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January/February 38

VOLUME 40 NUMBER 1

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An anniversary for the Cajun Mardi Gras

New Orleans brasserie Justine goes bold with French classics and an eye-popping, maximalist interior

From The Editor

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along the way

An unofficial Mardi Gras krewe channels the animal kingdom

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Noteworthy news and happenings around the state

Squash soup, steak and oyster pie, a bright watercress salad and poached pears cozy up your dinner table

pelican briefs

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health

Hundreds of thousands of Louisianians have incurable arthritis but, there is hope

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art

Louisiana’s second oldest Mardi Gras maintains traditions and embraces novelties

From Shreveport to Eunice and everywhere in between, here’s your guide to Carnival

From teachers and artists to healthcare professionals and poets, these are the people who enhance our daily lives in more ways than one

Following the Sabine River territory through history

Vicksburg, Mississippi is a must for Civil War buffs

Mandeville soap maker Kelsey Conner creates vegan, allnatural soap

Louisianians of the Year

traveler

Our suggestions to enjoy Carnival on and off the parade route

Made In Louisiana

Carnival Calendar

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Carnival in New Roads

kitchen gourmet

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Literary Louisiana

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great louisiana chef

Le Courir de Mardi Gras in the crawfish ponds of Mermentau Cove, Acadia Parish

photo contest

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St. Francisville native Daniel Dreher guides a rebranding of The Myrtles as a dining destination enlivened by flames and phantoms

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roadside dining

Shreveport photographer Ann George’s mystic Louisiana 46

home

Vanessa and Jeffrey Mayfield’s St. Tammany Parish house was designed to welcome family and friends

farther flung

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a louisiana life

Allstate Sugar Bowl CEO Jeff Hundley brings more national sporting events to Louisiana from the nonprofit’s headquarters in New Orleans

On The CoveR

Lafayette-based artist Christina Brown illustrated the cover for this issue. Her lively, colorful depiction of the many elements of Carnival convey food, fun and festivity of this special time of year.


f rom the e ditor

Galloping Through the Decades An anniversary for the Cajun Mardi Gras by errol laborde

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ardly anyone knows it, but this year the Cajun Courir De Mardi Gras approaches the 70th anniversary of its revival. Had it not been for a few men wanting to rescue a lost ritual there would be no customs to talk about today and only faded ancient memories. Carnival, especially as practiced in New Orleans and in the Cajun country has ancient roots. In Acadiana there is the tradition of maskers riding through the fields seeking ingredients for gumbo. That practice extended from the medieval customs of Europe, especially France, where peasants would re-enact the ritual of begging from their lords for food to prepare a meal. This line of celebration, practiced especially at Mardi Gras, is known by Carnival scholars as “begging traditions.” Over the years the custom became a little too rowdy and disorganized. Professor Barry Ancelet in a booklet (“Capitaine , voyage ton flag: The Traditional Cajun Country Mardi Gras,” (ULL) wrote that with the arrival of Americanization and the “civilizing” effects of schools and churches the rowdy celebrations were “banned from many communities and eventually disappeared from the annual cycle of Louisiana folk life.” However, in the early 1950s, according to Ancelet, some “cultural activists in the Mamou area” led by Revon Reed and Paul Tate, worked to revive what had been the traditional Mardi Gras ritual. From interviewing the old-timers they developed guidelines and reconstructed the songs of their day including “Le Chanson de Mardi Gras” (opening line: “Capitaine, Capitaine voyage ton flag,” meaning, roughly to carry the flag). This year marks the beginning of that revitalization seven decades ago. During that period much has happened to popularize the Cajun culture such as: Paul Prudhomme redefining Cajun cooking and putting it on the map; The Jazz Fest in New Orleans (established in 1970) giving Cajun music, along with other native forms, a national stage; the building of I-10 (beginning in 1957) creating a faster route across Southern Louisiana and then eventually I-49 from the north; new festivals in the Lafayette area and the emergence of the once lowly crawfish as a force so powerful as to become a symbol of a culture. Cajun Carnival was re-worked yet deeply rooted in tradition. This occasional spiffing up of a celebration that had gone amuck is not without precedent. In 1872 a king of Carnival, Rex, was created in New Orleans partially to provide a structured parade to replace the miscellaneous, unorganized activities that were giving Mardi Gras a bad name. Not even New Orleans though had a Revon Reed. He became a fixture in Cajun country by hosting a live radio show from Fred’s Lounge in Mamou. Each Saturday morning, as the lounge recovered from Friday night, the music of Acadiana would be transmitted across the prairies and along the Atchafalaya basin. Cajun music was alive, and like the Capitaines, Revon Reed was carrying the flag. Thusly has the culture been embellished and preserved — and at the end of the ride there is still a good gumbo.

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Awards Intern ation a l a nd region a l m ag a zine a ssoci ation 2019 Winner Magazine of the Year Silver Art and Culture Feature Silver General Feature Silver Hed and Dek Silver Food Feature Silver Art Direction of a Single Story Bronze Department Bronze Portrait Photo Bronze Special Focus 2018 Gold Art Direction of a Single Story Silver Photo Series Silver Travel Package Silver Food Feature Silver Department Bronze Cover 2017 Gold Art Direction of a Single Story Silver Portrait Photo Bronze Photographer of the Year Bronze Food Feature Bronze Cover Bronze Public Issue Bronze Hed & Dek 2016 Silver Art Direction of a Single Story Bronze Column Bronze Food Feature 2012 Gold Companion Website 2011 Silver Overall Art Direction Press Club of New Orle a ns 2019 1st Lifestyle Feature 1st Layout/Design 3rd Multi-Photo Feature 2018 1st Best Cover 1st Multi-Photo Feature 2nd Layout/Design 2017 1st Best Magazine 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award Errol Laborde 1st Best Magazine 1st Layout/Design 2nd Best Magazine 2nd Layout/Design 2nd Best Portrait 2nd Governmental/ Political Writing


Louisiana Life made journalistic history EDITORIAL Editor-In-Chief Errol Laborde MANAGING Editor Melanie Warner Spencer Associate editor Ashley McLellan copy EDITOR Liz Clearman web Editor Kelly Massicot travel EDITOR Paul F. Stahls Jr. FOOD EDITOR Stanley Dry HOME EDITOR Lee Cutrone Art Director Sarah George lead photographer Danley Romero

In November Louisiana Life tied with its sister publication Acadiana Profile for first place in a nationwide magazine competition. The publications were each awarded “Magazine of the Year� designation by the International and Regional Magazine Association (IRMA). This was the first time that the 59-year-old Association has ever had a tie for its most prestigious award.

sales

Magazine of the Year

vice president of sales Colleen Monaghan (504) 830-7215 Colleen@LouisianaLife.com account executive Nancy Dessens (504) 830-7263 Nancy@LouisianaLife.com marketing DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & EVENTS Jeanel Luquette Event Coordinator Abbie Dugruise digital media associate Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264

Bronze Special Focus: New Orleans Issue

Bronze Department

Production production manager Emily Andras production designers Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney traffic coordinator Lane Brocato traffic assistant Jeremiah Michel Administration Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde office manager Mallary Matherne Distribution Manager John Holzer Subscription manager Claire Sargent For subscriptions call (504) 830-7231

Silver Art Direction of a Single Story

Silver Hed and Dek

Silver Art and Culture Feature

110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123 Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380 LouisianaLife.com

Louisiana Life (ISSN 1042-9980) is published bimonthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rate: One year $10; Mexico and Canada $48. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional mailing entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Louisiana Life, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2020 Louisiana Life. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark Louisiana Life is registered. Louisiana Life is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork, even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in Louisiana Life are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the magazine or owner.

Silver General Feature

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Along the Way

Party Animals An unofficial Mardi Gras krewe channels the animal kingdom story and photo By Melanie Warner Spencer

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uring our first three Carnival seasons after moving to New Orleans, by the time Fat Tuesday arrived, we were too pooped to party beyond a brief amble out to the corner for a couple of the morning parades while sipping Irish coffee. Living just off of St. Charles Avenue a few steps away from the parade route means weeks on end of floats, marching bands, dancing in the streets, King Cakes, marching and dancing krewes, lots of imbibing, costumes and almost daily open houses in our home and the home’s of friends. While I understand the desire many New Orleanians have to flee to the mountains or some other preferred, nonCarnival-celebrating locale — especially the week and weekend leading up to Fat Tuesday — we love being in the center of the action. It’s a lot even for seasoned Carnival professionals, but we wouldn’t have it any other way. Thankfully, we’ve learned to better moderate our celebration schedule and for the past three years, we’ve participated in the early-morning Society of Saint Anne parade held in the Marigny neighborhood in an unofficial krewe created by some dear friends. Our merry band of revelers is a little disorganized, a lot unruly and, to be honest, a bunch of animals. No really, we dress in wildlife-themed costumes and are called Krewe du Zoo. Our debut year included a pre-party at a friend’s house near lineup, booze-fueled dance party during said lineup and a post-parade, rock blocker-blasting, balloon arch-bedecked procession from the friend’s house to the Golden Lantern bar in the French Quarter to hold an animal prom. During the parade and while processing through the Quarter in punny costumes including my husband’s Elvis-inspired King Bee, my Polar Beary Antoinette and an Attention Hog (dressed as a pig in a ‘70s-style prom dress with a sash), we doled out handmade critter-themed corsages and boutonnieres to Mardi Gras revelers donning their own creature creations. Each flora and fauna wrist accessory or pin doubled as an invitation to the prom and included the time and location of the impending dance party. To our delight, countless invitees joined us to boogie down in front of the bar and snap prom pics under the balloon arch. As you might expect when dealing with all creatures great and small, year after year, our roving animal kingdom is fruitful and multiplies. At such a rapid rate of procreation, perhaps it will someday morph into

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Krewe du Zoo’s Animal Prom in full swing outside the Golden Lantern on Mardi Gras.

an official krewe, with the prom transforming into a sanctioned Mardi Gras event. Regardless, we’re grateful that our friends created something so magical that we were forced to figure out a way to conserve energy and join in the fun of converging upon the Marigny and French Quarter on Fat Tuesday to shed our workaday lives and act like party animals. n


Photo Conte st

Traditional Cajun Carnival Le Courir de Mardi Gras in the crawfish ponds of Mermentau Cove, Acadia Parish Photo by kevin rabalais, new orleans

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→ Submit your photos by visiting louisianalife.com


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pe lican brie fs

Da Kings of Cakes Who makes the best king cakes in New Orleans? by lisa leblanc-berry

Baton Rouge

Carnival’s Dilemma: Savory or Sweet Check out the savory, briochestyle crawfish etouffée king cake with pepper jack cheese, andouille croutons and green onion at Stinky’s Fish Camp (stinkysbr. com), a spin-off of Florida’s Stinky’s on Hwy 30-A. Gluten-free lemon king cake balls can be found at Brew Ha-Ha (brewhahabr.com), or go hog wild before Lent at City Pork Deli (facebook. com/cityporkdeli) for a drool-worthy bacon praline king cake topped with crisp bacon.

New Orleans

Shorty Gets Tall The Krewe of Freret introduces a gigantic animatronic of Trombone Shorty, its grand marshal, when it rolls Feb. 15 with seven new animated floats. Constructed by Kern Studios, the likeness of the musician is over two stories tall, making it the largest prop ever to be featured on a Carnival float. The first annual “Shorty Gras” follows the parade, with an extensive musical lineup put together by Trombone Shorty himself (kreweoffreret.com).

Baton Rouge

Festival Follows New Parade An all-new parade and festival in north Baton Rouge, the Krewe of Oshun, rolls at noon Feb. 8, followed by an afternoon festival themed “Wakanda Now: Celebration, Prosperity and Expansion” featuring live music, cooking and eating contests and carnival games (facebook.com/kreweofoshunbr).

Woodworth, Boyce

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hef Nathan Richard of DTB (dtbnola.com) was crowned the 2019 King of American Seafood for his luscious crawfish and goat cheese king cake with cream cheese pepper jelly and Cajun caviar. “I’m serving it at DTB with optional caviar during Carnival season, but you can also get it year-round from cajungrocer.com,” says Richard. Chef Kelly Fields (winner of a 2019 James Beard Award) and her team at Willa Jean (willajean.com) in New Orleans offers the famous caramel crunch king cake throughout Carnival (tip: be sure to place orders a couple weeks in advance). Another James Beard award-winner, Dong Phuong (dpbakeshop.com) features a new coconut flavored brioche-style king cake, but you’ll have wait in line for their coveted confections (tip: do an advance order online). You can now find over 50 king cakes from a variety of places at just one location, King Cake Hub (kingcakehub.com), home of the Mortuary Haunted House featuring king cakes from Gambino’s, Bywater Bakery, Cannata’s, Caluda’s, NOCCA, Sugar Love and Girls Gone Vegan, all in New Orleans, to name a few (tip: watch for the debut of the new Dragon Claw king cake in 2020).

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Anything Goes, Ending Carnival with Boats You can rollerblade, ride bikes, tractors, trailers or cars at the unique Town of Woodworth Mardi Gras Parade Feb. 15 (alexandria-louisiana. com/mardi-gras). The Feb. 15 Mardi Gras Golf Cart and Pet Parade at Indian Creek Recreational Area has featured everything from goats to cats and turtles (alexandriapinevillela.com/ event-directory/). Catch the sunset on the waterfront Feb. 25 during Tunk’s Boat Parade in Boyce; great oyster bar, quail and crawfish on the edge of Kincaid Lake (tunkscypressinn.com).

willa jean photo courtesy willa jean; Trombone shorty photo by cheryl gerber


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healthy louisiana

Fresh Take

Fighting Arthritis Hundreds of thousands of Louisianians have incurable arthritis but, there is hope

3 greens in season

By Fritz Esker

Arugula

Like most tender greens, arugula needs to be consumed within a few days of buying it. The leaves should be firm. Health benefits include calcium, potassium and vitamin C.

Celery

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ver 50 million Americans have some form of arthritis, and approximately 923,000 of them live in Louisiana (arthritis.org). For some people, the condition may be unavoidable, but there are ways you can make living with arthritis easier. Some of the risk factors cannot be controlled: age, family history, sex (women are more likely to get arthritis than men). Others, however, are manageable. One of the risk factors is obesity. Louisiana has the fourth-highest adult obesity rate in the United States (stateofchildhoodobesity.org). Reducing your weight can reduce your risk of arthritis. Other risk factors can be traced back to life events. If you played high-impact sports like football, soccer,or basketball in your youth, you will be more likely to develop arthritis as you age. Physical traumas can also play a role. For example, if you were injured in a car accident as a teenager, that can make you more susceptible to arthritis later in life. Dr. Stephanie Coleman, a family practice physician at Baton Rouge General Medical Center, said the most

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common arthritis spots are the knees, hips, hands and spine. She said doctors will offer progressive treatments based on the severity of symptoms and how much a patient’s quality of life has been affected. Tylenol and anti-inflammatories are one form of treatment. Physical therapy is also recommended to strengthen the muscles surrounding the joints to ease the burden on the problematic area. Steroid injections into the joints can come later, and surgery in the form of joint replacement is the last resort. While exercise is recommended for arthritis patients, it is best to consult with a doctor or physical therapist before beginning a workout program. Highimpact activities can damage joints and cause more pain. But low-impact activities such as simple walking (avoid stairs) or swimming can be a great benefit to arthritis patients. “People think the only options are pain management or joint replacement, but there are other choices,” Dr. Coleman said. “There are multiple treatment options out there, so if you haven’t found the right one for you yet, don’t lose hope.” n

If you have issues with digestion or inflammation (including arthritis), celery is a great choice. Celery has approximately 25 anti-inflammatory compounds to help protect your body.

Kale

Kale is one of the healthiest, most nutrient-dense foods you can eat. It’s very low in fat and calories, but high in vitamins A, K, C and B6. It’s also full of calcium, potassium, magnesium and much more.


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L ITERARY LOUISIANA

Reads for Revelry Our suggestions to enjoy Carnival on and off the parade route By Ashley McLellan

Drink Up!

Batch Cocktails: Make-Ahead Pitcher Drinks for Every Occasion

Mardi Gras Indians

Jockomo: The Native Roots of Mardi Gras Indians

Get the Mardi party started with this collection of cocktails that are perfect for open house celebrations, enjoying along the parade route or after the festivities to keep the fun flowing. Each fun yet sophisticated recipe is designed to be mixed up in large pitcherfuls and in advance, and go way beyond the electrichued daiquiri and plastic cup mixes that abound. Ten Speed Press, 160 Pages, $19.99.

Carnival Queens and Teams

Cherchez la Femme: New Orleans Women by Cheryl Gerber

New Orleans photojournalist Cheryl Gerber explores the faces that make New Orleans and Mardi Gras magic with a raucous, moving, studied collection of portraits and moments. Additionally, Gerber has included essays penned by some of the area’s top female writers and journalists, (including Louisiana Life’s own managing editor Melanie Spencer), with a colorful line-up of chapters exploring women in culinary, music, business, philanthropy, entertainment and Mardi Gras krewes that keep the city rocking and rolling throughout the year. University Press of Mississippi, 272 pages, $40.

by Shane Lief and John McCusker

Language historian and musician Shane Lief and former Times-Picayune and New Orleans Advocate photojournalist John McCusker take a deep dive into the colorful culture of the Mardi Gras Indians, their evolving celebrations in the city and their impacts on the New Orleans community. “Jockomo” is a visual celebration, chock full of a collection of both historical and contemporary photographs that illustrate the Indians’ powerful costume traditions that have transformed throughout the generations. University Press of Mississippi, 192 pages, $40.

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Carnival Cuisine

Kevin Belton’s New Orleans Celebrations by chef kevin belton with Rhonda K. Findley

One-pot cooking with dishes that soak up the celebrations are essential during the festivities, and PBS Chef Kevin Belton has you covered in “New Orleans Celebrations.” Check out the “Jammin’ on Jambalaya” chapter for a wide range of rice and pasta-laya recipes to cook up for a crowd, or ways to incorporate boudin, crawfish and a festival of oysters throughout your celebration menu. Gibbs Smith, 176 pages, $24.99.


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Lo uis iana Made

So Fresh and So Clean Mandeville soap maker Kelsey Conner creates vegan, all-natural soap By Jeffrey Roedel photos by romero and romero

W

hen bathing (thankfully) began trending again in the 19th century, the search was on for ways to produce affordable soap on a large enough scale to keep the working class disease-free, healthy and able to fill the factories and fields of a rapidly industrializing America. Driven by market demands, research and development were poured into chemicals and catalysts that were soon refined enough for animal-based bars and liquid soaps to roll off the lines of a number of pioneering companies.

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Though processes have evolved, and automation taken over, the ingredients and methods of making mass-produced soaps have, by and large, remained consistent. This, according to Mandeville maker Kelsey Conner, should be of concern. “Might as well grab some detergent and rub that on your skin,” says the veteran soap-maker and founder of Cake Face Soaping Company. “Mass-produced soaps leave your skin feeling raw and stripped of natural oils.” For a decade now, the Slidell native has been offering her growing customer base a healthier alternative. Free of synthetics and toxins, her vegan, all-natural soaps come in a variety of inventively handcrafted scents and textures like Eucalyptus Tea and Rosemary Orange. “It’s so interesting that with a bath or shower, people say ‘I feel like a new person,’ but it’s true,” Conner says. “You’ve sloughed off all the old skin, so you are, in some ways, literally, new. This is still an underrated feeling, though, because too many people are using the chemical stuff.” Cake Face soaps can be found at a dozen Rouses supermarkets across the state as well as Whole Foods. When Conner has time, she’ll pop-up for New Orleans arts markets.

→ for more information visit cakefacesoaping.com


Inside a corner building in quaint old Mandeville not far from Lake Pontchartrain and her home with her electrician husband, Cody, Cake Face Soaping features Conner’s storefront then opens into a slender, savoryscented workshop lined with everything from fragments of samples to large batches ready to ship. Like slabs of marble, rows of fresh soap in colorful cuts are stacked just about everywhere. She’s apologetic about having to meet later than originally planned — turns out Whole Foods needed an emergency batch to fill an end-of-the-aisle pod, leaving the 32-year-old craftswoman just a few days to fill a large order. Conner works alone, handling research and experimentation, cooking, packaging, shipping and account management. “My stress level is on 10 most the time,” says the animal lover, looking out her window past a collection of cat-themed coffee mugs. “Even when there’s less to do, I’m thinking, ‘What am I not doing that I should be doing?’” Conner began slowly by selling homemade bars on Etsy and then at local markets. “It’s not something you can run through a machine and have it come out exactly the same,” she says, stepping back into the small workshop where she “cooks” soap among a wild library of raw ingredients like fresh lavender, beetroot, essential oils, even coffee grinds. “You never get the same exact product from batch to batch no matter what

you do. I don’t use any synthetics. That’s the fun — I like that about it.” That process of discovery is exciting for a creative who studied painting in college and once thought she’d pursue a career in fine art. On display in the Cake Face store, but somewhat neglected, are a few flamboyantlyhued landscape paintings, Conner’s handiwork, though she softly admits she hasn’t picked up a brush lately. “Soap is very creative, so it’s that creativity plus using natural elements for personal health that has been the combination of my career,” Conner says. “It’s impossible not to let your creativity out.” With sales growing, Conner wants to remain open to opportunities and outcomes she can’t quite predict, not unlike the pleasantly unexpected results of experimenting with a new soap recipe. “Whether it’s work or its life, you make a plan, but then something better happens on its own,” she says. “I’d rather introduce two materials and experience the surprise of what happens.” n

How long does it take to make a typical bar of soap? Typically, a batch of soap takes about two hours to make, 24 hours to sit in the mold, and I cure it for about 10 days before selling it. Do you recall making your very first batch and how that went? Vaguely. I made a recipe that I found online, and as I recall it went well. I didn’t start making mistakes until I began experimenting and creating my own recipes! How would you describe being a maker in Louisiana? Louisiana is so supportive. Cajun culture is a tightknit group. We’ve been through a lot together. People are close to their ethnic routes here, and there’s something to that genetic makeup where we want to support our own. A lot of people say Louisiana is its own country. I’ve heard that from a lot of people. It’s why a lot of people who are born here don’t move away. There are great places and beautiful places elsewhere but it’s not the the same. Nothing is like New Orleans and Louisiana.

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art

Spiritually Connected Shreveport photographer Ann George’s mystic Louisiana By John R. Kemp

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hreveport photographer Ann George is an artist, a storyteller and a playwright — not in the conventional sense of writing narratives and dialogue, but in composing staged photographic images that appear as still but quiet moments in a story or play inspired by her deep roots in the life and culture of Central and North Louisiana. “Louisiana is the genesis of all my work,” says George, who was born and raised in Alexandria in Rapides Parish and has strong Cajun family ties to nearby Marksville. “This sense of her [Louisiana] is also etched in me as metaphors.” In her series “Evangeline Reflected,” for instance, George’s photographs or “metaphors,” which some describe as Southern Gothic or Pictorial, appear as dreamlike spectral allusions to the culture-threatened “resiliency” of Acadian and Creole families and their “modern-day exile in America.” Her “Gumbo’s Virtue” images, reflecting Louisiana’s diverse cultural spices, “feeds the memory that grows on the backyard vine” of her youth. Another series titled “Three Chapters of Illumination” describes, as she says, a “metaphorical journey towards liberated living” from “bondage to spiritual faith, from spiritual faith to great courage, and from courage to liberty.” The staging, composition and dark ethereal mood lighting give her images the appearance of art photography popular in an earlier era. Yet, whether stated or implied, Louisiana’s stories, history, literature and myths are common almost spiritual threads in her work. “Louisiana’s modest roots, Southern values and storytelling carved the landscape of my life,” she says. “I am her daughter and whether or not one sees Louisiana in one of my images is irrelevant. She is always there. I sense her in her old things that still have a purpose, in her soft blanket of pine straw beneath my feet, and her suffocating summer nights. I smell her in that strong coffee, in the mud and the paper mills. I see her in the blur of the cotton and the sugar cane fields as I pass by as well as the small white churches that dot the landscape. I hear her voice in the distant train whistles and the song of the cicada signaling the dark and in the accents of the people I love.” Unlike documentary photographers who capture images of what they see, George composes her settings much like a stage director setting the scene, devising

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(above) “The Descent of Man” (facing page, left) “The Messenger” (right) “Exile Without End” (bottom) Shreveport photographer Ann George (following page) “Destiny”

costumes, gathering props, posing performers and guiding the story. There are two types of photographers, says George, who is mostly self-taught. Some are “constructors” and others, like documentary photographers, are “finders.” She’s a constructor. “I like developing a story for an image,” she says, “and then attempting to communicate it through the camera and in postproduction. My work in the ‘Evangeline’ series led me to travel the state with my model in tow and locate places that whispered Evangeline was here. I bring in the raw, unedited images, sort them and choose which one might convey what I was thinking or feeling at the time. One of the things that has surprised me ... is that what I captured was not what I thought I wanted to achieve. It’s better, even almost in a spiritual way. I feel the perfect shot is gifted through me.” George’s journey in art photography began late in life and only after a long career in health care. With a degree in nursing from Northeast Louisiana University,


Exhibits Art to see around the state Cajun

“Vitus Shell: Bout It Bout It, The Political Power of Just Being.” New work by Louisiana artist Vitus Shell, through March 20. Paul and Lulu Hilliard University Art Museum, Lafayette. hilliardmuseum.org Central

“Connected Visions: Louisiana’s Artistic Lineage.” Development of art in Louisiana through connections between artists and educators, through 2022. Alexandria Museum of Art. themuseum.org NOLA

“Inventing Acadia: Painting and Place in Louisiana.” today’s University of Louisiana at Monroe, she spent the next 10 years as an intensive care and trauma nurse at the LSU Medical Center in Shreveport. From there, George moved on to management positions while founding and operating 20 hospitals in a private health care system. Then in 2005 the nurse became the patient when she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Not to be undone, George gradually withdrew from the business world as she delved deeper into photography where she found solace and expression. Fortunately, George had found that portal to solace during a 1995 visit to a New Orleans photography gallery where she saw the work of the internationally acclaimed Texas-born Louisiana photographer Josephine Sacabo. Her work opened George’s imagination to the self-expressive possibilities of art photography. She saw how she could stage and create images based on stories, fairy tales, literature and experiences in her own life. “It took my breath away,” says George. “Sacabo’s ‘Susana San Juan’ image was staring into my soul. That day I understood what all the fuss over art was all about. I never had such an appreciation for it until then. It was right there at that moment staring at Susana San Juan that I knew that one day I wanted to learn how to photograph in a way that made me feel like that. To tell you the truth, I have never reached that same sensation

Nineteenth century Louisiana landscape painting, through Jan. 26. New Orleans Museum of Art. noma.org North

“Synthesis: Art and Nature in the PostDigital Age.” Artists worldwide look beyond boundaries of nature and technology, through Feb. 8. Masur Museum of Art, Monroe. masurmuseum.org Plantation

“Destination: Latin America.” Historical and artistic movements influencing Latin American art, through Feb. 9. LSU Museum of Art, Baton Rouge. lsumoa.org

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a rt

with my own work. I think it will be something I continue to chase as I improve and try new things.” Sacabo eventually became a friend and mentor, while encouraging George to pursue art photography. “She became my biggest cheerleader and had a no-nonsense attitude toward my self-doubt,” George says. “It was the most pivotal point in my photographic and personal life. My work is in the world because of Josephine. She told me to get it out there, and as much as I felt unworthy, I could not ignore her. I hit the ground running, and since then, her words have been validated by others concerning my work.” When asked about George’s work, Sacabo described her as “a photographer of great depth whose vision is expressed with true courage and heart-stopping beauty.” George did indeed hit the ground running. Over the last decade her images appeared in over 30 solo and group shows across the United States as well as in Mexico, Argentina and at the Louvre in Paris. She also has received a long list of awards, lectured to photography groups from California to Quebec, Canada, and featured in major publications in the United States, Canada and Great Britain. Representing her work are galleries in Shreveport, Cape Cod and New York City. Obviously, Sacabo’s instructions to George — “Get on with it girl, you are the real thing” — have gotten results. She now gives workshops and strives to be a “Josephine” to other women photographers and to awaken in them a passion for their art. In so doing, she says, “I hope to open the hearts of those who come to learn . . . how to tap into that passion.” n

→ for more information visit anngeorgephotography.com 18 Louisiana Life january/february 2020


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Ho me

Gather Round Vanessa and Jeffrey Mayfield’s St. Tammany Parish house was designed to welcome family and friends By Lee Cutrone Photos by Sara Essex Bradley

I

always wanted the big house with the big family gatherings; I thought maybe if I build it, they will come,” says Vanessa Mayfield, invoking the magical mantra from the movie “Field of Dreams.” Vanessa and her husband Jeffrey, both raised in New Orleans, were living in New York and raising their first child, when they decided to return to the New Orleans area. Vanessa’s parents moved from Lakeview to the North Shore due to flooding after Katrina and the Mayfields followed suit, moving first to Madisonville and then to Covington, where they built what Vanessa describes as a customized spec house. Their current home in Tchefuncta Estates, designed and built over the course of two years, took the design process a step further. This time, they cleared a lot and worked with architect Andy McDonald and Miles Biggs Construction to build a house tailor-made to their tastes and lifestyle, which includes a love of entertaining. They host an annual Christmas party for adults and last year added a spring crawfish boil and an Easter egg hunt to their roster of gatherings.

20 Louisiana Life january/february 2020


(facing page, left) The Library walls are lacquered with Sherwin Williams Rhythm and Blues. (top) The dining room walls are covered in grass cloth painted with a metallic finish to mimic a high-end designer version. Charcuterie board from Snacx. (bottom) Jeffrey, Scarlett, Vanessa and Harrison. (this page) White walls are contrasted with reclaimed woods that add a sense of age.

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22 Louisiana Life january/february 2020


(facing page) Jeffrey wanted an open kitchen with a large island where he could prep for cooking while watching football. Shelving by Jackson Cabinetry. (below, left) The heated pool is used by family and friends even in winter. (right) A gas fireplace enables the back porch to be used all year.

