Page 1

INSIDE

110 LIVE Your Home Improvement Success

22 WORK Artist Puts Mark On Dogwood Pool

16 PLAY Calling Kids: The Great Outdoors

103 GET INVOLVED Join The Garlic Mustard Challenge

THE TROT HOUSE +PLUS

RA Programs & Events

Reston Association Publication

THE COMPLETE RESOURCE FOR LIVING, WORKING, PLAYING AND GETTING INVOLVED WWW.RESTON.ORG


CONTENT 2013 SPRING EDITION | WWW.RESTON.ORG

28 FEATURES

28 COVER STORY The Trot House

10 Love Meetings

Whether the call is to rescue victims from the water, a tall building or a car, the firefighters at Reston's North Point Station are trained to respond. See why their mascot is not holding a hose or ax in his paw.

Her son told friends his mother loves meetings. And many years later, Senator Janet Howell provides an insight into the kinds of meetings she attends.

40 Ninety & Still Celebrating

BY WILLIAM MORELAND BY JANET HOWELL

PERSPECTIVES

08 12

14 16 18

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Having Your Say Heading South for the Winter Serving the People Get Moving No Time to Hibernate

ON THE STREET

22

Getting Ready for the Big Splash

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

ON THE COVER Three firefighters train in the smokehouse at Reston's North Point station.

BY SHELLEY S. MASTRAN

Photo by David Madison, a professional photographer based in the Reston area, Madison's clients include corporations and brides. David is one of several professional, award-winning photographers who generously support Reston magazine.

Come out for Reston's Founders Day celebration. Celebrate the birthday of the community's founder. Shelley Mastran explains how this day came into being.

THE FINER THINGS

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Reston's Path to a Healthy Diet

AROUND RESTON

38

The Campaign Against Garlic Mustard


40 54

10 PLAY IN RESTON

GET INVOLVED

102 103

Nature

Weed Warriors Weed Warriors: Citizens of All Ages Rescuing our Parkland 103 Virginia Invasive Plant Removal Day 105 Stream Monitoring Program 106 Potomac River Watershed Cleanup 107 Volunteer Opportunities 108 Volunteer Spotlight: Nicole Wynands

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LIVING IN RESTON

Special Events

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Member Services

44

Aquatics

54

RA Camps

Tennis

68 82

110 112

DRB Review Levels What to Expect at a DRB Meeting 113 Word Find 113 Spring Fling

BOARD & GOVERNANCE

114

Connecting to Apartment Residents 116 Board of Directors' Actions 117 Board of Directors 118 Reston Association Elections Primer 118 2013 Annual Members' Meeting

INFO & RESOURCES

120

Reston Association Common Area 121 Fishing & Boating Guidelines 122 RA Facilities & Map

Follow Reston Association on

A digital version of Reston is available online at www.reston.org.

Reston is published quarterly by the Reston Association. Send correspondence or address changes to Reston Association at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 201913404, 703-435-6530. All articles Š Reston Association 2012. All rights reserved. Advertising rates are available: Shannon B. Duffy E-mail: shannon@imprintcommunicationsllc.com Mobile: 703-508-4815 Jennifer Passey E-mail: Jennifer@imprintcommunicationsllc.com Mobile: 703-963-0503 Articles and letters to the editor may be submitted via mail to Amelia Townsend, Reston Association at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404, 703-435-6530. E-mail submissions may be made to Amelia@reston.org. Anonymous or incomplete information will not be published. Reston Association reserves the right to edit for length, style, clarity and content. Articles may be printed upon verification of authorship and availability of space.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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®

The Complete Resource for Living, Working, Playing and Getting Involved

Volume 4 | Number 1 VISION: Leading the model community where all can Live, Work, Play and

Get Involved™. MISSION: To preserve and enhance the Reston community through outstanding leadership, service and stewardship of our resources. PUBLISHER: Reston Association, Ken Knueven, President, Board of Directors EDITORIAL: Amelia Townsend, amelia@reston.org COPY EDITORS: Jennifer O’ Connor, Kathy Bush DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Long Nguyen, long@reston.org PHOTOGRAPHER: Sean Bahrami, sean@reston.org CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: David Madison, Jim Kirby, Charles A.

Want an easy way of keeping up with Reston news and offerings? Sign up for Reston Association’s electronic newsletter, RA News, to receive weekly e-mails about events, programs, community functions and important reminders. RA News is a free and concise way to stay informed. It is delivered to your in-box every Friday morning. All you need to do to join the thousands of subscribers is complete a brief sign-up form on the www.reston.org website. You don’t need to be an association member or be registered on our website. Just simply go to the home page and click on “RA News” at the top. Then enter your name and e-mail address and hit the “Join” button. You will automatically be added to our subscriber list. All issues of RA News are archived. You can read past editions by going to www.reston.org and clicking on the “RA News Archives” icon on the bottom left side of the home page.

WHERE

WHAT

HOW

WHEN

Veatch, Pete Staples, Don Atreides ADVERTISING: Shannon B. Duffy, Sales & Advertising RA CONTRIBUTORS: Arlene Whittick, Ashleigh Soloff, Barbara Beaver, Claudia Thompson-Deahl, Ha Brock, Katie Shaw, Laura Kowalski, Mary Conway, Nicki Bellezza, Sue Sims, Willa Whitacre COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTORS: Senator Janet Howell, Ken Plum (D-Va.36), Catherine M. Hudgins, Leila Gordon, Ken Knueven, Robert E. Simon, Jr., William Moreland, Harald Kasper, Eric Weinstein, Shelley S. Mastran

MAIN OFFICE (Member Services) 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, Virginia 20191-3404 Office Hours: Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Extended Hours: Saturday, 9 a.m.-Noon (April 20-July 27. Closed July 6th) Phone: 703-435-6530 Fax: 703-435-6516 E-mail: member_services@reston.org ƒƒ Board & Management Services ƒƒ Administration ƒƒ Financial Services ƒƒ Human Resources ƒƒ Assessment Questions ƒƒ Parks and Recreation ƒƒ Program information, reservations and registration for all camps, aquatics, tennis, special events and facility rentals ƒƒ Pool & Tennis Pass sales HOTLINES Tennis: 703-435-6502 Ball fields: 703-435-6530 COVENANTS ADMINISTRATION Phone: 703-435-6530 Fax: 703-673-2040 E-mail: member_services@reston.org ƒƒ Design Review Board applications and design guidelines for Reston properties ƒƒ Use and maintenance of property, covenants information and complaints ƒƒ Information resource for neighborhood association operations ƒƒ Disclosure documents PARKS & RECREATION (Central Services Facility) Phone: 703-437-7658 Fax: 703-435-6555 E-mail: mikemc@reston.org ƒƒ Maintenance and facilities such as wildlife, ball fields, tot-lots, pavilions, pathways and open space (including lakes, natural areas and trees) ƒƒ Recreational Vehicle Central Park (RVCP) ƒƒ Garden Plot Program VOLUNTEERING Phone: 703-435-7986 Fax: 703-435-9481 E-mail: habrock@reston.org ƒƒ To volunteer for events and programs ƒƒ Volunteer to serve on RA’s advisory committees, which are organized to provide advice and assistance to the Board

Printed on 10% post-consumer recycled paper, using vegetablebased ink. Please recycle.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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PERSPECTIVES

COMMUNITY RA RESTON STRATEGIC PLAN PERFORMANCE ISSUES QUESTIONNAIRE IMPACT COMMUNITY RA RESTON RESTON QUALITY IMPACT SURVEY PERFORMAN ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES NEW TOWN COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY RA INFORMATION

HAVING

COMMUNITY RA RESTON RA NEEDS PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RA RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON BOARD COMMUNITY RA RESTON RA NEEDS PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RA RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC LAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON BOARD COMMUNITY RA RESTON RA NEEDS PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION INFORMATION RECREATION ENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY ORMATION RA RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON BOARD COMMUNITY RA RESTON RA NEEDS PERFORMANCE ISSUES ACT SURVEY INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE EW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES COMMUNITY RESTON RFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RA RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON BOARD COMMUNITY RA ESTON RA NEEDS PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RA RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON BOARD COMMUNITY RA RESTON RA NEEDS PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION INFORMATION RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES COMMUNITY RESTON PERFORMANCE ISSUES IMPACT SURVEY INFORMATION RA RECREATION AMENITIES STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES QUESTIONNAIRE NEW TOWN QUALITY COMMUNITY RESTON BOARD COMMUNITY RA

Your Say

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Y NCE

N N

BY KEN KNUEVEN  PHOTO PROVIDED BY JIM KIRBY

W

hat do most people in our community think of the job the RA board is doing? Are we providing the right mix of services and what will we need as Reston grows and develops? Those are some of the questions we hope to answer in the first ever community-wide survey conducted by Reston Association.

Survey With Purpose

It will help the board set community and budget priorities and learn more of what residents think about Reston and the Association. The survey is one outgrowth of the 2012-2016 Strategic Plan, which functions as the road map for the Association. It guides the planning, organizational priorities and budget development through 2016.

The objective is to make Reston Association a high performance organization, agile and capable of meeting the needs of the community. So, in 2012, the Board’s attention centered on three priorities: 1.

2.

3.

Begin now, to annually develop and allocate appropriate financial resources to sustain and enhance the Association’s physical infrastructure. By 2013, establish procedures that will ensure Reston Association’s interests are considered in redevelopment and revitalization of our community. Regularly engage the diverse elements of the community on issues and opportunities that impact Reston.

The overall objective of these priorities is to help us maintain fiscal stability in the short term and align resources with the priorities of our members, while determining a responsible level of assessments in the process. We must always demonstrate efficiency to our members, while continuously improving how the business of the association is conducted.

Community Priorities

This year, Reston Association conducts a comprehensive community-wide survey of our members. It will provide us with information to help set budget priorities and help us understand how members interact with the Association and how to better serve our growing population. Three thousand randomly selected homes, reflecting the diversity of our community, will be participating through a questionnaire that will arrive via U.S. mail. If you receive one, please take the time to complete and mail it back to the independent firm conducting the survey. There will also be an option to complete the questionnaire online.

The 21st Century “New Town”

While Reston is not the same small, isolated “new town” on the edge of civilization that it was 50 years ago, ours remains a changing landscape. Metro will bring more people, more traffic and we hope, more diversity. Development along the Dulles Corridor will create a skyline unlike any we could imagine. Therefore, we are likely to see more multi-use and transit-oriented development.

Although the Association has conducted smaller surveys on specific topics, such as recreational amenities, there has never been a comprehensive look at the entire community. Therefore, the value of the data could be deemed priceless. It will be used to help the Board set priorities that address the needs of a growing and evolving community. When Robert Simon and his team planned Reston, they envisioned a densely packed community, where people walked, lived, worked, played and became involved. By keeping his goals at the forefront as the leadership of the community has changed, Reston has retained the qualities that our founder envisioned. This survey, the first of many more to come, will help us grow and understand the priorities of our 21st Century “New Town” residents. Ken Knueven is president of the Board of Directors of Reston Association and represents his beloved Lake Anne/Tall Oaks District. He represents RA on the boards of IPAR and Friends of Reston. Because he works in Reston as well, Knueven does get to experience the Reston motto: Live, Work, Play and Get Involved™.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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* PERSPECTIVES

Love Meetings

BY SENATOR JANET HOWELL  PHOTOS PROVIDED BY JANET HOWELL

M

any years ago when I was a Reston community activist, someone asked my then eight-year-old son what his mother did. Without hesitation, Brian answered, "My Mom goes to committee meetings. She loves meetings!" Brian was right then and, fortunately, I still do value meetings.

All About the Committees Most of the work in the Virginia General Assembly is done in committees. We have several different kinds and each serves a purpose. Since the legislature only meets a few weeks a year (46 days in odd-numbered years and 60 days in even-numbered), much of the policy work needs to be done between sessions. During the session, committees need to efficiently screen the good legislation from the bad. And we need to do it at breakneck speed, since typically we deal with about twenty five hundred bills and resolutions each session.

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Standing Committees

The most visible committees are the Standing Committees. They function mainly during the session and each has a specific area of concern. It is their job to consider all the bills under their purview. A bill must get a majority vote in committee before it can go to the Senate or House chamber for a vote. Nothing is as frustrating as working on a piece of legislation for a year and having it perfunctorily defeated in a standing committee after only a few minutes discussion. However, nothing is so satisfying as defeating a harmful or ill-advised piece of legislation.

Rules of the Chairman

The chairman rules the committee. He or she sets the agenda and determines how much time can be spent on deliberations. The chairman can also refuse to hear a bill at all, although that is rare in the Senate. The House committees sometimes run out of time and then bills are left in committee, not to be heard or

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

voted on. The standing committee chairman also decides if there will be subcommittees to screen bills and makes assignments to the subcommittees.

The Committees

Legislators vie for positions on Standing Committees. Some — like Finance in the Senate and Appropriations in the House — are coveted by everyone. Usually only senior members serve on those committees. In the House, the Speaker makes all the assignments and can, and does, remove people from the committees if they displease him. In the Senate, committee assignments are made by the majority party, usually with the advice of the minority party. Once you get a committee assignment, you can expect to stay on it unless you ask for a change. The chairman is usually the most senior member of the majority party serving on the committee. Over my 21 years in the Senate, I have been able to maneuver myself onto the most prestigious committees: Finance, Education

and Health, Courts of Justice, Privileges and Elections, and Rules. That is, frankly, an unusually heavy load, and I am in committee or subcommittee meetings virtually all the time when we are not voting on the Senate floor. However, Standing Committees are only one part of the system. We also have commissions and special joint study committees that meet when we are not in session.

The Commissions

Commissions are permanent and each has its own staff of experts. Some of the major commissions are the Health Commission, Joint Commission on Technology and Science, and the Commission on Youth. Commissions study policy options in depth and make recommendations to the General Assembly. Each commission meets several times during the year. Members are expected to develop a deeper understanding of the issues and guide their colleagues. I serve on several commissions. The most influential are the Crime Commission (where I


am currently vice-chair) and the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission. JLARC is the legislature's investigative division. Our staff of nineteen professionals analyzes various executive departments to assess how efficiently they are carrying out their mission. As you can imagine, there is frequently quite of a bit of tension. JLARC also studies issues when requested by the legislature.

Special Studies

The legislature also has special study committees These are temporary and exist only for a year or so. Topics range from combating obesity in children to evaluating the efficacy of tax incentives. Study committees can have quite an impact because the members work out recommendations that are mutually agreed to.

Committees ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Senate Finance (Vice-Chair) Virginia Crime Commission (Vice Chair) Education & Health Courts of Justice Privileges & Elections Rules Committee

Commissions ■■

■■

Joint Legislative Commission on Technology and Science Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission

Membership on commissions and study committees is also competitive. Most legislators want to serve. In the Senate, it is the Rules Committee that makes appointments. In the House, the Speaker decides who will serve on each.

You Are Invited

All committee meetings are open to the public. I strongly encourage you to sit in on some when you are in Richmond. They are usually very informative and sometimes very dramatic. Unfortunately, not many people besides lobbyists come to our meetings when we are out of session. I think if more members of the public were watching we would get better results.

It is a good thing I still enjoy meetings, because committees do most of the legislature’s work — and I have to drive to Richmond a couple times a week to participate in them. Senator Janet Howell has been a Reston leader for 35 years. She has represented us in Richmond since 1992. She serves on the powerful Finance, Courts of Justice, and Education and Health committees and is a budget conferee.

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* PERSPECTIVES

Heading South Winter FOR THE

BY KEN PLUM  PHOTOS PROVIDED BY SEAN BAHRAMI AND VIRGINIA GENERAL ASSEMBLY

A

s much as I like Reston, I nonetheless head south — at least weekdays for some of the winter — to Richmond, Virginia, for the annual General Assembly session. Fortunately, I travel south very early Monday mornings and return late on Fridays, which keeps my weekly commute of more than 100 miles each way to about two hours in the heavily-congested I-95 corridor that at other times of the day could add hours to the trip. My travel south does little to spare me winter weather, however. Richmond temperatures are not much higher than Reston’s, and the almost nonexistent snow removal in Richmond makes VDOT efforts in Reston look good. Any warmer temperatures I may experience during the legislative session are most likely to come from debate in the Capitol rather than the weather outside. When someone is addressing the concern of more sunshine in Richmond, they are more likely talking about opening up the legislative process than observing the weather.

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to hear great oratory at every meeting; it is fairly rare. A whole lot of legislating is fairly routine even as it is necessary. At times it can get boring for everyone.

Delegate Plum meets with visitors from the Virginia Credit Union League.

The intensity of the legislative process keeps me and my colleagues indoors and out of the weather for the 45 to 60 days (depending on the year) we are in session. We do have to leave our offices in the General Assembly Building and make our way to the State Capitol Building a halfblock away come rain, snow, hail or sleet. The underground tunnel that would have moved us and our constituents out of the elements was cut from the budget to economize when we renovated the Capitol building.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Our daily legislative sessions begin at noon, I suppose in order for us to have committee meetings in the mornings. We start promptly at noon with the first order of business being the “morning hour,” even though it is afternoon and can last anywhere from a few minutes to several hours. Even as we have adopted iPads to conduct our business, we still follow the rules written down in Jefferson’s manual. All of our floor sessions are open to public viewing from the gallery of the House or Senate Chambers or via electronic broadcasting. Committee meetings are open to the public but not broadcast. Do not expect

Nothing brightens my day and lifts my spirits more during the winter days in Richmond than a visit from friends, neighbors, and constituents from Reston. Stop by my office, 401 in the General Assembly Building. My schedule is always heavy, but I will find time to greet you and make sure your trip is educational and enjoyable. I am honored to represent you in Richmond, and I work fulltime at it in order to do a good job. At the same time, I am looking forward to spring in Reston. Ken Plum represents the 36th District in the Virginia House of Delegates. He lives in Reston.


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VACo * PERSPECTIVES

Serving the People

BY CATHY HUDGINS  PHOTOS PROVIDED BY THE OFFICE OF SUPERVISOR CATHERINE M. HUDGINS

A

s most of you no doubt know, the work schedule for a Fairfax County supervisor can be rather formidable. Many of my activities and meetings are well documented and a matter of public record. However, one role that I play may not be quite so readily apparent. Since 2000, I have represented Fairfax County on the Virginia Association of Counties (VACo) Board of Directors. A word of explanation about VACo would be helpful. The mission of VACo is “to support county officials and to effectively represent, promote and protect the interests of counties to better serve the people of Virginia.” VACo's Board of Directors is made up of publicly elected officials representing 13 regions of the Commonwealth. Like the federal House of Representatives, the number of directors per region varies with the population of that specific region. Regional Directors are selected by the counties they represent. VACo is a nonpartisan organization.

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Same Challenges, Different Scales

The broader perspective that VACo provides is amazingly valuable. Basically, all counties wrestle with the same issues, only the scale is different. All of us face the challenge of balancing the needs of the community and the demands of the budget. I can easily say that the shared experience of other Virginia counties — urban and rural — has decoded many a Fairfax County issue for me. By establishing legislative goals that allow the organization to work on behalf of the counties with our General Assembly, VACo plays a very valuable role. A good example of an issue that unites all counties is the request to the General Assembly for taxing authority equal to cities and towns.

Ideas and Best Practices

In addition, VACo offers the opportunity to observe best practices from counties across Virginia. Through a committee structure, organizational and policy matters are reviewed, discussed and clarified. VACo committees are: Administration of Government, Public Safety and

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Telecommunications, Community Development and Planning, Compensation and Retirement, Education, Environment and Agriculture, Finance, Health and Human Resources, and Transportation. For me personally, I found my committee work with Human Services and Transportation very rewarding and highly applicable to our county situation. VACo members can learn from experts in diverse disciplines. In an atmosphere of mutual respect, we help one another by sharing the wisdom many of us have gained from our experiences as county officials. It is the contacts and networks with other county officials that broaden the possibilities for VACo members, to the advantage of their respective counties and citizens. I believe the time invested in the additional VACo commitment is well made.

A Source for Unity

Another reason we meet is to strengthen and reaffirm the bonds that unite us as local government leaders. In an era of changing relationships between local, state and federal governments, never has the need for unity among county officials

Left to right: John D. Miller, Supervisor, Middlesex County and incoming VACo President; Catherine M. Hudgins, Supervisor, Fairfax County and outgoing VACo President; and James D. Campbell, Executive Director, Virginia Association of Counties.

been more imperative. In recent years, efforts by state and federal governments to shift expensive service responsibilities to localities have compounded the challenges we face. Since November 2011, I have led the 24-member board as president. Over the past year, it has been a true honor and fabulous learning experience to serve as VACo’s president. Well, on November 13, my term of office concluded. As I leave office, I fondly note that my official term may be over, but my relationship with VACo and its members continues, for the learning never stops. Cathy Hudgins has represented the Hunter Mill District on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors since 2000. As a long-time Restonian, she has been involved with local, county and state politics for over 30 years.


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* PERSPECTIVES

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e Restonians are blessed with a full basket of recreational opportunities. Many are the kids who plays soccer; my impression is that baseball comes next in popularity, or maybe swimming. Then there are football, basketball, field and ice hockey, lacrosse, rugby, tennis, and golf. But where are running, walking, biking, rowing, kayaking, canoeing and sailing?

MOVING

GET

BY ROBERT E. SIMON, JR

I often walk the paths in my neighborhood and I see Lake Anne from my window. Mighty few kids walking or biking on the trails and none (literally none) boating out on the lake. My spies tell me the average kid spends around 61/2 hours every day interfacing with his or her high tech hardware. Can it be that they have no time for a bike or a boat? At least they have to go to school. I do see the occasional kid, accompanied by a parent, walking to an underpass on the way to school. But no kids on bikes where there should be swarms. Does all this represent the maunderings of an old fuddy duddy? Robert E. Simon, Jr., founder of Reston.

STAY ACTIVE

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RESTON SWIM TEAM rsta.org

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

RESTON SOCCER

restonsoccer.com

CANOE & KAYAK ckapco.com

REST BASKET

restonbaske


TON TBALL

etball.com

KIDS TRIATHLON restonkidstri.org

RESTON RUNNERS

restonrunners.org

RESTON BIKE CLUB restonbikeclub

RESTON FOOTBALL

restonseahawks.org

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No Time to Hibernate BY LEILA GORDON  PHOTOS BY RCC STAFF LINDA RUTLEDGE

E

arlier sunsets and cold damp winds usually make us feel the “winter blues” and make us want to hunker down in our own nests to wait for spring. At Reston Community Center, there is lots going on that may bring you from the easy chair in front of your home fire, out to enjoy outstanding entertainment, participate in a teen-rrific run-up to the prom season, or round up a basket full of eggs and fun with your young children.

1: Reston Community Orchestra performed at RCC Community Room during the 2012 annual musical tribute to Dr. MLK. 2: Lunasa, international Irish acoustic group, will perform at the CenterStage on March 6 @ 8 p.m. Photo Credit: Georgia Bertazzi. 3: 2012 Diva Central, RCC Prom Dress Give-a-Way Event. 4: 2012 Reston MLK Voices of Inspiration Concert at the No. VA Hebrew Congregation. 5: 2012 Eggnormous Egghunt at Brown’s Chapel. 6: Brian Sanders JUNK, contemporary dance group, will perform at the CenterStage on February 13 @ 8 p.m. Photo Credit: Steve Belkowitz. 7: Gerald Clayton Trio will perform at the CenterStage on January 16 @ 8 p.m. Photo Credit: Ben Wolf. 8: 2012 Eggnormous Egghunt at Brown’s Chapel. 9: The Left Bank Quartet will perform at the CenterStage on March 3 @ 3 p.m. Photo Credit: Claudia Lohner.

Performances to Melt Away Winter Chills

After you enjoy all the activities of the Reston's Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday weekend, January 19th and 20th, you can look forward to two performances in February that will be part of every dance and music lover’s conversation. On Wednesday the 13th of February, at 8 p.m., Brian Sanders JUNK takes over the stage and wings of the CenterStage to present a contemporary dance evening with astonishing physical prowess and surprising props and staging. The following Saturday, the 16th, at 8 p.m., pianist and jazz phenomenon Gerald Clayton performs with his eponymous trio. Fans of last year’s Clayton Brothers performance, which was a huge hit with the CenterStage audience, will not want to miss Gerald’s exciting chops. March brings musical changes of pace. The annual sold-out performance by community favorite, Irish super-band, Lunasa is on March 6th at 8 p.m. Even though that is a Wednesday night, this concert is a hard ticket to get, so don’t wait too long to get yours. If classical music played

impeccably is your “sweet spot,” then you don’t want to miss the debut at the CenterStage of The Left Bank Quartet, Sunday, March 3rd, at 3 p.m. These great musicians perform in concert halls across the continent and have made local appearances at the University of Maryland’s Clarice Smith Center for the Performing Arts and at the Kennedy Center.

A Gown for the Ball

Teens everywhere look forward to their prom experience, but for a teenage girl without a lot of extra spending money, the enthusiasm could be tempered by unreasonable limitations. For years, RCC has found a way to make any teen girl’s prom dreams come true with the annual “Diva Central” Prom Dress Drive and Giveaway. From January 7th to March 4th, you can donate gentlyused prom dresses (Please — circa 2008 or later) as well as other parts of a dressy ensemble: shoes, purses, jewelry and accessories. On Saturday, April 6th, “Diva Central” opens for the teens seeking the ideal combination to make their prom evening a night to remember. For more details about “Diva Central,” contact RCC Teen Director Kenny Burrowes at 703-390-6158.

Eggnormous Spring

Finally, the surest sign that your hibernating instincts should shut down is the arrival of the annual Eggnormous Egghunt. Reston Community Center and Reston Association team up to throw the best and most fun celebration of all things spring. Veterans of the Egghunt know that you have to arrive at 10 a.m. sharp to be ready to gather the eggs and goodies distributed across Brown’s Chapel Park. The hunt is a blast and very brief — the treasure is quickly found and baskets are filled in a wink. Don’t worry though, because there is still much more fun to be had, whether enjoying the moon bounce, playing the games, or getting a commemorative photo with Mr. and Ms. Bunny. If the weather doesn’t cooperate on March 31st, plan for the same festivities on April 7th, same time and same place. So it doesn’t make any sense to spend your winter hiding indoors from all the fun you can have with your family and friends at Reston Community Center. Come join the party. Leila Gordon has been the RCC Executive Director since 2008.

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FIT 4 LIFE

Getting older can come with a variety of health challenges. But you can take action to maintain good health and reduce your risk of disease and disability. Exercise, good nutrition, regular health screenings, getting vaccines, having enough sleep, and participating in activities you enjoy are just a few ways to promote healthy aging.

4 Types of Exercise

Endurance, or aerobic, activities increase your

breathing and heart rate. They keep your heart, lungs, and circulatory system healthy and improve your overall fitness. As a result, they delay or prevent many diseases that are common in older adults such as diabetes and heart disease. Building your endurance makes it easier to carry out many of your everyday activities.

NACRE A pearl is a hard object produced within the soft tissue (specifically the mantle) of a living shelled mollusc. Just like the shell of a clam, a pearl is made up of calcium carbonate in minute crystalline form, which has been deposited in concentric layers. The ideal pearl is perfectly round and smooth, but many other shapes of pearls (baroque pearls) occur. The finest quality natural pearls have been highly valued as gemstones and

objects of beauty for many centuries, and because of this, the word pearl has become a metaphor for something very rare, fine, admirable, and valuable. Source: en.wikipedia.org

Strength exercises make your muscles stronger.

Even small increases in strength can make a big difference in your ability to stay independent and carry out everyday activities, such as climbing stairs and carrying groceries. These exercises also are called "strength training" or "resistance training."

Balance exercises help prevent falls, a common

problem in older adults. Many lower-body strength exercises also will improve your balance.

Flexibility exercises stretch your muscles and can help your body stay limber. Being flexible gives you more freedom of movement for other exercises as well as for your everyday activities. Source: go4life.nia.nih.gov/4-types-of-exercise

Rock Fit helps you make long-lasting changes to your health with online coaching and fitness programs. Rock-fit.com

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Annular Tears Most annular tears are caused by the natural aging process. Since the neck and back are responsible for bearing most of a person’s body weight, they are susceptible to a great deal of wear over time. By the age of 30, most people’s intervertebral discs have begun to degenerate to a certain degree. This degeneration, combined with continuous repetitive activities (e.g. bending, lifting, twisting, sitting) can lead to annular tears since the annulus fibrosus is in a weakened state. Also, traumatic injury can cause an annular tear. This is typically seen in those who participate in high-impact sports such as gymnastics and football and in people with strenuous occupations. Studies also indicate that annular tears may lead to premature degeneration of the disc, endplates, and facet joints.

Source: www.spinemd.com

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Annular Tear Viewed on MRI


PERSPECTIVES

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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* ON THE STREET

Getting Ready for the

Big Splash Cool Spot on Hot Days

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he long-awaited reopening of one of Reston’s pools is just a few months away. Dogwood Pool is undergoing a $1.4 million dollar renovation. Mark your calendars for the ribbon cutting in May.

