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CONTENT P O R T S TA F F

executive director

deputy director

c h i e f

Roy Quezaire

o p e r at i n g o f f i c e r

airport director

Vincent Caire

director of business development

executive counsel

director of finance

director of o p e r at i o n s

director of human resources

s p e c i a l

Dale Hymel, Jr.

Cindy Martin

director of a d m i n i s t r at i o n

Paul Aucoin

projects officer

Linda Prudhomme Melissa Folse Grant Faucheux Brian Cox Tamara Kennedy Joel T. Chaisson

port of south louisiana 171 Belle Terre Blvd., P.O. Box 909 LaPlace, LA 70069-0909 www.portsl.com Phone: (985) 652-9278 | Fax: (504) 568-6270 globalplex intermodal terminal Phone: (985) 652-9278 port of south louisiana executive regional airport Phone: (985) 652-9278 ext 8512 a s s o c i at e d t e r m i n a l s Phone: (985) 233-8545 The Port of South Louisiana is a member of the Ports Association of Louisiana. To become an associate member of PAL and to help further the maritime industry in Louisiana, please visit PAL’s website at www.portsoflouisiana.org or call the PAL office at (225) 334-9040.

published by renaissance publishing llc

editor

Operations Gangway

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director ’ s log overview

6 around the port River Parish Tourism Commission 8 what ’ s new FTZ 124 Gramercy

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Topher Balfer

Ali Sullivan

production designers Emily Andras, Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney

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airport update

traffic coordinator

Lane Brocato

Airport and Everyday Business

v i c e

president of sales

Colleen Monaghan

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company profile

20

company profile

22

port raits

St. John United Way

Louisiana Sugar Refinery

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what ’ s new South Louisiana Methanol Plant

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company profile

28

port map

what ’ s new

32

final frame

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PSL and Economic Development

Bayou Fleet

art director

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

port owned facilities

Brennan Manale, Caitlin Sistrunk, Jessica Jaycox, Sydney Steib

account executives

contributing writers

Andrea Blumenstein Jordan LaHaye William Kalec Misty Milioto

To advertise call Shelby Harper at (504) 830-7246 or email Shelby@myneworleans.com. 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Ste. 123, Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380 • www.myneworleans.com Copyright 2019 The Port Log, Port of South Louisiana, and Renaissance Publishing LLC. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Port of South Louisiana, Post Office Box 909, LaPlace, LA 700690909. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the owner or Publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine’s managers, owners or publisher. The Port Log is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self addressed stamped envelope.


DIRECTOR’S LOG

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he River Parishes’ resident industries are the life and blood of the regional economy and the Port of South Louisiana. In 2018, these companies moved over 303.1 million short tons of cargo, in spite of cargo movement stumbling blocks (e.g., high water on the Mississippi River during the spring). For that reason, our mission is to support our tenants, improve infrastructure, expand maritime industry services, encourage tonnage growth and create job opportunities within the district. Moving forward, the Port has more than $59 million of improvements and enhancements of port infrastructure that are crucial in remaining competitive in the global market. Four capital improvements projects are slated for the Port of South Louisiana’s Globalplex Intermodal Terminal: Almost 20 years ago, the general cargo dock was expanded to its current 660’ x 204’ configuration and outfitted with two Manitowoc 2250 rail-mounted cranes. The cargo needs of the dock facility have changed, and the need to operate efficiently and decrease cost have become a priority. Consequently, the requests for bids will go out around mid-2019 for (1) the acquisition of two new self-contained, self-propelled, diesel, rail-mounted, multi-purpose, single-jib cranes and (2) the fortification and retrofit of the dock to accommodate the new cranes and increased cargo capacity. We anticipate this $18.7 million project, funded by LA DOTD’s Port Priority program, to take two years to complete. We are in the process of rehabilitating a rail siding at the request of our tenant, Evonik, in the amount of $300,000, funded by the Port of South Louisiana. Simultaneously, Canadian National Railroad is installing a rail switch along its track on the north side of the warehouse. Both should be fully functional by summer 2019. A 54,000 square-foot warehouse on Holcim-leased property will undergo structural and cosmetic renovations, including repairs to metal beams, a new roof and siding. Construction is scheduled for spring 2019 and slated to be complete by mid-2020. Seventy percent of the project’s $4.1 million cost will be funded by Louisiana’s Capital Outlay program and the remainder covered by

d. paul robichaux president

pat sellars vice president

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Lafarge/Holcim and the Port of South Louisiana. Another 141,000 square-foot warehouse will undergo structural repairs as well, which are expected to be complete by the end of 2019. Approximately 65% of the $1.36 million cost will be funded by Louisiana’s Capital Outlay program, with the remainder financed by the Port of South Louisiana. The Port of South Louisiana will also be constructing a five-track rail yard for Dow Chemical that can accommodate 200 rail cars. This $8.7 million project, funded by Louisiana’s Capital Outlay program, will be located at SoLaPort, a port-owned property that sits adjacent to Dow Chemical in St. Charles Parish and will be accessible to Dow via an existing rail spur on the south side of the facility. We are expecting the bidding process to begin in the spring 2019 and construction to be complete in 2020. Upriver in St. John the Baptist Parish, the barge unloader system at ADM-Reserve is scheduled for an overhaul in late 2019/early 2020 and is expected to increase the facility’s grain processing efficiency and speed. Approximately 20% of the $25.5 million improvements will be funded by Louisiana Department of Transportation’s Port Priority program, with the remainder financed by Archer Daniels Midland. The upgraded system is planned to come on-line in mid-2021. Ten years ago, the Port of South Louisiana acquired what is now the Executive Regional Airport (KAPS) in St. John the Baptist Parish. In the past decade, we have expanded the runway and taxiway, installed an AWOS system and added a transient hangar, among other things. This year, in response to the high demand for hangar space, construction of a $1.15 million 10-unit T-hangar is scheduled to begin in late 2019. Fifty percent of its cost will be financed by LA DOTD’s Aviation Airport Construction and Development Priority Program and matched by the Port of South Louisiana. We are thankful for our continued success, an accomplishment to be credited to our first-rate industries whose cargo activity in 2018 registered as the second-best year for the Port of South Louisiana. We look forward to surpassing that figure in 2019 and remain committed to assisting our resident industries, the life and blood of the River Region. •

joseph scontrino executive vice president

p. joey murray

stanley bazile

treasurer

s e c r e ta r y

robert "poncho" roussel

kelly buckwalter

whitney hickerson

judy songy

vice president

vice president

vice president

vice president

SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA


OVERVIEW

T R A N S P O R TAT I O N CENTER OF THE AMERICAS The state legislature established the Port of South Louisiana in 1960 303.10

St. John and St. James tri-parish regions.

