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WEST MICHIGAN’S ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE FOR 31 YEARS » JULY 2019

FREE! MIA THE GOLDENDOODLE AT KIRK PARK

ALSO INSIDE: Andrew Bird gets political The White Pine Beer Trail Modern libraries do it all

THE PET ISSUE


H I S TO R I C C H A R AC T E R .

TIMELESS EVENTS. CEREMONIES | RECEPTIONS

COMPLIMENTARY VALET PARKING COMPLIMENTARY DJ SERVICES START PLANNING PERFECTION AT

THEHARRISBUILDING.COM Events @TheHarrisBuilding.com | 616.256.2535 | 111 Division Ave S, Grand Rapids, Michigan

2 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

DOWNTOWN GRAND RAPIDS


JUL

3

311 & DIRTY HEADS WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

THE INTERRUPTERS, DREAMERS & BIKINI TRILL

DOGG, 11 SNOOP ICE CUBE & JUL

WARREN G

Outdoor Venue | 7:30PM Tickets start at $26

Outdoor Venue | 5:45PM Tickets start at $16

JUL

19

CHARLIE WILSON & THE ISLEY BROTHERS

JUL

20

Outdoor Venue | 8PM Tickets start at $18

AUG

10

TIM MCGRAW WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

DEVIN DAWSON & LEVI HUMMON

5

30 STEELY DAN Outdoor Venue | 8PM Tickets start at $26

NOV

22 & 23

TOTO Entertainment Hall | 8PM Tickets start at $35

Doors: VIP Admission | 6PM General Admission | 7PM Entertainment: Eddie Money | 7:45PM Dwight Yoakam | 9:30PM Tickets start at $50

AUG

Outdoor Venue | 7:30PM Tickets start at $35

OCT

BEERS, BRATS & BURGERS

WE WILL ROCK YOU THE MUSICAL Entertainment Hall | 8PM Tickets start at $22

Get your tickets at Soaring Eagle Casino or Saganing Eagles Landing Casino Box Offices, ETIX.COM or call 1.800.513.ETIX. soaringeaglecasino.com

Mt. Pleasant, MI | 1.888.7.EAGLE.7

Performances held at Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan. Entertainment subject to cancellation. Management reserves all rights.

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

3


TAPROOM

DELI

STORE

MON-SAT: 11AM-2AM SUN: 11AM-12PM

SUN-WED: 11AM-11PM THU-SAT: 11AM-12AM

MON-SAT: 11AM-11PM SUN: 11AM-9PM

235 GRANDVILLE AVE. SW GRAND RAPIDS, MI 49503 616.776.1195

JULY THURSDAY

04

Olivia & The Aquatic Troupe

SATURDAY

The Go Rounds wsg M.SORD

FREE

THURSDAY

$5 COVER

18

Alma Afrobeat Ensemble

06

SATURDAY

07

Grand Rapids Jazz Orchestra

THURSDAY

THURSDAY

$5 COVER

SATURDAY

FREE

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

Cheap Pitcher Night with $10 class 1 pitchers & Trivia Night (7pm-close)

Cheap Pint Night with $3 class one and $4 class two pints & Open Mic Night (8pm-close)

Mug Club Day

Taproom Exclusive Beer Special with $1 off of featured TRX beer & Free Live Music

4 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

$5 COVER

27

SUNDAY

28

Rev. Sekou

$5 COVER

TUESDAY

13

Mark Lavengood Band

New Reveille

MONDAY

ALL SHOWS ARE AGES 21+ AND BEGIN AT 9:30 UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

SATURDAY

FREE

25

Mo Lowda & The Humble wsg The Hacky Turtles

11

My Son The Hurricane wsg Bumpus

FREE | 5:30PM | ALL AGES

20

Smooth Hound Smith FREE

SUNDAY

SATURDAY

FREE | 8:30PM

SUNDAY

Service Industry Day with $1.25 off pints starting at 9:30pm (11am-close) Live Music

@FOUNDERSGRANDRAPIDS

@FOUNDERSGRANDRAPIDS


Relax at Rosa MAY 2 - SEPTEMBER 19

Free Lunchtime Entertainment Every Thursday | All Summer | 12:00 PM-1:30 PM | Rosa Parks Circle

Serita’s Black Rose June 27

Cosmic Knot July 11

Hannah Rose & the GravesTones July 18

The Great Ones July 25

Cabildo August 1

Les Créatif August 8

Political Lizard August 15

Connla August 22

Earth Radio August 29

Thunderwüde September 5

Bear-A-Tones September12

Yolonda Lavender September 19

More info at DOWNTOWNGR.ORG


* july 19

JULY 8 JOHNNYSWIM

JULY 12 PATTON OSWALT

JULY 29 NAS

july 30 PRETTYMUCH

Dumpstaphunk, Miss Velvet & The Blue Wolf

july 20 THE STRUTS

w/ The Glorious Sons, JJ Wilde

JULY 24 JASON BONHAM'S LED ZEPPELIN EVENING

JULY 31 BLUEFACE

AUGUST 3 BILLY CURRINGTON

AUGUST 7 BEACH HOUSE

GEORGE CLINTON AND PARLIAMENT FUNKADELIC

JULY 27 CARIBBEAN SUMMER JAM

* w/ Mackenzie Ziegler

AUGUST 11 HELLYEAH

AUGUST 10 FUEGO SATURDAY

w/ JD Simo

SEPTEMBER 11 THE HEAD AND THE HEART

SEPTEMBER 20 LIL DUVAL

OCTOBER 15 LITTLE STEVEN & THE DISCIPLES OF SOUL

OCTOBER 20 AJR

NOVEMBER 8 X AMBASSADORS

w/ Asking Alexandria, Bad Wolves

OCTOBER 3 STEVE HACKETT

* OCTOBER 10 THEO VON

Genesis Revisited

*

AUGUST 28 THE ALLMAN BETTS BAND

AUGUST 20 PAPA ROACH

*

*

*

* NOVEMBER 10 LEWIS BLACK

* SEATED SHOW

NOVEMBER 12 BIG WILD

NOVEMBER 15 RYAN HAMILTON

NOVEMBER 22 AARON LEWIS w/ Ben Danaher

* DECEMBER 7 TOM SEGURA

Get more info and see the full schedule at 20MonroeLive.com

11 OTTAWA AVE NW • DOWNTOWN GRAND RAPIDS • 20MONROELIVE.COM 6 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

w/ ISSUES, Justin Stone

*

21+

september 27 JUDAH & THE LION

august 9 I PREVAIL

DECEMBER 17 JANE LYNCH

"A Swingin' Little Christmas"


summer T H E

P E R F E C T

C O M B O

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

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photo courtesy of Skydive Allegan

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WHAT’S INSIDE

July 2019 | Volume 31, Issue 7

SCENE: 12 14 16 18 42

What’s Going On Biz Beat Potshots All In On Trump Style Notes: A New Way to See Things

SOUNDS: 22 Saves the Day 24 Andrew Bird

REVUE ARTS:

25

1A Visual arts, classical and jazz music, theater, arts event previews and more. (See the center of this issue)

THE PET ISSUE 25 27 29 33 35 37 39 41

Introduction How to Rescue a Pet Pet Photography Doggy Date Pet Stores Pet Events Dog Parks Zoos

DINING & DRINKING: 45 Cakabakery 46 Brewery Bike Trail

42

46 REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

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W E S T M I C H I G A N ’ S E N T E RTA I N M E N T G U I D E

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

P

ets are part of the community too — one drive around town on any warm, sunny day will make that perfectly clear. In fact, I’m pretty sure there are just as many dogs in East Grand Rapids as people. At a certain point you have to ask: When do dogs deserve the right to vote?

Then again, maybe we shouldn’t expose them to that particular part of humanity. They’re too pure and innocent. Plus, they already have the life, especially in West Michigan. I mean, where else can a pup spend a beautiful summer day at the beach, safely running and swimming around with all kinds of other canines. We’re also blessed with plenty of dog parks that bring the entire community together — after all, dogs can’t drive themselves around (yet). Whether they’re cats, dogs, birds or anything else under the sun, there are a million ways to treat your pets. You just have to know where to look, which is what this issue is all about. We guide you to boutiques where you can buy clothes, toys and snacks for your cat, as well as dog-friendly patios and photographers who can capture those special moments forever. This all might be a bit sad if you don’t already have a furry friend, but we want to help you get one responsibly, which is why we talked to Cathy Bissell about how and where to adopt. To be quite honest, I technically don’t have any pets of my own, but I’ve grown extremely attached to my roommates’ cats, Hank and Luanne. They’re precious angels who light up my life and I can’t wait to adopt my own cat and dog one day. Until then, I’ll just have to browse the pet stores and stand on the edge of dog parks, admiring from afar.

EDITORIAL Publisher Brian Edwards Associate Publisher Rich Tupica / rich@revueholding.com Editor Joe Boomgaard / joe@revuewm.com Managing Editor Josh Veal / josh@revuewm.com Copy Editor Claire Boomgaard DESIGN Kristi Kortman / kristi@revuewm.com Kaylee Van Tuinen / kaylee@revuewm.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Andy Balaskovitz Dana Casadei Eric Mitts Jack Raymond Kayla Sosa

Kelly Brown Marla R. Miller Michaela Stock Missy Black

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Buddies Pet Photography ADVERTISING / 616.608.6170 Rich Tupica / sales@revuewm.com Kelli Belanger / kelli@revuewm.com Crissy Kline / christina@revuewm.com DIGITAL EDITOR Josh Veal

’Til next time,

MINION Abi Safago

FIND US ONLINE! Josh Veal, Managing Editor Website: revuewm.com Twitter: twitter.com/revuewm Facebook: facebook.com/revuewm Instagram: instagram.com/revuewm

UPCOMING ISSUES AUGUST

Best Of The West

SEPTEMBER The Arts Issue

We explore and celebrate the results from our fourth-annual reader poll to crown the best of West Michigan — music venues, restaurants, bars, shops, people and more.

A complete season preview of West Michigan’s cultural arts events, as well as artist profiles and behind-the-scenes stories about the local arts community.

REVUE is published monthly by Revue Holding Company. P.O. Box 1629, Grand Rapids, MI 49501-1629 Office: 616.608.6170 / Fax: 616.608.6182 ©2019, Revue Holding Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part granted only by written permission of the publisher in accordance with our legal statement, fools.

ON THE COVER: Mia the goldendoodle at Kirk Park Courtesy of Buddies Pet Photography

TO ADVERTISE: Call (616) 608-6170 or email sales@revuewm.com. Space reservation is the 17th of the month before publication.

10 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

See more on page 29


REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

11


WHAT’S GOING ON THIS MONTH |  Compiled by Revue Staff

7/5-6

paintings, clothes and much more from local artists.

Lakeshore Art Festival

7/9

Downtown Muskegon July 5-6, free lakeshoreartfestival.org

If you missed the Festival of the Arts in Grand Rapids in June, have no fear; the Lakeshore Art Festival will be happening for two days in Muskegon. This art festival features fine art, craft, artisan food, live entertainment and a section for kids to have a wonderful interactive experience. For the grown up in you, feel free to stop by the wine and craft beer garden. Along with this, the festival is teaming up with the DTE Energy Foundation to reduce waste at the festival but also to help properly recycle and compost. Stay local and stay green.

7/7-28

Summer of Brunch GR Loves Food Trucks Fulton Street Artisans Market 1145 E. Fulton St., Grand Rapids Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. facebook.com/grlovesfoodtrucks

It’s true, GR does love food trucks — who doesn’t! We also happen to love brunch, so why not combine the best of both worlds? Summer of Brunch brings all kinds of food trucks to the Fulton Street Artisans Market, offering all their usual fare alongside brunch specials. Grab some delicious food while browsing soap, candles, jewelry,

Meanwhile Movie: Good Burger

Wealthy Theater 1130 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids July 9, 8 p.m., $5+ grcmc.org/theatre When competition arises between your little food joint and the big new corporate one, you do whatever you have to do. Good Burger is a cult classic comedy based on an All That sketch, which is just about as ’90s as it gets. It’s coming to Wealthy Theater’s weekly series, Meanwhile Movies, which features iconic films of all kinds. Come enjoy this classic, featuring Kenan and Kel, bound to make anyone laugh.

Movies on Monroe. COURTESY PHOTO

7/12 Movies on Monroe: Matilda and Crazy Rich Asians

555 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids July 12, 6 p.m.-midnight, free downtowngr.com A childhood classic making us all wish we could move things with our minds and a newer film highlighting the life of the rich and beautiful are coming to the big screen on Monroe Avenue for a night. This summer

series hosts movies in a big lot along the Grand River, along with plenty to do before the shows for all ages. For the kid-at-heart, you should kick off with some “zero-gravity games” or a magician performance. Or, if you want to perfectly understand one scene from Crazy Rich Asians, you can learn how to play Mah-Jong. Along with great pre-movie entertainment, feel free to kick back and relax by eating some food from seven great food trucks.

7/18 Andrew Bird ft. Madison Cunningham Meijer Gardens 1000 E. Beltline Ave. NE, Grand Rapids July 18, 6 p.m., $40+ meijergardens.org

Meijer Gardens Concert. COURTESY PHOTO

12 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

Known for being a very talented multimusician and multi-genre artist, the

American indie-rock icon Andrew Bird is performing at Meijer Gardens. With more than 15 studio albums and many more singles released since his debut in 1996, he has more than enough folk music to fill out a beautiful night in the gardens. You’ll easily find yourself singing along with his plucky, violin-centric songs, as well as his special guest, Madison Cunningham.

2019 Picnic in the Park Wilcox Park 1570 Robinson Rd. SE, Grand Rapids July 18, 4-9 p.m., free

With delicious food, hot air balloon rides and live entertainment, this picnic is easily one of the coolest you’ll ever attend. The 4th annual Picnic in the Park is back this year at Wilcox Park. If you’re looking for any reason to go, pilots will be inflating a grounded RE/MAX hot air balloon and for $1 you can go inside, with the proceeds benefiting Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals and Helen DeVos Children’s

Hospital. If you’re feeling more adventurous, head up in one of the tethered balloons for $15. As for food, you can bring your own or pick some up from local vendors. There also will be caricatures, balloon animals, henna, face painting and more.

Goat Yoga Mindful Vinyasa School of Yoga 4050 24th St., Dorr July 18, 6:30 p.m., $15+ facebook.com/mindfulvinyasaschoolofyoga No one can deny that goats are the hot new craze in recent years, and why wouldn’t they be? Those horns, those tongues, those goofy faces — they make the perfect yoga companion. While you might have a good laugh getting used to these simple animals bouncing around you, it's hard to go back to regular yoga once you’ve spent a session with the goats.


7/26 “Weird Al” Yankovic: The Strings Attached Tour DeVos Performance Hall 303 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids July 26, 8 p.m., $65+ devosperformancehall.com

The classic and quirky “Weird Al” is making a stop in Grand Rapids to bring some laughs to your night. This event brings back the classic Al, as he returns with some original costumes, props and his original band. With a new twist, he also is performing with a full symphony orchestra, as well as many background singers. It’s musical parody like you’ve never heard or seen it before.

7/27 Mo Pop Festival 2019 West Riverfront Park 1801 W. Jefferson Ave., Detroit July 27-28, $85+ mopopfestival.com

For the ultimate weekend, you should spend it with amazing singers and performers at one of the hottest festivals of the summer. The annual music festival is back with an amazing lineup, including Ella Mai, Vampire Weekend, King Princess, Tame Impala and more. Mo Pop also has food trucks, a free arcade tent, plenty of drinks and much more. If you’re looking for a great time with great tunes and a great view of the river, gather up your friends now and get tickets before they’re gone!

Made in Michigan Pop-Up Market

Downtown Market 435 Ionia Ave. SW, Grand Rapids July 27, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., free downtownmarketgr.com

The Color Run 5k

300 Ottawa Ave. NW, Grand Rapids July 27, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $25+ thecolorrun.com As OneRepublic sings, “This is life in color, today feels like no other.” When running the annual Color

YOUR ENTERTAINMENT ESCAPE

Sir Mix-a-Lot

Bell’s Eccentric Cafe 355 E. Kalamazoo Ave., Kalamazoo July 27, 8 p.m., $27+ bellsbeer.com/events/cafe He likes big butts, he cannot lie and he’s coming back for another round in Kalamazoo this summer. Anthony Ray, better known as Sir Mix-a-Lot, is revisiting and reigniting his rap and hip-hop roots in the beautiful Bell’s Beer Garden. You’ll hear his classic hits like Baby Got Back, Posse on Broadway and Jump on It.

