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RESTON

Inside

MEMBER SERVICES 50

AQUATICS 52

CAMPS 56

RESTON ASSOCIATION PUBLICATION

NATURE 58

SPECIAL EVENTS 68

TENNIS 74

VOLUNTEERS 86

FALL 2014

TOGETHER, WE MAKE RESTON GREAT WWW.RESTON.ORG


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FEATURES FALL 2014

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Reston's Farmers' Market

From farm to table the Reston way. Reston’s farmers markets provide a variety of fresh produce and homemade goods that make you feel like you are living on a farm.

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The Plight of the Monarch

BY GEORGINA CHIN Protecting the arrival of the winged immigrants from Mexico. The story of the migration pattern of the Monarch butterfly.

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Reston's Alpha Organizations

BY CAROL NAHORNIAK The ABCs of Reston. Don’t know if you need to call RA about a program you saw at the RCC put on by IPAR? Exactly. A guide to the alphabet soup of Reston’s community organizations. On the Cover: You don’t have to travel to the coast to get fresh crabs. Seafood vendors bring them to you at Reston’s farmers markets. Photographer: Sarah Sertic

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


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INSIDE

PROGRAMS & EVENTS

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PERSPECTIVES 08 10 12 14

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RA Board Goes Back to School Reston in the Old Dominion First Phase of Silver Line is Finally a Reality Fairfax County Builds Community Through Education CenterStage Celebrates with Performances

LIVING IN RESTON

50 MEMBER SERVICES

BOARD & GOVERNANCE

52 AQUATICS

96 97 98 99

RA Wants to Connect with You Welcome Silver Line Board Actions Board of Directors

ON THE STREET

INFO & RESOURCES

AROUND RESTON

DIRECTORY & FACILITIES

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Reston Association's APO A Traveler’s Dream Come True Conserving Energy and the Value of Trees World Premiere in Reston Reston Home Tour

GET INVOLVED 86

87 88 90 90 91 92 94 94

Volunteer Resources for the Reston Community Reston Multicultural Festival Habitat Heroes Projects Storm Drain Marking Project Stream Monitoring Corporate & Volunteer Program Deloitte IMPACT Day 2014 Garlic Mustard Challenge Winners 2014 
 Fall Stream Cleanup

100 Reston Association Common Area 101 Fishing & Boating Guidelines 102 Map

56 CAMPS 58 NATURE 68 SPECIAL EVENTS 74 TENNIS 86 VOLUNTEER

facebook.com/restonassociation | youtube.com/restonassociation | twitter.com/restononline WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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RESTON VOLUME 5 | NUMBER 3

where healthy food comes naturally

PUBLISHER Ken Knueven, RA President, Board of Directors EDITORIAL Kirsten F. Carr kcarr@reston.org COPY EDITORS Jennifer O’ Connor, Kathy Bush DESIGN & PRODUCTION Long Nguyen long@reston.org PHOTOGRAPHER Sean Bahrami sean@reston.org CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Bob Haukness, Bryan Peters, Charles A. Veatch, Christopher So, David Madison, George Burke, Jim Kirby, Lisa Barker, Mark W. Majoros, Navya Dev Photography, Pete Staples, Sarah Sertic, William O'Brien

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RA CONTRIBUTORS Ashleigh Soloff, Abby Stocking, Claudia Thompson-Deahl, Ha Brock, Katie Shaw, Ken Rosenthal, Laura Kowalski, Lisa Delgado, Mary Conaway, Nicki Bellezza, Rob Tucker, Willa Whitacre COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTORS Bonnie Haukness, Carol Henderson, Carol Nahorniak, Catherine M. Hudgins, Georgina Chin, Gerry Connolly, Jean Janssen, Ken Knueven, Ken Plum, Leila Gordon, Michael McGurk, Rosemary McDonald

ADVERTISING Shannon B. Duffy E-mail: sduffy@onthegreenllc.net Mobile: 703-508-4815 Reston is published quarterly by the Reston Association. Send correspondence or address changes to Reston Association at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 201913404, 703-435-6530. All articles © Reston Association 2014. All rights reserved. Articles and letters to the editor may be submitted via mail to Kirsten F. Carr, Reston Association at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404. 703-435-6530. E-mail submissions may be made to kcarr@reston.org. Anonymous or incomplete information will not be published. Reston Association reserves the right to edit for length, style, clarity and content. Articles may be printed upon verification of authorship and availability of space. A digital version of Reston is available online at www.reston.org. RESTON ASSOCIATION 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, Virginia 20191-3404 Member Services Hours: Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Phone: 703-435-6530 Fax: 703-435-6516 Email: member_services@reston.org Printed on 10% post-consumer recycled paper, using vegetable-based ink. Please recycle.


Defend your trees against spring pests and diseases. The healthier a tree or shrub, the better able it will be to grow, thrive and fend off pests and diseases. The Care of Trees offers a full range of services to help your trees be as beautiful as possible this spring. • Tree and Shrub Pruning • Insect and Disease Management • SoilCareSM - our organic soil and root management program • Fertilization and Nutrient Management Programs • Cabling and Bracing • Planting and Tree Replacement • Tree and Stump Removal Help your trees to grow and flourish this spring by calling your local arborist at The Care of Trees to help ensure long and healthy lives for your trees and shrubs.

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P ERSPECTIVES

RA Board Goes Back to School BY KEN KNUEVEN

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very April our membership elects new members to the Reston Association Board of Directors with the expectation that we, as your board, will govern and rule as a body in the best interest of Reston Association members, and the greater Reston community. And, as elected board members, that is our hope and goal as well. However, even boards with the best intentions can learn and benefit from some internal reflection and assistance in best serving their constituents. With the election of new members and the recent appointment of Cate Fulkerson as the CEO, the board decided it was the perfect time to look inward and capitalize on the talent and expertise around the table. In May, the RA Board of Directors worked with Board Source to strengthen the inner workings of the board and prepare for the various changes Reston will be facing in the near future. It was an in-depth process starting with a detailed selfassessment highlighting the areas of focus for the all-day board workshop to follow. Board members assessed our

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AND, WHILE NO ONE THING CAN MAKE A BOARD PERFECT, WE ARE WORKING TOGETHER TO TAKE THE TOOLS WE OBTAINED AS PART OF THIS PROCESS TO BETTER SERVE YOU, OUR MEMBERS. ability as a board in four key areas: set direction, ensure resources, provide oversight, and board structure and operations. With 100 % participation, it was incredibly interesting to see what our board viewed as our strengths and our weaknesses. While several areas received high marks, we knew we had areas where we could improve and better serve our members. With the self-assessment report as our road map, we embarked on the next steps toward optimal board performance through an interactive

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

and lively day long meeting. As much of the board success involves the involvement of RA staff, Cate and members of the senior leadership team joined the board and staff from Board Source for the day. Whether it was in small group exercises or whole group conversations, the primary objective was always clear; create a board focused on serving the Reston Association membership and preserving and protecting the Reston community. The results of both the selfassessment and the workshop itself have the board focusing on five strategic considerations: 1. Develop effective practices that fully engage current and future board members; 2. Set performance measures for the organization, the CEO, and the board of directors; 3. Spend more time on strategic thinking; 4. Complete a succession policy for the chief executive officer position; and 5. Form a governance task

force that develops an ongoing program of continuous improvement in governance. As you have seen already, and will continue to see in board communications and actions to come, we are keenly dedicated to putting these considerations into practice and have already begun to implement steps toward these goals. From new board members to experienced veterans, all felt it was a Saturday well spent and everyone left energized and ready to put their new skills into play. And, while no one thing can make a board perfect, we are working together to take the tools we obtained as part of this process to better serve you, our members. We hope you will continue to work with us as we make Reston great. Ken Knueven is president of the Board of Directors of Reston Association. He represents RA on the boards of IPAR and Friends of Reston. Because he works in Reston as well, Knueven does get to experience the Reston motto: Live, Work, Play and Get Involved™.


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P ERSPECTIVES

Reston in the Old Dominion N BY KEN PLUM

an Netherton subtitled her history of Reston, “A New Town in the Old Dominion” (Donning: 1989), for while Reston is celebrating its first half-century, it is occupying land first divided by the English more than three and a half centuries ago. According to Netherton, the land now occupied by the community of Reston was part of a 1649 royal grant of 5,200,000 acres from Charles II of England to seven loyal followers. When this Northern Neck Proprietary was further divided a century later it became Fairfax family property of 12,000 acres called Great Falls Manor. By the time Robert E. Simon purchased the land in 1961, it had been reduced to about 7,000 acres, one of the largest pieces of land under single ownership in any close-in metropolitan area of the United States. Reston is a “new” community

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RESTON IS HELPING TO SHAPE VIRGINIA MORE THAN BEING SHAPED BY IT.

in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The County of Fairfax in which Reston is located was named for Thomas Fairfax, sixth Baron Fairfax of Cameron, and was formed from Prince William County in 1742. The county seat of Fairfax was first called Providence until the name was changed to Fairfax in 1859, incorporated as a town in 1874, and became a city in 1961. Reston’s newness in Virginia encompasses more than the tract of land upon which it is located. Reston was named for its developer, whose initials RES were joined with the English suffix for “town” to form Reston. In order to meet the planning, zoning, and landuse requirements for developing an entire community in a rural area, new enabling legislation was

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

needed from the Virginia General Assembly. The laws in effect at the time did not anticipate a development project as large and complex as that proposed for Reston. The resulting planned unit development (PUD) law not only enabled Robert E. Simon and his planners to meet the requirements of the law in a reasonable time, but it established a precedent that has affected development throughout Virginia and beyond. Village centers and town centers that had almost disappeared in the United States before Reston was developed are now the norm in most new communities. As Reston has transformed the landscape in environmentally sensitive ways for its time, it has had even more significant impact on community social customs — being from its

very beginning open to all people without discrimination and being a place where there is purposeful planning where people of all ages can live, work and play together from cradle to grave. The Old Dominion has been around for a very long time — Reston not so much so. Reston is helping to shape Virginia more than being shaped by it. A community that values and celebrates diversity; a place where multi-modes of transportation from walking and biking to mass transit are encouraged, and a community that can be built around guiding principles makes Reston the very special place it is in the Old Dominion. Delegate Plum represents the 36th District, including all of Reston, in the Virginia House of Delegates.


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P ERSPECTIVES

IN RESTON, WE ARE BUILDING FROM THE VISION OF RESTON FOUNDER ROBERT E. SIMON BY RE-PLANNING NEIGHBORHOODS AROUND THE STATIONS TO BE MULTIMODAL AND ADOPTING MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


First Phase of Silver Line is Finally a Reality T SV

BY GERRY CONNOLLY  PHOTOGRAPHY BY GEORGE BURKE

he year was 1962. John Glenn had just orbited the Earth; America was in the midst of the Cuban missile crisis; New York City introduced a “revolutionary” subway train that could operate without a crew on board — and Reston was only a dream. It was the year passengers began boarding flights at Dulles International Airport bound for points across the globe, and also the year that a regional transit study first suggested linking that airport with the nation’s capital by rail. After 52 years of studies, roadblocks, political battles, fits and starts, and, finally, construction, we have fulfilled that vision with the opening of Phase 1 of the Silver Line, from Falls Church to Reston. It’s been a long, arduous, and often-trying process that underscores the complexity of large-scale transportation projects. We’ve overcome challenges with financing, feasibility and environmental studies, community input, the creation of not one but two local tax districts, maintaining and expanding support from the Federal Government and other partners, and, most important, keeping the project safe, affordable, and on schedule. Two decades ago, when I was first elected to office as the Providence District Supervisor, I listed Rail to Dulles as my top priority, and that list remains in a frame hung in my office. To this day, I believe there is no investment more important to our region, and it already is having

a transformative effect across the community, even before the trains started running. Thirty years ago, Tysons and the Dulles Corridor accounted for about 4% of the National Capital Region’s economy. Today, it is the region’s second most important employment and investment center, generating more than 25% of the regional economic activity. It is now the economic driver not only for the region but also the Commonwealth. Seven Fortune 500 companies have moved their national headquarters into the Dulles corridor, which is now home to 2,300 employers and more than 250,000 employees. But as we all know too well, these jobs also bring transportation challenges. Every day, as I head to Capitol Hill, I witness our region’s long reverse commute with people from eastern Fairfax, Arlington, Montgomery County, MD, and Washington, D.C., heading to jobs in Tysons and the Dulles Corridor. The Silver Line will be a critical component to relieving some of the traffic congestion in this vital corridor. It will offer a choice that heretofore did not exist. Metro will serve as a catalyst for growth at Dulles Airport and throughout the corridor. Last year, Dulles moved 22.5 million passengers and 573 million pounds of cargo. With the arrival of the Silver Line, the corridor is expected to see a 40% increase in jobs and a doubling of the number of households with access to transit, a trend that is consistent with the walkable,

transit-oriented development plan for the rail stations. Neighboring Loudoun is expected to see the number of jobs increase by 43% during the next decade thanks to the arrival of Metro. The transformation already is underway in Tysons, where the County’s new master plan was recognized with the American Planning Association’s highest honor in 2011, the Daniel Burnham Award. What was once a collection of disparate office parks and parking lots is on its way to becoming a walkable, cutting-edge green city. In Reston, we are building from the vision of Reston Founder Robert E. Simon by re-planning neighborhoods around the stations to be multi-modal and adopting mixeduse development. Our Supervisor, Cathy Hudgins, has spurred the vision for the re-planning effort. The total 23.7-mile project promises to transform commuting patterns throughout the Dulles Corridor and Northern Virginia, providing greater choice for our commuters. Over the past two decades, Northern Virginia’s congressional delegation has fought to secure federal funding and identify necessary cost-savings to make this project viable. In March 2009, we finally signed the Full Funding Grant Agreement, providing $900 million in federal dollars to Phase 1. In addition, we secured advanced funding for $77.5 million in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, producing a $15 million savings in finance costs. Working with then-Secretary Ray

LaHood, we also identified almost $1 billion in savings, including supporting the less-costly above-ground station at Dulles Airport. But a common concern we all share is the impact this project could have on toll road users. In partnership with Fairfax County, Loudoun County, and the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority (MWAA), our congressional delegation recently helped to secure a $1.9 billion loan under the Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA). This represents about one-third of the total cost of the project and will help reduce financing costs. It represents a huge victory for commuters in the corridor and will allow MWAA to freeze tolls for the next five years and keep them far below previous forecasts. It continues to be an exciting and dynamic time here in Reston as Phase 1 opens for ridership and construction continues on Phase 2. I enjoy joining you and others from across the region in taking our first ride on the Silver Line and enjoying the benefits it provides to our quality of life and our region’s economy. Congressman Gerry Connolly represents Virginia’s 11th District, which includes Reston. A former chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, he serves on both the Oversight & Government Reform and the Foreign Affairs committees.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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P ERSPECTIVES

is a Wise Investment J BY CATHY HUDGINS

uly 1st is the start of the new Fairfax County fiscal year. With it comes fresh funding for the county priorities. One of those priorities should be a commitment to provide each and every student within the Fairfax County Public Schools a proper educational foundation. This strategy should be a universally applied policy. One year after President Johnson declared a War on Poverty, Project Head Start was founded as a summer program for children. Project Head Start transitioned into the Head Start Program designed to offer child care, assistance to parents and the critical health care lacking for so many needy children. Now, coming upon its 50th anniversary, Head Start is the primary early education and family support program available to families at or below the poverty level. What educators identified as critical in 1964 for Head Start families is today the successful model for other private and non-profit early education child care centers. Moreover, we find Head Start alumni throughout our communities, even members of Congress and professional athletics. Just as the Johnson administration saw the importance of Head Start, so did Virginia Delegate Dorothy McDiarmid, of Vienna. In 1968, she

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played an equally important role by ensuring kindergarten for all children in Virginia. But it took nearly 50 years in Fairfax County to offer all-day kindergarten in every public school. In 2013, Mission: Readiness, “a nonpartisan national security organization of more than 450 retired admirals and generals calling for smart investments in America’s children,” issued a report, Pre-K Around the Beltway, which contrasted access to pre-kindergarten programs among the municipalities of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. This report was unique in that it was not authored by educators but rather by a group of retired military officers. Why would pre-kindergarten programs be of concern for our military? The report estimates that 75 percent of all young Americans are unable to join the military, and poor educational skills are the leading reason. The authors identify the link between early school success and opening the doors to college, careers, and military service success later in life. “Without enough skilled men and women available to serve in tomorrow’s armed services, we endanger the future strength of our military.” The report focused on the opportunities for quality pre-kindergarten programs in Washington and the surrounding counties. Fairfax County

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

is not on par with our peers in this effort. “Full day k” is an excellent start. That each five-year-old receives six hours of kindergarten experience daily is critical. But in some situations, it isn’t enough. It is probably best to consider infant needs and toddler preparation as well. Happily, we have many successful private and non-profit models in Hunter Mill. These centers offer infant and toddler care, preschool education, private kindergarten, before- and after-school programs, and school-age and summer camp enrichment opportunities, for both preschool and school-age children. Quite a lineup of possibilities. In addition, many of these centers provide support systems for families. It is this consideration that closes the circle of communication and opens the door to preparation, where engaged staff and parents work together for the education and development of each child. Parental participation is invited at any time. The connection between early childhood education and parental involvement is integral for successful children and successful families, not just for some, but for all children. In the FY2015 Adopted Budget, the Board of Supervisors funded the first step in what is intended to close the loop where all children enter

kindergarten socially and emotionally ready for school and prepared to learn. Why does this conversation continue without resolution? You guessed it — more funding is needed. Aren’t our high-risk populations worth the investment that will significantly return great economic value, as well as improve everyone’s quality of life? I submit that the return on investment in terms of social capital and community improvement are within our reach, if we so decide. Please keep this in mind as school starts in September. High-quality early education that prepares all children for kindergarten is a wise investment for the county. It is essential to ensuring children leave the K-12 system emotionally, socially and academically prepared to enter the world of work or post-secondary education. Studies have shown that the investment in quality preschool not only prepares students for success in school, but carries over to success in life. Cathy Hudgins has represented the Hunter Mill District on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors since 2000. As a long-time Restonian, she has been involved with local, county and state politics for over 30 years.


HIGH QUALITY EARLY EDUCATION THAT PREPARES ALL CHILDREN FOR KINDERGARTEN IS A WISE INVESTMENT FOR THE COUNTY. Head Start and Head Start Alumni For additional information, go to www.nhsa.org and blog.nhsa.org

Pre-K Around the Beltway Report

THINKSTOCKPHOTO .COM

http://media.nbcwashington.com/ documents/PreK+Beltway+report.pdf

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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P ERSPECTIVES

CenterStage Celebrates with Performances BY LEILA GORDON  PHOTOS COURTESY OF RESTON COMMUNITY CENTER

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s Reston continues its 50th anniversary celebration, many Restonians have shared fond memories from the past halfcentury. Whether it be in a camp or classroom, community room or community event, swimming pool or theatre, RCC is proud to have provided the backdrop for so much of what has made Reston special. Our Fall 2014 Program Guide is full of new opportunities to share, including the 2014-15 Professional Touring Artist Series. This year’s CenterStage lineup welcomes back many artists with whom we’ve had history over the past few decades, while also introducing us to inspiring new artists from around the world. Whether they’re a returning favorite or new act, these artists are sure to entertain audiences of all ages. We will be transported to the mysterious and tumultuous Ukraine with DakhaBrakha. We will be moved by the extraordinary Anna Deavere Smith. We will be inspired

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by Inaugural Poet Richard Blanco. We will be intrigued by the artistic talents of the National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Awards Fellows. And audience members of all ages will be touched by the musical vignettes presented by the Cashore Marionettes. The CenterStage welcomes back several artists that have become familiar to Reston audiences over the past few decades. RCC’s favorite comedians return to Reston for a 10day Reduced Shakespeare Company Extravaganza. Lúnasa will once again celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with Restonians while New York Festival of Song follows up on last season’s success with a new concert of music from the Harlem Renaissance. Turtle Island Quartet welcomes jazz vocalist and Grammy-nominee Tierney Sutton. Trout Fishing in America will introduce a new generation of music when Ezra’s daughter, Dana Louise joins the duo on stage. Our long-standing partnership with DancePlace continues with new work from talented

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

local choreographers Daniel Phoenix Singh and Cynthia Oliver. And funnyman Mark Brutsché rounds out the season by once again transforming the CenterStage into a Motion Picture and Vaudeville House. RCC Director of Arts and Events Paul Douglas Michnewicz has put together a fantastic season that will keep audiences entertained from September through May. We hope you will join us as we turn the corner and head toward the next fifty years of making memories together. Leila Gordon has been the RCC Executive Director since 2008.