294.91

291.83

292.76

stretch of the Mississippi River that runs through the St. Charles,

307.86

to promote commerce and industrial development along the 54-mile

89.21

89.57

83.99

80.51

ORES / PHOSPHATE ROCK 11.4 (3.8%)

86.26

OTHER 2.7 (<1%) STEEL PRODUCTS 7.9 (2.6%)

MAIZE 48.3 (15.9%)

73.97

73.84

CHEMICALS / FERTILIZERS 22.2 (7.3%)

64.08

68.41

63.50

COAL / LIGNITE / COKE 21.7 (7.2%)

WHEAT 2.7 (<1%) SORGHUM (MILO) + RICE 1.5 (<1%)

65.96 73.96

2018

76.04 71.72

73.68 2016 67.59

2015

ANIMAL FEED 10.4 (3.4%)

73.23

NUMBER OF BARGE MOVEMENTS: 63,6388

2014

NUMBER OF VESSEL CALLS: 4,402

2017

75.93

69.67

TOTAL TONNAGE: 303,100,514

69.33

SOYBEAN 41 (13.5%)

PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA TOTAL TONNAGE 2018 (IN MILLIONS OF SHORT TONS) EXPORTS

DOMESTIC SHIPPED

IMPORTS

DOMESTIC RECEIVED

PETROCHEMICALS 59.1 (19.5%)

CRUDE OIL 74.1 (24.5%)

MISSION

PHILOSOPHY

FACILITIES

The Port is charged with a mission to promote maritime commerce, trade and development, and to establish public and private partnerships for the creation of intermodal terminals and industrial facilities.

The Port’s philosophy of development is to entice companies to set up regional operations within its boundaries. The Port serves primarily as a “landlord” port to more than 30 grain, petroleum and chemical companies. The exception to this is the port-owned world-class intermodal Globalplex facility SoLaPort, and the St. James Westbank property.

Within the Port’s jurisdiction, there are seven grain elevators, multiple midstreaming operations, more than 40 liquid and dry-bulk terminals, the Globalplex Intermodal Terminal and the Port’s Executive Regional Airport.

GOVERNANCE

The Port is under the jurisdiction of the state of Louisiana and authorized by the state constitution. A nine-member board of commissioners directs the Port; all of them are unsalaried.

WORLD’S LARGEST PORT DISTRICT

The ports of South Louisiana, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, St. Bernard and Plaquemines make up the world’s largest continuous port district. They are responsible for moving one-fifth of all U.S. foreign waterborne commerce.

PORT AREA

The Port covers a 54-mile stretch of the lower Mississippi River between New Orleans and Baton Rouge. The Port begins at river mile 114.9AHP near the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport and winds through St. Charles, St. John the Baptist and St. James parishes. It continues north to river mile 168.5AHP just north of the Sunshine Bridge. •

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AROUND THE PORT

R E DI SCOV E R THE RI VER REG I ON BY WILLIAM KALEC

After an extensive internal cultural audit, the River Parishes To u r i s t C o m m i s s i o n ’s n e w m a r k e t i n g e f f o r t t o u t s t h e a r e a a s a destination, not just a day trip.

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or Buddy Boe, Executive Director of the River Parishes Tourist Commission, the thought process was simple, yet brilliant: “Before we can share who we are with the world, we had to ask ourselves, ‘Well, who are we?’” Using that theme as an organizational compass, the River Parishes Tourist Commission recently underwent a complete rebranding in the dual hope of increasing traffic to already-popular attractions, as well as to fully promote fascinating cultural nuggets that had been under the radar for years. After an extensive introspective research and discovery process, the Tourist Commission recently decided to redesign the NEW ORLEANS PLANTATION COUNTRY logo, overhaul its entire website (www.visitnopc.com) to make it more contemporary, user-friendly and interactive, and have a profoundly greater presence at conventions and trade shows to promote the region’s uniqueness beyond just being an annex of New Orleans. “What we discovered is that there are stories, traditions and cultures that have never been told,” Boe said. “We have a rich, diverse story to tell and we’re excited to go tell it.” Boe partially means that in the literal sense. The RPTC has begun production on its River Reels video series, which will be accessible on the website and YouTube channel to highlight interesting local characters, popular attractions like the region’s 10 plantation homes, and overlooked hidden gems — be they cultural, culinary or recreational. To comple-

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

ment River Reels, the commission also authors a blog that outlines various tours and suggested itineraries, seasonal attractions such as the Christmas Eve bonfires on the East and West banks of the Mississippi River, and even offers a pictorial retrospective of a centuries-old (and then some) sugarcane harvest from the River Parishes. Home to the largest collection of plantation homes in the South — picturesque settings like Oak Alley in Vacherie, the steamboat design of the ornate San Francisco, or the expansive grounds of Destrehan— the River Parishes have always been a popular punctuation to those visiting New Orleans for a week or a weekend. So attracting tourists isn’t the challenge. Making them stay the night is. That’s why the Tourist Commis-

sion has chosen to share some of the plantation-home spotlight with other To-Do’s and Must-See’s, in hopes of making it impossible for visitors to cram everything into a 12-hour window. For instance, the River Parishes are the home of Andouille Sausage and a tasty rivalry between neighboring smokehouses, the home of Perique tobacco, the launch site for several memory-making Swamp Tours, and various outdoors activities that further boast Louisiana’s “Sportsman’s Paradise” title. The Tourist Commission is also organizing a local ‘Film Trail’ that will outline River Parish destinations used as the settings of numerous iconic movies and TV Shows. “Our job, and what we’re doing, is we have to flip the perception that we’re just a day trip,” Boe said,