DAUGHTRY JULY 5

LEONID & FRIENDS JULY 6

PAT BENATAR & NEIL GIRALDO JULY 12

CHRIS D’ELIA JULY 19

DAVE KOZ & FRIENDS JULY 26

THE BEACH BOYS AUGUST 2

HAPPY TOGETHER TOUR 2019 AUGUST 9

BOYZ II MEN AUGUST 16

TERRY FATOR AUGUST 24

THERESA CAPUTO AUGUST 30 & 31

AIR SUPPLY SEPTEMBER 6

THE ULTIMATE QUEEN CELEBRATION SEPTEMBER 7

CHAKA KHAN SEPTEMBER 13

38 SPECIAL SEPTEMBER 27

STEVE MARTIN AND MARTIN SHORT SEPTEMBER 28

7/29 Nas

20 Monroe Live 11 Ottawa Ave. NW, Grand Rapids July 29, 7 p.m., $45+ 20monroelive.com Known as one of the greats and born out of a house of jazz, rapper and songwriter Nas is making a sudden stop in Grand Rapids, with a quick detour from his co-headlining tour with Mary J. Blige. While her presence will be missed, this is a chance to see Nas in a slightly smaller venue, spitting verses like he has been for decades. His 1994 debut, Illmatic, launched Nas to fame and is still seen as one of the greatest hip-hop albums of all time.

7/30 Tilian - The Skeptic Tour The Intersection 133 Grandville Ave. SW, Grand Rapids July 30, 6 p.m., $17+ sectionlive.com

The clean vocalist from the bands Dance Gavin Dance and Tides of Man is making his way north on The Skeptic Tour. Tilian is known for his flexibility in pursuing different genres of music throughout his career — from experimental and progressive rock to his catchy indie-pop bops, his songs are bound to get stuck in your head. n

ENGELBERT HUMPERDINCK OCTOBER 19

JASON MRAZ & RAINING JANE NOVEMBER 22

STRAIGHT NO CHASER NOVEMBER 29

PLEASE VISIT TICKETMASTER.COM OR CALL 800-745-3000 FOR TICKET INFORMATION.

11111 WILSON ROAD • NEW BUFFALO, MI 49117 1-866-4WINDS1 • fourwindscasino.com Must be 21 years of age or older. The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians invites you to play responsibly. If you think you have a gambling problem, call 1-800-522-4700. ©2019 Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians. 3395-5.06.19

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

SCENE SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING

There’s no better way to shop than local, so why not go all out on Michigan vendors? At the Downtown Market, you can dive in and shop Michigan-made art, food, artisan gifts and more. This is the place to be for one-of-a-kind gifts and home goods you can’t find anywhere else. Attending the event is free, but we suggest you bring your wallet considering all the amazing vendors.

Run, you’re bound to feel the same. This vibrant and exciting 5k, also known as the “happiest 5,000 meters on the planet,” is for people of any age and skill level. While you may start with a lovely white shirt, at every kilometer mark, a new color is thrown your way. By the end of this race, you’re showcasing a rainbow. Afterward, feel free to join in the party, with music, dancing, photo ops, vendors and more.

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German Tradition. Crafted in Michigan

/// NEWS

WEST MICHIGAN

BIZ BEAT

A Roundup of Openings, Closings and other Local Business News

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

July Events

at Cedar Springs Brewing Company

JUL 1: Vinyl Night w/DJ Kingfish JUL 2: DREAM RIDE NIGHT Live Music: Tony Halchak JUL 3: Live Music: Jimmie Stagger JUL 4: Farmers Market & JEEP NIGHT Live Music: Carl Webb Band JUL 7: Tigers Bus Trip - Tigers vs. Red Sox JUL 7: BRUNCH Live Music: Flatland Grip JUL 8: Vinyl Night w/DJ Kingfish JUL 9: DREAM RIDE NIGHT Live Music: Travis Radaz JUL 10: Live Music: Vincent Hayes JUL 11: Farmers Market & JEEP NIGHT Live Music: Tony Halchak JUL 14: BRUNCH Live Music: Toby Bresnahan JUL 15: Vinyl Night w/DJ Kingfish JUL 16: DREAM RIDE NIGHT Live Music: Dale Wicks JUL 17: Live Music: Six Gun Report JUL 18: Farmers Market & JEEP NIGHT Live Music: Kevin Schaffer JUL 21: BRUNCH Live Music: Jim Spalink JUL 22: Vinyl Night w/DJ Kingfish JUL 23: DREAM RIDE NIGHT Live Music: Versus (Unplugged) JUL 24: Live Music: Kaitlyn Zittel JUL 25: Farmers Market & JEEP NIGHT Live Music: Tony Halchak JUL 28: BRUNCH Live Music: Jack Leaver JUL 29: Vinyl Night w/DJ Kingfish JUL 30: DREAM RIDE NIGHT Live Music: Toby Bresnhan JUL 31: Live Music: Flatland Grip AUG 1: Farmers Market & JEEP NIGHT Live Music: Tony Halchak 95 North Main | Cedar Springs | Michigan | {616} 696-BEER

14 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

CSBREW.COM

After changing its name from “Railbird” to avoid confusion with Railtown Brewing, Alebird Taphouse & Brewery arrived in Byron Center at 2619 84th St. SW. The new restaurant and brewpub is already making a name for itself with bold food, a large tap list and some signature cocktails. You’re never going to open a brewery with 20 beers off the bat, so it’s helpful that Alebird has a healthy selection from other breweries across the nation to supplement. At launch, Alebird kicked off with a pale ale, coffee stout, Brut IPA and classic IPA — we’re sure there’s plenty more where that came from. If you’re ever up near the idyllic little Beaver Island, take the ferry across to visit a special place with Michigan’s most remote brewery, Whiskey Point Brewing Co. (38230 Michigan Ave., Beaver Island). Owner Patrick McGinnity already has been sharing his homebrews with fellow islanders for years to great acclaim. If you’re not a fan of boats, at least you can expect some limited distribution in the Charlevoix area. In 2019, it’s easier than ever to watch a movie at home on a pretty nice TV with a decent sound system, which means movie theaters really have to step up their game to make the trip worth it. Sperry’s Moviehouse in Holland is up to the challenge, opening at 84 W. 8th St. with luxury chairs that feature heating and massage options. The 11-screen “boutique” theater has fewer seats per room to create a more relaxed, intimate experience. Soon, you’ll even be able to order beer and wine, as well as food delivered right to your seat.

am

u rod sP

Cheese Head burger from Alebird. COURTESY PHOTO

Plus, at $11.75 per ticket, it’s no more expensive than any major theater around. Yote Lab is more than a coffee shop — it’s a coworking space, meeting place and even an app. It’s all about making connections and working together, even down to the furniture by Steelcase and drinks all from Ferris Coffee. You’ll also find baked goods from Van’s pastries and small plates like ramen. Rent a desk and connect your laptop to the huge monitors or just take a seat at an open table. It’s all at 333 Grandville Ave. SW, Grand Rapids, right next to Founders Brewing. There’s a modern push toward healthy eating, drinking and living, and War Room Cafe is no exception. The new cafe in Grandville at 3097 30th St. offers all the uber-healthy juices and smoothies you can shake a straw at, like the A.B.C. with apples, beets, carrots, ginger and lime. There’s also coffee from Madcap and plenty to eat, from vegan sandwiches to salads and a variety of avocado toasts.

—Compiled by Josh Veal If you have any closings, openings or other business news for REVUE, e-mail josh@revuewm.com.

7/11

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Brauhaus & Restaurant

OPEN

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20

The Journeymen 7/18

JULY 11, 18, 25 FREE CONCERTS | CUTLER PARK - CUTLERVILLE, MI | 7 PM

Brought to you by: P. Williams Productions & The Byron Township. Sound By - LW Studio Nightly Kids Activities | For information call 616-818-9874

Max Colley III 7/25


TIME TO TURN

UP THE VOLUME

CLIEN

FireK Casin

PROJ

6/1 R

BRAD PAISLEY

JOB

FK-33

COLO

4/c

THURSDAY AUGUST 1

SIZE

9.25”

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n/a

JOHN FOGERTY

MY 50 YEAR TRIP SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

GEORGE THOROGOOD AND THE DESTROYERS GOOD TO BE BAD TOUR 45 YEARS OF ROCK

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19

BILL ENGVALL

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9

Tickets available now at the FireKeepers Box Office or FireKeepersCasino.com.

Must be 21 or older. Tickets based on availability. Schedule subject to change.

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

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/// NEWS

JULY 2019 A monthly roundup of marijuana news and notes.

A

las, retail medical marijuana shops are on the rise in West Michigan. On June 21, Park Place Provisionary formally opened in a refurbished commercial space near Seaway Drive in Muskegon. It’s the first of what advocates hope is a cannabisdriven revitalization in the city’s medical marijuana overlay district, an area that in recent years has taken to overgrown lots and abandoned buildings. The license is held by Agri-Med LLC, which also has been approved for a dispensary in Nunica. Owner Greg Maki touts the company as locally owned, a selling point for activists concerned about deep-pocketed outof-state investors as is the case in Grand Rapids. The state has also approved provisioning center licenses in Douglas, Breedsville, Bangor and two in Kalamazoo. With more local storefronts benefitting patient access, let’s hope the supply chain catches up soon to keep costs low. According to the latest bulletin from the state Marijuana Regulatory Agency, Michigan has issued licenses statewide for 77 growers and 107 provisioning centers (13 with home delivery). Since Gov. Whitmer disbanded a contentious licensing panel in April, the state has steadily picked up the pace in issuing licenses. The cannabis-friendly governor offered further support in June when she joined a bipartisan coalition of 19 governors calling on Congress to pass the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act, which would give businesses legal cover in states where pot is legal.

ing the first recreational marijuana initiative in the Midwest. A majority of states in the Great Lakes region will have followed suit (Detroit Metro Times columnist Larry Gabriel says Michigan already risks losing business to Illinois). Cannabis is ingrained in the cultural fabric. And Shirkey will still be yelling at the rain. How shocking for Republicans to be so out of touch on this issue. Here’s a few more quick hits that caught our attention this month: “There is an inherent danger for businesses operating an all-cash business because financial institutions are unable to accept the risks and penalties associated with providing service to this industry under current law,” Whitmer said. At the annual Mackinac Policy Conference in late May, Whitmer also reportedly sought to debunk the notion that cannabis tax revenue could help pay for the state’s abhorrent roads. Whitmer proclaimed “every man, woman and child” would have to smoke about $2,500 of marijuana a month to meet the state’s $2.5 billion need. Michigan Advance reporter and former Revue Juggalo correspondent Nick Manes tweeted Whitmer’s comments, receiving a flurry of responses taking it as a challenge. “At that level, no one is going to care about the damn roads,” Whitmer said. In the inaugural edition of Potshots late last year, we noted former Senate Majority Leader and “known buzzkill” Arlan Meekhof’s failed

attempt to reign in the state’s newly approved recreational marijuana law. Meekhof, who helped write the state’s medical marijuana regulations, was caught courting favor this year with the former licensing board while representing applicants. This is illegal, notes Craig Mauger of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network. “The behind-the-scenes communications raise questions about Meekhof’s handling of marijuana legislation while he was in office … and Michigan’s lax ethics laws,” Mauger writes. Meekhof’s successor, Mike Shirkey, was part of the failed effort to adopt and amend the citizen initiative before it went to voters. Thankfully, Shirkey was in the minority and voters had the final say. But last month, Shirkey held his line, claiming in an interview on WWJ-AM that there will be “serious voters remorse” in about five years over passing it. Here’s an alternative prediction: In five years, Michigan will be seen as a pioneer for pass-

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

The Zoo isn’t just for kids anymore!

16 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

• Kroger Co., the nation’s largest grocer, will begin selling cannabidiol-infused products at 92 stores across Michigan. As the latest sign of the exploding CBD market, Kroger joins CVS and Walgreens in selling the product. • A Detroit-area woman with a rare form of leukemia is suing the state in federal court after she lost access to a particularly effective form of oil, known as Rick Simpson Oil, MLive reports. Her attorneys say a state policy that ended caregiver sales to dispensaries has made the oil unavailable. • After the Grand Haven City Council approved an ordinance in April allowing medical marijuana establishments, the city’s Planning Commission in the coming months will review where they can be located, according to the Grand Haven Tribune. Some commissioners aren’t ruling out allowing dispensaries in the downtown. — Compiled by Andy Balaskovitz

COMING NEXT MONTH:

Experience the Zoo like never before— at night, with adult beverages, and without any kids! Enjoy beer, wine, and cider for purchase, savory foods from the grill, as well as delicious concession options, live music from local bands, animal encounters, and more! Rock, Roar, + Pour is a 21 and over evening event.

Jedi Mind Trip

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/// NEWS

ALL IN ON TRUMP For many West Michigan Republicans, taking a stand for law and order is political treason | Andy Balaskovitz Illustration by Kaylee Van Tuinen

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J

im Lower — who has worked his way up from Home Depot employee, legislative staffer, village manager, county commissioner and now state representative — was campaign-ready when he greeted Revue recently at a downtown Lansing coffee shop. “Did you see me on Ingraham last night?” Lower asked. The two-term Republican from Montcalm County the night before had done a brief interview with Fox News’ Laura Ingraham, the host of the consistently xenophobic “Ingraham Angle.” It was his third appearance on the network in less than a month, and his second with Ingraham. Lower, 30, has gained national attention for mounting a primary election challenge against U.S. Congressman Justin Amash, the Grand Rapids Libertarian/Republican who on May 18 upended state and national politics after concluding President Donald J. Trump has “engaged in impeachable conduct.” In both Ingraham appearances, the host heaped praise on Lower’s effort while mocking Amash, saying his “stunts may be costing him back home” as he “tries to snuggle up to the left.” Not only did Amash conclude there was impeachable conduct, but he had also just sided with Democrats in holding Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt of Congress related to a subpoena seeking information about a citizenship question on the 2020 Census. Republicans were aghast. A “Squash Amash” hashtag has emerged.

18 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

Amash’s first impeachment tweets came on a Saturday afternoon. By Sunday night, news broke that Lower was in the race to unseat Amash in the 2020 primary, an announcement he said was initially scheduled for July. Since then, Lower has been attempting to raise his national profile and court political support from the Trump and DeVos families. The DeVoses have bailed on Amash; Donald Trump Jr. has suggested his family is eager to back an Amash opponent. Lower says his campaign raised about $50,000 in the two days after his first Ingraham appearance. The trajectory over the past month also is somewhat expected. Amash — who received his J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School in 2005 — has a reputation for his Libertarian approach to legislating, pissing off hardline Republicans each time he crosses the aisle. Amash’s supporters say he acts with courage and conviction. His detractors call him self-serving and phony. The question remains: What’s wrong with standing up for your beliefs, even if it breaks from your political party? Lower answers this way: “I would describe (Amash’s) style as: He comes to whatever his conclusion is and wraps it in some argument related to the Constitution. He figures out how he wants to vote and comes up with the justification second.” Amash was unavailable to be interviewed for this story. His chief of staff, Poppy Nelson, didn’t respond to Lower’s remarks. But Amash, 39, has remained confident in media appearances over the past month. He

says Republican support for Trump in the 3rd Congressional District of West Michigan isn’t as strong as Lower portrays, and that Lower’s challenge isn’t serious. GOP strategists aren’t so sure. Amash’s path to re-election — which he says he’s committed to despite speculation he could run as a third-party candidate for president — is complicated. The less crowded the 2020 Republican primary field, the better for Lower. (A third candidate, former Sand Lake Village trust Tom Norton, also is running in the primary.) But it’s so early in the process, several more Republicans could enter the fray. Indeed, a pro-Trump strategy in the primary could be beneficial for Lower unless his votes are split up among like-minded candidates. Hence, Lower’s strong push to raise his national profile now. “The Republican Party on polling is still very strongly supportive of the president,” said GOP strategist Dennis Darnoi. “Maybe with a general election, something like (Amash’s position) would play well, but when you have over 90 percent of Republicans in favor of the president, for someone to call for impeachment is tantamount to a declaration of war.”

TRIED AND TRUE FOR TRUMP Lower was raised near Ionia. His mother was a secretary for Ionia County, while his father worked at the former Electrolux refrigerator factory in Greenville. The plant closed in 2006 when the company moved operations to Mexico. Lower developed an interest in politics as a kid, but the Electrolux plant closing helped shape some of his political views.

