Food Ireland Yearbook & Directory 2022/23

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Food www.foodirelanddirectory.com

Yearbook & Directory 2022/23

IRELAND

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contents

28 2 Minister’s INTERVIEW

Charlie McConalogue TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine, is well aware of the challenges facing the Irish agri-food sector in terms of rising costs, particularly when it comes to energy, and both the Minister and his Department are committed to supporting food producers.

8 MANUFACTURING

Sharon Higgins, Director of Membership and Sectors, Ibec, highlights energy inflation and supply chain pressures facing the manufacturing sector.

10 BEEF INDUSTRY

While Ireland’s beef industry already enjoys a strong reputation globally for its sustainability credentials, it is ready to play its part in reducing emissions going forward, reveals Joe Ryan, Meat Industry Ireland.

14 COLD STORAGE

Elizabeth Bowen, Irish Cold Stores Federation, explains how Irish cold stores operators are key to our ongoing agri-food growth and calls on Government to incentivise temperaturecontrolled stores to invest in resource efficiency.

16 REFORMULATION

Food Drink Ireland is committed to engaging with the Food Reformulation Task Force to ensure the success of the Department of Health’s recently launched Roadmap for Food Product Reformulation in Ireland.

18 DEPOSIT RETURN SCHEME

Dedicated work continues to deliver Ireland’s transformative Deposit Return Scheme, writes Shane Lyster, Irish Beverage Council, Ibec.

20 IRISH WHISKEY

William Lavelle, Director, Irish Whiskey Association, reports on the Irish whiskey industry’s ambition to make Ireland the home of the world’s most sustainable distilleries and whiskey brands.

22 BEER

Following an precedented couple of years, Ireland’s brewing sector is looking with cautious optimism to the future, but needs support from Government in terms of excise relief, argues Jonathan McDade, Director, Drinks Ireland|Beer.

48

24 CIDER

The Irish cider sector suffered hugely in the pandemic, due to its reliance on the hospitality sector.

26 FOOD DRINK IRELAND SKILLNET

Food Drink Ireland Skillnet continues to develop new learning and development programmes to help address the opportunities and challenges impacting the sector.

28 INVEST NORTHERN IRELAND

Invest Northern Ireland is helping local food and drink companies to grow exports postpandemic through a host of events, both live and virtual.

30 BORD BIA’S ORIGIN GREEN

Bord Bia’s Origin Green marks 10 years of progress with the announcement of a new programme, Accelerating Leadership of Sustainability.

32 TEAGASC

Teagasc’s Food Research Programme supports the development of Ireland’s agri-food industry through science-based innovation.

34 MID CORK PALLETS & PACKAGING Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging are amongst the country’s foremost suppliers of pallets, packaging and storage solutions.

36 FOOD SAFETY: FSAI

The Food Reformulation Task Force, a partnership between Healthy Ireland and the Food Safety Authority of Ireland, are working to create an awareness of the necessity for a major rethink on product composition for Ireland.

38 FOOD SAFETY: safefood

A new e-learning programme on food safety for SMEs, ‘safefood for business’ is practical and, most importantly, free.

40 GS1 IRELAND

The move to digitising paper records delivers added efficiency benefits, writes Maria Svejdar, Head of Marketing, Communications and CX, GS1 Ireland.

Food Ireland is published by: Tara Publishing Ltd 14 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01 6785165 Email: kathleenbelton@tarapublications.ie Web: www.foodirelanddirectory.com

44 FOOD INGREDIENTS

Univar Solutions are helping to discover wellness in the new era of the health-conscious consumer with their Foodology by Univar Solutions business, reveals Alan O’Donnell, Technical Manager for Food Ingredients, EMEA.

48 REPAK

Séamus Clancy, CEO, Repak, explains what new EU packaging recycling targets mean for Irish businesses, particularly when it comes to plastic packaging recycling, and advises on how to get the most from your waste contract.

50 ROBOTICS

How KUKA’s new robot portfolio is conquering the food industry.

52 PACKAGING

David Little, Chair of the Irish Packaging Society and MD of Leonard Little & Associates, addresses the challenges and opportunities facing the Irish packaging industry as it faces up to the sustainability agenda.

56 FORM FILL SEAL PACKAGING

Cavan-based Xtrupak are currently the only Irish company focused entirely on the Form Fill Seal market.

58 INGREDIENTS

NCC Food Ingredients can assist with food ingredient supply chain challenges, explains Fintan McConnell, Product Manager, NCC Food Ingredients.

60 CALIBRATION

Bonner have been setting the standards for calibration in Ireland for more than 40 years.

LISTINGS SECTION Product & Service Index

61

Company Listings

64

Relevant Organisations

76

Year Planner 78 Three-Year Calendar

Managing Director: Patrick Aylward Editorial and Marketing Director: Kathleen Belton

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Editor: John Walshe Sales: Brian Clark, Aaron Stewart Production: Ciara Conway Design: Tony Hunt Printed by: W&G Baird

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 1


minister’s interview

Challenging times

T

he words on everyone’s lips, not just in the agri-food sector but right across Irish and western society, are ‘inflation’ and ‘rising costs’. The Government are all too aware of the issues, most of which stem from macro-economic events out of their or our control, such as Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, which have pushed commodity and energy prices to previously unseen heights. “It has been a challenging time,” admits Charlie McConalogue TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine. “It’s something the Government has been monitoring very closely. We have made a number of interventions to try to address the cost of living challenges that families are facing, that consumers are facing, and also in the agriculture and food space, to try to support food producers as well in relation to the costs that are there, and this is something we will continue to monitor as we get closer to the Budget in the autumn.” The challenges around rising energy costs will move into sharper focus as we move into autumn, the Minister acknowledges, promising that he and his Cabinet colleagues will look at that “particular consideration”. He stresses that the Government have been very active in introducing schemes to alleviate pressure on Irish agri-food, focusing on the sectors most exposed by macro-economic events. “In the agriculture and food space, we have put €90 million in over the last three months to try to support different sectors, including the pigmeat and horticulture sectors, which have been under particular pressure,” the Minister notes. “Pig farmers have been under huge pressure, due to the rising price of grain, and we have introduced two separate packages which together would be worth in the region of €90,000 to the average pig farmer, to try to support them to get through this very unprecedented challenge. On the horticulture and

2 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

fruit-growing side, energy is a significant part of their cost base, so we have put €3 million into the horticulture sector to support our fruit and vegetable producers, particularly the high-ware glasshouse sector.” Livestock producers too have been singled out: “We have introduced a tillage incentive scheme, worth about €12 million, giving €400 per hectare for each additional hectare of grain grown, and the fodder support scheme will give €1,000 per farm family to grow up to 10 hectares of fodder,” the Minister notes. “This is a direct response to the cost pressures that exist, like the rising cost of fertiliser, to support the food-producing sector. “We can’t do it all, but it is something we are very conscious of and will continue to be the key priority for this Government in terms of the Budget package this autumn.” He acknowledges that “the challenges around energy and fuel costs are particularly difficult,” and there is no easy fix. “It becomes an erosion of resources and an erosion of wealth, which doesn’t really benefit anybody,” the Minister admits. “Prudent and sensible management is vital, to try to support people as best you can without exacerbating the problem. These costs have to be factored into the supply chain but we all have to work to minimise their impact and at the end of the supply chain is the consumer, and the Government is going to have to be very conscious of in relation to the Budgetary packages to help and support families.” In a worst case scenario, where there could be potential rationing of oil and gas supplies, would agri-food be prioritised? “Absolutely,” the Minister says immediately. “The same as it was during the pandemic, the production of food is an essential activity and were there to be any challenges around fuel, and every effort


minister’s interview

Charlie McConalogue TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine, is well aware of the challenges facing the Irish agri-food sector in terms of rising costs, particularly when it comes to energy. He and his Department are committed to supporting food producers, he tells John Walshe.

is being made to ensure that is not the case, but if there were to be, the production of food would have to be prioritised and that is something that is agreed at Government.”

A perfect macro-economic storm? Events of the last couple of years, with the twin challenges of Covid and Brexit, followed by the invasion of Ukraine, have delivered one macro-economic storm after another. It’s been a challenging time to be Agriculture Minister. “There have been big challenges there,” he sighs. “Brexit was the big challenge at the outset of my term; it was the big concern in relation to whether we would have a Trade and Co-operation Deal or not, whether there would be tariffs, making the preparations in relation to the introduction of the various checks [at our borders], and what it would mean in relation to trade. Thankfully, the agri-food sector has proven very resilient and stood up very well and has kicked on. That was followed by the Covid pandemic and now this [the invasion of Ukraine], so I think it’s fair to say that these challenges have been structurally bigger than what would be normal. But I think the sector has responded well to Brexit, responded well to keeping supply chains going during the pandemic and is responding well now to the effects of what is happening in Ukraine. “The importance of us all working together has been absolutely key, in terms of planning and looking ahead,” McConalogue continues. “I brought all the stakeholders together into the Food and Feed Security Committee as soon as the war started, looking at trying to make sure we could get a good sense of where supply was at in terms of fertiliser, in terms of grain, and also backing farmers to maximise their capacity to produce food over the spring and summer and also looking ahead towards next April and May and making sure we are fodder secure. People worked together in that

Irish Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Charlie McConalogue TD (right), pictured with Kieran Fitzgerald, Regional Director, Middle East, Bord Bia (left) and award-winning chef Eka Mochamad, at the announcement of the chef ’s appointment to the Chefs’ Irish Beef Club (CIBC) in Dubai. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 3


minister’s interview

Former Bord Bia CEO Tara McCarthy and Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine Charlie McConalogue TD at Capitol Hill in Washington officially launching Irish lamb to the US market in April 2022.

regard, productivity is strong, and the schemes we have put in place are making an important contribution.”

Office for Fairness and Transparency In the coming months, the big legislative change coming down the tracks is the Agriculture and Food Supply Chain Bill, which will establish a new independent statutory Authority to be known as the Office for Fairness and Transparency in the Agri-Food Supply Chain. The objective of the new Office will be to promote the principles of fairness and transparency in the agricultural and food supply chain, and it will principally do this in two ways: by performing a price / market analysis and reporting function, and by becoming the State’s designated enforcement authority for enforcing the rules on Unfair Trading Practices in business-to-business relationships in the agricultural and food supply chain. “It’s about introducing more trust and transparency into the supply chain by establishing an office on a statutory footing which is separate and independent, and can speak and act with authority in relation to improving supply chain relationships,” explains Minister McConalogue. One of the arguments in the past was that while certain regulations may have been in place, those charged with enforcing them didn’t have the power to impact on the sector. This, the Minister promises, will be different and the new office will have teeth. “It certainly will have teeth,” he insists. “We haven’t had an Office like this before; this is about an independent and credible statutory actor that can oversee the food supply chain to try to ensure there is fairness throughout, to influence and set good practice. You can’t set prices – some people would like to see that but it’s not how a market economy works – and 90% of the food we produce goes abroad, so the price you get for your product is determined by international markets, things we don’t control; we can control the quality of our product and try to add value, to premiumise it as much as we can, to ensure that we have the best quality possible to export so we can get the best price on independent markets. What we need to 4 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

do is to trace that back to the various actors in the supply chain, so we can shine more transparency on that, and bring confidence and fairness to the supply chain and in doing so, apply as much pressure as possible on the system to ensure that the farmers and producers get fair treatment for the massive contribution they make. Having someone who is independent, has a defined role and isn’t aligned with any stakeholder, is vital.” The Minister feels that the new law will “strengthen the position of smaller suppliers who are dealing with larger entities…putting in place fines and penalties where the position of power is abused”. When the new Office is in place, overseeing the supply chain and adjudicating on Unfair Trading Practices will move from the Department of Agriculture to the new office. The Minister is confident the Bill will move through both houses of the Oireachtas without delay and indeed, the recruitment process for the new Office is already underway, with the Minister stressing how “the leadership team and the role of CEO will be very important in driving good practice in the supply chain.”

ACRES of potential? June of this year saw the official launch of the new national agri-environment scheme, proposed as part of Ireland’s draft CAP Strategic Plan (CSP), which is called the Agri-Climate Rural Environment Scheme (‘ACRES’). The €1.5 billion scheme was described by Taoiseach Micheál Martin as “the single biggest investment ever by an Irish government, and meets a key commitment to design a flagship environmental scheme under the new CAP that is user friendly for farmers, and will deliver broader environmental and biodiversity benefits”. Reaction to the scheme has been broadly positive, the Minister maintains: “It’s been much anticipated by farmers and it has been received strongly by them. It was a key commitment I made going into the last election and a key commitment in the Programme for Government, when the three parties came together, that we would invest heavily in a new agri-environmental scheme. The scheme that


minister’s interview My focus has been to try to ensure that we keep our collective foot on the pedal in terms of producing food, while looking ahead and preparing for the additional stresses, such as growing more tillage and ensuring we grow more fodder, so that we are in good shape next winter and spring.”

we announced, along with the Taoiseach and Ministers Hackett and Hayden, delivers 50% extra funding compared to the outgoing environmental scheme, so that is going to be money which will make its way to farmers’ bottom lines and will help to deliver outcomes at farm level in terms of biodiversity improvement, water quality improvement and emissions reduction. It is a big actor scheme in our CAP plan and one which I think will enjoy strong uptake from farmers.”

Food Vision 2030 This time last year, the Minister and his department were putting the finishing touches to Food Vision 2030. A year later, it has been published, tying in with the Climate Action Plan, all moving in the same direction towards a sustainable future, and reducing emissions. The Minister has already set up working groups to oversee various sectors within the agri-food industry, such as a Beef & Sheep Group and a Dairy Group, the latter having already submitted an interim report. As Chair of the overall Food Vision 2030 Implementation Committee, the Minister is pleased with the progress so far: “We have timelined the various actions to deliver on the Food Vision 2030 plan and people are getting behind it. The fact that all stakeholders and all legislation is pointing in the same direction

is vitally important. It is about continuing to produce quality food, while striving in any way we can to minimise the emissions footprint of how that food is being produced.” Producing food sustainably is not just important from an environmental point of view but will also make a difference to companies’ and farmers’ balance sheets, the Minister stresses. “Adopting lots of these measures can improve the bottom line from a farmer’s point of view. Of course, it’s also hugely important in terms of the quickly evolving consumer attitudes, not just nationally but internationally, in relation to how people perceive food, its health credentials, its nutrition credentials and also its sustainability credentials. Is food being produced in the most carbon-efficient manner possible? Is it produced in a way that is positive for biodiversity and the environment? People want to see that, they want proof of that, and they increasingly want to purchase food that can show that. So for a number of reasons, it’s important that we go in that direction.” Ireland has led in the sustainability arena through initiatives like Bord Bia’s Origin Green, a multi-stakeholder, whole of industry approach to sustainability, which fast became the envy of other agri-food economies. Origin Green recently celebrated its 10th anniversary (see feature on Page 30). “Origin Green really was ahead of its time,” the Minister notes. “That initiative, which was launched by former CEO Aidan Cotter

Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Charlie McConalogue TD and Minister of State for Land Use and Biodiversity, Pippa Hackett TD joined Stephen Watkins, Managing Director, Boots Ireland, in Kilnavara, Co. Cavan, in January 2022 as Boots began their initiative to plant 15,000 native woodland trees such as Oak, Scots Pine, Birch and Hazel across the 11-acre site in celebration of their 25 years of business in Ireland. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 5


minister’s interview their consumers that the food they offer is sustainably produced. It is what distinguishes Ireland amongst other competitive countries. In fact, sustainability is equally as important as the quality and nutrition value of the food.”

PGI status for Irish beef

Minister McConalogue: “when I am engaging with customers internationally through trade missions and meetings, our sustainability credentials resonate and connect with them.”

and was driven forward by outgoing CEO Tara McCarthy, along with [Chair] Dan McSweeney and [Interim CEO] Michael Murphy, has been really important in relation to telling the story of Irish food, and it is going to be more important to deepen and broaden that story. Irish food quality is well known around the world but it is important that we double-down on that, which will be what keeps our place in the markets internationally, and that we play our part in reducing emissions as a sector.” So how can Ireland capitalise on the sustainable food systems on which Food Vision 2030 is built? Well, we have a great starting point, explains the Minister, in that “our landscape and climate help to give us a natural competitive positioning”. “The sustainability and environmental credentials of our food, thanks in part to the natural gifts the country has, puts us in a really good starting position. As an industry, that is something we have built on through initiatives like Origin Green, but it is going to be really important that we maintain that position and build on it through becoming more sustainable and reducing emissions. I find, when I am engaging with customers internationally through trade missions and meetings, our sustainability credentials resonate and connect with them; this is what they want to hear because it’s what their customers want to hear and they want to be able to prove to 6 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/232

One bright spot potentially on the horizon is the proposed Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status for Irish grass-fed beef. The application for PGI status is being made on an all-island basis, with the Minister and his Department working closely with their counterparts in Northern Ireland. “The all-island aspect, where Northern Ireland is working with us, is a positive thing in itself,” he enthuses. “I have had good engagement with Minister Edwin Poots [Minister of Agriculture, Environment, and Rural Affairs of Northern Ireland] on this issue and we hope to see it come to fruition.” The process is already “well progressed at European level”, the Minister stresses and PGI status would be of huge benefit for Irish beef: “PGI status is something that is well recognised across Europe. It adds to the credentials of Irish beef as a premium, grass-fed product; there is a huge difference in quality and taste between the primarily grass-fed beef that comes from Ireland and the more heavily grainfed product that comes from other parts of the world. PGI status is something which will help to communicate to the quality of the beef, how it is produced, its nutritional qualities and its taste and sustainability credentials.” The fact that this is an all-island initiative is a good news story, particularly in the wake of the negative publicity around the Northern Irish Protocol. Perhaps it could be a beacon for future northsouth collaboration? “It’s been very encouraging and energising, being able to work with Minister Poots and the Northern Irish Department, and being on the same page,” the Minister smiles. “The grass in Derry is the same as the grass in Donegal. We have a grass-based production system, north and south, and we should advertise and communicate that. We are an all-island food nation, with all-island health standards, so it makes sense that we should look to market our food as an island-ofisland product.”

Facing the challenges ahead Looking ahead to the rest of the year, the Minister admits that it’s going to be a challenge. “Across the economy, we’re going to continue to be under pressure from a cost perspective, driven by macro-economic factors like the rising energy costs and the continued effects of Brexit. As a Government, it is something we are very alert to; we have done a lot on it and will be doing more, particularly in advance of the autumn and winter months with the Budget.” Anticipating future challenges and preparing adequately for them now is crucial, Minister McConalogue insists: “My focus has been to try to ensure that we keep our collective foot on the pedal in terms of producing food, while looking ahead and preparing for the additional stresses, such as growing more tillage and ensuring we grow more fodder, so that we are in good shape next winter and spring – that is why I put money in now to allow farmers to grow grass because we won’t be able to address it next spring. “Against this challenging backdrop, it has been helpful that prices, including livestock and milk prices, have increased at farm-gate level, and the schemes we have put in place have been important in this regard,” the Minister concludes. “Looking ahead, it is a manner of continuing to monitor events closely, working together and ensuring that farm families are supported and that the rural economy is supported.”


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Energy inflation bites manufacturing sector Sharon Higgins, Director of Membership and Sectors, Ibec, highlights energy inflation and supply chain pressures facing the manufacturing sector.

I

n 2021, a rebounding economy and a surge in natural gas demand helped drive energy prices to levels unseen in over a decade. By December, many businesses were reporting gas and electricity prices 3-5 times higher than the previous year. Any expectations that prices would return to normal levels by the Spring ended with Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. The war effectively turned an upward trend into an fully fledged energy crisis. While Ireland is less exposed to the natural gas supply challenges faced by Continental Europe, our high dependency on natural gas leaves us acutely exposed to the war’s impact on energy prices. And further increases are a near certainty for the autumn and winter ahead. The first and obvious solution to this crisis is to use less energy by investing in energy efficiency; the cheapest unit of energy remains the unit you don’t use. The second response is to replace fossil fuels with renewables. The EU recently introduced new time-limited state aid flexibilities which Government must use to accelerate the decarbonisation of our energy system. Budget 2023 must help businesses invest in renewables and energy efficiency through new and expanded supports. Despite the pandemic and Brexit, Irish manufacturers grew their operations strongly over the last couple of years and proved themselves to be invaluable

8 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

components in the global supply chain - 60% of Ireland’s final manufacturing exports are now part of global supply chains, one of the highest such ratios in the world, with Ireland performing at scale in the areas of food and drink, medtech, technology, pharma, and other product lines. Throughout the pandemic, we saw intense pressure on supply chains and access to raw materials. Developing robust and agile approaches, such as digitalisation and ‘last mile mapping’ to understand and optimise supply chains and create improved mobility, were essential in the efforts to manage these challenges and consolidate Ireland’s manufacturing success over the last two years. Reflecting that success, in an Ibec member survey conducted late last year, 60% of manufacturers expected export sales to increase, 50% expect to increase both capital investment and investment in digitalisation and advanced manufacturing, and 44% plan to increase employment.

Acute energy price inflation We might have expected in 2022 to be able to draw breath, take the learnings of the last two years and push on past the pandemic crisis to address the issues that are in front of us. For example, as


Manufacturing well as the supply chain bottlenecks and general inflation, we know that attracting new talent is an urgent priority for every manufacturing company in the country, with upskilling and digitalisation also high on the priority list. But instead, quite apart from the devastating humanitarian crisis in Ukraine, to which our Government and the EU is trying to provide practical and strategic assistance, the war is bringing acute energy price inflation for Irish businesses and consumers, as well as presenting new layers of supply chain and logistical challenges. On energy price inflation alone, Ireland is acutely exposed due to our high dependence on natural gas and low levels of electricity interconnection, and we are currently experiencing some of the highest wholesale electricity prices in Europe. Irish businesses spend over €3 billion annually on gas and electricity and another €1 billion on road transport fuels. Many Irish businesses are reporting energy prices that are 3-5 times higher than last year.

Facing common challenges At our ‘Manufacturing the Future’ conference in Galway recently, many companies talked about the common challenges they face and focus that will be needed to support them through the rest of 2022 and beyond. Given the impact of the geopolitical situation, there was discussion about the need for Europe to progress its ‘strategic autonomy’ agenda in manufacturing, first articulated by the EU in 2020, particularly in the context of current and potential future global supply chain shocks. The elements that are essential for further manufacturing growth in Ireland include digital transformation and increasing the talent pipeline, while developing sustainable manufacturing processes are also at the core of the sustainability and digitalisation agendas in Europe.

Strong growth opportunity There is a strong growth opportunity for the manufacturing sector inherent in the EU’s green and digital transformation goals, which Ireland can seek to progress and exploit. But to consolidate and build on our manufacturing strength, companies will need support from Government, particularly in relation to the acute inflation in energy costs.