Vanessa wanted a large porch and had a file of images from shelter magazines. Jeffrey’s wish list included a large kitchen island where friends could gather, while he indulged his love of cooking, and an open concept that allowed him to prep at the island and still watch football. Loosely based on a cottage design that McDonald did for clients in Baton Rouge, the finished house reflects the Mayfield’s casual family life (they have an 11-year-old son, a 9-year-old daughter and a miniature goldendoodle) and the beauty of its North Shore setting. There are family-friendly features such as Crypton slipcovers, a screened porch, and a heated pool used even in winter. The Mayfields’ grounded the 5,300-square-foot house with a mostly neutral foundation and added age with natural doors and beams found through architectural salvage. Vanessa then added color and pattern in the form of accessories, wallpapers and contemporary art. “It was important to me to temper the newness with some elements that would lend character and

warmth,” she says. “Incorporating a few architectural salvage doors and reclaimed beams as headers helped, along with taking a similar approach of mixing old and new when it came to decorating.” While the house was built with family and friends in mind, it was also built with input from friends. Contractor Miles Biggs, decorator Marcia Artigues and her daughter Ashley Barrios, designer Angela Groner, store owner Erin Schaumburg, and organizer Kris Fortier are all friends who brought their expertise to the project. “They were all really good about letting me do what I wanted but making sure I didn’t screw up,” says Vanessa. Rather than use a high-end metallic grass cloth by Phillip Jeffries in the dining room, Artigues recommended using a less expensive grass cloth coated with a layer of gray paint and a top coat of silver paint to mimic the look. In the kitchen, Barrios suggested open shelves instead of upper cabinets, a decision that looked right and saved money. “I hope in a way, the house reflects the neighborhood we are so happy to be a part of,” says Vanessa. “Tchefuncta is a wonderful mix of old and new and we are thrilled that our kids are growing up in a place where neighbors become friends and friends feel like family.” n

At a Glance Location

Tchefuncta Club Estates in Covington Square Footage

5,300

Year built

2017-2018

Architect

Andy McDonald Interior Designers

Marcia Artigues and Ashley Artigues Barrios

Standout Features

Large porch with outdoor fireplace, designed to look as though the family added on to the original structure as the family grew, elevated quarters that hint at its Acadian roots, salvaged doors and beams.

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Carnival in New Roads Louisiana’s second-oldest Mardi Gras maintains traditions and embraces novelties By Brian J. Costello

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y the time the 2020 Carnival season reaches its climax on Mardi Gras, Feb. 25, numerous Louisiana cities and towns will have wrapped up their perennial schedules of preLenten parades, balls and other festivities. In one community, however, all proverbial stops will be pulled out as New Roads hosts its latest edition of the state’s oldest Carnival celebration outside New Orleans. Though Pointe Coupee Parish, of which New Roads is seat, has a population of less than 25,000, law enforcement and parade officials estimate as many as four times that number throng the picturesque streets of its capital on the banks of False River each year for one of the Gulf region’s most popular Mardi Gras events. Locals as well as tourists from across Louisiana, southwest Mississippi and other states, have long appreciated the New Roads fete as a tradition-laden, family-friendly and convenient alternative to Shrove Tuesday in the Big Easy. New Roads’ Mardi Gras roots were whetted in the era of dirt streets and make-do ballrooms. The parish’s official journal, the Pointe Coupee Banner, has provided an exhaustive chronicle of the town’s signature celebration since the founding of the newspaper in 1880. The following year brought the first account of a large scale Mardi Gras ball, held at the Duvernet Hotel on Shrove Tuesday night 1881 and attracting “the beauty and chivalry of False River.” In 1885, New Roads baker Casimir Savignol, a newcomer from southern France, was noted as observing Le Jour des Rois (Kings’ Day, i.e., Epiphany), January 6

– the first day of the Carnival – with the sale of cakes containing the “mystic bean”: King Cake. According to generations of oral history, costuming and parading the streets of New Roads began even earlier, with masked men riding horseback and children in various disguises frolicking throughout the community without any particular route in day-long joie de vivre. A sense of the comic, and the sinister, was evident in adult costumes of the 19th and early 20th centuries, as local men often appeared in wildly colored clashing female


Wall-to-wall crowds as seen here in the 1960s have spurred the modification and lengthening of New Roads’ parade rotes through the decades.

Leading up to the big day Many New Roads area residents get their amuse bouche of public Carnival revelry at the Livonia Carnival Association parade, an annual event held in the southern Pointe Coupee Parish community of that name on the Sunday afternoon preceding Mardi Gras. The following day is marked by Lundi Gras on Old River, an afternoon of music, food and contests on Raccourci-Old River in Upper, or northern, Pointe Coupee.

attire with generous “padding” front and rear or in homemade gorilla suits of Spanish moss. Many wore the tall, conical hats called capuchons, seen nowadays mainly in Acadiana celebrations, and cracking bullwhips with loud regularity to teasingly frighten youthful onlookers. Such characters are the origin of the local term Mardy Graw for any “promiscuous” (i.e., individual) masker. New Roads’ first known parade of floats occurred in 1897, with the Banner reporting Mayor Harry Demouy sponsoring two mule-

drawn floats as a promotion for his drugstore business. The first float featured Demouy robed and reigning as “Rex” in the manner of New Orleans’ Carnival monarch and surrounded by courtiers bearing symbols of the pharmacy profession, and the second float carried a brass band. Members of New Roads’ African-American community are recorded as staging lively parades of mule-drawn floats and brass bands in 1910 and 1911, with King “Snowball” and “Consort” ruling in the latter year.

In addition to local events, New Roadians holding membership in New Orleans krewes participate in parades, balls, luncheons and dinners in the Crescent City during the Carnival season, though largely in secret if member of one of the oldest and most traditional krewes.

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(Top) Antics of Revelers aboard comic float Mardi Gras morning, 1952 (Bottom) Jimmy Boudreaux leading his parade, one of the oldest and largest AfricanAmerican orchestrated events in the nation, 1946 (Right) Muledrawn flat highlighting Lions’ beneficiaries rolled in 1942, year Mardi Gras cancelled everywhere but in New Roads.

Mardi Gras has been consistently celebrated in New Roads since 1922 when James M. “Jimmy” Boudreaux (1887-1949) inaugurated the town’s Mardi Gras morning parade with a lone muledrawn float and a brass band on the town’s then-graveled thoroughfares. Known since 1959 as the Community Center Carnival parade, this annual spectacle is the state’s oldest Carnival parade after New Orleans’ Rex, Proteus and Zulu and one of the oldest and largest AfricanAmerican orchestrated events in the nation. For several years beginning in the 1930s, Jimmy Boudreaux and fellow merrymakers paraded through New Roads on Lundi Gras night, arrived by watercraft at the municipal bathing pavilion on False River on Mardi Gras morning,

and boarded floats again for their second procession. Their post- parade “thank-you” notices in subsequent Banner issues stated each year’s king and queen hailing from the “Island Paradise of Negrito” to enjoy a two-day rule in town each Carnival, much like the parlance and mysticism of Rex and Zulu. Mardi Gras afternoon is marked by a second parade in New Roads, founded shortly after the town’s streets were paved in 1931 as the Children’s Carnival. Sponsored by the community’s oldest women’s organization, the Mothers’ Culture Club, from 1932 through 1940, this event featured costumed children, led by king, queen and court, marching through the downtown area and enjoying a New Orleans-style masked ball in miniature, complete with grand march and call-out dances, thereafter in the old Knights of Columbus Hall. The burden of orchestration of the afternoon events and the public’s changing interests spurred J.T. Niland, Sr. and other New Roads businessmen to coordinate the 1941 parade, which featured eight floats and four school marching bands and attracted a crowd estimated at 10,000. Three months later, Niland and colleagues were formally chartered as the New Roads Lions Club, and the organization has continuously staged the parade as a charitable fundraiser. Only World War II kept Mardi Gras off the streets of New Roads. In 1942, the town’s duo of Carnival parades were the only ones to roll, as those in New Orleans and other cities were canceled due to the recent attack on Pearl Harbor. Material shortages and deference to the war effort resulted in the suspension of parades in New Roads as well during 1943-1945. “Weather or not,” tens of thousands of people of all ages line New Roads’ parade routes each Fat Tuesday. Sleet in 1978, subfreezing temperatures in 1986 and 1989, a 3.77-inch deluge and dangerous winds in 2011, freezing rain in 2014 and several other years marked by rain resulted in abbreviated crowds, but the region’s “event of the year” went on undaunted. A prime example is Mardi Gras 1989, when an estimated 15,000 shivering but intrepid merrymakers thwarted a mercury of 26 degrees Fahrenheit, threatening skies and numerous road and bridge closures, by far the coldest celebration in the weatheredcheckered annals of Louisiana Carnival. Annual attendance at the New Roads Mardi Gras ranks as the state’s largest after New Orleans and Lafayette. In ideal weather conditions, New Roads’ crowds are lined as many as 10-deep in some areas. The parade routes have been modified and lengthened to accommodate rises in attendance through the years, most recently owing to easier access from the Florida Parishes and Southwest Mississippi provided by the John James Audubon Bridge spanning the Mississippi River just northeast of New Roads. The less congested residential areas of New Roads’ parade routes and the abundance of


off-street parking lots throughout town add to the convenience for parade-goers. Parking is permitted all along the routes, except for the stretch of Main Street between St. Mary and Alamo Streets downtown, where the thick of activity is given over entirely to spectators, concession and souvenir vendors and the antics of hilarious Mardy Graw maskers. One of the most outstanding aspects of the New Roads Mardi Gras is that its parades are truly “of, by and for the people.” Unlike exclusive krewe parades in New Orleans and elsewhere that limit float-riding to their members, the Community Center and Lions parades in New Roads are civic events, open to public participation. Though the morning parade is predominantly African-American in composition, both of New Roads’ parades have been socially integrated since at least 1953. The Community Center and Lions encourage all interested parties to enter floats or marching units in their annual parades, providing entries are in keeping with the family orientation of the celebration. Most floats are built by schools, churches, businesses, clubs and families from throughout a multi-parish region, and marching bands and dance troupes come from Mississippi and Texas as well as across Louisiana. New Roads’ floats, which were last pulled by mules in 1946, have increased in size but are little changed in design from the early years. Most parades in New Orleans and other places are composed of generic rental floats which appear in several parades each season, but New Roads’ floats are built new each year and in a signature whimsical style despite any seriousness of subject portrayed. Floats entered in competition adhere to the respective themes chosen annually by the Community Center and the Lions Club, these having included historical events, patriotism, children’s literature, music, movies, states, foreign countries and various aspects of Louisiana life and culture. In a kaleidoscope of shimmering and rustling petal paper, New Roads’ floats feature such animation as smoke-breathing, head-bobbing papier-mâché dragons, bubbling volcanoes, confetti-firing cannons and rockets and old-time showboat music. The costumed riders aboard, usually children of the float-builders, enact skits illustrating their respective floats’ subjects upon reaching the reviewing stands and often proffer “bribes” of various sorts to the guest judges on the stands. As early as 1949, the Lions parade rolled with 26 floats, six more than the Rex parade in New Orleans that

same day. In the first decade of the 21st century the Lions and Community Center have featured as many as 35 and 40 floats, respectively, and nine high school, middle school and college marching bands each. Especially memorable were performances of the incomparable Southern University band of Baton Rouge in the 1953 Lions and 2006 Community Center parades. At the head of each New Roads Mardi Gras parade are robed and bejeweled kings, queens, dukes and duchesses aboard glittering royal floats. Parade royalty and its secrecy rank among the most hallowed traditions of the New Roads Carnival. Secret committees of the Community Center and Lions Club select their respective kings, queens and attendants about five months before each Mardi Gras. The kings are generally businessmen or professional men who have contributed to the welfare of the community, the queens inevitably college-age young ladies of outstanding achievement, and the dukes and duchesses are local high school students. Though the identity of the dukes and duchesses of both parades are announced at the opening of each Carnival season, the kings and queens remain anonymous as “Pointe Coupee Parish’s best-kept secret” until Mardi Gras itself, when they ceremoniously unmask before their respective clubs’ reviewing stands during the parades. At least three kings went so far as to keep their identities as Mardi Gras monarchs secret from their wives until unmasking: Richard Glynn, Lions king of 1950; Joseph Beaud,

Rolling for charit y The New Roads Lions Carnival was the first known Mardi Gras parade to roll for charitable purposes and has since 1941 helped the Lions put nearly $2 million back into local and state charitable causes. Among the New Roads Lions’ beneficiaries have been the Louisiana Crippled Children’s Camp, Louisiana Eye Foundation, Boy Scouts program, area schools (public, private and parochial), the National Guard, substance abuse prevention and youth recreational programs, as well as acquisition of street barricades for Mardi Gras and other community events, rescue units and improvements to the Morrison Parkway boat launches on False River.

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(Above) New Roads parade royalty remain masked and anonymous until reaching their respective reviewing stands. (Below) Doubloon cast from Lions parade in 1971 was one of a kind in city’s Carnival history. (Right) Comic floats featuring local and visiting bands and Mardy Graw revelers have been a New Roads Carnival staple since earliest years.

28 Louisiana Life january/february 2020

Sr., Lions king in 1952; and Stanley Jackson, Community Center king of 1991. The unmasking of royalty, presentation of Keys to the City by the current mayor of New Roads and exchanges of champagne toasts highlight each parade. The day’s festivities reach fever-pitch when the newly-unmasked Lions parade king gives the royal command, “Laissez les bon temps rouler!” and the parade lurches forward, bands thundering and trinkets flying, into the sea of bobbing heads and waving hands. Though the floats and trinkets or “throws” cast therefrom and the boom and blare of the marching bands are the parades’ main attractions, other entries include military and ROTC units, high-stepping dance teams (as many as 20 in the Community Center parade), school, organization and festival royalty, equestrian groups and comic mini-vehicles. Recent entries have included United States Marine units and Clydesdale teams. Celebrity appearances in the Lions parade included Louisiana Governor James “Jimmy” Davis astride his beloved equine, “Sunshine,” in 1963 and Baton Rouge children’s television personality William “Buckskin Bill” Black who appeared in a convertible most years during 1964-1986. Bringing up the rear of New Roads’ parades are truck floats, referred to locally as “comic floats.” These huge entries burgeon with scores of merrymakers, many obviously “feeling no pain” owing to the libations enjoyed, and swaying in time to the classic rock, rhythm and blues, zydeco, Cajun, reggae and traditional Carnival music belted out by on-board bands or sound systems.

Float accidents have been relatively few in the New Roads’ century-plus of parades. Most memorable is the burning of the “Batman” float in the 1966 Lions parade, due to a defective smoking device in the “Batmobile” and, fortunately, without harm to the young maskers who were quickly dismounted. Even the most blasé local or visitor to New Roads quickly gets into “the throws of Carnival” as float riders disburse a wide variety of trinkets and other items with gusto. As in New Orleans and elsewhere, the throwing of souvenirs in New Roads’ parades was a gradual phenomenon, done in a sporadic fashion by individual float riders as evidenced in film footage and photographs from the early years. Many parade-goers remember New Roads’ parade throws of the 1950s through the 1970s to have consisted of small hard candies, green apple flavored bubble gum, rubber balls and spiders, whistles and other small toys and paper books of matches. Miniature loaves of bread baked and wrapped by the Holsum Bread company of Baton Rouge were immensely popular catches from 1964 until their final appearance in 1986. The cancellation of Carnival parades in New Orleans due to a citywide police strike in 1979 swelled New Roads’ then-normal attendance of about 50,000 to more than 70,000 that year. From that year on, the crowd’s growth and its press upon the floats necessitated the throwing of more trinkets, spurring parade organizers to stock the floats with cases of plastic bead necklaces and small toys. At the dawn of the 21st century, the throws became greatly improved in quantity, quality and variety. Float-riders now disburse tons of long strands of metallic beads and imitation pearls, logo go-cups, stuffed animals, miniature footballs, tee-shirts, posters and other novelties. Specifically Bayou State touches are frequent, such as necklaces bearing medallions shaped as small crawfish, alligators and “shrimp boots.” Doubloons were first minted for and thrown from the 1971 Lions parade, occasioning the headline “Crowds Bustle, Break at New Roads Mardi Gras” in the following day’s, Feb. 24, Baton Rouge Morning Advocate. “New Roads came alive for Mardi Gras Tuesday, but crowd control broke down completely,” the article related, elaborating: ...as the floats began moving through the downtown area of this Pointe Coupee Parish seat, youngsters and adults alike paid no attention to the wire barriers strung along Main Street. Deputies from this and neighboring parishes and local policemen made no effort to restrain movement toward the lumbering floats and accompanying automobile [sic] as the onlookers stretched their hands skyward for 'something, mister'.” The coveted doubloon, though not described by the paper, depicted on one side the Lions International logo and on the opposite Canova’s statue of the semi-nude Pauline Bonaparte Borghese, albeit not holding an apple but a scroll inscribed “Calliope, Muse of Epic Poetry.” That year’s king, who had ordered the doubloon, informed this writer two decades later that he had for economy’s sake requested


a “stock” piece with one blank side upon which the familiar lion’s profile could be depicted and was a bit surprised, and concerned, when the order arrived in conservative, small-town New Roads. Nonetheless, it remains a Carnival collector’s item. Five years after the above, the New Roads Lions and Community Center Carnival parades featured more modestly designed doubloons, commemorating on one side the 1699 exploration of the area by Canadian explorer Iberville and party and on the reverse the United States Bicentennial. In 2009, the Lions’ royalty and court disbursed doubloons bearing the names of king and queen, year and Lions logo, initiating a custom which has prevailed in most years since. Most sought-after of New Roads’ parade throws now are the hand-strung necklaces of colorful glass beads, imported from the Orient, and which were introduced by the 2009 Lions royalty. They are reminiscent of the mid-20th century Czechoslovakian glass beads treasured by recipients more than a half-century later. In addition to the two big parades, other public highlights of Fat Tuesday in New Roads include the Lions’ annual $1,000 cash drawing, the Community Center’s midway rides, souvenir vendors galore and the day-long peregrinations of Mardy Graw maskers in hilarious disguises throughout the downtown area. Several of the town’s famed restaurants are open for the holiday and offer full or limited menus. Numerous concession stands feature tempting Creole cuisine ranging from boiled crawfish and steaming boudin to beignets, jambalaya, pastalaya, gumbo and etouffee prepared by local chefs, among the waffle cones, cotton candy and other more typical American festival foods hawked by vendors. The aroma of the various viands and the sounds of music, accompanied by souvenirs vendors' cries, the blowing of toy horns and whistles, and the laughter of young and old wafting on a mid-winter breeze offers a multisensory setting to the New Roads Mardi Gras familiar to generations and laden with nostalgia of Carnivals past. Mardi Gras is the climax and conclusion of the Carnival season, which opens on January 6 or Twelfth Night. Balls, dances and soirees are held on the weekends before the big day that is Shrove Tuesday. Locally, these events include the Lions Club masquerade dance and the Community Center ball, with public participation afforded the general public through admission. Gala invitation-only affairs follow the parades on Mardi Gras itself, including the Community Center King’s Luncheon and the Lions King’s Reception. New Roads’ Carnival season also includes countless house parties as well as balls, pageants and other events at local schools, churches, nursing homes and business places, all of which add to the festive spirit. The City of New Roads kicks off its most hallowed annual traditions on Lundi Gras as well, with the presentation of the female attendants of the two

royal courts amidst music, entertainment and champagne toasts offered by the current mayor. Beyond the benefits of tradition, charitable fundraising and affirmation of communal fellowship, the New Roads Mardi Gras parades and related events are profitable for the community. Not only do the New Roads Lions put tens of thousands of dollars into the community each year, local businesses reap even greater monies in revenue owing to the expense of Carnival parades and social events. For years, throughout each Carnival season, local as well as other cities’ and towns’ parades, balls and other Carnival festivities have been recorded for posterity in the Pointe Coupee Banner print and online editions by a personage whose byline is “Carnivalus Mysterious” and touts himself/herself as “nowhere yet everywhere” at the various merriments. Thus is afforded a behind-the-scenes view of events otherwise inaccessible to the most readers. This year, great plans are in the making for Mardi Gras in New Roads. The Community Center Carnival parade will roll at 11 a.m. with the theme “Movies and Pastimes,” followed by the New Roads Lions at 2 p.m. with a parade depicting “Timeless Tales.” Both organizations are anticipating another colorful and entertaining celebration with “surprise” entries and special throws and are extending an especially warm welcome to first-time attendees. In keeping with its commitment to education and programs benefitting area youth, the Lions Club will equally distribute the monetary proceeds of its Carnival fundraiser among those schools that roll competitive floats in its parade. If the past 98 years have been any indication, Shrove Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020 will prove a tradition-laden, fun-filled day for newcomers and seasoned festival-goers of all ages, in New Roads, Louisiana. n

Timeless appeal An early though timeless assessment of New Roads’ Mardi Gras allure is the following, gleaned from a detailed feature article entitled “A Bow to the Town of New Roads” in the March 1956 edition of Baton Rouge’s Register magazine: The Mardi Gras parades in New Roads have become something of a tradition in high quality and though the floats are built by amateurs they have a professional look – each a masterpiece in design, color, detail, and originality…. It is perhaps the thoughts of times past which give that extra sparkle and something out of the ordinary to New Roads celebrations. For tradition is preserved, yet innovations are not denied….

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While New Orleans is the most well-known place in Louisiana to celebrate Mardi Gras, Louisianians know there are lively parades and events for weeks all over the state. From Shreveport to Eunice and everywhere in between, here's your guide to Carnival. By Kelly Massicot Illustrations by Christina Brown

30 Louisiana Life january/february 2020


Krewe of Freret. Uptown. New Orleans. Follows Choctaw. Krewe of Tchefuncte. Madisonville. 1 pm Magical Krewe of Mad Hatters. Metairie. 5 pm

Monday, Jan. 6 Fools of Misrule. Covington. 6 pm

Knights of Sparta. Uptown. New Orleans. 5:30 pm

Krewe of Joan of Arc. French Quarter. New Orleans. 7 pm

Krewe of Pygmalion. Uptown. New Orleans. Follows Sparta.

Société Des Champs Elysée. French Quarter. New Orleans. 7:30 pm

Krewe of Centurions. Metairie. 6 pm Krewe of Olympia. Covington. 6 pm

Phunny Phorty Fhellows. Uptown. New Orleans. 7 pm

Krewe of Titans. Slidell. 6:30 pm

Funky Uptown Krewe. Uptown. New Orleans. Follows.

Sunday, Feb. 16

Saturday, Feb. 1

Krewe of Carrollton. Uptown. New Orleans. Follows Femme Fatale.

Krewe of Chewbacchus. Marigny. New Orleans. 7 pm

Mystic Krewe of Femme Fatale. Uptown. New Orleans. 11 am

Krewe of King Arthur. Uptown. New Orleans. Follows Carrollton.

Friday, Feb. 7

Krewe of Push Mow. Abita Springs. 1 pm

Krewe Bohéme. French Quarter. New Orleans. 7 pm

Krewe of Dionysus. Slidell. 2 pm

Saturday, Feb. 8

Krewe of Barkus. French Quarter. New Orleans. 2 pm

did you know? The original celebration of Mardi Gras was brought to the then colonies from France in 1699 by Iberville, a French explorer whose name can be found all over New Orleans.

Krewe of Pandora. Metairie. Follows Athena.

Monday, Feb. 24 Krewe of Proteus. Uptown. 5:15 pm Krewe of Orpheus. Uptown. 6 pm

Tuesday, Feb. 25 Krewe of Zulu. Uptown. 8 am Krewe of Rex. Uptown. 10 am Krewe of Elks Orleans. Uptown. Follows Rex. Krewe of Crescent City. Uptown. Follows Elks Orleans. Krewe of Argus. Metairie. 10 am Krewe of Elks Jefferson. Metairie. Follows Argus. Krewe of Jefferson. Metairie. Follows Elks Jefferson. Covington Lions Club. Covington. 10 am Krewe of Covington. Covington. Follows Lions Club. Krewe of Chahta. Lacombe. 1 pm Krewe of Folsom. Folsom. 1:30 pm

Krewe of Kings. Metairie. 5:30 pm

Krewe of Bilge. Slidell. 12 pm Krewe of Poseidon. Slidell. 6 pm

Wednesday, Feb. 19

Krewe du Vieux. French Quarter. New Orleans. 6:30 pm

Krewe of Druids. Uptown. New Orleans 6:15 pm

Krewe Delusion. French Quarter. New Orleans. Follows.

Krewe of Nyx. Uptown. New Orleans. 7 pm

Sunday, Feb. 9 Krewe of Nefertiti. New Orleans East. 11 am Krewe of Little Rascals. Metairie. 12 pm Krewe of Slidellians. Slidell. 1 pm Krewe of Perseus. Slidell. Follows Slidellians. ‘tit Rex Marigny. New Orleans. 4:30 pm Krewe of Pearl River Lions Club. Pearl River. 1 pm

Friday, Feb. 14

Thursday, Feb. 20 Knights of Babylon. Uptown. New Orleans. 5:00 pm Knights of Chaos. Uptown. New Orleans. 5:45 pm Krewe of Muses. Uptown. New Orleans. 6:00 pm

Friday, Feb. 21 Krewe of Bosom Buddies. French Quarter. 11:30 am Krewe of Hermes. Uptown. 6 pm

Krewe of Cork. French Quarter. New Orleans. 3 pm

Krewe d’Etat. Uptown. 6:30 pm

Krewe of Oshun. Uptown. New Orleans. 6 pm

Krewe of Morpheus. Uptown. 7 pm

Krewe of Cleopatra. Uptown. New Orleans. 6:30 pm

Saturday, Feb. 22

Krewe of Alla & Legion of Mars. Uptown. New Orleans. Follows Cleopatra. Krewe of Eve. Mandeville. 7 pm Krewe of Excalibur. Metairie. 7:30 pm

Saturday, Feb. 15 Krewe de Paws of Olde Towne. Slidell. 10 am Knights of Nemesis. Chalmette. 11 am The Mystic Knights of Adonis. West Bank. New Orleans. 11:45 am Krewe of Pontchartrain. Uptown. New Orleans. 12 pm Krewe of Choctaw. Uptown. New Orleans. Follows Pontchartrain.

Krewe of Selene. Slidell. 6:30 pm

Krewe of Bush. Bush. 9 am Krewe of NOMTOC. West Bank. 10:45 pm Krewe of Iris. Uptown. 11 am Krewe of Tucks. Uptown. 12 pm Krewe of Endymion. Mid-City. 4:15 pm Krewe of Isis. Kenner. 6:00 pm

Sunday, Feb. 23 Krewe of Okeanos. Uptown. 10 am Krewe of Mid-City. Uptown. 11:00 am Krewe of Thoth. Uptown. 11:15 am Krewe of Bacchus. Uptown. 5:15 pm Krewe of Athena. Metairie. 5:30 pm

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did you know?

Friday, Jan. 18 Krewe of Sobek. Shreveport.

Monday, Jan. 20 Krewe of Harambee. Shreveport

Sunday, Feb. 9 Krewe of Barkus and Meoux Mardi Paw Pet Parade. Shreveport.

In many religious communities, Mardi Gras is also known as “Shrove Tuesday.” The word shrove is derived from shriven which essentially means to go to confession to apologize for wrongdoings. Since Lent starts on Ash Wednesday, people hurry to church the day before to confess, which led the day to be called “Shriven Tuesday” and eventually “Shrove Tuesday.”

Friday, Feb. 14

Sunday, Feb. 23

Krewe of Artemis. Baton Rouge. 7 pm

Krewe of Terreanians. Houma. 1:30 pm Krewe of Galatea. Morgan City. 2 pm

Saturday, Feb. 15

Krewe of Montegut. Houma. 2 pm

Krewe of Mystique. Baton Rouge. 2 pm

Mardi Gras Children’s Day Parade. Lake Charles. 3:30 pm

Krewe of Orion. Baton Rouge. 6:30 pm

Sunday, Feb. 16 Mid City Gras. Baton Rouge.

Friday, Feb. 21 Krewe of Southdowns. Baton Rouge. 7 pm

Saturday, Feb. 15

Saturday, Feb. 22

Krewe of Centaur. Shreveport.

Krewe of Spanish Town. Baton Rouge. 12 pm

Saturday, Feb. 22

Baton Rouge Mardi Gras Festival. Baton Rouge.

Krewe of Geminiv Shreveport

Courir de Mardi Gras and Chicken Run. Eunice. 7 am Iowa Chicken Run. Iowa. 10 am King Gabriel’s Parade. Lafayette. 10 am Krewe of Bonne Terre. Houma. 11 am

Krewe of Kajuns. Houma. Follows Houmas.

Krewe of Hercules. Houma. 6 pm Krewe de Canailles. Lafayette. 6 :30 pm

Mystic Krewe of Mutts. Baton Rouge.

Tuesday, Feb. 25

Krewe of Houmas. Houma. 1 pm

Friday, Feb. 14

Sunday, Feb. 9

Krewe of Cleopatra. Houma. 6:30 pm

Franklin Mardi Gras Parade. Franklin. 1 pm

Krewe of Highland. Shreveport

Inaugural Krewe of Oshun Parade. Scotlandville. 12 pm

Queen Evangeline. Lafayette. 6 pm

Second Line Stroll. Lake Charles. 1 pm

Sunday, Feb. 23

Saturday, Feb. 8

Monday, Feb. 24 Krewe of Amani. Patterson. 2 pm

Saturday, Feb. 15 Krewe of Tee Caillou. Chauvin. 12 pm Krewe des Chiens. Lafayette. 2 pm Krewe of Carnivale en Rio. Lafayette. 6:30 pm

Mardi Gras Festival Parade. Lafayette. 1 pm Jeeps on Parade. Lake Charles. 2 pm Krewe of Hephaestus. Morgan City. 2 pm Town Square Media Independent Parade. Lafayette. 2:30 pm Motor Gras. Lake Charles 3 pm Krewe of Krewes’. Lake Charles. 5 pm Krewe of Illusions. Lake Charles. 7:30 pm

Krewe of Aquarius. Houma. 6:30 pm

Sunday, Feb. 16 Courir de Mardi Gras. Vermilionville. Krewe of Hyacinthians. Houma. 12 pm

Wednesday, Feb. 19

Krewe of Titans. Houma. Follows Hyacinthians.

LSUA Mardi Gras Parade. Alexandria. 12 pm

Thursday, Feb. 20

Saturday, Feb. 22

Lighted Boat Parade. Lake Charles. 7 pm

Children’s Parade. Alexandria. 10 am Mardi Gras Parade. Leesville. 2 pm

Friday, Feb. 21 Krewe of Aphrodite. Houma. 6 :30 pm

Sunday, Feb. 23

Mardi Gras Merchants’ Parade. Downtown Lake Charles. 7 pm

Krewes Parade. Alexandria. 2 pm

Krewe of Adonis. Morgan City. 7 pm

Saturday, Feb. 22 Children’s Parade. Lafayette. 12:30 pm Cypremort Point Parade. Cypremort Point. 1 pm Baldwin Mardi Gras Parade. Baldwin. 1 pm Mystical Krewe of Barkus. Lake Charles Civic Center. 2 pm Krewe of Dionysus. Bayou Vista. 2 pm Krewe of Omega. Lake Charles. 2 pm Krewe of Bonaparte. Lafayette. 6:30 pm Krewe of Mardi Gras. Houma. 6:30 pm

32 Louisiana Life january/february 2020

did you know? The first Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans was held Feb. 24, 1857 with the Krewe of Comus, who paraded through the streets and held a grand ball for the krewe members.


