Page 1

Happy Memorial Day to those who served

R E P O R T E R REPORTER

THE THE 2 SECTIONS 22 PAGES

Serving Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

Volume LV No. 11

USPS 118-690

75¢ $1.00

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Community disservice hours

10 percent of OLCHS students’ graduation on hold after allegedly falsifying paperwork THE

Brother Rice’s baseball team knock off 2 SECTIONS 22 PAGES some giants See sports

Volume XLVII No. 50

Oak Lawn to look at policy regarding criminals in hospitals Page 3

R EPORT ER

By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

last week that the 47 seniors each signature, Riordan said, and submitted service hour forms has served a five-day suspension that included the forged signa- from school. Approximately 10 percent of ture of Stony Creek Golf Course “The kids did not meet graduOak Lawn Community High Superintendent Bill Krueger. A ation requirements,” Riordan said School’s senior class was not ex- 48th student has been banned Monday. pected to participate in gradua- from graduation ceremonies beThe students will receive their tion ceremonies Wednesday night cause he forged Krueger’s signa- diplomas when they complete the because 47 students allegedly fal- ture on 45 of the forms, School required service hours, he said. sified paperwork indicating that District 229 Superintendent MiApproximately 400 seniors were they completed mandatory com- chael Riordan said. expected to participate in graduaServing Evergreen Park,classHickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos munity service hours. Chicago Ridge, The student charged his tion ceremonies Wednesday night School district officials realized mates between $10 and $20 for at the Shannon Center at St.

USPS 118-690

75¢

Xavier University. The students in question were on two forms submitted at the informed last week during indi- last minute with ones handed in vidual meetings that they would earlier in the year. “The signatures looked difnot participate in graduation ceremonies, Riordan said. District ferent,” Riordan said. “It was a administrators also talked to the fabricated signature.” Further examination revealed students’ parents on the phone or that all of the forms that bore at the meetings, he said. Riordan said administrators did Krueger’s signature were bogus, not become aware of the decep- Riordan said. Hills andlast Worth tion until week when theyThursday, March 1, 2007 (Continued on page 3) compared Krueger’s signature

The ultimate WHATIZIT? Name this car and win money and beer IMPRESSIONS By Jeff Vorva

The Gin Blossoms and lead singer Robin Wilson rocked Staggapalooza on Saturday Page 4

Rakow questions some media giving too many gory details out on teacher’s murder Page 6 Tony Pinto lets you know if its worth throwing your money away on the movie “The Million Dollar Arm” See O&A

INDEX Police News........................2 Our Neighborhood.............4 Sudoku.............................4 Commentary.....................6 Death Notices......................7 Crossword.........................7 School...........................8 & 9 Calendar..........................10 Consumer.........................11

COLUMNISTS Jeff Vorva...........................3 Bob Rakow..........................6 Dee Woods.......................12 Wine Guy..........................12

Hey gang, how would you like to earn a hundred bucks and a six pack of beer? No, the Reporter is not holding a promotional contest or anything like that. But you might call this the ultimate WHATIZIT? contest. For those unfamiliar, we run a photo of something on page 12 and our fine readers try to guess what it is. The prize is getting your name in the paper for a job well done. A man in St. Augustine, Fla., is seeking your help to solve a nearly half-decade old mystery and is willing to part with that big bounty in order to do it. But I have to warn you – this one is the toughest of the toughies. Celebrities couldn’t come up with the answer. Experts couldn’t come up with the answer. But you just might have a shot at the beer. And the hundy. We’re giving you a lot of hints. See, Phillip Topcik is looking for the name and make of a car that he bought years ago and said that it once belonged to John and Anne Greeneltch, who lived in the 9100 block of 50th Ave. in Oak Lawn. The car was in town in the early and mid 1960s and sold to a Volkswagen dealer in

Submitted photo

Phillip Topcik has spent nearly 50 years tracking down the make and model of this rare car, which belonged to an Oak Lawn family in the 1960s. Evergreen Park. It was serviced at Evergreen Imports at 3401 W 95th St in Evergreen Park and eventually traded to them for a VW Bus. It was also serviced at Zander Shell Service at 95th & Ridgeland in 1965. “I know a million things about this car,” Topcik said. “But I don’t know the make and model. No one knows who built it or what it was called. Anne Greeneltch told me her husband said it was made in

Germany for a movie star and that it was made to look sleek and fast.’’ Since he bought the car that he calls “ugly” and features suicide doors in 1967, Topcik has been trying to figure this out. He has written letters. He has had stories written about it in four magazines – including one written in all German. He said he even sought out former talk show host and car aficionado Jay Leno’s help. He

said Leno tried to help but couldn’t come up with an answer. He bought the car when there was no such thing as an Internet. But over the years, he got out his computer and hoped a trip down the information superhighway would solve his problem. Nope. Roadblocks. In 2003, Automobile Magazine tried to help Topcik out. Author Jean Jennings “sicced” her favorite expert on the case

– a dude by the name of Robert Cumberford who she described as a “rather historic” noted historian. “To me, it seems to be a homemade custom on a VW chassis with possibly some early Porsche bodywork,” Cumberworth said. “Porsche did do some contract work for Studebaker in the 50s and 60s, including some air-cooled V-6 cars. I have seen (Continued on page 3)

Check E. Cheese’s liquor license could be in jeopardy By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury will determine the future of Chuck E. Cheese’s liquor license Tuesday at a liquor control commission hearing. Bury Cheese The mayor, who is also the village’s liquor commissioner, could one another or ignoring police suspend or revoke the establish- commands to disperse, police said. ment’s license or levy a fine. It Four individuals were arrested during the incident and charged with disorderly conduct, trespassing or resisting a police officer, according to reports. would not be the first time Bury The liquor commission hearhas taken decisive action against ing is scheduled for 10 a.m. at an establishment that allegedly Oak Lawn Village Hall, 9446 S. has violated the terms of its li- Raymond Ave. quor license. The hearing notice says that Photo by Jeff Vorva Bury announced the hearing Chuck E. Cheese allegedly violated Worth Mayor Mary Werner, decked out in garb from the 1914 era, presided over a quick board Tuesday, just days after a May 18 the disorderly conduct clause of meeting and a party to help celebrate the village’s 100th anniversary. disturbance at Chuck E. Cheese, a village ordinance. 4031 W. 95th St. “No retailer of liquor licensed

ANALYSIS

‘We are adjourned, let’s party!’

The fracas involved a large, unruly crowd of approximately 100 By Kelly White 100th birthday, Worth village board In lieu of a gavel, Worth Mayor patrons—including many young Correspondent members brought back the sen- Mary Werner banged the table children—who were outside the sation of the era by dressing in with her hand and said “We are restaurant when police arrived Worth officials partied like it clothing from the 1900’s during a adjourned, let’s party!” and the at about 6:15 p.m., according to was 1914. brief 15-minute outdoor meeting close to a hundred people ate hot reports. Some members of the crowd On the eve of marking the 100- Tuesday night at Gale Moore Park (Continued on page 5) were swearing and arguing with day countdown to the village’s in the Worth Historic District.

under the provisions hereof shall suffer any loud or boisterous talking or obscene or profane language, quarreling, singing, fighting or other disturbances,” according to the ordinance. This is not the first criminal (Continued on page 3)


2

The Reporter Thursday, May 22, 2014

POLICE / LOCAL NEWS

Chicago Ridge

Evergreen Park

  Javier Hernandez, 31, of Cicero, was charged with driving without a valid license, using a cell phone while driving and no insurance May 12 after being stopped in the 6600 block of 95th Street, police said. ***    Pedro Valle, 27, of Midlothian, was charged with delivery and possession of marijuana May 12 after police observed him sell marijuana at 111th Street and Ridgeland Avenue, police said. ***   Christopher Manson, 25, of Harwood Heights, was charged with driving on a suspended license May 12 after a stop at 111th Street and Ridgeland Avenue, police said. ***   Norma A. Medina, 24, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft May 15 after allegedly stealing merchandise from Kohl’s at Chicago Ridge Mall, police said. ***

   Lemar White, 23, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft May 9 after allegedly stealing goods from Wal-Mart, 2500 W. 95th St., police said. ***    Gregory H. Tallent, 44, of Evergreen Park, was charged with aggravated assault and resisting and obstructing a police officer May 9 after a disturbance at 96th Street and Kedzie Avenue, police said. ***    Richard A. Jeschke II, 20, of Evergreen Park, was charged with resisting a police officer May 10 following an incident in the 8800 block of Sacramento Avenue. ***    Francisco A. Guzman, 25, of Oak Forest, was charged with possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia and driving without a valid license after a May 13 stop in the 3800 block of 87th Street, police said. ***    Porsha T. Pate, 20, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft May 13 after reportedly stealing items from Wal-Mart, 2500 W. 95th St., police said. ***    Ticonnaa Cammon, 31, Burbank, was charged May 13 with retail theft after allegedly stealing items from Wal-Mart, 2500 W. 95th St., police said. ***    Sandra Oluchi Amanze, 32, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft, May 14 after reportedly stealing items from Wal-Mart, 2500 W. 95th St., police said. ***   Michelle L. Debella, 54, of Chicago, was charged May 14 with possession of a controlled substance and drug equipment following a May 14 stop at 3999 W. 99th St., police said. ***   Amanda L. Sieracki, 28, of Evergreen Park, and Matthew

  Beyania Hernandez, 23, of Chicago, was charged May 15 with retail theft after reportedly stealing goods from Kohl’s at Chicago Ridge Mall, police said. ***   Valencia Jackson, 25, of Arlington Heights, was charged with driving on a suspended license and blocking an intersection May 16 after a stop at 96th Street and Ridgeland Avenue, police said. ***    Donald F. Macak, 56, of Chicago Ridge, was charged with drunken driving and improper lane use May 18 after being stopped at 95th Street and Ridgeland Avenue, police said. ***    Laura A. Przbylski, 37, of Alsip, was charged with retail theft May 18 after allegedly stealing merchandise from Kohl’s at Chicago Ridge Mall, police said.

THE

REPORTER

Chicago Ridge / Evergreen Park / Hickory Hills Oak Lawn / Palos Hills / Worth Publisher Amy Richards Editor Jeff Vorva Sports Editor Ken Karrson Graphic Design/Layout Kari Nelson & Jackie Santora Advertising Sales Val Draus To subscribe call (708) 448-6161 / Fax (708) 448-4012 Website: TheReporterOnline.net e-Mail: thereporter@comcast.net The Reporter is published weekly by the Regional Publishing Corp. 12247 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463 Office Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon Entered as periodical mail at the Post Office at Worth, Illinois, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Subscription rates: $38.00 per year by mail in Cook County. $48 per year by mail elsewhere. $1.00 per copy on newsstands and vending machines. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Reporter, 12247 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463.

Jack & Pat’s Old Fashioned Butcher Shop 10717 South Ridgeland Avenue Meat: 636-3437 Deli: 636-6203

$

3

98 Lb.

Marinated Boneless

Chicken Breast or Chix Stix 6 Varieties

$

3

98 Lb.

Jack & Pat’s

Porterhouse or Sirloin Patties

$

419

$

4

39

Krakus Polish Ham..................$5.49 lb. Eckrich Hard Salami................$4.59 lb. Jack & Pat’s (Pre-Sliced) Bacon..........................$3.69 lb. Kidney Bean or Tri-Bean Salad............$2.59 lb.

Lb.

of this notice. LDS Foods & Aable License Consul 2000 International VIN# 1HSCBAHRXYJ1063149    Two juveniles were arrested Lien Amount: $4,336.00 early Tuesday and charged with burglarizing four cars, Evergreen Park police said.    One of the offenders also was charged with resisting arrest, police said.   Police responded at 12:35 a.m. Tuesday to a car burglary in progress in the 2700 block of 97th Street after a witness told police he saw two men in a parked car on 97th Place.   A second witness informed police that he saw four AfricanAmerican men run eastbound through the alley between 97th Street and W. 97th Place. The witness said the men were pull-

  Michael J. Symons, 50, of Joliet, was charged with damage to property May 12 after a disturbance in the 6500 block of 111th Street, police said. ***    Brett L. Toovey, 18, of Worth, was charged with domestic assault May 12 following a disturbance in the 11100 block of Columbus Drive, police said. ***   Dana Williams, 24, of Chicago Heights, was charged with driving on a suspended license, speeding and no insurance May 15 after a stop in the 6600 block of 111th Street, police said. ***    Mohammad D. Jaber, 25, of Chicago, was charged with domestic battery May 15 after a disturbance at Palos Motel, 10600 S. Harlem Ave., police said. Area police departments Chicago Ridge 425-7831 Evergreen Park 422-2142 Hickory Hills 598-4900 Oak Lawn 499-7722 Palos Hills 598-2272 Worth 448-3979

store and demanded, “whatever money was in the register, give it to me.” He fired a weapon while he was followed out of the store by an employee. No one was injured, police said.    On April 8, at 8:35 p.m., Koliopoulos entered the Marathon Gas Station and announced an armed robbery. He lifted his shirt and showed a weapon to the employee behind the counter, according to reports.    He was given an undisclosed amount of money, left the station and fled west on 111th Street, police said.   On April 13, he returned to the gas station, announced a robbery, received an undisclosed amount of money and again fled west on 111th Street, according to reports.   Koliopoulos was on parole from the state of Florida where he was released from prison in 2012 after serving time for robbery, police said.

   The victim pushed the man away but was tackled by the other two. While fighting, the victim tried to dial 911 on his phone. An offender grabbed the phone, and the victim screamed for help.   The offenders stopped and fled south on Komensky Avenue. The victim called 911 from someone’s home. He was not injured, police said. — By Bob Rakow

EP cops arrest teens for car burglarizing

$

$

3

89 Lb.

369 Lb.

Jack & Pat’s

Pizza Set Ups

$

Worth

Worth man charged with role in robberies

Pork Chops

We Will Be Open MEMORIAL DAY 9 am - 3 pm

Boneless Sizzle Steaks

Palos Hills

Oak Lawn

Boneless Stuffed

Lb.

drunken driving, speeding and improper lane use May 14 after a stop at 95th Street and Harlem Avenue, police said. ***   Lori A. Kenny, 49, of Alsip, was charged with theft May 15 after reportedly stealing items from Kmart, 4101 W. 95th St., police said.

   Mark Janik, 38, of Oak Lawn, was charged with obstructing justice May 10 following a dis*** turbance at Centennial Park, 9299 S. Nashville Ave., police    Tamiko L. Jones, 38, of Chicago, was charged with disorsaid. derly conduct May 15 after a *** reported disturbance at Hobo,    Jillian M. Eppenstein, 28, of 8716 S. Cicero Ave., police said. Merrionette Park, was charged with drunken driving, transportation of open alcohol, driving without a valid license and improper lane use May 10 after he   Alexander Mrowca, 18, of Palos was stopped at 103rd Street and Hills, was charged with possession Komensky Avenue, police said. of marijuana and drug equipment May 14 after police reportedly spot***   Joseph T. Burkhead, 20, of ted him smoking marijuana in the Oak Lawn, was charged with a parking lot near Cinnamon Creek possession of a controlled sub- Court, they said. stance May 11 after a stop in *** the 4200 block of 100th Street,   Three hundred and twenty six police said. dollars was reported stolen May 15 *** from a car in the 10600 block of   Glenn E. Schallmo, 52, of    Phillip M. Kwak, 26, of HickVicky Lane, police said. ory Hills, was charged with Tinley Park, was charged with drunken driving, failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident, failure to yield to an emergency vehicle, no insurance and drivin previous robberies. The note ing without a valid license April By Bob Rakow stated that Koliopoulos had a 25 after he struck a squad car at Staff Reporter weapon, wanted money and no 101st Street and Cicero Avenue,   A Worth man was charged one would get hurt. police said. Monday in connection with a    Koliopoulos later admitted to ***    A push-button ignition valued spree of armed robberies in the three armed robberies in Palos Hills and one in Worth, accordat $1,000, was reported stolen city beginning in early April. sometime between April 26 and   Danny Tallant, 40, Worth, ing to the report. May 9 from a car at Carmax, was charged with aggravated   Palos Hills detectives were robbery for his involvement in able to piece together cell phone 6540 W. 95th St. the armed robberies, which also conversations between Tallant ***   The catalytic convertor was included one at a Worth beauty and Koliopoulos in order to come up with evidence needed reported stolen between May supply store. 3-10 from a car in the 4700    Police have investigated Tal- to charge Tallant, they said. lant’s role in the robberies since block of 101st Street. arresting Nicholas Koliopoulos   Tallant admitted to police April 17 at the Palos Pantry, that he drove Koliopoulos to the ***    An air compressor was report- 8100 W. 111th St., after Deputy Marathon Gas Station, 11056 edly stolen sometime between Police Chief Jeff Cucio spotted S. Southwest Highway, in order May 5-9 from outside a building him near the store, police said. to commit an armed robbery and to Sally Beauty Suppy in in the 9100 block of Mayfield   Cucio notified surveillance Worth to commit another armed Avenue. units, and police spoke with robbery on a different day, po***    Irene Guzman, 31, of Chicago, Koliopoulos. During the conver- lice said. was charged with retail theft sation, he tore up a note that   Tallant said he and KolioMay 10 after allegedly stealing he had concealed, according to poulos robbed the businesses to support their heroin addiction. merchandise from Target, 4120 reports.    Police reconstructed the note   Police said Koliopoulos on W. 95th St., police said. and determined that it was April 4 robbed the Palos Panty ***   Dominique L. Dailey, 19, of similar to ones he had used at 8 p.m. He walked into the Chicago, was charged with retail theft May 10 after reportedly stealing items from Kmart, 4101 W. 95th St., police said. ***    A 25-year-old man allegedly   While waiting, he then saw was attacked and robbed May three men pacing on Komensky 14 in Oak Lawn by three men, Avenue—one on the west side LEGAL NOTICE police said. of the street, the other two on    The man told police he the east side. Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-22-14, a sale will be held planned to meet a woman whom    He heard one suspect ask anat Three Brothers Hernandez, he communicated with online other what time it was. The 3045 S. Kilbourne Avenue, who lived near 100th Street and men then switched sides of the Chicago, IL. 60623, to sell the Komensky Avenue, according street, police said. The victim following articles to enforce a to reports. He arrived at her was then approached by one of lien existing under the laws of apartment building, sent her a the offenders, who asked for a the State of Illinois unless such text message and waited in his lighter. He gave it to him, but articles are redeemed within car until she was ready to meet the man took a swing at him, police said. thirty days of the publication him at the door, police said.   Nina M. Williams, 35, of Hickory Hills, was charged with possession of marijuana following a May 16 stop in the 8600 block of 85th Court, police said. ***   Keasha T. Williams, 24, of Joliet, was charged with driving on an expired license and registration May 17 after a stop in the 8200 block of 87th Street, police said. ***    Isra Erbas, 23, of Worth, was charged with driving on a suspended license, speeding and no insurance after a May 19 stop in the 8800 block of Roberts Road, police said.

Extra Lean Ground Chuck

SALE DATES: May 22 — May 28

Fancy Baby Back Ribs

Hickory Hills

  Tywanna K. McCoy, 45, of Evergreen Park, was charged with retail theft May 10 after she allegedly stole items from Kmart, 4101 W. 95th St., police said. ***

Man attacked while waiting for woman

To advertise call (708) 448-6161

— Founded in 1960 and Locally Owned — (© Entire contents copyright 2014 Regional Publishing Corp.)

R. Brown, 38, of Chicago, were charged with possession of a controlled substance May 14 after a stop in the 3900 W. 91st Street, police said.

Sausage

10

98

Each

Cheese

$

7

98

Each

Enough to make 3-12” Pizzas

ing on the door handles of several cars in the area, police said.    Evergreen Park police, with the assistance of the Chicago, Oak Lawn and Hometown police, created a perimeter and searched the area. Officers located two of the men in a backyard in the 9800 block of California Avenue at 12:58 a.m.    An officer ordered the offenders to lie on the ground. As he attempted to place handcuffs on one offender, the other man got up and approached the officer, who again ordered him to lie on the ground, police said.    The offender continued to approach the officer and ignored

— By Bob Rakow

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TOWN OF PALOS ROAD DISTRICT COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-22-14, a sale will be held at Z & B Truck & Trailer Repair, 680 Industrial Drive, Bensenville, IL. 60106, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Marko Putnik 2008 International VIN# 2HSCUAPR28C658118 Lien Amount: $25,811.17

(TENTATIVE 2014/2015 BUDGET AND APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the Board of Trustees of the Town of Palos, Cook County, Illinois, to consider a tentative 2013/2014 Budget and Appropriation Ordinance of the Town of Palos Road District, Cook County, Illinois. Said hearing will be held at the Palos Town Hall, 10802 South Roberts Road, Palos Hills, Illinois, at the hour of 7:00 P.M. on June 16, 2014. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Town Board of Trustees, at the public hearing, shall adopt the tentative Budget and Appropriation Ordinance, or any part thereof, as such

Sara Lee (Honey or Oven) Turkey Breast..............$6.09 lb. Scott Petersen Bologna.......................$3.29 lb. Colby Jack or Provolone Cheese.......$4.69 lb. Grandpa’s Deviled Egg Potato Salad...............$2.09 lb.

all commands. The officer, not knowing if the offender was armed, and fired one shot into the ground in an attempt to get the man to comply with the commands, according to reports.   The second offender then fled the area by climbing over a fence. The officer secured the first offender and radioed information concerning the direction of travel of the second offender, who was located by the Evergreen Park police K-9 unit at 1:44 a.m. and taken into custody, police said.

Board of Trustees deems necessary. All citizens of the Town present at the hearing and desiring to be heard concerning the tentative Budget and Appropriation Ordinance will be given an opportunity to do so. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that said tentative Budget and Appropriation Ordinance is filed and made conveniently available for public inspection in the office of the Town Clerk, 10802 South Roberts Road, Palos Hills, Illinois, during regular business hours.

Dated: May 22, 2014.

Jane Nolan/s Clerk, Town of Palos Cook County, Illinois

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-29-14, a sale will be held at Tinley Auto Repair & Towing, Inc., 17600 W. Duvan Drive, Tinley Park, IL. 60477, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Jonathan Braden Hatfield & Kurt Bella 1993 Chevrolet VIN# 1GCEK14KXPE116532 Lien Amount: $4,528.41


Thursday, May 22, 2014 The Reporter

3

Even car experts are stumped by this former Oak Lawn vehicle (Continued from page 3) photos of a couple of those prototypes. As I recall, they were all front-engine cars, and I think one might have been front-drive but am not certain. “C. Orval Selders actually drove those cars when he worked for Raymond Loewy at Studebaker in South Bend, running them around inside the ancient factory buildings at night. He might be able to shed some light on the photos, but I really do not think that the car is representative of what a professional organization would have done. As I say, probably a bodged-up body using existing steel stampings

superimposed on a rear-engine VW chassis.” The magazine located Sedlers. Case closed? Of course not. If the case was closed, you readers wouldn’t have the opportunity to win the bucks and beer. “I must say, I had never seen this vehicle or photos of it.” Selders said. “At first, it just seemed to be some backyard cobbled-up design. But the fact that it bore that identification plate does give it a different perspective. An attempt at styling has been made, so, therefore I think you can disregard it as a ‘mule.’ It looks like a hodgepodge of different parts pieced together

Fins were just coming into vogue when this mystery car was built.

to resemble a Porsche 356 from the front view. The doors look like 356 doors turned around from side to side and hinged to the rear. “As interesting as it may seem, I simply don’t think it had a thing to do with the Studebaker- Porsche project of the 1950s, when I worked for Raymond Loewy. Those body designs were very clean and reminded me a lot of the Simca Swallow of 1951. And as for a design project involving any designer from the Loewy group, I am sure it falls far short of that expertise.” For car geeks who need some more vital information about stuff I know nothing around, a metal identification tag on the luggage compartment says: Volkswagen BAUART: EIGENBAU BAUJAHR: 1951 MOTOR N.R. 2-030596 FARGEST: T.P. 143532 EIGENGW: 800KG V. ACHS-DR: 320KG H. ACHS-DR: 450KG KAROSSERIE: 001 CCM: 1131 ZUL. GES. GEW 1140KG Automotive magazine said it was hand built in 1951, the motor number is 2-030596, the chassis number is T.P. 143532, it weighs 800 kilograms, and it was the only one made. “I’ve been researching this since high school and college,”

Submitted photos

The side view of Phillip Topcik’s mystery car. He does not know themake or model of the car, which was once owned by an Oak Lawn family. Topcik said. “We’re hoping someone knows someone who knew John Greeneltch and who may have an idea of what made and model it is. Someone in Oak Lawn must remember the Greeneltch family and the car…maybe there is someone 70 years old and remember it from high school... What did Mr. Greeneltch tell you? Who made this car? For whom was

it made? What movie? What movie star?” Topcik got in contact with the Reporter last week after he was at a restaurant in St. Auguustine and a former Oak Lawn cop and his wife sat down near him and began talking. This might be his last shot at finding out this information. So ultimate Whatizit? players, send those guesses to

endofil2@gmail.com. You don’t have to put WHATIZIT? in the subject line or get it to us by Monday night. Good luck. If you win, don’t spend the money in one place and share the beer. And I’ll even throw in a buck so you can download Johnny Cash’s tune “One Piece at a Time’’ via iTunes because this story reminds me of that song.