Irish manufacturers grew their operations strongly over the last couple of years and proved themselves to be invaluable components in the global supply chain.

Ireland is acutely exposed to energy price inflation due to our high dependence on natural gas and low levels of electricity interconnection.

Among the short term measures Ibec would like to see from Government are: • Use the time-limited EU Temporary Crisis State Aid Framework to support the decarbonisation of industrial processes and an accelerated roll out of renewable energy; • Work with business to provide direct fiscal interventions to help ease the burden of increasing energy costs; • Begin work on a new framework to permit the development of new emergency energy storage in Ireland; • Introduce a new microgeneration scheme and capital grants for on-site renewable technologies. It is essential that Ireland acts now to provide as much assistance as possible to this diverse and important business sector.

We are currently experiencing some of the highest wholesale electricity prices in Europe. Irish businesses spend over €3 billion annually on gas and electricity and another €1 billion on road transport fuels. Many Irish businesses are reporting energy prices that are 3-5 times higher than last year.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 9


beef industry

Securing a sustainable future

Ireland’s beef industry already enjoys a strong reputation globally for its sustainability credentials, and is ready to play its part in reducing emissions going forward, explains Joe Ryan, Meat Industry Ireland. 10 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23


beef industry

T

he announcement by Government in late July of emissions ceilings for individual sectors has certainly generated a lot of debate, not least in agriculture which has been tasked with reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 25% by 2030.

Starting point From a beef perspective, our temperate climate and grass-based production systems means that Ireland is already a global leader in terms of the sustainability credentials of our product. Much of our beef is produced extensively on grassland pasture, with relatively low inputs. Combined with the sequestration potential of this undisturbed land, many beef farms could already be close to being carbon neutral. Advances in measurement at individual farm level in the coming years should be able to verify this claim on a wider scale. Nonetheless, MII members and the wider beef sector accept the challenge set out under the Climate Action Plan and are committed to playing our part in reducing emissions from beef production and further underpinning our sustainability credentials. As well as legislative targets at national level, international customers and consumers are increasingly demanding specifications that better capture the higher sustainability credentials of their food purchases.

Animal Health Ireland (AHI) for its Beef HealthCheck programme, which aims to improve the health of the cattle herd by providing post-mortem feedback to producers, thereby helping farmers (and their vets) to make appropriate interventions to improve animal health within their herd. Industry Research: Meat Technology Ireland (MTI) is a research collaboration between processors, academia and Enterprise Ireland, with a significant element of the work programme focused on sustainability, including detailed research into the potential for genetics to (a) breed for lower emitting animals and (b) breed for earlier finishing. The coherent and innovative approach by MTI has also seen progress in other areas, such as packaging innovation, factory processing efficiencies and shelf-life extension to minimise waste.

Key initiatives Early Finishing: MII members will continue to do all within their control to assist the transition to a low carbon The early finishing of cattle is recognised in the Climate Action Plan as a key environmental lever economy in the decades ahead. for the beef sector, with a target set to reduce the average finishing age from 27 to 24 months. We are confident Processing Plant: of achieving this, and, alongside genomic advances, will result In addition to supporting research and working with farmers to in reducing some 1.2Mt CO2 equivalent GHG emissions by 2030. reduce on-farm emissions, MII members are leaders in Europe in This would represent a significant portion of the overall emissions terms of their work to reduce the environmental footprint of their reductions target for the agriculture sector. MII members are processing facilities. This is achieved through increased adoption committed to continuing to progressively incentivise the earlier of the Science Based Targets Initiative (SBTi) to meet the Paris finishing of animals, in line with the targets set out in the Climate Agreement commitment to limit global warming. Furthermore, MII Action Plan. members are participating in Bord Bia’s Origin Green programme Signpost Farms: MII members are providing significant financial support and collaboration to this Teagasc initiative which aims to reduce GHG emissions from Irish agriculture, while creating more profitable and sustainable farming enterprises. The major focus is on showcasing science-based technologies that can reduce emissions, accompanied by a strong knowledge transfer programme to deliver real change at farm level in the period to 2030.

and committed to achieve measurable sustainability targets on an annual basis across the areas of raw material sourcing, manufacturing processes and social sustainability. In terms of their processing operations, our members are involved in initiatives to reduce water consumption, reduce energy usage, reduce waste to landfill, all of which are independently verified under the Origin Green programme.

Facilitating improvement

Demonstration Farms: The largest beef processors have also invested in demonstration farms to deliver best practice systems for both suckler and dairy beef production in partnership with Teagasc, ICBF, Bord Bia and Animal Health Ireland. The objectives behind these farms are to provide commercial case studies to act as knowledge transfer centres of excellence.

Dairy/Beef Integration: Dairy bred animals represent a large component of beef raw material. A closer partnership between beef and dairy production must be supported in actions that collectively drive better outcomes for both sectors. Better breeding, including lower emitting animals and improving the efficiency of animal finishing, will lead to better economic and environmental outcomes.

Animal Health: A healthier herd means less inputs required, less finishing days and a younger animal at finishing. In addition to improving the economics of the beef enterprise, this offers significant benefits in reduced emissions. This is why MII members provide funding to

Suckler Beef: Suckler beef continues to be a major rural economy activity and a vital component of Ireland’s market proposition and must be maintained. It contributes to the livelihoods of 80,000 farmer suppliers and 16,000 employees working in the industry. There is FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 11


beef industry

In addition to supporting research and working with farmers to reduce on-farm emissions, MII members are leaders in Europe in terms of their work to reduce the environmental footprint of their processing facilities.

also scope for significant improvement in the efficiency of suckler beef production. Genotyping: Genotyping the national herd represents a critical step to drive sustained genetic improvement. Genotyping all animals at birth is critical in providing the surety needed in terms of genetic merit for climate and the environment and ensure these factors are front and centre of breeding strategies for the national herd. Inevitably, breeding changes require a longer-term focus to yield their full benefits but investing now is important to help build farmer confidence in the data. While government have committed to genotyping the herd by 2030 under its Ag Climatise plan, MII believes that this should be actioned in the first half of this decade. Measurement: The delivery of a robust and comprehensive national inventory measurement approach is critical to accurately monitor progress and provide confidence to the sector that efforts made are being recognised in annual emissions reporting. This is particularly the case in relation to providing the infrastructure to capture information on

the MACC measures implemented at farm level. This information needs to be fully utilised in the inventory methodology, while ensuring emissions factors appropriate to Irish systems are used. In the context of the beef sector’s contribution to delivery of Ireland’s climate targets in sectors other than agriculture, most notably energy, there is a need to embrace an ‘all farm’ approach to measuring and recognising the overall contribution of the agriculture sector (e.g. recognition of solar installations on farm buildings). This will be increasingly important in meeting the needs of key customers as they transition towards a carbon neutral supply chain in the years ahead.

Conclusion While the agriculture target poses a difficult challenge to the sector, and for farmers in particular, MII members will continue to do all within their control to assist the transition to a low carbon economy in the decades ahead. Being ambitious for change, the beef processing industry will continue to play a meaningful role in emissions reductions through enhancing our already strong reputation as one of the most sustainable producers of beef internationally.

MII members and the wider beef sector accept the challenge set out under the Climate Action Plan and are committed to playing our part in reducing emissions from beef production and further underpinning our sustainability credentials. 12 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23


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cold storage

Temperature-controlled stores left out in the cold

Elizabeth Bowen, Irish Cold Stores Federation, explains how Irish cold stores operators are key to our ongoing agri-food growth and calls on Government to incentivise temperaturecontrolled stores to invest in resource efficiency.

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old storage plays a vital role in Ireland’s agri-food sector and ensures Irish chilled and frozen food products can be enjoyed at home and exported worldwide. As we aim to achieve sustainability in our food systems, cold stores play an active role in reducing food waste and loss. Due to cold storage’s position within the supply chains of exporting food businesses, they can be considered as export-enabling firms. Up until recently, there has been a surplus of cold storage space in Ireland. The extra space was created after intervention was abolished in 2003. The effect of the surplus space was inexpensive storage for the food industry, resulting in no new stores being built. The agri-food sector grew substantially over the past decade, with Irish food and drink exports increasing from €8.9 billion in 2010 to €13.5 billion in 2021. Increased processing and exports have now resulted in a severe shortage in cold storage space. In addition, Ireland’s expanding pharmaceutical sector is now competing with food companies for space in temperaturecontrolled stores.

Increased pressure on cold stores As we adjust to Brexit, pressure on cold and chilled storage is rising due to disruption to supply chains and the need for products to be stored for longer or frozen to go to new markets. 14 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

Furthermore, European companies who used to supply the Irish market from cold stores in the UK are now sending product directly to be stored in Ireland. Covid-19 and the war in Ukraine have also added more strain onto global supply chains and disrupted shipping routes, creating a shortage of container vessels and refrigerated shipping containers. Slower container and product movements across the supply chain are leading to rising demand for cold storage infrastructure here in Ireland. The invasion of Ukraine has seen substantial impacts on the cost of gas, in an already unsteady energy market. Before the crisis, Irish cold stores were already experiencing significant increases in their energy costs and many are now reporting that rising prices are having a major effect on their business. In addition, like many other Irish businesses, cold stores are facing several competitiveness challenges from commercial rates, access to credit, increasing transport, labour and insurance costs, allied to a rising administrative burden from new regulations and legislation. In times of uncertainty, it is essential that curbing the business costs over which Government have most influence must be a top priority.

Reducing emissions Temperature-controlled stores have been working hard and


cold storage

investing in energy efficient equipment and practices to reduce their emissions and become more sustainable. While more cold stores move beyond the low hanging fruit for energy efficiency, large capital investment will be needed for stores to transition to low carbon. Changes made now will need to last for decades so that these businesses can make sure they are resilient to future energy and emission regulation and taxation. Unfortunately, access to finance and uncertainty about the future path of both energy prices and demand in the economy is slowing down the sector’s decision making on long-term changes to reduce carbon emissions. To incentivise cold stores to invest in resource efficiency, the Irish Cold Stores Federation (ICSF), the Ibec group for businesses working in cold storage, would like to see new measures introduced to support maintenance, improvements and retrofitting of commercial buildings. A once-off Governmentbacked commercial rates exemption scheme could support such investment. ICSF believes that better utilisation of the Accelerated Capital Allowances Scheme by widening the scope of qualifying energy-efficient equipment and simplifying the current scheme would promote investment in energy efficient products and equipment. To deliver large-scale emissions reduction in this sector, all existing and new Government supports schemes must be reviewed and refinanced to ensure that cold stores are not excluded and that funds get to businesses in a timely and efficient manner.

Food Vision 2030 Food Vision 2030 aims to make Ireland a world leader in Sustainable Food Systems and aims for an increase in the value of agri-food exports to €21 billion by 2030 and achieve a carbonneutral food system by 2050. To achieve such high targets and

expectations, all actors within the agri-food supply chain must play a role. The mission and goals for farmers, food producers, Government, stakeholders, and others are well planned out in Food Vision 2030, but unfortunately there is no mention of temperaturecontrolled stores. Such an omission highlights that these businesses are little understood within our own food supply chain. Despite these challenges, colds store providers indicate that volumes over the past year have been extremely high and expectations from most members are that occupancy levels will remain at or close to 100% for the remainder of the year, based on reservations from existing customers. Enhanced food service activity, increased output in the dairy sector, shortage of containers to export products and strong retail volumes have been identified as some of the current drivers of high occupancy. At the current juncture, ICSF believe it is crucial that appropriate measures are introduced to strengthen Irish cold store businesses to take advantage of new opportunities, to play a significant role in achieving the ambitious targets set out for the agri-food sector and to support our transition to a low carbon economy.

About the Irish Cold Stores Federation Irish Cold Stores Federation (ICSF) fosters relationships between cold stores, their customers, and the wider supply food chain. Our priority is to ensure that the key issues for the sector are recognised and understood by policy makers at national level. ICSF works with members to provide a reliable service to meet the needs of Ireland’s growing food sector. ICSF is part of Food Drink Ireland, Ibec’s trade association for the food and drink industry in Ireland. FDI represents the interests of over 150 food, drink and non-food grocery manufacturers and suppliers. In you have any questions and queries about the Irish Cold Stores Federation, contact Elizabeth Bowen, PCF Director, Food Drink Ireland: elizabeth.bowen@ibec.ie.

Temperature-controlled stores have been working hard and investing in energy efficient equipment and practices to reduce their emissions and become more sustainable. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 15


reformulation

A roadmap for reformulation Food Drink Ireland is committed to engaging with the Food Reformulation Task Force to ensure the success of the Department of Health’s recently launched Roadmap for Food Product Reformulation in Ireland.

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n December 2021, the Department of Health launched a Roadmap for Food Product Reformulation in Ireland. Over four years (2021-2025), the Department of Health aims to reduce calories, saturated fat, sugar and salt in the Irish diet. Food and non-alcoholic beverage companies are being asked to use less of these target nutrients in many everyday foods. The Roadmap is a core element of Ireland’s Obesity Policy and Action Plan.

Food Reformulation Task Force A Food Reformulation Task Force has been set up within the Food Safety Authority of Ireland to implement the Roadmap. It will help drive progress towards the targets across 40 food and drink categories by working with industry and stakeholders. Food Drink Ireland (FDI) welcomes the launch of the Roadmap, as reformulation is one of the most effective ways in which the food and drink industry can contribute to reducing obesity and improve public health. Reformulation is ongoing in the Irish food and drink industry and FDI has tracked the sector’s successful efforts to reduce saturated fat, salt, and sugar in its 16 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

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TARGET 10% reduction

Sugar

20% reduction

Saturated Fat

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Energy (Calories)

20% reduction

Products targeted Targets due by explicitly at babies end 2022 and young children 2019 report, ‘The Evolution of Food and Drink in Ireland, 2005-2017’. ‘The Evolution of Food and Drink in Ireland, 2005-2017’ report found that for direct reformulation of products on the market between 2005 and 2017: • Sodium reduced by 28%; • Saturated fat reduced by 10.1%; • Sugar reduced by 8%; • Energy reduced by 1.6%; • Total fat reduced by 0.3%.

Portion size reduction In addition to reformulation, the Task Force will also look at suggested serving

size reduction. As many categories reach technical limits to reformulation, reduced portion sizes and new pack formats will play an increasingly important role. It is significant that portion size is recognised by the Task Force as it is one of the tools to address the issue of obesity, offering smaller portion sizes and offering increased choice for consumers across a range of formats. The food and drink sector is committed to reformulation; however, for small indigenous food companies, the technical challenges of reformulation and the time required to reformulate some products must be acknowledged. State supports will be needed to assist SMEs in addressing these challenges. To support this work, FDI has already commenced engagement with Enterprise Ireland and the Prepared Consumer Food Centre located at Teagasc Ashtown on how best to aid companies to achieve these new reformulation targets. FDI and its members look forward to engaging with the Task Force to ensure the success of the reformulation programme and with the Department of Health to improve public health.


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deposit return scheme

Ireland’s DRS scheme on track Dedicated work continues to deliver Ireland’s transformative Deposit Return Scheme, writes Shane Lyster, Irish Beverage Council, Ibec.

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arnessing the findings of a major feasibility study carried out by global experts throughout 2020, Ireland’s combined alcohol and non-alcohol beverage industry, led by Ibec’s Irish Beverage Council, continues to deliver on its commitments to realise a world-class, successful and sustainable Deposit Return Scheme (DRS) for Ireland. Having researched, modelled and designed a bespoke blueprint for how the complex initiative will work in a unique marketplace like Ireland, the Irish Beverage Council’s project group then collaborated closely with officials at the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications in drafting sensible legalisation to enable the scheme’s establishment.

Mandatory obligations The Separate Collection (Deposit Return Scheme) Regulations (SI-599/2021), enacted by Minister Eamon Ryan TD on November 19, 2021, lay out the mandatory obligations on both producers and retailers and codify the criteria to be satisfied for a government-approved licence to be awarded to a prospective system operator. The legislation also clarifies the scope of the scheme (PET bottles and aluminium and steel cans and containers up to three litres capacity) and transposes the ‘separate collection’ elements of the EU’s Single Use Plastics Directive by setting the necessary collection targets in Irish law (in the case of PET bottles – 77% by the end of 2025; rising to 90% by the end of 2029). The final phase of the Irish Beverage Council’s active project work focused on creating a wholly new and independent corporate entity to launch and operate the scheme on behalf of industry. To this end, DRS Ireland CLG was incorporated earlier this year as industry’s preferred DRS operator. Under the close direction of a governing board of 12 (with eight seats reserved for direct industry representatives – six beverage producers and two retailers, and representative of all sizes and categories of both) and led by Independent Chairperson Tony Keohane, 18 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

the company’s application for an operating licence was formally approved by the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications on July 12, 2022. The company is now liaising closely with industry actors and a wider audience of other stakeholders to make final decisions and finesse the set-up of the system in preparation for its launch.

Boosting collection rates By placing a value on what is currently discarded as waste, or worse still, litter, DRS will incentivise Irish consumers to responsibly dispose of their used beverage packaging by having a cash deposit, originally levied at the point of purchase, reimbursed when the applicable container is returned to one of several thousand designated return locations planned across the country. Our experience from similar initiatives in other markets proves that a well-designed DRS can significantly boost the collection rate, and therefore the availability of, high-quality, food-grade plastic, affording beverage producers the best opportunity to comply with linked recycled content obligations and ultimately more easily achieve fully-circular packaging. DRS is a strategic asset in building a fully circular, closed-loop beverage packaging recycling system. Its forthcoming introduction in Ireland heralds a truly transformative future, one which the combined Irish beverage industry is proud to make a reality. About the author: Shane Lyster is Director of the Irish Beverage Council, the dedicated body within Food Drink Ireland representing Ireland’s non-alcohol beverage industry and one of 39 individual sectoral trade associations operated by Ibec. For more information about Ireland’s forthcoming DRS, or the Irish Beverage Council’s activities more generally, contact shane.lyster@ibec.ie or connect with us via www.fooddrinkireland.ie.


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whiskey

Irish whiskey: working together on sustainability Food’s Future

William Lavelle, Director, Irish Whiskey Association, reports on the Irish whiskey industry’s ambition to make Ireland the home of the world’s most sustainable distilleries and whiskey brands.

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reland is a small island, with a large whiskey industry. Ireland is home to the world’s oldest whiskey tradition; and we are still the world’s fastest-growing spirits category. But as worldwide sales of Irish whiskey continue to increase, our industry is determined to work together to decrease our environmental impact. The Irish whiskey industry takes seriously our responsibilities to be sustainable, both locally and globally. We are committed to minimising the life-cycle environmental impact of our production practices and of our supply chains, while maximising our support for Irish farming and local suppliers. For this reason, in May 2022, the Irish Whiskey Association published ‘Irish Whiskey: Sustainable Together’, the first-ever sectoral sustainability roadmap for the Irish whiskey industry. The roadmap sets out our industry’s shared vision to work together to make Ireland the home of the world’s most sustainable distilleries and whiskey brands. The roadmap aligns with the UN Sustainable Development Goals and seeks to actively support the targets set down in Climate Action Plans, both north and south.

Knowledge transfer and partnership The roadmap is titled ‘Sustainable Together’ as it reflects the commitment of our member companies to work together to support delivery of our shared vision, goals and objectives. To this 20 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

end, the roadmap includes a strong focus on knowledge transfer and partnerships. The roadmap proposes a signature project on energy efficiency to facilitate innovation and knowledge transfer within the Irish whiskey industry. This will involve members sharing best practice on energy efficiency; and it will include state agencies and key stakeholders to support implementation. In addition to setting new targets for water usage in distilling, agreement has been reached on a new partnership with Irish Water to provide a dedicated water stewardship training for Irish whiskey distilleries, leading to certification accredited by the European Water Stewardship Standard (EWS). The Irish Whiskey Association have nominated ‘Trees on the lands’ as our all-island tree planting partner, allowing our members to fund tree planting - comprising at least 50% oak - through a consistent expert programme. The Irish Whiskey Association is also a signed-up supporter of the All-Ireland Pollinator Plan and will be working with AIPP to support members to implement actions on distillery/maturation sites.

Grain-to-glass The roadmap reaffirms the Irish whiskey industry’s commitment to supporting Irish farmers. Already our


whiskey

Far left: Barley fields at Galley Head - used by Clonakilty Distillery. Left: Irish whiskey stills at Powerscourt Distillery

industry purchases over 100,000 tonnes of Irish barley and malt annually, while production of distilling grade malt in Ireland has increased 400% over the past decade. As sales of Irish whiskey grow, demand for Irish barley and malt is also continuing to grow. But it’s not just about what we use; it’s also about what we give back as part of the circular economy. Every year, over 350,000 tonnes of co-products from Irish whiskey production (spent grain/ pot ale) are reused to become high-quality animal feed.

Water flowing at Bushmills Distillery, Co. Antrim. Pictured at the launch of the Irish Whiskey Association’s (IWA) sectoral sustainability roadmap for the Irish whiskey industry, entitled ‘Irish Whiskey: Sustainable Together’, are William Lavelle, Director, IWA, with John Quinn, IWA Chairman, and Minister of State Pippa Hackett.

Economic and social sustainability Our roadmap is not just an environmental strategy. It also addresses the importance of economic and social sustainability. People and place have been at the heart of Irish whiskey renaissance and our indsutry is proud of how we have supported communities and local economies across the island of Ireland. The roadmap identifies how the Irish whiskey industry generates high-quality jobs, with the highest gross value-added per employee of any Irish food or drink sector. Our industry has re-used vacant buildings in 17 towns and villages for development of distilleries. An assessment by Fáilte Ireland for the Irish Whiskey Association found that visitors to distilleries in 2019 spent €63 million in local communities. We look forward to continuing to support local economies around Ireland. Our roadmap is ambitious, but realistic. I firmly believe that working together, we will deliver on our ambition to make Ireland the home of the world’s most sustainable distilleries and whiskey brands. FOOD IRELAND YFOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 21


beer

Green shoots emerge for Ireland’s brewers Following an unprecedented couple of years, Ireland’s brewing sector is looking with cautious optimism to the future, but needs support from Government in terms of excise relief, argues Jonathan McDade, Director, Drinks Ireland|Beer.