Fresh, Updated, for Everyone

Since work began last year Dogwood Pool is coming to life. The revamped bathhouse, which is now ADA compliant, as well as new parking, and the facelift for the 25-meter lap pool have all been completed.

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Dogwood Pool is one of 15 pools operated by Reston Association. Located in the Hunters Woods/ Dogwood District, the pool is filled with children who can walk there from their homes. Additionally, students from nearby Southgate Community Center’s summer camp program have walked to the pool.

Outside the pool, there’s a little park with a water spray feature that will stay open after the pool closes for the season. There’s also a picnic pavilion that’s accessible to the bathhouse.

Public Art Brings Beauty

Even for those who are not swimmers, there will be a special attraction at Dogwood Pool. Reston Association partnered with the Initiative for Public Art Reston to create outdoor artwork for the pool.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Artist Valerie Theberge, who also designed the mosaic tile work at The Glade Underpass near Hunters Woods Elementary School, was tapped to create a new mosaic for the Dogwood Pool fountain.

During two swimming seasons of the construction project, Reston Association provided transportation, through Reston Limousine’s discounted service, for the campers to get to Shadowood Pool.


AQUATIC PROGRAMS THIRD ANNUAL

PERSPECTIVES

Reston Kids Triathlon

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START RIDGE HEIGHTS POOL

SUNDAY

AUGUST 11, 2013 8 A.M. REGISTRATION OPENS APRIL 16, 7 P.M.

Scholarships available (application on website)

Volunteers & Sponsors Needed FREE Training Clinics will be held throughout the summer to help participants prepare for the big day.

INFO

Contact Laura at pools@reston. org or 703-435-6528 for details or visit www.restonkidstri.org

SOUTH LAKES HIGH SCHOOL

Break out Box Dogwood Pool Fun Facts Location 2460 Green Range Drive near Glade Drive Dogwood opened in 1979 Grand-Re-Opening May 2013 Watch website for updates: www.reston. org Fun Fact There’s a bit of the Tyson’s Metro Rail Project in Dogwood. Fill dirt from that project was used in the renovation. Fun fact: The consultant on Filterra helped build the original pool.

FINISH 23

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* THE FINER THINGS

Reston's Path to a Healthy Diet BY HARALD KASPER

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t has a way of catching up to you. In my mind I was still in my 20’s, weighing 185 with a 32-inch waist, but, in reality, I was 60 and I weighed 241 with a 40-inch waist. “How did this happen?” I found myself wondering as I stared at the bathroom scale numbers in disbelief. I’ve never been fat or even overweight, yet when I did a check on the Internet for the proper weight for my six-foot frame, I was shocked to discover that, one, my proper weight should be 175 and, two, my current weight classified me as being OBESE. OBESE? That can’t be. I wasn’t like all those fat people I see every day with bulging bellies and wobbling backsides. I was slim, trim and athletic. And I could eat anything at all without gaining weight. Still, there were a few clues that my own perception of myself might indeed be a bit clouded. For instance, when I would bend over to dry my hair and turn to look in the mirror there was a huge round orb protruding from my mid-section, which happened to be my stomach. Normally, I held it in with company, but when no

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I lost my granddaughter and eight five-pound bags of potatoes on the paths of Reston. one was around, I’d set it free and it wasn’t at all pretty. Then, when I would stand in front of that same mirror, there was an extra tube of flesh around the circumference of my mid-section that simply sat unmoved, even when I would suck in my stomach. It used to be that clothes and a belt disguised these “love handles,” but photos of me at family gatherings revealed otherwise, so I blamed the camera and the lighting rather than face the facts. Also, my stamina was very suspect. I would be out of breath carrying groceries to the car and equally out of breath carrying them into the house. It never occurred to me that my extra poundage translated into carrying the equivalent of 13 five-pound bags of potatoes with every step I took.

Path to Healthy Living

One day I was taking my two grandchildren for a walk on the paths of Reston and, upon approaching a huge hill leading to the Nature Center, my four-yearold granddaughter informed me she couldn’t walk anymore.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

“Carry me, Grandpa,” she said, her arms pleadingly reaching up to me. I scooped her up into my arms and started the climb. Halfway up, I was so sucking for air that I was telling myself to be sure to let my granddaughter gently down before dropping dead of a heart attack. Three quarters of the way up, I was wondering what my obituary would read and how many people would be attending my funeral. Finally, when reaching the small pond at the Nature Center, I put my granddaughter down and she and her five-year old brother explored the pond while I flopped onto a bench and held the Grim Reaper at bay with massive doses of oxygen. So, after a few moments of absolute denial over the facts that the bathroom scale and Internet shoved in my face, I made a decision to actually accept reality and then to do something about it.

TIME FOR A STROLL Reston has 55 miles of paved trails. They connect to everything — shopping centers, schools, homes, open spaces and many of Reston Association's sought after facilities. It is one of the finers things that Reston has to offer to its residents.

Lose a Grandchild Living

My first task was to set a goal. In short, how many pounds did I want to lose? The Internet chart stated that 175 was my ideal weight. However, just the idea of losing 66 pounds made me want to have a Big Mac and large fries right then and there. Besides, I had a big frame and 175 would make me skinny. (I know it’s silly; here I was, too fat, and worried about being too skinny. The tricky mind dies a slow death.) Then I remembered climbing that hill carrying my granddaughter. She weighed forty pounds and that, with an extra pound for good measure, would be my goal.


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* PERSPECTIVES

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


I would lose the weight of my granddaughter, plus one pound, within 60 days to reach a weight of 200 pounds. Piece of cake, I told myself. The next day would be the first day towards slowly erasing the word OBESE. My plan started out simple — stop shoving food into my mouth and exercise. Day one wasn’t so bad — shake for breakfast, a snack at ten, a shake for lunch, a snack at two and a frozen dinner at six. But then came the exercise. Of all the options available, walking seemed the most attractive and the simplest. My bones were too old and my muscles too unused for anything more complicated. I left the house that evening, put one foot in front of the other, and decided to see how far they could carry me. Three quarters of a mile later I had reached my limit and turned back for home. I marked the calendar “Day One — 1.5 miles”.

Successful Steps

After a week, I looked at the calendar. My walking had increased from 1.5 miles on the first day to three miles on day seven. And when I stood on the scale, the number read 232 — I had lost nine pounds and walked over fifteen miles on Reston paths. At this rate, I’ll be at 200 in less than four weeks, or so I thought. Evidently, losing weight becomes harder and harder the more you lose. Your body adapts and your metabolism adjusts. Week two I lost just six pounds while increasing my walking to four miles a day. By week four I had lost 25 pounds. My pants and shirts were looser fitting and my walking stamina had increased to six miles a day. More importantly, I was feeling better, more energetic and less and less tired. And then another added benefit sneaked upon me without my even noticing it at first.

My Daily Walks

My daily walks started by staying on the main roads, but soon after I switched to the walking paths that meander the roads from South Lakes to Soapstone to Glade and Lawyers. Two minutes off these roads and you are completely surrounded by woods. Initially, I wore earphones and listened to music during my walks, but then I decided to give technology a rest and let nature be my music. I would even sit by the small pond at the Nature Center sometimes and watch the birds, squirrels and occasional deer and have a mini — “Walden” experience that Thoreau so eloquently described. The noise of day-to-day life becomes so intrusive and so relentless that one becomes almost drowned by it. The traffic, the radio, the television, the chatter of voices, the phone, the computer — silence itself seems to have become obsolete. And when you do initially confront a natural silence, broken only by the natural sounds of birds and leaves rustling, it is an almost alien experience. And then you not only get used to it, you find yourself needing it.

I found that moving through an environment of natural silence opens the mind to ponder, to reflect and wonder. Walking a simple path surrounded by nothing but nature can itself be a university of philosophical inquiry. Who are we, what are we doing here and where is here in the greater scheme of things. Unhindered by a cacophony of artificial noise, one rediscovers the simple act of just thinking, or of not thinking at all. And this all started out as just a diet. I reached my goal after approximately two months. I also walked over 250 miles on Reston paths. In short, I lost my granddaughter's weight and eight five-pound bags of potatoes on the paths of Reston. Harald Kasper is a Reston resident.

Harald takes a rest with granddaughter Cora, age 4, and grandson Sebastian, age 5.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


BY WILLIAM MORELAND  PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID MADISON

THE TROT HOUSE

ON THE STREET

T

*

he stickers on their helmets read like well-used passports to disasters.

There was the Tsunami in Japan, earthquakes in Taiwan and the Philippines, the terrorists’ attacks at the Pentagon, the U.S. Embassy bombing in Nairobi and Hurricane Katrina. Most recently, several members of the Fire Station 39 at North Point responded to New Jersey and New York to assist with rescue operations in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

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* ON THE STREET

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

THE STORM

HELPING WHERE THE NEED IS GREAT

Hurricane Sandy was a hurricane that devastated portions of the Caribbean and the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States during late October 2012, with lesser impacts in the Southeastern and Midwestern states and Eastern Canada. Sandy, classified as the eighteenth named storm and tenth hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, was a Category 2 storm at its peak intensity. While it was a Category 1 storm off the coast of the Northeastern United States, the storm became the largest Atlantic hurricane on record (as measured by diameter, with winds spanning 1,100 miles (1,800 km).

Preliminary estimates of losses due to damage and business interruption are estimated at $65.6 billion (2012 USD), which would make it the second-costliest Atlantic hurricane, behind only Hurricane Katrina. At least 253 people were killed along the path of the storm in seven countries. Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Hurricane_Sandy

Station Commander, Captain II Kit Hessel, along with several firefighters and technicians, headed to Fort Dix, New Jersey. They provided rescue support in Little Ferry, New Jersey and Staten Island, New York. Why did they go? They are all members of the highly honored Fairfax County International Urban Search and Rescue Team(USAR). Virginia Task Force -1, or VA TF-1, consisting of firefighters, and medical and emergency rescue personnel trained to respond to disasters. Among the squad members were Technician Trisha Danula and Master Technician Rolando Contreias, who were excited to be on their first deployment. As the newest firefighters at Station 39, both are assigned to driving fire trucks on a daily basis. The deployment represented opportunities to actually put their advanced rescue training to work. “There was lots of flooding,” said Contreias. “So we moved people in

Left to right: Trish Danula (Technician), Rico Contreras (Master Technician), Sam Poles (Technician), Jay Matais (Technician), Kit Hessel (Captain), BaaTakjav Javkhlan (firefighter), Brian Bonifas (Master Technician), Ed Teal (Technician) and Randal Bittinger (Lieutenant)

boats from their homes to safety.” “When we had to, we walked alongside the boats,” said Danula. “We actually got to help people, rather than just training for it.” For their station commander, the deployment was just another way to help people. He has served VATF-1 operations abroad and

in the States. With a shrug that seemed to say he had not done anything extraordinary by being part of the VATF-1 team, Hessel added that going on disaster relief and rescue operations was just part of the job of a firefighter.

“We go where there is a need,” he said. “And we train for it.”

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EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING SAVE LIVES Inside the expansive engine bay sits a handmade plywood structure that’s a testament to the fire team’s dedication to training. Although most of the members of Station 39 have years of experience, they are constantly honing their skills.

“We train in the morning, in the afternoon and every moment we are not working or on a call,” says Hessel. “And then we train some more,” jokes Master Technician Brian Bonifas, as he passes Captain Hessel, who retorts, “That we do.” Opened in 2000, the North Point Station houses one of the county’s four Technical Rescue Operational Teams — TROT for short. They have to be ready at a moment’s notice to handle complicated rescues, such as a building or trench

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collapse or water rescues. The station is also home to one of the county’s swift water rescue teams. Just as responding to natural disasters or tragedies across the globe is more than one would expect from a local firefighter, their regular job is more complex than ever in the time that Station 39 opened. Now, the unit is called on for just about any emergency. “We are likely to get a call for a car that’s collided into a building, or a trench that’s fallen in on a worker, so we train,” said Master Technician Samuel Poles. In fact, a huge emblem painted on the wall inside the station depicts the station mascot — a rhinoceros holding tools that firefighters now routinely use. Neither is a hose or an ax. Firefighters say while their profession has undergone tremendous change, the message to the public remains the same. Be safe and smart. Prevention and planning are keys to avoiding fires or injury.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Top: An in house gym keeps Captain Kit Hessel and other firefighters in top physical shape. Bottom: Inside the smoke filled house, Technician Trish Danula trains. Right: Captain Kit Hessel emerges from the smoke filled house in full gear.


PERSPECTIVES

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THE SMOKE HOUSE Several years ago, fellow "A-shift" firefighter Billy Coburn constructed two make-shift rooms, pumped them full of harmless theatrical smoke and led families through the pitch black space during the station’s annual open house. Since 2008, the station has won the Best Open House Award in Fairfax County.

“It shows you how difficult it would be to get out of a home during a fire,” said Bonifas. “The purpose is to teach people the importance of planning their escapes.”

And the smoke house has expanded, with more mazes, fake doors and half hallways inside. Walls are painted black. Doors don’t open. It is also used for training firefighters.

“We practice the techniques for extricating people from vehicles,” said Hessel. “We gain more experience on using tools such as the Jaws of Life. It’s all part of what we do to save lives.”

In addition to the smoke house, the firefighters also have a few truly wrecked cars, which they use to — you guessed it — train.

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ED TEAL

Technician, Fairfax County Fire And Rescue Department SERVICE AWARDS ƒƒ Length of Service Award — 30 years ƒƒ Safe Driving Awards ƒƒ Two Valor Awards ƒƒ USAID/VATF-1 Service Award ƒƒ Oklahoma City Bombing Ribbon ƒƒ Numerous Unit Citations for exemplary work over and above normal operations USAR DEPLOYMENTS ƒƒ Turkey (twice) ƒƒ Philippines ƒƒ Oklahoma City Bombing ƒƒ Nairobi, Africa — U.S. Embassy Bombing ƒƒ World Trade Center and Pentagon Terrorists Attacks, Sept. 11, 2011 ƒƒ Numerous Earthquakes and Hurricanes FAMILY Three children: ƒƒ 28-year-old fraternal twins. Steven is a U.S. Army Ranger with multiple deployments. ƒƒ Daughter Heather is married to a FBI agent, who was a Marine Corp veteran and is the mother of Teal’s only grandchild. ƒƒ Three grandchildren ƒƒ 19-year-old Dylan is attending college on a baseball scholarship.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


“In my hometown in South Georgia, my mother would take us to see the fire station if we were good while she shopped for groceries. I came to Northern Virginia with the FBI and found myself at the fire station.”

THE RIGHT MAN FOR THE JOB The two men, joking easily in the bright sun of a brisk November afternoon, would likely not see each other again. Seasoned veteran of countless fires and international rescue missions, Technician William “Ed” Teal joked easily with the rookie Jay Matais, who would be leaving first with a promotion and assignment at a different fire station. Teal had spotted and fostered the skills and drive he saw in Matais and helped him train for the next step in his career. Teal loved training new people and watching them “fly.” Soon, Technician Teal would “fly” from the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department, retiring after 30 decorated years of service. Although assigned to North Point Station 39 since it opened, much of Teal’s work took him to disaster sites around the world.

International Rescue Team Begins

In 1986, Teal was among less than two dozen Fairfax County firefighters who were tapped to join a brand new unit. Their mission would be to help out

with disaster searches and rescues anywhere in the world. Only a couple of other fire departments had such units. Military in character, these urban search and rescue teams would be on the ground “in country.”

“I knew (Griffin and Conrad) both had the skills to do this job,” said Teal. “If you give Tommy nails and say, ‘Build a box,’ you will return to find the perfect box. You need those detailed abilities in this (search and rescue operation).

Fairfax County's Urban Search and Rescue team, Virginia Task Force 1, or VATF-1, deploys worldwide to natural or man-made disasters when activated by the United States Agency for International Development or the Department of Homeland Security.

The use of specialized tools for search and rescue and even how to approach the task had not been fully developed, so the small team had to improvise.

Already, Teal was part of the Fairfax County small technical rescue team that pulled victims from trenches, cars and confined spaces. But it would be nothing on the scale of searching for survivors in a foreign city crumbled by an earthquake or a bombed and burning building.

Know-how and Determination

Using his knack for spotting skills, Teal tapped fellow firefighter and long-time colleague Tom Griffin. He also reached out to another fellow firefighter that he had trained with, David Conrad, to join his group.

“We learned on our feet,” Teal said. “We would stand in front of a broken building and then decide how we would approach going in and looking for survivors.” “ We literally went to K-Mart and bought some tents,” recalls Lt. Tom Griffin. “Then we went around to fire stations in the county and borrowed tools.” “We borrowed industrial equipment, and we started with one fiber optic camera,” Teal recalled. “There we went in our leather hats, a pick-up truck and our equipment from K-Mart,” recalls Kit Hessel.

Jay Matais jokes with William "Ed" Teal on his last day at Station 39 – North Point

Life and Death Choices

There were split second decisions. Did the team follow the pleas of a desperate family and look for one person in a building that could collapse on them, or did they respond instead to the six potential survivors in another location? How would they listen for sounds of life? How would they communicate with rescue crews from other countries? “We have to do the greatest good for the greatest number,” said Hessel. They had no search and rescue rule book to follow. So Teal, who had served a stint in the military and the FBI, quickly realized the similarities to searching for life in the crumbled remains of an earthquake. His fellow firefighters credit Teal with developing processes and equipment that have become world renowned. “He has traveled all over the world teaching what he developed and every team in the world has been touched by Ed Teal,” Griffin said.

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* PERSPECTIVES

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


PERSPECTIVES

*

THE TRADITION CONTINUES “He has defined the role,” said Hessel. “What he has taught to others — what tool to use, how to approach a search and the equipment he has helped to develop that allows us to listen and see into buildings; it saves lives and impacts all search and rescue teams.”

Beyond VATF-1

Because urban search and rescue is such a specialized field, all the firefighters around the country know one another. In fact, when Fairfax County’s Virginia Task Force -1 team got the call to respond to the terrorist's attacks on September 11, 2001, they were going to help their friends — rescuers from New York. Soon after that mission, with damaged lungs and other injuries, Teal stepped down from the VATF1 team. But that did not deter him from looking for just the right recruits.

“It is a young man’s profession now. Working 52 hours straight, or sleeping on asphalt in 100 degree temperature,” remarked Griffin. Teal's colleagues, Tom Griffin, David Conrad and Randal Bittinger would rise to officer ranks. Teal remained a dedicated driver and mentor.

VATF-1 and Station 39 After Ed Teal

All the men who have worked with Teal say he cannot be replaced. Lieutenant Randal Bittinger, the heir apparent for VATF-1 leadership, says Teal’s rock solid dependability have made his job easier. “It will be a loss for us. When we have been on the scene (of a disaster), all I had to hear was that Eddie was taking care of things and I never worried about them,” Bittinger said.

Left to right: Captain Kit Hessel, Technician William "Ed" Teal, Lieutenant Randal Bittinger

“Eddie has instilled in us more than knowledge. We have the character and drive to take on more than you thought you could take,” said Griffin. “I never dreamed about being part of an international rescue team until Eddie instilled that in me.” “He will call me three times his first day of retirement,” joked Hessel. Teal agreed he would miss his “band of brothers” terribly. But he has retirement plans: move back to his native Georgia. Hunt. Fish and Teal coached his son from T-ball to college with a VA State Championship along the way.

He hopes to teach and coach the game of baseball in youth sports and never miss another birthday or holiday with his family. Be grateful to all those who came before and taught him. Captain William Moreland, a 15-year veteran of Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department, serves as Public Affairs/Community Outreach Officer.

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* AROUND RESTON

T

his year, Reston Association’s environmental team is issuing a challenge to you. Help eradicate one of the most destructive invasive exotic plants in Reston. The goal is to do as much as possible to remove this rapidly growing plant from forests, woodlands and wildlife habitats. You will have the chance to take part in the challenge to restore these areas of Reston.

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So what is this plant and how did it get here? When European settlers brought along the garlic mustard plant to eat and make herbal remedies, they did not know how destructive this plant would become hundreds of years later. We interviewed Carol Ivory, co-chair of the Environmental Advisory Committee and a tree steward. She is also involved with the Garlic Mustard Working Group, a subset of the EAC. The group's purpose is to educate residents about the environmental problems associated with garlic mustard.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Q: How is Garlic Mustard destructive?

Because it has few enemies in Northern Virginia, garlic mustard can completely dominate a forest floor in less that five years by displacing hundreds of native plants, ferns, and wildflowers. Garlic mustard also damages local insect populations. For example, several butterfly species lay eggs on garlic mustard because it resembles their native “host” plant, but the larvae die because they cannot eat garlic mustard. The plant contains “allelopathic” chemicals, which are released and inhibit the growth of plants around the garlic mustard. These chemicals are in every part of the plant and prevent native plants and trees from establishing in the same area.

Q: How does Garlic Mustard spread?

Garlic mustard is self-fertilizing, so a single plant can populate or repopulate a site in just a few short years. The plant has a two-year life cycle and reproductively matures in the second year. Flower stalks elongate in early spring, growing at half an inch per day and dominating the area. Flowers open in April and May, with four petals that form a cross. Garlic mustard spreads by seeds. Human and animal activity play a part, as seeds stick to boots, clothing, hair, mower blades, vehicle tires, and animal fur. Seeds ripen and disperse between mid June and late September and can remain viable for up to five years.


Garlic Mustard Challenge

The culmination of the spring garlic mustard pull will be at the Spring Festival on May 4, 2013.

Q: What are the key take away points we should keep in mind? ■■

■■ ■■

Q: What can we do?

Infested sites require continuous effort over five to seven years. Although every part of the plant is edible and many recipes exist for garlic mustard on the Internet, cooks should take care to use this ingredient in moderation, as it contains arsenic.

If you own a home or townhome, you can start in your own back yard. Look to eliminate any plants along natural area borders first.

Plants on Reston Association property should not be harvested for consumption because herbicides are sprayed in many natural areas to control more virulent invasive exotic species.

Flowering plants are easy to identify and hand pull. Just grab the plant by the base to ensure you get the roots. They should be removed before seeds are released. Basal rosettes can be removed at any time.

Out walking? Carry a plastic bag with you and pull plants as you go. Garlic mustard’s favorite spots are the edges of woods, parking lots, roadsides, trail sides, floodplains, stream sides, and the bases of large trees.

Eliminate isolated plants first, then small groups. Isolated plants produce more seeds than those in clumps and are the starting points for infestations. Don’t wade into patches. You’ll do more harm if you spread seeds on your shoes and clothes. Work the edges.

arlic mustard is an G invasive exotic plant that harms wildlife and habitats. This plant is easy to hand pull. Removal can be a fun activity for all ages. Bag what you pull. The plant can re-root, expedite seed dispersal, and release chemicals into the soil long after you’ve pulled it up.

Eric Weinstein is a writer, healer, and environmentalist who serves on both the Communications and Environmental Advisory Committees. www.HollowReedHealing.com

To learn more, search for “Garlic Mustard” on www.reston.org. Contact Reston’s environmental staff at 703-437-7658.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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* AROUND RESTON

NINETY & STILL CELEBRATING

BY SHELLEY S. MASTRAN  PHOTOS COURTESY OF RESTON HISTORICAL TRUST, JIM KIRBY AND MOHAMED ALI

F

ounder’s Day is a celebration of the opening of Reston and the birthday of its founder, Robert E. Simon, Jr., who was born in April 1914. Founder’s Day takes place each April on the plaza at Lake Anne Village Center. Reston had long celebrated the anniversary of its opening, but the first official Founder’s Day took place on April 21, 2004, when founder Robert Simon turned 90. Lynn Lilienthal, Bob’s stepdaughter, formed a committee to plan a big party in honor of Bob’s birthday.

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At the same time, Chuck Veatch, Reston’s first marketing and sales directors and member of the board of the Reston Historic Trust, was dreaming up a promotional program that the Reston Historic Trust could hold annually.

Robert E. Simon Jr. in the 1960s

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

He had already commissioned Zach Oxman to sculpt a statue of Bob (now known as “Bronze Bob”) on the plaza at Lake Anne, which was funded by 35 donors who each paid $1,000. The two planned events combined into the first Founder’s Day. That first celebration began in the afternoon with the revealing of Bronze Bob on a bench beside Lake Anne.

Speeches by local elected officials included the late Martha Pennino. She was the Hunter Mill District Supervisor who staunchly supported Mr. Simon’s Seven Goals that have made Reston a successful community. Beverly Cosham, nationally renowned singer and actress, sang God Bless America. There was also a variety of community musical entertainment. This was followed in the evening by a dinner party at Lake Anne, where guests dined at Jasmine Café, Café Montmartre, and Il Cigno (now Kalypso’s), with tents on the plaza for cake, dancing, and champagne. It was a most festive celebration.


Installation of Zach Oxman's statue of Bob (now known as “Bronze Bob”))

Annual installation of commemorative bricks on the plaza

Bob Simon celebrates his birthday, along with friends, family and fellow Restonians.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

Founder’s Day in 2013 will be held Saturday, April 13th. Founder’s Day has been celebrated every April since then on a Saturday close to Bob’s birthday April 10th. The event includes congratulatory remarks by elected officials, including Congressman Gerry Connolly, State Senator Janet Howell, Delegate Ken Plum, Board Chair Sharon Bulova, and Supervisor Cathy Hudgins. A variety of musical entertainment follows.

In 2011, Bill Fraize’s brass ensemble played “Gabrielli,” with horns high up on each side of the plaza, as it was played at the original dedication of Lake Anne Village Center in December 1965. Since 2004, Founder’s Day has also included the dedication of commemorative bricks, which have been installed annually on the plaza since 2000. A highlight of the event is when Bob cuts his birthday cake, served to all who attend. Recently, the Reston Historic Trust has videotaped residents’ oral histories for its archives. For the last two years, the Trust has sponsored a scavenger hunt, where participants are challenged to seek out landmarks throughout Reston and prizes are awarded at a drawing that follows.

Founder’s Day in 2014 — marking Reston’s 50th, Town Center’s 25th, and Bob Simon’s 100th birthdays — will be celebrated on April 5th with a celebratory party and the premiere showing of a documentary film about Reston, The Reston Story, produced by Storycatcher Productions, LLC. Shelley S. Mastran is Chair of the Board of the Reston Historic Trust. She is also a professor in practice in Urban Affairs & Planning and Natural Resources at Virginia Tech in Alexandria.

Did You Know? ■■

Reston’s first press showing was in October 1964, when the world's press was invited to see Reston for the first time. Journalists toured the models in buses and had a catered lunch at the golf course.

■■

Reston’s first family moved here in December 1964, when founder Robert Simon was 50.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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COME PLAY IN RESTON

CONTENT PAGE

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RA CAMPS PAGE

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TENNIS PAGE

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NATURE PAGE

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SPECIAL EVENTS PAGE

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come play in reston

AQUATICS

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


MEMBER SERVICES

Pool & Tennis Passes

Guests Welcome

As a host member or non-member, you may bring guests when visiting a pool or tennis court. There are convenient options to purchase in advance or on-site.

Welcome to our 2013 Pool and Tennis pass options page. Have an enjoyable season.

Two Easy Ways to Purchase Passes 1. 2.

Online — www.reston.org Walk-In — Come to Reston Association Member Services; our staff is happy to assist you.

Purchase in advance

Walk-In Hours and Location

Season Long Guest Pass $40/Member $50/Non-member

Member Services 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191-3404

Hours of Operation

Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m.

Extended Hours

Saturday from 9 a.m.-Noon (April 20-July 27. Closed July 6th) Please Note: A current pass is required for anyone (age 1 or older) visiting pools and tennis courts. Receipts will not be accepted on-site. Customers must be at least 18 years of age to purchase. For corporate, family zip code and replacement passes, or if it is your first time purchasing as a nonmember, please visit Member Services with qualifying proof. Call 703-435-6530 for more information.

Members

Welcome to the 2013 season. We are happy to serve you again this year.

Pool & Tennis Pass

Price

Adults 18 years & older $20 Children under 18 $10 Season Long Guest Pass $40 Tennis Key Fob $2.50 (with purchase of pass) Discount for Members: For 2013 Assessments paid online by March 1st, you are eligible for a 20% discount towards passes purchased online at www.reston.org. Offer ends April 30th. Discount does not apply to Guest Passes or inperson purchases. Please Note: Members may purchase a pass for themselves and one adult household member and immediate family members under the age of 18. Two additional passes may be purchased for family members 18-22 years of age in person or online with prior approval from Member Services. All members must be in good standing and provide proof of owning or occupying a Reston Association property. REFUND POLICY: ALL POOL AND TENNIS PASS MEMBERSHIPS ARE NON-REFUNDABLE.

Non-members

We welcome non-members who either do not live in Reston or may live in portions of Reston that are not part of the Association. There are many pool and tennis pass options to meet your needs.