AROUND THE PORT

Photos Courtesy of New Orleans Plantation Country OPPOSING PAGE: Golden rays over Houmas House TOP RIGHT: Andouille Sausage BOTTOM RIGHT: St. Michael Church BOTTOM LEFT: Kayaking

comparing it to the ‘Three-Hour Tour’ mentioned in the Gilligan’s Island theme song. “This can be a destination experience, a place that you stay overnight and fully explore for 2 to 3 days so that those hotels — that the Port and industries along the river keep full Sunday through Thursday — are also busy on the weekend. “It’s economic development in a different form,” Boe continued. “The Port does it on a large, massive scale. We’re doing it on a medium-size scale.” Speaking of the Port of South Louisiana, the Executive Regional Airport was primarily upgraded to accommodate business, but over the years has occasionally been used by tourists with private planes for leisure. Beyond that, the Port has used the airport to assist in tourism efforts. During the past three years, the Port hosted the Andouille Fly-In at the Airport on the October weekend of the Andouille Festival. The promotion was designed to encourage aviation enthusiasts to visit the festival by providing food on the tarmac and a shuttle to the grounds. “At the Port, we’re always looking for ways to assist in the tourism effort,” said Paul Aucoin, Executive Director of the Port of South Louisiana and a board member of the River Parishes Tourist Commission. “We share the same threeparish jurisdiction, and we share the same wish to bring in people, activity and development to St. James, St. John and St. Charles. “So yes, things like having an accessible airport in the River Parishes can help tourism, as does having events like Aviation Awareness Day last year and the Andouille FlyIn — events that bring people out, because every little bit helps.” •

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W H AT ’ S N E W

F O R EIGN T RADE ZONE 124: B Y T HE NU M BERS BY WILLIAM KALEC

Recent reports once again quantify the impact of the Foreign Trade Zone within the Port of South Louisiana and showcase the strategic roles they play in international business.

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n extremely beneficial but often underutilized aspect of international commerce, U.S. Foreign Trade Zones have been operational for almost 90 years and have evolved since inception to fit the modern global economic climate. The Port of South Louisiana serves as grantee of Foreign Trade Zone 124 — one of eight FTZs located in Loui-

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siana — where materials entering are exempt from paying duty tax, permitting them to store them free of tariff charges or manufacture/refine those materials into a finished commodity that can then be exported without taxes or duties. When used effectively, Foreign Trade Zones allow companies to increase profit margins and improve their logistics efficiency.

“Having these Foreign Trade Zones helps companies stay competitive and evens the playing field on a global level,” said Paul Aucoin, Executive Director of the Port of South Louisiana. “Having products, in particular oil and gas, come into and come out of our Foreign Trade Zone enhances our reputation in the oil market… and to have that reputation, you


have to have the oil storage terminals to make that happen, like we do.” Not surprisingly, the same attributes that make the Port of South Louisiana the largest tonnage port in the Western Hemisphere — namely, prime location on the Mississippi River, an established and versatile infrastructure, and easy access to fuel supplies like natural gas — are also the reason why FTZ 124 is one of the most active in the United States. Recently, the U.S. Government released official FTZ data from 2017. In that report, FTZ 124 ranked No. 1 in the dollar amount of merchandise received — reclaiming the top spot after dropping to second place in 2016. Of specific companies located within FTZ 124, Marathon Petroleum in Garyville showed up No. 3 in both merchandise received and product exported in Production Operations rankings, while Valero Refining in Destrehan finished No. 4 in exports. When asked about FTZ 124’s standing in the 2017 rankings, the Port’s Foreign Trade Zone Manager Lisa Braud said, “This Port stands as a powerhouse not just with the FTZ, but in all port rankings such as #1 Tonnage Port in the Western Hemisphere, #1 Grain Port, and Top Energy transfer port- pretty impressive for a Port that has long struggled

with name recognition.” “The oil and gas industry is big for us, so any fluctuation in the cost of crude will influence our numbers,” Braud says. “The 2016 decrease in the rankings for (Foreign Trade Zone 124) was due to fact that the cost of crude tanked, so even though barrels were comparable to (or more than) 2015, the value of the goods diminished so that dropped our ranking for that year. But we are back on top again in the most recent report. “(Future) increases (in FTZ totals) will come with new subzones coming on board,” Braud continued. “We had one new active zone in 2018, and we are currently working with three additional companies, all of whom are submitting subzone applications at this time. This will boost our numbers for the upcoming year.” As Braud mentioned, Oil and Gas plays a major role not just in FTZ 124’s activity, but in every FTZ in the state. A breakdown of Louisiana’s “Top Foreign-Status Products by Value” shows that Oil/Petroleum accounts for 92 percent of all total products. When ranking the Top States for FTZ activity, Louisiana remained at No. 2 for merchandise received behind Texas and ranked No. 3 in exports behind Texas and South Carolina. •

In February 2019, a new study conducted by the Trade Partnership provided quantitative and qualitative data on the economic effects of FTZs on the communities in which the zones operate. Scan the code with your smart phone to read the full report.


W H AT ’ S N E W

Photo courtesy of South Louisiana Methanol

A GLOBAL INVESTMENT BY MISTY MILIOTO

St. James Parish welcomes a new $2.2 billion methanol complex.

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conomic development continues to flourish in South Louisiana, thanks to a new joint venture that will create new jobs and bring $2.2 billion in capital investment to St. James Parish. South Louisiana Methanol (SLM) is pursuing the investment with a new joint venture partner, a Houston-based subsidiary of Saudi Arabia-based SABIC, to build a new complex that would create one of the world’s largest methanol production sites. Preliminary work on the project began last year at the 1,500-acre Mississippi River site, and SLM could begin formal construction later this year after finalizing negotiations with SABIC. The facility, which was originally announced between Texas-based ZEEP Inc. and New Zealand-based Todd Corporation in 2013, has become a project between SLM — now majority-owned by Todd Corporation — and SABIC thanks to a project agreement. The site is located along the West Bank of the Mississippi River, nearly eight miles south of the Sunshine Bridge. “South Louisiana Methanol and SABIC recognize that our industrial corridor along the Mississippi River delivers the highest-performance port, pipeline and rail logistics available in the world,” said Governor John Bel Edwards. “We’re especially pleased that these global investors have confidence in Louisiana’s manufacturing workforce, the most productive in the nation, and that they will be contributing significantly to our economy in the coming years.” Methanol has many applications ranging from plastics and polyester fibers to fabrics, fuels, pharmaceuticals and adhesives. According to the Methanol Institute, a growing demand for methanol equates to $35 million in new