SPONSORED

Home Grown Mardi Gras brings out the best of Louisiana, with colorful costumes, decadent foods, festive parties, lively parades and fun for the whole family. The state’s creativity, ingenuity, and flare are on full display during this time of year. This winter season, enjoy all that makes Louisiana such a uniquely fun place to live by reveling in all things home grown. From local businesses and restaurants to clubs, krewes, and organizations, there are a variety of entities offering products and services that highlight the culture and community of Louisiana by using locally sourced materials and ingredients or by employing local workers and craftspeople who bring a personal touch. Show your Louisiana pride this winter by exploring the following home grown brands. Based in New Orleans, Tchoup Industries knows the importance of being hands-free for Mardi Gras and festival season. One of their best-selling handmade bag styles is the Slim Fanny Pack, which offers a secure place for your belongings while letting you “do what you wanna.” The Slim Fanny Pack also features Tchoup Industries’ custom hook closure that doubles as a bottle opener. Laissez les bon temp roulez!

LouisianaLife.com 33


Each year, we comb the state in search of Louisianians doing great things at home and, potentially, around the country or even the world. We look for individuals who stand out in their professions, give back and represent what’s best about the Pelican State. From teachers and artists to healthcare professionals and poets, these are the people who enhance our daily lives in more ways than one. We are thrilled to present to you our 2020 Louisianians of the Year.

Louisianians of the year

by cherĂŠ coen, fritz esker + John Kemp portraits by romero + romero


BUSINESS

Matt Saurage A Louisiana institution, Community Coffee, turned 100 in 2019. Norman Saurage founded the company and it has stayed in the Saurage family. Now, Matt Saurage, the 4th generation owner of Community Coffee, hopes the business will thrive for another hundred years. Growing up, Saurage, who lives in Baton Rouge, appreciated the family business and was proud of it, but wasn't sure it was what he wanted to do for the rest of his life. But at age 25, he felt the itch to rejoin Community Coffee shortly after getting married. “Something in my heart made me pick up the phone and call home,” Saurage said. “I missed the people.” Shortly after returning to Community Coffee, the now-50-year-old Saurage went to Brazil for three months in the summer of 1996 to work with coffee farmers. Saurage described it as an “almost spiritual experience” that cemented his love for the coffee business. Saurage, who starts every morning with a cup of dark roast, said meeting consumers’ changing demands and expectations of coffee is a challenge, but that is part of what keeps the work fun. “We may be financially conservative, but we are strategically aggressive,” Saurage said. In addition to his work with Community Coffee, Saurage is also involved with World Coffee Research examining

ways the industry can fight climate change. Increased intense rainfall from climate change can lead to fungus, which can destroy coffee crops. While Saurage does not know if his five children (ages 13 to 22) will join him in the family business, he says they will have the same freedom to make up their own minds that he was given by his parents. “They’re not expected to join the business, but each of them knows they’re welcome,” Saurage said. Saurage was also quick to point out that it’s not just the Saurage family that has kept Community Coffee going strong for 100 years. Multiple generations of other families have worked for Community Coffee at various positions in the company. “We’re not one family’s business,” Saurage said. “We’re many families’ business.” - by Fritz Esker

LouisianaLife.com 35


SCIENCE

Alyssa Carson Eighteen-year-old Alyssa Carson first began dreaming of space travel when she was a small child watching the Nickelodeon TV show "The Backyardigans." There was an episode titled “Mission to Mars” and Alyssa had a poster of it on her wall. Throughout her childhood, she has worked to achieve her dream of one day becoming an astronaut. The Baton Rouge native’s accomplishments include graduating the Advanced Space Academy and the National Flight Academy. At 15, she became the youngest person accepted into the Advanced PoSSUM Space Academy. Currently, she is in her freshman year at Florida Tech studying astrobiology. Astrobiology focuses on the potential for life on other planets — not just human life, but also plant and bacterial life. In order to become an astronaut, a person needs an an undergraduate degree and work experience. So, Carson is still at least a few years away from

36 Louisiana Life january/february 2020

reaching her goal. One of her dreams is flying to Mars. NASA is currently working on sending people to the red planet, Earth’s closest neighbor. While no manned Mars voyage is imminent, Carson believes it will happen sometime in the early 2030s. She does not think solar system exploration will end there, either. “I don’t think that it stops at Mars,” Carson said. “I hope after Mars there’s a kid with a dream to go to one of the moons of Jupiter.” Encouraging children to follow their dreams is important to Carson. When she was 9, she received a confidence boost when she met shuttle astronaut Sandra Magnus. “It made me realize that I could work hard and my dream could become a reality,” Carson said. Carson has traveled to many camps and schools throughout Louisiana to talk to children about how they can pursue careers in space travel. She has even done TED talks on the subject. One such talk on Mars has received over 25,000 views on YouTube. “I like to let kids know they don’t have to wait until college to start pursuing their dreams,” Carson said. - by Fritz Esker


It’s a tricky conversation because I was born and braised in Cajun Country. I’m as Cajun as they come. But I learned fine dining techniques in New Orleans. - Isaac Toups

CULINARY

isaac toups You know someone has culinary talent when they

walk into an Emeril’s restaurant and are hired on the spot. Isaac Toups worked six months at Prejean’s Restaurant in Lafayette before then girlfriend Amanda, now his wife, suggested they move to New Orleans. “When I walked into Emeril’s in New Orleans, the chef hired me,” Toups said. “I started working professionally right away.” From 2000 to 2010, Toups went from fry cook to second in command at Emeril’s chain of restaurants. In 2012, the couple opened Toups’ Meatery (featuring a menu that emphasizes Louisiana cooking traditions), and for three years, ran a second critically acclaimed restaurant, Toups’ South, in the Southern Food & Beverage Museum. Toups has three times been named a James Beard Best Chef of the South semi-finalist and finalist, among other accolades, and came in third along with being chosen fan favorite in "Top Chef." In 2018, Toups published the cookbook, “Chasing the Gator: Isaac Toups and the New Cajun Cooking.” Toups’ father hails from Thibodaux while his mother is a “prairie Cajun” from Oakdale. He grew up in Rayne, learning cooking skills from family and attending boucheries, fish frys and crawfish boils. “Everybody in my family cooks,” he said of his Cajun upbringing. Because he honed his culinary skills and established himself in New Orleans, his menu offers a unique take on Cajun cuisine, a culinary style Toups says has always been in flux due to their diaspora and intermingling with other cultures. At Toups’ Meatery, boudin patties are topped with poached eggs and hollandaise sauce for brunch, burgers embellished with a Creole aioli. His roots may run deep but they mingle with Creole traditions and ethnic culinary techniques. And yet his cookbook explains how to make cracklings and eat boiled crabs. “It’s a tricky conversation because I was born and braised in Cajun Country,” Toups explained. “I’m as Cajun as they come. But I learned fine dining techniques in New Orleans.” Toups is currently working on a new book and toying with future TV appearances. “I always have a couple of irons in the fire,” he said. — by Cheré Coen

At the center of Louisiana’s efforts to protect its citizens from catastrophic hurricanes is its coastal master plan. Coastal expert Dr. Denise Reed has been an invaluable advisor in creating that plan. The 60-year-old Dr. Reed is not a Louisiana native, even though she now calls Montegut home. She grew up in Luton, England (a little over 30 miles from London) and came to the United States for work. She was a full-time professor at the University of New Orleans from 1998 to 2012 and was a chief scientist at The Water Institute of the Gulf from 2012 to 2017. Dr. Reed is currently a research professor gratis at UNO. After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita devastated Louisiana in 2005, the importance of restoring the state’s coastal wetlands became painfully clear. The master plan analyzed different ideas for rebuilding the coast and told state officials which ones were the most likely to be effective within the state’s budgetary constraints. “We developed scientific processes to help the state decide which projects they should spend money on,” Dr. Reed said. Dr. Reed said one of the area’s best assets in coastal restoration is the Mississippi River itself. As part of the coastal master plan, structures would be placed inside river levees that reroute sediment and water from the muddy Mississippi River to the wetlands to help build a new delta. “It’s about harnessing the way the river transports sediment,” Dr. Reed said. “The river is a fantastic resource [to help our wetlands].” In addition to using the river to transport sediment, dredges physically pick up sediment and move them to strategic locations along the coast to rebuild wetlands. While Louisiana is a long way from Luton, Dr. Reed feels at home in the Pelican State. She laughed when recalling how upon her arrival, she couldn’t understand the locals’ accents and they couldn’t understand hers. But now, Dr. Reed is married with two grown children who were raised in Louisiana. “It’s definitely home now,” Dr. Reed said. “I’ve got a Louisiana family.” - by Fritz Esker

conservation

Denise Reed

We developed scientific processes to help the state decide which projects they should spend money on. - Denise Reed

LouisianaLife.com 37


We don’t want people to like our music just because it’s Cajun music. We want people to love our music because they love our music. - Louis Michot

music

Andre & Louis Michot Louis and Andre Michot grew up in a musical family, listening to their father and uncles perform throughout South Louisiana and the world as the band Les Frères Michot. When a brother had to bow out of a gig, teenagers Louis and Andre would often sit in. “They would plug us in and we’d take their places,” Andre Michot said. “Andre filled in for Uncle Billy and I filled in for Uncle David,” Louis Michot said. After high school, Andre stayed in Lafayette but Louis headed to learn French at the Université Sainte-Anne in Nova Scotia. Uncle Bobby Michot loaned his accordion to Andre and Louis brought his grandfather’s fiddle with him to Canada. Independently, they honed their musical skills and Louis learned French. When Louis returned to Lafayette, together they started a band called the Lost Bayou Ramblers. Twenty years later, the Ramblers are making history. They’ve produced 10 albums, the latest a collection of live recordings titled “Asteur,” in Cajun French meaning “right now” or “at this moment.” A documentary on the band, “On Va Continuer!” debuted last year at the New Orleans French Film Festival and refers to the band’s commitment to performing in Cajun French and preserving the culture. The band has also performed for film soundtracks, including “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and the recent documentary, “Rodents of Unusual Size,” about Louisiana’s infestation of nutria. The band has also been nominated for a Grammy twice, winning in 2017 for their album “Kalenda.” The popularity of Lost Bayou Ramblers may be their merging of traditional culture with modern musical styles, an evolution that keeps Cajun music alive, Louis Michot said. “Some people call the Lost Bayou Ramblers the gateway drug to Cajun music,” he said. “We don’t want people to like our music just because it’s Cajun music. We want people to love our music because they love our music.” Still, Cajun French and musical heritage is at the band’s core. “We love where we’re from and we love the music from this area and we feel lucky to have learned it,” Louis Michot said. “We want to share it.” — by Cheré Coen

38 Louisiana Life january/february 2020

2020 Louisiana Teacher of the Year Chris Dier didn’t always want to be a teacher. His mother was a teacher and he knew how demanding the job was. But when Dier was a senior in college, he had second thoughts about his previously planned legal career. So he asked his mom if he could sit in on one of her classes and observe. It’s now been 10 years in the front of the classroom for Dier and he’s still going strong. “It’s the hardest job anyone can do, but it’s also the most rewarding job anyone can do,” Dier said. Dier, a world history and AP human geography teacher at Chalmette High School, said it’s important to keep lessons relevant to students’ lives. For example, when teaching about apartheid in South Africa, Dier draws parallels to the Jim Crow laws in the American South. In a profession known for high burnout rates, Dier said one of the keys to the job is to manage expectations. It’s best to set goals based on where the students are at the start of year instead of setting goals before meeting the class. Another important part of teacher survival is not being afraid to ask for help from teachers and administrators. Collaboration with co-workers can ease the burden on individual educators as well as give them new ideas they might not have thought of on their own. When he’s not teaching, Dier coaches the Chalmette High School soccer team and is an avid traveler. He recently completed a three-week trip to Vietnam and Hong Kong. The 31-year-old Dier encourages anyone looking to make a difference in their community to consider teaching. However, he said it’s important for new educators to remember that the teacher they are in their first year is not the teacher they will always be. Dier said his first year was rough and he has dramatically improved since then. But even now, teaching remains an endlessly challenging profession for him. “It’s never going to be perfect,” Dier said. “I’m still going to face the struggles that all teachers face.” - by Fritz Esker

education

It’s the hardest job anyone can do, but it’s also the most rewarding job anyone can do. - Chris Dier

chris dier


ART

Malaika Favorite Malaika Favorite is a poet and artist whose paintings grace collections across the nation. Her list of honors includes an African American Institute grant to study art in West Africa, a FulbrightHays grant, and the 2018 Michael Crespo Visual Artist Fellowship for her contributions to the visual arts in Baton Rouge. But most importantly, the Geismar resident through her art and poetry rose above the soul-scarring bigotry of the 1950s and '60s to tell the AfricanAmerican story. “My background in creating historical pieces stems from my fascination with the history of African-American people, an interest initiated by a lack of adequate acknowledgement of their place in history,” Favorite says. Born in 1949 in Ascension Parish, Barbara “Malaika” Favorite and her parents broke barriers in 1965 when she was in the 11th grade and first integrated the all-white Dutchtown High School. “If I sat at the lunch table, everyone left,” she says. “They called me names and threw things at me. Some would spit at me or made jokes about me. I mostly ignored them and focused on my lesson. At recess I used

to sit outside and draw pictures. The little first grade kids would come to watch and beg me to draw something for them. They were too young to hate.” Favorite went on to study art at LSU where she again encountered racism and flirted with black militancy, which brought FBI agents knocking at her door. And like many young AfricanAmericans in the 1970s who adopted African names, Favorite chose “Malaika,” a Swahili word meaning messenger or angel. “Many of my early paintings were about racism and race issues,” says Favorite. “I wrote a lot of protest poetry and I cursed a lot, especially in my writing.” Today, her poems are “a door to another space” and her art “a form of meditation” and “cultural investigation” that takes a more universal look at “what it means to be a part of the American collective reality.” “As I observe the political, social and cultural landscape of America,” says Favorite, who once taught art at Grambling State University and LSU. “I offer my art as a starting point for discussion.” - by john r. kemp

LouisianaLife.com 39


literary

John Warner Smith In 2019, the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities and Governor John Bel Edwards appointed John Warner Smith to be the state’s poet laureate. Smith was the first African-American male to earn the title. “I’m blessed to have the honor and privilege of that distinction,” Smith said. The 66-year-old Morgan City native said he draws from a lifetime of experiences in Louisiana, as well as his parents’ and grandparents’ experiences, when crafting his poems. He strives to be both “imaginative and truthful” in his work. He said he has always had an interest in reading and literature. In the late '90s, he started dabbling in writing poetry. At first, it was just for himself and he had no expectations of his work ever being published. But as the years progressed, he started attending workshops and honing his craft. He would eventually receive an MFA in creative writing from the University of New Orleans.

Smith has published three collections of poetry: A Mandala of Hands (2015), Soul Be A Witness (2016), and Spirits of the Gods (2017). Smith believes poetry can help people think and feel emotions they might not otherwise have felt. “Poetry can be a bridge that can cross many of the differences between people of different races and economic backgrounds,” Smith said. Smith said many other poets have inspired his work. He admires Robert Frost’s use of nature as a metaphor of the human condition. He also loves the Harlem Renaissance poets, as well as Yusef Komunyakaa, Rita Dove, Lucille Clifton, Tracy K. Smith, and Terrance Hayes. In addition to his poetry, Smith is a passionate education advocate. He works as the CEO of Education’s Next Horizon. It is a Baton Rouge non-profit that works on education research and policy advocacy. In particular, Smith is passionate about providing better education opportunities for children from birth to age 3. He also teaches part-time at Southern University of Baton Rouge. When he is not writing or working, Smith follows Louisiana sports on weekends. He is also a husband and proud father of three children and 10 grandchildren. - by Fritz Esker

40 Louisiana Life january/february 2020


I just grew up knowing that nursing was what I wanted to do. - Jessica Landry

healthcare

Jessica Landry A few years ago, Assistant Professor for Clinical Nursing

at LSU Health Sciences Center Jessica Landry was working in a Northshore emergency room. A 12-year-old boy had attempted suicide. There was no history of mental illness, no history of abuse. It seemed like the young man had a good life. When Landry asked the boy why he did it, his answer changed her life forever. He said it was because he was a girl inside and no one understood that. “I did not know how to respond to that,” Landry said. “Not only did I not know what to say, I wasn’t teaching our students what to say.” Landry, a Eunice native, knew she had to rectify this issue. She sought out training on how to respond with sensitivity to patients who are LGBTQI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, intersex). After receiving training herself, she developed the Advocacy Program that trains other nurses and doctors how to react in situations like the one she found herself in with the 12-year-old boy. Landry, 45, also works as the program director for the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Program at LSU School of Nursing. She applied for the grant to start the program because of a dearth of Louisiana nurses trained in matters relating to sexual assaults. In 10 rural parishes outside New Orleans, a rape victim used to need to be transported into the Crescent City for treatment. Now, sexual assault victims in these parishes can be treated in their local hospitals. In addition to this work, Landry also travels with LSU Health Sciences Center to the Andes Mountains of Peru to provide needed medical care to indigenous residents who rarely have access to doctors. These efforts have garnered numerous awards for Landry. She has received the American Association of Nurse Practitioners’ State Advocate Award, Nightingale Advanced Practice Nurse of the Year, and the Gay Lesbian Medical Association Achievement Award, among others. When Landry is not caring for her patients, she cares for her 13-yearold son and is an avid runner. Other than that, her work is her passion. “I just grew up knowing that nursing was what I wanted to do,” Landry said. — by Fritz Esker

As successful as LSU’s football program has been in the 21st century, it has not had much star power at the QB position. But that has changed with the arrival of Joe Burrow from Ohio State. Burrow is a dazzling passer who led Tigers to their first regular season victory since 2011 over hated rival Alabama on the way to an undefeated season. He then capped it all off by being an overwhelming choice for the Heisman Trophy. Some pundits think he might even be the first overall draft pick in the 2020 NFL draft. The Ames, Iowa native is the son of a former University of Nebraska football player. Born into a competitive family (his two brothers would also play for Nebraska), he excelled at many sports from an early age. After graduating from The Ohio State University in three years with a degree in consumer and family financial services, Burrow transferred to LSU as a graduate student after sitting behind quarterbacks J.T. Barrett and Dwayne Haskins on the depth chart. In the past season, Burrow has shattered school records for passing touchdowns and and yards (41 and 4,014 before the season finale versus Texas A&M). However, Burrow is not satisfied with that success. A relentless perfectionist, he wants his team to be all they can be on every play. “This year, we expect to win every single game. We expect to score every single drive … If we don’t play a perfect game, we get upset,” Burrow said at a Nov. 25 press conference in Baton Rouge. While Burrow has only played two years at LSU, the quarterback views his time in Louisiana as a special period in his life. At the Nov. 25th press conference, Burrow described how the reception he has received from LSU fans has been “unreal.” He said LSU fans have not just been welcoming to him, but his family as well. “This place means so much to me and everyone’s been so great," Burrow said at the press conference. "I never could have dreamed that this was going to happen … The reception from people in Louisiana to an Ohio kid who came here, transferred … It’s been such a great two years.” - by Fritz Esker

sports

joe burrow

This place means so much to me and everyone’s been so great…I never could have dreamed that this was going to happen. - Joe Burrow

LouisianaLife.com 41


42 Louisiana Life january/february 2020


S P E C I A L ADV ERTIS ING S ECTION

LOUISIANA 2020

THE ANNUAL LIST OF

TOP LAWYERS

HIGHLY CREDENTIALED

PEER-INFLUENCED

THIRD-PARTY VALIDATED


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

Meet Louisiana’s Medical Malpractice Pioneer

Injured patients are incredibly vulnerable. Someone has to stand up for them when they’re wronged.

J

ohn Hammons was fresh out of law school in the late 1970s when two clients approached him needing representation in medical malpractice cases. At the time, he did not practice in that area, but he felt led to undertake the challenge. “I took the cases because I felt strongly that they deserved representation,” Hammons recalls. Both cases resolved favorably, and attorneys from across the state began referring medical malpractice cases to him. “I wasn’t an expert, but I had done two more successful cases than virtually anyone else in Louisiana,” he says. Within three years, Hammons’ caseload was substantial enough for him to focus exclusively on medical malpractice law. Forty-two years later, he still feels “thankful, blessed, and excited” to do this work every day.

Higher Calling For Hammons, practicing medical malpractice is more than just a job; it’s a ministry. “Injured patients are incredibly vulnerable and outgunned against the Louisiana health care legal system,” he says. “Someone has to stand up for them, and I believe God has called me to do this work.” However noble, the path is not easy. Louisiana medical legislation offers significantly more protection for the medical communities than other states. Regardless of the severity of a patient’s injury, general damages can never exceed $500,000. “Under these statutes, none of my clients can ever be fairly

John L. Hammons compensated, but it’s worth exposing the truth and influencing statutes going forward,” Hammons says. Such was the case when a patient with hypertension died from a stroke after a root canal because the dentist did not monitor his post-operative blood pressure. Hammons’ work led to the implementation of new post-operative monitoring standards in the Louisiana dental community. In another case, Hammons was suspicious of a hospital’s documentation that claimed that a fluke heart attack caused a woman’s death following a triple bypass surgery. He fought to exhume the body for an autopsy—which revealed that the surgical team had cut a major artery at the

beginning of surgery and the woman had actually bled to death within minutes. Hammons has taken hundreds of cases like these. Each one, he says, has been worth the challenge: “It’s an uphill battle because our media portrays the medical community as heroes— which, usually, they are—so it’s hard to convince a jury when a doctor is at fault for unacceptable care.” Ironically, he notes, his closest friends are doctors: “When I first started, I actually received threats from the medical community, but I’ve built a good reputation over the years by never pursuing a case that didn’t have sound medical and scientific evidence.”

Nelson & Hammons A PROFESSIONAL LAW CORPORATION

705 Milam St. | Shreveport, LA | 315 South College Road, Suite 146 | Lafayette, LA | 800-619-6444

nelsonhammons.com S-2 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LUNDY LUNDY SOILEAU & SOUTH, LLP LAKE CHARLES

OBTAINING JUSTICE FOR PERSONAL INJURY VICTIMS Personal injury victims deserve justice and that is what attorneys at Lundy, Lundy, Soileau & South, LLP fight for each day. With more than 100 years of combined experience, the firm has obtained million-dollar-plus settlements and verdicts for its clients. When an individual is injured or harmed due to the negligence of another, their entire family feels the impact. The firm’s skilled trial lawyers never walk away from a fight and take on some of the most powerful corporations in the world, often leading to successful outcomes for victims of negligence. The firm’s practice areas include wrongful death, dangerous drugs, pipeline explosions, products liability, commercial fraud, and automobile and trucking accidents.

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Attorneys Hunter W. Lundy and Matthew E. Lundy have been named to this year’s Super Lawyers list. Hunter Lundy founded the firm in 1986 and has a successful record of winning a variety of cases. He has been recognized by America’s Top 100 Attorneys®, Top Attorneys of North America, and The National Trial Lawyers, to name a few. Partner Matthew Lundy has more than 25 years of experience. His principal areas of practice include personal injury, maritime law, product liability (pharmaceutical drugs and medical devices), mass tort and class action.

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

PICTURED ABOVE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: STANDING: Rudie R. Soileau, Kristie M. Hightower, Kailey K. Gallegos, Jackey W. South, Hunter W. Lundy*; BACK ROW: Matthew E. Lundy* NaDina A. Beach, Nicholas J. Kohrs; FRONT ROW: T. Houston Middleton, Daniel A. Kramer. *Chosen to 2020 Super Lawyers

LUNDY LUNDY SOILEAU & SOUTH, LLP 501 Broad St. | Lake Charles, LA 70601 PH: (337) 439-0707

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SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

SELECTION PROCESS Super Lawyers selects attorneys using a patented multiphase selection process.* The objective is to create a credible, comprehensive and diverse listing of outstanding attorneys that can be used as a resource for attorneys and consumers searching for legal counsel. We limit the lawyer ratings to those who can be hired and retained by the public, i.e., lawyers in private practice and Legal Aid attorneys. The Super Lawyers selection process involves the steps outlined in the graphic (at right).

LEARN MORE

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SuperLawyers.com/SelectionProcess

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visit SuperLawyers.com Search for an attorney by practice area and location, and read features on attorneys selected to our lists.

*U.S. Pat. No. 8,412,564

DISCLAIMER: The information presented in Super Lawyers is not legal advice, nor is Super Lawyers a legal referral service. We strive to maintain a high degree of accuracy in the information provided, but make no claim, promise or guarantee about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information contained in this special section or linked to SuperLawyers.com and its associated sites. The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be solely based upon advertising or the listings in this special section. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services performed by the attorneys listed in this special section will be greater than that of other licensed attorneys. Super Lawyers is an independent publisher that has developed its own selection methodology. Super Lawyers is not affiliated with any state or regulatory body, and its listings do not certify or designate an attorney as a specialist. State required disclaimers can be found on the respective state pages on superlawyers.com. ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER: Super Lawyers is not a title or a moniker conferred on individual lawyers, and it is not intended to communicate that lawyers selected necessarily achieve better results.

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LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS

TOP 50 NEW ORLEANS

AN ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF THE NEW ORLEANS AREA LAWYERS WHO RANKED TOP OF THE LIST IN THE 2020 LOUISIANA SUPER LAWYERS NOMINATION, RESEARCH AND BLUE RIBBON REVIEW PROCESS Abaunza, Donald R., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Abbott, Charles H., Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans Adams, Marguerite L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Barrasso, Judy Y., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans

Herman, Stephen J., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Schonekas, Kyle, Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans

Kupperman, Stephen H., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans

Shapiro, Howard, Proskauer Rose, New Orleans

Lane, Steven J., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Boyle, Kim M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Lasky, Catherine E., Lasky Murphy, New Orleans

Brackett, Alan G., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans

Lee, Wayne J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Brown, James A., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Leyens, Jr., Jon F., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Cahill, Jr., Elwood F., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans Draper, Douglas S., Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans

Magner, Michael W., Jones Walker, New Orleans Mansfield, Mark J., Tranchina & Mansfield, Covington

Fendler, S. Gene, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Manthey, Tristan Edwards, Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans

Flanagan, Harold J., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans

Morris, Edith H., Morris Lee & Bayle, New Orleans

Flanagan, Thomas M., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans

Mouledoux, Andre J., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans

Fontham, Michael R., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Sher, Leopold Z., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans Shreves, H. Bruce, Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Silbert, Scott E., Silbert Pitre & Friedman, New Orleans Sperling, Peter E., Frilot, New Orleans Stanley, Richard C., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Sterbcow, Paul M., Lewis Kullman Sterbcow & Abramson, New Orleans Stern, Martin A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Talley, Susan G., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Thorne, René E., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans

Neff, Carole Cukell, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans

Tranchina, Jr., Frank P., Tranchina & Mansfield, Covington

Futrell, Elizabeth (Lisa) J., Jones Walker, New Orleans Garner, James M., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans

Patrick, III, William H., Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans

Waguespack, David F., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans

Gibbens, Billy, Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans

Peck, Stewart F., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Winsberg, Marc D., Winsberg & Arnold, New Orleans

Hayden, Jan M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Plunkett, Laura Walker, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Herman, Russ M., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Pyburn, Jr., Keith M., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans

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Vance, R. Patrick, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Wittmann, Phillip A., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


From Left to Right: Charles "Chase" Theriot Texada Jr., Thomas R. Hightower III**, Patrick Wade Kee, Thomas R. Hightower Jr.* *2020 SUPER LAWYERS HONOREE, **2020 RISING STARS HONOREE

THOMAS R. HIGHTOWER JR., APLC LAFAYETTE

PROVIDING BALANCED, TAILORED REPRESENTATION ENCOMPASSING A WIDE SPECTRUM OF LITIGATION. The Thomas R. Hightower Jr. law firm provides tailored representation with personal attention to clients. The firm has built an impressive record of service and success, with both seasoned and young attorneys: Tommy (admitted LA 1983); Wade (admitted LA 1988); Trey (admitted LA 2008); and Chase (admitted LA 2017). The firm has handled a number of complex lawsuits, representing clients whose claims exceeded a million dollars, as well as defending clients with potential exposure in the multimillion-dollar range. Firm cases reached and have been argued before the Louisiana Supreme Court, resulting in significant revisions to tort law, as well as modifications to substantial evidentiary and procedure issues.

Thomas “Tommy” R. Hightower Jr. has successfully defended and pursued cases in an array of personal injury and insurance disputes. Patrick “Wade” Kee, a former prosecutor for Orleans Parish, has considerable experience in both criminal prosecution and defense cases. Thomas “Trey” R. Hightower III, a 2020 Louisiana Rising Stars honoree, enjoys a varied general litigation practice and has dedicated a significant amount of time to pro bono matters, having been recognized by both the state and local bar associations for such efforts. The newest member of the firm, Charles “Chase” Theriot Texada Jr., received his Juris Doctor and graduate diploma in comparative law from Louisiana State University, Paul M. Hebert Law Center in 2017. Chase maintains a general civil litigation practice and is actively involved in both the state and local bar association.

In a legal community that is becoming progressively specialized, the firm provides legal services and experience to clients in a wide spectrum of litigation claims. Practice areas include general civil litigation, insurance defense, personal injury, commercial litigation and criminal defense. With extensive experience in the litigation field, the firm offers clients a balanced and objective approach. The firm vigorously pursues a prompt, favorable outcome with attention to detail, responsiveness, consideration and perspective.

THOMAS R. HIGHTOWER JR., APLC 1019 Lafayette St. | P.O. Drawer 51288 Lafayette, LA 70505-1288 PH: (337) 233-0555 | FX: (337) 233-5002

www.trhaplc.com


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

WHITEHEAD LAW FIRM BATON ROUGE

TRUSTED LAW FIRM THAT PROTECTS FEDERAL UNION EMPLOYEES AND LONG-TERM CLIENTS Not a day goes by without this group of dedicated professionals making a difference in the lives of workers who face the labyrinth of work guidelines. Over the last 33 years, every life challenge and obstacle helped create the Whitehead Law Firm. A self-made man of integrity, Jack K. Whitehead Jr. never had it easy. He decided to become a lawyer when, as a teenager, his family lost their business in Southwest Louisiana. He worked his way through college as a short-order cook, waiter, construction worker, oil-field roughneck and door-to-door salesman, which all honed his talents that serve his clients today. He states simply, “That embedded memory created grit, drive and ambition.”

Jack and his wife of 39 years, Eleanor, developed a plan in 1983 for Jack to start LSU Law School where he received a full scholarship. Starting out in 1986 with $1,500, some office supplies and the support of his loving wife, Whitehead established the Whitehead Law Firm. He wanted to help others understand the law and avoid missteps. The Whitehead Law Firm honed its legal talents with its business clients in transactional and complex litigation advocacy on commercial property issues, contract resolution and strategic solutions; governmental relations; adversarial bankruptcy proceedings; labor and employment matters; and ad valorem taxation. This all rolls into a tremendous knowledge and analytical base to serve his federal workers on many fronts.