Pass Options

Price

Family Pool & Tennis $620 Family Pool Only $590 Family Tennis Only $350 Couple Pool & Tennis $535 Couple Pool Only $520 Couple Tennis Only $305 Individual Pool & Tennis $445 Individual Pool Only $360 Individual Tennis Only $245 NEW Family Zip Code Pass $520 Season Long Guest Pass $50 10 and Under Tennis Pass $35 Discount for Non-members: If purchased prior to April 15th, recieve $20 off of Tennis Only passes and $50 off of Aquatics passes. Discount does not apply to Guest Passes or the 10 & Under Tennis pass. Please Note: All non-members purchasing passes for the first time are required to have a picture taken. If you are a 2012 returning customer this is not required. However, if you would like to have your picture for 2013 updated, please visit our office. We do recommend that children have their picture updated every two years.

Corporate Membership

If you work in Reston and are looking for a membership before, during or after work, please join us.

Pass Options

Price

Individual Pool & Tennis $260 Individual Pool Only $210 Individual Tennis Only $225 Please Note: Corporate memberships are for weekday use only. Please visit Member Services to show proof of employment in Reston.

Please Note: RA members and nonmembers (18 years or older) may purchase a Season Long Guest Pass (limit one per household). This pass is good for one (1) guest only per visit. The address on both the guest pass and host's pass must display the same address. Guests must be accompanied at all times.

Pre-paid Guest Pass: $25

Pre-paid passes may be purchased online or in person. This convenient pass can be used for one or more guests at a time and eliminates the need to carry cash to the facilities. Pre-paid passes are sold in packs of 5 passes.

Purchase on-site

Poolside One-Day Guest Pass: $5

A one-day pool guest pass can be purchased at your local RA pool; cash only please. Guests must be accompanied by a cardholder.

Courtside One-Day Guest Pass: $5

A one-day tennis guest pass can be purchased from the court monitor at the tennis court; cash only please. Guests must be accompanied by a cardholder. For more information on our facilities and programs, please refer to the Aquatics and Tennis sections, or e-mail Member Services at member_services@reston. org. Please let us know if you have recommendations on how we can serve you better. NEW 10 and Under Tennis Pass: $35 Valid at North Shore Courts only New this year is the Non-member 10 and Under Tennis Pass. This pass entitles Non-member children 10 years of age and under to utilize the North Shore Tennis Courts for practice. There are six 36-foot courts available for use. Children must be accompanied by an adult, but the adult is not required to have a pass. No photographs are needed and the pass may be purchased online.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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AQUATIC PROGRAMS Programs & Classes Members can participate at all levels — including learn-to-swim programs, safety training and exercise classes or relaxing by the pool — and do so at well-maintained, clean facilities under local health department standards and managed by a welltrained staff.

Lifeguard Certification Classes

Reston Association is an Authorized Provider or American Red Cross Lifeguard Training programs. Individuals who obtain the American Red Cross certifications from this class are then eligible to apply with Reston Association, as well as many other local agencies and businesses that honor the American Red Cross certification.

Certifications earned: Lifeguarding, First Aid, and CPR/AED for Lifeguards (all valid two years) Registration begins:

Monday, Apr. 1, 2013. $150*/RA Members $250*/Non-members

*Participants will receive a $100 refund IF participant attends all classes. Any student from 2012 is still certified and does not need a re-certification course until 2014. If interested in a re-certification course, please e-mail Willa at aquaticsinfo@reston.org.

Lifeguard Training Schedule

May 3-12, May 10-19 May 17-26, May 31-June 9 June 7-16, June 14-23 June 24-28, July 5-14 July 8-12, July 22-26 July 26-Aug. 4, Aug. 5-9 Aug. 9-18, Aug. 19-23

NOTE: This class will not certify you to work at the ‘WaterMine’ or any Fairfax County Park Authority facility.

Don't Wait

Get Your Pool Pass

All classes are taught at the Reston Association headquarters, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, and various Reston pools. See schedule for start and end dates of each class. The full details will be posted on our website in March once instructors have committed to the season. Classes will be scheduled primarily on evenings and weekends while public school is still in session. (six students minimum required to hold class)

Pool passes are required for admission to any Reston Association pool. Order yours online today to avoid long lines in our office. Online or in person.

Fitness Classes

Water Aerobics and Aqua-Zumba will start in May this year, and we’re thrilled to be offering at least five different classes to meet any skill or experience level. A full schedule of classes with dates, times, and descriptions will be available in the summer edition of Reston magazine and in our ‘Fitness Programs’ brochure. Drop-in class fees:

$8 per class/RA Members $4/RA Members ages 55+ $10 per class/Non-members $8/Non-members ages 55+ Buy a punch pass and avoid carrying cash to the pools! Punch passes are available for purchase from our Member Services desk starting April 1st and you can purchase as many classes as you would like.

For more info on Aquatic programs and events, please call the aquatics office at 703-435-6532.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


AQUATIC PROGRAMS

NOW HIRING

Reston Association Aquatics is looking for qualified lifeguards, pool managers, and all types of instructors. Top 5 Reasons 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

F lexible work schedule (early morning shifts are great for teachers) Competitive wages (ranging from $9.50/hour for lifeguards to as much as $30/hour for instructors) Network with Reston members and make new friends Advancement opportunity Work outside and get a great tan

Lifeguards must have American Red Cross certifications in Lifeguarding, First Aid, and CPR/AED prior to their interview, but are welcome to apply before they have taken the course. Limited positions are also available as office assistants and seasonal maintenance.

PHOTO BY DON ATREIDES

Submit your application to careers.reston.org.

Reston Association is an EOE and drug-free workplace.

For more info on Aquatic programs and events, please call the aquatics office at 703-435-6532. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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AQUATIC PROGRAMS DEAP DEAP stands for Drowning Education Awareness Program and is a collaborative effort between Reston Association and Reston Community Center to educate our community about water safety. DEAP offers three different presentations/classes that can be requested at any time year-round and is set up to serve the audience's schedule. To learn more about the programs offered, or request a session, please contact: Reston Community Center (RCC) or Reston Association (RA).

WHALE Tales (5-12 years old)

Free, Registration Required

Longfellow’s WHALE Tales is a FREE one-hour interactive presentation that provides easyto-follow information to help children learn safe behavior in, on, and around the water. Taught in a classroom environment, WHALE Tales makes water safety fun and easy to learn. Each lesson is reinforced with color posters, worksheets, activities, and a video that features Longfellow, the animated whale. This program is offered to Cub Scouts and Webelos, Daisy, Brownie, and Junior Girl Scouts, and daycare centers.

Parent Orientation to Swim Lessons (18 years and older)

Free, Registration Required

This FREE one-hour presentation (30-minute presentation, 30 minutes of Q&A) will provide parents with an orientation to the group swim lessons offered by Reston Association and the Reston Community Center. It is designed to teach parents with children in the lower swimming levels how to provide guidance, care, supervision, motivation, and support to their child in our swim lesson programs.

General Water Safety (18 years and older) Free, Registration Required

This FREE 90-minute presentation (60-minute lecture and 30 minutes of Q&A) focuses on the importance of water safety training and provides general information for keeping family members safe in, on, and around the water. The presentation is designed for rotary clubs, PTAs, home school networks, church groups, and other civic organizations, and can be scheduled at their facility.

Reston Community Center (RCC)

703-476-4500

Reston Association (RA)

703-435-6528

By working together, RCC and RA strive to assure our community’s access to healthy and safe fun in all of Reston’s pools.

Pool Party

For more info on Aquatic programs and events, please call the aquatics office at 703-435-6532.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


AQUATIC PROGRAMS Other Ways To Participate In Aquatics Junior Lifeguarding

Junior Lifeguarding is a two-week, half-day, camp for teens ages 13-15 who are interested in learning what it takes to become a professional lifeguard. Many former Junior Lifeguarding students have gone on to take the Lifeguard Training course in later summers and then become actual Reston Association Lifeguards. See the RA Camps section page 63 for more information.

Reston Swim Team Association (RSTA)

Reston Masters Swim Team (RMST)

The RSTA is an independent youth (6-18 years old) swim team working in cooperation with the Reston Association Aquatics Department. With nine teams in the community, swimmers of all levels are invited to participate.

The RMST is an adult (18 and older) swim league for Reston area residents operating under the Potomac Valley Local Masters Swimming Committee which is part of United States Masters Swimming (USMS).

General Information and Registration: 703-3260526 or www.RSTA.org

General Information and Registration: www.restonmasters.com

SCUBA Programba offers

Deep Blue Scuba offers certification classes for adults and week-long camps for children. Our highly experienced instructor is certified by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) and offers great rates to Reston Association members. Classes and camps are held right here in Reston as well as other Northern Virginia locations for the final ‘open water’ dive component of the class.

Contact Frank for details, 571-437-5189, or e-mail deep_blue_scuba@excite.com Reston Association offers both after-hours private parties for groups of 15-350, and two-hour daytime birthday party packages for groups under 15 people.

Private Pool Party

Private parties are very popular and certain weekends fill up fast so plan now. Party catering discounts are available through Vocelli’s Italian Catering.

Daytime Party Packages:

Admission for up to 15 people, pizza and drinks, reserved area at the pool, paper products, goody bags for each child, special gift for the birthday kid, and a party host to lead games/activities. Birthday party packages are available for children ages 4-11.

Reservations will begin Monday, April 1st for parties between May 25th and August 25th. Any parties after August 25th cannot be booked until after August 1st when we are able to confirm the necessary staffing. For details see our fact sheets online or contact Willa at aquaticsinfo@reston.org or 703-435-6532. Book before June 1st for a 10% discount!.

For more info on Aquatic programs and events, please call the aquatics office at 703-435-6532. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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AQUATIC PROGRAMS Pool Facilities and Features Please note that all our pools will have new phone numbers this year. Please check the summer edition of Reston magazine or our website www.reston.org in May for up-to-date pool contact information.

GLADE

LAKE AUDUBON

One-meter diving board, heated spa, zero-depth wading pool with fountains, two-story water slide, picnic tables, tennis courts and playground within walking distance

Diving board, grass area, picnic tables, wading pool, boat ramp to Lake Audubon within walking distance

11550 Glade Drive Lane depth: 3.5-12.5 feet Length: 25 meters

AUTUMNWOOD

GOLF COURSE ISLAND

Wading pool with fountain, covered picnic area, grass area, tennis courts and playground within walking distance

One-meter diving board, two grass areas, wading pool, picnic tables, playground and pavilion within walking distance

11950 Walnut Branch Road Lane depth: 3.5-5.5 feet Length: 25 meters

DOGWOOD NEWLY RENOVATED! 2460 Green Range Road Lane depth: 3.5-5 feet Length: 25 meters

Zero-depth entry, play pool with spray features, diving board, grass/picnic area. See opposite page.

11301 Links Drive Lane depth: 3-12 feet Length: 25 meters

HUNTERS WOODS

2501 Reston Parkway Lane depth: 3.5-8.5 feet Length: 25 meters

In-water basketball and volleyball, diving board, interactive splash pad, extralarge heated spa, ADA ramp into main pool, in-water wheelchair available for pool access, picnic tables, tennis courts, playground, and pavilion within walking distance

Pool Schedule Coming Soon

The full pool schedule will be published in the summer edition of Reston magazine and available online by late April. North Shore and Ridge Heights heated pools will open Saturday, May 11th with all other facilities opening Saturday, May 25th.

Help Keep The Pools Open!

Non-toilet trained children must wear swim diapers covered by rubber pants while using our facilities. We are proud to offer an all-in-one diaper and swim pants solution at our Member Services desk that’s less expensive than local retailers. If you have a child who’s still learning, please buy one and have an accident free summer!

2070 Twin Branches Road Lane depth: 3-5 feet Length: 25 meters

LAKE NEWPORT

11601 Lake Newport Road Lane depth: 3.5-5.5 feet Length: 50 meters

Two one-meter diving boards, wading pool, covered picnic area with charcoal grills, sand volleyball court, playground, softball and basketball within walking distance

LAKE THOREAU

2040 Upper Lakes Drive Lane depth: 3-5 feet Length: 25 meters

Diving board, heated spa, wading pool, grass area, picnic tables, scenic lake view

NEWBRIDGE

11768 Golf Course Square Lane depth: 3.5-12 feet Length: 25 meters

One-meter diving board, wading pool, picnic tables, tennis courts and playground within walking distance

Inclement Weather Policy For Pools

In the event of a storm (or if the weather is cool, raining or drizzling) all Reston Association pools will close for OPEN and ADULT SWIM with two exceptions: Lake Thoreau and North Shore Pools (unless normally closed on that day).

Lightning

All Reston Association pools will close until one half-hour after the last sound of thunder or visible lightning.

NORTH HILLS

SHADOWOOD

Wading pool with fountain, heated spa, ADA access and Hydrolift Chair to main pool, grass area, picnic tables, tennis courts within walking distance

Small slide into deep water, wading pool, grass area, picnic tables

1325 North Village Road Lane depth: 2-5 feet Length: 25 meters

NORTH SHORE

11515 North Shore Drive Lane depth: 3-11 feet Length: 25 meters

Seasonally heated main pool, heated spa, shaded upper deck with picnic tables, wading pool, diving board, Hydrolift Chair to main pool, Lake Anne Plaza and tennis courts within walking distance NOTE: Parking only on North Shore Drive

RIDGE HEIGHTS

11400 Ridge Heights Road Lane depth: 3-5 feet Length: 25 meters

Seasonally heated main pool, diving board, wading pool, two grass areas, picnic tables, Hydrolift Chair to main pool

For more info on Aquatic programs and events, please call the aquatics office at 703-435-6532.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

2201 Springwood Drive Lane depth: 3-5 feet Length: 20 meters

TALL OAKS

12025 North Shore Drive Lane depth: 3-12 feet Length: 25 meters

One-meter diving board, wading pool, picnic tables, Tall Oaks Shopping Center within walking distance

UPLANDS

11032 Ring Road Lane depth: 3.5-8.5 feet Length: 25 meters

Zero-depth (0-3 ft) pool with interactive fountains and bench seating, in-water wheelchair available for pool access, interactive sand pit, picnic tables


Welcome Back

Dogwood Pool

2460 Green Range Road The newly renovated Dogwood pool facility will feature a zero depth entry with small spray features, inwater seating, a 25-meter lap lane area, and diving board. Outside the pool enclosure, guests will be able to splash and play in a water feature installed in cooperation with Reston Association and the Initiative for Public Art in Reston (IPAR). The IPAR feature will be available seasonally and no pool pass is required.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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NATURE PROGRAMS AQUATIC PROGRAMS

Group Swim Lessons Member Registration

Monday, May 6, 8:30 a.m.

Non-member Registration

Wednesday, May 8, 8:30 a.m.

Group Lessons Registration

See the chart on page 51 to determine what level your student is ready to take. Children must be the required age by the first day of class, and we always recommend that returning students repeat the last level they took in the previous summer. If you are unsure of your student’s abilities, please attend the Water Test Day.

Water Test Day

Saturday, May 4 10 a.m. -1 p.m. Ridge Heights Heated Pool 11400 Ridge Heights Road For people needing assistance with level placement, please join our water safety instructors for a fun evaluation of skills.

See the Group Swim Lesson Schedule on pages 52 and 53 to select classes in your level that fit your schedule. Classes fill up fast, so please make your selections before your registration day and be prepared with alternate choices. Register online at www.reston.org or in person at our Member Services desk, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive.

Group Lesson Fee: $66/RA Members $83/Non-member

Parent & Infant or Parent & Toddler Fee (per 4 lessons): $33/RA Members $41.50/Non-members

Would you prefer more personalized instruction? RA offers private and semi-private swim lessons throughout the summer. Private lessons provide a one-on-one learning environment between student and instructor while semi-private lessons accommodate two students with one instructor. All the pool managers and assistant managers are certified Water Safety Instructors (WSI) and can provide customized, individual instruction. If you have a WSI in mind, simply ask them if they would like to be your instructor and be sure to write down their first and last name on your registration form. If you don’t have a person in mind, just contact our Swim Lesson Coordinator at 703435-6520 or swim@reston.org so that we can match you to an instructor who will meet your needs.

For more info on Aquatic programs and events, please call the aquatics office at 703-435-6532.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

All ages and skills levels are welcome. Classes are provided in four 40-minute sessions scheduled at the convenience of the participant and instructor.

Private: $96/RA Members $111/Non-members Semi-Private: $76/RA Members $93/Non-members

HOW TO REGISTER

STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3

Select and contact a Water Safety Instructor. Visit the member services desk at RA, where you will need to provide the name of your instructor. Customize your schedule and location with your WSI directly.


AQUATIC NATURE PROGRAMS Group Swim Lesson Level Descriptions

Toddler and Me

Submerge face/head, in chest-deep water Youth Swimming 5: recover object from ƒƒ Introduction to Entire class is conducted in bottom — two times underwater skills deep water. Students will Develops swimming ƒƒ Bob five times with ƒƒ Push off in a increase endurance and readiness by teaching rhythmic bubble streamlined position continue to receive feedback Reston Association offers water entry, bubble blowing on front and back on stroke proficiency. five 2-week sessions. Each blowing, front kicking, ƒƒ Submerge face in then begin flutter ƒƒ Circle swimming, session is held Monday back floating, underwater water at least three kicking, three-five surface dives, racing through Thursday for the exploration & basic water seconds while body lengths dives full two weeks. There are safety skills. blowing bubbles with ƒƒ Elementary ƒƒ Open turns and flip no classes scheduled on nose and mouth backstroke kick turns Fridays unless a makePre-Schooler and Me ƒƒ Kick on front and ƒƒ Breaststroke kick ƒƒ Butterfly arms, kick, up lesson is scheduled Ages: 3-5 years, parental back, with support ƒƒ Rotary Breathing, and timing — work by the instructor due involvement (three-five body 10 times up to 15 yards to inclement weather. Child will learn Youth lengths) ƒƒ Front crawl, 15 yards ƒƒ Front crawl, 50 Parent & Infant and Parent Swimming 1 skills. Perfect ƒƒ Front and back floats ƒƒ Elementary yards (with bilateral & Toddler classes are for a reluctant learner who with head in proper backstroke, 10 yards breathing) held every two weeks, has difficulty separating position and ability ƒƒ Back crawl arms, five ƒƒ Breaststroke, but parents may opt to from a parent. to stay floating w/o yards back crawl, and purchase all eight lessons support ƒƒ Deep water skills elementary or to purchase four lessons Youth Swimming 1: ƒƒ Front and back glides: ƒƒ Bobbing, five times, backstroke: 50 yards and attend any four All skills are completed with two body lengths at wall each lessons within the assistance and support. with recovery ƒƒ Front and back floats ƒƒ Standard scull, 30 two-week session. ƒƒ Safely enter and exit ƒƒ Roll from front to with recovery seconds water back and back to ƒƒ Treading water ƒƒ Tread water, two All group lessons are 35 ƒƒ Blowing bubbles front without support ƒƒ Sitting and kneeling minutes minutes in length, except three seconds with ƒƒ Change direction dives ƒƒ Sidestroke Youth Swimming 4-6, mouth and nose while swimming on which are 40 minutes. submerged back and front Youth Swimming 4: Youth Swimming 6: ƒƒ Submerging face two ƒƒ Front crawl: three-five Entire class is conducted in Highest level offered by Reston Parent & Child Aquatics times in a row body lengths deep water. Students will work Association. Builds basic water safety ƒƒ Flutter kick on front ƒƒ Swim on back, threeon technical improvement of ƒƒ Breaststroke, front skills for both parents and and back: two body five body lengths strokes. crawl, and back crawl, children, helping infants lengths (any type of arm ƒƒ Swim underwater, 100 yards each and young children ages ƒƒ Front and back floats action with flutter kick) three-five body ƒƒ Sidestroke and six months to three years with recovery ƒƒ Elementary lengths butterfly, 25 yards become comfortable ƒƒ Front and back glides: backstroke arms or ƒƒ Front crawl, 25 yards each in the water so they are two body lengths finning three body (with rotary breathing) ƒƒ Stroke drills (25 yards willing and ready to learn with recovery lengths ƒƒ Front crawl, open per drill — use drills for to swim. These basic ƒƒ Roll from front to ƒƒ Introduce back crawl turn each stroke) skills include adjusting to back and back to arms, supported/ ƒƒ Back crawl and ƒƒ Introduce individual the water environment, front guided by instructor elementary medley (IM) event/ showing comfort while ƒƒ Arm and hand ƒƒ Treading using arm backstroke, 25 yards order of strokes with maintaining a front or back treading action (in and leg actions, each legal turns position in the water and chest-deep water) 15 seconds in ƒƒ Backstroke open turn ƒƒ Tread water — two demonstrating breath ƒƒ Arms — front crawl shoulder-deep water ƒƒ Breaststroke kick, 15 minutes control, including blowing two body lengths yards — emphasis ƒƒ Aquatic exercise bubbles or voluntarily ƒƒ Finning and 'tickle, Youth Swimming 3: on knee position and submerging under water. T, pull' arms on back Students perform all shallow effective propulsion two body lengths water skills independently and ƒƒ Breaststroke, full Baby and Me with confidence while being stroke, work up to Ages: 6-18 months, parental Youth Swimming 2: introduced to deep water skills. 15 yards involvement Students are encouraged ƒƒ Safely enter/exit ƒƒ Tread water, one Instructor helps parent to perform the skills water by jumping minute and child to become independently by the end from the side into ƒƒ Dolphin kick, 15 yards comfortable in the water of the class. deep water (emphasis on keeping by emphasizing fun in ƒƒ Enter and exit water ƒƒ Bobbing while legs together) the water. safely moving towards ƒƒ Front crawl bilateral ƒƒ Jump in to chestsafety, in chest-deep breathing drills deep water water ƒƒ Sitting and kneeling ƒƒ Retrieve multiple dives objects underwater

Ages: 18-36 months, parental involvement

ƒƒ

For more info on Aquatic programs and events, please call the aquatics office at 703-435-6532. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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AQUATIC PROGRAMS

2013 SWIM LESSON SCHEDULE: Sessions 1-3 Baby and Me 6-18 months

Toddler and Me

18 - 36 months

Youth Youth Preschooler Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth and Me Swimming 1 Swimming 1 Swimming 2 Swimming 2 Swimming 3 Swimming 3 Swimming 4 Swimming 5 Swimming 6/ Age: 3-5

Age: 3-5

Age: 6-12

Age: 3-5

Age: 6-12

Age: 3-5

Adult Beginner

Age: 6-12

SESSION 1: JUNE 3 -14 (DUE TO EARLY SEASON COOL WATER TEMPERATURES, RIDGE HEIGHTS AND NORTH SHORE WILL BE HEATED FOR THE DURATION OF SESSION 1.)

11:45 AM (4 or 8) Lessons

RIDGE HEIGHTS

NORTH SHORE

10:15 AM 11 AM 11:45 AM 12:30 PM

10:15 AM 11 AM 12:30 PM

10:15 AM 11 AM

10:15 AM 11 AM

SESSION 2: JUNE 24 – JULY 5 (LESSONS WILL NOT BE HELD ON THURSDAY, JULY 4. THEY WILL BE RESCHEDULED FOR FRIDAY, JUNE 28.)

10:15 AM

HUNTERS WOODS

11 AM (4 or 8) Lessons

LAKE NEWPORT

10:15 AM 10:15 AM

NORTH HILLS

11 AM 11 AM

9:30 AM 10:15 AM

10:15 AM 11 AM

7:45 PM

AUTUMNWOOD

7 PM 7:45 PM

LAKE AUDUBON

7 PM 7 PM (4 or 8) Lessons

NEWBRIDGE

11 AM

7 PM

GOLF COURSE ISLAND

7 PM

SHADOWOOD

7 PM

UPLANDS

7 PM

10:15 AM

11 AM

10:15 AM 11 AM

10:15 AM

9:30 AM

10:15 AM 11 AM

RIDGE HEIGHTS

11 AM

10:15 AM

7:45 PM

10:15 AM

7 PM 7 PM

7 PM

7:45 PM

7:45 PM

Adult Beg. 7:45 PM

7 PM

7:45 PM

7:45 PM

7:45 PM 7 PM 7 PM

SESSION 3: JULY 8- 19 HUNTERS WOODS LAKE NEWPORT

11 AM (4 or 8) Lessons

10:15 AM

10:15 AM

10:15 AM

11 AM

9:30 AM 10:15 AM

NORTH HILLS

10:15 AM

10:15 AM

RIDGE HEIGHTS

7 PM

AUTUMNWOOD

7:45 PM

GLADE

7 PM

GOLF COURSE ISLAND

7 PM 7 PM (4 or 8) Lessons

11 AM

10:15 AM 11 AM

7 PM

7:45 PM

7:45 PM

7 PM

NEWBRIDGE

7 PM

7:45 PM

SHADOWOOD

7 PM

7 PM

UPLANDS

7 PM RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

11 AM

10:15 AM 11 AM

10:15 AM

10:15 AM

7 PM

7:45 PM

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11 AM

10:15 AM 11 AM

9:30 AM 10:15 AM

7:45 PM

LAKE AUDUBON

11 AM

7 PM 7:45 PM

Adult Beg. 7:45 PM YS 6 7 PM

7:45 PM

7 PM

7 PM


AQUATIC PROGRAMS

2013 SWIM LESSON SCHEDULE: Sessions 4-5 Baby and Me 6-18 months

Toddler and Me

18 - 36 months

Youth Youth Preschooler Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth and Me Swimming 1 Swimming 1 Swimming 2 Swimming 2 Swimming 3 Swimming 3 Swimming 4 Swimming 5 Swimming 6/ Age: 3-5

Age: 3-5

Age: 6-12

Age: 3-5

Age: 6-12

Age: 3-5

Adult Beginner

Age: 6-12

SESSION 4: JULY 22-AUGUST 2 HUNTERS WOODS

10:15 AM

11 AM

LAKE NEWPORT

10:15 AM 11 AM

10:15 AM

10:15 AM

9:30 AM

9:30 AM

10:15 AM

10:15 AM 11 AM

10:15 AM

10:15 AM (4 or 8) Lessons

NORTH HILLS RIDGE HEIGHTS

7 PM

AUTUMNWOOD

7:45 PM

10:15 AM 11 AM

7 PM

11 AM

10:15 AM

10:15 AM 11 AM

11 AM

11 AM 7:45 PM

7 PM

GLADE GOLF COURSE ISLAND

10:15 AM

7 PM 7:45 PM

LAKE AUDUBON

7 PM

7:45 PM

NEWBRIDGE

7:45 PM

7 PM

SHADOWOOD

7 PM

UPLANDS

7 PM

7 PM

Adult Beg. 7:45 PM

7 PM 7:45 PM

7 PM

7:45 PM

7 PM

7:45 PM

7 PM

7 PM 7 PM

SESSION 5: AUGUST 5-16 (DUE TO THE DECREASE IN INSTRUCTOR AVAILABILITY, SCHEDULING IS LIMITED THIS SESSION. ) LAKE NEWPORT

11 AM (4 or 8) Lessons

10:15 AM

10:15 AM 11 AM

9:30 AM

9:30 AM 10:15 AM

11 AM

7 PM

GLADE GOLF COURSE ISLAND

7 PM

LAKE AUDUBON

7 PM

YS 6 10:15 AM

7 PM

Adult Beg. 7:45 PM

7 PM 7:45 PM

7 PM

9:30 AM 11 AM

7:45 PM

7:45 PM

Swim Lesson Refund Policy • Group swim lessons are non-refundable except for medical reasons or family emergencies. • A doctor's note may be required and a 10% processing fee will be applied. • Any class canceled by Reston Association will result in a full refund. • Private swim lesson refunds will be given for any pending sessions that are reported to the Swim Lesson Coordinator before October 1.

WE APPRECIATE OUR SPONSORS Reston Association Aquatics staff would like to thank the following businesses for the goods, services, time and effort they donated to our operation in 2013!

Dr. Stephan Tisseront www. tisserontorthodontics.com

Vocelli Pizza

www.vocellipizza.com

All in Stitches

http://allinstitchesva.com

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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RA CAMPS RA Camps… Friendship and Fun for Over 35 Years!

Where real friendships are forged, youthful energy abounds and memories last a lifetime. Treat your child to a true camp experience. See why the longest operating camps in Reston are the place to be. Generations of Restonians have grown up through the RA Camps tradition, from campers to counselors and directors to managers, even to an Executive Vice President.

Our Camps

Nature Tots (ages 3-5) Hug-A-Tree (ages 5-7) Mini-Camp (ages 5-10) Sportsters (ages 6-8) Walker’s Rangers (ages 6-8) Camp On Wheels (ages 6-12) (formerly known as Skate Camp) Day Camp (ages 7-11) Science Camp (ages 8-12) Teen Camp (ages 11-14) Junior Lifeguarding (ages 13-15) (formerly known as Guard Start) Counselor-In-Training (ages 14-16)

Safety and supervision exceeds the minimum standards for Child Day Centers as required by the Virginia Department of Social Services.

Additional Services

Services & Requirement

Transportation

The icons will be listed for camps that meet that criteria. More information is provided on page 66.

Extended Care

For an additional fee, extended care is provided from 7:30-9 a.m. and 4-5:30 p.m. (See page 66 for details.)