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

state and local taxes from a typical methanol plant. The same sized plant uses approximately 70 billion cubic feet of natural gas annually, and ready access to affordable supplies of shale natural gas have led to the development of multiple methanol projects in Louisiana. The Methanol Institute and ADI Analytics have concluded that this trend could help the United States become a net exporter of methanol in the near future, which is even better news for Louisiana. “SABIC brings years of proven methanol operating experience and a global distribution network, and we are pleased to be based in St. James Parish, with great access to the Mississippi River and gas feedstock, and a businessfriendly community and state,” said Paul Moore, chief executive at SLM. SLM reevaluated the plans for this project, which led to redesigned plant technology and new production features. As such, the plant’s anticipated production capacity of 2 million metric tons of methanol per year will support both its domestic and international customers. In order to secure the facility in St. James Parish, SLM, which had not yet received incentives from the State of Louisiana for the project, renegotiated incentive terms with Louisiana Economic Development. Under the new terms, SLM will be eligible for a $5 million performancebased grant, with $1.5 million payable once the company makes $150 mil-

lion in capital expenditures in the state and the remaining $3.5 million payable upon the start of plant operations and no earlier than June 1, 2022. SLM also will receive the benefits of LED FastStart — the No. 1 state workforce training program in the nation — and the company is expected to use Louisiana’s Industrial Tax Exemption and Quality Jobs programs. As a new entrant into the global methanol market, SLM is dedicated to investing in St. James Parish and the State of Louisiana by domestically upgrading abundant natural gas to methanol. “This facility will continue to diversify our parish’s tax base and provide stability to the revenues that we use to educate our children and serve the needs of our residents and businesses,” said St. James Parish President Timmy Roussel. “Their commitment to utilize the services of our local businesses and suppliers will strengthen and expand our economy.” “The Port of South Louisiana is excited to hear the developing news for the South Louisiana Methanol plant in St James Parish,” said Executive Director Paul Aucoin of the Port of South Louisiana. “The new partnership with SABIC and South Louisiana Methanol will bring more opportunities to the success of this great project. This will add to the two new large projects recently announced this past year, all good news for our port district and Louisiana.” •


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

ROLLING ON THE RIVER BY MISTY MILIOTO

Ba y ou Fl ee t o ff e r s a m o d e r n - d ay fle e t in g , ve sse l re p air an d cleani ng fa c ilit y.

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s the company name suggests, Bayou Fleet — a moniker derived from a predecessor company that named all of its vessels and barges after Louisiana bayous—offers an array of services for the river barge industry. In addition to insured f leeting services, the company also offers shift boat services, barge cleaning, crew services, logistics and a full-service yard for off-loading and stockpiling aggregate material at its 85-acre facility in Hahnville. Brothers Robin and Peter Durant started Bayou Fleet in 1982, and they credit their success to having a dedicated philosophy of outperforming the

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

status quo with value-added services and building long-term customer relationships over the years. As part of the facility, the M/V Bayou Larose serves as the operation center where dispatch, management of f leet traffic and comprehensive logistics take place. The vessel was constructed in 1949 and, in later years, it reached a state of honorable discharge. However, Robin envisioned creating a unique structure that would attract the attention of mariners transiting the river. After substantial renovations, the refurbished vessel now also stands as a monument to mariners on the Mississippi River. And

while the Bayou Larose is hub of operations, most of the action takes place on the river, and at the wash dock and full-service yard. Bayou Fleet maintains three versatile shift boats that assist barges and are available for hire — all with names that stay true to Louisiana’s rich bayou landscape — including the 65-foot M/V Bayou Black, the 64-foot M/V Bayou Piquant and the 53-foot M/V Bayou Couba. Other primary f leet capabilities include barge-to-barge transfers, launch service for deliveries or crew transfer and barge heating. Bayou Fleet also offers a safe supply drop area, storage rental units and a


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

All photos © 2018 Matt Touchard

truck ramp for direct vessel access. For the company, it all comes down to convenience — a word that is seldom used in the river barge industry. A major part of that convenience comes down to its 24/7 crew services, which include vessel access at any river stage with a safe and secure dock barge, a crew lounge (that doubles as an area where training and safety meetings can take place), potable water access, crane service (a knuckle boom for small lifts and a 30-ton crane at the wash dock), free garbage disposal, mail drop (including UPS and FedEx) and pollution response (including routine and emergency spill supplies). At the wash dock, Bayou Fleet can clean barges that transport coal, rock, concentrates or grain. And at the full-service yard, contractors can off-load aggregate material in an area that is easily accessible to all major highways in the river region.

Bayou Fleet has formed several strategic partnerships with third-party vendors that operate at the facility in order to enhance the customer experience while awaiting dock space at any of the local chemical plants, tank farms, grain elevators or other local destinations. In addition to barge f leeting, crew changes, vessel repairs, third-party auditor access, customer access to their vessels and other amenities, these partnerships add value to those customers who are standing by and awaiting service for their barges and vessels. There is also a stripping plant and pipeline testing vendor, a dry cargo barge cleaning and topside repair service, a tank barge stripping and cleaning service, and a mobile marine fueling service that’s capable of transferring fuel from tanker trucks to docked vessels and barges. These types of offerings allow customers the option to complete needed repairs or

receive services that would otherwise take time away from revenue-generating vessel usage. Through these partnerships, Bayou Fleet is able to distinguish itself from the local competition. And while building lasting customer relationships is the company’s main goal, its values extend beyond that of its customer base. The Durants have maintained a philosophy of commitment, cooperation and service. These values are evident in Bayou Fleet Farms, a neighboring 160-acre tract of land in rural Hahnville where the company stables horses (many of which were rescued by local animal rights and advocacy agencies). The farm is also home to cattle and fowl, and numerous crops such as corn, tomatoes and citrus — all of which are goodnatured offerings to the company’s vessel crews. Wildlife preservation also is at the forefront of the company’s focus, and Bayou Fleet’s property has been designated as a certified wildlife habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. With a number of natural and sustainable micro-environments, from uncut brush piles and cypress stands to thickets and ponds, the riparian property serves as a mini-refuge for wildlife. •

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W H AT ’ S N E W

A D E S I R A B L E D E S T I N AT I O N BY WILLIAM KALEC

Joint recruitment efforts by the Port of South Louisiana and state agencies like Louisiana Economic Development have resulted in numerous new businesses setting up operations a l o n g t h e M i s s i s s i p p i R i v e r, a n d h i g h - p a y i n g j o b s f o r t h e skilled workforce of the region.

