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november 2016

myneworleans.com $4.95 WYES presents “Reshaping a Greater New Orleans: Creating Healthy Communities”


NOVEMBER 2016 / VOLUME 51 / NUMBER 1 Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Morgan Packard Art Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Contributing Editor Liz Scott Monaghan Food Edit­or Dale Curry Dining Edit­or Jay Forman Wine and Spirits Edit­or Tim McNally Restaurant Reporter Robert Peyton Home Editor Bonnie Warren web Editor Kelly Massicot Staff Writers Jessica DeBold, Melanie Warner Spencer Intern Marie Simoneaux Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan SALES MANAGER Kate Sanders (504) 830-7216 / Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executive Lisa Picone Love Account Executives Claire Cummings, Jessica Marasco, Veronica Ridgley Production Manager Staci McCarty Senior Production Designer Ali Sullivan Production Designer Monique DiPietro traffic Coordinator Terra Durio Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive VICE PRESIDENT Errol Laborde DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND EVENTS Cheryl Lemoine Event Coordinator Margaret Strahan Distribution Manager John Holzer Administrative Assistant Denise Dean Subscriptions Manager Sara Kelemencky SUBSCRIPTIONS Assistant Mallary Matherne WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511 Executive Editor Beth Arroyo Utterback Managing Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Jenny Hronek NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123 Metairie, LA 70005 Subscriptions: (504) 830-7231

MyNewOrleans.com

New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, on CD-ROM and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2016 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

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contents

72 FEATURES

IN EVERY ISSUE

ON THE COVER

64

ThY Daily Bread Pudding

16

INSIDE

For which our reporter searched for six of the best By Jyl Benson

“Picou’s Washington Pie”

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Finest of the fine

A dazzling display of jewelry By Mirella Cameran

Each November we send an intrepid reporter out into the city to find the best of a particular dish. This year we chose bread pudding, and writer Jyl Benson had the arduous task of riding her sugar high all the way to the top. See her top six choices – including Toups’ Meatery, pictured on the cover – and find your new favorite starting on pg. 64.

80 Saints Photo of the Half-CentUry

By Errol Laborde

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2016 Top Lawyers

In search of the best from among 56 specialties Profiles by Kimberley Singletary

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22 speaking out Editorial, plus a Mike Luckovich cartoon 24

JULIA STREET Questions and answers about our city

183 Try This

“Tastings at Martin Wine Cellar”

184 STREETCAR

“Two Women in Burkas”

Photographed by Marianna Massey


contents

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60

114

THE BEAT

LOCAL COLOR

THE MENU

28

MARQUEE

46

me again

112 table talk

Entertainment calendar

“Wizard Watch”

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PERSONA

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MODINE’S NEW ORLEANS

Ana Zorrilla, CEO, Louisiana SPCA

“Tofurkey In the Oven”

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Biz

50

Joie d’Eve

“Domain In the Skyline: Condo developers aim for new heights”

“Missing Parent Blues”

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education

52

IN TUNE

“Chasing a Moving Target”

“Pop Rules”

36

HEALTH

54

Read & Spin

118 LAST CALL

“Cranberries and Health”

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HEALTHBEAT

“Jingle All the Way”

40

Crime Fighting

“‘NCIS: New Orleans’”

42

CHRONICLES

“Light ’Em Up”

“Rising Tide: Where seafood is the specialty”

114 restaurant insider

News From the Kitchens: Meril, Cuzco & Rosedale

116 Food “Thanksgiving Sides: New with a traditional twist”

A look at the latest albums and books

56

JAZZ LIFE

120 DINING GUIDE

“After Pete: Tim Laughlin talking jazz”

60

HOME

“Doctor’s Orders: A new kitchen, garden and extra story embellish” Dr. Laurie Moeller’s Metairie home

Margarita Martini

DIAL 12 D1 “Creating Healthy Communities” premieres on Thurs., Nov. 17 at 7 p.m., and is the latest installment in WYES’ award-winning series “Reshaping a Greater New Orleans.” Host and Executive Producer Marcia Kavanaugh examines new challenges and opportunities in our region’s healthcare.

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inside

Picou’s Washington Pie

T

here was once a bakery called Picou’s located off of Esplanade Avenue near Bayou St. John. I am not saying that its neighborhood was rough back then, but to get what you wanted you had to stand outside and have your item given to you from a revolving bulletproof cube. Nevertheless, it was a popular place for one dish in particular: Washington Pie. Our cover story about bread pudding reminds me of the pie because there’s a kinship. Just as bread pudding is made from a restaurant’s leftover bread, the Washington Pie was created each day by combining pretty much whatever was left over in the kitchen and adding a common flavor. As I recall it was usually served in a square with icing on top and had an almond taste. Also it was very heavy, not just in calories but in density, making it suitable for alternative use as a paperweight. One legend has it that the pie originated in Washington D.C., and was often served around the former president’s birthday. Actually, the pie is very democratic in that it combines the huddled masses of whatever is left in the baking pans. Picou’s was also known for its donuts and was open late hours, which may account for the security. Nevertheless the Washington Pie, which was the sort of thing that students and the very idle would seek, made it famous. As far as I know, the Washington Pie isn’t made anywhere locally nowadays, but in this the year when we saw the return of the Mile-High Pie with the reopening of the Caribbean Room, someone should bring back the Washington. And if no one eats all the servings, they can always mix it into the next day’s pie.

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Correction: In our October issue, coverage of an exhibit of artist Peter Max’s work at the Angela King Gallery incorrectly stated that Max “co-owns” the gallery. What Max actually said was, “I’ve been to New Orleans many, many times. I have a gallery there, Angela King Gallery.” His reference to having a gallery there meant having a place where he had a working relationship. We regret the error. The exhibit opens Nov. 11. Information, AngelaKingGallery.com.


on the web

New Orleans Magazine is on the web, are you? Follow New Orleans Magazine on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Pinterest for all of the latest in New Orleans cuisine, music and more. Make sure to sign up for the daily MyNewOrleans.com newsletter, too. Be the first to read our blogs, get the 411 on top events around the city and see the features and columns from all seven of our publications all in one place.

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2016 Press Club of new orleans winners Lifetime Achievement Award: Errol Laborde Cartoon: Mike Luckovich Column: “Me Again,” Chris Rose Special Section – Writing: “People to Watch,” Tiffani Reding Amedeo and Morgan Packard 18

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meet our sales team

Kate Sanders Sales Manager (504) 830-7216 Kate@myneworleans.com

Lisa Picone Love Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7263 Lisa@myneworleans.com

Jessica Marasco Account Executive (504) 830-7220 JessicaM@myneworleans.com

claire cummings Account Executive (504) 830-7250 Claire@myneworleans.com

Veronica Ridgley Account Executive (504) 830-7257 Veronica@myneworleans.com

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

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SPEAKING OUT

The T-P and The Advocate Four years later

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our years have passed since the Newhouse family’s Advanced Publications Inc., dropped a bomb on New Orleans by announcing that the venerable newspaper, The Times-Picayune, which the New York-based company acquired in 1962, would be reduced to three home delivered newspapers per week. The move would also be accompanied by huge staff cuts. The good news, we were told, is that the change would lead us into the new web world, where information would be flowing all the time. We were very critical of the move at the time and still are. New Orleans faced the indignity of being the largest city in the nation without a daily newspaper, even though it has always been one of the country’s most active news towns. From the beginning our criticism was not with the newspaper, which we admire, nor its staff members, whom we also respect, but with the Newhouses.

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Many good journalists relocated to other locations. We might have lost even more had it not been for a surprise development, the entry into the market of what was then known as The Baton Rouge Advocate. The new New Orleans version, owned by the Baton Rouge-based Manship family had a rocky start with too much upstate news and not enough local, as well as a troubled circulation system. Gradually however, the newspaper grew into its role. The hero of the drama was businessman John Georges, who, along with his wife Dathel, bought the newspaper from David Manship who once quipped that he would sell the newspaper “for more than it was worth.” Georges hired some of the best business and journalistic minds from The Times-Picayune and built an impressive newspaper, The New Orleans Advocate. Meanwhile the rechristened Nola. com/Times-Picayune has gone all out for web, and although it claims to lead

the state in clicks, that’s a turf that isn’t exclusively theirs – not the way that they dominated the dissemination of news in the daily newspaper days. Their web news is competing with TV and radio stations, government agencies, social media, apps and everyone without a new idea. The internet is a crowded playground. As a newspaper The Times-Picayune has done some good reporting, but the three times a week distribution interrupts the flow. Some stories are aged by the time they come out. Worst yet, the newspaper is now printed in Mobile rather than, as it was, in downtown New Orleans, so the paper is no longer a source for late-breaking news. (Neither is The Advocate, which is printed at its Baton Rouge plants although their delivery trucks heading to New Orleans at least have a two hour head start on the T-P’s copies coming from Mobile.) So where do we stand at this stage in the saga? Actually, it isn’t as bad as it originally seemed. Instead of having no daily newspaper we, in effect, have a daily and a thrice weekly, both also feeding the internet. Both have smaller staffs than the T-P did in the old days; both suffer from those earlier deadlines; both also face the realities of the new age of journalism. Each newspaper now has a television partner – The Advocate with WWL-TV/ Channel 4; The Times-Picayune with WVUE-TV/(Fox 8). An example of the new bilateral news flow was the story about Jefferson Parish President Mike Yenni’s sexual issues. The news was broken by WWL’s David Hammer (a former T-P reporter) but also appeared in The Advocate the next day under Hammer’s byline with credit to WWL. The same approach is used for WVUE stories. With all newsrooms facing thinner budgets, the joint efforts have made sense. What will happen to newspapers is a story that’s far from reaching its final destination. Still to come is the realization that the internet is only as good as the people who feed it information, and those people will often be inexperienced and underpaid. Newspapers are still the best source for developing news stories. The generation that’s overlooking print would be well advised to take another look. In business and pleasure, the most successful citizens are usually the best informed. n AN ORIGINAL ©MIKE LUCKOVICH CARTOON FOR NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE


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JULIA STREET /

WITH POYDRAS THE PARROT

TH E PUR S UIT TO AN S W E R E T E RNAL Q U E S TION S

yes, the same stuff used in some antidepressants. (The ingredient was banned in ’48.) I am not certain exactly how long B-Up remained in production, but your bottle is most likely from the 1940s or ’50s. Jefferson Bottling Company, part of Pailet Industries, also produced the popular Big Shot line of soft drinks until ’87, when the company and its 10-flavor line were sold to Affiliated Food Stores of Little Rock, Arkansas.

Dear Julia, Before the New Basin Canal was closed and filled in, there was a derelict wooden boat moored there by the name of Argo. The story at the time was that it was a World War I sub chaser. This was the only information that I knew of them. We used to dive off the boat and swim in the polluted water of the canal. Barges loaded with watermelons would pass on their way to the markets in New Orleans. Sometimes, the crew would toss one of the melons into the water for us to retrieve. Oh, happy days! I, along with others, would appreciate any information that you can offer about the Argo. Howard V. Z. Kavanaugh Mandeville

Dear Julia and Poydras, My late father was a plumber and found this bottle years ago while working under a house. Can you please tell me anything at all about the soft drink B-Up? Shannon Kirtz Metairie The Jefferson Bottling Company, 716-724 Frisco Ave., introduced B-Up, a lithiated lemon-flavored fizzy soft drink, about 1941. Like its better-known competitor, 7-Up, it really did contain lithium –

During World War I, 441 wooden-hulled submarine chasers were built, six of which had their hulls laid in New Orleans. After the war ended, many were sold to private owners and renamed. While I have every reason to believe your story about the Argo, I have been unable to connect that name with the hull number of any of the documented WWI-era submarine chasers. I can, however, verify that a former submarine chaser, which became the yacht Blueridge before being renamed the Mercedes, passed through the New Basin Canal on what may have been its only voyage to Cuba.

Win a restaurant gift certificate

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Here is a chance to eat, drink and have your curiosity satiated all at once. Send Julia a question. If we use it, you’ll be eligible for a monthly drawing for a tour and Creole breakfast for two at Degas House or a Jazz Brunch for two at The Court of Two Sisters. To take part, send your question to: Julia Street, c/o New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 or email: Errol@MyNewOrleans.com. This month’s winners are Howard V. Z. Kavanaugh, Mandeville; and Sharon Nami, New Orleans.

NOVEMBER 2016 / myneworleans.com


In late 1921, the Mercedes’ owner, Mark Boasberg (aka Jack Sheehan), claimed the vessel was lost at sea while conveying a load of coconuts from Cuba to New Orleans. Neither the local press nor federal revenue agents believed the tale; rumor had it that the boat’s captain had been sighted in New Orleans and the vessel itself had likely been conveying something other than coconuts. While Sheehan’s Prohibition-era dreams of amassing a fortune in the coconut trade never materialized, his home adjoining his Suburban Garden resort was raided in January 1922, soon after the Mercedes was allegedly “lost;” $100,000 of liquor was taken in the raid. At the time, authorities alleged Sheehan was smuggling liquor by boat – possibly on his coconut fleet – and warehousing it in Jefferson Parish. The stash was returned to the Sheehans six months later when a court ruled that search warrant had been improperly issued; litigation, however, continued. Was the Argo you played on as a kid a sister vessel of Sheehan’s allegedly ill-fated Mercedes? Was she, too, a former submarine chaser? Did she have an illicit career as a rum-runner? Maybe. Using the resources at my disposal, I just can’t say for sure. Dear Julia, I am married into the Nami family. There is a building on the corner of Esplanade Avenue and Decatur Street that now houses the BMC music club. My husband’s family once owned this building and the jewelry store, Nami Jewelers, that took up the bottom floor. He remembers living on one of the floors when he was much younger. There is a mosaic tile inscription with “Nami” entering the

building and a “Nami” clock hanging on Buffa’s Bar on Esplanade. We would love to know more about the history of the building and of the clock. Sharon Nami Metairie The building at 1327 Decatur St. at the corner of Esplanade Avenue, was home to the George A. Nami jewelry store. The property, which Nami purchased in 1912, remained in his family until ’83. George Assaid Nami, who died in 1954 at the age of 83, was a native of Schwire, Lebanon. Like many other members of New Orleans’ Lebanese colony, he arrived in the Crescent City in the 1890s and settled in the French Quarter. In 1912, George purchased from the Banville family the building at Decatur and Esplanade, which had until that time housed the Banvilles’ millinery shop. For more than half a century, 1327 Decatur St. was home to the jewelry store Nami owned and operated with his two sons, George Jr. and Philip. The shop continued to prosper for more than a decade after George A. Nami Sr.’s death, but closed soon after George A. Nami Jr.’s August 1967 death. The founder’s widow, Henriette Werling, had passed away nine months earlier, in December ’66. Both George A. Nami Jr. and his brother, Philip, were sons of their father’s prior marriage to Beynout Sawaya, which ended in divorce in ’36. The clock at Buffa’s, 1001 Esplanade Ave., has been there since Vincent Buffa opened his doors in 1939. Jewelry manufacturer and distributor George A. Nami Sr. gave it as a gift to his friend, Buffa, on that occasion. n

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the beat MARQUEE / PERSONA / BIZ / EDUCATION / HEALTH / CRIME FIGHTING / CHRONICLES

persona pg. 30

”Because the Louisiana SPCA is an open-admission shelter, we take in every animal that comes to us. So while the majority of animals are cats, dogs and rabbits, we do get some unusual urban critters.” – Ana Zorrilla, CEO, Louisiana SPCA

greg miles PHOTOGRAPH


THE BEAT / MARQUEE

OUR TOP PICKS FOR november EVENTS by Fritz Esker

George Dunbar: Elements of Chance

2016 Tremé Creole Gumbo Festival

The New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) will celebrate the career of abstract artist George Dunbar with the exhibition “George Dunbar: Elements of Chance,” Thurs., Nov. 3-Sun., Feb. 19. Dunbar, a native New Orleanian, helped introduce abstract art to the South. His works evolved from paintings to clay relief. The exhibition will also feature a limited-edition artist book featuring an interview with Dunbar and an essay on the artist’s work. Information, NOMA.org

If you love brass bands and Creole Gumbo (and odds are you do if you live in New Orleans), then you’ll be happy to know the Tremé Creole Gumbo Festival is returning to Armstrong Park for its ninth year on Sat., Nov. 12-Sun., Nov. 13. Rebirth Brass Band will headline the event. Twelve vendors will offer their unique variations on gumbo, including a vegan option for those who traditionally avoid the dish. But traditionalists can also find plenty of gumbo samples to enjoy as well. Information, JazzAndHeritage.org/treme-gumbo

Grand Opening Performance at The Music Box Village The Music Box Village was previously a traveling installation of musical architecture in New Orleans. Now it has a permanent home in Bywater. It will have yearly fall and spring seasons with diverse and experimental programming. Its grand opening performance is Fri., Nov. 4-Sat., Nov. 5, featuring Sunpie Barnes & L’Union Creole with Dede Saint-Prix. Information, Facebook.com/NewOrleansAirlift

CALENDAR Nov 3: Lindsey Stirling, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com

Nov 5: Bonnie Raitt, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com

Nov 3: Sia: Nostalgic for the Present Tour, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com

Nov 6: Evanescence, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com

Nov 3-13: Faux/Real Festival, New Orleans Healing Center. Information, FauxRealNola.com

Nov 9-13: Words and Music Festival, Faulkner House. Information, WordsAndMusic.org

Nov 4: Emeril Lagasse Foundation’s Boudin, Bourbon & Beer, Champions Square. Information, BoudinBourbonAndBeer.com

Nov 10-Dec 4: The Clock (a 24-hour video exhibition on the passage of time in cinema), Contemporary Arts Center. Information, ProspectNewOrleans.org

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Garden; and a “Flower Fest.” And, of course, we always add a few surprises on the train route! Will the driving tour ever return? It’s unlikely that the

driving tour will ever return, but I never say never.

What’s your favorite part of the festivities? It’s the

SPOTLIGHT

smiles and wide eyes of the children that attend. Is there a part of the event visitors tend to overlook?

Celebration in the Oaks

Julie Lacour, director of Celebration in the Oaks,   discusses this year’s event

Visitors don’t always venture into the Entertainment Tent, where we stage three to five school groups, Irish dancers, church groups and more each night. How do you balance the traditional and the new?

N

ow in its 30th year, New Orleans’ favorite winter wonderland returns to City Park with twinkling lights, the carousel (“flying horses” if you’re old school), Mr. Bingle, carnival rides and more Fri., Nov. 25-Sun., Jan. 1. Other highlights include the two-mile train ride through the park and the animated “Cajun Night Before Christmas” display. Local schools decorate Christmas trees and provide choirs for live music entertainment throughout the season. Every exhibit is made in-house by a hardworking staff of six people.

How has Celebration in the Oaks changed in your tenure? The lighting technology has ad-

vanced tremendously. Gone are the days of using simple incandescent strings of light. Now, it’s all about LED lighting and movement.

What’s new this year? The new exhibits this year are a 15-foot-high menorah and spinning dreidels to celebrate Hanukkah; the “Beacon to Celebration,” which is a 16-foot-tall lighthouse (With a working beacon!); the “Walk of Lights,” a stroll through lit archways in the Botanical

Nov 11: An Evening of YES Music and More with Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin, and Rick Wakeman, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com

Many exhibits have now become traditional crowd favorites, such as the “Cajun Night Before Christmas” and Mr. Bingle, and we’ll always display those exhibits. However, we generally retire a few exhibits each year to make room for the new ones. For more information, visit NewOrleansCityPark.com. n

Nov 25: The Last Waltz – New Orleans, Joy Theater. Information, TheJoyTheater.com

Nov 12: Tegan and Sara, Joy Theater. Information, TheJoyTheater.com

Nov 26: Bayou Classic, Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Information, MyBayouClassic.com

Nov 15: Newcomb Department of Music 2016-’17 Concert Piano Series: Faina Lushtak, Dixon Hall. Information, Tulane.edu/Calendar

Nov 30: Dolly Parton: Pure and Simple Tour, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com

Nov 22-27: Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com

Dec. 1: Ms. Lauryn Hill, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com

Craig Mulcahy photograph

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THE BEAT / PERSONA

Zorrilla and her family, and won over her mother in the process. After many years of advocating for animals on a professional level, Zorrilla is set to wrap up her first decade with Louisiana SPCA, which attempts to provide the best care and find loving homes for 43,000 animals every year. She is the only animal shelter director in Louisiana and one of less than 100 in the country to become a Certified Animal Welfare Administrator (CAWA). The CAWA designation proves that Zorrilla has the skills, experience and competencies to excel in her field. But her dedication was evident long before she earned the certificate. When she was hired at the organization’s old Japonica Street location, she originally planned to stay a short time. But, inspired by the important work they were doing, and by the fierce and tireless devotion of their staff and volunteers, “I knew I wanted to stay on,” she admits. Nov. 11 marks Louisiana SPCA’s 38th annual Howling Success fundraiser, with a 2016 theme of “Pop Culture.”

Ana Zorrilla CEO, Louisiana SPCA By Faith Dawson

A

na Zorrilla’s childhood was filled with a variety of pets: ducks, chickens, cats and dogs. They all have good stories. The chickens used to chase Zorrilla around the yard; a Siamese cat, who lived to be 22, was sick all the time and was a frequent visitor to the veterinarian’s office. And her first dog, Princey, came from one of the cat’s office visits. Zorrilla was eager to have a dog, but her mother wasn’t. Once, when they took the cat to the vet, a woman arrived at the office with a box of puppies, all of which were yellow except for one that was black. That standout pup went home with

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Have you had any unusual animal encounters? Because the Louisiana SPCA is an open-admission shelter, we take in every animal that comes to us. So while the majority of animals are cats, dogs and rabbits, we do get some unusual urban critters like stray goats and pigs; miniature and fullsized horses; snakes and birds. We’ve also had small monkeys, pet rats and an African wildcat.

Q: What led you to this position? I had watched the footage of animal rescue during Hurricane Katrina and was so in awe of the work the Louisiana SPCA did under Laura Maloney’s leadership. I joined the team to help raise funds to build a new shelter since the Japonica Street facility was a complete loss. I planned to stay for about six months or a year. … Within a year, the opportunity to take on the CEO role came up. I felt (and still feel) so fortunate to have this opportunity. Over the past 10 years I’ve learned so much.

greg miles PHOTOGRAPH


Occupation: Chief Executive Officer, Louisiana SPCA Age: 42 Raised in: Metairie Lives in: Broadmoor Education: Dominican High School; Bachelor of Arts, Loyola University New Orleans; Master’s Degree, University of New Orleans. Family: Husband, Robby Harris; daughter Isa (11), son Jacob (2 months) Pets: Sparky (scruffy terrier mix) and Maximus (giant very vocal cat) were both adopted from the Louisiana SPCA. Favorite TV show: “The Goldbergs” Favorite book: Wonder by Raquel Palacios. “I recently read it with my daughter, and love how you see the same events through different people’s eyes. I cry every time I read the chapter about the dog. I just love this book.” Dream pet: “Any that are adopted from shelters. My shelter pets have been so much more easygoing, more grateful and more affectionate than any other pet I’ve had.” Nightmare pet: “Wildlife and exotic animals. They are beautiful, majestic animals whose needs cannot be met in a home.”

Q: What’s on the horizon for the Louisiana SPCA? I’m most excited about Louisiana SPCA’s Public Veterinary Clinic Services. We have brought some of the most talented veterinarians who are able to provide annual exams and vaccinations for dogs and cats, as well as rabbits and other small animals. We have been growing these services because they support keeping pets healthy and in

homes, which is critical to our mission. We have also been expanding our dogtraining programs and have two of the most outstanding trainers on our team.

Q: Who inspires you? Dr.

Kate Hurley is an amazing veterinarian at the University of California-Davis. She was one of the driving forces to create a shelter medicine specialty and launched the “Million Cat Challenge,” which has saved outdoor cats from shelters by challenging communities to focus on spay/neuter programs and returning cats to neighborhoods rather than shelters.

Q: Tell us about the Howl-

ing Success event. Howling Success is one of the most fun fundraisers I go to every year. Not only is the food outstanding (from some of the best restaurants in the city), but also the co-chairs and committee work to make it a unique experience. This year the theme is “Pop Culture,” and we’ll have some of the Mardi Gras dance groups performing to a medley of pop tunes. We also have one of the best auctions, featuring travel packages, pet care, art and jewelry. n

True confession I had no idea that spaying/ neutering my pets was important until I started working at the Louisiana SPCA. I always took my pets to the veterinarians and thought I knew so much about being a good pet owner, but I was wrong. myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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THE BEAT / BIZ

Domain in the Skyline Condo developers aim for new heights By Kathy Finn

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he recent announcement of a new construction project by one of the area’s most prolific apartment developers would not have seemed unusual but for one thing: The project isn’t an apartment complex, but rather a 15-story condominium building. In recent years, new condo construction projects in New Orleans have been relatively rare. While developers floated proposals and attempted to drum up interest, few projects that included more than a handful of condo units actually came to pass. Condominium projects, depending on market conditions, can carry significant financial risk for both a developer and a unit owner. If, for instance, an owner-occupied condo is located in a building where many of the units are vacation homes owned by people who live elsewhere, it could suffer a substantial loss in value during an economic downturn that prompts the sale of many

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second homes. Even in better times, condominium units can be harder to sell than the average single-family home, particularly if they aren’t located in an extremely high-demand neighborhood. And sometimes, the condo association terms and covenants that go along with ownership can complicate both the purchase and sale of a unit. The special risks that accompany condo ownership tend to make lenders wary, which makes it more difficult for a buyer to obtain financing for a purchase. Similarly, lenders are reluctant to extend millions of dollars in financing for development of a brand new condominium building. All of which makes the recent announcement by the Domain Companies stand out. The developers broke ground on their $80 million, 89-unit luxury condo building in August, shortly after they secured financing in the form of bank loans and equity capital.

“We are creating the finest residential building in New Orleans by any measure.” Domain principal Matt Schwartz said in a press release announcing the project, which the company dubbed the Standard. One likely reason that Domain was able to snag financing for the Standard is that, through its development of many apartment units around the city, the company had come to understand the local market and could make informed guesses at future demand. Founded by two Tulane University business graduates with a family history in New York real estate, Domain made its mark on New Orleans by creating apartments in old buildings along or near the Tulane Avenue corridor, in hopes of tapping demand fueled by the new University Medical Center and Veterans Administration hospital in Mid-City. Domain built the Crescent Club, Preserve, Meridian and Gold Seal Loft apartments in that area. The company later announced the remaking of an entire city block into South Market District, a $450 million downtown project that, in its first stages, would contain several hundred apartments in two buildings, along with a parking garage and retail space that now houses Arhaus Furniture, a CVS drugstore and popular restaurants. During the past decade, Domain


High-End High Rises Prices on luxury condominiums in New Orleans can range as high as $800 or more a square foot. The city has relatively few high-rise condo buildings. They include: One River Place 14 floors 80 units 600 Port of New Orleans Place 14 floors 81 units 625 St. Charles Ave. 12 floors 42 units Lake Marina Tower 19 floors 77 units Marseilles Condominiums 14 floors 48 units

has put some 700 rental units into service in New Orleans. In time, the developers may convert some of the apartments into ownership units – a common practice with older buildings that were renovated into apartments using tax credits that support the upgrading of historic structures. Eligibility for the credits requires that units be maintained as rentals for at least five years, after which property owners often convert them into condos and offer them for sale. Most of the condominium units located in and around the city’s Warehouse District are former rental apartments that became condos after the fiveyear interval expired. Much rarer than these conversions have been brand

new structures that were built as for-sale condos. With construction of the Standard, the Domain Companies may be taking a risk. Or, it could be getting a leg up on potential future competition. Other developers have their own condo projects on the drawing boards, or in some stage of approval, or construction. Generally, these projects contain 20 or fewer units. The Baker’s Row condominiums under development in the Marigny, for instance, consists of two four-unit buildings. But larger developments are also on tap. The planned makeover of the 33-story former World Trade Center into a Four Seasons hotel will include about 75 luxury condos on the building’s upper floors. But after many delays, completion of that project is at least a few years away. Meanwhile, work on the Standard has begun. Domain promises a building “with an elegant, reflective metal facade and deeply set windows to enhance the play of light,” according to the company’s press release. The ground floor of the building will double as an art gallery, and nearly 30,000 square feet of outdoor space will contain a pool and deck with private cabanas, gardens and fountains, along with a pool house and outdoor kitchens with barbecue areas. Features of the one- to threebedroom condos will include floor-to-ceiling windows, solid white oak flooring, marble countertops and high-end kitchen appliances. Two penthouses will occupy the 15th floor, each with 2,000 square feet of outdoor living space. Pricing information for the new units is not yet available, but by most indications, Domain intends to put its condos in the upper tier of luxury residences in New Orleans. n

myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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THE BEAT / EDUCATION

Chasing A Moving Target Where the numbers are improving by Dawn ruth Wilson

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he past two decades have been tumultuous ones for Louisiana’s educators and students, especially in New Orleans where Hurricane Katrina triggered a total overhaul. Every reform measure aimed at improving the academic performance of students has met intense hostility and resistance from one group or another. Parents raged when students were not promoted to higher grades; teachers unions raged at tougher evaluation standards; New Orleans raged when the state took over most of its failing schools; and far right political conservatives raged when the state moved to bring academic standards in line with national expectations. Since the end of the 1990s, the state has gradually instituted tougher academic standards and held students and schools accountable for meeting those standards. For students, the consequences include not being promoted to the next grade or not graduating on time. Consequences for schools are termination of school leaders and possible closure. High stakes testing and state takeovers of poor

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schools have created a good deal of hostility. But when all the fanfare died down after each controversy, the result was clear: In time students, teachers and schools adapt just fine to higher expectations. Because state leaders held firm, all that pain is beginning to pay off with rising standardized test scores, high school graduation rates and growing college entrance exam scores. According to a report released by the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) in July, Louisiana’s “fourth-graders outpaced the region and nation in gains in reading and math achievement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) at the Proficient level.” The report also said that “the number of ninth-graders who were promoted to 10th grade on time increased, indicating more ninth-graders were prepared for success in high school.” Better yet, “Louisiana’s high school graduation rate outpaced the nation in growth.” This statistic indicates that these trends started for recent graduates in their elementary school years. More good news came in August, when the

state’s department of education released the results of its 2016 standardized tests. Academic performance on LEAP tests improved in English and math at both the “basic” and “mastery” levels, the department of education reported on its website. In ’16, 67 percent of the state’s students scored “basic” compared to 65 percent in ’15. The percentage of students scoring at the “mastery” level in those subjects improved by five percentage points – from 33 percent in ’15 to 38 percent in ’16. Much of those gains came from academic improvement among “economically disadvantaged” students, the DOE’s report shows. Thirty percent of low-income students scored at the mastery level in 2016, five percentage points better than ’15. African American students also scored an increase at the mastery level, from 21 percent to 24 percent. The DOE’s focus on mastery reflects the state’s latest step in improving student achievement. By 2025, a school must have an average score of mastery in order to get an A rating, whereas in the past that rating applied to schools with high levels of “basic” scores. Students who score at the basic level, however, are not prepared to succeed in college. Joseph Fiedler illustration


College preparedness is the DOE’s new goal for student achievement and was also the goal of the controversial Common Core standards. Those standards underwent some revision recently here and in other states in response to political attacks, but most states are still committed to the higher standards to boost the United States’ ranking on global report cards. New Orleans students’ scores are also inching up at a steady rate at both the mastery and basic levels. According to a report released by Education Now, an education information website, 31 percent of the city’s students scored at the mastery level this year, compared to 28 percent last year. At the basic level, 61 percent scored at the basic level in New Orleans, compared to 60 percent in 2015. New Orleans students still trail the state average at the basic level by six percentage points, but their test scores at that level have improved considerably. Orleans Parish School Board Superintendent Henderson Lewis Jr. told board members in August that only 35 percent of Orleans Parish students were proficient on state assessments in 2005. “This improved performance in New Orleans has closed the gap with the rest of the state,” Lewis said. “In terms of school quality, the percentage of D and F schools in New Orleans has dropped from 79 percent in 2005 to only 26 percent in ’15.” Moreover, Education Now reported that New Orleans’ African American students “outperformed the state average” for African Ameri-

can students at the mastery level by four percentage points, 28 percent compared to 24 percent. These gains have been achieved even though Louisiana has one of the highest poverty rates in the country. SREB’s report showed that 22 percent of children under 18 years old live in poverty nationwide. In Louisiana, it’s 28 percent. An even higher number of the state’s children – 67 percent – come from low-income families, which qualifies them for free or reduced priced lunches. Louisiana’s percentage of low-income families is 10 percent higher than the southern average the SREB says, and 15 percent higher than the national average. Educators and state officials deserve praise for these gains, but they’re the first to acknowledge that the state will continue to struggle to compete with national averages in academic performance. The gap between average national performance scores and Louisiana’s average is still wide. SREB reported that in reading, for example, 40 percent of eighth graders scored at or above proficient on Louisiana’s academic assessments in 2015. But when Louisiana’s students took the NAEP, only 23 percent scored at or above proficient. The 17 percentage-point gap shows that Louisiana’s academic standards for grade level are still lower than national standards. Meanwhile, national standards are also inching up. Louisiana’s students are chasing a moving target, but at least they’re finally in the race. n

myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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THE BEAT / health

Cranberries and Health More than just a side dish By Brobson Lutz M.D.