Age Requirements ƒƒ

Transportation

Extended Care

Minimum age requirements must be met by Sept. 30, 2013. Maximum age requirements must be met by first day of the session.

Top Reasons for RA Camps 78% of the staff worked at camps previously. Great return rate.

Registration

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Camp Themes

At many RA Camps, there are designated session themes which promote creativity, imagination and enthusiasm at camp. Theme-related activities enhance the program’s core activities, and may include special event activities, field trips, counselor-inspired storylines, children’s literature, special snacks, songs, crafts, nature activities, group projects or contests. Not all activities at camp relate to the theme. Schedules and activities are subject to change at the discretion of camp management.

For an additional fee, van transportation is available within RA boundaries. Pick Up/Drop Off locations must be home, place of employment or daycare provider. (See page 66 for details.)

General Information

RA Member registration begins Jan. 28, 2013 at 8:30 a.m. Non-member registration begins Feb. 4, 2013 at 8:30 a.m.

counselor for every seven campers. of our 91 staff were former Counselors-In-Training at RA. Knowledgeable staff. camp scholarships given. Helping kids go to camp.

On-line registration is available for members and non-residents. Go to “Shop RA” at www.reston.org. A $75 non-refundable deposit per camper per session is required for all camps at registration time. Exception: Nature Tots and Walker’s Rangers deposit is $40. Full payment for all sessions and services is required by May 1. Refunds, minus applicable deposits, may be recovered until June 1.

Camper Forms

Certain forms are required for participation in RA Camps. This is a Virginia Department of Social Services requirement. Campers without all required forms will not be permitted to participate in camp until they are received. All forms are due by June 1. They can be found on RA’s website at http://bit.ly/fh0PsQ

Camp Shirt Required

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


RA CAMPS Nature Tots Ages: 3-5 by Sept. 30, 2013 Campers must be potty trained.

Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive $80/RA Members $64/RA Members (session 1B prorated due to holiday) $105/Non-members $84/Non-members (session 1B prorated due to holiday)

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iscover nature D through handson activities, special guests and exploratory walks. Use their five senses to experience music, movement, crafts and special snacks. Learn social skills through group games and learning centers. Have fun with puppets, drama and other imaginary play. Enjoy RA wading pool every Friday.

Nature Music

Session 1A: June 24-28

From the warble of birds to the soft whispers of the wind, nature creates a beautiful symphony. Tune your ears to the sounds heard in the Nature Center woods. Make your own instruments using a variety of natural and recycled materials. Tweet like a robin, hum like a bee and croak in a frog chorus. Dance to music inspired by natural sounds. This week of camp will be music to your ears!

Lovable Monsters

Session 1B: July 1-July 5 No Camp on July 4th

Not all monsters are scary. Search the trails and streams for the fuzzy, furry and slimy “monsters” that call the nature center home. Take a peek under logs to find many-legged critters. Learn what to do when you feel scared. Read “Where the Wild Things Are,” and meet some truly lovable monsters.

Earth Explorers

Session 3A: July 22-26

Pack your adventure bag and meet a travel guide who will help you explore this big, beautiful planet. Start out with a hike through the woods in search of local wildlife. Then use your imagination to jet off to other parts of the world to see what you can find. Dig in desert sand, feel the mist of a rainforest, play a waddling penguin game and wade in the water like a flamingo.

The Sky’s the Limit

Session 3B: July 29-Aug. 2

Hawks soaring, clouds drifting and the sun shining — the sky is full of wonders. Get a bird’s eye view of the world and play a game with an Earth ball. Use the sunlight to create a special picture, and make a bracelet that changes color when you step outside. Watch how the wind blows a pinwheel, and fly a kite at Quartermaster Field. Float like a butterfly and do the “bird bop.”

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

55


RA CAMPS Hug-A-Tree Ages: 5-7 by Sept. 30, 2013

June 24-Aug. 16, 4 two-week sessions, Monday-Friday AM groups: 9 a.m.-Noon PM groups: 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Full-Day groups: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Brown's Chapel Concession Stand — past the chapel, at the top of the park, 1575 Brown’s Chapel Road

Half-Day (AM or PM)

$170/RA Members $153/RA Members (session 1 prorated due to Holiday) $195/Non-members $175.50/Non-members (session 1 prorated due to Holiday)

Full-Day

$380/RA Members $342/RA Members (session 1 prorated due to holiday) $430/Non-members $387/Non-members (session 1 prorated due to holiday)

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articipate in games, P music, drama, crafts and swimming. Explore and learn about nature through hands-on activities and experiences. Expand their creativity and sense of wonder. Have a daily snack. Go on field trips within Reston and to selected sites outside of Reston. Build social skills through small group interactions.

Wagon Trains

Tall Tales & Fairy Tales

Grab your cowboy hats and round up for some Wild West fun. We’ll pack our own modern day wagon for a frontier trip. Try your hand at some rope tricks, make a corn husk doll or patch together a quilt like those the pioneers made. Design a bandana and get ready for a foot stomping time.

Heroes, tricksters and crafty campers join together to explore folktales from around the world. Each morning begins with "Once upon a time..." as a daily story sets the stage for the day's activities. Discover a world of fun through games, costumes and crafts. Help to make your favorite storybook characters come to life.

Pocket Mysteries

Wadin’ in Water

Some pockets are tiny and others are deep. Some pockets hold monsters or frogs that leap. Who knows what will sneak into counselor pockets each week? So it’s solvers of riddles and guessers we seek. Each day’s adventure will start rather small, but will grow through the day ‘til there’s fun had by all. Join us for scavenger hunts, games and good deeds. We’ll trade some cool beads, create projects with seeds and yes, we’ll have plenty of fun, indeed!

Water is important to wildlife; they drink it, bathe in it, make it their home, and never watch television. Come out to play detective with us. Make a critter net to help you explore a Reston stream. Find animals that live in and around the water. Identify their tracks and make a plaster cast to take home. We’ll trek to Lake Anne to try our hand at fishing. If the fish don’t bite, that’s all right, we’ll make our own.

Session 1: June 24-July 5 No camp July 4th.

Session 2: July 8-19

Session 3: July 22-Aug. 2

Session 4: Aug. 5-16

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551.

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RA CAMPS Mini-Camp Ages: 5-10 by Sept. 30, 2013

Aug. 19-23, 1 one-week session, Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Brown’s Chapel 1575 Brown’s Chapel Road $195/RA Members $220/Non-members

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Participate in sports, games, music, drama, crafts and swimming. Explore and learn about nature through hands-on activities and experiences. Expand their creativity and sense of wonder. Go on field trips within Reston and to selected sites outside of Reston.

Sportsters Ages: 6-8 by Sept. 30, 2013

June 24-Aug. 16, 4 two-week sessions, Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-Noon Lake Anne Park 11301 North Shore Drive $165/RA Members $148.50/RA Members (session 1 prorated due to holiday) $190/Non-members $171/Non-members (session 1 prorated due to holiday)

Sessions

1. June 24-July 5 2. July 8-19 3. July 22-Aug. 2 4. Aug. 5-16

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uild social and B cooperative skills through small group interactions and team-building activities.

Motor skill development made fun builds confidence that leads to a lifetime of success. Sportsters is located at beautiful Lake Anne Park, featuring a multipurpose court, practice wall, tennis courts, sand volleyball pit, spray fountain, playground and pavilion, just minutes from baseball and soccer fields.

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I mprove coordination and confidence through fun and challenging ageappropriate games with playground balls, parachutes, jump ropes and more!

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E njoy a lunch cookout and an endof-summer party.

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I mprove skills, such as fielding, throwing and dribbling through participation in non-intimidating drills, relays and instruction. Enhance their understanding of rules, procedures and strategies associated with a variety of sports and lead-up games such as soccer, basketball, kickball and whiffleball. Enjoy pool days at nearby RA pools. Build social skills and team work through small group interactions. Enjoy daily snack and a final awards ceremony.

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Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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RA CAMPS Walker’s Rangers Ages: 6-8 by Sept. 30, 2013

Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-Noon Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive $80/RA Members $105/Non-members

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iscover nature D through handson activities, special guests and exploratory walks. Participate in science experiments, active games and creative craft making. Build social skills through small group interactions. Have a daily snack.

Super Scientists

Session 2A : July 8 -12

Step into our lab and get ready to explore the fascinating world of science. Collect samples to view under a microscope. Discover where energy comes from and take a ride on our energy bicycle. Learn how to make a solar oven out of a pizza box and then use it to roast a marshmallow. Explore wacky weather and make a tornado in a bottle. Conduct simple chemistry experiments and explore the science of color mixing by tie-dying your own T-shirt.

Globe Trotters

Session 2B: July 15-19

Grab your passport and your imagination, because we’re setting out for adventure! Follow the trail of a wacky scientist who is searching for rare plants and animals across the globe. Search the Nature Center woods and streams for salamanders. Journey through a rainforest in

search of disappearing poison dart frogs. Explore the hot sands of the Sahara Desert to locate plants that survive with little water. Pull out your winter clothes as we brave the cold of the South Pole in our search for Emperor Penguins. Design a new species of animal and decide where it will live.

Gone Buggy

Session 4A: Aug. 5-9

In the trees, on the flowers, in the ground – insects are all around us. Become a junior entomologist and study the lives of our local insects. Use a net to find insects in a meadow, and look at a butterfly’s wing under a microscope. Make bug juice and use it to attract moths and other nocturnal insects. Dip in a creek to look for young dragonflies and diving beetles. Make a rock insect and decorate a bug box. This week is sure to be abuzz with excitement!

Naturalist’s Path

Session 4B: Aug. 12-16

Journey through the past and discover the fascinating lives of famous naturalists. Join John Muir on a hike through the woods and make a journal of all that you see. Listen for birds with John James Audubon and use a pair of binoculars to scan the tree tops for feathered friends. Conduct plant experiments like George Washington Carver, and enjoy the sounds of our local streams with Rachel Carson. Set out on your own naturalist’s path.

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551.

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RA CAMPS Camp on Wheels (formerly known as Skate Camp) Ages: 6-13 by Sept. 30, 2013

Two 1-week sessions Monday through Friday 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Lake Newport Soccer Field Parking Area $225/RA Members $250/Non-members

Sessions

Session 2B: July 15-19 Session 5: Aug. 19-23 Brought to you in partnership with

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Learn to skate, board or bike in an environment where safety and skills are a top priority. Increase your skills and confidence with American In-line’s fun, professional staff. Learn cooperative skills through group interaction. Campers provide their own equipment as listed. Participants receive camp T-shirt and stickers.

Note: Instruction in different sports will run simultaneously during each session. Campers will receive instruction in only one sport per session. Indicate your choice of skateboarding, inline skating or biking on your registration form. Campers will be grouped within their specialty during instruction time.

SESSIONS & OPTIONS Skateboarding

Ready, Set, Go. An extreme camp for skateboard riders of all levels. Whether you have never been on a skateboard and want to learn or you are an experienced skateboard rider who wants to improve your skills, this camp is for you. Learn to push, olly, ride ramps, drop in, grind, stall and get air while skating with an America Inline-certified coach. Camp is held in the mobile skate park designed for skaters of all levels. Includes a new 4-foot quarter pipe, 3-foot mini half pipe, bank ramp, fun box, fly box, grind box, launch ramps, grind rails and ledges. Required equipment: Skateboard, helmet, knee and elbow pads and wrist guards. Bring water and snack in labeled cooler.

Inline Skating

Skate, turn, stop and go! This exciting skate camp is for beginning through intermediate inline skaters. Campers learn how to gear up, stand up, avoid falling down, three ways to stop, turn, cross-over, skate backwards, play fun skating games and ride over small ramps. Required equipment: Inline skates, helmet, knee and elbow pads, and wrist guards. Bring water and snack in labeled cooler.

Bike Riding

Ages: 5-10 years old Say “good bye” to the training wheels. Learn basic bike riding, steering, shifting, safety and rules of the road and improve skills. This camp provides a hands-on, educational way for children to master the art of bicycle riding. Required equipment: Bike, bike gloves, helmet, water bottle or hydration pack, and snack in a labeled cooler.

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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RA CAMPS Day Camp Ages: 7-11 by Sept. 30, 2013

June 24-Aug. 16, 4 two-week sessions, Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Brown’s Chapel 1575 Brown’s Chapel Road. $385/RA members $346.50/RA members (session 1 prorated due to holiday) $435/Non-members $391.50/Non-members (session 1 prorated due to holiday)

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articipate in handsP on nature activities, sports, games, crafts, music, drama and swimming. Enjoy pool parties, daytime cookouts, festivals and guest entertainers. Go on field trips within Reston and to selected sites outside of Reston. Learn cooperative skills through small group interaction and team-building activities.

Wild, Wild West

Session 1: June 24-July 5 No camp July 4th.

Howdy partner! Join the rodeo. Be a roper. Be a clown. Sing some cowboy songs like Roy Rogers and Dale Evans. What act can you perform in the Wild West Stunt Show? Wash down your barbeque and baked beans with a frosty cold root beer and write all about your adventures in the camp newspaper. Happy trails to you!

Clue Finders

Wet-n-Wild

Calling all sleuths! A mystery has arrived at camp and we need your help to solve it. Search for clues to complete the mission. Unlock the secrets of survival. Create a new spy code, spy gadgets and hidden picture artwork. The mystery of the mission will be revealed in the end, but only with your help.

Beat the heat of summer by cooling off in the water. Look for ‘wild’ life in the stream and all around camp, then make some wild artwork to take home. Run in water relays, create a water craft and invent your own water works. Have a wild pool party and a wacky, wet hair contest. Hold on tight. It will be a wild ride.

Session 2: July 8-19

Session 4: Aug. 5-16

Survival Challenge Session 3: July 22-Aug. 2

How would you survive in the wilderness? What food would you take on your adventure and what gear would you carry in your pack? Take the Survival Challenge, make some primitive art, and prepare some food that will travel well. Learn about edible plants and the animal world’s greatest survivors.

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551.

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RA CAMPS Science Camp Ages: 8-12 by Sept. 30, 2013

June 24 -Aug. 16, 4 two-week sessions, Monday-Friday 8:45 a.m.-3:45 p.m. USGS Visitors Center 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive $385/RA Members & USGS Employees $346.50/RA Members & USGS Employees session (session 1 prorated for the holiday) $435/Non-members $391.50/Non-members (session 1 prorated for the holiday)

Science activities supplement this recreational camp program, brought to you in partnership with the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Camp is based at the USGS facility. However, campers will spend a good portion of their day outside and in traditional camp activities.

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T ake science to the cutting edge of fun through experiments and exploration. Practice new computer skills. Meet guest scientists and learn about careers in science. Go on field trips within Reston and to selected sites outside of Reston. Participate in swimming, crafts, games and drama.

Airborne Science

Session 1: June 24-July 5 No camp July 4th.

What sinks, swirls, and is constantly on the move around us? Launch off exploring air and the world above your head. Do some experiments

with gases, forecast the weather, design your own kite and make a feeder for our flying animal friends. Fly high on a trip to Udvar Hazy National Air and Space Museum.

Geo Time

Session 2: July 8-19

Step into dinosaur prints that will take you back in time — Geological Time! Discover what it might have been like when dinosaurs roamed the earth and go on a virtual dinosaur dig. Examine rocks and fossils that are millions of years old. Make your own fossils and see if you can find some sandstone, quartz or phyllite in Reston. Travel to the age of dinosaurs with a trip to the Hall of Paleobiology at the Museum of Natural History.

Expedition Climate Change Session 3: July 22-Aug. 2

Earth is an ever-changing planet. Learn how climate change is thought to be

affecting the animals and plants around us. Could you survive in the hot desert or in the cold arctic? Learn how scientists prepare for a scientific expedition. Heat up the lab with experiments demonstrating the greenhouse effect and glacial melt. Calculate your own carbon footprint and learn how your energy use affects our planet. Visit the National Geography Museum’s Explorers Hall.

Scaly, Slimy Fun Session 4: Aug. 5-16

Explore slippery, slimy and scaly members of the animal kingdom. What is the difference between a frog and a toad or a tortoise and a turtle? Learn why some species are in trouble and how we can help them. Make your own slime and try some slimy experiments. Listen to and imitate frog and toad calls, touch a snake, and go on a herpetological search around Reston to look for turtles, snakes, frogs, and salamanders. Take a field trip to the National Zoo.

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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RA CAMPS Teen Camp Ages: 11-14 by Sept. 30, 2013

June 24-Aug. 16, 4 two-week sessions, Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-4 p.m., plus one extended road trip day each session (estimated dismissal time 10 p.m., see session schedule) Glade Room, 11550 Glade Drive, above Glade Pool bathhouse $425/RA Members $382.50/RA Members (session 1 prorated due to holiday) $475/Non-members $427.50/Non-members (session 1 prorated due to holiday)

Note: On extended road trip days, all parents must pick up campers. No PM Transportation or Extended Care is available on these days.

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T ake an extended road trip to a fun destination each session. Participate in sports & games, arts & crafts, nature exploration, swimming and boating. Develop leadership skills by working with our younger campers. Develop interpersonal skills through small group interactions and team building challenges.

Go West!

Session 1: June 24- July 5 No camp July 4th.

Explore the wilds of the west. Practice the trades and skills of the frontier as we make leather crafts and traditional Native American crafts and dress in old western costumes for some “old time” photographs. See some real gold mining

history at Monroe Park, in the Goldvein, Virginia and even do some panning for real gold. Have a hootin’ and hollarin’ good time on our day at Massanutten Water Park.

Believe It Or Not Session 2: July 8-19

Do you have an interest in the strange, the unusual, the interesting, the odd or just the plain weird? Investigate the unusual and the strange things people will do to get their names in the record books. Go underground and tour a cavern to see some awesome sights. Then, take in some unbelievable views as we explore the George Washington National Forest. Spend a day in Richmond and visit the Science Museum of Virginia, the Metro Richmond Zoo and more!

Survivors!

Session 3: July 22-Aug. 2

Can you rough it with the best of them? Take the challenge of scaling a climbing wall. Enjoy

a game of laser tag, trekking in the woods, visit Riverbend Park, and an all day trip and cook out at Echo Lake at Greenbrier State Park, MD. At the National Zoo, see some species that have survived millions of years. Come and find out what it takes to survive the Teen Camp challenge! Let’s challenge the rides on our trip to King’s Dominion.

Beach Week

Session 4: Aug. 5-16

Visit Calvert Cliffs and Flag Ponds Nature Park to hike the trails, search for fossils and shark’s teeth while we enjoy our visit to the Chesapeake Bay. Soak up some rays, play beach volleyball, and explore a wetlands area. Hula at the Teen Camp Luau where we’ll play some beach games and enjoy some fruity cool treats. Join us for sun, swimming, stories and s’mores! Let’s cruise the Boardwalk and pool area on our trip to Hershey Park.

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551.

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RA CAMPS Junior Lifeguarding

(formerly known as Guard Start) Ages: 13-15 by Sept. 30, 2013

July 8-19, One 2-week session, Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Location: TBA $245/RA Members $270/Non-members

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T rain side-by-side with American Red Cross-certified instructors. Develop communication and decision-making skills. Gain valuable skills to help pass the American Red Cross Lifeguard Training course. Meet RA aquatics staff.

Dive into summer by gaining the knowledge, attitudes and skills required for future lifeguards! Brought to you in partnership with RA Aquatics.

Scuba Camp For details or to register for Seal Team for Kids, please contact PADI MSDT Frank Wilson at 571-437-5189 or deep_blue_scuba@ excite.com See page 47 for more information.

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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RA CAMPS Counselor-InTraining (CIT) Program Ages: 14-16 by Sept. 30, 2013

June 24-Aug. 16, 4 two-week sessions, Monday -Friday 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m.

Mornings

CITs report to an assigned camp program (Nature Tots, Walker’s Rangers, Hug-ATree, Sportsters, Day Camp or Science Camp).

Afternoon

CITs participate in skill building and recreational activities, then depart from Brown’s Chapel, 1575 Brown’s Chapel Road. $245/RA Members $220.50/RA Members (session 1 prorated due to holiday) $295/Non-members $265.50/Non-members (session 1 prorated due to holiday) The CIT program is fun, but also goal oriented. The ultimate goal of the program is to prepare you to be counselors. You will have the opportunity to learn skills that will not only help you in camp situations, but also in life. You will have the opportunity to observe many counselors at work and get hands-on experience at the different camps.

The skills that this program focuses on are: ƒƒ Communication ƒƒ Leadership ƒƒ Teaching ƒƒ Character Development ƒƒ Environmental Education ƒƒ Job Skills You are essentially going to be working as counselors under supervision. You will be taking on many responsibilities, and mostly you will be interacting directly with the campers. You get out of this program what you put into it. If you are motivated and enthusiastic as a CIT, you will have a rewarding experience and also be prepared to shoulder the responsibility of being a counselor. Enjoy!

CITs will… ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

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L earn how to be dynamite counselors. Share, teach and interact with our campers. Train side-by-side with a fun and caring staff. Go on field trips and recreational outings. Explore the natural world and learn how to share it with others. Join the excitement of our camps from a new and challenging perspective.

Sessions

1. June 24 -July 5 (No Camp July 4th.) 2. July 8-19 3. July 22-Aug. 2 4. Aug. 5-16 Note to our applicants: CITs are selected based on an application and interview process. See www.reston. org or call 703-435-6530 for an application. No online registration. Limited space is available, so apply early.

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551.

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RA CAMPS

RA Camps Scholarship Program Scholarships are available for Reston youth whose families have a demonstrated financial need. To receive a scholarship application, visit www.reston.org or call the Camp Program Supervisor at 703-435-6567. Each year, donations from organizations, businesses and individuals make it possible for economically disadvantaged children of Reston to attend our valuable camp programs.

Special Thanks to Our 2012 Camp Scholarship Donors! Friends of Lake Anne II Friends of Reston Joe Leighton Long & Foster Reston Branch Long & Foster North Hills/Herndon Branch MBH Settlement Company Noodles & Company Reston Garden Club Pat Sartorius

If you would like to make a donation to the 2013 scholarship fund, please contact CampAdmin@reston.org or call 703-435-6567. Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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RA CAMPS Camp Registration

General Information

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RA Member Registration begins 8:30 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 28, 2013. Non-resident Registration begins 8:30 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 4, 2013.

Register online at www.reston.org. Save time and get immediate enrollment confirmation. If you prefer not to register online, you may request a registration form and mail or bring in your forms to Reston Association. No faxed registrations are accepted. A 24-hour drop box is located in front of the building on the side facing Sunrise Valley Drive. When mailing, use the following address: ATTN: Camps Reston Association 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191 An electronic version of the registration form is located on our web page at www.reston.org.

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Waiting List

If your camper’s first choice is full, please put them on the waitlist. This is the only way we know if you are interested. To do so, click the waitlist option. We will call you if a slot becomes available in your first choice.

Transportation

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Camper Forms

Certain forms are required for participation in RA Camps. This is a Virginia Department of Social Services requirement. Campers without all required forms will not be permitted to participate in camp until the forms are received. All forms are due by June 1st. They can be found on RA’s website at http://bit.ly/fh0PsQ

Payment & Refunds ƒƒ

Confirmation Letters & Forms

In addition to your receipt, all registrants will receive a confirmation letter by email within two weeks of their registration. You then must go to the RA website at http://bit.ly/fh0PsQ to download the camper forms, which must be completed and returned by June 1st. These forms include a physical and proof of identification. Camp forms are also available by contacting the camp office at 703-435-6551.

inimum age requirements M must be met by Sept. 30, 2013. Maximum age requirements must be met by the first day of each session. Maximum staff-to-camper ratio is one to seven. If your camper wants to be placed with a friend, please submit a Special Placement Form, due by June 1. This form is available on the camp forms page of the website.

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$75 non-refundable A deposit per camper per session is required for all camps at registration time. Exception: Nature Tots and Walker’s Rangers deposit is $40. Deposits may be transferred as a deposit to another RA Camps session within the same camp season. They may not be used toward a camp balance. Deposits are credited toward the total cost of the program. Full payment for all sessions and services is required by May 1st. Refunds, minus applicable deposits, may be recovered until June 1st. See Camp Handbook, also available online, for complete refund policies and procedures. Transportation and Extended Care fees are refundable and transferable until two weeks before the start of the applicable session. Returned checks will result in a $36 fee.

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AM: $45/Session 1-4 PM: $45/Session 1-4 Van transportation is available within RA boundaries only. Transportation is available for all camps with the following exceptions: No transportation for Nature Tots, Walker’s Rangers, Camp On Wheels, and Junior Lifeguarding. One-way only transportation is available for Sportsters (to camp) and AM Hug-A-Tree (to camp) and PM Hug-A-Tree (home from camp). Transportation is not available between home and Extended Care. Campers may be picked up and dropped off at two different locations. Locations must remain the same throughout the session. Pick Up/Drop Off locations must be a home, place of employment or daycare provider.

Extended Care

AM: $45/Session, (7:30-9 a.m.) Exception: Science Camp and Teen Camp, Extended Care is $50. AM Extended Care is available for all camps, except Nature Tots, Walker’s Rangers, afternoon HugA-Tree, Camp On Wheels and Junior Lifeguarding. PM: $45/Session, (4-5:30 p.m.) Exception: Science Camp and Teen Camp, Extended Care is $50. PM Extended Care is available for all camps except Nature Tots, Walker’s Rangers, morning Hug-ATree, Camp On Wheels, Sportsters and Junior Lifeguarding. Extended Care is provided at our Brown’s Chapel facility.

Questions? E-mail camps at camp@reston.org or call the camps registration desk at 703-435-6551.

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As part of the service, RA will transport campers to their appropriate camps in the mornings and get them from camp to Extended Care in the afternoons as needed. These campers will ride the same vans that provide AM and PM transportation from and to private residences and workplaces within RA boundaries. If your child attends Science Camp or Teen Camp, please drop them off at Extended Care by 8:15 a.m., and pick them up no earlier than 4:15 p.m. These recommended times are subject to change. Extended Care activities are less structured and more independent than regular camp activities. They may include cards, board games, crafts, reading, videos, etc. A snack and drink will be served.

Camp Shirts

Campers at Hug-A-Tree, Sportsters, Day Camp, Science Camp, Mini-Camp and CITs are required to wear an official camp T-shirt each day. Shirts are sold at the RA office. $8 for youth sizes, $10 for adult sizes.

CAMP CALENDAR Jan. 28 Feb. 4 May 1 June 1

RA member registration begins. Non-resident registration begins. Camp balances are due. Camper forms are due. Last day for refunds.

Session 1: June 24-July 5 (No Camp July 4th) Session 1A: June 24-28 (Nature Tots) Session 1B: July 1-5 (Nature Tots) Session 2: July 8-19 Session 2A: July 8-12 (Walker’s Rangers) Session 2B: July 15-19 (Walker’s Rangers, Camp On Wheels) Session 3: July 22-Aug. 2 Session 3A: July 22-26 (Nature Tots) Session 3B: July 29-Aug. 2 (Nature Tots) Session 4: Aug. 5-16 Session 4A: Aug. 5-9 (Walker’s Rangers) Session 4B: Aug. 12-16 (Walker’s Rangers) Session 5: Aug. 19-23 (Mini Camp, Camp On Wheels)


WANT A SUMMER JOB?

We’re looking for responsible, creative and enthusiastic people to work at RA Camps. Have fun, make friends, and make a difference in a kid’s life! We need good role models who want experience working with children and the outdoors. Our jobs are great experience for people interested in careers in Education, Parks & Recreation, and Science.

APPLY EARLY ƒƒ Counselors must be at least 16 years of age. ƒƒ Senior Counselors must be at least 18 years of age. ƒƒ Also seeking college graduates for Specialist, Asst. Director, Mentor and Director positions.

Visit http://careers.reston.org or call 703-435-6504. Jobs will be posted beginning Feb. 1. Camp positions fill up fast, so submit your application early.

Reston Association is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a drug- free workplace. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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TENNIS PROGRAMS Youth Tennis 10 & Under

QuickStart Tennis For Munchkins (ages 3-4)

Tennis is a whole new ball game. Balls, rackets and courts sized right for kids. It’s all about the play. Children learn best when they have an opportunity to play and have fun. Reston Tennis Youth classes focus on practice, learn and play using the Quickstart format. Children will learn to play tennis by playing tennis. Reston Tennis implements the games-based approach to tennis, which means involving participants in tennis play within the first hour of the program. Class size limited to six.

Session 1: Apr. 8-May 18 Session 2: May 20-July 6

Once a week for six weeks (No classes on Memorial Day weekend) MONDAYS

2-2:45 p.m., 3-3:45 p.m.

SATURDAYS

10-10:45 a.m., 11-11:45 a.m. North Shore Courts $93/RA Members $102/Non-members This exciting new play format for learning tennis is designed to bring kids into the game by utilizing specialized equipment, shorter court dimensions and modified scoring — all tailored to age and size. Kids enjoy a fun, motivating introduction to tennis, emphasizing fun and play, It’s the fast, fun way to get kids into tennis and keep them playing. Parents or guardians must be present and join in the fun. Class size limited to six.