Unguarded criminals in hospital have OL bosses talking By Bob Rakow Staff Report

board to consider an ordinance requiring the hospital to notify Oak Lawn police any time a crimiTwo Oak Lawn trustees are call- nal is admitted to the hospital. ing on the village to re-examine Trustees are expected to discuss its policies with Christ Medical an ordinance at their next comCenter regarding the release of mittee meeting. patients who have been charged Police Chief Mike Murray said with a crime. it’s the responsibility of the law The concern comes following enforcement agency in charge of televised reports that a Lake Sta- a case to keep track of a suspect tion, Ind., man facing murder and or to alert local police and seek attempted murder charges left assistance. Christ Medical Center, 4440 W. Police are notified when a shoot95th St., in February where he was ing victim is brought to the hosbeing treated for gunshot wounds. pital and family or gang members “The system failed us,” Trustee might show up seeking revenge, Robert Streit said. Murray said. Streit asked that the village Streit brought the issue up at

the May 13 village board meeting, saying he heard about Mark Cherry’s departure from the hospital on NBC5 Chicago News. He did not mention that Cherry’s departure from the hospital occurred in February, a clarification made by Village Manager Larry Deetjen. “The incident we’re talking about tonight took place months ago,” Deetjen said. “In this particular case, there was no safety issue.” Trustee Alex Olejniczak said the village should meet with hospital officials to ensure a similar incident will not happen. “We still have to be concerned about how this happened,” Ole-

jniczak said. “It’s going to happen again.” Streit agreed. He added that a suspected murder that leaves the hospital likely requires two things: money and transportation—needs that make him dangerous to the surrounding community. “I think we’re all in danger when something like this happens,” he said. “There were no alerts. There were no emails. He was the subject of a nationwide manhunt.” Trustee Mike Carberry chastised Streit for using the issue to blindside the board. “There was a moment there

when I thought you were bringing it up as a constructive action. Now I realize what you’re selling (and) it isn’t going to work,” Carberry said. “If you’re going to blindside your own people, Bob, that’s not good.” Streit attempted to respond, but Mayor Sandra Bury halted the debate. Cherry surrendered at the Lake County Jail on May 12. He is charged with murder in the shooting death of Rolando Correa, 22, and wounding two others during a drug-related incident in Gary. Cherry was not held under police guard. Gary officers don’t typically guard prisoners outside Indiana

where they have no jurisdiction, Gary police spokeswoman Cpl. Gabrielle King said earlier. Michael Kaufmann, Oak Lawn police division chief, said that Gary police did not inform his department about Cherry’s status as a criminal defendant in a murder case. Christ Medical Center spokesman Mike Maggio refused to comment on this story, but in a previous statement said that the medical center “cannot legally detain a patient against his or her will. Without prior written consent from a patient, the hospital cannot alert another person or agency about a patient’s pending discharge.”

Oak Lawn cops keeping eye on Chicago Ridge officials ‘bite the seat belts this Memorial Day bullet’ on new security cameras The 2014 Illinois Click It or Ticket campaign kicked off May 9. The Oak Lawn Police Department is joining the Illinois Department of Transportation, the Illinois State Police and hundreds of local law enforcement agencies across the state to save more lives by strongly enforcing seat belt laws. In Illinois, as of January 1, 2012, all drivers and passengers must wear seat belts in all seating positions in the car, not just the front seat. During statewide observational surveys conducted by IDOT in 2013, the overall usage rate for rear seat occupants was 77.4 percent versus 93.7 percent for drivers and front seat passengers. “Memorial Day weekend kicks off the busy summer driving sea-

Disservice (Continued from page 1) Until that point, school officials had no reason to doubt the validity of the Krueger’s signature, the superintendent said. Statement Release They had confirmed earlier in the year with the park district’s volunteer coordinator that Krueger was authorized to sign service hour sheets, but no one at the park district had seen the signature, Riordan said. The students who submitted falsified documents indicated

License (Continued from page 1) incident at Chuck E. Cheese. In 2012, a 20-year-old man who was sitting in his car in the restaurant parking lot was shot. The man, a self-admitted gang member, told police he was sitting in his car when shots were fired. Police said that two men walked up to the car and started shooting. The restaurant agreed last year to hire off-duty Oak Lawn police to serve as security. This is not the first liquor commission hearing under Bury’s watch. Earlier this year, George’s Lounge, 5407 W. 95th St., was fined $3,000 for underage drinking and failure to have a liquor license Specifically, the tavern was fined $500 for serving four un-

By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter

that they had finished required service hours by volunteering at Stony Creek Golf Course, which is part of the Oak Lawn Park District. A small number of parents asked the school to consider a different consequence, but “this is our policy,” Riordan said. “There’s no one on this building that’s taking any pleasure in doing this,” he said, adding that most of the students expressed remorse for their actions. The Oak Lawn Park District distanced itself from the controversy. “The Park District was con-

as at the Metra station, parking posal, the mayor said. However, lot and pay box, Tokar said. the cameras images would be fed The live camera feeds will be to the police station. Chicago Ridge will spend monitored at the police station. Cameras at the fire station $55,000 to install security cam- The cameras will be connected would be included in the second eras outside village hall, the to a server that will store the phase of the project, Tokar said. police station and the Metra images. In other business, the board station and parking lot. Installation of the cameras is approved the installation of two Trustees on Tuesday approved scheduled for the end of June. motivation posters in the village Phase 1 of the program, which The Chicago Ridge Public Li- trustees’ offices, leading Trustee also includes a $4,000 audio com- brary also considering installing John Lind to quip to Tokar, “I ponent. security cameras, but they would was hoping we’d hang a poster Mayor Chuck Tokar said the not be part of the village’s pro- of you.” village had analog security cameras several years ago but they eventually fell into disrepair and became obsolete. Four companies responded to — 15% Discount to New Customers — the village’s request for proposals, and Griffon Systems of Elmhurst was chosen for the project. • Typesetting & layout • 67 years of experience The cameras will cost $51,000 • 500 to 250,000 copies • 149 satisfied publishers —Submitted by the and the audio system an addition• We have newsprint & • One-day service Oak Lawn Police Department al $4,000, Tokar said. Twenty-five 50 lb. white paper • Quality Goss presswork cameras will be install as part • Pickup & delivery • We can print from your of the first phase of the project, he said. service available Mac or other disks tacted earlier in the week by Tokar said the cost, which District 229 officials to verify inconsistencies in volunteer forms. is part of the village’s capital The Stony Creek general man- improvements budget, is well 12243 S. Harlem Ave. • Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932 ager confirmed that there was no worth it. “I think it’s high time that we record of these students particiHours: Monday thru Friday 9 am - 5 pm • Sat. 9 am - Noon pating in volunteer hours,” Park bite the bullet on this,” he said. The cameras will be installed Call (708) 448-4000 District Marketing and Public Relations Supervisor Denis Iwin- around the perimeter of village Visit us online: www.regionalprinting.com hall and the police station as well ski said in a statement. “While the Park District offers a wide range of community volunteer opportunities for area students, neither the park district volunteer coordinator or the Stony Creek general manager had any knowledge of the situation.’’

derage patrons on Nov. 9 and an addition $1,000 for not posting a valid liquor license, the second such violation, Bury said. An expired liquor license was posted in the tavern, said police, who could not find a valid license in the state’s database. The $500 fine per violation is the minimum fine that can be assessed by mayor, who also serves as the village’s liquor commissioner. The underage drinking was discovered when police arrived to conduct a spot check, they said. The ID check revealed four underage patrons, one who had a fake ID, police said. The four were charged with underage drinking. Additionally, TC Pub, 9700 S. Cicero Ave., was fined $250 for being open after hours on Dec. 13 and $1,000 because cocaine was found in the office of the establishment when police re-

sponded to a disturbance at the bar that night. The village reached an agreement with the tavern calling on the owner to enforce an employee code of conduct as well as a drug-free workplace policy. Additionally, TC Pub agreed to hire security to be at the bar from 8 p.m. until close on Fridays, Saturdays and other nights that a large is expected. The agreement requires employees to complete the state’s Beverage Alcohol Sellers and Servers Education and Training program. The code of conduct states that the bar’s last call will be at 1:30 a.m., and customers must leave by 2 a.m. Employees must leave by 3 a.m. Employees may not consume alcohol after the bar closes. Friends and customers are not allowed on the premises after close, according to agreement.

son, and we want to ensure that everyone arrives at their destination safe and sound,” said Sgt. Robert Brewer. “Our officers are prepared to ticket anyone, front or back seat, who is not wearing a seat belt.” In 2012, back seat passengers in Illinois accounted for 46 fatalities and over 5,000 injuries. Out of those 46 fatalities, 30 of them were not wearing their seat belt. “Seat belts save thousands of lives every year, but far too many motorists still are not buckling up, especially in the back seat,” Brewer said. “Our goal is to save more lives, so the Oak Lawn Police Department will be out enforcing seat belt laws around the clock, looking for those who are not buckled up, in all seating positions. If you are caught not

wearing your seat belt, you will be ticketed.” Provisional numbers show that during the 2013 Memorial Day weekend there were three fatalities and almost 600 injuries on Illinois roadways. Two of those fatalities were alcohol-related. Remember – wearing your seat belt is your best defense against an impaired driver. While this year’s Click It or Ticket enforcement campaign runs from May 9 through May 26, officers are out enforcing seat belt laws yearround. Buckle up and encourage loved ones to do the same. For more information about the Click It or Ticket campaign, please visit www.buckleupillinois. org.

We Print Newspapers

REGIONAL PUBLISHING CORP.

WE’RE BUYING oLD TREASURES! WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:

• Coin Estates & Collections • All Silver & Gold Coins • Silver & Gold Jewelry • Flatware & Antique Items • All War Relics • Quality Costume Jewelry

Bring this ad in for a FREE appraisal

• Diamonds & Precious Stones • Sports Cards & Related Memorabilia • Collectibles of All Kinds • Pocket & Wrist Watches

top prices paid for all items needed!

COLLECTOR’S GALLERY LLC. 15944 S. Harlem Ave. Tinley Park • 708-633-8394 See us at our 2nd location:

4812 S. Pulaski • 773-847-3585 3x5


4

The Reporter Thursday, May 22, 2014

Our Neighborhood

Staggapalooza provided fun morning, noon and night By Jeff Vorva Reporter Editor    A small crowd in the hundreds gathered around the big stage at the 50-yard line of the football field at Stagg Saturday night to watch the Gin Blossoms play their hits followed by a fireworks show.   Staggapalooza honored the Palos Hills high school’s 50th anniversary all day Saturday. The day started with a 5K race in the morning and ended with the fireworks show.   In between was a day of activities that included a pancake breakfast, craft and vendor fairs and plenty of bands ranging from student-run bands to professional local bands to the national headlining Gin Blossoms.    Here are a few photo highlights on the day.

The 5K race had hundreds of runners (above) participate on Saturday morning.

Gin Blossoms singer Robin Wilson gets close to the crowd at Staggapalooza on Saturday night.

Allison Stefan, a soccer player for Stagg, was the top female finisher in the Staggapalooza 5K race on Saturday in Palos Hills.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Stagg students enjoy themselves away on the football field away from the stage while the Gin Blossoms Senior cross country and track athlete Terry Gruns is the first finisher at the Staggapalooza were playing Saturday night. race, well ahead of runnerup Alphonso Sahagun, who is also a track and cross country runner.

RETRO

SUDOKU The object of the game is to fill all the blank squares with the correct numbers. Each row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order. Each column of 9 numbers must include all digits1 through 9 in any order. Each 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

By Mark Andrews

Compiled by Jeff Vorva

News and events from our archives.

OL Women Voters sing in Beatles costumes 50 years ago

From the May 21, 1964 issue   The story: Hickory Hills officials awarded Nick Apollo a $149,060 bid for a million-gallon reservoir to be built in front of a packed house at the city council meeting.   The quote: “Around the corner and under a tree, there lives a family on ACD. We feed the children and pay the rent, perhaps one might grow up to be president.” — lyrics to a song written by the Oak Lawn League of Women Voters and performed by them in Beatles costumes at their annual dinner.   Fun fact: Reporter Editor Alice Johnson was one of seven finalists for the Illinois Press Association Editor of the Year award.

Shoving and threats at Chicago Ridge meeting 25 years go

(Solution on page 11)

OUUU ES D IDDSIISCSCO NNN TT TRRAT CO RAT ATEESS withoutdiscount discount service. without service. without discount service.

It’s accident no accidentmore morepeople people trust It’s no trustState StateFarm. Farm. It’s no accident more people trust State Farm. ErikR RNelson, Nelson, Agent Agent Erik Erik R Nelson, 10200 Roberts RoadAgent 10200 S SRoberts Road 10200 S Roberts Road Palos Hills, IL 60465-1539 Palos Hills, IL 60465-1539 Palos Hills, IL 60465-1539 Bus: Bus:708-430-7575 708-430-7575 Bus: 708-430-7575 erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com

P040036P040036 02/04 State Farm Automobile Insurance Company (Not in NJ),in Bloomington, IL IL StateMutual FarmMutual Mutual Automobile Insurance Company NJ), Bloomington, P040036 02/04 02/04 State Farm Automobile Insurance Company (Not in (Not NJ), Bloomington, IL

History of the World

From the May 25, 1989 issue   The story: Chicago Ridge Trustee Edward Buettner and Village Attorney George Withous got into a skirmish during a public hearing. Withous reportedly shoved Buettner away from a microphone as Buettner was prepared to make a statement. Buettner allegedly raised his hand to strike Withous but an audience member intervened.   The quote: “I wanted to make a statement about the fees…I reached for the mike and he [Withous] shoved me so I went after him.” — Buettner on the incident.   Fun fact: St. Laurence’s Summerfest, which drew 35,000 people the year before, was scheduled to feature Chubby Checker, the Buckinghams and Bozo and Cookie from “Bozo’s Circus.”

Bacons ready to sizzle at Fest 10 years ago

From the May 20, 2014 issue   The story: The carcasses of 50 carp and one bullhead were found at Oak Lawn Lake. Officials were stumped as to what happened.   The quote: “Like in the Army, Navy and Air Force, it is best to kill the enemy when he is asleep in his barracks,” Khian Liem, an abatement district director on the area’s war against mosquitos.   Fun fact: Chicago Ridge announced that the Bacon Brothers, Keanu Reeves and Survivor to headline RidgeFest. “They [the Bacon Brothers, featuring actor Kevin Bacon] asked if we wanted them back, of course we said ‘Hell, yes!’ ’’ Village Clerk Charles Tokar said.

  May 22: ON THIS DATE in 1868, the Great Train Robbery took place near Marshfield, Ind., as the Reno gang made off with $96,000. In 1992, after a reign of nearly 30 years, Johnny Carson hosted NBC’s “Tonight Show” for the last time.   May 23: ON THIS DATE in 1934, bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were shot to death in a police ambush as they drove a stolen car in Louisiana.   May 24: ON THIS DATE in 1844, Samuel Morse transmitted the message, “What hath God wrought” from Washington to Baltimore as he opened America’s first telegraph line.   May 25: ON THIS DATE in 1787, the U.S. Constitutional Convention convened in Philadelphia after enough delegates showed up for a quorum. In 1927, Henry Ford stopped producing the Model T car and prepared to start building Model A’s.   May 26: ON THIS DATE in 1896, Dow Jones established an index of 12 industrial stocks. In 1977, the blockbuster movie “Star Wars” debuted.   May 27: ON THIS DATE in 1941, Britain’s Royal Navy sunk the German battleship Bismarck.   May 28: ON THIS DATE in 1937, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco was opened to vehicular traffic.   Answer to last week’s question: This week in 1790, Rhode Island became the last of the original 13 colonies to ratify the U.S. Constitution.   This week’s question: In 1977, the first personal computer went on sale. It was made by what company?    (Mark Andrews can be reached via e-mail at mlandrews@embarqmail.com.)


Thursday, May 22, 2014 The Reporter

Palos Hills

5

April and May showers making a mess By Kelly White Correspondent   April showers have yet to bring May flowers, and the large amounts of rainfall over the past week have left Palos Hills with some unplanned messes to clean up.    Two large rain storms caused minor flooding of streets and yards on May 9 and May 11 totaling 3.24 inches of rain, making for a combined total of 3.77 inches of rain thtough mid-May.   Public Works Commissioner Dave Weakley said at last Thursday’s council meeting that on May 9, more than two inches of rain fell in the area with the bulk of the rain falling in less than two hours between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. Public works workers responded to many calls for clogged storm

sewer inlets, clogged culvert pipes and blocked creek grates. All blockages were the result of floating yard waste, trash and tree debris. Most of the calls received came from a path along 99th Street from 90th Avenue to 78th Avenue, Weakley said.   “Public works crews worked quickly to clear blocked storm water inlets of debris and no reports of home flooding were received,” Weakley said.   On May 11, another inch of rain fell in the Palos Hills area, with the bulk of it falling in less than five hours between 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. The storm had the same track as the May 9 storm. Public works again responded to several minor flooding concerns due to floating debris clogging storm water inlets.   The city is still waiting on

road repairs from the Cook County Highway Department. Several storm water drainage improvements have been incorporated into the plan, delaying the project for two years, Weakley said. In the interim, he has requested the Cook County Highway Department to consider a patching project for the worst part of the roads along Roberts Road and along 103rd Street from Kean to Harlem avenues. The highway department said that due to the harsh winter, many roads are in poor condition and officials will evaluate Palos Hills’ request along with those of other surrounding suburbs.   The Harlem Avenue water pumping station has failed, Weakley said. The city was not anticipating the failure of the

25-horse power pump/motor but is planning for its repair. “The unit was removed from the station for evaluation,” Weakley said. Cost estimated to repair the pump and motor is $9,800. The unit should be up and running in a week or two.    In other Palos Hills news, the city will install a new RedSpeed light on 103rd and Harlem Avenue on the southwest corner of the intersection.    The light will track right-hand turn violators and any driver in the middle of the intersection during a red traffic light. The mayor and city council said that area is a heavy traffic intersection and will benefit from the light. Photo by Jeff Vorva   There are two other cameras in place in Palos Hills at 111th Eliminating or curbing signs such as this one in Oak Lawn are and Roberts Road and 111th and under discussion by village officials. Southwest Highway.

OL board looks to reduce size of realtors’ signs By Bob Rakow Staff Reporter Realtor signs are popping up all over in Oak Lawn leading to concern on the part of some residents. Trustees last week talked about adopting an ordinance that would allow the village to have some control over the signs, which are scattered throughout the community advertising both homes that are “for sale” and “for rent.” Many local realtors don’t use the large signs, which typically hang from a post, opting instead for smaller signs. But some national companies that lease houses prefer the large signs. The First Amendment protects the signs, but the village can adopt restrictions regarding their size, said village attorney

Patrick Connelly. “We can’t do away with them,” said Connelly, who added that many communities have limited the size of the signs. “We can regulate [the signs] for aesthetic purposes.” A proposed ordinance could limit both the square footage of the signs as well as the size of the posts from which they hang. The village plans to work with local realtors to come up with a standard-size sign, officials said. Trustee Terry Vorderer proposed eliminating the posts, saying, “People really don’t like the look of that.” Mayor Sandra Bury said she understood how the presence of the signs throughout the village worries some residents. “It creates fear,” Bury said. “Maybe it’s the anxiety.”

Community Briefs Chicago Ridge

The Worth Village Board poses on a porch on Depot Street – the same site that the original board posed at 100 years ago. The house is owned by the Meursch family. Mayor Mary Werner, in the middle of the bottom row, holds a photo of the original board posing at the house.

Party (Continued from page 1) dogs and ice cream and watched a fireworks show. Some stuck around for Worth’s edition of the game show “Are You Smarter than a Fifth Grader?’’ hosted by trustee Colleen McElroy featuring fifth graders from Worth Junior High competing against longtime Worth residents, including Carol Phalm, who has lived in the city for 60 yrs. Although the residents were tough competitors, the fifth graders took the win with a final score of 5-4. The festivities were rushed because of impending storms and most people cleared the area at 8 p.m. before heavy rains and wind hit the park. Officials dressed for the occasion. In the era of Queen Victoria, whose very name is synonymous with conservative manners, fashion was vastly more formal than modern standards. Men donned three-piece suits for nearly every occasion, and women wore dresses that reached down to their shoes. The board members did not disappoint, decked out in long dresses, bonnets, vests and top hats. “As a financial advisor, I sometimes wear a suit to regular meetings, minus the top hat, of course,” Trustee Tedd Muersch, Jr., joked. Muersch’s family has owns one of Worth’s historic landmark homes directly across from the park that his father purchased at the age of 18. “What’s ironic is that the family that owned that house before my father had a son who was also on the Worth Village Board,” Muersch said, “Now, fast forward 100 years, and I am the son of my father, also on the Worth Village Board.” Muersch was elected onto the board at the age of 29 and said he is the youngest board member ever elected. The board members gathered onto Muersch’s porch after the meeting, to reenact a photograph of the original 1914 board members at the same location. Werner held a photo of the original board members at that site during Tuesday night’s photo shoot. There was a positive, happy vibe to the night. “One of the best decisions

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Trustee Tedd Meursch Jr., left, looks dapper in his top hat while trustee Warren Soldan’s cowboymeets-Santa Claus ensemble was a hit at Tuesday’s board meeting, held at Gale Moore Park. I’ve ever made in my life was to move to the Village of Worth,” City Clerk Bonnie Price told the crowd. Price was elected onto the board in 2001 and said she is happy to be involved with the community. Price, along with the Centennial Committee, was responsible for organizing the 1914-themed event. “I was really excited about the attire,” Centennial Committee Chairperson Bahira Karim said. “I think it’s a great idea to come out here and see how it was for the village board members back then.” Karim and her family have lived in Worth for 24 years. A teacher at District 127 and a Worth library board member, Karim added the village is an excellent place to raise your kids. “Worth is such a diverse community. Not a lot of communities are like that when you live there or are trying to raise a family there. I really like that a lot about this

town,” she said. Some residents also participated in the 1900s-style attire, contributing to the atmosphere of the era. The occasion was catered by Buddy’s Special Events of Deer Park, providing hotdogs, chips, soft drinks and ice cream. The five-minute fireworks display, which started an hour earlier because of the pending rain, ended with a large, brightly lit 100-year sign in celebration of the centennial event. This is just the beginning of a long celebration in the coming months. “The entire village will be included in the celebration of Worth’s Centennial on Aug. 29,” Werner said. She said the village will be having birthday cakes for everyone to enjoy throughout the community, including, schools, park districts, the Worth Public Library and the Worth Village Hall. “Hopefully, everyone can

come out and enjoy a piece of cake with us that day in celebration of Worth’s 100th birthday.” she said. The Village Hall will also display a countdown calendar on the marquee outside of the building, counting down the days until the big event. The countdown started at 100 days on Wednesday.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is Hereby Given that on 6-22-14, a sale will be held at Sergio’s Body Shop, 15330 S. Cicero Avenue, Oak Forest, IL. 60452, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Fermin Cancino 2011 Ford VIN# 3FADP4BJ6BM143230 Lien Amount: $3,500.00

and hormone free grass-fed beef, pasture-raised chicken, turkey, pork and eggs, Naturally Herbsfresh cut herbs, John Bailey Honey-all natural honey and products, Katić Breads-artisan breads, Sinfully Delicious Cupcakes-gourmet cupcakes, Aracely’s Bakery-Homemade tamales, Mr. Kettle-kettle corn, The Happy Soap Lady-soaps and scrubs, Dark Star Sharpening-tool and utensil sharpening on site, and Smilin’ Clyde’s Hot Dogs.

  The Village of Chicago Ridge is offering the first ever Chicago Ridge Farmers’ Market to all the citizens of the southwest suburbs. The Working Man’s Farmers’ Market was coined when deciding to make the hours of the market from 2 to 7 p.m., so that everyone has an opportunity to shop at the market.    The Farmers’ Market is the first and third Monday of the month, beginning June 2, and continuing on June 16, July 7, July 21, Aug. 4, Aug. 18, Sept. 8 (there is no market on Labor Day), Sept. 15, and Oct. 6. The Farmer’s Market is located at 10739 S. Ridgeland Ave. On the first Monday of the month, there will be special events taking place in the Marquette Bank Cooking Demo Tent.   To kick off the first market on June 6, there will be a grand opening ceremony beginning at 2 p.m., followed by a Pizza Garden presentation, a Protect Yourself from the Latest Fraud Scams information session, Story Time for Children, and a From the Farm to Your Table live cooking demonstration by Chef Juan from Jenny’s Steakhouse. In 2015, Chicago Ridge is looking to expand the market to every Monday.    For more information, or to volunteer, visit chicagoridgefarmersmarket.com. Information for the Chicago Ridge Farmers Market can also be found on Facebook and Twitter.    Vendors that are committed to sustainable agricultural practices and, who grow or make their own products have been selected to be a part of the Farmers’ Market. The Village of Chicago Ridge is striving to provide citizens and their families with a healthy and satisfying alternative to commercially manufactured food.

Palos Hills

  The Palos Hills Friendship Festival and Carnival is looking for food vendors and crafters. Applications are available at the Palos Hills Activity Center, 8455 W. 103rd St., or online at paloshillsweb.org/Friendship Festival & Carnival. For more information, call 430-4500.    The festival is being held Thursday, July 10 through Sunday, July 13 at 107th Street and 88th Avenue. The hours for the festival are still being determined according to the website.

Worth

   The Worth Public Library District Board of Trustees is seeking resumes from Worth residents who wish to be considered for appointment to fill a board vacancy. The vacancy will become available in June due to the resignation of a current board member.   Resumes should be submitted no later than 5:00 P.M. on Friday, May 30th, to the attention of:   Karen Miller   President, Board of Trustees,   Worth Public Library District   6917 W. 111th St.   Worth, IL 60482   The Library Board will interview candidates at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 10. The person appointed to fill the vacancy will serve until the next election of library trustees in 2015. For more information e-mail kmiller@ worthlibrary.com.

  Some of our vendors include: Zeldenrust Farm Market-fresh herbicide-free organic produce, Nature’s Choice Farm-antibiotic

TAYLOR STEAM Carpet & Upholstery 708-385-5057 BE ST BU Y

WHOLE HOUSE UPHOLSTERY All 3 for $60! Carpet Cleaning CLEANING $ 00 Chair........................$15 Any 6 rooms Loveseat 2 cushions...... $25 (L-shaped & Great Room considered 2 rooms) Sofa 3 cushion..............$30 $ 00 ANY

60

45

CHIMNEY CLEANING per flue SIZE ROOM WHOLE HOUSE DUCT CLEANING

00 13 per room

$

(2 Rooms Minimum)

Removes up to 96% of all dust, dirt, pollen, mold spores & animal dander

$

8500

UNLIMITED REGISTERS - SINGLE FURNACE HOME


6

The Reporter

Thursday, May 22, 2014

COMMENTARY THE

How many details are too many details regarding teacher’s murder?