Today Whitehead and the team of lawyers and staff balance a caseload around the country that challenges the federal government at every turn. “Prior to joining our firm, each and every member of our legal team must have overcome some life obstacle placed before them; otherwise, how can they fully understand what our clients face,” says Jack Whitehead.

For the last eight years, the Whitehead Law Firm has focused on issues unique to federal labor unions and their members across the United States. Today, Whitehead and his firm travel the country representing union locals on behalf of over 89,000 federal employees. The firm’s mission is simple: find fair and equitable treatment in the workplace and ensure hardworking people are treated and paid what they deserve.

S-6 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

Left to right: John-Ed Bishop, Josh Davis, Jack Whitehead*, Joseph Matte, Brannon Lenard *Selected to Super Lawyers 11909 Bricksome Ave., Suite W - 3 Baton Rouge, LA 70816 PH: (225) 303-8600 • FX: (225) 303-0013 teamwhitehead@whitehead-law.com

www.whitehead-law.com

Whitehead, the managing senior partner, and his legal team vigorously battle for working people on critical issues involving federal sector employment issues, while handling select high-stakes litigation as well as legislative and governmental affairs. The firm has more than 33 years of trial advocacy and legal experience with expertise across multiple areas. He once opined that he learned how to speak to a jury from his days of selling dictionaries door-to-door while in college. He is licensed to practice in all Louisiana courts, the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court. The firm’s best days are when they receive a simple thank you note from a union worker whose job and lost pay were restored. In addition to his selection to Super Lawyers, Martindale-Hubbell® in 2011 recognized the Whitehead Law Firm as an AV Preeminent® law firm, and Stanford Who’s Who added Jack Whitehead to its list of notable professionals in 2012. His colleagues have honored Jack Whitehead with multiple positions of trust and leadership: Louisiana State Bar Association’s President’s Award (2015); American Bar Association Delegate (2012-2014); Louisiana State Bar Association Treasurer (2010-2012) and House of Delegates (19942000; 2002-2008; 2012-2020); Louisiana State Law Institute Tax Sales Committee (2015-2019); and the Louisiana Board of Legal Specialization Labor Law Advisory Commission. The firm's governmental relations clients include Tulane University and Kologik, a national school safety software company.

The Whitehead Law Firm is committed to growing the legal profession and has cultivated an opportunity for young professionals who possess grit, determination and a powerful work ethic. The firm regularly hires interns from high schools, colleges and law schools and underwrites scholarships at Tulane University and LSU Law School. The firm participates in diversity workshops and encourages community involvement, even closing the firm’s doors one day a year for a collective community service project. Active in the Baton Rouge community since 1986, the Whitehead Law Firm is known for creating sustainable fundraisers and donating time to causes such as St. Aloysius Boy Scout Troop 7, Boys & Girls Club of Greater Baton Rouge, American Red Cross, Baton Rouge Soccer, Karnival Krewe de Louisiane, Catholic High School Men’s Club, Sunrise Rotary Club of Baton Rouge and 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge. In fact, Whitehead was recently inducted into 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge, LTD, with a mission to heal old wounds, open doors and assist with the organization’s mission of mentoring young AfricanAmerican men through the over 200 chapters around the United States. The Whitehead Law Firm's goal is to leave a lasting imprint in our community as we make a positive difference in our clients’ lives.

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS

TOP 50

AN ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF THE LAWYERS WHO RANKED TOP OF THE LIST IN THE 2020 LOUISIANA SUPER LAWYERS NOMINATION, RESEARCH AND BLUE RIBBON REVIEW PROCESS Abbott, Charles H., Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans

Morris, Edith H., Morris Lee & Bayle, New Orleans

Andrews, B. Scott, Dué Guidry Piedrahita Andrews, Baton Rouge

Neff, Carole Cukell, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans

Ayres, Leland H., Ayres Shelton Williams Benson & Paine, Shreveport

Peck, Stewart F., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Barrasso, Judy Y., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans

Plunkett, Laura Walker, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Boyle, Kim M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Brackett, Alan G., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans Brown, James A., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Cahill, Jr., Elwood F., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans David, Blake R., Broussard & David, Lafayette Draper, Douglas S., Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans

Preis, Jr., Edwin G., Preis, Lafayette Roy, James P., Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, Lafayette Scofield, Bryan D., Scofield & Rivera, Lafayette Shapiro, Howard, Proskauer Rose, New Orleans Sher, Leopold Z., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans

Flanagan, Harold J., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans

Shreves, H. Bruce, Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

Flanagan, Thomas M., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans

Silbert, Scott E., Silbert Pitre & Friedman, New Orleans

Fontham, Michael R., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Garner, James M., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans

Simon, Jr., Lawrence P., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Smith, IV, S. Christie, SmithAdvocates, Leesville Sperling, Peter E., Frilot, New Orleans

Hayden, Jan M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Stanley, Richard C., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans

Herman, Russ M., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Sterbcow, Paul M., Lewis Kullman Sterbcow & Abramson, New Orleans

Herman, Stephen J., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Kallam, Robert M., Kean Miller, Lafayette

Talley, Susan G., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Lane, Steven J., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Thorne, René E., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans

Lasky, Catherine E., Lasky Murphy, New Orleans

Tranchina, Jr., Frank P., Tranchina & Mansfield, Covington

Lee, Wayne J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Vance, R. Patrick, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Leyens, Jr., Jon F., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Magner, Michael W., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Waguespack, David F., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans

10

BARRASSO, JUDY Y. • Ranked Number Two • Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans CAHILL, JR., ELWOOD F. Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans HERMAN, RUSS M. Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

ROY, JAMES P. Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, Lafayette SHAPIRO, HOWARD • Ranked Number Three • Proskauer Rose, New Orleans SHER, LEOPOLD Z. • Ranked Number One • Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans TALLEY, SUSAN G. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans VANCE, R. PATRICK Jones Walker, New Orleans WALTERS, JR., EDWARD J. Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge WITTMANN, PHILLIP A. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Walters, Jr., Edward J., Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge

Mansfield, Mark J., Tranchina & Mansfield, Covington

Winsberg, Marc D., Winsberg & Arnold, New Orleans

Manthey, Tristan Edwards, Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans

Wittmann, Phillip A., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Mason, W. Brett, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, Baton Rouge

TOP

TOP 25 WOMEN

AN ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF THE WOMEN LAWYERS WHO RANKED TOP OF THE LIST IN THE 2020 LOUISIANA SUPER LAWYERS NOMINATION, RESEARCH AND BLUE RIBBON REVIEW PROCESS Adams, Marguerite L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Alessandra, M. Nan, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Barrasso, Judy Y., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans Belleau, Ashley L., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Elliott, Céleste D., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Plunkett, Laura Walker, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Fischer, Madeleine, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Puente, Denise C., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

Furr, Susan W., Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge Futrell, Elizabeth (Lisa) J., Jones Walker, New Orleans Hardin, Pauline F., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Boyle, Kim M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Hayden, Jan M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Calhoun, Jaye A., Kean Miller, New Orleans

Henry, Miriam Wogan, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Cancienne, Phyllis G., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge

Lasky, Catherine E., Lasky Murphy, New Orleans

Degan, Nancy Scott, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Neff, Carole Cukell, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans

S-8 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

Morris, Edith H., Morris Lee & Bayle, New Orleans

Samuels, Kara Hadican, Kara Hadican Samuels & Associates, New Orleans Schnabel, Marta-Ann, O’Bryon & Schnabel, New Orleans Talley, Susan G., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Theard, Kelly E., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Thorne, René E., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

SHER GARNER CAHILL RICHTER KLEIN & HILBERT, L.L.C. NEW ORLEANS

LEFT TO RIGHT:

PETER L. HILBERT, JR.*, RYAN O. LUMINAIS**, MARIE A. MOORE*, ELWOOD F. CAHILL, JR.*†‡, STEVEN I. KLEIN*, TRAVIS A. BEATON**, MARTHA Y. CURTIS*, KEVIN M. MCGLONE*, JAMES M. GARNER*†, JONATHAN B. CERISE**, LEOPOLD Z. SHER*†‡, DEBRA J. FISCHMAN*, JOSHUA S. FORCE*, JOHN T. BALHOFF, II*, NEAL J. KLING* NOT PICTURED: RICHARD P. RICHTER* *CHOSEN TO 2020 SUPER LAWYERS; **CHOSEN TO 2020 RISING STARS † TOP 50 LOUISIANA & NEW ORLEANS; ‡ TOP 10 LOUISIANA

Celebrating 20 years as a leader in commercial and business law, Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. focuses on litigation and transactional matters. The firm represents a full spectrum of clients, ranging from individuals to major, multinational companies. This team of award-winning attorneys serves a multijurisdictional clientele and offers the sophisticated legal services of a large firm while maintaining the responsiveness, attention and efficiency of a smaller firm. AREAS OF PRACTICE

Clients regularly engage the firm to handle major commercial transactions, including real estate, tax, corporate, finance and banking. The firm’s litigation practice includes commercial litigation, mass torts, corporate internal investigations, insurance, maritime and admiralty law, municipal, First Amendment, administrative law, energy and environmental law, creditors’ rights, bankruptcy, toxic torts, products and premises liability, arbitration, RICO violations and white-collar crime.

THE A-TEAM OF BUSINESS AND COMMERCIAL LAWYERS

10+ YEARS

SELECTED TO Super Lawyers

Leopold Z. Sher James M. Garner Elwood F. Cahill, Jr. Richard P. Richter Steven I. Klein Peter L. Hilbert, Jr. Marie A. Moore Neal J. Kling Joshua S. Force

909 POYDRAS ST., SUITE 2800, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112 PH: (504) 299-2100

shergarner.com

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS

PRACTICE AREA INDEX Administrative Law .................................. S-10 Alternative Dispute Resolution ............... S-10 Antitrust Litigation ................................... S-10 Appellate .................................................. S-10 Banking..................................................... S-10

THE LIST BY PRIMARY AREA OF PRACTICE The list was finalized as of July 16, 2019. Any updates to the list (for example, status changes or disqualifying events) will be reflected on superlawyers.com.

Bankruptcy: Business ............................... S-10

Names and page numbers in RED indicate a profile on the specified page.

Bankruptcy: Consumer............................. S-10

Phone numbers included only for attorneys with paid Super Lawyers print advertisements.

Business Litigation ................................... S-10 Business/Corporate ..................................S-12 Civil Litigation: Defense ............................S-12 Civil Litigation: Plaintiff .............................S-13

Only attorneys who data verified with Super Lawyers for current year included on this list. All current selections reflected on superlawyers.com profiles.

Class Action/Mass Torts ...........................S-13

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

Construction Litigation .............................S-13

Dicharry, Christopher J., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

Consumer Law...........................................S-13 Creditor Debtor Rights ..............................S-13 Criminal Defense .......................................S-13 Criminal Defense: White Collar ................S-13 Elder Law ...................................................S-14

Derbes, IV, Albert J., The Derbes Law Firm, Metairie, 504-837-1230

ALBERT J. DERBES, IV THE DERBES LAW FIRM, LLC Metairie • 504-837-1230

www.derbeslaw.com

Draper, Douglas S., Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Drell, Bradley L., Gold Weems Bruser Sues & Rundell, Alexandria Forsyth, J. David, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans Futrell, Elizabeth (Lisa) J., Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Johnson, Jr., Patrick, Akerman, New Orleans Manthey, Tristan Edwards, Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION

McKenzie, Gary K., The Steffes Firm, Baton Rouge

Broussard, Terrel J., Broussard Dispute Solutions, New Orleans

Messina, David J., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Juneau, Sr., Thomas R., Juneau David, Lafayette

Mintz, Mark A., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Employment & Labor ................................S-14

Shaw, Danny G., ShawADR, Mandeville

Molloy, Kevin R., Simon Fitzgerald Cooke Reed & Welch, Shreveport

Employment Litigation: Defense ..............S-14

Shreves, H. Bruce, Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Patrick, III, William H., Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans Pg. S-4

Employee Benefits.....................................S-14

Employment Litigation: Plaintiff ..............S-14 Energy & Natural Resources .....................S-14 Entertainment & Sports ............................S-14 Environmental ...........................................S-14 Environmental Litigation ..........................S-14 Estate Planning & Probate .......................S-15 Family Law.................................................S-15 Gaming ......................................................S-15

ANTITRUST LITIGATION Cunningham, Mark A., Jones Walker, New Orleans McIntyre, Jr., Alexander M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

General Litigation......................................S-15

APPELLATE

Health Care................................................S-16

Bourgeois, Travis L., Degan Blanchard & Nash, New Orleans

Immigration ...............................................S-16 Insurance Coverage...................................S-16 Intellectual Property .................................S-16 Intellectual Property Litigation.................S-16 International ..............................................S-16

Grundmeyer, Douglas L., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans McReynolds, Joseph L., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Mergers & Acquisitions .............................S-16

Nickelson, John C., Nickelson Law, Shreveport

Personal Injury General: Defense .............S-16

Norman, Joe B., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Personal Injury General: Plaintiff..............S-16

Rubin, Michael H., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge

Personal Injury Medical Malpractice: Defense ...................................................S-18 Personal Injury Medical Malpractice: Plaintiff....................................................S-18 Personal Injury Products: Defense ...........S-18

Stern, Martin A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans Pg. S-4 Ward, Raymond P., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Personal Injury Products: Plaintiff ............S-18 Professional Liability: Defense .................S-18 Professional Liability: Plaintiff ..................S-18 Real Estate ................................................S-18 Securities & Corporate Finance ................S-19 Securities Litigation...................................S-19

Technology Transactions ..........................S-19 Transportation/Maritime ..........................S-19 Utilities ......................................................S-20 Workers’ Compensation...........................S-20

Cromwell, L. David, Pettiette Armand Dunkelman Woodley Byrd & Cromwell, Shreveport Willenzik, David S., Jones Walker, New Orleans

BANKRUPTCY: BUSINESS Bendana, Alicia M., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Caplinger, Christopher T., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Cerone, Rudy J., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

S-10 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

Phillips, Louis M., Kelly Hart & Pitre, Baton Rouge Shelby, Rick M., Kelly Hart Pitre, New Orleans Steffes, William E., The Steffes Firm, Baton Rouge Stewart, Jr., Paul Douglas, Stewart Robbins & Brown, Baton Rouge Strohschein, Stephen P., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge Vance, R. Patrick, Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Waguespack, David F., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Williamson, Stephen L., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

BANKRUPTCY: CONSUMER Willson, Thomas R., The Law Firm of Rocky Willson, Alexandria, 318-442-8658

BUSINESS LITIGATION BANKING

Surety .........................................................S-19 Tax..............................................................S-19

Peck, Stewart F., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Aaron, Jr., William D., Aaron & Gianna, New Orleans Adams, W. Michael, Blanchard Walker O’Quin & Roberts, Shreveport Aguilar, Ricardo A. “Richard”, McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Alltmont, Jack M., Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans Allweiss, Michael R., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Anada, Tarak, Jones Walker, New Orleans Anjier, John C., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS Flanagan, Thomas M., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Griffith, Jr., Steven F., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Gambel, Gary J., Murphy Rogers Sloss Gambel & Tompkins, New Orleans

Guerry, David L., Long Law Firm, Baton Rouge, 225-922-5110

Garner, James M., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2102 Pg. S-4, S-8, S-9

Hardin, III, Harry S., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Barriere, Brent B., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Geary, Covert J., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Bartlett, Tad, Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, New Orleans

Goodman, Alan H., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans

Holtzman, Shannon S., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Barton, Robert W., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge

Griffin, Samantha P., Taylor Wellons Politz & Duhe, New Orleans

Antis, Jr., Phillip J., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Ballay, Brian M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Barrasso, Judy Y., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9720 Pg. S-4, S-8

Hensgens, Scott N., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

Horton, Leland G., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, Shreveport CONTINUED ON PAGE S-12

Beh, Thomas M., Elkins, New Orleans Belleau, Ashley L., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Pg. S-8 Benjamin, Thomas M., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans Benson, J. Todd, Ayres Shelton Williams Benson & Paine, Shreveport

deGRAVELLES & PALMINTIER B ATO N R O U G E

Berger, Jamie L., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9784 Bergin, Edward H., Jones Walker, New Orleans Black, Brandon Kelly, Jones Walker, Baton Rouge Brady, Sean P., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Brown, Galen S., Sullivan Stolier Schulze, New Orleans Brown, James A., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Browne, David L., BrowneLaw, New Orleans Bruser, III, Henry B. (Hank), Gold Weems Bruser Sues & Rundell, Alexandria Burge, Jason W., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Burvant, Robert J., King & Jurgens, New Orleans Butler, Jr., Peter J., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans Carleton, Stephen C., Carleton Hebert Wittenbrink & Shoenfelt, Baton Rouge Cheatwood, Roy C., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Conroy, Stephen K., Conroy Law Firm, Metairie, 504-830-3450 Copley, Steven W., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Cortazzo, Thomas J., Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith, New Orleans Cullens, Jr., J.E., Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge Degan, Nancy Scott, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Pg. S-8 Denegre, Jr., George, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Faircloth, Jr., Jimmy R., Faircloth Melton Sobel & Bash, Alexandria

10 YEARS

SELECTED TO Super Lawyers Michael C. Palmintier

Left to right: Michael C. Palmintier*, J. Neale deGravelles*, Joshua M. Palmintier *Chosen to 2020 Super Lawyers

JUSTICE FOR GENERATIONS For more than 30 years, deGravelles & Palmintier has been advocating for people who need thoughtful and effective representation, including those who have been severely injured in motor vehicle accidents, by medical malpractice, or by defective products. This Baton Rouge-based firm, co-founded by partner Mike Palmintier, also handles maritime issues, toxic torts, business litigation, complex litigation and general tort litigation. Neale deGravelles and Josh Palmintier, both sons of the firm’s founding partners, continue that commitment to personalized, dedicated client advocacy. As they strategize the most effective approaches to cases, they always prioritize each client’s needs and concerns. When colleagues and opponents need to refer cases to a skilled legal team, they recommend deGravelles & Palmintier.

Farley, Matt J., Krebs Farley & Dry, New Orleans Feldman, Jr., Larry, McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

618 Main St. Baton Rouge, LA 70801

PH: (225) 344-3735 dplawla.com

Fendler, S. Gene, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Pg. S-4 Ferachi, Michael D., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS BUSINESS LITIGATION CONT’D FROM PAGE S-11

Johnson, Bernard S., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport Jones, Jr., Philip K. “Kirk”, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Joyce, John W., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9700 King, Henry A., King & Jurgens, New Orleans Kupperman, Stephen H., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9728 Pg. S-4 Kutcher, Robert A., Richard Kutcher Tygier & Luminais, Metairie Lambert, Kent A., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Landrieu, Martin E., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Lasky, Catherine E., Lasky Murphy, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Lee, Andrew R., Jones Walker, New Orleans Lee, Wayne J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Lipsey, Christine, McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge Luker, Lynn, Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Lutkewitte, Thomas J., Favret Demarest Russo Lutkewitte & Schaumburg, New Orleans Martinez, Judy P., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Masinter, Paul J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans McGlone, Kevin M., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2133 Pg. S-9

Schexnaydre, David, Schexnaydre Law Firm, Mandeville Schilling, Ellie T., Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans Schnabel, Marta-Ann, O’Bryon & Schnabel, New Orleans Pg. S-8 Schonekas, Kyle, Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans Pg. S-4 Simon, Jr., Lawrence P., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Pg. S-8 Simonson, Eric J., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Sinor, Jr., Howard E., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Stakelum III, P.J., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie Stanley, Richard C., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Stern, Jr., Charles L., Steeg Law Firm, New Orleans Swanson, Lynn E., Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, New Orleans Taggart, David R., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, Shreveport Thompson, Jr., Walter C., Barkley & Thompson, New Orleans Thornton, Jennifer L., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Tulley, Fredrick R., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Usdin, Steven W., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9721 Veron, J. Michael, Veron Bice Palermo & Wilson, Lake Charles

Pitre, Jr., Loulan J., Kelly Hart Pitre, New Orleans Reso, Jr., Jerome J., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Rieveschl, David, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Sherman, David R., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie Shreves, John F., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Stein, Mark S., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Welborn Weinstock, Marion, Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Werner, John D., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

CIVIL LITIGATION: DEFENSE Abbott, Charles H., Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Balhoff, II, John T., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2100 Pg. S-9 Bienvenu, David F., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Braun, Andrew A., Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans Breaux, Ralph G., Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans Byrd, III, Edwin H., Pettiette Armand Dunkelman Woodley Byrd & Cromwell, Shreveport Degan, III, Sidney W., Degan Blanchard & Nash, New Orleans deLaup, Mickey S., Mickey S. deLaup, Metairie

Waters, Jr., John W., Bienvenu Foster Ryan & O’Bannon, New Orleans

Drennan, George C., Plauché Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans

McGoey, Patrick Shaw, Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans

Wehlen, Nicholas J., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Glas, John Jerry, Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Melton, Barbara Bell, Faircloth Melton Sobel & Bash, Alexandria

Wise, Jon W., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Orlansky, C. Lawrence, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Owen, Jr., Thomas P., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Pardee, Avery B., Jones Walker, New Orleans Passler, Richard G., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans Patterson, Michael A., Long Law Firm, Baton Rouge, 225-922-5110

Wittmann, Phillip A., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Woolf, Matthew A., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Grimsal, A. Gregory, Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Gristina, Nicholas C., Porteous Hainkel & Johnson, New Orleans Hanna, Mark E., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans

BUSINESS/CORPORATE

Hayes, III, Thomas M., Hayes Harkey Smith & Cascio, Monroe

Aguilar, Jr., Rodolfo J., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge

Hightower, Jr., Thomas R., Thomas R. Hightower Jr., Lafayette, 337-233-0555 Pg. S-5

Percy, James C., Jones Walker, Baton Rouge

Davidson, III, James J., Davidson Meaux Sonnier McElligott Fontenot Gideon & Edwards, Lafayette, 337-237-1660

Ralston, Christopher K., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Eckstein, Michael L., Eckstein Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-527-0701

Hoychick, Jr., John, Cotton Bolton Hoychick & Doughty, Rayville

Reasonover, Kirk, Reasonover & Berg, New Orleans, 504-526-2921

George, III, Edward N., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Ieyoub, Christopher P., Plauché Smith & Nieset, Lake Charles

Redfearn, Robert L., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

Grodner, R. Marshall, McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge

Iiams, Sarah E., Kuchler Polk Weiner, New Orleans

Reuter, Bryan C., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans

Hines, William H., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Kuchler, Deborah D., Kuchler Polk Weiner, New Orleans

Kling, Neal J., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2112 Pg. S-9

Marionneaux, F. Barry, F. Barry Marionneaux, Plaquemine

Riviere, Christopher H., Riviere Abel, Thibodaux

Leefe, Richard K., Leefe Gibbs Sullivan & Dupre, Metairie

Neal, Mark J., Neal Law Firm, Monroe, 318-807-0929

Scandurro, Timothy D., Scandurro & Layrisson, New Orleans

Mayhall, Jr., Van R., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

Ordeneaux, James K., Plauché Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans

Richard, Jr., Herschel E., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport

S-12 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

Horn, Warren, Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS Temple, Jr., Thomas R., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

Whaley, John Randall, Whaley Law Firm, Baton Rouge, 225-302-8810

Carpenter, Elizabeth B., Attorney at Law, New Orleans

Weiner, Monique M., Kuchler Polk Weiner, New Orleans

Whiteley, Conlee S., Kanner & Whiteley, New Orleans

Cazayoux, Jr., Donald J., Cazayoux Ewing, Baton Rouge

Wilkes, Forrest Ren, Cosmich Simmons & Brown, New Orleans

Ciaccio, Michael P., Attorney at Law, Gretna

CIVIL LITIGATION: PLAINTIFF Sherman, Kea, Sherman Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-896-7304

CONSTRUCTION LITIGATION Bergeron, Keith J., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

CLASS ACTION/MASS TORTS Arsenault, Richard J., Neblett Beard & Arsenault, Alexandria Barrios, Dawn M., Barrios Kingsdorf & Casteix, New Orleans Bell, Troy N., Courington Kiefer Sommers Marullo & Matherne, New Orleans Bencomo, Raul R., Bencomo & Associates, New Orleans

Botnick, Michael E., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Cimino, Cynthia M., BrowneLaw, New Orleans Damico, Thomas C., Damico & Stockstill, Baton Rouge Daniels, III, Harry L., Daniels & Washington, Prairieville Di Giulio, John E., Manasseh Gill Knipe & Bélanger, Baton Rouge, 225-383-9703

Clement, David C., Clement Gates & May, New Orleans, 504-598-2220

Gibbens, Billy, Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans Pg. S-4

Frilot, Mark W., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Mandeville

Gill, William Robert, Manasseh Gill Knipe & Bélanger, Baton Rouge, 225-686-2311

King, Richard E., Melchiode Marks King, New Orleans

Goode, William L., The Goode Law Firm, Lafayette

Berniard, Jeffrey P., Berniard Law, New Orleans

Kingsmill, Marguerite K., Attorney at Law, New Orleans

Bickford, Scott R., Martzell Bickford & Centola, New Orleans, 504-581-9065

Kleinman, Randall L., Law Offices of Randall L. Kleinman, New Orleans

Bienvenu, Jr., David M., Bienvenu Bonnecaze Foco Viator & Holinga, Baton Rouge

Krebs, David J., Krebs Farley & Dry, New Orleans

Hébert, Stephen, Attorney at Law, New Orleans, 504-528-9500 Hinch, Shane K., Hinch & Associates, Lake Charles Johnson, Sara, Attorney at Law, New Orleans Lorenzi, Thomas L., Lorenzi & Barnatt, Lake Charles

Bohrer, Philip, Bohrer Brady, Baton Rouge

Landis, John M., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Centola, Larry J., Martzell Bickford & Centola, New Orleans, 504-581-9065

Long, Charles B., Degan Blanchard & Nash, New Orleans

Davis, Leonard A., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Melchiode, Gerald A., Melchiode Marks King, New Orleans

Eagan, Jr., Ewell (Tim) E., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Mercante, Mark W., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Mandeville

Sanchez, Walter Marshall, The Sanchez Law Firm, Lake Charles

Orgeron, Glenn P., Kean Miller, New Orleans

Gray, Tim, Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans

Prattini, Jeffrey K., Shields | Mott, New Orleans

Smith, Jr., Kenneth Craig, Smith & John, Shreveport

Haik, Sr., Richard T., Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Lafayette, 337-948-4483

Puente, Denise C., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Pg. S-8

Herman, Russ M., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Shields, Lloyd N., Shields | Mott, New Orleans

Toale, Robert S., The Law Office of Robert S. Toale, Gretna

Tyler, Richard J., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Tonry, Cullen, The Tonry Law Firm, Chalmette

Jones, Christopher K. “Chris”, Keogh Cox, Baton Rouge Klick, James C., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Krouse, A.J., Frilot, New Orleans Lundy, Matthew E., Lundy Lundy Soileau & South, Lake Charles, 337-439-0707 Pg. S-3 Meunier, Gerald E., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Mince, Loretta G., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Murray, Jr., Stephen B., Murray Law Firm, New Orleans

McLindon, John S., Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge Moore, Steven J., Law Office of Steven J. Moore, Baton Rouge Mosca, Provino C., Attorney at Law, Harahan

Tizzard, Julie C., Attorney at Law, New Orleans, 504-529-3774

Utley, Dylan C., DiGiulio Utley, New Orleans

CONSUMER LAW Sterbcow, Marx D., Sterbcow Law Group, New Orleans

Walsh, Michael S., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE COLLAR CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS

Becker, Jr., Walter F., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Finn, William T., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans

Capitelli, Brian J., Capitelli & Wicker, New Orleans

Hayden, Jan M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Capitelli, Ralph, Capitelli & Wicker, New Orleans Castaing, Jr., Edward J., Crull Castaing & Lilly, New Orleans

Nowak, Eric, Harrell & Nowak, New Orleans, 504-522-7885

CRIMINAL DEFENSE

Hardin, Pauline F., Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-8

O’Bell, Eric J., O’Bell Law Firm, Metairie, 504-456-8677

Atkinson, Ian L., Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans

Larson, Herbert, The Law Offices of Herbert V. Larson Jr., New Orleans

Parkinson, Erin Fury, McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

Bélanger, André Robert, Manasseh Gill Knipe & Bélanger, Baton Rouge, 225-383-9703

Magner, Michael W., Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Boren, James E., James E. Boren, Baton Rouge

Meche, Timothy A., Attorney at Law, New Orleans

Borghardt, Franz N., Borghardt Law Firm, Baton Rouge

Petersen, Glen R., Hymel Davis & Petersen, Baton Rouge

Bourland, J. David, Attorney at Law, Baton Rouge

Simmons, Jr., Richard (Rick) T., Hailey McNamara Hall Larmann & Papale, Metairie

Paulsen, III, Dwight C., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans Pendley, Patrick W., Pendley Baudin & Coffin, Plaquemine Price, Andrea Mahady, Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9766

Boustany, II, Alfred F., Boustany Law Firm, Lafayette

Reid, Devin C., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Campbell, Nandi F., Attorney at Law, New Orleans

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

Skinner, Michael D., Skinner Law Firm, Lafayette CONTINUED ON PAGE S-14

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE COLLAR CONT’D FROM PAGE S-13

Lewis, V, Sidney F., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Stockstill, Kevin, Attorney at Law, Lafayette

Malone, Jr., Ernest R., The Kullman Firm, New Orleans

Whalen, Jr., Ralph S., Attorney at Law, New Orleans

Masinter, Eve B., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans

ELDER LAW

McGoey, II, Thomas J., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Brown, Gary S., Brown Weimer, New Orleans

Miller, Eric R., The Kullman Firm, Baton Rouge

Losavio, Jr., Peter J., Losavio and DeJean, Baton Rouge

Mitchell, Michael S., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans

Prokop, Jr., Joseph A., Joseph A. Prokop Jr., Baton Rouge Villarrubia, M. Janice, Law Office of M. Janice Villarrubia, Baton Rouge

Murov, Ellis B., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Pyburn, Jr., Keith M., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans Pg. S-4 Schwartz, Jeffrey A., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans Scott, Timothy H., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS Brechtel, Timothy P., Jones Walker, New Orleans Cerrone, Stacey C.S., Proskauer Rose, New Orleans

Whitehead, Jr., Jack K., Whitehead Law Firm, Baton Rouge, 225-303-8600 Pg. S-6 Wilson, Scott D., Scott D. Wilson, Baton Rouge