Quickstart Tennis For Champions (ages 7-10)

Twice a week for three weeks

Session 1: Apr. 9-25 Session 2: Apr. 30-May 16 Session 3: May 21- June 6

TUESDAY & THURSDAY

6-7 p.m., Hook Road Courts $99/RA Members $108/Non-members

This is the next step for children who are committed to improving their tennis skills. A certificate from Tennis Aces II is required for enrollment into this class. The Quickstart format will be implemented but there will be more of a focus on forehand and backhand stroke production so that students can consistently hit the ball over the net.

QuickStart Aces I (ages 5-7) Aces II (ages 7-8)

Aces I (ages 5-7)

Session 1: Apr. 8-May 18 Session 2: May 20-July 6

4-5 p.m., 5-6 p.m.

Once a week for six weeks (No classes on Memorial Day weekend)

North Shore Courts $99/RA Members $108/Non-members

This exciting new play format for learning tennis is designed to bring kids into the game by utilizing specialized equipment, shorter court dimensions and modified scoring — all tailored to age and size. Kids enjoy a fun, motivating introduction to tennis emphasizing fun and play, It’s the fast, fun way to get kids into tennis and keep them playing. We encourage a parent or guardian to join in the fun to make this class a success. The emphasis will be on learn, practice and play. To be enrolled in Aces II, you must have completed Aces I. Class size limited to six.

MONDAYS

2:30-3:30 p.m., 3:30-4:30 p.m. FRIDAYS

SATURDAYS

9-10 a.m., 10-11 a.m. 11-Noon, Noon-1 p.m.

Aces II (ages 5-8) MONDAYS

4:30-5:30 p.m., 5:30-6:30 p.m. FRIDAYS

5-6 p.m.

SATURDAYS

Noon-1 p.m.

Aces III (ages 6-9)

Once a week for six weeks MONDAYS

4:30-5:30 p.m., 5:30-6:30 p.m. SATURDAYS

9-10 a.m. North Shore Courts $99/RA Members $108/Non-members

Aces III (ages 6-9)

Twice a week for three weeks TUESDAY & THURSDAY

4:30-5:30 p.m. North Shore Courts $99/RA Members $108/Non-members

For more info on tennis programs and classes, please contact Tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502.

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TENNIS PROGRAMS

Junior Raquets & Equipments Available at

RA Pro Shop

USTA Reston Junior Team Tennis USTA Reston Junior Team Tennis in partnership with Hidden Creek Country Club Reston will host spring, summer and early fall. HCCC will host late fall and winter. The sessions are each six weeks and include two hours of practice and match play.

FORMAT

12 & UNDER TEAM Composition: Minimum 3 boys & 3 girls 10 & UNDER TEAM Composition: Minimum 3 boys & 3 girls 8 & UNDER TEAM Composition: Minimum 4 players (non-gender specific)

SESSIONS

(6-Week Program) Spring: Apr. 15- May 25 Summer: June 8- July 13

TRY OUTS

Monday, Apr. 8, 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, Apr. 9, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

MATCH DATES

Saturday, 4-6 p.m.

TO REGISTER

1.

2. 3.

o to website: G http://tennislink. usta.com/ TeamTennis/Main/ Home.aspx Click on “Register to Play” Enter Team ID 8 & Under #3029200873 10 & Under #3029200871 12 & Under #3029200872

COST

$164 (Reston League Fee) For more information, please contact Mary Conaway at mary@reston.org or call 703-435-6534.

PRACTICE DATES

PHOTO BY PETER STAPLES

Monday, 4-6 p.m.

LOCATION

Hook Road Tennis Courts

For more info on tennis programs and classes, please contact Tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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TENNIS PROGRAMS Learn, Practice and Play for Juniors Junior group tennis lessons for ages eight through twelve.

________________ Level One

This class is for players with little or no tennis background.

Level Two

This class is for students who have taken Level One.

Level Three

Teenage players advancing beyond Level Two should qualify for RA High School Tennis Innovations Development Program.

________________ Level One

Twice a week for three weeks

Session 1: Apr. 8-25 Session 2: Apr. 29-May 16 Session 3: May 20-June 6

MONDAY & WEDNESDAY

5-6 p.m., Lake Newport

TUESDAY & THURSDAY

5-6 p.m., Lake Newport $116/RA Members $120/Non-members

Level One

Once a week for six weeks

Session 1: Apr. 13-May 18 Session 2: June 1-July 6

(No classes on Memorial Day Weekend) SATURDAY

9-10 a.m., Autumnwood 11-Noon, Autumnwood $116/RA Members $120/Non-members

Level Two

Twice a week for three weeks MONDAY & WEDNESDAY

Level Two

Once a week for six weeks SATURDAY

10-11a.m., Autumnwood $116/RA Members $120/Non-members

Teen Tennis (ages 13-16)

Level One

This class is for players with little or no tennis background. MONDAY & WEDNESDAY

6-7 p.m., Shadowood $116/RA Members $120/Non-members

Twice a week for three weeks

Level Two

Teens will enjoy tennis with their peers and learn the fundamentals of tennis techniques and strokes. Emphasis is on fun, fitness and play. In addition, we will have a Team Tennis Event at the conclusion of each session on the last day of the session. In the event of rain, the Team Tennis Event will be held on Friday. Classes will meet twice a week for four weeks. Class size limited to six.

7-8 p.m., Shadowood $116/RA Members $120/Non-members

Session 1: Apr. 8-24 Session 2: Apr. 29-May 15 Session 3: May 20-June 5

This class is for students who have mastered Level One. MONDAY & WEDNESDAY

Court Locations

Autumnwood Courts 11950 Walnut Branch Road Lake Newport Courts 11452 Baron Cameron Avenue Shadowood Courts 2201 Springwood Drive

5-6 p.m., Lake Newport

TUESDAY & THURSDAY

5-6 p.m., Lake Newport $116/RA Members $120/Non-members

For more info on tennis programs and classes, please contact Tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502.

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TENNIS PROGRAMS Junior Match Play (ages 8-12)

Once a week for six weeks.

Session 1: Apr. 10-May 15 Session 2: May 22-June26 THURSDAY

5-6:30 p.m., Shadowood $135/RA Members $137/Non-members

This is an opportunity designed for advanced juniors looking for match play outside of lessons. Students will be on court with an RA Tennis Teaching Professional working on strategy and conditioning during actual match play situations. Strokes will be evaluated, not instructed, so students must be able to serve and rally at a high level to participate.

Futures Program (ages 9-12)

Once a week for six weeks.

Session 1: Apr. 8-May 13 Session 2: May 20-July 1

(No classes on Memorial Day Weekend) MONDAY

PHOTO BY DAVID MADISON

5-6:30 p.m., Lake Newport $174/RA Members $176/Non-members

This is RA’s highest level junior class for 9-12 years olds. Students must be able to rally with Quickstart green dot and regulation size tennis balls. Students should have experience playing matches in USTA leagues or sanctioned tournaments. This match play program will develop competitive skills for both singles and doubles under actual match conditions. Emphasis will be on strategy, conditioning and footwork. Players must be competitive to enter this program.

High School Tennis Innovations Development Program (ages 12-17) Session 1: Apr. 9-25 Session 2: Apr. 30-May 16 Session 3: May 21-June 6

RA Tennis Scholarship Program

TUESDAY & THURSDAY

4:30-6 p.m., Autumnwood $174/RA Members $175/Non-members

This is Reston Association’s highest level of play for juniors. This program is for rising high school players and those already in high school. This match play program will develop competitive skills for both singles and doubles play under actual match conditions. Emphasis will be on strategy, conditioning and footwork. Players must already be competitive to enter this program.

RA Tennis provides scholarships to Reston youth whose families have demonstrated financial need for example, if the family resides in subsidized housing or participates in the school meal program. To learn more about the scholarship program, call 703-435-6502.

HEART

For more info on tennis programs and classes, please contact Tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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TENNIS PROGRAMS Adult Tennis 17 years and older.

________________ Beginners

Introduces serve, volley, forehand and backhand strokes, court positions and tennis terms.

Advanced Beginners

Reviews beginners’ strokes with an emphasis on stroke execution. Introduces lob and overhead, scoring and rules. Students must know the basic strokes and forehand rallying.

Intermediate

For those wishing to perfect their strokes through drills with an emphasis on consistency, singles and doubles strategy and match play. Note: We cannot guarantee court preference. On some occasions, classes may be combined at one location or students may be asked to move from one level to another to maximize the ability for congenial class instruction.

Twice A Week Group Lesson

One Day A Week Group Lesson

Session 1: Apr. 8-25 Session 2: Apr. 29-May 16 Session 3: May 20-June 6

Session 1: Apr. 13-May 11 Session 2: May 18-June 8

Groups of three to five students meet with one instructor twice a week for two weeks.

(No classes on Memorial Day weekend )

________________

$126/RA Members $135/Non-members

Court Locations

Beginners

Autumnwood Courts 11950 Walnut Branch Road Hook Road Courts Fairway Drive & Hook Road Lake Newport Courts 11452 Baron Cameron Avenue Newbridge Tennis Courts 11718 Golf Course Square

Groups of three to five students meet with one instructor once a week for four weeks. (No classes on Memorial Day weekend )

$126/RA Members $135/Non-members

Beginners SATURDAY

TUESDAY & THURSDAY

Noon-1:30 p.m., Autumnwood

MONDAY & WEDNESDAY

Advanced Beginners

6-7 p.m., Lake Newport 7-8 p.m., Lake Newport

Advanced Beginners

SATURDAY

10:30 a.m.-Noon, Autumnwood

TUESDAY & THURSDAY

Intermediates

MONDAY & WEDNESDAY

9-10:30 a.m., Autumnwood

7-8 p.m., Lake Newport 6-7 p.m., Lake Newport

SATURDAY

Intermediates

TUESDAY & THURSDAY

8-9 p.m., Lake Newport

MONDAY & WEDNESDAY

8-9 p.m., Lake Newport

For more info on tennis programs and classes, please contact Tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502.

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TENNIS PROGRAMS Adult Match Play

Meets once a week for six weeks

Session 1: Apr. 9-May 14 Session 2: May 21-June 24 TUESDAY

10-11:30 a.m., Shadowood $135/RA Members $137/Non-members

This is an opportunity designed for all level adults looking for match play outside of lessons. Students will be on court with an RA Tennis Teaching Professional working on strategy during actual match play situations, including at times live ball drills where a pro feeds balls into match situations. Players will then play points out, competitively trying to win the point and the game. Strokes will be evaluated, not instructed so students must be able to serve and rally in order to participate. Let’s play tennis.

Fitness and Tennis Fun Meets once a week for six weeks

Session 1: Apr. 10-May 15 Session 2: May 22-June 26 WEDNESDAY

PHOTO BY PETER STAPLES

10-11 a.m., Shadowood $126/RA Members $135/Non-members

This is a high energy fitness class that combines the best features of tennis with a dynamic aerobic workout which will include a warm-up, a drill-based workout and a cool down. All drills are specifically designed to be fun, challenging, and will get you moving. You will hit forehands, backhands and volleys and have constant movement on the court. This is a great and healthy workout for people of all ages and abilities. When you are done hitting tennis balls, you will have energy to spare for the rest of your day!

Stroke Of The Week

Three to eight players. Must register at least one week in advance. Book four strokes and receive a 5% discount.

$24/RA Members $26/Non-members

TUESDAY NIGHTS

7-8 p.m., Shadowood

DATE

STROKE

Apr. 9 Serves Apr. 16 Volleys & half volley Apr. 23 Serve and volley Apr. 30 Forehands May 7 Backhands: one & two handed May 14 Overheads & lobs May 21 Approach shots May 28 Doubles strategy THURSDAY DAY

10-11 a.m., Shadowood

DATE

Serve & Return Lesson Session 1: Apr. 13-May 4 Session 2: May 11-June 8

(No classes on Memorial Day weekend ) TUESDAY

6-7 p.m., Shadowood $80/RA Members $88/Non-members

Groups of up to four students meet once a week for four weeks to become masters of their serve. The serve is the most important stroke in tennis. It starts the game. Without being able to serve, you cannot play the game of tennis. In this class you will learn a kick serve, a slice serve and increase the pace and velocity of your flat serve. Let the games begin.

STROKE

Apr. 11 Serves Apr. 18 Volleys & half volley Apr. 25 Serve and volley May 2 Forehands May 9 Backhands: one & two handed May 16 Overheads & lobs May 23 Approach shots May 30 Doubles strategy

For more info on tennis programs and classes, please contact Tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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NATUREPROGRAMS TENNIS PROGRAMS Adults Tennis Leagues Tennis Ratings

RA tennis professionals will give free ratings. Please call 703-435-6502 to arrange a convenient time. These are Reston ratings and apply for play in the Reston Team Tennis League.

Game On

Monday, Apr. 8 6-8 p.m., Lake Newport Courts Free for players registered in Reston Tennis Leagues.

Get your Game On and get back into Tennis Match Play Shape. Phifer Fitness and Reston Tennis will offer a free two-hour clinic for Reston Tennis League players. Registration required. Please e-mail mary@reston.org to register.

Greater Washington Tennis League

This is a women’s competitive league. All levels of players are invited to join one of our teams in the Greater Washington Daytime Doubles Tennis League. League play occurs in the spring and fall. Reston Association sponsors four women’s teams in this league. (Teams: B-2, B-3, B-4, C-2 )

Women play at Lake Newport, Hook Road and Autumnwood on weekday mornings or travel to other area clubs. $17/RA Members $20/Non-members *Non-members must purchase a RA tennis membership to participate

Northern Virginia Tennis League

Men! Women! Seniors! Play singles, doubles or mixed doubles in the Northern Virginia Tennis League. This league begins mid-May and continues through July. MEN

Men play at Lake Newport, Newbridge, Uplands, and travel to play against other clubs on Saturday mornings. WOMEN

Women play at Lake Newport, Autumnwood and Hook on weekday mornings and Tuesday evenings or travel to other area clubs, depending on the schedule. $17/person, RA Members $20/person, Non-members

*Non-members must purchase a RA tennis membership to participate

Reston Team Tennis

Reston Team Tennis, formally known as World Team Tennis, is one of our most popular leagues. There are 24 teams that play on Wednesday and Thursday nights. This is a social, yet competitive league. Please call the tennis office at 703-4356502 if you would like to join a team or start your own. FORMAT Men’s and Women’s Singles, Men’s and Women’s Doubles and Mixed Doubles. Matches can be played with as few as four players or as many as ten players per team.

Start Date: Apr. 17 Wednesday 3.0-3.5 Thursday 4.0-4.5 7-10 p.m., Glade, Lake Newport, Hook Road, Shadowood, North Hills and Autumnwood Courts. $70/RA Members $75Non-members

*Non-residents must purchase a RA Tennis Membership to participate

For more info on tennis programs and classes, please contact Tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502.

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NATURE TENNIS PROGRAMS Senior Round Robin (ages 55 and over )

Spring Tournaments

Apr. 19-May 24 (Rain date May 31) Fridays, 9-11 a.m., Hook Road $15/per person (six weeks of play) Still looking for competitive fun play? Join the senior interReston league. The format will be doubles. Register in advance.

Adult Tennis Drop In Tennis

Tuesday, 7-10 p.m. Lake Newport Tennis Courts: 1, 2, 5, 6

Note: Drop in tennis is for Reston Association Members and tennis members only. Nonmembers must purchase an RA tennis membership to participate. How it works: You must have your RA pass with you to participate. Bring a can of balls and your game. Doubles will be the format when people are waiting to play. Teams will play best of five games using NO-AD scoring. The winning team will stay on the same court but will split and no longer be partners. Losing team will slide to the next court down where a winning team will have split and will accept one player each. If the court next to you has not finished, you are asked to wait outside the court or on a bench. This format will continue until nobody is waiting to play. Once people are waiting to play, you are asked to go back to the five game NO-AD matches. Courts 1 and 2 should be used by players 3.5 and below when no line is present. Courts 5 and 6 should be used for 3.5 and above when no line is present. If court 3 has no lessons at 9 p.m., it will be reserved for drop in tennis.

USTA/ MAS Men’s and Women's 35/45 Championships Singles (SE) Apr. 12-15, 2013 Entry Fee: $50 Deadline: Apr. 10, 2013

Register at www.usta.com

USTA / MAS Men’s and Women's Open Singles Championship Singles (SE) Cash Prize May 17-20, 2013 Entry Fee: $50 Deadline: May 8, 2013

Register at www.usta.com

USTA/MID-ATLANTIC & RESTON TENNIS ASSOCIATION PRESENT

ADULT MINI “CASH MONEY” TENNIS TOURNAMENT FRIENDRAISER SATURDAY, APRIL 27, 2013 9 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

Ages 18 and Over, Non-gender specific Guaranteed at least 3 matches Format: Red felt ball on 36 foot courts NTRP Level: Up to 5.5 singles, 3.0–3.5 doubles Rules: Balls must bounce once. Underhand serves only. 1st & 2nd Place will receive awards & cash money 3rd & 4th Place will receive awards & gift certificates For more information, visit www.restontennis.org.

For more info on tennis programs and classes, please contact Tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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TENNIS PROGRAMS Men & Women Singles & Doubles Ladder

Colts Neck Tennis Courts Colts Neck Road

New this year, we are offering both Adult Singles and Doubles Ladders. Prizes will be awarded at the end of the season. If you sign up for the doubles ladder with a partner, you can automatically enter the singles ladder at no additional cost. Upon completion of registering, you will receive a password to the online ladder. You must have a partner to join doubles ladder. Fee: $15 per person.

Glade Tennis Courts 11550 Glade Drive

Challenge Ladder Rules

TENNIS COURTS Autmnwood Courts 11950 Walnut Branch Road Barton Hill Tennis Courts Sunrise Valley Drive/ Barton Hill Road

Hook Road Courts Fairway Drive/Hook Road Lake Anne Tennis Courts (with blended lines) 11301 North Shore Drive Lake Newport Courts 11452 Baron Cameron Avenue Newbridge Tennis Courts 11718 Golf Course Square North Shore Tennis Courts (10 & Under) 11515 North Shore Drive North Hills Courts 1325 North Village Road Shadowood Courts 2201 Springwood Drive Upper Lakes Tennis Courts Upper Lakes Drive/ Sunrise Valley Drive Uplands Tennis Courts 11032 Ring Road

The initial ranking of players on a ladder is random. New players are added to the bottom of the ladder. The challenger must contact the player challenged. The challenged player may select the time and location of the match; however, the time and location should be mutually agreeable to both players. The challenger is responsible for providing new tennis balls and reserving the court according to Reston Association Tennis Court Rules.

The standard rules of the United States Tennis Association (USTA) apply to ladder matches. The usual method of scoring is based on winning two of three sets, with a tiebreak at the end of any set that reaches a score of six games each. In the tiebreak, the first to win seven points wins the set, but must win by at least two points. The winner of the match is responsible for recording the results online within 24 hours of the match. A. B. C. D.

Date of the match Winner’s name Loser’s name Match score.

The ladder listing is updated each time a new challenge match score has been entered. A player inactive for a period of four weeks is moved down in the rankings at that time, with additional penalties for each succeeding period of inactivity. The rules will be interpreted and disputes between members will be settled at the sole discretion of the ladder coordinator, Rob Tucker at 703-435-6502.

A match should be completed within seven days of the challenge. A person challenged who cannot play within seven days for any reason shall forfeit the match. A withdrawn or canceled challenge is a default loss for the challenger.

RA Tennis Court Rules Usage

Court changes are made on the hour. Please show your pass when entering the court.

Players must show membership cards and guest passes on the changeover.

Play is limited to one hour for singles and two hours for doubles when other people are waiting. Players who have used the court for a fraction of the hour must vacate on the hour when others are waiting to play.

RA Members with their membership cards. (Guests must have a guest pass and be accompanied by the host member).

RA instructors are the ONLY persons permitted to give lessons on a feepaying basis.

Enforcement of the Rules

Reserving a Court

Failure to adhere to these rules will result in loss of court privileges.

Players must place their membership card and a racquet (or racquet cover) on the numbered hooks on the courtside bulletin boards. Failure to display the racquet/cover and the membership card or key tag means the court is not reserved. Players reserving courts must remain courtside while waiting to play. Players may not reserve a court while playing. RA may reserve courts for lessons, tournaments, league play and court rentals.

For more info on tennis programs and classes, please contact Tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502.

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Priority of Play

RA court monitors and staff will enforce the rules of court play.

Membership cards and guest passes are available at the RA tennis office, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404. Guest passes are also available from a court monitor.


NEW Aeropro Drive $199

NEW Aeropro Lite $189

NEW

V-PRO 2 Men $94.95

NEW Aeropro Team $195

NEW Aeropro Junior $104

NEW

V-PRO 2 Women $94.95

NEW Propulse 4 Women $119.95 NEW Propulse 4 Junior $64.95

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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TENNIS PROGRAMS Game. Set. Match. RA offers spring, summer and fall tournaments ranging from USTAsanctioned to friendly local round robins. The tennis program also features men’s, women’s and junior leagues, as well as adult and junior individual and group lessons. Register for leagues, lessons and tournaments at Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive or online at www.reston.org. General tennis information can be found on our website as well as on the tennis court bulletin boards at each of the tennis complexes. All registrations must be made online or at Reston Association. With 48 outdoor tennis courts, 26 lighted for night play, Reston Association offers one of the most extensive tennis programs in the Washington metropolitan area.

Tennis Online

Info on our Reston Tennis News Facebook page www.facebook.com/ RestonTennisNews. Find the following upto-date information in the tennis section on the Reston Association website. www.reston.org. RTT Score Board www.restontennis.org Tennis Ladder www.tennisengine.com USTA Tournament & Entry forms www.usta.com

Tennis Committee

The RA Tennis Advisory Committee meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at Reston Association. All comments and suggestions are welcome. Send an e-mail to tennis@reston.org. To call or e-mail a committee member with suggestions, look them up on our website www.reston.org.

Community Court Watch

We have some of the best community courts in the Northern Virginia area. We are calling on you to help keep our courts in tiptop condition. If you see a broken net strap or a light out, please e-mail tennis@reston.org or call the tennis office at 703435-6502.

Lighted Courts

The following 26 RA courts are lighted until 11 p.m. for night play. ƒƒ Autumnwood Courts ƒƒ Glade Clay Courts ƒƒ Hook Road Courts ƒƒ Lake Newport Courts ƒƒ North Hills Clay Courts ƒƒ Shadowood Courts

Tennis Practice Walls ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Colts Neck Hook Road Lake Anne Park

Tennis Key Tags

Great for easy identification and your convenience. Key tags are available for $2.50. Come to RA to purchase one.

Tennis Lesson Gift Certificates

Tennis gift certificates are available at the Reston Association Tennis Office. Please call 703-435-6502 or visit our website at www.reston.org.

RACKET BEAR Racket Bear

Private Tennis Lessons For those who prefer more individual instruction or for the player needing a flexible schedule.

PRIVATE

Need Your Racket Strung?

$64-70 hour/RA Members $66-72 hour/Non-members

SEMI PRIVATE

$35 person/hour/RA Members $36 person/hour/Non-members Book a series of six private lessons or semi-private lessons and receive a 5 percent discount. Contact tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502 for a list of available pros.

For more info on tennis programs and classes, please contact Tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6502.

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Member of USRSA (MRT), PTR (AI)

571-313-0507

e-mail racketbear@comcast.net


TENNIS PROGRAMS

MARY CONAWAY RA’s Tennis Manager has been involved in Reston since 1987. In 1998, Mary became certified as a PTR Instructor and taught lessons for Reston Association. Mary currently serves as council chair of the USTA National Volunteer Development Council.

TYLER MCGINNIS First and foremost, tennis is my passion. I have played the sport since I was young. I have previously worked as an intern for the USTA/WTA. As a tennis pro with Reston Association, I look forward to teaching and developing a love of tennis in others.

ROD PAOLINI Rod particularly enjoys working with young children. He employs various activities and games that develop the skills needed for tennis. He invites parents to be involved in the lesson in order to learn and play together. Rod is a PTR-certified instructor.

MARK STEED Mark is a USPTA-certified instructor. He has experience teaching women’s team practices, junior programs, adult programs and private lessons to children and adults of all ages and levels.

JIM ELDER Jim has been a USPTA-certified pro since 1997 and co-chairs the USTA Mid-Atlantic Adult-Senior Ranking Committee. He is the VP for the men’s division of the Northern Virginia Tennis League. In 2010, Jim was ranked in singles as high as number 16 nationally in his age group, won the MAS Clay Doubles, and was the finalist in one national and two MAS singles championships.

CHUME BERTRAND Chume is a PTR-certified associate instructor. She has been involved with tennis since she moved to the Reston area in 1991. Chume has been very active with USTA junior tennis. She plays tennis competitively in many local tennis leagues.

PETE STAPLES A native of Australia, Peter is a PTR-certified instructor, now living in Reston. He is passionate about tennis and loves to share his love of the game with high energy instruction. His other passion is tennis photography. Peter photographs the pros at the Citi Open Tournament, as well as many other ATP tour events.

JESSICA KEENER Jessica is a recent graduate from the Top 50 Division I tennis program, Marshall University, where she played on a full scholarship for her collegiate career. She loves to work with upcoming juniors, helping them develop their game.

ROBERT TUCKER Robert is a certified PTR tennis instructor who lives in Reston. With two decades of experience in tennis sales, he is the “go to” guy when you’re trying to find the right equipment for your game.

KATHY REDDLE Kathy is both a Junior Development PTR-certified instructor and Adult PTR-certified instructor. From beginners to advanced juniors and adults, Kathy enjoys instructing at a variety of skill levels. Her passion for tennis and helping players reach their potential is a terrific combination.

JUAN FIGUEROA Juan is a PTR tennis instructor. He has been playing tennis since 1984 and became a certified tennis instructor in 2003. Juan loves working with children of all ages. He also works with adults and loves to improve their game.

BILL WOOD As a lifelong player and enthusiast, I love giving back to the sport of tennis. For the past two years, I have been teaching juniors at the Herndon Community Center and also serve as the Assistant Tennis Coach at Herndon High School. Certified by USPTR in Spring 2012.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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TENNIS PROGRAMS REGISTER FOR TENNIS PROGRAMS AND EVENTS ADULT REGISTRATION Session Number:

Location: Day:

Time:

Cost:

Name: DOB:

/

/

Sex:

o Male

o Female

NTRP Rating

Street Address: City: State:

Zip:

E-Mail: Phone: (Home)

(Work) (Cell)

DIAL-A-MATCH AVAILABILTY: o Weekdays o Evenings o Weekends o Anytime Level

STROKE OF THE WEEK Date:

Stroke:

Cost:

JUNIOR REGISTRATION Parent/Guardian’s Name: Street Address: City: Phone: (Home)

State:

Zip:

E-Mail:

(Work) (Mobile)

Child’s Name (1): DOB:

/

Session Number:

/

Grade:

Sex:

o Male

Location: Day:

o Female

Time:

Cost:

LEVELS: o Munchkin o Aces I o Aces II o Champions I o Champions II o Level 1 o Level 2 o Level 3 o Junior Futures I o Junior Futures II o Teen L1 o Teen L2 o HS Development Child’s Name (2): DOB:

/

Session Number:

/

Grade:

Sex:

o Male

Location: Day:

o Female

Time:

ADULT CLASSES

o Beginner o Advanced Beginner o Intermediate o Serving Class

COURT LOCATIONS

o o o o o o

Lake Newport Hook Road Shadowood Newbridge Autumnwood North Shore

ADULT LEAGUES

o Wed o Thurs o RTT League Captain’s Name o Greater Washington Tennis League o Northern Virginia League o Men's o Women's o Mixed o Senior Round Robin

TENNIS LADDER

o Male o Female o Singles o Doubles

DOUBLES

o Mixed Doubles Flight Doubles Partner (Name) o MAKE A CONTRIBUTION TO OUR CHILDREN’S TENNIS SCHOLARSHIP FUND $

Cost:

LEVELS: o Munchkin o Aces I o Aces II o Champions I o Champions II o Level 1 o Level 2 o Level 3 o Junior Futures I o Junior Futures II o Teen L1 o Teen L2 o HS Development

HEART

Payment can be made by personal check, cash or credit card. Please make checks payable to Reston Association. If mailing registration form, please send to: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404. No faxes will be accepted. AMOUNT: $

CHECK NUMBER:

oVISA oMC CARD NUMBER:

EXPIRATION DATE: *CARD SECURITY CODE:#

SIGNATURE:

*Typically a 3-digit code located on back of credit card, to the right of the signature strip.

I hereby release the Reston Association (RA), and any of its directors, officers, employees and agents from all claims for bodily injury, death or property damage arising out of my and my child’s participation in the above event(s), except for claims caused directly by the negligence or willful misconduct of RA. I assume full responsibility for all liability in connection with such claims, and for having insurance for me and my child. I agree to indemnify RA and hold RA harmless against any such claims and related costs, including claims by any minor which may be brought after attaining majority. I also hereby grant permission for Reston Association to photograph and videotape my child and to use such photographs and videotapes for promotional and advertising purposes and for trade purposes. I promise to abide by the rules and regulations of RA’s tennis courts and exercise care and caution for my and/or my child’s personal safety and that of my fellow participants. I acknowledge and agree that my and my child’s participation in any program sponsored by RA or presence at its tennis courts or other areas under RA’s control may be an activity where injury can occur and shall be undertaken at my and my child’s sole risk. I hereby certify that I and my child are physically fit and have not been otherwise informed by a physician. I understand that RA employs no physicians, and its staff cannot and does not diagnose medical problems.