22 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23


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t’s been a tough couple of years for Ireland’s brewers. An unprecedented period of lockdowns, hospitality closures, trade restrictions and declining sales has come to an end. Ireland’s brewing sector has endured this bruising period with a dogged resilience and is now looking ahead to a brighter future. However, many challenges for the sector remain. In 2020, sales fell by 17.3% compared to the previous year. In 2021, sales declined by a further 1.2% which showed a significant slowdown in the drop in sales. The lockdown in the first half of 2021 contributed to this continued slump in sales. However, as the hospitality sector began to open, sales increased by 38% compared to the first half of the year.

beer

drinkers continue to ❝payIrishthebeer second highest rate of excise on beer in the EU, with 55 cents going to the exchequer for every pint of lager sold. ❞

Ireland’s favourite alcoholic beverage In more encouraging news from 2021, beer’s share of the alcohol market increased from 38% in 2020 to 40%. As such, beer remains Ireland’s favourite alcoholic beverage. Prior to the pandemic, beer’s market share was 45%. I am hopeful that with beer’s sales increasing by 59% in the first quarter of 2022 compared to the same period in 2021, beer’s market share will gain some ground this year. The pandemic not only changed how much beer is consumed and but also where it has been consumed. Typically, around 60% of beer is consumed in our pubs, restaurants, and hotels. In 2020 an estimated 29% of beer sales were from the hospitality sector. The on-trade market share went up to 46% in 2021. This was primarily driven by the easing of restrictions in the hospitality sector in the latter half of the year. I expect that the hospitality sector will gain significant ground in the market share of beer’s sales channels in 2022.

Stark fall in production The starkest figure from 2021 is the fall in production. In 2020, production fell by 13%, followed by a fall of a further 46% in 2021. This is primarily due to the prolonged closure of the hospitality sector in Ireland but also the hospitality restrictions in the United Kingdom, where much of Ireland’s beer exports go. Indeed, the value of beer’s exports in 2021 also continued to fall but only marginally, by 3%. The most popular destination for Irish beer continues to be the UK, with the United States in second place. The prolonged closure of the hospitality sector had an impact on the types of beer that were sold in 2020. For example, stout sales typically make up around 30% of overall beer sales, but in 2020 stout made up just 25% of beer’s market share. In 2021, stout’s market share rose to 32% which reflects the return to normality regarding the market share of the different beer variants. Lager’s market share fell from 69.5% in 2020 to 61.2% in 2021. Ale’s

share recovered somewhat, going up from 4% in 2020 to 5% in 2021 while non-alcoholic beer’s market share continues to rise, growing from 1.1% in 2020 to 1.4% in 2021. In 2017, non-alcoholic beer’s market share was 0.4%, which highlights its growing popularity in recent years. For the second consecutive year, beer was not the biggest contributor of excise receipts to the exchequer within the alcohol market. In 2021, beer contributed €351 million to the exchequer in excise receipts, the same amount as the year before. In the past decade, the exchequer has received €3.9 billion in excise receipts from the brewing sector. Irish beer drinkers continue to pay the second highest rate of excise on beer in the EU, with 55 cents going to the exchequer for every pint of lager sold.

of the introduction of a minimum unit price on alcohol products coupled with cost-of-living increases, means that an excise reduction would benefit hard-pressed consumers. The situation remains delicate for Ireland’s brewers; while sales have begun to recover somewhat, it is too early to tell if sales, production, and exports will return to prepandemic levels. The green shoots have emerged but oxygen, in the form of an excise reduction, is needed from the Government for the sector to grow from the ashes of the pandemic.

Help needed for the challenges ahead In 2022, a whole new range of challenges have emerged, such as high input cost inflation and other external pressures. The emergence from Covid restrictions and the War in Ukraine has applied various pressures on other sectors that inevitably have a knock-on impact on the brewing sector. Due to these challenging years and current issues, Drinks Ireland|Beer urges the Government to reduce the rate of excise in this year’s budget. The combination FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 23


cider

Cider’s hard-pressed pandemic The Irish cider sector suffered hugely in the pandemic, due to its reliance on the hospitality sector, writes Jonathan McDade, Director, Drinks Ireland|Cider.

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reland’s cider and beer sectors have struggled more than the other categories during the pandemic. There has been an overall decline in cider sales, market share and the value of exports in the past two years. The primary reason for this decline has been the rolling closures and trade restriction of the hospitality sector. Typically, cider, like beer, has a much higher proportion of sales in the hospitality sector, compared to spirits and wine. This exposure to the hospitality trade has resulted in a sales slump for the sector since the pandemic began.

Declining sales in 2020-21 In 2021, cider sales declined by 4.2% compared to 2020, which was 15.1% down compared to 2019, before the pandemic. In terms of cider’s market share of the alcohol market, it has fallen by 1.1 points in a year to a share of 5.8%. In 2019, cider’s share of the alcohol market was 7.4%. In other words, this is a fall of 1.6 points in two years. In terms of per capita consumption, cider consumption has fallen by 5.6% in 2021 compared to the previous year, and per capita consumption is down by 16.8% since 2019. However, there was a 20% increase in cider 24 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

sales in the second half in 2021 and a rise in sales by 12.5% in the first quarter of this year, compared to the same period in 2021. While this is not a spectacular increase in sales, it shows that the reopening of the hospitality sector is crucial for the cider sector’s recovery. Cider exports took a significant hit in 2021, with the estimated value of cider exports being €25 million, 56% down from the previous year. The most popular destination for Irish cider is the UK, where the value of cider exports fell significantly last year. The second most popular destination is the United States, followed by the Netherlands. The value of imported cider also fell in 2021, by 13%. The most popular international cider for Irish consumers is from the United Kingdom, followed by Belgian cider. The value of imported cider has returned to prepandemic levels.

Excise relief programme for small producers Drinks Ireland|Cider welcomed the announcement of the introduction of an excise relief programme for small cider producers, like the one enjoyed by craft brewers. This move will foster growth and

investment in the sector. While the excise relief programme was deferred to next year’s Finance Bill, Drinks Ireland|Cider is looking forward to seeing the details of the programme, when it emerges. Furthermore, Drinks Ireland|Cider would like the standard rate of excise on cider, as well as all other alcohol categories, to be reduced in the forthcoming budget. For consumers, there is still an unprecedented choice of cider products on offer, most of which are produced in Ireland. However, many consumers are dealing with significant cost-of-living issues which is why a reduction in excise is needed. It is worth noting that when combining excise and VAT, about 28% of the cost of a pint of cider is taxed. The excise rate on cider in Ireland is the third highest in the EU. The overall picture for the cider sector remains unclear. However, I am certain that there will be a recovery in sales in 2022, when compared to the previous year. Whether those sales will return to prepandemic levels remains to be seen but the introduction of the excise relief programme for craft cider producers is a cause for optimism.


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food drink Ireland skillnet

FDI Skillnet offers training relevant for today

Food Drink Ireland Skillnet: Learning and Development - a key tool in addressing the opportunities and challenges Mark Skinner, Food Drink impacting the sector. Ireland Skillnet Manager.

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rom sustainability to food inflation, and attraction of talent to Brexit, businesses in the food industry continue to face many challenges. These challenges all have an impact on talent and are leading to more and more businesses investing in training to address these specific challenges. Over the past two years, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet, part of Ibec, developed new programmes to in response to Brexit and Covid. From a Brexit perspective, these programmes included a Diploma in Global Sales for the Food and Drink Sector, as well as training interventions around Regulatory Divergence and Customs training. Whilst for Covid, supports including training around Risk Mitigation, Crisis Communication, and remote working. All are clear examples of how training interventions are a key enabler in addressing external challenges to your business.

Key priorities for the future Looking to the future, key priorities for the network include sustainability, access to talent, regulatory divergence and digital transformation. In sustainability, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet now offers members a new MSc 26 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

in Sustainable Food Systems, as well as a Certificate in Sustainable Food Packaging. To support access to talent, their Graduate programme upskills 40-50 participants per year, whilst tailored people management programmes at Supervisor and Team Leader level aid the attraction and retention of talent, and their Traineeship in Meat Industry Skills supports progression from operative into high-skilled knife roles in the meat industry. In terms of regulatory divergence, a new MSc in Food Regulations has been created to address the challenges of a more complex regulatory environment. Whilst in relation to technology and digitalisation, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet has secured funding to undertake a research project to review current levels of digitalisation, how we compare to other sectors and markets, all with a view to understanding barriers and opportunities for increased levels of digitalisation. All these programmes are developed with the support of an excellent Steering Group of L&D and HR professionals from across the food and drink sector.

Benefits of membership Membership of Food Drink Ireland Skillnet

is free and is open to companies from the Meat, Dairy, Consumer Foods and Beverages sector. Benefits of membership include: • Industry specific training that’s relevant to your business; • Up to 60% saving on the cost of training due to network purchasing power plus part-government funding through Skillnet Ireland, funded by the National Training Fund through the Department of Education and Skills; • Flexible training that is delivered at times that suit your company; • Saving time on procurement, as all courses procured by the network are organised so as to ensure all trainers meet the quality standards of the sector and that value for money is achieved; • Opportunity to collaborate and learn from colleagues across the industry. More information can be found on www. fooddrinkirelandskillnet.ie or if you would like to join the network for free, or would like to input into the Food Drink Ireland Skillnet Steering Group, please contact Mark Skinner, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet Manager on (01) 6051615 or email: mark.skinner@ibec.ie.


Northern Ireland.

Bringing our world-class food and drink to your table. When you source food and drink from Northern Ireland you can be sure of its pure, natural, quality. That’s why Invest Northern Ireland’s Food and Drink division works with local producers to help them take their products around the world. Whether it’s helping companies to find new markets in the Republic of Ireland, or working with UK supply chains to drive new sales, Invest NI partners with our local producers to help them identify new trends, bring forward innovative products and grow their business. Learn how you can serve our quality food and drink.

Northern Ireland. Altogether more.

For further information contact Jen Guiney, Invest NI E: Jen.Guiney@investni.com M: +44 79 8511 1024

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We work with NI producers to help identify new trends, bring forward innovative products and grow their business.


invest northern ireland In June 2022, Around Noon, the Newry-based food-to-go manufacturer, announced a new contract to supply sandwiches from its Twelve Handmade in County Down range to Marks & Spencer stores across the island of Ireland, representing an agreement worth Sterling £3.5 million in retail sales.

Northern Ireland is open for business! Invest Northern Ireland is helping local food and drink companies to grow exports post-pandemic through a host of events, both live and virtual.

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pavilion, where over 70 NI food and drink producers were exhibiting. ood remains a serious business in Northern Ireland and is the region’s biggest manufacturer, one which contributes over “This type of event supports our role, which is to broker mutually Sterling £5 billion to the local economy annually and employs beneficial and profitable business relationships between retailers more than 100,000 people across the extensive and foodservice operators in the Republic supply chain. of Ireland and Northern Ireland companies,” Northern Ireland food and drink is on sale in explains Jenn Guiney. “Undoubtedly, the over 70 global markets, including the US and last two years have been very difficult, but throughout Asia and the Middle East. Whilst the it has been so encouraging to see many environment is still challenging, NI food & drink local companies demonstrate resilience and producers have manoeuvred their way through innovation in the face of adversity. Covid-19 and Brexit to continue delivering safe, “Later this year, I am delighted to announce nutritious and quality food. that Invest NI’s traditional November showcase Whilst traditional face-to-face selling will return, offering visitors the opportunity to approaches were disrupted for nearly two engage with a large number and wide range of years, there is a growing appetite to start NI food and drink companies under one roof,” interaction directly once again and according Jen continues. “The show will also feature award to Jen Guiney, Business Development Manager winners from this years Blas na hÉireann, Irish with Invest Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland Jen Guiney Invest NI Business Quality Food and Drink Awards, and Great Taste Development Manager RoI Food and Drink Plc has delivered during this Awards, and is a great way for buyers from both difficult time and remains very much open for business. retail and foodservice sectors to see what is on offer from our NI suppliers” Invest NI offers buyers a comprehensive understanding of the Open for business A great example of this resurgence in physical interaction was at the products, capacity and capabilities of around 400 Northern Ireland producers. recently held Balmoral Show, Northern Ireland’s largest agricultural show, which was visited by over 40 retail and foods service buyers from ROI and GB. As guests of Invest NI, buyers attended a NI Reacting quickly to support the sector showcase breakfast, followed by a private viewing of the food Whilst much of Jen’s work within Invest NI’s Food and Drink

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invest northern ireland Division ordinarily includes co-ordinating a programme of exhibitions, networking events, factory visits and ‘meet the buyer’ activities, when the pandemic hit, the wider team had to react quickly to the needs of the sector in terms of how they delivered support. “We had to look at new ways of ensuring that Northern Ireland products and services were still effectively promoted to potential buyers in our two target markets, ROI and GB. The answer for us was to go virtual,” explains Jen. “We developed an innovative model comprising the circulation of themed sample boxes followed by a live demo – a virtual ‘meet the buyer’.” The team delivered its 10th virtual event in February 2022. Over 80 local food and drink suppliers have now presented their products to approximately 200 targeted ROI & GB retail buyers, resulting in sales in both markets. Given the success of these virtual events, Invest NI plans to maintain its online activities alongside live events. “Busy buyers can find it hard to clear their diaries for one or two days to come and visit us in person, but an hour of online chat on a Friday afternoon is much easier to achieve – especially if it comes with a box of delicious samples to enjoy over the weekend!” Jen smiles. “Getting products directly into home kitchens has encouraged our audience to enjoy NI’s finest products at their leisure and really get a feel for their quality and versatility.” Food and drink from Northern Ireland are characterised by a unique blend of tradition and innovation, as Jen explains, “Invest NI’s ‘Pure Natural Quality’ strapline summarises the goodness of Northern Ireland’s produce, which emanates from our rich pastures and sustainably managed farms. The highest quality ingredients deliver the finest natural products, often created using traditional production techniques, un-changed for generations.” Mark Wright from award-winning Ballylisk of Armagh attending the Balmoral Show Food Pavilion.

Driving export growth Invest NI is proud to support the growing food and drink industry and is focused on driving growth in export sales over the next five years. Innovation is central to boosting competitiveness and fuelling growth. Invest NI aims to drive innovation through building research and development skills, actively encouraging and supporting innovation across all levels of NI’s business base and directly supporting investment in the development of worldclass processes, products and services. Their goal for the future is to hone environmentally conscious, innovation-fuelled businesses with the capability and appetite to trade in international markets. “Looking forward, we will continue to work with existing, and new customers,” concludes Jen, “helping them to grow and expand by supporting them to innovate, to identify export opportunities, to increase their knowledge of consumer behaviour and to invest in the skills of their people.” For more information, visit www.buynifood.com or contact Jen by email: jen.guiney@investni.com. Dromore-based bakery Grahams signed a new all-island supply deal with supermarket chain Lidl in June 2022, which will see its baked goods stocked in 215 Lidl stores across the island.

The ‘Better Naked’ brand team from Finnebrogue Artisan attending the Balmoral Show Food Pavilion. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 29


bord bia’s origin green

Bord Bia’s Origin Green marks 10 years of progress with the announcement of a new programme, Accelerating Leadership of Sustainability.

A decade of progress

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decade on from its inception, Bord Bia’s Origin Green Programme remains the world’s only national food and drink sustainability programme and has been part of a wider coalition of the willing across the Irish State actively working to drive positive and lasting change. A pioneering sustainability programme, covering the entire supply chain from farm to fork, Origin Green enables the industry to set and achieve measurable sustainability targets that respect the environment and serve local communities more effectively. Since 2012, Origin Green has established an infrastructure for farmers and producers committed to positive change and sustainable food production across Ireland. Recent challenges, such as the Covid-19 pandemic, international trade tensions, and the ever-growing impact of climate change, have reiterated the crucial role that Bord Bia and the Origin Green Programme must continue to play in maintaining and growing Ireland’s global reputation for food, drink and horticulture that is sustainably produced by people who care. Currently Origin Green collaborates with approximately 55,000 farms and over 300 leading Irish food and drink companies to prove and improve the sustainability of the food they produce to meet the evolving needs of customers and consumers globally. Since its launch, Origin Green has supported a decade of progress in the Irish food and drink industry’s journey to a more sustainable future.

Improvements across the supply chain By providing a national framework for farmers and processors to embed sustainability into their ways of working, Origin Green has brought 30 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

something entirely new to the food industry landscape, here and elsewhere. Since its launch, the programme has recorded significant improvements among farmer members. Since 2019, farmer members achieved a 6.3% average reduction in CO2 per unit of beef from Sustainable Beef and Lamb Assurance Scheme (SBLAS) members and a 6% average reduction in CO2 per unit of milk from Sustainable Dairy Assurance Scheme (SDAS) members. In particular, 400 SDAS members have decreased their carbon footprint over three consecutive cycles of audits and reduced their average footprint by 18%, demonstrating a phenomenal performance. The scale and scope of the Origin Green programme continues to produce important results, with 290,000 carbon footprints calculated to-date and over 32,000 farm audits carried out remotely due to Covid-19. Origin Green members have achieved significant milestones across the supply chain, and account for 90% of our food and drink exports. Manufacturing members have set a total of 2,779 sustainability targets and established 13,600 initiatives between the years 2012 and 2021, while the 10 retail and foodservice members have set a total of 165 sustainability targets.

Targeted supports In addition to supporting members in measuring and monitoring sustainability performance across the supply chain, Origin Green has engaged collaboratively with its members to provide guidance and resources to accelerate sustainability improvement.


bord bia’s origin green New services and significant changes are continually introduced to the Origin Green programme, with an aim of supporting members in driving further improvements to ultimately drive down emissions from the sector. Initiatives and innovations, such as the Origin Green Gold Membership launched in 2020, the Pathways to Net Zero Guidance published in 2021, and this year’s bespoke Science Based Targets webinar series, have all been strategically developed and offered to members to support their sustainability progress.

Accelerating Leadership of Sustainability programme In June 2022, Origin Green announced its latest expert resources for members, a new Sustainability Executive Programme called Accelerating Leadership of Sustainability, in partnership with UCD’s Smurfit Business School, to develop senior sustainability leaders at Board and C-Suite level in Irish food, drink and horticulture businesses. The executive programme was unveiled at an event marking 10 years of progress under Origin Green and as Bord Bia reported that 80% of its client companies would like to receive more training for senior leadership teams to better understand and embed sustainability across their businesses. Designed and delivered in partnership with the Smurfit Business School, the new programme will focus on senior members of organisations’ leadership teams and will develop skills at board level and amongst senior management to allow businesses to leverage commercial growth, while also establishing sustainability as a key value proposition driver for their business. “Since its launch a decade ago in 2012, Origin Green has supported huge progress in the Irish food, drink and horticulture industry’s journey to a more sustainable future,” noted Deirdre Ryan, Director of Sustainability and Quality Assurance at Bord Bia, speaking at the event. “The Accelerating Leadership of Sustainability Programme, in partnership with UCD, is an important next step in the evolution of Origin Green, as we advance and embed the sustainability agenda across businesses by developing expertise and growing skills at Board and C-Suite level. Sustainability is now a key issue for the entire executive team and the Board of our clients. “The sustainability expectations and requirements of global consumers are accelerating, and as an industry, we must embed the knowledge and ambition for companies to meet these standards. A survey of our clients found that eight out of 10 firms wanted more training for senior leadership teams to understand sustainability, so Bord Bia is delighted to be able to offer this programme to business leaders to leverage commercial growth and establish sustainability as a key value proposition driver for their businesses.”

Deirdre Ryan, Director of Sustainability and Quality Assurance at Bord Bia.

Over the last 10 years, the Origin Green programme has demonstrated leadership in food sustainability, providing the food, drink and horticulture sector in Ireland with the knowledge and guidance to embed sustainability into their businesses, helping to bring a competitive advantage to the Irish food and drink industry and forging a reputation for innovative leadership internationally. While the global challenges ahead are significant, Bord Bia and Origin Green provide a strong base from which to position Ireland as a global leader in sustainable food systems now and into the future.

Charlie McConalogue TD, Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine, pictured at the launch of the Accelerating Leadership of Sustainability programme at an event to mark 10 years of Bord Bia’s Origin Green.

Powered by partnership At the event, Origin Green also unveiled its new three-year strategy, Powered By Partnership, which is a commitment to strengthen and empower the Origin Green programme over the period 2022-2025 by developing and building on new and existing relationships with other state agencies, including Teagasc, the National Biodiversity Data Centre, the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI), Repak, leading academic institutions, and international stakeholders, platforms and customers. Strengthened by those relationships and reflecting the new dynamics in sustainability, Origin Green will support an acceleration in progress through a structured programme that places greater emphasis on science-based targets, nature-based solutions and the integration of circular approaches.

Pictured are (l-r): Dan MacSweeney, Chair, Bord Bia; Professor Anthony Brabazon, Smurfit Business School, UCD; Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Charlie McConalogue TD; Deirdre Ryan, Director of Sustainability and Quality Assurance, Bord Bia; and Michael Murphy, Interim CEO, Bord Bia. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 31


teagasc

Teagasc:

science-based support for agri-food

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Teagasc’s Food Research Programme supports the development of Ireland’s agri-food industry through science-based innovation.

he Teagasc Food Programme drives and supports all elements of the agrifood industry, through science based innovation that aids and directs the future development and sustainability of this sector. The Food Programme operates across five departments, each uniquely populated with innovative scientists, exceptional infrastructure and an ambition to deliver. Those five departments are: Food Biosciences; Food Chemistry & Technology; Food Safety; Food Quality & Sensory Science; Food Industry Development. All departments work closely with each other and with the Teagasc Technology Transfer Office to implement the Teagasc Food Technology and Knowledge Transfer Strategy. The Teagasc Food Research Programme encompasses many aspects of food science and technology, including: Food Structure and Functionality; Food Safety and Quality; Food for Health; Food Fermentation; Microbiome Research; Meat and Meat Products; Dairy Foods and Ingredients; Sensory Science; Plantbased Food and Ingredients; Marine-based Foods and Ingredients; Prepared Consumer Foods; Food Industry Supports. In total, there are almost 300 staff involved in the Teagasc Food Research Programme, comprising permanent scientists, permanent technical staff, contract scientists and post graduate students.

Food bioscience The core objective in the Teagasc Food 32 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

Biosciences Department is to engage in advanced research and technology development in support of the Irish agri-food sector. Activities fall into three research areas: Fermented Foods, Food for Health and Milk and Product Quality.

with staff and facilities located at both Ashtown in Dublin and Moorepark in Fermoy, County Cork.

Food industry development

Teagasc aims to help food processors maintain competitive advantage and secure premium markets. Dairy research focuses on cheese, infant formula and dairy based ingredients. Meat research focuses on quality, whole chain management and recovering value from meat processing streams. Cereal research focuses on product quality and innovation in the bakery industry.

The Teagasc food industry development department provides advice, consultancy and specialist technical services. These services include new product development and reformulation, scale-up processing, product testing and sensory analysis. Teagasc delivers in-company and public training programmes to address specific industry needs and skills gaps and works with food companies, providing consultancy services to ensure the highest standards of food safety and quality are achieved.