REPORTER

An Independent Newspaper Jeff Vorva Editor

Amy Richards Publisher

Published Weekly Founded March, 16, 1960

Editorial

End the stall — OL Park board needs to make a decision on hoops   Full court basketball will continue to be played at Little Wolfe Park for the foreseeable future following the Oak Lawn Park Board’s delay on a proposal to remove one of the hoops.    The proposal was talked about in April, and expected to appear on the board’s May agenda. Now the board is deferring the matter, saying more time and consideration is needed before a decision is made.    This issue goes back several months. Last summer, a group of residents from the neighborhood adjacent to Little Wolfe Park attended two park board meetings to protest what they described as inappropriate behavior on the part of some basketball players.   Unfortunately, phases such as “players from outside the community� were bandied about, which brought racism into the conversation. Was players’ behavior the problem or the color of their skin?    Trustee Carol Quinlan, a strong opponent of the fullcourt games, said last week that the issue is not about race, though she has on more than occasion pointed out that some players are not from Oak Lawn.   Park Commissioner Gary Callahan and others have noted that Oak Lawn parks are not open exclusively to village residents. Residents who live near Little Wolfe will have to accept that fact. They do not live in a gated community. Callahan also rightly maintained that the park district would rather not reduce recreational opportunities.   But residents who live near the park deserve a final decision on the future of the basketball court. The five commissioners should either decide to leave the court as is, remove one of the hoops or come up with another solution that is agreeable to all. Perhaps increased police presence in the area is the answer.   However, maintaining that more time and study is needed is disingenuous. Residents deserve a decision whether or not they with agree with it.

I can rest easy now that I know the grim details surrounding the death of Brother Rice teacher Al Filan. I feel better now that I’m aware of the sensational specifics that apparently led to his January death at the hands of a prostitute. Alisha Walker, a 21-year-old prostitute from Ohio, is being charged in Filan’s death. She’s being held without bail in the Cook County Jail and is next expected in court May 28. I now know, for example, that investigators found multiple ads from an online female escort service on the desk in Filan’s home. Also, the veteran teacher was found under a bay window on his kitchen floor wearing a gray sweatshirt, jeans and brown socks, according to an autopsy report that was reported by other media outlets. But there’s more. Filan was found lying face-up with his head resting against the base molding at the bottom of a wall and tilted toward the left shoulder. His hands were resting on his mid-section, his right leg was extended and his left leg was bent at the knee with his foot resting against a chair that had fallen over, the report said.

Letters to the Editor Memorial Day spelled out Dear Editor:   M emories of times past   E ach one bringing a tear and a smile   M indful that life is fragile   O ur hearts fill with mixed emotions   R emembering the loss of our loved ones   I nstilled in our minds and hearts   A re treasures beyond measure   L ove and laughter we once knew   D ays go fleeting by   A lways forging ahead   Y et remembering those gone from our lives Marlene Jeziorski Oak Lawn

  The Reporter Newspaper encourages letters to the editor.    Letters must be 350 words or less.  Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Writers must also include their address and telephone number for verification, but that information will not be published and will remain otherwise confidential. Mail letters to the editor to The Reporter, 12247 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463 or e-mail us at thereporter@comcast.net

Not enough? Well, the report goes on to describe the location of 14 knife wounds and the condition of the body after it was discovered during a Jan. 21 well-being check at Filan’s Orland Park home. I get it. Reporting the details of an autopsy report is part of an ongoing story when someone allegedly is murdered or dies as a result of suspicious circumstances. It’s part of our job as reporters. And you, as readers, have the right to know what happened. For instance, the information about the stab wounds Filan incurred are important because Walker contends she acted in self-defense after she and Filan fought over money. The number and location of wounds may support or disapprove her claim in court. Unfortunately, some enjoy reading these titillating tidbits, which have all the makings of a cable TV movie. But what about Filan’s family and friends? Do they have no right to privacy? Or must they endure unending media reports about his gruesome death—each and every excruciating detail.

For example, more than one newspaper report led with the information about escort service ads found on Filan’s desk. Let’s be honest, that’s not the most important detail in the autopsy and police reports, but it’s the most salacious item, so the media plays it up because it implies that Filan regularly sought the services of call girls. Maybe he did, and it clearly is not appropriate conduct for a man teaching at a Catholic high school. Filan had a weakness, and he paid dearly for it in the end. When the incident occurred, he took a beating on Facebook from a slew of judgmental folks who apparently would be fine with a thorough inspection and public reveal of their private lives. As a newspaper reporter, I routinely advocate for our rights to inform the public with as much information as possible. We are not public relations or marketing people hired to put a positive spin on story. But we have an obligation to be sensitive and think about the impact our writing will have on others. That responsibility is routinely overlooked.

The B-Side by Bob Rakow Maybe I’m too close to the Filan story. I attended Brother Rice High School, where he taught for 40 years. He was my teacher on one occasion, but I did not know him well—had no real affinity for the man. I just think that a man who committed himself to young people both in the classroom and on the athletic field deserves a modicum of respect. I found one sentence in a Sun-Times story about the autopsy report especially interesting. “Though Filan taught at Brother Rice for nearly 40 years, it was a representative of a nearby hotel in Orland Park where he also apparently worked that contacted police and asked for a well-being check after Filan failed to show up for a Jan. 20 shift, according to the report,� the story said. Read that sentence carefully and appears to be saying that Brother Rice did not care enough about one of their own to check on their well-being check. Of course, Jan. 20 was Martin Luther King Day and school was not in session. I’m sure Brother Rice appreciates the subtle insinuation that they did not care enough about Filan to pick up the phone.

Inside the First Amendment

From the Supreme Court, prayer rules that won’t work By Charles C. Haynes Mixing prayer and state has always been a messy, contentious business — but last week it got even messier and more contentious. In a close 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of prayers at legislative meetings, even when most prayers are prayed in the name of Jesus (Town of Greece v. Galloway). Writing for the majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy reaffirmed the argument-fromhistory made by the Court 30 years ago in Marsh v. Chambers: Because legislative prayer dates back to the founding, it must be constitutional. Moreover — and here’s the new bit — legislative prayers don’t have to be nonsectarian to be constitutional since such a requirement “would force legislatures that sponsor prayers and the courts that are asked to decide such cases to act as supervisors and censors of religious speech.� According to the Court, once the government “invites prayer into the public sphere, government must permit a prayer giver to address his or her own God ... as conscience dictates.�

Before the ink was dry on the court’s ruling, Al Bedrosian, a country supervisor in Roanoke, Va., announced plans to jettison the county’s nonsectarian prayer policy and get back to the good old days of Christian prayers at every Board of Supervisors’ meeting. Asked by The Roanoke Times if non-Christians would be invited to prayer under a new policy, Bedrosian said that was unlikely since “the freedom of religion doesn’t mean every religion has to be heard.� Supervisor Bedrosian needs to read the fine print. Justice Kennedy, it turns out, lays out specific ground rules for legislative prayers: No proselytizing. No denigrating other faiths. And the government must have a non-discrimination policy when selecting people to pray. In other words, free speech during prayer time isn’t so free after all.  It’s ironic that Kennedy rejects requiring nonsectarian prayer in order to avoid government censorship of religious speech only to turn around and require pray rules that could lead to even greater government censorship of religious speech.

What could be possibly be more entangling and confusing for government officials than trying to figure out when prayers cross the proselytizing line or come across as disparaging of other religions? Messier still, how will local governments practice “non-discrimination� in the selection of prayer givers? Must the policy allow all comers — or can the list be limited to certain groups? In communities with scores of religious congregations — increasingly most American communities — the “prayer giver� list will be long indeed. Many minority religious groups as well as non-religious people are already planning to test the application of the new prayer regime by lining up to give invocations in cities and towns across the country. Within days of the Court’s decision, for example, the American Humanist Association announced plans to offer humanists and atheists resources for offering secular invocations at legislative meetings. And in Florida, activist Chaz Stevens has already petitioned his local city commission and the state legislature to allow him to open one of their sessions with a Satanist prayer.

Far from resolving the fight over legislative prayer, the Supreme Court has opened the door for new conflicts and more litigation over who gets to pray and what they can say. That’s bad for religion, bad for government and good only for lawyers. If history is any guide, government sponsored prayers are a recipe for conflict and division. The only workable solution, in my view, is to get government out of the business of choosing prayer givers and monitoring the content of their prayers. Perhaps the cacophony of controversial prayers at legislative meetings around the country will soon become so loud that government officials will end the fight — and adopt a Moment of Silence to solemnize their meetings. Then, and only then, Justice Kennedy, will every citizen be free to pray (or not) “as conscience dictates.� Charles C. Haynes is director of the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum Institute, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20001. Web: religiousfreedomeducation.org Email: chaynes@newseum.org

 What are your plans for Memorial Day? (Asked at Lake Katherine in Palos Heights) Photos by Bob Rakow

Danny Long, Palos Park   “I’m going to Gaelic Park.�

Eamon Fitzgerald, Oak Lawn    “It’s a big day of rest. It has big significance. It’s a family day.�

Ernest Lamm, Oak Forest Mary Ann Regnier, New Lenox Russell Rachubinski, Chicago “I’ll probably visit my dad’s “I’ll remember my dad. He was “I’m working that day.� grave. He was in the Coast a World War II veteran and died Guard.� in February.�


Thursday, May 22, 2014 The Reporter

Ribit, ribit: LCM receives an A from Leapfrog Group hospital stay. “Receiving another top A grade Hospital Safety Score further validates our commitment to the quality and safety of our patients, “said Dennis Reilly, President and CEO of Little Company of Mary Hospital and Health Care Centers. “Safety should come first for our families when we pick a hospital, because errors and infections are common and deadly,” said Leah Binder, president & CEO of the Leapfrog Group, which produces the Hospital Safety Score. “No hospital is perfect, but we congratulate the Board, clinicians, administration, and staff of Little Company of Mary Hospital for achieving an A and showing us that you made the well-being of

your patients your top priority.” Calculated under the guidance of Leapfrog’s Blue Ribbon Expert Panel, the Hospital Safety Score uses 28 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to produce a score representing a hospital’s overall capacity to keep patients safe from preventable harm. More than 2,500 U.S. general hospitals were assigned scores in spring 2014, with about 32 percent receiving an A grade. The Hospital Safety Score is fully transparent, and its website offers a full analysis of the data and methodology used in determining grades. —Submitted by Little Company

Church Corner    Sacred Heart Church, 8245 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, is hosting its third annual summer music series for the 2014 season.    Musicians, under the guidance of James Grzadzinski, music director, will present five installments throughout the summer months, and everyone is invited to attend. Those attending may make a free will offering to benefit the Sacred Heart Music Department. For more information, call Grzadzinski at 974-3336, Ext. 245.   The series will be presented on these five dates:    • Sunday, June 8 at 4 p.m. in

the Ministry Center Gym. The theme will be Broadway Hits and Popular Favorites and will be featuring musicians Rita Burns, Tom Cameron, Dave Gaidas, and Christine VanLoon.    • Wednesday, June 11 at 7 p.m. in the church and the program will feature an organ recital featuring Grzadzinski.    • Wednesday, July 16 at 7 p.m. in the church and the program will be a voice recital featuring soprano and published author Michelle Gliottoni Rodriguez.    • Sunday, July 20 at 4 p.m. in the church and the theme will be Musical Meditations on the Life

Submitted photo

Walkers came out in record numbers on Mother’s Day to fight cancer.

of Blessed [soon to be Saint] Pope John Paul II in the Year of His Canonization. The musical program will be featuring the Sacred Heart Cantori and Organ under the direction of Grzadzinski.    • Wednesday, Aug. 6 at 7 p.m. in the Church. There will be music for church and chamber featuring an ensemble of strings, woodwinds, brass, and keyboard. Musicians include Helen Blazie (violin), Stephen Moran (violin/ viola), D. Liane Cochran-Stafira (cello), Angelica Nolan (trumpet), Christine Otrembiak (flute), and Josh Rodriguez (saxophone/clarinet).

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Record numbers of attend walk to fight breast cancer   On Mother’s Day, May 11, more than 13,000 men, women and children gathered together to walk the 15th Annual Beverly Breast Cancer Walk.    Bright pink BBCW logo t-shirts could be seen in abundance as walkers embarked the three-mile route through the historic Beverly Hills and Morgan Park neighborhood. The record-breaking turnout was in support of Little Company of Mary’s Nationally Accredited and award winning Comprehensive Breast Health Center.   “It’s truly remarkable to look back and see how far this familycentered historic walk has come. It began with three pioneering women [Carol Moriarty, Nancy Mulcahy and Lisa O’Brien] who believed in fighting breast cancer with one step at a time on one of the most memorable days of the yearMother’s Day,” said Brian Lepacek, MDiv, Executive Director of the LCMH Foundation. “Fast-forward 15 years later, three walkers grew to more than 13,000 supporters that all have joined in the fight against breast cancer taking one step at a time.’   More than two decades ago, Chicago area resident, Moriarty,

Death Notices

Across 1 A dromedary has one 5 Smart guy? 10 Exec’s “I need it now!” 14 Black-and-white snack 15 Military training group 16 Actress Hatcher 17 Like a clock reading 5:05 at 5:00 18 “Eat!” 19 Tenant’s expense 20 *Space-saving computer monitor 22 Fateful March day 23 Equipment on a balance sheet, e.g. 24 Immunity builder 26 Cuban dance 30 Defective cars 33 Devious laughs 36 “That stings!” 38 Often __: about half the time 39 Foofaraw 40 Untidy waking-up hair condition, and what the first word of the answers to starred clues can be 42 Historical span 43 Posh 45 Freezer bag feature

46 Bluish hue 47 Go away 49 Southern speech feature 51 Turn out to be 53 Zodiac transition points 57 Arizona Indian 59 *Title racehorse in a 2003 film 63 Mont Blanc, par exemple 64 Rabbit relatives 65 Foreign Legion cap 66 Falsehoods 67 “Fame” singer Cara 68 First family’s garden site? 69 Oater stronghold 70 Tickle pink 71 Cubicle furnishing Down 1 Labor leader who vanished in 1975 2 Range dividing Europe and Asia 3 Southwestern tablelands 4 Kiln users 5 Adaptable, electrically 6 Wilderness home 7 Rim 8 Reacts to a tearjerker 9 Pet’s home away from home 10 Some hotel lobbies

11 *Start-up capital 12 “Rule, Britannia” composer 13 Depressing situation, with “the” 21 Early Beatle Sutcliffe 25 Enjoy King and Koontz 27 Cohort of Curly 28 Future blossoms 29 Felt pain 31 Director Ephron 32 Kenton of jazz 33 Difficult 34 Falco of “The Sopranos” 35 *Jalape-o, for one 37 Listen to 40 Polar explorer Richard 41 Menu words 44 Most off-the-wall 46 Sounded like a chicken 48 Buttocks, informally 50 Loos, for short 52 Necklace gem 54 Soft leather 55 Plumber’s concerns 56 Reek 57 Football game division 58 Hodgepodge 60 Real estate measurement 61 Curved 62 “That makes sense”

one of the three original BBCW founders, found herself at Little Company of Mary’s Comprehensive Breast Health Center receiving treatments to aid in her battle with breast cancer. After a successful plan of treatments, Carol found herself cancer-free and with a new profound vision for life.   Today, hundreds of women like Carol have found compassionate and state-of-the-art treatment at Little Company of Mary’s Nationally Accredited Comprehensive Breast Health Center.   “The Breast Health Center at Little Company of Mary has been recognized as one of the top in the nation due, in huge part, because of each of you and this community, who have supported us for the last 15 years,” said Dr. Nancy Taft, board-certified breast surgeon for Little Company of Mary Hospital. “I hope you never have to see us, but, if you do face breast cancer, we are here to provide ease, comfort, care and state-of-the-art technology through an expert team and a holistic approach to the healing process.”   This year’s walk raised more than $400,000 and all proceeds of the event will go towards Little Company of Mary’s Comprehen-

You may already know that we offer cremation, but you may not know this:

We’re Reasonably Priced.

Edith R. Lathus Edith R. Lathus, 85, of Chicago Ridge died May 9 in Palos Community Hospital. Visitation was May 12 at Schmaedeke Funeral Home and a service was held at the chapel May 13 followed by burial at Evergreen Cemetery. Ms. Lathus is survived by her children, Susan, Carol, Nancy, Sandy, Michael, James, Lynda, Vince, Lorie and Jeri. She was born in Chicago and was a homemaker. Robert Vander Veen Robert Vander Veen of Evergreen Park died April 18 at Christ Hospital. A memorial Mass was held Saturday at Most Holy Redeemer Church in Evergreen Park. Mr. Vander Veen was survived by Anna (nee Kerner) and children Michael (Gerri) and Edward (Alice) Vander Veen. He was born in Chicago and worked as a truck driver.

sive Breast Health Center that is located in the Women’s Center for Life and Health. The Center continues to address women’s health and wellness and provide forward-thinking, gender-sensitive healthcare for women of all ages.   This NAPBC accreditation is only given to a select few centers across the country that have voluntarily committed to provide the highest level of quality breast care. The center also offers an array of integrative therapy services, such as acupuncture, massage therapy and post-treatment esthetic care.   In addition to the Breast Center’s re-accreditation by the NAPBC, The Center was recognized as an Imaging Center of Excellence due to its excellent service, good quality and state-of-the-art imaging technology. The Center has also been recently awarded with the “Women’s Choice Award” for being one of nations best breast centers.    The Beverly Breast Cancer Walk is still taking donations, please visit beverlybreastcancerwalk.org to donate, view the photo gallery or to find out more information about the walk. — Submitted by Beverly Breast Cancer Walk

We offer traditional funeral services as well astraditional cremation.funeral We also want We offer services as as cremation. We also want youwell to know that we offer them you offer them bothtoforknow muchthat lesswe than it might both for much less than it might cost you elsewhere. cost you elsewhere.

So if you you appreciate appreciate quality quality service, service, So if but but don’t don’t appreciate appreciate overspending, overspending, think of us—you’ll be glad you did.

13401 South Ridgeland Ave. Palos Heights, Illinois 60463

(708) 448-3530 VanHenkelum.com

Affordable Funeral & Cremation Services

Funeral Directory

Printed on Recycled Paper Please Recycle Your Reporter

Funeral Directory

(Answers on page 11)

FUNERAL HOME

“Your Neighborhood Funeral Home”

9236 ROBERTS ROAD HICKORY HILLS, IL

The LATCH system makes it easier to be sure your

708-430-5700

child’s car seat is installed correctly every time. Just clip it to the lower anchors, attach the top tether, and pull the straps tight. To find out more, visit safercar.gov.

Call About Our ‘VALUE PLAN’

For Information FUNERAL HOMEAbout an Affordable

Full Funeral Service with Burial or Cremation

Since 1916

Cremation Service

www.lackfuneralhome.com “Your Neighborhood Funeral Home”

Palos-Gaidas FUNERAL HOME

9236 ROBERTS ROAD HICKORY HILLS, IL

708-430-5700

Call About Our ‘VALUE PLAN’ 708-974-4410 For Information About an Affordable David Gaidas, Jr. Director

Full Funeral Service with Burial or Cremation

11028 Southwest Highway SincePalos Hills, IL 60465 www.lackfuneralhome.com 1916

Cremation Service

‹DGÀQLW\

Designed to rate how well hospitals protect patients from accidents, errors, injuries and infections, the latest Hospital Safety Score honored Little Company of Mary Hospital of Evergreen Park with an A – its top grade in patient safety. The Hospital Safety Score is compiled under the guidance of the nation’s leading experts on patient safety and is administered by The Leapfrog Group, an independent industry watchdog. The first and only hospital safety rating to be peer-reviewed in the Journal of Patient Safety, the score is free to the public and designed to give consumers information they can use to protect themselves and their families when facing a

7


8

The Reporter

Thursday, May 22, 2014

SCHOOLS

Submitted photo

Raising big bucks

  Over the past 10 years, Oak Lawn-Hometown Middle School has raised more than $400,000 for the Make-a-Wish Foundation of Illinois. Through this effort, the school has been able to grant 75 wishes to local children who have life-threatening illnesses.   The kickoff campaign this year was a volleyball charity tournament sponsored in conjunction with the Oak Lawn Police and Fire Departments. Students and community members netted more than $3,700. The District 123 staff members also participated in the Jeans For Wishes campaign which helped to raise more than $4,200.

CLampus eaders   Maura Slattery of Oak Lawn, a first-year student at Ripon College in Ripon, Wis., received the 2014 J. T. Lewis Prize during the College’s annual awards convocation, held recently.   A one-year subscription to Scientific American is awarded to the student who shows outstanding initiative and performance in the introductory biology courses. Slattery is the child of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Slattery of Oak Lawn. ***   Jessica Cap of Palos Heights has made the dean’s list for Franklin & Marshall College’s fall 2013 semester. Dean’s list status is awarded to students who have successfully completed their course work with a semester grade point average of 3.5 or higher out of a possible 4.0 score at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa.   Cap is the child of James T. Cap and Rose M. Cap, and a graduate of Marist High School.

Bulletin Board 5.75"

Submitted photo

A visit to NIU St. Louis de Montfort’s students visited Northern Illinois University’s School of Engineering recently. Pictured is Juliana Rehnquist testing her engineering skills at Northern Illinois University. Juliana worked with a group of students to develop an object to cushion its descent. She was selected to drop the object and observe the fall.

District 123 invites golfers to ‘Beat the Pro’    The District 123 Education Foundation Golf Outing will take place Saturday, June 28. “Beat the Pro” and many more contests will be running throughout the day.   The deadline to register is Friday, June 6. For more information and to register, visit d123.org/golfouting-cfm.    Registration starts at 7 a.m. with a shotgun start at 7:30 a.m. Dinner and awards will take place shortly after golfing at approximately 12:30 p.m.

Submitted photo

The Worthwoods Wax Museum    Fifth grade students held their Wax Museum recently at Worthwoods School. They completed a Social Studies project that depicted American historical figures and their accomplishments in shaping our country. When a coin was put into a box near the exhibit the characters came alive and told their life story. The students collected $607.82 for the Worth Food Pantry. Pictured are Mayor Mary Werner, Police Chief Martin Knolmayer, Isra Qasem, Teddy Spiewak and Dylan Warren-Brady.

SXU, firefighters aim for cure    St. Xavier University will host local firefighters who will raise money to help fight pediatric cancer at The Cure It Foundation’s third annual Fire Up A Cure event Saturday, July 26.   The event, which is open to the public, is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Saint Xavier’s Chicago campus, 3700 W. 103rd St. Tickets are $5 for children, $10 for adults and $20 for a family ticket. For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit fireupacure.com, or call 872-222-5437.    Fire Up A Cure will bring to-

gether firefighters from across Illinois to compete in a series of challenges to raise awareness and funding for pediatric cancer clinical trials, and for local children who are battling this illness. Events will include a fire truck pull, a hot wing-eating contest sponsored by Buffalo Wild Wings, an obstacle course, inflatable jousting, tug-of-war, and more. Pediatric cancer patients will serve as honorary coaches for each team.   In addition to the firefighter competitions, the event features

concessions and entertainment for the entire family. Children’s activities will include an inflatable fire truck slide, an obstacle course, a kids’ fire pole to slide down, real fire trucks for children to explore, face painting, a photo booth and a balloon artist.    A disc jockey will provide music, and there will be performances by local dance troupes, travel cheerleading squads, and a magician. There also will be several food trucks and vendors. Channel 9 reporter Patrick Elwood will emcee the event.

The Kid’s Doctor By Sue Hubbard, M.D. Help your child get through allergy season 10.5"

  The surge in allergies this year has been due to a very wet winter, followed by a trying spring that has brought erratic temperatures and lots of wind. The result: the perfect storm for the “allergic cascade” to inflict itself on everyone’s nasal mucosa.    The best preventative for nasal allergy symptoms (allergic rhinitis) has been the use of intranasal steroids. These steroid sprays have been used for the past 15 years, and clinical studies have shown that intranasal steroids are superior to oral antihistamines.   Intranasal steroids function by inhibiting the production of chemical mediators, such as histamine and prostaglandin, that cause inflammation and

You don’t have to be perfect to be a perfect parent. There are thousands of teens in foster care who would love to put up with you.

mucous production. In other words, they’re more preventative medications, while an antihistamine is treating the histamine that was released once you inhaled that offending tree or grass pollen. Intranasal steroids may also help ease eye allergy symptoms.    The problem is getting young kids to let you use a nose spray on them. The same holds true for the older ‘tween and teen crowd, who often claim that they “just don’t have the time” to use a spray every day (although it must take all of 15 seconds to use on yourself!)   These products have been shown to be effective within 3-12 hours. They reach their maximum effectiveness after several days to weeks of use, so using a nose spray daily and throughout the spring allergy season will provide the maximum therapeutic effect.   There are many different

brands available, and everyone seems to have their favorite. If one spray seems to bother your child due to the scent or intensity of the spray, ask your doctor to suggest another brand. Many times, physicians will have samples and can give you several to try. They can then prescribe the one that’s easiest to get your child to use.    The process may be trial and error, but finding the right nasal steroid may make allergy season easier to face.   (Dr. Sue Hubbard is an award-winning pediatrician, medical editor and media host. “The Kid’s Doctor” TV feature can be seen on more than 90 stations across the U.S. Submit questions at http://www.kidsdr. com. The Kid’s Doctor e-book, “Tattoos to Texting: Parenting Today’s Teen,” is now available from Amazon and other e-book vendors.)

1 888 200 4005 • adoptuskids.org

Printed on Recycled Paper Please Recycle Your Reporter


Thursday, May 22, 2014 The Reporter

SCHOOLS

9

Three from D230 earn scholarships

Photo by Joan Hadac

Accepting awards for excellence in art from Moraine Valley Community College Governing Board President Sandra Wagner (right) are students Braelyn Zavala (from left), of Palos Hills, Rachel Bard, of Tinley Park, and Andrew Morales, of Evergreen Park. The awards were among a string of accolades given to a number of students, faculty and staff at the board’s meeting last week.