SIGNATURE OF PARTICIPANT (or parent/legal guardian if participant is under 18 years of age): DATE: PRINTED NAME:

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TENNIS PROGRAMS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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NATURE PROGRAMS Walker Nature Center

CALLING VOLUNTEERS OF ALL AGES!

RESTON’S ARBOR DAY

Located at 11450 Glade Drive, the Nature Center provides a variety of educational and recreational programs and amenities. The mission of the center is to foster an environmental stewardship ethic in the community. The center enhances people’s awareness, knowledge, appreciation, and enjoyment of the environment.

The 72-acre wooded site features: ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

ne mile of loop trails, o including a short ADA accessible trail An education building known as Nature House A picnic pavilion Picnic tables and trailside benches A campfire ring Outdoor displays and interpretive signs Demonstration gardens and meadows A pond The Glade Stream Valley Snakeden Branch stream’s entrance to 44-acre Lake Audubon

MONDAY, APRIL 15 9:30 A.M.-NOON (RAIN OR SHINE)

TWO LOCATIONS: WALKER NATURE CENTER AND TWIN BRANCHES NATURE TRAIL

Visit Nature House to: ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Enjoy exhibits and displays. See a live box turtle and fish up close. Talk with a naturalist. Use the nature resource library. Do a simple activity or read a nature story. Learn about the green features of this LEED Gold building.

Nature House Hours MONDAY, WEDNESDAY-FRIDAY: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. TUESDAYS: Closed SATURDAY: 10 a.m.-1 p.m. SUNDAY: 1-4 p.m. Check holiday schedule for additional closings. Free parking, restroom and trail access dawn to dusk, 365 days a year.

Reston is a Tree City USA as certified by the National Arbor Day Foundation. Join us as we: ƒƒ Help plant native trees, plus a variety of shrubs, ferns and wildflowers. ƒƒ Learn about Reston’s trees and shrubs, including proper planting and care. ƒƒ Show our appreciation for trees. Volunteers will be treated to a free pizza lunch. Contact Ha Brock at ha@reston.org or 703-435-7986 to sign up. Perfect for gardeners, seniors, scout groups and students.

Environmental Volunteers Details in the Get Involved Section

Weed Warriors — help protect the trees and other native plants in our natural areas, see page 102. Garlic Mustard Challenge — help pull this invasive exotic plant from our woodlands, see page 103. Storm Drain Marking — help mark storm drains that flow to local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, see page 105. Stream Monitors — help monitor local stream health by inventorying macroinvertebrates, see page 105. Reston’s Arbor Day — dig in to plant trees, shrubs and wildflowers on Apr. 15, see page 106. Spring Festival — help out at this annual nature center event on May 4, see page 107.

Nature programs may be canceled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.

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NATURE PROGRAMS

10TH ANNUAL

5K Fund Run & Walk To Benefit Nature House

Saturday, April 20, 8 a.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive

ADULT FEE: $25 (prior to Apr. 1), $30 (regular) CHILDREN’S FEE: $15 (prior to Apr. 1), $20 (regular)

Register at www.active.com or in person starting at 7 a.m. on race day.

This Earth Day weekend, get into nature on one of the most scenic courses in the area and help us celebrate the tenth anniversary of this popular event. There will be lots of prizes, music and refreshments following the race.

Funds go to Friends of Reston, the 501(c)3 organization which led the capital campaign to create Nature House, now in its third year of operation. Donations above and beyond the race entry fees are tax deductible.

LEED Gold certified by the U.S. Green Building Council, Nature House is the home of environmental education in Reston. Funds raised will support new green building enhancements, educational displays and exhibits. Volunteers needed. Contact habrock@ reston.org or call 703-435-7986. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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NATURE PROGRAMS All Ages

Nature Game Night

All ages welcome. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Owl Investigations

Thursday, Jan. 24, 7-8:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Jan. 21 $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members

For ages 7 through adult. What do owls eat? Become nature detectives and examine a real owl pellet! Learn about how owls catch their prey, which owls can be found in Reston, and what they like to eat. Finally, take a short hike in search of owls in the forest.

Friday, Feb. 8, 7-8:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Feb. 5 $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members

Bring the whole family for a game night with a nature spin. Play Nature Pictionary, Tree Twister and Forest Bingo. Then, make your own checker board out of natural and recycled materials to take home. Have popcorn and homemade snack mix while enjoying an evening full of fun and games.

Love is in the Air

Friday, Feb. 22, 6-7:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Feb. 19 $4/person RA Members $6/person Non-members

Animals do some weird things to find that special someone, from singing insects and frogs, to dancing fish, strutting birds, and smelly moths. Explore the amazing, and sometimes funny world of animal courtship through animal artifacts and multimedia.

Storytime Fun: Toadie and the Snake Ages 3 to 8 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Saturday, Mar. 2, 11 a.m. - Noon Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Feb. 27 $5/child RA Members, $8/child Non-members

Listen to Reston author Ellice Rosenberg Stern read her new and delightful book, Toadie and the Snake. Hear the tale of what happened one night in the garden around her home. Meet a live snake and make a toad abode. Copies of the book will be for sale at the book signing after the program.

Amphibian Idol

Saturday, Mar. 9, 11 a.m.-Noon Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Mar. 6 $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members

An Evening with the Lorax

Friday, Apr. 5, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Apr. 2 $5 suggested donation

Frogs and toads sing in Step into the magical world the spring, but they are of Dr. Seuss’s "The Lorax." hoping to attract mates Watch the newest movie instead of recording while surrounded by a contracts. Learn which colorful forest of trufulla songs belong to which trees. Explore a touch table amphibians, and make of nature objects, make a noise as part of a frog trufulla tree to take home, chorus right here at the and learn how we can all Nature Center! be local Loraxes. There will be concessions for sale.

Owl Prowl

Friday, Mar. 22, 6-7:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Mar. 19 $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members

Meet a wildlife rehabilitator from the Raptor Conservancy to view live owls of Virginia up close. Then prowl the trails along the Glade Stream Valley in search of our resident owls.

HOW TO MAKE A SOLAR OVEN

Ages 10 years to adult.

Sunday, May 19, 1-4 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: May 16 $5/person RA Members, $8/person Non-members

Solar ovens use sunlight to slow cook or warm foods without the aid of electricity or other fuel sources. While primarily used in regions where no fuel is available or where there are serious threats of fire, they can also be used to sterilize water and be helpful on camping trips. Build an oven and receive a simple recipe. All supplies provided. Co-sponsored by Reston Community Center and Sustainable Reston.

Nature programs may be canceled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.

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NATURE PROGRAMS

Attention Scout Leaders

The Walker Nature Center can help your organization to earn patches & badges. Make a Date with a Naturalist to...

Lead a fun and educational program in an achievement area such as: Forester, Naturalist, Wildlife, Eco-action, Earth Connections, Earth is Our Home, Earth and Sky, Water Everywhere, Senses, Animals and more.

$4 per participant (min. charge $40), RA Members $6 per participant (min. charge $60), Non-members

Lead a Campfire Fun or Campfire Cookery program. $5 per participant (min. charge $50), RA Members $8 per participant (min. charge $80), Non-members Campfire Ring Rental:

$10/hr. for RA Members $15/hr. for Non-members.

Note: The Campfire Ring can also be rented for self-use. You bring the wood and the water.

Lead a Community Service Project with your group. FREE. Activity kits are also available on loan for Birds, Trees and Watershed requirements. Call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org for details and reservations.

Nature programs may be canceled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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NATURE PROGRAMS Babes in the Woods

Earth Day Fun

18 months to 35 months. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

5 to 12 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Sunday, Apr. 21, 2-3 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Apr. 17 $5/child RA Members $8/child Non-members

Nesting Birds

Choose Monday, Feb. 4 or Tuesday, Feb. 5, 10-11 a.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: February 1 $5/child RA Members $8/child Non-members

Celebrate Earth Day at the Nature Center. Play carnival-style games, and build a tower out of recyclable materials. Make a papermache Earth and a grass head craft to take home. Have fun while learning what you can do to keep our planet green.

Bird nests are easy to find in the winter. Make your own bird nest craft to take home, see real bird nests up close, and go in search of nests in the trees along our trails.

Dancing Wind

Choose Monday, Mar. 4 or Tuesday, Mar. 5, 10 -11 a.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Feb. 28 $5/child RA Members $8/child Non-members

Preschool Happenings 3 to 5 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

March is the windy month. Spring Senses Take a walk and feel the Saturday, Feb. 23, wind as it dances around 11 a.m.-Noon you. Blow around like a Walker Nature Center gale and float like a breeze. 11450 Glade Drive Make a wind sock so you Reserve by: February 20 can always tell when the $5/child RA Members wind is on the move. $8/child Non-members Spring is right around the corner — time to give our Wonderful Spring senses a tune-up. Learn Wildflowers about our five senses, how Choose Monday, Apr. 8 or animals use their senses, Tuesday, Apr. 9, 10-11 a.m. and then go outside to get Walker Nature Center your senses ready for the 11450 Glade Drive sights, sounds and scents Reserve by: Apr. 5 of spring.

$5 RA Members $8 Non-members

Before the leaves appear on trees, wildflowers bloom to soak up the sun. Make a pretty flower craft to take home, and take part in a scavenger hunt to find different colored wildflowers.

Brilliant Birds

Monday, Mar. 11, 10 -11 a.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Mar. 8 $5/child RA Members $8/child Non-members

Many birds migrate far away during the winter. They return with their most colorful feathers in spring. Make a colorful bird craft, see some pretty feathers up close, and go on a short hike to see if we can find these beautiful birds in the trees.

April Fool's Day Fun

Monday, Apr. 1, 10-11 a.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Mar. 29 $5/child RA Members $8/child Non-members

April Fool's Day is always a silly day full of fun. Bring your best nature jokes to share, and enjoy this wacky hike to see the funny side of nature. ning after the program.

Nature programs may be canceled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.

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NATURE PROGRAMS

Planning a Birthday Party?

Bring the kids and the cake to a fun-filled, creative party at the Nature Center. Thematic parties include a two-hour facility rental, 45 minutes of staff-led activities, and party favors.

CHOOSE FROM THE FOLLOWING THEMES: Nature Detectives Ages 3-7

Learn to be a good nature detective by using your eyes, ears, nose and hands. Play sensory guessing games, find what doesn’t belong on our “un-nature” trail, and follow clues to solve a mystery animal’s trail. Favors include a magnifying hand lens, a mini-notebook and a nature center pencil. The birthday child receives an Earl the Squirrel stuffed toy.

Dinosaurs Ages 3-9

Share what you know about these amazing animals. Uncover bones and shells like a paleontologist, and make your own fossil imprints in clay. Go on a dinosaur egg hunt that will lead you to a nest full of eggs. Favors include a dinosaur egg, a dinosaur sticker and a fossil imprint. The birthday child gets a Myrtle the Turtle key chain.

Nature Crafts Ages 3-12

Learn new skills and nature facts as you make a variety of crafts to take home. Younger crafters will make bug boxes, rock insects and wildlife masks or puppets. Older crafters will try their hands at leather craft, building a bird feeder and making beaded accessories.

Campfire Fun Ages 7-12

Parties are held at the campfire ring off of Soapstone Drive. Program includes nature jokes, stories, songs, and games around the campfire. S’mores provided. Favors include a glow stick and red hot candies. The birthday child gets a nature center flashlight.

How to Book ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Parties may be booked up to three months in advance. Weekend dates are limited and fill quickly. Consider a weekday afternoon or evening party. Maximum 15 children.

Fee: $175/RA Members $200/Non-members

CALL 703-476-9689 AND PRESS 3 OR E-MAIL NATURECENTER@RESTON.ORG.

Nature programs may be canceled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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NATURE PROGRAMS Adult Programs

FREE BRUSH CHIPPING

16 years to adult

Organic Gardening

Thursday, Mar. 7, 7-8 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Mar. 4 $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members

Organic gardening uses landscape design and the environment to improve and maximize the health and the development of plants and soil without the use of commercial pesticides and fertilizers. Learn about this mainstay method of sustainable gardening, and bring your questions. Co-sponsored by Reston Community Center and Sustainable Reston. Sr. Container Planting Seniors, 55 years & older

Eco-Friendly Cleaning

Wednesday, Mar. 20, 7-8 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Mar. 17 $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members

Learn why it’s a good idea to reduce the use of harsh, sometimes toxic, cleansers in the home, and how to make safe and environmentally friendly ones that are quick, easy and economical. Attendees are encouraged to purchase Clean House, by Karen Logan and bring it to the workshop. Co-sponsored by Reston Community Center and Sustainable Reston.

Monday, Apr. 8, 1-2:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: Apr. 3 $8/person RA Members $12/person Non-members

Have the perfect window sill or patio to enjoy a container garden? Come learn what plants and herbs grow best in this type garden. Listen to a presentation, then create your own container garden to take home. To register, call 703-435-6530.

Wild Edibles

Sunday, Apr. 28, 1-4 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members

All food does not have to come from the grocery store. Many naturally occurring plants can make a nutritious and tasty addition to your diet. Sample some “wild” dishes and take home recipes to try on your own. After an indoor presentation that includes the ethics of collecting and how good foraging starts at home, we’ll hike the trails in search of edible plants. Each participant will harvest their own garlic mustard. Special Guest Instructor: Lori Thomas

RA’s brush chipping program offers you a place to bring your brush for chipping at no cost. RA Guidelines state that no brush may be dumped on RA property. Just drop off your brush at the locations listed below, and RA crews will chip it for use on RA open space. PLEASE: Brush only (Branches should be less than 4 inches in diameter.) No grass clippings, dirt, trash, paper, vines, thorns or other debris. Brush may be dropped off at any time during the days listed. No contractors. Lake Audubon Pool 2070 Twin Branches Road Central Services Facility 12250 Sunset Hills Road

CHIPPING DATES & SITES

Jan. 19-20

Lake Audubon Pool

Feb. 16-17

Central Services Facility

Mar. 16-17

Lake Audubon Pool

Apr. 20-21

Central Services Facility

Nature programs may be canceled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.

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NATURE PROGRAMS

Spring Festival Saturday, May 4,1-5 p.m. (rain or shine) Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive

All Ages Welcome Free Event Entertainment Live Animals Fishing Activities Craft Making for Kids Displays & Information from Environmental Groups Canoe and Kayak Rentals on Lake Audubon ($3) New this year! Celebrate the culmination of the first ever Garlic Mustard Challenge in Reston. Learn all about this invasive exotic plant through fun activities, including a drop-off station for bags of removed garlic mustard. Volunteers needed. Contact habrock@reston.org or call 703-435-7986.

Entertainment Sponsor: Reston Community Center See www.reston.org for more event updates.

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NATURE PROGRAMS THE NATURE OF RESTON

Photos by: Charles A. Veatch Text By: Claudia Thompson-Deahl An art photography, nature and informational book and guide to Reston’s habitats all in one beautiful hardbound volume.

ON SALE FOR $20 at Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive All proceeds from the book sales go to the Walker Nature Center.

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Bird Walks 16 years to adult. FREE. No reservations required. Beginning and expert birders are invited to search for birds in some of Reston’s most beautiful natural areas. We will visit a variety of sites. Our collaborative efforts usually produce a good variety of local birds, and we always have a great time. These walks are jointly sponsored by Reston Association and its Environmental Advisory Committee, the Audubon Society of Northern Virginia and The Bird Feeder store.

February Bird Walk: Reston’s Lakes — Waterfowl and Raptors Tour

Sunday, Feb. 10, 7:30-10:30 a.m. 2070 Twin Branches Road

Park at Lake Audubon Pool We will start at the Lake Audubon Boat Ramp to check for waterfowl on the lake. Participants are invited to gather at the South Lakes Shopping Center Starbucks later in the morning to warm up and check for birds on Lake Thoreau. If the birding is good, we may caravan or carpool to other Reston sites. Leader: Kevin Munroe

Join the Walker Nature Center’s electronic mailing list to receive the quarterly newsletter, Branching Out, as well as announcements of upcoming special events. To subscribe or submit nature questions, e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.

Nature programs may be canceled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.

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NATURE PROGRAMS

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Eight Prohibited Plants in Reston Invasive exotic plants are non-native and adversely affect the ecosystem to which they are introduced. They spread quickly and outcompete our native vegetation. Often, invasive exotic plants get their start in yards and gardens where they can become a serious problem for the property owner and adversely affect neighboring private property as well as RA natural areas. The proliferation of these plants decreases plant diversity and harms the wildlife that depends on native plants for food and shelter. Many invasive exotics overtake native shrubs and trees that are a signature of the Reston community. Efforts to control these species on RA property are ongoing and costly. We are grateful for the many volunteers who have worked diligently to remove invasive exotic plants and educate our members about their harmful effects.

PHOTO BY JIM KIRBY

By resolution of Reston Association's Board of Directors, the Use and Maintenance Standards for all properties that fall under the Reston deed were amended in May of 2008 to include the eight invasive exotics.

If you would like to learn more about invasive exotic plants, visit “Plants” on the “Natural Resources” page in the “Nature” section of our website, www.reston. org. If you would like to volunteer to help control invasive plants in Reston, contact Ha Brock via e-mail at habrock@reston.org. Please direct questions to our environmental resource staff at 703-437-7658. Thank you for your cooperation in not planting any of these species in Reston.

Banned Invasive Exotics

• Flowering Pears (Pyrus calleryana cultivars) • Winged Burning Bush (Euonymus alata) • Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii) • Exotic Bush Honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.) • Exotic Bamboos (Bambusa spp.) • Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) • Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) • English Ivy (Hedera helix) • Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) Throughout the spring season, RA will be hosting a Garlic Mustard Challenge. We need your help to remove as much Garlic Mustard from Reston as possible. Garlic Mustard is an invasive species that produces allelopathic chemics that alter the soil chemistry and prevent native plants and trees from growing. Contact Ha Brock at habrock@ reston.org for more information on how to get involved.

FRIENDS OF RESTON ADOPT-A-BENCH PROGRAM

Adopt-A-Bench is a program of Friends of Reston, which seeks to increase seating along Reston’s pathways and at recreational areas. Donations are appreciated in any amount and are tax-deductible. Sponsor a bench in someone’s honor for the donation amounts below.

Tennis Benches

Select the court location (based on availability on a first-come, first-serve basis). Cost includes an engraved plaque, Donation Amount: $235 if desired. For more details about tennis benches, contact tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6534.

Pathway/Recreation Facility Benches

Locations based upon need and your preference. Benches are made of recycled plastic with heavy duty Donation Amount: $850 steel supports. Cost includes an engraved plaque, if desired. For more information about pathway/recreation facility benches, contact CSFstaff@reston.org or call 703-437-7658.

Please make checks payable to the “Friends of Reston” and write “Adopt-A-Bench” in the memo section. Mail to: Friends of Reston, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston VA 20191.

ADOPT A RECYCLING BIN Help Reston increase recycling in the community. Attractive recycling bins are needed at Reston’s tennis courts. Select the court of your choice. Reston Association will manage the Donation Amount: $475 recyclables. The bins are made of 100% recycled plastic lumber, fastened to a sturdy, recycled, cast-aluminum frame. The cost includes an engraved plaque, if desired.

Make checks payable to “Friends of Reston” and write “Adopt-ARecycling Bin” in the memo section. Mail to: Friends of Reston, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston VA 20191. For more information, contact CSFstaff@ reston.org or call 703-437-7658.

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NATURE PROGRAMS

RENT SPACE AT THE Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive

Looking for the perfect spot for a community meeting, family gathering or business retreat? Affordable and attractive rentals are available at the nature center. Nature House Multipurpose Room

664 square feet of space, capacity 94 people, seats 44 people with tables and chairs. Parking and restroom access.

RA Member or Reston not-for-profit fee Non-member or Non-Reston not-for-profit fee For profit/corporate fee

$30/hr. $50/hr. $75/hr.

Nature Center Pavilion

576 square feet pavilion with picnic tables and bench seating in a beautiful woodland setting. Parking and restroom access.

RA Member fee $20/hr. Non-member fee $30/hr. For profit/corporate fee $50/hr.

Campfire Ring

Campfire pit with bench seating, small pavilion and picnic tables. Roadside parking. No restroom. Renters must supply their own wood and water to extinguish the fire.

RA Member fee $10/hr. Non-member fee $15/hr. For profit/corporate fee $25/hr. For details and reservations, call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.

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NATURE PROGRAMS

COMMUNITY BUILDING RENTAL

MEETING FACILITIES RA’s Glade Room and Brown’s Chapel are frequently used for group functions, including cluster meetings, scout meetings, wedding ceremonies and a variety of classes.

RENTAL FEES: $15–$70 per hour (security deposit required) Contact Member Services to reserve a community room by calling 703-435-6530 or e-mailing member_services@reston.org.

BROWN’S CHAPEL, 11300 Baron Cameron Avenue Size: 914 square feet Its tall ceilings provide excellent acoustics and its parklike grounds offer a lovely setting. The facility has chairs to seat 65 people, three tables, restroom facilities, heating, air conditioning and ample parking. It is perfect for church services, small meetings or classes. GLADE ROOM, 11550 Glade Drive Size: 881 square feet Located above the pool bathhouse at the intersection of Glade and Soapstone Drive. This facility is equipped with chairs to seat 65 people, four tables, restroom facilities, heating and air conditioning. It is an ideal facility for preschool groups, dance classes, small meetings and club functions.

PICNIC PAVILIONS

Available for rent seven days a week April through October, a perfect place for private parties and group gatherings. RENTAL FEES APPLY: $150/RA Members, $300/Corporate & Non-members HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION (James “Jimmy” Wright Memorial Pavilion), at the corner of Steeplechase Drive and Reston Parkway. Size: 842 square feet The pavilion offers four picnic tables, one grill and ample parking (shared parking at Hunters Woods Pool or Hunters Woods Park).

NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION Center Harbor Road and North Village Road Size: 1,024 square feet North Hills Picnic Pavilion offers electricity, water, lights, three large brick barbecue grills, two portable restrooms, six picnic tables (under cover of pavilion), tot-lot and ample parking.

BROWN’S CHAPEL PICNIC PAVILION Located next to Brown’s Chapel, 11300 Baron Cameron Avenue

PONY BARN Corner of Steeplechase Drive and Triple Crown Road Size: 2,006 square feet

This pavilion is equipped with four picnic tables, two grills, and restrooms. The pavilion is near a basketball court, ball fields, an exercise trail and a tot-lot. Lake Newport is close by for fishing off the dock/ dam. Brown’s Chapel Picnic Pavilion is available on a firstcome, first-serve basis at no charge.

A wood-chipped tot-lot, equipped with swings and a jungle gym, is an inviting place for youngsters to romp and play. The Pony Barn contains seven picnic tables, two grills and two portable restrooms. Water available.

LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION 11301 North Shore Drive Size: 900 square feet Lake Anne Park includes a tot-lot, two large grills and a restroom facility. Six picnic tables are situated under cover. Basketball court, tennis court, sand volleyball court, water, electricity, and ample parking also are available. Recreational courts are not included in private reservation.

TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION Corner of North Shore Drive and Temporary Road Size: 892 square feet The pavilion is equipped with ten picnic tables (eight of which are under cover), one large grill, two portable restrooms, swing set and four benches situated throughout the park. Parking is available in 16 marked spaces or at curbside. Water fountain available.

WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER: See oppposite page for more information on rental space. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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SPECIAL EVENTS All Ages

All ages welcome. Children must be accompanied by an adult

Reston Presents…

Reston Presents...is a bi-monthly lecture and presentation series that highlights the multifaceted talents of local residents. Topics include anything from cooking demonstrations to stories from war veterans and book signings with local authors. Reston Presents…is sponsored by the Reston Association and the Reston Community Center.

Reston Presents… When Your Belly Hurts but "Nothing is Wrong”

Monday, Feb. 11, 7-9 p.m. Reston Community Center 1609 Washington Plaza FREE

Many people have mysterious aches and pains in their belly but everything checks out fine at the doctor's office. After a brief overview of gastrointestinal anatomy, this seminar will explore common causes of abdominal pain. Food allergies, food sensitivities and the “mysterious gray areas” of science will be discussed. Could belly pain be related to head pain? Could an upset stomach cause problems with joints? Can poor digestion be related to osteoporosis? Reasons will be shown why a healthy gut is absolutely essential for a healthy body. Dr. Peter Jo, a Reston area chiropractor who emphasizes nutritional health, will discuss these issues and how diet and lifestyle practices can lead to better health. This program is

for educational purposes only; there will be no solicitation or obligations of attendees. Registration requested.

Reston Presents… Heart-Based Communication

Monday, Apr. 8, 7-9 p.m. Reston Community Center 1609 Washington Plaza FREE

This month features HeartBased Communication — Learning to Engage the Heart as well as the Head in Discourse. In this revealing program, presenter Rev. Joanne Aaronson will discuss important points to remember when speaking with others. Join us for an inspiring, interactive presentation. ƒƒ Understanding the basic sender/ receiver model of communications. It’s a Pirate Parrrrty ƒƒ Distinctions between Ages: 3-5 years head and heart Children must be modes of interacting. accompanied by an adult. ƒƒ The inner vs. outer Wednesday, Mar. 6, "voice." 11 a.m.-Noon ƒƒ Points to remember Reston Association, 12001 with difficult Sunrise Valley Drive situations. $4/RA Members ƒƒ Some fun audience $6/Non-members participation Join us for a Pirate Parrrrty! exercises. The Pirate Adventure will This program is for transform your child into educational purposes a pirate, complete with only; there will be no dress-up. Enjoy games, solicitation or obligations crafts & fun activities. of attendees. Registration Registration required. requested. Payment due at the event.

Children’s Events

Dogwood Pool Grand Opening

May 2013 Dogwood Pool 2460 Green Range Road FREE See Aquatics section page 49 for details.

Bike Riding Class for Kids Ages: 5-10 years

Saturdays, Apr. 27- May 25 (five 1-hour classes) 1-2 p.m. Reston Association parking lot 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $80/RA Members $90/Non-members Say “good bye” to the training wheels. This class provides a handson, educational way for children to master the art of bicycle riding. Learn basic bike riding, steering, shifting, safety and rules of the road. In addition to improving skills, this bike class gives children a chance to socialize and interact with their peers, getting away from the TV and into the great outdoors. Participants will receive a class T-shirt. Bring bike, helmet, water bottle or hydration pack and snack. Registration required.

For more information on these or upcoming events, or to receive e-mail notices of upcoming events, contact Ashleigh@reston.org, call 703-435-6577, or visit the Parks, Recreation & Events section at www.reston.org.

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SPECIAL EVENTS

Want a Great Summer Job? SPECIAL EVENTS ASSISTANT POSITION

Mid-May to Mid-August

Assist in planning, implementing and evaluating a variety of programs throughout the Reston Community. ✓✓

Must be comfortable working independently

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Available to work evenings, some weekends and July 4th

✓✓

At least 18 years of age

✓✓

Good driving record

✓✓

Able to lift 20 lbs

This job will be open for applicants to apply online beginning in January under Jobs at RA at www.reston.org. Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577 to find out details on this great summer job.

careers.reston.org For more information on these or upcoming events, or to receive e-mail notices of upcoming events, contact Ashleigh@reston.org, call 703-435-6577, or visit the Parks, Recreation & Events section at www.reston.org. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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SPECIAL EVENTS Senior Events

Ages 55 years and older

CPR Class for Seniors

Wednesday, Feb. 6, 1-3 p.m. Tall Oaks Assisted Living Facility, 12055 North Shore Drive $10/RA Members $14/Non-members

doing a Reston themed Center and Reston puzzle to see how much Association. Registration you can finish in the time required. allotted. Enjoy coffee and conversation while doing one of Americas favorite Write your Memories pasttimes. Lunch will be into Memoirs provided. Registration Thursdays, Apr. 4 -May 23, required. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Reston Association

Consider taking advantage of the newly revised Senior Social: St. training programs and Patrick’s Day Style materials now being Thursday, Mar. 14, implemented by the Noon-2 p.m. American Red Cross Reston Community Center at for CPR emergencies. Hunters Woods, 2310 Colts It could save the life of Neck Road your spouse, your best FREE friend or your neighbor. It's never too early to Registration is required as celebrate the luck o' the space is limited. Payment Irish. The quarterly Reston due at the event. Community Center and Reston Association social event is switching gears Jigsaw Puzzle Event in March to celebrate Wednesday, Mar. 13, St. Patrick's Day. Spend 10 a.m.-3 p.m. the afternoon with friends Reston Association while enjoying traditional 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Irish fare and beautiful Irish $9/RA Members music and entertainment. $13/Non-members Plan your social calendar Do you like to put while you learn about together jigsaw puzzles? upcoming senior adult Join us as an individual trips, classes, and events. or as a couple for this fun This event is cosponsored event. Each team will be by Reston Community

Senior Movie Day

Wednesdays; Jan. 23, Featuring, TBD Feb. 27, TBD Mar. 27, TBD Apr. 24, TBD Doors open at 9:15 am Showtime is at 10 am Reston Town Center Bow Tie Cinemas FREE

The Reston Association, in cooperation with Reston Town Center Bow-Tie Cinemas, presents, "Meet Me at the Movies." Join us on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Refreshments are provided and door prizes are distributed prior to the movie. Movie titles are posted at www.reston.org. Movies follow Fairfax County Public Schools for winter weather cancelations.