He says Trump’s economic message resonates with him. Lower earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Michigan State University and his master’s in business administration at Grand Valley State University. (Former Lt. Gov. Brian Calley’s dad helped finance his college education, which Lower failed to disclose on his campaign website early on, stating he paid his own way through college. Calley’s brother and longtime friend of Lower, John Calley, criticized the oversight on Facebook.) By the age of 21, Lower was elected to the Ionia County Commission. He would go on to staff jobs in the state House and Senate and serve as the village manager in Edmore, about 30 miles southwest of Mt. Pleasant. Lower also was director of operations at Mitchell Research and Communications, the public relations firm representing his congressional campaign. Lower was elected to the state House’s 70th District in 2016 and re-elected last year. He won with more than 60 percent of the vote in both races. He’s now running a “three-tiered” campaign for Congress: support Trump, portray Amash as ineffective in Congress, and promote his own legislative record in Lansing. Lower believes his pro-Trump stance will be the difference in a Republican primary. Indeed, he first announced his support for Trump shortly after the infamous Access Hollywood (“grab them by the pussy”) tape surfaced during the 2016 campaign. “We decided to do that because a lot of people in the party essentially abandoned (Trump) even though he was the nominee,”


Lower said. “His message on what he wanted to do for the economy and the country was still a good message. Obviously, he had a personal issue I’m sure he agrees was less than ideal that it happened. I didn’t see that as a reason not to be elected president.” G O P c o u n t y ch a i r s i n t h e 3 r d Congressional District also are sticking with Trump. While they will remain neutral on endorsing a candidate until after the primary, most have expressed disappointment in Amash’s impeachment position. “It’s certainly disappointing to have that dispute going on. Most Republicans disagree with Justin Amash’s position,” said Joel Freeman, Kent County GOP chair. Montcalm County GOP chair Jackie Champlin said the area is “not too happy with Amash. No matter which Republican would say he wants to impeach our president, we’re not for that. It’s absolutely ridiculous.” Champlin believes Amash took his stance for “personal reasons” and has “abandoned us.” Perhaps unsurprisingly, none of the county GOP chairs nor Lower agree that Trump has engaged in impeachable conduct. They offer standard talking points about alleged motives of the Special Counsel Robert Mueller and his team, and the fact House Speaker Nancy Pelosi isn’t interested in starting impeachment proceedings (although this appears to be entirely a political calculation.) However, the Mueller report investigated 10 instances in which Trump may have obstructed justice without coming to a conclusion, noting that Trump’s “efforts to influence the investigation were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests.” In a press conference, Mueller explained that the Justice Department can’t prosecute a

MICHIGAN U.S. DISTRICT 3

sitting president of a federal crime. He added: “If we had had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so.” Amash said his “principal conclusions” from the Mueller report are that Barr “deliberately misrepresented” the report to the public; Trump “engaged in impeachable conduct;” “partisanship has eroded our system of checks and balances;” and few members of Congress read the report. “Contrary to Barr’s portrayal, Mueller’s report reveals that President Trump engaged in specific actions and a pattern of behavior that meet the threshold for impeachment,” Amash wrote on Twitter. He later added that obstruction of justice doesn’t require the prosecution of an underlying crime. Asked whether defending Trump against impeachment is putting the party over the country, Lower responded: “I’d say it’s the opposite. From my perspective, Democrats will say and do anything to make excuses why they won’t work with (Trump). Since the day he was elected, they’ve just wanted to resist, obstruct and stop him from doing anything. It’s not good for the country.”

3RD CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT POLITICS

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This relatively early showdown between Amash and Lower sheds light on Republican Party politics in the district, which includes Barry, Ionia and Calhoun counties, most of Kent County, and a small portion of Montcalm County. Amash took the district in 2018 with 54 percent of the vote over Democrat Cathy Albro. In 2016, Amash won 59 percent of the vote over Democrat Douglas Smith. Freeman of the Kent County GOP said the 2016 outcome was “really interesting” since both Trump and Amash won the district, although Amash “was not on Team Trump.” “I think there is a lot of room for both individuals even though they’re very different,” Freeman said. Whereas Lower says there’s strong backing for a Trump candidate among Republican voters, Amash appears unconcerned. “He’s completely out of touch with reality on that,” Lower said. “Despite what some people think, our polling is very clear: They’re very pro-Trump whether they’re in the rural part of the district or in Grand Rapids.” GOP strategist Darnoi says both Amash and Lower are correct on their assumption of voters. While it’s likely there are fewer general election voters in support of Trump than 2016, the Republican primary electorate “is still strong and in favor of Trump and does want their Congress person to be supportive of Trump. They’re both correct, but they’re talking about different universes.” The more Lower can build support with the business community and high-profile

GRAND RAPIDS

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donors, the more of a threat he is to Amash, Darnoi said. However, it’s only early summer 2019. The Republican field is likely to continue growing, in addition to announced candidates Lower and Norton. An Amash ally who spoke on background has heard more than 10 names surface as possible GOP challengers. “I think the larger number of primary candidates, the greater the benefit is to Justin Amash,” Darnoi said. “They get it, they understand the game. It’s why (Lower) is trying to go on the offensive and why they’re going to tout polls that show his ability to beat Justin Amash. They need to make sure it’s a very limited primary field.” Democrats, meanwhile, are watching the GOP drama unfold with high spirits. “It’s been amusing to watch,” said Gary Stark, chair of the Kent County Democrats. “Of course, we Democrats have disagreed with (Amash) on virtually everything. The seriousness, integrity and even courage with which he looked at the Mueller report — we applaud him for that. We think the same thing.” A Democratic primary also is likely in 2020 given that at least three candidates

have announced campaigns. These include Amanda Le’Anne Brunzell, Doug Booth and Nick Colvin. Stark thinks Democrats would fare better if Amash loses his primary. “If a Democrat runs against a rabid Trumpite, I think it would probably be a much better situation for us,” Stark said. “I don’t think the 3rd District is a strong Trump district.” Wh i l e D a r n o i b e l i e v e s t h e 3 r d Congressional District favors Republicans by 8 to 10 percentage points over Democrats, he points out that Michigan is losing a congressional seat in 2022 and the 3rd is “ripe for redistricting” and combining geographical areas. “If I’m looking at it from a consultant’s standpoint, you have to realize your time is probably limited,” Darnoi said. Meanwhile, Lower has been reaching out to the powerful Trump and DeVos families for support, recognizing an early endorsement would be a major boost to his profile. “I’d like to see the president get directly involved,” Lower told Ingraham on June 12. She responded: “We hope the president is watching this tonight.” n


REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

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DAYS OF FUTURE PAST Longtime emo heroes Saves The Day look back to move forward with latest album | by Eric Mitts

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

C

hris Conley never intended to write a theme song for his band. But when the muse came to visit the Saves The Day frontman as he worked on the band’s latest LP, 9, it just came pouring out of him like it’s always been there. “I had heard it in the back of my head, and I just grabbed a guitar and I started playing it, and when I got to the part right before the chorus where I go, ‘So turn it up, we’re Saves The Day,’ I thought, ‘Wow, OK, so I’m writing our theme song,” Conley told Revue about the album’s opening track, Saves The Day. “One of my favorite songs ever is Wilco’s song Wilco from their (2009) album Wilco,” he added. “So right away, I knew that I was writing a song like that. And if you’ve never heard that song … the basic mood of it is: if you’re having a hard day, just put on the headphones and we’ll be here.” The album plays out as both a chronicle and celebration of Saves The Day and its music. Conley opens the book on his 20-plus year career with the band, penning songs that touch on everything from his teenage days in the ’90s New Jersey hardcore scene to the band’s sudden success with 2001’s Stay What You Are, as well as his immense gratitude for continuing to do what he loves now. “If (this album) inspires people to think, like, ‘Wow, I am psyched that Saves The Day has been in my life for so long,’and if they go back and start from the beginning and listen all the way through, I think it will be wild to do that chronologically,” Conley said. “Like, once you’re older and you’ve had different life experiences, you can kind of see it with a different eye. I know that’s been really fun for me over the years, listening to The Beatles. Continually I find more and more things (in the band’s music) as I get older.” Growing up with his fan base and sharing many of the same quarter-life crises as his listeners, Conley still bears his heart on his sleeve. His completely candid lyrics culminate in the album’s closing track, 29, a 21-minute song-suite that makes up the entirety of the album’s second half. “It’s basically the story of my life told through my relationship with music,” he said of the epic song.

22 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

SAVES THE DAY. PHOTO BY ALICE BAXLEY

Having studied creative writing at NYU and the College of New Jersey, Conley described writing the song as more like working on a screenplay. Easily the band’s longest song to date (doubling the runtime of 2010’s Daybreak), 29 also touches on Conley’s earliest days in music, having learned classical cello as a wide-eyed elementary schooler, before discovering The Beatles, Led Zeppelin and the punk rock scene coming up around him. “My first memory of being alive, I was listening to my heartbeat in my temple against my pillow when I was trying to fall asleep,” he said. “I’d hear this pulsing dream heartbeat, and I was mesmerized by it. Before I knew that it was music, I was obsessed with music. And then after that, it was the birds singing in the blue sky, and you start to wake up to life.”

“My dad says one of my first words ever was ‘radio,’” he added. “So I was just obsessed with music and sound right from when I was born, and that has led me on this incredible journey. I have literally grown up through my relationship with music, and it’s been a wild ride.” That ride has gotten a little calmer over the past decade, with Conley finding the first stable lineup Saves The Day has really ever had since he started playing side-by-side with original drummer Brian Neuman when the pair was just 13 years old. Now 39 with a teenage daughter of his own, Conley looks ahead at what the band’s future holds, while never forgetting the basement shows and garage gigs that got him to where he is today. “I just feel incredibly grateful to be here,” Conley said. “On the album, I just keep refer-

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encing 20 years. I say it on a number of songs. To be here for 20 years in a world of music where it’s incredibly hard to have success at all, even once, I feel like the luckiest guy that ever got to play guitar and sing onstage. So I’m just incredibly honored. It’s all so surreal. The fact that it is all so real is mind-boggling and beautiful.” n


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/// TOURING

"OUTRAGE IS A SYMPTOM OF OPTIMISM AS APATHY IS ONE OF PESSIMISM. ... I DON’T THINK JUST MAKING BEAUTIFUL THINGS IS ENOUGH RIGHT NOW."

ANDREW BIRD. PHOTO BY AMANDA DEMME.

‘NO TIME FOR INSIDE JOKES’

DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

Andrew Bird talks politics and his Finest Work Yet ahead of Meijer Gardens return | by Eric Mitts

I

nternationally acclaimed singer/songwriter Andrew Bird has made a career out of crafting a masterful mixture of music. Raised on the violin from age four, he earned a performance degree on the instrument from Northwestern University, before exploring the swing-jazz revival of the mid-’90s with Squirrel Nut Zippers and his own project Bowl of Fire. By 2003, he had branched out solo, experi-

24 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

menting with looping pedals and pioneering the live multitrack experience. Now 12 albums into an eclectic solo career that has meandered from old-time Appalachia to indie-rock clubs, he has taken politics headon with his latest LP, My Finest Work Yet, released earlier this year. Inspired by gospel-jazz records of the ’60s and obsessed with the effect space has on sound, he recorded most of the album

live with his band. The experience challenged the inimitable performer to rise to new heights, as he lyrically found himself ready to shout down from the mountaintop. Revue got ahold of the virtuosic violinist last month ahead of his return to Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park on July 18.

You’ll be performing outdoors at the Meijer Gardens Amphitheater when you return. What do you enjoy most about having the opportunity to play your music outdoors? I play and sing differently outdoors. Without the sound bouncing back off the walls of a room you just keep pushing to the horizon so it’s a more physical and sometimes a more ecstatic experience.

On the flip side of that, what are some of the biggest challenges of presenting your music outdoors? I’ve played Meijer Gardens twice before and it’s about as ideal as it gets. It’s the big festivals which are ‘throw and go,’ as we say, that are always dicey whether you can hear yourself. I don’t mind a little chaos though.

You wrote most of this album between the 2016 presidential election and the incident in Charlottesville, Va.? Why did you ultimately decide to make this album as political as it is? I didn’t really decide anything. It’s mostly an involuntary reaction to being alive in this time. I just couldn’t be as abstract as I’ve been in the past so my choice of words was driven by a desire to communicate with as many people as possible while hitting my lyrical (and) melodic standards.

How much do you feel like music, especially live music, can at the very least help begin the healing process? I’m trying to frame some of what’s happening outside of ideological talking points so that someone who isn’t on the same part of the left-right spectrum as me could say, ‘Oh, I hadn’t thought of it like that.’ I like to think that what I’m saying is kinda hard to argue with. Music offers a different frequency we can tune into, one that’s above the news feed algorithm.

You view this album, like most of your music, as an act of optimism. Why do you feel like optimism is more important than ever, especially for anyone attempting to create? Outrage is a symptom of optimism as apathy is one of pessimism. I can easily let myself get fatalistic, but I can choose these things. As in Olympians, ‘we’re gonna turn it around,’ or Bloodless, ‘keeping mine with the altruists.’ I don’t think just making beautiful things is enough right now.

As a performer, what is it like for you to revisit some of your older songs written during a different time, both culturally or personally, and infusing them with new meaning? I often think about where I am and what day it is when I’m singing an old song to see how the lyrics are being heard 15 years on. I still do Tables and Chairs from 2004 about how when everything falls apart, we’ll finally talk to each other like some apocalyptic block party. It has the line ‘Don’t you worry about the atmosphere or any sudden pressure change.’ That was an inside joke of sorts where ‘atmosphere’ in this case was like that of a restaurant, though aware of the double meaning. Now I sing, ‘Now I’m worried about the atmosphere.’ This is no time for inside jokes. n

How much do the outdoors continue to inspire or reinvigorate you as an artist? I learned something invaluable when I lived on a farm in Western Illinois for a few years. You can affect how you see your environment through music, but not before the environment affects you. If you see a storm roll in through a valley, pass overhead and move on, that affects how you experience time and as a result, affects your phrasing or tempo.

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WEST MICHIGAN'S CULTURAL ARTS GUIDE

HARMONY ON THE HILL Picnic Pops celebrates 25 years with a blast from the past SEE PAGE 16A. STORY BY ABI SAFAGO

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PAGE YOUNG AND OLD UICA displays all-ages talent

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[THEATER]

Backstage Heroes

Lakeshore Museum Center is shining the spotlight offstage

“The exhibit is not only celebrating the Muskegon Civic Theatre’s 35th anniversary, but also — instead of going over the shows they did or the history — it’s looking at all the different parts and volunteers that it takes to put on a show,” said Jackie Huss, program manager at the Lakeshore Museum Center. The Show Must Go On: Celebrating 35 Years of Muskegon Civic Theatre is interactive, so viewers are able to play with different types of lighting on a lightboard, mess with sounds, use a working stage and more. There are also parts of the exhibit where visitors can read into the history or look at theater artifacts. Mat Moore, preservationist manager at the museum, said this exhibit is important because these roles aren’t often highlighted. “It’s part of the theater work that people forget,” Moore said. “They see all the people that are doing all the hard work onstage and forget that for every person that’s up onstage, there are two or three people behind them working just as hard to get the whole production on.” These roles include but are not limited to lighting, sound, props, costumes, set design, stage crew and directors. The museum staff worked with the Muskegon Civic Theatre staff to make sure every representation was accurate. “I wanted it to be something that celebrated everyone that was involved with the

Associate Publisher Rich Tupica Editor Joe Boomgaard / joe@revuewm.com Managing Editor Josh Veal / josh@revuewm.com Copy Editor Claire Boomgaard Design Kristi Kortman / kristi@revuewm.com Kaylee Van Tuinen / kaylee@revuewm.com Contributing Writers Kayla Sosa Dana Casadei Marla Miller Michaela Stock Abi Safago

BY KAYLA SOSA

An interactive exhibit at the Lakeshore Museum Center in Muskegon is highlighting all the parts of a theater that make a production happen, especially the “backstage” roles like lighting, costuming and set design.

Publisher Brian Edwards

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The Show Must Go On at Lakeshore Museum Center. COURTESY PHOTO

theater,” said Jeff Bessinger, exhibit collections director and archivist at the museum. As visitors walk around the exhibit, they can see a wall from the “scene shop,” where props, sets and costumes are made, designed and stored. Information is provided about who built the sets and what their job is. Moving further through the exhibit, visitors can learn about costume designing and makeup artists, as well as sound and lighting designers. “People I walked through the exhibit with, who were from the theater, said they felt really familiar there,” Moore said. “A lot of times they go to an exhibit and they’re seeing artifacts, but this one, we tried to recreate the feel of the scene shop and the feel of the theater.” In addition to the exhibit, the museum is hosting Backstage Theater Workshops for Kids, bringing professionals in to talk about and teach their craft. On July 9, a makeup artist will show kids how to make animals, bruises and other face designs. On Aug. 20, kids can learn all about theater tech — light, sound and 3-D printing. Huss said it’s important for kids and everyone to be exposed to the community of people that actually keep theaters running. “It takes thousands and thousands of hours of volunteer work to put on their season, and a lot of people don’t realize how many people aren’t onstage but are actually behind the scenes, making sure everything’s running smoothly, or getting

things set months — or even a year — in advance,” Huss said. The interactive part of the exhibit takes the experience for the viewer one step further from just still pictures on the wall, adding in historic information. “(The goal is) to really dive into all the different jobs that it takes and the lives that it touches, because it’s really a passion for all the people involved in the theater,” Huss said. “To be able to celebrate them has been great.” Moore said the theater community, specifically Muskegon Civic Theatre, has been more than supportive of the museum’s exhibit. “I was blown away by the support that they gave us,” Moore said. “Anything we needed help with, any suggestions, the doors were open to us; they were willing to help out.” ■

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HARMONY ON THE HILL PICNIC POPS CELEBRATES 25 YEARS WITH A BLAST FROM THE PAST SEE PAGE 16A.