THE CENTERSTAGE WELCOMES BACK SEVERAL ARTISTS THAT HAVE BECOME FAMILIAR TO RESTON AUDIENCES OVER THE PAST FEW DECADES.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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0 N THE STREET

APO

Reston Association's

BY LAURA KOWALSKI  PHOTOGRAPHY BY FERNANDO ORTIZ

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id you know Reston Association’s Special Events Coordinator, Ashleigh Soloff, also volunteers for The Fairfax County Police Department? Volunteering as an Auxiliary Police Officer (APO) since 2003, APO Soloff has recently taken on the role of Lead Auxiliary at the Sully District Station, which includes a variety of administrative duties in addition to her patrol and event duties. She acts as the liaison between the eight other auxiliary officers at her station and command staff, attends quarterly meetings, ensures adequate staffing of community events, including drunk and impaired driver checkpoints, and maintains timesheets and training records for those officers at her station. She facilitates monthly meetings in which upcoming events, policy changes and participation in different operations within the police department are discussed. She also utilizes this time to organize training on various aspects to keep officers proficient on required skills and keep officers safe in the line of duty. APO Soloff’s outstanding performance does not stop at just the administrative functions of that lead role. In addition to her administrative duties, APO Soloff frequently provides valuable support to patrol officers on the street. She is a proficient

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AN AMAZING COMMITMENT FOR ANY VOLUNTEER, ESPECIALLY WHEN ONE CONSIDERS THIS WAS ABOVE AND BEYOND HER FULLTIME, PROFESSIONAL CAREER WITH RESTON ASSOCIATION.

cover officer, having provided support during physical arrests and testified in traffic arrest cases which led to several convictions. Her dedication was tested when a drunk driver struck the cruiser she and another officer occupied while working a patrol shift. During this alarming turn of events, APO Soloff remained calm and professional as she assisted the patrol officer in pursuing and arresting the driver for felony hit and run and drunk driving. This continuous level of commitment has provided leadership and positive examples many fellow auxiliary officers look up to and aspire toward. Ashleigh logged over 1,000 hours of service to the program in 2013, far in excess of the annual requirement of 288. An amazing commitment for any volunteer,

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Basic Qualifications

Applicants for the Auxiliary Police Officer Program must be: ƒƒ At least 21 years of age ƒƒ Not currently employed in any position that presents a potential conflict of interest ƒƒ Not currently an applicant for a police officer position in any jurisdiction ƒƒ In good health and willing to submit to a physical examination ƒƒ Without a criminal record or history of drug use (case by case) ƒƒ Successfully pass a polygraph exam

General Information To request more information, please call or email the Auxiliary Police Coordinator at: 3911 Woodburn Road Annandale, VA 22003 Phone: (703) 280-0576 Email: auxiliarypolice@fairfaxcounty.gov

especially when one considers this was above and beyond her full-time, professional career with Reston Association. She was recently recognized by Volunteer Fairfax for her dedication and service to the Fairfax County community. She was also recently awarded Auxiliary Officer of the Year for Patrol by the Fairfax County Police Department. “We all get to see Ashleigh’s commitment

to the people of Reston on a daily basis through her work with our special events and the 55+ Advisory Committee,” said Larry Butler, Reston Association Senior Director of Parks, Recreation & Community Resources. “It is nice for her to be recognized for the numerous hours and efforts she expends long after her official work day is over. She epitomizes the community spirit of Reston, and we are


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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incredibly proud of her.” Second Lieutenant James Krause, the Auxiliary Program Coordinator, says that “APO Soloff is an invaluable volunteer for our organization. She is extremely efficient and productive. She goes above and beyond what is expected of her. Because of her excellent organizational skills, she makes the volunteering experience very easy and enjoyable for many.” In short, Lead APO Ashleigh Soloff has proved to be an outstanding APO overall; a true model for all APOs to emulate. Her commitment is not just displayed by her timesheet, but also by the countless awards and accolades she has received, not only by the Department, but by the citizens and businesses of Fairfax County. APO Soloff is the epitome of the Fairfax County auxiliary police officer. Join Ashleigh and our elite Auxiliary Police Officer Program as a sworn law enforcement officer….

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You can make a difference in your community. The Fairfax County Police Department is seeking volunteers who are interested in becoming auxiliary police officers. APOs are unpaid, sworn law enforcement officers. They perform a variety of operational and administrative functions in support of the county’s police department. Some of the duties the members of our APO unit perform include: ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

raffic and crowd control T Patrol augmentation Assist at DWI checkpoints Fingerprinting Crime deterrence Special event support Parking enforcement Child safety seat inspections High visibility patrol Honor Guard Marine Patrol To become a member of the

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Fairfax County Police Department’s APO Program, applicants are required to undergo a thorough background investigation. Once accepted into the program, and before being sworn as law enforcement officers, volunteers complete a course of training of approximately 200 hours at the Fairfax County Criminal Justice Academy. The comprehensive training is an abbreviated version of the police academy that all full-time officers complete. Training is conducted Tuesday and Thursday evenings and on a number of Saturdays over a period of approximately five months. In addition, in-service refresher training is conducted on an annual basis. APOs are required to contribute a minimum of 24 hours of service a month, primarily nights, weekends and holidays, to maintain their status in the program. When on duty, APOs are covered by injury insurance that is provided and

paid for by Fairfax County. Upon graduation from training and being sworn in as an APO, you will be issued a uniform and department identification. APOs are authorized to operate police cruisers and other department vehicles. Although APOs receive firearms training on an annual basis, they are not authorized to carry a sidearm while on duty. Laura Kowalski, Deputy Director for Recreation, has been an RA employee since 1992. She and her family are proud supporters and participants in RA recreation activities.


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THINKSTOCKPHOTO .COM

THE PLIGHT OF THE

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


FARMERS WHO USE GLYPHOSATE TO ELIMINATE WEEDS ALSO ELIMINATE MILKWEED WHICH GROWS AROUND THE EDGES OF THE FIELDS. AS A RESULT, MILLIONS OF ACRES OF MONARCH HABITAT HAVE BEEN LOST.

BY GEORGINA CHIN Mexico has dropped from a high of 20.97 hectares in 1997 (1 hectare is about 2.5 acres) to a low of just .67 hectares this past winter. (Data courtesy of Monarch Watch) What has caused this precipitous decline in their population? There are several factors. The first and most significant is habitat loss. Monarchs rely on milkweed for their survival. Unfortunately, the area covered by milkweed has diminished tremendously due to the introduction of herbicide-resistant corn and soybean plants, including genetically modified organisms (GMOs). These plants are resistant to the herbicide glyphosate (also known as Roundup), but milkweed is not. Farmers who use glyphosate to eliminate weeds also eliminate milkweed, which grows around the edges of the fields. As a result, millions of acres of monarch habitat have been lost. Habitat loss does not only occur due to herbicides. In Mexico, illegal logging conditions have reduced the suitable areas for monarch hibernation. Finally, drought conditions in recent years have caused a significant reduction in the number of monarchs. In the United States, Canada, and Mexico, over-development is also an issue. Urbanization

threatens the areas that monarchs need in order to rest and feed during their migration.

Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, Michoacan (Mexico)

THINKSTOCKPHOTO .COM

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his summer, if you see a splash of orange, black and white hovering over the flowers in your garden, you may be one of the lucky few to see a monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). This tiny creature, with a wingspan of two and a half inches, is known for its migration, but there are other North American butterfly species that also migrate. Every late summer and early fall, millions of monarchs make a treacherous 2,500 mile journey to the transvolcanic mountains of Mexico. They endure harsh weather conditions, drought, lack of nectar sources, predators and even cars to hibernate high in the mountains in the oyamel fir trees. Amazingly, the monarchs that manage to find their way to Mexico are four or more generations removed, depending on the breeding season from those who originally traveled north. Scientists who study these tiny creatures are still not sure how they find their way to a place they have never been to before. Just like the osprey who don’t travel with their parents but manage to find their way back to the overwintering areas, it is genetic. In the past two decades the number of monarchs recorded in

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Addressing the Plight

What can we as homeowners do to help monarchs? The answer is quite simple — plant milkweed. Milkweed is a fast-growing “weed” which has a beautiful flower after two years. It is the only food source for monarch larva. Because a single monarch caterpillar gains 2,700 times its original weight in less than two weeks, the female monarch will generally lay only one egg per milkweed plant. The average is about 300, but a healthy female laid around 1,200 in a study done by Monarch Lab’s Karen Oberhauser. With so many eggs to deposit over her short lifetime (approximately one month), she will need to visit a tremendous number of plants. In addition to helping the monarch, milkweed is attractive to many species of insects and pollinators. There are several varieties that grow in our area, namely butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa — not to be confused with butterfly bush), swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) and common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca). These plants can grow four to five feet tall and the common milkweed is best suited to full sun. Milkweed seeds can be purchased; however they take more time and effort to germinate.

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IN ADDITION TO HELPING THE MONARCH, MILKWEED IS ATTRACTIVE TO MANY SPECIES OF INSECTS AND POLLINATORS. More information about Milkweed Planting and Care is available at http://www. loudounwildlife.org/PDF_ Files/Monarch_Campaign_ Milkweed_Planting_and_ Care.pdf The second thing we can do to help the monarch is to try to eliminate the use of chemicals in our gardens. Butterflies of all varieties prefer gardens that are pesticide and herbicide free, and find many pesticides to be toxic. Thirdly, we can establish monarch waystations which contain the resources that monarchs need to survive, including milkweed for the larvae, and nectar sources for the adults. By planting milkweed and nectar sources we can provide a place for females to lay their eggs,

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Left: Milkweed in Reston. Right: This Monarch Waystation sign was donated by Mona Miller. She has worked with the pipeline representatives to delay mowing to protect an important milkweed patch for the Monarchs. Bottom: Mona Miller is a naturalist whose hobbies include raising butterflies and moths for conservation. and nectar for them to drink. The nectar sources which attract monarchs will also attract many other species of insects and Lepidoptera. At last count, there were about 8,000 waystations in the United States, according to the Monarch Watch registry. For more information about monarchs and how to establish a waystation, visit http:// monarchwatch.org. Finally, we can be on the lookout for monarchs during their breeding season, which lasts from late spring to early fall. Recently, a concerned citizen in our area, Mona Miller, was able to convince the Williams Gas Pipeline to mow their fields in Reston in midOctober instead of mid-August. This small change in the mowing schedule has probably saved many, many monarch larvae which live on the milkweed found in the area of the pipeline.

Many small individual acts such as these can collectively help keep the monarch migration from becoming a thing of the past. Together we can ensure the survival of the monarch migration — one of the true wonders of nature. Georgina Chin is a FCPS teacher who has been raising monarchs for the past four years.


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1. Brooks Rose Supplemental Brand Awareness Study, 2012. 2. Nielsen and comScore Media Metrix, 2012. 3. RealTrends, May 2013. 4. First national real estate brand to launch IDX integration within an iPhone App and property/agent videos into an iPad App.©2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. 1866WDC_G5/13

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A Traveler’s Dream Come True New Lanes and More Predictable Travel Times Coming To I-95 BY MIKE MCGURK  PHOTO COURTESY OF 95 EXPRESS LANES

I

n congestion-plagued Northern Virginia, many a frustrated driver has wished to open up a clear path to escape the standstill traffic on Interstate 95. Next year, a new option will become available with the opening of the 95 Express Lanes. The 95 Express Lanes are 29 miles of high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes that will begin in the vicinity of Edsall Road on I-395 in Fairfax County and extend to Garrisonville Road on I-95 in Stafford County. Reversible like today’s HOV system, the 95 Express Lanes will provide new choices, add capacity, and extend and improve the performance of the existing HOV system. Unlike today’s HOV system — where the rules only apply during morning and afternoon peak travel periods — the rules of the road will be in effect on the Express Lanes 24/7. Currently under construction, the 95 Express Lanes will convert the existing high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) system to a tolled express lanes system. That means drivers need to prepare now for the new rules of the road that will go into effect when the Express Lanes open to drivers in early 2015. The first and biggest change is that all drivers – even carpoolers and sluggers — will need an E-ZPass® or E-ZPass® FlexSM to travel on the 95 Express Lanes. But not everyone will pay a toll — carpoolers with three or more people in the vehicle will enjoy a toll-free trip with an E-ZPass Flex set to HOV mode. The E-ZPass Flex was designed for use on the 495 and 95 Express Lanes and can be switched between toll-free HOV mode and toll-paying mode. It allows HOV-3 travelers to enjoy

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toll-free trips 24 hours a day, seven days a week. A regular E-ZPass will automatically pay the toll for every trip. For drivers who travel alone or with just one passenger, the transition from the current I-95 HOV lanes to the 95 Express Lanes will provide the option to pay a toll for a faster trip whenever it’s needed. This means that you won’t have to wait until the HOV requirement is lifted to enjoy predictable travel — all you need is an E-ZPass. Like the 495 Express Lanes — which opened on the Virginia side of the Capital Beltway in November 2012 — tolls on the 95 Express Lanes will be dynamic, meaning they will change periodically based on real-time traffic conditions. There will be no toll booths, so traffic can be free-flowing. Once The 95 Express Lanes End Just North Of Edsall Road, Standard HOV Rules Will Apply: ƒƒ HOV-3+ vehicles heading north on the 95 Express Lanes will be able to continue on to the I-395 HOV lanes as they do today. ƒƒ Vehicles that do not meet the HOV requirements when the HOV rules are in effect will need to exit from the Express Lanes and reenter the regular I-395 lanes after Edsall Road to continue into Arlington and Washington, D.C. Other Important Considerations: ƒƒ An E-ZPass from another state will work on the 95

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

ƒƒ

ƒƒ

ƒƒ

Express Lanes, but it will automatically pay the toll for every trip no matter how many occupants are in the car. Because there are no toll booths on the Express Lanes, there won’t be any options to pay with cash or credit card. Both E-ZPass and E-ZPass Flex work on all Virginia toll roads and throughout 14 E-ZPass states in the Northeast, Midwest and Mid-Atlantic region — E-ZPass Flex works to pay your toll on other roads regardless of the position of the switch. Travelers may pick up an E-ZPass or E-ZPass Flex at a variety of local Virginia retailers including AAA MidAtlantic locations; select Giant and Wegmans grocery stores and Tysons Corner Center; at E-ZPass customer service centers; online, or by

ƒƒ

ƒƒ

calling E-ZPass Virginia at 1-877-762-7824. The new Express Lanes rules of the road will be enforced using video technology and police patrols. Dedicated response teams will be employed on the Express Lanes to quickly identify and respond to incidents and assist customers in disabled vehicles. These features will help drivers maintain highway speeds and make travel times more predictable.

Whether you carpool, slug or drive yourself, visit www.95ExpressLanes. com to learn about the coming changes and make a plan today. Mike McGurk is the senior corporate relations associate at Transurban, the operator of the 495 and 95 Express Lanes


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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Conserving Energy and the Value of

BY KEN ROSENTHAL ď Ž PHOTOGRAPHY BY JIM KIRBY

T

rees are active, living organisms that interact with their environment. These interactions are beneficial to all living organisms, including us. Most people can tell you that we get material for homes and furniture, fuel, foods and other everyday items from trees. But, how many of us recognize the immediate value of a living tree? Trees mitigate temperature extremes. A large maple tree, as one example, captures sunlight with its leaves, providing shade to homes and yards. Strategically placing trees to the south and west of a house can provide energy benefits. Shading of your house can produce a 30% savings in air conditioner usage throughout the summer. Trees such as pines will also provide insulation and windbreak for your home, reducing heating costs in winter by 20-50%. Evapotranspiration from trees produces lower ambient temperatures. Evapotranspiration is the sum of evaporation and transpiration. Leaves, stems, branches and roots all intercept rainwater, preventing it from reaching the ground. This

THE NEXT TIME YOU ARE CONSIDERING PLANTING OR REMOVING TREES IN YOUR YARD, BE SURE TO EXAMINE THE HIDDEN COSTBENEFITS BEFORE YOU MAKE YOUR FINAL DECISION. water evaporates, changing from liquid to water vapor. Transpiration is the movement of water inside the tree from its roots to its leaves. Loss of this water by evaporation occurs through pores on leaves, stems and other aerial structures. The resulting water loss from evapotranspiration has a cooling effect on the atmosphere. The absorptive ability of trees is a valuable benefit to overall environmental health. Tree canopies attract or absorb particulate matter, including pollutants, on their leaves, stems and branches, improving air

quality. This matter eventually ends up in the soil, either washed there by rain or deposited by decomposers that break down fallen leaves. Evapotranspiration in a healthy forest can absorb 60% of precipitation, allowing groundwater to recharge from percolation and reducing stormwater runoff. Removing trees doubles stormwater runoff, which can be expensive and destructive for everyone downstream. As trees grow larger, they gain more biomass and can absorb more nutrients. Sequestering these nutrients keeps them out of air and water cycles, improving the quality of both for human use. An acre of trees in a healthy forest can absorb six tons of carbon dioxide, while producing four tons of oxygen annually. This production would meet the oxygen requirements of 18 people. Absorbing carbon dioxide keeps it out of the atmosphere where it could contribute to the greenhouse effect, which is linked to global climate change. The National Wildlife Federation estimates that there are 60-200 million spaces along city streets that could accommodate trees. This would absorb an additional 33 million tons

of carbon dioxide annually, saving $4 billion in energy costs. Other absorbed nutrients are prevented from entering our waterways, improving the health of fish, other aquatic organisms, and ecosystems as a whole. Reston’s commitment to trees and natural areas has been evident in its status as a Tree City USA for 20 years. Our tree-lined communities are aesthetically pleasing, and the trees can also provide a very real fiscal advantage in the form of energy savings and improved property values. Surveys of realtors have shown that mature trees or landscaping with trees improves the salability of homes. The next time you are considering planting or removing trees in your yard, be sure to examine the hidden cost-benefits before you make your final decision. Ken Rosenthal is a naturalist at Walker Nature Center in Reston. He enjoys birding and wildlife watching, and spends many late nights trying to identify the many creatures he photographs during his outings.

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World Premiere in Reston BY CAROL HENDERSON AND ROSEMARY MCDONALD  PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID MADISON

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musical world-premiere in Reston? Yes, it’s true! The first-ever performance of a new composition by Scott Solak will be performed on October 2 at Center Stage at the Reston Community Center (RCC). It’s part of the popular Meet the Artists series sponsored by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at George Mason University. It’s free of charge, and you are invited. Put Thursday, October 2 from 2:15 to 3:30 on your calendar now for this special event. Gloria Sussman, musician, music instructor, and longtime Reston resident, told her sons that rather than a big party for her upcoming 90th birthday, she would like to have a piece of music composed. Her sons Ted, an engineer in Lexington MA, and Bob, an engineer in Plano TX, happily agreed to support a commission. What you will hear premiered is a ten-minute piece for two violins and piano in three movements. The first is a march, the second more lyrical and expansive, and the third very rhythmic. Scott Solak has written works in a wide variety of genres, including solo piano, orchestral and chamber music. His music has been performed throughout the United States and around the Washington metropolitan area, including the

FOR GLORIA, THIS NEW COMPOSITION IS A VERY APPROPRIATE WAY TO CELEBRATE HER 90TH BIRTHDAY SINCE HER LIFE CENTERS AROUND MUSIC. Washington National Cathedral and the Kennedy Center. His other premieres in Reston have included “Velvet Shoes” and “This Music,” commissioned by the Reston Chorale; and “Canzona,” commissioned by the Reston Community Orchestra. This piece was performed as arranged for saxophone and piano and played by Rich Kleinfeld and Yumiko Rogers in the Meet the Artists series in 2012. The performers of this new composition will be three sisters from the very musical Chamasyan family. They were born in Yerevan, Armenia, and studied music there. Later, each came to the United States where they acquired advanced degrees. Violinist Monika, pianist Marina and violinist Armine

have all performed in the Meet the Artists series of concerts developed by OLLI. Getting to know them over the five years of this concert series, Gloria Sussman was impressed with the immense talent of all three Chamasyan sisters. In addition to the new Scott Solak work, they will play selections by other composers at the October 2 concert. For Gloria, this new composition is a very appropriate way to celebrate her 90th birthday since her life centers around music. She was born in Philadelphia, the niece of well-known composer Richard Yardumian, and has an M.S. degree in Music Education from the University of Pennsylvania. With her late husband, Nate, an engineer with the Mitre Corporation, she moved to Reston in 1970. Gloria immediately checked out the status of music in the new town and became involved with the Reston Chorale. She served as its pianist from 1972 to 1978. Because of impaired vision, she became Chorale Assistant Director and Manager. Gloria’s innovative ideas to raise funds for the Chorale included Musical Walks where residents walked short distances from home to home to listen to musicians perform chamber music. She founded Musica Concordia,

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


FEATURING

Premiere: Composition for two violins and piano Composer: Scott J. Solak Performers: Three Chamasyan sisters — violinists Monika and Armine, pianist Marina When: October 2, 2:15-3:30 p.m. Public Invited: Free of charge; reception follows concert Where: Center Stage, Reston Community Center, Hunters Woods Honoree: Gloria Sussman, for her 90th birthday Commissioned by: Ted and Bob Sussman, Gloria’s sons Concert Sponsors: In Meet the Artists series, by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at George Mason University and the Reston Community Center

a group of nine a cappella singers who perform widely in Reston and the Washington metropolitan area. For the Senior Academy, a program at the RCC, she called herself a disc jockey for classical music for senior citizens. Her philosophy throughout her career and in her active retirement has been using music for entertainment and education. In 2000, Gloria was asked to teach for the Learning in Retirement Institute, now the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at George Mason University. For fourteen years she has taught the “Ongoing Pleasures of Music” class at its Reston campus. OLLI member and Reston resident Bob Webb says the class has become an institution. “It is for taking the next step and discovering what is new in music and who the emerging performers and composers are, or gaining new insights into old favorites, or simply indulging in the spectacular or humorous,” said Webb. “All of this is brought on Monday afternoons to a devoted following of 60-to-90year-olds by a woman in her 80s with severely constricted eyesight but enormous music knowledge and sensitivity and an ability to communicate it with passion.” “Gloria has been very active with the Prevention of Blindness Society of Metropolitan Washington

where she has led support groups for adults facing vision challenges for close to twenty years,” according to Society Executive Director Michele Hartlove. “Gloria has shared her own experiences, including use of assistive technology that enables her and others with vision loss to more fully access and enjoy written and digital materials.” Gloria Sussman is delighted that this birthday celebration involves her family and her musical friends Scott Solak and the Chamasyan sisters. She is also grateful to Rosemary

McDonald, her good friend and OLLI member who coordinates the Meet the Artists series of concerts. Gloria and Rosemary were both involved in establishing the very successful partnership between OLLI and the RCC. Rosemary recruits musicians to perform, and the RCC provides the Center Stage theater, staffing and publicity. Gloria thanks them all and looks forward to a large audience at this special musical premiere on October 2. Those attending are also invited to a reception at the RCC following the concert.

Carol C. Henderson is a former Board member and Reston Coordinator for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at George Mason University. Rosemary McDonald has been an Art and Music Chair for Osher Lifelong learning Institute at George Mason University for several years and coordinator for Meet the Artists music series at RCC for the past four years.

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A ROUND RESTON

RESTON'S

A

L

P

H

A

ORGANIZATIONS BY CAROL NAHORNIAK

A

cronyms are in abundance in this region of government, military, and corporate headquarters, and Reston has its own fair share. It’s not surprising that many don’t know how it all breaks out when it comes to who’s in charge of what in Reston. As it’s not a ‘town,’ Reston doesn’t have the traditional form of municipal governance that many may be accustomed to. And, alphabetically speaking, finding the right institution can be confusing. To help clarify, inform, and help you find the right ‘department,’ here’s a list of Reston’s leading organizations that cover the range of living, working, and playing.

Clusters

You would know if you have one. Many neighborhoods in Reston have, in addition to RA, an elected board of local residents who oversee their cluster’s common areas, including maintenance and collection of dues to pay for the services of contractors.