Food safety

Prepared Consumer Food Centre

The Teagasc food safety research programme aims to provide the science to underpin a total chain risk-based approach to food safety, focusing on microbial and chemical contaminants in the ‘farm to fork’ food chain. The safety and the integrity of food is fundamental to the sustainability and continued development of the Irish agri-food sector and a ‘risk-based total chain approach’ to food safety management is essential to reduce level of food borne illness.

The National Prepared Consumer Food Centre (PCFC) is a state-of-the-art food research and development centre located at Teagasc Ashtown in Dublin. The centre helps food businesses to develop new products and overcome obstacles on their product development journey.

Food chemistry & technology

Food quality and sensory science Research on Food Quality and Sensory Science focuses on meat science, cereal/bakery science, sensory science and flavour chemistry,

Research infrastructure Research at Teagasc spans the entire agri-food chain, from farm production through to food processing, quite literally from farm to fork. The Teagasc Food Research Programme is supported by an elaborate infrastructure, with on-going investment in buildings, facilities and equipment.


Food Research

The leading provider of Research & Technology for Irelands Food Industry Ashtown Centre (Dublin 15)

Expertise Support in:

Prepared Consumer Foods Meat Processing and Cereals Technologies Food Bioactives and Nutraceuticals Food Training and Consultancy Innovation and NPD Management Sensory Training and Panels

Moorepark Centre (Cork) & MTL Innovation Solutions in:

Food Microstructure Emulsions, Gels and Foams Drying Technologies & Powder Analysis Pilot Scale Processing Bioprocess Innovation and Microbial Systems DNA Sequencing Flavour Chemistry and Sensory Science Digestion Models For more information contact: Professor Mark Fenelon Email: mark.fenelon@teagasc.ie | Tel: +353 (0)25 42355 Web: www.teagasc.ie Corporate Food Research 210x297.indd 1

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mid cork pallets & packaging

Continued growth fuelled by independence Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging are amongst the country’s foremost suppliers of pallets, packaging and storage solutions.

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id Cork Pallets and Packaging (MCP) have been in business for 44 years, where the company has built up an enviable reputation for their pallets, packaging and storage solutions, as well as their dedicated staff, world class facilities and sustainability practices. Company founder, Johnny Lehane, and Managing Director, Aidan Harty, explain what makes a company like MCP so special and successful. In 1978, manufacturing industries were growing fast in Ireland and the demand for pallets and packaging was soaring. It was here when the entrepreneurial spirit of Johnny Lehane shone through, establishing MCP on the outskirts of a small village

in rural Cork to repair used pallets. The company was formed with a clear vision of offering a dependable, efficient and reliable service to match the pace of growth in Irish industry. Fast forward 44 years and a lot has changed but their business ideals have remained the same: “We provide a quality, reliable product at competitive prices, exactly when and where our customers need it,” explains Johnny Lehane. One thing that strikes any visitor to the MCP facility is its sheer size. It is almost like an optical illusion, as what you can see from the road is only a small fraction of what is behind the fence, with the facility taking up more than 40 acres, more than three times

MCP’s Combined Heat and Power Plant which generates 1.2 megawatts of green electricity per hour and powers the needs of over 1,100 houses.

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the size of Croke Park. “The staff who work here are so proud of the facility and every product that they produce,” Aidan Harty notes. “We are a big employer in the locality, both directly and indirectly. Some of the staff have grown up with the company and are second, if not third, generational staff or have been here since our inception, and still have many years left in them!”

Devastating fire For any company to survive more than four decades, there will be ups and downs, and MCP suffered their hardest blow in late 2011, on a Sunday just before Christmas, when the company suffered a devastating fire, which destroyed over half of their factory and stocks, both pallets & packaging. “Fortunately, our main pallet manufacturing machine was saved, thanks in no small part to the fire-fighters and our staff trying to contain and break the fire,” Johnny reveals. “As a result, we were back up and running and manufacturing on the Tuesday morning again and haven’t looked back since.” Today, MCP are recognised as one of Ireland’s leading independent


mid cork pallets & packaging MCP’s company’s packaging section supplies, stores and distributes in excess of 6,000 custom designed corrugated/cardboard packaging units each year.

manufacturers of pallets, distributors of packaging and suppliers of storage solutions. “We feel that our hard work, determination and independence have driven our continued growth, not only in these uncertain times but throughout the years”, explains Aidan. The company has two sites in Clondrohid, Co. Cork, and Dunboyne, Co. Meath and is strategically located to provide fast and efficient delivery of their customers’ pallet and packaging products throughout Ireland, both north and south. The facilities at both MCP’s sites in Cork and Meath are the largest and most high-tech in the industry, with 10 onsite kilns, eight purpose built storage and distribution warehouses, six articulated lorries, four warehouses installed with solar generation capabilities to power each site, two automated manufacturing machines, and one combined heat and power plant.

A leader in the industry MCP manufacture more than 2.5 million pallets per annum, including ISPM15 Heat Treated Wooden Pallets, Euro pallets, custom crates etc. MCP are further expanding their pallet and crate manufacturing capabilities with the commissioning of their third pallet manufacturing machine in 2023. “This will ensure greater quality and accuracy of each wooden pallet or crate and catapult MCP even further as a leader in the industry,” remarks Johnny. Meanwhile, the company’s packaging section supplies, stores and distributes in excess of 6,000 custom designed corrugated/cardboard packaging units across the food & beverage, e-commerce, pharmaceutical and manufacturing industries every year. MCP specialise in the supply of highquality customised packaging solutions and offer a complete service to customers, from hands-on design, prototyping and expert

advice, to create exciting and original packaging solutions, from single wall corrugated cardboard boxes, to specialised solid board and folding box board. “That’s not all,” stresses Aidan. “We also handle the manufacturing process, extensive warehousing and storage facilities, coupled with nationwide distribution from our sites in both Cork and Meath, backed by our integrated stock management service.” MCP are further expanding their operations at both their sites, building two new state-of-the-art warehouses in both Cork and Meath with an additional capacity for 20,000 pallet spaces. Both these warehouses will allow MCP to store and/or distribute more of their customers’ products. “MCP continue to invest heavily in our systems, our processes and our facilities,” Aidan explains. “For our customers’ reassurance and confidence in our products, we are ISO 9001:2015 accredited and heat treat pallets to ISPM 15 standards. We are also BRCGS certified to an AA standard for storage and distribution.”

Strong on sustainability MCP’s passion doesn’t stop there and also extends across their sustainability efforts

on-site. In recent years, the company has invested over €20 million in various sustainability projects. They were one of the first companies in Ireland to build a Combined Heat and Power Plant which generates 1.2 megawatts of green electricity per hour and powers the needs of over 1,100 houses. They have also installed LED responsive lighting at both sites, while another energy-generating initiative saw MCP installing solar panels on unused rooftop space at both their Clondrohid and Dunboyne sites. This involved the installing of a 598KWp solar generation facility on nearly 4,000 square metres of rooftop in Clondrohid and another 100KWp solar installation in Dunboyne, which equates to over 2500 solar panels and helped reduce MCP’s CO2 emissions by 265 tonnes a year. “Preserving the environment’s future is something that dominates MCP’s business practices,” Aidan stresses, “and allows us to reduce our carbon footprint, one pallet or package at a time!” “We may be in business for 44 years, but we feel that we are only getting started,” concludes Johnny.

MCP specialise in the supply of high-quality customised packaging solutions, from single wall corrugated cardboard boxes, to specialised solid board and folding box board. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 35


food safety: FSAI

Task Force to examine food reformulation The Food Reformulation Task Force, a partnership between Healthy Ireland and the Food Safety Authority of Ireland, are working to create an awareness of the necessity for a major rethink on product composition for Ireland.

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ood retailers, manufacturers and food service providers shape Ireland’s food supply through voluntary actions and commitments regarding product development and reformulation. Some parts of the retail and manufacturing industries have been innovating and reducing nutrients such as salt, saturated fat and sugar in anticipation of tighter EU food regulation on labelling. New mandatory front-of-pack nutrition labelling is being proposed and the use of nutrition and health claims in advertising and marketing will not be permitted on foods high in salt, saturated fat or sugar once the regulations are introduced. These nutrients have been targeted for reduction because high intakes are causing serious negative impacts on public health: obesity, diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke. For this reason, it is now important that all parts of the food industry begin working on the reformulation agenda. The Food Reformulation Task Force, a partnership between Healthy Ireland and the Food Safety Authority of Ireland, are working to create an awareness of the necessity for a major rethink on product composition for Ireland. The Task Force will oversee and

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monitor the reduction of selected nutrients and energy (saturated fat, salt and sugar) in key food categories. Changes to product formulations of commonly consumed processed food will lead to healthier food environments for everyone. The Roadmap the Task Force is working to was published by the Department of Health in December 2021.

Mapping the priority food categories One of the first actions for the Task Force was to map the scientific evidence on consumer dietary intakes to food categories which contribute the most to salt, saturated fat and sugar in the population in Ireland; as such, to establish a ‘priority food categories’ list. Although a lot of work has been undertaken in parts of the EU and in the UK on food reformulation, food categories have different sub-components, and there are different descriptions used throughout Europe. Each country has its own food heritage and food descriptions, while food category definitions vary. An important first step for the Task Force was to verify which food groups will impact Irish population’s intakes of saturated fat, salt


food safety: FSAI Reformulation

and sugar. When reformulation of these priority food categories has been completed to the set targets, this will make a huge difference to the food supply. The Task Force has published the priority food categories which must reduce saturated fat, salt and sugar. The range in the nutritional characteristics of prepacked food consumed in Ireland is also summarised in a further report and this helps demonstrate the scope there is for product composition to change.

Strong appetite for change Consumers are interested in healthier foods and there is an appetite for change. Furthermore, obesity statistics for adults and children in Ireland demonstrate a compelling need for food with lower levels of saturated fat, salt and sugar. In a question posted on LinkedIn by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland on May 30, 2022, asking ‘Is there a need to reduce salt, saturated fat and sugar in the Irish diet?’, 92% of respondents said yes. And a report commissioned

by safefood in 2020 on attitudes of the public towards policies to address obesity found a high level of support for the improvement of the nutritional content of food. 89% of consumers in Ireland support the idea of Government working with industry to improve the nutritional content of processed packaged foods. With almost two thirds of Irish adults living with overweight or obesity (16% of children and 24% of teenagers), and the risk this poses to the development of diabetes and coronary heart disease, it is imperative that we succeed in making food healthier. The Task Force will facilitate workshops to support collaboration so that food retailers, manufacturers and the food service industry can share information on how to make incremental changes to improve and ensure everyone can participate in reformulation. Food businesses that are starting on their reformulation journey can use the resources on getting started on https://www.fsai.ie/ food_businesses/reformulation.html or email the Task Force for advice and support at foodreformualtion@fsai.ie.

Consumers are interested in healthier foods and there is an appetite for change. Furthermore, obesity statistics for adults and children in Ireland demonstrate a compelling need for food with lower levels of saturated fat, salt and sugar.

FOOD FOODIRELAND IRELANDYEARBOOK YEARBOOK2021/22 2022/23| |37 37


food safety: safefood

Free e-learning food safety course for food businesses A new e-learning programme on food safety for SMEs, ‘safefood for business’ is practical and, most importantly, free.

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afefood have launched ‘safefood for business,’ a new free e-learning programme on the fundamentals of food safety for small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) operating in the food production sector. This includes SMEs working in food production, food processing, retail, catering, and food services. Industry workshops previously hosted by safefood revealed that many staff working in small food businesses don’t have a high level of food safety knowledge. These businesses acknowledge that they struggle to prioritise food safety due to competitive pressures. With many food businesses now hiring new staff to deal with post-pandemic increases in demand, ‘safefood for business’ is ideally placed to help train these staff as part of their induction process and get them started in the basics of food safety.

Building a food safety culture “Building a culture of good food safety benefits both the public and those food businesses that supply them,” noted Dr Gary Kearney, Interim CEO, safefood, introducing the new eLearning tool. “There are approximately 50,000 business producing food across the island of Ireland and around 80% of these are small food producers. Having met many small food business owners through our Knowledge Network, we understand the pressures they face and how they have a lot on their plate, including food safety training. Our aim is to provide business owners with a free and practical food safety training tool that fits their needs.” Dr Linda Gordon, Chief Specialist in Microbiology with safefood, added, “We designed safefood for business’ to be practical for small food businesses so it uses short training modules with real-life scenarios. Because managers and small-business owners can track staff progress while training, it is ideal both for new staff as part of their induction process, as well as re-training staff returning to the industry.”

Dr Gary Kearney, Interim CEO, safefood.

Covering key topics ‘safefood for business’ covers eight key areas and has been designed in an easy-to-understand, multimedia format to engage the participants with interactive, online modules. Based on safefood collective experience and the latest research available, the topics include: • The importance of food safety; • Food microbiology; • Temperature control; • Personal hygiene; • Cleaning essentials; • Allergens in food; • Pest control; • HACCP. To sign up for ‘safefoodfor business,’ simply visit safefoodforbusiness.com. 38 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

safefood for business’ uses short training modules with real-life scenarios to make food safety training practical for small food businesses.



GS1 Ireland

Making a business case for digitising records The move to digitising paper records delivers added efficiency benefits, writes Maria Svejdar, Head of Marketing, Communications and CX, GS1 Ireland.

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s Irish food and beverage producers move to digitise their paper-based processes and records, in particular for areas such as HACCP management or product recall, additional benefits accrue within the organisation in terms of time and cost savings. Upgrading legacy systems and shifting ‘from paper to glass’ has a renewed focus for many businesses as the recovery continues from the Covid lockdowns experienced throughout 2020 and 2021.

Case study: Glenaine Foods With advances in systems and technology, it is easier today to adopt automatic data capture systems and to share information on a much more granular level than ever before. Newer systems offer speed, agility and efficiency in accessing digitally-stored information for recall and traceability purposes, meaning information can be found in seconds or minutes, rather than the hours or days required to sort through filed paper records; time which can be critical in the event of a recall or audit. GS1 Ireland have recently worked with member company Glenaine Foods to help modernise their systems. “Following the recent upgrade and digitising of our production, traceability and recall system, we are now in a position to view and report on every box of product that we have shipped to our customers,” explains Ray Connolly, Commercial Manager, Glenaine Foods, Limerick. “The level of detail and real-time access to that data means we can even print batch and expiry information on the delivery docket for our customers. Our production performance reports, audit records and 40 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

product recall data can be retrieved at the touch of a button. “We’ve adopted GS1 standards right throughout our data management and logistics processes,” Ray continues. “We’re also ready for the next wave of digital product data sharing with our implementation of the GS1 Data Matrix barcode on all our shipping units. The advice and support from the traceability team in GS1 Ireland have been invaluable in ensuring that we now benefit from having state-of-the-art, seamless and intuitive processes which are far more efficient than the old paper-based processes.”

Increasing importance of sustainability and traceability While traceability and sustainability may have taken a step back from consumers’ minds during the Covid-19 pandemic, the latest data from the Irish Grocery Shopper Insights Research, conducted by Shopper Intelligence, shows a marked increase in the importance of delivering on both traceability and sustainability criteria. In the 2022 data, the indicators for ‘environment’ and ‘sustainability’ are up +2% on two years ago and the importance of traceability is up +4% vs 2020 (Interviews conducted with almost 30,000 shoppers between November 2021 and March 2022). Understandably, sustainability and traceability are core to the Chilled and Fresh Foods categories, moreso than categories such as non-edible grocery, general merchandise and toiletries. In terms of the ways in which consumers relate to sustainability,


GS1 Ireland

GS1 barcodes, which are based on open, global standards, can be used and read by all parties across the supply chain.

recyclable packaging, less packaging, the manufacturing process, and reducing food waste rank as the most important areas for producers/ brands to consider and deliver on. The Shopper Intelligence data also demonstrates the increasing importance of traceability to the Irish grocery shopper, with an increasingly upward trend in the percentage of shoppers that rate traceability as important, and furthermore the commercial value of that shopper to the sector. Fresh and frozen meat, poultry and seafood, plus eggs, milk and baby food/milk, continue to dominate the top 10 categories where traceability is deemed as most important to shoppers.

The business case for traceability Research supports the business case for traceability, which delivers high value, loyal consumers. When looking at the cohort of shoppers that deem traceability as important, the data revealed that those shoppers are also key for traffic driving, spend and in-store engagement metrics. The retailers and brands that satisfy these shoppers are winning the battle to attract a more loyal shopper, with a larger basket. Consumer demand for data and transparency is a primary driver for traceability, which is about accurately and efficiently recording the identity of ingredients and products as they flow into, through and back out of your business. “Traceability is a complex metric and business driver to navigate,” explains Denis O’Brien, Director of Standards and Solutions, GS1 Ireland. “It comprises, on the one hand, a detailed amount of internal inventory and production data, and on the other, sharing and communicating that data in a way that is meaningful to consumers. That’s the real data challenge for most organisations that we deal with on a day-to-day basis.”

DataMatrix offers all stakeholders across the supply chain, a unique opportunity to encode and share product and asset information quickly, accurately and efficiently “Consumers want to know everything about a product they buy or a service they experience: where it comes from, if it is good for their health, if it is safe for the environment,” reveals Mike Byrne, CEO, GS1 Ireland. “To strengthen the trust of consumers, we must offer increased transparency by providing more and more trusted, accurate information. Thanks to the combination of GS1 standard barcodes and data services such as ‘Verified by GS1’, retailers, manufacturers and e-retailers can provide the right data to enable the transparency demanded by consumers.” For help on identifying the opportunities for your business and the steps to get started, contact one of our industry experts today. Email ask@gs1ie.org or visit our online resource centre at www.gs1ie.org/datamatrix.

GS1 solutions for traceability GS1 standards can help organisations to build efficient processes to identify, track and manage their ingredients, raw materials and finished goods. Barcode scanning boosts data input accuracy and automation, while reducing manual effort and error rates. In addition to the traditional linear EAN barcodes commonly found on retail products, there are a number of other barcode symbol types that can help with sharing information across the supply chain. These symbols include GS1 128 for outer cases and pallets and the (newer) Data Matrix barcodes that are approved for use in both logistics applications as well as at retail point-of-sale. GS1 barcodes, which are based on open, global standards, can be used and read by all parties across the supply chain. This overcomes the issues and costs created by internal, company-specific or proprietary numbering systems and barcode symbols.

Barcodes for traceability The compact size of the GS1 DataMatrix symbol, combined with its greater data capacity, supports both commercial teams and consumers with their demands for extended product information, such as food provenance, allergens, organic and other certification criteria, best before and expiry dates or product recall notices. GS1

The Global Trade Item Number (GTIN) encoded in a barcode symbol operates as a type of unique licence plate for a product, enabling it to pass through the supply chain, through the checkout of a store or online marketplace, and into the end-consumer’s hands.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 41


About Us A Family run business established in 1997, QPM LTD has developed a reputation for providing high performance systems, comprehensive support and specialist advice to the food and pharmaceutical manufacturing industry in Ireland.

CHECK & DETECT CHECK &fürDETECT Inspektionsgeräte die Lebensmittel-, CHECK & DETECT

Inspektionsgeräte fürequipment die Pharmaund Verpackungsindustrie Inspection the Food, Inspektionsgeräte fürLebensmittel-, die for Lebensmittel-, Pharmaund Verpackungsindustrie Pharmaceutical & Packaging industry. Pharmaund Verpackungsindustrie

Metalldetektion Röntgeninspektion Metalldetektion Röntgeninspektion CHECK & DETECT Metalldetektion Metal Detection XrayRöntgeninspektion Inspection nspektionsgeräte für die Lebensmittel-, Pharma- und Verpackungsindustrie

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Combo-Systeme Combo Systems Combo-Systeme Combo-Systeme

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Unit 12, Robinhood Business Park, Road, Dublin43 22.7240 Tel: +353 (0) de.sales@loma.com 1 450 2421 Web: www.qpm.ie sales@qpm.ie Germany | Robinhood  +49 (0) 2064 Unit 22,|Scarva Road Industrial Estate,| Banbridge, BT32 3QD Metalldetektion Röntgeninspektion Kontrollwaagen | Service

Germany |  +49 (0) www.loma.com 2064 43 7240  de.sales@loma.com Germany |  +49 (0) 2064|43Kontrollwaagen 7240  de.sales@loma.com Metalldetektion | Röntgeninspektion | Service Metalldetektion | Röntgeninspektion | Kontrollwaagen | Service


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METAL DETECTORS • CHECKWEIGHERS X-RAY INSPECTION SYSTEMS • SCALES & WEIGHTS TEMPERATURE MEASURING EQUIPMENT DATA LOGGERS • pH METERS • GAS ANALYSIS MAGNETIC SEPARATORS • FREEZERS / OVENS

All calibrations are traceable to the National Standard  All manufacturers and models covered  Onsite / In house Calibrations  Our experienced engineers and technicians can calibrate and test your systems as part of regular quality assurance and risk management audits Email: service@qpm.ie Phone: 01 4502421

Accurately measure chilled and frozen food temperatures with no waste. The Celsius instrument measures the mean temperature of chilled and frozen food without damaging the packaging or the product allowing you to sell your tested items instead of throwing them away.

Save product, save money, save the environment!

QPM LTD have been appointed as the distributors in Ireland for Sovereign Labelling Machines Sovereign Labelling Machines are a UK manufacturer and with over 25 years of experience are well established in the forefront of labelling and sleeving technology.

Protect Your Process - Magnetic Separation A comprehensive range of high performance products to protect processes from metal contamination includes options for gravity, pneumatic or conveyor feed.

Unit 12, Robinhood Business Park, Robinhood Road, Dublin 22. Tel: +353 (0) 1 450 2421 Web: www.qpm.ie sales@qpm.ie Unit 22, Scarva Road Industrial Estate, Banbridge, BT32 3QD


food ingredients

Formulating for healthy nutrition

Univar Solutions are helping to discover wellness in the new era of the health-conscious consumer with their Foodology by Univar Solutions business, writes Alan O’Donnell, Technical Manager for Food Ingredients, EMEA.

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ealthy nutrition is the new norm, as markets globally show rising demand for healthier foods. Formulating for the new generation of health-conscious consumers remains challenging, as taste, texture, flavour and appearance matter, alongside convenience and a nutritional profile. Fibre and protein enrichment, free-from, plant-based nutritional choices, sugar, salt and fat reduction, fresh-keeping for sustainable health, clean label and healthy indulgence are focus topics for formulators worldwide. Bakery, snacks, beverages, dairy and active nutrition are some of the key categories seeing consumers drive for healthy nutrition. Today’s healthconscious consumers are increasingly demanding that ingredients are ‘better for me, better for the planet’’. Casting a net across all of the food and beverage trend forecasts, it is clear that the next couple of years will see a combination of holistic health and self-care, underpinned by sustainability and delivered with the highest organoleptic properties of taste, flavour, texture, and appearance. This leads to evaluating product safety issues more now than in the past, such as acrylamide in baked goods and other quality and traceability matters. Delivering sustainable and nutrient-dense functional products, across the core categories of bakery, snacks, beverages and dairy is becoming a prerequisite for a successful product launch.

for the health-conscious consumer, to help prevent disease or to assist recovery. Consider the gut microbiota, and the significant role it is known to play in consumer well-being, energy balance and immunity. Offering consumers easy ways to boost fibre intake by inclusion in baked goods and snack products can be achieved with functional ingredients such as prebiotic dietary fibres. These soluble fibres can have additional benefits as effective sugar-replacers and fat-replacers.