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hose of us of a certain age remember the Great Cranberry Scare of 1959. Just weeks before Thanksgiving that year, a government official announced that cranberries from the Northwest were contaminated with a cancer causing pesticide. Food panic commenced. Grocery stores removed both fresh and canned cranberries from their shelves. “Well, I don’t care what some secretary in Washington says, we’re having cranberry sauce at my house Thanksgiving. Mr. London at the A&P saved me two cans,” proclaimed Clio Flanagan, a revered Athens, Alabama, seventh grade science teacher, in response to this warning. The secretary who had her upset was Arthur Flemming, Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, and one of the most important cabinet members in the Eisenhower administration. Even Mamie Eisenhower drank the Kool-Aid and served applesauce with nonpardoned turkey that Thanksgiving. My teacher’s response to what has since been dubbed our nation’s first mass chemical-related food scare is etched in my memory. First of all, I

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adored Mrs. Flanagan. She wasn’t afraid of bugs and snakes. She could recite the periodic table from memory. Her knowledge of chemicals was also practical, as she had the blackest hair in town and a chemical sensing nose that could detect mere traces of any Avon product. She would announce on the first day of school each year that she was allergic to all Avon products and ban any student from her classes who dared come to school wearing anything Avon. Secretary Flemming thought he was protecting us from a chemical villain called aminotriazole, a very effective herbicide used to kill bog weeds that chocked out cranberry production. Rats fed an aminotriazole-laced diet developed thyroid cancer, thus the alarm. The tainted cranberries contained only trace amounts of this chemical. As additional information became available, Mrs. Flanagan’s decision to proceed with cranberry sauce was vindicated. A person would need to consume some “15,000 pounds of cranberries every day for several years to get cancer” according to a later press account of the event. Mrs. Flanagan inoculated

me with a healthy dose of skepticism that has served me well to this day. The public panic in 1959 was short lived. Today, cranberries are the darling of health food followers, especially in matters of the bladder. Cranberries are touted as a preventive and even as a treatment for urinary tract infections. The overwhelming majority of urinary tract infections are caused when E. coli bacteria from the colon go wandering and attach to the epithelial cell layer in the urinary tract. They climb right up into the bladder and beyond. Once attached, these guileful bacteria construct a microbial mucosal matrix called a biofilm. The biofilm fixes the individual bacteria to each other and adheres the group to the surface of cells in the urinary tract. Cranberries contain a unique plant chemical compound that disrupts infectionforming biofilm. Like millions of tiny Tonya Hardings, this chemical bashes bacterial fimbriae – hair-like apendages that allow attachment. Without the ability to attach to the cells lining the urinary tract, bacteria cannot bind together to create a biofilm and are washed away by a tepid flow of urine. Cranberry products do decrease the frequency of urinary tract infections in women and children, according to a few well designed peer reviewed studies. Pure cranberry juice actually outperformed cranberry extract pills in one study. There may be more to cranberries than just urinary health. The primary culprit causing tooth plaque and subsequent decay is a bacterium called Streptococcus mutans. Recent research showed that


Cranberries and Scurvy Cranberries are an indigenous North American fruit. They grow on small vine-like shrubs that thrive in cold water bogs and marshes. Louisiana wetlands, perfect for crawfish, are too warm for cranberries. Most cranberries, whether fresh or in the can, consumed in Louisiana come from commercial growers in Massachusetts, Oregon, Washington, New Jersey and Wisconsin. The berry that partners so well with Thanksgiving turkey and dressing begins as a pink flower in spring, transforming into a red berry by late summer. Like limes, cranberries have a high Vitamin C content. Dried cranberry consumption during winter months helped protect Native Americans from scurvy. And New England ship captains, without access to lime trees, sailed with barrels of dried cranberries, doling out a daily handful to sailors as a North American scurvy preventive. Learn more at MyNewOrleans.com a subtye of polyphenol unique to the cranberry also disrupts the ability of these oral bacteria to bind together, preventing the formation of plaque. No plaque means no colonies of bacteria producing acid forming chemicals that initiate tooth decay. Researchers are looking into harnessing the power of these plaque pillaging chemicals as protective chemical additives to toothpaste and mouth wash. Cranberry lore confirmed by some preliminary research

suggests that cranberry products have other cardiovascular, intestinal and immunological benefits. The added sugar needed to make cranberry juice and sauce palpable presents a caloric problem, but Thanksgiving isn’t a day to fret about calories. “The bioactives in cranberry juice, dried cranberries and a variety of other cranberry sources have been shown to promote an array of beneficial health effects,” said a scientist connected to a cranberry producers’ trade group. “Given the complex nature and diversity of compounds found in berry fruits and how they interact with each other, I believe we’ve only scratched the surface when it comes to identifying the potential power of the cranberry.” Back to the great cranberry cancer panic. It was the first nationwide scare involving a chemical additive to food. Its media coverage temporarily paralyzed the cranberry industry. Subsequent chemical food scares included cyclamate and saccharine sweeteners, nitrites and DES in meats, red dye Number 2, Alar on apples and benzene in bottled water. But no food scare hit the American public with the intensity of that Category 5 cranberry storm in 1959. “During the height of the alarm a housewife is said to have returned several cans of cranberry sauce to her local market – exchanging them for three cartons of cigarettes,” according to an editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine. “In the long run people will not believe what they wish not to believe, and vice versa, illustrating one of the difficulties that the educational process encounters.” Acknowledgments: Joel Hitchcock Tilton of Paradigm Gardens helped research this column. n myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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THE BEAT / HEALTHBEAT

Jingle All the Way Running for a cure

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ne in five adults, 300,000 children and countless families are affected by arthritis. Fifty million Americans live every day with a form of arthritis, which according to the Arthritis Foundation is the No. 1 disability in the country. Because of my personal fight with this disease, I’ve made it a point to get involved and help the cause in any way I can. Within the past year, the Arthritis Foundation, with the help of Dr. Madeleine Feldman, created a New Orleans chapter for the first time since Hurricane Katrina. Having a chapter of the foundation in the city will not only bring awareness to something that troubles countless Americans, but also will lend a voice and a shoulder to lean on to those affected. Like other national foundations, the Arthritis Foundation holds multiple fundraising events throughout the year to aid in the research of finding a cure for arthritis. As the New Orleans chapter gets its bearings, the first event the chapter will hold is the popular AF Jingle Bell Run. Sat., Dec. 17, the first New Orleans Jingle Bell Run (JBR) will convene at the Audubon Park Jogging Path. The JBR is a 5K holiday-themed run or walk, held to bring together the community in hopes of raising awareness and funds for arthritisrelated illnesses. JBR registration will begin at 7:30 a.m., with the race beginning at 9 a.m. There will be PJ’s Coffee and Smoothie King for participants to enjoy, as well as a swag bag that comes along with your registration. In addition to all of the festivities, there will be a costume contest for those dressed in their best holiday flair – including a costume contest for the four-legged, furry attendees. For additional information visit JBR.org/NewOrleans. And if you’re feeling generous or want to join my JBR team, visit JBR. org/NewOrleans/MassicotMafia – there may even be a themed shirt waiting for you. So join the team, tie bells to your shoes, dress in a festive costume and we’ll see you Dec. 17 to help raise funds to cure arthritis.

– Kelly Massicot

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myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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THE BEAT / CRIME FIGHTING

“NCIS: New Orleans” Rape & “The Challenge of Our Times” By Allen Johnson Jr.

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ne day I’m mulling over various topics for this column. The next day I’m standing in a hushed crowd outside of a neighbor’s house. We are waiting for the crew of the TV drama series “NCIS: New Orleans” to finish shooting a scene inside the residence. I am anticipating an (unscripted) meeting with D’Wayne W. Swear, the show’s technical advisor and a retired chief of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service in New Orleans, now located at the naval air base at Belle Chasse. Swear’s 25-year career with NCIS is said to have inspired the main character of “NCIS: New Orleans,” Special Agent Dwayne Pride (played by Scott Bakula). Pride leads a team of highly trained federal agents who take down terrorists and spies, shoot it out with dangerous killers or solve cold case homicides in just 48 minutes – excluding TV commercials. (Nielsen ratings will later show “NCIS: New Orleans” cracked TV’s top 10 prime-time network programs.) At the moment, we remain frozen. “Cut!” someone yells. The people around me, actors and crew, resume talking and moving around.

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I meet Swear under an oak tree. He is barrel-chested and friendly. Sorry, he says, he cannot talk to reporters without approval from CBS-TV. *** “What would the angle for the piece be?” Katie Barker, a vice president for CBS Entertainment Communications, asks via email. I tap out a reply: “For a day at least, a popular TV show provides a respite for area residents weary of chronic drug-fueled crime and public corruption” (and a veteran journalist welcoming a break). Waiting for Barker’s response, I realize I know little about the real-life NCIS, other than its local agents assisted local police after Katrina hit in 2005. I begin reading. There are some 2,000 NCIS agents worldwide spread over more than 40 Navy and Marine bases and ships. They investigate terrorism, espionage and incidences of homicide, rape, child abuse and other felonies involving Navy and Marine personnel, military and civilian. The modern NCIS evolved from the ruins of the Navy/Marine Tailhook sex abuse scandal of

1991, 25 years ago. President George H. W. Bush appointed New Orleanian Sean O’Keefe, a confidant of Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, to reform both the Navy and NCIS’ predecessor, the Naval Investigative Services (NIS). A total of 83 women, including officers, and seven men were assaulted by Navy and Marine aviators during a three-day convention at the Las Vegas Hilton Hotel. Many of the victims were sexually molested as they attempted to pass a gauntlet of rowdy junior officers in a hotel foyer. A month later, Navy Lt. Paula Coughlin, a helicopter pilot, dropped a bombshell at a press conference. Coughlin described how she fought back against a crowd of men who groped at her breasts and buttocks in a third-floor hallway of the Hilton. Other Navy women filed sexual assault complaints with authorities investigating Tailhook, including the NIS. Problems with the agency’s investigation soon surfaced. In 1992, The Los Angeles Times reported the commander of the NIS, an admiral, “disparaged female pilots as ‘go-go’ dancers” and told Pentagon officials he


didn’t believe that women belonged in the military. An NIS investigator made “romantic overtures” to an apparent victim, calling her “sweetcakes” as she looked through photographs for her sexual assailants. A Pentagon investigation excoriated the NIS’ probe of the scandal, finding the agency shielded the Navy from criticism and unduly limited findings of sexual misconduct to junior officers. “Frontline,” the investigative program on public television, reported: “Ultimately, the careers of 14 admirals and almost 300 naval aviators were scuttled or damaged by Tailhook,” the NIS admiral among them. No one was criminally prosecuted. Dozens of aviators were disciplined internally. Tailhook played a “major role” in the beginning of the end of a Pentagon policy excluding women from combat, says retired Navy Captain Robert L. Beck, author of a book on the scandal. In 2013, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta removed the ban on women in combat; final restrictions were removed for all positions in all the armed forces earlier this year, Beck wrote in a guest column for the Capital Gazette of Annapolis, Maryland, marking the 25th anniversary of the convention in September. “Concerns that women might have physical or psychological deficiencies that would keep them from serving in these positions were eventually dispelled by studies of actual combat conditions, by training and by changing perceptions of a new generation of American war fighters.” Sexual assault remains a major problem for the Navy, Marines and NCIS.

“We’ve got to focus on sexual assault prevention,” Admiral Jonathan Greenert, the Navy’s highest-ranking military officer, told a Tailhook convention in 2013. “It happened here in this association years ago and it can happen anywhere. It [sexual assault] is the challenge of our times. It’s a safety issue … our kids deserve a climate of dignity and respect and a good place to work.” Rear Admiral Ann Burkhardt, Chief of Naval Personnel, says all sailors received scenario-based training on sexual assault prevention by Sept. 30, 2016. “We want our sailors to live and act, on- and off-duty, on- and off-line … as professionals who treat each other with dignity and respect,” she said. NCIS Director Andrew Traver didn’t respond in time for publication to our requests for a retrospective on the progress of women in the Navy since Tailhook, and for recent NCIS sex crime statistics. After his presidential appointment in 2013, Traver told Navy Times that complaints of sexual assaults are one of the “biggest things we wrestle with” at NCIS. *** CBS Entertainment declined a request for an interview with former NCIS Chief Swear, suggesting topics such as NCIS rape investigations and Tailhook were “more suited for an interview with the real agency, not our show.” I watched the season premiere of “NCIS: New Orleans” anyway. A lot of viewers are upset that the popular character Agent Brody has left the show. I’m more impressed that the actress C. C. H. Pounder has become New Orleans’ first black female coroner (an elected position). All it took for Pounder to get the job was a script change. n

myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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THE BEAT / Chronicles

Light ’Em Up! New Orleans and cigars BY CAROLYN KOLB

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ttorney Tommy Lemann, in his 90s, has been known to credit his longevity to his habit of having a daily cigar. In fact, once when he was seated at a luncheon next to the late Dr. Alton Ochsner (a staunch foe of tobacco), Lemann posed the question: “Winston Churchill was known to smoke 10 cigars a day, and he lived to age 90. What do you think of that?” Ochsner didn’t hesitate to reply: “If he hadn’t smoked, he’d be alive today.” In the view of Lemann, and of many others, a life without cigars would be a life without a necessary pleasure. When Cuban cigars were readily available, Lemann favored Upmann’s. He is a bit more wide-ranging in his brand choices today, and admits that he was favorably impressed with the product of the local New Orleans Cigar Factory, having been presented with a box as a favor at a wedding and later ordering some online. In the 19th century, the best local cigar brand was La Belle Creole, made

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by S. Hernsheim Brothers on Magazine Street at Julia Street, where the Deutsch Kerrigan law firm is now. The most famous local cigar worker was Benito Juarez, later President of Mexico, who held that job in the 1850s while in exile. Perhaps the last of the original cigar makers in New Orleans was the Trellis family. Manuel Trellis’ grandfather came from Spain, and Manuel’s father worked for the company, but Manuel never did. “I don’t even smoke,” he admits. The family’s cigars were favorably mentioned in the fall 2008 issue of Smoke Magazine (SmokeMag.com) for “what most people in the industry thought was the best cigar made at the time, an El Trellis Triangle – a brand from New Orleans. It was considered an upscale smoke. They also made Keep Moving, which was a big seller down in south Louisiana.” Manuel Trellis explains that the wrappers were made from Connecticut shade tobacco, and the filler was

Havana tobacco. Their factory was first located at 701 South Peters St., but the company moved to Donaldsonville when a plant there closed, leaving many experienced cigar makers looking for work. After cigar making machines were introduced, the company was sold. Being a cigar maker was considered a good career for New Orleans high school female graduates in 1928, when the city directory listed 18 different cigar factories, half of them located in the business district and the French Quarter, with the rest downtown below Canal Street. “Left handed girls and quick-eyed girls and girls with lusty noses are the girls who can get rich making cigars in New Orleans,” said a story in The Times-Picayune on Aug. 5 of that year. According to the article, those who rolled the cigar in its wrapper had to be left handed. That is no longer the case, says Amanda Fuoco, office manager of Cigar Factory New Orleans, “most of the time they use both hands.” Visitors to their location at 415 Decatur St. can view an exhibit on cigar history and see cigar makers at work. (There is another location at 905 Decatur St., one at 206 Bourbon St. and one in Destin, Florida.) Cigar Factory New Orleans has been manufacturing their own cigars since 1999. “We don’t sell anybody’s but our own,” Fuoco says proudly. “Most of our master cigar makers come from the Dominican Republic – and we have different generations of the same families. One is a lady from Cuba.” According to Fuoco, they each produce about 250 cigars a day. “We get our tobacco from Nicaragua and Brazil, and for wrappers we use Connecticut shade, a wrapper from Cameroon, Africa, and a Brazilian one.” Just last month, President Obama lifted the remaining restrictions on bringing back cigars from Cuba. When asked how importing Cuban cigars could affect American cigar makers, Fucco says, “It would level the playing field. It will let people compare them to ours!” As for Fuoco, she grew up in “an Italian family, lots of wine and cigars,” so she does have a personal favorite. “Every morning with my coffee, I like our Robusto Social Club Maduro.” (And, if you were wondering, she has her own humidor to store them and she uses a “classic Guillotine cutter.”) Smokin’! n cheryl gerber photograph


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LOCAL COLOR ME AGAIN / MODINE GUNCH / JOIE D’EVE / in tune / READ+SPIN / JAZZ LIFE / HOME

in tune pg. 50

Phantogram will be playing at the Joy Theater on Thurs., Nov. 3. The Greenwich-based electronic duo have just wrapped up a summer tour as Big Grams with Big Boi, and their third album, Three, was released in October. Phantogram is one of the most exciting electro-pop groups on the scene right now. This will be one of the best shows of the month for sure.


LOCAL COLOR / ME AGAIN

Wizard Watch There in the Square BY CHRIS ROSE

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was walking along Decatur Street recently when I came across a busy crowd in front of Jackson Square. Folks were trampling through the artist colony and ducking under the necks and heads of the sullen mules that line up there, rushing to the gate, but the gate was locked. As it turns out, they weren’t rushing to get into the park. They were rushing to get near the man who was trying to get into the park. That would be Louisiana’s esteemed ambassador of charity, unity, equality, goodwill and peace: David Duke. The noted white supremacist, anti-Semite, tax-evader and cosmetically enhanced former imperial wizard of the Ku Klux Klan was holding court. Something about the statue of Andrew Jackson inside the square. Word was out some folks were coming to tear it down. There were cops everywhere. And so Duke was on his soapbox and the crowd pressed in. There was visible joy in his face at the size and energy of the crowd. What he didn’t seem to notice that it was almost entirely comprised of tourists rushing in, taking selfies and then rushing away, only to be replaced by a new set of gawkers rushing in. But obliviousness has always

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been one of his charms. Nobody was really listening to him. It could only have taken a political campaign as we witnessed this past year to embolden the creeps, cretins and crazies to crawl out from under their rocks and out of their caves to enter – or, as in Duke’s case, re-enter – the public square, literally, and the public debate, frighteningly. By the time you read this, the election is either impending or over. And no matter the results, this was a campaign season that brought back to us in Louisiana a reminder of one of our most shameful periods, one of our most collectively regrettable phenomena: the Duke of Darkness. Though I write this weeks before the election, my assumption (my hope, my prayer) is that Duke got crushed and will once again fade into obscurity, resentment and bitterness. And, please, retirement. Because we’re a better people than this. Even if he gets (or got) 20 votes, that’s enough to tell me that there are 20 folks among us who have lost all perspective, lost their way and maybe even lost their hope in this great city, state and nation. For 10 years we’ve done so much to re-

habilitate our region’s reputation as a corrupt, backwater host to crooks, thieves, demagogues, political grifters and ministers of hate; purveyors of willful ignorance, succumbed to fear and holding dear to false gods; charismatic charlatans and those who sell a brand of victimhood that exists only in the minds of those who refuse to apply critical thinking to their daily lives. So, who’s our president now? I am not a prognosticator. It wasn’t a year of top of the line choices. It was like being in the high school lunch cafeteria again and having a choice between the mystery meat or the mystery fish with tater tots. Thank God for the tater tots. Unfortunately, no matter who sits in the Oval Office, the culture wars will still rage. Gay rights. Black lives. Etc. At least nationally. Here, maybe we can calm down and get about being New Orleans again – a respite of hope, romance, tolerance, unity and the kindness of strangers. Maybe even the Saints can pull off a winning season. Because we need that now more than ever. We need to know that we can solve our issues in a fair, civil and righteous manner. Without demagogues taking over our public squares. Without the specter of division and violence hovering over every civic debate. Without neighbors turning on neighbors. Or am I as naive as I sound? The record shows: I believe in this city. I am a true believer. And I believe we will get through this. n jason raish illustration


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LOCAL COLOR / MODINE’S NEW ORLEANS

Tofurkey in the Oven And other vegan treats BY MODINE GUNCH

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very year my mother-in-law Ms. Larda leads the blessing at Thanksgiving dinner. “We ain’t dead yet, so we’re thankful,” she says. It is short and it covers everything. But this year there was some muttering, “Might as well be dead.” Food is a very big deal to the Gunches. And Thanksgiving is your major eating holiday. Gunches don’t care about the Macy’s parade (where nobody throws nothing). Even football is in second place. Gunches care about food. They tell stories about past Thanksgivings like other people talk about past Super Bowls. (Remember Luna’s oyster dressing in 1968? How about Gramma Luna’s sweet potato pie – when was that – ’72? The first year we didn’t have the pineapple Jell-O salad?) But this year we’re eating vegan. I got to explain. We are eating at my sister-in-law Gloriosa’s, which is always a stupid idea. But they got a wall-sized TV so good you can count the nose hairs of every player in every game. Also, her husband, Proteus, is a liquor wholesaler. The problem is her mother-in-law, Ms.

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Sarcophaga. She is very delicate. Also mean as a snake. And every Thanksgiving there’s some disaster. Either potpourri gets mixed with the stuffing and she chokes on it, or the turkey bursts into flames on the table and she faints. Stuff that could happen to anybody. But still. Ms. Larda decides things will go smooth this time. Four of us – me, Larva, Leech and Lurch – will get there early in the morning and do all the cooking under Ms. Larda’s supervision. Ms. Larda’s cooking is fit for the angels, so no way is Gloriosa going to turn that down. The day before Thanksgiving, Ms. Larda calls Gloriosa to check if she thinks a 20-pound turkey will be enough. Gloriosa says “You mean tofurkey?” Ms. Larda says “Don’t talk dirty.” “Ma,” Gloriosa replied, “didn’t you read my email? We’re eating vegan.” She says Ms. Sarcophaga no longer partakes of any animal product whatsoever, and can’t stand to be around those who do. Gloriosa, who’s one of them granola-hugging types anyway, extensively researched it on Google, and now she and Proteus and the kids, Comus and Momus, eat vegan too.

Gloriosa probably figured we would all back out if she told Ms. Larda earlier. But she knows Ms. Larda hardly ever reads her email. She also knows Ms. Larda never cooks without bacon grease and butter. Ms. Larda calls me up, hysterical. I google some vegan recipes for her. She gags a little, but she comes up with a menu. And then she gets an idea that will fix everything. She calls Proteus. Next day, we meet at Gloriosa’s at 6 a.m. Ms. Larda brews us strong coffee and explains the new rules. She gets us chopping the onions and celery and bell peppers, plus mushrooms to substitute for oyster in the stuffing; then she puts the “Slab O’ Soy” in the oven with olive oil-slathered potatoes. Yuk. But she says cheer up, she got a secret weapon. Proteus strolls in with an armload of bottles. What Ms. Larda told him was to mix a batch of Fogg Cutters, like she remembers from the old Pontchartrain Beach Polynesian bar. She forgets he makes drinks strong. When he finishes stirring everything together, the drink stirrer looks like it’s been gnawed on. “Now, use a lot of ice in these,” Ms. Larda says. Proteus pours one – over ice – for each of us. We cheer right up. Anyway, when the in-laws show up we got dinner fit for – well, for a bunch of people who don’t eat animal products. Ms. Sarcophaga glares at the mushrooms and announces she’s allergic to fungi. Lurch asks if she tried athlete’s foot spray. Proteus pours her a Fogg Cutter. She says ice makes her teeth hurt, so she knocks it back straight. Then she smiles. I didn’t know she could do that. She asks what’s in it. Proteus says kale and prune juice. He pours her another. Somebody notices the grandchildren have disappeared. Ms. Sarcophaga thinks that’s hilarious. “Bet they slunk off to eat that Halloween candy under Comus’ bed,” she says, and snorts into her drink. By the time we finish dinner and the Fogg Cutters, we have turned into quite the jovial family. So jovial we all have to go home in taxis. Another Thanksgiving for the books. If anybody can remember it. n LORI OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


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LOCAL COLOR / JOIE D’EVE

Missing Parent Blues when a parent moves away BY EVE CRAWFORD PEYTON

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ew Orleans isn’t for everyone. Even when I’m at my happiest here – on an 80-degree day in January drinking a perfect iced coffee, eating a roast beef poor boy with gravy dripping down to my elbows, sipping a cocktail in the park in early spring or laughing at raunchy Krewe du Vieux floats from a friend’s balcony – even then, I get that it isn’t for everybody. Yes, we hear a lot of “came here for Jazz Fest and never left” stories, but we have to acknowledge that there are also a lot of people who came here for Jazz Fest and left thinking the city was filthy or who (as happened to me and a group of college friends I brought home for Jazz Fest) got robbed at gunpoint, or who can’t understand why anyone would voluntarily live in a swamp or would move back after Katrina. I respect that. I don’t know how I would feel about New Orleans if it weren’t my home; like someone growing up in a dysfunctional family, I don’t really know any different. But this is home. This is my city. This is where I’m going to live, God willing and the river don’t rise. My ex-husband never liked New Orleans. He didn’t like it when we first came here in the summer of 1999, and he liked it even less after the whole robbery thing. Nonetheless, we’d made a deal that I could pick where

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we moved after we were finished school, and so we moved here. He never thought of New Orleans as home and found it difficult to live here, both socially and financially, particularly after we divorced in 2010, and last year, he finally moved back to his home in St. Louis. I am happy for him. I know the thrill of being back in familiar surroundings, back among childhood friends, back where you know all the shortcuts and the private jokes. But Ruby has struggled. This past week was rougher than normal as she had Donuts with Dad (my husband went, of course, but it wasn’t quite the same) followed by cheerleading at the homecoming game – she really wanted him to see her be the flier on the pyramid. She decided she’d feel better if she could write about it and asked if she could tell kids whose parents have moved away 10 things they should know.   10 Things You Should Know If Your Parent Has Moved Away By Ruby Crawford

1. Either your mom or dad will always love you, even when they’re living in a different place. 2. It’s just as hard for them as it is for you. Trust me. 3. One thing almost all parents do is be glad that they still have you, just not in their house. 4. Life is like a hill. There are some ups and some downs. And even though you’re going through a downhill into a valley, somehow it seems to turn around. Even if you’re bummed. 5. It gets better over time, no matter what you think when it’s happening. I remember thinking as hard as it was when my dad

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first moved away, that’s how hard it was going to be forever. But just like my mom told me, it got better and was probably better in like three months. I still miss him a lot, but I feel a lot better. 6. Sometimes you may feel like they don’t love you, but that’s not true at all. Sometimes they move for the better. If they stayed, they might be living an even worse life, and most kids want what’s better for their parents. 7. Hopefully, they still get to see you. From time to time, you learn how to make your time together count. When my dad came to visit, he came to lunch at my school and met all my friends. 8. If your parent moved out of the state and doesn’t have a nighttime job, you can FaceTime with them to do your homework. That always made me feel better. 9. If your parent lives in another state, you might have flown on a plane by yourself. I know it’s scary the first time. You might feel abandoned, but as you fly more times, you get used to the feeling and hopefully you’ll make some new friends. I know I did. 10. You might be the only one in your class without their dad or mom or the only one in your grade or the only one in your school, and sometimes you might feel like you’re the only kid in the world. But you’re not. I used to think I was the only one in the world for about two weeks. Then I bumped into a few kids whose parents also lived out of state. But they got through it just like me. And there’s really nothing you can do about it. Kids can’t fix it. There might be kids out there who could. It might even be you. You can try, but if you try and you fail, it isn’t your fault. n

Excerpted from Eve Crawford Peyton’s blog, Joie d’Eve, which appears each Friday on MyNewOrleans.com.

jane sanders ILLUSTRATION


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LOCAL COLOR / IN TUNE

Kishi Bashi

Raitt & Parton In addition to all of the amazing young acts coming to town this month, there are some veterans in the mix as well. Two of the great female voices are coming through town for theater shows. First, on Nov. 5, Bonnie Raitt will play a show at the Saenger. This is a rare treat for New Orleans, as most of Raitt’s recent shows here have been at Jazz Fest. Here is an opportunity to see her in a more intimate, controlled setting. If that weren’t enough, on Nov. 30, Dolly Parton will bring her show to the Smoothie King Center. On this tour Parton has been playing two full sets spanning her entire career. Do not miss it.

Pop Rules A November to be thankful for BY mike griffith

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ovember always seems to be a little top-heavy. It starts with the sustained momentum of the Voodoo Music + Arts Experience and drifts through what’s generally the end of the fall touring season. The month begins with Kishi Bashi performing on Nov. 1 at One Eyed Jacks. Kaoru Ishibashi, who performs as Kishi Bashi, is a signer and multi-instrumentalist who produces absurdly joyful and nuanced indie pop. Ishibashi is a renowned violinist, and he pushes the instrument to its sonic limits through looping and modulation. As Kishi Bashi he has just released his latest record, Sonderlust, which is a step forward for the artist. There is a masterful blending of genres here that’s brought together by Ishibashi’s trademark style. His shows are always excellent. It seems as though every month there’s a night with a number of excellent shows stacked on top of each other. This month Thurs., Nov. 3 carries that distinction. First and perhaps foremost, Sia will be at the Smoothie King Center. The Australian singer, who released the excellent This Is Acting in January,

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is known for the exuberance of her live shows. This is another in a great string of pop shows that has been through the arena lately. That night will also see Alex G and LVL UP dropping by Siberia with Brandon Can’t Dance. LVL UP just released their best album of low-fi rock yet. Return to Love is one of the better albums released this year, and here’s a chance to see them up close at Siberia. Finally, Phantogram will be playing at the Joy Theater the same night. The Greenwich-based electronic duo have just wrapped up a summer tour as Big Grams with Big Boi, and their third album, Three, was released in October. Phantogram is one of the most exciting electro-pop groups on the scene right now. This will be one of the best shows of the month for sure. Just a few nights later on Nov. 6, Guided by Voices will play Republic. GBV in some form or other have been a fixture on the indie scene since the 1980s. This latest incarnation is based on Robert Pollard’s latest release Please Be Honest, which sees him playing every instrument on the record himself. It has

been exciting to see Pollard start fresh on this record, and it will be interesting to see what parts of the GBV canon he carries with him and what’s made new. In a similar vein, the Brooklyn based indie pop group Lucius will be at Tipitina’s on Nov. 9 with Lake Street Dive. Lucius will be well known to anyone who has kept up with my Newport Folk Festival coverage. In addition to their excellent solo work, they’re consummate collaborators who lend sonic texture everywhere they go. The combination of them with Lake Street Dive will be an excellent evening. Finally, this month, Tegan and Sara will be at the Joy Theater. Personally, I’m thrilled about this show. I think that their latest release, Love You to Death, was the best record of the summer. Tegan and Sara are at the top of their game. This record is lyrically and sonically beautiful. The hooks are magnificent and there’s a depth of feeling that belies the cheeriness of the pop itself. Note: Dates are subject to change. Playlist of mentioned bands available at: bit.ly/ InTune11-16 n

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To contact Mike about music news, upcoming performances and recordings, email Mike@MyNewOrleans.com or contact him through Twitter @Minima.

Shervin Lainez photograph


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LOCAL COLOR / READ+SPIN

Non-Fiction: Author of academic works and published research on the history of cuisine, Paul Freedman’s Ten Restaurants That Changed America is thick with details and hunger-inducing menus. Opening with an introduction by restaurateur Danny Meyer, the owner of Union Square Hospitality Group,. Freedman focuses primarily on Le Pavillion, Chez Panisse, Mamma Leone’s, The Mandarin, Delmonico’s, The Four Seasons, Sylvia’s, Howard Johnson’s, Schrafft’s and New Orleans’ own Antoine’s.

Rock-Pop/Electronic: A talented musician power duet, trombonist/vocalist Carly Meyers and drummer Adam Gertner of ROAR! have been rocking the New Orleans live music scene for more than six years. Their most recent album La-Di-Da is an eclectic, upbeat conglomerate of the band’s aerial, electronic, edgy sound – completely unique to other local bands coming out of New Orleans right now. I suggest attending a live show for the true ROAR! experience. Meyer’s hair flips and awe-inducing energy with the trombone is simply amazing. Both band members have great onstage chemistry and bring energized passion to audiences.

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Non-Fiction: A mouth-watering short but spicy book steeped in vinegar, salt and the history of chilies’ world takeover. Denver Nicks travels the United States, equipped with a taste for adventure and a craving for the secret to “America’s burning obsession.” Nicks makes stops to learn origin stories and test his boiling point with several Louisiana hot sauce and Cajun spice flavor aficionados. Nicks touches on the questionably-controversial start of Tabasco on Avery Island and goes on to offer his favorite locally sourced concoctions, such as Crystal, Moko Jumbie and Trappey’s. Could chilies bring people together in a state of love and arousal? Have India, China and North Africa always had spicy foods? Does Louisiana Crystal Hot Sauce adorn restaurant tables in Saudi Arabia? Hot Sauce Nation explores all of these questions. Disclaimer: You’ll definitely want to seek your local farmer’s market, grocery and the internet for your next favorite flavorful condiment after this read.

Rock-N-Roll: New to the New Orleans music scene, McGregor is a young group of musicians based in the Crescent City. The band’s talent is sourced from all over, including Los Angeles, Memphis and Washington D.C. Drawing inspiration from classic rock bands such as Fleetwood Mac, the Eagles and Wilco, these former Gold In The Rush bandmates just released their first EP, Fell.

by jessica debold Please send submissions for consideration, attention: Jessica DeBold, 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. More reviews appear as a bi-weekly blog on MyNewOrleans.com.