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o matter the time of day, time of month or time of year, economic activity within the 54-mile stretch of river that is the Port of South Louisiana never sleeps. The same is true of efforts to bring economic activity to the Port District. That doesn’t stop, either, as government agencies like Louisiana Economic Development constantly team with Port officials to entice domestic and international industry heavyweights in various sectors — agricultural, energy, chemical and manufacturing, to name a few — to relocate operations or expand their global footprint by setting up shop right here in the River Parishes. Most only see the final result of those efforts — a press release, a write-up in the local paper or in Port Log. But make no mistake: It takes long-term, multi-faceted and sophisticated recruitment to reach that finality. “Nothing happens overnight,” says Linda Prudhomme, the Director of Business Development at the Port. “These are years in the making. These are billiondollar investments, so they aren’t necessarily quick decisions.” When it comes to attract-

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ing new business, the Port of South Louisiana has several positive aspects that are included in pretty much every pitch. For starters? Location, location, location. Situated on the Mississippi River, the Port has direct access to the heart of the United States and vital international markets. From there, the Port’s multi-faceted transportation infrastructure makes receiving raw materials or transporting completed product possible by waterway, rail, highway, air or pipeline. Handling/Refining/Manufacturing that material is a highly-skilled, highly-trained and highly-technical workforce with a decades-long reputation of providing an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay. Couple all of that with a state that affords companies competitive business costs through financial incentive programs, and it’s little wonder why the Port of South Louisiana has enjoyed rapid economic growth since the turn of the century. “I really consider the River to be this state’s greatest natural resource, and maybe our country’s greatest natural resource,” says Paul Aucoin, the Executive Director of the Port of South Louisiana. “And despite all our growth, we still have great

site availability. There’s property available, desirable property in the River Parishes with access to cheap and abundant natural gas, which is the feedstock for many of these companies. And then you have a productive workforce. “Together, all these things help you feel comfortable when you’re making an investment in the billions of dollars.” While the benefits and advantages of locating inside the Port District are numerous and undeniable, the companies already here and those considering coming here are diverse in operation. With that establishment, the Port and state/local agencies spend extensive workhours tailoring proposals to the specific prospect. “We always determine what (the potential client) needs as they consider the Port,” Prudhomme says. “Do we have the right site? Do we have deep water for a deepwater dock? Do we have sites with pipeline access that can carry the raw materials needed, such as maybe natural gas, to make their final product?...There’s so much to consider, so may variables. “And it’s not a one-man operation. It really isn’t,” Prudhomme


Economic Development

continues. “It’s a team effort, and we team with LED and local economic developers in our Port parishes in making sure there’s an answer and a solution to all the logistics before anyone even comes to visit a site.” In fact, the Port is using modern technology to expedite the siteseeing process. Instead of traveling miles on the River to visit five to eight potential sites, the Port allows clients to digitally tour the prospective sites through a computer program at the Maritime Security Operations Center that virtually drops them there and affords them 360-degree views of the area — thus allowing clients to quickly trim the site list before actually traveling there. Combined recruiting efforts between the state and the Port have resulted in substantial economic developments. In November 2018, Wanhua Chemical Group officially announced the company will build a $1.25 billion chemical manufacturing complex in St. James Parish that will result in 170 new direct jobs, with an average annual salary of more than $80,000 plus benefits. A few months before that, Formosa finalized a massive agreement to build a $9.4 billion chemical manufacturing complex on a 2,400-site on the west bank of St. James that will employ 1,200 plant workers. •

Parish

Capital Investment

Number of Direct Jobs

Average Salary

Formosa TAIWAN methanol

St. James

$ 9.4B

1,200

$ 84.5K

Nucor Steel U.S.

St. James

$ 3.4B

1,250

$ 75K

South Louisiana Methanol U.S./NEW ZEALAND

St. James

$ 2.2B

75

$ 71.4K

Yuhuang Chemical CHINA methanol

St. James

$ 1.85B

400

$ 85K

St. John

$ 1.5B

200

$ 58K

St. James

$ 1.25B

170

$ 80K

EuroChem RUSSIA fertilizer Wanhua CHINA mdi

Darling Ingredients St. Charles $ 1.1B 55 U.S. (Expansion-Diamond Green) naphtha Monsanto

$7.15M (tot payroll)

St. Charles

$ 975M

95

$ 76K

St. Charles

$ 869M

27

St. John

$ 750M

80 - 100

$ 63K

NuStar U.S. crude oil storage

St. James

$ 365M

32

$98K

Syngas Energy MALAYSIA methanol

St. James

$ 360M

86

$ 78K

Bunge (expansion) U.S. grain

St. Charles

$ 140M

Plains All American U.S. crude oil storage

St. James

$ 50M

Momentive Specialty Chemicals U.S.

St. Charles

$ 38M

8

$ 82K

(expansion)

U.S. Entergy | Little Gypsy (expansion)

U.S. Pin Oak Terminals (acq. by MPLX on 9/2018)

U.S. crude oil

Kongsberg Maritime St. Charles $ 15M 20 NORWAY office &training Denka Performance St. John Elastomers HQ U.S.

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$ 100K $ 80K

corporate

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15


AIRPORT NEWS

F LY I N G I N F O R BUSINESS BY ALEXANDER JUSDANIS

O f fering high speed, low cos t s and profes sional ser vice, the E xecutive Regional Air por t is bringing in busines s and helping the River Parishes grow.