MVCC board uses final meeting of school year for happy talk By Joan Hadac Correspondent    In a meeting long on congratulation and short on deliberation, Moraine Valley Community College trustees sat back and watched a parade of accolades at their May 14 meeting, held at the school, 9000 W. College Parkway, in Palos Hills.    “We have quite a few students that we are recognizing tonight, and this is always the time of year that we do that [at Governing Board meetings],” said Sylvia M. Jenkins, MVCC president. “It is important to recognize their hard work and achievements.”    Like a commencement exercise, the meeting was long and included awards for dozens of students, a live performance demonstrating student excellence in forensics, and reminiscences and other observations from faculty and staff as they accepted praise from their colleagues upon their retirement.   Health Sciences Department Chair Susan Phelan offered an anecdote about the reach of MVCC’s positive impact. She recalled a time when she was asked to share her phlebotomy training expertise with a group in Bangor, Maine.   “So I went, and it was great,” she told the board. “Two or three years later, they called me and asked me to come again. So I said, ‘Sure, what would you like me to speak about this time?’ and they said, ‘Well, the same stuff you

talked about last time.’ I thought, ‘Well, that’s a little redundant, but it’s your dime and I’ll talk about whatever you want.’    “So when I got there, I quickly realized that they didn’t really want me to go over the same ground again,” she continued. “They wanted to let me know that they had implemented some of the [phlebotomy training techniques] we had talked about the last time, and all of their quality indicators didn’t just rise, they skyrocketed. And it may sound silly, but for the first time I realized the impact of quality training and education on health care in a region.    “I realized that what we do here [at the college] is bigger than all of us, and I have been very proud to be a part of this,” she concluded, as board members and the audience of several dozen burst into applause.   David Deitemyer, Dean of Academic Services, echoed the sentiment.    “I’ve been in education my whole career—as a teacher for many years, as an administrator for many years, and now in higher education,” he said. “This is my fifth stop, and I’ve been here for 11 years.   “All school districts of all kinds have a mission statement,” he continued. “I want to tell you, though, that this place, in my experience, comes the closest, every day, to manifesting its mission statement. I’ve worked in school districts that were fun places to work, but the gap between what they say they value and what we did every day

was huge. Here, there’s not much of a gap—and I have benefitted from being able to spend, really, a pivotal part of my career here.”   A lighter moment was provided by Joyce Mufich, the retiring grants and scholarship clerk at the school.    “I just want to say that I’ve handled more of the college’s money over the years than [MVCC Chief Financial Officer] Bob Sterkowitz will ever know,” she began as the room broke up in laughter, including Sterkowitz himself. “And that’s the truth.”    She described a list of duties and programs that took her “all over the community and all over the college community.” It was a dizzying array of programs, and Mufich stopped short, saying it was getting boring, but the point was made about the challenges to keep it all straight. “And they’re good sports over in Accounting,” she deadpanned, triggering another wave of laughter and applause from her peers.    “Seriously, though, it’s been great, and I’m happy I’ve had the chance to work with so many wonderful people,” she added, as she headed into a retirement expected to include her antiquing hobby. “But I am happy that I’m leaving in 10 days.”    After the procession, the meeting shifted into hyperdrive, with trustees approving a 34-part consent agenda in mere seconds, without a whisper of discussion or debate.   A rumored discussion of an employee pay raise was nowhere to be found.

   The District 230 Foundation awarded Administrator Scholarships to three seniors from Sandburg, Stagg and Andrew High Schools. The funds that support this scholarship come directly from administrators across the district as a way to show their commitment to graduates’ futures.    Through the Foundation, the administrators of District 230 formally recognize one senior at each campus who approaches academics with an open mind and rises to the challenge of the highest standards of excellence, represents the very best that their school has to offer through co-curricular involvement and achievement, and demonstrates leadership in representing their fellow students, their school, and their community.    Paige Kordas from Sandburg, Sarah Borczyk from Stagg and Ashlee Renich-Malek from Andrew have been awarded the $2,500 scholarships.   Along with being cast in 22 Stagg Drama Productions, Borczyk has been on the Drama Club executive board as president and social chair, has been a part of the choir program for four years as well as on the Choir Executive Board.   In addition, she has been a member of the softball team, speech team and principal’s and superintendent’s advisory, as well as a host for two variety shows. Sarah also has been a participant and team captain for Relay for Life.

Paige Kordas

Ashlee Renich-Malek

  As drama president, she led the club to complete more philanthropy than ever before. This year, drama donated more than $750 to Washington High School in relief from the tornadoes and nearly $1,000 to the Sydney Sawyer Toy Drive. and was active in Relay for life donations.    She will attend Illinois State University to major in theater education in the fall.   Kordas ranks in the top 1 percent of her class achieved a perfect score of 36 on the ACT exam. She was a member of the cross country team as well as the science and engineering competitive team. She received the Cook County Sheriff’s Medal of Honor for community service, the AP Scholar with Distinction

recognition and she was named a Carson’s Scholar.   She was selected to attend the M.I.T. Women’s Technology summer program. She will attend the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to major in Computer Engineering next year.   Renich-Malek ranks in the top two percent of her class.    For the past four years, Ashlee has been a member of the girls’ cross country and track teams, serving as captain this year. She is also a member of the school’s speech team, newspaper, senior class council, National Honor Society and German Honor Society. She will attend the Stetson University in Florida to major in Marine Biology with a PreVet emphasis.

Bulletin Board Fenger High School

   The Fenger High School Class of 1964 is having their 50th reunion Saturday, August 2, at the Tinley Park Convention Center. For more information, contact Susan Rheinheimer at susan_sings@att.net, or email Fengerreunion1964@ gmail.com.

Moraine Valley

   The Moraine Valley Community College Foundation is seeking notable alumni, who have achieved success in their careers or through work in the community, for its new Hall of Fame. Between five to eight inductees will be honored at the inaugural Hall of Fame reception in November.   Candidates must have completed any amount of credit or noncredit coursework at Moraine Valley, achieved success in their chosen field and made a positive impact on the community through volunteering or leadership. They also must agree to attend the reception to accept the award, and return to campus at least once within the year to be a guest speaker and/or participate in a student engagement activity.   Nominees can self-nominate (must include a letter of recommendation) or be nominated by someone else. All nominees are encouraged to submit up to three letters of recommendation and a maximum of three pages of supplementary materials such as news articles, brochures or photos highlighting the applicant’s accomplishments and contributions.    Nominations, which must be accompanied by a current resume or bio, are due by midnight Sunday, June 1. Application forms are online at morainevalley.edu/alumni.   For more information, contact Kari Pantol at alumni@moraineschool officials, and friends at Oak valley.edu or (708) 974-5551. Lawn Community High School. The Congressman also gave him an American flag that had been Printed on Recycled Paper flown over the U.S. Capitol in Please Recycle Washington.    The Congressional Art CompeYour Reporter tition began in 1982 to provide an opportunity for members of Congress to encourage and recognize the artistic talents of their young constituents. — Submitted by Dan Lipinski’s office

7329 W. 79th Street, Bridgeview (79th & Harlem, next to K-Mart) 708-496-8822 advantagecarpetsplus.com HOURS: Mon. - Thurs. 9am-8pm; Fri. & Sat. 9am-5pm; Sun. 11am-4pm

2x3 5/15/14

Sell Your Home

SHop For A CAr

Lipinski gives a ‘salute’ to OL’s Pfister   Congressman Dan Lipinski announced that Brian Pfister, a senior at Oak Lawn Community High School, is the Third Congressional District’s winner of this year’s Congressional Art Competition.   Pfister’s digital photograph, entitled “Salute,” shows an image from an Air Force Ceremony involving his brother. The photograph will be displayed in the U.S. Capitol for the next year alongside the winning pieces from congressional districts across the country. He will also receive two roundtrip tickets for the exhibition opening this summer in Washington, D.C.   “We are fortunate to have so many talented artists in the district with such diverse skill sets,” Lipinski said. “While I was impressed by all the artwork that my office received, Brian’s moving photograph really brings out that patriotic feeling that many of us share when we think about the brave men and women putting their lives on hold, and often in harm’s way, in order to serve this great nation.    “I congratulate Brian on this honor and thank all the young men and women who participated in this year’s competition for the thought and care they put into their art. I would also like to thank the family members, friends, teachers and others that

continue to encourage our young people in a subject area that is unfortunately receiving less support and attention in many of our country’s schools. I urge every student that is going to be in high school next year to sharpen their pencils, get their brushes out, and make sure their camera batteries are charged for next year’s competition.”    Lipinski presented Pfister with a certificate at a special ceremony attended by his family, teachers,

mAke A new beSt Friend

Find A bArgAin! Call to place your classified ad! Cultivate fresh ideas and help them take root.

The

reporTer Newspaper Serving this area since 1960

12247 South Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, Illinois 60463-0932 Live, learn, and work with a community overseas. Be a Volunteer.

peacecorps.gov

Still 20 Words for $25 Call (708) 448-6161 Open Mon.-Fri. 9-5 — Sat. 9-Noon


10

The Reporter

Thursday, May 22, 2014

FEATURES / COMMUNITY CALENDAR Park Clips

Chicago Ridge

   The Chicago Ridge Park District has several locations. One is the Frontier Fieldhouse, 9807 S. Sayre Ave. For more information on programs at this location, or to register, call 423-3959. Another location is the Freedom Activity Center, 6252 W. Birmingham St. For more information on programs at this location, call 708-636-4900. ***   Immediately: Registration is available for Chicago Ridge Park District’s Yougottawanna Summer Day Camp. Campers, ages 6 to 14, can enjoy field trips, games, sports and fun in the sun during summer time. Camp will run from Monday, June 16 through Friday, Aug. 8. Camp begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. Camping for all eight weeks is $450 for residents and $650 for non-residents. Each four-week session is $260 for residents and $360 for non-residents. Registration is being taken at Freedom Activity Center. For more information, call the Center. ***   Wednesdays through June 25: The second session of Vinyasa “Flow” Yoga, a form of yoga that focuses on flowing from pose to pose and linking the movement with the breath, will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Freedom Activity Center.    The cost is $40 for residents and $50 for non-residents. The class is being taught by Kelly McKimsonRhodes, a certified yoga teacher trained at Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga School in Chicago.   This energizing type of yoga builds endurance, strength, and flexibility, all while calming the mind. The Class is set to upbeat music and ends with peaceful relaxation. All levels welcome. A third session is scheduled for July 9 through Aug. 13. ***   Thursdays through June 26: The Chicago Ridge Park District invites residents and non-residents to enjoy the benefits of yoga, connecting the breath to movements.   Julie Chappetto, a 200 CYT Ayurveda Yoga teacher, will lead the class from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Freedom Activity Center. The cost is $40 for residents and $50 for non-residents.    Yoga can also build strength while releasing muscles and stress. Hatha style poses will be designed around the chakras, energy centers of the body. Class will begin with short mediation and end in savasana. Participants are asked to bring their yoga mats and yoga blocks if needed. All levels are welcome. For more information and registration, call the Freedom Activity Center. Another session is slated for July

10 through Aug. 21. ***   Tuesdays through June 17 and Thursdays May 15 through June 19: Zumba class, a Latin inspired dance fitness program that individuals at all fitness levels can participate in, is being offered from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Freedom Activity Center.    The cost is $40 for residents and $50 for non-residents. Another session is being offered Tuesdays from June 24 through Aug. 5 and Thursdays from June 26 through Aug. 7. For more information, or to register, call the Freedom Activity Center.   Zumba is a program that the fit athlete and the shy, uncoordinated beginner can enjoy. The dance rhythms include: meringue, salsa, reggaeton and much more. ***   May 31: Chicago Ridge Park District is taking a trip to Navy Pier in Chicago. The fee of $7 for residents and $12 for non-residents includes transportation to and from Navy Pier. The family package of up to five people is $25 for residents and $35 for non-residents. The bus leaves the Freedom Activity Center at 9:30 a.m. and will return about 3:30 p.m. The fee is $7 for residents and $12 for non-residents. ***   June 20: Chicago Ridge Park District’s Western Open Miniature Golf Tournament deadline comes a week before the actual tournament. Residents are invited to compete against the top professional miniature golfers in the world Friday, June 27 and Saturday, June 28 at Ball Fore Miniature Golf Course, 6701 W. 107th St. The entry fee is $100 and includes ten rounds of miniature golf, official polo shirt and lunch and breakfast. The top five finishers will get paid, with first place being awarded $1,500. Registration is now available online, or at Frontier Park Fieldhouse. ***   June 24 and June 26: The Chicago Ridge Park District is hosting third sessions of Tuesday and Thursday Zumba classes. Zumba is a Latin inspired dance fitness program. The dance rhythms include: meringue, salsa, reggaeton and more.   Zumba classes are being held Tuesdays, June 24 through Aug. 5 and Thursdays, June 26 through Aug. 7. All classes will run from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Freedom Activity Center. The cost is $40 for residents and $50 for non-residents. Registration and more information are available at the Center. ***   July 9: A third session of Vinyasa yoga, which focuses on flow(Continued on page 12)

LEGAL NOTICE STATE OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OF COOK

) ) SS. ) PALOS TOWNSHIP LEGAL NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Town of Palos (Palos Township) shall hold a public hearing on June 30, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. at the Palos Township Hall located at 10802 S. Roberts Road, Palos Hills, Illinois 60465 concerning the Budget and Appropriation Ordinance for the fiscal year beginning April 1, 2014 and ending March 31, 2015. PLEASE BE FURTHER ADVISED that the tentative Budget and Appropriation Ordinance for the 2014-2015 fiscal year is conveniently available for public inspection at said Palos Township Hall from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and during all other regular Town Hall hours.

/s/

/s/

________________________________________ Colleen G. Schumann, Town of Palos Supervisor

________________________________________ Jane Nolan, Town of Palos Clerk

Dial it up — Park Lawn wins AT&T Award    AT&T announced an Oak Lawn social service non-profit, Park Lawn, is the winner of an AT&T Investing in Illinois Award. Park Lawn is a non-profit organization offering a variety of programs and services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.    Park Lawn receives public recognition and a contribution of $2,500 from AT&T. The contribution will support Park Lawn’s enrichment program designed to enhance community participation, social engagement and the opportunity to learn new skills for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.   “At AT&T, we’re investing for today and tomorrow. As our customers continue moving to new Internet-based communications technologies like Internet home phone and wireless, we are investing in next generation communications networks. At the same time, we are also investing in the communities we serve, by making corporate contributions to Illinois nonprofit groups and programs that are making a difference locally,” said Sam Balark, AT&T Exter-

Submitted photo

Park Lawn received an AT&T Investing in Illinois Award. From left to right is Park Lawn Program participant Henry, State Representative Kelly Burke, Park Lawn Director of Development Nancy Schmitz and AT&T Director of External Affairs Sam Balark. nal Affairs Director.   State Representative Kelly Burke nominated the organization for the recognition from AT&T Illinois.

  The AT&T Investing in Illinois Awards provide resources and recognition to organizations and programs that are improving lives in their communities and the

state by advancing education, economic growth, new technologies and other essential community services. — Submitted by Park Lawn

Focus on Seniors Oak Lawn Senior Center to offer events during May

  The Oak Lawn Senior Center is offering many programs during May to benefit their target audience, senior citizens. For more information, or to register for a program, call 499-0240.   The Parketts of Evergreen will be performing from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Friday, May 23 in the Oak Lawn Senior Center gym.    Medicare Fraud and Prevention will be the topic under discussion from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, May 28.   Blood and sugar testing will be available at 10 a.m. Friday, May 30 at the center.

Illinois Senior Spelling Bee coming to Worth Township

  Worth Township Supervisor Kevin M. Hughes, Worth

Township Clerk Katie Elwood, State Sen. Bill Cunningham (D-18th) and State Rep. Fran Hurley (D-35th) invite all senior organizations to participate in the Association of Illinois Senators and the Illinois Department on Aging’s annual Senior Spelling Bee.   The Township will host the competition at 1 p.m. Friday, June 6. The Spelling Bee will include three levels, with the state finals being held Tuesday, Aug. 12 at the Illinois State Fair’s Senior Day. For more information, call Elwood at: 371-2900, Ext. 27.

Oak Lawn senior volunteer earns recognition

  Phyllis Collura, a volunteer at the Oak Lawn Senior Center, was selected by AgeOptions to be recognized with other vol-

unteers at the annual luncheon and volunteer recognition celebration, Celebrating Aging.    Madonna Ray, administrative assistant at the Oak Lawn Senior Center, nominated Collura.   Celebrating Aging will take place at 11 a.m. Thursday, June 19 at the William Tell Holiday Inn, 6201 Joliet Road, Countryside.

Double Nickel

   The Double Nickel Plus Chorus meets at the Community Center, 3450 W. 97th St. in Evergreen Park, every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. in Room 111. Newcomers are welcome. For more information call 422-8776.

Meals on Wheels

  The Evergreen Park Office of Citizens’ Services offers a Meals on Wheels program for village residents 60 years and older who are unable to prepare their own meals. Meals

are delivered Monday through Friday. For more information call 422-8776.

55 and Up

   Palos Hills residents 55 years and older meet from noon to 2 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at the Palos Hills Community Center, 8455 W. 103rd St. Tickets for events must be purchased one week in advance. Entertainment includes musicians, singers, luncheons, movies, plays and bingo.

Pinochle

  The Worth Senior Pinochle club is seeking new members. Membership is free. Visit the group at the Worth Park District Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., every Monday and Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Games begin at noon. Call 448-1181 for information.

Library Notes Evergreen Park

  The Evergreen Park Public Library is located at 9400 S. Troy Ave. For more information, or to register for a program, call 422-8522. ***   Ongoing: The Evergreen Park Public Library is asking residents to share their time, talents or hobbies with the library. Volunteering gives individuals the opportunity to enrich the quality of life in the community by investing in the public library. There are opportunites to fill an employment gap, enhance personal growth, earn service hours, and meet new people.   Adult and teen volunteers perform a variety of tasks so that more resources can be directed toward library materials, services, and programs. All that is required is a positive attitude and a willingness to give back to our community.    Interested residents will need to schedule a meeting with Volunteer Coordinator Kay O’Connor, by calling, or emailing volunteer@evergreenparklibrary.org.

  The Green Hills Public Library is located at 8611 W. 103rd St., Palos Hills. For more information, or to register for a program, call the information desk at 598-8446, Ext. 120. Registration may also be available online at greenhillslibrary.org. ***   May 22: Teen pizza and movie night will feature “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire,” from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Pizza and pop will be provided. One person will win a copy of the movie. Registration is required and limited to 30 teens. Registration is available online. ***   May 23: Family Movie Time at the library features, “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2” at 2 p.m. Participants can snack on popcorn and lemonade. All ages are welcome. ***   May 26: The Library will be closed in honor of Memorial Day. ***   May 29: Families are invited to play bingo to win prizes and to partake in trivia between

rounds. All ages are invited to participate from 6 to 7 p.m. Registration is required and limited to 40. Registration is available online. ***   Daily: The library offers daily sessions of story time for children 18 months–5 years of age. Parents can register online, or call the Youth Services Department at ext. 117 for more information. ***   Ongoing: The Friends of the Library accept book donation at the Circulation Desk on the second floor of the library. Those interested in becoming a Friend of the Library can find membership applications in the Friends Bookstore or at the Circulation Desk. ***   Ongoing: Patrons can subscribe to Green Hills Public Library mailing list at greenhillslibrary.org for all of the latest announcements about the library. ***   Ongoing: Patrons interested

in their family history can visit the library and gain free access to Ancestry.com Library Edition and HeritageQuest Online. For more information, visit greenhillslibrary.org, or call the Information Desk at ext. 120. ***   Ongoing: New voters and those needing to change their name or address can stop by the library. There are several staff members on-site that are able to register patrons to vote. Patrons can visit, or call the library to check for staff availability. ***   Ongoing: The latest update to Freegal Music allows Green Hills Public Library District patrons increased access to over 6 million songs from 85 different countries. Registered cardholders can download up to three songs each week, as well as stream three hours each day at no direct cost. Patrons can get started at greenhillslibrary. org, or download the free app for their smartphones. *** (Continued on page 12)

Green Hills

municip.p.twp.notice of B&A Hearing_2014_5.4.14

SHE SNORES MORE THAN I DO, BUT I STILL LOVE MY HUMAN. — BANDIT adopted 11-26-09

Photo courtesy Backbeat Photography

High tea will benefit Sertoma Sertoma Centre Inc. and Sertoma Speech and Hearing Center will host a High Tea event at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, June 4, at Crystal Tree Country Club in Orland Park. Tickets are $40 per person and include a traditional high tea, music by harpist Amy Lee, raffles, a fashion show by Funkie Fashions and the comedic talents of Tracy DeGraaf. In addition, the event offers an extraordinary selection of vendor tables for guests to peruse, including: Funkie Fashions, Lia Sophia, Tealightful Tea, Premiere Design Jewelry, Celebrating Home, 3D Pictures, Gold Canyon Candles, Hollingsworth, Premier Jewelry, Back Beat Photography, Nerium Skin Care,  Beijo Bags and Dermatology Associates.   Event sponsors of the High Tea include: Home Helpers and State Farm Insurance Company. Proceeds from this event support the non-profit missions of Sertoma Centre, Inc. and of Sertoma Speech & Hearing Center.  To make reservations, visit www.sertomacenter.org or call 599-9500.


Thursday, May 22, 2014 The Reporter

CONSUMER / FEATURES

11

Trying to eliminate information toll booth    Last Thursday, the FCC voted to move forward with considerations on a proposal for new rules known as “Open Internet” rules — the new name for Net Neutrality. If you are a provider of Internet services, nothing has changed. You still get to do business exactly the way you have been. If you are a concerned citizen wondering how you can compete and prosper in a world where ISPs charge for the “fast lane,” you still have time to make your case.    Back in 2010, I wrote this article to help get the discussion going. Right now, the FCC’s current ruling should highly motivate all interested parties to get into the discussion. Here’s a way to think about it.

An Excellent Place for a Tollbooth

   There’s still an ongoing battle between Level 3 and Comcast. It’s a good example of the kind of issues that are intended consequences of the Net Neutrality debate. Netflix uses Level 3 to deliver its videos to customers. It pays Level 3 for bandwidth. If you are a Comcast customer, you pay Comcast for bandwidth. In theory Level 3 is getting paid and Comcast is getting paid and everything should be fine. However, in order for your Netflix movie to arrive at your Comcast-connected home, the bits have to pass from Level 3 to Comcast. If you’re Comcast, this is an excellent place to put a tollbooth.    Up to now, Level 3 and Comcast have had an arrangement that allowed each company to send bits bidirectionally. The arrangement was made back when both companies sent about the same amount of bits to each other.

But now that not often. Most Level 3 is sendof the time, ing more bits modes of travel through Com— air, train, bus, cast than Comcar, bike, feet — cast is sending are a function of through Level 3, economic class, Comcast wants means and By Shelley Palmer to be paid. This emergent need. is the nature To keep the of the current metaphor going, battle in its simplest terms. But, imagine that Comcast is Cathay like I said, it’s a smoke screen. Pacific Airlines and Time Warner   The cliché description for the Cable’s basic broadband service public Internet (courtesy of Al is Amtrak and Verizon’s low-end Gore) is the “Information Su- DSL service is Greyhound. perhighway.” It’s a reasonable    How would we expect the ecometaphor for the way information nomic landscape to look in a world travels around the Internet. Even where, instead of one Information engineers like to call bunches of Superhighway, we’d have web of bits getting from place to place, public and privately owned Infor“traffic.” mation Super Toll Roads? Would we expect people who could only People vs. Bunches of Bits afford Greyhound bus service to   In the physical travel world, do business with companies in you can get from place to place Europe or Asia? Would we exseveral different ways. You can pect people who could only afford walk, ride a bike, take a car, Amtrak train service to compete take a bus, take a train or fly. with people who could deliver Of course, while some places are merchandise overnight via air? only accessible by air, we all know Would organizations that own that remote locations very often toll roads make it just a little require us to use multiple modes too expensive to compete with of transportation. Now, imagine them? Would organizations that own airlines charge competitors that people are bits.   The physical transportation for extra bags and bigger seats? world also has a fairly well de- Keep asking travel questions — fined class structure. It is seg- they all apply! mented with modes of travel that efficiently meet the needs A Look to the Future of each constituency — and it is    It is hard to be optimistic about economically segregated. You are a future world where there is a about as likely to find an Upper low-powered free and open InEastside Socialite in the lounge at ternet and a web of private toll the Port Authority bus terminal roads owned by non-governmenwaiting for a bus to South Caro- tal organizations that inherently lina, as you are to find a single compete with their customers. mother of six on welfare in the The specter of such a world bodes Admiral’s Club at JFK Terminal ill for innovation, entrepreneur8 waiting for her first class seat ship and, in some ways, even the to the Vineyard. It happens, but doing of digital life. That said,

TECHNO TALK

regulating pricing for Internet Service Providers will seriously dissuade private investment in the infrastructure we need to move America into the Information Age.   This line of thinking begs for the question: Will a plurality of Internet under-classes evolve? Want a current day analog? Look at the prepaid mobile phone business. It’s huge, and so unstructured that even the service providers don’t know who is using their products or how they are using them.    Back in the day, phone companies charged us for making calls, but receiving a call was free. This was a function of technology, not desire. As soon as cell phones hit the market, we started paying for time used (bandwidth) both coming and going. What’s happening with Net Neutrality is a fight over exactly the same issue. Now, we pay for the bandwidth we use on one end. If this goes the wrong way, we (you and I) will pay for bandwidth both coming and going. On a personal level, this is not onerous. However, at the enterprise level, if we were to govern America for the best possible GDP (as opposed to governing for corporate profits), it has the potential to be a huge problem.   I am not advocating any government involvement with the Internet. I think government has proven that it has no business being in any business. However, this is not a debate you can leave to others. Get your elected officials on the phone. Take a few minutes to learn about the issue. This is the moment that we have to step up and become architects of our digital future. Become part of the solution… America needs you!