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3A


[THEATER]

Intensely Prepared

GR Civic readies teens for a life on the stage BY KAYLA SOSA

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This summer, teens at the Grand Rapids Civic Theatre are taking the lead in putting on two very different, but equally challenging productions. The Summer Repertory Theatre Intensive is a summer program for teens in 7th through 12th grade who want to learn about all the various aspects of putting together a theatrical production. Kristin Tomlin is the SRTI program coordinator, as well as director of one of the productions. She said the program provides an opportunity for young artists to work on a professional production at a theater. “Look around Grand Rapids and West Michigan and see the number of really, highly talented young artists we have,” Tomlin said. “We kind of looked at how could we bridge that gap and get students where they may have a lot of talent and interest but not much training, to preparing them to going into conservatory or university programs.” The SRTI is split into two tracks for students: performance and production. “While it’s good for them to have training from both (tracks), allowing them to really focus gives them stuff to put on their resume or portfolio,” Tomlin said. In the afternoons, Monday through Thursday, students come to the theater to take classes in their chosen track. “So if they’re a production student and they want to focus on costumes, they will take all sorts of production classes but their predominant focus would be the costuming,” Tomlin said. “If they are a performance student, they would take acting classes, musical theater classes, dance classes, improv classes, things that are very focused on performance, but they do get an opportunity with electives to take a little bit of the production stuff.”

After classes, the students have a dinner break before coming back at night to rehearse and prep. This year, the SRTI students will be performing the play Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and the musical All Shook Up, a modern story based on Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. The narrative centers on Chad, the cool guy on the block, who rolls into a dreary town that is set in its old-fashioned ways against music, dancing and hand-holding. “They’re just against love in general,” said Josh Keller, music director for the show. “(Chad) doesn’t see anything wrong with (love) and the town is sort of finding their love life back into the town again.” In addition, the musical is based entirely on songs by Elvis Presley, like Heartbreak Hotel, Jailhouse Rock and All Shook Up. “Presley was sort of like Chad,” Keller explained. “Bad boy, the girls all loved him.” Keller said the music of Presley and the choreography makes it an especially high-energy show. Listening to the stories Elvis was telling through his music, Keller said he can’t help but be grateful. “I think it’s just given me a window into the past to appreciate what we have now,” Keller said. “Also, I’m seeing more through music how relevant love is and how people can still feel the same things.” The other production is a version of Alice in Wonderland. Tomlin is directing and said there are 25 characters, but only 11 actors. “We’ll be doing a lot of quick costume changing,” she said. “We’ll work in rehearsals to really develop unique characteristics for each character, unique traits, unique ways of moving, of speaking.” All the music you’ll hear is written originally for the show by composer Todd Lewis. “I was just thinking of ways to flesh out the world of Wonderland,” Tomlin said. “There’s so much magic that has to happen and I thought that having unique, specific, original music to the show could add that little bit of magic. And that could also bring in a way for a local artist to work with the students, so they’ll be performing with this music for the first time.” ■

Posters for Grand Rapids Civic Theater's summer productions. COURTESY IMAGES

ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND July 27-Aug. 3

ALL SHOOK UP July 26-Aug. 4

Grand Rapids Civic Theatre 30 N. Division Ave., Grand Rapids grct.org


[theater]

preview Summer theater is in full swing and it’s as hot as the season itself, with shows taking place in Texas and Louisiana. In July, there are murderous barbers, puppets who swear, some Shakespeare, and a few much lighter plays. Good luck finding time for all the great plays! BY DANA CASADEI

THE BARN THEATRE

DOG STORY THEATER

SWEENEY TODD, July 2-14, $39+

ROMEO AND JULIET, July 12-21, $10+

13351 M-96, Augusta barntheatreschool.org, (269) 731-4121

The demon barber of Fleet Street is alive and well in the Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler musical. So what turns your run-ofthe-mill barber into a demon? Well, in the Tony Award-winning musical Sweeney Todd, he was unjustly imprisoned for years by a corrupt judge. Naturally, he’s bent on revenge for those who wronged him and starts baking his victims into meat pies — after he murders them — with the help of his accomplice, Mrs. Lovett. Apparently, they are surprisingly delicious.

BIG THE MUSICAL, July 16-28, $39+ A much, much lighter musical comes next in the Barn’s summer season. Based on the 1988 classic film Big, the musical follows Josh Baskin, a pre-teen who suddenly finds himself turned into an adult after making a wish on a carnival machine. Turns out, adult life isn’t exactly what he hoped it would be — which we all can relate to — in this 1996 musical adaptation of the Tom Hanks film. STEEL MAGNOLIAS, July 30-Aug. 11, $39+ Get your tissues ready for this Robert Harling play, based on his experiences with his sister. If you’ve seen the 1989 movie, you’ll know why. Following the lives of a group of women in northwest Louisiana, Steel Magnolias takes place mostly in a beauty parlor. There, the women discuss life, love and a lot of gossip in this funny, heartfelt play.

CIRCLE THEATRE

1703 Robinson Road SE, Grand Rapids circletheatre.org, (616) 456-6656

HANDS ON A HARDBODY, July 11-27, $26+ Inspired by the true events of the acclaimed 1997 documentary of the same name, this new American musical takes place on a brutally hot Texas day as 10 down-on-their-luck Texans try to win a brand-new truck. The catch to winning? They have to keep at least one hand on the prize — literally — at all times.

7 Jefferson Ave., Grand Rapids dogstorytheater.com, (616) 425-9234

CENTRAL PARK PLAYERS 421 Columbus Ave., Grand Haven centralparkplayers.org, (616) 843-3906

THE LION KING JR., July 25-27, $15

FARMERS ALLEY THEATRE KALAMAZOO

HOPE SUMMER REPERTORY THEATRE

MASON STREET WAREHOUSE

ELEPHANT AND PIGGIE’S “WE ARE IN A PLAY!,” July 2-31, Aug. 2-7

IN THE HEIGHTS, Through July 14, $49+

141 E. 12th St., Holland, hope.edu, (616) 395-7600

400 Culver St., Saugatuck, sc4a.org, (269) 857-2399

UNNECESSARY FARCE, July 26-Aug. 10, $49+

WEST SIDE STORY, July 9-31, Aug. 3-8 TRUTH: THE TESTIMONIAL OF SOJOURNER TRUTH, Through July 29 SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE, July 19-Aug. 6 Hey, more Shakespeare! Well, kind of. Based on the screenplay by Tom Stoppard (which won him one of the film’s seven Academy Awards), the Bard — a young, hot William — is having some serious writer’s block as his deadline for a new play approaches. He’s in need for some inspiration, but then he meets Viola, a young woman who is his greatest admirer and willing to do anything to get into his next show. Even if it means doing something illegal. Drama ensues.

THE OLD MAN AND THE OLD MOON, July 6-Aug. 9 What’s more important, duty or love? In this epic tale of a play, the titular old man abandons his duty of filling up the moon with liquid light in order to cross the sea and find his wife. As heroic as that is, leaving his post means he plunges the world into darkness. Oops. Hope it’s worth it!

In the Heights at Mason Street Warehouse. COURTESY IMAGE

221 Farmers Alley, Kalamazoo farmersalleytheatre.com, (269) 343-2727

AVENUE Q, July 19-Aug. 11, $32+ If you like puppets and swearing, this “triple crown” Tony Award-winning musical — it received Best Musical, Best Score and Best Book — will be right up your avenue. Recent college graduate Princeton has just moved to Avenue Q as he struggles to figure out his next move in life, love and his career. What exactly is his life’s purpose? Luckily, he has some very helpful monster friends to give him advice, which is naturally all done through song.

Dog Story Theater, 7 Jefferson SE July 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, and 21

GRAND RAPIDS CIVIC THEATRE

30 N. Division Ave., Grand Rapids grct.org, (616) 222-6650

ALL SHOOK UP, July 26-Aug. 4, $16+ ALICE’S ADVENTURE IN WONDERLAND, July 27-Aug. 3, $16+

HOLLAND CIVIC THEATER

50 W. 9th St., Holland hollandcivictheatre.org, (616) 396-2021

JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH, July 11-20, $10+

Tickets at www.dogstorytheater.com REVUEWM.COM/ARTS | JULY 2019 |

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[VISUAL ARTS]

Mitten-Made UICA focuses on artists from around the state in summer

BY DANA CASADEI

If you go to the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts this month, you might see a familiar name or two.

From Top to Bottom: Michigan Emerging Graduate Artists 2019, Untitled. CAITLYN BRANDT Composite: High School Artist Exhibition, Rich. LIN GALLAGHER All That Glitters, Magnificat XIII. MANDY CANO VILLALOBOS

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All three exhibitions debuting on July 12 couldn’t be more different when it comes to the works presented, but they do have one thing in common: a Michigan connection. “I really wanted to showcase Michigan talent. I wanted to show it on every level,” said Juana Williams, curator at the UICA. “I feel like you don’t have to be an MFA graduate student or a so-called professional artist to have artistic talent.” For example, Composite is a juried group exhibition that features high school students from Kent, Ottawa and Allegan counties. Williams said there are about 30 students who were selected from the open call, working in all sorts of mediums. She believes this show will be the first of its kind for the gallery, and hopes for it to become an annual event. Another exhibition opening in July is the Michigan Emerging Graduate Artists (MEGA) 2019, an annual juried show featuring artists currently enrolled in one of Michigan’s academic institutions. The deadline for students to apply had just passed during our interview, but Williams — one of the show’s two jurors — said there were a variety of mediums submitted, including ceramics, installations, drawings and paintings. “I try to make the effort to show the whole spectrum of different levels of artists,” Williams said. “Although we bring in artists from other states and other countries, UICA started as a space for local artists and to showcase the talent of local artists and support local artists. I’d like to continue with that legacy as much as possible.” The third exhibition coming in July is a perfect example of fulfilling that legacy. All That Glitters is a solo exhibition by Mandy Cano Villalobos, who has lived in Grand Rapids for a decade, during which time Williams said she’s become very involved in the city’s arts community. Williams found Cano Villalobos’ work, process and life story all to be fascinating. “I hadn’t seen work quite like it before and

I was sort of curious for her to explain what it’s made of,” Williams said. “When you look at it, you can’t necessarily understand what products she used or how she put it together.” Cano Villalobos is more than happy to explain. “I’m taking a lot of things that have been discarded, and some things from my former installations, then I’m painting them gold. Gold being this obvious reference to something of value or something we desire,” Cano Villalobos said. “I’m transforming what is old into something shiny and new.” In total, the exhibition will have somewhere between 20-30 pieces, including one large-scale structure that she described as “shack-like.” In her work, Cano Villalobos uses a lot of discarded products that have domestic histories, like old clothing, discarded cloth diapers and cleaning rags. One series in the exhibition, Corpus, is actually a collection of discarded clothing she made into a vessel. “I’m interested in woman-dominated, domestic history,” she said. “I’m taking all of these items that belong to that kind of ‘lesser’ history, and trying to put it on an equal platform with the things you find in the library archives or the things you study in school.” Much of Cano Villalobos’ work comes from an intense awareness of mortality. In her mind, that relates strongly to the idea of home, in part because her grandma died at an early age, unexpectedly. Cano Villalobos was only six months old when it happened. After the death, her mom and siblings all moved away from their home state of Virginia, where the family homestead is. Losing someone like that has made her family very aware of the fleeting nature of life. She said an underlying practice with her family is to make sure you say goodbye to everyone and that you love them, even if they’re just going to the grocery store. Her awareness is part of why she takes items that aren’t always gallery-worthy and transforms them, taking something that’s died, in a sense, by being thrown away, and making it full of life again. Her process shows how objects could have had another life with this other context. “I definitely see it as this idea of resurrection,” she said. A lot of her work also stems from the topics of personal history, familial relationships

through generations, and trying to find a sense of belonging. Cano Villalobos’ desire for a place of permanence comes from moving around a lot as a kid, as her mother was in the military. She’s hoping to find that belonging in Grand Rapids. “I’m trying to build a sense of community here and a lot of that is involving people in my work,” she said. Neighbors are more than happy to help out. As we chatted, someone came to her house and dropped off a ceramic angel figurine because they knew she needed it for an upcoming piece. She’s also come home to find tea bags on her porch for the tea bag quilts she makes. Whether it’s members of her community or total strangers, Cano Villalobos wants her exhibition to help people see those discarded objects in a different way. “My hope is with that first entrance into the gallery, people will find beauty … that people will recognize a sort of worthy beauty and enjoy it,” she said. ■

ALL THAT GLITTERS July 12-Sep. 8

MICHIGAN EMERGING GRADUATE ARTISTS 2019 July 12-Sep. 8

COMPOSITE: HIGH SCHOOL ARTISTS EXHIBITION July 12-Sep. 8

Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts 2 W. Fulton St., Grand Rapids uica.org


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REVUEWM.COM/ARTS | JULY 2019 |

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[VISUAL ARTS]

Show Your Work SC4A’s Storied Drawing presents the artistic process

BY MARLA R. MILLER

In a world of immediacy and information overload, it’s easy to lose sight of the time and talent that goes into the stories we see and read every day. Storied Drawing, the summer exhibition at Saugatuck Center for the Arts, shines a light on the creative processes behind the images that fill magazines, digital screens and children’s books. Walking into the calming gallery, the exhibit offers a space to pause and ponder: What is your story and how will you tell it? Storied Drawing, on display through Sept. 6, also shares the stories of four accomplished female artists and illustrators. Their drawings, illustrations and finished editorial work offer insights into each artist’s unique journey, artistic inspiration, style and practice. “The world we are living in is so fastpaced and we want more and more and more,” said Whitney Valentine, education and exhibitions manager. “We want to have viewers slow down and really think about all of the creative steps and decisions that go into making the work that we see.” Storied Drawing features the work of Libby VanderPloeg, a successful illustrator and designer; Hillery Sproatt, a painter

STORIED DRAWING Saugatuck Center for the Arts 400 Culver St., Saugatuck Through Sept. 6 with classes and events throughout the summer sc4a.org, (269) 857-2399

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who translates her designs onto textiles; Ginnie Hsu, an illustrator and designer who conducts research on behavioral science, emotion and visual arts; and Rebecca Green, an illustrator, artist and “make-believe maker” who authored the children’s book How to Make Friends with a Ghost. “All of their work is really intriguing and compelling and they have huge clients and a lot of followers and fans who admire their work,” Valentine said. “They are four exceptional artists, and they are really amazing role models.” Each artist has dedicated space in the gallery. VanderPloeg’s colorful and playful work highlights a mix of old and new illustrations and posters, including a plug for community college and a map of the Saugatuck-Douglas area made for the exhibit. A video screen in the gallery shows her process of making GIFs using Procreate and her iPad. Sproatt’s corner includes examples of her artwork and finished blankets set up as if they were part of a home. She is a painter who enjoys seeing her art on blankets and other home goods. Her organic shapes, whimsical landscapes, and colorful prints and patterns draw connection between home and nature. Green shares the original sketches for her book, and the entire process from the first draft to the final illustrations. Green, currently residing in Japan, grew up in Owosso, graduated from Kendall College of Art and Design, and had a solo show at the SCA in 2012. The idea for a children’s book came to Green while walking her dog, and she initially planned to make a short zine to share with friends. Tundra, a publishing house in Toronto, Canada, discovered her early self-published version on her website and worked with her to get it in bookstores across the globe. Green feels the best illustrations are made when we are playing and unbound, which is how her book came about. “Even as an illustrator, I had no idea how much work went into illustrating picture books until I got my first book deal,” Green said. “How to Make Friends with a Ghost was also a passion project that turned into a

Above: The Process of How to Make Friends with a Ghost. REBECCA GREEN Below: Storied Drawings in the SCA gallery. COURTESY PHOTO

published book, so my hope is that viewers appreciate and dive into their own personal projects, as you just never know where they’ll lead.” Hsu, a Taiwan native now living in Syracuse, New York, is good friends with Green and works with acrylic, gouache and digital. She is an illustrator, designer and educator, and the exhibit showcases some of her illustrations for Breathe magazine. A lot of Hsu’s work is based on research and her own personal style, including Zen and Asian influences. The exhibit takes a look at the editorial process and how much say clients have in the final design, Valentine said.