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IT’S NOT SURPRISING THAT MANY DON’T KNOW HOW IT ALL BREAKS OUT WHEN IT COMES TO WHO’S IN CHARGE OF WHAT IN RESTON. Cornerstones

Cornerstonesva.org This regional social services safety net helps families and individuals in need on many levels, including housing, food banks, day care, and more, and operates the Embry Rucker Homeless Shelter in Reston. Formerly known as Reston Interfaith, the organization underwent a name change in 2013. Cornerstones is funded by donations, tax dollars from Fairfax County, and fundraising efforts. Their annual gala, Best of Reston, is produced, along with GRCC, to award volunteers and businesses in the community for their noble efforts.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

FOR Friends of Reston

Reston.org The FOR board of volunteers leads charitable works in support of RA to benefit a variety of community projects in Reston. Through donations and fundraising events like the annual 5K Fund Run, storytelling nights, and more, FOR provides RA camp scholarships for children, benches, nature and educational activities, and its flagship achievement, the LEED Gold Certified Nature House at the 72-acre Walker Nature Center on Glade Drive, where FOR is based.

GRACE Greater Reston Arts Center

Restonarts.org GRACE has been a leader in expanding the regional arts community since it was established in 1974. Located at Reston Town Center, GRACE operates the remarkable annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival, and all year round, the gallery offers programs for all ages and curated art exhibits.

GRCC Greater Reston Chamber of Commerce

Restonchamber.org Established in 1982, the GRCC consists of regional corporations and businesses of all sizes that form a roster of more than 600 members who work together in developing a voice in government policies, networking, and special events of all sizes, including Taste of Reston and Oktoberfest.

IPAR Initiative for Public Art — Reston

Publicartreston.org Community leaders created this non-profit organization in 2007 to develop a Public Art Master Plan for Reston. They have documented all of the works established since 1964, and support more for the future to inspire and engage the mind and senses. Find all the destinations online and on the hardcopy of the RA map.


RA Reston Association

www.reston.org If you or your landlord pays annual flat-rate dues to RA each year, you are a member of RA, Reston’s largest organization. To determine RA’s jurisdiction, get the excellent map of Reston — published online and in print — which is also a guide to the trails and recreational spaces around the community. RA is also the publisher of Reston magazine, which you are now reading. If in doubt, contact RA for information about anything in Reston, but in a nutshell: ƒƒ RA oversees and maintains our many pools, tennis courts, open spaces, natural amenities, trails, programs and events for all ages, and summer camps for tots to teens. RA also rules the covenants, a set of procedures and guidelines to serve all members in the continuation of property standards that includes exterior remodeling and paint colors, trees, and much more. Beyond standard procedures handled by staff, there is the RA Design Review Board (DRB), a volunteer committee that helps property owners seeking to make changes to their properties. ƒƒ RA operates with a yearround staff of 90, plus seasonal staff, headed by CEO Cate Fulkerson, and is governed by a volunteer board of directors. Each year, elections are held to rotate new members into the board. As the saying goes, it’s a tough job but someone’s got to do it. Then again, it’s also an honor to be a part of this democracy. Each board member represents all RA members, and some a specific district in Reston. RA also directs a variety of volunteer committees to enhance and support community involvement and offerings. This is one of many ways to “Get Involved” in Reston.

RES Robert E. Simon, Jr.

This list of acronyms would be remiss without mention of our founder’s monogram, from which Reston’s name is derived.

Reston Celebrates

Restoncelebrates.org Established for Reston’s anniversary, this is a newer organization of a variety of groups that support an online hub with an ongoing list of special events in the community.

RCA Reston Citizens Association

Restoncitizensassociation. blogspot.com RCA was founded in 1967 to promote and protect Reston's founding principles in the political arena by serving as a non-partisan forum and advocacy for all residents. This is an action organization in which every citizen has a voice, supported by donations and operated by a board of volunteers representing specific districts in Reston.

RCC Reston Community Center

Restoncommunitycenter.com Reston’s residential and commercial property owners are in Small District #5 of Fairfax County and pay an additional tax of 4.7 cents per $100 of assessed home value which provides the funding for RCC buildings, programs and services. RCC was established in 1979 by members of the community to further enhance Reston’s sense of place. RCC offers programs in the arts, aquatics, recreation, and community events for all ages and interests and has two locations. At RCC Hunters Woods there is an indoor pool — the Terry L. Smith Aquatic Center — and the 290-seat Center Stage, a state-of-the-art theater that hosts performances by community arts organizations and professional artists. RCC Lake Anne is home to the Jo Ann Rose Gallery for local artist exhibits, plus a ceramics studio, and fitness/wellness classrooms.

RHT Reston Historic Trust

Restonmuseum.org Our unique history is archived and celebrated by RHT, which operates Reston Museum, a storefront at Lake Anne Plaza with informative displays and Reston wares. RHT consists of a volunteer board, two parttime staff, and a roster of volunteers, supported by membership and donations. In addition to its ongoing informative programs backed by RCC, RHT has been busy with the celebration of Reston’s 50th anniversary and the 100th birthday of our founder in 2014, and frequent media inquiries about the success of the development of this New Town.

RTC Reston Town Center

Restontowncenter.com True to the master plan of Reston, the urban core for community gathering was developed by Mobil Land Corporation in 1981 and opened for business in October 1990. This mixed-use center is a magnet for locals and visitors alike — a “downtown for the 21st century” — with shopping, dining, entertainment, and ice skating in winter under the glass Pavilion. As shown on the website directory, RTC boundaries are Reston Parkway, New Dominion Drive, St. Francis Street, and Bluemont Way — it’s not a part of RA (see RTCA). Some assume that Reston homes were built up around RTC, rather than the opposite. As Restonians know, the community started in 1964 when the first residents moved into their new town homes at Lake Anne Village Center, then Hickory Cluster, followed by a surge of single family homes built in south Reston in 1968 and through the 1970s, then development of North Point in the 1980s. Over the years, Reston Town Center has received inquiries about ‘town’ information, asking for the municipal hall/mayor’s office/marriage license bureau, etc. Depending on the information requested, callers are usually directed to RA or RCC, GRCC, or Fairfax County.

RTCA Reston Town Center Association Restontc.org

RUCA Reston Urban Core

Restontc.org For the district of Reston Town Center, RTCA is the Master Association for the urban core that is separate and apart from RA jurisdiction. The boundaries of RTCA’s service area are Reston Parkway, Baron Cameron Avenue, Town Center Parkway, and Sunset Hills Road. Since it was incorporated in 1988, RTCA provides services to the various properties within these boundaries, including RUCA management of roads and common areas, as well as additional benefits to the larger Reston community. Think of Reston Concerts on the Town in the Pavilion all summer long, public art … that’s RTCA at work.

Fairfax County

Fairfaxcounty.gov Services that are not listed here are likely under the jurisdiction of Fairfax County. This is the government for Reston which collects property taxes based on a rate established by the county’s assessed market value of homes. Reston is a Planned Residential Community (PRC) that is overseen by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, including Cathy Hudgins, who is the magisterial representative of our district, Hunter Mill.

VDOT Virginia Department of Transportation

Virginiadot.org As in many communities in Virginia, this is the government organization that plows public roads, fills potholes, builds, repaves, and maintains the buffer areas of grass and trees along some of our roadways. 1-800-FOR-ROAD is a useful number to remember for reporting related problems. Carol Nahorniak, creative director at Myers PR, lives, works, plays, and gets involved in Reston.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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A ROUND RESTON

Reston Home Tour BY BONNIE HAUKNESS  PHOTOGRAPHY BY BOB HAUKNESS

Reston @ 50 – Celebrating the Decades SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18 10 AM-5 PM

Tickets: $30 Visit www.restonmuseum.org or call 703-709-7700 for more info.

H

ere we are — celebrating 50 fabulous years in Reston! The homes on this year’s tour span Reston’s history, beginning with a vintage Charles Goodman townhouse. The land-use innovation, design excellence and physical harmony of places that our founder, Robert Simon, brought to his planned residential community all those years ago are still apparent today. We have the opportunity to reflect on 50 years of diversity of housing in Reston and to celebrate our owners, who have created these special spaces they share with us. Our13th annual tour takes you behind the façade of some of the most interesting and unusual homes in Reston. Besides the homes featured on this year’s tour, there’s a special stop at The Avant, a luxury apartment building in Reston Town Center. The exquisite amenities and amazing design are unparalleled in apartment living in Reston.

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Available at: ƒƒ Reston Museum at Lake Anne Plaza ƒƒ Lake Anne Florist at Lake Anne Plaza ƒƒ The Wine Cabinet at North Point ƒƒ Appalachian Spring in Reston Town Center ƒƒ Greater Reston Arts Center

South Lakes High School’s Culinary Arts Program will offer a taste from Reston’s five decades, prepared by students and served in these stunning surroundings. Tickets to this one-day, self-guided event sell out quickly. To avoid disappointment, make plans now. All proceeds benefit the Reston Historic Trust and the Reston Museum. As chair of Reston's Home Tour since 2007, Bonnie Haukness is still selling Reston – whether in tour tickets or her real estate career – and she looks forward to sharing these amazing homes with you once again.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

The Avant The luxury apartment building in Reston Town Center.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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Waterfront Road Smaller, with character and walkability, a health club they could bike to and a Town Center just minutes away were the lures. Leaving their home of twenty-four years in Great Falls, the owners also wanted to create a special space, one that they could call their own. The interior makeover lasted nine months and today’s property is vastly different from the original. “New” and exciting are the operative words! Special moments include mornings spent rocking, coffee in hand, on the dock overlooking Lake Newport, and returning in the evening for a blaze of color at sunset.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


An Original The man who brought modernism to ordinary people of the Washington metro area was Charles M. Goodman, the architect of Hickory Cluster. In the mid-1960’s homebuyers in “rural” Virginia were shocked at this adventurous architectural style. It was the slowest seller of Reston’s original communities. Today’s owner has been in Reston since childhood, and she loves the mid-century modern design with its large expanses of glass, new IKEA kitchen and the wonderful views of woods, paths and streambeds. Come see what living “out in Reston” was like!

Wild Pine Way Moving from Chicago, where she was going to “spend the rest of her life,” was daunting. Searching for a main-level master bedroom to accommodate her mom, who later chose to live in a retirement community, was difficult. And, when the mover arrived, nearly everything was damaged. But her home in Reston, built by the Gulick Group in their first community, had great bones, originality and extraordinary design. Knowing another transfer may be in her future, she has focused on comfort and value with an elegant main-level master suite, a newly renovated gourmet kitchen and Design on a Dime accessorizing! WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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Quimby Point Unlike many, who downsize with an eye toward retirement, their “dream home” would have to accommodate large gatherings of family and friends. Today, the grandkids love their private apartment’s skylight for stargazing, and British relatives arrive to soak up the summer heat. Local and personal artwork shares space with special family antiques. They love “all things Reston” — wooded paths, the sense of community and proximity to amenities. Talking with them is like listening to a live Reston ad!

Springhouse Place When she purchased this shingled home, reminiscent of New England, it was just the right size. That didn’t last long, as a husband and child were soon on the scene. Marrying wisely, she chose a husband with a general contractor’s license, and the home you see today is very different from the original. Today’s home includes a stacked-stone wall in the cozy theatre room, perfect office cleverly added in the shed dormer addition of the attic, an inspiring kitchen renovation with bay window seating connecting the outdoor living area to the indoor space. Come to be inspired!

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


RESTON ASSOCIATION

Conference Center

Hold Your Next Meeting Close to Home CONFERENCE CENTER AVAILABLE FOR RENT

SPACE AVAILABLE Ideal For ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Corporate events Community meetings Workshops

Can Accommodate ƒƒ ƒƒ

Small groups of 35 or less Large groups up to 100

Features ƒƒ ƒƒ

Flexible floor space Monday–Friday, 8 a.m.–10 p.m. Saturdays, April–August

Extras (for an additional fee) ƒƒ ƒƒ

Pantry with microwave, coffee maker and refrigerator Audio visual equipment

Attractive Rates: $30-$90/hr Contact: Member Services to make your reservation at reservations@reston.org or 703-435-6530.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191-3404 | www.reston.org

41


A ROUND RESTON

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


 PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARAH SERTIC AND SEAN BAHRAMI One doesn’t have to travel far, or wait too long, to find farm fresh produce and local goods in Reston. The Reston Farmers Market at Lake Anne is open Saturdays, 8 a.m. – noon, from May to November and the Reston Smart Market, in the parking lot at Reston Association headquarters, is open Wednesdays, 3-7. From fresh crabs to okra and beef to pasta, local vendors provide bountiful selections of the season’s delicious offerings. For more information on vendors and specific information for each market, visit: Lake Anne Farmers Market – www.restonfarmersmarket.com Smart Market – Reston – www.smartmarkets.org

From the field to your table, the farmers markets of Reston have all your culinary needs.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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Produce so fresh, you could have picked it yourself.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


FROM FRESH SEAFOOD TO UNIQUE ARTS & CRAFTS, THE RESTON FARMERS MARKET HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERY SHOPPER.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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PICK UP YOUR FRUITS & VEGETABLES FOR THE WEEK, PLUS DELICIOUS BAKED GOODS, GIFTS & HAND CRAFTED ARTISAN WEARS.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


The smells of grilled treats entice patrons the minute they enter Lake Anne Plaza.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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“Pick me! Pick Me! At Arnest Seafood.

“Stand Up Straight guys!” Okra getting ready for their day in the shade at Ignacio’s Produce.

What a line-up at Fossil Rock Farm!

Good idea to come early to avoid the really long lines at Ignacio’s Produce. 48 RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


BREAKING NEWS: PICK-IT LINES FORMING AT SMART MARTKETS RESTON

Gorgeous little tomatoes all in a row – or not. Lining up tomatoes for a publicity shot is a little like herding cats.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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MEMBER SERVICES // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

POOL & TENNIS PASSES

MEMBER SERVICES

12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191-3404 Email: member_services@reston.org Phone: 703-435-6530

Two Easy Ways to Purchase Pool & Tennis Passes 1. 2.

Online — www.reston.org, Walk-In — Come to Reston Association Member Services; our staff is happy to assist you. Please Note: A current pass is required for anyone (age 1 or older) visiting pools or tennis courts. Receipts will not be accepted on-site. Customers must be at least 18 years of age to purchase. For replacement passes, please visit Member Services.

MEMBERS

Welcome to the 2014 season. We are happy to serve you again this year. All members must be in good standing and provide proof of owning or renting a Reston Association property.

POOL & TENNIS PASS

PRICE

Adults, 18 years & older $25 Children under 18 $10 Family Pass Package* $70 *Includes two adult and up to four child passes Season Long Guest Pass* $40 *Allows admittance of one guest, regardless of age, with pass holder. Address on guest pass must match host pass-holder. Tennis Key Fob* $3 *with purchase of pass ƒƒ

Members may purchase a pass for themselves, one additional adult household member, and all household members under the age of 18. Two additional passes may be purchased for family members 18-22 years of age in person or online with prior approval from Member Services.

ƒƒ

For more information on our facilities and programs, please refer to the Aquatics and Tennis sections. Refund Policy: All pool and tennis pass memberships are non-refundable.

NON-MEMBERS

CORPORATE PASSES GUESTS WELCOME

We are happy to welcome persons who live outside Reston or in a portion of Reston that is not part of Reston Association and offer a variety of nonmember passes to meet your needs. Prices are half off for the remainder of the season, except for the Season Long Guest Pass and the 10 & Under Tennis Pass.

If you work in Reston and are seeking a weekday only membership, please consider these options. Prices are half off for the remainder of the season.

PASS OPTIONS

ƒƒ ƒƒ

PRICE

Family Pool & Tennis $625 Family ZIP code pass* $525 *Zip code within Reston but not part of Reston Association. Proper documentation and inperson purchase required. Family Pool Only $595 Family Tennis Only $355 Couple Pool & Tennis $540 Couple Pool Only $525 Couple Tennis Only $310 Individual Pool & Tennis $450 Individual Pool Only $365 Individual Tennis Only $250 10 and Under Tennis Pass* $35 *Only valid for North Shore courts for children's practice. North Shore has six, 36foot courts designed specifically for children. Children must be accompanied by an adult who does not need a pass. No photographs necessary for this pass. Available online or in person. Season Long Guest Pass* $50 *Allows admittance of one guest, regardless of age, with pass-holder. Address on guest pass must match host pass-holder. ƒƒ ƒƒ

ƒƒ

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HOURS OF OPERATION

Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m.

All non-member passes require a photograph. If you are a returning pass-holder from last year, you can purchase online and use the existing picture; however, if purchasing for the first time, you must do so in person. We recommend children have their picture updated at least every two years.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

PASS OPTIONS

Pool & Tennis Pool Only Tennis Only

ƒƒ

PRICE

$260 $210 $225

Sold individually. Photograph and proof of employment in Reston required. In-person purchase only.

TRIAL 4-DAY PASSES

NEW for 2014 — a four-day pass option for travelers or those interested in trying the membership before committing to the season.

PASS OPTIONS

PRICE

Individual $50 Family* $100 *Admits up to six family members ƒƒ

ƒƒ ƒƒ

Trial passes are good for four consecutive calendar days at all Reston Association pools and tennis courts. One pass per household each season. Purchase a non-member pass within 10 days after your trial and the trial amount will be applied to your balance. TION Pool RESTON ASSOCIA & Tennis pass

2014

As a pool pass holder (member or non-member) you may bring guests when visiting the pool or tennis facilities. Options are available to purchase in advance or on-site. Guests must be accompanied by a pass-holder at all times.

PRE-PAID PUNCH PASS Tennis court guests Pool adult guests Pool child guests

PRICE $40 $40 $20

ON-SITE GUEST PASS Tennis One-day

PRICE $10

Pre-paid punch passes are valid for five guest entries and can be used for multiple guests at one time. This is a great option to eliminate carrying cash and is equivalent to a 20 percent discount compared to buying five visits individually.

Pass-holders may purchase a oneday guest pass from the roving court monitor at the tennis courts. Cash only.

Adult Pool One-day $10 (18 years and older) Child Pool One-day $5 (17 or younger) Pass-holder may purchase a oneday guest pass from the pool staff at any pool. Cash only. Handwritten receipts will be issued at time of purchase. RESTON ASSOCIATION Pool & Tennis pass

2014

RESTON ASSOCIATION Pool & Tennis pass

2014


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

UPDATE YOUR ACCOUNT Do you want to make sure you get the most current information from Reston Association about our programs and events?

Please take a moment to update your online profile so we can contact you about upcoming classes, registration dates, and notify you directly if there’s a change to a program for which you are registered. To edit your account, please follow these simple steps: 1. Go to www.reston.org. 2. Click on ‘login’ in the top right corner of the screen. 3. Enter your username and password. If you forgot either one, click the appropriate link to have it sent to you via email. 4. Once logged in, click on ‘My Account’ in the orange band across the top of the screen and select ‘Profile’ from the drop-down menu. 5. Within your profile, you can add household members, edit phone numbers and edit email addresses. In order to edit a birth date, please contact our Member Services department. Many of our programs and classes are only available to individuals within a certain age bracket, so this must be filled in correctly in order to register. If you have questions about your account or need any further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Member Services via email at member_services@reston.org or by phone at 703-435-6530.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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AQUATICS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

SAFETY AROUND THE POOL

Reston Association and Reston Community Center want to help you be safe in, on, and around the water this year. Please consider contacting us for any of the three water safety presentations described below. Some sessions will be scheduled at our facilities in advance or they can be requested at any time and are set up to serve the audience’s schedule.

WHALE Tales (5-12 years old – in similar age groups)

ƒƒ One 60-minute session ƒƒ Free, registration required Longfellow’s WHALE Tales is an interactive presentation that provides easy-to-follow information to help children learn safe behavior in, on, and around the water. Taught in a classroom environment, WHALE Tales makes water safety fun and easy to learn. Each lesson is reinforced with color posters, worksheets, activities, and a video that features Longfellow, the animated whale.

General Water Safety (18 years+)

ƒƒ One 90-minute session ƒƒ Free, registration required This presentation (60-minute lecture and 30 minutes of Q&A) focuses on the importance of water safety training and provides general information for keeping family members safe in, on, and around the water. The presentation is designed for rotary clubs, PTAs, home school networks, church groups, and other civic organizations and can be scheduled at their facility.

Kayak & Canoe Classes

Parent Orientation to Swim lessons (18 years+)

Reston Community Center (RCC): 703-476-4500 option 2 Reston Association (RA): 703-435-6530

ƒƒ One 60-minute session ƒƒ Free, registration required This presentation (30-minute presentation, 30 minutes of Q&A) will provide parents with an orientation to the group swim lessons offered by Reston Association and the Reston Community Center. It is designed to teach parents with children in the lower swimming levels how to provide guidance, care, supervision, motivation, and support to their child in our swim lesson programs.

Canoe Kayak and Paddle Company offers a variety of classes and trips for all skill levels. Check out the introduction classes held in our own Lake Audubon or venture further from home on a scenic trip in our nation’s capital. Contact Mike for details, 703-264-8911, or check them out online at www.kayakreston.com

By working together, RCC and RA strive to assure our community’s access to healthy and safe fun in all of Reston’s pools.

SWIM TEAMS

Reston Swim Team Association (RSTA)

Reston Masters Swim Team (RMST)

General Information and Registration: 703-326-0526 or www.RSTA.org

General Information and Registration: www.restonmasters.com

The RSTA is an independent youth (6-18 years old) swim team working in cooperation with the Reston Association Aquatics Department. With nine teams in the community, swimmers of all levels are invited to participate.

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

The RMST is an adult (18 and older) swim league for Reston area residents operating under the Potomac Valley Local Masters Swimming Committee, which is part of United States Masters Swimming (USMS).


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

Reston Association Aquatics staff would like to thank the following businesses for the goods, services, time and effort they are donating to our Aquatic Season.

Dr. Stephan Tisseront

Jerry’s Subs and Pizza

All in Stitches

Atrium Environmental

SCUBA – UNDERWATER EXPLORATION

Dominion Pawn

Certification Courses (ages 12+)

CPR AND FIRST AID TRAINING

Reston Association is excited to be an authorized provider of American Red Cross Health and Safety programs and will begin offering CPR, First Aid, and AED training this fall. All courses will be taught by certified instructors and the fee includes all class materials. Six student minimum in each class.

Registration opens 8:30 a.m. on September 15 online at www.reston.org or in person at our Member Services desk.