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LOCAL COLOR / JAZZ LIFE

After Pete Tim Laughlin talking jazz BY JASON BERRY

“I

fell in love with the sound of the clarinet before I owned one,” reports Tim Laughlin, by cell phone, on an Indian summer morning. “A buddy down the street in Gentilly Woods had one. I was about 8, and got my own.” That was in the early 1970s. After music lessons, he advanced to saxophone in middle school at Holy Cross, continuing through 12th grade. “I played in the concert and marching bands. At night I’d listen to jazz rather than study music.” The radio yielded a magical sound: Pete Fountain and His Mardi Gras Strutters. At Laughlin’s 17th birthday dinner at the Hilton, where Fountain had a club, they met. “He gave me some [clarinet] reeds, a couple of albums and said, ‘Come by any time.’” The doorman, Wimpy Courrege (Captain of Fountain’s Half-Fast Marching Club) refused to let him in until he was 18. “For an entire year I sat in the foyer, only seeing Pete after the show.” One night Wimpy said, “Hey kid, you want something to drink?” A beer! Laughlin sat

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in the hallway, drinking his illegal beer, dreaming of a career playing in clubs. That began out of high school. “My parents went through the Depression and wondered where I’d get money to stuff in the mattress. I lost my dad at 15. ‘So what are you going to do now?’ my mom asked. ‘Play music!’ She just looked at me.” Laughlin has been a mainstay on New Orleans-Style clarinet for three decades with a string of recordings, concert tours, gigs at Palm Court, the Bombay Club and other local venues. He had a five-year association with the Dukes of Dixieland, including a 1992 concert at Carnegie Hall that included his mom in the audience. His latest CD, Tim Laughlin: The Trio Collection, Vol. 1, features ballads, swing waltzes and a tender take on “Old Rugged Cross” with drummer Hal Smith, and David Boeddinghaus on the 1922 Mason & Hamlin piano that Juliet, Tim’s wife, imported from California for their home on Royal Street, where the recording was made. “I went to the Conservatory of Bourbon

Street,” he chuckles of his early years, hustling gigs. “[Trumpeter] Murphy Campo got me to join the union. Paul Crawford of Crawford Ferguson Night Owls helped me arrange my first CD in (19)91. George Buck put out my first five albums. He helped me get my name out there. Later on I started selfproducing on my own label.” Laughlin has a full, graceful tone with the flex to go sweet and mellow on “Must Be Right, Can’t Be Wrong,” a melody suggesting life as an easy amble, composed by Jabbo Smith in the Great Depression. Laughlin’s mentor was Connie Jones, the cornetist and trumpeter, who lately retired at 82. Fountain, who recently died at 86, had long influence. “It was Pete’s phrasing and language of jazz that really struck me,” Laughlin says. “He worked well with the ensemble but played the melody on records. You could almost dance to him if he was playing by himself, he could swing that well. I used to tease him that every note had a smile. He told me, ‘Work on your tone. You’ve got the rest of your life to learn technique.’ He was right.” “For every hour I practiced, I would listen to a record for an hour. Jazz is about note placement. On a great Armstrong solo, there’s space in there, and beauty in between the space,” he says. “I’m concentrating on my phrasing to become a better story teller, to use space, like a good orator would pause in the right place to capture the listener. You state the melody, the comfort zone, and the listener is challenged to stay with the story teller on a journey that’s a pleasure for the musician and listener as well.” n George Long photograph


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LOCAL COLOR / HOME

Doctor’s Order A new kitchen, garden and extra story embellish BY BONNIE WARREN PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHERYL GERBER

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r. Laurie Moeller’s Metairie home has been transformed from an ordinary one-story, 1,100 square foot floor plan to a grand two-story contemporary home of 2,700 square feet. “Nothing about the exterior gives a hint to the unique open floor plan that leads through French doors onto a porch that overlooks the large rear garden,” says Laurie, an associate professor at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center’s School of Dentistry. “The lot is 170 feet deep and the garden is one of my favorite areas. Once you enter the garden you’re in a peaceful oasis, far from the busy boulevard in front of the house.”

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Located on what’s known as Metairie Ridge, the house was built in the 1950s on property that was originally owned by Henri Bonnabel, a chemist from Paris who arrived in New Orleans in 1825 at the age of 25. He opened a pharmacy on Tchoupitoulas Street and soon became wealthy. In 1836, he purchased the land that had originally been inhabited by Tchoupitoulas Indians with the idea of making it a separate city in Jefferson Parish. After he died, his son Alfred continued his father’s dream and developed what become known as Bonnabel Place 1914. Laurie purchased the property in 2009 from a cousin,


Facing page: Laurie added a new kitchen with the help of kitchen designer Missy Howell and contractor Brice Lobitz of Pro Remodeling; rosewood cabinets were added to give the space the warm feeling she wanted. Top, left: Built in the 1950s, the original house was a one-story structure of only 1,100 square feet; today the two-story home is a contemporary gem of 2,700 square feet. Top, right: Dr. Laurie Moeller with Cooper, her pet Havanese. Bottom: The circular patio highlights the rear garden.


Facing page: Top, left: The stately four-poster bed is shown through the double doors that lead to the upstairs master suite. Top, right: The breakfast room opens into the kitchen; a counter and barstools in the kitchen provides space for a quick meal. Bottom, left: A new dining room was created in Laurie’s remodeling. It features a glass table and contemporary chairs from Scandinavia Furniture. Bottom, right: The high-pitched ceiling in the den adds volume to the space that occupies the entire rear of the house; a circular sofa provides comfortable seating. Top: The living room showcases the black-and-white ceramic tile and open floor plan that takes in everything on the first floor, except the guest bedroom and bathroom.

Cheryl Thompson, and her husband, Daryl. “They had done the major renovation of completely opening up the living area of first floor and adding a luxurious master suite on the second floor with the help of Steve Ratley of Ratley Architects,” she says. Then Laurie came along and further tailored the house to her needs by creating a totally new kitchen with the help of kitchen designer Missy Howell of Southport Custom Cabinetry, and contractor Brice Lobitz of Pro Remodeling. “Missy and Brice did a great job,” she says. “Brice was a meticulous contractor who treated my house and the project like his own. Missy had done a kitchen for my friend Charlotte Connick, and she was excellent with even the smallest detail. When everything was finished I told Missy and Brice that it was the prettiest kitchen I have ever seen – and it’s mine.” The new kitchen received features Rosewood cabinets, granite countertops and topof-the-line Kitchen Aid appliances. A new bar was added between the large den that covers the entire back of the house. “It’s a great place for a quick meal,” Laurie says. One of the major design features of the

house is the black-and-white ceramic tile on the floor of the entire downstairs that was done to provide continuity for the open floor plan, with only the guest bedroom receiving carpet and the guest bathroom was tiled. “Cheryl and Daryl had selected the black-and-white tile and kept it because I liked the unique dramatic effect it offered.” The back of the house features a series of tall windows and French doors, thus providing an unobstructed view of the rear patio and garden. “Since there’s total privacy in the space I didn’t need to cover the windows with curtains or blinds,” she continues. “The living areas blend perfectly for entertaining providing plenty of space for the easy movement of guests.” Laurie is quick to point out that her home also is warm and cozy. “I enjoy relaxing on the comfortable circular sofa and watching a movie on the television that is normally hidden in the large armoire.” She especially enjoys having a private floor for the large master suite upstairs. “It feels very peaceful,” she says. “Then again, the entire house feels like a sanctuary to me from the stresses of life.” n myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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Bread

Thy Daily

By Jyl Benson

Photographed by Marianna Massey Photo Assistant Scott Williams


In

an effort to bring some kind of order to the task of determining which among New Orleans’ thousands of worthwhile bread puddings should make the final cut, I limited the contenders to those of the sweet variety with a provenance of some form of not-sweet bread. The only constants among the six finalists are they all involve a custard base of eggs and cream, and each of them is served with a sauce – if not two. It will come as a shock to some, I know, but bread pudding isn’t a New Orleans invention. It isn’t even an American invention. Merit for the creation of the confection we hold so dear belongs to unnamed yet clever and frugal Medieval or ancient European or Middle Eastern cooks who found themselves with an abundance of bread, too precious to waste. With a heritage of Creole thrift, culinary creativity and a supply of our signature “French” bread with its fragile yet crisp crust and light, airy center, it was surely preordained that bread pudding became New Orleans’ best known dessert-worthy concoction of leftovers. In its purest form, the simplicity and availability of its comprising ingredients allow it to cross all racial and socioeconomic barriers, turning up on dining room sideboards and school cafeteria lunch plates, as well as restaurant menus from humble to grand – I have even encountered it in gas stations. To say bread pudding is New Orleans’ definitive dessert isn’t to say there’s any “right” way to make it. Variations are as numerous as the cooks who prepare this sacred goo – simple, lavish, traditional and newfangled – some of them not made from bread at all but, rather, from other sweet treats, such as doughnuts or King Cake. Others aren’t desserts at all. They are savory affairs leaden with items including chicken and cheese as well as hunks of andouille sausage. I once made one with an assortment of chopped up Hot Pockets left over from an evacuation. I soaked them in a savory custard and layered the mixture with shredded Cheddar cheese and sautéed mushrooms and onions. I brought it to a potluck and lied about the ingredients as people swooned over it. Now they know.

Pudding For which our reporter searched for 6 of the best


Creole Bread Pudding Souffle' with Whiskey Sauce The late, beloved chef Paul Prudhomme achieved immortality through many of the dishes he created during his lengthy career. Among them is the enduring Bread Pudding Soufflé he concocted during his tenure at Commander’s Palace for the restaurant’s 100th anniversary in 1980.

The menu advises you to order the labor-intensive dessert at the same time you order your entrée. In the kitchen, the employee devoted solely to this task will fold clouds of meringue into a cinnamon and vanilla custard foundation heavy with soaking cubes of Leidenheimer bread and dark raisins. The result

arrives at table a puffed golden dome atop a pristine soufflé cup. On cue your server cracks the dome with a spoon, and ladles in whiskey cream sauce until it flows down the sides. The best part? The thin candy-like rim where the puff meets the edges of the dish. Make the effort to chisel it all out with your spoon.

Commander’s Palace | 1403 Washington Ave. | 899-8221 | CommandersPalace.com

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Praline Leidenheimer Bread Pudding When he took over the kitchen at the Big Pink after a $20-plus million renovation in 2014, chef Slade Rushing was tasked with infusing enough modern technique and sensibility into Brennan’s classic dishes to make them relevant and refreshed. He also had to find something to do with thousands of egg whites, the

byproduct of the countless gallons of yolk-rich Hollandaise sauce the restaurant shoots through in a week. His solution was a bread pudding that arrives at the table in a shallow cream soup bowl within which it’s baked. It looks like nothing special. Looks deceive. Rushing’s reputation for the abstract is at play here, the fluffy puddle in

the bowl is much more about the rich vanilla custard leavened with plenty of stiff meringue than the cubes of Leidenheimer bread poking up here and there. Crisp shards of praline are the primary texture in the non-traditional dessert, which is topped with generous pours of rye whiskey crème anglaise and chantilly cream.

Brennan’s Restaurant | 417 Royal St. | 525-9711 | BrennansNewOrleans.com

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White Chocolate Bread Pudding Chef Scot Craig forgoes the usual vanilla extract to flavor his distinctive bread pudding. Instead he relies on almond extract as a base note, which pairs beautifully with the freshly crushed pineapple and melted white chocolate he beats into the custard base, within which he soaks cubes of day-old French bread from Gendusa

bakery, Katie’s exclusive vendor. “I avoided making a traditional New Orleans-style bread pudding with raisins and hard sauce, but I didn’t want my version to be too, too, out there,” Craig says. “I wanted it to be recognizable as bread pudding while still showing up with an element of surprise. I think

this strikes a balance between the familiar and the new.” Before serving, the dense pudding is backed into bouillon cups, which are then inverted and unmolded atop pools of white chocolate crème anglaise. He presents the rich bread pudding with fresh, seasonal fruit or berries.

Katie’s Restaurant | 3701 Iberville St. | 488-6582 | KatiesInMidCity.com

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Bananas Foster Bread Pudding Ringing in at a thrifty $5.99 for a generous serving, Cafe Reconcile’s brilliant marriage between two beloved New Orleans classics is both decadent and virtuous. The core of the nonprofit Central City soul food restaurant is a life skills and job training program for severely at-risk youths who are ready to transform their

lives. They learn front and back-ofthe-house skills that prepare them for employment in New Orleans’ thriving hospitality industry. When the time comes for kitchen training, one of the first things Executive Chef/General Manager Eugene Temple expects is a mastery of the justifiably famous bread pudding. Day-old donated Leidenheimer

French bread is cubed and mixed with a rich custard of butter, white and brown sugars, eggs, heavy cream, rum and banana extract. The dense, jiggly pudding is served in squares set atop a caramel sauce laced with more rum and banana extract to mimic the familiar pan sauce commonly associated with more high-tone restaurants.

Cafe Reconcile | 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard | 568-1157 | CafeReconcile.org

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Warm Bourbon Cornbread Bread Pudding with Rillon Fudge Sauce “Look up ‘Cajun’ or ‘Coonass’ in an encyclopedia and you’ll probably see a picture of me,” says Isaac Toups. “I’m probably chewing on some kind of bone.” The Rayne native’s Cajun family has lived in South Louisiana for more than 300 years, and both his heritage and classical culinary training

come screaming off of the “Top Chef” finalist’s menu – piping hot cracklin'; double-cut pork chops with a cumin-kissed dirty rice and cane syrup gastrique; foie gras torchon; medium-rare venison back strap; and a charcuterie board to end all. Most of his food is straightforward with no riffs. This isn’t the case with his unusual,

most noteworthy bread pudding. The end of meal must-do at Toups’ Meatery is cornbread-based with bourbon worked into the custard that binds the warm dense rectangle. It is topped with fresh seasonal fruit, drizzled with rillon fudge sauce and scattered with crackly, toasted buttered pecans.

Toups’ Meatery | 845 N. Carrollton Ave. | 252-4999 | ToupsMeatery.com


Bread Pudding with Rum-Soaked Raisins, Pineapple, Rum Sauce and Creme' Anglaise Jordan Ruiz’s resume includes training at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, and stints at Ralph’s on the Park and Commander’s Palace. Whatever restraint and high-brow style these storied institutions may have tried to instill in him, when it came time to open his own restaurant in Gentilly in 2011, he

eschewed it all, instead marrying his classical skills with his New Orleans upbringing and his more-is-more culinary sensibilities. The Munch Factory is a warm, family-friendly place, with personable, attentive service and generous portions of comfort foods with an edge. As is his style, Ruiz holds nothing

back from his glorious bread pudding. Each softball-sized portion arrives with a uniformly crisp exterior achieved by a long visit under the broiler. Crack the crust to reveal an interior pudding loaded with rum-soaked raisins and pineapple. This hot hunk arrives atop a pool of caramel-hued rum sauce swirled with pale crème anglaise.

The Munch Factory | 6325 Elysian Fields Ave. | 324-5372 | TheMunchFactory.net


Twenty carat diamond Riviera necklace in platinum; 8 carat diamond Tennis bracelet in 18 karat white gold; (right hand) 3.27 carat oval cut diamond eternity band in platinum and 4.37 emerald cut diamond eternity band in platinum; (left hand) 4.39 carat two-toned Simon G. diamond ring with invisible set princess cut diamonds and fancy vivid yellow diamonds in 18 karat gold; (earrings) 4.20 carat pear shaped cluster diamond earrings in 18 karat white gold. Boudreaux’s Fine Jewelers, 701 Metairie Road, Metairie, 831-2602, BoudreauxsJewelers.com

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Antique Edwardian 18.5 carat aquamarine necklace with diamonds, circa 1890-1910; antique Art Deco platinum bracelet circa 1920, with 20 carats of diamonds; antique finely chased platinum ring with 9.90 carat aquamarine and diamonds; antique English earrings in platinum with 3.25 carats of diamonds. Keil’s Antiques, 325 Royal St., 522-4552, KeilsAntiques.com

Finest of the

Fine

A dazzling display of jewelry By Mirella Cameran Photographed by Theresa Cassagne Model Kimberley Cressman at FiftyTwo45 Hair by Abby Bordes, Makeup by Meggan Ory myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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Necklace with 27 carats of oval cut rubies accented with round brilliant cut diamonds; 3 carat cushion cut ruby flanked by two pear shape diamonds ring in a platinum setting; pavĂŠ set diamond earrings in a teardrop design. Wellington & Company, 505 Royal St., 525-4855, WCJewelry.com

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Platinum and diamond necklace; platinum and diamond earrings; diamond tennis bracelets; and diamond ring with yellow diamond center stone. Adler’s, 722 Canal St., 523-5292, AdlersJewelry.com

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Eighteen karat white gold earrings with pear shaped diamonds surrounded by round brilliant diamonds; pearl necklace with 8 millimeter Akoya pearls with diamond rondelles and a diamond studded clasp; 18 karat white gold with 2.01 carat European cut diamond center surrounded by round brilliant diamonds engagement ring; 18 karat white gold with round brilliant diamonds wedding band,. Symmetry Jewelers and Designers, 8138 Hampson St., 861-9925, SymmetryJewelers.com

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Eighteen karat white gold, tennis necklace with 15.27 carats of emerald cut diamonds and 5.05 carats of round diamonds; 4.83 carats of emerald and Asscher cut diamond dangle earrings set in platinum; 12.22 carat emerald cut diamond and platinum eternity band; 5.88 carat emerald cut three stone ring. Jack Sutton Fine Jewelry, 315 Royal St., 522-0555, JackSutton.com

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Saints Photo of the Half-Century (Not counting anything Super Bowl-related) Michael Hebert photograph

This month, the 50th anniversary of the awarding of an NFL franchise to New Orleans is being honored. As our tribute we scouted for a great off-the-field photo and this one was the easy winner. Pictured here are running back Mark Ingram (left) and defensive end Cameron Jordan. Neither knew each other until the evening of April 28, 2011, when they met at Manhattan’s Radio City Music Hall for the NFL draft. Ingram (who played at the University of Alabama where he won the Heisman trophy) and Jordan (who starred at the University of California) were picked 24th and 28th overall respectively, both by the Saints. That night a bond started that would lead to the two being the best of friends. The picture was taken for the cover of the Saints program (Gameday) by photographer Michael Hebert. “Mark’s my guy,” Jordan was quoted as saying. “Jordan’s my dude” Ingram responded. Together they make an impressive picture that would be made even better by a pair of Super Bowl rings. 78

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NOVEMBER 2016 / myneworleans.com


2016

TOP LAWYERS In search of the best from among 58 specialities

P r o f i l e s b y K im b e r l e y Si n g l e t a r y Photographed by Craig Mulcahy

M

ost people hope not to need them, but when they do, they want  the good ones on  their side. To help with that we present our annual list of Top Lawyers. The list was prepared by Detroit-based Professional Research Services. PRS provided this explanation of its methodology:  The voting was open to all licensed attorneys in New Orleans. They were asked which attorney, other than themselves, they would recommend in the New Orleans area. Each attorney was allowed to recommend up to three colleagues in each given legal specialty. Once the online nominations were complete, each nominee was carefully evaluated on the basis of the survey results, the legitimacy of their license and their current standing with the State Bar Association of Louisiana. Attorneys who received the highest number of votes in each specialty are reflected in the following list.  As always when making professional services choices, second opinions are encouraged. In the end, you’re the judge.


Administrative/ Regulatory Law New Orleans John C. Saunders Jr. Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7516

Suite 5000 556-4133

Suite 3300 585-3200

David W. Leefe Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4137

Paul L. Zimmering Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0818

Georges M. Legrand Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 948-8490

Jason P. Waguespack Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith, APLC 701 Poydras St. Floor 40 616-5306

Admiralty & Maritime Law New Orleans Richard D. Bertram Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8334

Kevin A. Marks Melchiode, Marks, King, LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 336-2432

Wilton E. Bland III Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 648-8470

Andre J. Mouledoux Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 648-8480

Robert C. Clotworthy Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8676

Patrick E. O’Keefe Montgomery Barnett, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3300 585-3200

S. Gene Fendler Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4122 Adelaida J. Ferchmin Preis, PLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1700 581-6062 Thomas D. Forbes Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St.. Suite 2300 585-7041 Don K. Haycraft Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4128 Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8224 R. Keith Jarrett Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St.

James H. Roussel Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5278 Adam P. Sanderson Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 648-8466 William B. Schwartz Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900 David B. Sharpe Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Joseph P. Tynan Montgomery Barnett, LLP 1100 Poydras St.

Raymond T. Waid Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4042 Brian D. Wallace Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9204 James E. Wright III Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8234

Alternative Dispute Resolution Metairie Patrick R. Follette Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4281 William R. Pitts Attorney at Law 474 Metairie Road 831-5050 Rodney “Rocky” A. Seydel Jr. Mediation Arbitration Professional Systems 3850 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 400 831-2141 New Orleans Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0822 Mark E. Hanna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 648-8494 Corinne A. Morrison Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7228

Ronald J. Sholes Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St., Suite 4500 585-0479 H. Bruce Shreves Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, LLP 1100 Poydras St., Suite 3000 569-2908

Antitrust Law New Orleans Mark R. Beebe Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0436 Craig L. Caesar Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8616 Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8536 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5222 Alexander M. McIntyre Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 566-5215 David G. Radlauer Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8210 Charles-Theodore N. Zerner Flanagan Partners, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 2405 569-0075

Appellate Practice Mandeville Mary S. Johnson Johnson, Gray, McNamara, LLC 21375 Marion Lane Suite 300

(985) 246-6544 Metairie Glenn S. Newbauer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4295 New Orleans Barry W. Ashe Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0843 Kelly Brechtel Becker Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4067 George Denegre Jr. Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4119 Andy J. Dupre Flanagan Partners, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 569-0066 Thomas M. Flanagan Flanagan Partners, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 569-0064 Michael R. Fontham Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0810 Douglas L. Grundmeyer Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7028 Harry S. Hardin III Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8170 Shannon Skelton Holtzman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4148 Loretta O. Hoskins Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300

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585-7264 Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4135 Joseph L. McReynolds Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0606 David M. Prados Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 517-8160 Martin A. Stern Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0289 Raymond P. Ward Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0339

Banking and Finance Law New Orleans Lee R. Adler Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9351 Wm. Blake Bennett Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4113 Joseph P. Briggett Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Philip deVilliers Claverie Jr. Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9368 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7212 William T. Finn Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & 82

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Areaux, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 585-3808 Benjamin W. Kadden Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Bennet S. Koren McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2732 J. Marshall Page III Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8248

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 556-5204 Brent B. Barriere Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 556-5525 Christopher T. Caplinger Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990

Leon J. Reymond III Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4028

Rudy J. Cerone McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2786

James A. Stuckey Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9239

Robin B. Cheatham Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0411

Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0828

Douglas S. Draper Heller, Draper, Patrick & Horn, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 299-3300

Robert P. Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 585-3810 Susan M. Tyler Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8298 Sterling S. Willis Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 310-0264

Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights/Insolvency and Reorganization Law New Orleans Edward H. Arnold III

NOVEMBER 2016 / myneworleans.com

John M. Duck Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0226 Elizabeth J. Futrell Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8260 Alan H. Goodman Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5465 Barry H. Grodsky Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 599-8535 Jan M. Hayden Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell &

Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8645 Patrick Johnson Jr. Akerman LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2200 584-9417 Philip K. Jones Jr. Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4132 Benjamin W. Kadden Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0819 David J. Messina Gordon, Arata, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 582-1119 Dena L. Olivier Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4144 Stewart F. Peck Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 David F. Waguespack Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100, 585-3814 Nicholas J. Wehlen Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0827 Stephen L. Williamson Montgomery Barnett, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3300 585-7698

Bet-the-Company Litigations New Orleans Barry W. Ashe Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0843 James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4116 Peter J. Butler Jr. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5427 Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5266 John Jerry Glas Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0627 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0814 James R. Swanson Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5250 John M. Wilson Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4160 Phillip A. Wittmann Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 581-3200

Commercial Litigation Metairie Stephen K. Conroy Conroy Law Firm 3838 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 3130 830-3450


My Toughest Case: Helping Foreign Nationals Succeed

“W

Brandon Davis Immigration Law Partner | Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. | Suite 2000 | 584-9312

11 years in practice B.A. – Loyola University, Finance, 2001 J.D. – Tulane University, 2005 Native of Prairieville

e are a nation of immigrants,” says Brandon Davis. “Innovative talent in this country has commonly come from outside the U.S. – from people who bring their talent, labor and money here.” In today’s global economy, Davis’ specialty in employment and business immigration means he’s a very busy man. “Half of my time is spent helping companies large and small create environments where employees can succeed and resolve issues that impact the labor force,” he explains, “and the other half is helping them resolve immigration issues that control an employee’s ability to work in the U.S. or a business owner’s ability to expand a business or launch a new company.” Davis' work spans a wide variety of industries. “STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) are big fields that are wide open here,” he says. “As we move toward a more automated economy we’re seeing less focus on manufacturing and greater focus on the cloud economy and soft products.” To this end, Davis has worked with a lot of tech companies, including those launched by immigrants that have been educated in the U.S. or are receiving seed money through social media and are seeking to use it to start a business in America. “Healthcare is another huge area of immigration activity,” he says. “With the aging baby boomers and greater and broader access to healthcare now being offered we need more providers – particularly in areas that are already medically underserved.” Davis says he’s part of a small niche of business immigration lawyers in the region. “It is definitely a highly specialized and discreet area of practice,” he says, “in part, I think, because it’s highly regulated. Immigration law is about as dense and regulated as tax law.” When it comes to his most difficult cases, Davis says they’re typically the cases in which a foreign national comes to him with only an idea and little bit of money seeking to obtain lawful immigration. “The government is always concerned about whether a business is going to be viable enough over a long period of time,” he says, “so these cases present a steep burden of persuasion that can require hours of research, argument and persuasion, expert resources and a lot of fortitude on behalf of the foreign national. On top of that, they usually only have limited resources with which to put down enough of a foundation to convince the government to grant a visa for the long haul. These people are trusting you with their life savings.” Davis says agricultural cases can also present great challenges. “Policies change all the time, and when they change in a way that delays a farmer’s ability to bring in foreign labor that can really affect a person’s livelihood. Agriculture is a billion-dollar business in Louisiana and those cases are, by the nature of the industry, very time sensitive.” myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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Matthew A. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4130 New Orleans James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4116 Thomas J. Cortazzo Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900 George Denegre Jr. Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4119 Thomas M. Flanagan Flanagan Partners, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 569-0064 Shannon Skelton Holtzman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4148 Carey L. Menasco Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4171 Richard G. Passler Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5440 Harry Rosenberg Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9219

New Orleans Edward H. Arnold III Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 556-5204 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7212 Robert M. Steeg Steeg Law Firm, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3201 582-1199

Communications Law Metairie Scott W. McQuaig McQuaig & Associates, LLC 100 Lilac St. 836-5070 New Orleans Lesli D. Harris Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0938 Martin E. Landrieu Gordon, Arata, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 569-1832 Mary Ellen Roy Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9254 Constance C. Willems McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2724

Kyle D. Schonekas Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600 680-6052

Construction Law Mandeville Mark W. Frilot Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 3 Sanctuary Blvd. Suite 201 (985) 819-8417

Commercial Transactions/ LLS Law

Mark W. Mercante Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell &

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Berkowitz, PC 3 Sanctuary Blvd. Suite 201 (985) 819-8410 Danny G. Shaw Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 3 Sanctuary Blvd. Suite 201 (985) 819-8401 Metairie Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4284 New Orleans Terrence L. Brennan Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0605 Adrian A. D’Arcy Shields / Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 581-4445 Shannon Skelton Holtzman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4148 Richard E. King Melchiode, Marks, King, LLC 639 Loyola, Suite 2250 336-2435 Daniel Lund III Coats, Rose, Yale, Ryman & Lee, P.C. 365 Canal St., Suite 800 299-3089 Gerald A. Melchiode Melchiode, Marks, King, LLC 639 Loyola, Suite 2250 336-2970 Paul L. Peyronnin Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7217 Denise C. Puente Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, LLP 1100 Poydras St.

Suite 3000 569-2983 Carol Welborn Reisman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4193 H. Bruce Shreves Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3000 569-2908 John A. Stewart Jr. Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900

Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0845 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5250 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9324 Edward N. George III Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7253

Kelly E. Theard Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0667

Abid Hussain Hussain Law LLC 643 Magazine St. Suite 102 (888) 789-7250

David E. Walle Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375

Michael D. Landry Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0852

Corporate Governance and Complaints Law Covington Daniel E. Buras Jr. Buras Law Firm, LLC 301 N. Columbia St. (985) 789-5006 Metairie George A. Mueller III Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4282 New Orleans Wm. Blake Bennett Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4113 Shawn M. BridgewaterNormand Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7281 Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther

William H. Langenstein III Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7037 William N. Norton Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5297 Leon J. Reymond III Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4028 David C. Rieveschl Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8660 Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7226


My Toughest Case: Employee vs. Employer

A

Julie D. Livaudais Labor and Employment Law Partner | Chaffe McCall, LLP
 1100 Poydras St. | Suite 2300 | 585-7007

34 years in practice B.A. – Stanford University, 1976 J.D. – Tulane University School of Law, 1982 Native of New Orleans

lthough her father was a lawyer and then a federal judge, New Orleans native Julie Livaudais made her mind up in college that she was going to be a clinical psychologist. Just before leaving the Crescent City to pursue a Ph.D. at Cal Berkeley, however, Livaudais made a change, instead opting to attend law school close to home at Tulane University. “As an employment lawyer, I get to be both a litigator and a counselor,” Livaudais says. “It’s the perfect mix of both. About 40 to 50 percent of what I do is litigation, and the rest is counseling businesses on things like hiring, firing, discipline and employee training.” Livaudais says she see a lot of harassment, retaliation and disability discrimination claims these days. “Disability is definitely an evolving area of the law,” she says. “Back in the day you used to lose your job if you became disabled; now companies work to accommodate disabilities.” Retaliation lawsuits can result from an employee asserting a complaint and then finding him transferred or demoted. “These cases are difficult; just because someone makes a complaint, they can’t use that as a way to avoid doing their job properly,” she says. “The challenge here sometimes can be handling the situation fairly without bringing another lawsuit.” Livaudais’ clients include New Orleans businesses, along with local schools and colleges. She says she is particularly proud that her work helped establish the fact that employee handbooks are not contracts in Louisiana. Livaudais says her most difficult cases are those brought against an employer by a current employee. “The employer is legally obligated to not retaliate against that employee during the case, but what if they’re making claims against their co-worker or supervisor? The employer must be fair to all of them. Employment law is actually second to divorce and family law in terms of the level of intense emotions.” Whatever the emotions, Livaudais says she enjoys handling issues. “Whatever happens in the world will find its way into employment law,” she says. “From AIDS in the workplace to swine flu, to now transgender cases. Whatever comes up we’re dealing with it.” myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2101 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0836

Criminal Defense Non White-Collar New Orleans Walter F. Becker Jr. Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7046 Seth J. Bloom Bloom Legal, LLC 700 Camp St., Suite 210 265-9768 Brian J. Capitelli Capitelli & Wicker 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 582-2425 Robert S. Glass Glass & Reed 3015 Magazine St. 581-9083 Samantha P. Griffin Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0808 Herbert V. Larson Jr. Attorney at Law 700 Camp St. 528-9500 John W. Reed Glass & Reed 3015 Magazine St. 581-9083 Thomas W. Shlosman Shlosman Law Firm 3919 Baronne St. 662-1187 Peter G. Strasser Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7231 Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 86

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593-0811

680-6065

Julie C. Tizzard Julie C. Tizzard, Attorney at Law 700 Camp St. Suite 101 529-3774

Samantha P. Griffin Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0808

Christopher M. Utley The Law Office of Christopher Martin Utley, LLC 2331 Esplanade Ave. 427-1856 Ralph S. Whalen Jr. Attorney at Law 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 525-1600

Criminal Defense White Collar Metairie Julian R. Murray Jr. Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4125 Richard T. Simmons Jr. Hailey, McNamara, Hall, Larmann & Papale, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1400 836-6516 New Orleans Walter F. Becker Jr. Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7046

Pauline F. Hardin Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8110 Michael W. Magner Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8316 Charles D. Marshall III Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7242 John W. Reed Glass & Reed 3015 Magazine St. 581-9083 Harry Rosenberg Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9219 Randall A. Smith Smith & Fawer, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3702 525-2200 Peter G. Strasser Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7231

Brian J. Capitelli Capitelli & Wicker 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 582-2425

Dorothy M. Taylor Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4020

Ralph Capitelli Capitelli & Wicker 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 582-2425

Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0811

Edward J. Castaing Jr. Crull, Castaing & Lilly 601 Poydras St. Suite 2323 581-7700

Julie C. Tizzard Julie C. Tizzard, Attorney at Law 700 Camp St., Suite 101 529-3774

William P. Gibbens Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600

Elder Law Metairie Steven E. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile,

NOVEMBER 2016 / myneworleans.com

Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4107 Jane C. Scheuermann Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4206 New Orleans Steven E. Bain Steven E. Bain Attorney at Law, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2900 585-7942 Joel A. Mendler Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7885 Carole Cukell Neff Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3815 582-1519 Jerome J. Reso Jr. Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900 John A. Rouchell Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7854 Eric M. Schorr Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3815 582-1540 John W. Waters Jr. Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375

Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law Metairie Thomas A. Crosby Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 830-4165 Patrick R. Follette Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4281 Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4105 New Orleans P. Albert Bienvenu Jr. Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2102 Cheryl Mollere Kornick Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4156 Matthew D. Simone Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4191 John M. Wilson Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4160

Employee Benefits Law New Orleans Jane E. Armstrong Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9244 H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7271