“We wanted to share with viewers what that really looks like,” she said. “You just see it in a magazine; you don’t think about how many steps it took to be in there.” Besides being nationally acclaimed, the four women are creating positive, compelling work, being true to themselves and making a living doing what they love. “It hasn’t been easy,” Valentine said. “They have to work really hard and they have all shared in some way or another how they are following their passions, and they have finally realized they are being true to their own selves.” ■


[VISUAL ARTS]

Getting GIFfy With It Behind the scenes with illustrator Libby VanderPloeg

BY MARLA R. MILLER

Grand Haven native Libby VanderPloeg praises her Grand Rapids Community College experience and offers this bit of wisdom when it comes to making it in a creative field: “Don’t wait for work to come to you. Opportunity awaits those who seek it out! And if you want to get better at what you do, do it every single day.”

Day, and has been shared by some of my favorite celebrities, including Reese Witherspoon and Cyndi Lauper!

What does it take to be a successful illustrator? You have to be a problem solver — figure out what your client needs, why they came to you, and deliver a solution. Pretty much like every job, but with a lot more drawing. (Laughter) But making a good illustration in a reasonable amount of time takes a LOT of practice. It took me years and years to be able to work efficiently and create a workflow that felt right. You also need to be self-motivated. If you don’t have any client work going on, take that as an opportunity to make some fun, self-directed work to bolster your portfolio and show people what you love to create. Then you just might get hired to do the thing you want to be doing! Honestly, that’s how things started to take off for me.

Now a successful illustrator with national clients including the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Oprah Magazine, Condé Nast Traveler and more, VanderPloeg is one of four female artists featured in Storied Drawing at Saugatuck Center for the Arts. She moved to Grand Rapids two years ago after living in Brooklyn for 10 years and Chicago before that. “It’s nice to be back in one of my hometowns after so many years away,” she said. “We especially love Michigan summers!” VanderPloeg is leading the workshop Drawing Remixed for children ages 7 to 14 years old from July 19-20 at the arts center.

What goes into making a GIF?

Can you talk a little bit about your work in general and the work that is included in the exhibition?

I hope people will feel inspired to grab some pencils and paper, start doodling, and see where the lines take them. Drawing is as much about the process as it is about the finished thing.

My illustration work is colorful, crisp, clean, hopefully inspiring and/or motivating, and generally bustling with life. I’m inspired by the cities in which I’ve lived, and the diversity of people therein. I make a lot of maps, but I also make a lot of work about empowering women and the importance of community and diversity. My ‘Lift Each Other Up’ GIF has been going viral since I first shared it in 2016 on International Women’s

There are a lot of layers of drawing in a GIF. I typically draw all of the elements for each frame on their own layer, so that each element can move independently of the others. I then create my animation from these layers in Photoshop using the timeline. But before any of the nuts and bolts of drawing happen, there has to be an idea, which is more complicated. The best GIFs loop seamlessly, but it can be really difficult to come up with ideas that are both clever and can work in a looping format.

What do you hope viewers learn or take away after seeing the exhibition?

What is your favorite thing about being an artist and illustrator? I love how I see color and shape, and I love how much excitement I get from making an idea come to life visually. It sometimes seems to take forever to get there, but when a work suddenly snaps into place, it’s such an awesome feeling. ■

Above: Jump Into Summer. Below: Saugatuck Douglas Map. LIBBY VANDERPLOEG

REVUEWM.COM/ARTS | JULY 2019 |

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FIFTH THIRD BANK SUMMER CONCERTS AT MEIJER GARDENS

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1000 East Beltline Avenue NE, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49525 • MeijerGardens.org 10A

| REVUEWM.COM/ARTS | JULY 2019


[VISUAL ARTS]

PREVIEW

We won’t lie, there’s isn’t a whole lot opening this month. But that’s more than OK, because it gives you plenty of time to check out all the exhibitions that have been around before they disappear. Read below to check out the schedule and learn some fascinating facts about flowers. BY DANA CASADEI

Photo of Morrissey from Lights, Camera, Rock ‘n’ Roll: The Music Photography of Paul Jendrasiak. BY PAUL JENDRASIAK

CALVIN COLLEGE CENTER ART GALLERY 106 S. Division, Grand Rapids calvin.edu/centerartgallery/studio, (616) 526-6271

HAGUE SCHOOL PAINTINGS, Through July 31

FREDERIK MEIJER GARDENS & SCULPTURE PARK 1000 East Beltline Ave. NE, Grand Rapids meijergardens.org, (888) 957-1580

A NATIONAL TREASURE: FRED MEIJER, HIS COLLECTION AND LEGACY, Through Aug. 25 HOSTA SHOW, July 20-21 This is a special show, focused entirely on hostas, also known as plantain lilies. Presented by the West Michigan Hosta Society, the two-day show will feature a variety of shapes, sizes, colors, patterns and textures available in hosta foliage, which are native to northeast Asia.

DAYLILY SHOW, July 20 Since daylilies typically only last one day, it only makes sense that this show will last the same amount of time. Don’t worry, there’s plenty to do, from taking a closer look at the huge variety of daylily colors and sizes to checking out creative arrangements and chatting with the Grand Valley Daylily Society. The flower’s genus, Hemerocallis, comes from the Greek words (hēmera) “day” and αλόςκ (kalos) “beautiful.”

GRAND RAPIDS ART MUSEUM

101 Monroe Center, Grand Rapids artmuseumgr.org, (616) 831-1000

SELF, SYMBOL, SURROGATE: ARTIST PORTRAITS FROM GRAM’S COLLECTION, Through Aug. 11

MAYA LIN: FLOW, Through Sept. 8 MELANIE DANIEL: ONLY FOUR DEGREES, Through Sept. 8

SELECTIONS FROM THE 2019 FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS REGIONAL ARTS COMPETITION,

RISING VOICES: THE BENNETT PRIZE FOR WOMEN FIGURATIVE REALIST PAINTERS,

Through July 28 The GRAM’s Chief Curator Ron Platt and Assistant Curator Jennifer Wcisel took on the giant task of narrowing down a selection from nearly 400 pieces for this exhibit. Fourteen regional artists are featured in this collaboration between the museum and the 50th Festival of the Arts.

Through Sept. 8

KALAMAZOO INSTITUTE OF ARTS

400 Culver St., Saugatuck sc4a.org, (269) 857-2399

314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo kiarts.org, (269) 349-7775

GUITAR WITH WINGS: THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF LAURENCE JUBER, Through Sept. 1

SAUGATUCK CENTER FOR THE ARTS STORIED DRAWING, Through Sept. 8 FRAIL DEEDS, Through Sept. 16

URBAN INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ARTS 2 W. Fulton St., Grand Rapids uica.org, (616) 454-7000

BREACHING THE MARGINS, Through Aug. 18 MICHIGAN EMERGING GRADUATE ARTISTS (MEGA) 2019, July 12-Sept. 8 COMPOSITE: HIGH SCHOOL ARTISTS EXHIBITION, July 12-Sept. 8 ALL THAT GLITTERS, July 12-Sept. 8

WEST MICHIGAN AREA SHOW, Through Aug. 25

ORNA BEN-AMI: ENTIRE LIFE IN A PACKAGE, Through Aug. 18 L'ESPRIT: EXPLORING WIT AND BEAUTY IN FRENCH PRINTS, Through Aug. 25 MOMENTS OF PEACE: WATERCOLORS BY SUNGHYUN MOON, Through Sept. 22

HOXEYVILLE.com

LAFONTSEE GALLERIES 833 Lake Dr. SE, Grand Rapids 410 W. Center St., Douglas lafontsee.us

OPEN ENDED: A CONTINUATION…, Through July 3

LOWELLARTS!

223 W. Main St., Lowell lowellartsmi.org, (616) 897-8545

LIVIN' IS EASY, Through Aug. 17

MUSKEGON MUSEUM OF ART 296 W. Webster Ave., Muskegon muskegonartmuseum.org, (231) 720-2570

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ROCK ‘N’ ROLL: THE MUSIC PHOTOGRAPHY OF PAUL JENDRASIAK, Through Sept. 1 REPLAY: THE EXHIBITION, Through Aug. 18 REVUEWM.COM/ARTS | JULY 2019 |

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[Literature]

Beyond the Books How libraries are offering more services than ever before BY DANA CASADEI

If you walked into a library for the first time recently, it might not have been what you were expecting. These aren’t your grandma’s libraries anymore.

Books featured in the GR Reads: Summer Reading All Grown Up program. COURTESY IMAGES

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| REVUEWM.COM/ARTS | JULY 2019

Or at least that’s what John Martin, director of the Loutit District Library, told Revue. “If you want to think of a library as where the little old lady with the gray bun in her hair and the glasses on the chain with a button-up sweater is sitting at the desk shushing you … that is not what a library is,” he said. “If it ever even was that, it certainly isn’t that now.” Libraries across the area agree with Martin. Take, for instance, the programs happening this summer inside and outside libraries. Many focus on summer reading, such as GR Reads: Summer Reading All Grown Up, an annual program for adults at the Grand Rapids Public Library. The program — based on the Chicago Public Library’s Summer Reads for Adults program and the National Endowment for the Arts’ The Big Read — selects 10 books each summer that focus on a common theme in a variety of genres. This summer, it’s space — not outer space, but the spaces that we exist in, live in, and visit. “Our goal was to move the library outside of its walls,” said Kristen Krueger-Corrado, marketing and communications manager at the Grand Rapids Public Library. She’s been with the program since its inception 10 years ago. “I think also, people like seeing the library connect with the community in an unusual way.” As far as unusual goes, the summer reading program for kids had a Comic Geek Out in June, where Grand Rapids native and cartoonist Jeffrey Brown spoke. There are also plans for Broadway Karaoke at Last Chance Saloon, museum tours, adult beginner ballet classes, and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. “It’s about meeting people in a space they might feel more comfortable and doing something fun,” said Krueger-Corrado, who mentioned GRPL is working with 16 community partners this year. Those spaces don’t have to be where people would typically expect to see a library presence. “One of the best things we hear is, ‘I didn’t expect to see you guys,’” said Scott Duimstra, executive director of capital area District Libraries and Michigan Library Association board member. “I

Loutit District Library naturalization ceremony.. COURTESY PHOTO

love hearing things like that. If they see us at a musical festival and that’s an area they didn’t necessarily associate with the library, now they start to.” CADL — which operates 13 branches and a mobile library throughout Ingham County — partners with the Common Ground Music Festival, Mid-Michigan Women’s Expo, Ingham County Fair, and Lansing Home and Garden Show, to name a few. Duimstra said through those types of partnerships, they are able to get exposure for the library and vice versa. They also have partnerships with the Lansing Symphony Orchestra and Wharton Center, the latter leading to interesting guests for their three monthly podcasts: CADLcast, Executive Edition and Reader's Roundtable. “It really is a nice way to evolve our brand,” said Trenton Smiley, marketing and communications director of the Capital Area District Libraries. “We want to be known for our information. We want to be known for entertainment.” That means changing with the times not only through the programs and marketing, but what people can actually check out of the library. At Kent District Library’s Grandville branch, patrons can now check out inflatable kayaks, with plans to expand this to some of the other 18 branches in Kent County. Records, portable turntables, and high-end headphones are available at seven locations, and one Continued on page 15


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Continued from page 12 branch even has a thermal camera available. “Society and technology changes so fast, we want to stay abreast of it and do it in a way that we can help people experience these new, emerging technologies and trends,” said Randall Goble, director of marketing communications for KDL. “Especially for people who might not be able to afford or purchase some of these services or things on their own. “What we really try to do is make resources available to everybody, regardless of what their situation is. … It’s what we see the library being about.” Some of these programs are actually life-changing. Multiple times a year, the Loutit District Library hosts Naturalized Citizenship ceremonies, where about 40 new citizens are sworn in each time. KDL recently launched a program to help adults earn a high school diploma, not just a GED. Since libraries now offer all types of community programs year-round — ranging from just about every arts and entertainment activity you can think of, including craft fairs, exercise classes, free bicycle rentals and lectures — we asked if libraries fear they could lose their identity of, well, being a library. Simply put: Absolutely not. Libraries may be becoming more community centers, but they’ll always provide the service they have since the beginning — materials for people to come in and enjoy and learn from, whether it’s through a book or not. “You can educate yourself at your local library on virtually any subject, and not just because there are books on different subjects on the shelves, but because of all the electronic, online access that libraries subscribe to and then offer free to people who are members of their library,” Martin said. “It’s really kind of exciting that the access to information has been expanded greatly in the library world over the last 30 years.” Goble thinks that going beyond books has actually integrated libraries more into the community as a place of importance and value. “Librarians know the people in the neighborhood of the library who visit the most and they develop these personal relationships, which is important, but it also positions us to help people when we see a need,” Goble said. Hearing what the community needs — across every age group — is how most of these programs come about in the first place. Going forward, many of these libraries have big plans to fill even more needs than they already do. Expansions for STEM and arts programs

“What we really try to do is make resources available to everybody, regardless of what their situation is. It’s what we see the library being about.” - Randall Goble, Kent District Library were brought up more than once by the librarians we talked to, as was adding more social and offsite programs, community partners and making sure members can stream music, movies and TV through their online access. Theoretically, some of this could be done at home, but then you miss out on the crucial community aspect. “In the digital age, we connect with people not in person more often, (but) the library is that really unique space where people still do connect,” Krueger-Corrado said. “One of the interesting things about these programs is you watch people who don’t know each other, they leave and they’re talking together, laughing together and having a conversation.” The same is true of all libraries, including KDL. “You read about town squares in villages and those are pretty much gone, but libraries are kind of filling that space as a place where people can come together for news, for education, for being social and for helping each other,” Goble said. ■

From top to bottom: Turntable at KDL, patrons riding KDL cruisers, CADL Craft Fair. COURTESY PHOTOS

REVUEWM.COM/ARTS | JULY 2019 |

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[Music]

Harmony On the Hill Picnic Pops celebrates 25 years with a blast from the past BY ABI SAFAGO

Over the past 25 years, much has changed in Grand Rapids. New buildings and businesses, new art and new ideas are emerging at every corner of the city. Even longstanding institutions have been shaped by the changing times.

Grand Rapids Syphony at Picnic Pops. PHOTOS BY TERRY JOHNSTON FOR THE GRAND RAPIDS SYMPHONY.

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With Picnic Pops, now in its 25th year, the Grand Rapids Symphony continues to evolve while shining a light on the performing arts scene with one of the happiest and most relaxed events of the summer. In July 1995, the Grand Rapids Symphony was looking for a fun way to kick off the summer season, according to Associate Conductor John Varineau. He was there at the very beginning and has stood at the podium for nearly every Picnic Pops season since. Varineau said the idea from the start was to bring more people in with a unique outdoor show. From this, Picnic Pops was born, bringing the sounds of the symphony to the hills of Cannonsburg with concerts spanning a variety of genres. One of the biggest, most consistent draws over the past 25 years has been the fireworks show. “Classical Fireworks has been a mainstay of the Picnic Pops ever since the beginning,” said Jeffery Kaczmarczyk, senior manager of communications for the GRS. “It’s not always the first concert of the season, but we’ve had it every year since the beginning.” Not only has the tradition of Picnic Pops brought joy to summertime in Grand Rapids, it

has brought many different styles of music to the symphony itself. While the humble beginnings featured a line-up of classical pieces, the series quickly grew past that. “Our very first year was called Picnic Pops and our entire program was works by Tchaikovsky, and our audiences were pretty quick to say, ‘If you’re gonna call this ‘pops,’ you can’t do what you just did,’” Varineau said. “We caught on and turned it into a light-classical season and then branched out into doing many of the standard pop shows and went on to tribute bands.” Now, you can visit shows like The Beatles tribute group Classical Mystery Tour or singers performing soulful, authentic Motown hits. In the past, the symphony also has featured Latin-American groups. In live concerts from bands, you always have the main instruments and vocalists, but Kaczmarczyk said Picnic Pops brings out so much more. “You can listen to a particular rock group on tour, but what they do in the studio is usually a different experience. But with a lot of extra musicians, it’s going to sound like how you hear it on the record,” Kaczmarczyk said. “That’s the point, that’s the goal, that’s the ideal. All the backup musicians that were in the studio, we’ve (essentially) got them there onstage at Cannonsburg.” Along with bringing back a true sound to the music, Picnic Pops strives to be a relaxed event for everyone. One of the main goals is to make everyone feel comfortable while listening to live music and soaking up sun rays and sunsets, which is why Cannonsburg Ski Area has been the venue for the past 25 years. From the beginning, the location is what made the event iconic. With the ski slope being a natural amphitheater, as well as a lot of fun for the inner-child to roll down, it was meant to be. More people are coming year after year, which only excites Varineau. Along with the ski slope being a large area, it’s also great for the family.