Free yourself from cycle of emotional investing In many areas of your life, you’re probably aware that it’s useful to keep emotions out of your decision-making — and that’s certainly the case with investing. However, it can be difficult to keep your feelings from influencing your investment decisions. But you may find it easier to invest with your head, rather than your heart, if you know a little something about two different cycles: the market cycle and your emotional cycle. Let’s start with the market cycle. If you’ve been investing for a while, you’re aware (probably highly aware) that the financial markets are rarely static — they are always moving up and down, at least in the short term. (Over the very long term, a period of many decades, the markets have trended up.) But these shortterm movements, while perhaps appearing as “zigs” and “zags” on a daily basis, actually form a pattern, or a cycle, that can last for months or years. These cycles are known as bull (up) or bear (down) markets. Going back to the Great Depression, the average

ress to denial, fear, desperation and panic. Furthermore, market cycles and emotional cycles don’t really align. For example, investors may well experience euphoria when the market has reached its high point and a bear market has just begun. For a while, then, these investors, fueled by their euphoric feelings over the big gains they’ve achieved, may continue pouring money into the market, bear market has lasted 21 months, even as it’s declining. This type while the average bull market has of behavior, though, is probably extended for 57 months, according better suited for when the market to research from Standard and is already at a low, when invesPoor’s Index Services. tors’ dollars will buy more shares. These market cycles greatly in- Conversely, investors may reach fluence investors’ attitudes and the peak of their fearfulness at behavior. In fact, they lead to the the end of a bear market, just formation of investors’ emotional when things are about to turn cycles. During bull markets, inves- around. At this point, their fear tors tend to feel optimism, excite- may hold them back from investment and even Dunst euphoria. But once ing — even though, with prices with Tony a bull market ends and a bear low, it can be a good time to inmarket begins, investors start vest. Clearly, basing investment getting nervous. And the longer decisions on emotions can lead and deeper the bear market, the to poor choices. greater the depth of emotion felt So don’t get caught up in by investors. These emotions can this pattern. Instead, strive to begin as anxiety and then prog- follow a disciplined approach to

Talkin Poker

By Bryan Devonshire

1,475. I know — it made no sense to me either.   I’ve been seeing this line of play more and more lately: Players weakly get to the river out of position and then lead into the aggressor. This range was super-polarized. My opponent either had an eight or better, or he was bluffing. Very rarely with Tony Dunst would my opponent turn over a hand containing a single pair, and this was really good for me. If my opponent had checked, I would have quickly checked behind, since most hands that call me would beat my sixes. Now, I needed to decide if my opponent was bluffing.    It’s important to note that since my opponent’s range was polarized, my hand was identical to A-Q. Since with he wouldn’t be betTony Dunst ting a better two pair than mine, his bet meant that he either had three of a kind or better, or he had nothing. Two pair would beat nothing — it doesn’t matter which two pair. Two pair gets crushed by a range of three of a kind or better, so therefore it didn’t matter that I had sixes in this spot; it matters that I had a pair. My pair couldn’t ever be worse than my opponent’s pair, because my opponent wouldn’t take this line of play with a pair. Therefore, since his range was polarized to tripsplus or air, sixes were the same as deuces or aces from my perspective.   It was nice of my opponent to bet so small, only 575 into 1,475. I only have to be right 28 percent of the time to break even on this call, and going into the river, there were far more

Talkin Poker

Talkin Poker

Scott Johnson, CFP, is a financial advisor with Edward Jones, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos Hills, 974-1965. Edward Jones does not provide legal advice. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor.

Profits & Sense

Talkin Poker Don’t polarize your range   There are often situations in no-limit Texas hold ‘em where a player polarizes his range, and it’s usually a mistake. A range is polarized when the pool of possible hands a player could be holding becomes skewed toward one extreme or another. Avoiding this by keeping your range balanced is fundamental to any winning poker strategy.   It was early in a $100-buy-in tournament, with blinds at 25-50. Everybody folded to my righthand opponent in the cutoff seat, who made it 150. He had a stack of 6,000.    It was my turn on the button. I had 7,000 in chips and 6h 6s — a pretty easy call. Both blinds folded, and we saw a flop of Js 8h 5h.   My opponent bet 175, and I called. I didn’t think raising or folding after or before the flop was optimal. Folding would have been too weak. I had a pair, and pairs are hard to make. Raising would have had some merit, but usually it would just mean turning my hand into a bluff, and I certainly didn’t want to get reraised.   The turn was a good one for me, the 2c. The villain checked. I bet 375 and was called. I wasn’t bluffing here. I wanted to get value from ace-high hands and various draws, and if I could get two overcards to fold, that would be OK, too. I would have happily folded if he check-raised, and I expected him to call with any pair that he might have had.    The river was the 8c, and my opponent bet 575 into a pot of

investing. Build an investment portfolio that reflects your objectives, risk tolerance and time horizon, and seek to hold appropriate investments for the long term. Of course, you may well need to make adjustments along the way, but do it for the right reasons — such as a change in your goals or in the investments themselves — rather than as a reaction to the current market cycle. Our emotions are powerful, and their power can increase when applied to such a meaningful aspect of our life as our finances. But if you can detach yourself, as much as possible, from the emotional cycle of investing, you can avoid considerable angst — while helping clear the path to pursue your goals.

unmade hands in his range than there were eights or sets.   I called, and my opponent turned over 9c 7c. At least he executed his plan of bluffing me off the pot on the turn, and while an eight was indeed in his range, his bet size didn’t make me seriously consider folding.    Don’t polarize your range, and don’t overestimate or underestimate the strength of your pair when it’s polarized.   (Bryan Devonshire is a professional poker player from Las Vegas. Known as “Devo” on the tournament circuit, he has amassed more than $2 million in career earnings. Follow him on Twitter: @devopoker.)

  Ron Beckstrom of Golden Rule Coins will be available to appraise rare or collectible coins in the lobby of the First National Bank of Evergreen Park, 3950 W. 95th St. from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, May 29 He will also appraise gold jewelry. No appointments are necessary. Appraisals will be made on a first come, first serve basis. ***    Marquette Bank’s Wolf Road location will host a business networking after-hours event Thursday, May 22, at 17865 S. Wolf Road, Orland Park. Participants are invited to enjoy an evening of refreshments, door prizes and networking opportunities. For more information, or to register, call 873-8170.

We Print Newspapers — 15% Discount to New Customers — • 67 years of experience • 149 satisfied publishers • One-day service • Quality Goss presswork • We can print from your Mac or other disks

• Typesetting & layout • 500 to 250,000 copies • We have newsprint & 50 lb. white paper • Pickup & delivery service available

REGIONAL PUBLISHING CORP. 12243 S. Harlem Ave. • Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932

Hours: Monday thru Friday 9 am - 5 pm • Sat. 9 am - Noon

Call (708) 448-4000

Visit us online: www.regionalprinting.com

Golden winners    Judith A. Gonsch, executive vice president and CFO of Prospect Federal Savings Bank, congratulates winners Sheila Uraski (left) and Cynthia Kusek (right) at the Golden Eagle Club’s 33rd Anniversary Luncheon and Raffle May 7 at The Mayfield Banquetsin Chicago. Uraski won a microwave and Kusek won a 21-inch television.

Elsie’s Place featured food and video gaming    Gaming fans will have a new place to play.    The soon-to-be-opened Elsie’s Place café will open its first two locations at 6901 W. 111th Street in Worth and 14407 S. Cicero Avenue in Midlothian. At Elsie’s Place, adults can enjoy quality food and beverages while playing state-of-the-art gaming machines in a quiet, relaxed environment.    “We are excited to finally open our first two Illinois locations,” says Chuck Knoblauch, Director of Operations for Elsie’s Place. “We have been working to make Elsie’s more than just a place to try your hand at gaming — our food will be great too.”    The menu consists of a variety of choices including gourmet sandwiches, freshly made cook-

ies, muffins, all beef hot dogs, pizza, breakfast sandwiches, and soft pretzels. Signature items are offered such as Elsie’s barbecue beef sandwich and four cheese toasted ravioli. Beer, wine, coffee, tea, and soda are also available.    “We look forward to serving the south suburbs,” says Hal Lieberman, president of Lieberman Companies, who developed the concept of Elsie’s Place. “Look for our Justice location to open in the near future.”   Lieberman Companies is a 107-year-old company based in Bloomington, MN. For more information, call Hal Lieberman at 952-887-5299 or visit www. elsiesplacerestaurant.com. — Submitted by Elsie’s Place

Mortgage Rates Around the Area United Trust Bank (as of May 20) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 4.125 4.097 0 3.375 3.335 0 3.000 2.949 0

Prospect Federal (as of May 19) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

RATES APR POINTS 4.250 4.288 .25 4.000 4.052 .25 3.375 3.439 .25

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

SUDOKU Solution

Crossword Answers


12

The Reporter

The

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Back Page

Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT?

Well, that was a lock. So many guessers were correct that last week’s photo was of locks of hair to be donated for the Locks of Love charity that it warmed even the black and cold hearts of the irritable WHATIZIT? Board of Directors. One of the directors almost smiled. Almost. It was also nice to see a few new playas in the game. Come back and play again. Worth’s Frank and Donna Hirsch were the first to come in with the right answer. Others who enjoyed a hair-raising experience were Palos Heights Janet Lombard, Bill Bulthuis and Jackie Miller, Hickory Hills’ Jack and Griffin Burke Faddis and Chicago Ridge’s Dana Oswald, Mike and Linda Denham, Patty Vandenberg. Other expert guessers were Evergreen Park’s Bernadette Pratl, Jan Merchantz, Vince Vizza, Henrietta Mysliwiec and Bea Lamb, Worth’s E.J. Oakueke, Theresa and George Rebersky, Sandy Joiner, Celeste Cameron and Robert Solner and Oak Lawn’s Jane Foley, For the second week in a row, the Friday Night Poker Ladies got the right answer. We don’t know who they are but they claim four are from Oak Lawn, one is from Orland Park and another is from Oak Forest. Apparently they don’t let anyone join this club unless they are from an O-town. Incorrect guesses were of a doll and therapy dog. This week we know it’s a dummy head but what is the dummy head wearing? The clue is: Who would have thought fiber optics would come to this? Send those guesses to thereporter@comcast.net by Monday night. Put WHATIZIT? in the subject line and give us your name and home town.

Park Clips (Continued from page 10) ing from pose to pose and linking the movement with the breath, is being offered. This energizing type of yoga builds endurance, strength, and flexibility, all while calming the mind. Class is set to upbeat music and ends with peaceful relaxation and all levels are welcome.    The class is being taught by Kelly McKimson-Rhodes, a certified yoga teacher trained at Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga School, Chicago. The yoga class will run from 6 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays, July 9 through Aug. 13 at the Freedom Activity Center. The cost is $40 for residents and $50 for non-residents. Registration and more information are available at the Center. ***   Spring and Summer: The Chicago Park District is offering a discount special for those who register for yoga or zumba classes. Participants who register for any two yoga or zumba classes will receive the classes at a cost of $65 for residents and $85 for non-residents. ***   Summer: The Chicago Ridge Park District is looking for seasonal supervisory help this spring and summer. The supervisor position would be available from April through September, and would entail supervising a splash pad, miniature golf course and batting cage facility. Applicants must be available days, nights and weekends. Applications are available at the Frontier Fieldhouse, or the Freedom Activity Center. ***   Note: The Chicago Ridge Park District is offering a discount special of any two yoga classes for $65 for residents and $85 for non-residents.

Evergreen Park

  The Evergreen Park Recreation Department is located at 3450 W. 97th St. For more information, or to register for a program, call 2293373, or visit evergreenpark-ill.com. ***   Ongoing: Registration is ongoing for summer programs. Park department hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday. The program brochure is on the website where residents can click on recreation summer book. The Evergreen Park Recreation Department also is on Facebook at facebook.com/ evergreenparkrecreation.   The departments offers summer camps, exercise classes for children and adults, tumbling classes, sport camps, drawing classes, dance classes for all ages, free concerts in the park, movies in the park and more. Residents are invited to view the recreation book on line, and register for programs.

Sulfites of little concern for most   Those of you who drink wine have probably heard of sulfites, widely used compounds used to preserve some foods and beverages.   Sulfites actually occur naturally in all wines to some extent — unless removed — because they occur naturally in the soil in which the grapes are grown. They are sometimes added to wines to stop fermentation, oxidation and spoilage, and to keep wine barrels and corks free from bacteria. California winemakers David Coleman and Ayn Ryan have stated outright that without sulfites, “wine wouldn’t be wine, it would be vinegar.”    Some people are allergic to sulfites, and the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has since 1987 required that foods containing sulfites in more than 10 parts

per million be labeled as such. The FDA claims only a half percent of the population is highly sensitive to sulfites, and some medical researchers believe about 5 percent of people have a slight sensitivity. But is there reason for most of us to worry?   Well, first of all, sulfites have been added to wine for centuries. A reaction to sulfites can be minor, as slight as a tickle of the nose, or slightly more serious, such as skin irritation and headache. Those people who get headaches after drinking just a little wine, especially white and sweet wines, can usually chalk it up to sulfites. Other adverse reactions include sneezing and hives, and the most serious is swelling of the throat. Asthmatics and persons with aspirin sensitivity are at most risk for serious reactions and even death, and should

gies such as lobbing, drive shots and overhead slams. Cost is $1. ***   Ongoing: Open gym basketball is offered at the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., Thursdays from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $1. ***   Ongoing: The Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit Ave., has an indoor playground featuring slides, a climbing wall, tree house and more for children who can walk through 4 years old. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Fee is $1 for residents, $2 for non-residents. For more information call 448-7080 or visit worthparkdistrict.org.

The Wine Guy with Anthony Scarano get to the emergency room as soon as possible if a reaction occurs.   Perhaps the worry should be directed more toward the overall quality of the wines we are drinking. Coleman tells the story of a winery that makes organic wine that sent a shipment of sulfitefree wine to Florida. The wine

was shipped in optimal conditions but spoiled very quickly.   So, the moral of the story is: Sulfites in wine are essentially harmless to most of us. Many more people have much more serious sensitivities to nuts, dairy products, shellfish, eggs and wheat. Even for those slightly sensitive to sulfites, the benefits of wine far outweigh the minor discomfort of a tickling in the nose. Anthony Scarano is not a doctor. He is an Evergreen Park resident, winemaker and certified naturopath. Suggestions in this space are solely the opinions of Mr. Scarano based on years of independent study and personal experience, and may not be beneficial to health. Wine should be consumed in moderation, as overindulgence may be harmful to health.

Submitted photo

Cops shoot and score

The 10th annual hockey war between the Oak Lawn Police and Fire Department was won by the cops, 6-1 Sunday at the Oak Lawn Park District Proceeds from the event went to help the Illinois Chapter of Concerns of Police Survivors. Mayor Sandra Bury said in her blog that she attended and tried to remain impartial. “Trustee [Terry] Vorderer and I made sure we spent equal time on both the Fire and Police sides because we support both team’s efforts. This is just another reason to appreciate all [what] of our first responders do for others.”

reservations, call 857-2433. ***   Ongoing: Duplicate bridge will be held at 11:30 a.m. Mondays at the Oak View Center. Cost is $7 per (Continued from page 10) person and includes a light lunch. For more information, call 857-2200.   Ongoing: Green Hills Public Library District is the first library in the state of Illinois Worth    The Worth Park District is located to offer Freegal Movies and at the Terrace Centre, 11500 S. Be- Television. This new service loit Ave. For more information, or offers access to streaming movto register for the programs, call ies and television content. Library patrons are able to access 448-7080.   The Winter/Spring Worth Park thousands of video selections District program guide has arrived. from major content suppliers conveniently on their personal Registration has begun. computer, or portable device. ***   Ongoing: Pickle Ball will be at Patrons wanting to get started, the Terrace Centre, 11500 Beloit should visit greenhillslibrary. Ave., from 6 to 8 p.m. every Tuesday. org. Those needing assistance, Pickle Ball is a cross between tennis should visit the Information and ping-pong and involves strate- Desk, or call ext. 120.

Library Notes lic Library will host a free movie screening of “Philomena” at 10 a.m. A world-weary political journalist picks up the story of a woman’s search for her son, who was taken away from her decades ago, after she became pregnant and was forced to live in a convent. The movie stars Judi Dench. It is rated PG-13 and is 98 minutes long. ***   Immediately: Students, ages 11 to 15, seeking two hours of service may register for a group volunteering session. Students work together on large projects at the library as group volunteers. The sessions will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 15 with registration already underway; Tuesday, March 25 with registration beginning March 15; and Thursday, March 27 with registration beginning March 17. ***   Ongoing: Several Oak Lawn auto dealers are participating in Oak Lawn Public Library’s Goodreads program auto including: Webb Chevrolet, Mancari’s Chrysler, Mike Haggerty Buick/ GMC, Ed Napleton Honda, Happy Hyundai, Oak Lawn Mazda, Kelly Nissan, Frank Shirey Cadillac and Oak Lawn Toyota. Courtesy of the library, a library staff member set up items, which

Oak Lawn

   The Oak Lawn Public library is located at 9427 S. Raymond Ave. The library’s regular hours are: Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, or to register for a program, call 422-4990. ***   Various Dates in May: High school students are invited to study for finals at the Oak Lawn Public Library. Students should bring their books, and the library will provide the snacks on the following dates: ***   May 23: The Oak Lawn Pub-

includes material for children, magazines, non-fiction and fiction, in each dealership’s waiting area. Those who don’t finish a book or article are welcome to check the book out at the library. ***   Ongoing: Oak Lawn Public LibraryLocal History Coordinator Kevin Korst’s new book “Images of America: Oak Lawn Tornado of 1967” is now on sale. The book features 180 tornado-related images with caption and chapter introductions and is available at the reception booth for $21.99 (cash or check). Korst’s first book Images of America: Oak Lawn is also available. ***   Ongoing: Patrons are asked to donate their “gently used” books, magazines, CDs and videos to the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library Ongoing Book Sale at the library. Due to space limitations, the Friends will not accept Readers Digest Condensed Books, encyclopedias and older textbooks. The donation drop-off area is near the library’s Cook Avenue entrance. Interested parties may fill out a short form at the reception booth to receive a tax letter by mail that acknowledges their dona-

tion. The Friends Ongoing Book Sale provides an ever-changing variety of books, magazines and other forms of media at bargain prices. Hardcover books cost 50 cents each, paperbacks are 25 cents and magazines cost 10 cents each. Audio-visual items are priced as indicated. Funds collected from the book sale support library programming and purchases that are beyond their regular budget.

Worth

  The Worth Public Library is located at 6917 W. 111th St. For more information, or to register for a program, call 448-2855. ***   May 27: Individuals interested in learning how to organize the photos are invited to the Worth Public Library district when it hosts Judi Weber, a certified personal photo organizer at 7 p.m. in the library meeting room. Weber will give a presentation about the importance of organizing, preserving and making accessible old photographs, movies and memorabilia that tells a story of an individual’s heritage, and how to preserve these memories. She will share DIY tips and resources needed, future generations can where they came from and learn about their families’ stories.

MEMORIAL DAY SALE!

Beverly Environmental, LLC Landscape Architects & Contractors

$

500 OFF

SUMMER FUN TIME

ANY COMPLETE

Basic ABOVE GROUND POOL PACKAGE &Installation “the original portable pool”

Primo Grills starting at

• Snow & Ice Removal • Custom Hardscapes • Property Master Planning/ Phasing • Ponds & Water Features • Retaining Walls & Natural Stone • Landscapes Design • Garden Design & Lawn Maintenance • Free Estimates

79299

April 25th, 26th & 27th

20% OFF

(708) 331-4911

ON ALL BIOGUARD PRODUCTS

www.beverlyenvironmental.com

25% OFF ON ALL BAQUACIL PRODUCTS

HOMER GLEN - 13445 W.POOL 159th ON ALL FROG St. • 855.301.AQUA 15% OFF PRODUCTS WORTH - 10517 Southwest Hwy. • 708.361.1000

Ad #2

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

Please Recycle Your Reporter

$

ANNUAL CUSTOMER APPRECIATION SALE

Beverly Environmental, LLC

Oak Lawn

  The Oak Lawn Park District administrative building is located at 9400 S. Kenton Ave. For more information, call 857-2225 between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. ***   The Oak Lawn Park District’s Stony Creek Clubhouse, 5850 W. 103rd St., is hosting special events during March. Reservations are suggested. For more information and

Best of The Wine Guy

www.AquaPoolsOnline.com

Mon-Fri: 9am-8pm Sat: 9am-5pm | Sun: 9am-3pm

3x6

HOMER GLEN

WORTH Fun 10517 Southwest Hwy sure to follow Since 1978 Make sureMake to follow us us onon 855-301-AQUA 708-361-1000

Creating 13445 W. 159th (EastFamily of Parker)

MEMORIAL DAY Hours: 9am-3pm Tues..-Fri. 9am~8pm Sat. 9am~5pm & Sun. 9am~3pm


Sports S

The Regional News - The Reporter

outhwest

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Section 2

Page 1

Crowning achievement Bulldogs lock up SSC Red championship By Ken Karrson

Photo by Jeff Vorva

St. Laurence first baseman Roger Wilson chases after an overthrow as Brother Rice’s Jake Barry reaches the bag safely during Saturday’s Chicago Catholic League Blue game in Chicago. The Crusaders blanked the Vikings 2-0.

Piece of the pie

Vikings share CCL Blue title By Ken Karrson

coach Pete Lotus said with a chuckle. “Luckily, Mt. Carmel    Half a piece is better than none came through for us. Our game was done in probably an hourat all.   That’s true whether the ob- and-a-half, but we still had guys ject in question is a baked good around because it was our Alumni or baseball title. And it was an Day. opinion shared by St. Laurence   “This is always our first goal players and coaches in the after- and I’m really proud of our guys. math of Saturday’s 2-0 loss to Once you get past the frustration of not playing the way we’re caBrother Rice.    That defeat put the Vikings in pable [on Saturday], you realize danger of a runner-up finish with- it’s a great accomplishment [to in the Chicago Catholic League win the championship].” Blue. But Mt. Carmel, which had    And, as Lotus pointed out, the fallen twice to the Vikings in ear- Vikings actually had to come from lier matchups, did them a favor behind after losing a game to De by knocking off arch-rival St. Rita La Salle several weeks ago. The Meteors handed St. Laurence its in another Saturday clash.   Thus, St. Laurence was guar- only other shutout of the spring. anteed a slice of the champion-    “We had to be at least a game ship pie, which it shared with the better than everyone else in the Mustangs. The Vikings (26-4, 13- Blue because nobody else lost to 3) bagged at least a piece of the a White team,” Lotus said. “It Catholic Blue crown for the third says something about the effort time in four seasons. They won we put in to get to that point.”   Although the Vikings dropped it outright in 2013.    “It’s not the most ideal way to their league finale, they also win a conference championship, notched a pair of victories last but we’ll take it,” St. Laurence week, one of them against the

Crusaders. On Wednesday, Brad Wood and Mike Kornacker joined forces to quiet Rice’s sticks enough to net a 4-2 triumph for St. Laurence.   The Crusaders’ only scoring occurred in the bottom of the fifth, when Kevin Biondic (double), Ryan Kutt and Kyle Hilliard all hit safely. Hilliard drove in a run with his single, while Dan Paluch did the same with a fielder’s choice.    By that time, though, Rice (23-9, 11-5) was chasing a deficit, which St. Laurence created by tallying in each of its first three plate appearances. The Vikings totaled just seven hits, but included among them were Wood’s two-run double and Mike Miller’s RBI single.    St. Laurence was given further assistance by the Crusaders, who contributed some mix of walks and miscues to each of the Vikings’ rallies. Lotus didn’t care how St. Laurence prospered, just that it did.   “Obviously, there was a lot of (Continued on page 5)

   The Bulldogs are back on top.   A season that began on a high note and has pretty much remained there paid its first dividends on Saturday when Richards officially locked up its third South Suburban Conference Red title in four years. The Bulldogs did so by defeating host TF North 8-3 in a conference crossover while their closest Red Division pursuer, Evergreen Park, was being shut out by SSC Blue leader Lemont.    “It’s been a very nice season,” Richards coach Brian Wujcik said. “I really did not anticipate us [having] the potential to go 17-2 [in league play].”    Wins over Argo this past Monday and Wednesday would give the Bulldogs that exact mark. While Wujcik certainly wasn’t about to assume success against the Argonauts before the games were played, the veteran boss figured everything would be fine if Richards simply followed the script.    “Our MO the last couple years was that we played our best baseball at some time other than heading into the playoffs,” Wujcik said. “One of our downfalls last year was the big inning [against us], but we’ve stayed consistent the whole way [in 2014].    “We don’t have any Division I studs, but we have a good group of guys that are playing very well. We’ve not lost two games in a row this year.”   And in the Bulldogs’ case, the numbers don’t lie. Three players carry averages at or above .400, and as a team Richards (22-6, 152) is at .384. Its overall earnedrun average is an acceptable 3.50, while its fielding percentage is a crisp .948.   The Bulldogs have committed only 39 errors in 28 contests.    “At the high school level, when you can average less than two errors a game, you’ll win a lot of games,” Wujcik said. “At any given time, at least two aspects [of pitching, defense and hitting] have been working for us.”   Richards got a little bit of everything in its conquest of the Meteors. Two-thirds of its nine hits went for extra bases, including Charlie Zeschke’s solo homer

On eve of playoffs, Knights bag three more wins

Letting it fly

Richards 11 TF South 1   Coached by Richards alumnus Matt Tiffy, the Rebels were no match for the Bulldogs last Monday. Instead, the latter rode Chiaramonte’s grand slam to a comfortable first-inning lead and never lost control of the proceedings.   “I know that he wants to win this game badly,” Wujcik said of his former player. “He always gets his guys up and we’ve had some battles with them.”   Not this time. After three stanzas, Richards’ advantage had grown to 9-0 and it was poised to grab a slaughter-rule triumph, which it did by scoring twice more in the fourth. Nate Natividad (three hits, including a double), Sanchez (two-run double), Castro (double, two RBI) and Mike Marchione (RBI single) were the Bulldogs’ headliners.   The game was the 13th this season in which Richards amassed a double-digit run total.