My Toughest Case: Finding Compromises Among the Angry

I

Abid Hussain

Corporate Governance and Complaints Law Attorney, Managing Member | Hussain Law LLC 643 Magazine St. | Suite 102 | (888) 789-7250

10 years in practice B.A. – University of California at Berkley, Legal Studies, 1993 J.D. – University of Oregon, 1998 Native of Queens, New York

f you run a startup, a tech company or any small business in New Orleans, Abid Hussain is a name you should know. A solo law practitioner with 10 years of corporate law experience in both Louisiana and Texas, Hussain specializes in counseling businesses in order to keep them out of trouble and out of court. “In small businesses, you typically have entrepreneurs doing a fair amount of multitasking,” he says. “By their very nature, roles and responsibilities tend to be so diverse that critical business issues can get overlooked, and sometimes those issues can land you in legal trouble.” Hussain is well versed with the problems of the tech world and startups, having worked in both. He grew up in Queens, New York, then headed to the West Coast and lived and worked at software companies and law firms in various parts of the country before settling in New Orleans five years ago. “I went straight into high tech," he says, "holding web development and a variety of marketing and web-related positions.” After eight years, Hussain returned to law and now has an office at Launchpad. “I work primarily with companies that have been in existence from two to five years,” he says. “At that point these companies are typically experiencing the kind of growth where they understand that they need a business lawyer.” When asked about his toughest case, Hussain says it’s too hard to choose. “Every situation is tricky,” he says. “Whenever there’s a negotiation where someone on the other side is really angry, my strength is in arriving at a good compromise. I’ve been on both sides of difficult issues, so I can use that experience to help form a positive outcome for both parties, and often one that avoids costly litigation when possible." Hussain says legal services to small business have changed with the internet. “Thanks to things like Rocket Lawyer, Google and a lot of other online tools, you can get a simple lease or operating agreement online. "The internet has minimized the simple stuff," he says. "It has also, however, created a real danger for small businesses who may not know the nuances of agreements they’re executing. If you don't know how to navigate those nuances, you'll find yourself on the other side of a costly legal dispute. At that point, you're being reactive instead of proactive, and your young business is in dancer. Those that stay in business are proactive, and that's where I can be most helpful." myneworleans.com / NOVEMBER 2016

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Katherine Conklin McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2876 Sandra Mills Feingerts Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3710 529-3836 Tabatha L. George Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3710 529-3845 Steve Hymowitz Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, PC 701 Poydras St. Suite 3500 648-2600 Rudolph R. Ramelli Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8206 Charles F. Seemann III Jackson Lewis PC 650 Poydras St. Suite 1900 208-5843 Howard Shapiro Proskauer Rose, LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 1800 310-4085 G. Phillip Shuler III Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7011 Randye C. Snyder Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4033 John J. Weiler Weiler & Rees, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 1250 524-2944 Michael S. Williams Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 581-7979

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Energy Law New Orleans Kelly Brechtel Becker Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4067 Louis E. Buatt Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4082 Noel J. Darce Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St 593-0831 Ernest L. Edwards Akerman LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2200 586-1241 Michael R. Fontham Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0810 C. Peck Hayne Jr. Gordon, Arata, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 40 569-1858 Harry R. Holladay Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2300 585-7518 Jonathan A. Hunter Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 556-4131 Cheryl Mollere Kornick Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4156 Robert B. McNeal Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 556-4052 Cynthia A. Nicholson Gordon, Arata, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 40 569-1658

NOVEMBER 2016 / myneworleans.com

Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 556-4143 Edward B. Poitevent II Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0889

Greg L. Johnson Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4115

Dana M. Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0816

Renee S. Melchiode Melchiode, Marks, King, LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 336-2544

Paul L. Zimmering Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0818 Adam B. Zuckerman Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5210

Environmental Law Baton Rouge W. Brett Mason Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 301 Main St., Suite 1150 (225) 490-5812 New Orleans P. Albert Bienvenu Jr. Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375 Louis E. Buatt Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4082 Daria Burgess Diaz Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0858 Monica Derbes Gibson Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4010 Robert E. Holden Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4130

Marjorie A. McKeithen Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8420

Dana M. Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0816 Roger A. Stetter Roger A. Stetter, Esq. 228 St. Charles Ave. Suite 1334 524-9100 Quentin F. Urquhart Jr. Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2107 Stephen W. Wiegand Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4192

Equipment Finance Law New Orleans Kathleen S. Plemer Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7222 Robert P. Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 585-3810 Sterling S. Willis Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 310-0264

Family Law Covington Christine O’Brien Lozes Attorney at Law 434 E. Lockwood St. (985) 892-6348 Frank P. Tranchina Jr. Tranchina & Mansfield, LLC 321 E. Kirkland St. (985) 892-1313 Metairie Jane C. Scheuermann Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4206 New Orleans Robin Penzato Arnold Winsberg & Arnold, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2050 648-2711 Jack L. Dveirin Attorney at Law 7925 Willow St. 861-8672 Jennifer J. Greene Herman, Herman & Katz, LLP 820 O'Keefe Ave. 581-4892 D. Douglas Howard Jr. Howard & Reed 839 St. Charles Ave. Suite 306 581-3610 Steven J. Lane Herman, Herman & Katz, LLP 820 O'Keefe Ave. 581-4892 Elizabeth S. Meneray Meneray Family Law, LLC 710 Carondelet St. 581-4334 Edith H. Morris Morris, Lee & Bayle, LLC 1515 Poydras St. Suite 1420 524-3781 Lacy M. Smith The Law Office of Lacy M. Smith 1820 St. Charles Ave. Suite 203 249-8242


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Brooke C. Tigchelaar Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0862

Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0915

Barbara J. Ziv Barbara J. Ziv, LLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 4100 525-4361

C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0842

First Amendment Law New Orleans Alysson L. Mills Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 310-0253

Wesley M. Plaisance Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5471

Loretta G. Mince Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5250 Mary Ellen Roy Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9254 Scott L. Sternberg Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7857

Gaming Law New Orleans Thomas M. Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5464 Wm. Blake Bennett Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4113 J. Kelly Duncan Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8218 Abigayle C. Farris Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St 593-0948

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General Service Law Firm New Orleans Robert C. Jenkins Jr. Robert C. Jenkins Jr. & Associates 631 St. Charles Ave. 586-1616 Frank A. Milanese Attorney at Law 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 588-1400 Lance R. Rydberg Hangartner, Rydberg and Terrell, LLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 310 522-5690 Suzanne H. Terrell Hangartner, Rydberg and Terrell, LLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 310 522-5690 Kevin S. Vogeltanz The Law Office of Kevin S. Vogeltanz, LLC 643 Magazine St. Suite 102 564-7342

Government Relations Practice Metairie Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4294 New Orleans Donna D. Fraiche Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell &

NOVEMBER 2016 / myneworleans.com

Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5201 Deborah Duplechin Harkins Roedel Parsons Koch Blache Balhoff & McCollister 1515 Poydras St. Suite 2330 566-1801 Stanley A. Millan Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8328 Richard G. Passler Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5440 John C. Saunders Jr. Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7516 E. Paige Sensenbrenner Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0420 Bryant S. York Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0803

Health Care Law Metairie Ellen S. Fantaci Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4150 David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4110 New Orleans Donna D. Fraiche Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5201

A. J. Herbert III Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 599-8514 John C. Saunders Jr. Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7516

Immigration Law Metairie David A. M. Ware Ware Immigration 3850 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 555 830-5900 New Orleans Malvern C. Burnett Law Offices of Malvern C. Burnett 1523 Polymnia St. 586-1922 Brandon E. Davis Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9312 Kathleen Gasparian Gasparian Immigration 829 Baronne St. 262-9878

Insurance Law Metairie Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4284 New Orleans Sidney W. Degan III Degan, Blanchard & Nash, APLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2600 529-3333

1100 Poydras St. Suite 1700 585-7612 Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 569-0062 Gus A. Fritchie III Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2106 A. Kirk Gasperecz Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0408 George B. Hall Jr. Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9234 Richard E. King Melchiode, Marks, King, LLC 639 Loyola, Suite 2250 336-2435 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0814 David W. O’Quinn Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2111 C. Michael Parks Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000

Mary L. Dumestre Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0856

Andrew L. Plauche Jr. Plauche Maselli Parkerson LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3800 582-1142

Celeste D. Elliott Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990

James J. Reeves II Melchiode, Marks, King, LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 336-2464

George D. Fagan Leake & Andersson, LLP

Seth A. Schmeeckle Lugenbuhl, Wheaton,


Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 John W. Sinnott Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2116 William D. Treeby Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0807

Intellectual Property Law New Orleans Raymond G. Areaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 585-3803 Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St.

593-0822 Brad E. Harrigan Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990 Lesli D. Harris Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0938 Andrew T. Lilly Lilly PLLC 715 Girod St., Suite 200 249-8670 Charles D. Marshall III Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7242 David L. Patron Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9295 Bryan C. Reuter Stanley, Reuter, Ross,

Thornton & Alford, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 523-1580

400 Poydras St., Floor 30 595-5120

Michael Q. Walshe Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0881

James R. Swanson Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5250 Daniel A. Tadros Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7054

George J. Fowler III Fowler Rodriguez, Counselors at Law 400 Poydras St., Floor 30 595-5123

Derek A. Walker Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7044

International Arbitration New Orleans Andrew T. Lilly Lilly PLLC 715 Girod St., Suite 200 249-8670

International Trade and Finance New Orleans William H. Hines Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8272

Luis E. Llamas Fowler Rodriguez, Counselors at Law

J. Marshall Page III Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave.

Mary E. Roy Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9254

582-8248 Derek A. Walker Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7044

Labor and Employment Law Metairie Patricia E. Pannell Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4126 New Orleans M. Nan Alessandra Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9297 Magdalen Blessey Bickford McGlinchey Stafford PLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2726

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H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7271

Joseph R. Hugg Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5466

Eve B. Masinter Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5468

Clyde H. Jacob III Coats, Rose, Yale, Ryman & Lee, P.C. 365 Canal St., Suite 800 299-3072

Thomas J. McGoey II Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 299-6101

Brooke Duncan III Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0220

Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0915

Ellis B. Murov Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0655

Steven F. Griffith Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5225

Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5222

Sarah Voorhies Myers Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7009

Edward F. Harold Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3710 522-3801

Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7007

Donna Phillips Currault Gordon, Arata, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 569-1862

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E. Fredrick Preis Jr. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5470

Timothy H. Scott Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3710 522-3834

Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4105

Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0911

New Orleans P. Albert Bienvenu Jr. Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375

Land Use and Zoning Law Metairie Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4294 Thomas A. Crosby Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4165 Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman,

Galen S. Brown Sullivan Stolier Knight LC 909 Poydras St. Suite 2600 561-1044 James T. Dunne Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0824 Rose McCabe LeBreton Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990


Jon F. Leyens Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8628 Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0835

Legal Malpractice Law New Orleans C. Wm. Bradley Jr. Bradley, Murchison, Kelly & Shea, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 596-6302

400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2106

909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 523-1580

Daniel Lund Montgomery Barnett, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3300 585-3200

Edward W. Trapolin Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2115

Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0602

William E. Wright Jr. Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0623

Ernest L. O’Bannon Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375

Mass Tort Litigation/Class Actions Metairie Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4284

James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4116

C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0842

Gus A. Fritchie III Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC

Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, LLC

New Orleans Neil C. Abramson Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St.

James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2102

Suite 5000 556-4009 Dawn M. Barrios Barrios, Kingsdorf & Casteix, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3650 524-3300 Carmelite M. Bertaut Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0898 Charles P. Blanchard Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7216 Leonard A. Davis Herman, Herman & Katz, LLP 820 O'Keefe Ave. 581-4892 Mark C. Dodart Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9307

James C. Gulotta Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0817 Stephen J. Herman Herman, Herman & Katz, LLP 820 O'Keefe Ave. 581-4892 Anthony D. Irpino Irpino Law Firm 2216 Magazine St. 525-1500 James B. Irwin Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2105

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Gerald E. Meunier Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. 522-2304 Chad J. Mollere Johnson, Gray, McNamara, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 1200 525-4649 Douglas J. Moore Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2163 John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7241 Dwight C. Paulsen III Bradley, Murchison, Kelly & Shea, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 596-6305

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Scott C. Seiler Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4159 Charles B. Wilmore Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 299-6113 Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0911

Medical Malpractice Law Metairie Rebecca J. Beck Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4274 Jeffrey A. Mitchell The Cochran Firm 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 2130

NOVEMBER 2016 / myneworleans.com

309-5000 Charles O. Taylor Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4277 New Orleans Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates, PLC 4173 Canal St. 526-2222 C. Wm. Bradley Jr. Bradley, Murchison, Kelly & Shea, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 596-6302 Richard S. Crisler Bradley, Murchison, Kelly & Shea, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 596-6308 Robert J. David Gainsburgh, Benjamin,

David, Meunier & Warshauer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. 522-2304

Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5441

Karen Fontana Kean Miller, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 3600 620-3191

R. Christopher Martin Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7534

Monica A Frois Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8615

Robin Catherine O’Bannon Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375

Michele Gaudin Michele Gaudin, Attorney and Counselor at Law 858 Camp St. 524-7727

Lydia Habliston Toso Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 584-5461

James C. Klick Herman, Herman & Katz, LLP 820 O'Keefe Ave 581-4892 Michael C. Luquet Breazeale, Sachse &

Mergers and Acquisitions Law New Orleans William R. Bishop Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St.


593-0962 Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0845 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5250 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9324 Edward N. George III Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7253 Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8308

William H. Langenstein III Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7037

Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900

Matthew P. Miller Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7867

Mining law New Orleans John Y. Pearce Montgomery Barnett, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3300 585-3200

William N. Norton Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5297 Leon J. Reymond Jr. Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4150 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0836

Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law New Orleans G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7289 J. Dalton Courson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0812 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, LLP

1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7212

962-4291

Cris R. Jackson Jackson & McPherson, LLC 1010 Common St. Suite 1800 581-9444 Philip B. Sherman Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7579

Municipal Law Metairie Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4294 Inemesit U. O’Boyle Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100

James M. Williams Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4287 New Orleans William D. Aaron Jr. Aaron & Gianna PLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3800 569-1807 Mark E. Hanna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 648-8494

Natural Resources Law New Orleans Daria Burgess Diaz Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0858

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John P. Farnsworth Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0855 Justin P. Lemaire Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0942 John M. Wilson Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4160

NonProfit/ Charities Law Metairie Ryan P. Monsour Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4230 New Orleans Thomas B. Lemann Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St.

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Suite 5000 581-7979 Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0838 Michael S. Williams Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 581-7979

Oil and Gas Law New Orleans Ernest L. Edwards Akerman LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2200 586-1241 John P. Farnsworth Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0855 Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405

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569-0062

569-7000

C. Peck Hayne Jr. Gordon, Arata, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Floor 40 569-1858

Robert B. McNeal Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4052

Jonathan A. Hunter Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4131 Cheryl Mollere Kornick Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4156 Justin P. Lemaire Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0942 Charles D. Marshall Jr. Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300

Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4143 John Y Pearce Montgomery Barnett, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3300 585-3200 Edward B. Poitevent II Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0889

On Air Media Legal Analyst Metairie Dane S. Ciolino Dane S. Ciolino, LLC 18 Farnham Place 975-3263

Personal Injury Litigation Metairie Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4284 John W. Redmann Law Office of John W. Redmann, LLC 2901 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 202 535-7736 New Orleans Justin McCarthy Chopin Chopin Law Firm, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2525 323-5755 Richard A. Chopin Chopin Law Firm, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2525 264-5600 John J. Glas Deutsch, Kerrigan &


Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0627 Brian D. Katz Herman, Herman & Katz, LLP 820 O'Keefe Ave. 581-4892 Robert E. Kerrigan Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0619 Mark D. Latham Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4180 David W. Leefe Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4137 Kelly T. Scalise Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 299-6110 Jeremy Z. Soso The Lambert Firm 701 Magazine St. 581-1750 Slidell John B. Perry Attorney at Law 103 Smart Place Suite 1 (985) 639-0207

Product Liability Litigation Baton Rouge Matthew W. Bailey Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Convention St. Suite 1001 (225) 615-7395 New Orleans Carmelite M. Bertaut Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0898

Joy Goldberg Braun Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3815 582-1548 James C. Gulotta Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0817 Russ M. Herman Herman, Herman & Katz, LLP 820 O'Keefe Ave. 581-4892 James B. Irwin Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2105 Lynn Luker Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 262-9063 Kathleen A. Manning McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2737 Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles, LLP 755 Magazine St. 593-0602 David M. Melancon Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2117 Douglas J. Moore Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2163

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Kim E. Moore Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2108 Stephen G. A. Myers Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2114 Colvin G. Norwood Jr. McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2707 John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7241 Lawrence G. Pugh III Pugh Accardo LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3200 799-4533 David E. Redmann Jr. Bradley, Murchison, Kelly & Shea, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 596-6307 Carol Welborn Reisman Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4193 Richard E. Sarver Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, LLC 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 589-9733 Kelly T. Scalise Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 299-6110 Scott C. Seiler Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4159 John W. Sinnott Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. 98

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Suite 2700 310-2116 Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7059 Quentin F. Urquhart Jr. Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2107

Project Finance Law New Orleans Anthony P. Dunbar Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7029 Railroad Law New Orleans Alissa J. Allison Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5233 Bradley R. Belsome Bradley, Murchison, Kelly & Shea, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 596-6309 Joshua W. Christie Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2234 Timothy F. Daniels Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2203 Dow M. Edwards Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2205 William H. Howard III Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-5275

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David S. Kelly Bradley, Murchison, Kelly & Shea, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 596-6303

James T. Dunne Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0824

Benjamin R. Slater III Akerman LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2200 586-1241

Brian R. Johnson Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7819

Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7059

Paul C. Kitziger Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4126

Patrick A. Talley Jr. Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 584-9220

Rose McCabe LeBreton Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St., Suite 2775 568-1990

Real Estate Law Baton Rouge Louis S. Quinn Jr. Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 100 North St., Suite 800 (225) 706-4050 Metairie Thomas A. Crosby Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4165 Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4105 New Orleans Marguerite L. Adams Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4142 G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7289 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7212

Jon F. Leyens Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8628 Heather Begneaud McGowan Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0946 Marie A. Moore Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2108 Anne E. Raymond Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8647 Richard P. Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2104 Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0835

Stephen P. Schott Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900 Steven C. Serio Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5250 Robert M. Steeg Steeg Law Firm, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3201 582-1199 Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0828 Frank A. Tessier Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 585-3809 Peter S. Title Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3815 582-1542 Susan M. Tyler Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8298 Sterling S. Willis Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 310-0264

Securities Regulation New Orleans John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4177 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600


586-5250 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 584-9324 Paul J. Masinter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0882 Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7226 Nicholas J. Wehlen Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0827

Securities/ Capital Markets Law New Orleans John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4177 Maureen B. Gershanik Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 586-5250 David C. Rieveschl Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 566-8660 Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7226

Tax Law New Orleans Hirschel T. Abbott Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC

546 Carondelet St. 593-0809 Robert S. Angelico Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4112 Hilton S. Bell Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 569-7000 Jaye A. Calhoun McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2785 John W. Colbert Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0832 Mark Embree Adams and Reese LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 585-0247 James C. Exnicios Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4034 Edward N. George III Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7253 William F. Grace Jr. Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7224 Steven I. Klein Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 299-2105

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William H. Langenstein III Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7037 Brian T. Leftwich Ajubita, Leftwich & Salzer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 582-2310 A. Kelton Longwell Coats, Rose, Yale, Ryman & Lee, P.C. 365 Canal St., Suite 800 299-3075 Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0838 Rudolph R. Ramelli Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8206 Jerome J. Reso Jr. Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900

Transportation Law New Orleans Timothy F. Daniels Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 310-2203 Gerard J. Dragna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000 Douglas R. Holmes Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7263 David W. Leefe Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 581-7979 Andre J. Mouledoux Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 648-8480

F. Kelleher Riess Hickey & Riess, LLC 1139 Arabella St. 525-1120

C. Michael Parks Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000

John A. Rouchell Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7854

Eric Winder Sella Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000

Daniel J. Walter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0826

Benjamin R. Slater III Akerman LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2200 586-1241

Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 569-2900

Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7059

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Trusts and Estates Metairie Deborah C. Faust Perez, McDaniel & Faust, LLP 321 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 107 883-1230

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Steven E. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 830-4107

582-1519

Christine W. Marks Conroy Law Firm 3838 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 3130 830-3450

S. Frazer Rankin Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 568-1990

Jane C. Scheuermann Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4206

Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0838

John A Rouchell Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7711

New Orleans Hirschel T. Abbott Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0809

John W. Waters Jr. Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375

Marguerite L. Adams Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4142

Kenneth A. Weiss McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 596-2751

David F. Edwards Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8184 Miriam Wogan Henry Jones Walker, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 582-8436 Erin E. Kriksciun Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC 546 Carondelet St. 593-0975 Joel A. Mendler Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 585-7885 Max Nathan Jr. Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3815 582-1502 Carole Cukell Neff Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3815

John D. Wogan Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4032

Venture Capital Law New Orleans Mandy Mendoza Gagliardi Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7018 Workers Compensation Law Metairie Charles O. Taylor Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 962-4277 New Orleans Patrick J. Babin Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 648-8445

Beth S. Bernstein Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 648-8581 Alan G. Brackett Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 648-8450 H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2300 585-7271 Scott R. Huete Melchiode, Marks, King, LLC 639 Loyola, Suite 2250 336-2439 Mark D. Latham Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 556-4180 Kevin A. Marks Melchiode, Marks, King, LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 336-2432 Gregory J. McDonald Bienvenu, Foster, Ryan & O’Bannon 1010 Common St. Floor 22 322-1375 Foster P. Nash III Degan, Blanchard & Nash, APLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2600 529-3333 Robert N. Popich Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 648-8455 Simone H. Yoder Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 595-3000 n


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Legal Services

Regional Firms & Attorneys From the business owner who needs constant, go-to counsel for navigating or drafting contracts to the injured individual seeking help with medical bills and compensation for another’s negligence, attorneys across New Orleans can help identify proper legal solutions for individuals with a variety of legal concerns. While legal representation may not be a constant need for some people, it’s arguably a necessary resource for everyone at some point in their lives or in the life of their business. Attorneys in the region offer legal counsel in areas of

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expertise that include family matters, such as estate planning and divorce, insurance and healthcare law, toxic tort and environmental law, commercial litigation, immigration, construction, maritime, aviation and railroad, as well as criminal defense, among countless others. Attorneys who know the ins and outs of the law can help ensure your bases are covered when outlining plans for a new startup, planning your progeny’s inheritance or facing a legal battle. The following regional firms and attorneys may be a helpful resource, whatever your legal concern.


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Founded in 1926, Deutsch Kerrigan LLP is built on a foundation of being problem-solvers and applying enduring principles of craft to serve clients effectively and efficiently. Because the firm views each legal problem as a partnership, its attorneys work closely with the client or outside counsel to provide high quality, effective legal service that exceed the client’s expectations. Deutsch Kerrigan employs over 70 legal counselors and trial attorneys practicing in Civil Litigation, Commercial Litigation, Commercial Transactions, Construction Law, Labor & Employment Law, Marine & Energy Law, Professional Liability Law and Toxic Tort & Environmental Law. Equipped with the latest technologies, the firm communicates and shares up-to-date information with its clients on legal news and emerging industry trends. From its offices in New Orleans and Gulfport, Mississippi, Deutsch Kerrigan represents local, national and international businesses ranging in size from Fortune 500 companies to small, emerging business and individuals. The firm also defends state and local governments and nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit DeutschKerrigan.com. The Davis, Saunders, Miller & Oden Law Firm has over four decades of experience in trying Railroad (FELA), Maritime (Jones Act) and Aviation (FTCA) cases to verdicts before juries and judges as courtroom litigators. The firm accepts the challenge of representing individuals fighting large corporations and has successfully helped individuals hurt on the job or who lost loved ones in catastrophes, as in a FELA amputation case where a conductor’s leg was severed

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in a gruesome train derailment. The firm has litigated railroad lawsuits under the Federal Employers Liability Act for injured railroaders in Federal and State Courts from New Orleans to Washington D.C., and down the Atlantic Coast to Palm Beach, Florida. The firm has obtained jury trial verdicts in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, Texas and Washington D.C. As litigators, the firm’s attorneys have handled Aviation cases in Louisiana, Texas, and Florida, and numerous Maritime cases arising out of accidents occurring offshore in the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and off the coast of Scotland. To contact the firm, call 800-321-7815 or visit DavisSaunders.com.

Gasparian Immigration is the New Orleans-based boutique immigration law firm of Kathleen Gasparian, an attorney with nearly 15 years of experience in immigration law. Being a boutique firm, Gasparian Immigration can provide tailored personal service and undivided attention to clients in need of legal representation. As both an attorney and a teacher of immigration law at Tulane and Loyola universities, Gasparian remains up-to-date with the latest judicial decisions, regulations and procedures. A case that was hopeless yesterday may now have a solution. The firm’s experience and advocacy can provide a pathway for individuals and organizations through the changing landscape of immigration. Gasparian Immigration assists clients all over the United


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States and the world. The firm strongly believes in communication with clients, which means being accessible, returning calls and emails promptly, keeping clients informed and understanding clients’ overall immigration goals. The immigration process can be frustrating and lengthy; working with your attorney should be easy. For more information or to schedule a consultation, visit GasparianImmigration.com or call 504-262-9878. Since 1989, Chehardy Sherman Williams has served individuals and businesses in the Greater New Orleans region with integrity, professionalism and experience. The firm’s attorneys understand the importance of attention to detail and provide superior legal consultation in a variety of practice areas, ranging from Business & Corporate Law to Healthcare Law, Personal Injury to Estate Planning, and all types of Litigation. The experienced, knowledgeable and talented attorneys of Chehardy Sherman Williams provide candid and expert consultation to ensure that clients are informed to the highest degree on their cases and legal options. They are also dedicated to the community, and many of the firm’s attorneys serve in charitable groups and educational institutions, on various councils and as regional leaders. Chehardy Sherman Williams Law Firm strongly believes in this community and chooses to give back to it by doing more than just providing legal representation and protection for local businesses and individuals. For more information on Chehardy Sherman Williams’ practice areas, attorneys and legal approach, visit Chehardy.com or call 504-833-5600. 

The shifts in family dynamics that accompany divorce can be difficult, painful and sometimes traumatic for the various parties involved. To avoid the common problems largely responsible for the fear and suffering attendant to divorce, couples need to understand the system and know what to expect. Counsel from an experienced family law attorney can be invaluable when making tough decisions and planning for the future. With more than 40 years of experience in domestic relations, Barbara J. Ziv, LLC is a small firm committed to helping individuals seeking advice about divorce and family law matters. During your initial consultation, Ms. Ziv and her team will explain what they need to know about you, why they need to know it and what you should expect from both the process and your attorney. Clients of Ms. Ziv and Esther L. Greenbaum can expect competence in divorce law and matters related to it, clear-cut billing and trouble-free accessibility. For more information or to schedule a consultation, visit NewOrleansDivorces.com or call 504-525-4361. The firm of Melchiode Marks King LLC (MMK) may only be in its second year of existence, but its attorneys have practiced together for decades, and recent accolades are a testament to both their talents and the breadth of services they provide to clients. This year, six MMK attorneys were recognized as New Orleans Magazine’s Top Lawyers: Jerry Melchiode (Construction Law), Kevin Marks (Admiralty and Workers’ Compensation), Rich King (Construction and Insurance Law), Renee Melchiode (Environmental Law), J.J. Reeves (Insurance Law) and Scott Huete (Workers’

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Compensation). While awards are gratifying, the best endorsement is the loyalty of MMK’s clients who have enthusiastically supported the young firm. It is this trust and commitment that inspires MMK to achieve successful outcomes while controlling costs. Through increased efficiency and advances in technology, MMK delivers big firm capabilities with small firm efficiency, agility, and attentiveness. MMK’s attorneys’ practice areas include, among others, maritime, construction, insurance, environmental, employer’s liability and transportation. For more information, visit MMKFirm.com. As a regional law firm, Roedel Parsons Koch Blanche Balhoff & McCollister is unique to Louisiana and operates with the understanding that South Louisiana is a significant economic engine. New Orleans serves as the hub of a larger super region that includes Jefferson Parish, Baton Rouge and the River Parishes. Roedel Parsons is firmly connected to the cities and dynamics of the region. The full-service firm proudly represents many of Louisiana’s most important public and private economic entities and offers quality services at reasonable rates, on a timely basis and with fierce dedication. Regional cooperation isn’t a new concept. Roedel Parsons recognizes that local economic engines’ main competitors aren’t each other, but rather regional and metro giants such as Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth, Mobile and multiple Floridian geographical clusters. Competitive by nature, Roedel Parsons is committed to making this region a super region that competes with success. The firm is further

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bolstered by its strong Government Relations practice, which services all walks of industry, leveraging government relationships and interests with the needs of the company. For more information, visit RoedelParsons.com or call 504-566-1801. Seth J. Bloom, Esq. and his associates at Bloom Legal help good people who need legal representation get their lives back on track. If you’re a New Orleans local or visitor, this full-service firm is here for you when you’ve been arrested, detained, ticketed or injured. The associates at Bloom Legal understand that a sudden legal concern can be stressful. That is why Mr. Bloom and his team strive to resolve cases in the most stress-free, streamlined manner possible. They can assist with a wide range of services and specialize in the areas of personal injury, property insurance, and criminal defense, including DWI, DUI, accidents and auto injuries. When you contact Bloom Legal, you’ll speak with an attorney right away. Rest assured, they’ll provide you with the information you need to make an informed decision about your legal situation. To contact Bloom Legal, call 504-599-9997 or visit BloomLegal.com.  Established in 1928, Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. (BSW) is one of the oldest law firms in the state of Louisiana. The firm takes great pride in its long history of client service. With almost 70 attorneys, the firm is among the largest firms in the state and one of the larger law firms in the South. BSW’s clients range from individuals and startup companies,


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to Fortune 500 corporations, governmental entities and notfor-profit institutions. Since the firm was established, two standards have remained constant: to strive for legal excellence and to be involved in local communities. Members of the firm have served as presidents, directors and officers of community and business organizations. BSW’s primary focus is growing and protecting each client’s business. Whether it’s in litigation, negotiating contracts, advising on management restructures or assisting in the purchase or sale of a business, BSW attorneys possess the skill set to help their clients achieve their goals. For more information, visit BSWLlp.com.

Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand, & Brackett is a defense firm founded on excellence and personal attention with a dedication to providing the highest level of professional legal service to clients. Operating with the highest standards enables the firm’s attorneys to consistently resolve legal matters for clients effectively and expediently. Services begin with careful evaluation of client needs, which then allows the firm to individually tailor services to best address client interests. With practice areas in Admiralty & Maritime Law, General Casualty & Insurance Defense, Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act, Defense Base Act and War Hazards Compensation Act, Trucking, Transportation and Automobile Liability, Municipal Liability and Workers’ Compensation, the firm uses advanced research and communication tools to provide clients with the most

up-to-date information and resources regarding all areas of law and industry. Versatile and well trained, the attorneys of Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett afford clients full legal services in all phases of trial and appellate practice in Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas and other areas of the United States. For more information, visit MBLB.com. When a business contract is broken, it’s one thing to be able to comprehend its language and argue its interpretation. It is another thing to know both the law and the businesses it governs. With both a Juris Doctor and a Master in Business Administration, Robert B. Evans III of Evans Law is uniquely able to assist clients in a variety of areas, including but not limited to contract negotiations, commercial and residential leases, corporate transactions and reorganizations, as well as business formation and management. In addition to the many businesses that seek Evans’ counsel, a number of individuals turn to him as well – many of which have been the victims of personal injury, car accidents, medical malpractice or wrongful death. A member of numerous professional associations, including local, regional and national bar associations, Mr. Evans is AV Top Rated, a Martindale Top Lawyer in Louisiana and among the 1 percent of attorneys in the nation recognized by The National Institute of Trial Advocacy as a Designated Trial Advocate. For more information, visit RobertEvansLaw.com.

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Taggart Morton is a New Orleans-based law firm that provides full service legal representation to the business community. The firm’s primary practice involves the representation of regulated and formerly regulated industries of all types, including healthcare, public utilities, insurance, transportation, media and communications, technology and oil and gas in corporate, transactional, regulatory, bankruptcy, tax and litigation matters. Representing these clients as well as small businesses and property owners, Taggart Morton embraces virtually every type of dispute, including commercial and business disputes, healthcare, insurance regulatory services, bankruptcy employment law, ERISA, antitrust and trade regulation, intellectual property, media and technology law, environmental and toxic tort, bankruptcy, workers’ compensation, real estate, managed care and construction. Taggart Morton provides its attorneys with the latest in resources and technologies to put its quality of work on par with the largest firms. Its goal is always to offer clients effective and comprehensive representation at a reasonable cost. Taggart Morton is pleased to congratulate its 2016 New Orleans Magazine Top Lawyers: A.J. Herbert and Barry Grodsky. For more information about Taggart Morton, contact the firm at 504-599-8500.

from Fortune 500 companies to international corporations, local businesses and individuals. Attorneys spend a significant amount of time with each client to be certain of the client’s individual needs and all available options. For more information on Blue Williams’s commitment to providing lasting solutions, visit BlueWilliams.com or call 800-326-4991.

D. Douglas Howard Jr., better known as “Mad Dog” for his tenacious and often unconventional court manner, began a general practice of law in the 1970s, soon developing a focus on family law. Since then, he has represented many of the highest profile names in divorce proceedings throughout Louisiana. With partners Shawn Reed and Jonathan Pedersen, Howard has also successfully taken on some of the country’s largest corporations, including 3M and General Electric, Inc. in asbestos litigation on behalf of 6,000 plaintiffs. The firm was recently lead trial counsel in the Pearl River Fish Kill case and also litigated against a custom wheelchair manufacturer. Howard devotes substantial time to the community, serving on the board of trustees for the Nature Conservancy of Louisiana, preserving 300,000 acres of critical habitat. He also served on the New Orleans Aviation Board. A former U.S. Marine, he enjoys the outdoors, hunting and photography, and collects southern regional art. He graduated from LSU and Loyola University Law School. For more information or to contact Howard & Reed, call 504-581-3610 or visit HowardandReed.com.