10 Books, 26 Events

July Events Comic Geek Out Saturday, July 13, 2019, 10:00 am – 1:00 pm Main Library – 111 Library St NE

Adult Beginner Ballet Monday, July 15, 2019, 7:00 pm Main Library – 111 Library St NE

GR Reads: The Movies – West Side Story Tuesday, July 16, 2019, 8:00 pm Wealthy Theatre – 1130 Wealthy St SE Instrument Petting Zoo at GR Symphony Picnic Pops. COURTESY PHOTO

“The parents can let their kids go and play on the slope while listening to music,” Varineau said. Other than dancing, one of the best activities for kids is the Instrument Petting Zoo, which allows them to play around with some classic symphonic instruments. It sparks curiosity and gives kids a chance to discover interests they never knew they had. After 25 years on the hillside, Picnic Pops has developed a few traditions, of which Varineau is a big fan. “We’ve always done Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture (for Classical Fireworks) and that goes directly from the end of that into a really wonderful fireworks show,” he said. “It’s really close, you really feel like you’re within the show itself.”

What To Expect This Summer This year, Picnic Pops is all about blasts from the past. That means not only classic hits that everyone knows and loves, but bringing back performers who’ve become fan-favorites with the symphony. Kicking off the season is Classical Fireworks on July 11 and 12, with songs like The Armed Forces Salute, the overture to Candide, Sousa’s Stars and Strips Forever and more. At the next show, songs from The Beatles’ White Album will be a special feature, with the Classical Mystery Group celebrating the album’s 51st anniversary on July 18 and 19. The tribute group is one of the most popular returning acts for Picnic Pops, never failing to make the audience happy. It’s likely you’ll hear some of The Beatles’ great hits like Penny Lane or The Long and Winding Road. Kaczmarczyk is excited for the group’s return, as “each

concert is different, they mix it up quite a bit. Their shows differ every time in the best way.” The third show on July 25 and 26, Dancing in the Street, is all about Motown, once again bringing back Broadway actress and singer Shayna Steele. She’s known for recreating the true feeling of Motown when she sings, digging deep into the soul of the songs. Steele will be joined by singers Chester Gregory and Michael Lynche, performing hits like Stevie Wonder’s Superstition and Marvin Gaye’s How Sweet It Is. At the final show on August 2, the people behind the biggest country hits are coming to town. The singer-songwriters who helped write hits for stars like Tim McGraw and Carrie Underwood are joining forces for Nashville: The Songwriters. Their Story. The Symphony. For the genuine, authentic feeling of the songs that rose many country singers to the charts, this is a special moment. “It should be a very different experience,” Kaczmarczyk said. “I’ve heard it’s kind of like you’re sitting on someone’s back deck as they’re doing this.” ■

PICNIC POPS Cannonsburg Ski Area 6800 Cannonsburg Rd. NE, Belmont July 11-Aug. 2

Fly Me to the Moon Thursday, July 18, 2019, 7:00 pm Main Library – 111 Library St NE

GR Reads Photowalk Monday, July 22, 2019, 7:00 pm (rain date July 29) Main Library – 111 Library St NE (meet on the front steps)

Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum Tour Wednesday, July 24, 2019, 11:00 am Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum – 303 Pearl NW Parking is free in the lot on the West side of the museum.

Final Approach at the Public Museum Saturday, July 27, 2019, 10:30 am Grand Rapids Public Museum – 272 Pearl St NW

Amazing UFO Cases Tuesday, July 30, 2019, 7:00 pm Main Library – 111 Library St NE For full list of events and details, visit www.grpl.org/GRReads.

WWW.GRPL.ORG/GRREADS 616.988.5400 SPONSOR:

MEDIA SPONSORS:

grsymphony.org

REVUEWM.COM/ARTS | JULY 2019 |

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[MUSIC]

PREVIEW Musicians tend to take a well-deserved break in the summer, which makes it that much more appreciated when groups like the Grand Rapids Symphony and West Michigan Jazz Society keep the good times rolling. The symphony has its Picnic Pops, a free kids show and one concert that includes a walk in the woods. The West Michigan Jazz Society continues its summer series as well, with five performances this month. BY DANA CASADEI

GRAND RAPIDS SYMPHONY

WEST MICHIGAN JAZZ SOCIETY

300 Ottawa NW Ste. 100, Grand Rapids, grsymphony.org, (616) 454-9451 ext. 4

Millennium Park, 1415 Maynard Ave., Walker, wmichjazz.org, (616) 490-9506

CLASSICAL FIREWORKS: SALUTE TO AMERICA, July 11-12, $20

KAT JONES AND COMPANY, July 1

GRAND RAPIDS SYMPHONY AT BLUE LAKE FINE ARTS CAMP, July 13

STARRY NIGHT OCTET, July 8

Inside the 300-seat Edith Blodgett Recital Hall, the GRS will play an evening of five different selections, including music from Our Town, Bottesini’s Double Bass Concerto No. 2, Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4 and the Star Spangled Banner. The evening will have a dessert reception and benefit programming on Blue Lake Public Radio. This show marks the 14th year for the annual event.

HERE COMES THE SUN: A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES, July 18-19, $20

This jazz orchestra from Muskegon will bring their sound to Millennium Park this month, with an ensemble matching the Dave Pell octet from the 1950s: a trumpet, tenor sax, baritone sax, trombone, jazz guitar, piano, bass and drums. Fun fact: The jazz guitarist plays more of a horn part instead of just the rhythm section. The group — the Starry Night Octet — also plays arrangements by other famous jazz bands, like Mack the Knife, Green Eyes, Dancing on the Ceiling and Perfidia, among others.

EVIDENCE JAZZ GROUP LATIN PROJECT, July 15

BEHOLD THE BOLD UMBRELLAPHANT, July 20, Free

DOUBLE TROUBLE , July 22

WINE IN THE WOODS: AN EVENING WITH THE GRAND RAPIDS SYMPHONY,

Get ready for an unleashing of two fearsome divas, Mary Rademacher Reed and Francesca Amari. The duo will be joined on stage by the Mark Kahny Band for an evening of tight harmonies, sassy choreography and audience participation. If the latter isn’t your preference, we can only suggest sitting in the back.

July 20, Free Do you like wine? Do you like nature? Even better, do you like listening to music while drinking in nature? Have we got a show for you. During this evening at the Blandford Nature Center — where there will be a cash bar of wine and beer — guests will be serenaded with Mozart’s Serenade for Winds and Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, as well as a drum circle performed by members of the Native American community. Just try not to get lost in the woods.

DANCING IN THE STREET: THE MUSIC OF MOTOWN, July 25-26, $20 GRAND RAPIDS SYMPHONY AT GREAT LAKES CENTER FOR THE ARTS, July 28, $30+

GUSTAVO CORTIÑAS, July 29 The Mexican composer and drummer has released two records with a focus on melody, interaction and the rhythms of his native culture. The jazz musician doesn’t do it alone, however — the band’s main line-up features fellow musicians playing everything from trumpet and tenor saxophone to guitar, bass and piano to round out the group’s sound. Cortiñas has played all over the world and recorded with a variety of individuals and ensembles over the years.

2660 28th Street NE Grand Rapids MEET THE AUTHOR OF BIRTH WITHOUT FEAR JANUARY HARSHE

JULY 26 · 7PM Expecting and new Mamas and Papas—meet January Harshe, the voice behind the blog Birth Without Fear and co-host of the Harshe Podcast as she shares her debut title Birth Without Fear, a judgement free guide to taking charge of your pregnancy, birth and postpartum.

Fresh Farm to Table Performances Nightly We’ve handpicked the most popular plays and musicals, added the freshest talent in the Midwest, and it makes for one sweet night that you’ll never forget. Whether it’s your first time or you’re a regular, the Barn Theatre is the perfect way to get a little taste of Broadway this summer.

STARRING ROBERT NEWMAN

July 2-14

WHERE’S WALDO

JULY 1-27 Find Waldo around town, fill your passport and be entered to win our summer reading gift pack and other prizes. We’ll celebrate finding Waldo with an in-store event on July 27 at 11am. Stop in the store to grab a passport today!

July 16-28

OUT OF THIS WORLD

50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing Story Time JULY 20 · 11AM Blast on over to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing! Local author Emmy Caster will read her book Nerdy Babies: Space, we’ll make a rocket craft, watch a clip from the moon landing in 1969 and enjoy a snack of Tang and Fla-vor-ice popsicles, two other 50-yearold favorites!

July 30-Aug 11

KID’S STORY TIME

SATURDAYS + MONDAYS · 11AM Miss Margaret reads great books for great kids and guides your preschooler in a small art project or related make and take activity.

SchulerBooks.com

Aug 13-25 Tickets & Season Details at

barntheatreschool.org or call 269-731-4121 13351 M-96 AUGUSTA, MI 49012 REVUEWM.COM/ARTS | JULY 2019 |

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Summer with the

Grand Rapids Pops

at Cannonsburg Ski Area Thursday and Friday nights

JULY 11-12

JULY 18-19 6-PACK $102

HERE COMES

Rhapsody in Blue, 1812 Overture Fantastic Fireworks, and More! JULY 25-26

AUGUST 2

MUSIC OF MOTOWN MUSIC OF MOTOWN

TICKETS AS LOW AS $20 CHILD TICKETS (2-18) $5

Tickets $5 more day of show

ORDER TICKETS TODAY

PicnicPops.org | 616.454.9451 x 4


THE PET ISSUE

THE PET ISSUE We all love our pets — the furry ones, feathery ones, scaly ones, even the weirdly smooth ones. West Michigan makes it easy to show that love with plenty of places to treat your animal children to a special day. We have parks, groomers, patios, photographers, boutiques and even special events all centered around pets. In this issue, we lay out a roadmap to it all so you can reinvigorate your special relationship with your furry friend or maybe even feel inspired to start a new one — just remember to adopt! We even set up a whole itinerary for a special doggy date. Whether you have your own pet or not, we also have a guide to the area’s many zoos and sanctuaries, where you can visit animals you won’t see playing fetch in the park.

Courtesy of Buddies Pet Photography

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26 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019


THE PET ISSUE

How to Save a Life Adopting pets responsibly is good for the soul | by Michaela Stock

T

Kzoo Cat Cafe and Rescue

here’s nothing better than coming home from a long day at work to an excited, fluffy friend waiting for you at your front door. Just about everyone who has adopted an animal can attest to how uplifting living with a pet is. Adopting a pet adds life to your home, makes you healthier and enriches communities. Welcoming a new pet into your daily routine may be intimidating at first, but Cathy Bissell of The BISSELL Pet Foundation — an organization that helps pets get out of shelters and into happy, healthy homes through adoption or foster care — has been around the block a couple of times when it comes to owning animals. She has some advice for welcoming them into your home and she’s here to make you into the best new pet owner ever.

1128 W. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo kzoocatcafe.com

Kalamazoo Humane Society 3661 Easy St., Kalamazoo kazoohumane.org

Humane Society of West Michigan 3077 Wilson Dr. NW, Grand Rapids hswestmi.org

Michele’s Rescue Grand Rapids Appointment-Based michelesrescue.com

Step One: Understand the Commitment

Understanding the amount of love, attention and time owning a pet requires is an important first step when it comes to adoption. “Bringing a pet into your home is a big decision, and it’s an important decision because it’s life-changing. Pets live much longer today, and they’re a commitment,” Bissell said. Owning an animal means more than just finding a dogsitter for your weekend getaways and filling up their food and water bowls once a day. “It’s important that when you adopt, you commit to that and understand what that means, which is taking care of it,” she said. “It means expenses. It means a lot of love and attention. In order to have a great pet, you have to really want to put time into the pet. That’s really important.”

Step Two: Why You Should Choose Adoption

OK. We get it. You’re ready to commit to owning a pet and can’t wait to spoil it with love. You have their name picked out, the collar engraved and know exactly what size and type of animal you and your home can handle. But now it’s time to decide how to purchase the perfect pet — should you adopt a pet in need or purchase one from a breeder? The answer should be obvious. “Adopting takes a pet out of a shelter,

West Michigan Shelters

Cathy Bissell. Courtesy of Happy Dog Mom Photography

out of a bad situation, and puts it into a home that’s loving and kind, unlike purchasing a pet from a store,” Bissell said. “Those pets need to find homes too, but unfortunately you continue that cycle of abuse. It’s important to adopt because it’s the only chance those pets have at a second chance in life.” Adoption through your local shelters is the only way to give an animal another opportunity to live a happy and healthy life of snoozing in the sun and sneaking your dinner table scraps. The choice to adopt allows your pet to do more than just learn how to play fetch and cuddle on your couch — it stops animal abuse in its muddy tracks.

Step Three: Bringing Your Pet Home Congratulations! You’ve finished the adoption process and are now the proud owner of a pet. Be aware that the transition between the shelter and the animal’s new home can be startling, though. During the first few days of owning your new fluffy friend, be careful to not cause too much commotion in your house. “Take time and spend quiet time alone with your pets,” Bissell said. “Don’t invite friends over and don’t have a party. Take

the time to make your pet feel comfortable, because they’re nervous. They were just in a home, then in a shelter, and now in another home, and they don’t know you. “Allow them to get acclimated to their new place, to figure out who you are. If you’re kind and loving, they will respect you a little bit more.” After some quiet time and TLC, you and your new pet will start to bond. Bonding with an animal provides an array of health benefits by reducing loneliness and increasing exercise. “Even the American Heart Association has come out with something that says owning a dog is great for your heart, because you exercise more than you normally would,” Bissell said. Making you physically and mentally healthier isn’t the only benefit of owning a pet, though. Animals also create better communities. “When you have a community that loves pets, it speaks a lot about the community,” Bissell said. “When people are out with their pets, it speaks to who these people are. It shows that you live in a really warm and wonderful community. It’s family friendly, and pets are part of your family. “Pets do so much for everyone. They’re life-changing.” n

Carol’s Ferals Brooknelle Pet Resort 4600 Knapp St. NE, Grand Rapids carolsferals.org

Happy Cat Cafe 447 S. Division Ave., Grand Rapids happycatcompany.com

Critter Cottage 7205 Thornapple River Dr., Ada vickyspetconnection.com

Noah Project 5205 Airline Rd., Muskegon noahprojectmuskegon.org

Kent County Animal Shelter 740 Fuller Ave. NE, Grand Rapids accesskent.com/health/ animalcontrol

Kalamazoo County Animal Services 2500 Lake St., Kalamazoo kalcounty.com/ac

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

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STEAKS • BURGERS • FISH • CHICKEN beechwoodgrill.com • 380 douglas ave. holland, mi • (616) 396-2355 28 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019


THE PET ISSUE

SIT, STAY, POSE Courtesy of Buddies Pet Photography

Local pet photographers help you capture that special moment | by Elma Talundzic

W

e all know the struggle — you look over at your canine or feline companion sitting in the most adorable pose, but as soon as you go to snap a photo, they scurry away. It takes an eye for detail and a quick hand to capture those priceless memories. If you’re looking to get some professional prints of your favorite furry family members, you’re in luck — Revue sat down with some of our favorite local pet photographers to get some tips and tricks on how to prepare.

Buddies Pet Photography

237 Andover St. SE, Grand Rapids buddiespetphotography.com, (616) 350-8977 Buddies owner Sara Lowthian-Hanna moved to Grand Rapids from Indiana University in 2014, when she started volunteering at the Humane Society of West Michigan.

“I was taking happy, bright and colorful photographs in the hopes of increasing the chances for a speedy adoption,” Lowthian-Hanna said. “It was right around then that I adopted two dogs myself, as well as decided to combine my love for animals and my master’s degree in photography, specializing in pets.” When it comes to sessions, Lowthian-Hanna takes time to position and pose. She also makes sure to have plenty of training treats and a squeaker to get your fur baby’s attention. “The technical requirements are expertise and knowledge of photography, more specifically action photography,” Lowthian-Hanna said. “The emotional requirements are a love for animals, a deep and soulful respect for the relationships we have with our furry family members and their welfare.” Since pets can be unpredictable at shoots, LowthianHanna likes to photograph pets where they are most com-

fortable, whether that’s at a client’s home or at a park close by. It helps if owners can bring along their pet’s favorite treats or toys to grab their attention while she is snagging that picture-perfect moment. “Pets have their own idea of how a session is going to go, so plan on bringing extra patience for your pet’s new modeling gig,” Lowthian-Hanna said. Our furry companions are truly members of the family, which is why Lowthian-Hanna encourages people to get professional photos. “(Pets) are there when you wake up and when you get home and love you unconditionally,” she said. “They are as much family as anyone and a forever portrait in their forever home will always make you smile. They are not on this earth long enough, but with a photoshoot you will have a memorable portrait of your family member to cherish forever.”