Formulating for health-conscious consumers Formulating for this new generation of health-conscious consumers sounds and is challenging. We see an intensified focus on boosting and maintaining health. Immune health is now a fundamental requirement

Today’s consumers are constantly on the lookout for cleaner labels, less sugar, salt and fat, fibre and protein fortification, and meat-free and dairy-free choices with an enhanced sensorial experience.

44 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

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Create your winning recipe with Foodology by Univar Solutions Discover our ingredients and innovations. As a global leader in ingredient distribution, we offer complete ingredient solutions for your formulations. Foodology by Univar Solutions is your trusted partner, with food and beverage ingredient solutions for every eating occasion – whether you are looking for dairy, bakery, beverages, and beyond. Together, let’s shape the future of food.

Reach out to Foodology by Univar Solutions today. Email foodemea@univarsolutions.com univarsolutions.com/foodology

000014223 Univar Foodology NMCD A4 advert - Q3 2022 V2.indd 1

10/08/2022 07:34


food ingredients Self-care in all its guises, from supporting mental health to improving the way we look, has gained more importance for the mindful consumer and will continue to guide purchasing choices. Beverage applications are a leading choice for self-care, and the formulation of the sweet spot relies on having an ingredient partner that can identify the optimal combination of functional health ingredients, natural flavours, sweetening systems and texturisers.

Clean labels: clean conscience Clean labels are essential in providing the health-conscious consumer with information, and therefore confidence, in their chosen products. The concept of clean conscience is beginning to supersede clean labelling, as it goes beyond what is good for the body and reflects what is also good for the planet, the provenance of ingredients and their environmental sustainability. Today’s consumers are constantly on the lookout for cleaner labels, less sugar, salt and fat, fibre and protein fortification, and meat-free and dairy-free choices with an enhanced sensorial experience. Natural ingredients, added nutrients and plant-based solutions top the list of healthy products. Plant-based nutrition, for instance, is seen as one of the pillars of health and wellness from the self-case as well as the environmental and sustainability perspective. Health crises, climate change and the ability of food production systems to keep pace with a population projected to reach 8.5 billion by 2030, bring the need for alternative proteins into focus, rapidly elevating the ‘better for me, better for the planet’ theme across continents. Plant-based food innovations could help the food industry bring together business communities, science and technology to create

sustainable growth, enable consumer choice for better nutrition and have a positive impact on fighting climate change. Foodology by Univar Solutions has these innovative technologies and ingredients to assist the challenges of developing high-quality and clean label plantbased alternative products.

Provenance matters The source of the ingredients used to create products matters. Consumers are educating themselves more often on product safety, quality and traceability. European markets are adopting the Nutri-Score front-of-pack label, while in the UK, promotions on food and drinks high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS) in medium to large retailers may soon be restricted (subject to pending legislation). Delivering sustainable, nutrient-dense and functional products is becoming a prerequisite for successful product launches and brand longevity. Clean labels are essential in providing the health-conscious consumer with information and therefore confidence in their chosen products as front-of-pack labelling is well established throughout Europe. In our Discover Wellness concept focused on formulating for healthy nutrition, Foodology by Univar Solutions has selected key ingredients, technologies and formulations for bakery, snacks, dairy, beverages and active nutrition, such as starches, enzymes, natural sweeteners, taste modulators, natural colours and flavours, texturising systems, proteins and protein concentrates and prebiotic dietary fibre. Foodology by Univar Solutions hopes to help formulators, purchasers, marketers and brand owners alike to advance innovation for stronger consumer choice. For more information, visit: UnivarSolutions.com/Foodology.

Foodology by Univar Solutions hopes to help formulators, purchasers, marketers and brand owners alike to advance innovation for stronger consumer choice.

❝ Healthy Nutrition is a topic close to our hearts at Foodology by Univar Solutions,

as we focus on bringing new ingredients and solutions to the formulating tables worldwide. Formulators and brands have an opportunity to provide the healthiest ingredients formulated to fit a clean profile, keeping health, nutrition and wellness at the core of our food experiences. Our role as scientists and formulators is shifting to bring more transparency to the process so that consumers can trust the journey of taking food ingredients and innovations from the lab to their table.

46 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23


Although most plastic packaging is no longer landfilled we currently only recycle 31%. We need your help to meet future EU plastic recycling targets of 50% by 2025 and 55% by 2030. As an Irish business you are obligated to segregate the waste you generate at your premises for recycling. Waste contractors must provide you with the necessary bin collection systems to maximise the segregation and recycling of your waste. Repak will provide you with the support and advice to help ensure you are recycling correctly and help to reduce your waste management costs. Please contact our Membership Team and help Ireland remain one of Europe’s top recycling countries.


repak

Plastic packaging recycling and your business Séamus Clancy, CEO, Repak, explains what new EU packaging recycling targets mean for Irish businesses, particularly when it comes to plastic packaging recycling, and advises on how to get the most from your waste contract.

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n 2018, the European Union updated a number of directives covering waste, as part of its overall Circular Economy Package. As a result of these changes, the EU Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive (94/62/EC) was amended, with higher targets for packaging reuse and recycling to help increase recycling rates for all packaging placed on the market across Europe. In 2020, the Irish Government published an amendment to SI 282/2014 - European Union (Packaging) Regulations 2014. This amendment (S.I. No. 322/2020) increased recycling targets for packaging in line with the new European legislation.

As a result, Ireland’s recycling targets for 2025 and 2030 have increased for packaging overall, as well as for each of the individual packaging materials placed on the Irish market.

A challenge for Ireland At present, Ireland meets all of the previous EU targets set in the Packaging & Packaging Waste Directive. In fact, we already exceed 2025 targets for Wood (69%) and Paper & Cardboard (84%). In the case of glass recycling, we already exceed our 2030 targets with a current recycling rate of 86% (Source: Waste Packaging Statistics for Ireland - https://www.epa.ie/our-services/

Material Previous Target 2025 Target 2030 Target All Packaging 55% 65% 70% Plastic 22.5% 50% 55% Wood – including repair 15% 25% 30% and reuse Metal 50% - - Ferrous Metals - 70% 80% (e.g. Steel) - Aluminium Metals - 50% 60% Glass 60% 70% 75% Paper & Board 60% 75% 85% 48 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

monitoring--assessment/waste/nationalwaste-statistics/packaging/). However, the new plastic packaging recycling targets will be more challenging for Ireland to meet and present an opportunity for Ireland to change the way in which we manage these often complex materials, which currently have a recycling rate of 31% (Source: Repak estimates for 2021). To achieve the new EU targets of 50% by 2025 and 55% by 2030 will require a dramatic change by all stakeholders in order to capture more of this material. This will require behavioural change amongst consumers, changes to how the materials are handled by businesses and treated by the waste industry, as well as investments in local plastic recycling infrastructure here in Ireland.

The business opportunity As a packaging compliance scheme, Repak funds the recycling of packaging waste in order to help Ireland meet its packaging recycling targets. In 2020, Repak saw a 3.5% decline in the tonnes of backdoor plastic packaging waste it funded versus 2019. This is most often due to poor waste segregation practices on site as a result of: - Recyclable plastic packaging being discarded in business general waste bins.


repak - Material being too contaminated when placed in a recycling bin, making it unsuitable for recycling. - Waste collection infrastructure or services that do not meet the current needs of the businesses. Although this decline is a concern, it must also present a significant opportunity to increase plastic packaging recycling rates, given that almost 50% of all packaging waste generated in Ireland arises at commercial premises.

What can you do? Your legal obligations First of all, it is important to note that there are legal obligations on Irish businesses when it comes to the segregation of packaging waste. Regulation 5 of the European Union (Packaging) Regulations 2014 as amended states that: - Producers should ensure that packaging waste is separated at source, by material type. - Packaging waste should be collected by a contractor for the purposes of recycling. It is important, therefore, that your business is segregating all recyclable packaging. Plastic packaging materials such as plastic pallet wrap, shrink hoods, case wrap and pallet sheets should be separated from other types of waste. If in doubt about what your waste contractor will accept in the recycling bin or in bales, ask them for their assistance. It is also essential that these recyclable materials are kept as clean and dry as possible, so that they are suitable for recycling at the point of collection.

What you should expect from your waste contractor Waste contractors have a significant role to play in helping you to maximise recycling

Ireland’s recycling targets for 2025 and 2030 have increased for packaging overall, as well as for each of the individual packaging materials placed on the Irish market.

at your premises. It is, therefore, critical to ensure that they are providing the following offering: 1. At least a three bin service for recycling (General Waste, Organic Waste and Mixed Dry Recycling). 2. Support in order to source segregate by material where possible, such as through baling of plastic film, bottles and the separation of other recyclable items such as drums or barrels. These items are usually manufactured from highly recyclable plastics such as Polyethylene (LDPE or HDPE), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) or Polypropylene (PP). 3. A breakdown of what the waste contractor is doing with your waste, showing:

what materials are being recycled, - what materials are being recovered or disposed, - food waste collected, - the associated cost of all of the above. This can usually be provided on a monthly basis and can help you track trends over the year to see how well you are managing and any further improvements that might be needed. The more material that is being recycled, the lower the cost. In fact, it is important to note that source segregated material that has been baled is often collected free of charge.

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Waste contractors have a significant role to play in helping you to maximise recycling at your premises.

What to do if there are any shortfalls in the current arrangements If you are having challenges achieving good segregation on site due to the bins or balers you currently have, it is important to engage with your waste contractor, who can advise on how you improve this and implement the changes within an agreed timeframe. It is also important to note that improvements in recycling rates will not only help the environment but can reduce costs for your business. Evaluate and review your waste services on a regular basis. A list of waste contractors (Repak-approved recovery operators) is available on our website at www.repak.ie. If you need any additional support, you can also contact our packaging services team here at Repak at preventandsave@repak.ie or call us on (01) 4670190. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 49


robotics

KUKA: pushing the boundaries of automation

W

ith food-compatible lubricants in all axes, KUKA’s new Hygienic Oil (HO) robot portfolio is pushing the boundaries of automation in the food industry. Lubricants that are used in the food industry have very specific characteristics. The HO robot portfolio has been designed specifically with this in mind. All robot axes, in addition to the energy supply systems, are equipped with certified NSF H1 lubricants to avoid potential contamination, opening up new avenues for automation in food production.

A holistic approach Whether handling, packaging, palletising or stacking, the new HO robot portfolio impresses in every area of application where hygiene is of the essence. In developing such a diverse range of robots, KUKA are pursuing a holistic approach; not only are the robots themselves equipped with food-suitable lubricants, but the energy supply systems also adhere to NSF H1 cable grease. This means 50 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

Uncompromisingly safe: how KUKA’s new robot portfolio is conquering the food industry. that unintentional contact with food during production does not pose a risk to humans, eliminating the need for costly downtime or deep cleans that might arise if foreign substances, unsuited to use within the food manufacturing process, make their way into the food chain. Demands upon robots and automation within the food & beverage sector are often high in both primary and secondary areas. These demands are increasing as manufacturers turn to automation to satisfy challenges such as depleting skilled labour pools, health and safety protocol and supply versus demand. Increasingly, the applications that can be given to automation are extensive. As such, the HO robot range covers a payload portfolio from 6 to 240 kilograms and a reach portfolio from 900 to 3200mm for

use along the entire process chain. This includes all robot families, from KR AGILUS to KR QUANTEC PA, with protection ratings up to IP69, and all meet hygiene requirements in accordance with the Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC or DIN ISO 14159.

Hygienic handling “It’s all about uncompromised hygienic handling” says Brian Cooney, Managing Director, KUKA Ireland. “KUKA are the only supplier worldwide with this broad portfolio of hygienic robots. They address the industry’s stringent hygiene regulations, whilst satisfying applications from rapid pick and place tasks through to primary meat handling. Customers can achieve a new level of automation that meets with the demands of the food & beverage sector.” Additional variants with higher payloads and reaches are also in planning, to complement KUKA’s existing HO portfolio To find out more, please contact Brian and his team at KUKA Ireland. Tel: (042) 9395034. Email: sales.ie@kuka.com.


The KUKA Hygienic Oil (HO) portfolio: conquering the food industry.

Food-grade oil in all axes: The secondary sector of the food industry demands the highest of safety standards = zero contamination. Automated handling, packaging and palletising applications feature predominantly within the F&B industry, as manufacturers strive to satisfy challenges such as labour shortages, though in maintaining both high safety standards and delivering technical requirements of the robot hardware, food-safe lubricants feature as standard. KUKA’s Hygienic Oil (HO) portfolio

Yearbook ad F&B 2022.indd 1

meets the hygiene requirements of the Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC and DIN ISO 14159. When areas of application are as diverse as the HO portfolio itself, these robots are able to satisfy potential applications beyond packaged foods: for example, for processing chocolate and baked goods, safely and efficiently. For more information, contact KUKA Ireland: sales.ie@kuka.com or call 042 939 5034

09/08/2022 11:22:25


packaging

Packaging

Coming of Age

David Little, Chair of the Irish Packaging Society and MD of Leonard Little & Associates, addresses the challenges and opportunities facing the Irish packaging industry as it faces up to the sustainability agenda. 52 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23


packaging

H

as there ever been a busier, more stressful, complex time in packaging? Currently, the whole industry is facing challenges in every direction: leadtimes have extended, prices are rising (it seems like every few weeks), raw material shortages continue to bite, general inflation, supply chain delays and staff shortages, combined with pressures in retaining staff. There is also more pressure from retailers for increased recycled content, with an important drive for more sustainable packaging choices. This is all coming after what was a difficult couple of years for everyone. Covid made much of the sector very busy, with increased demand, while also adding a host of management issues in trying to balance sales and production with social distancing and absenteeism, and now we have the worries from the east. There has been unprecedented growth in fibre-based packaging, driven by more sustainable thinking and in part by a knee-jerk move away from plastics. The end user tends to see all plastics as a negative, fed by dreadful images of single use plastics in the sea, damaging wildlife, as well as litter on beaches etc. While this is appalling and wrong, littering is actually another issue, predominantly driven by lack of infrastructure and exacerbated by some of the largest food corporations in the world and the local governments. Between them, they introduced first world retail models and supply chains to developing nations without a thought for their waste infrastructure, or how people might handle the ensuing waste, with much of it ending up near or in rivers and ultimately the sea. In Europe, we added to this problem, as we had the idea that if we collected waste packaging and shipped it abroad in segregated bales, then that constituted recycling. That is just collecting and sorting. What we were doing was shipping our waste to developing nations that were effectively even less well equipped to deal with it than we were!

Installing solar panels can actually have a net zero cost, as excess energy can be supplied back to the grid.

sustainable options will actually prove more expensive and may reduce barrier properties and shelf-life. That is why testing in advance of any pack substrate change is so important; sometimes it is necessary to take your time and not be first to jump, but do more testing. The other big driver of growth in fibrebased packaging was the unprecedented growth in online sales during Covid and the subsequent demand for corrugated outers. These two drivers, the environmental and the online aspects, are still driving high demand and continue to put pressure on paper manufacture, the supply chain, causing shortages in some liner types, with lead-times extending by up to 3-4 times the norm, and prices are ultimately increasing, it seems, nearly each delivery. Some of these things we cannot change nor control, but some of them we can. I am a big fan of training and I think the right knowledge and know-how can help

improve most situations. Training can help increase efficiencies; it can help increase speed to market; it can help us make better choices; it can help save money; and it can help us feel appreciated.

Upskilling your staff Whichever side of the desk you are on, your people need to be upskilled to deal with these new challenges. Retailers are demanding more and more in-depth or Advanced Packaging Specs. They now need to know the make-up of the board or laminate, the weights, the recycled content, the barrier properties etc. How can you make informed pack change choices if you do not understand the current or required performance of your pack? If you do not know the stacking strength of your current outers’ BCT (Box Crush Test), how can you suggest, recommend or agree to an alternative spec, one that has perhaps more recycled content?

The demonising of plastics So the current changes are good and necessary for us to take responsibility; not just collecting and sorting but also recycling in a sustainable, circular way. This approach and the Single Use Plastics legislation is a good and necessary way to combat some of these issues and raise awareness, but it should not be extrapolated that all plastics are necessarily bad. Very often, plastics are ironically the best and cheapest way (in terms of CO2 emissions and final cost) to contain or wrap a product and other, more

There is more pressure from retailers for increased recycled content, with an important drive for more sustainable packaging choices

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 53


packaging

Innovation is the key to creating sustainable solutions. A drive for more sustainable specs, together with increased demand, will help to bring down the prices of greener options.

54 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

Similarly for flexible film and laminates, if you are exporting plastic packaged products to the UK you will need ideally to include at least 30% recycled content or your customer will suffer a £200 per ton plastic packaging tax. Is the increased recycled content film supply available and at what cost, and will it perform as well as your current spec? Here in Ireland with our Eco fee modulation, you may wish to move towards a mono-material rather than a multi-material laminate that is harder to recycle. In this case, you would need to understand the barrier properties of your material, MVTR and OTR (Moisture Vapour Transmission Rates and Oxygen Transmission Rates) and seal strength etc. Packaging change like this requires testing: testing of what you are currently using as a control and testing of the proposed new material. In packaging, the volumes are usually very high, so mistakes are costly! An agreed process and protocol for pack change is essential and cannot be rushed, as failure will impact on shelf life, food safety and brand equity. For me, the days of relying on our suppliers’ specs are now gone. Companies need to work with their suppliers to develop their own in-house specs. They should, of course, contain the basic product name, references, dimensions, colours, coatings, materials, unwind codes, weights, etc., but they should also state the required material pack performance, the tolerances, the test method, the recycled content, the box or pallet packing requirements and an agreed run sample provision, etc. Taking control of your specifications and investing in Packaging Technologists and a packaging process, brings real benefits, in terms of raising quality and even warehouse efficiency. When you understand what you need, with quality checks you can reduce the number of pack fails, maintain better seal integrity/ shelf-life and create faster reporting and tendering. By default, it also makes you more aware of possible alternatives, or new materials coming onto the market, which will give you an edge and an advantage over the competition. These changes will help to support sustainability in your organisation; while packaging is just one aspect, it is very visible and easily judged, or misjudged, by the end-user. We need to get ahead of the game and remove unnecessary


packaging packaging, reduce (lightweight) where possible, design for re-use (think of the packaging format and the packaging material), and recycle (mono-material / use higher recycled content). Only if all the above are impossible, should we consider energy recovery or, in a worst case scenario, disposal.

Keeping the circular economy on the agenda There is a massive onus on us all, despite the distractions mentioned at the start of this article, to keep the Circular Economy and the issue of sustainability firmly on the agenda. The world and our children’s future really need us to stay focused and avoid further increases in global warming beyond the already impactful 1.5 degrees C. Therefore, reductions in carbon emissions are essential. Renewable energy sources are imperative to drive forward with a focus on circular thinking and not the selfish, short-sighted, linear approach to life that we have had for the last 50 years or so. It is amazing that the sustainable approach has not had a faster impact, as it does also bring good cost savings. When you change your packaging as mentioned above, or take the practical steps to change your factory lights to LED, or reduce your water consumption (with less volume hoses), or put solar panels on your roof, these all bring positive savings. The solar panels installation, for instance, can actually be done for zero cost, under contract, when you have a large factory roof area and supply excess energy back to the grid.

suitable specs combined with increased demand will help to bring down the prices of these greener options.

on how to assess their packaging and choose a more sustainable version. https://www.fooddrinkirelandskillnet. ie/Sectors/FDI/SKILLNET.nsf/ vPages/Training_Courses~Sustain ability~certificate-in-sustainable-foodpackaging~0031?OpenDocument

The benefits of training As I mentioned, training is the answer, in my opinion, arming your organisation and your staff with the tools to make a real difference, both to the environmental performance of your business and to your bottom line. Here are two excellent part-time courses in packaging, a Certificate and a Diploma course that, depending on the requirements, will bring the novice to a new level of understanding of packaging, with all its challenges and opportunities. By way of full disclosure, I am one of the Trainers on these courses. •

Food Drink Ireland Skillnet (Ibec) have recently started a very successful Certificate in Sustainable Food Packaging, accredited by PiABC. Carried out online across 12 half-day sessions, it forms an introduction to sustainable packaging, covering all aspects of packaging functions, preservation, manufacturing, materials, NPD, testing, design for circularity and legislation. The course gives students an excellent introduction

Design Print & Packaging Skillnet run the very successful Diploma in Packaging Technology, Accredited by TU Dublin. This course creates Packaging Technologists and trains them on all aspects of packaging, including the fundamentals, substrates, conversion techniques, printing, packing line operations, legislation, etc. https://dppskillnet.ie/course/diploma-inpackaging-technology/

About the Author David Little is Managing Director of Leonard Little & Associates Ltd, Packaging Consultancy and Training: www.leonardlittleassociates. com. David has over 30 years’ experience in the Packaging Industry. David is a qualified Print and Packaging Technologist. He is Chair of the Irish Packaging Society, a member of the UK IOM3 Packaging Leadership Group and Head Trainer IOM3 (Packaging) and a Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining.

Focusing on the big picture We need to stay focused on the big picture and agree that we all must do our bit and consider our full impact, inside and outside our organisation. The Green House Gas Protocol’s Scope 1 deals with direct company facilities and vehicles, Scope 2 covers indirect purchased electricity and Scope 3 deals with indirect upstream (purchased goods and services, travel, transport etc.) and downstream activities, such as transportation, use of product, recycling ease and cost and product end of life etc. Only if we take responsibility and drive the required changes with a united concerted effort, will we slow or stop the upward spiral of global warming, with all its consequences. The practicable examples above are a no-brainer. Sustainable packaging is actually a little more difficult to implement and in some cases, industry is racing hard to catch up with R&D; hopefully, innovations with

There is a massive onus on us all to keep the Circular Economy and the issue of sustainability firmly on the agenda. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 55


form fill seal packaging

Xtrupak focus on Form Fill Seal packaging C

avan-based packaging experts, Xtrupak are the only Irish company who are focusing on the Form Fill Seal market. “Currently 90% of base web film is imported from other European countries and UK into Ireland - we are currently the only Irish company focused entirely on the Form Fill Seal market across PET, PE rPET and PE Mono,” explains John Reilly, Commercial and Marketing Director. “Xtrupak now offer a solution for Film Slitting, Rewinding and Roll Restoration.” Sustainability and recycling are key concerns when it comes to packaging, and Xtrupak are very conscious of their obligations in this area, as John notes: “All of our inputs are 100% recyclable and the materials that we use in production are fully traceable, from supplier to production to end product. We drive positive change throughout Xtrupak, from sustainable sourcing of raw materials to minimising our operational impact and lowering the environmental footprint of our customers. As an extrusion APET and rPET film manufacturer, our circular business model helps to embed sustainability in every aspect of what we do.”