12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $32/RA Members $42/Non-members

Whether you are just beginning or already writing your memoirs, this eight-week class focuses on turning life experiences into an engaging story. You will discuss different writing topics each week in a supportive and lively setting. All you need is a serious desire to write, the willingness to share your personal journey and the ability to put your Celebrate Your thoughts on paper. At the Bonus Years end, your stories may be Wednesday, May 22, bound as a book for you 11 a.m.-2 p.m. to keep. Give the priceless Reston Community Center at gift of legacy to your Hunters Woods, 2310 Colts children, grandchildren Neck Road and future generations. FREE Class size is limited Celebrate Older Americans to eight. Registration Month with us. Abigail required. Registration form Trafford, author of My Time, is available on our website Making the Most of the at www.reston.org. Bonus Decades after Fifty, will be the keynote speaker for this event. Ms. Trafford Container Planting is a former health editor Monday, Apr. 8, 1-2:30 p.m. for the Washington Post Nature House and is currently working 11450 Glade Drive on her next book. As the $8/RA Members primary tasks of adulthood $12/Non-members have been completed, Have the perfect window children raised, career sill or patio to enjoy a goals achieved, many ask, container plant? Join the “Now what?” Ms. Trafford’s Nature House staff as they presentation will inspire show you what plants/ attendees to seek out herbs grow best in this and try new activities and environment. Listen to a experiences. Don’t let go brief presentation, then of dreams and aspirations; create your own container this is the time to explore plant to take home. and learn new skills such Registration required as as playing an instrument, space is limited. Payment learning to paint, and due at the event. studying new languages. Other inspirational

speakers and community exhibitors specializing in leisure, learning and aging issues will be available to provide information and to answer questions. Reston Hospital Center will also offer several health screenings. This event is co-produced by Reston Community Center, Reston Association, and Reston Hospital Center.

For more information on these or upcoming events, or to receive e-mail notices of upcoming events, contact Ashleigh@reston.org, call 703-435-6577, or visit the Parks, Recreation & Events section at www.reston.org.

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SPECIAL EVENTS

Community Yard Sale Saturday, May 11 (Rain Date: May 12) 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $26/RA Members, booth space, $33/Non-members, booth space Registration for vendor space opens March 1st.

Ninety-five families will be selling a variety of items so this event is a great opportunity to find things for a new home or a college dorm. Sign up to have a booth or stop by to browse for great bargains. Booth space = two parking spaces. Tables are not provided. Space is limited. Vendors must pre-register with payment to secure space. All sales are final. No refunds unless canceled due to rain. Registration form can be found at www. reston.org after March 1. Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577 for more information.

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NATURE PROGRAMS SPECIAL EVENTS Senior Trips & Tours Ages 55 years and older

Reston Association’s Seniors Advisory Committee will take a variety of trips this year to locations such as the Kennedy Center, DC museums, theatres and local places of interest. Join us as we have fun visiting the area’s hot spots. For upcoming trip dates, details or to get on our trip mailing list, contact Ashleigh@reston.org or 703-435-6577.

Hollywood Casino (Charles Town Races) Wednesday, Mar. 20, 3:30-11:30 p.m.

BUS PICK-UP TIMES & LOCATIONS:

3:30 p.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 3:45 p.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 4 p.m. Lake Anne Plaza parking lot $32/RA Members, $38/Non-members

Join us for an evening at the race track to enjoy live thoroughbred horse racing, play the new table games including blackjack and poker, or just come to enjoy a nice dinner overlooking the horses. Participants will receive a yet to be determined amount of free play. Registration required. Registration form can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

National Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal Thursday, Apr. 4, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. (The concert is from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.)

BUS PICK UP TIMES/LOCATIONS:

8:00 a.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 8:15 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 8:30 a.m. Lake Anne Plaza parking lot $27/RA Members, $30/Non-members

Attend an open rehearsal of the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Conducted by Hugh Wolff. Emanuel Ax, piano. ALBERT: Rivering Waters (Movements I & IV from Symphony No. 1 "Riverrun”). CHOPIN: Piano Concerto No. 2. DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 5 in F major, Op. 76. Bring a lunch for the bus ride home. Reservations required. Registration form can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

SENIORS ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Day Trip to New York City

Wednesday, May 15, 7 a.m.-11 p.m.

BUS PICK-UP TIMES & LOCATIONS:

7 a.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 7:15 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 7:30 a.m. Lake Anne Plaza parking lot $45/RA Members, $51/Non-members

Join us for a chartered bus trip to the Big Apple. Participants will be dropped off at Bryant Park on 40th Street and will be on their own to catch a Broadway matinee or to explore the city. Registration required. Registration form can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

We are looking for NEW ideas and FRESH perspectives. This committee, established by the Reston

Association, is charged with developing and implementing programs to benefit Reston’s senior adults. If you have visited Reston Town Center’s Multiplex Cinemas recently to see a movie and enjoy coffee and pastries with friends, then you have seen the work of the Seniors Advisory Committee firsthand. Give something back to your community by sharing your talents and ideas.

Reston Association 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive 2-3:30 p.m. 2nd Tuesday of each month

For more information on these or upcoming events, or to receive e-mail notices of upcoming events, contact Ashleigh@reston.org, call 703-435-6577, or visit the Parks, Recreation & Events section at www.reston.org.

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NATURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS EVENTS Newcomers’ Night Thursday, Mar. 21 7-9 p.m.

Reston Association 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive

New or not so new to Reston? Come learn more about Reston Association (RA) and its many services, amenities and programs as well as other local organizations in the community. Meet RA Board members and staff and find out how you can get involved in Reston.

Light refreshments will be available and door prizes will be awarded. Please RSVP to Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577.

For more information on these or upcoming events, or to receive e-mail notices of upcoming events, contact Ashleigh@reston.org, call 703-435-6577, or visit the Parks, Recreation & Events section at www.reston.org. WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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* GET INVOLVED Getting Involved and Suiting Your Own Style

You could say the ways to get involved in Reston are as unique as you. For example, if you have a special knack for gardening and like to beautify natural spaces, then the Weed Warriors program might be for you. This group is out and about in Reston, removing invasive exotic plants from our forested areas, which can grow rapidly, eventually taking over the native ferns, wildflowers and tree seedlings. Or, maybe you like to slosh around in a streambed, checking water quality, identifying wildlife and collecting data on your findings. As a stream monitor, you can actively help to assess the health of our local watersheds. There are several monitoring sessions per year, with training given by the watershed staff. A two-year commitment is encouraged for this project. But there are also shorterterm endeavors that will allow even the busiest person the opportunity to make a difference in the community they live in. These include festivals or events such as Halloween House or Potomac River Watershed Clean Up Day.

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The RA volunteer program consists of about 500 active volunteers, working in a variety of capacities and settings. Ha Brock, RA’s community outreach specialist II, takes special care to make sure that there is a good match with the volunteer and the job.

Our Volunteers Really Dig Us Some say it’s the tree planting they like the best, some like the fact that they can cultivate an idea and watch it flourish. In some cases, RA volunteers actually do “dig” into the dirt to plant a few seedlings. You can make a difference in your community, be involved in something you like, meet some interesting people and learn some new skills in the process. Planting trees may not be what you’re into, but there are plenty of other areas in which to “grow.” RA is seeking volunteers to help enhance the community in a variety of areas. There are many opportunities available in such areas as environment and ecology, the Walker Nature Education Center, recreational programs and facilities, special events and many more.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Volunteer for Your Passion

*

Our Advisory Committees are where you can really immerse yourself in a cause or area that suits you. Advisory Committees are comprised of RA members who provide advice on Association matters and perform such duties as may be requested by the Board of Directors. Advisory Committees exist for a term of one year from the annual or initial meeting of the Board of Directors and may be renewed at the discretion of the Board of Directors. The Board currently has eight such committees: • • • • • • • •

T he Reston Neighborhood Advisory Committee The Environmental Advisory Committee The Parks and Planning Advisory Committee The Pedestrian and Bicycling Advisory Committee The Seniors Advisory Committee The Tennis Advisory Committee The Transportation Advisory Committee The Communications Advisory Committee

Each committee is comprised of up to 15 members and includes a board and at least one staff liaison, and generally meets once per month. More information on the committees and an application can be found at www.reston.org.

Do You Need Service Hours for School?

Often times we find that individuals (such as middle and high school students) are required to perform a specified number of community service hours. If this is the case, then you may be able to complete up to eight hours of community service by working one of our departments' special events, such as festivals, Weed Warriors, and watershed cleanups, to name a few. We cannot guarantee that you'll be able to complete all of the hours you need during one special event. Each special event will have a limited number of spots available for volunteers, so it is very important you notify us well in advance of your desire to work a special event.

To volunteer or learn more about how you can get involved in Reston, call Ha Brock at 703-435-7986, or via e-mail to habrock@ reston.org and she can help to provide ideas and options that are well suited for your talents. You can also visit the RA website, www.reston.org and click on the “Get Involved” tab for more information or to complete the online volunteer application.

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* GET INVOLVED Weed Warriors Projects

Kids’ Trout Fishing Day Let's Go Fishing

Our native trees, ferns and wildflowers are under attack by invasive exotic plants like English Ivy, Garlic Mustard, Japanese Honeysuckle and Bamboo. That is why we need warriors like you to join us in rescuing Reston’s beautiful parkland from these aggressive plants. These fast growing, invasive plants escape from people’s yards and seriously threaten local ecosystems, taking away vital food and habitat from already stressed wildlife populations. Please wear long sleeves and long pants to protect against poison ivy, thorny plants and biting insects. RA will provide tools, gloves, snacks and water.

Join Reston in The Garlic Mustard Challenge

Throughout the spring season, Reston Association will be hosting a Garlic Mustard Challenge. We need your help to remove as much Garlic Mustard from Reston as possible. Garlic Mustard is an invasive exotic species that produces allelopathic chemicals that alter the soil chemistry and prevent native plants and trees from growing. Each plant may produce thousands of tiny seeds. The plant is easy to spot and remove at this time of the year. Everyone of all ages can help and then report to us how many pounds you or your group removed. For information on opportunities to join in on the Garlic Mustard Challenge throughout the spring season, call 703-435-6552.

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Ages: 2-12 Mar. 23, 2013, 8 a.m.- Noon

Location: Snakeden Branch Stream between Soapstone Drive and Lake Audubon, park along Soapstone Drive, Glade Drive, and the Glade Pool parking lot. Snakeden Branch will be well stocked with hundreds of trout. All necessary equipment will be provided to make your day a success. Plus, Trout Unlimited members will help clean the fish you catch. Registration is required. Volunteers will be on hand to teach you how to bait, cast, hook and cook your freshly caught dinner. Please wear shoes that can get wet and muddy. No sandals.

Garlic Mustard at Old Trail Drive

Garlic Mustard Everywhere

Help restore the Old Trail Drive natural area and remove the garlic mustard that has invaded the Snakeden Stream watershed. The spring is the best time of the year to identify garlic mustard and pull it out of the ground before it goes to seed. Please meet along Glade Drive between Old Trail Drive and Generation Drive. There is poison ivy at this site.

Help restore Reston’s natural areas by pulling garlic mustard, a nonnative, invasive plant that spreads by seed. Each plant can produce hundreds of seeds, spreading quickly into the natural areas and altering the soil chemistry. We will meet at the sign for Lake Anne Elementary School. You can park along North Shore Drive and we will follow the path behind the school. Look for the RA truck on the pathway if you miss us at the parking lot. There is poison ivy at this site.

Saturday, Mar. 23 10 a.m.-Noon

Garlic Mustard in the Watershed Saturday, Apr. 27 10 a.m.-Noon

We will battle garlic mustard, one of the many invasive exotic plants taking over the Wainwright natural area. Reston needs as many hands as possible to pull garlic mustard from the forest floor to help create space for native plants to grow. Meet at Wainwright Drive near the recreational field. Look for the RA truck. There is poison ivy at this site.

Saturday, May 25 10 a.m.-Noon

For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA community outreach specialist, at habrock@ reston.org or 703-435-7986.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

All kids must be accompanied by an adult. Teens and adults, ages 16 & up who are helping, must have a Virginia State Fishing License, available online at www.dgif.state.va.us. Adults are not permitted to fish during kid’s fishing time. Reston’s Kids’ Trout Fishing Day is made possible by a partnership with Reston Association, Northern Virginia Trout Unlimited, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc. Volunteers are needed to help kids learn how to fish and to help filet the fish caught. To reserve a fishing rod for your child or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock at 703-435-7986 or e-mail habrock@reston.org by Mar. 18.


COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Weed Warriors: Citizens of All Ages Rescuing our Parkland

In 2002, RA environmental resource staff implemented the Weed Warriors program in Reston. The program provides opportunities where volunteers can participate in “hands-on” restoration projects by improving the aesthetic of our natural areas. With our volunteers, muscle power and hand tools, we go in and manually remove non-native vines and shrubs and save the mature trees and other native plants that invasive plants are strangling and outcompeting. Who are these “Warriors?”They are volunteers and supporters, which include adults, elementary, middle and high school students from the surrounding communities, RA members, local businesses, and more . . .

We launch our program in March and volunteers meet at different sites every fourth Saturday of each month throughout Reston, with the last project ending in November. At every Weed Warriors project, volunters will learn the goals of the program. Volunteers will also be shown techniques that include the removal of invasives and will be able to use saws and other equipment. No experience is necessary; our enviromental resource staff will train volunteers on site. Our final 2012 project on November 17th brought out 35 volunteers from Flint Hill School, South Lakes High School Interact Club, and our seasoned Weed Warriors volunteers who removed and piled English Ivy creating a large 6-foot tall pile. “This was one of our largest Weed Warriors event turnouts and a great way to end the year,“ said

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Jenn Truong, enviromental resource supervisor for Reston Association. Students in Mr. Taylor’s, Ms. Boucher’s and Mrs. Hinnant’s fourth grade classes at Flint Hill School in Oakton had a productive morning. When asked what they learned from this project. Students replied, "We learned what invasive plants are and how they hurt animals and plants that are supposed to live in Virginia.” What else are these students doing to help the environment? At school they stenciled all the storm drains to say ‘DRAINS TO CHESAPEAKE BAY – DO NOT DUMP!’ They enjoy helping the environment because it helps the world and us. It’s also fun to climb around and explore in the woods. They want others to know that by learning more about the plants and animals that live in the Chesapeake Bay, we will all have a greater respect for them.

Virginia Invasive Plant Removal Day Saturday, May 4, 2013 Reston Association invites you to join us for the fourth annual state-wide Virginia Invasive Plant Removal Day. Groups all over Virginia will be doing their best to remove invasive exotic plants in their communities. The Reston Garlic Mustard Challenge will also culminate on Invasive Plan Removal Day with a celebration at the Nature Center Spring Festival. For more information on the Weed Warriors Program, contact Ha Brock, community outreach specialist II, at 703-435-7986 , or e-mail habrock@reston.org

Weed Warriors projects reflect the willingness of citizens of all ages to get involved and take part in the community as environmental stewards. We would like to thank all the volunteers who have participated in the Weed

Warriors Program during the past years — your generous contributions of time and effort are making this project a huge success in Reston.

Invasive Plant Removal Day

9 a.m.-Noon Help pull garlic mustard in the natural area surrounding Old Trail Drive. Please park at the Glade Pool parking lot or along Glade Drive. We will meet near the tot-lot next to the pool parking lot . Please wear long sleeves and long pants. There is poison ivy at this site.

Games and Fun

1-4 p.m., The Nature House, 11450 Glade Drive Join us for fun games and activities that help you learn more about the nasty invasive exotic garlic mustard plant. There will be a weigh station to weigh your bags full of garlic mustard. We’ll also have a dumpster for you to throw out your collected garlic mustard and prevent the spread of seeds and toxic chemicals from this plant.

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* GET INVOLVED Give Back To Your Community

Reston Association (RA) is a not-for-profit corporation that is initially empowered by the developer, further authorized by the state and responsible to its members. Reston’s attractiveness and the amenities provided by the Association play an important role in attracting and retaining environmentally-friendly commercial enterprises. The Association maintains and nurtures over 1,350 acres of open space, including four man-made lakes, 55 miles of paved and natural surface pathways, 800 acres of parkland in woods, meadows and wetlands, as well as a 72-acre Walker Nature Education Center and Nature House. Perhaps the best metaphor for RA is that of a “steward” responsible for maintaining the quality of life in Reston, by caring for and administering the use of one of the community’s most precious assets — its real property.

There’s no better way to raise your profile in the community and make employees feel proud than by giving back to the community where they Live, Work, Play and Get Involved. Perhaps dedicate a day of service. Close your office for a day (or a half-day) and let your employees use that time to give back. Research shows that the most successful companyrun volunteer programs allow employees to select the causes they support, so you pick the day and let your people pick their cause.

Get involved with the Reston Association and give back to Reston. ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

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Sponsor a Reston Association project or event. Sponsor a bench or recycling bin. Work with our environmental resource staff on an environmental project. Staff a booth at the Spring or Multicultural Festival. Donate or sponsor Newcomers’ Night or RA’s Annual Volunteer Appreciation Party. Post our volunteer opportunities in your lunch room or post it on your internal website. Encourage employees to volunteer during business hours (if applicable) or during their personal time.


COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Storm Drain Marking Project

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Our storm drains prevent flooding of roads and neighborhoods by carrying rain and snowmelt away from streets and sidewalks. Unlike water from our taps and tubs, water flowing into our storm drains is not treated. Trash, pet waste, motor oil, paint and other materials dumped or washed into storm drains pollute our watersheds and ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay. Markers on each storm drain remind all of us to keep storm drains and our streams and lakes clean. Since there are over 4,000 storm drains in Reston, many volunteers are needed. Everybody is encouraged to participate.

Stream Monitoring Program

Many storm drains in Reston are on private roads. Contact your local cluster board member and get your neighborhood involved today. To get your project started, or for more information, contact Nicki Bellezza at 703-435-6560, Nicki@reston.org.

Become a volunteer stream monitor and help RA assess the health of our streams. RA is in need of volunteers to assist with stream monitoring at several locations throughout Reston during all seasons. If you are willing to learn, can work with a partner, enjoy data collection, insect identification, and are interested in the health of Reston’s streams, this is the job for you. Volunteering consists of four monitoring sessions of 2-3 hours each. Training and practice are required and a twoyear commitment is encouraged. Each season we need at least one volunteer to help us monitor two sites in Reston.

The Storm Drain Marking Project in Reston is sponsored by the Fairfax County Department of Public Works and Environmental Services, the Northern VA Soil and Water Conservation District, the Virginia Department of TransportationNorthern VA District, and Reston Association.

If you are interested, join our volunteer monitors e-mail distribution list for notices of upcoming monitoring dates. E-mail bpetty@reston.org with the message, “add me to the stream monitors list,” and you will begin receiving e-mails. For more information about becoming a stream monitor, contact Ha Brock at 703-435-7986, or e-mail habrock@reston.org.

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* GET INVOLVED 25th Annual Potomac River Watershed Cleanup

Reston Sites:

All are invited Saturday, Apr. 6 9 a.m.- Noon (rain or shine) Please sign up by Apr. 1.

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Coordinated by the Alice Ferguson Foundation and Reston Association

Rain date: under extraordinary circumstances, Sunday, Apr. 7 Join thousands of volunteers in a multistate effort as we do our part in cleaning up the Potomac Watershed. Reston Association is hosting several sites along Snakeden Branch and Colvin Run, two tributaries to the Potomac River. Come learn about our watersheds and see what "interesting" artifacts end up in our streams.

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Snakeden Branch — Upper, near Hunters Woods Village Center Nature Center — In Nature Center from Soapstone Drive to Lake Audubon Colvin Run — Behind Tall Oaks Pool Stevenage Road — Behind Home Depot and Reston North Park Hidden Creek — Behind Lake Anne and Unitarian Universalist Church

Please wear sturdy shoes or boots and bring work gloves. Come prepared to get a little wet and dirty. Gloves and trash bags will be provided. Join us at the Walker Nature Education Center afterwards for a pizza lunch. For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA community outreach specialist II, at habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986.

Watershed Cleanup Site Leaders Needed Saturday, Apr. 6

VOLUNTEER HOURS

8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

If you are at least 21 and can supervise a large group of people, complete data sheets and walk in wooded, floodplain areas then you could be a great site leader.

Site leader duties: 1.

2.

3.

4.

icking up all of their P groups’ supplies from RA's Central Services Facility. Arriving at their clean-up location by 8:30 a.m. to meet and register volunteers, giving a short safety speech and handing out all supplies. Leaders make sure that volunteers behave responsibly and safely. Leaders must have a functioning cell phone to report any problems or emergencies.

5.

F inally, Leaders should return any unused supplies to RA following the event, along with their volunteer signin sheet marked with the items their team recovered from the cleanup site.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA community outreach specialist II, habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986.

RESTON’S ARBOR DAY Calling volunteers of all ages!

Monday, April 15 9:30 a.m.-Noon

Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive and Twin Branches Nature Trail Reston is a Tree City USA as certified by the National Arbor Day Foundation. Join us as we: ƒƒ Help plant an Arbor Day tree, plus a variety of native shrubs, ferns and wildflowers. ƒƒ Learn about Reston’s trees and shrubs, as well as proper tree and shrub planting and care. ƒƒ Show our appreciation for trees.

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A special Arbor Day presentation and flag raising ceremony will take place at 11:45 a.m. followed by a free pizza lunch for volunteers. Special guests will include Jim McGlone of the Virginia Department of Forestry. For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA community outreach specialist II, at 703-435-7986, or e-mail habrock@reston.org. Perfect for gardeners, seniors, scout groups and students who need community service hours.


COMMUNITY OUTREACH

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10th Annual 5K Fund Run & Walk Saturday, Apr. 20, 2013 (rain or shine) Walker Nature Education Center 11450 Glade Drive, Reston, VA VOLUNTEER HOURS

7:30-9:30 a.m. The Walker Nature Education Center needs volunteers to help with the 5K Fund Run & Walk. We need at least 15 Race Marshals to be positioned along the trail/pathway. Volunteers direct runners and walkers through the course, assist runners, and shout encouragement. There will be a mandatory volunteer orientation for Race Marshals on Friday, Apr. 19 from 6-7 p.m. at the Walker Nature Education Center. For more information, or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA community outreach specialist II, at 703-435-7986, or e-mail habrock@reston.org.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

SPRING FESTIVAL Saturday, May 4 (rain or shine) Walker Nature Education Center 11450 Glade Drive Reston, VA FREE Volunteers Needed VOLUNTEER SHIFTS: 12:30-3 p.m. and 3 -5:30 p.m. Volunteer to help for a couple of hours and then spend the rest of the day enjoying the festival with your family and friends! Concessions • Carnival games • Simple crafts for children • Canoe and kayak rentals • Face painting

The festival will feature entertainment, displays and information from environmental groups, hands-on nature activities, carnival style games, canoe and kayak rentals on Lake Audubon, fishing activities, food and a whole lot of fun. Contact Ha Brock, community outreach specialist II, at 703-435-7986, or e-mail habrock@reston.org for more information.

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* GET INVOLVED

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COMMUNITY OUTREACH

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VOLUNTEER

Q

A

Nicole Wynands PHOTO PROVIDED BY STEVE WYNANDS

How long have you lived in Reston? We moved to Reston in A 2009. I am a community planner by training, so I was excited to experience living in a planned community.

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Where are you from originally? I am originally from Aachen A in Germany. I moved to the United States in 2007 for graduate school. My whole family is still overseas, and I try to visit Germany once or twice a year.

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What do you do as a volunteer for RA? What sort of projects have you worked on? started out on the A IEnvironmental Advisory Committee, and joined the Planning & Zoning Committee, and the Pedestrian & Bicycling Advisory Committee shortly after.

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I have also participated in stream and lake cleanups, volunteered at the Reston Oktoberfest and the first kids triathlon, and played a character at the Halloween House & Trick or Treat Trail at the Nature House. I always check Reston magazine and RA News (weekly e-newsletter) for more volunteer opportunities.

Do you know a Reston Association volunteer who should be in the spotlight? Send your nomination to Ha Brock, RA community outreach specialist II, at habrock@ reston.org or 703-435-7986.

How long have you been an RA volunteer and what is it that you like about volunteering? first got involved in July A I2010. It took me about a year to settle down in our new community, but once I discovered the many volunteer opportunities in Reston I was excited to participate.

Q

As a member of an advisory committee, I really have the opportunity to shape Reston’s future. The Planning & Zoning Committee has a powerful say in what is being built in Reston and what amenities are being provided. The Environmental Advisory Committee is working hard to address the threat of exotic invasive plants, trash in our natural areas and is making sure that new developments in Reston do not have a detrimental impact on the environment. The Pedestrian & Bicycling Advisory Committee (PBAC) is working with our schools to make it safer for our children to walk or bike to school, is organizing fun social rides for families and is working to close gaps in our path system. But I also enjoy fishing trash out of the lakes and streams because it gives me a sense of ownership and belonging, while giving me the opportunity to discover new parts of Reston and make new friends. Apart from my committee work, my husband, Steve, and I usually volunteer together, because it is a great way to spend quality time together.

What is one of your proudest accomplishments as an RA volunteer? one of our Environmental A At Advisory Committee meetings, fellow member Diane Blust brought up the need for Reston to become more sustainable. I had learned about the concept during my studies in Germany and was interested in introducing it to the Reston Association Board.

Q

I contacted Michael Sanio, a sustainability engineer in Reston, whom I had met at a workshop at the World Bank, to give a presentation on sustainability to the Reston Association Board of Directors. The Board members picked up the concept and integrated it into the current strategic plan for Reston. I also organized a well-attended training on sustainable transportation, energy consumption/production and management of our natural resources for Reston Association staff and advisory committee members. By the way, Michael Sanio went on to become a member of the Environmental Advisory Committee and was elected to serve on the RA Board. Do you volunteer with other organizations in Reston? also an active member A Iofam Reston Useful Services Exchange, which is a time bank in which you volunteer to help someone and “earn” time for yourself in the future.

Q

Q

What do you do for fun?

My husband, Steve, and I like the outdoors, so we can be found walking or biking on Reston's paths, or canoeing or kayaking on Lake Audubon. We also like to entertain family, friends and neighbors in our backyard.

A

What’s the last book you read and last movie you saw? last book I read was A A The Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith. The last movie I saw was Lawless.

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Aside from what you do now, what would be your ultimate dream job? am currently working as a A Ifull-time bicycle advocate, which is honestly pretty hard to top. The only thing I could imagine to be more fun and meaningful than that is being a mom.

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What would you say to someone who was considering volunteer opportunities with RA based on your experiences with RA? staff is well organized and A RA never forgets to make its volunteers feel appreciated. This great community relies on volunteers to run its popular events and keep its unique common areas clean. Reston would not be able to offer as much as it does without volunteers.

Q

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DRB * LIVING IN RESTON

REVIEW LEVELS ď Ž PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN BAHRAMI

You want to improve the outside of your home? In Reston, your plans would come before the Design Review Board (DRB). Here is some information to help you understand the design review process and help make your review a success.

T

he Design Review Board (DRB) has different levels of review which depend on the project. You can refer to the Design Guidelines available online for your property type and project and/or contact your Covenants Advisor to determine the level of review. The levels of review are as follows:

Staff Level

Covenants Administration staff may approve the project. Once a complete application is received, staff will process it and e-mail the approval usually within one week, as well as mail a copy. Project Example: Exterior color change

to a standard color or one already in the neighborhood, small rear patio, small groundlevel deck, simple landscape plan, tree removal of a documented dangerous tree

Consultation Level

One member of the DRB reviews the application with a Covenants Case Manager. Owners do not attend and you will receive the DRB decision via certified mail, usually within three weeks of turning in a complete application. Consultation level reviews are done weekly, with a few exceptions due to holidays. If your application is reviewed at staff or consultation level, you will not be require to attend a meeting. If your application is going to panel or full DRB level, you will be expected to attend the meeting. You may also request panel review if you disagree with a consultation level decision or wish to go straight to a meeting with DRB members and skip a consultation level review, and you are willing to attend the meeting. Most of your preparation is already done because you have gathered the information necessary for submission of your application. Project Example: Window replacement,

elevated deck, siding material change, multiple tree removal, fence

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HELPFUL HINTS

The best way to get your application reviewed quickly is to make sure you turn in a complete application. 1.