Adult, Child, and Infant CPR/AED and First Aid

September 14, October 5, December 6, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Reston Association headquarters building, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $75 $95

Taught by a Professional Association of Dive Instructors (PADI) Master Scuba Diver Trainer (MSDT), these classes will lead to certification as a PADI Open Water Diver. The course consists of two phases; one in the classroom and pool and the last in open water. Medical history screening and pre-requisite skill test (200-yard swim and 10-minute survival tread/float) are required for this course.

Knowledge and Skill Development Weekends September 5-7, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Saturdays, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Sundays, 2-7 p.m. $300 $320

Open Water Evaluation Weekends October 4-5 $200 $220

NOTE: You must complete both the Knowledge and Skill Development Weekend and the Open Water Evaluation Weekend to receive certification; however, each weekend is priced separately so that you can choose to complete both here in Reston or take only the first phase here and then complete your certification, with a PADI Diver Trainer, while on vacation.

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

53


AQUATICS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

2014 POOL SCHEDULE OPEN SWIM TIMES

POOL

Weekdays

Weekends

DROP-IN FITNESS HOURS (for pass-holders age 16+)

CLOSED DAY

Season 4: August 18-September 1 Dogwood Pool

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Thursday

Glade Pool & Spa

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Monday

Lake Audubon Pool

Weekends Only

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Lake Newport Pool

10 a.m.-8 p.m.

11 a.m.-8 p.m.

Friday

Lake Thoreau Pool & Spa

10 a.m.-7:30 p.m.

10 a.m.-8 p.m.

Wednesday

North Hills Pool & Spa

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

10 a.m.-7 p.m.

Tuesday

North Shore Heated Pool & Spa

11 a.m.-9 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Monday

Ridge Heights Heated Pool

11 a.m.-8 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Thursday

North Shore Heated Pool & Spa

3-7 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Ridge Heights Heated Pool

3-7 p.m.

11 a.m.-7 p.m.

6-8:30 a.m. Weekdays 7:30-10 p.m. M/T/R/F

7-9 a.m. Weekdays

Season 5: September 2-28

EXCEPTIONS TO POOL SCHEDULE Labor Day

September 1 All pools except North Shore and Ridge Heights close for the season

Reston Triathlon

September 7 Race start at Lake Audubon Pool. For details see www. restontriathlon.org

Inclement Weather End of Pool Season September 28 All remaining pools close for the season

POOL FACILITIES AND FEATURES DOGWOOD

2460 Green Range Road 703-476-5717 Lane depth: 3.5-5 feet Length: 25 meters Zero-depth entry, play pool with spray features, diving board, grass/picnic area, = ADA hydrolift chair, zero-depth entry, and in-water wheelchair

GLADE

11550 Glade Drive 703-476-5732 Lane depth: 3.5-12.5 feet Length: 25 meters One-meter diving board, heated spa, zerodepth wading pool with fountains, twostory water slide, picnic tables, tennis courts and playground within walking distance

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7-9 p.m. Weekdays (Sept. 2-5)

LAKE AUDUBON

2070 Twin Branches Road 703-860-3080 Lane depth: 3-5 feet Length: 25 meters Diving board, grass area, picnic tables, wading pool, boat ramp to Lake Audubon within walking distance

LAKE NEWPORT

11601 Lake Newport Road 703-467-0694 Lane depth: 3.5-5.5 feet Length: 50 meters Two one-meter diving boards, wading pool, covered picnic area with charcoal grills, sand volleyball court, playground, softball and basketball within walking distance

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

In the event of a storm (or if the weather is cool, raining or drizzling) all Reston Association pools will close, with two exceptions: Lake Thoreau and North Shore Pools (unless normally closed on that day).

Lightning

All Reston Association pools will close until one-half hour after the last sound of thunder or visible lightning.

= accessible amenities available on-site. See pool description for exact amenities.

LAKE THOREAU

2040 Upper Lakes Drive 703-860-0640 Lane depth: 3-5 feet Length: 25 meters Diving board, heated spa, wading pool, grass area, picnic tables, scenic lake view

NORTH HILLS

1325 North Village Road 703-435-6769 Lane depth: 2-5 feet Length: 25 meters Wading pool with fountain, heated spa, grass area, picnic tables, tennis courts within walking distance, = ADA hydrolift chair into main pool

NORTH SHORE

11515 North Shore Drive 703-689-4091 Lane depth: 3-11 feet Length: 25 meters Seasonally heated main pool, heated spa, shaded upper deck with picnic tables, wading pool, diving board, Lake Anne Plaza and tennis courts within walking distance, = ADA hydrolift chair into main pool Note: Parking only on North Shore Drive

RIDGE HEIGHTS

11400 Ridge Heights Road 703-476-7084 Lane depth: 3-5 feet Length: 25 meters Seasonally heated main pool, diving board, wading pool, two grass areas, picnic tables, = ADA hydrolift chair into main pool


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

Interested in Working for Reston Association Next Summer? Reston Association is proud to employ over 300 members of the Reston community every summer across our different Parks and Recreation programs and while many return year after year we’re always interested in meeting new, qualified people.

To work for Reston Association aquatics, applicants must be 15 years old and have obtained the following American Red Cross certifications: ƒƒ Lifeguarding ƒƒ First Aid ƒƒ CPR/AED Classes in Lifeguard Training are held at various indoor facilities in the fall and winter months, and classes held here at Reston Association will be advertised in the spring edition of Reston magazine. If you have questions about working for RA Aquatics or want help finding a certification course, please contact Willa at aquaticsinfo@reston.org.

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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CAMPS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

HELP SEND A KID TO CAMP Each year, donations from organizations, businesses and individuals make it possible for economically disadvantaged children of Reston to attend our valuable camp programs. If you would like to make a tax deductable donation to the scholarship fund, please contact campadmin@ reston.org or call 703-435-6567.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

MANY THANKS TO OUR 100 CAMP SPONSORS, EMPLOYEES AND OUR EXTENDED RA FAMILY FOR MAKING THIS GREAT SUMMER POSSIBLE. Our 2014 Camp Donors!

Fairfax County Department of Family Services Friends of Reston for Community Projects, Inc. USGS Reston Kids Triathlon Reston Relay Triathlon Long & Foster Reston

RA CAMPS… FRIENDSHIP AND FUN FOR 40 YEARS! Registration: ƒƒ RA member registration begins January 26, 2015. ƒƒ Non-resident registration begins February 2, 2015. ƒƒ Check our website at www.reston.org for 2015 camp information. Our family of camps includes: ƒƒ Nature Tots (ages 3-5) ƒƒ Walker’s Rangers (ages 6-9) ƒƒ Hug-A-Tree (ages 5-7) ƒƒ Sportsters (ages 6-8) ƒƒ Mini Camp (ages 5-10) ƒƒ Camp on Wheels (ages 6-12) ƒƒ Day Camp (ages 7-11) ƒƒ Science Camp (ages 8-12) ƒƒ Teen Camp (ages 11-14) ƒƒ Junior Lifeguarding (ages 13-15) ƒƒ Counselor-In-Training (ages 14-16)

BRING A FRIEND AND JOIN THE FUN NEXT SUMMER.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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NATURE // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

RESTON

Reston is a community founded on the preservation and appreciation of natural areas. To this day, a strong environmental stewardship ethic is nurtured in the community. Over 1,300 acres of open space are maintained by Reston Association, including more than 800 acres of woodlands, four lakes, three ponds, four wetlands, 50 meadows, and 20 miles of streams. Environmental education programs are provided by the Walker Nature Center, and ample opportunities exist for volunteers to help care for our local environment. Explore, protect and enjoy the nature of Reston.

WALKER NATURE CENTER

Located at 11450 Glade Drive, the Nature Center provides a variety of educational and recreational programs and amenities.

The mission of the center is to foster an environmental stewardship ethic in the community. The center enhances people’s awareness, knowledge, appreciation, and enjoyment of the environment.

The 72-acre wooded site features: ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

One mile of loop trails, including a short ADAaccessible trail An education building known as Nature House A picnic pavilion Picnic tables and trailside benches A campfire ring Outdoor displays and interpretive signs Demonstration gardens and meadows A pond The Glade Stream Valley Snakeden Branch stream’s entrance to 44-acre Lake Audubon

Visit Nature House to: ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Enjoy exhibits and displays. See some native animals up close. Talk with a naturalist. Use the nature resource library. Do a simple activity or read a nature story with a child. Learn about the green features of this LEED Gold building.

NATURE HOUSE

Free parking, restroom and trail access dawn to dusk, 365 days a year.

HOURS

MONDAY, WEDNESDAY – FRIDAY

9 a.m.-5 p.m.

TUESDAY

Closed

SATURDAY 10 a.m.-1 p.m. SUNDAY 1-4 p.m.

Check holiday schedule for additional closings.

ENVIRONMENTAL VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Details in Get Involved Section on page 86.

Habitat Heroes

Help protect the trees and other native plants in our natural areas, see page 88.

Halloween Volunteers

Help at the nature center’s special event nights, see page 89.

Stream Monitors

Help monitor local stream health by inventorying macroinvertebrates, see page 90.

Fall Stream Clean Up

Saturday, October 18, 2014 10 a.m. -Noon, see page 94.

Storm Drain Marking

Help mark storm drains that flow to local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, see page 90.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RENT SPACE AT THE WALKER NATURE CENTER WALKER NATURE CENTER 11450 GLADE DRIVE

Looking for the perfect spot for a community meeting, family gathering or business retreat? Affordable and attractive rentals are available at the nature center.

Nature House Multipurpose Room

664 square feet of space, capacity 94 people, seats 44 people with tables and chairs. Parking and restroom access. RA Member or Reston not-for-profit fee $35/hr. Non-member or Non-Reston not-for-profit fee $55/hr. For profit/corporate fee $80/hr.

Nature Center Pavilion

576-square-foot pavilion with picnic tables and bench seating in a beautiful woodland setting. Parking and restroom access. RA Member or Reston not-for-profit fee $25/hr. Non-member or Non-Reston not-for-profit fee $35/hr. For profit/corporate fee $55/hr.

Campfire Ring

Campfire pit with bench seating, small pavilion and picnic tables. Roadside parking. No restroom. Renters must supply their own wood and water to extinguish the fire. RA Member or Reston not-for-profit fee $15/hr. Non-member or Non-Reston not-for-profit fee $20/hr. For profit/corporate fee $25/hr. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

For details and reservations, call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or email naturecenter@reston.org.

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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NATURE // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

ALL AGES

All ages welcome. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Fall for the Birds

Sunday, September 7, 2-3 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 4. $5/person $7/person September can be an exciting time to watch birds, as many different types pass through on their journey south. Examine preserved specimens and learn to identify the different parts of a bird. Then borrow a pair of binoculars and hike through the woods in search of our avian friends.

Nut Know-how: Seed Identification

Saturday, October 4, 10:30-11:30 a.m., Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by October 1. $5/person $7/person Recommended for adults and children 7 and up. Come for a primer on identifying tree nuts. We are participating in the Growing Native Program with the Potomac Conservancy and will train you on how you can contriubte to this worthwhile citizen science project.

Campfire Cookery

Friday, November 7, 6-7:30 p.m. WNC Campfire Ring, On Soapstone Drive, between Glade Drive and Lawyers Road. Reserve by November 4. $7/person $9/person Enjoy dinner around a crackling campfire. Try different methods of campfire cookery, including stick and pouch techniques. We’ll also make campfire popcorn, and finish our evening with s'mores. All supplies provided.

Join the Walker Nature Center’s electronic mailing list!

Receive the quarterly newsletter, Branching Out, as well as announcements of upcoming special events. To subscribe, email naturecenter@reston.org. You can also email nature questions to this address. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ WALKERNATURECENTER

Nature programs may be cancelled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or email naturecenter@reston.org.

Get Nuts for Clean Water

NEW THIS YEAR: OCTOBER 4-22 Potomac Conservancy is planning a Growing Native Day on October 4. See our listing above for a primer you may want to attend. Seed Drop Off: October 4-22. Info and Bag Pick Up: Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Please deposit bagged and identified acorns in the container on the side porch.

How to Help: ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

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PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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Collect nuts in your yard or other open areas where they will be unable to grow. Please do not collect at the Nature Center or any natural area in Reston. Separate the nuts by species and place them into breathable bags (no plastic bags). Label each bag with the kind of nuts that are inside. Store in a cool dry place then drop them off at the Nature Center.

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Help to restore native forests and protect streams throughout the Potomac River region one acorn at a time. When you rake the leaves, don’t throw out the acorns. Consider getting involved in this fun activity that can be enjoyed by all. Citizens throughout the Potomac River watershed are invited to take part in a native seed collection effort. Collected seeds are donated to state tree nurseries, where they are nurtured and transplanted for

use in streamside and riverside reforestation. Growing Native is coordinated by Potomac Conservancy on behalf of the Potomac Watershed Partnership. For additional information about the program, detailed instructions (including desirable seeds), and seed identification materials, visit www.growingnative.org.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

Halloween House & Trick-or-Treat Trail You’re invited to the best family friendly Halloween event this side of Transylvania — RAIN OR SHINE. Choose from one of four event times:

Friday, October 24, 6-7:15 p.m. or 7:30-8:45 p.m. Saturday, October 25, 6-7:15 p.m. or 7:30-8:45 p.m. Walker Nature Center 11450 Glade Drive, Reston VA 20191

Gate opens 15 minutes prior to the event start time. Please park along Glade Drive or at Glade Pool, and bring a flashlight. Meet a creative cast of characters, including live animals, along our stroller-friendly, naturethemed Trick-or-Treat Trail and inside our Nature House, turned Halloween House for this very special evening. Enjoy jack-o-lanterns, carnival style games, sound and light effects, and creatures of the night. This is NOT a horror show or a haunted house. Children must be accompanied by an adult at all times. Ticket price includes a Trick-or-Treat bag. Additional concessions (ex. popcorn, cotton candy, apple cider) will be on sale. Participants are encouraged to wear non-scary costumes, and enjoy the activities at their own self-guided pace.

TICKETS

Advance tickets only. Tickets go on sale Wednesday, October 1 at 9 a.m. Some or all event times will sell out on the first day of sales. Don’t delay your purchase! $10/person (Adults and children who are 18 months or older must have a ticket.) Buy your tickets online at www.eventbrite.com at the following links: http://halloweenhousefri1.eventbrite.com http://halloweenhousefri2.eventbrite.com http://halloweenhousesat1.eventbrite.com http://halloweenhousesat2.eventbrite.com Note: A service fee per ticket will be applied to online sales. You may also purchase tickets in person at the Walker Nature Center’s Nature House. Hours: Monday and Wednesday-Friday, 9-5, Saturday, 10-1, Sunday, 1-4. Closed on Tuesdays.

For more information, call 703-476-9689, and press 5 or email naturecenter@reston.org. To volunteer, see page 89. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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NATURE // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

BABES IN THE WOODS

Things with Wings

18 months through 35 months. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Deer Me!

Monday, September 8 or Tuesday, September 9, 10-11 a.m., Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by September 4. $7/ child $9/child Fall is a great time of year to see deer. Read a story about deer, make an antler craft, and go in search of deer. Find out what they like to eat, and why their antlers are so important.

Monday, October 6 or Tuesday, October 7, 10-11 a.m., Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by October 2. $7/child $9/child As the weather grows cold, birds begin to migrate south. But birds are not the only animals with wings. Learn what animals have wings and how they use them. Enjoy a story about wings, make a craft and take a short hike to find winged animals.

PRESCHOOL HAPPENINGS

3 to 5 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Terrific Treefrogs

Monday, September 22,1:30-2:30 p.m., Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 18. $7/child $9/child Treefrogs are excellent climbers, making their homes high in trees away from ponds and other frogs that live there. Learn which treefrogs live in Reston, how they climb and how they survive in trees. Make a froggy craft to take home.

Noisy Woodpeckers

Thursday, October 16, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by October 13 $7/child $9/child Woodpeckers need a strong head for all the pecking that they do. Find out what else is extraordinary about them, including how different their feet are and how they use their tongue to get food. Make a woodpecker puppet to take home, and hike in search of woodpeckers.

Puppet Show: Earl’s Lunch Munch on a morning snack while you enjoy a creative puppet show about what the animals at the Nature Center like to eat. Afterwards, create an animal puppet of your own to take home. Reservations required by October 30. Monday, November 3, 10-10:45 a.m. or 11:15 a.m.-Noon. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by October 30. $7/child $9/child. Ages 3-7

Nature programs may be cancelled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or email naturecenter@reston.org.

SCHOOL PROGRAMS The Walker Nature Center offers free elementary programs for Reston schools, as well as programs for preschools and non-Reston schools at affordable rates.

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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Elementary Field Trips

ƒƒ Fall and Spring ƒƒ 1 ½ to 2 hours Topics include: Earth Cycles, Sensory Awareness, Habitats, Trees, Geology

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Elementary Winter Programs

ƒƒ 50 minutes Topics include: Season of Change, Wild About Weather, Winter Survival, Wonderful Watersheds

Preschool Field Trips and Classroom Visits

ƒƒ Fall, Winter, Spring ƒƒ 45 minutes Topics include: Fall Frolic, Crack-a-Nut, Animal Adaptations, Winter in the Woods Preschool Fee: $45/program (Reston schools), $75/program (Non-Reston schools)


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

ATTENTION S Planning a Birthday Party?

Bring the kids and the cake to a fun-filled, creative party at the Nature Center. Thematic parties include a two-hour facility rental, 45 minutes of staff-led activities, and party favors.

Choose the following themes: Nature Detectives

Ages 3-7 Learn to be a good nature detective by using your eyes, ears, nose and hands. Play sensory guessing games, find what doesn’t belong on our “un-nature” trail, and follow clues to solve a mystery animal’s trail. Favors include a magnifying hand lens, a mini-notebook and a nature center pencil. The birthday child receives an Earl the Squirrel stuffed toy.

Dinosaurs

Ages 3-9 Share what you know about these amazing animals. Uncover bones and shells like a paleontologist, and make your own fossil imprints in clay. Go on a dinosaur egg hunt that will lead you to a nest full of eggs. Favors include a dinosaur egg, a dinosaur sticker and a fossil imprint. The birthday child gets a Myrtle the Turtle key chain.

Nature Crafts

Ages 3-12 Learn new skills and nature facts as you make a variety of crafts to take home. Younger crafters will

make bug boxes, rock insects and wildlife masks or puppets. Older crafters will try their hands at leather craft, building a bird feeder and making beaded accessories.

Campfire Fun

Ages 7-12 Parties are held at the campfire ring off of Soapstone Drive. Program includes nature jokes, stories, songs, and games around the campfire. S’mores provided. Favors include a glow stick and red hot candies. The birthday child gets a nature center flashlight.

C

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LEADERS

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The Walker Nature Center can help your organization earn patches & badges. Make a Date with a Naturalist to: Lead a fun and educational program in an achievement area such as: Forester, Naturalist, Wildlife, Eco-action, Earth Connections, Earth is Our Home, Earth and Sky, Water Everywhere, Senses, Animals and more. $5 per participant (min. charge $50) $7 per participant (min. charge $70)

1

Lead a Campfire Fun or Campfire Cookery program. $6 per participant (min. charge $60) $8 per participant (min. charge $80)

2

Campfire Ring Rental: $15 per participant/hr. $20 per participant/hr. Note: The Campfire Ring can also be rented for self-use. You bring the wood and the water. Lead a Community Service Project with your group. FREE.

3

Activity kits are also available on loan for Birds, Trees and Watershed requirements. Call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or email naturecenter@ reston.org for details and reservations.

How to Book ƒƒ ƒƒ

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Parties may be booked up to three months in advance. Weekend dates are limited and fill quickly. Consider a weekday afternoon or evening party. Maximum 15 children.

Fee: $175 RA members, $200 Non-members Call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or email naturecenter@reston. org.

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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NATURE // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

ADULT PROGRAMS

16 years to adult.

Backyard Composting

Thursday, September 11, 7-8 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 8. $5/person $7/person Dealing with all of the fallen leaves in the yard can be tough. Learn how to recycle them the natural way. Plants will love the rich organic soil that your composting efforts provide. Also learn how kitchen waste and other yard debris can be composted right in your own backyard. Co-sponsored by Sustainable Reston.

Fall Container Gardening Wednesday, September 17 2-3 p.m. For ages 55 years and up. See senior programs on page 70.

FREE

Plight of the American Chestnut

Saturday, September 27, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m., Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 24. Once the mighty giants of eastern forests, American Chestnuts stood up to 100 feet tall and numbered in the billions. They were a vital part of forest ecology, a key food source for wildlife, and an essential component of the economy. In the early 20th century, a fungal pathogen spread rapidly through the chestnut population and by 1950 killed an estimated four billion trees. Join Kathy Marmet of The American Chestnut Foundation as she recounts this dramatic story and the foundation’s thirty-year effort to restore this species. There will also be a short hike to visit a surviving American Chestnut tree growing at the Nature Center. Co-sponsored by the Reston Historic Trust.

Home Energy Efficiency

Home Food Preservation

Tuesday, September 23, 5-7 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 20. $5/person or RCC members $7/person This introductory class will cover food preservation methods, including canning and fermentation. Learn about safety precautions, kitchen set up, and jar and equipment prep, as well as food and recipe selection. There will be a "dry" demo of how to fill jars for canning. Co-sponsored by Reston Community Center in support of Sustainable Reston.

Thursday, October 2, 7-8:30 p.m. Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 29. $5/person $7/person Cold weather is on its way. Do you want to improve your home’s energy use to make it more efficient, comfortable and cost effective? Learn how from a representative of LEAP (Local Energy Alliance Program). LEAP is a non-profit leader that coordinates energy efficiency improvements of homes through a Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program. Learn about the Re-energize Reston Challenge and how you can help your home and your community at the same time. Co-sponsored by Sustainable Reston.

Mushroom Hike

Saturday, October 11,10:30 a.m.Noon, Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by October 8. $5/person $7/ person Explore the forest with local mushroom expert Mark Richman. Look for the fruiting bodies of these curious organisms that live 99% below ground. Learn about their life cycle, the types found in our area and which edible mushrooms are commonly foraged for. Search for Aborted Entolomas.