Meet Jana Lindner McCaffery, a Metairie-based personal injury attorney who’s passionate about her job and the clients she represents. McCaffery’s main focus is on personal injury, including medical malpractice. She also handles estate planning, veteran’s benefits and immigration cases. While pursuing her Juris Doctorate from Loyola University, McCaffery served as a student advocate for the Loyola Honor Board, as an active board member of the Association of Women Law Students and as Vice-President of the Association of Trial Lawyers of America. Since earning her J.D. in 1999 and becoming a member of the Louisiana State Bar Association, she has represented clients with fierce tenacity and a personal touch. Maintaining open communication with clients is a tenet of the practice, and all aspects of clients’ cases are handled directly by Jana. For more information, visit JMacLLC.com, or call 504-837-1234. Your phone call will never go unreturned. After all, “it’s not just business; it’s personal.”

Blue Williams, LLP, has been providing high-quality representation to clients throughout the Gulf South in commercial litigation, healthcare and construction law and business matters since 1983. By recruiting motivated and experienced attorneys in diverse areas of law, Blue Williams is able to provide a full spectrum of services and create lasting solutions to the legal dilemmas faced by clients. The firm’s attorneys practice in 17 areas of law, including Commercial Litigation, Estate and Tax Planning, Corporate Law, Healthcare Law, Construction Litigation, Insurance Law, Products and Professional Liability and more. Blue Williams has a history of rising to the challenge and has defended clients in multi-million dollar exposure cases. The firm provides services to clients nationally, though primarily in Louisiana, and these clients range 108

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Ralph Capitelli and T. Carey Wicker III, began practicing law together in 1982. Over the last 30 years, their firm represented individuals and businesses in their most urgent time of need. The firm has been nominated to the Bar Register of Preeminent Lawyers and its founding partners have received recognition in their respective practice areas. Ralph Capitelli has been named to Louisiana Super Lawyers each consecutive year since 2011, and T. Carey Wicker III has been recognized as one of the top 100 trial lawyers in the state of Louisiana for several consecutive years. The attorneys at Capitelli and Wicker have dedicated their efforts to the following areas: criminal and white collar criminal defense and civil litigation with an emphasis on medical malpractice and products liability cases. To learn more about Capitelli and Wicker and their attorneys, call 504-582-2425 or visit CapitelliAndWicker.com.

Jones Walker LLP is one of the largest law firms in the southeastern United States, serving a wide range of local, regional, national and international clients. The firm provides a full complement of legal services, with practices spanning across its 19 offices in nine states and the District of Columbia. Jones Walker is committed to providing excellent legal services to clients ranging from major multinational companies to emerging businesses. Clients have recognized the firm for consistent excellence in areas such as client focus, anticipating client’s needs and understanding the client’s business. Jones Walker has been named to the 2016 Client Service A-Team by The BTI Consulting Group, which conducts hundreds of in-house counsel interviews to identify law firms providing top client service. For more information, visit JonesWalker.com. •


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table talk pg. 112

GW Fins has long been a go-to place for seafood lovers, with a menu that offers a wider array of choices than just about anywhere else. The volume is high and the sourcing top-notch, both good indicators of quality. ... Owner Tenney Flynn recently stepped down from his longtime role as executive chef, promoting his longtime chef de cuisine Mike Nelson into the position.

jeffery johnston PHOTOGRAPH


THE MENU / TABLE TALK

Tempura fins wings appetizer with Korean glaze at GW Fin

Rising Tide

Where seafood is the specialty By Jay Forman

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eary of the same old seafood dishes? The thought may be hard to fathom, but it happens. Luckily, New Orleans has several places with fresh takes if the idea of yet another blackened redfish or trout amandine fills you with ennui. And with fall flipping the switch for richer, more complex flavors, now is a good time to dive into some of the more diverse seafood menus around town. GW Fins has long been a go-to place for seafood lovers, with a menu that offers a wider array of choices than just about anywhere else. The volume is high and the sourcing top-notch, both good indicators

Catch a Dish GW Fins 808 Bienville St. 581-3467 GWFins.com Dinner nightly

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of quality. Fresh off a kitchen renovation, owner Tenney Flynn recently stepped down from his longtime role as executive chef, promoting his longtime chef de cuisine Mike Nelson into the position. “Mike is doing a lot of really interesting stuff. But then again the chef de cuisine usually does a lot of interesting stuff that the executive chef takes credit for, right?” Flynn points out. “So now he’s got his due.” Chef Nelson has already made his mark, punching up the menu with innovations like Fins Wings, a way to trim a fish collar so that it can be held and eaten like a chicken wing, making a cut like collar (delicious and

Pêche Seafood Grill 800 Magazine St. 522-1744 PêcheRestaurant.com Lunch and dinner Tuesdays-Saturdays

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Seaworthy 630 Carondelet St. 930-3071 SeaworthyNola.com Happy Hour and dinner Wednesdays-Mondays

popular in Japanese cuisine) more accessible. Preparations vary, but recently included tempura-style with a Korean glaze. Such methods aren’t just tasty, they represent a sustainable ethos that has long been a focus of GW Fins, which features a remarkable array of primarily Gulf seafood. “Many places only have three or four fish on the menu,” Flynn points out. “We buy our fish whole and always have at least 10 or 12, just with the entrées.” Variety is one thing; the menu is another. The kitchen at GW Fins is set up more like a steakhouse rather than a seafood restaurant, with standardized preparations that can be applied to a variety of fish, giving them flexibility to adapt to the best of what the market has to offer. “If the tuna boats aren’t coming in and I don’t want to import tuna, tuna comes off the menu,” Flynn explains. Recent appetizers there included a terrific tuna tartare, served in a molded cylinder veneered with micro-planed sections of watermelon radish and garnished with diced mango and microgreens. An entrée of local drum was crosshatched and pan-fried to yield a distinctive “cracklin’ crust,” then plated atop butternut squash, green beans, shitakes and pecans with a nutty splash of brown butter bringing it together – a wonderfully seasonal dish. For dessert, consider the Salty Malty: an ice cream pie with a pretzel crust and caramel whipped cream. Like GW Fins, Pêche shines a light on Gulf seafood. This seafood-centric outpost of Donald Link’s Restaurant Group also buys their fish whole and breaks them down in-house, with an emphasis on using all off the parts – the aquatic equivalent of nose-to-tail. Unlike GW Fins, though, their jeffery johnston PHOTOGRAPH


Seafood Peruvian-style At first blush, Cuzco – a new Peruvian restaurant on Freret Street – may seem an odd choice for seafood. But dishes like the Parihuela, a Peruvian take on bouillabaisse, takes diners in an unexpected directions. Ditto that for the Arroz Con Mariscos, which is akin to Peruvian paella.

menu has a more regional focus. “We definitely have a southern slant,” says Executive Chef Ryan Prewitt. “We try to keep things straightforward – the idea is just to let the seafood speak for itself and then use what we have around us to augment the flavor.” Augmentations include regional produce and accoutrements such as house-made pickles and hot sauces. Much as Cajun and Southern influences shape the menu at Cochon, they shape them at Pêche. For appetizers, consider their smoked drum salad, which is a canvas for seasonal expression. While its composition shifts frequently – recently it featured watercress, pumpkin seeds and bacon – the core element remains constant. Trimmings from drum filets are cubed, cured overnight and then smoked. The result yields a firm, meaty texture that lends itself well to small plate-type preparations. Some international flourishes do appear. The spicy ground shrimp small plate – modeled on Chinese Dan Dan noodles – is one. Built on rich, chewy noodles and featuring ground shrimp cooked down to a bolognese-type consistency, it’s recommended. “We use ginger, citrus zest and chili oil, which kind of pushes it into

Asian territory, but not so far that it doesn’t have a place in the dishes we’re doing here,” Prewitt explains. Pêche is also known for its whole fish. Like much on the menu the preparation changes often, but recently included whole roasted red snapper garnished with fried garlic in fermented chili vinaigrette. Fresh fish off the bone is far more succulent than the more traditional filet, so the extra care required to eat it is worth the effort. Plus, it just fits the vibe. Seaworthy, the new seafood-centric offshoot of the Ace Hotel comes courtesy of the team behind New York’s Grand Banks Oyster House, a wooden schooner-based restaurant that literally docks in Manhattan. Seaworthy is more conventionally housed in a two-story cottage with the antiquated nautical patina of place that has been around for decades. While operated by the New York group, Seaworthy is helmed by chef de cuisine Daniel Causgrove, formerly of the Windsor Court Grill Room. Oysters are a specialty here, and this is one of a handful of places that allow locals to sample bivalves from waters beyond the Gulf of Mexico. Locals, too, may blanche at the price per piece, but it can be worth it to try something new like a meaty Fanny Bay from the icy waters of British Columbia’s inland passage or a briny, deepcupped Pacific kumamoto. For main courses, consider the lobster roll, a split roll overflowing with chopped Main lobster in an herbed dressing and served with excellent fries. The butter poached sheepshead is a good choice as well – a local fish that’s gaining more traction in restaurants and prepared in a manner that expounds the flavor. A chili sauce adds some heat. n

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News From the Kitchens Meril, Cuzco & Rosedale BY ROBERT PEYTON

Meril I don’t have the space in this column to give Emeril Lagasse the credit he deserves for promoting our food culture, and food culture generally, over the last two decades. It has been a while, though, since Emeril opened a restaurant in New Orleans; in September, the chef opened Meril at 424 Girod St. in the Warehouse District. Chef Will Avelar is in charge of the kitchen; he’s a native New Orleanian and most recently sous chef at Delmonico. His menu at Meril is eclectic, with small plates dominating, and just about every item is under $20. There are influences from all over the world. “Snacks” include shrimp and grilled pork spring rolls with mint; catfish tacos with mango slaw and piri piri crema; a buttermilk biscuit with foie gras butter and blackberry preserves; and house-made meatballs with buffalo mozzarella. A wood oven puts out a few different flatbreads, including one with mortadella and green chile; pastas include fettucine nero with crabmeat, toasted almonds, Calabrian chile and argula; and fennel rigatoni with shrimp, broccoli, spicy Italian sausage and Pecorino cheese. Finally, there’s a robata grill for things like a hanger steak with black beans and a red chimichurri sauce, a daily fish preparation and chicken thighs with preserved lemon and pimentón. Meril is located at 424 Girod St., and it’s open Sundays-Thursdays, 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; and until 11 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. Call 5263745 to make a reservation. 114

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Cuzco Peruvian cuisine has been “up and coming” for a decade or so. I think it’s because the food is both exotic and relatable; the nation is renowned for ceviche, but seasoned mashed potatoes form the basis of its most iconic dish. It hasn’t taken off here as predicted, but I’m always happy to see another place I can eat causa, and even better if it’s only a few blocks from my home. Cuzco adds to the restaurant revolution on Freret Street. It is a family-style place run by four friends – Luis “Lucho” Ampuero, Mirtha Gallegos, Monica Concha and Angelica Moscoso – all of whom were born in Peru. The kitchen puts out specials on a regular basis, with the result that Cuzco fairly represents the diversity of Peruvian cuisine. Ceviche, the aforementioned causa, is a dish of cool potato purée, generally flavored with aji chile and topped with various salads of seafood, chicken and/or vegetables. Some standards from South and Central America show up as well, such as arroz con pollo, but some, like Cuzco’s take on chicharrones, are somewhat different; at Cuzco they’re not just crispy pig skin, there’s a lot of meat involved and the result is delicious. Cuzco’s small dining room seats about 35, and they’re considering adding sidewalk tables to increase their capacity. The restaurant is located at 4714 Freret St. and is open Tuesdays-Saturdays, noon-3 p.m., and 5-8 p.m.; and on Sundays noon4 p.m. Call 345-2884 to learn more.

Rosedale Susan Spicer is one of the best chefs in New Orleans, and so the news that she planned to open a third restaurant (after flagship Bayona and Lakeview casual Mondo) comes as good news to anyone who loves to eat in the Crescent City. The new venture, which opened fully Oct. 19, is Rosedale, named for the street on which it’s located. Like Mondo, Rosedale will be a fairly casual affair, fitting for its semi-residential setting. Chef Spicer told me she wants it to be a neighborhood place. Brett Duffee will be the executive chef, moving from the same position at Bayona to open the place. The menu focuses on New Orleans and Louisiana home cooking, with items such as duck and andouille gumbo with German potato salad; turtle soup with spinach dumplings and an egg mimosa; rosemary barbecue shrimp; and fried oysters with celery root slaw showing up as appetizers. Larger plates include a cochon de lait poor boy with hot mustard and fried pickles; panéed pork chops with pink eye peas and hot peach mustard; and lemonherb grilled chicken thighs with olives, red bliss potatoes and tzatziki sauce. The restaurant is located at 801 Rosedale Drive, and is open Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-’til; I suspect the “’til” doesn’t mean 3 or 4 a.m., but I was told they don’t want to hedge their bets at this point. You can call 309-9595 to get a better idea of their closing time.

SARA ESSEX BRADLEY photographs


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Thanksgiving Sides New with a traditional twist by Dale Curry

PHOTOGRAPHed and styled EUGENIA UHL

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Holiday Relish Tray Deviled Eggs with Shrimp: 6 boiled eggs 6 green olives stuffed with pimentos 2 Tablespoons mayonnaise 2 teaspoons yellow mustard Salt and pepper to taste Paprika 12 small boiled shrimp Halve eggs lengthwise and place whites on serving plate. On a plate, mash egg yolks with a fork. Mash olives with the fork and mix with eggs. Add mayonnaise and mustard and mix until creamy. Stir in salt, pepper and a pinch of paprika. Stuff egg whites, spreading yolk mixture to cover the full surfaces of the whites. Top with a small shrimp. Sprinkle with paprika. Makes 12 stuffed eggs Stuffed Celery With Cream Cheese: 5 stalks celery, cut into thirds 1 1/2 cups whipped chive cream cheese 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce 2 teaspoons lemon juice Salt and pepper to taste ½ cup pistachio nuts, shelled Place celery in ice water for about an hour before stuffing to make it crisp. In a medium bowl, mix cream cheese with Worcestershire, lemon juice and seasonings. Chop pistachio nuts in small pieces and mix half with the stuffing. With a knife, fill pieces of celery and garnish with remaining pistachios. Makes 15 pieces Belgian Endive Spears: 2 heads Belgian endive 8 ounces goat cheese at room temperature ½ cup roasted walnuts, chopped, divided in half* ¼ sweetened dried cranberries, chopped, divided in half ¼ cup chopped loosely packed flat-leaf parsley, divided in half 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar Few dashes garlic powder Cut 1-inch off the root end of the Belgian endive heads. Discard any withered spears and remove about 20 of the largest spears. Rinse and pat dry. In a medium bowl, mix goat cheese, half of walnuts, half of cranberries, half of parsley, balsamic vinegar and garlic powder. Spread onto the cut end of the endive spears and garnish with remaining walnuts, cranberries and parsley. Makes about 20 pieces *Roast walnuts on a baking sheet in a 350-degree oven for about 10 minutes. To make an attractive holiday tray: Use a large platter, arranging eggs, celery and endive spears in their own sections of the tray. Decorate between them with black olives, gherkins, pickled okra and pepperocini. Use extras to refill tray or save as leftovers. Serves 8 to 10

F

ood is the heart of Thanksgiving, when cooks show off their very best dishes – some old, some new. There is a lot to be said for the traditional. What is Thanksgiving without the turkey, dressing, cranberries and pumpkin pie? On the other hand, why not go cutting-edge and bring new twists to table. I can argue both sides, but a little of each – a lot, that is – keeps coming to our table. One of my strategies is to do something unconventional that carries a traditional thread. Instead of the sweet potato casserole, I have substituted butternut squash. In place of salad, I like a tray of tempting bites. And, I often pull off a different dessert – a cheesecake, say – but dress it with a familiar taste, such as praline. At least that’s my thinking right now. Last year, I made oyster dressing, stuffed mirlitons and rice dressing – all

in the stuffing family. Then, my husband made cornbread dressing. Each one was to please a certain person. Some of those people aren’t coming this year, so we can cut out a few carbs. I love my mother’s ambrosia recipe made from fresh coconut and oranges, but a recipe card so old it’s shredded contains a quick and easy one, mostly from cans, that’s just as delicious. Sometimes it’s hard to know what to take when going to someone else’s home. I think a relish tray featuring tasty morsels is just the answer. No one can resist a deviled egg with a shrimp on top. And veggies, such as celery and Belgian endive, are irresistible when filled with a creamy cheese stuffing. Last year at Thanksgiving, talk was all about the election. This year we won’t have candidates to fuss about. That might be the biggest treat of the day.

Butternut Squash Casserole

1 medium butternut squash, cut in half lengthwise and seeded 1 Tablespoon butter ½ onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 3 large eggs 1/3 cup pure maple syrup ½ cup whole milk ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon cinnamon 1/3 cup roasted pumpkin seeds* 1/3 cup bacon bits Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil. Spray with cooking spray and place squash halves meat side down. Roast in oven for about 40 minutes or until cooked through when checked with a fork. Cool slightly and scrape squash into a food processor. Pulse until squash is almost but not quite puréed. In a small skillet, melt butter and sauté onion and garlic. Set aside. In an electric mixer, beat eggs. Add maple syrup, milk, salt and cinnamon, and mix well. Remove from stand and stir in squash and oniongarlic mixture, mixing well. Pour into a buttered 8-by-8-inch baking dish. Top first with bacon bits and then pumpkin seeds. Bake for 45 minutes or until done and slightly browning on top. Serves 6 to 8 * I used store-bought fire-roasted pumpkin seeds with sea salt.

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Out the Box Margarita Martini BY tim mcnally

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s much as New Orleans prides itself on its Free Spirit, within those parameters, we can actually be a victim of our own hidebound habits. For most of us, celebrations, like Carnival or Jazz Fest while seemingly manic to the inexperienced eye, are actually repeats of previous performances. We pretty much do the same things for each celebration, having learned from experience or our parents to park the car in a certain area, then position ourselves at just about the same place doing just about the same thing as we have done in previous years. After all, why change what works? Holiday seasons are particularly traditional in both drink and cuisine, within a New Orleans context. And so it is with some reluctance that we propose your seasonal martini be altered a bit. The folks at Boulevard American Bistro suggest you widen your horizon this year by looking to the South for inspiration.

Margarita Martini 1 1/4 ounces Tres Agave Blanco Tequila 1 1/4 ounces Licor 43 1 ounce house-made sour mix* 2 dashes of orange bitters Garnish: lemon zest and mint sprig In a shaker, add ice and all ingredients. Shake and strain into a coupe glass, and garnish. *Sour Mix: 3 cups each water and sugar 2 cups each fresh lime and fresh lemon Combine water and sugar in large saucepan. Stir over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Bring to boil. Cool syrup. Mix syrup, lemon juice and lime juice in pitcher. Chill until cold. Can be made 1 week ahead. Cover; keep chilled As served at Boulevard American Bistro, 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-2301, BoulevardBistro.com 118

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sara essex bradley PHOTOGRAPH


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THE MENU / DINING GUIDE H= New Orleans Magazine award winner / $ = Average entrée price. $ = $5-10 / $$ = $11-15 / $$$ = $16-20 / $$$$ = $21-25 / $$$$$ = $25 and up.

American

nightly. Jazz Brunch on Sunday. $$$$$

Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill Multiple Locations, ZeaRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Drawing from a wide range of worldly influences, this popular restaurant serves a variety of grilled items as well as appetizers, salads, side dishes, seafood, pasta and other entrées. Also offers catering services. $$$

Manning’s 519 Fulton St., 593-8118. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Born of a partnership between New Orleans’ First Family of Football and Harrah’s Casino, Manning’s offers sports bar fans a step up in terms of comfort and quality. With a menu that draws on both New Orleans and the Deep South, traditional dishes get punched up with inspired but accessible twists in surroundings accented by both memorabilia and local art. $$$

Bywater Elizabeth’s 601 Gallier St., 944-9272, ElizabethsRestaurantNola.com. B, L MonFri, D Mon-Sat, Br Sat-Sun. This eclectic local restaurant draws rave reviews for its praline bacon and distinctive Southern-inspired brunch specials. $$$

H Maurepas 3200 Burgundy St., 2670072, MaurepasFoods.com. D Thu-Tue, Br Sat-Sun. Pioneering farm-to-table restaurant with an ingredient-driven menu that changes daily. Clever cocktails a plus as well. $$ Satsuma Café 3218 Dauphine St., 3045962, SatsumaCafe.com. B, L daily (until 5 p.m.). Offers healthy, inspired breakfast and lunch fare, along with freshly squeezed juices. $

carrollton Bourré 1510 S. Carrollton Ave., 5104040. L, D Tue-Sun. “Elevated” street food along with quality daiquiris and reconsidered wings are the draw at this newcomer from the team behind Boucherie. $$

CITY PARK Café NOMA 1 Collins Diboll Circle, NO Museum of Art, City Park, 482-1264, CafeNoma.com. L, (snacks) Tue-Sun. Sleek bar and café in the ground floor of museum offers a thoughtful array of snacks, sandwiches and small plates that are sure to enchant, with a kids’ menu to boot. $$

CBD/Warehouse District The Grill Room Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-1992, GrillRoomNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sun. Featuring modern American cuisine with a distinctive New Orleans flair, the adjacent Polo Club Lounge offers live music

Pete’s Pub Intercontinental Hotel, 444 St. Charles Ave., 585-5401, IcNewOrleans.com/dining/petes_pub. D Mon-Fri. Casual fare and adult beverages are served in this pub on the ground floor. $$ Q&C Hotel/Bar 344 Camp St., (866) 247-7936, QandC.com. B, D daily. Newly renovated boutique hotel offering a small plates menu with tempting choices such as a Short Rib Poor Boy and Lobster Mac and Cheese to complement their sophisticated craft cocktails. $$

H Root 200 Julia St., 252-9480, RootNola.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily. Chef Philip Lopez opened Root in November 2011 and has garnered a loyal following for his modernist, eclectic cuisine. Try the country fried chicken wings and the Cohiba-smoked scallops crusted with chorizo. $$$$

H Restaurant August 301 Tchoupitoulas St., 299-9777, RestaurantAugust.com. L Fri, D daily. James Beard Award-winning chef John Besh’s menu is based on classical techniques of Louisiana cuisine and produce with a splash of European flavor set in an historic carriage warehouse. $$$$$ Walk-On’s Bistreaux & Bar 1009 Poydras St., 309-6530, Walk-Ons.com. L, D, daily. Burger, sandwiches, wraps and more made distinctive with a Louisiana twist are served at this sports bar near the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. $$ Warehouse Grille, 869 Magazine St., 322-2188, WarehouseGrille.com. L, D daily, Br Fri-Sun. Creative fare served in

an art-filled environment. Try the duck crêpes or the lamb spring rolls. $$ Wolfe’s in the Warehouse 859 Convention Center Blvd., 613-2882. B, L, D daily. Chef Tom Wolfe brings his refined cuisine to the booming Fulton Street corridor. His Smoked Kobe Short Ribs are a good choice. $$$

Downtown The Grill 540 Chartres St., 522-1800. B, L, D daily. A diner with local character staffed by local characters. $

Faubourg Marigny Langlois 1710 Pauger St., 934-1010, LangloisNola.com. L Fri-Sat, D Wed-Sun. *Reservations only Supper club and boutique cooking school in the Marigny serves up culturally informed, farmto-table fare with the added bonus of instruction. Dishes include Spiced Quail and Lemongrass Meatballs with Smoked broth. Open kitchen and convivial atmosphere add up to a good time. $$$

in the tourist Ground Zero of the French Market. Sandwiches, breads, cheeses and more. $$ Hard Rock Café 125 Bourbon St., 5295617, HardRock.com. L, D daily. Local outpost of this global brand serves burgers, café fare and drinks in their rock memorabilia-themed environs. $$ The Pelican Club 312 Exchange Place, 523-1504, PelicanClub.com. D daily. Serves an eclectic mix of hip food, from the seafood “martini” to clay-pot barbecued shrimp and a trio of duck. Three dining rooms available. $$$$$ Rib Room Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046, RibRoomNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Old World elegance and high ceilings, house classic cocktails and Anthony Spizale’s broad menu of prime rib, stunning seafood and on weekends a champagne brunch. $$$

GARDEN DISTRICT

The Marigny Brasserie 640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472, MarignyBrasserie.com. L, D daily. Chic neighborhood bistro with traditional dishes like the Wedge of Lettuce salad and innovative cocktails such as the cucumber Cosmo. $$$

Cheesecake Bistro by Copeland’s, 2001 St. Charles Ave., 593-9955, CopelandsCheesecakeBistro.com. L, D daily. Shiny, contemporary bistro serves Cajun-fusion fare along with its signature decadent desserts. Good lunch value to boot. $$

Snug Harbor 626 Frenchman St., 949-0696, SnugJazz.com. D daily. This jazz club serves cocktails and a dining menu loaded with steaks, seafood and meaty burgers served with loaded baked potatoes. $$$$

District Donuts Sliders Brew, 2209 Magazine Street, 570-6945, DonutsAndSliders.com. B, L, D daily. Creative sliders (hello, pork belly) and super-creative donuts (think root beer float) are the hallmarks of this next-generation café. $

French Quarter

Metairie

Angeline 1032 Chartres St., 308-3106, AngelineNola.com. B Mon-Fri, Brunch Sat & Sun, D nightly. Modern southern with a fine dining focus is the hallmark of this bistro tucked away in a quiet end of the French Quarter. Southern Fried Quail and Braised Lamb Necks with ricotta agnolotti represent the style. $$$

Boulevard American Bistro 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-2301. L, D daily. Classic American cuisine including steaks, chops and more is augmented by regional favorites like Boulevard Oysters at this Metairie bistro. $$$

Continental Provisions 110 N Peters St., Stall 23, 407-3437. Open daily. Artisan purveyors including Bellegarde Bakery and Cleaver & Company team up to reclaim a foothold for quality food

café B 2700 Metairie Road, 934-4700, cafeB.com. D daily, L Mon-Sat. Br Sun. Ralph Brennan offers New American bistro fare with a Louisiana twist at this family-friendly neighborhood spot. $$$ Caffe! Caffe! 3547 N. Hullen St., 2679190. B, L Mon-Sat. & 4301 Clearview

Caffe! Caffe! – Time To Stop By Caffe! Caffe!, 3547 N. Hullen St., Metairie, 267-9190; 4301 Clearview Parkway, Metairie, 885-4845; CaffeCaffe.com Tucked away on Clearview Parkway is Caffe! Caffe! Surrounded by big brand-name restaurants, this place is perennially popular both with locals in-the-know and visitors who have been tipped off. There are a number of things that make this family-run business special. There is always a selection of huge cakes that are made from scratch using heirloom recipes, and they’re available by the slice. Delicious pies, salads and expresso beverages also fill the menu. And at the heart of this business is a group of people who make good food and serve it with excellent customer service. – Mirella Cameran.

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Parkway, 885-4845. B, L daily; D MonSat. CaffeCaffe.com Healthy, refreshing meal options combine with gourmet coffee and espresso drinks to create a tasteful retreat for Metairie diners at a reasonable price. Try the egg white spinach wrap. $ Heritage Grill 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 934-4900, HeritageGrillMetairie. com. L Mon-Fri. This lunch-only destination caters to the office crowd and offers a freshly squeezed juice menu to go along with its regular menu and express two-course lunch. $$ Martin Wine Cellar 714 Elmeer Ave., 896-7300, MartinWine.com. Wine by the glass or bottle to go with daily lunch specials, towering burgers, hearty soups and salads and giant, deli-style sandwiches. $ Vega Tapas Café 2051 Metairie Road, 836-2007, VegaTapasCafe.com. D Mon-Sat. Innovative establishment offers fresh seafood, grilled meats and vegetarian dishes in a chic environment. Daily chef specials showcase unique ingredients and make this place a popular destination for dates as well as groups of friends. $$

Mid-City Parkway Bakery and Tavern 538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Featured on national TV and having served poor boys to presidents, it stakes a claim to some of the best

sandwiches in town. Their french fry version with gravy and cheese is a classic at a great price. $

NORTHSHORE Dakota 629 N. Highway 190, (985) 892-3712, TheDakotaRestaurant.com. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. A sophisticated dining experience with generous portions. $$$$$

Riverbend Carrollton Market 8132 Hampson St., 252-9928, CarrolltonMarket.com. D TueSat. Modern Southern cuisine manages to be both fun and refined at this tasteful boîte. $$$

Uptown Audubon Clubhouse 6500 Magazine St., 212-5282, AudubonInstitute.org. B, L Tue-Sat, Br Sun. A kid-friendly menu with local tweaks and a casually upscale sandwich and salad menu. $$ Camellia Grill 626 S. Carrollton Ave., 309-2679. B, L, D daily. A venerable diner whose essential character has remained intact and many of the original waiters have returned. Credit cards are now accepted. $ GG’s Dine-O-Rama 3100 Magazine St., 373-6579, GGsNewOrleans.com. B Sat, L, Tue-Sun, D Tue-Fri, Br Sun. Upscalecasual restaurant serves a variety of specialty sandwiches, salads and wraps, like the Chicago-style hot dog and the St. Paddy’s Day Massacre, chef Gotter’s take on the Rueben. $$

Martin Wine Cellar 3827 Baronne St., 899-7411, MartinWine.com. Wine by the glass or bottle with cheeses and snacks to-go. $ Slim Goodies 3322 Magazine St., 891 EGGS (3447), SlimGoodiesDiner.com. B, L daily. This diner offers an exhaustive menu heavily influenced by local cuisine. Try the Creole Slammer, a breakfast platter rounded out by crawfish étouffée. The laid-back vibe is best enjoyed on the patio out back. $ Stein’s Market and Deli 2207 Magazine St., 527-0771, SteinsDeli.net. B, L, D TueSun. New York City meets New Orleans. The Reuben and Rachel sandwiches are the real deal and the half-sours and pickled tomatoes complete the deli experience. $ Surrey’s Café and Juice Bar 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; 4807 Magazine St., 895-5757, SurreysCafeAndJuiceBar.com. B, L daily. Laid-back café focuses on breakfast and brunch dishes to accompany freshly squeezed juice offerings. Health-food lovers will like it here, along with fans of favorites such as peanut butter and banana pancakes. $$ Tracey’s Irish Restaurant & Bar 2604 Magazine St., 897-5413, TraceysNola. com. L, D daily. A neighborhood bar with one of the best messy roast beef poor boys in town. The gumbo, cheeseburger poor boy and other sandwiches are also winners. Grab a local Abita beer to wash

it all down. Also a great location to watch the game. $

H Upperline 1413 Upperline St., 891-9822, Upperline.com. D Wed-Sun. Consummate hostess JoAnn Clevenger and talented chef Dave Bridges make for a winning combination at this nationally heralded favorite. The oft-copied fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade originated here. $$$$

H Wayfare 4510 Freret St., 309-0069, WayfareNola.com. L, D daily. Creative sandwiches and southern-inspired small plates. $$ Ye Olde College Inn 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-3683, CollegeInn1933.com. D Tue-Sat. Serves up classic fare, albeit with a few upscale dishes peppering the menu. $$$

Asian Fusion/Pan Asian Little Tokyo Multiple locations, LittleTokyoNola.com. L, D daily. Multiple locations of this popular Japanese sushi and hibachi chain make sure that there’s always a specialty roll within easy reach. $$

Bywater Red’s Chinese 3048 St. Claude Ave., 304-6030, RedsChinese.com. D Wed-Mon. Assertive, in-your-face Chinese fare by chef Tobias Womack, an alum of Danny Bowien’s Mission Chinese. The Kung Pao Pastrami and Delta Broccoli are good options. $$

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DINING GUIDE CBD/Warehouse District Rock-N-Sake 823 Fulton St., 581-7253, RockNSake.com. L Fri, D Tue-Sun, late night. Fresh sushi and contemporary takes on Japanese favorites in an upbeat, casual setting. $$$

Faubourg Marigny Bao and Noodle 2700 Charters St., 272-0004, BaoAndNoodle.com. L, D daily. Housemade noodles and a more authentic take on Chinese fare sets this neighborhood startup apart. Try the soup dumplings if available $$

French Quarter V Sushi 821 Iberville St., 609-2291, VSushiMartini.com. D daily, late-night. Creative rolls and a huge list of fusion dishes keep party-lovers going late into the night at this combination sushi and martini bar. $$$

Garden District Hoshun Restaurant 1601 St. Charles Ave., 302-9716, HoshunRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Offers a wide variety of Asian cuisines, primarily dishes culled from China, Japan, Thailand and Malaysia. Five-pepper calamari is a tasty way to begin the meal, and their creative sushi rolls are good. Private dining rooms available. $$

H Tan Dinh 1705 Lafayette St., 3618008. B, L, D daily. Roasted quail and the beef pho rule at this Vietnamese

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outpost. $$

Kenner Little Chinatown 3800 Williams Blvd., 305-0580, LittleChinatown.net. L, D daily. One of the city’s best Chinese restaurants is secreted away on William’s Boulevard in Kenner. Try the roast duck or roast pork, either one is terrific, as well as their short menu of authentic dishes that (for the most part) avoid Americanized Chinese fare. $$