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

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30 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019


DON’T MISS

SKILLET

Courtesy of Green Dog Photography

Green Dog Photography

greendogphotography.com, (616) 262-4525 Nidal Kanaan started Green Dog Photography back in 2014 and has been capturing people’s most important moments ever since. Before becoming a professional photographer, Kanaan was a volunteer at the Kent County Animal Shelter. “(The shelter) started to do cell phone pictures. They put the photos up on Facebook and the website,” Kanaan said. “After doing that for a while, it became a passion and I decided to get a real camera and learn how to actually shoot.” Now a professional behind the lens, Kanaan says the key to being a pet photographer and getting those adorable shots is to have a go-with-the-flow attitude. “You might not be able to get the pose the exact way that you want, but be patient and wait for something (the pets) give you that’s just perfect,” he said. Along with having patience and perfect timing, it doesn’t hurt to have some silly and tasty tricks up the sleeve. “I make a lot of funny noises,” Kanaan said. “I have cookies and even little bacon

Other Pet Professionals Happy Dog Mom

happydogmom.com, (616) 322-5589 Owner Jennifer Waters of Happy Dog Mom, formerly known as Grumpy Pups Pet Photography, continues to provide the area with adorable, high-quality pet photos under the new name.

strips. You have to find the one thing that works because it just takes a split second to get that face. I haven’t met a dog where absolutely nothing works.” Pet owners can help prepare for a session by letting the photographer know what special treats or noises get their fur baby to sit still or pose. Either way, Kanaan guarantees that first and foremost there is a lot of fun to be had at the sessions. Kanaan still takes the time to volunteer and help shelter dogs through his photography. Similar to his 2017 ArtPrize entry, Nike, which helped cover more than two dozen adoption fees, Kanaan recently started “Project One in Ten” to help do the same. “The project is called that because only one in 10 dogs get a home, and that always just breaks my heart,” he said. One-hundred percent of the profits from the project will go to cover adoption fees in West Michigan. “My favorite thing is being at the shelters and rescues, because I like to be a voice for those who don’t have it,” Kanaan said. “If there are things that I can do to help them get exposure and get them out there, that’s my biggest passion.” n

Tailwagger Dog Photography

tailwaggerphoto.com, (517) 990-5630 The goal for Tailwagger Dog Photography is simple: celebrate the bond with your pets through beautiful artwork.

Finkanie Photography finkanie.com, (269) 377-2462

The Kalamazoo-based Finkanie tackles just about every kind of photography, including pets!

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SPONSORED CONTENT

DAY AT THE S-PAW I

f you own a dog, you’ve probably heard of grooming and its benefits. But you’ve likely also heard stories from friends and others who may not have had the best experience. You may have tried at-home grooming, and it didn’t go so well; or you tried to trim your dog’s nails, and it didn’t go so well; or you tried to cut a matte out, and that didn’t go so well. We are here to help!

STARTING EARLY Starting at a young age is important to build trust with the groomer and the process. It can be a scary experience for a puppy, which is why a lot of grooming establishments offer an “intro to grooming” package — take advantage of this! Starting a regular grooming schedule at a young age will make it easier for both the dog and the groomer, and help build a lasting relationship between them.

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If you have a dog that needs haircuts, such as a Doodle, the longer you desire to have your dog’s coat, the more frequently your dog should see their groomer. Most reputable groomers recommend bringing your dog in every 4-8 weeks (depending on the length you want your dog’s coat). Grooming at home, with the proper tools, is important in maintaining your desired look as well. If you have questions, ask your groomer what tools are right for your breed, or come and ask one of our knowledgeable groomers!

HEALTH BENEFITS All dogs benefit from regular grooming, even short-coated dogs that don’t need a haircut. Regular grooming invigorates the skin and promotes healthy hair growth (and typically less shedding is a result). Even regular nail-trims are crucial in keeping your dog’s paws in good shape and nails at a healthy length. Regular bathing and brushing helps keep your household clean and family members healthy as well, with less dirt, hair and dander hanging around inside the house. A clean and well-groomed dog is a happy dog!

“I was a good boy, do I get my treat now?” -Toby

BUILDING TRUST We value building trust with our customers by forming a relationship with not only your dog, but with you, and helping you keep your dog healthy, beautiful and comfortable. Find a groomer that you feel comfortable with, will help you and your dog maintain your desired look, and is open to teaching you at-home grooming techniques to keep your dog’s coat nice between grooms. We encourage everyone to find a reputable groomer to help you maintain your dog’s health through grooming! Written by: Mallory Knight, Lead Groomer @ Fido & Stitch

FIDO & STITCH 820 Monroe Ave NW, Suite 140 Grand Rapids fidoandstitch.com (616) 288-7992


THE PET ISSUE

Doggy Date Where to take your dog for a special day | by Kelly Brown

D

ating can often get in the way of relationships with the ones who have always been there for you, loving you unconditionally. We’re talking about Fido, of course, the beloved doggo who is always excited to see you (even if you just saw them five minutes ago). Don’t leave your fur baby lounging on the couch all day with pent-up energy while you browse through Bumble for the sixth time. Grab that leash, pack a bag of treats and hit the ground running for a full day of dog-friendly adventure in Grand Rapids, or wherever you live!

First Stop: Coffee

Outside Coffee Company 734 Wealthy St., Grand Rapids outsidecoffeeco.com All good days start with coffee and fresh air. If you live close enough to Outside Coffee Company, clip on the leash and go for a walk through the historic East Hills neighborhood. Then, stake out a table, grab a beverage from the adorable coffee camper, and dig into a magazine or book while you wait for the caffeine to kick in. This place was basically made for dogs — fresh air and excellent people/pet watching.

Walk It Off

Provin Trails 4 Mile Rd. NE, Grand Rapids It’s time to work up an appetite for lunch. Pack up the car with treats and water — for both you and your dog — and drive over to Provin Trails, located in Northeast Grand Rapids. All dogs must remain on a leash while walking the trails, no matter how well-behaved they may be. This moderately trafficked hiking trail is only a 0.8-mile loop. By the end of it, you’ll both be ready to eat.

ping District, is a progressive and independent bookstore which allows dogs to shop with their owners. Pick up a new read to enjoy in the park later — just steer clear of Garfield and Grumpy Cat.

fishermen or families on kayaks. If you’re feeling up to it, try out the new exercise equipment running the length of the park or run a couple of rounds at the stairs on Division.

Chow Time

Frosty Boy

Garage Bar and Grill 819 Ottawa Ave. NW, Grand Rapids garagebargr.com There are plenty of places to take your pup, but the rest of this date will happen in the up-and-coming Monroe North Neighborhood. Parking is easy and cheap in the neighborhood and it’s only a short walk to all the local businesses. First, though, it’s time to eat. Nothing will satiate your hunger like a juicy burger from Garage Bar, featuring their signature garage sauce. We’ve got slobber hanging from our mouths just thinking about it. A side of onion rings or fries can’t be missed. For dog-friendly seating, be sure to sit at one of the outdoor tables. Fido sure does deserve a fry or two tossed his way after that walk.

Fixing the Mid-Day Slump

Whitewater Cafe (Inside Embassy Suites) 710 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids embassysuites3.hilton.com You may have noticed that the skyline in the Monroe North neighborhood changed drastically over the last year. It’s all thanks to the stunning new Embassy Suites hotel, which opened earlier this spring. At this point in the day, you’re going to need your second wind and there’s no better cure than a hot cup of coffee. Grab one to go from the Whitewater Cafe on the main floor of the hotel. Of course, the outdoor seating is dog-friendly.

Riverside Views

Save It For Later

6th Street Park 647 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids

All good doggies enjoy storytime! Books & Mortar, located in the Cherry Hills Shop-

With coffee in-hand and the sun shining, it’s as good a time as any to take a quick walk through the 6th Street Park right along the Grand River. Stop to watch the

Books & Mortar 955 Cherry St. SE, Grand Rapids

Outside Coffee Company. Courtesy Photo

1757 Plainfield Ave. NE, Grand Rapids The last stop is finally here and the sun is setting beyond the river. A short drive north leads you to Frosty Boy, located in the Creston neighborhood. This iconic Grand Rapids ice cream shop serves up seriously delicious scoops. No summer date is complete without a cup or cone of ice cream to cap it off.

Bonus: Lakeside Sunset

Provin Trails. Courtesy Photo

Kirk Park Beach 9791 Lakeshore Drive, West Olive If there’s still daylight left, it’s time to hurry over to the lakeshore to catch an incredible Lake Michigan sunset. Kirk Park Beach in West Olive is dog-friendly and a great spot to set out a blanket, snuggle up and enjoy the views. n

AT KAZOO WITH YOUR BOO

Books & Mortar. Courtesy Photo

If you live in Kalamazoo, there are plenty of special places to take your doggy date. O’Duffy’s Pub has a beautiful Bernese Mountain Dog who would love to play with your pup on the drinks-only patio. Boatyard Brewing Co. and Arcadia Brewing allow dogs outside as well, along with The Thirsty Hound, Water Street Coffee and Shifters Bar & Grille. Woof! Kirk Park Beach. Courtesy Photo

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

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34 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

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THE PET ISSUE

Creature Comforts Where to shop for your furry friends | by Josh Veal

B

uying a new toy, leash or dog sweater is a treat for owner and pet alike. The best pet shops make spoiling your furry friends fun, with a welcoming atmosphere and unique, locally made choices. Luckily, no matter where you live in West Michigan, we’ve got you covered.

Fido & Stitch

820 Monroe Ave., Grand Rapids fidoandstitch.com One of the best places to bring your dog is downtown Grand Rapids so they can take in the sights, sounds and smells of the city life. The discerning pup deserves a lovely walk along the Grand River up to Fido & Stitch, a nice little boutique specializing in everything your dog could ever need. Premium pet food, fun toys, beds and leashes — it’s all there. Whether you live downtown or are just passing through, it’s a muststop shop.

Decadent Dogs

206 S. River Ave., Holland 505 Phoenix St., South Haven decadentdogs.com Sometimes you just need to indulge. Decadent Dogs has plenty of lavish gifts for your special pet, like cooling vests, foot coverings, winter apparel, toys, gourmet food and much more. On top of that, there are plenty of ways to treat yourself — jewelry, clothing, home decor, magnets, picture frames, pens, breed-specific Christmas ornaments and so much more.

Chow Hound

Multiple locations chowhoundpet.com If you head to Chow Hound, you’re guaranteed to find what you need. This is no boutique — it’s a full-on store with hundreds of options for animals of all shapes and sizes, yet it’s still locally owned. Whether you have a dog, cat, bird, ro-

dent, bunny or some other special animal, Chow Hound will have you covered with all the necessities and helpful advice.

Ebby’s Pet Bakery & Boutique

618 E. Savidge St., Spring Lake ebbyspetbakery.com Ebby’s takes treats to another level, baking healthy, unprocessed pet snacks with fun designs like tractors, squirrels, the Eiffel Tower and more. Natural ingredients abound, from freshly milled flax seeds and peanut butter to real fruits and veggies. Plus, you’ll find plenty of beautiful bows, dresses and sweaters for your precious pups.

Must Love Dogs Boutique & Spa

211 Washington Ave., Grand Haven mustlovedogsonline.com When someone has a true passion for dogs, it shows, and that passion radiates through everything Must Love Dogs does. The boutique is more than that—it’s a place to meet with people who care as much about your pup as you do and can help you with informed advice on everything from behavior and training to which toy to bring home. There’s also a self-serve grooming facility if you’d rather not get dirt and fur all over your own bathtub.

Bark’s 5th Avenue

3015 Oakland Dr., Kalamazoo facebook.com/barks5thave Bark’s strives for an attention to detail, from pet beds that complement your home to clothing that fits your four-legged friend perfectly. If you need it, it’s there: training aids, behavioral toys, backpacks, frisbees, collapsible bowls, designer collars and more. You’ll find pet products you never even knew you needed. If you’re in Kalamazoo and come here, you’re barking up the right tree. n Treats from Ebby’s Pet Bakery & Boutique. Courtesy Photo

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PET PARTIES

THE PET ISSUE

Where to live it up with your beloved critters | by Abi Safago Happy Cat Cafe

447 S. Division Ave., Grand Rapids happycatcompany.com

Game Nights With Cats July 5, 6:15 p.m., $40 per group of four Everyone has those nights where you don’t know what to do or where to go, and you don’t want to spend a fortune — here’s your solution: game time. You don’t have to drink or buy food or anything like that, just enjoy classic card and board games or bring your own while hanging out with some sweet cats. It’s the best of all worlds.

Happy Cat Yoga July 7, 21, Aug. 4, 18, Sept. 1, 10 a.m, $20 If you’re looking for a reason to get active, here’s the purr-fect start. Happy Cat Cafe is back with Happy Cat Yoga, where you can begin your yoga adventures while surrounded by some lovely cats. These gentle felines will roam all around and maybe sit on you while you do yoga and stretch out. Whether you’re a seasoned yogi or just starting out, furry friends will make it better. This class also includes coffee and snacks, so you can treat yourself too.

line, all levels are welcome to join in and create. Along with this, all materials are provided, so you just need to bring yourself and some clothes you wouldn’t mind getting a little paint on. While aprons are provided, you never know what these silly cats will do!

Yappy Hour at the Downtown Market Downtown Market 435 Ionia Ave. SW, Grand Rapids July 10-31, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. downtownmarketgr.com Every Wednesday in July, stop by the Downtown Market to play with pets during lunch. At Yappy Hour, you can relax and pet some wonderful dogs while escaping the midday blues. Take a long lunch and eat from one of the market’s many restaurants while you’re at it — your boss doesn’t need to know.

Puppies and Pints at Horrocks Horrocks Market Tavern 4455 Breton Rd. SE, Kentwood July 13, 2-6 p.m. facebook.com/horrocksmarkettavern

Cats and Canvas July 19, 20, 6:15 p.m., $30 Trying to channel your inner artiste? Look no further. Happy Cat Cafe brings it out while letting you enjoy some cats on the sidelines. Whether you’ve been painting for years or you can barely paint a straight

If you’re looking for a new dog or simply thirsting after some delicious drinks, Puppies and Pints is the place for you. At the second annual event, adoptable dogs is present for pets alongside all kinds of drinks. For every pint bought, $1 will be donated directly to Harbor Humane Society.

You’ll find beers and ciders from Vander Mill Cider, Rockford Brewing Company, Short’s Brewing Company and more.

Community Dog Walk Paddock Place 1033 Lake Dr. SE, Grand Rapids July 31, Aug. 28, Sept. 25, 6:30-8 p.m. facebook.com/pubatpaddock Treat your pet to some social time in a dog walk with neighbors from all around. You and your pup can get great photos to remind you of all the fun you have, as Buddies Pet Photography will be there to capture the moments. After the walk, play yard games with others (or even just your dog) in the park, and treat yourself with something sweet from Furniture City Creamery’s ice cream truck.

Corgis and Cocktails in Kazoo O’Duffy’s Pub 804 W. Vine St., Kalamazoo Aug. 1, 5-8 p.m, $5 facebook.com/corgisinthepark The corgis are coming! Corgis and Cocktails, hosted by a West Michigan group called Corgis in the Park, is making summer a little more fun. Join many of these short but sweet dogs (and other breeds) and enjoy food from what’s known as the premier Irish pub in Kalamazoo. A portion of O’Duffy’s sales that night will be donated to Paws With a Cause, a nonprofit organization that trains dogs to become service animals. Keep your eyes peeled for

more events from this group, like another classic Corgis in the Park during the fall.

Dogs N’ Beers N’ Dogs Shaggy Pines Dog Park 3895 Cherry Lane Ave. SE, Ada Aug. 25, 12-3 p.m., $15 facebook.com/shaggypinesdogpark Enjoy the summer heat with some of the best four-legged friends around, free beer and hot dogs — the edible kind. If you don’t have a dog and you’re looking to get out, no worries, you can come to this event for free. If you are bringing your pet, call ahead to make sure you pack everything your pup will need to make it a great day.