T

he River Parishes are a great place to do business, offering competitive pricing and solid infrastructure, and the Port of South Louisiana’s Executive Regional Airport has long supported the area’s development. Throughout

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

the past decade, the airport has seen a number of major improvements and additions — from new hangars to taxiway extensions — that make business trips to the region faster, cheaper and safer. Streamlining air travel has been a

boon for South Louisiana’s energy and chemical giants, but it’s not just big industry that’s seeing the benefits. The Executive Regional Airport has played an equally important role in nurturing the projects of small and mediumsized companies — just ask Delton Smith and Kyle Hand. Smith, President of SMC Hotels Group, and Hand, Vice President of Operations at Hand Construction, are about to finish up construction on a hotel in LaPlace, just outside the airport. The project, a fourstory, 94-room Fairfield Inn by Marriott, will cater to people doing business at the Port and the local industrial plants. Oddly enough, it was airplanes that brought Smith and Hand together. Their fathers are longtime friends, and also licensed pilots. “They’ve been f lying airplanes together for some time now,” said Hand. Since construction began in 2017, Smith and Hand have been making visits around every two weeks to follow the hotel’s progress. And thanks to the airport, almost all of those trips have been by private plane. Smith f lies down with his father, Harrison Smith, the Chairman of SMC Hotels Group. For them, the advantages of the Executive Regional Airport over the area’s larger airports are obvious. Landing in New Orleans, for example, would mean long waits and a long drive out of the city. But when they touch ground at the Port, they’re out of the plane and onto the tarmac almost instantly, where a car is already waiting to take them to the site. “It’s a very well-run and


convenient airport,” said Smith. “We can get to the hotel from the airport in 10 minutes or less.” Hand agreed, thanking Airport Director Vincent Caire and FTZ Manager Lisa Braud for their professional, friendly and accommodating service. “The airport has helped this project tremendously,” said Hand. “I live over 200 miles away, but I can come down and walk the job within hours. It’s allowing us to get down there, check the job, visit with the owner, the architect, the subcontractors — just keep an eye on it.” The two men made it clear that the airport offers the best choice of transportation in terms of both speed and cost. Driving from Shreveport to LaPlace could take as long as five hours, but f lying would only take around one. That means Smith and Hand can get to the site in the morning and be back home by mid-afternoon. “If I drove, I’d be less productive,” said Hand. “Instead of driving down here today and driving back tomorrow, I f ly down here and back in a day, and I’m working on something else the next day.” Saving on time

also means saving on expenses. Hand said that visiting the worksite by plane not only expedites his travel time, but also results in less spending. The airport’s offerings go beyond convenience and savings, however. Hand gave his interview for this article over the phone from LaPlace’s own Frisco Deli. “I’m about to eat a fried shrimp po-boy,” he said, “so you all can thank the Port for allowing me to come down here and get a good South Louisiana sandwich! ” For Smith’s part, he stressed that the Port of South Louisiana and the Executive Regional Airport will be crucial for his business’s continued success long after they finish construction. “We decided to build this hotel because we saw the Port was growing and attracting business,” he said. “Not only is the airport important to us as a customer — we use it — but it’s also important to us as a business, that the airport continues to grow and continues to be a strong engine for the area.” Fairfield Inn & Suites, located at 944 Belle Terre Boulevard in LaPlace, is scheduled to open in April 2019. •


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

BUILDING BETTER LIVES BY DREW HAWKINS

St. John Uni ted Way

S

ince its founding in 1972, St. John United Way has worked to unite people and resources to produce long-lasting positive changes in St. John the Baptist Parish. The nonprofit organization strives to accomplish these changes by focusing on what they believe to be the foundation for a better standard of living: health, education and financial stability. According to Artis Williams, St. John United Way’s Executive Director, “These focus areas are considered the primary building blocks for a good quality of life.” After the catastrophic damage inflicted on St. John the Baptist Parish by Hurricane Isaac in August 2012, St. John United Way managed the funds that were given to the parish to help with the recovery efforts of over 8,000 homes that were impacted. The organization commissioned new roofs and new walls, as well as provided

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

financial assistance to help the people affected get back on their feet. “This is what they do,” said Linda Prudhomme, who serves as the St. John United Way Campaign Chair for 2019 Fundraising and the Business Development Director for the Port of South Louisiana. “They step up and they support those that do not have [resources].” One of United Way’s main focuses of support is health care. While a person’s address should never determine the quality and accessibility of the health services they receive, this remains a constant reality and a barrier for many people. St. John United Way is fighting to make it easier for those who need access to substance abuse programs, quality health care and nutritious food to be able to obtain what they need. They do this by providing funding and support to over 30 agencies and investing in programs, not provided by any other local agency, that

target specific needs. Among their partner agencies that aid in health improvement are the Red Cross, St. John Ministry of Care, Second Harvest of GNO and The Right Choice, which provides free health screenings, counseling and contraceptive barriers to the River Parishes. Williams said that some of his proudest accomplishments in his role at United Way is the organization’s increased focus on ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) in St. John the Baptist Parish. “Nearly half the households in SJBP are struggling to afford basic necessities,” Williams said. “Some of the ways that SJUW does this is by supporting 2-1-1 Services, rent and utility assistance, transitional housing, financial literacy, local food banks, respite care and wheelchair ramps for the elderly and disabled.”


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

PHOTO OPPOSING PAGE: A few of the St. John Untired Way Board members (from the left) Tricia Rousselle, Greg Maurin, Megan Hudson, Linda Prudhomme, Rhonda Colar-Myles, Deborah Varnam, Angel Thompson, Annette Faircloth, James Wagner and Patrick Morton. PHOTO ABOVE: Port presents check to United Way. (L-R) Dale Hymel Jr. (Port COO), Linda Prudhomme (Port Business Development Director), Artis Williams (Executive Director of St. John United Way), Roy Quezaire (Port Deputy Director)

In addition, a successful life begins with quality education, yet millions of the nation’s youth do not have the support they need to obtain a comprehensive education, graduate high school and embark on a rewarding career. St. John United Way believes that an investment in knowledge pays the best interest, and therefore takes an approach to education that spans from cradle to career. Williams said he is particularly proud of St. John United Way’s strong support of Early Childhood Education and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) Education in St. John the Baptist Parish. The average college graduate earns about $36,000 more per year than someone who drops out of high school and is half as likely to end up in poverty. Through partner agencies like St. John 4-H, Boy Scouts & Girl Scout Programs, New Wine