Lakeview Lakeview Pearl 6300 Canal St., 3095711, LakeviewPearl.com. L, D Mon-Sat. A long list of specialty rolls rounds out the offerings of this Asian-Fusion restaurant. $$

Metairie

MARRERO

H Chill Out Café 729 Burdette St., 872-

Daiwa, 5033 Lapalco Blvd., 875-4203, DaiwaSushi.com. L, D daily. Japanese destination on the Westbank serves an impressive and far-ranging array of creative fusion fare. $$$

9628. B, L daily, D Mon-Sat. Thai food and breakfast favorites like waffles and pancakes can both be had at this affordable college-friendly hangout. $

Mid-City H Café Minh 4139 Canal St., 482-6266, CafeMinh.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Chef Minh Bui and Cynthia Vutran bring a fusion touch to Vietnamese cuisine with French accents and a contemporary flair. $$ Five Happiness 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935, FiveHappiness.com. L, D daily. This longtime Chinese favorite offers up an extensive menu including its beloved mu shu pork and house-baked duck. $$

CoNola Grill & Sushi 619 Pink St., 8370055, CoNolaGrillSushi.com. L, D TueSun. Eclectic cafe with DNA from both Sun Ray Grill and Aloha Sushi Bar puts out southern-inspired fare backed by an Americanized sushi menu, a kids menu and more. Along with a Sunday brunch, there’s something for everyone at this independent restaurant. $$$

H MoPho 514 City Park Ave., 482-6845,

H Royal China 600 Veterans Blvd.,

5628. L, D Mon-Sat. The kitchen plays fast and loose with Vietnamese fare at this eclectic outpost on Maple Street. Try the caramelized pork “Baco”. $

831-9633. L daily, D Tue-Sun. Popular and family-friendly Chinese restaurant is one of the few places around that serves dim sum. $$

MoPhoMidCity.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Vietnamese cuisine meets southern Louisiana in this upscale casual hybrid by chef Michael Gulotta. Mix-and-match pho and an interesting poor boy menu rounds out the appeal. $$$

Riverbend H Ba Chi Canteen 7900 Maple St., 373-

Uptown Chiba 8312 Oak St., 826-9119, Chiba-Nola.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Contemporary restaurant features fresh, exotic fish from all over the world and fusion fare to go along with typical Japanese options. Extensive sake list and late night happy hours are a plus. $$$

H Jung’s Golden Dragon 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280, JungsChinese.com. L, D daily. This Chinese destination is a real find. Along with the usual, you’ll find spicy cold noodle dishes and dumplings. One of the few local Chinese places that breaks the Americanized mold. $

H Magasin 4201 Magazine St., 8967611, MagasinCafe.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Pho, banh mi and vegetarian options are offered at this attractive and budgetfriendly Vietnamese restaurant. Café sua da is available as well. $

WEST BANK Nine Roses 1100 Stephen St., 366-7665, NineRosesResturant.com. L, D Sun-Tue, Thu-Sat. The extensive Vietnamese menu specializes in hot pots, noodles and dishes big enough for everyone to share. $$


Bakery/Breakfast Café du Monde Multiple Locations, CafeDuMonde.com. This New Orleans institution has been serving fresh café au lait, rich hot chocolate and positively addictive beignets since 1862 in the French Market 24/7. $ CC’s Coffee House Multiple locations in New Orleans, Metairie and Northshore, CCsCoffee.com. Coffeehouse specializing in coffee, espresso drinks and pastries. $

BROADMOOR Gracious to Go 7220 Earhart Blvd., 301-3709, GraciousBakery.com. B MonFri. Quick-service outpost of Gracious Bakery + Café serves artisan pastries, locally roasted coffee and grab-and-go sandwiches to meet the needs of commuters. Onsite parking a plus. $

CBD/Warehouse District H Merchant 800 Common St., 571-9580, MerchantNewOrleans.com. B, L daily. Illy coffee and creative crêpes, sandwiches and more are served at this sleek and contemporary café on the ground floor of the Merchant Building. $ Red Gravy 4125 Camp St., 561-8844, RedGravy.com. B, Br, L, Wed-Mon. Farm-to-table Italian restaurant offers a creative array of breakfast items such as Cannoli Pancakes as well as delectable sandwiches and more for lunch. Homemade pastas and authentic Tuscan specialties like Cacciucco round out the menu. $$

H Ruby Slipper Café 200 Magazine St., 525-9355; 1005 Canal St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

CARROLLTON Breads on Oak, 8640 Oak St., 324-8271, BreadsOnOak.com. B, L Wed-Sun. Artisan bakeshop tucked away near the levee on Oak Street serves breads, sandwiches, gluten-free and vegan-friendly options. $

City Park Morning Call 56 Dreyfous Drive, City Park, 885-4068, NewOrleansCityPark. com/in-the-park/morning-call. 24 hours a day; cash-only. Chicory coffee and beignets coated with powdered sugar make this the quintessential New Orleans coffee shop. $

Faubourg Marigny H Ruby Slipper Café 2001 Burgundy St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

Mid-City Gracious Bakery + Café 1000 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, Suite 100, 301-3709, GraciousBakery.com. B, L daily. Boutique bakery on the ground floor of the Wood-

ward Building offers small-batch coffee, baked goods, individual desserts and sandwiches on breads made in-house. Catering options available. $

H Ruby Slipper Café 139 S. Cortez St., 525-9355, TheRubySlipperCafe.net. B, L daily, Br Sun. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and grits. $$

Barbecue Bywater The Joint 701 Mazant St., 949-3232, AlwaysSmokin.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Some of the city’s best barbecue can be had at this locally owned and operated favorite. $

French Quarter BB King’s Blues Club 1104 Decatur St., 934-5464, BBKings.com/new-orleans. L, D daily. New Orleans outpost of music club named for the famed blues musician features a menu loaded with BBQ and southern-inspired specialties. Live music and late hours are a big part of the fun. $$$

Lower Garden District Voodoo BBQ 1501 St. Charles Ave., 5224647, VoodooBBQAndGrill.com. L, D daily. Diners are never too far from this homegrown barbecue chain that features an array of specialty sauces to accompany its smoked meats and seafood. $$

Metairie Voodoo BBQ 2740 Severn Ave., 3534227, VoodooBBQAndGrill.com. L, D daily. Diners are never too far from this homegrown barbecue chain that features an array of specialty sauces to accompany its smoked meats and seafood. $$

Burgers French Quarter Bayou Burger, 503 Bourbon St., 5294256, SportsBarNewOrleans.com. L, D daily. Sports bar in the thick of Bourbon Street scene distinguishes its fare with choices like Crawfish Beignets and Zydeco Bites. $$ Port of Call 838 Esplanade Ave., 5230120, PortOfCallNola.com. L, D daily. It is all about the big, meaty burgers and giant baked potatoes in this popular bar/ restaurant – unless you’re cocktailing only, then it’s all about the Monsoons. $$

Lakeview Lakeview Harbor 911 Harrison Ave., 486-4887, NewOrleansBestBurger.com. L, D daily. Burgers are the name of the game at this restaurant. Daily specials, pizza and steaks are offered as well. $

Riverbend H Cowbell 8801 Oak St., 298-8689, Cowbell-Nola.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Burgers and homemade sauces on potato rolls are the specialty here, along with other favorites like skirt steak. $$

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DINING GUIDE Uptown H The Company Burger 4600 Freret St., 267-0320, TheCompanyBurger.com. L, D Wed-Mon. Custom-baked butterbrushed buns and fresh-ground beef patties make all the difference at this excellent burger hotspot. Draft beer and craft cocktails round out the appeal. $

French CBD/Warehouse District Chateau du Lac 857 Fulton St., 3010235, ChateauduLacWarehouse.com. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. This casual French bistro, run by chef-owner Jacques Saleun, offers up classic dishes such as escargot, coq au vin and blanquette de veau. $$$$ Le Foret 129 Camp St., 553-6738, LeForetNewOrleans.com. D Mon-Sat. Sophisticated fine dining melds southern cuisine and classic French with modernist influences in an elegant setting. $$$$

Faubourg St. John H Café Degas 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635, CafeDegas.com. L, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. Salad Niçoise, Hanger steak and frites are served in a lovely enclosed courtyard at this jewel of a French bistro. $$

French Quarter Broussard’s, 819 Conti St., 581-3866, Broussards.com. D daily, L Fri, Br Sun. Creole-French institution also offers beautiful courtyard seating. $$$$

H Marti’s 1041 Dumaine St., 522-5478, MartisNola.com. D daily. Classic French cuisine, small plates and chilled seafood platters like Grand Plateau Fruits De Mer are the calling cards for this restaurant with an elegant “Old World” feel. $$$

Lacombe H La Provence 25020 Highway 190, (985) 626-7662, LaProvenceRestaurant. com. D Wed-Sun, Br Sun. Chef John Besh upholds time-honored Provençal cuisine and rewards his guests with a true farm-life experience, from housemade preserves, charcuterie, herbs, kitchen gardens and eggs cultivated on the property. $$$$$

Metairie Chateau du Lac 2037 Metairie Road, 831-3773, ChateauduLacBistro.com. L

Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. This casual French bistro, run by chef-owner Jacques Saleun, offers up classic dishes such as escargot, coq au vin and blanquette de veau. $$$$

Uptown Bistro Daisy 5831 Magazine St., 8996987, BistroDaisy.com. D Tue-Sat. Chef Anton Schulte and his wife Diane’s bistro serves creative and contemporary bistro fare in a romantic setting. The signature Daisy Salad is a favorite. $$$$

H Coquette 2800 Magazine St., 2650421, CoquetteNola.com. L Wed-Sat, D Wed-Mon, Br Sun. The food is French in inspiration and technique, with added imagination from chef Michael and his partner Lillian Hubbard. $$$ Flaming Torch 737 Octavia St., 8950900, FlamingTorchNola.com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. French classics including a tasty onion soup and often a sought-after coq-au-vin. $$

H La Crêpe Nanou 1410 Robert St., 899-2670, LaCrepeNanou.com. D daily, Br Sun. Classic French bistro fare, including terrific moules and decadent dessert crêpes, are served nightly at this neighborhood institution. $$$ La Petite Grocery 4238 Magazine St., 891-3377, LaPetiteGrocery.com. L TueSat, D daily, Br Sun. Elegant dining in a convivial atmosphere. The menu is heavily French-inspired with an emphasis on technique. $$$ Lilette 3637 Magazine St., 895-1636, LiletteRestaurant.com. L Tue-Sat, D MonSat. Chef John Harris’ innovative menu draws discerning diners to this highly regarded bistro. Desserts are wonderful as well. $$$$$

Gastropub Abita Springs Abita Brew Pub 72011 Holly St., (985) 892-5837, AbitaBrewPub.com. L, D TueSun. Better-than-expected pub food in its namesake eatery. “Tasteful” tours available for visitors. $$

CBD/Warehouse District Gordon Biersch 200 Poydras St., 5522739, GordonBiersch.com. L, D daily. Local outpost of this popular chain serves specialty brews made on-site and crowd-

pleasing lunch and dinner fare. $$ Victory 339 Baronne St., 522-8664, VictoryNola.com. D Tue-Sat. Craft cocktails served by owner and acclaimed bartender Daniel Victory, as well as refined small plates and gourmet pizza. $$

French Quarter H Cane & Table 1113 Decatur St., 5811112, CaneAndTableNola.com. L Sat-Sun, D daily. Open late, this chef-driven rustic colonial cuisine and rum and “protoTiki” cocktails make this a fun place to gather. $$ Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro 720 Orleans Ave., 523-1930, OrleansGrapevine.com. D daily. Wine is the muse at this beautifully renovated bistro, which offers vino by the flight, glass and bottle. A classic menu with an emphasis on local cuisine. $$$

H Patrick’s Bar Vin 730 Bienville St., 200-3180, PatricksBarVin.com. D daily. This oasis of a wine bar offers terrific selections by the bottle and glass. Small plates are served as well. $$

Lower Garden District The Tasting Room 1926 Magazine St., 581-3880, TTRNewOrleans.com. D WedSun. Flights of wine and sophisticated small plates are the calling cards for this wine bar near Coliseum Square. $$

Mid-City Trèo 3835 Tulane Ave., 304-4878, TreoNola.com. L Wed-Sat, D Tue-Sat. Craft cocktail bar also serves a short but excellent small plates menu to accompany its artfully composed libations. $$

Uptown The Avenue Pub 1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243, TheAvenuePub.com. Kitchen open 24/7. With more than 43 rotating draft beers, this pub also offers food, including a cheese plate from St. James Cheese Co. and the “Pub Burger.” Counter service only. $ Bouligny Tavern 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, BoulignyTavern.com. D MonSat. Carefully curated small plates, inventive cocktails and select wines are the focus of this stylish offshoot of John Harris’s nationally acclaimed Lilette. $$ The Delachaise 3442 St. Charles Ave.,

895-0858, TheDelaichaise.com. L SatSun, D daily. Cuisine elevated to the standards of the libations is the draw at this lively wine bar and gastropub. Food is grounded in French bistro fare with eclectic twists. $$

Italian Avondale H Mosca’s 4137 Highway 90 West, 4638950, MoscasRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sat. Italian institution dishes out massive portions of great food, family-style. Good bets are the shrimp Mosca and chicken à la grande. Cash only. $$$

Bywater H Mariza 2900 Charters St., 598-5700, MarizaNewOrleans.com. D Tue-Sat. An Italian-inspired restaurant by chef Ian Schnoebelen features a terrific raw bar, house-cured charcuterie and an array of refined adult beverages served in the industrial/contemporary setting on the ground floor of the Rice Mills lofts. $$$

CBD/Warehouse District H Domenica The Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-6020, DomenicaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Chef Alon Shaya serves authentic, regional Italian cuisine. The menu of thin, lightly topped pizzas, artisanal salumi and cheese, and a carefully chosen selection of antipasti, pasta and entrées features locally raised products, some from chef John Besh’s Northshore farm. $$$$ Tommy’s Cuisine 746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103, TommysNewOrleans.com. D daily. Classic Creole-Italian cuisine is the name of the game at this upscale eatery. Appetizers include the namesake oysters Tommy, baked in the shell with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper. $$$$$

French Quarter Café Giovanni 117 Decatur St., 5292154, CafeGiovanni.com. D daily. Live opera singers three nights a week. A selection of Italian specialties tweaked with a Creole influence and their Belli Baci happy hour adds to the atmosphere. $$$$ Chartres House, 601 Chartres St., 5868383, ChartresHouse.com. L, D daily. This iconic French Quarter bar serves terrific Mint Juleps and Gin Fizzes in its pictur-

Reveillon At The Court of Two Sisters The Court of Two Sisters, 613 Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters.com The beautiful wrought iron gates at 613 Royal St. were blessed by Queen Isabella of Spain in the 1700s, so that their charm would be passed onto anyone who touched them. Legend or not, the gates are the perfect entrance to arguably the most charming courtyard in the city and to the restaurant, The Court of Two Sisters. This holiday season, a Reveillon dinner and a jazz brunch with Santa can be enjoyed in this historic setting during December (reservations required). – M.C.

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esque courtyard and balcony settings. Also famous for its fried green tomatoes and other local favorite dishes. $$$ Irene’s Cuisine 539 St. Philip St., 529881. D Mon-Sat. Long waits at the lively piano bar are part of the appeal of this Creole-Italian favorite beloved by locals. Try the oysters Irene and crabmeat gratin appetizers. $$$$

H Italian Barrel 430 Barracks St., 569-0198, ItalianBarrel.com. L, D daily. Northern Italian dishes like Braciola di Maiale as well as an exhaustive pasta menu tempt here at this local favorite that also offers al fresco seating. $$$ Muriel’s Jackson Square 801 Chartres St., 568-1885, Muriels.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Enjoy pecan-crusted drum and other local classics while dining in the courtyard bar or any other room in this labyrinthine, rumored-to-be-haunted establishment. $$$$ Napoleon House 500 Chartres St., 524522-4152, NapoleonHouse.com. L Mon-Sat, D Tue-Sat. Originally built in 1797 as a respite for Napoleon, this family-owned European-style café serves local favorites gumbo, jambalaya and muffulettas, and for sipping, a Sazerac or lemony Pimm’s Cup are perfect accompaniments. $$ Ralph Brennan’s Red Fish Grill 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, RedFishGrill.com. L, D daily. Chef Austin Kirzner cooks up a

broad menu peppered with local favorites such as barbecue oysters, blackened redfish and double-chocolate bread pudding. $$$$$ Arnaud’s Remoulade 309 Bourbon St., 523-0377, Remoulade.com. L, D daily. Granite-topped tables and an antique mahogany bar are home to the eclectic menu of famous shrimp Arnaud, red beans and rice and poor boys as well as specialty burgers, grilled all-beef hot dogs and thin-crust pizza. $$

H R’evolution 777 Bienville St., 5532277, RevolutionNola.com. L Wed-Fri, D daily, Br Sun. An opulent place that combines the local flavors of chef John Folse with the more cosmopolitan influence of chef Rick Tramonto. Chef de cuisine Chris Lusk and executive sous chef Erik Veney are in charge of day-to-day operations, which include house-made charcuterie, pastries, pastas and more. $$$$$

harahan Oak Oven 6625 Jefferson Highway, Harahan, 305-4039, OakOvenRestaurant. com. L, D Mon-Sat. Wood-fired pizza and seasonal Italian cuisine with a locavore philosophy brings respite to the burbs. Family friendly with patio seating to boot. $$

Lakeview H Tony Angello’s 6262 Fleur de Lis Drive, 488-0888, TonyAngellos.com. D Tue-Sat. Creole-Italian favorite serves up

fare. Ask Tony to “Feed Me” if you want a real multi-course dining experience. $$$$

Metairie H Andrea’s Restaurant 3100 19th St., 834-8583, AndreasRestaurant.com. L Mon-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Osso buco and homemade pastas in a setting that’s both elegant and intimate; off-premise catering. $$$ Semolina 4436 Veterans Blvd., Suite 37, 454-7930, Semolina.com. L, D daily. This casual, contemporary pasta restaurant takes a bold approach to cooking Italian food, emphasizing flavors, texture and color. Many of the dishes feature a signature Louisiana twist, such as the muffuletta pasta and pasta jambalaya. $$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine 4411 Chastant St., 885-2984, Metairie, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Snug Italian boîte packs them in, yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$

Mid-City H Liuzza’s 3636 Bienville St., 482-9120, Liuzzas.com. L, D daily. Classic neighborhood joint serves favorites like the “Frenchuletta,” stuffed artichokes and andouille gumbo. Kid’s menu offered. $$ Ralph’s On The Park 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000, RalphsOnThePark.com. Br Sun, L Tue-Fri, D daily. A modern interior and contemporary Creole dishes such as City

Park salad, turtle soup, barbecue Gulf shrimp and good cocktails. $$$$

NORTHSHORE H Del Porto Ristorante 501 E. Boston St., (985) 875-1006, DelPortoRistorante. com. L, D Tue-Sat. One of the Northshore’s premier fine dining destinations serving Italian food that makes use of locally sourced meats and produce. $$$

Uptown Amici 3218 Magazine St., 300-1250, AmiciNola.com. L, D daily. Coal-fired pizza is the calling card for this destination, but the menu offers an impressive list of authentic and Creole Italian specialties as well. $$ Pascal’s Manale 1838 Napoleon Ave., 895-4877, PascalsManale.com. L MonFri, D Mon-Sat. Vintage neighborhood restaurant since 1913 and the place to go for the creation of barbecued shrimp. Its oyster bar serves icy cold, freshly shucked Louisiana oysters and the Italian specialties and steaks are also solid. $$$$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. L Tue-Fri, D Tue-Sun. Snug Italian boîte packs them in yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$

Louisianian Fare CBD/Warehouse District H Annunciation 1016 Annunciation

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DINING GUIDE St., 568-0245, AnnunciationRestaurant. com. D Mon-Sat. Chef Steven Manning brings a refined sensibility to this refined Warehouse District oasis along with his famous fried oysters with melted brie. $$$

Stryjewski showcase Cajun and Southern cuisine at this hot spot. Boudin and other pork dishes reign supreme here, along with Louisiana seafood and real moonshine from the bar. Reservations strongly recommended. $$

Balise 640 Carondelet St., 459-4449, BaliseNola.com. L Mon-Fri, D nightly. Chef Justin Devillier turns back the clock at this turn-of-the-century inspired bistro in the CBD. Decidedly masculine fare – think venison tartare with horseradish and pumpernickel – is carefully crafted and fits well alongside the excellent cocktail and beer list. $$$

Drago’s Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras St., 584-3911, DragosRestaurant. com. L, D daily. This famous seafooder specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

Bon Ton Cafe 401 Magazine St., 5243386, TheBonTonCafe.com. L, D Mon-Fri. A local favorite for the old-school business lunch crowd specializing in local seafood and Cajun dishes. $$$$ Café Adelaide Loews New Orleans Hotel, 300 Poydras St., 595-3305, CafeAdelaide.com. B, D daily, L Mon-Fri. This offering from the Commander’s Palace family of restaurants has become a power-lunch favorite for business-people and politicos. Also features the Swizzle Stick Bar. $$$$

H Cochon 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123, CochonRestaurant.com. L, D, Mon-Sat. Chefs Donald Link and Stephen

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Emeril’s 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 5289393, EmerilsRestaurants.com. L MonFri, D daily. The flagship of superstar chef Emeril Lagasse’s culinary empire, this landmark attracts pilgrims from all over the world. $$$$$

H Herbsaint 701 St. Charles Ave., 524-4114, Herbsaint.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Enjoy a sophisticated cocktail before sampling chef Donald Link’s menu that melds contemporary bistro fare with classic Louisiana cuisine. The banana brown butter tart is a favorite dessert. $$$$$ Mother’s 401 Poydras St., 523-9656, MothersRestaurant.net. B, L, D daily. Locals and tourists alike endure long queues and a confounding ordering system to enjoy iconic dishes such as the

Ferdi poor boy and Jerry’s jambalaya. Come for a late lunch to avoid the rush. $$

served in an opulent setting features dishes like rack of lamb and plume de veau. $$$$$

Mulate’s 201 Julia St., 522-1492, Mulates.com. L, D daily. Live music and dancing add to the fun at this worldfamous Cajun destination. $$

Faubourg Marigny

Palette 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350, B, L, D daily. Creole, Cajun and French flavors all come together at this restaurant in the Renaissance Hotel near the Convention Center. $$

Central City Café Reconcile 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157, CafeReconcile.org. L Mon-Fri. Good food for a great cause, this nonprofit on the burgeoning OCH corridor helps train at-risk youth for careers in the food service industry. $$

Darrow Café Burnside Houmas House Plantation, 40136 Highway 942, (225) 473-9380, HoumasHouse.com. L daily, Br Sun. Historic plantation’s casual dining option features dishes such as seafood pasta, fried catfish, crawfish and shrimp, gumbo and red beans and rice. $$ Latil’s Landing Houmas House Plantation, 40136 Highway 942, (225) 473-9380, HoumasHouse.com. D Wed-Sun. Nouvelle Louisiane, plantation-style cooking

Feelings Cafe 2600 Chartres St., 9452222, FeelingsCafe.com. D Wed-Sun, Br Sun. Romantic ambiance and skillfully created dishes, such as veal d’aunoy, make dining here on the patio a memorable experience. A piano bar on Fridays adds to the atmosphere. Vegan menu offered. $$$$ Horn’s 1940 Dauphine St., Marigny, 459-4676, HornsNola.com. B, L daily, D Thu-Mon. This casual, eclectic watering hole offers offbeat twists on classics (the Jewish Coonass features latkes to go with the crawfish etouffée) as well as the usual breakfast and lunch diner fare. $ Praline Connection 542 Frenchmen St., 943-3934, PralineConnection.com. L, D daily. Down-home dishes of smothered pork chops, greens, beans and cornbread are on the menu at this Creole soul restaurant. $$

French Quarter Acme Oyster House 724 Iberville St., 522-5973, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Arnaud’s 813 Bienville St., 523-5433,


ArnaudsRestaurant.com. D daily, Br Sun. Waiters in tuxedos prepare Café Brûlot tableside at this storied Creole grande dame; live jazz during Sun. brunch. $$$$$

memorable outdoor dining experience. The famous daily Jazz Brunch buffet and classic Creole dishes sweeten the deal. $$$$$

Mon. This quasi-popup operating out of the Erin Rose Bar serves some of the city’s best poor boys, including one featuring glazed pork belly. $

Antoine’s 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, Antoines.com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. This pinnacle of haute cuisine and birthplace of oysters Rockefeller is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant. (Every item is á la carte, with an $11 minimum.) Private dining rooms available. $$$$$

Criollo Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 681-4444, CriolloNola.com. B, L, D daily. Next to the famous Carousel Bar in the historic Monteleone Hotel, Criollo represents an amalgam of the various cultures reflected in Louisiana cooking and cuisine, often with a slight contemporary twist. $$$

K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen 416 Chartres St., 596-2530, ChefPaul.com/KPaul. L Thu-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Paul Prudhomme’s landmark restaurant helped introduce Cajun food to a grateful nation. Lots of seasoning and bountiful offerings, along with reserved seating, make this a destination for locals and tourists alike. $$$$

SoBou 310 Chartres St., 552-4095, SoBouNola.com. B, L, D daily. There is something for everyone at this “Modern Creole Saloon.” Decidedly unstuffy with an emphasis on craft cocktails and wines by the glass. Everything from $1 pork cracklins to an extravagant foie gras burger on accomplished yet eclectic menus. $$

H The Bistreaux New Orleans Maison

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House 144

H MiLa 817 Common St., 412-2580,

H Tableau 616 S. Peter St., 934-3463,

Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., 5868000, MaisonDupuy.com/dining.html. L, D daily. Dishes ranging from the casual (truffle mac and cheese) to the upscale (tuna tasting trio) are served in an elegant courtyard. $$

Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse. com. B, L, D daily. Classic Creole dishes such as redfish on the halfshell and baked oysters served. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$

MiLaNewOrleans.com. L Mon-Fri, D MonSat. Focuses on the fusion of the cuisines of Miss. and La. $$$$

TableauFrenchQuarter.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Gulf seafood such as trout amandine and classic Creole brunch dishes like eggs Sardou are the highlights of this Dickie Brennan restaurant that shares space with Le Petite Théâtre on the corner of Jackson Square. $$$

The Bombay Club Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., 586-0972, TheBombayClub. com. D daily. Popular martini bar with plush British décor features live music during the week and late dinner and drinks on weekends. Nouveau Creole menu includes items such as Bombay drum. $$$$ Café Maspero 601 Decatur St., 523-6250, CafeMaspero.com. L, D daily. Tourists line up for their generous portions of seafood and large deli sandwiches. $ Court of Two Sisters 613 Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters.com. Br, D daily. The historic environs make for a

Galatoire’s 209 Bourbon St., 525-2021, Galatoires.com. L, D Tue-Sun. Friday lunches are a New Orleans tradition at this world-famous French-Creole grand dame. Tradition counts for everything here, and the crabmeat Sardou is delicious. Note: Jackets required for dinner and all day Sun. $$$$$ House of Blues 225 Decatur St., 3104999, HouseOfBlues.com/NewOrleans. L, D daily. Surprisingly good menu complements music in the main room. Worldfamous Gospel Brunch every Sunday. Patio seating available. $$ Killer Poboys 811 Conti St., 252-6745, KillerPoboys.blogspot.com. L, D Wed-

NOLA 534 St. Louis St., 522-6652, Emerils.com. L Thu-Mon, D daily. Emeril’s more affordable eatery, featuring cedarplank-roasted redfish; private dining. $$$$$ Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant, 301 Dauphine St., 586-0972, RichardFiskes.com. D nightly. Just a few steps off of Bourbon Street you can find this relaxing bar featuring an innovative menu with dishes like Crawfish, Jalapeno-and-Bacon Mac and Cheese garnished with fried oysters. Live music a plus. $$$ Royal House, 441 Royal St., 528-2601, RoyalHouseRestaurant.com. L, D daily. B Sat and Sun. Poor boys, jambalaya and shrimp Creole are some of the favorites

served here. Weekend breakfast and an oyster bar add to the crowd-pleasing appeal. $$$

H Tujague’s 823 Decatur St., 525-8676, TujaguesRestaurant.com. L Sat-Sun, D daily. For more than 150 years this landmark restaurant has been offering Creole cuisine. Favorites include a nightly six-course table d’hôté menu featuring a unique beef brisket with Creole sauce. $$$$$

Kenner Copeland’s 1319 W. Esplanade Ave., 617-9146, CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$

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DINING GUIDE Lakeview H Cava 789 Harrison Ave., 304-9034. D Mon-Sat. Fine dining (and excellent wine list) at this high-end Cajun and Creole restaurant that makes customer service a big part of the experience. $$$

Metairie/Jefferson Acme Oyster House 3000 Veterans Blvd., 309-4056, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Austin’s 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 8885533, AustinsNo.com. D Mon-Sat. Mr. Ed’s upscale bistro serves contemporary Creole fare, including seafood and steaks. $$$ Copeland’s 1001 S. Clearview Parkway, 620-7800; 701 Veterans Blvd., 831-3437, CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$ Crabby Jack’s 428 Jefferson Highway, 833-2722, CrabbyJacksNola.com. L MonSat. Lunch outpost of Jacques-Imo’s. Famous for its fried seafood and poor boys including fried green tomatoes and roasted duck. $ Drago’s 3232 N. Arnoult Road, 888-9254, DragosRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. This famous seafooder specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

Mid-City H Katie’s Restaurant and Bar 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582, KatiesInMidCity. com. L, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Creative poor boys, local dishes such as gumbo and Sunday brunch make this a neighborhood favorite. $$ Lil’ Dizzy’s Café 1500 Esplanade Ave., 569-8997, LilDizzysCafe.com. B, L daily, Br Sun. Spot local and national politicos dining at this favored Creole soul restaurant known for homey classics like fried chicken and trout Baquet. $

H Mandina’s 3800 Canal St., 482-9179, MandinasRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Though the ambiance is more upscale, the food and seafood dishes make dining

here a New Orleans experience. $$

mer and for all major holidays. $$

H Toups’ Meatery 845 N. Carrollton

Clancy’s 6100 Annunciation St., 8951111, ClancysNewOrleans.com. L Thu-Fri, D Mon-Sat. Their Creole-inspired menu has been a favorite of locals for years. $$$

Ave., 252-4999, ToupsMeatery.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Charcuterie, specialty cocktails and an exhaustive list of excellent à la carte sides make this restaurant a carnivore’s delight. $$$

Upper 9th Ward St. Roch Market 2381 St. Claude Ave., 615-6541, StRochMarket.com. B, L, D daily. Beautiful restoration of historic St. Claude Marketplace with open dining space houses a broad collection of independent eateries including craft cocktails and more. $$

NORTHSHORE Acme Oyster House 1202 N. Highway 190, Covington, (985) 246-6155, AcmeOyster.com. L, D daily. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Gallagher’s Grill 509 S. Tyler St., (985) 892-9992, GallaghersGrill.com. L, D TueFri, D Sat. Chef Pat Gallagher’s destination restaurant offers al fresco seating to accompany classically inspired New Orleans fare. Event catering offered. $$$

Riverbend H Boucherie 1506 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-5514, Boucherie-Nola.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Serving contemporary Southern food with an international angle, chef Nathaniel Zimet offers excellent ingredients presented simply. $$ Brigtsen’s 723 Dante St., 861-7610, Brigtsens.com. D Tue-Sat. Chef Frank Brigtsen’s nationally famous Creole cuisine makes this cozy cottage a true foodie destination. $$$$$

Uptown H Apolline 4729 Magazine St., 894-8881, ApollineRestaurant.com. D Tue-Sun, Br Sat-Sun. Cozy gem serves a refined menu of French and Creole classics peppered with Southern influences such as buttermilk fried quail with corn waffle. $$$ Casamento’s 4330 Magazine St., 8959761, CasamentosRestaurant.com. L Tue-Sat, D Thu-Sat. The family-owned restaurant has shucked oysters and fried seafood since 1919; closed during sum-

Commander’s Palace 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace. com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. The grande dame is going strong under the auspices of James Beard Award-winner chef Tory McPhail. Jazz Brunch is a great deal. $$$$ Dick and Jenny’s 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., 894-9880, DickAndJennys.com. L Thu-Fri, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. A funky cottage serving Louisiana comfort food with flashes of innovation. $$$$ Domilise’s 5240 Annunciation St., 899-912. L, D Mon-Wed, Fri-Sat. Local institution and rite-of-passage for those wanting an initiation to the real New Orleans. Wonderful poor boys and a unique atmosphere make this a one-of-a-kind place. $

H Gautreau’s 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant.com. D Mon-Sat. Upscale destination serves refined interpretations of classics along with contemporary creations. $$$$$ Jacques-Imo’s Cafe 8324 Oak St., 8610886, Jacques-Imos.com. D Mon-Sat. Reinvented New Orleans cuisine served in a party atmosphere. The deep-fried roast beef poor boy is delicious. The lively bar scene offsets the long wait on weekends. $$$$ Joey K’s 3001 Magazine St., 891-0997, JoeyKsRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. A true neighborhood restaurant with daily lunch plates; red beans and rice are classic. $ Mahony’s 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374, MahonysPoBoys.com. L, D daily. Along with the usual poor boys, this sandwich shop serves up a grilled shrimp and fried green tomato version dressed with remoulade sauce. Sandwich offerings are augmented by a full bar. $ Mat & Naddie’s 937 Leonidas St., 8619600, MatAndNaddies.com. D Mon-Tue,

Thu-Sat. Cozy converted house serves up creative and eclectic regionally inspired fare. Shrimp and crawfish croquettes make for a good appetizer and when the weather is right the romantic patio is the place to sit. $$$$

WEST BANK Copeland’s 2333 Manhattan Blvd., 3641575, CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. L, D daily, Br Sun. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$

Pizza Reginelli’s Pizzeria Multiple Locations, Reginellis.com. L, D daily. Pizzas, pastas, salads, fat calzones and lofty focaccia sandwiches are at locations all over town. $$ Theo’s Pizza Multiple Locations, TheosPizza.com. L, D daily. The crackercrisp crust pizzas are complemented by a broad assortment of toppings with a lot of local ingredients at cheap prices. $$

Bywater H Pizza Delicious 617 Piety St., 6768282, PizzaDelicious.com. Authentic New York-style thin crust pizza is the reason to come to this affordable restaurant that began as a pop-up, but they also offer excellent salads sourced from small farms and homemade pasta dishes as well. Outdoor seating a plus. $

Uptown H Ancora 4508 Freret St., 324-1636, AncoraPizza.com. D Mon-Sat. Authentic Neapolitan-style pizza fired in an oven imported from Naples. The housemade charcuterie makes it a double-winner. $$ Pizza Domenica 4933 Magazine St., 301-4978, PizzaDomenica.com. L Fri-Sun, D nightly. James Beard Award Winning Chef Alon Shaya’s pizza centric spinoff of his popular Restaurant Domenica brings Neapolitan-style pies to Uptown. Excellent salads and charcuterie boards are offered as well. $$ Slice 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-PIES (7437); 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800; SlicePizzeria.com. L, D daily. Order up slices or whole pizza pies done in several styles (thin- and thick-crust) as well as pastas, seafood, panini and salads. $

Taste Creole Caribbean at Compère Lapin Compère Lapin, 535 Tchoupitoulas St., 599-2119, CompereLapin.com We all know that a visit or a life spent in New Orleans includes indulging in its delicious Creole cooking, but how about Creole Caribbean? Bravo TV “Top Chef” second place winner Nina Compton made the bold move to open a restaurant and to define a new take on the city’s famed cooking. The gamble paid off; within a year, Compton’s Compère Lapin has won critical acclaim from the trusted local food critics as well as national titles including The New York Times, Huffington Post, USA Today and many more. Situated in the art-centric The Old No. 77 Hotel and Chandlery, its craft cocktails are also excellent. – M.C.