Extruded Thermoplastic Xtrupak manufacture and distribute extruded thermoplastic for the print, packaging and display markets in Ireland and internationally. A large part of their business has been supplying their XtruForm product to huge UK thermoforming companies, who subsequently supply supermarkets like Asda, Tesco, and Marks and Spencer. Here in Ireland, the company supplies medium-sized sheet roll stock into factories that have an in-house machine which moulds their material into packaging, so it is formed, filled and then sealed, but Xtrupak are actively looking to grow their market domestically. “We have invested in machinery to target the Irish FFS packaging market, so we can supply the XtruForm FFS brand directly into Irish retailers and food companies,” John explains. When it comes to rigid films, Xtrupak offer a range of products for thermoforming and Form Fill Seal applications, ranging from high clarity food packaging and specialist recycled products to non-food applications. All products are available with options such as anti-block by means of master batch, silicone coating and anti-fog coating. Xtrupak’s rPET flakes are generated from recycled APET bottles, which they import from Europe, and then recycle to create the XtruForm sheet roll, using APET virgin material or rPET sheet roll stock. “Our rPET film is 100% recycled and 100% recyclable,” John stresses. “Typically, the customer will specify how much recycled content must go into the sheet. XtruForm is dimensionally stable, high impact, high rigidity and has excellent mechanical properties. The UV stable polyester film offers the best in thermoforming quality and maintains high transparency and light transmission properties before and after machining.” XtruForm can be used in a host of packaging solutions, from fresh food to medium and long shelf-life products. It is widely used in the packaging of ready meals, salads, fresh sandwiches, fruit, meat, and 56 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

Xtrupak are currently the only Irish company focused entirely on the Form Fill Seal market.

Xtrupak offer a range of products for thermoforming and Form Fill Seal applications, ranging from high clarity food packaging and specialist recycled products to non-food applications.

freshly baked products, as well as in containers for some healthcare products, like toothbrushes.

XtruClear The company’s product range also includes XtruClear, a range of thermoplastic, amorphous, polyester sheets, which can be used to produce products with complex shapes and demands, due to its flexible fabrication properties. “XtruClear is cost-effective, has excellent transparency, high impact resistance, chemical resistance and prints to an immaculate standard, making it a fantastic option in many situations,” John says. XtruClear is ideal for shopping trolley bays, smoke shelters, POS display shelving, fridge and freezer lines and dividers, vending machine covers, box type and transparent packaging applications, convenience packaging and printed signage. The last two years also saw the material used extensively to produce protective screens, which were installed at till points in supermarkets and convenience stores in response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Service The other thing that sets Xtrupak apart is the level of service provided, as John explains: “Our strategic geographical footprint through Europe allows us to be close to our customers, so that we can provide a more flexible and reliable source of film supply with shorter lead times and lower transport costs. Understanding that punctuality from order is key in meeting your deadlines.”


Manufacturing Apet & Rpet packaging rolls servicing the thermoforming industry under the XtruForm brand

Form Fill Seal PET/PE RPET/PE MONO Xtrupak now offers a solution for Film Slitting Rewinding and Roll Restoration. Currently 90% of base web film is imported from other European countries and UK into Ireland - Xtrupak are currently the only Irish company focused entirely on the Form Fill Seal (FFS) market. Additional investment is already in place to further develop our product range.

✓ High Quality, Fully Certified ✓ Flexible & Dynamic Service ✓ Sustainable & Recyclable

We offer Competitive Pricing for High Quality Products State of the Art Equipment Meeting Local Demand The Reilly Family Ownership 26 years of Extrusion Expertise

Gowna, Co. Cavan, Ireland +353 (0) 43 668 3464 | info@xtrupak.ie

QUALITY

ENVIRONMENT

I.S. EN ISO 9001:2015

I.S. EN ISO 14001:2015

HEALTH & SAFETY I.S. ISO 45001:2018

NSAI Certified

NSAI Certified

NSAI Certified


ingredients

Solving your supply chain challenges

NCC’s Fintan McConnell, Product Manager, discusses key considerations that a food producer should observe when choosing a food ingredients sourcing partner.

T

he last few years have been a very challenging environment for global supply chains; difficulties have included a pandemic, political instability and trade barriers. More recently, war, as well as rising inflation, have added to the list of obstacles for supply chains. When it comes to sourcing ingredients for food production, it is important for companies to work with the most reliable and reputable partners. With that in mind, below are some key considerations that a food producer should consider when choosing a food ingredients sourcing partner.

Secondary sourcing options Secondary sourcing has becoming increasingly important; if your current supplier is unable to provide vital ingredients due to supply chain issues, then having an additional supplier lined up can rectify this challenge. NCC Food Ingredients are uniquely positioned to assist you with your second sourcing. We have in-house sourcing and research capabilities to conduct manufacturer due diligence, as well as in-house operations and quality teams. Our sourcing team are skilled in analysing the production of a food ingredient and researching the supply 58 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

chains of the manufacturers offering this product. By doing so, our customers can be assured that an effective, reliable second sourcing option is chosen.

Managed additional stock If as a company you have established that there are ingredients that run the risk of shortages in the future, then it is recommended that managed extra stock is stored. Though it does tie up finance and there is the risk of non-use, the costs that are associated with production down-time pale in comparison to the expense. Savings from lean inventories and just-intime supply chain practises are quickly lost to drops in revenue caused by production disruption and higher costs related to limited supply. If the additional stock is managed correctly and efficiently, with planned rotation, then there need not be any wastage.

Failure to plan No-one could have foreseen the combination of supply chain challenges that we are presently experiencing. That said, it has stripped bare the vulnerabilities that exist. While it is true that there is no ‘fix all’ approach, there are steps that can be taken that will soften the impact and

blow. Doing so will not only cause less supply chain headaches but in turn will provide an advantage over competitors who may not be as prepared and flexible. We believe that it is now time to take a different approach, one which reflects the turbulence and unpredictability of this age. On one hand, with low-risk materials you can utilise more lean inventories and just-in-time approaches. On the other, with medium to high-risk materials, you can improve resilience by having secondary sources lined up and additional managed stock to hand. Taking this perspective should reduce the risk and most importantly, the associated costs. If you’re a food manufacturer based in Ireland or the UK and are finding it challenging to source food ingredients, then we can assist. At NCC Food Ingredients, we have over 50 years of experience with sourcing and navigating challenging supply chains. We provide our customers with integrated end-to-end supply chain solutions that has resilience built-in as standard. By optimising the efficiency of your supply chain, we can save your company time, money, resources and remove the risk of production downtime. Our customer base ranges from international producers of foods and beverages to small niche artisan creators of fine foods. For more information, visit nccingredients.com.


An ingredient partner you can rely on

In times of uncertainty, you need a food ingredient sourcing partner that not only has the know-how and in-house capability but will always go the extra mile. NCC Food Ingredients is that partner. With over 50 years of sourcing expertise and an ingredient supplier of the year award winner, our customers can count on us to receive the food ingredients that they require when they need them. Whatever you want, we can provide it for you, from sugar alternatives, through to natural flavourings. With full supply chain traceability and the highest global standards, NCC Food Ingredients is that essential link in your supply chain.

T. +353 1 613 1400 To learn more about NCC Food Ingredients:

E. info@nccingredients.com W. nccingredients.com


calibration

Digitisation meets calibration

T

he world of food and beverage production is swiftly evolving, so is the role played by technology in maintaining critical asset records. So, what kind of automation technologies can businesses use efficiently to maintain sustained competitive advantages across their industries?

Paperless calibration One method that is significantly changing asset management is paperless calibrations. Gone are the days when a human had to play the burdensome role of manually managing calibration records and maintenance. Paperless calibrations now complete tasks in a matter of minutes, enabling businesses to grow and scale at speeds that were previously unthinkable.

Partner portal Bonner have performed periodic process and laboratory calibrations using paperless solutions for over 10 years. Today, they can deliver a calibration management system that gives clients direct access to all their assets, information and history in real-time. This portal allows you to securely make decisions and take actions from anywhere in the world.

Bonner have been setting the standards for calibration in Ireland for more than 40 years.

certified in an ISO17025 laboratory. Bonner’s Partner Portal provides digitally complete reports, generates certificates and labels that guarantee audit readiness and are available the same day.

Standards you can trust

For over 40 years, Bonner have been setting the standards for calibration in Ireland, making them the partner of choice for quality Calibrations are completed on-site by Bonner’s qualified technicians, assurance managers. When it has to be calibrated, it has to be ai165849213027_Bonner_FI2022_180x131_04.pdf 1 22/07/2022 13:15 who have unparalleled holistic understanding of your production Bonner. One thing is certain: Paperless calibration is here to stay. The process. They conduct traceable calibrations using test instruments question is when will you take part in it?

Traceability

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Food

IRELAND 2022 / 23 Ye a r b o o k & D i re c to r y

Product & Service Index

ACCREDITATION Air Products Ireland Ltd ATLAS for Industry

ARCHITECTS / FOOD RELATED BUILDINGS Carey Associates

BARCODING / LABELLING AIS Ltd - Automatic Identification Systems ATLAS for Industry Avery Weigh-Tronix Carabay Packaging Products Com-Plas International DSG Packaging Ltd Fischbein-Saxon GS1 Ireland JMC Packaging Ltd Label One Ltd Obeeco Ltd SAI Global Tekpak Automation Ltd Versatile Packaging Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

BROKERING INTRODUCTIONS / SUPPLY OF INFORMATION Invest Northern Ireland

Clean IN Place Skids Flexachem Manufacturing

CONSUMER TASTE TESTING & SENSORY RESEARCH Innovate Solutions

EDUCATION /TRAINING / CERTIFICATE /CONSULTANCY GS1 Ireland Irish National Accreditation Board JMC Packaging Ltd KUKA Ireland Ltd National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI)

Repak Ltd safefood SAI Global UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Sciences UCD School of Agriculture and Food Science

ENERGY / UTILITIES MANAGEMENT Calor Festo Ltd

EXTRUDED THERMOPLASTIC SHEETING Xtrupak Ltd

FOOD GRADE/COMPATIBLE ROBOTIC AUTOMATION KUKA Ireland Ltd Versatile Packaging Ltd

FOOD SAFETY AUDITING Festo Ltd SAI Global CONSULTANTS Air Products Ireland Ltd Festo Ltd SAI Global CONTAMINANT CONTROL Festo Ltd QPM Ltd CONTROL /INSTRUMENTATION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Festo Ltd KUKA Ireland Ltd QPM Ltd FOREIGN BODY REMOVAL Festo Ltd QPM Ltd

HYGIENE Carabay Packaging Products Enviroclad Systems Ltd Festo Ltd safefood TESTING/INSPECTION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Bonner DSG Packaging Ltd Festo Ltd QPM Ltd Teagasc Food Research Programme Moorepark and Ashtown Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd TRACKING SYSTEMS Festo Ltd GS1 Ireland Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd WrenTech Ltd

FOOD LUBRICANTS Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Festo Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery

GENERAL SERVICES /SUPPLY TO THE TRADE Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd ATLAS for Industry Avery Weigh-Tronix BIM/Irelands Seafood Development Agency Blenders Bord Bia - The Irish Food Board Carabay Packaging Products Com-Plas International Fisher Scientific Flexachem Manufacturing Foodology by Univar Solutions Healy Group Irish National Accreditation Board FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 61


product & service index GENERAL SERVICES /SUPPLY TO THE TRADE (contd.) JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI) Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd QPM Ltd Saica Pack Ireland Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

HEALTH & SAFETY Enviroclad Systems Ltd Festo Ltd SAI Global WrenTech Ltd

IDENTIFYING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT GS1 Ireland Invest Northern Ireland

INDUSTRIAL WASHING EQUIPMENT Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Foodology by Univar Solutions Kevin Woods Machinery

INGREDIENTS AB Mauri UK & Ireland Andrew Ingredients Ltd Azelis Ireland Limited Brenntag Camida Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd D.D. Williamson (Ireland) Ltd Foodology by Univar Solutions Glanbia Ireland Healy Group Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd Innovate Solutions Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd NCC Food Ingredients Nutrition Supplies O’Brien Ingredients Ornua Puratos Crest Foods Ltd Trilby Trading Ltd

IT SERVICES & OUTSOURCING DSG Packaging Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd 62 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

MATERIALS HANDLING SERVICE CONTROL / INSTRUMENTATION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Kevin Woods Machinery KUKA Ireland Ltd QPM Ltd Tekpak Automation Ltd WrenTech Ltd MACHINERY / EQUIPMENT ABB Ltd Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Carabay Packaging Products Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Ene Limited Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Fischbein-Saxon JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery KUKA Ireland Ltd Obeeco Ltd QPM Ltd Syspal Tekpak Automation Ltd Toyota Material Handling Ireland WrenTech Ltd PALLETS, CRATES & CONTAINERS AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Carabay Packaging Products Dollard Packaging Ltd Donoghue Packaging Festo Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Saica Pack Ireland Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Syspal WrenTech Ltd PUMPS & VALVES Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Kevin Woods Machinery WrenTech Ltd REFRIGERATION / COLD STORAGE Air Products Ireland Ltd CRS Mobile Cold Storage Ltd DSG Packaging Ltd Festo Ltd

Ornua Syspal SERVICE & CALIBRATION Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd QPM Ltd TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS Avery Weigh-Tronix DSG Packaging Ltd Ornua Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Toyota Material Handling Ireland WrenTech Ltd WASTE MANAGEMENT/RECYCLING Avery Weigh-Tronix Kevin Woods Machinery Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd

PACKAGING AUDITS Carabay Packaging Products Limerick Packaging Repak Ltd

PACKAGING /DESIGN /LABELLING AiP Thermoform Packaging Air Products Ireland Ltd ATLAS for Industry Carabay Packaging Products Com-Plas International Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd Diamond Corrugated Dollard Packaging Ltd Donoghue Packaging DSG Packaging Ltd Ene Limited Fischbein-Saxon Greiner Packaging Ltd GS1 Ireland Industrial Packaging Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd Label One Ltd Limerick Packaging Measom Freer & Co. Ltd Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging NPP Group Ltd Obeeco Ltd Ornua Pharmafoods Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Repak Ltd Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Sealed Air Ltd


product & service index Smurfit Kappa Ireland Syspal Tekpak Automation Ltd The Packaging Centre Ltd Versatile Packaging Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd WrenTech Ltd Xtrupak Ltd

PEST CONTROL /FLY SCREENS Rentokil Pest Control

PLANT MAINTENANCE Acorn Recycling Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Bonner Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Kevin Woods Machinery Obeeco Ltd

PROCESSING EQUIPMENT BAKERY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Ene Limited Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd QPM Ltd Syspal Versatile Packaging Ltd WrenTech Ltd DAIRY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix David Kellett & Partners Ltd DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Ene Limited Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd

Syspal Versatile Packaging Ltd WrenTech Ltd DRINK Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Ene Limited Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing JMC Packaging Ltd Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Syspal Versatile Packaging Ltd WrenTech Ltd

Versatile Packaging Ltd WrenTech Ltd WASTE WATER EQUIPMENT Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Kevin Woods Machinery

PRODUCTION OPTIMISATION Bonner Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Fischbein-Saxon Flexachem Manufacturing JMC Packaging Ltd KUKA Ireland Ltd Versatile Packaging Ltd

Production Skids

FRESH FOOD Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Ene Limited Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd QPM Ltd Syspal Versatile Packaging Ltd WrenTech Ltd

Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing

MACHINERY AUCTIONEERS Air Products Ireland Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Festo Ltd

STAINLESS STEEL FABRICATION

MEAT, FISH & POULTRY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Ene Limited Festo Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Syspal

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT BIM/Irelands Seafood Development Agency Bord Bia - The Irish Food Board Innovate Solutions JMC Packaging Ltd KUKA Ireland Ltd Ornua safefood Teagasc Food Research UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Sciences Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd WrenTech Ltd

Ene Limited Festo Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Syspal WrenTech Ltd

STORAGE SOLUTIONS Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging

SUSTAINABILITY AND TRACEABILITY TRACKING SOLUTIONS GS1 Ireland

TANK Cleaning Flexachem Manufacturing

TRADE ASSOCIATIONS GS1 Ireland FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 63


company listings a ABB Ltd

Address: Orion House, Maidstone Road, Kingston, Milton Keynes, MK10 OBD. Tel: (0044) 1908 350 300 (0044) 1908 350 301 Fax: Email: robotics@gb.abb.com Web: www.abb.com www.abb.com/robotics Main Products & Services: ABB is a leading supplier of industrial robots, modular manufacturing systems and service. A strong solutions focus helps manufacturers improve productivity, product quality and worker safety. ABB has installed more than 200,000 robots world wide.

AB Mauri UK & Ireland

Address: Barn Way, Lodge Farm, Northampton, NN5 7UW. Tel: (0044) 1604 755 522 Fax: (0044) 1604 752 470 Email: Damien.McDonald@abmauri.com Web: www.abmauriukandireland.com Main Products & Services: Dough conditioners, yeast, soya flours, sour doughs, cake & donut mixes, icings & fillings. Contact: Director of Sales (Ireland): Damien McDonald

Acorn Recycling

Address: Galmoy via Thurles, Castletown, Johnstown, Co. Kilkenny. Tel: 086 2241734 Email: stan@aqssolutions.ie Web: www.aqssolutions.ie Main Products & Services: Industrial Cleaning Services. Contact: Commercial Director: Stan O’Reilly

64 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd

Address: 718 Northwest Business Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Tel: (01) 861 2141 Fax: (01) 861 2142 s.dallas@test.ie Email: Web: www.packagingmachinery.ie Main Products & Services: Metal detectors, x-ray inspection systems, check weighers & label applicators. Contact: Technical Director: Stephen Dallas

AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd

Address: The Woodlands, Carrigmore, Ballineen, Co. Cork. Tel: (023) 884 7333 Email: info@aicplastics.com Web: www.aicpp.com Main Products & Services: Plastic, timber and aluminium pallets, pallet boxes, totes, storage boxes, stacking containers, slipsheets, linbins, bespoke pallets and boxes (aluminium and plastic). Contact: Joe O’Flynn

AiP Thermoform Packaging

Address: Unit 1 A Ballymaley Business Park, Barefield, Ennis, Co. Clare. (065) 686 4486 Tel: Fax: (065) 689 3479 Email: john@aip.ie Web: www.aip.ie Main Products & Services: Design and manufacture services of Thermoform Packaging for the Irish market.

Air Products Ireland Ltd

Address: Unit 950, Western Industrial Estate, Killeen Road, Dublin 12. Tel: 1800 99 50 29 Email: ieinfo@airproducts.com Web: www.airproducts.ie Main Products & Services: Air Products brings you the latest, most innovative solutions in cryogenic freezing, chilling, cooling and Modified Atmosphere Packaging. Freshline Gases® include CO2, Nitrogen and Oxygen in liquid or gaseous form. Backed by over 40 years’ knowhow in food processing. To find out more please visit our website. Contact: Air Products on 1800 99 50 29

AIS Ltd - Automatic Identification Systems

Address: Unit 48, Canal Walk, Park West Industrial Park, Nangor Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 620 5742 Fax: (01) 620 5735 info@aisltd.ie Email: Web: www.aisltd.ie Main Products & Services: RFID equipment,automatic labelling, print & apply systems, industrial barcode scanning, 2D barcode equipment, hand held readers, mobile computers, fixed mount scanning, label printers, mobile printers, desktop printers, industrial printers, barcode printers, labels & ribbons. Supply, install & maintenance of auto ID products. Custom solution development for product traceability suitable for you.

Andrew Ingredients Ltd

Address: 27 Ferguson Drive, Knockmore Hill Industrial Park, Lisburn, Co. Antrim, BT28 2EX. Tel: (048) 9267 2525 sales@andrewingredients.com Email: Web: www.andrewingredients.ie Main Products & Services: • Food and Bakery ingredients, flour, bread, cake and confectionery mixes, gluten free and vegan products, icings, dried fruit, savoury and sweet sauces,


company listings colours and flavours, baking powders, raising agents, sugar etc. • Dedicated technical team. • Test Bakery and Kitchen available to existing and potential customers to support NPD, innovation and problem solving.

ATLAS

for Industry

Atlas for Industry

Address: Glen Vale, 178 Portadown Road, Richhill, Co. Armagh, BT61 9LJ. 0044 (0) 28 3887 0166 Tel: Email: sales@atlasforindustry.co.uk www.atlasforindustry.ie Web: Main Products & Services: Manufacture of self-adhesive labels both plain & printed, in various substrates. Predominantly, Mid-Gloss Paper, Thermal Paper, and synthetics. We also manufacture A4 Laser Labels in a range of formats, starting at 1/sheet; up to 84/sheet (permanent & removable). Manufacture of tags & tickets for meat plants / garden centres / engineering etc. Supply of label printers from Zebra / Citizen / Godex / TSC. Transfer ribbons for label printers, economy / mid-range & premium grades. Contact: Managing Director: David Nethercote

Avery Weigh-Tronix

Address: Dublin: Unit L11, Greenogue Business Park, Rathcoole, Dublin. Tel: (01) 400 0700 Fax: (01) 400 0750 Address: Antrim: Units 52/58, Mallusk Enterprise Park, Newtownabbey, BT36 4GN. Tel: (028) 9083 9092 Fax: (028) 9083 5393 Email: irelandinfo@awtxglobal.com Web: www.averyweigh-tronix.com /ireland

Bonner Azelis Ireland Limited

Address: Unit 23, Sandyford Office Park, Blackthorn Avenue, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Foxrock, Dublin 18. (01) 295 6977 Tel: Fax: (01) 295 8338 Email: graeme.locke@azelis.ie Main Products & Services: Food Ingredients. Contact: Managing Director: Graeme Locke

B BIM/Ireland’s Seafood Development Agency

Address: Crofton Rd, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 214 4100 Fax: (01) 284 1123 Email: info@bim.ie Web: www.bim.ie Main Products & Services: Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) helps to develop the Irish Seafood Industry by providing technical expertise, business support, funding, training and promoting responsible environmental practice.

Blenders

Address: Whitestown Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24, D24 VY75. Tel: (01) 453 6960 Fax: (01) 453 7607 Email: sales@blenders.ie Web: www.blenders.ie Main Products & Services: Mayonnaises, dressings, bouillons, cooking sauces, table sauces, carvery sauces, relishes in bulk catering, sachets, dip-pots and retail jar formats. Branded and private label.