Changes by Degrees: Addressing the Climate Challenge

Mondays, October 13-November 17, 7-8:30 p.m., Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Reserve by September 29. $30/person $40/person This six-week, facilitated discussion course examines global climate change and the big picture of energy. Discover simple actions you can take to reduce your carbon footprint. Participants will receive a book of readings that form the basis of each discussion. You will be contacted when the materials arrive, and asked to pay your fee when you pick them up. Co-sponsored by Sustainable Reston and Reston Community Center.

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RA MEMBERS AND

Beginning and expert birders are invited to help find birds in some of Reston’s most beautiful natural areas. Co-sponsored by Audubon Society of Northern Virginia and The Bird Feeder store. Ages 16 years to adult. No reservations required.

September Bird Walk: Lower Glade Stream Valley FREE

Sunday, September 21, 7:30-10:30 a.m., Park on Glade Drive at Twin Branches Road Leaders: Joanne & David Bauer FREE

October Bird Walk: Brown’s Chapel

Sunday, October 5, 7:30-10:30 a.m., Brown's Chapel, 1575 Brown’s Chapel Road Leader: Matt Bender

Nature programs may be cancelled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or email naturecenter@reston.org.

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

BIRD WALKS

NON-MEMBERS

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

FRIENDS OF RESTON ADOPT-A-BENCH PROGRAM

Storytelling Night

Adopt-A-Bench is a program of Friends of Reston which seeks to increase seating along Reston’s pathways and at recreational areas. Donations are appreciated in any amount and are tax-deductible. Sponsor a bench in someone’s honor for the donation amounts below. Tennis Benches

Nature Calls: Stories about things that can't be ignored

Saturday, September 27 at 8 p.m.

DONATION: $235

Fee: $15 on sale at http://eventbrite.com or at the door. Advance tickets are recommended due to limited seating. Come out for a fun evening of personal storytelling as told by Virginia’s premiere storytelling troupe Better Said Than Done. The show is intended for an adult audience. Refreshments (beer, wine, coffee, sodas and snacks) available for purchase. Sponsored by Friends of Reston. All proceeds benefit the Nature Center.

"Voted Best Performing Arts Company 2012-2014 by Virginia Living Magazine"

Select the court location (based on availability on a first-come, first-served basis). Cost includes an engraved plaque, if desired. For more details about tennis benches, contact tennis@reston.org or call 703-435-6534.

Pathway/Recreation Facility Benches

DONATION: $850

Locations based upon need and your preference. Benches are made of recycled plastic with heavy duty steel supports. Cost includes an engraved plaque, if desired. For more information about pathway/ recreation facility benches, contact CSFstaff@reston.org or call 703-437-7658.

Please make checks payable to the “Friends of Reston” and write “Adopt-A-Bench” in the memo section. Mail to: Friends of Reston, 11450 Glade Drive, Reston VA 20191.

ADOPT A RECYCLING BIN

Help Reston increase recycling in the community. Attractive recycling bins are needed at Reston’s tennis courts. Select the court of your choice. Reston Association will manage the recyclables. The bins are made of 100% recycled plastic lumber, fastened to a sturdy, recycled, cast-aluminum frame. The cost includes an engraved plaque, if desired. Make checks payable to “Friends of Reston” and write “Adopt-A-Recycling Bin” in the memo section. Mail to: Friends of Reston, 11450 Glade Drive, Reston VA 20191.

GARDEN PLOTS

Do you have a Green Thumb?

Reston Association’s garden plots are available for members to rent on an annual basis. Reserve early. The plots rent quickly. Plant flowers and vegetables at one of our four convenient locations. Call 703-435-6530.

DONATION: $475

For more information, contact CSFstaff@reston.org or call 703437-7658.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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NATURE // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

So You Want to Keep Honeybees? Saturday October 25, 1-4 p.m. Reston Association Conference Center, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive. Reserve by October 20. $5/person $7/person

Certified Master Beekeepers will present an overview covering the basics of keeping honeybees. Class will briefly touch on what honeybees are; rules and regulations for keeping them locally; and costs/equipment and time involved in keeping them. This presentation will not teach you all you need to know, but will help you decide whether to pursue keeping honeybees further with a later class.

Nature programs may be cancelled in the event of severe weather, severe weather warnings, or low enrollment. Advance reservations are required for all fee-based programs. Call 703-476-9689 and press 5 or email naturecenter@reston.org.

BRUSH CHIPPING

Dispose of Brush Free

RA’s brush chipping program offers you a place to bring your brush for chipping at no cost. RA Guidelines state that no brush may be dumped on RA property. Just drop off your brush at the locations listed below and RA crews will chip it for use on RA open space. PLEASE: Brush only (Branches should be less than four inches in diameter.) No grass clippings, dirt, trash, paper, vines, thorns or other debris. Brush may be dropped off at any time during the days listed. No contractors.

Chipping Dates Sites

September 20-21 Lake Audubon Pool, 2070 Twin Branches Road October 18-19 Central Services Facility, 12250 Sunset Hills Road

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

EIGHT PROHIBITED PLANTS IN RESTON

THE NATURE OF RESTON

Invasive exotic plants are not native to North America. They spread quickly and outcompete our native vegetation. Often, invasive exotic plants get their start in yards and gardens where they can become a serious problem for the property owner and adversely affect neighboring private property as well as RA natural areas. The proliferation of these plants decreases plant diversity and harms the wildlife that depends on native plants for food and shelter. Many invasive exotic plants overtake native shrubs and trees that are a signature of the Reston community. Efforts to control these species on RA property are ongoing and costly. We are grateful for the many volunteers who have worked diligently to remove invasive exotic plants and educate our members about their harmful effects. By resolution of Reston Association's Board of Directors, the Use and Maintenance Standards for all properties that fall under the Reston deed were amended in May of 2008 to include banning the installation of eight invasive exotic plants in Reston. If you would like to learn more about invasive exotic plants, visit “Plants” on the “Natural Resources” page in the “Nature” section of our website, www.reston.org. If you would like to volunteer to help control invasive plants in Reston, contact Ha Brock via email at habrock@reston.org. Please direct questions to our environmental resource staff at 703-437-7658.

Photos by: Charles A. Veatch Text By: Claudia Thompson-Deahl

An art photography, nature and informational book and guide to Reston’s habitats all in one beautiful hardbound volume. ON SALE FOR $20 at Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive All proceeds from the book sales support the nature center.

Thank you for your cooperation in not planting any of these species in Reston.

Banned Invasive Exotic Plants ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Flowering Pears (Pyrus calleryana cultivars) Winged Burning Bush (Euonymus alata) Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii) Exotic Bush Honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.) Exotic Bamboos (Bambusa spp.) Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) English Ivy (Hedera helix) Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus)

Lake Anne Boat Rentals May 22-August 31

HOURS OF OPERATION

Contact the Book Shop by calling 703-435-9772.

*Boat operator must be at least 16 years of age. A parent or legal guardian (18 years of age or older) must sign a waiver/agreement and accompany passengers under the age of 16. Swimming is not permitted. Pets are not allowed in boats.

Enjoy a journey across Lake Anne in a canoe, kayak, paddleboat or rowboat. Rental tickets can be purchased at Reston’s Used Book Shop, 1623 Washington Plaza (near the fountain).

THURSDAY: 4 – 8 P.M. FRIDAY: 4 – 8 P.M. SATURDAY: 9 A.M. – 5 P.M. SUNDAY: 11 A.M. – 5 P.M. COST: $6 PER BOAT FOR 1-HOUR RENTAL* (CASH ONLY)

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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SPECIAL EVENTS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

CHILDREN’S YES Reston Association has something EVENTS FOR for everyone including trips to local places of interest, monthly movies for seniors and a community yard sale, just to name a few. Join us at one of Reston Association’s many facilities and see what’s in it for you. Visit the Parks, Recreation & Events section at www.reston.org.

AGES 3-5 YEARS

Children must be accompanied by an adult

It’s a Pirate Parrrrty

Tuesday, September 23, 11 a.m.Noon. North Hills Pavilion, 1325 North Village Road $4 $6 Ahoy, me Hearties! Ye all be invited fer a pirate parrrrrty! This Pirate Adventure will transform your child into a pirate, complete with dress-up, and allow them to take part in a real treasure hunt on land. Enjoy crafts, games and fun activities. This program is cancelled in the event of rain. Payment due at the event. Registration required.

Halloween Fun

Tuesday, October 28, 10-11 a.m. Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $4 $6 Dress up in your favorite costume and join the fun with hands-on activities, crafts and go trick-ortreating around the Association office. Payment due at the event.

RESTON PRESENTS…

All ages are welcome. Reston Presents is a bi-monthly lecture and presentation series that highlights the multifaceted talents of local residents. Topics include anything from cooking demonstrations to stories from war veterans and book signings with local authors. Reston Presents… is sponsored by the Reston Association and the Reston Community Center.

Getting the Most Out of Social Security During Retirement FREE

Monday, September 8, 7-9 p.m. Reston Community Center at Lake Anne, 1609 Washington Plaza Learn about the three Social Security benefits that most people haven’t heard about, discover strategies for married couples, and avoid the five most common mistakes people make with Social Security before reaching the age of eligibility. Social Security is a key part of a good retirement plan so start the planning process early to enjoy a financially comfortable retirement. Join financial gurus, Amy Brandts and Nancy Rick, as they help attendees determine the best benefit strategy that will lead to long-term financial security. This seminar is ideal for those ages 40-68, but all ages

ALL AGES

All ages are welcome. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. FREE

Board Led Bike Ride

Saturday, September 27, 9-10 a.m., Lake Newport Join Reston Association board members on this unique bike tour around the Lake Anne area of Reston. We will start and end in the Lake Newport Tennis Court parking lot the morning of the Multicultural Festival. Helmets are required for riders under 15. Registration required.

Annual Reston Thanksgiving Day Family Bike Ride FREE

Thursday, November 27, 9 a.m. Start a new family tradition and begin your Thanksgiving Day with a family bike ride. Join a village center ride to Reston Town Center or organize your own neighborhood ride. All rides converge at Starbucks at Reston Town Center. Contact cyclinginreston@gmail.com or call 703-966-6182 for more information and to connect with a ride coordinator in your neighborhood. are welcome. This program is for educational purposes only and sold out last year so be sure sign up early. There will be no solicitation or obligations of attendees. Registration requested. FREE

Seven Covert Agents of the Revolutionary War

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Tour de Lights

Saturday, December 20 (rain date: Dec. 21), 4:30-6 p.m. Starting Point: Lake Anne Plaza parking lot Join Reston Association’s Pedestrian and Bicycle Committee for a bike tour around Reston to see all the holiday lights. Must have experience and ability to keep up with a group averaging 10 mph over a one hour ride, including hills. Route includes North Reston paths and secondary roads. Cancelled if rain/ ice/snow or temperature below 35 F and wind over 12 mph. Riders are required to have front light and red, rear bike light. Helmet strongly recommended and required if under 15 years old. Waiver available at event or on www.reston.org. Contact Dan Kole, 571-383-5771, dankol@verizon. net or Burton Griffith 408-7052652, burtoncg@yahoo.com for information.

Washington and the Half-King Chief Tanacharison”, released in 2014, which details the origins of the French and Indian War. This program is for educational purposes only. There will be no solicitation or obligations of attendees. Registration requested.

Monday, November 10, 7-9 p.m. Reston Community Center at Lake Anne, 1609 Washington Plaza This month features Paul Misencik, a former international airline captain, and presently manager of an airline accident investigation division of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). He will discuss "The Original American Spies: Seven Covert Agents of the Revolutionary War", featured in his 2013 book release. Mr. Misencik also has written “George

TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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FREE

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

WALK OR BIKE TO SCHOOL DAY Wednesday, October 8

In celebration of Reston's status as a Bronze Level Bicycle-Friendly Community by the League of American Bicyclists, the Reston Pedestrian and Bicycling Advisory Committee is coordinating with all eight of Reston's elementary schools as well as Langston Hughes Middle School, to participate in National Walk or Bike to School Day on October 8. This will be the third year for this coordinated effort. Organizers hope that this collaboration will help build more awareness and be the starting point for future rides and opportunities within each school community. Once again, there will be a friendly competition between the elementary schools to see who can get the most bikes on their bike racks. The following schools are participating. If you would like to get involved, contact cyclinginreston@gmail.com or contact the PTA representative at your local school. ALDRIN ES Contact Jennifer Johns, jkjohns@mac.com, and Anne-Marie Swope, amguy19@gmail.com ARMSTRONG ES Contact Ingrid Freeman, ingfreeman@aol.com DOGWOOD ES Contact AmberBadgley@yahoo.com FOREST EDGE ES Contact communications@forestedgepta.com HUGHES MS Contact Amy Shaw, wyoamy@gmail.com HUNTERS WOODS ES Contact Aric Line and Kristin Eddy, saferoutes@hwpta.org LAKE ANNE ES Contact Melissa Romano, villabacio@yahoo.com SUNRISE VALLEY ES Contact jcurren@hotmail.com & Steve Gurney, cyclinginreston@gmail.com TERRASET ES Contact Annette Bobby, akbobby@comcast.net

Register to participate at www.walkbiketoschool.org/go TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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SPECIAL EVENTS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

ADULT EVENTS

Ages 17 years and older

Community Yard Sale

Saturday, Sept. 6 (rain date, 9/7) 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Reston Association parking lot, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Ninety-five families will be selling a variety of items, so this event is a great opportunity to browse for bargains for a new home or a college dorm. Vendor space is sold out. Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or 703-435-6577 for information on weather-related cancellations.

SENIOR EVENTS

Ages 55 years and older FREE

Senior Movie Day

Wednesdays: Aug. 27, Featuring, “Diana” Sept. 24, TBD Oct. 22, TBD *Nov. 19, TBD (*one week early due to the holiday) Doors open at 9:15 a.m. Showtime: 10 a.m. Reston Town Center Bow-Tie Cinemas The Reston Association, in cooperation with Reston Town Center Bow-Tie Cinemas, presents, "Meet Me at the Movies." Join us on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Refreshments are provided and door prizes are distributed prior to the movie. Movie titles are posted at www. reston.org.

Write your Memories into Memoirs

Thursdays, September11-October 30, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $50 $65 Whether you are just beginning or already writing your memoirs, this eight-week class focuses on turning life experiences into an engaging story. You will discuss different writing topics each week in a supportive and lively setting. All you need is a serious desire to write, the willingness to share your personal journey and the ability to put your thoughts on paper. At the end, your stories may be bound as a book for you to keep. Give the priceless gift of legacy to your children, grandchildren and future generations. Class size is limited to eight. Registration required. Registration form is available on our website at www. reston.org.

Container Planting

Wednesday, September 17, 2-3 p.m., Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive $10 $14 Are your summer annual plants fading but you still want decorative planters that last into the colder months? Learn what plants can be used in a fall container garden. Also, discover other creative items to use such as gourds or branches. Listen to a presentation then plant a small container garden to take home. Registration required.

FREE

Senior Social: Hippifest

Thursday, September 18, 1:30-3 p.m., Reston Community Center at Hunters Woods, 2310 Colts Neck Road It's the 50th anniversary of the lava lamp, so dig out your tie dye, daisies, and peace signs. Spend the afternoon with friends while you plan your social calendar with senior adult trips, classes, and events. This event is co-sponsored by Reston Community Center and Reston Association. Registration required.

Jigsaw Puzzle Event

Tuesday, October 7, 0 a.m.-3 p.m. Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $10 $14 Do you like to put together jigsaw puzzles? Join us as an individual or as a couple for this fun event. Each team will be doing a Restonthemed puzzle to see how much you can finish in the time allotted. Enjoy coffee and conversation while doing one of Americas favorite pastimes. Lunch will be provided. Payment due at the event. Registration required. FREE

Navigating the Local Transit System

Thursday, October 16, 10 a.m.12:30 p.m., Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Join us for an innovative transportation experience to get familiar with the regional transit systems. The bus, called MATT (Mobile Accessible Travel Training), is used to educate seniors through a hands-on learning experience. You will learn "travel training" tips in which you will travel by bus and learn to read bus schedules and route maps, learn how to pay the fare and how to signal the driver to stop, as well as other bus travel skills. The bus will deliver us to a Metrorail station where you will learn how to determine the fare and purchase Metrorail fare cards, load SmarTrip cards and read the system map. Registration required.

TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Antiques & Jewelry Road Show

Wednesday, November 5, 10 a.m.Noon, Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $5 $10 Bring your jewelry, silver, coins, furniture, paintings, documents, or other heirlooms to discover their age and value. Certified appraisers with Peenstra Antiques and gemologists from NovaGold will provide free appraisals, consultations and advice on your prized possessions.You are welcome to bring one item. You do not need to bring an item to attend. Registration required as space is limited.

Noisy Nature Night

September 12, 7-8:30 p.m., Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive $7/person $9/ person Grandparents — bring your grandchildren out for a fun and exciting evening hike at Walker Nature Center. Explore the woods after dark to hear who is still awake. We will listen for crickets and katydids, treefrogs, owls, and other nocturnal creatures. Learn what nocturnal adaptations these animals use to survive and communicate. We will end our evening back at Nature House for some refreshments. Payment due at the event. Registration required.

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS


MULTICULTURAL

RESTON

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

FESTIVAL

SATURDAY, SEPT. 27,11 A.M.- 6 P.M. LAKE ANNE VILLAGE CENTER, 1609 WASHINGTON PLAZA

The Reston Multicultural Festival is a celebration of the diversity and community spirit that is found in Reston. This annual event brings together the people of Reston to celebrate our rich medley of cultures. Come and share with family, friends, and neighbors the music, entertainment, dress, food, and cultural treasures from all over the world. This signature Reston event honors the diversity that is one of our greatest assets. Everyone is encouraged to dress in attire from their own cultural roots and share the stories that we gather on the pathways of our lives. The Reston Multicultural Festival is hosted by the Lake Anne of Reston Condominium Association and co-sponsored by the Reston Association, with partners from a variety of Reston-based organizations and businesses. Check out www.restoncommunitycenter.com or call 703-476-4500 for more information.

TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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SPECIAL EVENTS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

SENIOR TRIPS & TOURS

Ages 55 years and older

Reston Association’s 55+ Advisory Committee will take a variety of trips this year to locations such as museums, shows and local places of interest. Join us as we have fun visiting the area’s hot spots. For upcoming trip dates, details and to get on our trip mailing list, contact Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577.

55+ ADVISORY COMMITTEE

audience sleuthing to deliver a unique performance each night. Shear Madness has been running at the Kennedy Center for 25 years, giving more than 11,000 performances, and is the second longest running play in the history of American Theater. All sales are final. Registration forms can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

Trip to See Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons at the Strathmore

Wednesday, October 15, 6-11 p.m. (show begins at 8 p.m.) Bus pick-up times & locations: 6 p.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo Pizza) 6:15 p.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 6:30 p.m. Lake Anne Plaza parking lot $60 $68 Join Reston Association for a chartered bus trip to the Music Center at Strathmore to see Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons. Oh, what a story! Frankie Valli, the street corner Jersey kid who came to fame in 1962 as the lead singer of the Four Seasons, is hotter than ever in the 21st century. Thanks to the volcanic success of the Tony-winning musical Jersey Boys, which chronicles the life and times of Frankie and his legendary group, such classic songs as “Big Girls Don’t Cry,”“Walk Like a Man,” “Rag Doll,” and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You” are all the rage all over again. As the play enters its third sold-out year on Broadway, the real Frankie Valli is packing concert halls coast to coast. Order your tickets early for this sure-tosell-out event — and be among the first to hear live performances from Frankie’s newest album! Registration forms can be found on our website at www.reston.org. All sales are final.

Sunday, August 24,1-6 p.m. (show is 3-5 p.m. with intermission) Bus pick-up times & locations: 1 p.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo Pizza) 1:15 p.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 1:30 p.m. Lake Anne Plaza parking lot $42 $49 Join us for a chartered bus trip to the Kennedy Center to see Shear Madness, the comedy whodunit that lets the audience solve the crime. Set in present-day Georgetown, Shear Madness engages locals and visitors alike as armchair detectives to help solve the scissorstabbing murder of a famed concert pianist who lives above the Shear Madness hairstyling salon. The show combines up-to-the-minute improvisational humor and a mixture of

PHOTO BY LOUISE PALANKER @ EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG.

Trip to see Shear Madness at the Kennedy Center

TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

We are looking for NEW IDEAS and FRESH PERSPECTIVES. Give something back to your community by volunteering your time and join this active senior committee. This committee, established by the Reston Association, is charged with developing and implementing programs to benefit Reston’s senior adults. If you have visited Reston Town Center’s theater recently to see a movie and enjoy coffee and pastries with friends, then you have seen the work of the 55+ Advisory Committee first-hand.

JOIN US Second Tuesday of each month from 2-3:30 p.m. Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

NEWCOMERS’ NIGHT OCTOBER 9, 6:30-8:30 P.M.

RESTON ASSOCIATION, 12001 SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE A one-stop shopping, open house event for new or not so new members, volunteers and newcomers. Come learn more about Reston Association (RA) and the many services, amenities and programs it provides for you. Meet other organizations, RA board members and staff. Find out how you can get involved in Reston. Light refreshments will be available and door prizes will be awarded. Please RSVP to Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577.

TO REGISTER FOR EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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TENNIS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

COURT NEWS RA offers spring, summer and fall tournaments ranging from USTAsanctioned to friendly local round robins. The tennis program also features men’s, women’s and junior leagues, as well as adult and junior individual and group lessons. Register for leagues, lessons and tournaments at Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive or online at www.reston.org. General tennis information can be found on our website, as well as on the tennis court bulletin boards at each of the tennis complexes. All registrations must be made online or at Reston Association.

With 52 outdoor tennis courts including 26 lighted and six 36' courts for children, Reston Association offers one of the most extensive tennis programs in the Washington metropolitan area.

TENNIS COURTS Lighted Courts

The following 26 RA courts are lighted until 11 p.m. for night play. ƒƒ Autumnwood Courts ƒƒ Glade Clay Courts ƒƒ Hook Road Courts ƒƒ Lake Newport Courts ƒƒ North Hills Clay Courts ƒƒ Shadowood Courts

Tennis Practice Walls ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Colts Neck Hook Road Lake Anne Park

TENNIS COURT ADDRESS Autmnwood Courts (also 10 & Under 60 ft Lines)

11950 Walnut Branch Road

Barton Hill Courts

Sunrise Valley Drive/Barton Hill Road

Colts Neck Courts

Colts Neck Road (south of Steeplechase Drive)

Glade Courts

11550 Glade Drive

Hook Road Courts (also 10 & Under 60 ft Lines)

Find the following up-to-date information in the tennis section on the Reston Association website at www.reston.org ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

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RTT Score Board is listed at www.restontennis.org Tennis ladder is listed on www.tennisengine.com USTA Tournament and entry forms are listed on www.usta.com

Tennis Key Tags

Great for easy identification and your convenience. Key tags are available for $3. Come to RA to purchase one.

