January 2018  
Revue Magazine, January 2018  

REVUE is West Michigan's monthly arts & entertainment guide covering events, music, dining & drinking and more. Visit us at revuewm.com.

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