   “The only thing that frightens me a little bit is the number of one-run losses we have — we’ve lost more close games than we’ve won,” Wujcik said. “We have to learn we’re not going to bludgeon opponents every time out. The farther you get into the playoffs, the less you’re going to see that.”   Sanchez earned the pitching victory by tossing a two-hitter, fanning six and walking no one. Brother Rice 3 Richards 2   A bases-loaded walk to Mike Massey and Kevin Sullivan’s RBI single gave the Crusaders the boost they needed in the bottom of the fifth to slip past the Bulldogs last Tuesday in Chicago.   A misplayed bunt also helped out Brother Rice, which was kept from doing greater damage by Richards reliever Eric Ruge. Ruge forced the Crusaders to leave the sacks filled by registering a strikeout and inducing a pair of pop flies.   The Bulldogs collected their only runs in the fourth inning on Castro’s double and a double-play ball. The twin killing came in a bases-loaded, no-out situation and prevented Richards from inflicting more harm upon Rice.   Jake Barry also had an RBI hit for the Crusaders, who outhit the Bulldogs 8-4. Freshman Ryan Kutt pocketed the win while whiffing seven. Ryan Thompson took the loss for Richards.

Statistics TF South 000 10 — 1 Richards 414 2x — 11 Richards 2B: Castro, Mills, Natividad, Sanchez. HR: Chiaramonte. RBI: Chiaramonte 4, Castro 2, Sanchez 2, Marchione. WP: Sanchez (5-0). Richards 000 200 0 — 2 Brother Rice 010 020 x — 3 Richards 2B: Castro. RBI: Castro. LP: Thompson (4-2). Brother Rice 2B: K. Biondic. RBI: Barry, Massey, Sullivan. WP: Kutt (5-2). Richards 122 100 2 — 8 TF North 002 000 1 — 3 Richards 2B: Castro, Chiaramonte, Mejia, Mills, Zeschke. HR: Zeschke. RBI: Castro 3, Mills, Sanchez, Zeschke. WP: Mallo (4-0).

SXU sports summary

Surprises sprung on Cougars in national events

   Visits to national tournaments resulted in surprise endings for a couple of St. Xavier University sports teams.   One of those was rather unpleasant, as the No. 8-ranked Cougars softball squad had its postseason journey halted earlier than anticipated by Lindsey WilBy Ken Karrson portant. It was not the level of fore,” Brauer said, referring to the son College in the NAIA Opening competition we’d been playing Knights’ championship-clinching Round National Championships    With a second straight Subur- the previous four weeks in con- triumph over Marmion Academy. in Columbia, Ky. SXU left a dozen ban Christian Conference Gold ference, and we played down to “It took us a few days to get back runners stranded in a 4-3 loss title already in hand, Chicago our competition.” [on course], but we’re definite- to the Blue Raiders, its second Christian had nothing to prove   Sensing that perhaps his guys ly happy with how we’re doing suffered against Lindsey Wilson in the double-elimination event. against three nonleague foes last were in need of a break near the [now].” week. end of a long regular season, Brau-    The good times started rolling   Also somewhat shocking, but    And on Monday, that’s exactly er gave it to them on Wednesday. against U-High, which had beaten in a good way, was the Cougars the way it appeared. Only two other times during his Christian in 2013 and also been golf team’s top-25 finish at the    Knights coach Eric Brauer liked nine-year coaching career had competitive with it in the previous NAIA Men’s Golf National Chamthat his club managed to knock Brauer called for a complete day year’s matchup. Because of that, pionships in Daytona Beach, Fla. SOFTBALL off Christian Liberty Academy off, but it worked wonders here Brauer wasn’t shocked to see the 5-0, but that’s as far as the pos- as the Knights returned to action Knights clinging to a 3-2 edge    Brittany Graves’ RBI single in the sixth inning gave Lindsey Wilitive vibes went. While Chicago refreshed on Thursday. through 3 ½ innings. Christian was never in danger of   And after crushing University   Far more stunning was Chris- son the run it needed to send SXU suffering a defeat, it also lacked High 13-2 in five innings at the tian’s reaction in both the fourth (47-9-1) packing last Wednesday. the game-day energy Brauer has Ray Kroc Center, Christian com- and fifth frames. Five-run erup- Collecting the Blue Raiders’ other come to expect. pleted a spotless week by slipping tions in each turned the contest RBI was winning pitcher Jordan   “Our intensity and focus was past neighboring Shepard 5-4 on into a laugher as the Knights Hood, who cleared the bags with nowhere near what it needed to Saturday. (22-11-1) made full use of their her second-inning double. be,” he said. “I think our kids   “We probably had a mental 13 hits, which were spread among   Cougars pitcher Nicole Nonnemacher (21-6) allowed just weren’t looking at it as very im- hangover from the Saturday be(Continued on page 2) three other hits besides those and struck out nine, but she couldn’t overcome her own club’s lack of timely hitting. SXU notched eight hits and also drew four walks, but was able to tally only in the first and third stanzas.    Junior Amanda Hainlen’s double drove in the Cougars’ initial marker, while freshman Savannah Kinsella singled home two teammates in the later inning. Junior Katie Sears and senior Katie Houlihan hit safely in front of Kinsella.   There were other chances for SXU after that, but the Cougars left eight runners aboard over the final four innings. ***   Lindsey Wilson also handed down a 1-0 defeat last Tuesday, but SXU stayed alive in the tourney for another day by downing Photo by Jeff Vorva Cornerstone University 9-0 in six innings in that afternoon’s second contest.   The Cougars managed just    Chicago Christian’s Rachel Janke threw the discus over 85 feet to take first place in last Thursday’s four hits off Hood in Tuesday’s opener and fanned seven times. Class 2A University High Sectional. The Lady Knights served as meet host. Story on Page 3.

Just for the fun of it

in the second inning. Zeschke also poked a double, as did Noel Castro (RBI), Shawn Chiaramonte, Shane Mills and Nick Mejia.    Castro finished with three RBI in all, while Mills (single) and AJ Sanchez (sacrifice fly) each added one. Interestingly, Wujcik wasn’t overly impressed with what he saw from his offense.    “I don’t want to make it sound like we were terrible because we did score eight runs,” he said. “But we were kind of lackluster [at times]. We didn’t always have a good approach at the plate and we popped up a lot.   “We have to continue to build and strive to play a perfect game, so when the playoffs come we’re not pressing for it. I don’t want guys to think they [really] have to play a perfect game because that puts too much pressure on you, but we have to minimize the opportunities we give the other team.”   None of the Bulldogs’ flaws mattered much to TF North, which solved Richards starter Eric Mallo for seven hits but could never generate a full-blown rally. Mallo struck out four and walked just one.

Nonnemacher was Hood’s equal with a 13-strikeout, five-hit stat line, but the Blue Raiders nicked her for the game’s lone run by staging a two-out rally in the bottom of the fifth. A free pass and consecutive singles did the damage.   SXU’s best scoring opportunity occurred in its ensuing at-bat, when it placed runners on second and third with no one out. Two strikeouts and a flyout snuffed out the would-be uprising, however.   Scoring wasn’t a problem for the Cougars in Game 2, as they garnered a pair of runs in the top of the third and kept on extending their lead. Hainlen smacked a tworun double and walked with the bases loaded to lead the way, but juniors Megan James and Shannon Lauret also stroked RBI hits to aid the cause.    In her final collegiate outing, senior pitcher Megan Nonnemacher (23-2) whiffed eight and scattered three hits while throwing her 12th shutout of the spring. MEN’S GOLF   Paced by senior James Kerr’s 35th-place individual finish, the Cougars wound up 24th in the team standings at the NAIA Men’s Championships. Twenty-nine schools took part in the threeround event, which was held at the Jones Course of LPGA International.   SXU totaled a 917. College of Coastal Georgia captured the title with a team score of 865.   Kerr carded an overall score of 221, based on rounds of 71, 74 and 76. Junior Kyle Bahnick, who was named to the 2014 NAIA PING All-Region North squad by the Golf Coaches Association of America, was 75th after firing a 228 (78-74-76).   Also scoring for the Cougars were seniors Brendan Ryan and Kirby Brown, who tied for the 123rd position. Ryan’s 235 total was fashioned on rounds of 79, 78 and 78, while Brown shot 84, 72 and 79. Freshman Robert Lively landed in 152nd place after shooting a 247 (82-86-79).    “Making it to our first national championship was a great experience for our [second-year] pro-

gram,” SXU coach Mike Mandakas said. “The whole team played well at times and really embraced the opportunity that was well deserved.   “I am very proud of each and every golfer on the team as they all worked extremely hard to reach our goal of making it to the national tournament.” ***   Before the season ended, the Cougars received a number of awards. In addition to Bahnick’s GCAA prize, SXU boasted the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Player (Kerr) and Coach of the Year. Bahnick and Brown joined Kerr on the all-conference team.   Kerr posted a 74.7 per-round scoring average during the season and never shot above 79. His best round of the season came at the Bethel College (Ind.) Pilot Invitational, where he won Day 1 of the two-day tournament with a round of 67. He finished the tourney tied for second.    Kerr also shot three other sub75 rounds this spring, including a 74 on the second day of the CCAC Tournament, where he placed third overall. SXU won both the Pilot Invitational and conference tourney.    “This is a great accomplishment for our top three golfers,” Mandakas said. “Their consistent play helped contribute to a successful team record. All three had a chance to win conference Player of the Year, but Kerr’s low scoring average helped give him the vote.”    Mandakas was also thrilled for the recognition given Bahnick by the GCAA.   “Kyle has overcome a lot of adversity this season and is well deserving of this award,” Mandakas said. “After breaking his collarbone in January, he was told he wouldn’t be able to compete this season, but Kyle didn’t take ‘no’ for an answer.    “He worked every day with our trainers and in the weight room to get his strength back. Not only did he return to competition, but his hard work paid off as his scoring average dropped more than two (Continued on page 3)


2

Section 2 Thursday, May 22, 2014  

The Regional News - The Reporter

Nothing phone-y about this competition   Alexander Graham Bell is probably turning over in his grave right about now.   Then again, maybe he’s known about this for a while and already completed his post-burial, human tilt-a-whirl reaction. After all, the activity that would cause such a dramatic response has been going on for over a decade.   News of it has only recently come my way, which I’d normally be embarrassed to admit. However, there’ve been more important stories to pursue, and even the most intrepid news gatherer can’t be everywhere at once, can he?   Anyway, this latest tale involves a bizarre endeavor, one that takes its rightful place among the ever-growing list of so-called “sporting competitions” that are wrongly categorized. Through the years, readers familiar with this column have been told of many others — lawn-mower racing, iron-man ironing, pole dancing and beer pong, just to name a few — and, in case you haven’t heard about it before, mobile phone throwing now can be included.   If you’re like me, you actually appreciate the general concept. To truly capture the public’s full attention, though, there should be a stipulation that, in order to be declared victorious, participants must toss both a mobile phone and the gadget’s high-decibel user as far as possible.   Mobile phone tossing would seem a rather new phenomenon, but, in fact, it dates back to 2000, when some Finnish folks beset by boredom decided this was something they simply couldn’t live without any longer. Had it not extended beyond the city of Savonlinna, phone tossing probably would have remained a mystery to normal folks to

this day.    But for some inexplicable reason, a regional endeavor went national a few years later. And in 2005, the first winter championships were held in Switzerland, with the competitive field comprised of first-place finishers in various national events, which by that time included a number of European nations besides Finland.    Interestingly, the grand prize for winning the world championships is — you guessed it — a new mobile phone. And so the cycle begins in earnest.   What’s even stranger is that the competition encompasses more than just your basic heaveand-retrieve exercise. According to its entry in Wikipedia — now that’s scary — mobile phone tossing can be broken down into several divisions.    Personally, I like what is called “freestyle.” Entries in this category get points for “aesthetics and creative choreography.”    Choreography? I don’t believe that was even a part of the judging for pole dancing, which, if you recall my previous column on it, has had some people lobbying for its inclusion in the Olympics. That was right before those same individuals excused themselves to take cold showers.    So how exactly does one combine choreography with mobile phone throwing? Does executing a pre-toss pirouette, for example, accumulate style points for the participant or simply make him the object of manly ridicule? How about if someone slow-dances with the mobile phone before deciding to hurl it through space or goes under the limbo bar while shouting, “How low can I go in embarrassing myself?”    As for the creative part, I suppose just about anything should be allowed. After all, nothing can be sillier than the main activity.    But why stop at tossing mobile phones? Let’s make the contest

more challenging by having competitors yank out pay phones from no-longer-in-use booths and then see how far those can be thrown. The winner gets to keep whatever coins are still inside his phone.    And let’s look beyond phones. Build the competition around all items that society has deemed past their prime and ready for the scrap heap. Think of the possibilities:   • The cassette-tape roundup, where contestants try to rope a small animal using only the material found inside what was once considered a cutting-edge recording device. (Eight-track music tapes and Beta videocassettes may be substituted when attempting to tie up larger critters).   • Incandescent-bulb juggling, where participants seek to keep as many government-disapproved lighting sources balanced in the air without having any of them break.   • Typewriter Scrabble, where competitors must break off machine keys and form as many different words as possible in a predetermined time limit.   • The analog-TV obstacle course, where contestants are made, at various junctures, to sidestep, hurdle and disassemble television sets that are no longer operational.   • The 45-record distance fling.   You get the idea. The above suggestions may seem outlandish, but no more so than many of the activities already masquerading as “sports.”    I guess I can’t blame anyone for developing something they think might intrigue more gullible factions of the public, nor can I fault the latter for trying their hand at an endeavor that offers prizes. There is only one thing I ask:   If you ever take part in an incandescent bulb-juggling contest, please remember it was my idea.

“ I FEEL LIKE

A FISH WITH NO WATER.”

  Those two defeats kept Sandburg from perhaps clinching a divisional title, but it remained in a first-place tie with Lockport by gaining revenge on Joliet on Saturday. Behind six strong innings from starting pitcher Matthias Dietz, the Eagles whipped the Tigers 7-1.    “He didn’t have a lot of strikeouts, but he threw a lot of firstpitch strikes,” Peters said of Dietz.    A five-run fourth inning enabled Sandburg to break open a close contest. Juniors Jim Landgraf and Ben Kociper fueled the Eagles’ offense with two hits and two RBI, respectively. One of Landgraf’s safeties was a double.   Sandburg was scheduled to wind up SWSC play this week with two matchups against District 230 sister school Stagg. The Chargers very nearly did the Eagles a big favor by putting Lockport on the brink of two defeats last week, but the Porters escaped with 3-2 victories in each instance.    “That was disappointing Stagg couldn’t beat them, but I like our chances [of capturing the championship],” Peters said. “We’ve got good arms. We’ve just got to score some runs.”

Trading places Spartans, Astros swap victories By Ken Karrson

tans at bay.   “At this point in the season, we have to start beating good teams because that’s what we’re up against in the playoffs,” Gerny said. “We took advantage of the wildness of the Oak Forest pitcher in the first inning, so despite scoring six runs [in the game], our offense is still struggling to find its way.”    Four hit batsmen and two walks were part of Oak Lawn’s opening volley, along with Ryne Melnik’s RBI single. Dunne (hit by pitch), Witkowski (walk) and Kevin Zurek (hit by pitch) also collected RBI, but the Spartans left the sacks jammed after striking out twice to abruptly halt the rally.   “We should’ve taken [better] advantage of the situation with more scoring,” Gerny said. “It really came back to haunt us.”    Justin Swatek’s double accounted for Oak Lawn’s remaining markers. Mitch Swatek suffered the pitching loss.   Four contests were on tap for the Spartans this week, including Monday’s meeting with Tinley Park that was played as “Tommy’s Brigade” game. Named after the son of former Oak Lawn coach Brian Clifton, the event was designed to increase awareness of pediatric cancer.

fifth broke a 3-all tie and lifted the Knights to a victory over the Astros on Saturday. Frieling also doubled in a run in the sixth, (Continued from page 1) which became vital when Shepard 10 different players. picked up a marker in its half of    “We did not miss many oppor- the seventh. tunities to score runs,” Brauer    The Astros stranded the tying said. “But it’s easy to score runs run at third base after placing it when you’re getting contributions there with just one out. up and down the lineup. To be    Christian’s first batch of scoring honest, I’m surprised it ended came in the bottom of the third, up the way it did, but we really when O’Meara (double), De Vries played a nice ballgame.” (bases-filled walk) and Trevor   Junior ace Christian Bolhuis Wolterink (groundout) each regstopped the Maroons on three hits istered an RBI. Dan Vos logged and struck out six while throw- the pitching win. ing his fifth complete game and raising his ledger to 7-2. He now Chicago Christian 5 has 22 career victories, just seven Christian Liberty 0 fewer than the school’s all-time    While Brauer didn’t find Monleader Trent Overzet. day’s performance particularly no   Bolhuis also chipped in a pair of table, the Knights did pick up hits, including a double. Ron Clark their 20th victory, making it six (double, RBI) and Jack De Vries seasons in a row that has been (double, sacrifice fly, two RBI) accomplished. Christian has a were other offensive ringleaders. total of 10 20-win campaigns in Stagg 7 Stagg 110 000 0 — 2 Driving in runs as well were Pat its history. –JACOB, AGE 5 Bolingbrook 1 Lockport 001 100 1 — 3 McCarthy (two-RBI single, suicide    Novak and Jim Vos combined on DESCRIBING ASTHMA   What the Chargers did last Stagg 2B: Martinez. RBI: Glaza, Strus. squeeze), Josh Novak (single, bas- the hill to hold Christian Liberty Monday was hammer the Raiders LP: Casey (1-4). es-loaded walk, two RBI), Zach to two hits. The Knights plated Frieling (two sacrifice flies) and the only run they really needed You know how to react Mike Santarelli (RBI single). in the top of the first on Bolhuis’ to their asthma attacks. Here’s how to prevent them. Chicago Christian 5 double, but they struck for four Shepard 4 more tallies in their final at-bat, 1- 866 - NO -ATTACKS    Doubles by Sean O’Meara and which featured Wolterink’s twoEVEN ONE ATTACK IS ONE TOO MANY. Novak (RBI) in the bottom of the run double, Bolhuis’ RBI single For more information log onto

and Novak’s sacrifice fly.   After concluding its regular slate this past Monday against Hammond (Ind.) Academy, Christian hosts its own Class 2A regional. It was to meet its first playoff opponent on Wednesday.   “We try to approach it from Day 1 that we’re going to have 35 games and about 30 practices to get ourselves as good as we can be,” Brauer said. “We finally settled on our lineup, which took us about 28 games, so we’re still trying to push to get better and peak at the right time of year.”

Chargers play well in sub-.500 week   The it’s-how-you-play-the-game crowd would have approved of Stagg’s exhibition last week.    So, too, did Chargers coach Matt O’Neill. After all, what was not to like about a display that featured only two errors over 20 innings and just a baker’s dozen worth of enemy hits?   Given that Stagg entered the week with five straight victories, its most recent showings would seem like a continuation of a newly established status quo. Instead, they spelled heartbreak for the locals.   After dispatching Bolingbrook 7-1 on Monday, the Chargers saw their momentum — and winning — stopped by Lockport. The Porters, who are tied with Sandburg atop the SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue, had their hands full with Stagg but managed to squeeze out 3-2 triumphs on Wednesday and Saturday.    “In both games, we were up 2-0 early but couldn’t tack anything else on,” O’Neill said. “The two Lockport guys [who pitched] are realistically the best we’ve seen so far this season.”   Obviously, the Chargers’ own pitching wasn’t too shabby, either. Max Strus and CJ Casey both handcuffed the Porters, holding them to four and five hits, respectively. One of those surrendered by Casey on Saturday cleared the fence in the fourth inning and brought Lockport into a tie, but O’Neill still had no complaints.    “CJ Casey was lights out in that game — even the home run their kid hit was a good pitch,” O’Neill said. “He was tremendous, and so was Strus on Wednesday.   “Our pitching has been really, really solid for about three weeks straight. Every guy is giving us a chance [to succeed], so I’m really pleased about that. Guys are pitching to contact and we’re making plays.    “I knew we were going to figure it out [defensively] and I think

  These 16 went sour on Sandburg.    Playing what amounted to twoplus games against SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue rival Lockport, the Eagles met frustration head-on last Wednesday. The contest that had begun on Monday and been suspended after 10 innings finally tilted the Porters’ way, but the 2-1 loss wasn’t the sole reason for Sandburg’s misery.   What bothered the Eagles’ coaches was their team’s inability to do extensive damage behind a 12-hit attack. Outside of Dan Santiago’s game-tying double in the seventh, Sandburg’s hits were scattered.    The Eagles placed at least one runner in scoring position in 11 of the 16 stanzas. Compounding their misery, however, were 12 strikeouts.   And that wasn’t the end of Sandburg’s offensive struggles, either. Sandwiched between the marathon encounter with Lockport was a conference clash against Joliet West, which blanked the Eagles 6-0 on Tuesday. Twelve more Sandburg batters were re-

tired on third strikes by the Tigers’ top hurler.   “That’s way too many strikeouts,” Eagles assistant coach Chuck Peters said. “There’s always a big concern with that.    “Facing guys throwing 90 miles an hour, high school teams are going to struggle. But you’re not giving yourself the best chance to win if you don’t put the ball in play against upper-echelon pitchers.”   Wednesday’s shortcoming meant Sandburg (20-7, 8-2) wasted a fine mound outing of its own. Seniors Bryan Pall and Sean Leland handled the pitching chores, and between them only allowed five hits to the Porters. Pall fanned 10.    “It was just a bad game [from an offensive standpoint],” Peters said. “You play six innings [on Wednesday], you’d better score some more runs. It was pretty embarrassing.”   No more so, however, than Tuesday’s exhibition, where Peters said Joliet West “shoved it [to us] pretty good. It was extremely disappointing.” The Eagles mustered just four hits on the day.   Jim Roche took the loss on the hill. ***

the third. Both followed Bobby Beard’s single, and the second of them pulled the hosts into a 1-all tie. Another miscue on a ball hit by Dunne let in two more runs in the next frame, but that still left the Spartans in chase mode.   By contrast, Oak Lawn never trailed in the rematch. Joe Dodaro’s two-RBI double put the Spartans ahead in the second stanza, and they added solo tallies in both the fifth and sixth innings. Mitch Swatek (sacrifice fly) and Beard (single) drove in the runs, the latter doing so after Dunne swatted a two-bagger.   “It was nice to bounce back against Shepard and to win a game against a good team,” Gerny said. “We still struggled at the plate a bit, but we got the hits when we needed them.”   Oak Lawn’s eight-hit attack was enough to make a winner of Matt Witkowski for the first time on the varsity level. The junior held the Astros to four hits and fanned three.   “He has really been throwing the ball well lately,” Gerny said of Witkowski. “He’s not overpowering hitters, but he is really keeping teams off-balance and locating [his pitches] well.”    “We’ve had our opportunities,” DiFoggio said. “We’re just going to keep playing and see how it goes.” Oak Forest 8 Oak Lawn 6   Four runs in the first inning gave the Spartans (9-21, 8-9) a lead to protect right away on Saturday, but the Bengals refused to cave. They fought back with a fivespot in the third, then answered Oak Lawn’s two-run rally in the fourth with one of their own.    Once Oak Forest went in front for the second time, it summoned its best hurler to the hill. He struck out four batters over the last two innings and induced a double-play ball to keep the Spar-

Deserving of a better fate By Ken Karrson

Eagles fall to Lockport in 16 innings By Ken Karrson

Bartosh   (Reprinted from Sept. 13, 2012)

Marathon misery

we’re playing cleaner games. We behind Tim Gambill’s solid mound turned at least one double play performance, which featured the in five straight games.” junior tossing a four-hitter over   That didn’t mean everything five innings. Fifty-five of his 88 was perfect for the Chargers (12- pitches went for strikes. 16, 6-6) in the field, however. The   Bolingbrook tallied in the secPorters’ deciding run in one of the ond inning, but Stagg countered contests, for example, was plated with a deuce in the top of the when a Stagg outfielder slipped third. Glaza and Peter Angelos and a routine fly ball fell in for accounted for the RBI with doua game-winning hit. bles. Glaza was heard from again    The Chargers put Lockport in in the sixth as he poked a twoa 2-0 hole by the second inning run single. on Wednesday by tallying once in   In between, the Chargers reeach of their first two at-bats. A ceived RBI from Strus (fielder’s dropped third strike sparked the choice), Wimmer (sacrifice fly) and initial scoring, as a stolen base and Mitchell Spencer (single). Ethan Glaza’s RBI single followed.    While O’Neill admitted his guys Strus singled home the second have been “seeing good teams and run one frame later. good pitching,” he’s satisfied with    Two bases-on-balls and a Stagg Stagg’s ability to stay afloat in its error helped the Porters shave first SWSC Blue season. Part of their deficit in half in the bottom the reason, he said, is because of the third. The Chargers wasted there doesn’t appear to be a great a pair of fourth-inning singles and deal of difference between the two Calogelo Martinez’s leadoff double SWSC divisions. in the sixth.   “It used to be the Blue was *** always head and shoulders above   Saturday’s encounter lasted [the Red],” O’Neill said. “It aleight innings and was decided by most seems now, in baseball, both a wild pitch. Strus shut out Lock- leagues are pretty equal top to port through six innings before bottom.” Rusty Hoh’s triple highlighted a   In addition to Sandburg, the two-run outburst in the seventh. Chargers will square off with Oak   Just as on Wednesday, Stagg Forest in both squads’ regular-seastruck early, collecting both runs son finale on Saturday. From in the first on Martinez’s single there, it’s on to the postseason. and a passed ball. Jake Wimmer    “Our goal every year is to make also hit safely in the stanza, the sure we’re better on Day 1 of Chargers coaxed three free passes the playoffs [than at any time and stole two bases, but a putout before],” O’Neill said. at home ended the rally.   Strus went the distance and Statistics whiffed seven but couldn’t avoid WITH NO WATER. getting tagged with a hard-luck Stagg 002 302 0 — 7 defeat. He and Stagg can still have Bolingbrook 010 000 0 — 1 –JACOB, AGE 5 an impact on the SWSC Blue race Stagg 2B: Angelos,DESCRIBING Glaza. RBI: Glaza 3, ASTHMA as they were to tangle twice with Angelos, Spencer, Strus, Wimmer. WP: Sandburg this week. Gambil (4-1).   “That’s a good position to be in if you can’t win it yourself,” Lockport 000 000 21 — 3 O’Neill said. “We’ll see what our Stagg 200 000 00 — 2 boys WITH can do.” NO WATER.Stagg RBI: Martinez. LP: Strus (2-4).