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cheryl gerber photograph


Seafood Akers Middendorf’s Interstate 55, Exit 15, 30160 Highway 51 South, (985) 3866666, MiddendorfsRestaurant.com. L, D Wed-Sun. Historic seafood destination along the shores of Lake Maurepas is world-famous for its thin-fried catfish fillets. Open since 1934, it’s more than a restaurant, it’s a Sun. drive tradition. $$

CBD/Warehouse District H Borgne 601 Loyola Ave., 613-3860, BorgneRestaurant.com. L, D daily. Coastal Louisiana seafood with an emphasis on Isleños cuisine (descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in St. Bernard Parish) is the focus of this high-volume destination adjacent to the Superdome. $$$

H Pêche 800 Magazine St., 522-1744, PecheRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Award-winning southern-inspired seafood destination by chef Donald Link serves whole roasted Gulf fish from its massive, wood-burning oven. An excellent raw bar is offered as well. $$$ Sac-A-Lait 1051 Annunciation St., 324-3658, Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com. D Tues-Sat, L Fri. Cody and Sam Carroll’s shrine to Gulf Coast and Louisiana culinary heritage melds seafood, game, artisan produce, and craft libations in an ambitious menu that celebrates local and southern cuisine. The striking buildout in the Cotton Mill lofts adds to

the appeal. $$$$

French Quarter Bourbon House 144 Bourbon St., 5220111, BourbonHouse.com. B, L, D daily. Local seafood, featured in both classic and contemporary dishes, is the focus of this New Orleans-centric destination. And yes, bourbon is offered as well. $$$ Crazy Lobster 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 83. L, D daily. Boiled seafood and festive atmosphere come together at this seafood-centric destination overlooking the Mississippi River. Outdoor seating a plus. $$$ Creole Cookery 508 Toulouse St., Suite C110, 524-9632, NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com. L, D daily. Crowd-pleasing destination in the French Quarter offers an expansive menu of Creole favorites and specialty cocktails served with New Orleans flair. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood 841 Iberville St., 5811316, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

H GW Fins 808 Bienville St., 581-FINS (3467), GWFins.com. D daily. Owners Gary Wollerman and twice chef of the year Tenney Flynn provide dishes at their seasonal peak. On a quest for unique variety, menu is printed daily. $$$$$

H Kingfish 337 Charters St., 598-5005, CocktailBarNewOrleans.com. L, D daily. Regionally inspired seafood dishes with carefully sourced ingredients and southern influence is the focus at this chef-driven French Quarter establishment. $$$ Landry’s Seafood 400 N. Peters St., 5580038, LandrysSeafood.com. Kid-friendly and popular seafood spot serves of heaping platters of fried shrimp, Gulf oysters, catfish and more. $$ Le Bayou 208 Bourbon St., 525-4755, LeBayouRestaurant.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Blackened redfish and Shrimp Ya-Ya are a just a few of the choices at this seafood-centric destination on Bourbon Street. Fried alligator is available for the more daring diner. $$$ Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House 512 Bienville St., 309-4848, MrEdsRestaurants.com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. A seafood lover’s paradise offering an array of favorites like Shrimp Creole, Crawfish Etouffee, Blackened Redfish and more. An elaborate raw bar featuring gulf oysters both charbroiled and raw is part of the draw. $$$ Oceana Grill 739 Conti St., 525-6002, OceanaGrill.com. B, L, D daily. Gumbo, poor boys and barbecue shrimp are served at this kid-friendly seafood destination. $$ Pier 424, 424 Bourbon St., 309-1574,

Pier424SeafoodMarket.com. L, D daily. Seafood-centric restaurant offers long menu of traditional New Orleans fare augmented by unusual twists like “Cajun-Boiled” Lobster prepared crawfish-style in spicy crab boil. $$$

Kenner Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant 910 W. Esplanade Ave., Ste. A, 463-3030, AustinsNo.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$

Metairie Austin’s Restaurant, 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 888-5533, AustinsNo.com. D MonSat. Signature steak, seafood and Italian specialties reign at this dinner-only destination. Catering offered as well. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood 1713 Lake Ave., 8314141, Deanies.com. L, D daily. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried, is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$ Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House 3117 21st St., 833-6310, MrEdsRestaurants. com/oyster-bar. L, D Mon-Sat. Seafoodcentric eatery specializes in favorites like whole flounder, crabmeat au gratin and more. An oyster bar offering an array of raw and broiled bivalves adds to the appeal. $$$

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DINING GUIDE Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant 1001 Live Oak St., 838-0022, AustinsNo.com. L, D Mon-Sat. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$

Morton’s The Steakhouse 365 Canal St., One Canal Place, 566-0221, Mortons. com/NewOrleans. D daily. Private elevator leads to the plush, wood-paneled environs of this local outpost of the famed Chicago steakhouse popular with politicians and celebrities. $$$$

Mid-City

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099, RuthsChris. com. D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this area steak institution, but there are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House 301. N. Carrollton Ave., (phone number coming soon), MrEdsRestaurants.com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. Latest outpost of local seafood chain features char-broiled oysters, seafood poor boys and other favorites such fried chicken and red beans and rice in a casual setting in Mid-City Market. $$

Uptown

Garden District H Mr. John’s Steakhouse 2111 St.

Frankie & Johnny’s 321 Arabella St., 243-1234, FrankieAndJohnnys.net. L, D daily. Serves fried and boiled seafood along with poor boys and daily lunch specials. Kid-friendly with a game room to boot. $$

Charles Ave., 679-7697, MrJohnsSteakhouse.com. D Tue-Sat, L Friday. Wood paneling, white tile and USDA Prime Beef served sizzling in butter are the hallmarks of this classic New Orleans steakhouse. $$$

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House 1327 St. Charles Ave., 267-0169, MrEdsRestaurants.com/oyster-bar. L, D daily. Outpost of local seafood chain serves Cajun and Creole classics in the Maison St. Charles Hotel. Favorites include Redfish Maison St. Charles, which features blackened redfish topped with crawfish etouffee. $$$

French Quarter

West End Landry’s Seafood 8000 Lakeshore Drive, West End, 283-1010, LandrysSeafood. com. Kid-friendly and popular seafood spot serves of heaping platters of fried shrimp, Gulf oysters, catfish and more. $$

Steakhouse CBD/Warehouse District H Besh Steak Harrah’s Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6111, HarrahsNewOrleans. com. D daily. Acclaimed chef John Besh reinterprets the classic steakhouse with his signature contemporary Louisiana flair. $$$$$ Chophouse New Orleans 322 Magazine St., 522-7902, ChophouseNola.com. D daily. In addition to USDA prime grade aged steaks prepared under a broiler that reaches 1,700 degrees, Chophouse offers lobster, redfish and classic steakhouse sides. $$$

H Desi Vega’s Steakhouse 628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegaSteaks. com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat. USDA Prime steaks form the base of this Mr. John’s offshoot overlooking Lafayette Square, but Italian specialties and a smattering of locally inspired seafood dishes round out the appeal. $$$

Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com. L Fri, D daily. Nationally recognized steakhouse serves USDA Prime steaks and local seafood. $$$$$

H Doris Metropolitan 620 Chartres St., 267-3500, DorisMetropolitan.com. L SatSun, D daily. Innovative, genre-busting steakhouse plays with expectations and succeeds with modernist dishes like their Classified Cut and Beetroot Supreme. $$$$ Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak 215 Bourbon St., 335-3932, Galatoires33BarAndSteak. com. L Fri, D Sun-Thu. Steakhouse offshoot of the venerable Creole grande dame offers hand-crafted cocktails to accompany classic steakhouse fare as well as inspired dishes like the Gouté 33: horseradish-crusted bone marrow and deviled eggs with crab ravigote and smoked trout. Reservations accepted. $$$

Metairie Ruth’s Chris Steak House 3633 Veterans Blvd., 888-3600, RuthsChris.com. L Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this area steak institution, but there are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$

Mid-City H Crescent City Steaks 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271, CrescentCitySteaks.com. L Tue-Fri & Sun, D daily. One of the classic New Orleans steakhouses. Steaks, sides and drinks are what you get. $$$$

H La Boca 870 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-

Uptown

8205, LaBocaSteaks.com. D Mon-Sat. This Argentine steakhouse specializes in cuts of meat along with pastas and wines. Specials include the provoleta appetizer and the Vacio flank steak. $$$

Charlie’s Steak House 4510 Dryades St., 895-9323, CharliesSteakHouseNola. com. D Tues-Sat. This quintessential New Orleans neighborhood steak house serves up carnivorous delights including its 32-ounce T-Bone in a relaxed and

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unpretentious atmosphere. An upstairs dining room accommodates larger parties with ease. $$$

Vegan/Vegetarian Lower Garden District H The Green Fork 1400 Prytania St., 267-7672, GreenForkNola.com. B, L Mon-Sat. Fresh juices, smoothies and vegetarian-friendly fare make The Green Fork a favorite for lovers of healthy food. Catering is offered as well. $$

World Byblos Multiple Locations, ByblosRestaurants.com. L, D daily. Upscale Middle Eastern cuisine featuring traditional seafood, lamb and vegetarian options. $$

Bywater The Green Goddess 307 Exchange Place, 301-3347, GreenGoddessRestaurant.com. L, D Wed-Sun. One of the most imaginative local restaurants. The menu is constantly changing, and chef Paul Artigues always has ample vegetarian options. Combine all of that with a fantastic selection of drinks, wine and beer, and it’s the total (albeit small) package. $$

CBD/Warehouse District

French Quarter Bayona 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455, Bayona.com. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. Chef Susan Spicer’s nationally acclaimed cuisine is served in this 200-year-old cottage. Ask for a seat on the romantic patio, weather permitting. $$$$$ El Gato Negro 81 French Market Place, 525-9752, ElGatoNegroNola.com. Central Mexican cuisine along with handmuddled mojitos and margaritas made with freshly squeezed juice. A weekend breakfast menu is an additional plus. $$

Kenner H Fiesta Latina 1924 Airline Drive, 4682384, FiestaLatinaRestaurant.com. B, L, D daily. A big-screen TV normally shows a soccer match or MTV Latino at this home for authentic Central American food. Tacos include a charred carne asada. $$

Lakewood H Mizado 5080 Pontchartrain Blvd., 885-5555, MizadoCocina.com. L daily, D Mon-Sat. Sleek restaurant offers modern Mexican cuisine featuring pan-Latin flavors and influences. Small batch tequila and a ceviche bar make it a party. $$

Johnny Sanchez 930 Poydras St., 304-6615, JohnnySanchezRestaurant. com. L, D daily. Contemporary Mexican mecca offering celebrity chef cachet to go along with the locally sourced produce accompanying the Bistec a la Parilla. Popular happy hour and downtown locale next to South Market District add to the appeal. $$$

Lakeview H Mondo 900 Harrison Ave., 224-2633,

H Lüke 333 St. Charles Ave., 378-2840,

Vega Tapas Café 2051 Metairie Road, 836-2007, VegaTapasCafe.com. D MonSat. Fun, eclectic small plates destination offers creative fare keeps guests coming back with frequent regionally inspired specialty menus served with humor and whimsy. $$

LukeNewOrleans.com. B, L, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Chef John Besh and executive chef Matt Regan serve Germanic specialties and French bistro classics, housemade patés and abundant plateaux of cold, fresh seafood. $$$ Palace Café 605 Canal St., 523-1661, PalaceCafe.com. L Mon-Sat, D daily, Br Sun. Dickie Brennan-owned brasserie with French-style sidewalk seating and house-created specialties of chef Darrin Nesbit. Favorites here include crabmeat cheesecake, turtle soup, the Werlein salad with fried Louisiana oysters and pork “debris” studded Palace potato pie. $$$$$

Faubourg Marigny H Mona’s Café 504 Frenchmen St.,

MondoNewOrleans.com. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat, Br Sun. Chef Susan Spicer’s take on world cuisine. Make sure to call ahead because the place has a deserved reputation for good food and good times. $$$

METAIRIE

Mid-City Juan’s Flying Burrito 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., 486-9950, JuansFlyingBurrito. com. L, D daily. Hard-core tacos and massive burritos are served in an edgy atmosphere. $ Lola’s 3312 Esplanade Ave., 488-6946, LolasNewOrleans.com. D daily. Garlicky Spanish dishes and great paella make this artsy boîte a hipster destination. $$$

H Mona’s Café 3901 Banks St., 482-

949-4115. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, tender-tangy beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros, stuffed into pillowy pita bread or on platters. The lentil soup with crunchy pita chips and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

7743. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, tender-tangy beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros, stuffed into pillowy pita bread or on platters. The lentil soup with crunchy pita chips and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

Faubourg St. John H 1000 Figs 3141 Ponce De Leon St.,

H Taqueria Guerrero 208 N. Carrollton

301-0848, 1000Figs.com. L, D Tue-Sat. Vegetarian-friendly offshoot of the Fat Falafel Food Truck offers a healthy farm-to-table alternative to cookie-cutter Middle Eastern places. $$

Ave., 484-6959. B, L, D, Tue-Sat. Friendly staff and authentic Mexican cuisine make this affordable neighborhood restaurant a neighborhood favorite. $


Upper 9th Ward

H Mona’s Café 4126 Magazine St.,

Kebab , 2315 Saint Claude Ave., 3834328, KebabNola.com. L, D Fri-Mon. The menu is short and tasty at this kebab outpost along the revitalized St. Claude Avenue corridor. $

894-9800; 1120 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8174. L, D daily. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, tendertangy beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros, stuffed into pillowy pita bread or on platters. The lentil soup with crunchy pita chips and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

Uptown H Café Abyssinia 3511 Magazine St., 894-6238. L, D daily. One of a just few authentic Ethiopian restaurants in the city, excellent injera and spicy vegetarian fare make this a local favorite. $$

H Irish House 1432 St. Charles Ave., 595-6755, TheIrishHouseNewOrleans. com. L Mon-Fri, D daily, Br Sat-Sun. Irish pub dishes such as shepherd’s pie and fish and chips are featured here, as well as creative cocktails like Irish iced coffee. Check the schedule of events for live music. $$ Jamila’s Mediterranean Tunisian Cuisine 7808 Maple St., 866-4366. D Tue-Sun. Intimate and exotic bistro serving Mediterranean and Tunisian cuisine. The Grilled Merguez is a Jazz Fest favorite and vegetarian options are offered. $$ Juan’s Flying Burrito 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000, JuansFlyingBurrito. com. L, D daily. Hard-core tacos and massive burritos are served in an edgy atmosphere. $

H Panchita’s 1434 S. Carrollton Ave., 281-4127. L, D daily. Authentic, budgetfriendly Mexican restaurant serves tamales, mole and offers free chips and salsa as well as sangria. $ H Patois 6078 Laurel St., 895-9441, PatoisNola.com. L Fri, D Wed-Sat, Br Sun. The food is French in technique, with influences from across the Mediterranean as well as the American South, all filtered through the talent of chef Aaron Burgau. Reservations recommended. $$$

H Shaya 4213 Magazine St., 891-4213, ShayaRestaurant.com. L, D daily. James Beard Award-winning chef Alon Shaya pays homage to his native Israel with this contemporary Israeli hotspot. Fattoush Salad and Matzo Ball Soup made with slow-cooked duck are dishes to try. $$$

Specialty Foods CBD/Warehouse District Calcasieu 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-

2188, CalcasieuRooms.com. For gatherings both large and small, the catering menus feature modern Louisiana cooking and the Cajun cuisine for which chef Donald Link is justifiably famous.

French Quarter Antoine’s Annex 513 Royal St., 5258045, Antoines.com/Antoines-Annex. Open daily. Serves French pastries, including individual baked Alaskas, ice cream and gelato, as well as panini, salads and coffee. Delivery available.

Metairie Sucré 3301 Veterans Blvd., 834-2277, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available.

great place for gifts. St. James Cheese Company 5004 Prytania St., 899-4737, StJamesCheese. com. Open daily. Specialty shop offers a selection of fine cheeses, wines, beers and related accouterments. Look for wine and cheese specials every Friday. Sucré 3025 Magazine St., 520-8311, ShopSucre.com. Desserts daily & nightly. Open late weekends. Chocolates, pastry and gelato draw rave reviews at this dessert destination. Beautiful packaging makes this a great place to shop for gifts. Catering available. n

Mid-City H Blue Dot Donuts 4301 Canal St., 218-4866, BlueDotDonuts.com. B, L Tue-Sun. The Bacon Maple Long John gets all the press, but returning customers are happy with the classics as well as twists like peanut butter and jelly.

Uptown Blue Frog Chocolates 5707 Magazine St., 269-5707, BlueFrogChocolates.com. Open daily, closed Sundays in summer. French and Belgian chocolate truffles and Italian candy flowers make this a

If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Managing Editor Morgan Packard at Morgan@MyNewOrleans.com.

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Ace Hotel

Andrea’s Restaurant

Antoine's Restaurant

600 Carondelet St., New Orleans Josephine Estelle, inside the Ace Hotel 504-930-3070 | JosephineEstelle.com

3100 19th St. at Ridgelake, Metairie 504-834-8583 AndreasRestaurant.com

713 St. Louis St., New Orleans 504-581-4422 Antoines.com

An osteria helmed by chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman, Josephine Estelle combines the seasonal, craft­centric philosophy of Italian cuisine with the flavors of New Orleans and the American South. Located inside Ace Hotel New Orleans, Josephine Estelle was named to both Bon Appetit and Southern Living's 2016 "Best New Restaurants" lists for its rich menu of house­made pastas, farm­fresh vegetables, prime meats and Gulf Coast seafood.

Andrea's Italian, Steak and Seafood Restaurant isn't just for special occasions; it's elegant, casual and affordable. Chef Andrea serves only the freshest fish amberjack, speckled trout, flounder, red snapper and redfish. Book one of their private rooms for up to 500 people. Andrea's is the perfect choice to celebrate the holiday season with your loved ones!

Antoine’s $20.16 Fall Lunch special offers a fresh three course menu along with 25 cent martinis! This menu features classics like Charbroiled Oysters and Butternut Squash Bisque, and some innovative dishes like a French Cut Pork Chop and Breaded Veal.

Arnaud’s

Balise Bar & Parlour

Boulevard American Bistro

813 Bienville Ave., New Orleans 504-523-5433 ArnaudsRestaurant.com

640 Carondelet St., New Orleans 504-459-4449 BaliseNola.com

4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie 504-889-2301 BoulevardBistro.com

Arnaud’s has been a New Orleans classic since 1918. Fourteen beautifully restored, turn-of-the-century dining rooms and two private balconies can hold intimate gatherings to grand receptions (up to 220 guests). And the world-renowned French 75 Bar is the perfect meeting place before and after. Whatever the occasion, Arnaud’s delivers a quintessential New Orleans dining experience.

Balise is a tavern in the Central Business District, helmed by James Beard Award winner Chef Justin Devillier. Set in a Creole townhouse, Balise evokes the bygone era with an Old-World, New Orleans feel, featuring a menu and beverage program inspired by traditional Louisiana cuisine.

Boulevard is a Classic American Bistro offering simple, well composed dishes. General Manager Robert Hardie welcomes you to the casual yet sophisticated dining room with an all-day, à la carte menu. The large bar imparts the feeling of a favorite neighborhood bar, with an extensive wine list and hand-crafted, specialty cocktails.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Caffe! Caffe!

Compère Lapin

819 Rue Conti St., New Orleans 504-581-3866 Broussards.com

4301 Clearview Parkway | 504-885-4845 3547 North Hullen St. | 504-267-9190 CaffeCaffe.com

535 Tchoupitoulas St., New Orleans 504-599-2119 CompereLapin.com

In a city that joyously celebrates fine dining as an art form, Broussard's has been a New Orleans fixture for nearly a century. Located in the heart of New Orleans’ venerable French Quarter, Broussard's offers Chef Neal Swidler's creative contemporary renditions of classic Creole cuisine in a timeless historic setting.

You love their delicious salads, sandwiches and soups for lunch – don’t forget to stop in for breakfast, too at at both Metairie locations of Caffe! Caffe! Enjoy bacon & egg breakfast sandwiches and creamy grits made from scratch daily. Catering menu available. Call individual location for daily lunch specials.

Compère Lapin (kom-pare la-pan) n. 1. French for “brother rabbit” 2. traditional Caribbean and Creole folktales featuring a mischievous rabbit named Compère Lapin 3. Restaurant helmed by Chef Nina Compton in the heart of the Warehouse Arts District in New Orleans.

The Court of Two Sisters

Crazy Lobster

Dickie Brennan & Co.

613 Royal St., New Orleans 504-522-7261 CourtOfTwoSisters.com The Court of Two Sisters, known for its large dining courtyard, serves a lavish daily Jazz Brunch buffet. Now serving appetizers at the Carriageway Bar. Enjoy Blackened Alligator or BBQ Shrimp while sipping cocktails at the bar! At night, choose from its à la carte dinner menu or a four-course dinner. Reservations recommended.

500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite #83, New Orleans 504-569-3380 | TheCrazyLobster.com

FrenchQuarter-Dining.com

Enjoy Riverside dining on the banks of the Mississippi River. Their signature dish is the Bounty of Sea, featuring a two-pound Maine lobster, shrimp, crawfish, snow crab, clams, mussels, corn and potatoes. Listen to the sounds of live music featuring the best entertainment straight off Frenchmen Street.

Fall is well represented on the menus at Dickie Brennan’s restaurants. From the Bone Marrow Escargot at Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse to the Crab and Brie Au Gratin at Palace Café, the season’s best flavors are taking center stage. Tableau’s Veal Ossobuco with broccolini and taleggio polenta is the perfect complement to a nice glass of red wine and an evening spent in their courtyard. Bourbon House just got a revamp with a ten-day renovation. The oyster bar area has expanded and their collection of American Whiskey continues to grow.

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Broussard's


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

ADVERTISING SECTION

Five Happiness 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., New Orleans 504-482-3935 FiveHappiness.com Come to Five Happiness and let the ambience and friendly staff take you to a new level of dining experience. This award-winning restaurant always strives to achieve its best. Private party and banquet rooms are available.

Foundation Room at House of Blues 225 Decatur St., New Orleans 504-310-4976 HouseOfBlues.com/NewOrleans/fr Feelin’ fancy but don’t want to break the bank? Elevate your dining experience every Tuesday as James Beard nominee, Chef Nathan Winowich, creates a delicious 4 course menu with fresh and seasonal dishes for just $45 per person. Reservations begin at 6 p.m.

French Market District 1008 N. Peters St., New Orleans 504-522-2621 FrenchMarket.org The French Market Open Air Market has fresh oysters daily when in season at J’s Seafood Dock!

Hoshun Restaurant

Katie’s Restaurant

La Petite Grocery

1601 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans 504-302-9717 HoshunRestaurant.com

3701 Iberville St., New Orleans 504-488-6582 KatiesInMidCity.com

4238 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-891-3377 LaPetiteGrocery.com

Chinese or Japanese? Can’t decide? Hoshun is your answer! They offer an extensive menu from classic Chinese dishes to Japanese sushi and everything in between (like Vietnamese pho or pad thai). Stick with one cuisine or mix and match! Open daily until 2 a.m.

Fresh and delicious, the Daily Catch Noel features grilled fresh fish over veggies topped with lump crabmeat and grilled shrimp. Call to ask about daily specials. Open for lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday and don’t miss the bottomless mimosa Sunday brunch!

Located in a century-old building, La Petite Grocery is an Uptown restaurant with a storied history. Led by James Beard Award winner Chef Justin Devillier, the restaurant’s menu features a creative spin on New Orleans cuisine with dishes like Turtle Bolognese and Blue Crab Beignets.


ADVERTISING SECTION

4938 Prytania St., New Orleans 504-899-8886 LaThaiUptown.com La Thai Uptown is the creation of owner and executive chef Diana Chauvin Gallé who has tapped into her Thai, Cajun French ethnicities to create a flavorful fusion between the two worlds. While traditional Thai dishes are on the menu, La Thai also features Louisiana seafood paired with authentic Thai spices that make unique, but very complimentary combinations.

Lafitte's Landing Seafood House

Lower Coast Wine & Music Festival

1700 Lapalco Blvd., Harvey (504) 252-9613 LafittesLandingSeafoodHouse.com

One Club House Drive, New Orleans 504-391-8000 LowerCoastWineFestival.com

Now open until 10 p.m. seven days a week! Daily lunch specials are served 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and Happy Hour is 3-6 p.m.! They are the home of the steamed seafood bucket and feature steamed seafood, fried seafood, pasta, steaks, fresh fish, soft shell crabs, duck and a pork porterhouse. You can also take it home with our curbside to-go available everyday from 11 a.m.-8 p.m.

Join us at English Turn on Sat., Nov. 19th, for an intimate afternoon of wine, food and entertainment. Taste over 100 wines from around the world. Meet local wine makers and distributors – Lirette Selections & Bizou Wines. Small Plates prepared by English Turn Country Club. Putt-Putt golf tournament, art market – featuring local artists and live performances from local entertainment.

M Bistro at The Ritz Carlton

Mandina’s Restaurant

Morning Call

921 Canal St., New Orleans 504-524-1331 RitzCarlton.com

3800 Canal St., New Orleans 504-482-9179 MandinasRestaurant.com Mandina's is the quintessential neighborhood restaurant. "There are some items that have been on the menu for 75 years," says Cindy Mandina. "My grandmother always said, 'Take care of the neighborhood people and locals that come here … cater to their needs and desires’. That's what we're all about." Mandina's is open for lunch and dinner daily.

City Park Casino, 56 Dreyfous Drive 504-300-1157 3325 Severn Ave. | 504-885-4068 MorningCallCoffeeStand.com

Dessert is everyone’s favorite! We suggest the Caramel Chocolate Mousse with raspberry jam filling and a hazelnut brownie base. A 2016 NOWFE award winning dish from M Bistro.

Come enjoy café au lait, beignets and other local favorites at New Orleans’ "most famous coffee drinking place" since 1870. The City Park location is open 24 hours, seven days a week and 364 days of the year and features live music on Sundays – call for weekly schedule.

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

La Thai Uptown


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Mr. Ed's Oyster Bar & Fish House 301 N. Carrollton Ave., New Orleans 504-872-9975 MrEdsRestaurants.com Lunch & Dinner Monday-Sunday. Mr. Ed's Oyster Bar & Fish House is NOW OPEN in Mid-City on the corner of Carrollton and Bienville. Fried and grilled oyster favorites can also be found at the Metairie, French Quarter and St. Charles locations.

Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar & Bistro 720 Orleans Ave., New Orleans 504-523-1930 OrleansGrapevine.com Enjoy true New Orleans atmosphere in a beautiful, tropical courtyard. Serving high quality cuisine and one of the largest selections of wine by the bottle or by the glass. Don’t miss the popular Bacon Happy Hour, where you’ll enjoy free bacon with your cocktails and wine. 4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m.-midnight daily.

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New Orleans Creole Cookery

New Orleans Drink Lab

510 Toulouse St., New Orleans 504-524-9632 NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com

343 Baronne St., New Orleans 504-522-8664 DrinkLabNOLA.com

Savor authentic Creole dishes prepared by Chef John Trinh, formerly of Eleven 79. Delight in traditional dishes such as Gumbo, Shrimp Creole and Crawfish Etouffee as well as oysters grilled and raw, boiled seafood and more. Enjoy handcrafted cocktails and signature drinks in the historic French Quarter.

Get behind the bar and make your own drinks! Learn the history of classic New Orleans cocktails while you make them yourself at this fun, interactive, hands-on master cocktail class! Sign up with one or two friends or bring a whole party!

Parkway Bakery & Tavern

Pascal's Manale

538 Hagan Ave., New Orleans 504-482-3047 ParkwayPoorBoys.com

1838 Napoleon Ave., New Orleans 504-895-4877 PascalsManale.com

Voted "Best Po’ Boy in Louisiana" by USA Today’s 10 Best, Parkway Bakery & Tavern is the oldest poor boy shop in New Orleans, overlooking the historic Bayou St. John in Mid-City. Come enjoy one of Parkway’s legendary poor boys in the restaurant, covered patio or classic New Orleans bar.

This famous restaurant has been family-owned and operated since 1913. Pascal’s Manale is the origin of the wellknown Bar-B-Que Shrimp. The old-time oyster and cocktail bars offer raw oysters on the half shell and all types of cocktails, as well as a great selection of fine wines. Fresh seafood, Italian dishes and delicious steaks are featured.


ADVERTISING SECTION

Located on Spanish Plaza across from Harrah's Casino 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 80 504-247-9265 PoppysTimeOutSportsBar.com Poppy's Time Out is the place with the hottest sports action. They have all the DIRECTV packages on 21 huge screens, great food and 20 beers on tap. They're open seven days a week 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Come catch the game!

Ralph Brennan Catering RalphBrennanCatering.com 504-539-5510 New Orleans' premier caterer for groups 100-1,200 people! Let them match your palate, theme and budget in your home, restaurant or venue of your choice. They are dedicated to servicing a seamless, professional and above all memorable experience.

Red Gravy 125 Camp St., New Orleans 504-561-8844 RedGravyCafe.com Red Gravy is Open Table’s 2016 No. 1 Best Brunch spot in New Orleans! Try The Uptown – handmade meatballs, two farm fresh eggs, and rosemary roasted potatoes – or any of their other scratchmade dishes made with local, fresh ingredients. Open Wednesday through Monday 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

The Riverview Room

The Ruby Slipper

Scarlet's Steaks & Seafood

600 Decatur St., New Orleans 504-525-3000 RiverviewRoom.com

Mid-City, Marigny, CBD, French Quarter, Pensacola, FL, Orange Beach, AL 504-525-9355 | TheRubySlipperCafe.net

9380 Central Avenue, D’Iberville, MS 228-392-1889 ScarletPearlCasino.com

Host your next event where the French Quarter meets the Mississippi in our newly renovated space! Located in on the 4th floor of the Jackson Brewery Millhouse with floor-to-ceiling views of the Mississippi River and outdoor terraces overlooking the French Quarter.

The Ruby Slipper adds New Orleans flair to Southern breakfast standards, brunch classics, and fresh lunch specials. The Ruby Slipper Mimosa and award-winning Bacon Bloody Mary are perfect complements to Eggs Cochon, Bananas Foster Pain Perdu or BBQ Shrimp & Grits. Named Favorite Breakfast/Brunch in New Orleans Magazine's 2016 Tops of the Town.

Our Citrus Jumbo Scallops, served at Scarlet’s Steaks and Seafood for $32, is a top seller because of its unique flavor. These pan seared scallops served with Cajun corn and bacon Maque Choux, topped with a lemon herb glaze, have customers coming back for more!