Green, Karleen J., Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge

Mascari, Pamela Roman, Kean Miller, Baton Rouge Masur, Samuel E., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, Lafayette McGlone, Michael A., Kean Miller, New Orleans McNamara, Mark L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans McNeal, Robert B., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Murchison, Malcolm S., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, Shreveport Nicholson, Cynthia A., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans O’Connor, Scott A., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Pearce, John Y., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Randazzo, III, Matthew (Matt) J., Randazzo Giglio & Bailey, Lafayette

Rachal, Robert W., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans

EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: DEFENSE

Rhymes, Jamie D., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette

Seemann III, Charles F., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans

Christy, Walter W., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans

Shea, Jr., Joseph L., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, Shreveport

Shapiro, Howard, Proskauer Rose, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Thorne, René E., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Williams, Michael S., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

EMPLOYMENT & LABOR

Fischman, Debra J., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2109 Pg. S-9 Harold, Edward F., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans Knight, Kathryn M., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Marks, Kevin A., Melchiode Marks King, New Orleans

Strickland, Paul A., Hargrove Smelley & Strickland, Shreveport Zuckerman, Adam, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS

Zurik, III, Samuel, The Kullman Firm, New Orleans

Toledano, Suzette, Toledano Entertainment and Arts Law, New Orleans

Alessandra, M. Nan, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Pg. S-8

EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: PLAINTIFF

Anderson, Jennifer L., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge

Williams, Christopher L., Williams Litigation, New Orleans

ENVIRONMENTAL

Adams, H. Mark, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Beiser, Stephen P., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Bickford, Magdalen Blessey, McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Boyle, Kim M., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Cancienne, Phyllis G., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge Pg. S-8 Crochet, Vicki M., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Currault, Donna Phillips, Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Demmons, Larry Edward, The Demmons Law Firm, Metairie Ehret, Leslie W., Frilot, New Orleans Foster, III, Murphy J., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

Harrison, Jr., Andrew J., Harrison Law, Baton Rouge

ENERGY & NATURAL RESOURCES

Johnson, Greg L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Arceneaux III, George, Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette

Landry, Arthur W., Attorney at Law, New Orleans

Clements, Miles P., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Daigle, Susan A., Daigle Rayburn, Lafayette

Melancon, David, Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

Darden, M. Taylor, Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans

Nazareth, Neil F., Martzell Bickford & Centola, New Orleans, 504-581-9065

Davidson, Randall S., Davidson Summers, Shreveport Downer, III, Philip E., Downer Jones Marino & Wilhite, Shreveport Hayne Jr., C. Peck, Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Hebert, Aimee W., Kelly Hart Pitre, New Orleans Hunter, Jonathan A., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Furr, Susan W., Phelps Dunbar, Baton Rouge Pg. S-8

Jarrott, Colleen Carr, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Guidry, Gregory, Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart, Lafayette

Jurgens, III, George B., King & Jurgens, New Orleans

Hymowitz, Steve, Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart, New Orleans

Klemm, Kenneth M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Jacob, III, Clyde H., Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans

Kornick, Cheryl M., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Koch, Amelia Williams, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Marshall, Jr., Charles D., Milling Benson Woodward, New Orleans

S-14 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

Harbourt, Maureen N., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

ENVIRONMENTAL LITIGATION Boudreaux, Jr., Bernard E., Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, Baton Rouge Gordon, Demarcus J., Kelly Hart Pitre, New Orleans Gray, Patrick W., Johnson Gray McNamara, Lafayette Hand, Jr., Albert M., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport Johnson, Mary S., Johnson Gray McNamara, Mandeville Jones, III, Gladstone N., Jones Swanson Huddell & Garrison, New Orleans Kanner, Allan, Kanner & Whiteley, New Orleans, 504-524-5777 Knister, Terrence K., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS Kreller, Stephen S., The Kreller Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-484-3488

STEPHEN S. KRELLER

THE KRELLER LAW FIRM New Orleans • 504-484-3488

www.krellerlaw.com

LeBlanc, IV, J. Burton, Baron & Budd, Baton Rouge, 225-927-5441 Losch, Jill T., Johnson Gray McNamara, Mandeville Marullo, Dawn Danna, Courington Kiefer Sommers Marullo & Matherne, New Orleans Neuner, Jr., Francis X., NeunerPate, Lafayette Nieset, James R., Plauché Smith & Nieset, Lake Charles Palermo, III, J. Rock, Veron Bice Palermo & Wilson, Lake Charles

Reso, Patrick K., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie

Morris, Edith H., Morris Lee & Bayle, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Riess, F. Kelleher, Hickey & Riess, New Orleans

Neathamer, Susan H., Susan H. Neathamer, Gretna

Rouchell, John A., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Sigler, David L., Sigler Arabie & Cannon, Lake Charles Theus, Jr., James G., Theus Law Offices, Alexandria Weems, III, Charles S., Gold Weems Bruser Sues & Rundell, Alexandria

Nguyen, Kim Ngan, Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Perque, Richard G., Law Offices of Richard G. Perque, New Orleans Prados, David M., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Riegel, Jr., Philip, Attorney at Law, Metairie, 504-834-5345 Pg. S-22

FAMILY LAW

PHILIP RIEGEL

Anderson, Ernest S., Anderson & Anderson, Slidell

ATTORNEY AT LAW Metairie • 504-834-5345

Aubin, Terry G., Aubin Law Firm, Alexandria Bayle, Suzanne Ecuyer, Morris Lee & Bayle, New Orleans

Rue, Stephen R., Stephen Rue & Associates, Kenner

Buhrer, R. Scott, Buhrer Law Firm, Metairie

Schwab, Danna, The Schwab Law Firm, Houma

ESTATE PLANNING & PROBATE

Cabral, H. Craig, Harry Craig Cabral Inc., Metairie, 504-831-5319 Pg. S-20

Tranchina, Jr., Frank P., Tranchina & Mansfield, Covington Pg. S-4, S-8

Abbott, Jr., Hirschel T., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Carroll, Teresa Culpepper, Culpepper and Carroll, Jonesboro

Winsberg, Marc D., Winsberg & Arnold, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Adams, Marguerite L., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Carter, Jennifer C., de Blanc Law Firm, New Orleans

Wolff, Bennett, The Law Office of Wolff & Wolff, Metairie

Bayard, III, Alton E., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge

Coci, Phyllis C., Law Office of Phyllis C. Coci, Harvey

Ziv, Barbara J., Barbara J. Ziv, New Orleans

Swetman, Max, MG+M, New Orleans

Blackman, IV, John C., Jones Walker, Baton Rouge

Felder, Bradford H., Veazey Felder & Renegar, Lafayette

Blitzer, Jr., Sidney M., Kantrow Spaht Weaver & Blitzer, Baton Rouge

Franz, Patricia M., Pat M. Franz & Associates, Metairie

Burkenstock, Susan J., Elkins, New Orleans

Garrett, Valerie Gotch, Valerie Gotch Garrett, Lafayette, 337-232-1600

GENERAL LITIGATION

Greene, Jennifer J., Scott Vicknair Hair & Checki, New Orleans

Abaunza, Donald R., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Pg. S-4

Haines, Kenneth P., Weems Schimpf Haines Shemwell & Moore, Shreveport

Ayres, Leland H., Ayres Shelton Williams Benson & Paine, Shreveport Pg. S-8

Hale, Steven W., Hale Law Firm, Lake Charles, 337-426-1071

Benjamin, Jr., Jack C., Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans

Hesser, David C., Hesser & Flynn, Alexandria

Carter, Pamela W., Carter Law Group, New Orleans

Hoffman, Jeffrey M., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450

Delery Davis, Tiffany, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Coleman, J. Grant, King & Jurgens, New Orleans Edwards, David F., Jones Walker, New Orleans Hayes, Steven E., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie Henry, Miriam Wogan, Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-8 Hester, Mary C., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Ladouceur, Raymond P., Ladouceur Law Firm, Abita Springs Lehmann, Lawrence M., Lehmann Norman & Marcus, New Orleans Marks, Christine W., Conroy Law Firm, Metairie, 504-830-3450 Medlin, W. Deryl, McMichael Medlin D’Anna Wedgeworth & Lafargue, Shreveport

Hoffman, Mitchell J., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Hogan, Lila Tritico, Hogan Attorneys, Hammond Howley Connois, Christy M., Bowman & Howley, Gretna, 504-367-4842 Kesler, Debra M., Attorney at Law, Metairie

GAMING Duncan, J. Kelly, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Giarrusso, III, Joseph I., Barrios Kingsdorf & Casteix, New Orleans Harris, Lesli D., Kelly Hart Pitre, New Orleans Hebert, Paul J., Ottinger Hebert, Lafayette Kerrigan, Jr., Robert E., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Mills, Alysson L., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Meltzer, Donald M., Attorney at Law, Baton Rouge

Kobetz, Philip C., Attorney at Law, Lafayette

Mendler, Joel, Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Ladouceur, Lindsey M., Ladouceur Law Firm, Abita Springs

Mengis, Joseph W., Perry Balhoff Mengis & Burns, Baton Rouge

Lane, Steven J., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Messina, Carey J., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

Levy, Robert G., LaCroix Levy and Barnett, Alexandria

Philips, Jr., Harry J., Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge

Lowe, Robert C., Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450

Rather, Jr., James C., Alker & Rather, Mandeville, 985-727-7501

Moragas, Sheila L., Milling Benson Woodward, New Orleans Neff, Carole Cukell, Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Perez, Robert L., Perez McDaniel Faust & Adams, New Orleans Plunkett, Laura Walker, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Poché, Laura C., Attorney at Law, Baton Rouge

Madere, Barbara Volk, Barbara Volk Madere, Gretna Mansfield, Mark J., Tranchina & Mansfield, Covington Pg. S-4, S-8 Miles, Terri M., Terri M. Miles, Gretna Miller, Jack, Miller Mitchell & Long, Crowley

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

Ostendorf, Lance, Ostendorf Tate Barnett, New Orleans, 504-343-8989 Pg. S-22 Patrick, Patrick H., Patrick Miller, New Orleans Perrier, Guy D., Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans

JAMES C. RATHER, JR. ALKER & RATHER, LLC Mandeville • 985-727-7501

www.alker-rather.com Spaht, Paul H., Spaht Law, Baton Rouge CONTINUED ON PAGE S-16

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS GENERAL LITIGATION CONT’D FROM PAGE S-15

Vale, Richard S., Blue Williams, Metairie Williams, James M., Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie Williams, Sharonda R., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

HEALTH CARE Atkinson, Robert L., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Caesar, Craig L., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans Fraiche, Donna D., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Frois, Monica A., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Grey, Emily Black, Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge King, Jr., Errol J., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge

Sutherland, Dean A., Jeansonne & Remondet, New Orleans Teske, Christopher R., Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans

Staub, Jr., Perry R., Taggart Morton, New Orleans Stolier, Jack M., Sullivan Stolier Schulze, New Orleans

IMMIGRATION Gasparian, Kathleen, Gasparian Spivey Immigration, New Orleans

INSURANCE COVERAGE Baumgartner, Adrianne L., Porteous Hainkel & Johnson, Covington Curtis, Martha Y., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2111 Pg. S-9 de Klerk, Andrew S., Frilot, New Orleans Elliott, Céleste D., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Pg. S-8 Engelhardt, Leah Nunn, Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Fischer, Madeleine, Jones Walker, New Orleans Pg. S-8 Flanagan, Harold J., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Giarrusso, Catherine Fornias, Pipes Miles Beckman, New Orleans Guichet, Joseph P., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Homza, Brian A., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport Pipes, III, H. Minor, Pipes Miles Beckman, New Orleans Plauché, Jr., Andrew L., Plauché Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans

Spears, Kenneth R., Spears Gary, Lake Charles, 337-513-4333 Pg. S-22

Treas, Bill T., Nielsen & Treas, Metairie

Thibodeaux, Terry, The Thibodeaux Law Firm, Lake Charles

Wilson, Kristopher T., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Truitt, Jack E. (Bobby), The Truitt Law Firm, Covington, 985-327-5266 Wallace, Campbell E., Frilot, New Orleans

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Areaux, Raymond G., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Esman, Marjorie R., M Breaux IP Law, New Orleans Norton, Taylor M., Norton IP Law Firm, Metairie Walshe, Jr., Michael Q., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LITIGATION Harrigan, Brad, Tolar Harrigan & Morris, New Orleans

Pizzo, Stephen M., Blue Williams, Metairie Savoie, Lyn, Benton Benton & Associates, Baton Rouge

Richard, Thomas M., Litchfield Cavo, Mandeville

INTERNATIONAL Fowler, III, George J., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Wilmore, Charles B., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF Alexander, Glenn W., Glenn W. Alexander, Lake Charles Alexander, M. Benjamin, Laborde Earles Injury Lawyers, Lafayette Alvendia, Roderick, Alvendia Kelly & Demarest, New Orleans, 504-482-5811 Anderson, Jr., Bennett Boyd, Anderson Dozier Blanda & Saltzman, Lafayette, 337-233-3366

BENNETT BOYD ANDERSON, JR.

ANDERSON DOZIER BLANDA & SALTZMAN Lafayette • 337-233-3366

www.andersondozier.com

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS Kantrow, Lee C., Kantrow Spaht Weaver & Blitzer, Baton Rouge Page, III, J. Marshall, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Andrews, B. Scott, Dué Guidry Piedrahita Andrews, Baton Rouge Pg. S-8 Armentor, Glenn J., Glenn Armentor Law Corp., Lafayette

Stubbs, Jr., William P., Stubbs Law Firm, Lafayette

Bailey, Jr., Jack M., Jack Bailey Law Corp., Shreveport

Whittaker, Scott T., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Bassett, Jeffrey M., Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: DEFENSE Acomb, Wm. Ryan, Porteous Hainkel & Johnson, New Orleans Bailey, Matthew W., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, Baton Rouge Bash, Lottie L., Faircloth Melton Sobel & Bash, Alexandria

Berger, Allan, Allan Berger & Associates, New Orleans, 504-526-2222 Bice, Jay, Veron Bice Palermo & Wilson, Lake Charles Blanda, Nicholas A., Anderson Dozier Blanda & Saltzman, Lafayette, 337-233-3366 Brandner, Jr., Michael S., Mike Brandner Injury Attorneys, Metairie Bravo, David D., Bravo Law Firm, New Orleans

DeArmond, Laurie L., DeRouen Law Firm, New Orleans

Broussard, Richard C., Broussard & David, Lafayette, 337-233-2323

DeRouen, Patrick D., DeRouen Law Firm, New Orleans

Bruno, Stephen P., Bruno & Bruno, New Orleans

Fraser, David A., Fraser Wheeler & Courtney, Lake Charles Gideon, Kyle L., Davidson Meaux Sonnier McElligott Fontenot Gideon & Edwards, Lafayette, 337-237-1660 Grace, III, Christopher T., Blue Williams, Metairie Kay, III, Ped C., Broussard & Kay, Broussard Latham, Mark D., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Maselli, Jr., Joseph, Plauché Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans

Cain, Joseph E. “Jed”, Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Campbell, Robert L., Williamson Fontenot Campbell & Whittington, Baton Rouge Chopin, Justin M., The Chopin Law Firm, New Orleans Chopin, Richard A., The Chopin Law Firm, New Orleans Clayton, Antonio M., Clayton Frugé Ward, Port Allen

Mouton, Charles A., Mahtook & LaFleur, Lafayette

Colomb, Brian C., Gordon McKernan Injury Attorneys, Lafayette

Salley, David P., Salley Hite Mercer & Resor, New Orleans

O’Bryon, Kevin C., O’Bryon & Schnabel, New Orleans

Comeaux, Todd C., Todd C. Comeaux, Baton Rouge

Schmeeckle, Seth A., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Perkins, Mark A., Perkins & Associates, Shreveport

Cossich, Jr., Philip F., Cossich Sumich Parsiola & Taylor, Belle Chasse

Sever, Jay Russell, Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

S-16 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

Popich, Robert N., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans

Creed, Christian C., Creed & Creed, Monroe

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS Creevy, John S., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans David, Blake R., Broussard & David, Lafayette, 337-233-2323 Pg. S-8 deGravelles, J. Neale, deGravelles & Palmintier, Baton Rouge, 225-344-3735 Pg. S-11 DeJean, Kenneth W., Law Offices of Kenneth W. DeJean, Lafayette Demarest, Jeanne, Alvendia Kelly & Demarest, New Orleans, 504-482-5811 DiLeo, Gregory P., Law Offices of Gregory P. DiLeo, New Orleans Domengeaux, James H., Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, Lafayette Dunahoe, Jr., Edwin, Dunahoe Law Firm, Natchitoches Earles, Digger, Laborde Earles Injury Lawyers, Lafayette Edwards, Thomas R., Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, Lafayette Exnicios, Val P., Liska Exnicios & Nungesser, New Orleans Fezio, John Mark, The Voorhies Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-875-2223

JOHN MARK FEZIO THE VOORHIES LAW FIRM New Orleans • 504-875-2223

www.voorhieslawfirm.com Filo, Thomas A., Cox Cox Filo Camel & Wilson, Lake Charles

Impastato, III, Dominick F., Frischhertz & Impastato, New Orleans, 504-523-1500 Pg. S-20

Possa, Joseph C., Tyler & Possa, Baton Rouge Rannals, Tracey, Rannals Law Firm, New Orleans

DOMINICK F. IMPASTATO, III

Redmann, John W., Law Office of John W. Redmann, Gretna, 504-433-5550

www.frischhertzlaw.com

Roy, James P., Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, Lafayette Pg. S-8

FRISCHHERTZ & IMPASTATO New Orleans • 504-523-1500

Jacobs, Darleen M., Jacobs Sarrat Lovelace & Harris, New Orleans, 504-522-0155 Pg. S-22

DARLEEN M. JACOBS

JACOBS, SARRAT, LOVELACE & HARRIS New Orleans • 504-522-0155

Jacobson, Tamara Kluger, Attorney at Law, New Orleans Joubert, John T., Joubert Law Firm, Baton Rouge Kelly, III, J. Bart, Alvendia Kelly & Demarest, New Orleans, 504-482-5811 Kelly, Keenan K., Kelly & Townsend, Natchitoches, 318-352-2353

KEENAN K. KELLY

KELLY & TOWNSEND, LLC Natchitoches • 318-352-2353

Roy, John Parkerson, Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, Lafayette Ryan, James P., Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483 Salim, Robert L., Salim-Beasley, Natchitoches Saunders, Benjamin B., Davis Saunders & Miller, Mandeville Schieffler, Will, Law Office of Will Schieffler, Thibodaux Schwartzberg, Michael H., Roach Law Firm, Lake Charles Silbert, Scott E., Silbert Pitre & Friedman, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Singleton, W. James, Singleton Law Firm, Shreveport, 318-631-5200

Kennedy III, Richard Ramsey, Law Offices of Richard R. Kennedy, Lafayette

Smith, IV, S. Christie, SmithAdvocates, Leesville Pg. S-8

Kiefer, Kris P., Kiefer & Kiefer, Metairie

St. Pe, Kenneth D., Kenneth D. St. Pe’, Lafayette

Knoll, Edmond H., The Knoll Law Firm, Marksville, 318-253-6200

Thomas, David Abboud, Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge

Laborde, David, Laborde Earles Injury Lawyers, Lafayette

Tomeny, III, Frank, Tomeny Law Firm, Baton Rouge

Lagarde, Ross F., Ross F. Lagarde, Slidell, 985-605-0527

Townsley, Rex D., The Townsley Law Firm, Lake Charles

Fletcher, Ralph L., Fletcher Roy & Chenevert, Baton Rouge

Lamothe, III, Frank E., Lamothe Law Firm, New Orleans

Friedman, Jonathan P., Silbert Pitre & Friedman, New Orleans

Layrisson, Parker, Parker Layrisson Law Firm, Ponchatoula

Gaar, Jr., Joseph F., The Gaar Law Firm, Lafayette

Loup, Terry B., Morris Bart, New Orleans

Garon, R. Justin, Silbert Pitre & Friedman, New Orleans

Manard, III, Robert L., Attorney at Law, New Orleans

Geiger, Andrew J., Allan Berger & Associates, New Orleans, 504-526-2222

McGovern, Glenn C., Attorney at Law, Metairie

Villemarette, Chris, Attorney at Law, Lafayette

McKernan, Gordon J., Gordon McKernan, Baton Rouge

Voorhies, III, Richard P., The Voorhies Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-875-2223

Gertler, Louis L., Gertler Law Firm, New Orleans Gertler, Meyer H., Gertler Law Firm, New Orleans Gisleson, Soren E., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Goforth, William H., Goforth & Lilley, Lafayette, 337-237-5777 Guidry, Kirk A., Dué Guidry Piedrahita Andrews, Baton Rouge Haik, Jr., Richard T., Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483 Hall, Jr., Alton J., Delise & Hall, Covington

Meredith, Jr., C. Locke, Locke Meredith Sean Fagan & Associates, Baton Rouge Miller, Joseph M., Davis Saunders & Miller, Mandeville Morris, Trey, Morris & Dewett, Shreveport, 318-221-1507 Pg. S-22 Morrow, Patrick C., Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483 Offner, Kurt A., Alvendia Kelly & Demarest, New Orleans, 504-200-0000 Palazzo, Leo J., Palazzo Law Firm, Gretna

Hammond, II, Peirce A., Hammond Law Firm, New Orleans

Palmintier, Michael C., deGravelles & Palmintier, Baton Rouge, 225-344-3735 Pg. S-11

Herman, Maury A., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Papillion, Darrel J., Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge

Herman, Stephen J., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Perret, Kris Allan, Law Offices of Ossie Brown, Baton Rouge

Hoffoss, Lee, Hoffoss Devall, Lake Charles

Perry, John B., Attorney at Law, Slidell

Holthaus, C. Frank, Attorney at Law, Baton Rouge

Piacun, Joseph S., Gennusa Piacun & Ruli, Metairie

Hooks, III, Kenneth H., Dodson & Hooks, Baton Rouge

Pichon, Jeremy J., Wright Pichon & Gray, New Orleans

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

Unglesby, Lewis, Unglesby Law Firm, Baton Rouge, 225-387-0120 Pg. S-22

LEWIS UNGLESBY UNGLESBY LAW FIRM Baton Rouge • 225-387-0120

www.unglesbylaw.com

RICHARD P. VOORHIES, III THE VOORHIES LAW FIRM New Orleans • 504-875-2223

www.voorhieslawfirm.com Waddell, Cameron R., Waddell Anderman, Baton Rouge, 225-636-5639 Walters, Jr., Edward J., Walters Papillion Thomas Cullens, Baton Rouge Pg. S-8 Ward, Aub A., Gordon McKernan, Baton Rouge Welborn, Jason M., Jason M. Welborn, Lafayette, 337-234-5533

JASON M. WELBORN JASON M. WELBORN APLC Lafayette • 337-234-5533

www.JasonWelbornlaw.com Whittington, Christopher Lee, Williamson Fontenot Campbell & Whittington, Baton Rouge Williamson, Luke, Williamson Fontenot Campbell & Whittington, Baton Rouge CONTINUED ON PAGE S-18

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS PI CONT’D FROM PAGE S-17

Wright, Bob F., Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, Lafayette Zainey, Jr., J. Christopher, The Lambert Firm, New Orleans

PERSONAL INJURY MEDICAL MALPRACTICE: DEFENSE Blankenship, Kurt S., Blue Williams, Metairie Bradley Jr., C. Wm., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans Crisler, Richard S., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans Curry, Guy C., Curry Caviness & Webb, New Orleans Gibbs, Vance A., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge James, Gordon L., Hudson Potts & Bernstein, Monroe Judice, Marc W., Judice & Adley, Lafayette Sobel, David R., Faircloth Melton Sobel & Bash, Alexandria Sperling, Peter E., Frilot, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Sues, Eugene J., Gold Weems Bruser Sues & Rundell, Alexandria

Webre, Scott, Webre & Associates, Lafayette, 337-237-5051

SCOTT WEBRE WEBRE & ASSOCIATES Lafayette • 337-237-5051

www.webreandassociates.com Wicker, III, T. Carey, Capitelli & Wicker, New Orleans Willis, Jennifer, Willis & Buckley, New Orleans, 504-488-6301

PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCTS: DEFENSE Capodice, Camala E., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Coco-Ewing, Celeste R., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9700

PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY: DEFENSE Clary, Albert Dale, Long Law Firm, Baton Rouge, 225-922-5110 Gibson, James H., Gibson Law Partners, Lafayette Lund, Daniel, Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Ross, William M., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Theard, Kelly E., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Pg. S-8 Trapolin, Edward W., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY: PLAINTIFF Kott, Joseph A., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Ward, Jr., Samuel C. “Chuck”, Samuel C. Ward Jr. & Associates, Baton Rouge

Cook, Jr., Sidney E., Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport Courington, Kaye N., Courington Kiefer Sommers Marullo & Matherne, New Orleans Daniels, Timothy F., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Gieger, Jr., Ernest P., Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans

REAL ESTATE Cahill, Jr., Elwood F., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2103 Pg. S-4, S-8, S-9 Colvin, R. Keith, Jones Walker, Baton Rouge Crosby, E. Howell, Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Glass, Joseph G., Duplass Zwain Bourgeois Pfister Weinstock & Bogart, Metairie

de Lisle, Victoria M., Locke Lord, New Orleans

Bialous, Todd J., Bialous Law Firm, New Orleans

Laborde, Kenneth H., Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans

Bowling, David A., The Bowling Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-586-5200

Gregorie, Jr., Isaac M. “Mack”, Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

Lavelle, Paul M., Cotten Schmidt, New Orleans

Hood, Ralph E., Kizer Hood & Morgan, Baton Rouge

PERSONAL INJURY MEDICAL MALPRACTICE: PLAINTIFF

David, Robert J., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Ecuyer, Michael J., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Glago, Mark P., Glago Williams, New Orleans Hammons, John L., Nelson & Hammons, Shreveport, 318-227-2401 Pg. S-2, S-21 Lee, Christopher T., Christopher T. Lee, Lafayette Morrison IV, Walter C., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans Mouton, Benjamin P., McGlynn Glisson & Mouton, Baton Rouge

Manning, Kathleen A., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Massenburg, Christopher O., MG+M, New Orleans Myers, Stephen G.A., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Norwood, Jr., Colvin G., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

Morton, James R., Taggart Morton, New Orleans

Sarver, Richard E., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9733

Surprenant, Mark C., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Samuels, Kara Hadican, Kara Hadican Samuels & Associates, New Orleans, 504-558-9478 Pg. S-8

Talbot, Brent A., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Wagar, III, Nelson W., Wagar Hickman, Mandeville, 985-888-8740

NELSON W. WAGAR, III WAGAR HICKMAN, LLC Mandeville • 985-888-8740

www.wagarhickman.com S-18 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

McMurray, Patricia B., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge

Pugh, III, Lawrence G., Pugh Accardo, New Orleans

Russell, III, Sera H., The Law Offices of Sera H. Russell III, Lafayette, 337-769-3260

Townsley, Todd A., The Townsley Law Firm, Lake Charles

Leyens, Jr., Jon F., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Moore, Marie A., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2108 Pg. S-9

Sinnott, John W., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

Silvestri, Frank A., Silvestri & Savoie, New Orleans

LeBreton, Rose McCabe, Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Olinde, John F., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Orrill, Jr., R. Ray, Orrill & Malbrough, Metairie

Schrumpf, Oliver “Jackson”, Schrumpf Law Office, Sulphur

Eyrich, Lillian E., Steeg Law Firm, New Orleans

Urquhart, Jr., Quentin F., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCTS: PLAINTIFF Gee, III, William N., The Law Office of William Gee III, Lafayette Kleinpeter, Robert E., Kleinpeter & Schwartzberg, Baton Rouge Lundy, Hunter W., Lundy Lundy Soileau & South, Lake Charles, 337-439-0707 Pg. S-3 Swarr, Frank J., Landry & Swarr, New Orleans

Mouton, Robert W., Locke Lord, New Orleans Richter, Richard P., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2104 Pg. S-9 Schott, Stephen P., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Sclafani, Kyle, Law Office of Kyle Sclafani, New Orleans, 504-875-4079 Pg. S-22 Serio, Steven C., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Sher, Leopold Z., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2101 Pg. S-4, S-8, S-9 Slaton, James E. A., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, Baton Rouge Steeg, Robert M., Steeg Law Firm, New Orleans Talley, Susan G., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Tessier, Frank A., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans Title, Peter S., Sessions Fishman Nathan & Israel, New Orleans

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS Tyler, Susan M., Jones Walker, New Orleans Willis, Sterling Scott, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Tarcza, Robert E., Tarcza & Associates, New Orleans Treuting, Matthew A., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

SECURITIES & CORPORATE FINANCE

Warren, Jr., J. Benjamin, Warren & Baker, Shreveport

Chenevert, Scott D., Fishman Haygood, Baton Rouge

Weiler, Christian, Weiler & Rees, New Orleans

Graffagnini, Mark J., Cara Stone, New Orleans

SECURITIES LITIGATION Bieck, Jr., Robert B., Jones Walker, New Orleans Freeman, III, George C., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9700 McCardle, Lance C., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Fay, Jr., John F., Fay Nelson Fay, New Orleans Ferchmin, Adelaida J., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Flint, Jr., Delos E., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Flotte, David M., Salley Hite Mercer & Resor, New Orleans

Weiler, John J., Weiler & Rees, New Orleans

Force, Joshua S., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2130 Pg. S-9

Williams, John R., Ayres Shelton Williams Benson & Paine, Shreveport

Goodier, Glenn G., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Zimmermann, Karl J., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Grant, Jr., A. Gordon, Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Guy, Matthew C., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

TECHNOLOGY TRANSACTIONS Slack, Todd R., Cyber Counsel, New Orleans

Haas, III, Frederick T., Pugh Accardo, New Orleans Hassinger, Timothy W., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, Mandeville

Peiffer, Joseph C., Peiffer Wolf Carr & Kane, New Orleans

TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME

Hemphill, Gary A., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Adley, Michael W., Judice & Adley, Lafayette

Swanson, James R., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Anseman, III, Norman E. “Skeet”, Kraft Lege Anseman, Lafayette

Hilbert, Jr., Peter L., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2107 Pg. S-9

SURETY D’Arcy, Adrian A., Shields | Mott, New Orleans Gordon, Elizabeth L., Shields | Mott, New Orleans Kern, Jay H., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