Development Corporation and River Parishes Community College, St. John United Way is working to ensure that every child gets a strong start in life, that teenagers have the tools and support to learn and grow, and that young men and women are better able to thrive in the modern job market. United Way is also fighting to put all Parish residents on a path toward financial freedom, which starts with access to services, job training, credit counseling and money management programs. By mentoring youth through financial workshops, and securing transitional housing for struggling families through their partner agencies, St. John United Way is putting people on the right track to achieving stability. As an organization, they are great examples of financial stewardship. A non-profit is considered “healthy” if its administrative costs are under 25

percent. With overhead administrative costs at approximately 7 percent, St. John United Way is committed to keeping their operating costs as low as possible in order to ensure that they can provide maximum impact in St. John the Baptist Parish. Every penny donated is used in St. John the Baptist Parish unless asked to be sent elsewhere, and less than one percent of SJUW funding goes to United Way Worldwide for membership dues. In 2018, their fundraising goal of $820,000 was met and exceeded by three percent. With a board made up of local leaders from the Parish community, every decision about the operation of St. John United Way is made by the people who know what St. John the Baptist Parish needs most. “Without their support, we could not do any of the things we do,” Prudhomme said. •

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C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

LEGACY OF LOUISIANA SUGARCANE ENDURES WITH EDUCATION BY ANDREA BLUMENSTEIN

Louisiana Sugar Ref ining LLC Make s Lear ning A L it tle Sweeter

A

new scholarship created by Louisiana Sugar Refining LLC aims to support the legacy of Louisiana sugarcane growers into the future. The annual scholarship, managed by the LSU College of Agriculture, will be geared toward students studying plant and soils systems or agricultural business. “There is always a need for great young talent to enter the industry,” said Larry Faucheaux, General Manager and CEO of Louisiana

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

Sugar Refining. A third-generation employee of the company himself, Faucheaux has seen both the company and the industry evolve. “There is always a need for great young talent,” he added. “It was only fitting that we target an area for the scholarship that allows for just that.” For more than a century, Louisiana State University College of Agriculture has educated multitudes of students in agriculture, farming and related disciplines. The College of Agriculture

displays commitment to agriculture production and sustainability in Louisiana, with graduates joining the workforce as nutritionists, food scientist, natural resource managers, farmers, horticulturalists, educators and economists. The College of Agriculture offers an array of scholarships geared toward both incoming freshman and continuing education students. The addition of the Louisiana Sugar Refining scholarship strengthens


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E

this resource base. Faucheaux said that this scholarship is a part of the organization’s continuous commitment to the industry and its local roots. “The College of Agriculture is going to manage the promotion of the scholarship, as well as the scholarship itself,” said Faucheaux, who estimates the scholarship at around $2,000 per year. Sugarcane production is agriculture — a natural-resource based industry that requires good stewardship for the future. A huge part of that is innovation. In Louisiana, sugarcane is produced on more than 400,000 acres of land in 22 parishes with an annual production of around 12 million tons. Data from the 2017-18 harvest reported a record-breaking 8.2 million tons. Specialists from the LSU Agriculture Center cite an above average rainfall and the warmest seasonal temperatures on record to the success of the cane crop, which is both a major part of the state’s economy as well as its culture for tourists and locals alike. Since inception in 2003, Louisiana Sugar Refining LLC successfully

stabilized the growth of Louisiana sugarcane farmers, enabling the integration of more than 800 growers in the industry through this joint venture between Cargill, Inc, Louisiana Sugar Growers and Refiners. The powerhouse added Imperial Sugar Company in 2007, securing the future of the 110-yearold Gramercy refinery with funds to access new technology and improved infrastructure. In 2011, Imperial Sugar sold its share, resulting in the facility that, now operational, is capable of refining 2 billion pounds of white sugar annually for distribution to commercial and residential customers throughout the United States. Locally, the organization provides direct jobs for approximately 180 residents in St. James and the surrounding parishes. Louisiana Sugar Refining LLC’s home is in the 54-mile jurisdiction of the Port of South Louisiana, which extends three parishes along the Mississippi River and is the largest tonnage grain port in the United States, representing a $190 million investment inclusive of

$90 million in owner equity plus $100 million in revenue bonds issued by the State of Louisiana. Sugar subsidies were among the hot topics of the Farm Bill that made its way through Congress in 2018. Sugar subsidies are a worldwide phenomenon, resulting in around 80% of refined sugar sold domestically. Additional factors of currency exchange rates and surplus and shortages in major producers worldwide affect the historically volatile market. The support of Louisiana lawmakers on Capitol Hill to maintain the current arrangement speaks to the importance of the crop for Louisiana’s economy, arguing that subsidies are essential safeguards against bargain imports with questionable quality. Refined sugar is used across industries, but the most beloved are found in food and beverage products. The cloud of powdered sugar ascending from a fresh beignet, the glue that binds milk, butter and pecans for sweet creamy pralines, and the food for fermentation of beer are among the many local to Louisiana uses for refined sugar, mostly derived from the tall grassy stems of the sugarcane plant. Sugarcane requires frost-free conditions and ample raining during its growing season, making Louisiana soil among the highest producers in the United States for this powerhouse of the agricultural business. Louisiana has the oldest and most historic sugar production in the United States, owing to both the tropical climate and port access. Support for the agricultural sciences will ensure the future. “We are looking for some bright young talent that has a technical mind,” said Faucheaux. “The industry has flourished for 200 years, and there’s no reason it can’t continue for another 200.” •

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P O R Tr a i t s

PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA EMPLOYEE LUNCHEON

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Joey Oubre and Jody Stein

Leon Robinson, Lisa Adams and Michael Anderson

Monica Pierre and Lydasha Augusta

Lisa Braud, Maria Stein (retired) and Joanne Weber (retired)

Cat Becnel, Roy Quezaire and Lupe Torres

Melissa Folse-Oubre and Tamara Kennedy

Dale Hymel and Nyler Williams

Grant Faucheux

SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA


P O R Tr a i t s

PORT OF SOU TH LOUISIANA EMPLOYEE LUNCHEON

Rachel Swords and Vincent Caire

Lenora Davis, Danielle Joseph, Janeen Benn and Joseph Benn

Duke Morrow

Charles Graffeo, Shawn Hidalgo, Brian Cox and Richie Zito

Linda Prudhomme and Commissioner Judy Songy

Cindy Martin and Lana Simon

Paul Aucoin

Commissioner Joey Murray

W W W. P O R T S L . C O M | S P R I N G 2 0 1 9

23


P O R Tr a i t s

The Port attends the annual NBAA schedulers and dispatchers conference to promote the Executive Regional Airport. Vincent Caire, Airport Director, and Lisa Braud, Port Manager, are pictured.