“ I FEEL LIKE

A FISH ”

“ I FEEL LIKE

A FISH ”

www.noattacks.org or call your doctor.

   Baseball is not typically known as a parallel universe, but Oak Lawn and Shepard made a strong argument last week in favor of its existence.    All things being equal, the Spartans and Astros pretty much are exactly that in 2014. Each team has a credible pitching staff and capable fielding but lacks a consistent offense.   And, appropriately enough, in two head-to-head matchups, each had its moments to shine. For Shepard, that was Monday, when it secured a 5-3 road triumph.    But before the Astros could fully savor their success, they received payback from Oak Lawn, which collected a 4-1 victory in Wednesday’s return engagement. Perhaps not surprisingly, the two South Suburban Conference Red clubs exited that game with identical 8-8 league records.   “We’re two teams that pretty much mirror each other,” Shepard coach Frank DiFoggio said. “Pitching wasn’t the problem [either day]; it was one of those things where neither team can hit. It’s wonderful when you’re hitting the ball really well.”    The Astros (11-15, 8-8) notched just six hits off Matt Dunne in their win, but that was one more than the Spartans mustered. All of Oak Lawn’s runs were unearned.   “We are still struggling to hit consistently,” Spartans coach Bill Gerny said. “It seems as though when we get a baserunner, we [already] have two outs or we strike out. We just have to get more aggressive.   “Matt Dunne did a great job again. He gave up only one earned run, but our defense let him down.”   Two Shepard errors boosted Oak Lawn in the bottom of

Knights

Statistics Shepard 001 300 1 — 5 Oak Lawn 001 200 0 — 3 Oak Lawn LP: Dunne (2-6). Oak Lawn 020 011 0 — 4 Shepard 010 000 0 — 1 Oak Lawn 2B: Dodaro, Dunne. RBI: Dodaro 2, Beard, Swatek. WP: Witkowski (1-3). Oak Lawn 400 200 0 — 6 Oak Forest 105 200 x — 8 Oak Lawn 2B: J. Swatek. RBI: J. Swatek 2, Dunne, Melnik, Witkowski, Zurek. LP: M. Swatek (3-4).

Statistics Chicago Christian 100 000 4 — 5 Christian Liberty 000 000 0 — 0 Chicago Christian 2B: Bolhuis, Wolterink. RBI: Bolhuis 2, Wolterink 2, Novak. WP: Novak (3-4). University High 100 10 — 2 Chicago Christian 021 55 — 13 Chicago Christian 2B: Bolhuis, De Vries. RBI: McCarthy 3, De Vries 2, Frieling 2, Novak 2, Clark, Santarelli. WP: Bolhuis (7-2). Shepard 300 000 1 — 4 Chicago Christian 003 011 x — 5 Chicago Christian 2B: O’Meara 2, Frieling, Novak. RBI: De Vries, Frieling, Novak, O’Meara, Wolterink. WP: D. Vos (6-3).

This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.

–JACOB, AGE 5 DESCRIBING ASTHMA

You know how to react


The Regional News - The Reporter  

Thursday, May 22, 2014 Section 2

Softball roundup

Lady RedHawks enjoy four-win week By Anthony Nasella   Marist was nearly perfect last week.    Only a loss to Bishop McNamara spoiled an otherwise successful week for the Lady RedHawks, who also defeated the Lady Fightin’ Irish while recording wins over Lockport and New Trier as well. The latter was swept in a Saturday doubleheader.   The week opened with a wild 15-12 victory over Bishop Mac. Spearheading Marist’s potent offense were Madison Naujokas and Brooke Wyderski, who combined to go 7-for-8 with seven RBI and six runs scored. Naujokas included a pair of homers among her five hits, while Wyderski went deep once.   Wyderski slammed her 10th homer of the year on Thursday and also belted a pair of doubles, which lifted the Lady RedHawks to a 5-1 triumph over the Lady Porters. Also aiding Marist’s cause were Vanessa Villasenor (two hits), Brooke Wilson (RBI triple, one run) and pitcher Zariya Gonzalez, who fired a four-hitter to enable Marist bounce back from Tuesday’s 6-2 loss to Bishop Mac.   Wyderski was an unstoppable force versus New Trier as she was retired just once in seven atbats. Four of her six hits went for extra bases — two homers and two doubles — and she ended the day with eight RBI and five runs.   With Wyderski leading the way, the Lady RedHawks (20-71) beat the Lady Trevians 4-2 and 10-7. Villasenor knocked in the tiebreaking run in Game 1 with her eighth-inning single. RICHARDS    A fourth consecutive South Suburban Conference Red title came the Lady Bulldogs’ way after they edged Shepard 7-6 last Tuesday.    Pitcher Sarah Kiziak improved her ledger to 13-4 by striking out seven and choking off would-be rallies in the fifth and seventh innings. She forced the Lady Astros to leave the bases loaded in the fifth and then ended the game with two strikeouts, which stranded the tying run.   Kiziak also drove in a pair of runs for Richards (17-6, 14-2), as did Jordan Battels and Sara Tobin (triple). Emily Wetzel had one RBI and Molly Pohrebny finished with three hits.    Pacing Shepard’s offense were Breanna Graffeo and Jalyn

Stepney, both of whom socked homers. Graffeo’s round-tripper was at the heart of a three-run outburst in the second stanza that also included input from Alyssa DeChene (RBI single) and Bryanna Cross (sacrifice fly).   Stepney unloaded her homer in the fourth to give the Lady Astros (17-8) a 4-2 edge, and Jenna Huisenga, Melissa Kelly and Graffeo (double) all supplied hits during Shepard’s two-run rally in the seventh. SHEPARD    The Lady Astros recovered from their tough loss to Richards quickly enough to dole out a 10-0 SSC Red defeat to Reavis on Wednesday. Huisenga’s two-RBI single was a key element in Shepard’s tide-turning six-run explosion in the third inning.    Also part of the scoring were an RBI double from Stepney (3-for-3, two RBI), a run-producing hit by Sarah Wedster (2-for-3, two RBI), Stephanie Brand’s steal of home and a passed ball.   Kelly tossed a two-hitter en route to garnering the pitching victory.   Evergreen Park saddled the Lady Astros with another gut-wrenching loss on Saturday. Jenna Haase’s 4-for-5 performance that featured a homer and four RBI was the main ingredient in the Lady Mustangs’ 7-6 triumph, but winning hurler Megan Pyles did her part, too. Her offensive contributions included two doubles and three hits in all.    Evergreen (18-12, 10-9) dropped an 8-7 verdict to Reavis last Tuesday. OAK LAWN    The Lady Spartans sandwiched a 13-0 rout of Eisenhower in between a pair of losses last week.   Reily McTeague homered, Liz Childers knocked in three runs, and pitcher Mia Loya allowed one hit while fanning 10 over six innings in Oak Lawn’s SSC Red romp past the Lady Cardinals on Tuesday. That win came on the heels of a 13-3 setback against Beecher, which silenced every Lady Spartans batter except Marisa Loya, who registered all three of Oak Lawn’s RBI.    Morgan Josza went 3-for-4 with a double and two RBI against the Lady Bengals on Wednesday, but her exploits — plus those of fellow RBI people Marisa Loya, Mia Loya, McTeague and Hayden Landingham — weren’t enough

to save the Lady Spartans (13-15, 8-9). Instead, Oak Lawn fell short by a 7-6 count. QUEEN OF PEACE    The Pride triumphed twice on Saturday at the Girls Catholic Athletic Conference Red Tournament. Queen of Peace rolled over Gordon Tech (15-4) and St. Francis de Sales (16-5).   The Pride erupted for 11 first-inning runs versus the Lady Rams and never wavered. Headlining for Peace were Jasmine Escobedo (3-for-4, two RBI, one run) and Caitlin Fitzgerald (2-for4, four RBI, two runs).   Both players were at it again opposite the Lady Pioneers, who were burned for a combined five hits by the duo. Fitzgerald had three of them, while Escobedo recorded three RBI and tallied three times herself.    Emily Janozik (two hits, three runs), Magdaline Bennett (two hits, three RBI) and Isabelle Ogden (three RBI) were other Pride notables. SANDBURG    Emily Driskell and Sarah Herold both homered and knocked in two runs, as the Lady Eagles cruised past Joliet Central 12-1 in a SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue contest last Wednesday.    Madline Hanley (two hits, two RBI, one run) was the driving force for Sandburg (17-11, 8-4) in its 5-3 conquest of Stagg on Thursday. Emily Abbene chased in two of the Lady Chargers’ runs.    Stagg (2-15, 1-10) also absorbed SWSC Blue losses against Homewood-Flossmoor (1-0) and Lincoln-Way East (13-3) last week. MOTHER MCAULEY    Behind three RBI triples from Alex Brown and pitcher Jessica Alberts’ complete game, the Mighty Macs beat Regina 8-1 last Tuesday at the GCAC Red Tournament. Alberts threw a two-hitter and struck out six.    Morgan Fleming (two hits) and Kelly O’Donnell each contributed two runs and an RBI for Mother McAuley. MT. ASSISI    The Screeching Eagles dropped a 10-0 decision to Trinity last Tuesday at the GCAC Red Tournament. Amber Anderson, Terri Dearth and Abby Malloy all posted one hit for Mt. Assisi (7-15).    On Saturday, the Eagles lost 7-5 in the morning before rebounding to post an 11-10 victory over De La Salle in the afternoon.

Sports wrap By Anthony Nasella

  Zieler and Ben Crnich (two goals) tallied in the fourth to hand the Eagles a 9-7 advantage, but Dan Cavato’s goal narrowed the gap once more. That’s when Roper stepped forward to seal the deal for Sandburg.    “We knew if we played well, we could come out on top,” Caliendo said. “We did, though, have to really step up to win the sectional championship. Teams generally play with more urgency in the playoffs and you get every team’s best game. We know that will be the case [today at state].    “We’re going to find out early if we’re worthy of being downstate. We’re going to put a game plan together, show up and play hard. Win or lose, I can’t say enough about how much this team has improved, and to know they’re sectional champions and an Elite Eight team [is great].    “We’ve definitely overachieved from where we started in March. Lockport was a heavy favorite and Stagg was right there, too, yet here we are.” ***   Stagg’s quest to advance to state was thwarted Saturday as Brother Rice dished out a 12-10 loss in the championship match

of the Chargers’ own sectional.    Peter Krivanec and Nick Amendola led Stagg (17-13) with three goals apiece. Zack Amendola scored twice.    The Chargers, who were seeking their first-ever state berth, fought back from an early 5-1 deficit and had chances late. Their fate was sealed, however, when they came up empty on three power-play opportunities in the fourth period.   Down 7-3 at halftime, Stagg drew to within 8-7 with 4:48 left in the third as Nick Amendola led the comeback. However, the Chargers could get no closer. ***    The Crusaders also ended Shepard’s campaign as they crushed the Astros 24-6 in the Stagg Sectional quarterfinals. GIRLS’ TRACK   In the third year since the IHSA elevated it from Class 1A to 2A, Chicago Christian finally broke through in a sectional meet. The Lady Knights qualified for this weekend’s state meet in six events out of the University High Sectional.   Christian placed fourth in the team standings with 69 points and (Continued on page )

  Despite guiding Sandburg to the state’s Elite Eight on four previous occasions during the 12 years that boys’ water polo has been an IHSA-sanctioned sport, Eagles coach Jim Caliendo was not convinced his 2014 squad was of that same caliber.   But that’s exactly what Sandburg became on Saturday when it defeated Andrew 12-10 in the Lincoln-Way Central Sectional championship match. The victory was realized when Zach Roper scored two goals, both on lob shots, in the final 93 seconds.    The Eagles (25-8), who will be making their third trip to state in four years, meet Naperville North in one of today’s quarterfinals at Stevenson High School.    “I didn’t know if this team had the potential to go downstate, but they put it all together and proved themselves,” Caliendo said. “It was a very exciting match. Andrew is very well coached and they were very senior-based. They had good, tall athletes with long arms [and] very athletic bodies.   “Andrew was impressive, so we were very happy to get by them. It took about everything we had and every play we had in our playbook. Zach Roper has averaged six goals a game for us — it’s amazing what he’s done this season.”    And Roper has succeeded while being the focal point of every opposing defense.   “He’s been subject to double teams all season on a regular basis,” Caliendo said. “And Andrew shut him down pretty good early in the game. He was getting frustrated, but he broke though in the final quarter with some crucial plays.”    After Roper’s second goal within a 21-second span, the Thunderbolts (26-4) got within one when Eric Tamulonis (two goals) tallied with 24 seconds remaining. Sandburg (25-8), though, was able to play keep-away until Majd Ibrahim (two goals) tacked on an insurance marker at the buzzer.   Roper and Mitch Zieler led Sandburg with four goals each, while Alex Gacek provided Andrew with that same number.   The back-and-forth affair featured five lead changes and six Photo by Jeff Vorva ties. The T’bolts were ahead 5-4 at the half and 7-6 in the final Queen of Peace sophomore Sadie Haywood finishes a heat in the minute of the third period before 100-meter dash prelims at last Thursday’s Class 2A University High Zieler tied the score. Sectional.

3

Dazed after a dozen Mustangs see 12-game win streak snapped By Ken Karrson   Unlucky 13 wasn’t only a superstition for Evergreen Park.   A school-record 12-game win streak gave the Mustangs plenty of momentum heading into Saturday’s showdown with South Suburban Conference Blue leader Lemont. And that long unbeaten stretch had also helped Evergreen remain a contender within the SSC Red, where it was pursuing front-running Richards.   But Indians pitcher Jake Latz was unfazed by all the encouraging things surrounding the Mustangs. Instead, he dominated Evergreen by limiting it to three hits while striking out 14 batters and, in the process, mathematically eliminated it from the SSC Red race.    “He’s tough,” Mustangs coach Mark Smyth said of Latz. “We had guys that were just physically overmatched.”    Evergreen’s 9-0 setback, coupled with the Bulldogs’ 8-3 conquest of TF North that same day, created a four-game difference in the loss column between the programs heading into the final week of the regular schedule. Despite failing to catch Richards, the Mustangs earned their coach’s approval.   “Richards is having a fantastic season,” Smyth said. “Just to be able to be within sniffing distance of them was good. It was a good run.    “If all goes well and we can win a couple games in the [Class 3A state] tournament, we might get a chance to see [Lemont] again. They’re something else, but at least we will have seen them already and know what to expect, [so] let’s get back at it and finish strong.”   Evergreen’s only real threat came in the fourth, when Mark Martin led off the inning with a triple. However, Latz quickly quieted the noise by ringing up three consecutive strikeouts.   “That was deflating,” Smyth said. “It was only 3-0, and I

SXU

thought maybe we could get something going and get back in the game.”   Frank Meisl was tagged with his second defeat in seven decisions after issuing an uncharacteristically high six walks, which Lemont grouped together with 10 hits. Four of the free passes and a passed ball were all part of the Indians’ three-run uprising in the fifth, a rally that was duplicated one stanza later. Evergreen Park 3-4 Eisenhower 2-0    Before running afoul of Lemont, the Mustangs took two from the Cardinals, although Evergreen received a stern challenge on both Monday and Tuesday.    “I expected two tough games,” Smyth said. “[Eisenhower’s coach] has got them competing and playing hard. They’ve played some tight games against really good teams.”   Brian Pall, who lowered his earned-run average to 1.28, held the Cards in check on Monday as he surrendered just four hits and fanned 11. Eisenhower did its only scoring in the fourth inning.   “He’s been ‘on’ lately and very good,” Smyth said of Pall. “We’re really happy with the way he’s come along as the season’s gone on.”   By the time Pall got nicked, the Mustangs (18-9, 11-5) were ahead 3-0, courtesy of hits from Dan Kohler (two-run single) and Sean Miller in the first and third frames, respectively. The latter eruption began after two outs, with Kohler’s walk and Corey Miller’s single preceding Sean Miller’s hit.    Evergreen finished with seven hits.   “I think we work hard at it, so I like to see us rewarded for it,” Smyth said, referring to the Mustangs’ time spent on batting in practices. ***    Evergreen’s sticks still weren’t explosive on Tuesday, but five

for the NAIA meet, while Shares had previously qualified to compete in the national marathon. (Continued from page 1)   Also doing well for SXU in shots from last year. Kyle is a Naperville were Rosario (2:23.14) great golfer and team leader as and Watkins (2:23.81) in the he represents our golf program 800 and sophomore Ann Kolker and university better than anyone (5:05.79) in the 1,500. I know.” *** MEN’S TRACK    Also honored by the CCAC was    Sparked by solid performances freshman Taylor Thompson, who from juniors John Scancato and was selected as the Women’s Play- Daniel Spencer, the Cougars er of the Year. placed third among nine schools    She was among the top-10 fin- competing in the CCAC Chamishers in each of her four spring pionships. competitions, a feat highlighted by    Host Olivet Nazarene Universiher medalist honors at the first-ev- ty won the meet with 287 points, er CCAC Tournament April 23-24. while the University of St. Francis Thompson shot an 81 and a 79 was a distant second (152). The those two days. Cougars scored 106 points, their   Her best two-round total this highest total in meet history. spring came at the Embry-Riddle   Stancato was an ironman Aeronautical University (Ariz.) for SXU as he competed in six Spring Invitational in Prescott, events. He took second in the Ariz., where she recorded a 78 and 100-dash (11.46) and anchored a 79 on back-to-back days for a the runner-up 400-relay four157 total, which earned her sixth some. Other finishing spots for place. Thompson also placed ninth him were fourth in the javelin among 42 golfers at the University (41.73 meters), fourth in the pole of St. Francis Spring Invitational vault (3.20 meters) and fifth in the with a two-round score of 171 200 (23.52) as an individual, and (82-89) and tied for eighth at the third as a part of the 1,600-relay Bethel College (Ind.) Pilot Spring team. Invitational after totaling a 164    Spencer was also busy as he par(84-80). ticipated in four events, the best of    A two-time CCAC Player of the which was his win in the 110-high Week honoree, Thompson posted hurdles (16.83). He placed fourth a per-round average of 81 for the in the triple jump (11.87 meters), season. seventh in the 400-intermediate hurdles (1:00.87) and eighth in WOMEN’S TRACK the long jump (5.89 meters).   Finishing second overall in 9   Other impressive exhibitions minutes, 29.16 seconds at the were delivered by senior Chris CCAC Championships, the Cou- Shellenberger (third in the javgars’ 3,200-meter relay unit’s elin, 42.48 meters), junior Janis clocking was fast enough to punch Pastars (fifth in the 1,500 in its ticket to the NAIA Outdoor 4:05.1; seventh in the javelin at Track & Field National Cham- 39.37 meters; eighth in the 800 in pionships. 2:01.82), senior Nick Pesek (sev   The three-day national meet be- enth in the 100, 11.94), junior Matt gins today at Mickey Miller Black- Krakowski (fourth in the 400 in well Stadium in Gulf Shores, Ala. 50.83; sixth in the 200 in 23.70),   SXU’s qualifying quartet was sophomore Rexford Wiafe (third comprised of junior Leslie Rosa- in the 800, 1:59.65), senior Brian rio, senior Anna Galvez, senior Corcoran (fifth in the 800, 2:01.08), Jordan Wallace and freshman Ni- freshman Abel Hernandez (third cole Watkins. Rosario, Watkins in the 5,000, 15:33.68) and junior and Wallace also posted individual Brandon Gentry (second in the top-10 finishes, Rosario’s fourth in triple jump, 12.65 meters). the 800-run (2:19.95) representing   Pesek, Krakowski and sophthe best showing. omore Ben Tracy joined Stan   Watkins (2:23.77) was sixth in cato in the 400-relay, while Withat same race, while Wallace took afe, Corcoran and senior Shane ninth (4:58.44) in the 1,500. Se- Kenney completed the 1,600-relay nior Ashley Shares gave the Cou- lineup. Shellenberger, Pastars, jugars another fourth after timing nior Kyle Counter and freshman out in 18:44.55 for 5,000 meters. Alex Ray teamed up to give SXU   “This is always an enjoyable a fourth place in the 3,200-relay. meet because we get the chance   “Fourteen of the 17 athletes to go up against all the talented that we entered scored points schools in our conference,” SXU for the team,” Cougars coach Ed coach Lisa Ebel said. “I’m thrilled McAllister said. “This is as close that our relay team was able to to a perfect team performance that turn in a national qualifying time I can ever remember. Our guys because they have worked real- just dug deep, again and again. ly hard and deserve a chance to    “I can’t say enough about our compete at nationals.” overall performances. I am not *** going to single out any individuals   The Cougars completed their this time, as this was a complete regular season at the Dr. Kee- team performance. The times ler Invitational, where Shares’ were not great, in that all races fourth in the 10,000 (38:59.03) finished into the wind, but we all and Wallace’s season-best time in ran into the same wind. the 3,000-steeplechase (11:26.61)    “It was a very good day. I could provided the biggest highlights. not be prouder of our guys and Wallace’s effort made her eligible their performances.”

Cardinals errors allowed the Mustangs to make the most of seven more hits and complete a series sweep.    Seeing as how Eisenhower has not been among the SSC Red elite the past few years, was Evergreen guilty of looking beyond the Cards? Smyth didn’t think so.   “We’re not in a position to do that,” he said. “If you look at the 12 in a row, there were probably only about three games where we jumped on [foes] and were able to coast. [Close games] are our comfort zone because we’ve gotten used to playing in them.”   Joe Moran, who pitched a no-hitter a few weeks ago, toyed with another one here before losing it in the sixth inning. He didn’t lose the game, though, thanks to a two-hit, six-strikeout effort.   The Mustangs didn’t erase a scoreless tie until the fifth, when Kohler’s infield hit and one of Eisenhower’s miscues led to two runs. Evergreen tallied its other two markers in its last at-bat, again with the aid of a couple Cardinals muffs.   “We caught some breaks,” Smyth said. “When you’re on a winning streak, you get those.”    The Mustangs were due to close out their regular season with four contests this week, three of them conference affairs, including two versus Shepard.

Statistics Eisenhower 000 200 0 — 2 Evergreen Park 201 000 x — 3 Evergreen Park 2B: C. Miller. RBI: Kohler 2, S. Miller. WP: Pall (4-2). Evergreen Park 000 020 2 — 4 Eisenhower 000 000 0 — 0 Evergreen Park 2B: Martin. RBI: Kohler. WP: Moran (5-1). Lemont 010 233 0 — 9 Evergreen Park 000 000 0 — 0 Evergreen Park 3B: Martin. LP: Meisl (5-2).

BASEBALL    Limited to just four hits in the game, the Cougars (22-29) saw their 2014 campaign endon the third day of the CCAC Tournament as they absorbed a 12-1 loss to top-seeded St. Francis in nine innings at Hoffer Field in Elgin.   The score was tied at 1-all through three innings before the Fighting Saints erupted. The setback marked the end of Mike Dooley’s coaching career at SXU, where he had guided the baseball program since 1993. Dooley, who started as an assistant coach in 1981, finished with an 807-501-3 record.    “I look at my career as a body of work, and I’m so proud and fortunate to have been able to coach this program through the many years of success, including the 2006 NAIA World Series berth and the numerous conference and regional championships,” Dooley said. “However, it has never been about the numbers.   “It has always been about the people. The players I have coached and the staff I have worked with over the years are what have truly made my career so special, and they will always hold a special place in my heart.”    Freshman catcher Ryan Pellack was the lone Cougar to have more than one hit versus USF. He went 2-for-3 and knocked in SXU’s only run. ***   Before falling to the Saints, the Cougars lost 6-2 to Judson University. SXU was unable to maximize 11 hits, four of which were split between Pellack and freshman Bryan Polak, who were the Cougars’ top offensive performers. ***   Polak, who was chosen as the CCAC Freshman of the Year, and Pellack were among four SXU players accorded all-conference recognition. Senior pitcher Scott Vachon joined them on the second team, while senior Chris Klein was a first-team selection.    Pellack was also tabbed for the CCAC Gold Glove squad, the only freshman to make the nine-man unit.    Klein led the Cougars in several statistical categories this season, including batting average (.346), hits (62), runs scored (40), triples (three), stolen bases (11) and total bases (84). As a pitcher, he was 4-2 with a 4.23 earned-run average and 58 strikeouts over 61 2/3 innings.    Polak had a great debut season with SXU as he hit .344 (54-for157) with 13 doubles, 31 RBI and 25 runs. Vachon led the Cougars in ERA at 2.24, as well as strikeouts (74), innings pitched (84 1/3), starts (12) and complete games (seven).    Pellack also had a solid collegiate debut as he batted .265 (30-for113) with eight doubles, 25 runs scored and 16 RBI. His biggest contributions came behind the plate, where he registered a .982 fielding percentage with 232 putouts, 42 assists and just five errors.