Bark in the Dark Riverside Park 2001 Monroe Ave NE, Grand Rapids Oct. 5, 5 p.m., $10+ hswestmi.org/bark If your’e going to get active, why not make the most of it and do it with man’s best friend? The seventh annual Bark in the Dark finds its way back for a funfilled night the entire family can enjoy. Join in on a glow-in-the-dark 5K or a one-mile fun run, along with other great activities, like a dog costume contest. If you’re hungry or forgot to eat before the run, no worries: a few local restaurants will be present, along with a beer tent. To make it even better, all proceeds from this event go to the Humane Society of West Michigan to help animals in need. n

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THE PET ISSUE

PUPPY PLAYPLACE Dog parks across West Michigan create community | by Elma Talundzic Shaggy Pines Dog Park. Courtesy Photo

D

owntown Grand Rapids is making space for pups to run, play and socialize. Located across the street from Founders Brewing Co., the Downtown Dog Park is an 8,000-square-foot space that gives your dog the freedom to safely explore a part of town that was mostly just concrete before. The park, owned by Maplegrove Property, is funded by the Grand Rapids Downtown Development Authority and is maintained and operated by Downtown Grand Rapids Inc. We sat down with Stephanie Wong, project manager at DGRI, to talk more about the new addition.

OTHER PAW-SOME PARKS Grand Ravines Dog Park

What went into the decision to open up a dog park downtown?

3991 Fillmore St., Jenison Let your pup run, play and socialize with other furry friends in more than 20 acres of space. This off-leash park is wide open and free to the public, with miles of wooded trails to walk as well. Even if you’re pet-less, it’s a great place to visit.

According to our market research, more than 5,000 households own at least one dog in the 49503 ZIP code. That’s a lot of dogs. Before this project came to life, we only had two public dog parks, and neither were conveniently walkable for downtown residents. In an effort to make downtown better for people and pets, the Downtown Dog Park was born.

Kruse Park

3205 W. Sherman Blvd., Muskegon Perfect for the water-loving pups, Kruse Park offers nearly 1 mile of Lake Michigan beach where pets can splash and play all day long.

What does a dog park bring to the area?

The park aspires to add a new lifestyle amenity for the growing number of people and dogs in downtown Grand Rapids. Dog parks are a fun and unique way to build community and a place for pets and pet owners to gather.

Does the park have any special features?

The Downtown Dog Park has two distinct areas for small and large dogs, plenty of seating, greenery and color. We wanted to create a place that people would want to spend time in. Bold colors for the planter boxes, flowers and unique fire hydrants make the space a little more vibrant.

Do you plan to hold any special events there soon?

There are no upcoming events at the moment, but you can stay updated on park happenings by following the Downtown Dog Park GR on Facebook. We’re also open to hear any event ideas the community might have. We also encourage other dog-friendly businesses to use the space as their own.

Kirk Park Dog Beach Downtown Dog Park. Photos by Erika Townsley for Downtown Grand Rapids Inc.

You’ve said the park may not necessarily stay where it is. How does that work?

Aside from the fence, all the amenities can be moved and relocated to another ‘pop-up’ location. As we bring more creativity to downtown spaces, a pop-up can be a great way to test ideas and see how the community Downtown responds. In this case, we are … evaluDog Park ating how it performed after one year. Other cities like Austin, Cleveland and 210 Market Ave SW Raleigh have experimented with pop-up downtowngr.org dog parks and found that their residents (616) 719-4610 found a lot of value from it. n

9791 N. Lakeshore Dr., West Olive With 210 acres available for swimming, picnicking and playing, both you and your dog are sure to have a good time.

Shaggy Pines

3895 Cherry Lane Ave., Ada This private, membership-based park offers 16 acres of fields, forests, ponds and more. Recently, the park added Doggy Day Play to its services, in which your fur baby is shuttled to and from the park for a very special kind of monitored daycare where the pups can run free all day. All dogs are required to be vaccinated and friendly, so you know they’ll be safe and healthy.

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

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THE PET ISSUE

INTO THE WILD Where to see animals you can’t keep as pets | by Abi Safago John Ball Zoo. Courtesy Photo

N

ot all animals are meant to be kept in your home — there’s a reason why an “elephant in the room” isn’t considered a good thing. Luckily, zoos take in those animals that are in need or in danger of extinction and allow us to get a look without having to find room for a giraffe in the backyard. West Michigan has plenty of zoos, sanctuaries and animal parks to check out, you just have to know where to look.

John Ball Zoo

1300 W. Fulton St., Grand Rapids jbzoo.org One of Grand Rapids’ largest and oldest attractions is also a great opportunity to learn. The John Ball Zoo, located on a hillside in the west side of Grand Rapids, is a popular family-friendly spot known as one of the best zoos around. John Ball is up-close and personal, which is ideal for seeing animals. Throughout the park, you may even find some animals outside of their cages with the zookeepers, giving you an opportunity to be closer while learning a thing or two. Even if you’ve been recently, the zoo has been going through renovations and expansions over the years and also bringing in new animals like a red panda, meerkats, toucans, armadillos and more.

Blandford Nature Center 1715 Hillburn Ave. NW, Grand Rapids blandfordnaturecenter.org

Inspired by true nature — getting dirty and learning hands-on — the Blandford Nature Center is passionate about what they do. With a passion for building community, Blandford focuses on rescuing animals while letting them live in a truly natural setting. It may not have all the animals big zoos have, but it does have lovely “wildlife ambassadors” like owls, vultures, snakes,

turtles and Bob the bobcat, all of whom couldn’t survive completely on their own. You can see them all while walking beautiful trails and visiting historic structures, such as the R.B. Stilwill Blacksmith shop originally built in 1869 or the Star Schoolhouse, built in 1853.

Binder Park Zoo

7400 Division Dr., Battle Creek binderparkzoo.org As one of the most interactive animal experiences around, Binder Park Zoo packs it all in. Located in Battle Creek, this zoo has plenty of activities for people of any age to get involved in. To start, you can head to the Twiga Giraffe Experience, feeding the giraffes a snack and snapping a photo — you might even get a long-necked kiss! Or, head to the Wild Africa walking path for an enriching trip through history and zoology. Binder Park has all kinds of animals you might see on a safari, like lions, gazelles, painted dogs, zebras, kangaroos and so many more.

Boulder Ridge Wild Animal Park

8313 Pratt Lake Ave. SE, Alto boulderridgewap.com Round up family and friends and head to this private animal park for a truly unique experience. Despite having hundreds and hundreds of species, Boulder Ridge is known for having exhibits you can get closer to, including flamingos, monkeys, lemurs, kangaroos and more. If you’re looking to be a bit more adventurous, hop on a safari ride for the wildebeests, water buffalos, ostriches and other favorites you might remember from the Lion King. If you’re seeking an even more personal experience with animals, you can feed some, like the dromedary camel or giraffe, or stop by the petting zoo inside to see baby goats and others.

John Ball Zoo. Courtesy Photos

Critchlow Alligator Sanctuary 1698 M-66, Athens alligatorsanctuary.com We’ve all watched in amazement as Steve Irwin held alligators and pet them, which might’ve led too many people to believe these beasts can be tamed easily. At Critchlow, you’ll realize just how large and in-charge these creatures really are. Since

2008, the sanctuary has rescued hundreds of reptiles that people across the country misguidedly bought as pets. It’s not only seven-foot gators, Critchlow has given a home to tortoises, turtles, snakes, lizards and more. Even if you are afraid of scaly reptiles, this is the perfect place to conquer those fears. The sanctuary is known for being friendly, caring and informative, offering up-close opportunities to touch and hold some cold-blooded animals. n

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STYLE NOTES

by Missy Black

PHOTOS BY LEIGH ANN COBB

A NEW WAY TO SEE THINGS J

u s t whe n you t houg ht you cou ld n’t stomach one more T-shirt, Ashley Trieu, owner at Iconoclasp gets bored and has a clearly creative idea. The maker admits she can lose interest in what’s in her closet but was inspired to find new ways to express herself. “I was looking to create a versatile item that people could change up,” Trieu said. Her idea had to be approachable, unisex, use natural fibers and function as a staple piece too. The result was the “mood tee.” Everyone appreciates a classic tee, but now Trieu offers it with a little seethrough charm in the front, clear pocket. “I wanted to give the wearer the freedom of expressing their daily mood and to be able to customize the same tee each time they wear it,” she said. Cho o s e f r om t wo si l houe t te s (cropped or full-length) in shades including chic black, an off-white/bone hue and a mustard striped version. If you’re feeling a little extra, there is an aqua blue shade that’s limited edition. From a Polaroid picture of your crush to a fresh-picked flower, the tee allows you to be as irreverent and random as you want to be. “We’ve even put sunglasses in the functional pocket,” Trieu said. “It’s intended to be an exciting staple piece with endless options of what to display in the pocket.”

42 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

With the transparent handbag craze, the mood tee is keeping in theme. The design is casual and oversized with slightly longer sleeves to perfect that laidback slouch that’s so in right now. “It’s a classic tee with a fashion edge. The fit and cut has that relaxed, ’90s grunge look.” When it comes to styling advice, have fun with it — roll the cuffs or wear it under a blazer. Take a belt and make the oversized version into a makeshift T-shirt dress (with leggings and sneakers). Do a half-tuck with the cropped version which hits above the upper hip area. “When I do pop-ups, I want to have things people can wear all the time because I normally make gowns and bodysuits,” Trieu said. “I made the mood tee for Grand Rapids — something more casual.” Will your tee be girly, provocative, moody, quirky or glam? Are you an artist that could display your small pieces inside the pocket? You get to decide. Costs range from $40 to $50, and don’t worry about how to care for this piece. Flip the tee inside out and wash it on the gentle setting. Lay flat or hang dry and avoid the dryer for a longer life. If the clear pocket gets wrinkly, you can run an iron on the backside to fix it. For more information, visit iconoclasp. com or head to Instagram and find the shop @iconoclasp. n


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By Michaela Stock

DINING

PIECE OF CAKE Cakabakery opens a third location in downtown Holland

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the area. Even during its soft opening, cookies and cupcakes couldn’t be kept on the shelves. “I’ve been super happy with the reception we’ve gotten and the following we’ve gotten,” Kakabaker said. “I feel very lucky and fortunate that we’re successful and people love our product. It feels good when people come in everyday and spend their hard-earned money on our baked goods that we put a lot of love into.” Love is one of the primary ingredients of The Cakabakery’s success. Whether hiring staff or providing customers with the perfect custom cakes, The Cakabakery is driven by being a business of diversity and inclusion. “We want to be sure that we represent all types of people, that age is not a factor, that relevance is a factor, that race and sexual identities are not factors, that humanity is a factor,” Jacob said. “We put out quality, consistent product everyday, and we connect with the community,” added Kakabaker. “We just want to be everyone’s best baker friend.” n

VISIT CAKABAKERY NEAR YOU 919 E. Fulton St., Grand Rapids 82 W. 8th St. Holland 48 E. Lakewood Blvd. Holland thecakabakery.com

Co-owners Jason Kakabaker and Peter Jacob. PHOTOS BY ALYCIA M. CHOROSZUCHA

REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

SCENE | SOUNDS | SIGHTS DINING

f you haven’t visited downtown Holland in a while, you’ll want to stop by on the way to your next beach adventure. The quaint small town is still as delicate as you remember it, but with a new edge. Developments have lengthened 8th Street past River Avenue — all the way down to the recently renovated Civic Center — and its additions include multiple restaurants, a movie theater and The Cakabakery, a custom order and retail bake shop. Jason Kakabaker and Peter Jacob, coowners of The Cakabakery, had envisioned making West 8th Street their third West Michigan location for a while now. The new storefront serves cupcakes, cookies, cake by the slice, and coffee by Rowster. There’s at least one gluten-free and vegan option every day as well. “We’ve always wanted to be part of the downtown shopping district. It’s so quaint and there’s so much traffic, and everyone is so friendly here,” Kakabaker said. “I think our brand has been headed this direction for a while; to have two production kitchens that also have walk-in retail, plus just a stand alone walk-in retail store makes sense for us,” Jacob added. However, downtown Holland didn’t have any vacancies for a new business for quite some time, so getting a spot in the heart of the town took more than a year of strategizing with friends and urban planners for Kakabaker and Jacob. “The development company, as well as us, knew that Holland needed something like us here. We didn’t have coffee at this end of 8th Street until now, and we didn’t have custom sweets and desserts, so it’s a natural fit,” Kakabaker said. Even with a new storefront, The Cakabakery has already proven its place in

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By Jack Raymond

BEER

GEARS + BEERS A West Michigan brewery bike trail

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omen’s suffrage superstar Susan B. Anthony famously called the bicycle a “freedom machine,” an “emancipator,” and “the all powerful whirligig of the future.” OK, maybe not that last part, but don’t discredit the bike’s magic — it takes us to and fro with nothing but a pair of legs and the will to zoom. It so happens that we’re blessed with a string of breweries to zoom between along Grand Rapids’ White Pine Trail. Revue plotted some coordinates and dropped in on breweries that share a passion for good beer and a good ride. We learned that a beer will never feel more earned than when you’re in the middle of a nearly 30-mile round trip. We hope you’ll bust out your wheels and make the adventure too. Sidenote: Bier Distillery would make a great addition or substitution on this trip, we just didn’t want to overdo it. As always, drink responsibly and protect your noggin.

Above: Rockford Brewing Co. Below: Speciation Artisan Ales. PHOTOS BY JACK RAYMOND

START: City Built Brewing Company

DINING SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

820 Monroe Ave. NW #155, Grand Rapids These guys are tight with bikes. “We engage in bike events as well as promote the West Michigan Mountain Biking Alliance,” said owner Ed Collazo. “We also ride and encourage employees to do the same. About five of 45 ride to work.” Cheers to more converts as the weather betters. This brewery’s a good starting point — centrally located with quality beer and food. Plus, it’s nice to get a taste of the urban setting before disappearing into the White Pine. While their tacos amaze, to survive the ride we suggest carbo-loading on the Barbacoa Jibarito, a Grandwich winner and a starchy treat that piles beef cheek between two plantains. Now, off to the races.

PIT STOP: Speciation Artisan Ales // 4.4 miles 3721 Laramie Dr. NE, Comstock Park

After whooshing by the local waterfowl along Riverside Park, we arrive at our next brewery: Speciation. Owner Mitch Ermatinger, a guy who’s listened to every Game of Thrones audiobook while biking to work, believes his beer and a healthy lifestyle go hand-in-hand. “We

46 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019

have a product that’s inherently healthier than most beer, as it has little to no residual sugar,” Ermatinger said. Perfect. Now you can stroke your health-nut ego while enjoying some of the finest sours on the planet. The Common Descent with Blood Orange and Lime, a 3.7-percent ABV Berliner Weisse, makes for a great pit stop choice — zippy, refreshing and it won’t slow you down.

PIT STOP: ELK Brewing // 1.6 miles 400 Dodge NE, Comstock Park

This stop might seem superfluous — a pint every 10 minutes isn’t the wisest cycling regimen — but ELK is worth a visit for the lineup of ever-improving beers. I grabbed an IPL (India Pale Lager), and enjoyed its balance between an earthy hoppiness and clean, crushable body. I felt tempted for another, but the trail awaited.

FINISH: Rockford Brewing Company // 8.8 miles 12 E. Bridge St. NE, Rockford

Miles fly by, the mouth begins to parch when finally, the trail opens to an oasis: a brewery. While Rockford Brewing has always been

intentional about exercise — hosting kayak trips, group bike trips and more — the brewery is no slouch about its menu either. Matt Valleau explained, “We build seasonal dishes to incorporate produce that is seasonally fresh, with the goal of helping guests find new ways to prepare and enjoy nutritious food that they can find locally.” This includes the wings coated in Smaug’s Revenge, a sauce so hot you’ll forget your tush is swelling from your bike seat. A glass of Rogue River Brown quells away the pain.

BREWERY BIKE TRAIL ROUTE Cedar Springs Brewing Company 7.7 miles

Rockford Brewing Company 8.8 miles

OVERACHIEVER: Cedar Springs Brewing Company // 7.7 miles 95 N. Main St. NE, Cedar Springs

To those with juice left in the tank, push on. In Cedar Springs, you’ll find the red and white checkers, a completionist’s finish line. With about 23 miles behind you, it’s time for a victory beer. The Küsterer Original Weißbier, a Best of the West winner, is fluffy and complex — sheer Bavarian perfection. After a couple, the bike back to Grand Rapids starts to sound a bit daunting. You might just want to take up residence here. Start a new life. Become a unicyclist.

Speciation Artisan Ales 4.4 miles

ELK Brewing 1.6 miles

City Built Brewing Company Start


Grand Rapids Grizzly Jam

Street Party with

Gunnar and the Grizzly Boys &

8:30pm

The Legal Immigrants 7:30pm

presented by:

music starts at 2pm!!

and

Saturday July 20

special guest

Elijah Russ!!

Tickets $10 via Eventbrite or $15 @ the door

819 Ottawa Ave. NW REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2019 |

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