TAX

Arata, Jr., Blake G., Rome Arata Baxley & Stelly, New Orleans, 504-522-9980 Pg. S-20 Arnold, III, Edward H. “Hank”, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Balart, L. Etienne, Jones Walker, New Orleans Barry, Jr., Francis J., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Bertram, Richard D., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Adams, III, Jesse R., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Bland, III, Wilton E., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans

Ajubita, A. Albert, Ajubita Leftwich & Salzer, New Orleans

Bourque, Jr., Charles C., St. Martin & Bourque, Houma

Angelico, Robert S., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Brooks, Jr., Philip S., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Antin, Jr., Walter “Bud”, Antin Law Firm, Hammond Backstrom, Jr., William M., Jones Walker, New Orleans Bell, Hilton S., Milling Benson Woodward, New Orleans

Carrigee, David, Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Cerise, Jr., Charles A., Adams and Reese, New Orleans

Burvant, Andre B., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Chenault, Alanson T., Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker, New Orleans

Calhoun, Jaye A., Kean Miller, New Orleans Pg. S-8

Clotworthy, Robert C., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Cassidy, David R., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Dunn, Richard S., Attorney at Law, Baton Rouge Echols, Michele M., Litchfield Cavo, Mandeville Elkins, Gary J., Elkins, New Orleans Goode, Carl S., Goode Tax and Estate Planning Law Group, Baton Rouge Gunn, David S., Gunn & York, Baton Rouge Klein, Steven I., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2100 Pg. S-9 Koch, David G., Koch Law Firm, Baton Rouge Leftwich, Brian T., Ajubita Leftwich & Salzer, New Orleans Mayhall, Michael A., The Mayhall Law Firm, Covington Rittenberg III, Leon H., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Hufft, Patrick H., Hufft & Hufft, New Orleans Hurley, Grady S., Jones Walker, New Orleans Hymel, Richard J., Mahtook & LaFleur, Lafayette Jarrett, R. Keith, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Johnson, Christy L., Mainstay Law, New Orleans Jones, L. Blake, Blake Jones Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-525-4361

L. BLAKE JONES

BLAKE JONES LAW FIRM, L.L.C. New Orleans • 504-525-4361

www.nola-law.com

Kallam, Robert M., Kean Miller, Lafayette Pg. S-8 Katz, Brian D., Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans Kenney, Jason Robert, Staines & Eppling, Metairie Kessenich, J. Fredrick, Daigle Fisse & Kessenich, Covington Kiefer, Scott B., Courington Kiefer Sommers Marullo & Matherne, New Orleans Koch, Jr., R. Joshua, Koch & Schmidt, New Orleans Koehl, Jr., Edward J., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Cohn, Stanley J., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Lambert, Hugh P., The Lambert Firm, New Orleans, 504-581-1750

Colletta, Jr., Thomas Louis, Attorney at Law, New Orleans

Larzelere, Stephen M., Kuchler Polk Weiner, New Orleans

Cozad, Richard A., Schouest Bambas Soshea & Ben Maier, New Orleans

LeBreton III, Edward F., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Davis, Christopher O., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Lee III, Joseph E., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

DeMarcay III, Lawrence R., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Legrand, Georges M., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans

Denny, Danica B., Frilot, New Orleans

Lemoine, Michael G., Jones Walker, Lafayette

Dill, James M., The Dill Firm, Lafayette

Lemon, II, Robert T., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Dittman, Stevan C., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans

Marino, III, Joseph B., The Young Firm, New Orleans

Dodson, Richard J., Dodson & Hooks, Baton Rouge

Mason, W. Brett, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, Baton Rouge, 225-490-5812 Pg. S-8

Dragna, Gerard J., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

Leefe, David W., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

CONTINUED ON PAGE S-20

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME CONT’D FROM PAGE S-19

Matthews, Douglas P., King & Jurgens, New Orleans McElligott, Jr., John E., Davidson Meaux Sonnier McElligott Fontenot Gideon & Edwards, Lafayette McShane, Patrick J., Frilot, New Orleans

Schwartz, William B., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans Scofield, Bryan D., Scofield & Rivera, Lafayette Pg. S-8

Silverstein, James R., Kean Miller, New Orleans

Mestayer, Michael J., Michael J. Mestayer, New Orleans

Slater, III, Benjamin R., Akerman, New Orleans

Sterbcow, Paul M., Lewis Kullman Sterbcow & Abramson, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Morrow, Jr., P. Craig, Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483

Stevens, Jr., Elwood C., Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, Lafayette

Mouledoux, Andre J., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans Pg. S-4

Sullivan, Jr., Norman C., Frilot, New Orleans

Parks, C. Michael, Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans Pecoraro, Elena Arcos, Pecoraro Law, Lafayette Perry, S. Brian, Allen & Gooch, Lafayette Peterson, Cayce C., The Lambert Firm, New Orleans Plunkett, Jr., Lawrence R., Reich Album & Plunkett, Metairie

TIMOTHY J. YOUNG THE YOUNG FIRM New Orleans • 504-680-4100

www.theyoungfirm.com

Soule, Scott A., Blue Williams, Metairie

Moroux, Marc D., Juneau David, Lafayette

Musser, V, John H., Murphy Rogers Sloss Gambel & Tompkins, New Orleans

Young, Timothy J., The Young Firm, New Orleans, 504-680-4100

Sharpe, David B., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Merchant, Kevin P., NeunerPate, Lafayette

Moeller, Matthew A., The Moeller Firm, New Orleans, 504-702-6774

Wynne, William Pitard, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Talley, Charles R., Kean Miller, New Orleans Theunissen, Randall K., Allen & Gooch, Lafayette Tillery, Jefferson R., Jones Walker, New Orleans Truxillo, Douglas W., Onebane Law Firm, Lafayette Tynan, Joseph P., Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith, New Orleans Waguespack, Jason P., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, New Orleans, 504-525-6802 Pg. S-22

UTILITIES Alford, III, W. Raley, Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans Darce, Noel, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Fontham, Michael R., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8 Marionneaux, Kyle C., Marionneaux Kantrow, Baton Rouge Parkerson, G. Bruce, Plauché Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION

Preis, Jr., Edwin G., Preis, Lafayette Pg. S-8

Waid, Raymond T., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Brackett, Alan G., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans Pg. S-4, S-8

Rivera, James T., Scofield & Rivera, Lafayette

Warshauer, Irving J., Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans

Brewster, Arthur J., Brewster Law Firm, Metairie

Rodriguez, Antonio J., Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker, New Orleans Rome, III, C. Perrin, Rome Arata Baxley & Stelly, New Orleans, 504-522-9980 Pg. S-22

Wheaton, Jr., Scott R., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Ryan, Kent B., The Miller Law Firm, New Orleans

Williams, III, Conrad S.P. (Duke), Lewis Kullman Sterbcow & Abramson, New Orleans

Scalise, Kelly T., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Woods, Jonathan L., Pecoraro Law, Lafayette

Schlotterer, Bradley J., Kean Miller, New Orleans

Wright, III, James E., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Fontana, Wayne J., Roedel Parsons Koch Blache Balhoff & McCollister, New Orleans Losavio, Maria, Losavio Law Office, Alexandria Mandel, Jeffrey I., Juge Napolitano Guilbeau Ruli & Frieman, Metairie

SORTED ALPHABETICALLY

BLAKE G. ARATA JR.

H. CRAIG CABRAL

Poydras Center 650 Poydras Street Suite 2017 New Orleans, LA 70130 Tel: 504-522-9980 Fax: 504-522-9971 barata@romearata.com www.romearata.com

3230 Metairie Road Metairie, LA 70001 Tel: 504-831-5319 Fax: 504-831-5321 ccabral431@aol.com

ROME, ARATA, BAXLEY & STELLY, LLC

HARRY CRAIG CABRAL INC., APLC

DOMINICK F. IMPASTATO, III

FRISCHHERTZ & IMPASTATO 1140 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70130 Tel: 504-523-1500 Fax: 504-581-1670 dominick@fi-lawfirm.com www.frischhertzlaw.com

TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

FAMILY LAW

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

Since 1984, Blake G. Arata Jr. has been representing injured individuals for personal injury and wrongful death involving railroad accidents, maritime personal injury, and severe truck and vehicular accidents. He concentrates his practice on representing injured railroad employees and their families under the Federal Employers’ Liability Act (FELA) and offshore workers and seamen under the Jones Act and general maritime law. Mr.  Arata and his firm have used their vast resources and skills to successfully represent these individuals all over the United States. He has been awarded an AV rating by Martindale-Hubbell and is a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum. Mr.  Arata graduated from Loyola Law School in New Orleans and is managing partner in the firm.

H. Craig Cabral is certified by the Louisiana Board of Legal Specialization as a family law specialist. He is a graduate of Tulane Law School and Loyola University. As a third-generation family law practitioner, Mr. Cabral handles complex domestic litigation cases dealing with issues involving community property partitions, child and spousal support, divorce, civil domestic violence, custody litigation, paternity, and many other family related matters. His practice is limited solely to domestic relations, with extensive trial experience over his 37 year career. Recognized by Louisiana Super Lawyers.

Dominick F. Impastato,  III has been the lead trial attorney in products liability, toxic tort, industrial equipment, commercial construction, insurance bad faith, and motor vehicle casualty trials since he was admitted to the bar in 2004. He has also served as liaison counsel in mass tort litigation in certain mass tort cases. Dominick takes particular pride in representing the proverbial little guy against parties of far greater resources and capabilities and achieving success for his clients, even when the odds may appear against them. Dominick graduated second in his class from Loyola Law School in 2004, served on the Loyola Law Review, and was named Best Oral Advocate in the seven-state region for the National Moot Court Competition.

S-20 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: William W. Murray, Jr.**, John L. Hammons* , Cornell Rushing Flournoy *CHOSEN TO SUPER LAWYERS, **CHOSEN TO RISING STARS

Nelson & Hammons A P RO F E S S I O NA L L AW C O R P O R AT I O N

Nelson & Hammons is a Louisiana medical malpractice law firm. Its attorneys, John L. Hammons, Cornell R. Flournoy and William W. Murray, Jr., have championed the rights of victims of serious medical malpractice for over 30 years. The firm emphasizes a team approach, so each client benefits from the experience and energy of every attorney. The attorneys of Nelson & Hammons work diligently to be advocates for patients. They are committed to providing professional guidance and representation for those patients and families of patients who have been seriously injured as a result of substandard medical care. With all three attorneys emphasizing medical malpractice, Nelson & Hammons is specially situated to thoroughly investigate and effectively handle such cases. To better help people throughout Louisiana, the firm has offices in Shreveport and Lafayette. The firm is proud to announce John L. Hammons has been named to the Super Lawyers list for the 14th time, and William W. Murray, Jr. has been named to the Rising Stars list for the third time.

705 MILAM ST. SHREVEPORT, LA 71101 PH: (318) 227-2401 FX: (318) 221-4762 315 S. COLLEGE RD., SUITE 146 LAFAYETTE, LA 70503 PH: (337) 534-0515 FX: (337) 261-3301

nelsonhammons.com


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 SUPER LAWYERS

SORTED ALPHABETICALLY

DARLEEN M. JACOBS

TREY MORRIS

823 St. Louis Street New Orleans, LA 70112 Tel: 504-522-0155 Fax: 504-522-3819 dollyno@aol.com

509 Milam Street Shreveport, LA 71101 Tel: 318-221-1507 Fax: 318-221-4560 btmorris@shreveportlaw.net www.shreveportinjurylawfirm.com

JACOBS, SARRAT, LOVELACE & HARRIS

MORRIS & DEWETT, LLC

LANCE OSTENDORF

OSTENDORF, TATE, BARNETT LLP 650 Poydras Street Suite 1460 New Orleans, LA 70130 Tel: 504-343-8989 Fax: 504-208-3447 lanceostendorf@gmail.com

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCTS: PLAINTIFF GENERAL LITIGATION

GENERAL LITIGATION INSURANCE COVERAGE TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME

Darleen M. Jacobs is the managing partner of her firm. Her offices are located in New Orleans and Violet. Her firm specializes in personal injury, general negligence, medical malpractice, maritime, Jones Act and class action law. She is a member of the LTLA, NYSTLA, NBOTA, New Orleans Bar Association, St.  Bernard Bar Association, DCBAR and the NYSBA. Darleen is AV rated and was recognized as a Preeminent lawyer by Martindale-Hubbell. In 2014  she was selected for the cover of Super Lawyers Magazine in Louisiana. She is a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum. She received over 76 judgments for $1 million or more and one judgment in excess of $3 billion. She is admitted to practice law in Louisiana, New York and the District of Columbia.

Personal injury attorney Trey Morris received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Louisiana State University and his Juris Doctorate from Southern University Law Center. Mr. Morris’s experience and tenacity have been rewarded inside and outside the courtroom with multimillion-dollar verdicts and settlements. A respected and seasoned trial attorney, Mr.  Morris has also served as co-counsel to other law firms who have trusted in his skill and insight. He is a member of the Louisiana State Bar Association, Louisiana Association for Justice and the Multi-Million Dollar Advocates Forum. Mr.  Morris is also licensed to practice law in Texas.

Mr. Lance  S. Ostendorf represents numerous companies and clients in various aspects of law, including general liability, hotel and resort litigation, retail operations, offshore/energy industries, transportation and trucking, construction, contract law, intellectual property, trademark and copyright law, workers’ compensation, tort claims, entertainment law and several other areas. He represents clients on a national, regional and local level in state and federal courts. He is a speaker at seminars for corporations across the U.S. He has been the recipient of top ratings by Martindale-Hubbell, A.M. Best and many other professional organizations.

PHILIP R. RIEGEL, JR.

C. PERRIN ROME, III

KYLE SCLAFANI

Poydras Center 650 Poydras Street Suite 2017 New Orleans, LA 70130 Tel: 504-522-9980 Fax: 504-522-9971 prome@romearata.com www.romearata.com

4130 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70119 Tel: 504-875-4079 Fax: 504-910-4324 kyle@kylesclafanilaw.com www.kylesclafanilaw.com

ATTORNEY AT LAW 3017 21st Street Suite 150 Metairie, LA 70002 Tel: 504-834-5345 Fax: 504-833-6365 phil@prriegel.com

ROME, ARATA, BAXLEY & STELLY, LLC

LAW OFFICE OF KYLE SCLAFANI

FAMILY LAW

TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE LITIGATION BUSINESS LITIGATION

Philip Riegel graduated from Louisiana State University, Juris Doctor, in 1969 and admitted to the practice of law in the same year. He has practiced extensively in area of family law and certified as a specialist by Louisiana Board of Specialization since 1996. For over 30 years he has been listed in the peer-selected publication The Best Lawyers in America. He is named to Louisiana Super Lawyers and received the AV Preeminent rating from Martindale-Hubbell. In addition to his practice as an advocate, he serves as a court-appointed special master to assist the court in the adjudication of complex family law cases, especially in the area of community property.

Perrin Rome is a senior partner in the New Orleans (and Houston) law firm of Rome, Arata, Baxley & Stelly where he handles significant litigation (primarily railroad litigation) throughout the United States. He is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell and has handled jury trials in a wide variety of arenas, including trials in 14 different states and the District of Columbia. Mr. Rome serves as national designated counsel for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) for all commuter railroads, including Amtrak. Mr.  Rome has been recognized as a lifetime member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum, wherein membership is limited to trial lawyers whom have demonstrated exceptional skill, experience and excellence in advocacy by achieving several trial verdicts of $1 million or greater.

Kyle Sclafani practices in the areas of real estate litigation, business litigation, and personal injury. With years of experience handling lease and purchase agreement disputes, evictions, warranty claims, liens, boundary/servitude issues, creditor foreclosures and suits to quiet title, Kyle is a seasoned real-estate litigator. Kyle provides counsel and guidance to business owners, but also represents individuals injured in auto accidents, slip and falls, and wrongful death cases. Kyle has specialized knowledge and experience in the business of convenience store/gas stations, as he owns and operates a local c-store/gas station in New Orleans. Kyle is accessible, accountable, and responsive to his clients’ legal needs.

KENNETH R. SPEARS

LEWIS UNGLESBY

JASON P. WAGUESPACK

1 Lakeshore Drive Suite 900 Lake Charles, LA 70629 Tel: 337-513-4333 Fax: 337-494-5584 kspears@law-sg.com www.spearsandgary.com

246 Napoleon Street Baton Rouge, LA 70802 Tel: 225-387-0120 Fax: 225-336-4355 lisa@unglesbylaw.com www.unglesbylaw.com

SPEARS GARY, L.L.C.

UNGLESBY LAW FIRM

GALLOWAY, JOHNSON, TOMPKINS, BURR & SMITH, APLC

Hancock Whitney Center, 40th Floor 701 Poydras Street New Orleans, LA 70139 Tel: 504-525-6802 Fax: 504-525-2456 jwaguespack@gallowaylawfirm.com www.gallowaylawfirm.com

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: DEFENSE CIVIL LITIGATION: DEFENSE EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: DEFENSE

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE COLLAR CRIMINAL DEFENSE

TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME INTERNATIONAL GENERAL LITIGATION

Kenneth R. Spears, Louisiana State University (J.D., 1972), concentrates his practice on civil litigation, eminent domain, and toxic tort litigation. He is admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court; U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit; U.S. District Court, Western, Middle, and Eastern Districts of Louisiana; and U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Texas and by the Louisiana State Bar Association and State Bar of Texas. He is a member of the National Board of Trial Advocacy and Litigation Counsel of America.

Based in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Lewis Unglesby serves as co-counsel to lawyers throughout the U.S. in all areas of litigation. For 44 years, he has been achieving successful trial outcomes and is described as one of the premier trial lawyers in the country. His cases have been featured on ABC’s 20/20, Good Morning America, CNN, Court TV, numerous periodicals and several books. He has achieved more than 25 multimillion-dollar jury awards, plus more than 40  jury awards in excess of $1  million. In criminal defense cases, he has won acquittals in more than 50 felony jury trials in both state and federal courts. He has been listed in The Best Lawyers in America for 31 years in the areas of mass tort litigation, personal injury, product liability, criminal defense and white collar criminal defense.

Jason P. Waguespack is a recognized leader in the maritime and international legal fields. He currently serves as the Managing Director of Galloway, a Gulf South law firm with its headquarters in New Orleans. He maintains a regional practice based in New Orleans and Houston and specializes in the representation of maritime owners, charterers, operators, and insurers in all types of marine casualty losses. He serves as national counsel to several clients with ongoing international interests. He is also an Associate Professor of Law at Tulane University School of Law and Tulane University A.B. Freeman School of Business. He is active in the civic life of his community and serves as the president of the New Orleans Bar Association and chair of their Maritime Committee.

S-22 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 RISING STARS

THE LIST BY PRIMARY AREA OF PRACTICE The list was finalized as of July 16, 2019. Any updates to the list (for example, status changes or disqualifying events) will be reflected on superlawyers.com. Names and page numbers in RED indicate a profile on the specified page. Phone numbers included only for attorneys with paid Super Lawyers print advertisements. Only attorneys who data verified with Super Lawyers for current year included on this list. All current selections reflected on superlawyers.com profiles.

ANTITRUST LITIGATION Chiorean, Dan, Odom & Des Roches, New Orleans

APPELLATE

BUSINESS LITIGATION Abel, William, Riviere Abel, Thibodaux Allain, Jessica S., Jones Walker, Lafayette Borel, Danielle, Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Borgen, Emily Claire, Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Briggett, Joe, Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Broussard, Maggie A., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans Capell, Brian W., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Carter, Meghan E., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Thriffiley, Jr, Peter S., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Veith, Rebekka, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Venn, Brett S., Jones Walker, New Orleans Zerner, Charles-Theodore, Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9719

BUSINESS/CORPORATE Arbour, Tyler J., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Barriere, Jennifer E., Koch & Schmidt, New Orleans Breland, Quin, Breland Law, New Orleans

Chaney, III, Mark J., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

Kantrow, Jacob M., Kantrow Spaht Weaver & Blitzer, Baton Rouge

Cvitanovic, Dominik J., Brettner Cvitanovic, New Orleans

Legrand, Andrew, Spera Law Group, New Orleans

Deethardt, Mark R., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Loupe, Jon N. (Blue), Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge

Devillier, Jr., Carroll, Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

McBride, Annie, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Leblanc, C. Reynolds, Keogh Cox, Baton Rouge

Donnelly, Jeanette A., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Naccari, Keith J., Sternberg Naccari & White, New Orleans

Munson, Kathryn W., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans

Dossier, Eva, Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans

Pifko, Erzsebet, Corvinus Law, New Orleans

Paul, Matthew J., Stanley Reuter Ross Thornton & Alford, New Orleans

Finkelstein, Michael, Sternberg Naccari & White, New Orleans

Penner, D’Ann R., Larry Curtis Law Corp., Lafayette, 337-564-2217 Pg. S-25, S-27

French, Ryan, Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge

Gonski, Kathryn, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans King, Charles, Herman Herman & Katz, New Orleans

Winston, Sam, The Law Office of Sam Winston, New Orleans, 504-577-2500

BANKING Dysart, Katie L., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Edwards, Sarah, McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Guyton, Camalla Kimbrough, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

BANKRUPTCY: BUSINESS Ashley, Laura F., Jones Walker, New Orleans Landis, Michael E., Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans

Gauthier, Camille E., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Hayes, Kristen, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Hebert, Carmen T., Carleton Hebert Wittenbrink & Shoenfelt, Baton Rouge Holmgren, Anders F., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Janke, Benjamin West, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Juneau, Matthew C., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Latuso, Erin Wedge, Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans LeBon, Jr., Brian G., Ricci Partners, New Orleans Lemaire, Justin P., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Nobles, Cherie Dessauer, Heller Draper Patrick Horn & Manthey, New Orleans

Lutkewitte, Conor, Favret Demarest Russo Lutkewitte & Schaumburg, New Orleans

Thurman, Jim W., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans

Magee, Todd, Riviere Abel, Thibodaux

BANKRUPTCY: CONSUMER

Richmond, Windsor V., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

Abshier, Jenny, Bacchus Law Group, Metairie DeTrinis, Jonathan R., DeT Law Firm, New Orleans Jones, Devin T., E. Orum Young Law, Monroe

Pelleteri Howser, Erin, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Rudin, Lee M., Aaron & Gianna, New Orleans Rudin, Skylar B., Kuchler Polk Weiner, New Orleans Ryan, Graham H., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Moore, Joseph Richard, E. Orum Young Law, Monroe

Schonekas, McClain, Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans

Soto, Jennifer N., Ayres Shelton Williams Benson & Paine, Shreveport

Segrist, Peter J., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO RISING STARS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

Richard, Kristi W., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge Schroeder, Logan, Cook Yancey King & Galloway, Shreveport Toups, Ryan C., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Welsh, Margaret, Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Wootten, Chris, Coats Rose, New Orleans

CIVIL LITIGATION: DEFENSE Aiyegbusi, Denia S., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Albertine, III., James G., Salley Hite Mercer & Resor, New Orleans Blevins, Eric J., Wagner Bagot & Rayer, New Orleans Bowling, Tori S., Keogh Cox, Baton Rouge Bradford, Brian Michael, Scofield Gerard Pohorelsky Gallaugher & Landry, Lake Charles Brian, Kelly M., Blue Williams, Mandeville Camelford, Jason A., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, New Orleans Cefalu, III., Joseph J., Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Collura-Day, Amanda, Kean Miller, New Orleans Cutaiar, Trevor, Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans Emmerling, Victoria ‘Tori’, Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans Felder, Robert D., Davidson Meaux Sonnier McElligott Fontenot Gideon & Edwards, Lafayette Godofsky, Evan J., Larzelere Picou Wells Simpson Lonero, Metairie CONTINUED ON PAGE S-24

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 RISING STARS CIVIL LITIGATION CONT’D FROM PAGE S-23

Gould, Kristopher Michael, Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans Gregory, Lynette, Gregory Law Firm, Monroe Grinton, Kellye R., Porteous Hainkel & Johnson, Baton Rouge Kelly, Shannon A., Gieger Laborde & Laperouse, New Orleans Linn, Jenna, Bankston & Associates, Baton Rouge Moghis, Matthew D., Connick & Connick, Metairie Peterson, Megan S., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Preston Gailmor, Cassie, Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Roberts, Daniel, Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans Royce, Doris A., Thompson Coe Cousins & Irons, New Orleans

Napolitano, Shelley, Maron Marvel Bradley Anderson & Tardy, New Orleans Robertson, Pearl, Irpino Law Firm, New Orleans Smith, T. Peyton, Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans

Spokes, James A., Scott Law Firm, Baton Rouge Sudduth, III, James E., Sudduth & Associates, Lake Charles Tran, Tony V., Law Office of Tony V. Tran, Gretna

Spindler, Ali, Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

ELDER LAW

Wool, Zachary L., Barrios Kingsdorf & Casteix, New Orleans

Ryan, Dayna Michelle, Theus Grisham Davis & Leigh, Monroe

Wright, Lydia A., Burns Charest, New Orleans Yelton, Rick, Burns Charest, New Orleans

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS Chopin, Lindsey H., Proskauer Rose, New Orleans

CONSTRUCTION LITIGATION Derenbecker, Jessica R., Shields | Mott, New Orleans Emmons, Matthew R., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Mandeville

Glaser, Alex H., Jones Walker, New Orleans

EMPLOYMENT & LABOR Baer, Andrew, Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Forester, Jonathan S., Riess LeMieux, New Orleans

Trew, Tyler D., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Blackman, Natalie, Law Office of Attorney Natalie Blackman, Baton Rouge

Gibbs, Gillian (Gigi), Gibbs Law, New Orleans

Tschirn, Robert W., Preis, New Orleans

Bremenstul, Minia E., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Huddleston, Jacob, Kracht Law Firm, Baton Rouge

Wolff, Richard W., Keogh Cox, Baton Rouge

Lane, Michael D., Riess LeMieux, New Orleans

Bryant, Camille R., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans

CIVIL LITIGATION: PLAINTIFF Courtenay, James (Jimmy) E., The King Firm, New Orleans, 504-909-5464 Pg. S-29 Dick, Jr., Kelley R., Mansfield Melancon Cranmer & Dick, Baton Rouge

Mercuri, Kaile, Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

Chirinos, Tulio D., Proskauer Rose, New Orleans

Pastorek, Jeffrey, Couhig Partners, New Orleans

Hadden, Lauren Rivera, Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge

Pri-tal, Benjamin M., Melchiode Marks King, New Orleans Schaps, Brian S., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Egan, Gillian, Proskauer Rose, New Orleans

Jeanfreau, Rachael, Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans

Hair, Galen M., Scott Vicknair Hair & Checki, New Orleans

Thomas, John Matthew, Smiley Law Firm, New Orleans

Kee, P.J., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Magee, Tanner, Landry Magee, Houma

Vicknair, David P., Scott Vicknair Hair & Checki, New Orleans

London, Wm. Brian, Fisher & Phillips, New Orleans

Rogenes, Matthew D., Stag Liuzza, New Orleans Young, Jacob, Chehardy Sherman Williams Murray Recile Stakelum & Hayes, Metairie

CIVIL RIGHTS Bordes, Kenneth C., Law Office of Kenneth C. Bordes, New Orleans DeReus, Garret, Bizer DeReus, New Orleans Lanser, David, Law Office of William Most, New Orleans

Wynne, Jr., Douglass F., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans

Kilgore, Erin Lutkewitte, Kean Miller, Baton Rouge Mayhall, Sunny, Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge Molina, Ross M., Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker, New Orleans

CONSUMER LAW

Murphy, Kerry A., Lasky Murphy, New Orleans

Ford, Samuel J., Scott Vicknair Hair & Checki, New Orleans

Roberts, MaryJo L., The Kullman Firm, New Orleans

CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS

EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: DEFENSE

Rochester, Lacey, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

Most, William, Law Office of William Most, New Orleans

Carlisle, Laura E., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Castoriano, Benjamin M., Frilot, New Orleans

CRIMINAL DEFENSE

Caviness, Laura R., Curry Law Firm, Mandeville

CLASS ACTION/MASS TORTS

Carter, Gregory Q., The G. Carter Law Firm, New Orleans

Beaumont, William, Beaumont Costales, New Orleans

Liner, Elizabeth, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge

Chervinsky, Sarah, NFC Law, New Orleans

McCluer, Matthew, Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, New Orleans

Dore, Philip, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Cooper, Carolyn, King and Cooper Law, New Orleans

Eagan, Kelsey A., Frilot, New Orleans

Ewing, Jr., J. Lane, Cazayoux Ewing, Baton Rouge

Gower, C. Jacob, Burns Charest, New Orleans

Kriksciun, Alex K., Law Office of Alex Kriksciun, New Orleans

Higgins, Anna, Pendley Baudin & Coffin, New Orleans Holinga, Lexi T., Bienvenu Bonnecaze Foco Viator & Holinga, Baton Rouge Klevorn, Amanda, Burns Charest, New Orleans Mattappally, Jay M., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

S-24 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

Larson, Kara Anne, The Law Office of Sam Winston, New Orleans, 504-577-2500

Obregon, Juan C., Jackson Lewis, New Orleans

EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: PLAINTIFF Vogeltanz, Kevin, The Law Office of Kevin S. Vogeltanz, Mandeville

Ludwig, Karl, Rozas & Rozas, Baton Rouge Matthews, Jr., Jerome W., Law Firm of Jerome W. Matthews Jr., Gretna Phillips, Bradley S., Phillips Law, New Orleans

ENERGY & NATURAL RESOURCES Bambrick, Erin, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans CONTINUED ON PAGE S-26

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

SERVING INJURED MARITIME WORKERS ACROSS THE GULF COAST The Larry Curtis law firm has a simple mission:

crew and fishermen. Backed by this depth

to obtain outstanding results for every client,

of experience, the firm brings thorough

without exception. Recognized as one of

preparation, strategic planning and

Louisiana’s preeminent personal injury firms, the

exceptional skill to every case, laying a strong

firm successfully represents all types of maritime

foundation to achieve the best possible

workers in cases involving serious injury or death.

outcome for each and every client.

The firm has over four decades of experience

The lawyers at the Larry Curtis firm know that

representing injured drill rig and platform

their clients are counting on them to help

workers, service hands, and offshore construction

them through a very difficult time in their life.

workers as well as commercial divers, dredge

The firm’s focus is on ensuring that injured maritime workers get the full compensation and medical benefits they need to move forward. A seasoned trial lawyer with a national reputation for success, Larry Curtis has won numerous multimillion-dollar verdicts and settlements for his clients. He was previously named to the Louisiana Super Lawyers list for 13 consecutive years, including three years on the Top 50 list. Now D’Ann Penner, an associate at the firm, is again named to the 2020 Louisiana Rising Stars list.