T he application form should be neatly filled in and it must be signed by the property owner.

2.

N otification signatures from a cluster board officer (if the property is in a cluster) and neighbors are required on DRB applications. (For notification requirements, please refer to the Design Guidelines or contact your Covenants Advisor.)

3.

The application should include such items on the guideline checklist as color samples, site plans, elevation drawings, window frame dimensions and specification sheets for larger projects.

4.

If you drop off your application in person, your Covenants Advisor will review it with you to make sure it is complete and inform you when it will be reviewed.

5.

The submission deadline is Tuesday of each week for the application to be reviewed the following week, provided availability remains on the agenda.

6.

No exceptions can be made to submission deadlines, as the schedule is extremely streamlined; therefore, it is recommended that you submit your application early to allow sufficient time to obtain other needed items or notification signatures.


COVENANTS

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PROJECT PENDING

STAFF

CONSULTATION

PANEL

FULL DRB

DECISION: APPROVE, DISAPPROVE, DEFER Panel Level

Full DRB Level

However you should not move forward with your project until you receive the decision in writing. Panel level reviews are done weekly, with the exception of one week a month (usually the third week) and a few exceptions due to holidays.

However you should not move forward with your project until you receive the decision in writing. Full DRB level reviews are done once a month (usually the third week), with a few exceptions due to holidays.

Project Example: Room addition,

site redevelopment, addition increasing size of house by more than 25%, stream restoration

Three members of the DRB review the application at a night-time meeting which the owner attends. If your application has registered affected parties, or if you request panel review because you disagree with a consultation level decision, it is automatically scheduled to panel review level. The decision will be made in front of you and it will be mailed out via certified mail one week after the meeting.

screened porch, cluster standards, site lighting, carport enclosure

All nine members of the DRB review the application at a nighttime meeting which applicants attend. If you appeal a panel level decision, your appeal will automatically be scheduled for full DRB review. The decision will be made in your presence (unless deferred for additional information) and it will be mailed out via certified mail one week after the meeting.

Scheduling Info

When you submit the application your Covenants Advisor will provide you the meeting date and your agenda item number. It is very important that you attend the meeting so that you can answer any questions from the DRB. For larger projects, you may wish to bring your architect or contractor to the meeting to provide technical details.

Project Example: Teardown/In-fill,

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* LIVING IN RESTON

What to Expect at a

DRB Meeting Reston Association's Design Review Board(DRB) reviews applications for additions and exterior alterations for properties in Reston BY BARBARA RAMEY  PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN BAHRAMI

D

esign Review Board (DRB) panel and full DRB meetings are informal and relaxed. Members of the DRB are your neighbors. They are volunteers who live in Reston and know the Reston community, and they are well-qualified to review design aesthetics. The DRB uses the Design Guidelines and cluster standards for reference when reviewing an application.

Helpful Tips for Application Review ✓✓ Be respectful. ✓✓ Be punctual — the meetings usually start on time and if you are at the top of the agenda and not there when your property is called, you will be moved to the end of the agenda. ✓✓ Be prepared to explain the project and answer questions or bring someone to do this. (If your Covenants Advisor asks you to bring additional information to the meeting, please be sure to do so and have copies which may be left with staff.) ✓✓ Be flexible — the DRB may suggest changes to your plans. ✓✓ Be succinct — the DRB has many applications on each meeting agenda. ✓✓ Be patient — you may have to wait before your application is called.

Typically, DRB panel and full DRB meetings are on Tuesday nights at 7 p.m. They are held at Reston Association in the Conference Center. When members arrive, they sign in at the table at the entrance to the room and note the property for which they are attending. The DRB starts the meeting with "Members' Comments," which is a time reserved for brief comments that are not related to any application on the agenda. The DRB vice chair or chair will then call the first item on the agenda. When the subject address is called, all interested parties should move from the audience to the table and sit down across from the DRB, including affected parties. If others are present who wish to participate, such as an architect, they should move to the table as well. (If there are too many affected parties to fit at the table, they should remain in the audience and will be acknowledged by the DRB.)

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Once seated, the applicant should explain the project to the DRB and can refer them to information which was provided with the application. The DRB members will each have a copy of the application and any supporting documentation. The review is a conversation between the applicant and the DRB and is typically done informally. However, it is expected that all attendees will act in a respectful and courteous manner. After the applicant is finished explaining the project, affected parties have the opportunity to explain their concerns to the DRB.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

The DRB will discuss the project, then one member will make a motion for the action they wish to take (approve, disapprove, or defer). After another member seconds the motion, there can be additional discussion and then they will vote on the motion. Once the motion passes by majority vote, the review is considered completed and everyone should leave the table so that the DRB may call the next item on the agenda. A copy of the decision will be sent to the applicant via certified mail one week after the meeting; the applicant should wait until receipt of the decision letter to start the project. Registered affected parties will also receive a copy of the decision.

If the application is for an existing alteration and the DRB disapproves it, typically thirty (30) days will be allowed to remedy the violation. Information on how to appeal a decision is included with the decision letter. The Covenants Advisor for the property can be contacted to answer any questions. If you have questions about the DRB, contact Barbara Ramey, Covenants Manager, at 703-435-6573, or e-mail bramey@reston.org


COVENANTS

DRB WordFind P D H Y O W T X J B M S E G X N W L H Z

G U E B F U L L D R B I R S U M F L C G

N N V Q D M E G Z P T G F B R K L P G L

K H I Y M V M I Q S Q N X C E P O Z W N

W R O T O K M X S H Z A M J V T T D S J

P Q H R E P Z N C Y K T R J I Q X O N V

X F P Z M E K V W O L U S E E W P R V U

Q P R N U S M R N E V R B N W P P A T R

A M E P P U A F J O J E E I B S P T M Q

M C I Y X F M C I P I S N N C P M Z H A

A L A K Y G N V L U S T O A L D L V T M

N O I T A C I F I T O N A I N Q Z Y Q W

W Y R A E P R O O B S P C T D T D Z G I

Z A A X D V E E Q B K A A E L R S O Z F

A H O Z H G T J K J T H S N A U S O T J

F R C V V T S N P I D I J O E X S Q P G

F V F Q R N U G O M G E B E C L L N W K

L T Z T N C L N C N Z X S T A F F R O Q

J N E S W M C Y A D S E U T O A W K B C

H J C C N G R B L Z S W L S V Q I N D J

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Search up, down and diagonally to find the following 16 terms in the above puzzle.

❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏

APPLICATION APPROVE BOARD CLUSTER CONSULTATION COVENANTS DESIGN FULL DRB MEETING NINE NOTIFICATION PANEL REVIEW SIGNATURES STAFF TUESDAY

Spring Fling MARCH 4, 2013, 7 P.M.

It’s not too early to start planning your awards submission for the 2013 Spring Fling Award categories.

2013 Spring Fling Award Categories ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Volunteer of the Year (Board Member and Non Board Member) Event of the Year Neighborhood Association of the Year Year’s of Service Award

Award eligibility is for work or volunteer outreach completed between January 2012 and December 2012. All nomination forms will be available online and must be submitted by Feb. 4, 2013. For more information, contact Arlene Whittick 703-435-6503 or arlene@reston.org.

David MacWorter, President of Lakeport Cluster, recieves plaque for Neighborhood Association of the year 2011.

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* BOARD & GOVERNANCE

Connecting to

APARTMENT RESIDENTS BY AMANDA ANDERE

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ver the summer, volunteers joined students from George Mason University to learn how our members who live in apartments get information about the Association, its activities and how they get involved. It was the first ever Apartment Residents' Survey.

How It Was Done

In the survey, more than 100 residents were interviewed in person at their homes. They were chosen at random and lived in five of Reston’s 17 apartment complexes, which agreed to participate. Volunteers and students from George Mason University’s Department of Anthropology and Sociology, which oversaw the survey, conducted the interviews. Residents were asked about their participation in the community, civic involvement and what barriers keep them from getting involved. Reston Association Board and staff will use the results to help better engage apartment residents.

Diversity

While the population is diverse — speaking English, Spanish, Russian, Arabic, Farsi, Chinese and Korean, 74 percent have one household member who speaks English. The team interviewed slightly more women (62.1 percent) than men and spoke with residents of a variety of different ages. Slightly more than a quarter of the sample was aged 18-29 and another quarter was 60 years or older. The residents interviewed had lived in their current apartment complex for an average of about five years.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Nearly half of the residents interviewed identified their race as White, 19.4 percent identified as Asian, and 15.5 percent identified as Black or African American. In terms of ethnicity, 15.5 percent of interviewees stated they were Latino or Hispanic.


BOARD & GOVERNANCE

Residents Are Involved, Not Aware of RA Membership

Despite participating in many social and recreational activities sponsored by Reston Association, about two thirds said they were not aware they were RA members, or of the association’s benefits. In fact, many residents thought that they were not members because they had not personally paid a fee to join the Association. However, many said they could not participate in the activities offered by RA because of other time commitments, a language barrier or events that were scheduled at times inconvenient for them.

The findings showed that about half — 47 percent of residents — are involved in activities in their apartment complexes. Seventy-five percent are involved in the Reston community. Only 12 percent said they had voted in an RA election.

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Three quarters said they learned about RA activities through Reston magazine. Just over a third said they get information from RA flyers or activity calendars delivered to their homes. Surprisingly, only about 15 percent get information from the Reston Association website, although most have Internet access.

The challenge for the Reston Association Board is to work with the apartment owners and managers to find better ways to engage these residents. In the coming months, RA will be meeting with the apartment owners to begin to develop a plan.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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* BOARD & GOVERNANCE

BOARD OF DIRECTORS' ACTIONS

September 13, 2012 Hired the law firm of Odin, Feldman, Pittleman PC as Special Counsel to the Reston Association (RA) to perform legal services on behalf of the RA, all as directed by the Board of Directors, related to opposing the Reston National Golf Course for any residential development or the possibility of being used for any purpose other than a golf course or other similar appropriate open space uses. (Full motion can be viewed on www. reston.org under the Board Minutes section of the site.)

Granted to the Environmental Advisory Committee the authority to speak before the Fairfax County Planning Commission, Design Review Board, Reston Planning & Zoning Committee and other entities, addressing specific points concerning the planned renovations and site redevelopment at Terraset and Sunrise Valley Elementary Schools (Full motion can be viewed on www. reston.org under the Board Minutes section of the site.) Appointed Victor Van Rees as Chair of the Covenants Committee for a one year term ending September 2013. Approved the request of Camp Sunshine, in coordination with the Lake Anne Merchants Association (LARCA), to hold its annual winter fundraiser, the “Polar Dip,” in Lake Anne on Saturday, February 2, 2013, under set conditions that LARCA and Camp Sunshine must meet. (Full motion can be viewed on www.reston.org under the Board Minutes section of the site.) Approved the request of the Reston Runners (RR) to use the Association’s pathways and other identified facilities for the Runners Marathon of Reston on Sunday, March 24, 2013 subject to entering into an agreement approved by RA Legal Counsel with set limitations. (Full motion can be viewed on www.reston.org under the Board Minutes section of the site.)

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Directed staff to report to the Board of Directors during the October 25, 2012 Regular Meeting, the implementation status of three Strategic Board Priorities identified in May 2012. (Full motion can be viewed on www. reston.org under the Board Minutes section of the site.)

September 27, 2012

Diane Blust to the Environmental Advisory Committee for a term of three years, ending September 2015; Carolyn Badila as Chair of the Environmental Advisory Committee for a one-year term, ending September 2013;

Approved the Work Plan of the Transportation Advisory Committee for the period of September 2012 to August 2013.

Carol Ivory as Vice Chair of the Environmental Advisory Committee for a one-year term, ending September 2013;

Appointed/Reappointed:

Valerie Jackson to the Seniors Advisory Committee for a term of three years, ending September 2015;

Mark Steppel to the Fiscal Committee for a term of two years, ending September 2014; Bobbie Beck to the Reston Neighborhoods Advisory Committee for a term of three years, ending September 2015; Lisa Bader to the Communications Advisory Committee for a term of three years, ending September 2015; Nathaniel Dickert to the Communications Advisory Committee for a term of three years, ending September 2015;

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Carol Nahorniak to the Communications Advisory Committee for a term of three years, ending September 2015; Susan Konrad to the Communications Advisory Committee for a term of three years, ending September 2015. Dedicated to Fairfax County, for public right-of-way purposes, to necessitate the completion of the missing sidewalk link on Twin Branches Road, 84.87 square feet or .00195 acres of Reston Section 84, Block 4 as depicted on the July 27, 2012 revised Plat, Deed Book 6590, at Page 420.

Approved the proposed resolution, as amended, establishing a Special Committee to Review RA’s Information Technology Systems (IT) to examine the current state of the Association’s IT systems and to provide recommendations on strategies to enhance such systems to meet the defined purposes and projected needs for the Association over the next five years. Approved, as amended, the proposed Electronic Device Usage Agreements for Employees and Directors and Officers, which delineates the rules by which these devices, issued by the Reston Association to Employees and the Board of Directors, are to be used in conducting Reston Association business. Approved the proposed Member Rights Resolution 4, Member Complaint Processing Procedures, which puts in place a written complaint process by which members and residents of the Association can challenge “adverse decisions” made against them by the Association.


BOARD & GOVERNANCE

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS « BoardofDirectors@reston.org Approved the proposed amendments to Common Area Rules & Regulations Resolution 6, Garden Plot Use, which adds rules on securing plot areas, watering, use of carpets in plots, and temporary greenhouse structures. Approved the proposed Common Areas Rules & Regulations Resolution 14, Special Events, which puts in place a mechanism for staff to license Common Areas to third parties for Special Events, including but not limited to, fundraising walks and runs, triathlons, and other events, some competitive and others not, for which area organizations wish to use the Association’s Common Areas. Directed staff to draft a letter, for President Knueven’s signature, to Dean Tistadt, Chief Operating Officer for the Department of Facilities and Transportation Services for Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS), regarding the proposed Sunrise Valley and Terraset Elementary Schools Renovation Projects, reminding Mr. Tistadt that, pursuant to the recorded Reston Deed, which is applicable to both school sites, Reston Association Design Review Board approval is required in advance of any renovations contemplated by FCPS on these properties, notwithstanding any approvals granted by Fairfax County.

October 25, 2012

Approved the 2013 Board of Directors Election Schedule, which includes setting the Record Eligibility Date for members to participate in the election, as January 28, 2013, and the deadline for returning the elections ballots to the Counting Agent’s office and online voting booth closes, which is 5 p.m. on Friday, March 29, 2013.

Approved changes to Elections & Referenda Resolution 2, Candidate Filing Procedures, as proposed by the Elections Committee, thereby clarifying: 1) candidate filing rules; 2) the announcement of Certified Candidates; and, 3) when Candidate Forums may be held. Approved changes to Elections & Referenda Resolution 3; Campaign Rules & Standards of Conduct, as proposed by the Elections Committee, thereby: 1) providing an e-mail address for Board Candidates and Members to send inquiries; 2) clarifying requirements for and the use of candidate photographs in Reston Association produced election materials; and, 3) including the Board of Directors in the list of groups to which the Elections Committee will annually send the Campaign Rules & Standards of Conduct Policy, as amended.

November 15, 2012

Approved the appointment of Gina Felix to the Communications Advisory Committee for a term of three years, ending November 2015. Directed staff to notify the public of the Board’s intent to set the 2013 Assessment and related fees during the December 13, 2012 Regular Board of Directors Meeting. Approved the 2013 Board Meeting Calendar.

Ken Knueven, President Lake Anne/Tall Oaks District Representative BODKnueven@reston.org or kknueven@hotmail.com Andy Sigle, Vice-President At-Large Representative BODSigle@reston.org or awsigle@gmail.com

Joe Leighton, Secretary At-Large Representative BODLeighton@reston.org or joe_leighton@comcast.net

John Higgins, Treasurer Reston Association Member BODHiggins@reston.org or jdhiggins3@gmail.com

Amanda Misiko Andere Apartment Owners’ Representative BODAndere@reston.org or amanda.andere@gmail.com

Cheryl Beamer Hunters Woods/Dogwood District Representative BODBeamer@reston.org or cherylbeamer@verizon.net

Donna Miller Rostant At-Large Representative BODRostant@reston.org or donnarostant@gmail.com

Mike Collins North Point District Representative mikecollins@reston.org or mike4ra@gmail.com

Michael R. Sanio At-Large Representative bodmichaelsanio@reston.org or Michael.R.Sanio@gmail.com Richard Chew South Lakes District Representative directorchew@reston.org Milton Matthews, Chief Executive Officer matthews@reston.org

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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* BOARD & GOVERNANCE

Reston Association Elections Primer While the national elections are well behind us, those for the Reston Association Board of Directors are getting underway. The nine-member board guides the direction and sets policy for the Reston community. Each board director serves a three-year term and is eligible to run for a second term. All members of the Reston Association, including property owners and renters, can run for office and vote. There are three seats open this year. One is for the Lake Anne/ Tall Oaks District. Another seat is open in the North Point District and one at-large director seat is open. If you are interested in running for an open district seat, you must be a resident of that district.

To run for the board, you must complete a Candidate’s Statement and Petition, with at least 25 valid RA member signatures, You can obtain the forms online at www.reston.org. The voting period begins at 5 p.m. on Monday, March 4, 2013. Ballots will be mailed to all Reston Association members. You may vote online at www.reston.org. Just click the “VOTE” button. You must use the USER NAME and PASSWORD on the back of your printed ballot. You may also vote via U.S. mail. Simply mark the ballot box (es) with a heavy “ X ” and return the ballot in the enclosed postage-paid envelope.

IMPORTANT DATES FEBRUARY 1

Deadline for filing candidacy, 5 p.m.

MARCH 4

Ballots mailed to members. Internet voting opens, 5 p.m.

Candidates’ Forum, 7 p.m. Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive

MARCH 29

Deadline to return election ballots to counting agent’s office. Internet voting closes, 5 p.m.

APRIL 9

Annual Members’ Meeting — Election results announced at 7 p.m., Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive

All ballots must be received by 5 p.m., March 30, 2012. Allow sufficient time for delivery.

If you have questions, you can call 703-435-6512 or e-mail electionscommittee@reston.org.

2013 ANNUAL MEMBERS' MEETING Honoring and Recognizing Members of the Community Hear Reports on the State of the Association Learn the results of the 2013 Board of Directors Election. www.reston.org

Tuesday, April 9, 7 p.m. Reston Association,12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, 20191 Details: 703 435-6530 118

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


RESTON ASSOCIATION

Conference Center

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SPACE AVAILABLE Ideal For ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

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Extras (for an additional fee) ƒƒ ƒƒ

Pantry with microwave, coffee maker and refrigerator Audio visual equipment

Attractive Rates: $30-$90/hr Contact: Member Services to make your reservation at reservations@reston.org or 703-435-6530.

12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191-3404 | www.reston.org WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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Reston Association Common Area 1.

2.

Owners, including owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall not attempt to nor improve, alter, landscape or mow Reston Association (RA) Common Area. Owners, including owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall confine all fencing (including invisible fencing), sheds, or any other development to their own property.

3.

RA meadows in the Common Area shall be mowed annually by RA staff only.

4.

Smoking is prohibited within all RA Community Buildings, and is also prohibited in all Pool facilities; on and within all Tennis Court facilities and Picnic Pavilions; on all Ball fields, Multi-purpose Courts, Garden Plots or Garden Plot Areas; and on or within TotLots or Tot-Lot Areas. This smoking ban is also in effect for up to a 25-foot perimeter around these buildings or facilities, to the extent that the 25 feet, or any portion thereof, comprises RA Common Area.

5.

Horseback riding shall be confined to designated bridle paths.

6.

Dogs are to be walked on a leash in accordance with Fairfax County regulations. Cats, while on Common Area, must also be walked on a leash. Except for service dogs, no pets are permitted on active recreation areas, including but not limited to, such areas as playgrounds, picnic and multi-purpose courts, and play fields.

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7.

Dumping of any refuse, including but not limited to, grass clippings, leaves, Christmas trees, appliances, old sofas, crank case oil, etc., is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(b)]

8.

No invasive exotic plants or animals (especially invasive plants such as bamboo and English ivy), shall be introduced to the RA Common Area.

9.

Unless specifically authorized by the Association, the use of any motor vehicles or other motorized vehicle, other than governmental police, fire and rescue vehicles, on walkways or other Common Area is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(db)(10)]

10. Loitering, as defined by Fairfax County Code Article 1 Section 5-1-2, is prohibited. Specifically, it shall be unacceptable for any person to loiter at, on or in RA Common Area in the following manner: a. To interfere, impede or hinder the free passage of pedestrian or authorized vehicular traffic; b. To threaten or do physical harm to another member or members of the public; c. To threaten or do physical damage to the Common Area; or d. To breach the peace or engage in disorderly conduct by the use of words, or acts or other conduct that clearly threaten, intimidate or present a danger to others. Except where 10 a-d apply, before contacting local law enforcement, Reston Association, in its sole discretion, may contact an appropriate organization(s) to assist in the intervention with or removal of individuals from the Common Area.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

PHOTO BY CHARLES A. VEATCH

* INFO & RESOURCES

11. Unless specifically authorized by the RA Board of Directors, the following actions are prohibited in the RA Common Area: a. Carrying or discharging of firearms, air guns, archery equipment, including but not limited to, bow and arrow, and B-B guns; b. Hunting, trapping, harvesting or collecting of any wildlife, including but not limited to, mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians; c. Feeding of nondomesticated wild animals (except songbirds); d. Practices that attract non-domesticated wild animals or those that may be vectors for infectious diseases, including, but not limited to, leaving pet food out of doors overnight in a location accessible to nondomesticated wild animals; e. Fires or burning; f. Overnight camping; g. Harvesting or collecting plant life, except as authorized by the Association. 12. Fishing in the Association’s Lakes and Ponds is permitted as per Section 8(i) of Common Area Rules & Regulations Resolution 2 on Lake Use & Access.

13. Geocaching (use of Geographic Positioning Systems (GPS), to locate a cache of materials is permitted only by Members under the following rules: a. Members interested in performing geocaching must notify the Association of all cache sites. b. Cache sites located on the Common Area must be completely hidden from view. c. Cache sites are not permitted near wildflowers, a wildlife nest or den. d. Cache sites located in the Association’s Common Area, known as the Walker Nature Education Center, must be no more than ten feet from a pathway or trail edge. e. The Association shall not be held liable for any injuries or personal property damage incurred by those participating in geocaching on the Common Area. The Board of Directors may, for specific management purposes on certain properties, amend these rules or implement additional rules to meet land and resource management objectives.


INFO & RESOURCES

Fishing & Boating Guidelines

Reston’s four man-made lakes — Anne, Thoreau, Audubon, and Newport — along with Reston’s two ponds, Bright and Butler, cover 125 acres and provide recreation and stormwater management for the community. While swimming and ice skating are not permitted, fishing, boating, wildlife watching, and lakeside picnicking are available to RA members and their guests.

Fishing in Reston

Fishing is allowed on all of Reston’s lakes and ponds from designated areas. ƒƒ Much of the shoreline around each lake is private. Please respect the “No Trespassing” and “Private Property” areas indicated by signs. ƒƒ Please do not litter. ƒƒ Please do not feed ducks, geese or other waterfowl. Lake Newport: Along dam (park at Brown’s Chapel). Lake Anne: Along Lake Anne Plaza steps and dock, along south shore of the canal and along dam. Lake Thoreau: Along 80 feet of shoreline and dock near Thoreau pool, along dam, along bridge near golf course, and along timber wall at Purple Beach. Lake Audubon: Along dam behind Brenton Point Drive, at boat ramp and dam at Twin Branches Road and along shoreline for 150 feet near Nature Center. Docks are private.

Species of fish that may be caught include:

Large mouth bass, channel catfish, crappie, blue gill and sunfish. Please release grass carp. To support the large mouth bass population, please fish out large mouth bass four to twelve inches from Lake Aududon, Thoreau and Newport. Catch and release all species at Lake Anne. ƒƒ Anglers 16 years and older must have a VA fishing license. ƒƒ Residents may fish from RA-owned property, which includes the dams on each lake.

Boating in Reston

Reston’s four lakes are also available for boating. We suggest taking your favorite book out, having a floating picnic or fishing for large mouth bass. ƒƒ Electric motors only ƒƒ A free permit for general access to the four lakes is available at the RA main office,12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, during regular office hours. Proof of boat size is required. ƒƒ The concrete boat ramp at Lake Audubon, off of Twin Branches Road, is available to launch boats from trailers. ƒƒ Access points are monitored between April and October.

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Boat Reminders ƒƒ

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Boats (jon boats, canoes, deck boats, sailboats, etc.) may be up to 18 feet long, and no more than 10 feet wide. One electric motor (no gas motors) up to three horsepower may be used. Inflatables must have three separate compartments and sidewalls. All boats are required to have a wearable flotation device for each passenger on board. All boats left in the water between November 1st and March 31st require a permanent mooring permit. If you see an abandoned boat floating around or have lost your boat on our lakes, call Watershed Specialist Brian Petty at 703-435-6535 to help track it down. Only lakefront owners may permanently moor a boat on Reston's lakes. Cluster or condo associations who own lakefront property have specific rules regarding boat mooring, consistent with RA rules and regulations. For more information, see Resolution 2: Lake Use Access in Governing Documents.

Follow. Like. Watch. Share. Look for the latest updates, events, programs and community news from Reston Association.

Other general access points for hand-carried boats include: ƒƒ

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On Lake Thoreau, the grassy area by the underpasses at the intersection of South Lakes Drive and Ridge Heights Road. On Lake Anne, the area at the north end of the dam at the intersection of Wiehle Avenue and Inlet Court. On Lake Newport, at the east end of the dam at the wooden dock.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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* INFO & RESOURCES Directory & Facilities

RESTON ASSOCIATION HEADQUARTERS (14) 12001 SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE 703-435-6530

NORTH HILLS POOL (1) 1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

LAKE NEWPORT TENNIS COURTS (5)

UPLANDS TENNIS COURTS (7)

11452 BARON CAMERON AVENUE

11032 RING ROAD

NEWBRIDGE TENNIS COURTS (17)

BROWN’S CHAPEL PARK (4) BARON CAMERON AVENUE

11718 GOLF COURSE SQUARE

SHADOWOOD TENNIS COURTS (23)

HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION (25)

11950 WALNUT BRANCH ROAD

DOGWOOD POOL (24) 2460 GREEN RANGE ROAD

NORTH HILLS TENNIS COURTS (1)

LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION (6)

TEMPORARY ROAD/NORTH SHORE DRIVE

11301 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION (1) 1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

FAIRWAY DRIVE/HOOK ROAD

GLADE POOL (29) 11550 GLADE DRIVE

AUTUMNWOOD TENNIS COURTS (2)

GOLF COURSE ISLAND POOL (12)

11950 WALNUT BRANCH ROAD

PONY BARN PICNIC PAVILION (28) TRIPLE CROWN/ STEEPLECHASE DRIVE

11301 LINKS DRIVE

HUNTERS WOODS POOL (26)

BARTON HILL TENNIS COURTS (20)

2501 RESTON PARKWAY

SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE/ BARTON HILL ROAD

LAKE AUDUBON POOL (22)

COLTS NECK TENNIS COURTS (27)

2070 TWIN BRANCHES ROAD

COLTS NECK ROAD

LAKE NEWPORT POOL (3)

GLADE TENNIS COURTS (29)

11601 LAKE NEWPORT ROAD

11550 GLADE DRIVE

LAKE THOREAU POOL (19) 2040 UPPER LAKES DRIVE

NEWBRIDGE POOL (17) 11768 GOLF COURSE SQUARE

TALL OAKS POOL (13) 12025 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

UPLANDS POOL (7) 11032 RING ROAD

NORTH SHORE POOL (8) 11515 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

LAKE ANNE TENNIS COURTS (6) 11301 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

RIDGE HEIGHTS POOL (21) 11400 RIDGE HEIGHTS ROAD

NORTH SHORE QUICKSTART 36 FT TENNIS COURTS (8)

SHADOWOOD POOL (23)

11515 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

2201 SPRINGWOOD DRIVE

UPPER LAKES TENNIS COURTS (18) UPPER LAKES DRIVE/SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE

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12250 SUNSET HILLS ROAD 703-437-7658

TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION (11)

1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

HOOK ROAD TENNIS COURTS (9)

RESTON ASSOCIATION CENTRAL SERVICES FACILITY (10)

STEEPLECHASE DRIVE

2201 SPRINGWOOD DRIVE

AUTUMNWOOD POOL (2)

POLO FIELDS RECREATION AREA (15) THUNDER CHASE DRIVE

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER (30) 11450 GLADE DRIVE 703-476-9689

WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER CAMPFIRE RING (31) SOAPSTONE DRIVE/LAWYERS ROAD


INFO & RESOURCES

WWW.RESTON.ORG | SPRING EDITION 2013

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12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191-3404

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PRSRT STD US POSTAGE  PAID RESTON, VA PERMIT NO.21

Reston Spring 2013  

Reston Magazine