Tennis Lesson Gift Certificates

Tennis gift certificates are available at the Reston Association Tennis Office. Please call 703-435-6502 or visit our website at www.reston.org

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Newbridge Courts

11718 Golf Course Square

North Shore Courts (10 & Under 36 ft Courts)

11515 North Shore Drive

North Hills Courts

1325 North Village Road

Shadowood Courts 2201 Springwood Drive

Upper Lakes Courts Upper Lakes Drive/Sunrise Valley Drive

Lake Anne Courts

Uplands Courts

11301 North Shore Drive

TENNIS INFO

11452 Baron Cameron Avenue

Fairway Drive/Hook Road (with blended lines)

Info on our Reston Tennis News Facebook page www.facebook.com/RestonTennisNews

Lake Newport Courts

11032 Ring Road


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

RESTON ASSOCIATION PRO SHOP Featuring Babolat Pure Strike Racquets available for demo. Call 703.435.6502 or email tennis@reston.org for more infor on Babolat Performance Products.

BABOLAT - OFFICIAL TENNIS RACKETS, SHOES*, BAGS AND ACCESSORIES OF THE CHAMPIONSHIPS, WIMBLEDON *EXCEPT IN JAPAN

BABOLAT - OFFICIAL RACKETS, STRINGS, BALLS, BAGS AND WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014 ACCESSORIES OF THE FRENCH OPEN ROLAND-GARROS

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TENNIS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

YOUTH TENNIS 10 AND UNDER

Tennis is a whole new ball game. Balls, rackets and courts sized right for kids. It’s all about the play. Children learn best when they have an opportunity to play and have fun. Reston Tennis Youth classes focus on practice, learn and play using the QuickStart format. Reston Tennis implements the games-based approach to tennis, which means involving participants in tennis play within the first hour of the program.

QuickStart Tennis for Munchkins

This exciting new play format for learning tennis is designed to bring kids into the game by utilizing specialized equipment, shorter court dimensions and modified scoring — all tailored to age and size. Kids enjoy a fun, motivating introduction to tennis emphasizing fun and play. It’s the fast, fun way to get kids into tennis and keep them playing. Parents or guardians must be present and join in the fun. Class size limited to six.

Munchkins (ages 3-4)

Once a week for six weeks Session 4: September 5-October 11 Fridays, 2:45-3:30 p.m., 3:30-4:15 p.m., North Shore Saturdays, 9-9:45 p.m.,10-10:45 a.m., North Shore $96 $104

QuickStart Tennis for Aces Aces I (ages 5-7) Aces II (ages 7-8) Aces III (ages 6-9)

This exciting new play format for learning tennis is designed to bring kids into the game by utilizing specialized equipment, shorter court dimensions and modified scoring — all tailored to age and size. Kids enjoy a fun, motivating introduction to tennis emphasizing fun and play. It’s the fast, fun way to get kids into tennis and keep them playing. We encourage a parent or guardian to join in the fun to make this class a success. The emphasis will be on learn, practice and play. To be enrolled in Aces II, you must have completed two sessions of Aces I. Class size limited to six.

Aces I (ages 5-7)

Once a week for six weeks Session 4: September 5-October 11 Fridays, 4:30-5:30 p.m., 5:30-6:30 p.m., North Shore Saturdays, 9-10 a.m., 10-11 a.m., Noon-1 p.m., North Shore $100 $108

Aces II (ages 5-8)

Once a week for six weeks Session 4: September 5-October 11 Mondays, 4:30-5:30 p.m., North Shore Fridays, 5-6 p.m., North Shore Saturdays, 11 a.m.-Noon, Noon-1 p.m., North Shore $100 $108

Aces III (ages 6-9)

Once a week for six weeks Session 4: September 5-October 11 Mondays, 5:30-6:30 p.m., North Shore Saturdays, 11 a.m.-Noon, North Shore $100 $108

Aces III (ages 6-9)

Twice a week for three weeks Session 4: September 5-October 11 Tuesday/Thursday, 5-6 p.m., North Shore $100 $108

Tennis Equipment for Juniors available at RA Pro Shop. Call 703-435-6502 or email tennis@reston.org for more info. PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

TENNIS BIRTHDAY PARTIES

Let one of our professionally trained tennis pros lead the group in fun-filled instructional activities. Group size can range from six to 12 children. You supply the refreshments and we will supply the courts for 90 minutes, racquets, balls, staff and a prize for each child, plus a free lesson for the birthday child to be arranged at a later date. Cost ranges from: $185-$225, depending on size of the group. Call the tennis office at 703-435-6502 to schedule.

RESTON JUNIOR TEAM TENNIS JTT (Junior Team Tennis) strives to provide a cooperative team environment that fosters integrity, self-reliance, positive self-esteem, and promotes social skills while developing lifelong tennis players. It is a great entry point into competition and match play. USTA Junior Team Tennis Matches 8U and 10UI Session: September 13-October 18 (Six week)

RA Tennis Scholarship Program RA Tennis provides scholarships to Reston youth whose families have demonstrated financial need. (This includes residing in subsidized housing or participating in a school meal program.) To learn more about the scholarship program, call 703-435-6502. RESTON TENNIS STICKERS: $1. ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE RESTON CHILDREN’S TENNIS SCHOLARSHIP FUND.

Day Saturday Sunday

Time Level Location 4-6 p.m. 10UI Hook Road Courts 4-6 p.m. 8U North Shore Courts

To Register: 1. Go to website: http://tennislink.usta.com/TeamTennis/ Main/Home.aspx 2. Click on “Register to Play” 3. Enter Team ID #: 3029245116 (10 & UNDER) INTERMEDIATE 3029245117 (8 & UNDER) Cost: $95 All league players are encouraged to participate in our Aces or Futures Programs. For more information, please contact Mary Conaway at mary@reston.org or 703-435-6534.

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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TENNIS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

LEARN, PRACTICE AND PLAY FOR JUNIORS

FUTURES I (AGES 9-12)

This is RA’s highest level junior class for 9-12 years. This match play program will develop competitive skills for both singles and doubles under actual match conditions. Emphasis will be on strategy, conditioning and footwork. To have your child evaluated for Futures classes, please contact the tennis office at 703-435-6502 or tennis@reston.org.

Level I (ages 8-12)

This class is for players with little or no tennis background. Twice a week for three weeks. Session 7: September 8-25 Session 8: September 29-October 16 Monday/Wednesday, 5-6 p.m., Lake Newport Tuesday/Thursday, 5-6 p.m., Lake Newport $120 $128

Level II (ages 8 -12)

This class is for students who have taken Level I for two sessions. Twice a week for three weeks. Session 7: September 8-25 Session 8: September 29-October 16 Monday/Wednesday, 5-6 p.m., Lake Newport Tuesday/Thursday, 5-6 p.m., Lake Newport $120 $128

Level I (ages 8-12)

This class is for players with little or no tennis background. Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: September 13-October 18 Saturday, 9-10 a.m., Autumnwood Saturday, 11-Noon, Autumnwood $120 $128

Level II (ages 8-12)

This class is for students who have taken Level I for two sessions. Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: September 13-October 18 Saturday, 10-11a.m., Autumnwood $120 $128

Teen Tennis (ages 13-16)

Teens will enjoy tennis with their peers and learn the fundamentals of tennis techniques and strokes. Emphasis is on fun, fitness and play. In addition, we will have a Team Tennis event at the conclusion of each session on the last day of the session. In the event of rain, the Team Tennis Event will be held on Friday. Classes will meet twice a week for four weeks. Class size limited to six.

Level I (ages 13-16)

This class is for players with little or no tennis background. Twice a week for three weeks. Session 7: September 8-25 Session 8: September 29-October 16 Monday/Thursday, 6-7 p.m., Shadowood $120 $128

Level II (ages 13-16)

This class is for students who have taken Level I for two sessions. Twice a week for three weeks. Session 7: September 8-25 Session 8: September 29-October 16 Monday/Thursday 7-8 p.m., Shadowood $120 $128

Level II (ages 13-16)

This class is for students who have taken Level I for two sessions. Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: September 13-October 18 Saturday, Noon-1 p.m., Autumnwood $120 $128

Level III (ages 13-16)

Teenage players advancing beyond level II should qualify for RA High School Tennis Innovations Development Program.

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Qualifications: ƒƒ Students must be able to Rally with Quickstart orange dot, green dot and regulation size tennis balls. ƒƒ Students should have experience playing matches in USTA leagues or sanctioned tournaments. ƒƒ Players must be competitive to enter this program.

Futures I (Orange Dot Ball)

Meets once a week for six weeks. Session 4: September 8-October 13 Monday, 5-6:30 p.m., Hook Road $180 $188

Futures II (Green Dot Ball)

Meets once a week for six weeks. Session 4: September 9-October 14 Tuesday, 5-6:30 p.m., Lake Newport $180 $188

Futures III (Regulation Ball)

Meets once a week for six weeks. Session 4: September 10-October 15 Tuesday, 5-6:30 p.m., Lake Newport $180 $188


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

HIGH SCHOOL TENNIS INNOVATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (AGES 12-17)

This is Reston Association’s highest level of play for juniors. This program is for rising high school players and those already in high school. This match play program will develop competitive skills for both singles and doubles play under actual match conditions. Emphasis will be on strategy, conditioning and footwork. Players must already be competitive to enter this program. Session 6: September 9-25 Session 7: September 30-October 16 Tuesday/Thursday, 4:30-6 p.m. Autumnwood $180 $188

JUNIOR SERVE & RETURN (AGES 8-12)

This is an opportunity designed for advanced juniors looking to improve their serves and returns in competitive situations. Four students per class.

60-Foot Court Orange Ball

Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: September 11-October 16 Thursday, 5-6 p.m., Hook Road $120 $128

Serve them UP!

Full Court Regulation Ball

Once a week for six weeks. Session 4: September 11-October 16 Thursday, 6-7 p.m., Hook Road $120 $128

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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TENNIS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

ADULT TENNIS

17 years and older.

Beginners

Introduces serve, volley, forehand and backhand strokes, court positions and tennis terms.

Advanced Beginners

Reviews beginners’ strokes with an emphasis on stroke execution. Introduces lob and overhead, scoring and rules. Students must know the basic strokes and forehand rallying.

Intermediate

For those wishing to perfect their strokes through drills with an emphasis on consistency, singles and doubles strategy and match play. Note: We cannot guarantee court preference. On some occasions, classes may be combined at one location or students may be asked to move from one level to another to maximize the ability for congenial class instruction.

Advanced Beginners

Once a week for four weeks Session 6: September 6-27 Session 7: October 4-25 Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.-Noon, Autumnwood $130 $138

Intermediates

Beginners

Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: September 8-25 Session 9: September 29-October 16 Monday/Wednesday, 8-9 p.m., Lake Newport Tuesday/Thursday, 6-7 p.m., Lake Newport $130 $138

Once a week for four weeks Session 6: September 6-27 Session 7: October 4-25 Wednesdays, 7-8:30 p.m., Shadowood Saturday, 9-10:30 a.m., Autumnwood $130 $138

Advanced Beginners

Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: September 8-25 Session 9: September 29-October 16 Monday/Wednesday, 6-7 p.m., Lake Newport Tuesday/Thursday, 7-8 p.m., Lake Newport $130 $138

Intermediates

Twice a week for three weeks. Session 8: September 8-25 Session 9: September 29-October 16 Monday/Wednesday, 7-8 p.m., Lake Newport Tuesday/Thursday, 8-9 p.m., Lake Newport $130 $138

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

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RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

ADULT SERVE & RETURN LESSON (17+ YEARS)

Groups of up to four students meet once a week for four weeks to become masters of their serve. The serve is the most important stroke in tennis. It starts the game. Without being able to serve, you cannot play the game of tennis. In this class you will learn a kick serve, a slice serve and increase the pace and velocity of your flat serve. Let the games begin. Session 5: September 9-30 Session 6: October 7-28 Tuesdays, 6-7 p.m., Autumnwood $84 $92


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

STROKE OF THE WEEK (17+ YEARS)

Three to eight players. Must register at least one week in advance.

ADULTS TENNIS LEAGUES Tennis Ratings TUESDAYS STROKE September 2 Serves September 9 Volleys and half volley September 16 Serve and volley- attack the net September 23 Forehands September 30 Backhands: one-and two-handed October 7 Overheads and lobs October 14 Approach shots October 21 Doubles strategy THURSDAYS STROKE September 4 Forehands September 11 Backhands: one-and two-handed September 18 Approach shots September 25 Volleys and half volley October 2 Overheads and lobs October 9 Serves October 16 Serve and volley- attack the net October 23 Doubles strategy Tuesday, 7-8:30 p.m., Autumnwood Thursday, 10:30-Noon, Hook Road Book four strokes and receive a 5 percent discount. $24 $26

Reston Association tennis professionals will give free ratings. Please call 703-435-6502 to arrange a convenient time. These are Reston ratings and apply for play in the Reston Team Tennis League.

Greater Washington Tennis League (18+ years)

This is a women’s competitive league. All levels of players are invited to join one of our teams in the Greater Washington Daytime Doubles Tennis League. League play occurs in the spring and fall. Reston Association sponsors four women’s teams in this league (Teams: B-2, B-3, C-1, C-2 ). Women play at Lake Newport, Hook Road and Autumnwood on weekday mornings or travel to other area clubs. $17 $20* *Non-members must purchase a RA tennis membership to participate.

Northern Virginia Tennis League

Men! Women! Seniors! Play singles, doubles or mixed doubles in the Northern Virginia Tennis League. This league begins mid-May and continues through July. ƒƒ Men play at Lake Newport, Newbridge, Uplands, and travel to play against other clubs on Saturday mornings. ƒƒ Women play at Lake Newport, Autumnwood and Hook on weekday mornings and Tuesday evenings or travel to other area clubs. $17 $20* *Non-residents must purchase a RA Tennis Membership to participate.

Reston Team Tennis (18+ years)

Reston Team Tennis, formerly known as World Team Tennis, is one of our most popular leagues. There are 24 teams that play on Wednesday and Thursday nights. This is a social, yet competitive league. Please call the tennis office at 703-435-6502 if you would like to join a team or start your own. FORMAT Men’s and Women’s Singles, Men’s and Women’s Doubles and Mixed Doubles. Matches can be played with as few as four players or as many as ten players per team. Start Date: April 16 Wednesday: 3.0-3.5, 7-10 p.m. Thursday: 4.0-4.5, 7-10 p.m. Locations: Glade, Lake Newport, Hook Road, Shadowood, North Hills and Autumnwood Courts. $75 $80* *Non-residents must purchase a RA Tennis Membership to participate.

Senior Round Robin

Still looking for competitive fun play? Join the senior inter-Reston league. The format will be doubles. Session 4: September 12-October 17 (Rain date: October 24) Fridays, 9-11 a.m., Hook Road $17 per person. Six weeks of play. Register in advance at the tennis office 703435-6502.

PRICES ARE LISTED FOR BOTH

RA MEMBERS AND

NON-MEMBERS

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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TENNIS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

RA COURT RULES

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WHO MAY USE THE COURTS

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eston Association Members only with their R membership cards. Guests must have a guest pass and be accompanied by the host member. Players must show membership cards and guest passes on the changeover. Reston Association instructors are the only persons permitted to give lessons on a feepaying basis on RA courts.

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OURT CHANGES ARE MADE ON THE HOUR. C Please show your pass when entering the court. Play is limited to one hour for singles and two hours for doubles when other players are waiting. Players who use the court for a fraction of an hour must vacate on the hour when others are waiting to play.

RESERVING A COURT ƒƒ

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layers must place membership card or key tag P and racquet (or racquet cover) on numbered hook on courtside gates. Failure to display both racket or cover and membership card or key tag means court is not reserved. Players reserving courts must remain courtside while waiting to play.

RA Tennis Advisory Committee Announces

ADOPT-A-BENCH

RULES FOR COURT USE ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

PRIORITY OF PLAY ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

layer may not reserve court while playing. P One member may reserve a court to use a ball machine or ball hopper. Reston Association may reserve courts for lessons, tournaments, junior activity, league play and court rentals. Check our online calendar www.reston.org.

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OURTS ARE TO BE USED FOR TENNIS ONLY. C Players are required to use tennis shoes when using the courts. (No jogging or soccer shoes.) Bicycles, skates, skateboards, baby carriages, playpens, strollers, radios and pets are not allowed on the courts. Children who are not playing tennis are not allowed on the courts. Please dispose of trash in proper receptacles.

RULES ENFORCEMENT ƒƒ

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eston Association and staff, court monitors and R Reston Tennis Association officers will enforce the rules of court play. Failure to adhere to the rules will result in loss of court privileges. RA cards are available at Reston Association headquarters or online at www.reston.org. Guest passes can be purchased from court monitors. For further information, call 703-4356530.

Help increase seating capacity at Reston’s tennis courts. Select the bench’s court location, based on availability on a first-come, first-served basis. Cost: $235 per bench, includes brass name plate, if desired. Make checks payable to Friends of Reston. “Adoptions” are 100 percent tax deductible. Call RA tennis office at 703-435-6502 or email tennis@reston.org.

Play tennis to benefit two great causes! Presenting Sponsor: Dr. Hani Thariani, Orthodontist

All funds go directly to one of these two organizations:

Men's & Women's Singles & Doubles Doubles Play: Saturday, Sept. 20 Singles Play: Sunday, Sept. 21 Location: Lake Newport Tennis Courts, Reston, VA Level: NTRP Brackets for 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 and above players Players guaranteed at least two matches! $30 charitable donation per player

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Registration Open: August 1 at www.restontennis.org More Info: http://www.restontennis.org/rally-for-a-causecharity-tournament/tournament-info or email rally4acause@ restontennis.org


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

Tuesday, October 21, 10 a.m.-noon Rain date: Wednesday, October 22 Lake Newport Courts Cost: $20

Rally for the Cure works to educate women about breast self-awareness to ensure the early detection of breast cancer. When breast cancer is found early, there are more treatment options and a better chance for survival. Rally is a fun, easy and rewarding way to remind women to get their annual screening through a favorite activity like tennis. ■■ Rally on the Tennis Court ■■ Rally for the Cure. A friendly round robin and “Beat the Pro” contest or fun tennis! Join your fellow tennis players in a friendly round robin followed by a BEAT the Pro Contest. We will have a raffle for prizes. Raffle tickets are $5 or five for $20. All raffle money and donations will go to Rally for the Cure for Breast Cancer. Support the cause. Educate your friends. RSVP to mary@reston.org and bring a check to the courts for Rally for the Cure.

TENNIS BASH Saturday, November 8 7-11 p.m. Reston Association 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive $25 per person

No tennis racquets or partners required. Enjoy a buffet meal. Entertainment, door prizes, and awards.

CALL 703-435-6534 FOR MORE INFORMATION. SIGN UP AT WWW.RESTON.ORG WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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TENNIS // RESTON ASSOCIATION HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

MARY CONAWAY RA’s Tennis Manager has been involved in Reston since 1987. In 1998, Mary became certified as a PTR Instructor and taught lessons for Reston Association. Mary currently serves as council chair of the USTA National Volunteer Development Council.

HARMEN WARAICH Harmen is new to the staff and will be one of our lead instructors for Tennis Aces and Munchkin classes. Harmen is currently ranked #1 on the girls South Lakes High School team and enjoys working with juniors of all levels. Intermediate to advanced players will enjoy private hitting sessions with her.

ROD PAOLINI Rod particularly enjoys working with young children. He employs various activities and games that develop the skills needed for tennis. He invites parents to be involved in the lesson in order to learn and play together. Rod is a PTR-certified instructor.

MARK STEEDS Mark is a USPTA-certified instructor. He has experience teaching women’s team practices, junior programs, adult programs and private lessons to children and adults of all ages and levels.

NICK ORIS Nick Oris is in charge of our Munchkin tennis program, but works with juniors of all ages. Known for his high energy and enthusiasm, Nick has his kids putting their best foot forward from day one. Tennis should be fun and he makes sure of it.

CHUME BERTRAND Chume is a PTR-certified associate instructor. She has been involved with tennis since she moved to the Reston area in 1991. Chume has been very active with USTA junior tennis. She plays tennis competitively in many local tennis leagues.

PETE STAPLES A native of Australia, Peter is a PTR-certified instructor now living in Reston. He is passionate about tennis and loves to share his love of the game with high-energy instruction. His other passion is tennis photography. Peter photographs the pros at the Citi Open Tournament, as well as many other ATP tour events.

JESSICA KEENER Jessica is a recent graduate from the Top 50 Division I tennis program, Marshall University, where she played on a full scholarship for her collegiate career. She loves to work with upcoming juniors, helping them develop their game.

ELAINE KILLORAN New to Reston’s tennis staff, Elaine is passionate about tennis and wants to share her passion on the courts with all ages of juniors. Elaine has been a Reston Team tennis captain for ten years and enjoys the thrill of competition.

JIM ELDER Jim has a Elite Professional certification from the USPTA and chairs the USTA Mid-Atlantic Ranking Committee. Jim is also the VP of the Northern Virginia Tennis in charge of the 40-team Men's Division. In 2013, he was ranked #4 in MAS 65 singles and #1 in Virginia for 65 singles.

JUAN FIGUEROA Juan is a PTR tennis instructor. He has been playing tennis since 1984 and became a certified tennis instructor in 2003. Juan loves working with children of all ages. He also works with adults and loves to improve their game.