300 Rue Beauregard, Building C Post Office Box 80247, Lafayette, LA 70508 PH: (337) 235-1825 • (800) 528-1825 • FX: (337) 237-0241

L TO R: D'Ann Penner*, Larry Curtis

www.larrycurtis.com

*CHOSEN TO 2020 RISING STARS

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO RISING STARS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 RISING STARS ENERGY & NATURAL RESOURCES CONT’D FROM PAGE S-24

Bush, Brittan J., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Danos, Addie L., Looper Goodwine, New Orleans

Malbrew, Penny Leonard, Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette

Pfeiffer, Sarah, Law Office of Sarah Pfeiffer, New Orleans

Schilling, E. Blair, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Reed, Alexander L.H., The Sanchez Law Firm, Lake Charles

Douthitt, Katherine Guidry, Blanchard Walker O’Quin & Roberts, Shreveport

Semmes, Mathilde V., Courington Kiefer Sommers Marullo & Matherne, New Orleans

Flanagan, Caitlin J., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans

VanTassell, Court C., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette

Fox, Jonathan J., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

ESTATE & TRUST LITIGATION

Shoenfelt, Mary Katherine, Carleton Hebert Wittenbrink & Shoenfelt, Baton Rouge

Bouillion, Shelley, Stutes & Lavergne, Lake Charles

Swanson, Renee L., Renee Swanson, Gretna

Gonzales, Carlee White, Law Office of Carlee White Gonzales, Hammond

Treadaway, Kristyl Revelle, Treadaway Law, Metairie

Grant, Meghan F., Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Hearne, Jr., Wm Lake, Davidson Summers, Shreveport Laborde, Maurine, Wall Bullington & Cook, New Orleans Love, Jonathan E., Hargrove Smelley & Strickland, Shreveport

ESTATE PLANNING & PROBATE Delerno, Zachary J., Sunrise Law Group, Metairie

Rotharmel Shanks, Tracy, Rotharmel Shanks Law Firm, New Orleans Samuel, Scott R., Samuel & Coleman, Metairie

Vamvoras-Antoon, Alyson, Vamvoras Antoon, Lake Charles Willis, Sheila, Morris Lee & Bayle, New Orleans

Mouledoux, Taylor P., Looper Goodwine, New Orleans

Kriksciun, Erin E., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

GENERAL LITIGATION

Patton, Margaret G., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, Baton Rouge

McMakin, Dixon Wallace, The McMakin Law Firm, Baton Rouge

Bourgeois, Blake, Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, New Orleans

Rhorer, James D., Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Robb, Brandon, Delaney Robb & Rubin, New Orleans

Frederick, Zelma M., McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge

Scott, Brad, The Law Offices of Brad Scott, Jefferson

Glenn, Brodie, Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans

Rolen-Ogden, April L., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Rothenberg, Alex, Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans Shealy, Jeremy B., Onebane Law Firm, Lafayette Simone, Matthew, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Springer Brown, Laura, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Tettleton, Andrea K., Seabaugh Joffrion Sepulvado & Victory, Baton Rouge

ENVIRONMENTAL

Gremillion, Druit, Breazeale Sachse & Wilson, Baton Rouge

FAMILY LAW Arnold, Robin Penzato, Winsberg & Arnold, New Orleans Bayard, James D., Onebane Law Firm, Lafayette Bennatt, Candice, Candice Bennatt Law, Metairie Cain, Amber L., Attorney at Law, New Orleans Catalanotto, Rachael P., Talley Anthony Hughes & Knight, Mandeville

Roché, Elizabeth A., Roché Law Firm, Jennings

Coleman, George Read, Samuel & Coleman, Metairie

Wiegand, Stephen W., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Cranmer, Brad, Mansfield Melancon Cranmer & Dick, Baton Rouge Daniels, Morgan S., Attorney at Law, Hammond

ENVIRONMENTAL LITIGATION Barlow, Amber B., Kuchler Polk Weiner, New Orleans Brown, Jasmine N., Blue Williams, Metairie Brumby, Turner, Veron Bice Palermo & Wilson, Lake Charles Chauvin, Hunter A., Liskow & Lewis, Lafayette Frazier-Santiago, Krystin, Kelly Hart Pitre, New Orleans Fuller, Melissa D., Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans Gelpi, Jeffrey J., Kean Miller, New Orleans Gillen, Laura M., Blue Williams, Metairie Hale DeShazo, Michele, Kuchler Polk Weiner, New Orleans Jackson, Jane A., Kelly Hart Pitre, New Orleans Kostal, Tyler Moore, Kean Miller, New Orleans Lewis, Sara M., Wall Bullington & Cook, New Orleans Liuzza, Ashley, Stag Liuzza, New Orleans

S-26 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

Epstein, Jacqueline, Epstein Law Firm, New Orleans Epstein, Jeremy, Jeremy Epstein Law, New Orleans Hunter, Rebecca J., The Sanchez Law Firm, Lake Charles Killen, Lucy Ann, Law Office of Lucy Killen, New Orleans Kuehl, Jr., Gordon Joseph, Lowe Stein Hoffman Allweiss & Hauver, New Orleans, 504-581-2450 Latiolais, Emily, Latiolais Law Firm, Lafayette LeBlanc, Betsy L., Law Office of Betsy L. LeBlanc, Addis Lynch, Katherine Wiarda, Koch & Schmidt, New Orleans Margiotta, Michael, The Law Office of Wolff & Wolff, Metairie Meneray, Elizabeth S., Meneray Family Law, New Orleans Miciotto, Mark, Mark J. Miciotto, Shreveport Ogden, Jr., M. Scott, Fuerst Carrier & Ogden, Lake Charles

Hightower, III, Thomas R., Thomas R. Hightower Jr., Lafayette, 337-233-0555 Pg. S-5 Juneau, Claire E., Kean Miller, New Orleans Kenny, Erin Sayes, Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge Lefeve, Mccann, Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans Ludeau, Christopher, Fontenot & Ludeau, Ville Platte Luminais, Ryan O., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2106 Pg. S-9 Marse, Randy, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Morris, Ebony S., Garrison Yount Forte & Mulcahy, New Orleans Ortte, Christopher “Chris” B., NeunerPate, Lafayette Shockey, Patrick K., Blue Williams, Metairie Sternberg, Scott L., Sternberg Naccari & White, New Orleans Taylor, III, B. Gene, Gold Weems Bruser Sues & Rundell, Alexandria Vozzella, Alexandra, Ayres Shelton Williams Benson & Paine, Shreveport Weixler, Jacob, Schonekas Evans McGoey & McEachin, New Orleans Wells, Molly L., Fishman Haygood, New Orleans Wynne, Michael C., The Dill Firm, Lafayette

GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS Eccles, Susan N., Dunlap Fiore, Baton Rouge

GOVERNMENT FINANCE Parker, Adam C., Butler Snow, Baton Rouge

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 RISING STARS HEALTH CARE Cicardo Mannino, Katherine, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, Baton Rouge Otten, Christopher G., Beahm & Green, New Orleans Shelton, Shannon A., Pendley Baudin & Coffin, New Orleans

IMMIGRATION Grand, Anna M., Pecoraro Law, Lafayette Kinnison, Christopher K., Liberty Law Group, Alexandria Moody, Flavia Rocha, Scott Law Firm, Baton Rouge Weidner, Samantha, Hart Carter & Associates, New Orleans

INSURANCE COVERAGE Addison, Bryce M., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Ricci, R. Devin, Kean Miller, New Orleans

Fletchinger, Marianne Wise, Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Smith, Parker N., Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, New Orleans

Gahagan, Peter M., Duplass Zwain Bourgeois Pfister Weinstock & Bogart, Metairie

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LITIGATION

Jeansonne, Jordan M., Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans

Fincher, Micah J., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Juneau Rookard, Kelly G., Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS

Leggette, Laura, Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

Saulsbury, Albert O. “Chip”, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Melerine, Michael C., Melerine Law Firm, Shreveport

Silberstein, Daniella Genet, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Poche, Dustin, Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: DEFENSE

Rossi, Alexandra E., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

Rainwater, Scott, Taylor Wellons Politz & Duhe, Baton Rouge Simon, Mandy, Degan Blanchard & Nash, Lafayette

Abernathy, Sloan L., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Stuart, Cory T., Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans

Ankersen, Brittney, Courington Kiefer Sommers Marullo & Matherne, New Orleans Bernard, David C., Staines & Eppling, Metairie

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

Borne, Charmaine B., Pecoraro Law, Lafayette

Baer, Jason M., Baer Law, Metairie Barron, John, O’Pry Law Firm, Lafayette

Burk, Lauren E., Phelps Dunbar, New Orleans

Durham, Meredith, Plauché Maselli Parkerson, New Orleans

Culver, Christina A., Thompson Coe Cousins & Irons, New Orleans

Elam, Jason K., Cosmich Simmons & Brown, New Orleans

Barton, E. Madison, Wanek Kirsch Davies, New Orleans Brettner, Jacqueline M., Brettner Cvitanovic, New Orleans

Bassett, Taylor J., Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483 CONTINUED ON PAGE S-28

Davidson, Jared A., Taylor Wellons Politz & Duhe, New Orleans Farmer, Jay, Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Harris Abel, Laura, The Monson Law Firm, Mandeville

D’ANN R. PENNER TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME, PERSONAL INJURY, ENERGY & RESOURCES

Lambert, Taylor R., Brown Sims, New Orleans Lindsey, Brian J., Kean Miller, Lafayette

D’Ann R. Penner is an associate attorney at Larry Curtis, APLC in Lafayette, Louisiana. Ms. Penner primarily dedicates her practice to appellate and maritime personal injury law, involving boat crew accidents, commercial diving accidents, construction barge accidents, dredge boat accidents, fishing boat accidents and offshore drilling rig accidents.

Marchand, Jessica, Scofield & Rivera, Lafayette Meeks, Kelsey L., Pipes Miles Beckman, New Orleans Monsour, Jr, Mitchell D., Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans Morse, Amanda Gammon, Kiefer & Kiefer, Metairie

A licensed attorney since 2014, Ms. Penner is admitted to practice in all Louisiana state courts and before the U.S. District Courts for the Western, Middle and Eastern Districts of Louisiana, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, and the Supreme Court of the United States.

Schroeter, David M., Simon Peragine Smith & Redfearn, New Orleans Soso, Jeremy Z., The Lambert Firm, New Orleans Stogner, Sarah, Flanagan Partners, New Orleans Truong, Olivia Yen, Melchiode Marks King, New Orleans

Ms. Penner earned a doctorate degree from the University of California, Berkeley, after which she served as an associate professor at The University of Memphis and a visiting scholar at Harvard University and Columbia University. After deciding to enter the legal profession, Ms. Penner earned her law degree from Loyola University New Orleans College of Law and a Master of Law degree from Tulane Law School.

Vorhaben, Tessa P., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Engler, Jessica C., Kean Miller, New Orleans Estrada de Martin, Ph.D., Paula, Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Gaither, Channing Nicole, Creativa IP Law, New Orleans Nichols, Chris, McGlinchey Stafford, Baton Rouge

LARRY CURTIS, APLC

300 RUE BEAUREGARD, BUILDING C, LAFAYETTE, LA 70508 | (337) 564-2217 D.Ann@larrycurtis.com | larrycurtis.com

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO RISING STARS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

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S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 RISING STARS PI CONT’D FROM PAGE S-27

Bezou, Jr., Jacques Francois, The Bezou Law Firm, Covington Bosso, Adam, Morris Bart, New Orleans Brandhurst, Alaina, Morris Bart, New Orleans Broussard, Aaron, Broussard & Hart, Lake Charles Brown, Somer G., Cox Cox Filo Camel & Wilson, Lake Charles Bruscato, John F., Bruscato Law, Monroe, 318-323-4070

Mcgregor, George, Burgos & Associates, New Orleans McNeil, Christopher G., Gauthier and Amedee, Gonzales Melancon, Collin, Mansfield Melancon Cranmer & Dick, New Orleans Melucci, Mike, Yeager LaNasa Tauzier, Metairie Meyer, Daniel, Bruno & Bruno, New Orleans Muller- McCrary, Anne Marie, Gordon McKernan, Baton Rouge

JOHN F. BRUSCATO

Phillips, Sarah A., Phillips Law, New Orleans

www.bruscatolaw.com

Reddy, Ramesh K., Ultimate Accident Law, New Orleans

BRUSCATO LAW Monroe • 318-323-4070

Bryant, Misti, Gordon McKernan Injury Attorneys, Lafayette Clayton, Joshua P., Clayton Law Firm, Slidell

Reese, Justin, The King Firm, New Orleans Robin, Stephanie, Thompson d’Entremont and Robin, Baton Rouge

PERSONAL INJURY MEDICAL MALPRACTICE: PLAINTIFF Christiansen, Zachary Ryan, The Bowling Law Firm, New Orleans, 504-613-4561 Hyla, Erica A., The Bezou Law Firm, Covington Ikerd, Whitney Sheppard, Webre & Associates, Lafayette Murray, Jr., William W., Nelson & Hammons, Shreveport, 318-227-2401 Pg. S-2, S-21

PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCTS: DEFENSE Brilleaux, Kelly, Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans Cox, Marshall T., McGlinchey Stafford, New Orleans Lee, Perrey S., Kuchler Polk Weiner, New Orleans

Robinson, Craig M., Robinson Law Offices, New Orleans

Lewis, Raymond C., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Russell, Danny, Russell Law Firm, Baton Rouge

McIntire, Amy L., Chaffe McCall, New Orleans

Crotty, Matthew, Neblett Beard & Arsenault, Alexandria

Ryan, Kathleen E., Morrow Morrow Ryan Bassett & Haik, Opelousas, 337-948-4483

Penn, Elizabeth R., Forman Watkins & Krutz, New Orleans

DeReus, Casey C., Baer Law, Metairie

Salter, Hannah, Lifeline Lawyer, New Orleans

Reid, Sarah, Cotten Schmidt, New Orleans

Dewett, Justin, Morris & Dewett, Shreveport, 318-221-1507 Pg. S-29

Scallan, Vincent P., Vincent P. Scallan Law, New Orleans

Senter, Meghan, MG+M, New Orleans

Colligan, Lucas S., The Gaar Law Firm, Lafayette Credeur, Adam R., Law Offices of Kenneth W. DeJean, Lafayette

DeWitt-Kyle, Jeanette, Stutes & Lavergne, Lake Charles Dunahoe, Jared, Dunahoe Law Firm, Natchitoches Eskew, Patrick J., Blake Jones Law Firm, New Orleans Flattmann, Grady J., Grady J. Flattmann, Covington

Shadinger, Meagan, Morris & Dewett, Shreveport, 318-221-1507 Pg. S-29 Shlosman, Tom, Shlosman Law Firm, New Orleans Smiley, Seth J., Smiley Law Firm, New Orleans Smith, Jacki L., The Lambert Firm, New Orleans

Siegel, Kyle Wallace, Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9700 Sossamon, Meera, Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, New Orleans

PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCTS: PLAINTIFF

Gennusa, Jeffrey S., Gennusa Firm, Metairie

Spurgeon, Samuel J., Spurgeon Law Firm, Alexandria, 318-224-2222

Graf, John P., Anderson Dozier Blanda & Saltzman, Lafayette

Stein, Joshua A., Baer Law, Metairie

Cheek, Lindsey, The Cheek Law Firm, New Orleans

Gray, Kacie F., Irpino Law Firm, New Orleans

Taylor, Julia Love, Veron Bice Palermo & Wilson, Lake Charles

Hoffman, Philip C., Landry & Swarr, New Orleans

Hale, Taylor, Hale Law Firm, Lake Charles, 337-433-0612

Tureau, Steven, Tureau & Tureau, Gonzales

Hemmer, Matthew, Morris Bart, New Orleans

Washington, Christopher, Daniels & Washington, Prairieville

Honeycutt Calandro, Hannah, Fayard & Honeycutt, Denham Springs

Weintraub, Adam, Weintraub Law, New Orleans

Hoskins, Loretta O., Dudley DeBosier, New Orleans

Williams, Jatavian, Glago Williams, New Orleans

Johnson, James H., Perrier & Lacoste, New Orleans

Woods, Trey, Didriksen Saucier & Woods, New Orleans

Kiefer, Megan C., Kiefer & Kiefer, Metairie Lambert, M. Palmer, Gainsburgh Benjamin David Meunier & Warshauer, New Orleans LaPorte, Ryan Frederick, LaPorte Law Office, New Orleans Lawson, David T., Morris Bart, New Orleans, 504-599-3279 Lillis, Michael, Lillis Law Firm, New Orleans Lorio IV, Philip D., The Chopin Law Firm, New Orleans Mansfield, Scott M., Mansfield Melancon Cranmer & Dick, New Orleans Matt, Jason A., Law Offices of Matt & Allen, Lafayette Mau, Donald, Miguel A. Elias, Kenner

S-28 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

Zimmerman, III, Richard F., Gordon McKernan, Baton Rouge

PERSONAL INJURY MEDICAL MALPRACTICE: DEFENSE Biller, Benjamin J., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans Domreis, Crystal E., Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, New Orleans

Boling, Jeremiah, Baron & Budd, New Orleans, 800-222-2766

Rust, Jennifer Reboul, The Voorhies Law Firm, New Orleans

PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY: DEFENSE Keller, Robert L., Salley Hite Mercer & Resor, New Orleans Lessell, Melissa, Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Stewart, Alan W., Gibson Law Partners, Lafayette

REAL ESTATE Beaton, Travis A., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2100 Pg. S-9 Bernard, G. Wogan, Chaffe McCall, New Orleans Cerise, Jonathan B., Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, New Orleans, 504-299-2131 Pg. S-9

Miller, Bert J., Blue Williams, Metairie

Christiansen, Ryan T., Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans

Rito, Kat, Jones Walker, New Orleans

Good, Jeffrey P., Jones Walker, New Orleans

Thames, L. Adam, Taylor Porter Brooks & Phillips, Baton Rouge

Graf, Vanessa W., Jones Walker, New Orleans Iverstine, Wade R., Kean Miller, Baton Rouge

SEE ADVERTISING DISCLAIMER ON PAGE S-4.


S P E CIAL ADV E RT ISIN G SE C T ION

LOUISIANA 2020 RISING STARS Marquette, J. Tyler, Fishman Haygood, New Orleans

Waring, Jeannette, Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

McCabe, Ryan M., Steeg Law Firm, New Orleans

White, Jacob C., Ayres Shelton Williams Benson & Paine, Shreveport

Ricci, Michael S., Ricci Partners, New Orleans Riess, Megan C., Coats Rose, New Orleans

Spaht, W. Carlos, Alexander Sides, Baton Rouge

Tweedy, Jonathan A., Schouest Bambas Soshea & Ben Maier, New Orleans

TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME

Walsh, Tarryn E., Murphy Rogers Sloss Gambel & Tompkins, New Orleans

Amy, Jeanne, Jones Walker, New Orleans Amy, Michael T., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans Baldwin, William C., Jones Walker, New Orleans

SECURITIES & CORPORATE FINANCE Layfield, Alexandra Clark, Jones Walker, Baton Rouge

SECURITIES LITIGATION Berg, Nicholas, Reasonover & Berg, New Orleans, 504-526-2921 Dressel, Robert J., Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, New Orleans, 504-589-9700 Palestina, Michael J., Kahn Swick & Foti, New Orleans

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Rosado, Sophie Diane, The Rosado Law Firm, Kenner

Birdsong, Jeffrey, Liskow & Lewis, New Orleans Miller, Matthew P., Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Zubic, R. Ethan, Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, New Orleans

Benoit, Raven Fielding, Duplass Zwain Bourgeois Pfister Weinstock & Bogart, Metairie

UTILITIES

Denny, Robert K., Hurley & Cot, New Orleans

Kantrow, Kara B., Marionneaux Kantrow, Baton Rouge

DuBose, III, Emmitt L., Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr & Smith, New Orleans Gardner, Jr., W. Jacob, Frilot, New Orleans

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION

Guillot, Gavin H., Pusateri Johnston Guillot & Greenbaum, New Orleans

Babin, Patrick J., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans

Hale, Paul D., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Bernstein, Beth S., Thompson Coe Cousins & Irons, New Orleans

Hannan, Christopher M., Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, New Orleans Huete, Scott R., Melchiode Marks King, New Orleans Ibert, Jessica L., Lewis Kullman Sterbcow & Abramson, New Orleans Morse, Harry E., Bohman Morse, New Orleans

TAX

Taylor, Ian Fitzgerald, Lewis Kullman Sterbcow & Abramson, New Orleans

Wilson, B. Trevor, Jones Walker, Baton Rouge

Schultis, Jonathan, Ricci Partners, New Orleans Scullin, Stephen P., Carver Darden Koretzky Tessier Finn Blossman & Areaux, New Orleans

Stanton, Daniel B., Kean Miller, New Orleans

Ramos, Destinee F., Lugenbuhl Wheaton Peck Rankin & Hubbard, New Orleans Rosamond, Kari M., Deutsch Kerrigan, New Orleans

Briscoe, Jeffrey P., Brewster Law Firm, Metairie Carrigan, Caitlin (Byars), Taylor Wellons Politz & Duhe, New Orleans Hotard, Amy Dunn, Salley Hite Mercer & Resor, New Orleans Louapre, Lindsay F., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans McLin, Virginia J., Keogh Cox, Baton Rouge Mineo, John, The Monson Law Firm, Mandeville

Morehouse, Lucas H., Attorney at Law, Metairie

Sanderson, Adam P., The Chopin Law Firm, New Orleans

Sullivan, Andrew, Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, New Orleans

Sella, Eric Winder, Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans

JAMES (JIMMY) E. COURTENAY

JUSTIN DEWETT

MEAGAN SHADINGER

THE KING FIRM

509 Milam Street Shreveport, LA 71101 Tel: 318-221-1507 Fax: 318-221-4560 jdewett@shreveportlaw.net www.shreveportinjurylawfirm.com

509 Milam Street Shreveport, LA 71101 Tel: 318-221-1507 Fax: 318-221-4560 mshadinger@shreveportlaw.net www.shreveportinjurylawfirm.com

CIVIL LITIGATION: PLAINTIFF CIVIL LITIGATION: DEFENSE

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

PERSONAL INJURY GENERAL: PLAINTIFF

James “Jimmy” Courtenay is a member of The King Firm, a civil litigation practice specializing in significant plaintiff personal injury. He joined the firm in 2016 after spending over 7 years defending trucking companies, insurance companies, corporations, and retail stores. He is seasoned in handling all facets of litigation stemming from insurance coverage, trucking and automobile accidents, premises and product liability, and plant explosions. He is rated AV Preeminent by Martindale-Hubbell, is a former member of TIDA, CLM, and Transportation Lawyers Association, is a current member of the New Orleans and Jefferson Parish Bar Associations, and was a member of the LSU 2003  National Championship Football Team.

Justin C. Dewett received his Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from Louisiana State University. He excelled and received a Juris Doctorate from the Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Louisiana State University. While in law school, he served on the LSU Law Center’s Student Bar Association as vice president. Dewett has continuously practiced with the firm since being admitted to the bar. Through hard work and persistence he has handled hundreds of cases to successful judgments. His primary areas of practice are collection law and personal injury. He is a member of the Louisiana State Bar Association, the Shreveport Bar Association and the Louisiana Association for Justice.

Meagan Shadinger received her B.A. in political science from the University of Georgia, and J.D. from Louisiana State University, where she was a Faculty Merit Scholar. During law school, Mrs. Shadinger served as secretary of the Federalist Society and was a member of the SBA Faculty Appointments Committee. Also, as a participant in the Family Law Clinic, she represented victims of domestic violence in family court proceedings at the 19th Judicial District Court. Upon completion of law school, Mrs.  Shadinger was judicial law clerk to the Hon. John  M. Robinson and Hon. Jeff Cox at the 26th Judicial District Court. She has excelled in legal research and writing and is eager to expand her areas of practice.

2912 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70119 Tel: 504-909-5464 Fax: 800-901-6470 jimmy@kinginjuryfirm.com www.kinginjuryfirm.com

MORRIS & DEWETT, LLC

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO RISING STARS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-4.

Yoder, Simone H., Mouledoux Bland Legrand & Brackett, New Orleans

MORRIS & DEWETT, LLC

SUPER LAWYERS | LOUISIANA 2020

S-29


ROADSIDE DINING

Touch of Brass New Orleans brasserie Justine goes bold with French classics and an eye-popping, maximalist interior by Jyl Benson photos by morgan & owens

J

ustine, the sprawling 200-seat French Quarter restaurant is the third from spouses Mia Freiberger-Devillier and James Beard Award -winning Chef Justin Devillier, following the quietly elegant La Petite Grocery on Magazine Street and the now-shuttered downtown gastro pub, Balise. This bright bird of a space pushes a welcome sensory overload from its hot pink cursive neon outdoor signage straight through to the last bite of Gâteau Basque. To enter here is to leave a dull world behind: This is a glorious, screaming shout out to the gods of Maximalisim. Yes. With Justine the Devilliers, quite literally, put brass in the brasserie. Considered garish and, therefore unpopular in the not-so-distant past, the warm-hued gleaming metal is on bold display from the caps on the feet of the barstools to the tops of the structural support pillars, which are encased in wild brass luminaries made by E. Kraemer Metal & Woodwork expressly for the project, which was overseen by the

72 Louisiana Life january/february 2020

Among the luxurious, traditional French entrees on the Boeuf Gras section of the menu is a 14-ounce prime rib-eye entrecote bearing a deeply-hued, flavorful crust finished with a shine of herbal maitre d’hotel butter.

Justine 225 Chartres St. 504-218-8533 justinenola.com

local interior design firm Farouki Farouki. Smoked glass mirrors, plush banquette seating, loads of shiny finishes from the tiles to the gloss paint lend a sexy air that could entice even the most restrained to consider getting loaded on Champagne then make out in the bar. The light and bright Café Room opens to the Chartres Street sidewalk. The Bar Room is, suitably, moodily lit. The Kitchen Room includes large communal tables and a few private round booths. The Devilliers made numerous trips to France as they collected antique pieces for Justine including a handpainted, pressed tin marquee, which once hung above a meat counter inside a Parisian butcher shop and now hangs above the open kitchen. Successfully commanding center stage within this brilliant, action-packed melee is a two-sided mural by Ellen Macomber, a New Orleans artist with an international following who is known for anything but understatement and restraint. The spectacular work of art flows as the Mississippi in brilliant hues


On The Side (left) Most welcome on a cold day, onion soup arrives cloaked by a layer of melted Gruyere. (below, top to bottom) Vibrant Neon sets a dramatic tone straightaway on the approach to Justine. A two-sided mural by Ellen Macomber flows as the Mississippi in brilliant hues through the history of New Orleans. Erin Hollas, recently appointed Chef de Cuisine, oversees the kitchen at Justine.

To undertake an exploration of Louisiana is to undertake an exploration of different regions that vary wildly in their personalities and customs based on settlement patterns established centuries ago. No matter your mood or interest there is something somewhere in this state to satisfy your curiosity and your appetite. statewide

Crawfish Season

through the history of the city from its original Native American inhabitants to the present, poring through slavery, the Civil War, and the Saints' winning of the Superbowl along the way. It has long been notably disappointing that, save for small handful, for a city with a French foundation New Orleans is curiously lacking in places serving classic French food. Justine strikes aggressively at this oddity. Pink tiles frame an open kitchen, where Chef de Cuisine Erin Hollas commands a platoon of cooks who turn out those crave-worthy classics: filet au poivre (peppercorn crusted filet mignon with cognac pan sauce); steak tartare; rich and savory duck confit; a towering seafood plateau; luscious French onion soup with a cap of melted Gruyere cheese; billowing piles of fully ripe raclette scraped atop thinly shaved ham; and a sandwich of duck fat fried chicken paillards, frisée salad, lemon, and remoulade are served on brioche with a side of pommes frites. Classic New Orleans options on the menu include Gulf fish laced with a deep brown butter and toasted almond Meunière; and a new rendition of the justifiably famous LPG burger. This one features a thick, peppercorn-crusted beef patty melted over with pungent Emmental cheese on house-made brioche. Causgrove gilds the lily, serving a dish of obscenely delicious cognac cream jus on the side into which one should dip their already decadent sandwich. Just be prepared to pay: That seafood plateau, which is meant for sharing with one or two others will cost you $165. A 40-ounce cote de boeuf, also meant to serve two or three, goes for for $135. As for making out at the bar? Save that for the Real Deal. Justine is no cheap date. n

Crawfish season varies based on a cold or mild winter. It also depends on the amount of rain but generally, wild crawfish season in Louisiana runs from mid-January through early-July with the peak months being March, April and May. New Orleans

New Orleans Wine & Food Experience (NOWFE) to Honor Chef John Folse The 2020 Ella Brennan Lifetime Achievement in Hospitality Award will be presented Chef John Folse “Louisiana’s Culinary Ambassador to the World," at a gala celebration on Jan. 29 at Ritz-Carlton, New Orleans. nowfe.com. Arnaudville

Free Festival Every Saturday at Bayou Teche Brewing Every Saturday in January and February from 3-6 p.m. get the best of the best at Bayou Teche Brewing in Arnaudville with crisp, refreshing craft beer, Louisiana food trucks, and live music. bayoutechebrewing.com

Shreveport

A Host of New Restaurants Chef Anthony and Amanda Felan opened Fat Calf Brasserie, Chef Gabriel and Brooke Balderas opened Zuzul Coastal Cuisine, Chef Boz Baucum will opened Ralph’s Place, Chef David and Stephanie Bridges opened Sauvage, and Chef Jessica Comegys opened Glow Alchemy Kitchen. The host of new restaurants are scattered all over town in Highland, Fern Marketplace, and South Shreveport. Kenner

Restaurant Honored by the Southern Foodways Alliance The esteemed organization has recognized Felton Hurst of Hurst Family Restaurant in Kenner with its 2019 Ruth Fertel Keeper of the Flame Award. The award honors an unsung hero or heroine, a foodways tradition bearer of note, and pays homage to their work through a documentary film. The restaurant began as a barroom in 1940.