Instrumentation, Calibration and Automation Solutions

Address: 35 Western Parkway Business Centre, Ballymount Drive, Ballymount, Dublin 12, D12 X542. (01) 450 5050 Tel: Email: contact@bonner.ie Web: www.bonner.ie Main Products & Services: Services inc. Calibration, Maintenance, Analysis & Temperature Mapping, Instrumentation products for measurement and control, Automation & Control solutions. Contact: Managing Director: Patrick Bonner Service Manager: Roddy Jefferson Automation Solutions Manager: Vernon Smit

Bord Bia The Irish Food Board

Address: 140 Pembroke Road, Dublin 4, D04 NV34. Tel: (01) 668 5155 Email: info@bordbia.ie Web: www.bordbia.ie Main Products & Services: Marketing, promotion and development of Irish food, drink and horticulture.

Brenntag

Address: Unit 405, Greenogue Business Park, Rathcoole, Dublin 24. Tel: +353 (0) 1 4013500/ +353 (0) 86 2958750 Email: dublin.sales@brenntag.ie/ james.dixon@brenntag.ie Web: www.brenntag.ie Main Products & Services: Food ingredients, cake mixes, blends, NPD. Contact: Key Account Manager: James Dixon FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 65


company listings

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Calor

Address: Long Mile Road, Dublin 12. Tel: y o(01) u 291 r 6229 Email: info@calorgas.ie Web: www.calorgas.ie Main Products & Services: Supply of LPG in bulk tanks i or s cylinders. o v e r Contact: Sales Director: Oliver Kenny.

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Address: New Quay, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary, New Quay, Clonmel, E91 YV66. Co Tipperary, Ireland. Tel: (052) 612 5455 Mobile: (087) 622 6810 Email: michael.odonovan@camida.com LIFE SCIENCE INDUSTRIAL INgREDIENTS t: www.camida.com +353 52 6125455 Web: Main Products & Services: e: joe.guiney@camida.com Ingredients (Food, Beverage, m:Feed). +353Natural 86 2413223 Emulsifiers (Soya Sunflower Lecithin), Synthetic w:&www.camida.com Emulsifiers (Esters) Sweeteners (Sucralose, Sodium Saccharin and Sodium Cylamate), Antioxidants and Natural Vitamin E, Spray Crystallised High Performance Fats. Feed Sector – Glycinates (Copper, Iron, Manganese & Zinc), 02/06/2015 Dicalcium Phopshate, Xanthan Gum, Stevia Extract, Glucose Syrup, Glycine, Oils & Waxes. Contact: Sales Manager: Michael O’Donovan

Carabay Packaging Products

Address: Unit 3, 4, 5, Liosban Industrial Estate, Tuam Road, Co. Galway, H91 C793. Tel: (091) 773 370 Fax: (091) 773 371 Email: sales@carabay.ie Web: carabay.ie Contact: Sales Director: Kenneth Casburn

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Carey Associates

Architects for the Food Industry Address: Office 1, Second Floor, Building 3b, Killegland Street, Ashbourne Town Centre, Ashbourne, Co. Meath, A84 NX77. Tel: (01) 835 1572 Email: info@careyassociates.ie Web: www.careyassociates.ie Main Products & Services: Architects and Project Managers. Contact: Fergus Carey MRIAI

Com-Plas International

Address: Unit F5 & F6, Southern Link Business Park, Naas, Co. Kildare, Ireland, W91 RT9P. Tel: +353 (0)45 874 088 Email: sales@complas.ie Web: www.complas.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging products for food, pharma and chemical industries.

CRS Mobile Cold Storage Ltd Address: Carnisle, Kildalkey, Co. Meath, C15 KP29. Tel: (046) 943 5000 Fax: (046) 943 5068 Email: enquiry@crs.ie Web: www.crs.ie Main Products & Services: Increase your on-site cold storage capacity: CRS offer a wide range of temperature controlled storage solutions both new and professionally refurbished for short and long-term rental. Our products include 1-58 pallet portable cold stores and 10-106kw portable blast freezers. Contact: Michael O’Keefe

D Corcoran Chemicals Ltd

Address: 17 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8. Tel: (01) 633 0400 Fax: (01) 679 3521 Email: info@corcoran-group.com Web: www.corcoran-group.com 12:48 Main Products & Services: Distributors of raw materials for the food, pharmaceutical, polymer & chemical industry. Contact: Sales

Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd

Address: Unit 12 Northern Cross Business Park, Finglas, D11 DC67, Ireland. Tel: (01) 864 4422 Email: info@corcoran-group.com Web: www.corcoran-group.com Main Products & Services: Suppliers of packaging to the food, pharmaceutical and chemical industry. Contact: Derek Lennon

Diamond Corrugated

Address: 12-13 Pennyburn Industrial Estate, Londonderry, Northern Ireland, BT48 OLU. Tel: (048) 7126 2957 Email: info@diamondcorr.com Web: www.diamondcorr.com

Dollard Packaging Ltd

Address: Units 6-11, Eklad Park, Malahide Road Industrial Park, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: (01) 847 0044 Email: sales@dollard-packaging.ie Web: www.dollard-packaging.ie Main Products & Services: Print and Packaging.

Donoghue Packaging

Address: Donpack Business Park, Bandon, Co. Cork Tel: (023) 884 2111 Fax: (023) 884 1211 Email: donpack@donpack.ie Web: www.donpack.com Main Products & Services: Manufacturers of Waxed Solid Board & Corrugated Packaging Products. Contact: Managing Director: Ray Donoghue


company listings DSG Packaging Ltd

Address: Unit 1D Willow Drive, Newhall, Naas Enterprise Park, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 884 200 pmoloney@dsgpack.ie Email: Web: www.dsgpack.ie Main Products & Services: Specialists in Contract Packaging, Outsourcing and “End of Line” Filling and Packaging Services.

E Endress+Hauser Ireland Ltd

Address: Exchequer House, Embassy Office Park, Kill, Co. Kildare. (045) 989 200 Tel: Email: info.ie@endress.com www.ie.endress.com Web: Main Products & Services: Endress+Hauser are a global leader in instrumentation solutions and services for the food and beverage industry.

Ene Limited

Address: Unit 24, Scarva Road Industrial Estate, Banbridge, Co. Down, BT32 3QD Tel: +44 28 4062 2215 Email: info@eneconveyors.com Web: www.eneconveyors.com Main Products & Services: Conveyor systems and replacement belts. Contact: Belting Manager: Darren Horner

Enviroclad Systems Ltd

Address: Unit 57B, Hebron Industrial Estate, Hebron Road, Co. Kilkenny. Tel: (056) 775 2866 Fax: (056) 777 0955 Email: info@enviroclad.com Web: www.enviroclad.com Main Products & Services: Supply and Fitting of Enviroclad Hygienic Wall and Ceiling Cladding in P.V.C. for the Food Industry.

F Fisher Scientific Festo Ltd

Address: Head Office: Unit 5, Sandyford Park, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. (01) 295 4955 Tel: Fax: (01) 295 5680 Email: sales_ie@festo.com Web: www.festo.com/ie Main Products & Services: Automation Technology · Industrial Automation · Electrical Automation · Process Automation Training & Consulting Food, Beverage & Packaging Expertise.

Address: Suite 6, Plaza 212, Blanchardstown Corporate Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15, DI5VY66. Tel: (01) 885 5854 Fax: (01) 899 1855 Email: fsie.sales@thermofisher.com Web: www.ie.fishersci.com Business: Laboratory supplies, Chemicals, Consumables, Reagents, Equipment & Instruments. Contact: Portfolio Manager: Gerry Fitzmaurice

Flexachem Manufacturing

Fischbein-Saxon

Address: 274 Alma Road, Enfield, Middlesex, EN3 7BB, England. Tel: (0044) 208 344 6600 Fax: (0044) 208 344 6625 Email: salesuk@fischbein.com Web: www.fischbein.com Main Products & Services: Through the recent partnership with VOTECH, FISCHBEIN enhances its ability to offer fully automatic Dosing, Bagging and Palletizing lines, as well as Pallet Wrapping and Stretch-Hooders. The Votech brand is known for providing high-precision, hygienic solutions, in the food and powder sectors such as Milk, Animal Feeds, Food Flavours, Flour Milling, Fertilizers, Pellets, Horticulture, and associated products. Votech exudes quality, robustness, and reliability, and as a result, have thousands of successful installations, and a reputation with our clients, that precedes our name. Contact: Sales & Services Director: Barry Cox

Address: Donnybrook Commercial Centre, Douglas, Cork, T12 X68Y. Tel: 021 461 7200 Email: michael.bradley@flexachem.com Web: www.flexachem.com Main Products & Services: Mechanical & Process Solutions, Pumps, Valves, Mechanical Seals. Contact: Sales: Michael Bradley

Foodology by Univar Solutions

Address: 536 Grants Crescent, Greenogue Business Park, Rathcoole, Co. Dublin. Tel: +44 7803 951222 Email: Angela.Mills@univarsolutions.com Web: univarsolutions.com Main Products & Services: Food and Pharmaceuticals. Contact: Angela Mills

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company listings

G

Glanbia Ireland

Address: Ballyragget, Co. Kilkenny. Tel: (056) 883 6000 giicustomerservice@glanbia.ie Email: Web: www.glanbiairelandingredients.com Main Products & Services: B2C Dairy, Ingredient Solutions & Agribusiness. Contact: Head of Marketing Ingredients: Ann Meaney

H

Innovate Solutions

Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd

Address: Unit 49, Baldoyle Industrial Estate, Dublin, D13 H2N2. Tel: (01) 839 3127. info@heterochem.com Email: Web: www.heterochem.com Main Products & Services: Antifoams, Antioxidants, Colours, Distilling & Brewing Additives, Emulsifiers, Flavours, Gums, Preservatives & Sweeteners. Greiner Packaging Ltd Contact: info@heterochem.com Address: Killyman Road Industrial Estate, Accreditation: Dungannon, ISO, FEMAS & Organic Trust County Tyrone, BT 71 6LN, Certified. Northern Ireland. Tel: (0044) 28 8772 3131 Fax: (0044) 28 8772 7318 Email: Sales.Dungannon@greiner-gpi.com Web: www.greiner-gpi.com HH SOLUTIONS Contact: Sales Director: Julie Eller Address: 12 Ritaville, Sales Manager: Philip Hogan Old Cork Road, Limerick. Tel: (061) 603 742 Email: info@hhsolutions.ie www.hhsolutions.ie Web: Main Products & Services: Food Probes & Data Services: Loggers & Wireless Monitoring Systems. GS1 Ireland Irish agents for Eltex of Address: Second Floor, The Merrion Centre, Sweden & Comark Ltd. Nutley Lane, Donnybrook, Dublin 4, D04 KF62. Tel: (01) 208 0660 Fax: (01) 208 0670 Email: info@gs1ie.org Web: www.gs1ie.org/food Main Products & Services: Global Supply Chain Standards Body. Barcode Numbers, Barcode Manager Tool, Barcode Symbols, fTRACE, GS1 Digital Link, Verified by GS1, EDI Message Standards, EPC/RFID, Traceability Standards, Barcode and EDI Message Verification, Advisory and Training Services. Contact: Chair: Gerry Boylan (Diageo) Vice-Chair: Pat Tracey (DCC Vital) Vice-Chair: David Codd (Musgrave) Chief Executive Officer: Mike Byrne 68 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

I Address: 2nd Floor, 6 South William Street, Dublin 2. (01) 707 9856 Tel: Email: sales@innovatesolutions.ie www.innovatesolutions.ie Web: Main Products & Services: Consumer Research – NPD taste testing, product benchmarking, expert sensory panels, focus group research.

Invest Northern Ireland

Address: Bedford Square, Bedford Street, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Tel: 0044 7985 111024 Email: jen.guiney@investni.com www.investni.com Web: Main Products & Services: Brokering introductions to Northern Ireland’s food and drink sector. Invest NI’s Food and Drink Business Development team offers comprehensive support to retailers, foodservice and wholesale operators seeking innovative ideas from experienced food and drink producers to help build mutually beneficial and profitable business relationships. Contact: Business Development Executive: Jen Guiney

Irish Exporters Association

Address: 28 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 661 2182 Email: contact@irishexporters.ie Web: www.irishexporters.ie Main Products & Services: Food and Drink Export Ireland, a division of the IEA, provides assistance to Irish food and drink companies in the home market and to increase their sales abroad.


UK & Ireland’s Ingredients Specialist Heterochem Dist. Ltd is the speciality raw materials supplier of choice to the Food and Beverage industries both in Ireland and the UK. ◊ Acidulants ◊ Antioxidants ◊ Emulsifiers ◊ Flavourings and Colorants

◊ Preservatives ◊ Starches ◊ Sweeteners

Benefits to your business: ◊ High quality, competitively priced products - ISO 9001 & GDP accredited ◊ Excellent customer service - before and after the sale ◊ A reliable and efficient sourcing partner, assisting our customers to develop new and existing products ◊ A highly qualified sales team of chemists available to assist with any technical queries ◊ Prime location in Baldoyle, Dublin - situated in close proximity to all distribution channels ◊ On site storage of all raw materials in our controlled warehousing ◊ Variety of UN approved pack sizes available: 25kg, 50kg, 200kg barrels & 1000kg IBCs Unit 49 Baldoyle Industrial Estate, Dublin D13 H2N2, Ireland T. +353 1 839 3127 E. info@heterochem.com W. www.heterochem.com

Food Industry Training Unit Continuing Professional Development and Training for the Food, Agri Food and Seafood Sectors Information on courses from: Mary McCarthy-Buckley, Food Industry Training Unit School of Food and Nutritional Sciences College of Science, Engineering and Food Science University College Cork Email m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie www.ucc.ie/en/fitu


ny

Listings

company listings Irish National Accreditation Board

Address: Metropolitan Building, James Joyce Street, Dublin 1, D01 KOY8. Tel: (01) 614 7182 Email: inab@inab.ie www.inab.ie Web:

J JMC Packaging Ltd

Address: 37 Seagoe Industrial Estate, Craigavon, Co. Armagh, BT63 5QE. Tel: 028 3839 1723 Mobile: +353 86 0234177 Email: salesteam@jmcpackaging.co.uk Web: www.jmcpackaging.co.uk Main Products & Services: Specialists in packaging materials and equipment. Shrink wrap equipment, tray sealing equipment, automatic label applications, automatic stretch wrappers, checkweighing & metal detections, polyolefin shrink film, smoothwall foil trays, soft fruit punnets, food grade stretch film & lidding film and meat & poultry trays.

K David Kellett & Partners Ltd

Contact:

Kevin Woods Machinery Limited

70 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

Road, Belfast BT13 3LZ. (048) 9077 7444 (048) 9077 4067 info@labelone.ie www.labelone.ie Self-adhesive labels, extended content leaflet labels. Sales Manager, ROI: Chris Moore 087 252 3335

Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd

Address: Unit 8 Steadfast Industrial Estate, Carrickmacross, Co. Monaghan. Tel: (042) 966 2096 (042) 966 3954 Fax: Email: info@kiernans.ie Web: www.kiernans.ie Main Products & Services: Food ingredients - seasonings, cures, sauces, marinades etc. Food packaging - aluminium trays, vac pack, shrink bags, etc. Contact: Martin Kiernan Mobile 087 2567694 James Kiernan Mobile 087 6866993

KUKA Ireland Ltd

Address: Unit 16 Brewery Business Park, Ardee Rd, Cambrickville, Dundalk, Co. Louth, Ireland. Tel: +353 (0)42 93 95034 Email: sales.ie@kuka.com Web: www.kuka.com Main Products & Services: Robotics & Automation Contact: Brian Cooney, Managing Director – KUKA Ireland

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M

Limerick LimerickPackaging Packaging

Manotherm Ltd Address:

Address: Park, Address: Eastlink Business Eastlink Business Park, Ballysimon Road, Telephone: Ballysimon Road, Limerick.Co. Limerick. Fax: Tel: (061) 400(061) 035 400 035 Email: Telephone: info@lmkpkg.ie Email: Website: Fax: (061) 400 036 Web: Main Products/ Email: www.limerickpackaging.ie info@lmkpkg.ie Main Services: Web:Products & Services: www.limerickpackaging.ie Corrugated Boxes, Polythene Main Products/ Corrugated Boxes, Palletwrap, Contact: Services:Bags, Edgeguards, Polythene Bags, Strapping, Tapes, Litho printed Edgeguards, Palletwrap, Cartons,Strapping, Litho Laminated Tapes. outers, High QualityBoland Post-Printed Outers, Contact: Mike Shelf-Ready Packs. Contact: Mike Boland

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LINPAC Allibert

Measom Freer &

Address:

Address:

17 Ridgeway, Quinton Business Park, Bimingham, B32 1AF, United Kingdom. Telephone: (0044) 1606 56 1929 Manotherm Ltd Fax: (0044) 1606 56 1998 Address: 4 Walkinstown Road, Email: brendan.mcgarry@linpac.com Dublin D12 RP83 Web: www.linpacallibert.com Tel: (01) 452 2355 Main Products/ Plastic Materials Handling Fax: (01) 451 6919 Services: Products - Boxes, Bins, Email: info@manotherm.ie Trays, Pallets etc. Web: www.manotherm.ie Contact: Sales Manager, Ireland: Main Products & Services: Brendan McGarry Distributor of process 087 676 7161

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instrumentation and controls.

Address: Maple Court, Wormbridge Label One Ltd House, Wormbridge, Hereford, Address: 3 Advantage Way, HR2 9DH. Ballygomartin Industrial Estate, Tel: (0044) 1981 570 611 Ballygomartin Road, Email: davidkellett@davidkellett.co.uk Belfast BT13 3LZ. Main Products & Services: Tel: (048) 9077 7444 Dairy Engineering, Filtration Fax: (048) 9077 4067 Systems/Membranes, RO, UO, Email: info@labelone.ie UF & MF. Osmosis®, Ultra Web: www.labelone.ie Filtration and Micro Filtration, Effluent Treatment, Spiral Wound Main Products & Services: and Plate & Frame, Cheese Self-adhesive labels, extended Maturing Vacuum Pouches. content leaflet labels. Contact: Managing Director: David Kellett

Address: The Inch, Balbriggan, Co. Dublin, Ireland. Tel: 086 859 5532 / 086 170 8791 Web: www.kevinwoodsmachinery.ie Main Products & Services: Suppliers of machinery and service to the processing and packaging sector.

Telephone: Fax: Email: Web: Main Products/ Services:

Matheson

Address: 70 Sir John Rogersons Quay, Dublin 2, Ireland. Tel: 00 353 1 232 2000 Email: louise.tolerton@matheson.com Web: www.matheson.com Main Products8& Services: 37_48 company_listing.indd Legal Services.

Measom Freer & Co. Ltd

Address: 37/41 Chartwell Drive, Wigston, Leicester, LE18 2FL, England. Tel: (0044) 116 288 1588 Fax: (0044) 116 281 3000 Email: sales@measomfreer.co.uk Web: www.measomfreer.co.uk Main Products & Services: Measom Freer manufacture and stock quality plastic bottles, custom moulded bottles, dropper caps, scoops, measures, boxes, jars, tubes, fasteners etc, for food use. Services include 3D design, in-house tool making and screen printing.

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company listings Nutrition Supplies

Food Ingredients

NCC Food Ingredients

Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging

Address: Clondrohid, Macroom, Co. Cork. Oranstown, Dunboyne, Co. Meath. Tel: +353 26 41311 +353 1 825 2059 Email: sales@midcorkpallets.com Web: www.midcorkpallets.com Main Products & Services: Established in 1978, Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging (MCP) is Ireland’s leading manufacturer of pallets and supplier of corrugated packaging and storage solutions. With over 350,000 sq. ft. of manufacturing and storage facilities and 2 locations in Cork and Meath, MCP are strategically located to service our ever growing customer base. We are currently expanding our operation in both sites and are in the process of building new state-of-the- art warehouses, with the capacity of an additional 20,000 pallet spaces which will allow MCP to store and distribute more of our customers’ products. Contact: sales@midcorkpallets.com

N National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI)

Address: 1 Swift Square, Northwood, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: (01) 807 3800 Fax: (061) 332 982 Email: info@nsai.ie Web: www.nsai.ie Main Products & Services: Certification and inspection services to national & interna- tional product & management system standards including ISO 22000, ISO 9001, OHSAS and BRC Global Food Standard.

Address: NCC House, 42 Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 613 1400 (01) 661 6261 Fax: foodsales@ncc.ie Email: www.nccingredients.com Web: Main Products & Services: Food Ingredients: Natural Flavours, Acidulants, Preservatives, Biocides, Enzymes, Hydrocolloids, Stabilizers, Antioxidants, Carriers, Binders, Gelling agents, Fibres, Sweeteners (natural & high intensity), Amino Acids, Colours, Fats & Oils, Starches, Texturizers, Clean Label Ingredients, Prebiotics, Atlantic Sea Salts among other ingredients. Ingredients Sourcing: With a dedicated team of qualified food professionals, we have a deep and informed understanding of the many challenges facing the food industry today. Working in close partnership with highly innovative producers across the globe we provide our customers with a wide range of functional, clean label products and technologies. Our customer base ranges from international producers of foods and beverages to small niche artisan creators of fine foods. We support our customers from the very early stages of product development through to end production. Contact: Product Manager: Fintan McConnell (fmcconnell@ncc.ie)

NPP Group Ltd

Address: Vantage Business Park, Unit 2, Coldwinters, Dublin 11 D11 WP2P. Tel: (00353) (0) 1 880 9299 Fax: (00353) (0) 1 880 9298 sales@npp.ie Email: Web: www.npp.ie Main Products & Services: Flexible plastic packaging distributors.

Address: Innishannon, Co. Cork, T12 F248. Tel: (021) 477 5522 Fax: (021) 477 5449 Email: ursula.lecane@nutritionsupplies.ie Web: www.nutritionsupplies.ie Main Products & Services: Vitamin & Nutrient Precision Premixes.

O Obeeco Ltd

Address: Annaville Avenue, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 278 2323 Fax: (01) 278 2374 Email: sales@obeeco.ie Web: www.obeeco.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging Processing and Automation Machinery. Coding and Printing Solutions and Materials. Contact: Sales Director: Richard Burke Managing Director: Olive Walker

O’Brien Ingredients

Address: 11 Magna Drive, Magna Business Park, Citywest, Dublin D24 T97Y Tel: 00353 [0]1 469 1400 Fax: 00353 [0]1 469 1360 Email: ingred@obrien-ingredients.ie Web: www.obrien-ingredients.ie Main Products & Services: Supplier of ambient, frozen and chilled ingredients to Bakery, Beverage, Confectionery, Dairy, Ice Cream, Feed, Pharmaceutical, Infant Formula and Savoury sectors in Ireland. Contact: Ailise McKay, Paul Wiseman

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company listings

Q Ornua

Address: Grattan House, Mount Street Lower, Dublin 2. +353 1 661 9599 Tel: +353 1 661 2778 Fax: communications@ornua.com Email: www.ornua.com Web: Main Products & Services: Ireland’s largest exporter of Irish dairy products (butter, cheese and milk powders) and proud owner of the Kerrygold brand.