BILL WOOD As a lifelong player and enthusiast, Bill loves giving back to the sport of tennis. For the past two years, he has been teaching juniors at the Herndon Community Center and also serve as the Head Tennis Coach at Herndon High School. Certified by USPTR in Spring 2012.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, VISIT WWW. RESTON.ORG

REGISTER FOR TENNIS PROGRAMS AND EVENTS

ADULT REGISTRATION Session Number:

Location: Day:

Time:

Cost:

Name: DOB:

/

/

Sex:

o Male

o Female

NTRP Rating

COURT LOCATIONS

Street Address: City: State:

o o o o o o

Zip:

E-Mail: Phone: (Home)

(Work) (Cell)

o Wed o Thurs o RTT League Captain’s Name o Greater Washington Tennis League o Northern Virginia League o Men's o Women's o Mixed o Senior Round Robin

STROKE OF THE WEEK Stroke:

Cost:

JUNIOR REGISTRATION Parent/Guardian’s Name: Street Address: City:

State:

Phone: (Home)

Zip:

E-Mail:

TENNIS LADDER

o Male o Female o Singles o Doubles

(Work) (Mobile)

Child’s Name (1): DOB:

/

Session Number:

/

Grade:

Sex:

o Male

Location: Day:

DOUBLES

o Female

Time:

o Mixed Doubles Flight Doubles Partner (Name)

Cost:

LEVELS: o Munchkin o Aces I o Aces II o Aces III o Level I o Level II o Junior Futures I o Junior Futures II o Junior Futures III o Teen Level I o Teen Level II o HS Development Child’s Name (2): DOB:

/

Session Number:

/

Grade:

Sex:

o Male

Location: Day:

o Female

Time:

Lake Newport Hook Road Shadowood Newbridge Autumnwood North Shore

ADULT LEAGUES

DIAL-A-MATCH AVAILABILITY: o Weekdays o Evenings o Weekends o Anytime Level

Date:

ADULT CLASSES

o Beginner o Advanced Beginner o Intermediate o Serving Class

o MAKE A CONTRIBUTION TO OUR CHILDREN’S TENNIS SCHOLARSHIP FUND $

Cost:

LEVELS: o Munchkin o Aces I o Aces II o Aces III o Level I o Level II o Junior Futures I o Junior Futures II o Junior Futures III o Teen Level I o Teen Level II o HS Development

HEART

Payment can be made by personal check, cash or credit card. Please make checks payable to Reston Association. If mailing registration form, please send to: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404. No faxes will be accepted. AMOUNT: $

CHECK NUMBER:

oVISA oMC CARD NUMBER:

EXPIRATION DATE: *CARD SECURITY CODE: #

SIGNATURE:

*Typically a 3-digit code located on back of credit card, to the right of the signature strip.

I hereby release the Reston Association (RA), and any of its directors, officers, employees and agents from all claims for bodily injury, death or property damage arising out of my and my child’s participation in the above event(s), except for claims caused directly by the negligence or willful misconduct of RA. I assume full responsibility for all liability in connection with such claims, and for having insurance for me and my child. I agree to indemnify RA and hold RA harmless against any such claims and related costs, including claims by any minor which may be brought after attaining majority. I also hereby grant permission for Reston Association to photograph and videotape my child and to use such photographs and videotapes for promotional and advertising purposes and for trade purposes. I promise to abide by the rules and regulations of RA’s tennis courts and exercise care and caution for my and/or my child’s personal safety and that of my fellow participants. I acknowledge and agree that my and my child’s participation in any program sponsored by RA or presence at its tennis courts or other areas under RA’s control may be an activity where injury can occur and shall be undertaken at my and my child’s sole risk. I hereby certify that I and my child are physically fit and have not been otherwise informed by a physician. I understand that RA employs no physicians, and its staff cannot and does not diagnose medical problems.

SIGNATURE OF PARTICIPANT (or parent/legal guardian if participant is under 18 years of age): DATE: PRINTED NAME: WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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VOLUNTEER RESOURCE FOR THE RESTON COMMUNITY

DO YOU NEED SERVICE HOURS FOR SCHOOL?

OUR VOLUNTEERS REALLY DIG US.

Often times we find that individuals (such as middle and high school students) are required to perform a specified number of community service hours. If this is the case, then you may be able to complete up to 8 hours of community service by working one of our special events, such as festivals, Habitat Heroes, and watershed cleanups, to name a few. We cannot guarantee that you'll be able to complete all of the hours you need during one special event. Each special event will have a limited number of spots available for volunteers, so it is very important you notify us well in advance of your desire to work a special event. To volunteer or learn more about how you can get involved in Reston, call Ha Brock at 703435-7986, or email habrock@ reston.org and she will help provide ideas and options that are well suited for your talents. You can also visit the RA website at www.reston.org and click on the “Get Involved” tab for more information or to complete the online volunteer application.

Volunteer Reston seeks to build a strong, healthy and engaged community by connecting volunteers of all ages with opportunities to serve in Reston. Our volunteers make an immeasurable impact, not only on RA, but on our community as a whole. The mission of Volunteer Reston is to enhance Reston Association’s services and programs by matching the varied talents of individuals and groups of all ages, interests and skills, with a variety of engaging and challenging projects and endeavors. Volunteers range in ages, come from diverse ethnic backgrounds and have a multitude of skill levels. Our volunteers all have one thing in common — they care about the Reston community. This past year projects included cleaning our streams, lakes and natural areas; assisting at our trout fishing event; workdays at the Walker Nature Center; removing invasive plants; and planting native species; and monitoring streams. Volunteers come from all walks of life and include high school, middle school and college students, retirees, scouts, individuals, families and businesses. Some of these volunteers have been involved in Reston for many years. They participate in one-time events, and serve on the Board of Directors or advisory committees, while others return to the same events each year.

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Projects Are you a Boy Scout looking for a Life or Eagle Service Project or a Girl Scout looking for a Silver or Gold Service Project? If so, we have some ideas for you and would welcome the opportunity to assist scouts in the completion of projects benefiting the Reston community. To discuss project ideas, you will need to be an approved volunteer with Reston Association. Go to www.reston.org and click on the

Some say it’s the tree planting they like the best, some like the fact that they can cultivate an idea and watch it flourish. In some cases, RA volunteers actually do “dig” into the dirt to plant a few seedlings. You can make a difference in your community, be involved in something you like, and meet some interesting people and learn some new skills in the process. Planting trees may not be what you’re into, but there are plenty of other areas in which to “grow.” RA is seeking volunteers to help enhance the community in a variety of areas. There are many opportunities available in such areas as environment and ecology, the Walker Nature Education Center, recreational programs and facilities, special events and many more.

u

T

“Get Involved” tab to complete the online volunteer application. Scout troops, school groups and other organized youth groups or clubs can also participate in the Habitat Heroes Program. For more information on scout projects, contact Ha Brock, RA volunteer & community outreach coordinator, at 703435-7986, or email habrock@ reston.org.


MULTICULTURAL

RESTON

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FESTIVAL

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS SEPT. 27

Volunteer Hours: 7 a.m.-8 p.m. (Rain or Shine) Lake Anne Plaza, 1609-A Washington Plaza, Reston Volunteers are an essential part of the festival, and each year it takes more than 100 volunteers to make the event a community success. Please carefully review the list of possible job descriptions. Volunteers will receive a food voucher and a festival volunteer T-shirt. Volunteers must be 13 years or older. Younger volunteers must be accompanied by an adult. The Reston Multicultural Festival is an annual event that brings together the people of Reston to celebrate our rich medley of cultures. The festival opening will include a Naturalization Ceremony where some of America’s newest citizens will take the Oath of Allegiance. Come and share with family, friends, and neighbors the music, entertainment, dress, food, and cultural treasures from all over the world that are all right here. The Festival is hosted by the Lake Anne of Reston Condominium Association and cosponsored by the Reston Association, with partners from a variety of Reston-based organizations and businesses. This signature Reston event honors the diversity that is one of our greatest assets. For more information on the festival or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, 703-435-7986 or e-mail habrock@reston.org.

FESTIVAL VOLUNTEER SCHEDULE

Please specify which day and shifts you would like to work. If you are taking on more than two shifts, we will provide you with breaks in between shifts. Pre-event: Friday, Sept. 26 3-6 p.m. Festival set-up Event: Saturday, Sept. 27 7-11 a.m. Set-up 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Specific jobs at the festival (see job descriptions) 2-5:30 p.m. Specific jobs at the festival (see job descriptions) 5:30-8 p.m. Breakdown

JOB DESCRIPTIONS

Parking Attendants – Control access to parking lot by directing the public to parking areas around the plaza. Volunteer must be 18 years or older. Activity Assistant – Volunteers will assist with hands-on arts and crafts making activities with school-aged children. Volunteers will be assigned tasks by staff. Surveys Takers – Volunteers will walk around the festival site asking attendees to fill out a brief survey. Volunteers should be outgoing and comfortable talking with people.

Concession – Volunteers will assist with selling popcorn, hot dogs & cotton candy. Set-up/Break Down – Set-up crew in the morning will help with decorating the plaza, setting up tables, chairs and tablecloths. Volunteers may be required to do heavy lifting. Please note: set-up will take place as early as 7 a.m. and break down will begin at 5:30 p.m.

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HABITAT HEROES PROJECTS

Our native trees, ferns and wildflowers are under attack by invasive plants like English ivy, Japanese honeysuckle and bamboo. We need heroes like you to join us in rescuing Reston’s beautiful parkland from these aggressive plants. These fast growing aggressive plants escape from people’s yards and threaten local ecosystems, taking away vital food and habitat from already stressed wildlife populations. Please join us and spend a couple of hours in our parkland protecting our natural areas. We meet the fourth Saturday of each month from 10 a.m. – noon during the months of March – November, except August. You don’t need to be an expert to assist in protecting our forests and help us restore Reston’s forests to their natural state. Our volunteering opportunities each month provide you with all the training you need to become an honorary Habitat Hero! We do a lot of invasive removal year-round. In the fall, we also focus some of our efforts on replanting of shrubs and trees, as it is the best time of year to plant for maximum survivability and site success. For all projects: Please wear long sleeves and long pants to protect against biting insects, thorns, and poison ivy. There is poison ivy at all sites. Bring gardening gloves if you have them. RA will provide some tools, gloves, snacks and water.

PROJECT SITES | SATURDAY FROM 10 A.M.-NOON Beat the Bush Honeysuckle

SEPT. 27

10805 Oldfield Drive We will battle bush honeysuckle and garlic mustard surrounding the Oldfield Tot Lot. We need help cutting back the large invasive bush honeysuckle that have taken over the field edge and hidden the natural beauty of our woods. Meet at the Oldfield Tot Lot, and park along Oldfield Drive. The entrance steps are located between 10803 and 10807 Oldfield Drive.

NeighborWoods® Month Planting for Habitat Restoration

OCT. 4

Old Trail Drive During NeighborWoods® Month, help restore the Old Trail Drive natural area by planting beautiful native trees and shrubs. Meet at the asphalt path between 2337 and 2339 Old Trail Drive. We will plant near the asphalt path at the base of the stairs.

Support Biodiversity

OCT.

Golf Course Island 25 Garden Plots Want to learn how to use a Weed Wrench? Join Habitat Heroes this month to help restore the natural area behind the garden plots. We will use neat tools like the Weed Wrench, hand saws and loppers to remove bush honeysuckle, burning bush, and more from this unhealthy patch of woods. Please park along North Shore Drive near the intersection with Links Drive. We will meet in front of the Golf Course Island Garden Plots. If you arrive late, look for signs and the group down the trail behind the garden plots.

Stop the Choking Hazard

Sanibel Drive Help protect the Sanibel Drive natural area by removing the English ivy that is battling native plants for a place to grow. Thick ivy can accelerate rot by holding in moisture, which can also attract mosquitoes. Please park at the culde-sac on Sanibel Drive. Then walk down the asphalt path turning behind the houses to the left. There is poison ivy at this site.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA volunteer and community outreach coordinator, at habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986.

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Halloween House & Trick-or-Treat Trail We’re looking for fun-loving, energetic Halloween volunteers to bring this event to the community. Friday, Oct. 24 & Saturday, Oct. 25, 4:30-9:30 p.m. Rain or shine event Walker Nature Center, 11450 Glade Drive, Reston, VA Teens and adult volunteers are needed at this event. Volunteers between ages of 13-14 must have an adult chaperone. Volunteers 15 through adult are eligible to be a character. Volunteers will receive pizza dinner. VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION There will be a volunteer orientation on October 14 from 6-7 p.m. at the event location, Walker Nature Center. The meeting is very important for everyone who is interested in helping out. All characters must attend. JOB DESCRIPTIONS Casting Call – Halloween characters needed. All costumes and scripts will be provided. Volunteers will receive talking points and suggested dialogue. To be a character, we hope you will understand and stay committed to this wonderful community service. Volunteers will receive their script at orientation. Earl the Squirrel character & Escort – Kids love Earl the Squirrel! They love having their picture taken. We need a volunteer to wear the costume. This person needs excellent people skills and should be able to animate the character without talking. We also need an escort to help lead Earl around and help children pose for pictures with Earl. This job requires standing and walking. Concessions – Preparation, serving and selling popcorn, cotton candy and beverages.

Face Painting – Paint simple animals and shapes on children’s faces. Design choices are usually pre-determined. Minimal artistic skill necessary. Supplies provided. Carnival Activities – Responsible for assisting children play Halloween-related carnival games and crafts. Volunteers will also distribute prizes and candy. Trick-or-Treat Trail Assistant (Start) – Welcome patrons to the trail, check for hand stamps, explain the rules of the trail and hand out trick-or-treat bags. Trick-or-Treat Trail Assistant (End) – Stop patrons from entering the trail, direct them to the start and pass out candy.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, Volunteer and Community Outreach Coordinator at habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986. Volunteers must be pre-registered to help with this event.

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STORM DRAIN MARKING PROJECT

What can you do to protect our local streams, lakes and the Chesapeake Bay? One way is to participate in the Storm Drain Marking Project. Our storm drains prevent flooding of roads and neighborhoods by carrying rain away from streets and sidewalks. Unlike water from our taps, water flowing into our storm drains is not treated. Storm drains connect directly to our streams and empty into our lakes. Trash, pet waste, motor oil, paint and other materials dumped or washed into storm drains pollute our watersheds and ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay. Markers on each storm drain remind all of us to keep storm drains and our streams clean. By contacting Nicki Bellezza, Reston Association’s watershed supervisor, you can be a part of the Storm Drain Marking Project. Since there are over 4,000 storm drains in Reston, many volunteers are needed to mark the storm drains and to help educate the

community about the connection between the storm drains and our streams and lakes. Everybody is encouraged to participate. Many storm drains in Reston are on private roads. In order for volunteers to mark the drains, clusters need to grant permission first. Contact your local cluster board member and get your neighborhood involved today.

Connect with us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ VolunteerReston. “Like” us on Facebook today. View our photo albums to see volunteers of all ages in action and find out how your neighbors and friends are getting involved in Reston.

To get your project started or for more information, contact Nicki Bellezza at 703-435-6560, Nicki@reston.org. The Storm Drain Marking Project in Reston is sponsored by the Fairfax County Department of Public Works and Environmental Services, the Northern VA Soil and Water Conservation District, the Virginia Department of TransportationNorthern VA District, and Reston Association.

Stream Monitoring Thursday, Sept. 18, 7-9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20, 9 a.m.-Noon Saturday, Oct. 11, 9-11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 8, 9-11 a.m. RA welcomes new volunteers to assist with stream monitoring at several locations throughout Reston. It involves working within a small team during all seasons to collect data and identify insects with the goal of assessing the health of Reston’s streams. For a regular investment in the program, training and practice opportunities are offered by joining seasoned volunteers and RA staff.

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Each monitoring session consists of 2-3 hours. There is a certification process and a two-year commitment is encouraged. However, more casual and less frequent volunteers are also welcome. Join us for an indoor workshop on Thursday, September 18 to learn how to identify the stream creatures and follow it up with an outdoor monitoring session on Saturday, September 20. For more information, please contact Ha Brock at 703-435-7986 or email habrock@reston.org.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


VOLUNTEE R

TEAM BUILDING WITH A DIFFERENCE Corporate Volunteer Program

Our Corporate Volunteer Programs offer expertise in community service to corporations by creating customized, hands-on group volunteer projects that complement team building, leadership development, and philanthropy initiatives. Through this program, Reston Association staff will fully develop and coordinate all aspects of your company’s community service volunteer project.

Who We Are

Reston Association is one of the largest community associations in the U.S. We serve over 60,000 residents in Reston. Even though we’re not a “town” per se, we provide services and

BOARDS & COMMITTEES

programs similar to a town or city government. We own and maintain over 1,300 acres of parkland, 15 outdoor pools and 48 tennis courts, a 72-acre Nature Center, 55 miles of pathways and four man-made lakes. Living in Reston is like living in a park. Your project will go through the Friends of Reston, a 501(c)3 organization established in 1999 to support the Reston Association in bringing valuable projects to the community. The Friends group allows the association to tap into other resources to bring great community projects to fruition on our land, at our facilities and within our programs.

Why Partner With Us

Be recognized in your support. ƒƒ An article and photos of “your give back” project will be printed in RA’s Reston magazine, mailed to 22,000 households and will have a long shelf life. ƒƒ Your company’s name will be listed on the event flyer which is distributed throughout Reston prior to the event, if time permits. ƒƒ RA’s volunteer and community outreach coordinator will work with you to design a volunteer experience that will have a major impact on those you serve while also making sure we stay aligned with your corporate philanthropic mission.

UNLIMITED OPPORTUNITIES . . .

Should you have something specific in mind, we would love to hear your ideas.

Serve on our Board or Committees. Our Advisory Committees are where you can really immerse yourself in a cause or area that suits you. Advisory Committees are comprised of RA members who provide advice on Association matters and perform such duties as may be requested by the Board of Directors. Advisory Committees exist for a term of one year from the annual or initial meeting of the Board of Directors and may be renewed at the discretion of the Board of Directors. The Board currently has eight such committees: ƒƒ The Reston Neighborhood Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Environmental Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Pedestrian and Bicycling Advisory Committee ƒƒ The 55+ Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Tennis Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Transportation Advisory Committee ƒƒ The Communications Advisory Committee Each committee is comprised of up to 15 members and includes a Board member and at least one staff liaison and generally meets once per month. More information on the committees and an application can be found at www.reston.org.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Special Project Donations

Donate funds towards the purchase of plants and supplies or engage employees to participate in special service projects during the work week.

Habitat Heroes

Clear invasive species and increase biodiversity in Reston’s natural areas during a half-day or fullday event during the week or participate in a scheduled Saturday event March – November.

Annual Events

Sponsor and engage employees in a one-day special event such as MLK Day of Service (January), 5K Fund Run (April), Spring Festival (May), Reston Multicultural Festival (September) or the Halloween House & Trick-or-Treat Trail to benefit the Nature House (October).

Adopt-a-Recycling Bin Donate funds towards the purchase of recycling bins to increase recycling in Reston.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA volunteer and community outreach coordinator, at habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986. WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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DELOITTE IMPACT DAY 2014 It’s called “IMPACT DAY’ for a reason. On June 6 from 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Southgate Community Center and Reston Association staff worked alongside 75 Deloitte volunteers on an indoor and outdoor beautification service project at Southgate Community Center. Volunteers upgraded the landscaping, removed invasive plants along the back fence, brightened up the program rooms with paints, refurnished donated furniture, painted the outside railings and added a hopscotch grid. Deloitte also added a nice touch with a quote from Shel Silverstein on one of the main walls. It just goes to show what happens when 75 volunteers from Deloitte descend upon the community center. This was a major endeavor. Thank you Deloitte for the financial support and the massive effort that went into making the day a success. This is Reston Association's 5th year working with Deloitte. We look forward to partnering with them again next year.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


VOLUNTEE R

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G ET INVOLVED

GARLIC MUSTARD CHALLENGE WINNERS 2014 

 Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) is a rapidly spreading invasive plant with a two-year life cycle. It spreads in wooded areas and can rapidly dominate a forest floor. Garlic mustard out-competes native plants for light and nutrients and secretes damaging chemicals that alter the soil chemistry, inhibiting the growth of native plants and trees. Garlic mustard is toxic to local caterpillars, reducing native butterfly populations.
 The second annual Garlic Mustard Challenge was a huge success this year, with participants pulling about a thousand pounds of garlic mustard. This is a great difference from the 260 pounds in 2013. The Challenge culminated at the Spring Festival located at Nature House on Saturday, May 3, where participants brought their large trash bags full of garlic mustard to be weighed by RA staff, Claudia Thompson-Deahl and Chris Brown. RA would like to thank all of the participants of this year's Garlic Mustard Challenge. The winners of the 2014 Garlic Mustard Challenge are:

appreciation and congratulate these two individuals for their dedication to caring for Reston’s natural areas.

CA TECHNOLOGIES

Small Group Category (10 or fewer people) – CA Technologies

RA would like to congratulate CA Technologies for winning the small group category of less than 10 participants with two people pulling a total of 90 pounds. This is the first year that CA Technologies has participated in the Garlic Mustard Challenge. A big thanks goes to Lori Thomas for coordinating the participation.

Individuals Category– Domenick DiPasquale and Molly O’Boyle

RA would like to congratulate two winners in the Individuals Category, Domenick DiPasquale and Molly O’Boyle for winning the individual category. Domenick DiPasquale pulled 150 pounds and Molly O’Boyle pulled 45 pounds of garlic mustard. RA would like to show our

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October 18,10 a.m.-Noon (Rain or shine) All Ages Are Welcome WHERE?

Potential sites located near the Hunters Woods Village Center, Southgate Community Center, Cedar Ridge Apartments and in the woods near Great Owl Circle.

WHY? REACT

Large Group Category (more than 10 people) – Reston Environmental Action (REACT) RA would like to congratulate REACT for winning the Large Group Category with a grand total of 302.5 pounds. This is the second year that REACT has won in the large group category.

DOMENICK & MOLLY

FALL STREAM CLEANUP


Thank you to all who made the 2014 Garlic Mustard Challenge a success. Next year's Garlic Mustard Challenge will start in February, with the addition of a new Corporate Group category. Welcome one and all.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Tons of trash ends up in the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay every year from our watersheds. Litter is harmful and an eyesore in our neighborhoods and open spaces. Let’s do our part. It is amazing what a group of people can accomplish in a few hours.

HOW?

To sign up, call Ha Brock, at 703-435-7986 or email at habrock@ reston.org. Please sign up by October 10. Gloves and supplies are provided.


VOLUNTEE R COMMUNITY BUILDING RENTAL To reserve a community room or picnic pavilion, contact Member Services at 703-435-6530 or emailing reservations@reston.org.