Great Louisiana Che f

Firing It Up St. Francisville native Daniel Dreher guides a plantation’s rebranding as a dining destination enlivened by flames and phantoms By Lisa LeBlanc-Berry photos by Romero & Romero

A

s twilight gives way to darkness, and spirits wander through the Myrtles’ wintry mist, the alluring aroma of burning logs, fat dripping onto coals and ribeye steaks charring over leaping flames puts guests in a smoky trance at Restaurant 1796. While visitors nibble on buttery cast iron cornbread and locals wield craft cocktails at the bar, Executive Chef Daniel Dreher fires up his seasonal farm-to-table creations at the 10-foot-long open hearth centering the art-filled eatery. Pineapples sliced for cocktails and legs of lamb dangle above the inferno, dancing to their fiery finish. Dreher’s small but impressive team of chefs at the charming new 100-seat restaurant includes three risingstar graduates of the Culinary Institute of America. “I teach our chefs to respect the flame,” Dreher says. “They love playing with fire. But you have to learn to control the process. I’ve always been mesmerized by fire, even as a little kid. I used to take all our Christmas wrapping paper outside and burn it up. I’ll always be a pyro!” A seventh generation St. Francisville native and a graduate of the John Folse Culinary Institute, Chef Dreher elevated his European fine dining skills after moving to St. Louis to helm restaurants owned by acclaimed Chef Bryan Carr. “He became my mentor,” says Dreher. “I was his chefde-cuisine at Atlas before I returned to Louisiana and opened Fresh Kitchen in Baton Rouge. I sold it to Good Eats before joining Restaurant 1796.” The Myrtles’ general manager, Morgan Moss, tapped Chef Dreher to help transform his family’s 224-year-old plantation into a unique open-hearth dining destination, and transcend its reputation as “the most haunted house in America.” “I was drawn to Daniel’s keen business sensibilities and creativity,” says Moss. “We hope to develop agritourism by creating kitchen gardens, orchards, walking trails and other attractions.” “We’ll be introducing live music in the Restaurant 1796 courtyard, wine dinners and many special 7747 Hwy. 61 events at Restaurant 1796,” says Chef Dreher. St. Francisville “We live just around the corner, so our home myrtlesplantation.com 225-635-6277 is where the hearth is.” n

74 Louisiana Life january/february 2020

Pork Shanks à l a Restaur ant 1796 4 12-ounce pork shanks 3 ounces Herbsaint 2 ounces soy sauce 1 can Steen’s Pure Cane Syrup 1 ounce fresh ginger, minced 2 stalks green onion, chopped 1 ounce fresh garlic, minced Pat the pork shanks dry and season with salt and pepper. In a heavy-bottomed pot, heat enough vegetable oil to cover the bottom and place on medium heat. Brown the pork shanks in the oil and remove

from pot; drain the excess oil from the pot and return pork shanks to the pot. Degl a ze the pot with Herbsaint and soy sauce, bring it to a simmer then add the cane syrup, ginger and green onions. Cov er pot and place in a 300 F oven for 2.5 hours. Once the shanks are tender, remove from pot and reduce the remaining liquid to a syrupy consistency. Serv e with cream cheese grits;

garnish with haricots verts (recipe online). Serves 4.


chef’s Tip The pot should be large enough (5-quart Dutch oven) so that the shanks can stand up, and you won’t have to rotate them while braising.


K itche n Gourme t

Pears Poached In Red Wine 2 cups red wine ½ cup sugar ¼ teaspoon cinnamon 2 large Bosc pears 4 ounces sour cream Combine wine, sugar and cinnamon in a nonreactive pan. H a lv e, core and

peel pears. Add pears to pan, cut side down. Bring wine to a simmer and cook until pears are soft, about 15 minutes.Using a slotted spoon, remove pears to a serving dish.

Incre a se heat

under the pan and boil until wine is reduced by half. Pour over pears. When cooled to room temperature, cover and refrigerate.

Serv e pears and

Warm Up Squash soup, steak and oyster pie, a bright watercress salad and poached pears cozy up your dinner table by stanley dry photos and styling by eugenia uhl

76 Louisiana Life january/february 2020

N

ow’s the time when I look forward to cozy dinners of substantial food and hearty red wine. Soups, stews, one-pot dishes and sweet or savory baked goods are warming, comforting and an affirmation of life amid the darkness. The enjoyment begins days before the meal, while planning the menu. Where to start? Usually with just one dish. Often it’s the main course, but it could just as well be an appetizer, dessert or even a side, something that captures your imagination and intrigues you on some level. From there, it’s a matter of rounding out the menu with dishes that complement, contrast and

sauce in large, flat bowls with a dollop of sour cream in each bowl. Makes 4 servings.


provide a variety of tastes, textures and colors. That last — color — takes on added importance this time of year, when the world is so gray and in need of cheer. Planning for this month’s menu began with the idea of a steak and oyster pie. I had never eaten one, but I do love the combination of steak and oysters in a carpetbag steak or a gumbo. Initially I thought of one large pie, but wound up making individual Tip ones. To go with the pie I settled on a waterIf you shuck cress salad dressed simply with olive oil and your own white wine vinegar to provide contrast, color oysters, add the and relief from the richness. Watercress is often served with steak, and for good reason. oyster liquor to the pot while The meal needs a vegetable, but I couldn’t you’re cooking think of one that would go well with the the beef. steak and oysters. The best solution was to serve the vegetable in the form of a soup, so the meal starts with a roasted butternut squash soup enlivened with chipotle chile pepper and enriched with freshly grated Parmesan. The food is substantial without being overly rich, so a light fruit dessert seemed in order. I settled on one of my favorites — pears poached in red wine and served with a sauce made by reducing the poaching liquid. I like some sour cream with it, but that really is optional. A dry cookie would also go nicely here, if you find that appealing. This is a simple menu, nothing complicated or difficult to execute, and it can largely be prepared in advance. The flavors in each course are intense and, I think, satisfying. Each course has eye appeal and vivid color — the deep orange of the soup, the bright green of watercress with the entree and the lovely burgundy of the dessert. n

Roasted Butternut Squash Soup 2 pounds butternut squash, cubed 2 medium onions, sliced 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 4 cups chicken or vegetable stock coarse salt and chipotle chile pepper to taste freshly grated Parmesan cheese Prehe at oven to 450 F. Toss squash and onions

in olive oil to coat. Place on a sheet pan and roast until browned and softened, about 20-30 minutes.

Combine squash, onions

and chicken stock in large pot. Bring to a boil. Puree with an immersion blender. Season with salt and chipotle chile pepper. Serv e hot, garnished generously with freshly grated Parmesan cheese. Makes 4-6 servings.

Steak And Oyster Pie FILLING

1½ pounds beef, such as rump or top round, cut into 1-inch cubes 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium onion, chopped 2 cups beef stock 2 tablespoons dry roux coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste cayenne pepper to taste 12 small oysters, shucked CRUST

1¼ cups all-purpose flour ¼ teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons cold butter 4 tablespoons cold lard or shortening 3-4 tablespoons ice-cold water GLAZE

1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon water brown beef in oil, in batches, without overcrowding. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. Add onion and cook until softened. Add beef stock and roux and stir to dissolve. Return beef to pot, season with salt, black pepper and cayenne. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 2-3 hours. Adjust seasoning. Di v ide among 4 (8-10 ounce) baking

dishes. (The recipe can be prepared in advance to this point.) Before baking, add 3 small oysters to each dish.

Whisk flour and salt in mixing bowl. Cut

Watercress Sal ad 1 bunch watercress 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil ½ teaspoon white wine vinegar coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste Sepa r ate watercress leaves from large stems. (Save large stems for a stir-fry.) Whisk to combine olive

oil and vinegar. Drizzle over watercress. Toss and season with salt and pepper. Makes 4 servings.

butter into small pieces and add to bowl, along with lard or shortening. Using a pastry cutter or your fingertips, mix fats into flour until it resembles coarse meal. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time, mixing it in with a fork, until dough forms.

Turn dough out onto a floured surface. Divide dough into 4 parts, form into discs and wrap each in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. Prehe at oven to 400 F. On a floured surface, roll out a disc of dough so that it is a bit larger than the baking dish. Place dough on baking dish, turn under excess dough and fashion edge as desired. Repeat with remaining doughs and baking dishes. Place baking dishes on a rimmed baking sheet. Using a pastry brush, glaze each crust with egg wash. With a sharp knife, cut vents in each crust. Place baking sheet with pies in preheated oven and bake until crusts are browned, about 30 minutes. Makes 4 individual pies.

LouisianaLife.com 77


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Traveling Around Louisiana

Well into another winter with Mardi Gras arriving, Louisiana is a festive place to be during this time of year. And while the parades are getting rolling, plenty of the state’s cities and parishes are already prepping for spring and the numerous festivals, events, and activities that come with the warming weather. Several museums and arts centers are announcing new exhibitions that explore unique aspects of Louisiana’s history while others are bringing world class artwork to the region. Springtime festivals highlight everything from blues music and craft beers to egg knocking and songwriting. Meanwhile, consider experiencing Mardi Gras away from home this year and see how other communities celebrate the Carnival Season, from family-friendly parade zones to Mardi Gras festivals, boat parades, and costume contests. Check out the latest from the following Louisiana cities, town, and parishes, and you’ll know exactly what to recommend when your family asks, “What’s going on this weekend?”

80 Louisiana Life january/february 2020

Louisiana Cities

Alexandria/Pineville is bustling this season

with a variety of ways to experience Central Louisiana’s charm, culture, history, and entertainment. Mardi Gras arrives in February and brings nine parades that run between February 15 and Fat Tuesday (February 25) along with additional events such as Taste of Mardi Gras at the Randolph Riverfront Center and Mardi Gras Party at the Zoo. When and if you prefer a quiet escape, the nearby Kisatchie National Forest is available to paddle, hike, bike, and relax. Meanwhile, on view through February at the Alexandria Museum of Art is The Pelican State Goes to War: Louisiana in World War II, an exhibition celebrating the numerous ways that residents of Louisiana impacted the war efforts. On January 31, The Arts Council of Central Louisiana is proud to present The Chipper Experience at the Coughlin-Saunders Performing Arts Center. For over 20 years Chipper Lowell has been bringing his odd brand of amusing mayhem to audiences around the world.

Visit AlexandriaPinevilleLA.com or call 1-800-551-9546 for details on these events and more. Begin planning your romantic spring getaway now to Louisiana’s oldest city, Natchitoches. Start your getaway with a little shopping or take a tour of one of the many historic attractions located throughout the town. Discover the replica of the original fort that established Natchitoches in 1714 or explore the grounds of Oakland Plantation, one of the units of the Cane River Creole National Historical Park. Learn the history and lore during a walking tour with the Cane River National Heritage Area or a carriage ride through the 33-block historic district. From sunset views over Sibley Lake to local favorite foods like the Natchitoches Meat Pie, a variety of options exist for an intimate lunch or dinner. Make reservations at one of the area's 20+ bed and breakfasts or boutique hotels in the historic district or choose from the convenient hotels located near Interstate 49 or Highway 1. Visit Natchitoches.com to learn more about activities, events and accommodations within Natchitoches, a treasure trove of Louisiana history. There are plenty of reasons this winter and spring to visit Baton Rouge, Louisiana’s multidimensional capital city located just a short drive from anywhere in the state. This winter, Mardi Gras rules February—three weeks of festive fun include parades, parties, and the tantalizing scent of king cakes in the air. Spring brings a number of festivals and events to the area, including the Ebb & Flow arts and culture festival, Zapps International Beer Festival, the family-friendly Baton Rouge Blues Festival, and the 3rd Street Songwriter’s Festival. From April 1-30, Rome comes to Baton Rouge and the Raising Cane’s River Center in the form of Michelangelo and the ceiling paintings of the Sistine Chapel. Michelangelo: A Different View uses state-of-the-art technology to replicate the elaborate paintings on the ground so that visitors can walk around the gigantic masterpieces and experience a “different view” of Michelangelo’s work. Tickets are available now through Ticketmaster. For more to do in Baton Rouge, go to visitbatonrouge.com. Lafayette is at the heart of Louisiana’s Cajun Country, an area known for letting the good times roll, or, as they say it, “Laissez les bons temps rouler!” That’s in large part because no matter what time of year you visit Lafayette, they will have something for you to celebrate.


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One celebration that has visitors from all over the world heading down south with a smile on their face is Mardi Gras. Worldwide, Mardi Gras is known as a time to let loose and celebrate. In Lafayette, you can experience all of the excitement and revelry of the carnival season in a family-friendly atmosphere. The festivities, which span two weekends (Feb. 14-15 and Feb. 21-25), feature nine parades, a festival with live music, balls, and a costume contest. So come on down and shout, “Throw me something, mister!” Visit LafayetteTravel.com/MardiGras for the 2020 schedule of events.

Parish Happenings

St. Martin Parish draws visitors year round with its welcoming hospitality, world-class music and famous local cuisine. Accommodations offerings include beautiful B&B’s, top quality campgrounds and cabins, houseboats, and hotels. Breaux Bridge offers an array of shopping, antiquing and world-renowned hot spots like the famous Zydeco Breakfast at Buck & Johnny’s and nighttime entertainment at Tante Marie’s, Pont Breaux's Cajun Restaurant, and Cafe Sydnie Mae. The Henderson area, at the edge of the Atchafalaya Basin, offers airboat and swamp tours and great family-owned restaurants such as Chicken on the Bayou and Crawfish Town USA. St. Martinville plays host to countless festivals and quaint cafes in the beautiful downtown district. Take heritage tours at Acadian Memorial and Museum, African American Museum, and LongfellowEvangeline State Historic Site. Located just two hours west of New Orleans and a short drive from anywhere in the state, St Martin Parish holds the true essence of Cajun and Creole. Discover “where Cajun began” by visiting CajunCountry.org. Allons aux Avoyelles, to pass a good time! The Rotary Club of Avoyelles will host the Krewe of Cyllenius Parade in Marksville on February 16, 2020, at 2 p.m. The parade begins at the Avoyelles Parish Courthouse square, takes a left on Hwy 1 South and another left on Acton to Preston Street before ending downtown. Continue the Mardi Gras festivities with Lundi Gras at Bailey’s on the Square in Marksville on February 24 at 7 p.m., where you can participate in the costume contest and the Sweet Potato Dance. For more details, call 318-240-3495. Avoyelles Parish, the “Easter Egg Knocking Capitol of Louisiana,” invites you to pacque on Easter Weekend. Cottonport hosts Knockin’ on the Bayou, and Effie welcomes you to Easter on the Red River, both family-

friendly events scheduled for Easter Saturday. On Easter Sunday morning, Marksville celebrates its longtime tradition of the egg knocking competition at the Avoyelles Parish Courthouse Atrium with registration beginning at 9 a.m. Come for the joie de vivre! Ici on est fier de parler Français! Whether it is a festival you crave, highspeed drag racing, historic plantation homes, scenic views of the Mighty Mississippi, West Baton Rouge Parish has it all. Visit the West Baton Rouge Museum and one of their many great exhibits. In February, West Baton Rouge Parish welcomes visitors for its two Mardi Gras parades: February 16 in Addis and February 23 in Port Allen. This spring, visit West Baton Rouge for Kite Fest Louisiane, April 4 and 5. Celebrate the stars and stripes on July 4 in the downtown Port Allen riverfront with fireworks, live music, and activities for children from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. This September, have a blast at the Oldies But Goodies Fest & BBQ Cook-off. Saturday and Sunday, September 12-13, the West Baton Rouge Tourist Information & Conference Center will be taken over with live music, delicious barbecue, a huge antique car show and more. Visit WestBatonRouge.net for details and more events. Stop in at Exit #151 and enjoy a cup of Community Coffee locally roasted in West Baton Rouge, LA. Every year, Mardi Gras brings excitement and joy to Louisiana, as families gather to delight in the regalia, marching bands, throws and merriment. As a family-oriented festival set amidst the parades of Jefferson Parish, Family Gras is a highlight of Carnival season featuring music and entertainment for all ages, your favorite Louisiana seafood and cuisine, and an art market all now conveniently placed at Clearview Center, where storied krewes such as Excalibur, Madhatters, Centurion, Atlas, and Kings parade through. High-caliber entertainment has included national and regional favorites such as Zac Brown Band, Taylor Swift, Allen Toussaint, Beach Boys, The Drifters, and The Imagination Movers. Admission is free, though a Royal Pass VIP experience is available at Ticketmaster and offers premium viewing, backstage access, food and beverage, and restroom facilities. This year’s festival takes place February 14-16. For information, including the 2020 lineup, visit FamilyGras.com or call 1-877-572-7474. Located ten minutes from New Orleans, Jefferson Parish offers family fun yearround—from the decadent Oyster Trail to the magnificent trails of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park & Preserve. Plan your itinerary at VisitJeffersonParish.com.

LouisianaLife.com 81


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Visit Mississippi In Greenwood, past and present converge into a unique melting pot of down-home culture and unexpectedly cosmopolitan experiences. Savor authentic Delta cuisine from a James Beard Award nominee or pick up tricks of the trade at the Viking Cooking School. Explore the history of blues legend Robert Johnson, and parade through downtown shops brimming with artsy treasures. No matter what moves your soul, in Greenwood, inspiration awaits around every corner.

Greenwood

Vicksburg

Natchez

M

ississippi offers a taste of the South that remains unique. Heavily influenced by its proximity to the Mississippi River, the state abounds with important national history and the stories of the creative individuals who helped shape it. Home of the delta blues and several Civil War sites, the state gives travelers a unique glance into how small towns and rural river deltas have influenced the America we know today. Conveniently close for Louisiana travelers, Mississippi is a wonderful destination for explorers looking to experience something a little different. Whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast, a history buff, a foodie, or an artist, Mississippi offers something for everyone.

Vicksburg bursts at the seams with local culture and character—in Vicksburg, you’ll find authentic Southern hospitality, significant U.S. history, influential art, flavorful food, and thrilling outdoor adventures. With sweeping views of the Mississippi River, Vicksburg perfectly blends Southern culture and heritage with exciting modern-day attractions, from worldclass casinos, upscale shopping, dining and spas to fascinating historic sites, architecture, and antebellum mansions. It all runs on river time—go to VisitVicksburg.com. 

This season, allow a small Mississippi River town with over 300 years of history to thrill your senses with its sights, sounds, and unique Southern charm. Natchez is filled with breathtaking views of the mighty Mississippi, meticulously kept antebellum homes and churches, beautiful parks, historic walking trails, hand-crafted southern home cooking, informative city tours, vibrant nightlife, and much more for you to discover. Plan your trip at VisitNatchez.org.


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Staying Neutral Following the Sabine River territory through history By Paul F. Stahls Jr.

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Toledo Bend Forest Scenic Byway Cane River National Heritage Trail Louisiana Colonial Trails Myths And Legends Byway Creole Nature Trail

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he Bicentennial celebration called “No Man’s Land, Becoming Louisiana” is now entering its second year of festivals, special events and driving tours through Sabine River territory (for decades cursed with border disputes and rampant crime). The 24-month observance is a salute to the treaty that made it Louisiana's. For an events calendar plus a timeline tracking the No Man’s Land story (courtesy of Rebecca Blackenbaker of the Cane River National Heritage Area) visit visitnomansland.com. Shortly after the Louisiana Purchase the old No Man’s Land, aka Sabine Free State, earned a third title, “Neutral Strip,” when U.S. and Spanish military commanders signed a formal agreement in 1806 to avoid the place rather than fight over it. That made settlers and travelers easy prey for the region’s “land pirates” for 15 years until the Sabine was finally established as the U.S.-Tejas border by the AdamsOnis Treaty, signed by Secretary of State John Quincy Adams and Spanish envoy Luis Onis on Feb. 22, 1819, and ratified by both governments 24 months later. The banditti remained a factor, of course, and other varieties of violence would appear soon enough, like criminal “Jayhawkers” in the Civil War years and labor union clashes in the “Timber Boom” era. Visitors seeking related landmarks in that eight-parish spiderweb of highways need guidance, so it’s good to know that of Louisiana’s 19 “Trails & Byways” charted by the State Office of Tourism (byways.louisianatravel.com), five trails are dedicated to the historic, cultural and recreational attractions of the Neutral Strip. The Sabine River marks the northern tip of the Strip and becomes our state line at the point of its arrival in DeSoto Parish, a place of picturesque villages like Keatchie and the old battleground town of Mansfield, and an 1840 border marker placed in nearby Logansport still stands. Downstream the river soon swells to become the South’s largest manmade lake, 50-year-old Toledo Bend Reservoir, and the Toledo Bend Forest Byway follows the reservoir along hilly Highway 191, crossing LA 6 and passing bike trails and golf resorts on its way to North and South Toledo Bend State Parks. LA 6, better known as El Camino Real (Spain’s beaten path from Mexico and now a National Historic Trail), begins at the Pendleton Bridge, starting point of the Colonial Trails Byway, where the Sabine River Authority shares quarters with a welcome center (318-256-4114). Just east in Many a Sabine Parish information center (318-256-5880) is a source of directions to landmarks like the well-preserved sawmill village of Fisher (3 miles down U.S. 171), and the byway continues east to future-president Zachary Taylor’s 1922 Fort Jesup and the excavated site of Spain’s 1719-72 Los Adaes presidio (actually capital of Spanish Texas 1729-72). Costumed guides “occupy” a stunning replica of France’s 18th-century Fort St. Jean Baptiste in nearby Natchitoches, and the welcome center at 708 Front St. (318-352-8072) provides information on the Cane


River National Heritage Trail, a byway leading east on Highway 6 to a Corps of Engineers’ museum atop Red River’s Grand Ecore Bluff, with another leg heading downstream along Cane River to Melrose Plantation, historic St. Augustine church and the two restored plantation complexes of the Cane River Creole National Historical Park. From Leesville in Vernon Parish with its Museum of West Louisiana, Museum of the New Llano Colony and Fort Polk Military Museum, LA 8 leads west along the lower leg of the Colonial Trails Byway to Burr’s Landing on the Sabine. Also known as Nolan’s Trace, it was the favored (and final) trail of horse and cattle smuggler Philip Nolan, captured and executed by Spanish cavalry for “filibustering” activities favoring Texas independence. A riverside park at the crossing preserves earthen Civil War breastworks and swales remaining from the original trace. The Myths and Legends Byway scours the central portion of No Man’s Land. From DeRidder, known for its Beauregard Parish Museum and haunted “Hanging Jail,” it’s a short drive west on U.S.190 to Merryville’s museum of vintage logging items and regional history (by appointment, 337-340-0785). In the shadow of that museum stands the tiny jail where the hated gunfighter and strikebreaker Leather Britches was laid out before being buried just outside the town cemetery, face down. Heading east the byway leads to points of interest like Sugartown, with its blackberry farms and sweetsweet watermelons; the city of Oakdale with its Leatherwood Museum of Allen Parish history (housed in a former sawmill village hospital); the Allen Parish Tourist Center in Oberlin where they tell the “Legend of the Money Trees” (involving hidden Jayhawker loot); and, near Kinder, the Coushatta tribe’s casino and Koasati Pines golf course. Many No Man’s landmarks are waiting in Calcasieu and Cameron parishes, like the Railroad Museum in DeQuincy and, upriver from Vinton, Niblett’s Bluff Park where artillery batteries discouraged encroachment by Spanish troops and, later, Union gunboats. Lake Charles boasts the Charpentier Historic District and Imperial Calcasieu Museum, and historic Bilbo Cemetery marks the lakeside location of Cantonment Atkinson, fortified by Zachary Taylor to guard the border and protect travelers on the Old Spanish Trail (U.S.90). In Sulphur the story of Frasch-method sulfur mining is told at the Brimstone Museum, and kid-friendly Adventure Point serves as trailhead of the Creole Nature Trail Byway. That stretch of LA 27, designated an All-American Road, leads to four marshland and Gulf Coast wildlife refuges with trails and interpretive centers, where Jayhawker gangs once plundered at will. Touring the Neutral Strip today means safe bike trails beside Toledo Bend, hiking in Kisatchie National Forest, Native American powwows, bayou crabbing and marshland birdwatching, golf courses and casinos, "Greco-Deco" courthouses, white sand creeks and paddling adventures, hotels and historic B&B’s — a far cry from traveling those hills and dales in days of old. n

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History and Hauntings Vicksburg, Mississippi is a must for Civil War buffs By Cheré Coen

A Taste of Vicksburg Food and drink for your travels 10 south rooftop bar and grill

Grab a craft beer, margarita or cocktail and enjoy the best view in town of the Mississippi River, Yazoo Diversion Canal and Centennial Lake. Every visit includes the restaurant’s complimentary pretzels and honey mustard sauce, but don’t miss the Yazoo City catfish tacos with sugarcane slaw and a cilantro corn salsa or their “famous” fried chicken topped with pepper jack cheese, candied bacon and a maple chili glaze. Mississippi Delta Hot Tamale Trail

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uilt in three sections, the McRaven Mansion in Vicksburg has been labeled the “Time Capsule of the South.” And rightly so. The original 1797 structure remains next to the 1836 addition with an elaborate Greek Revival front, constructed in 1849. McRaven is also haunted. So haunted, in fact, that its second label is Mississippi’s “Most Haunted House.” The Duff Green Mansion in town, an enormous house built by a cotton broker before the Civil War, also contains those who refuse to check out. But, unlike McRaven, owner Harley Caldwell doesn’t enjoy discussing her bed and breakfast apparitions, namely a one-legged Confederate and a small child named Annie. “Annie’s thought to be the spirit that lingers on the stairs,” Caldwell explained. “I don’t believe in ghosts but if I have to do chores, I say a little prayer before I go about my business.” Haunts or no haunts, one thing’s for certain. Vicksburg’s steeped in history.

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In 1863, the Civil War dragged on and Union forces were anxious to capture control of the Mississippi River. Vicksburg stood at the center of the battle and Pres. Abraham Lincoln called Vicksburg “the key" to victory over the South. U.S. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant surrounded and held siege over the city for 47 days until Confederate Lt. Gen. John C. Pemberton surrendered on July 4. But the “Siege of Vicksburg” took a massive toll on the city and its residents. To learn more about this important turn in the war visit Vicksburg National Military Park and Vicksburg National Cemetery, both part of the National Park Service. The massive battlefield includes miles of historic markers and antique artillery, the USS Cairo ironclad and more than 1,400 monuments and memorials. Pick up the audio guide at the visitor’s center or listen along on a corresponding phone app. The park offers occasional free admission, including Jan. 20 for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Vicksburg exists within the Mississippi Delta and that means it’s also a stop on the Mississippi Delta Hot Tamale Trail. Solly’s Hot Tamales has been around since 1939, while The Tamale Place serves orders to go, a great stop for grabbing lunch to enjoy while watching ships pass on the river. craft brews

New to Vicksburg is Key City Brewing Co., pouring brews with names like Mississippi Queen and Hazy He Calls Me within the Cottonwood Public House in downtown Vicksburg. Visitors and locals alike hang out at Cottonwood, enjoying craft beer, trivia night and unique pizzas.


To get a visual of the town’s Civil War history, the Old Depot Museum offers a 250-square-foot diorama of the Siege of Vicksburg. Why Vicksburg?

The town harks back further than the Civil War, founded in 1811 and incorporated as a town in 1825 because of its unique location on the Mississippi River. The Jesse Brent Lower Mississippi River Museum explains the relationship of Vicksburg’s commerce with the river, why the town was vital to the Union takeover in 1863 and how the river has changed course over the years. Other historic museums include For more info the Jacqueline House Museum, an visitvicksburg.com appointment-only landmark dedicated to the area’s African American culture, and the Old Court House Museum, where visitors can tour on their own and view the largest collection of Civil War artifacts in the South. Atlanta may lay claim to starting Coca-Cola (Columbus, Ga., does too) but Joseph Biedenharn first bottled the bubbly drink in Vicksburg in 1894, starting the worldwide craze. Visitors will learn more about this entrepreneurial feat in the Biedenharn Coca-Cola Museum, located in the downtown Vicksburg building the Biedenharn family used as a wholesale candy company and shoe store. Where to stay

Vicksburg is home to numerous bed and breakfasts, many of which date back to the Civil War. The Duff Green Mansion with its three stories and 15 ½-foot ceilings was built by cotton merchant Duff Green when he married the daughter of a local judge and was given an entire city block for a wedding present. One of the best examples of Palladian architecture in Mississippi, this massive home has seen many famous statesmen through its doors, including Confederate Pres. Jefferson Davis. Other mansions that survived the Siege of Vicksburg, and a few built after the Civil War, are open for accommodations, many of which include a house tour. Spirits

But if you’re still wondering about those ghosts, McRaven isn’t the only haunted house in town, although it’s top on the list. McRaven’s haunted tours are offered on weekends. Other sites to make your hair stand up include the Old Court House Museum, the Baldwin House Restaurant and parts of the Vicksburg National Military Park. For an overview, enlist Haunted Vicksburg Ghost Tours. Mark your calendar

A great time to visit Vicksburg is the second Saturday of every month for Vicksburg Second Saturday. The historic downtown boutiques, art galleries, restaurants and bars offer special events, sales and more while on the street musicians perform. n

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Sports of All Sorts Allstate Sugar Bowl CEO Jeff Hundley brings more national sporting events to Louisiana from the nonprofit’s headquarters in New Orleans By Laura McKnight portrait by romero & romero

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hen Allstate Sugar Bowl CEO Jeff Hundley tells people what he does for a living, he often fields the following query: That’s a full-time job? It certainly is — and then some, Hundley says. As the newly tapped head of the nonprofit Allstate Sugar Bowl, Hundley oversees the organization’s namesake game while guiding efforts to bring more national sporting events to Louisiana. “No two days are the same — that’s what I love about this job,” Hundley said. “It never becomes rote.” Along with helping to secure and host national events, the Allstate Sugar Bowl sponsors more than 50 amateur athletic events annually, from lacrosse to sailing, and serves as title sponsor for New Orleans’ annual Crescent City Classic. The organization also offers youth programs and awards scholarships to high school and college athletes. The varied slate of national events and community programs keeps Hundley not just busy, but fulfilled. “You really do make a difference in some people’s lives,” he said. Though new to the CEO spot, Hundley has worked for the Allstate Sugar Bowl for over 25 years, most recently coordinating New Orleans’ successful bid to host the 2020 College Football Playoff National Championship and playing an integral part in drawing the 2020 NCAA Women’s Basketball Final Four to the city. The Iowa native, who played all-state football and basketball and then college basketball, spent seven years working for the University of Georgia Athletic Association before arriving to New Orleans. Hundley cites the satisfaction of his job and the energy of New Orleans with keeping him and his family rooted in the city — and with the Allstate Sugar Bowl — beyond the three or so years he intended to stay. As CEO, he looks forward to keeping the city competitive as a host site. “For 25 years I had to be focused on the gritty details of our business and in this new position I’m learning to let go of some of that to focus more on the big picture — what’s going to happen down the road and how do we best position ourselves to remain at the top,” he said. n

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What do you enjoy most about living and working in New Orleans? The energy of this city is second to none and I really appreciate the ‘can do’ spirit of the people here. That’s big in the event business. And, of course, who doesn’t love the food? What would most people be surprised to learn about the Allstate Sugar Bowl organization?

Many people don’t realize the number of community programs and amateur sporting events we support throughout the year, and most probably don’t understand the role the Sugar Bowl Committee had to play in financing the bid to land the 2020 CFP National Championship. To bring the National Championship to New Orleans, the Bowl is providing millions of dollars in funding

for an event that will benefit the tourism industry in New Orleans and across the state. Which fan event do you, personally, most anticipate during the National Championship? I’m a big music buff and will definitely look forward to taking in the CFP’s Playoff Playlist Live at Woldenberg Park.


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

Louisiana Life January-February 2020  

Louisiana Life January-February 2020