P Pharmafoods Ltd

Address: Lower Waterford Road, Carrickbeg, Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. Tel: (051) 645 066/645 084 Fax: (051) 645 033 Email: info@pharmafoods.net Web: www.pharmafoods.net Main Products & Services: Bilwinco Multihead Weighers, Mondini Tray Sealers Vacuum and Gas, Limitech Liquid Processing Equipment, Rovema Vertical Form Fill Sealers, Cartoning, Bag In Box, Abtech Premade Pouch Production for Tuna in Foil.

Puratos Crest Foods Ltd

Address: 70 - 71 Dunboyne Business Park, Dunboyne, Co. Meath. Tel: (01) 825 5505 (01) 825 5506 Fax: Email: info_ireland@puratos.com Web: www.puratos.com Main Products & Services: Bakery, patisserie and chocolate ingredients. Belcolade Belgian chocolate, Puratos bakery & patisserie products, PatisFrance premium patisserie ingredients. Contact: General Manager: Sean McDaid 72 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

Repak Ltd

QPM Ltd

Address: Unit 12, Robinhood Business Park, Robinhood Road, Dublin 22, D22 RD39. Tel: (01) 450 2421 Email: anevin@qpm.ie Web: www.qpm.ie Main Products & Services: X-ray inspection, Metal Detection, Checkweighing, Scales, Temperature Probes, Data Loggers, pH Meters, Gas Analysis, Magnetic Separators, Automatic Labelling Machines and Automatic Sleeving Machines, Service & Calibration. Contact: Andy Nevin

Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd

Address: St Brendan’s Road, Portumna, Co. Galway, H53 HX51. Tel: (090) 97 41148 Fax: (090) 97 41459 Email: sales@quitmannoneill.com Web: www.qonpack.com Main Products & Services: Stockist and Distributors of Packaging. Contact: General Manager: David O’Neill

Address: Red Cow Interchange Estate, 1 Ballymount Road, Clondalkin, Dublin 22. (01) 467 0190 Tel: (01) 403 0929 Fax: Email: info@repak.ie Web: www.repak.ie Main Products & Services: Repak is an environmental notfor-profit organisation with a social mission. Repak is Ireland’s only governmentapproved packaging compliance scheme, licensed by the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment. Repak was set up in 1997 in accordance with EU Packaging Regulations. Repak has over 3,400 members (importers, brand-holders, retailers) whose fees fund household recycling bins, bottle banks, civic amenities and commercial backdoor waste nationwide. Over the past 25 years, Repak members have invested over €514 million to help grow packaging recycling and recovery from under 15% in 1997 to an estimated 96% in 2021. There are many benefits to becoming a Repak Member, including access to its Prevent & Save programme which can cut packaging waste at source and save your business money.

R Rentokil Pest Control

Nationwide Coverage Tel: 0818 882 326 Fax: (045) 852 890 Email: pestcontrolinfo@rentokil.ie Web: www.rentokil.ie Main Products & Services: Suppliers of Pest Control to ISO 9001:2008 specification. Contact: Pest Control: Michael O’Mahoney

S


company listings Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland

Schütz (Ireland) Ltd

safe food

Address: 7 Eastgate Avenue, Eastgate, Little Island, Co. Cork T45 RX01 Tel: 021 230 4100 Fax: 021 230 4111 info@safefood.net Email: Web: www.safefood.net Main Products & Services: safefood is the all island public agency promoting food safety and healthy eating to consumers through education and awareness campaigns. It also acts as an independent source of scientific advice, commissions and funds relevant research, co-ordinates scientific co-operation and facilitates knowledge exchange among those working in the food sector and other key stakeholders.

SAI Global

Address: Block 3, Quayside Business Park, Mill St, Dundalk, Co. Louth. Tel: 042 932 0912 Email: information@saiglobal.com Web: www.saiglobal.com Main Products & Services: Food Safety certification, BRC Certification, GFSI Scheme Certification, Environmental Management, Quality Management Systems, Supply Chain Management, Aquaculture Services, Fishery Services, Compliance Solutions, Risk Management.

Saica Pack Ireland

Address: Ashbourne Industrial Estate, Ashbourne, Co. Meath. Tel: (01) 801 0400 Fax: (01) 835 1249 Email: michael.shaw@saica.com Web: www.saica.com

Address: Killala Business Park, Townamore, Killala, Co. Mayo, F26 XY18 (096) 33044 Tel: Fax: (096) 33045 Email: info1ireland@schuetz.net www.schuetz.net Web: Main Products & Services: Manufacturer of IBCs and PE Drums.

Sealed Air Ltd

Address: 1-3 Cromwell Road, St. Neots, Cambridgeshire PE19 1QN. Tel: (0044) 148 022 4000 Fax: (0044) 148 022 4063 Email: cryovac.ukmkt@sealedair.com Web: www.sealedair.com Main Products & Services: Cryovac® Packaging Solutions, including films, barrier bags, rigid trays, punnets and pots. Diversey Hygiene Solutions including detergents, disinfectants, dosing equipment and energy and water management solutions. Contact: Timothy O’Connell Mobile: 086 225 3172

Smurfit Kappa Ireland

Address: Ballymount Road, Walkinstown, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 409 0000 (01) 456 4509 Fax: Email: info@smurfitkappa.ie Web: www.smurfitkappa.ie www.skpackaging.ie www.smurfitkappadirect.ie Main Products & Services: Ireland’s leading manufacturer of packaging and point of purchase displays, with a wide product range to suit the needs of the food industry. Standard packaging & promotional products can now be bought on-line via our webshop at www.smurfitkappadirect.ie

Address: 3 Park Place, Hatch Street Upper, Dublin 2. (01) 808 2100 Tel: Fax: (01) 808 2002 info@seai.ie Email: Web: www.seai.ie

Syspal

Address: Cockshutt Lane, Broseley, Shropshire, TF12 5JA, England. Tel: (0044) 1952 883188 (0044) 1952 884 093 Fax: Email: sales@syspal.com Web: www.syspal.com Main Products & Services: Manufacturers of stainless steel and aluminium products, specifically designed for regulations within the food industry.

T

Teagasc Food Research Programme Moorepark and Ashtown Address: Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork, P61 C996.

Ashtown, Dublin 15, D15 KN3K. (025) 42 222 / (01) 805 9500 Tel: Email: mark.fenelon@teagasc.ie / declan.troy@teagasc.ie www.teagasc.ie Web: Main Products & Services: Research, development and innovation, food bioscience, food safety, food chemistry and technology, food industry development, Food Quality & Sensory Science pilot plant facilities, analytical services, training, consultancy.

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company listings Tekpak Automation Ltd

Address: Whitemill Industrial Estate, Wexford, Ireland. (053) 916 3033 Tel: Email: jkehoe@tekpak.ie Web: www.tekpak.ie The Packaging Ltd Main Products & Services:Centre For all your packaging needs Vision guided pick Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. TPC and place Tel: 01 450robots. 8759 ~ Fax: 01 450 7567 www.thepackagingcentre.ie Contact: John Kehoe

The Packaging Centre Ltd For all your packaging needs

TPC

Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. Tel: 01 450 8759 ~ Fax: 01 450 7567 www.thepackagingcentre.ie

The Packaging Centre

Address: Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 450 8759 Fax: (01) 450 7567 Email: sales@thepackagingcentre.ie www.thepackagingcentre.ie Web: Contact: Managing Director, Ivan Powell

Toyota Material Handling Ireland

Address: Killeen Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 419 0200 Fax: (01) 419 0325 Email: materialhandling@toyota.ie Web: www.toyota-forklifts.ie Main Products & Services: Toyota forklifts and BT warehouse equipment. Diesel/LPG and electric forklifts, powerpallet trucks, stackers etc.

U

UCD - School Of Agriculture and Food Science

Pantone 2935

UCC - Food Institute

Address: 3rd Floor, Food Science Building University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 1728 infofoodinstitute@ucc.ie Email: Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

CMYK Cyan: 100 Magenta: 50

UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Sciences

Address: Room 242, Food Science Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 3393 Email: foodandnutrition@ucc.ie www.ucc.ie/en/fns/ Web: Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCC - Department of Food Business and Development

Address: O’Rahilly Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 2788 Email: foodbusiness@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/foodbus/ Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCC - Food Industry Training Unit Trilby Trading Ltd

Address: Boyne House, Boyne Business Park, Greenhills, Drogheda, Co. Louth. Tel: (041) 983 2137 Fax: (041) 983 5463 Email: sales@trilbytrading.ie Main Products & Services: Food Grade Vegetable Oils. Contact: sales@trilbytrading.ie 74 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

Address: Room 246, Food Science Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 3363 Email: m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/fitu Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

Address: UCD Agriculture and Food Science Centre, UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4. Undergraduate Programmes: UCD Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine programme Office UCD Agriculture and Food Science Centre. (01) 716 7194 Tel: Email: agandfoodprogrammes@ucd.ie www.ucd.ie/agfood Web: Postgraduate Programmes: UCD School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine UCD Veterinary Sciences Centre. (01) 716 6100 Tel: agfoodvet@ucd.ie Email: www.ucd.ie/agfoodvet Web:

V

Versatile Packaging Ltd

Address: Silverstream Business Park, Silverstream, Co. Monaghan. Tel: (047) 85 177 Fax: (047) 85 199 Email: info@versatilepackaging.ie Web: www.versatilepackaging.ie Main Products & Services: Food Packaging Materials and Equipment - Tray Sealers, CPET, Barrier, Antifog Films, Aluminium Trays, Stand Up Pouches, Vacuum Pouches, Pouch Filling & Sealing Equipment, Egg Packaging, Labelling.


company listings

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Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

Address: Kilcannon Industrial Estate, Old Dublin Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. (053) 923 3778 Tel: Fax: (053) 923 3284 Email: sales@weberireland.com www.webermarking.ie Web: Main Products & Services: Print & Apply Labelling Systems, Desktop Printers, Laser Coders. Manufacturers of Blank & Pre-Printed Labels.

D.D. Williamson (Ireland) Ltd

Address: Unit D, Island Corporate Park, Little Island, Co. Cork. (021) 435 3821 Tel: (021) 435 4328 Fax: Email: info@ddwmson.com Web: www.ddwcolor.com Main Products & Services: Caramel colours, natural colours, burnt sugars, natural colour blends, liquids & powders.

WrenTech Ltd

Address: Eversley, Church Bay Road, Crosshaven, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 483 2644 Fax: (021) 483 1363 Email: smurray@wrentech.ie/ mwren@wrentech.ie Web: www.wrentech.ie Main Products & Services: Ytron & Matcon Mixing & Blending, Powder Dispersion / Incorporation, Dust free transfer batch sytems, Powder bins / Silo discharging, Auger filling, Dosing, Formulation, Batching, Flexibatch.

X Xtrupak Ltd

Address: Gowna, Co. Cavan Tel: +353 43 6683464 Email: Manufacturing johnm.reilly@xtrupak.ie Web: xtrupak.ie Apet & Rpet Main Products & Services: packaging Manufacturing extruded Apet andservicing Rpet sheet films rolls thefor the packaging and display thermoforming markets. Contact: John M Reilly, industry under the Commercial Director

XtruForm brand

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 75

Form Fill Seal PET/PE RPET/PE MONO


relevant organisations

relevant

Organisations AN BORD PLEANÁLA 64 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-858 8100 Lo-call: 1800 275 175 Email: bord@pleanala.ie Web: www.pleanala.ie

BORD BIA

140 Pembroke Road, Dublin 4. Tel: 01-668 5155 Email: info@bordbia.ie Web: www.bordbia.ie

BORD GÁIS ENERGY

PO Box 10943, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-611 0133 Emergency: 1850 205 050 Email: customercare@bordgais.ie Web: www.bordgaisenergy.ie

BORD IASCAIGH MHARA

(Irish Sea Fisheries Board) BIM Dun Laoghaire, Crofton Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-214 4100 Email: info@bim.ie Web: www.bim.ie

DRINKS INDUSTRY GROUP OF IRELAND (DIGI) 50 Upper Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-637 1777 Web: www.drinksindustry.ie

ENTERPRISE IRELAND

The Plaza, Eastpoint Business Park, Dublin 3. Tel: 01-727 2000 Web: www.enterprise-ireland.com

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ASSOC. OF IRELAND

Heraghty House, 4 Carlton Terrace, Novara Avenue, Bray, Co. Wicklow. Tel: 01-276 1211 Email: info@ehoa.ie Web: www.ehai.ie

EUROPEAN COMMISSION IN IRELAND

Europe House, 12-14 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-634 1111 Email: eu-ie-info-request@ec.europa.eu Web: ec.europa.eu/ireland

EXPERIAN IRELAND LTD

Ground Floor, Newenham House, Northern Cross, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: 01-846 9200 Email: info@experian.ie Web: www.experian.ie

FOOD DRINK IRELAND (FDI) Confederation House, 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@fooddrinkireland.ie Web: www.fooddrinkireland.ie

The FOOD Innovation Lab TU Dublin - City Campus, Sackville Place, Dublin 1 DO1 WD85 Tel: Dr Lubna Ahmed 01 402 4442 Email: foodinnovation.research@tudublin.ie Web:https://www.dit.ie/fil/

FOOD SAFETY AUTHORITY OF IRELAND The Exchange, George’s Dock, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-817 1300 Email: info@fsai.ie Web: www.fsai.ie

COMPETITION AND CONSUMER PROTECTION COMMISSION

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

GUARANTEED IRISH LTD

Bloom House, Railway St, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-402 5500 Web: www.ccpc.ie

Europe House, 12-14 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 7900 Email: epdublin@ep.europa.eu Web: www.europarl.europa.eu/ireland

CONSUMERS’ASSOCIATION OF IRELAND

EXCELLENCE IRELAND QUALITY ASSOCIATION

The Metropolitan Building, James Joyce Street, Dublin 1. Tel: +353 1 614 7000 Lo-call: 1890 289 389 Email: wcu@hsa.ie Web: www.hsa.ie

120/121 Baggot Street Lower, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-659 9430 Email: cai@thecai.ie Web: www.thecai.ie

76 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23

12 Pembroke Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4. Tel: 01-660 4100 Email: info@eiqa.com Web: www.eiqa.ie

20 Molesworth Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-661 2607 Email: info@guaranteedirish.ie Web: www.guaranteedirish.ie

HEALTH & SAFETY AUTHORITY


relevant organisations INVESTMENT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY (IDA)

THE PRIVATE SECURITY AUTHORITY

Three Park Place, Hatch Street Upper, Dublin 2, Ireland Tel: 01-603 4000 Email: idaireland@ida.ie Web: www.idaireland.com

Davis Street, Tipperary Town, Co. Tipperary. Tel: 062-32600 Email: info@psa-gov.ie Web: www.psa.gov.ie

IRISH BUSINESS & EMPLOYERS CONFEDERIATION (IBEC)

REVENUE COMMISSIONERS

Head Office, Confederation House, 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie

IRISH SECURITY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION Chase House, City Junction Business Park, Northern Cross, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: 01-484 7206 Email: info@isia.ie Web: www.isia.ie

IRISH SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES ASSOCIATION (ISME) 17 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-662 2755 Email: info@isme.ie Web: www.isme.ie

LEGAL METROLOGY, C/O NSAI

1 Swift Square, Northwood, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: 01-807 3800 Email: info@nsai.ie Web: www.nsai.ie/legal-metrology/

Head Office, Dublin Castle, Dame Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-647 5000 Web: www.revenue.ie

RGDATA

Tel: 01-288 7584 Email: rgdata@rgdata.ie Web: www.rgdata.ie

SMALL FIRMS ASSOCIATION (IBEC) 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@sfa.ie Web: www.sfa.ie

TEAGASC FOOD RESEARCH CENTRE Ashtown, Dublin 15. Tel: 01-805 9500 Email: info@teagasc.ie Web: www.teagasc.ie

WORKPLACE RELATIONS COMMISSION O’Brien Road, Carlow, R93 W7W2 Tel: 059-917 8990 Web: www.workplacerelations.ie

MANDATE

Government Departments:

NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL

Agriculture House, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01 607 2000 Email: info@agriculture.gov.ie Web: www.agriculture.gov.ie

O’Lehane House, 9 Cavendish Row, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-874 6321 Email: glight@mandate.ie Web: www.mandate.ie

The Studio, 55C, Maple Avenue, Stillorgan Business Park, Sandyford, Co. Dublin, A94 HY83. Tel: 01-290 2451 Email: hello@ndc.ie Web: www.ndc.ie

AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND THE MARINE

COLLECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE VAT/PAYE/PRSI Sarsfield House, Francis Street, Limerick. Tel: 01 738 3663 Email: through MyEnquiries Web: www.revenue.ie

COMPANIES REGISTRATION OFFICE Bloom House, Gloucester Place Lower, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-804 5200 Email:cro.info@enterprise.gov.ie Web: www.cro.ie

CUSTOMS PROCEDURES BRANCH St. Conlons Road, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. Tel: 067 63370 Email: tarclass@revenue.ie Web: www.revenue.ie

Enterprise, Trade and Employment 23 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-631 2121 0818 302121 Email: info@enterprise.gov.ie Web: enterprise.gov.ie

FINANCE Government Buildings, Upper Merrion Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-676 7571 Email: webmaster@finance.gov.ie Web: www.gov.ie/finance

HOUSING, LOCAL GOVERNMENT & HERITAGE Custom House, Custom House Quay, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-888 2000 Email: qcsofficer@housing.gov.ie Web: www.gov.ie/housing

JUSTICE AND EQUALITY 51 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-602 8202 Lo-call: 1800 221 227 Email: info@justice.ie Web: www.justice.ie

SOCIAL PROTECTION Aras Mhic Dhiarmada, Store Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-704 3000 Email: info@welfare.ie Web: gov.ie/dsp

VALUATION OFFICE Block 2, Irish Life Centre, Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-817 1000 Email: info@valoff.ie Web: www.valoff.ie FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2022/23 | 77


2022/2023 Year Planner MON TUES WED THUR FRI

1

September

October 1

2

3

November 1

December

2

SAT

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

SAT

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

SAT

3

4

10

11

5

6

7

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9

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13

14

2022

15

16

17

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

4

5

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9

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15

16

17

18

19

2

3

4

5

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13

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15

16

17

1

2

3

4

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6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

16

17

18

New Year’s Public Holiday day

January 1

2

3

4

5

6 St Brigid’s Day Public Holiday

February 1

2

March

2023 3

4

5

1

2

7

3

4

8

5

9

6

10

11

7

12

8

Good Friday

April 1

May

6

2

3

4

Public Holiday

1

5

6

7

2

3

4

1

13

14

9

10

Easter Sunday

Easter Monday Public Holiday

15

St Patrick’s Day Public Holiday

11

12

13

14

15

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

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15

16

17

2

3

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5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

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15

16

17

18

19

SAT

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

Public Holiday

June

July 1

2

3

4

Public Holiday

August MON TUES WED THUR FRI

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

SAT

1 14

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

2 15

3 16

4 17

5 18

6

197

SAT

208

2


er FRI

16

SAT

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

SAT

SUN MON TUE WED THUR FRI

17

18

24

25

19

20

21

22

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26

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SAT

SUN MON TUES

30

September 2022

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23 24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31 Public Holiday

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

October 2022

30

November 2022

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30 31

Christmas St. Stephen’s Public Holiday Day Day

December 2022

Public Holiday

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

January 2023

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

February 2023

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29 30

31

t Patrick’s Day ublic Holiday

14

March 2023 15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23 24

25

26

27

28

29

30

April 2023

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

May 2023

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

June 2023

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23 24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

July 2023

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

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31

August 2023 FRI

197

SAT

208

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

219

SAT

2210 2311 2412 2513 2614 2715 28

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

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19 20

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21

SUN MON TUES

22

23

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25

26

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30


three year calendar

2021 January Week 53 M T W T F S S

1 2 3

2021 1

2

3

4

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

July

Week 5 M T W T F S S

2021

Week 26 27 28 29 30 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

February 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

2021 6

7

8

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

August M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

2021

1

2021

Week 9

Week 30 31 32 33 34 35

26 27 28 29 30 31

March

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

6

7

8

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 28 22 23 24 25 26 27

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

10 11 12 13 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

September

22 29 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 2021

Week 35 36 37 38 39 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30

April

2021

Week 13 14 15 16 17 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

October

26 27 28 29 30

1 2 3

2021

Week 17 18 19 20 21 22 M T W T F S S

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

2021 November

Week 39 40 41 42 43 M T W T F S S

May

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

2021

Week 44 45 46 47 48

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

M T W T F S S

2022

May

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27 28

June

2021

Week 22 23 24 25 26 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

December

21 28 22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27 2021

Week 48 49 50 51 52 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 26

27 28 29 30 31

2022 January Week 52 M T W T F S S

1 2

2022 1

2

3

4

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

July

5

2022

Week 26 27 28 29 30 M T W T F S S

1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

February Week 5 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

2022

August

9

2022

Week 31 32 33 34 35 M T W T F S S

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 29 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28

6

7

8

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 27 21 28 22 23 24 25 26

March

2022

Week 9 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

10 11 12 13 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

September

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30 31

2022

Week 35 36 37 38 39 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30

April

Week 13 14 15 16 17 M T W T F S S

1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

October

25 26 27 28 29 30

1 2

M T W T F S S

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

2022 November

Week 39 40 41 42 43 44 M T W T F S S

2022

Week 17 18 19 20 21 22

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

2022

Week 44 45 46 47 48 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 28 22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27

June

2022

Week 22 23 24 25 26 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

December

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30

2022

Week 48 49 50 51 52 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 31

2023 January Week 52 M T W T F S S

11

2023 1

2

3

4

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

July

5

2023

Week 26 27 28 29 30 31 M T W T F S S

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

February Week 5 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5

2023

August

9

2023

Week 31 32 33 34 35 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30 31

March

2023

Week 9 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5

10 11 12 13 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

September

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30 31

2023

Week 35 36 37 38 39 M T W T F S S

1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

April

2023

Week 13 14 15 16 17 M T W T F S S

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

October

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

1

2023

Week 18 19 20 21 22 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

2023 November

Week 39 40 41 42 43 44 M T W T F S S

May

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

22 29 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 2023

Week 44 45 46 47 48 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30

June

2023

Week 22 23 24 25 26 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

December

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30

2023

Week 48 49 50 51 52 M T W T F S S

1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

= Public Holiday

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