Noranda Alumina Chairman and CEO David D’Addario (center) pictured with Paul Aucoin (L) and Roy Quezaire (R) at the Port’s Executive Regional Airport

Congressman Garret Graves (center) visits the Port’s Executive Regional Airport. Pictured with Executive Director Paul Aucoin (left) and Commission President Paul Robichaux (right).

River Parish Community College and Ascension Parish High School Principals & Administrators learn about Port operations. Deputy Director Roy Quezaire and Marine Operations Director Brian Cox led the presentation. Port employee Nyler Williams (far left) was also in attendance.

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA

Members of Google’s Associate Product Manager program visit the Port to gain exposure to industries outside of their day-to-day work. Port employees Brian Cox (left), Lisa Braud (right) and Alex Hernandez (not pictured) spoke with the group.


P O R Tr a i t s

R I VER REGIO N E C ONOM I C D E V E LOP ME N T I N I TI ATI VE BRE A KFA ST I N WA SHI N G TON , D . C.

Over 200 Louisiana lawmakers, businessmen, industry executives, parish leaders and economic developers attended the annual breakfast meeting held in Washington, D.C., hosted by the Port and the parishes of St. Charles, St. John the Baptist and St. James. Paul Aucoin emceed the event.

Paul Aucoin, Port Executive Director John Murphy, US Chamber Don Pierson, LED Secretary

Standing – Governor John Bel Edwards and Paul Aucoin Sitting (L-R) – Commissioner Joey Murray, Commission President Paul Robichaux, Michelle Citron of Dynamic Industries, Marissa Lingoni of Providence Engineering, and John Ducrest, Commissioner of Louisiana Office of Financial Institutions.

W W W. P O R T S L . C O M | S P R I N G 2 0 1 9

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P O R T O W N E D FA C I L I T I E S

Globalplex Intermodal Terminal a d d re s s : 155 West 10th Street, Reserve, La. 70084 ma i l i ng a d d re s s : P.O. Box 909, LaPlace, La. 70069 ph o ne : 985-652-9278 fa x : 985-653-0798 e - ma i l : info@portsl.com we b: www.portsl.com co ntact ( s ) : Paul Aucoin, Executive Director; Roy Quezaire, Deputy Director lo cat i o n: River mile 138.5 e qu i p me nt: Two Manitowoc 2250 rail-mounted gantry cranes; 100,000-pound capacity weighing scale for trucks; 100,000 square foot warehouse; 72,000-square-foot, and 40,000-square-foot transit shed; and a 177,000 square foot paved open storage pad d o ck : 204 ft. x 660 ft. with upstream and downstream mooring dolphins. allow for dockage of panamax size vessels; 700 ft x 65 ft finger pier general cargo operators associated terminals ph: 985-536-4520

Globalplex Bulk Dock ma i l i ng a d d re s s : P.O. Box 909, LaPlace, La. 70069 ph o ne : 985-652-9278 fa x : 985-653-0798 e - ma i l : info@portsl.com we b: www.portsl.com contact(s): Paul Aucoin, Executive Director; Roy Quezaire, Deputy Director lo cat i o n: River mile 138.5 f u nct i o n: Transfer and store bulk, primarily cement fluorspar limestone and wood chips e qu i p me nt: An 800 tons-per-hour continuous Carlsen ship unloader, a 1,800 tons-per-hour ship-loading system, 100,000 tons of cement storage in two storage domes, 70,000 tons of storage for flourspar in an A-frame building and approximately nine acres of paved open storage for wood chips and other products. d o ck :507’ x 44’ with upstream and downstream mooring buoys to allow for panamax-size vessels

ADM Reserve a d d re s s : 2032 La. Highway 44, Reserve, La. 70084 ph o ne : 985-536-1151 fa x : 985-536-1152 we b: ADMWorld.com co ntact ( s ) : Mike Landry, generale manager of commercial operations lo cat i o n: River mile 139.2 f u nct i o n: Grain export elevator. ot h e r: Fully automated

Port of South Louisiana Executive Regional Airport ma i l i ng Ad d re s s : P.O. Box 909, La Place, La. 70069-0909 ph y s i ca l Ad d re s s : 355 Airport Road, Reserve, La. 70084 ph o ne : 985-652-9278 we b: portsl.com/airport-services e ma i l : psl-era@portsl.com co ntact: Vincent Caire, Airport Director lo cat i o n: N30° 05.25’, W30°34.97

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA


P O R T O W N E D FA C I L I T I E S

Plains Marketing L.P. a d d re s s : 6410 Plains Terminal Road, St. James, La. 70086 t e rmi na l ma nag e r: Craig Ellinwood ph o ne : 225-265-2353 fa x : 225-265-3171 we b: PAALP.com lo cat i o n: Mile marker 158.6 f u nct i o n: Storage of petroleum products.

SoLaPort West Bank industrial site acquired for development into an industrial park located adjacent to Dow in St. Charles Parish. co ntact: Paul Aucoin ph o ne : (985) 652-9278

MPLX L.P. (Pin Oak Terminals) a d d re s s : 4006 Highway 44 Mt. Airy, La. 70076 co ntact: Gregg Qualls ph o ne : 504-533-8783 we b: PinOakTerminals.com lo cat i o n: Mile marker 144.1 f u nct i o n: Storage of petroleum products.

PSL Westbank St. James co ntact: Paul Aucoin ph o ne : (985) 652-9278 Property acquired for development.

W W W. P O R T S L . C O M | S P R I N G 2 0 1 9

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INDUSTRY MAP

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SPRING 2019 | PORT OF SOUTH LOUISIANA


W W W. P O R T S L . C O M | S P R I N G 2 0 1 9

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31


FINAL FRAME

On the bank of the Mississippi River at mile marker 137 just before the high water season began.

PHOTO BY OF ALEX HERNANDEZ

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SS PP RR II N NG G 22 00 11 99 || PP O O RR TT O O FF SS O OU U TT H H LL O OU U II SS II A AN NA A


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

Port Log Spring 2019  

Port Log Spring 2019