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Poppy's Time Out Sports Bar & Grill

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1. 30A 10K 30a10k.com Amy Stoyles, 30A 10K, Inc. PO Box 613651 WaterSound, FL 32461 850-325-0561 Give the gift of precious family time and holiday giving to local charities. Join them for the 5th annual 30A 10K & 1 Mile Run in Rosemary Beach, Florida. Named one of the top 5 Thanksgiving Day races in America, this fast, scenic course takes place along the Gulf of Mexico. Registration is now open for the 2016 event! Visit 30a10k.com for more information.

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2. Acadian Auction House AcadianAuctionHouse.com 2838 Elysian Fields Ave., New Orleans 504-444-1657 Grand New Orleans Interiors at Auction Prices! Over 1,000 items to be auctioned including rugs, bronze, jewelry, new home dĂŠcor, furniture and estate pieces. Nov. 18-20: Preview 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m.-noon Saturday and Sunday. Auction Friday at 6:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday at 12:30 p.m. LA Auction License #AB-419.

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3. Auraluz Children's Linens ShopAuraluz.com
 4408 Shores Drive, Metairie 504-888-3313 LAMPE BERGER ... the perfect gift! It's both decorative and functional. Made in France for over 118 years, each Lampe Berger cleanses, purifies and fragrances the air with over 50 fragrances to choose from. All available at AURALUZ.

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4. Ashley Longshore The Longshore Studio Gallery Ashley@ashleylongshore.com 4537 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-333-6951 The Longshore Studio Gallery looks and feels like a giant jewel box on the corner of Magazine and Cadiz streets. Ashley’s colorful world beckons friends, collectors, designers and celebrities to spin through the gallery space and spend a little time inside “Ashley’s brain”.

5. The Basketry TheBasketry.com 12337 Highway 90, Luling 985-785-8769 The Basketry has been providing beautiful custom designed gift baskets since 1995. Customers from across the globe simply call Kristi and her team with a price range and they handle the rest. Same day hand delivery and shipping to anywhere with baskets starting at $25. Call them today!

6. Boudreaux’s Fine Jewelry BoudreauxsJewelers.com 701 Metairie Road, Metairie 504-831-2602 Since 1933, the craftsmen of Boudreaux’s Jewelers have taken enormous pride in designing exquisite creations of outstanding quality and enduring value. Boudreaux’s offers distinguished pieces from many of the world’s finest watch and jewelry designers including this lady’s oval sapphire and diamond ring in 18 karat White Gold. A gift from Boudreaux’s Jewelers will surely make your loved one’s holidays sparkle.

7. Bra Genie TheBraGenie.com Headquarters Store 2881 Highway 190, Mandeville 985-951-8638 7539 Corporate Blvd., Suite. 180, Baton Rouge 225-223-6114 Spice up your holidays with this Tia Lyn chemise ($89) and matching hipster bottom ($26). Designed for a fuller bust, available in mocha and crimson red ranging from S-2XL. Gift wrap and shipping are always free! Carrying 180+ sizes, Bra Genie has holiday gifts for everyone! The best quality of products and service ensures every client is satisfied with their purchase.

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8. Celebration in the Oaks CelebrationInTheOaks.com
 Celebrate New Orleans City Park’s Celebration in the Oaks 30th anniversary with a walk though the most spectacular holiday lights festival in the country. City Park’s stunning natural landscape, with its oak groves, Botanical Garden, and historic Carousel make Celebration in the Oaks a unique holiday event.

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9. Chateau Drugs & Gifts 3544 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie 504-889-2300 Find something for everyone on your holiday list in one spot! In addition to beautiful home décor, you’ll find children’s toys, soaps & candles, handbags, sweaters & ponchos, robes & pajamas, seasonal items and more! Free gift wrap, too!

10. Commander’s Palace CommandersPalace.com 1403 Washington Ave., New Orleans 504-899-8221

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Miss Ella of Commander’s Palace: I don’t want a restaurant where a jazz band can’t come marching through. Before the food business was show business, one woman led the way. You’ll love the story of Miss Ella Brennan and how the famous Brennan clan got their start on New Orleans’ Bourbon Street. This is the Great American Story. Purchase your copy at Commander’s Palace, Café Adelaide and SoBou or online at CommandersPalace.com.

11. Cristy Cali CristyCali.com 504-407-5041 The To Be or Not To Be Flip Ring can mean many things to many people. With a flip comedy and tragedy mask, it can represent Mardi Gras or perhaps a deeper meaning like in Shakespeare's Hamlet when Prince Hamlet is deciding his fate, will it be happy or will it be sad. Hamlet, like all of us, are free to make this decision, because at Mardi Gras – as we all know – we are free to make decisions that are nice or decisions that are a bit naughty.

12. Delta Festival Ballet DeltaFestivalBallet.com 504-888-0931 Delta Festival Ballet’s 35th Anniversary Season of The Nutcracker, will be held at Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts on Sat., Dec. 17 at 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 18 at 2 p.m. The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra will accompany the performances.

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13. Fleur D'Orleans FleurDOrleans.com 3701a Magazine St. | 504-899-5585 818 Chartres St. | 504-475-5254 Inspired by the design of a traditional New Orleans art glass window, this beautiful pair of 14 karat gold plated earrings add the sparkle of gold, and New Orleans, to any holiday gift. Fleur D'Orleans has more than 100 designs inspired by the heritage of New Orleans.

14. Grandmother's Buttons GrandmothersButtons.com 2105 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-249-5821 The Divine Deco necklace is perfect for fall. It combines four pieces of 1930s Czech glass – three tiny beige buttons with one carnelian Deco triangle – with a burnished bronze plated pendant and crystal chain. This necklace is 30 inches long.

15. Judy at the Rink 2727 Prytania St. | 504-891-7018 Facebook: @JudyAtTheRink

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Judy at the Rink has a large selection of unique holiday decor and gifts, including the New Orleans scenery pillows! There is various local scenes to choose from starting at $38. Judy is the place to get away from the mall madness to shop local at great prices for décor, gifts and party supplies for the perfect holiday hostess! Parking available in The Rink garage. Check us out on Facebook!

16. Konnie’s Gift Depot 859 Brownswitch Road, Slidell 985-643-8000 “Bird of Paradise” by Circle E Candles has been an all time favorite fragrance for many years among candle fans. Available in long burning, 28oz. and 12oz. sizes, Circle E. Candles are hand poured in attractive heavy glass jars. See other Circle E fragrances at Konnie’s Gift Depot in the “Country Club Plaza.”

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17. Lakeside Shopping Center LakesideShopping.com 504-835-8000 Cotton woven gray and cream herringbone throw blanket with custom embroidered initial and twisted tassels on hem, only $39.95 at The Engraving Company; or Tory Burch Oversized Cat-Eye Sunglasses in Tortoise, $175 at Dillard’s Lakeside Shopping Center.

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18. NOLA Boards

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NolaBoards.com 4304 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-516-2601 This year give a gift that is handmade right here in New Orleans! NOLA Boards is now open at 4304 Magazine St., or check them out online. Pictured is The Sazerac Bar board with woods from Maple, Cherry and Walnut ($65). Also, hand blown and stamped bar glasses ($32/36).

19. NOLA Christmas Fest Diane Lyons, Development Director: dlyons@accent-dmc.com NolaChristmasFest.com Facebook: @NOLAChristFest Spend time with your family at the indoor NOLA ChristmasFest for kids of all ages! With crafts, carnival rides, inflatables and many holiday characters – there's something for everyone! Located inside Hall I and J of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center Dec. 16-30, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Christmas Eve hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Christmas Day: 2-8 p.m. Tickets are $20 per person and group rates are available!

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20. Preservation Tile Co. PreservationTiles.com The perfect personalized gift for everyone on your list! Local artist Danny Chinn recreates the historic New Orleans street tiles by hand. No two are alike to ensure a unique collection. Each comes framed and ready to hang. Give a piece of history and share in the spirit of New Orleans and its local art.

21. QUEORK Queork.com 838 Chartres St., French Quarter 3005 Magazine St., Garden District 504-481-4910 The Lagniappe Cork Handbag by QUEORK is a Christmas must have for the gal on the go. There is a detachable wristlet strap as well as a fully adjustable cross body strap to make this bag dress up or down, and the compact 7.5”x5.5” is enough to carry all of the necessities as well as any “Lagniappe” items found along the way. $89 and free gift wrap! 146

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TrashyDiva.com 2048 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-299-8777 This stunning Elizabeth Cole set from Trashy Diva is the perfect gift for the jewelry lover in your life. Vintage-inspired Deco shapes and luxe detailing combine to create a unique and powerful statement that's sure to draw attention.

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23. R | D Home RazzleDazzle.com
 2014 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-523-9525 Lady Primrose products were first created when one of London's finest hotels, the Lanesborough (adjacent to Buckingham Palace) needed a line of luxury bath and body products that would live up to the standards of their discriminating guests. The Tryst candle is part of the Tryst collection – their signature fragrance.

24. Saint Hugh TheWomenWhoHunt.com 504-517-4844 The Shooter’s Vest is the perfect gift for the woman who appreciates quality, style, and the outdoors. Featuring Saint Hugh’s signature herringbone style marsh print, it effortlessly transitions from field to fun. And it’s lined with Polartec® fleece to keep her cozy all winter long.

25. Shen Yun Shen Yun Performing Arts at the Mahalia Jackson Theater ShenYun.com/New-Orleans 888-974-3698 The New York Times says "Shen Yun" presents "5,000 years of Chinese music and dance in one night." Every year Shen Yun presents over 400 shows all over the world. See for yourself why this performance is leaving millions in awe at the Mahalia Jackson Theater Jan. 20-21.

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[SUDDENLY, LAST SUMMER (2015) - Photo credit John B. Barrois]

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26. Southern Rep Theatre SouthernRep.com 504-522-6545 Southern Rep offers great theatre experiences for the culture vulture on your list! Choose a two-play spring membership (including Tennessee Williams’ Sweet Bird of Youth, starring Leslie Castay) or a custom gift certificate! 2017 performances are at Loyola University.

27. Symmetry Jewelers SymmetryJewelers.com 8183 Hampson St. 504-861-9925 14 karat yellow gold and sterling silver oval monogram ring from our very popular "shadowbox" collection. This ring is made to order and takes four weeks for completion. All orders must be placed by Dec. 3 for Christmas presentation.

28. NOLA Made MagnoliaBlvd.net Lakeside Shopping Center 504-339-7770 Oyster is the new neutral. Own a piece of art. Their oyster gifts are locally handmade. Each Oyster is hand painted by Dawn in Ponchatoula with an iconic scene of New Orleans. Their painted oysters come with a hanger for your christmas tree or display beautifully anywhere in your home. Their oyster crosses are handmade for quality and durability and are the perfect accessory for any room.

29. Yvonne LaFleur YvonneLaFleur.com 8131 Hampson St., New Orleans 504-866–9666 Yvonne LaFleur has gifts for every woman on your holiday list. Each year she extends special shopping evenings 6-8 p.m. on Thursdays between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Enjoy champagne, models and expert assistance in selecting gowns and presents complimentary gift-wrapped. Gift selections include Yvonne LaFleur signature fragrance products, furs, cashmere sweaters, lingerie, formal gowns, jewelry, handbags and scarves. 150

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Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

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hether you simply felt a twinge while on your morning jog or took a major tumble resulting in significant injuries, finding a specialist who knows muscles, bones and joints, and who can put you on a path to healing is easy to do in South Louisiana. From expert pediatric orthopedic care, to sports medicine and rehabilitation, to cutting-edge spinal therapies, quality orthopedic care is sought locally for a vast range of maladies and injuries that can prevent a person from working, playing and even conducting daily activities. Orthopedic injuries can affect anyone – high school athletes, professionals in the workforce, active retirees, stay-at-home parents and the young ones they spend their time nurturing. Your movements should be pain-free and uninhibited, and that’s the goal of the following orthopedic centers and specialists.

Children’s Hospital’s Orthopedic Center is committed to providing comprehensive and compassionate care for pediatric, adolescent and young adult patients. Orthopedic residents from several medical centers complete pediatric rotations at Children’s Hospital to train with the largest group of board-certified orthopedic surgeons in the area. Established in 1955, it contains the region’s largest and most experienced pediatric orthopedic team. In its specialty

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clinics last year, the hospital recorded more than 24,000 visits, treating the full spectrum of orthopedic conditions – ranging from fractures and sports-related injuries to scoliosis, hip conditions, limb length discrepancies and cerebral palsy. The center blends cutting-edge treatments and innovative surgical approaches with prompt, family-centered care. A specialized critical care spinal unit is available to all patients who undergo a spine-related surgical procedure. The center’s team is committed to providing the best possible care for every patient. For more information about the Orthopedic Center at Children’s Hospital, visit CHNola.org/orthopedics. Serving the West Bank and Greater New Orleans region,

Westside Orthopaedic Clinic provides superior general

orthopaedic treatment with a specialty in spinal care. The clinic has been in operation since 1961, making it one of the longest standing orthopaedic clinics in the city. Dr. Ralph Katz is a board-certified and fellowshiptrained orthopedic specialist who has performed over 500 minimally invasive procedures with consistently excellent outcomes. For the right patient, who has failed conservative treatment (e.g. medication, physical therapy, injections), a minimally invasive microdiscectomy can be done in an


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outpatient setting with an incision that can be covered by a band-aid. The procedure typically takes less than an hour. Most patients can return to normal activities within three to six weeks. Additionally, Dr. Katz performs cervical and lumbar spinal fusions, utilizing small incisions with minimally invasive systems. He is one of few local surgeons who perform both cervical and lumbar disc replacements. Westside offers full-service, in-house X-rays, EMG/ NCS, as well as physical therapy services with access to new rehabilitation equipment. Same day appointments can be accommodated. For more information, visit WestsideOrtho.com or call 504-347-0243.  The Sports Medicine Center of Thibodaux Regional is committed to providing student athletes and coaches with the tools needed for a safe and successful season. One unique aspect of care offered through Thibodaux Regional’s Sports Medicine Center is use of its advanced concussion technology, which provides physicians with concrete data to help determine when an athlete is ready to return to sports following an injury. In addition to concussion management, comprehensive treatment and rehabilitative services are offered for all types of injuries, with an end goal of helping athletes return to the same level of competition performance.

“Thibodaux Regional’s sports medicine program also offers educational seminars that focus on nutrition, conditioning, equipment fitting and reconditioning, and specific health topics such as concussion and athletic injury rehabilitation,” says Larry D’Antoni, ATC, LAT, Coordinator of the Sports Medicine Center of Thibodaux Regional. To learn more about the sports medicine program at Thibodaux Regional Medical Center, call 985-493-4502 or visit Thibodaux.com. Orthopedic care at East Jefferson General Hospital is best described as personalized. EJGH orthopedists take the approach that not every patient, knee, hip, shoulder or injury is the same. The hospital takes great pride in providing the surgical and non-surgical solutions needed to provide each patient the best outcomes possible. Recognized as a Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Distinction Orthopedic Center and recognized as Best in Region by U.S. News & World Report for both hip replacement and knee replacement, EJGH is the leader in providing minimally invasive solutions that get you back to work, play and life as quickly and safely as possible. Visit EJGH.org for more information and orthopedic solutions at East Jefferson General Hospital. •

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Patio at The Villas Independent Living Community at Woldenberg Village

Aging Parents A

long life of hard work should be rewarded with years of joy and relaxation. Finding ways to live comfortably later in life is attainable for the aging community. Whether you’re an older adult or the child of aging parents, researching ways to improve quality of life can be time consuming and sometimes costly. Fortunately, a variety of resources are in abundance locally, from retirement living options that remove worry and home maintenance to healthcare specialists that know the health concerns older adults may face. Aging presents its own set of challenges for the body and mind, but help is available for older individuals and their families as they face inevitable changes. If you have an aging parent and are looking to maintain or improve quality of life, the following service providers can help with a variety of concerns, from assisted living and health insurance to solutions for hearing loss, cardiovascular and urologic care, as well as medical equipment and prescriptions.

Retirement Living

Poydras Home celebrates its 200th anniversary in 2017. In 1817, Poydras Home began a legacy of care for the New Orleans community as a haven for female children orphaned from the Yellow Fever outbreaks.

The organization has continued that generosity of spirit in its current-day mission of compassionate, cuttingedge eldercare. Poydras Home offers a full complement of gracious retirement living options for its residents, including Independent Living, Assisted Living and nursing care with state-of-the-art memory support and an adult day program. Located on three acres in Uptown New Orleans, Poydras Home is known nationally for its quality of care and innovative programs that allow residents to enjoy life to the fullest in a beautiful and historic setting. Offering highly individualized care, Poydras Home is the only full continuum of care community with dementia care and an adult day program in the Greater New Orleans Area. For more information, visit PoydrasHome.com or call 504-897-0535. When it comes to the art of living and aging well, Lambeth House, a full-service retirement center, offers the best of all worlds – independent living for active adults (ages 62+) plus a full continuum of care, including Assisted Living, Nursing Care and Memory Care in the event that it’s ever needed.  Nestled in the heart of Uptown New Orleans, Lambeth House offers a cultural program committed to enrichment

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of the mind, body and spirit. With a focus on active aging, Lambeth House offers a full array of amenities, including the fitness center with a stunning indoor saltwater swimming pool, an art studio, meditation room and garden, fine and casual dining options and engaging activities and social events. Lambeth House is also proud to offer public access (for ages 55+) to its custom-designed Fitness Center. In the words of one resident, “It’s like living on a cruise ship. There’s always something to do!”  In 2015, Lambeth House’s latest extension was recognized by the American Institute of Architects with the Merit Award for the Design on Aging Review. For more information, call 504-865-1960.

Woldenberg Village is one of the region’s premier healthcare and retirement communities, located just minutes from downtown New Orleans. Offering quality care and an engaging lifestyle across the full spectrum of senior living, residents in the community experience independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing care.  As a premier Touro Retirement Community specializing in Alzheimer’s and dementia, aging loved ones at Woldenberg are comfortably accommodated with more than 60 independent living apartment homes, 60 assisted

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living apartments and 120 skilled nursing beds across 18 acres of land. Meals are served daily in a community dining area with private dining available for small gatherings or family visits. The pet-friendly campus offers housekeeping and laundry services in addition to group transportation for activities, errands and appointments. From a 24-hour emergency response system to short-term rehabilitation and in-patient hospice service, your loved ones are kept safe and healthy at Woldenberg Village. To learn more or to schedule a tour, call 504-367-5640.

Vista Shores is a luxury senior living and memory care community located on Bayou St. John. Vista Shores residents enjoy chef-prepared meals in the bistro, socialize over coffee or cocktails in the lounge and take in beautiful sunsets on the wrap-around porch. Vista Shores’ diverse social and cultural activities and fitness programs keep residents active and engaged, while weekly housekeeping, laundry and transportation services ensure that residents are able to relax and focus on living their best lives. All residents are provided with 24-hour personal care and individualized assistance plans. Vista Shores offers a specialized Memory Care program – each staff member has been vigorously trained in Alzheimer’s and dementia


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care to enrich the lives of memory care residents. Vista Shores was recently presented with the Dementia Care Specialists Distinguished Provider Award. The highest level of recognition that can be conferred upon a memory care provider, it’s awarded to assisted living communities that provide the most exemplary resident-centered care. For more information, visit VistaShores.com or call 504288-3737. Providing better solutions for aging well in New Orleans since 1991, Home Care Solutions specializes in compassionate in-home care and Alzheimer’s care in addition to Aging Life Care Management services to help elderly loved ones in the Greater New Orleans area extend their independence. Home Care Solutions’ team of reliable, experienced caregivers provide older adults assistance with daily living and companionship services. Each caregiver is carefully matched to meet both client needs and personality. The company is committed to providing clients with the highest quality of care in their chosen environment, keeping loved ones safe and comfortable while giving families peace of mind. Care Managers simplify, coordinate and proactively guide the care of a loved one with intelligence, expertise

and heart. They are experienced advocates capable of managing complex situations, and finding intelligent and creative solutions for all care concerns. Home Care Solutions is a member of the Home Care Association of America and the Aging Life Care Association and is also a licensed Personal Care Attendant Agency. For more information, call 504-828-0900 or visit HomeCareNewOrleans.com.

Hospice Anyone seeking compassionate and dignified care for their terminally ill loved ones should consider the outstanding services offered by Canon Hospice. Canon Hospice is dedicated to helping patients and families accept terminal illness positively and resourcefully, to preserve dignity and to endure the challenges that accompany this critical time of life. Their stated goal is to “allow our patients to live each day to the fullest and enjoy their time with family and friends.” With special expertise in pain management and symptom control, Canon Hospice designs individualized plans of care for each patient based on their unique needs. Home Based Services provide doctors, nurse practitioners, nurses, social workers, pastoral care and volunteers.

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For patients with more intensive symptom management needs, Canon has an Inpatient Hospice Unit located on the fourth floor of the Ochsner Elmwood Medical Center. This unit provides 24-hour care in a home-like environment where patients are permitted to receive visits at any hour. Canon is excited to now offer private rooms. For more information, visit CanonHospice.com or call 504-818-2723.

Resources for Alzheimer’s Disease Caregivers for Alzheimer’s and dementia face special challenges, and you’re not alone. Whether you need information about early-stage caregiving, middle-stage caregiving or late-stage caregiving, the Alzheimer’s Association is here to help. Day-to-day help can be accessed through education programs located throughout the state, and you can find support through local chapter offices and support groups. Additionally, advice from the caregiver community can be found on the association’s message boards and forums at ALZ.org/crf. Call the New Orleans office today to find out more at 504-613-6505 or

Poydras Home

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visit ALZ.org/Louisiana. The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Their mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research, to provide and enhance care and support for all affected and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Their vision is a “world without Alzheimer’s®.” To learn more, visit ALZ.org or call 800-272-3900.

Cardiovascular Care November is Diabetes Awareness Month. Did you know that those with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or a stroke? This is because high blood glucose levels can lead to increased deposits of fatty materials on the insides of the blood vessels. These deposits affect blood flow, increasing the chance of blocked arteries. In addition to diabetes, other factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking can add to a person’s risk for cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of diabetes and obesity in south Louisiana also


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increases the chance of a cardiovascular event, such as a heart attack or stroke. Cardiologists at Cardiovascular Institute of the South (CIS) are world-renowned in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diabetes and heart disease. Ask your doctor about your risk. To learn more about CIS, or to schedule an appointment at the location nearest you, visit Cardio.com or call 800-425-2565.

Southern Aesthetics is celebrating 21 years of making you look and feel your best. Dr. Treece and her staff are dedicated to providing the highest level of quality in cosmetic surgery in a comfortable, private environment. The practice is located in Metairie at 3815 Hessmer Ave. For information, including before and after photos, visit PenelopeTreece.com. You can also request a consultation at the site or by calling 504-779-7749.

Aesthetics & Cosmetic Surgery

Women’s Health

Southern Aesthetics is a private cosmetic surgery

practice focused on comprehensive rejuvenation of the body and patients’ confidence no matter their age. Looking younger helps patients feel younger and thereby maintain youth in many aspects of their lives. Board-certified surgeon Dr. Penelope Treece offers a vast array of surgical services including facelifts, abdominoplasty and liposuction in addition to non-surgical procedures and treatments that include Botox, Xeomin, micro-blading, Radiesse, Belotero, Juvederm, Clear + Brilliant, EMatrix lasers, CoolSculpting body contouring, radiofrequency, laser hair removal, IPL, Lasergenesis and prescription skincare. Dr. Treece is proud to introduce Kybella, a non-invasive injection treatment for improving the appearance and profile of moderate to severe fat below the chin.

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Many women suffer from incontinence or overactive bladder in silence. Often these conditions occur from childbirth, aging and at times medical problems. But according to Dr. Margie Kahn, associate professor and board-certified Section Head of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery in the Departments

of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology at Tulane’s School of Medicine, “Urinary incontinence

is not a normal part of aging! We address all pelvic floor disorders, including accidental bowel leakage and pelvic organ prolapse, at the same time. We have an experienced and sensitive team that understands most women are embarrassed to bring up these problems and may have had them ignored if they did so. We offer a multidisciplinary approach comprising behavioral


interventions, physical therapy, simple office procedures and more complex, minimally invasive surgery in the operating room.” Dr. Kahn’s patients are given every option for treatment, and every woman chooses what options are right for her. To schedule an appointment at Tulane’s downtown or Metairie offices, or for more information on Tulane’s OB/GYN department, call 504-988-8070.

Hearing Loss Approximately one in three people in the United States between the ages of 65 and 74 have hearing loss, and nearly half of those older than 75 have difficulty hearing. As people age there’s an increase in hearing loss that, when left untreated, can lead to daily embarrassment, social isolation, cognitive decline and undiagnosed depression. Helping your older parent to hear, process and communicate better will improve the overall quality of life for your parent – and also for you.  The Doctors of Audiology at Associated Hearing have been impacting patients’ and their families’ lives for over 35 years. Their methods are unique in the sense that they create a customized treatment plan based on each individual’s lifestyle and listening environment. Their mission is to strive to provide the best hearing care possible through experienced professionals, expert advice, exceptional technology, excellent value and extraordinary service. Call 504-833-4327 today to begin your journey to better hearing. Visit AssociatedHearingInc.com for more information.

Urology Have you or someone you know experienced the excruciating pain from kidney stones? The Department of Urology at Tulane University Medical Center is the first and most experienced urologic surgical center in the entire Gulf South and offers comprehensive care for complex kidney stones. Kidney stones form in the kidney and get stuck in the urinary tract where they can cause pain. While kidney stone treatment varies depending on the type of stone and the cause, Tulane Urology will provide you with a personalized approach to best suits your needs. For treatment of large and complex kidney stones cases, Tulane Urology’s expert surgeons use the daVinci high-definition robot. This cutting-edge, minimally invasive surgical technology, combined with the extensive experience of the Tulane Urology team, has made Tulane Urology a comprehensive care center for treatment of complex kidney stones. Visit TreatKidneyStones.

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com and TulaneUrology.com for more information on the various treatments and procedures offered for treatment of kidney stones. Call 504-988-2536 to schedule an appointment and “get relief today.” 

Health Insurance

As the state’s oldest and largest health insurer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is committed to

improving the health and lives of Louisianians. The company and its subsidiaries offer a full line of health insurance plans for people of every age – from birth through retirement – including supplemental coverage, such as dental and senior plans, at affordable rates. The Blue Cross provider networks offer the peace of mind that comes with being covered by the Cross and Shield. Blue Cross is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association and headquartered in Baton Rouge. To better serve customers, Blue Cross operates regional offices in Alexandria, Houma, Lafayette, Lake Charles, Monroe, New Orleans and Shreveport. Louisiana-owned and operated, Blue Cross is a private, fully taxed mutual company owned by policyholders – not shareholders. To learn more, call a Blue Cross agent or visit BCBSLa.com.

Pharmacy & Medical Equipment Generations of families have turned to Patio Drugs for assistance in managing their healthcare needs. Family-owned and operated since 1958, Patio Drugs helps customers understand their medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, and provides free prescription delivery throughout East Jefferson. A full-service pharmacy, the oldest independent pharmacy in Jefferson Parish, Patio Drugs is also a leading provider of home medical equipment. For everything from a Band-Aid, to medication, to a hospital bed, Patio Drugs is the one-stop source for your family’s healthcare needs. In addition to providing retail and medical equipment, Patio Drugs can assist with long-term care and infusion needs as well as specialty and compounding services. Patio Drugs is accredited by The Joint Commission in Home Medical Equipment, Consultant Pharmacy Services and Long Term Care and Home Infusion Pharmacy. Their Compounding Pharmacy is PCAB accredited through ACHC. Patio Drugs is located at 5208 Veterans Blvd. in Metairie. For more information, call 504-8897070. Patio Drugs, “Large Enough to Serve You, Yet, Small Enough to Know You.” •


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jeffery johnston photo

Acadian Auction House of New Orleans Starts Bidding in November Acadian Auction House of New Orleans, 2838 Elysian Fields Ave., AcadianAuctionHouse.com Not all auction houses are created equal. New Acadian Auction House of New Orleans aims to overturn the traditional view of auctions and turn them into fun events where you can score one-of-akind treasures at great prices. Inventory spans varied budgets and styles from new, classic interiors and contemporary art to bronze and estate pieces. The first auctions will be held Nov. 18, 19 and 20, and a portion of the proceeds from every auction will be donated to charity. There will be a full preview day on Fri., Nov. 18, and on the mornings of Nov. 19 and 20.

Boudreaux’s Jewelers Experts for Over 80 Years 701 Metairie Road, Metairie, 831-2602; (additional locations in Baton Rouge and Mandeville); BoudreauxsJewelers.com In 1933, Gilmore Boudreaux Sr., a craftsman and jeweler, set up shop in the Pere Marquette building in downtown New Orleans and started a New Orleans legacy. Over 80 years later, his grandchildren and great-grandson now run three stores in Louisiana. In a world dominated by online shopping, Boudreaux’s customer service and expertise make it more relevant today than ever. Customers can choose from an impressive selection of fine jewelry and watches, and the company’s custom design services combine master craftsmanship with cutting-edge technology. – Mirella Cameran

Wine Time

Tastings at Martin Wine Cellar By Kelly Massicot

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here is no shortage of libations in New Orleans. But how does one pick among all that’s offered? The editorial team at New Orleans Magazine, however, is dedicated to helping you, dear readers, answer that question. One brisk evening, most of the editorial staff attended a wine tasting at Martin Wine Cellar off of St. Charles Avenue and Baronne Street, to see if they were serving up something delicious. Though Martin’s offers private and corporate event tastings, their real gem is the free Friday night tastings at all of their store locations. And when you hear free wine, you should definitely make it a point to be there. When you check in, you’re given a wristband and a glass for tasting. This particular Friday tasting had three different stations with Martin’s staff pouring a multitude of red, white and rosé wines. “It’s such a fun atmosphere with everyone circulating around to the different tasting stations. Our pourers were friendly, knowledgeable and happy to answer our questions,” says Renaissance Publishing editor Melanie Spencer. Marc Pelletier, Martin’s Wine and Spirits Consultant, expressed the staff’s excitement in presenting new or vintage offerings the store may possess, and telling their history as guests enjoy. I think this level of enthusiasm for their work is what reflects most in the whole evening and gets participants excited about the wine that they drink. I found a new fondness for a bottle of red wine, and Custom Publishing editor Jessica DeBold mentioned that she, “found more than a few bottles that I loved, and the cheese and snacks kept my stomach full ... even after a few sample glasses.” Pelletier noted that group tastings, both private and open to the public, are offered to all depending on availability of the staff and connoisseurs. They have held them in people’s homes, offices and privately for groups of all sizes, both in and out of the store. Friday free tastings take place 4:30-6:30 p.m., unless there’s a paid tasting, which are interspersed two to three times a month – subject to change during busier holiday periods. Martin’s makes it easy for New Orleanians to enhance their love of wine while being social and healthy; because wine is made from grapes, grapes are a fruit and we all need a few servings of fruit a day. Cheers! Martin Wine Cellar locations, phone numbers and schedule of events can be found at MartinWine.com. n

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Two Women in Burkas By errol laborde

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wo women dressed head to toe in black burkas were getting on the same Delta flight, from Paris to Atlanta, that I was boarding. Yes, I know about the proper political correctness and the unfairness of stereotypes, but there are some things that make fellow flyers squeamish. France is a country that doesn’t allow faces to be fully covered in a public place, so you might think that the rules would be more stringent on a plane, but apparently not. The women and their entourage were stopped at a pre-entry security area, but after a few moments of checking documents they were allowed to board. Travelling with them were two men plus two toddlers (a boy and a girl) and a baby. Only the women were dressed culturally. The rest of the family was in totally western

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casual garb that made the juxtaposition to the two women even stranger. Whoever booked their tickets obviously knew planes. They had secured a row of seats behind a bulkhead – the wall that divides sections. That is a good place for someone travelling with a newborn, because the wall has two hooks that can be used to attach a crib. The disadvantage to the location is that it’s next to the restrooms, so people tend to congregate in the aisle there, as I did, while at the same time trying to be discreet in assessing the group. Both of the men looked like they could be comfortable at a football game tailgate party; the two toddlers were occupied with coloring books. The baby was totally cute, with puffy cheeks, and slept peacefully. Then there were the two women in black. They merely sat in their

seats for nine hours, their world view was limited through the mesh that covered their eyes. More than uneasiness, I felt sorry for them. What must it be like to live in a world in which even their children have more freedom than they have? Then I notice that one of the burka women did something very modern. She pulled out an iPhone and began scrolling with her thumb. As the apps flashed by, she showed lots of scrolling experience and had many apps to choose from. Though she could use none of them while in airplane mode, the rolling apps at least provided distraction through the black mesh. Down the row the toddlers continued with their crayons. I wondered if they ever asked why mom was dressed that way. Because they were totally covered, there was little to be learned about the two women except for a fleeting moment. One of the women, the one with the iPhone, briefly turned her head toward me. For an instant our eyes made contact. She had strong, dark eyes that seemed to be outlined with light makeup. I would guess she was in her early 30s. The eyes seemed sad, but that might have just been the context in which I was seeing her. From what I could tell, she looked like she was quite pretty. Then she turned away. As the plane began its descent, the baby was still soundly asleep. Maybe one day he’ll wake up to a more just world. n ARTHUR NEAD ILLUSTRATION


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine November 2016  

New Orleans Magazine November 2016