MEETING FACILITIES

RA’s Glade Room and Brown’s Chapel are frequently used for group functions, including cluster meetings, scout meetings, wedding ceremonies and a variety of classes. RENTAL FEES: $20–$70 per hour (security deposit required)

BROWN’S CHAPEL, 11300 Baron Cameron Avenue Size: 914 square feet Its tall ceilings provide excellent acoustics and its park-like grounds offer a lovely setting. The facility has chairs to seat 50 people, three tables, restroom facilities, heating, air conditioning and ample parking. It is perfect for church services, small meetings or classes. GLADE ROOM, 11550 Glade Drive Size: 881 square feet Located above the pool bathhouse at the intersection of Glade and Soapstone Drive. This facility is equipped with chairs to seat 75 people, four tables, restroom facilities, heating and air conditioning. It is an ideal facility for preschool groups, dance classes, small meetings and club functions.

PICNIC PAVILIONS

Available for rent seven days a week April through October, a perfect place for private parties and group gatherings. RENTAL FEES APPLY: $155/RA Members, $310/Corporate & Non-members HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION (James “Jimmy” Wright Memorial Pavilion), at the corner of Steeplechase Drive and Reston Parkway. Size: 842 square feet The pavilion offers four picnic tables, one grill and ample parking (shared parking at Hunters Woods Pool or Hunters Woods Park).

NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION Center Harbor Road and North Village Road Size: 1,024 square feet North Hills Picnic Pavilion offers electricity, water, lights, three large brick barbecue grills, two portable restrooms, six picnic tables (under cover of pavilion), tot-lot and ample parking.

BROWN’S CHAPEL PICNIC PAVILION Located next to Brown’s Chapel, 11300 Baron Cameron Avenue

PONY BARN Corner of Steeplechase Drive and Triple Crown Road Size: 2,006 square feet

This pavilion is equipped with four picnic tables, two grills, and restrooms. The pavilion is near a basketball court, ball fields, an exercise trail and a tot-lot. Lake Newport is close by for fishing off the dock/ dam. Brown’s Chapel Picnic Pavilion is available on a firstcome, first-serve basis at no charge.

A wood-chipped tot-lot, equipped with swings and a jungle gym, is an inviting place for youngsters to romp and play. The Pony Barn contains seven picnic tables, two grills and two portable restrooms. Water available.

LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION 11301 North Shore Drive Size: 900 square feet Lake Anne Park includes a tot-lot, two large grills and a restroom facility. Six picnic tables are situated under cover. Basketball court, tennis court, sand volleyball court, water, electricity, and ample parking also are available. Recreational courts are not included in private reservation.

TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION Corner of North Shore Drive and Temporary Road Size: 892 square feet The pavilion is equipped with ten picnic tables (eight of which are under cover), one large grill, two portable restrooms, swing set and four benches situated throughout the park. Parking is available in 16 marked spaces or at curbside. Water fountain available.

WALKER NATURE CENTER: See page 59 for more information on rental space. WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL 2014

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L IVING IN RESTON

RA Wants to Connect with Y u F or efficiency and assistance in communicating important messages to our members, Reston Association maintains a database of contact information for all cluster and condo associations in Reston. This roster includes items such as contact information for the cluster and condo boards, including a list of officers and their contact information, the management company’s contact information (if applicable), cluster or condo mailing addresses, and the name of the assigned covenants advisor. Keeping the cluster/condo roster information up-to-date is incredibly useful for both internal RA staff and our community members as they work with the association. Part of the Design Review Board (DRB) process for homeowners in a cluster or condo association includes obtaining the signature of a cluster or condo board officer. Covenants staff often refers to

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the database to direct homeowners on who to go to for that signature. RA will accept the signature of the president, vice president, secretary or treasurer only as currently listed in the RA roster. Making sure that contact information is up-to-date is a substantial help to homeowners. Covenants staff also consults the roster to assist homeowners with matters that are specific to the cluster or condo. For example, questions about parking, guest parking, snow removal, trash/recycling and cluster/ condo common areas are often referred back to the cluster or condo board as RA usually does not have purview over those items. Finally, RA staff often checks the roster to see who homeowners or their agents should contact regarding disclosure documents for the cluster or condo. RA, as the master association, provides resale disclosure documents to owners when they

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

are selling their homes, but those homeowners that live in clusters or condos must also obtain disclosure documents from the cluster or condo association. Having a specific contact person in the roster helps RA assist homeowners, agents and title companies during that process. Updating your cluster or condo board contact information can be done a few ways. A form is available on the RA website that can be filled out and submitted. Cluster or condo board members can also contact RA directly via email (keeyana@reston. org). Finally, you can contact your covenants advisor to assist you with the process. Cluster and condo board information should be updated with RA anytime the officers/board members change. This way we can ensure that we are providing members with the most up-to-date and accurate information.


COVENANT S

Welcome SILVER LINE

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яБо PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN BAHRAMI

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B OARD & GOVERNANCE

BOARD ACTIONS MARCH – JUNE March 27, 2014 ƒƒ

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Approved the request of the Seniors Advisory Committee to change the committee’s name to “55+ Advisory Committee.” Directed Staff to send a letter to Supervisor Hudgins requesting that if the application by EnviroSolutions is approved by the County Board of Supervisors, language be included in the agreement providing Reston Association with the right to free disposal of lake-dredged materials Entered into a one-year agreement with Surf Reston, LLC, as drafted by the Association’s legal counsel, to use Lakes Anne and Audubon for standup paddle board instruction, incorporating the proposed changes enumerated by the Board in 2013: (1) requiring Surf Reston to have insurance naming Reston Association (RA) as additional insured in the amount recommended by RA’s carrier; and, (2) delineating the revenue terms to be paid to RA for the use of the lakes. Entered into a one-year agreement with SUP-Asana, as drafted by the Association’s legal counsel, to use Lake Anne for stand-up paddle board yoga classes, under the same conditions as outlined above for Surf Reston, LLC, pending the successful outcome of SUPAsana’s purchase of space at Lake Anne Village Center. Granted the request of the owner(s) of the property located at 11901 Triple Crown Road, Reston, VA 20191 to enter into a recordable Maintenance Covenant Agreement with Reston Association to construct and maintain a shallow rock swale located in part on Reston Association Common Area property – Section 8, Parcel 74 – subject to the execution of such agreement as reviewed and approved by Reston Association’s legal counsel and, if approved, recorded after execution by both parties. Approved to undertake three Strategic Board Actions over

the next 12 months in support of the Association’s 2012-2016 Strategic Plan. (Details available at www.reston.org.)

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Granted a permanent easement and temporary construction easement over Reston Association Common Area Section 22, Block 1, Parcel 24 to the Fairfax Water Authority to provide a 24-inch water main connection from Sunrise Valley Drive to the W&OD Trail property, subject to review and approval by the Association’s legal counsel, the Design Review Board, and subject to the payment of an easement fee of $3,208.50 to the Association. Approved the Staffrecommended update to the Association’s non-discrimination policy, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of political affiliation or gender identity in addition to the basis for discrimination already included in the policy. Directed staff to prepare, for consideration by the Board of Director’s on June 26, 2014, a plan to evaluate alternative uses of the Pony Barn Picnic Area located at the corner of Steeplechase Drive and Triple Crown Road, which would

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

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include but not be limited to the possibility of a memorial garden of reflection. Appointed, at the recommendation of the Fiscal Committee, Raffa Wealth Management as Reston Association’s investment manager to conduct investment business with and on behalf of the Association, subject to an appropriate letter of engagement or contract reviewed by legal counsel. Directed the Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC) and the Design Review Board to work together to draft, for the RA Board’s consideration, one or more Design Guidelines that capture the recommendations of the EAC on tree cover preservation/restoration and stormwater management as they relate to development and redevelopment projects in Reston. Consideration should also be given to amending existing Design Guidelines to achieve these desired outcomes. Accepted the proposed Reston Association (RA) Procedures for Commenting on Development/ Redevelopment Projects (available online at www.reston.org) as developed by RA Staff and Land Use Counsel in coordination with Fairfax County

Hunter Mill District Supervisor Catherine M. Hudgins and County Planning staff, and directed RA staff to work with Legal Counsel to convert the document into the form of a Resolution for the Board’s consideration by June 2014.

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Approved the proposed revisions to Use & Maintenance Standards Resolution 15; AirConditioning Service Covenant Reasonable Accommodations (available online at www.reston.org); thereby delineating the conditions under which the Covenants Committee may grant temporary exemption permits to Members bound by Section VI.2(b)(15) of the Reston Deed, as amended. Moved to fill the open North Point Director Seat vacated by Tim Cohn, effective on Friday, May 30, 2014, whose term was to expire in April 2016, and moved to adopt a resolution which establishes the procedures for the Board of Directors to appoint member to fill the open North Point District Director seat.

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Approved the request of the Reston Triathlon Association


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(“RTA”), subject to an agreement approved by Reston Association’s Legal Counsel, to use Lake Audubon and Lake Audubon Pool Facilities for the swim portion of the 31st Annual Reston Triathlon to be held on Sunday, September 7, 2014. Approved the request of the 2014 Lake Thoreau Boat Party Committee to play amplified music on Lake Thoreau during its lake neighborhood event to be held on Saturday, August 23, 2014, 7-11 p.m. (with a rain date of Sunday, August 24, 2014, from 6-10 p.m.) under certain restrictions. Adopted Land Use Resolution 1; Procedures for Comment on Development/Redevelopment Projects (available online at www.reston.org). Adopted Use & Maintenance Standards Resolution 16; Common Area Violations & Encroachments (available online at www.reston. org) to address incidents where obstructions or unapproved improvements, as defined in Reston Deed Section VI.2 Use and Maintenance of Property, have been found on the Association’s Property or Common Area, presumably made by a person or entity. Adopted a resolution authorizing the President of the Reston Association (“RA”) to enter into an agreement, on behalf of RA, with Lake Anne Development Partners LLC to exchange unimproved land, under certain terms and conditions, and allow a parcel of RA property to continue to be included with zoning entitlement applications to Fairfax County for the redevelopment and revitalization of Lake Anne Village Center and the Crescent Apartments property. Approved the deer hunting request by owners of 11624, 11626 and 11628 Sourwood Lane, subject to the execution of an agreement as approved by Reston Association’s Legal Counsel, thereby granting permission to bow hunt through the 2016-2017 urban archery

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season, and subject to the conditions outlined in Use & Maintenance Standards Resolution 1, waiving the condition delineated in Section 3.a.iii of the Resolution that the proposed location of the hunter be held 75 yards from any street. Approved the proposed community engagement process for renovating or re-purposing the Pony Barn/Steeplechase Recreation Area. Adopted amendments to Committees Resolution 5, Board Advisory Committees, thereby establishing the Community Engagement Advisory Committee to take the place of the current Communications and Reston Neighborhood Advisory Committees.

Some of the above motions have been abbreviated from their original form. Full motions can be reviewed online at www.reston.org by clicking on 2014 Board Meeting Agenda Packets.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS « BoardofDirectors@reston.org Ken Knueven, President At-Large Representative BODKnueven@reston.org or kknueven@hotmail.com Ellen Graves, Vice-President Apartment Owners’ Representative BODGraves@reston.org

Michael R. Sanio, Secretary At-Large Representative bodmichaelsanio@reston.org or Michael.R.Sanio@gmail.com

John Higgins, Treasurer At-Large Representative BODHiggins@reston.org or jdhiggins3@gmail.com

Lucinda Shannon Hunters Woods/Dogwood District BODshannon@reston.org

Rachel Muir At-Large BODmuir@reston.org

Eve Thompson Lake Anne-Tall Oaks District Representative BODthompson@reston.org

Dannielle LaRosa North Point District BODLaRosa@reston.org Richard Chew South Lakes District Representative directorchew@reston.org Jeff Thomas At-Large BODthomas@reston.org

Cate Fulkerson Chief Executive Officer cate@reston.org

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I NFO & RESOURCES

RESTON ASSOCIATION COMMON AREA 1. Owners, including owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall not attempt to nor improve, alter, landscape or mow Reston Association (RA) Common Area. 2. Owners, including owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall confine all fencing (including invisible fencing), sheds, or any other development to their own property. 3. RA meadows in the Common Area shall be mowed annually by RA staff only. 4. Smoking is prohibited within all RA Community Buildings, and is also prohibited in all Pool facilities; on and within all Tennis Court facilities and Picnic Pavilions; on all Ballfields, Multi-purpose Courts, Garden Plots or Garden Plot Areas; and on or within Tot-Lots or Tot-Lot Areas. This smoking ban is also in effect within a fifty (50) foot wide perimeter around the exterior of any building or the boundary of any facility, to the extent that such fifty (50) foot area, or any portion thereof, comprises RA Common Area. The utilization of electronic cigarettes is also prohibited on these RA common areas. On those Association Common Areas where smoking is not prohibited by this resolution, RA strongly discourages smoking and requests that all persons refrain from smoking. 5. Horseback riding shall be confined to designated bridle paths.

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6. Dogs are to be walked on a leash in accordance with Fairfax County regulations. Cats, while on Common Area, must also be walked on a leash. Except for service dogs, no pets are permitted on active recreation areas, including but not limited to, such areas as playgrounds, picnic and multi-purpose courts, and play fields. 7. Dumping of any refuse, including but not limited to, grass clippings, leaves, Christmas trees, appliances, old sofas, crank case oil, etc., is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(b).] 8. No invasive exotic plants or animals (especially invasive plants such as bamboo and English ivy) shall be introduced to the RA Common Area. 9. Unless specifically authorized by the Association, the use of any motor vehicles or other motorized vehicle, other than governmental police, fire and rescue vehicles, on walkways or other Common Area is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(db)(10).] 10. Loitering, as defined by Fairfax County Code Article 1 Section 5-1-2, is prohibited. Specifically, it shall be unacceptable for any person to loiter at, on, or in RA Common Area in the following manner: a. To interfere, impede or hinder the free passage of pedestrian or authorized vehicular traffic; b. To threaten or do physical harm to another member or members of the public; c. To threaten or do physical damage to

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

the Common Area; or d. To breach the peace or engage in disorderly conduct by the use of words or acts or other conduct that clearly threaten, intimidate or present a danger to others. Except where 10 a-d apply, before contacting local law enforcement, Reston Association, in its sole discretion, may contact an appropriate organization(s) to assist in the intervention with or removal of individuals from the Common Area. 11. Unless specifically authorized by the RA Board of Directors, the following actions are prohibited in the RA Common Area: a. Carrying or discharging of firearms, air guns, archery equipment, including but not limited to, bow and arrow, and B-B guns; b. Hunting, trapping, harvesting or collecting of any wildlife, including but not limited to, mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians; c. Feeding of nondomesticated wild animals (except songbirds); d. Practices that attract non-domesticated wild animals or those that may be vectors for infectious diseases, including but not limited to, leaving pet food out of doors overnight in a location accessible to nondomesticated wild animals; e. Fires or burning; f. Overnight camping; g. Harvesting or collecting plant life, except as authorized by the Association.

12. Fishing in the Association’s Lakes and Ponds is permitted as per Section 8(i) of Common Area Rules & Regulations Resolution 2 on Lake Use & Access. 13. Geocaching [use of Geographic Positioning Systems (GPS)] to locate a cache of materials is permitted only by Members under the following rules: a. Members interested in performing geocaching must notify the Association of all cache sites; b. Cache sites located on the Common Area must be completely hidden from view; c. Cache sites are not permitted near wildflowers, a wildlife nest or den; d. Cache sites located in the Association’s Common Area, known as the Walker Nature Education Center, must be no more than ten feet from a pathway or trail edge; e. The Association shall not be held liable for any injuries or personal property damage incurred by those participating in geocaching on the Common Area. The Board of Directors may, for specific management purposes on certain properties, amend these rules or implement additional rules to meet land and resource management objectives.


INFO & RESOURCE S

FISHING & BOATING GUIDELINES

Reston’s four man-made lakes — Anne, Thoreau, Audubon, and Newport — along with Reston’s two ponds, Bright and Butler, cover 125 acres and provide recreation and stormwater management for the community. While swimming and ice skating are not permitted, fishing, boating, wildlife watching, and lakeside picnicking are available to RA members and their guests.

Fishing in Reston

Fishing is allowed on all of Reston’s lakes and ponds from designated areas. Species of fish that may be caught include: largemouth bass, channel catfish, crappie, blue gill and sunfish. ƒƒ ƒƒ

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Anglers 16 years and older must have a VA fishing license. Residents may fish from RA-owned property, which includes the dams on each lake. Much of the shoreline around each lake is private. Please respect the “No Trespassing” and “Private Property” areas indicated by signs. Please do not remove or damage shoreline vegetation. Please do not litter. Please do not feed ducks, geese or other waterfowl. Help protect people and wildlife. Please take all lines, lures and hooks with you when you leave.

Places to Fish

Lake Newport: Along the dam (Park at Brown’s Chapel Park.) Lake Anne: Along the Lake Anne Plaza steps and public docks, along south shore of the canal and along the dam. Lake Thoreau: Along 80 feet of shoreline and the public dock near Lake Thoreau pool, along dam by Lake Audubon, along bridge near golf course, and along timber wall at Purple Beach.

Lake Audubon: Along dam by Lake Thoreau, at boat ramp by Lake Audubon Pool off Twin Branches Road, and along shoreline for 150 feet near Nature Center (Docks are private.)

Boating in Reston

Reston’s four lakes are also available for boating. Whether you want to launch your own craft or rent a boat at Lake Anne (in season only), ample opportunities exist to get on the water. We suggest taking your favorite book out, having a floating picnic or fishing for largemouth bass. ƒƒ

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A free permit for general access to the four lakes is available at RA headquarters, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive during regular office hours. Proof of boat size is required. The concrete boat ramp at Lake Audubon, off of Twin Branches Road, is available to launch boats from trailers. (Electric motors only) Access points are monitored between April and October.

Other general access points for hand-carried boats include: ƒƒ On Lake Thoreau, the grassy area by the underpasses at the intersection of South Lakes Dr. and Ridge Heights Road; ƒƒ On Lake Anne, the area at the north end of the dam at the intersection of Wiehle Ave. and Inlet Court; ƒƒ On Lake Newport, at the east end of the dam at the wooden dock.

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Boats (jon boats, canoes, deck boats, sailboats, etc.) may be up to 18 feet long, and no more than 10 feet wide. One electric motor (no gas motors) up to three horsepower or the equivalent of 80 pounds of thrust may be used. Inflatables must have three separate compartments and sidewalls. All boats are required to have a wearable flotation device for each passenger on board. All boats left in the water between November 1 and

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March 31 require a permanent mooring permit. Only lakefront owners may permanently moor a boat on Reston’s lakes. Individual clusters or condo associations, which own lakefront property, have specific rules regarding mooring boats consistent with RA rules and regulations. For more information, see Resolution 2: Lake Use Access in the Governing Documents. If you see an abandoned boat floating around or you have lost your boat on our lakes, call Watershed Specialist Brian Petty at 703-435-6535 to help track it down.

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D IRECTORY & FACILITIES RESTON ASSOCIATION HEADQUARTERS (14)

NEWBRIDGE TENNIS COURTS (17)

BROWN’S CHAPEL PARK (4)

RESTON ASSOCIATION CENTRAL SERVICES FACILITY (10)

WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER (30)

12001 SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE 703-435-6530

11718 GOLF COURSE SQUARE

BARON CAMERON AVENUE

NORTH HILLS POOL (1)

SHADOWOOD TENNIS COURTS (23)

HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION (25)

12250 SUNSET HILLS ROAD 703-437-7658

11450 GLADE DRIVE 703-476-9689

1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

2201 SPRINGWOOD DRIVE

STEEPLECHASE DRIVE

TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION (11)

NORTH HILLS TENNIS COURTS (1)

LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION (6)

TEMPORARY ROAD/NORTH SHORE DRIVE

WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER CAMPFIRE RING (31)

AUTUMNWOOD POOL (2) 11950 WALNUT BRANCH ROAD

1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

11301 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

DOGWOOD POOL (24)

HOOK ROAD TENNIS COURTS (9)

NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION (1)

2460 GREEN RANGE ROAD

FAIRWAY DRIVE/HOOK ROAD

1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD

GLADE POOL (29)

AUTUMNWOOD TENNIS COURTS (2)

PONY BARN PICNIC PAVILION (28)

11950 WALNUT BRANCH ROAD

TRIPLE CROWN/ STEEPLECHASE DRIVE

11550 GLADE DRIVE

GOLF COURSE ISLAND POOL (12) 11301 LINKS DRIVE

BARTON HILL TENNIS COURTS (20)

HUNTERS WOODS POOL (26)

SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE/ BARTON HILL ROAD

2501 RESTON PARKWAY

LAKE AUDUBON POOL (22)

COLTS NECK TENNIS COURTS (27) COLTS NECK ROAD

2070 TWIN BRANCHES ROAD

LAKE NEWPORT POOL (3)

GLADE TENNIS COURTS (29) 11550 GLADE DRIVE

11601 LAKE NEWPORT ROAD

LAKE THOREAU POOL (19) 2040 UPPER LAKES DRIVE

NEWBRIDGE POOL (17) 11768 GOLF COURSE SQUARE

TALL OAKS POOL (13) 12025 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

UPLANDS POOL (7) 11032 RING ROAD

LAKE ANNE TENNIS COURTS (6)

NORTH SHORE POOL (8)

11301 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

11515 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

RIDGE HEIGHTS POOL (21)

NORTH SHORE QUICKSTART 36 FT TENNIS COURTS (8)

11400 RIDGE HEIGHTS ROAD

11515 NORTH SHORE DRIVE

SHADOWOOD POOL (23)

UPPER LAKES TENNIS COURTS (18)

2201 SPRINGWOOD DRIVE

UPPER LAKES DRIVE/SUNRISE VALLEY DRIVE

LAKE NEWPORT TENNIS COURTS (5) 11452 BARON CAMERON AVENUE

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UPLANDS TENNIS COURTS (7)

POLO FIELDS RECREATION AREA (15) THUNDER CHASE DRIVE

11032 RING ROAD

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

SOAPSTONE DRIVE/LAWYERS ROAD


HOME GARDEN

EXPO RESTON 2014

Saturday, October 11 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Reston Association Headquarters 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Great ideas & experts to help you improve your home & garden • landscapers, roofers, painters, and much more in one location Many exhibitors & 30-minute mini-seminars on a variety of homeowner related topics. Email Lisa Delgado at ldelgado@reston.org for more information.


12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191-3404

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE  PAID RESTON, VA PERMIT NO.21

Reston Fall 2014  

Reston Association Magazine