4

Section 2

Thursday, May 22, 2014    The Regional News - The Reporter

Sports wrap (Continued from page 3) grabbed wins in the 3,200-meter relay, high jump and discus. Posting the relay victory was the foursome of Jill VanDyk, Alyssa Bednarek, Keelin Krotty and Cassidy VandeKamp, who completed the race in 10 minutes, 23.67 seconds.   VanDyk also took first in the high jump with a clearance of 4 feet, 8 inches and was runner-up in the 800 after clocking a 2:33.01. Winning the discus was Rachel Janke with a throw of 85-1.   Completing the list of Lady Knights qualifiers were shot putter Jalynn Morrison and distance runner Brianna Kooiman, who’ll compete in the 3,200 at Charleston.    In summarizing his team’s overall performance, veteran Christian coach Jim Kwasteniet expressed a great degree of satisfaction.    “It was a very fun sectional meet for the girls,” said Kwasteniet, who is in his 33rd season. “The girls are really excited. They’ve been a fantastic group of kids who have worked hard all year long. Their goal all season has been trying to get as many individuals as possible downstate.    “I took one girl downstate the first year we were moved up to Class 2A, and last year we qualified in two events. It looks as though we may be back at Class 1A next year because we haven’t had as much success going up against much bigger schools.”   Given those circumstances, Kwasteniet is relishing the Lady Knights’ current success, which has been realized by a program representing a school of 360 students. Christian has found itself pitted against foes with enrollments of 1,000 or more.    “Going up against schools with 1,200 to 1,500 students, we’re very happy with the way we performed,” Kwasteniet said. “With all our alternates, we’re going downstate with an even dozen.” BOYS’ TRACK   Shepard (157 points) won all four relays en route to securing the team championship of Saturday’s South Suburban Conference Red meet at Eisenhower. The Astros also boasted a pair of individual standouts in Corry Williams and Josh Maier.   Williams was tops in both the 110-high (15.40) and 300-intermediate (41.56) hurdles, while Maier prevailed in the 800 (2:02.18) and mile (4:33.77) runs. Evergreen Park’s Charles Taylor won the 200 (23.10) and teammate Sam Senerchia finished first in the discus (139-2½). GIRLS’ WATER POLO    Sandburg was eliminated from the state tournament on Friday but not before battling Bremen in an exciting semifinal at the Stagg Sectional. The Lady Eagles wound up one goal shy of the Lady Braves, 11-10    Hannah Schultz scored four of Bremen’s first five goals as it built a 5-1 lead. She buried two more in the fourth period to give the Lady Braves 9-7 and 10-8 advantages.   Trailing by five in the second quarter, Sandburg rallied behind Sarah Dolitsky’s six goals. The Lady Eagles (21-10) made it 6-all on a goal from Caitlyn Olson early in the third, but Schultz answered with two markers in a row.   Sandburg cut Bremen’s lead to a single goal on four separate

Trinity sports report

Trolls blanked in NCCAA tourneys By Tim Cronin

  In the 1960s, when the game show “Let’s Make A Deal” was in its heyday, this would have been called “getting zonked.”   Trinity Christian College’s softball and baseball teams both advanced to the National Christian College Athletic Association Championships this year, the softball team for the first time in 22 springs.   Neither club won a game.   What was behind door No. 3 wasn’t pretty. The Trolls softball squad went 0-2 in Troutville, Va., while the baseball team suffered four straight losses in Mason, Ohio, two of them in extra innings.    There was great anticipation in Mason last Wednesday when Trinity took the field against top-seeded Oklahoma Christian (38-15) in the first game in its bracket, and that anticipation was rewarded — for a short time anyway.   The Trolls opened the scoring on J.T. Yokum’s RBI double in the second stanza and doubled their advantage on Peter Kyrgsheld’s fifth-inning single. But the Eagles rebounded to take a 3-2 lead into the ninth inning.    It was then that All-Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference performer Joe McCaw, Trinity’s slugger all season, came through once more. McCaw belted an RBI single off Dillon Endicott in the top of the inning to tie the game at 3-all and force extra frames.    The score remained knotted unPhoto by Jeff Vorva til the bottom of the 11th, when Evergreen Park freshman Meleah Tines completes a long jump at Brad Kopale’s two-out wild pitch with the bases loaded allowed last Thursday’s Class 2A University High Sectional. Oklahoma Christian’s Zac Coboccasions in the fourth period, but for the Chargers in their loss to ble to score the deciding run in the Knights on Tuesday. Tom the 4-3 final. it could never pull even.   The Lady Eagles reached the Matonis (four kills, four blocks), *** finals via a 12-1 win over Curie Nick Stanek (18 assists) and Sean    The Trolls were the home team on Thursday. Dolitsky’s four goals Runyon (eight digs) also played last Thursday, and a similar scewell in defeat. paved the way for Sandburg. nario played out. The foe was *** *** Bluefield (35-18), and this time   Richards co-op bounced Stagg   Shepard (7-15, 2-4) came up Trinity held a 4-2 lead on the from the tournament last Thurs- short against Eisenhower in a Virginia school entering the ninth. day as it survived four goals South Suburban Conference Red    Tyler Timmer smacked a twofrom the Lady Chargers’ Mallory match. Leading the Astros in their RBI single in the top of the inning Schaub to record a 12-9 victory 25-17, 25-22 loss were Hussein to pull Bluefield even, then in Al-Rashdan (10 assists) and Ivan the 11th Sawyer McLamb turned in a sectional quarterfinal. Magana (five kills, one block). BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL into a lion. His single sent Jacob GIRLS’ SOCCER    Sandburg triumphed twice last Schober across the plate with the week, downing Marist 25-18, 25-   Shepard began last week by 22 on Wednesday and Bolingbrook playing Marist to a scoreless tie. 30-25, 25-16 in a SouthWest Sub- The shutout was Lady Astros urban Conference Blue match on goalie Heather Banis’ 11th of the season. Thursday.   Dan Tynski put down 10 kills,    Also instrumental in Shepard’s Paul Chmura had nine and Neil half of the whitewash were deNaughton added eight to lead the fenders Rachel Libera, Megan Eagles past the RedHawks. Naugh- Brady, Abby Newsome and Araceton also contributed a block and ly Reyes. By Ken Karrson an assist. Further help came from    Another tie was in place at the Kyle Van Stedum (four blocks) and end of regulation on Thursday,    Marist may not be in a league but the Lady Astros (13-5-2, 9-2) of its own, but it still can own Ian Zalewski (22 assists).   Tynski and Naughton paced broke the 2-2 deadlock by con- a piece of the league in which Sandburg (24-8, 7-2) in its tri- verting three penalty kicks. Banis it resides. umph over the Raiders by record- made sure Thornton Fractional   At least that was true as the ing nine kills each. Jimmy Drynan co-op didn’t do the same and, at RedHawks entered the final week backed the duo with seven kills the same time, assured Shepard of the 2014 regular season. Deand Zalewski fueled the offense of taking over first place in the spite its short supply of offense SSC Red. with 32 assists. throughout the spring, Marist ***   The Eagles have captured 12 found itself tied in the loss column of their last 13 matches, with   Lincoln-Way Central edged with three other East Suburban the only setback administered Sandburg 2-1 in an SWSC cross- Catholic Conference schools as of by defending state runner-up over last Tuesday. this past Sunday. BOYS’ TENNIS Lincoln-Way North.   The RedHawks still faced an   Sandburg and Shepard both uphill climb — they had four ***    Lincoln-Way North (25-12, 25- absorbed defeats last week, the conference games left to play 12) and Lincoln-Way Central (25- former doing so against Marian while Joliet Catholic Academy 22, 25-21) both got the better of Catholic on Monday. The Spartans had already completed its league prevailed 5-3. Stagg last week. slate, and Benet Academy was   Trevor Crain had seven kills    The Astros dropped a 4-1 SSC two up in games played — but and Kamil Krysiak produced six Red verdict to Reavis on Tuesday. that couldn’t diminish the accomplishments to date. Marist (16-11, 8-4) earned a series split with both the Hilltoppers and Redwings, so its fight for a share of the ESCC championship cerversus Benet. Recording eight kills tainly had merit. Evergreen places 18 Marist splits pair of each were Inzinga and Munro.   “If you let us hang around on Athletic Wall ESCC volleyball matches The latter also topped Marist with a little bit, we’re a dangerous   Eighteen student-athletes be-   Despite engaging in a spirited 11 blocks, while Moran had five, team,” said RedHawks coach Tom came the latest individuals chosen three-game battle, Marist came up Fabrizio, who wants his athletes plus three aces. for inclusion on Evergreen Park short against Benet Academy in   Hauser distributed 31 assists, to adopt that same sentiment in High School’s Varsity Athletics an East Suburban Catholic ConBrian Barry had 15 digs, and regard to the upcoming Class 4A Leaders Wall. ference boys’ volleyball match. Luke Mayer totaled 11 digs and playoffs.    The designation is given to ath-    But after suffering a gut-wrenchtwo aces. letes who have earned a minimum ing 29-27, 20-25, 29-27 setback to of five varsity letters during their the Redwings, the RedHawks reprep careers. An induction ceremo- bounded to take down St. Patrick St. Laurence to host ny was held in the school cafeteria. (25-19, 25-22) in another confer- 25th annual golf outing   Leeza Campbell, Dorothy Ka- ence clash. Spearheading Marist’s   The Alumni Association of St. lafut and Zoe Monks headed up winning effort was Jake Moran, Laurence will host its 25th annual the latest group of honorees. Each who registered five kills and six golf outing on May 31 at Water’s By Maura Vizza girl was awarded eight letters. digs. Tom Inzinga equaled Mo- Edge Golf Club in Worth. Sarah Klawitter, Jacquet McClen- ran’s kill total, while Nick O’Gor-   Play will be conducted in a   A longer-than-usual winter don and Corey Miller were right man chipped in four kills and a scramble format and begin with wreaked early havoc on softball behind them with seven apiece, service ace. a shotgun start at 1:30 p.m. Tee and baseball schedules throughwhile Will Jones, Colleen Elzinga,    Also lending a hand were Matt times are limited to the first out the area, but it couldn’t Jaymell Sheppard and Kelly Shine Munro (two blocks), Dan Anzelmo 144 golfers. Reservations must completely ruin Moraine Valley College’s on-field exploits. all collected six letters. (three digs, one block), Tim Haus- be made by May 26.    Rounding out the list of induct- er (three digs) and Ivan DelBosque    The cost is $150 per person, and   Once play got underway in ees were Tre’Shawn Burks, Alex (one block, one ace). includes 18 holes of golf, lunch, earnest, the Cyclones softball Cheatham, Kevin Farmer, Nick   Moran put down 13 kills and dinner, on-course beverages, open squad posted a 22-17 ledger and Knieps, Justin Houle, Meghan Anzelmo added nine, but those bar and giveaways. Contests and went 8-4 in the Illinois Skyway Kress, Tobi Oladejo and Juwan displays weren’t enough to spare a raffle will also be held, and Collegiate Conference, which was good for a runner-up finish in the Smith. the RedHawks (15-16) from defeat (Continued on page 5) league standings. Included among the season highlights was a ninegame win streak.   Carly Trinley captured ISCC Player of the Year honors after batting .545 in conference action with an .841 slugging percentage. Other Moraine athletes chosen for the all-conference first team were Amie Raynor (.397 average; .450 in the ISCC) and Jenny Vanek (.295; .356 in conference). Second-team picks were Ari Bulthuis (.382; .357 in conference) and Dana Cummings. COMMUNITY SPORTS   “This is one of the most fun teams I’ve had in my coaching (Submitteded Photo) Eighteen student-athletes at Evergreen Park were chosen for inclusion on the high school’s Varsity career,” Cyclones boss Mike Veen said. “I wish this was a four-year Athletics Leaders Wall.

Community sports news

tiebreaking run in a 5-4 verdict.    That dropped the Trolls to 0-2 in the tournament, and in a fiveteam bracket, that’s a deep hole. It got deeper on Friday morning, when Shorter scored a 6-4 victory to negate Yokum’s 2-for-4, twoRBI day.    And at 0-3, Trinity players knew they were headed home. Their Friday finale reflected that, as the Trolls managed just four hits in a 4-0 loss to Fresno Pacific.   That made for a tough ride back to Palos Heights, but Trinity finished 26-24 — a team record for wins in a season — and made the NCCAA finals for the first time in seven years. McCaw heads up a long list of returnees that will make head coach Justin Huisman’s rebuilding effort much easier. ***   • Final Numbers: 26-24 overall, 17-10 CCAC, 10-7 home, 8-7 road, 8-10 neutral. Leaders: Joe McCaw, .359, 66 hits, .549 slugging percentage, 45 RBI, 5 HR; Lance Lammers, 13 steals; Benny Collesano, 5 wins; Vince Flores, 2.70 ERA; Brad Kopale, 3 saves; Danny Britt, 51 strikeouts. SOFTBALL    The opener of the NCCAA Softball Championship pitted Trinity against Grace College of Indiana, a school the Trolls beat in the second game of the season.   The Lancers evidently remembered, for they took revenge by pelting Trinity with a 15-hit attack last Thursday. First, Grace turned the Trolls’ 3-0 lead — which had been constructed a half-inning earlier on RBI hits from Adrianna Puente and Anna Phillips (two-run single) — into a tie in the bottom of the third.    The fourth inning, though, was the killer. The Lancers pushed nine runs across the plate on as many hits to put the contest beyond the Trolls’ reach.   In NCCAA play, an eight-run gap triggers the slaughter rule from the fifth inning forward, and a 12-3 score created that circumstance for Trinity.    The Trolls then dropped a 5-3 verdict to Mississippi College

in Friday’s elimination-bracket matchup and were sent packing.    In contrast to Grace’s rally, the Choctaws pounced instantly as their first two batters reached base and eventually scored. It was 3-0 after four innings and 5-0 midway through the sixth.   Then Trinity rallied. Brianna Brugioni doubled in the Trolls’ first run, Phillips’ bases-loaded single sent the second one home, and a Grace error on Jayme Love’s ball allowed a third to score.    But that was it. While Trinity’s defense kept the Choctaws off the board in the seventh, there was no rally repeat for the Trolls and their 2014 season came to a close.   Even with the twin defeats, Trinity accomplished more this spring than anyone except those within the softball program expected. A record-tying 26-win season bodes well for the future. ***   • Final Numbers: 26-27 overall, 11-9 CCAC, 13-7 home, 4-9 road, 9-11 neutral. Leaders: Jayme Love, .371, 62 hits; Tori Grzincic, 27 RBI, 3 HR, .465 slugging percentage; Anna Phillips, 8 steals; Brianna Brugioni, 10 wins, 90 strikeouts, 2.40 ERA; Mattie McGuire, 2 saves, 14 complete games. TRACK & FIELD   Junior Anna Bos and senior Andy Reidsma lead the qualifiers from the Trolls track teams into the NAIA Championships, which begin a three-day run today in Gulf Shores, Ala.   Reidsma is slated to compete in the 10,000-meter run, where he’s seeded second after clocking a personal-best time of 29 minutes, 51.58 seconds, and the marathon on Saturday. Senior teammate Chris Koutavas will also take part in the latter event.   Bos’ time of 36:08.50 earned her the fifth seed in the women’s 10,000. Sophomore Jessica Disselkoen, seeded 28th, will give the 3,000-steeplechase a go, while the 17th-seeded 3,200-relay squad will also line up. Some combination of Ashley Jourdan, Courtney Kalous, Hannah Schwab, Anna Spotts and Justine VanDyk will make up that relay quartet.

A league they can own

RedHawks still alive in ESCC race   “Hit or miss, I look at us as dangerous. Our kids know that.”   Seeing as how Marist had to clear four ESCC hurdles this week, including two against contending Carmel, Fabrizio preferred to be realistic about the RedHawks’ chances of gaining a piece of the title.    “It’s a stretch that’ll happen,” he said. “We have to play our best for four games and we basically have to win out.”    Marist definitely got adequate rest in preparation for those showdowns, as it took the field just once last week. That Wednesday nonconference affair resulted in a 5-4 victory over Downers Grove South.    The RedHawks’ run total was a bit misleading, simply because it was not generated through a batting barrage. Marist collected only six hits, although that was one more than the Mustangs managed off the RedHawks’ mound tandem of Robert Hovey and Marty Meyer.   Hovey stopped Downers on one hit and did not give up any earned runs during his three-inning stint.   “Pitching and defense have been our strengths, and we’re doing just enough offensively to

get by,” Fabrizio said. “We haven’t gotten into a good rhythm [at the plate], but we harp on the little things and small details [in every area]. Those are the differences in a lot of games.”    Blake Bieniek and Pat Meehan paced Marist’s attack with two hits apiece. Meehan included a double among his production, and the duo also drove in three of the RedHawks’ five markers. Two of those were plated in the sixth with the help of some Mustangs defensive missteps.   “They kicked it around a little, and we try to tell our kids that we need to take advantage of those opportunities,” Fabrizio said. “A lot of times teams look at those games they thought they should have won, but I look at it like we’ve been lucky to not lose some games we could have.”   Besides its ESCC confrontations, Marist also had matchups with Richards and Mt. Carmel planned for this week.

Statistics DGS 003 010 0 — 4 Marist 010 202 x — 5 Marist 2B: Meehan. RBI: Bieniek 2, Meehan. WP: Hovey.

Moraine athletics wrap

Diamond teams finished on promising note institution [because] I didn’t want to see the season end.   “We were lucky we got in the number of games we did. Not only that, but there is real talent on the team. It’s hard to see the sophomores go.”    Vanek intends to continue playing softball at North Central College next season, while Raynor will head to Aurora University. Trinley is expected to return to Moraine for the 2015 campaign, and Veen has some recruits in mind to further develop his squad. BASEBALL    The Cyclones had some periods of struggle on the diamond, but they made strides and should have an increased level of confidence heading into 2015.    Moraine wound up 9-17 overall and 5-10 within the ISCC while performing with a freshman-dominated roster. Bobby Neylon earned a nod to the all-conference first team, while Sheamus Brennan and Mike Levigne were second-team selections.   Also contributing at various times were sophomore catcher Ryan Gyrion, shortstop Jason Hine and Stagg alumnus Mike

Rankin, who batted over .300.   “We got a lot out of playing,” Cyclones coach Cole Farmer said. “Our guys had to learn how to play college ball because it’s different from high school.    “They learned and took away a lot from this season, making them better ballplayers. We battled all year and persevered.”    Levigne, who Farmer says possesses the “it” factor, is transferring and expects to play ball for the University of Antelope Valley (Calif.) next spring. Departing, too, will be Farmer himself after a three-year stay at Moraine, the last two of which were spent as head coach.    “I had a blast here,” said Farmer, who will pursue other career avenues. “Moraine Valley was the right fit when I took the role.    “I want to thank [athletic director] Bill Finn for letting me coach such a large program [and] I want to thank everyone [else], especially my co-workers. I couldn’t do it without their help and support. It’s something I’ll never forget.   “It was an honor to be here and create great contacts. Moraine (Continued on page 5)


The Regional News - The Reporter  

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Moraine (Continued from page 4) Valley will help me in my future career.� MEN’S TENNIS   The Cyclones played some of their best tennis of the season at last week’s National Junior College Athletic Association Division I Tournament in Plano, Texas, even earning some points against top-level competition.    Facing athletes from around the country, Moraine finished 23rd among 27 teams. Leading the Cyclones’ charge was No. 3 singles player Tim Stewart, who scored a 6-2, 6-2 first-round victory over an opponent from the New Mexico

Military Institute. The Stagg grad absorbed a second-round loss but still wound up in the top 16.    “This was the best I’ve seen him play all season,� Moraine coach Ben Thompson said of Stewart.   Kevin Karczynski played well at No. 1 singles before losing his opening match, but he bounced back to win in the consolation round. Karczynski advanced into the semifinals, but he was unable to compete there because the Cyclones were scheduled for a flight back home at that time.   Karczynski paired with Mike Broderick to take the first set of their No. 1 doubles match versus Temple College, but they could not follow up their 6-3 triumph with another and fell in three sets.

Section 2

5

  Sophomore Brad Smith was slowed by an injury, but he still played at both third-singles and No. 2 doubles along with Stewart. Even with Smith having to use his less-dominant left hand in the latter match, he and Stewart battled into a third set before suffering a defeat.    Broderick (No. 2 singles), Ryan Adamski (No. 5) and Christian Lagunas (No. 6) also represented Moraine at nationals, as did the third-doubles pair of Bryan Jimenez and Alec Mikes. JimenezMikes dropped a tiebreaker.   “Everyone stepped up at nationals and played well,� Thompson said. “I’m looking forward to [working with] all the freshmen who come back next year because of this experience.�

Real Estate Property Listings For Sale Photo by Jeff Vorva

St. Laurence’s Mike Kornacker follows the ball after hitting a popup Saturday against Brother Rice.

Vikings

But when Loyola erupted for four Also making his presence felt in a runs in its initial at-bat, Lotus measurable way was Barry, who admitted his players received a slugged a two-run homer and twowake-up call. (Continued from page 1) RBI triple. The Crusaders tallied    St. Laurence responded to the eight times in the fourth inning meaning to this game, but they’re challenge before it by plating three and five times in the seventh. always such intense games [any- first-inning runs and, more im-   Earning the win in relief was way],� he said. “We knew it was portantly, slamming the door on Mike Enriquez, who struck out going to be a battle. the Ramblers after that. Reliever five and allowed only two hits    “It’s good to win games like this. Frank Greco threw 5 2/3 innings over three frames. We’ve been in so many lopsided on a yield of four hits. games that you almost don’t know   “It was a frustrating start — the mentality of your team. It’s we didn’t come out well at all,� Statistics very easy to pitch and hit when Lotus said. “It was big for us to Loyola Academy 400 000 0 — 4 you’re up by a lot of runs.� get a couple of those runs back, St. Laurence 303 500 x — 11 *** and not giving them any more St. Laurence 2B: Wilson, Wood. 3B: Mill   It was Rice’s turn to hold a foe momentum was huge.� er. RBI: Miller 4, Kornacker 2, Burnette, in check on Saturday. It did so    The Vikes required only one hit Wilson. WP: Greco (5-0). behind Brian Musielak’s route-go- during their three-run rally, but ing performance on the mound, Roger Wilson’s double and Mill- St. Laurence 121 000 0 — 4 which featured the senior retiring er’s two-RBI single were key ele- Brother Rice 000 020 0 — 2 the last 14 batters he faced, nine ments in St. Laurence’s third-in- St. Laurence 2B: Wood. RBI: Wood 2, of them on either groundouts or ning surge. Miller, who also stole Miller. WP: Wood (5-1). strikeouts. home, delivered a two-run triple Brother Rice 2B: K. Biondic. RBI: Hilliard,    “Those were not very good at- one stanza later to highlight a Paluch. LP: K. Biondic (0-1). bats,� Lotus said. “We didn’t hit five-run outburst. and we gave them a lot of easy Brother Rice 020 000 0 — 2 outs. Once we got down, we start- Brother Rice 16 St. Laurence 000 000 0 — 0 ed to press a little bit, and that’s St. Rita 5 Brother Rice RBI: Barry. WP: Musielak the last thing we needed to do.�   The Crusaders threw a road- (5-3).   St. Laurence had a golden op- block in the Mustangs’ path last St. Laurence 2B: White. LP: Kornacker portunity to break through in the Monday by blasting 21 hits and (6-2). third when Kevin White doubled winning in a rout. Mike Massey and Kornacker singled with one and Dyke both went 4-for-5 to Brother Rice 102 800 5 — 16 out. A popout and groundout pace the Rice assault, while Lies- St. Rita 212 000 0 — 5 followed, however, and Musielak er and Biondic chipped in three Brother Rice 2B: K. Biondic, Lieser, was able to preserve his squad’s hits apiece. Massey. 3B: Barry. HR: Barry. RBI: Barry 2-0 lead.   Between them, the quartet 4, K. Biondic 3, Dyke 3, Massey 3, Lieser.    The Crusaders had constructed drove in 10 runs and scored seven. WP: Enriquez (6-2). it in the second frame by combining singles from Erich Lieser, Andrew Dyke and Jake Barry (RBI) with a Vikings throwing error. Kornacker surrendered just two other safeties besides those and fanned nine, but he still got saddled with a heartbreaking defeat.    The Catholic League season is over, but St. Laurence isn’t finished playing Blue Division clubs. The Vikings will tangle with St. Rita yet again when they square off today in the Steve Bejanski Tournament. Mt. Carmel is also among the participants.   While Lotus is fully on board with the fund-raising portion of the event, he admitted that playing three contests in as many days at the end of the schedule can be dicey.    “If you’re a struggling team and you do well there, it can carry you [into the postseason],� he said. “The last thing you want is for it to work the other way.� St. Laurence 11 Photo by Jeff Vorva Loyola Academy 4    After pummeling the Ramblers Brother Rice pitcher Brian Musielak goes through a pregame rittwo days earlier, the Vikings might ual before facing St. Laurence on Saturday. Musielak shut out the have thought last Monday’s re- Vikings, but the latter still gained a share of the Chicago Catholic match was a foregone conclusion. League Blue title.

Community sports

the fundamentals of her sport July 7-10. Sessions for those in grades 5-8 will go from 9-10:30 a.m. each day, with ones for grades 9-12 to follow from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Continued from page )   The cost of each camp is $70, sponsorship opportunities are and all three will be held in the available for both individuals and school’s new Health, Fitness & businesses. Recreation Center gymnasium.   For more information, contact For more information, call 974Ed Kozak at 458-6900, ext. 244, 5727 or visit www.morainevalley. or ekozak@stlaurence.com. Infor- edu/Athletics. mation is also available at www. stlaurence.com.

Moraine to conduct summer sports camps

Summer softball camp at Richards

  Richards coach Julie Folliard will host her annual softball camp for girls in grades 3-12 June 16-19 at the high school.   Separate sessions will be conducted for those entering grades 8-12 and individuals who will be in grades 3-7 in the fall. The younger participants will be broken up into two groups (grades 3-5 and 6-7) as well. Hitting, bunting, baserunning, catching, throwing, strategies and mental approach to the game will be taught by Folliard, her staff and alumni.    The cost is $40 and registration is currently being taken. Forms are available in Richards’ athletic office and online at www. CHSD281.org. Go to the “Richards softball� link.

   Moraine Valley College will conduct three youth sports camps this summer.   Athletic director and former men’s basketball coach Bill Finn will lead a hoops camp from July 14-17 for youngsters entering grades 3-8. Each session will run from 9-10:30 a.m. The camp is designed to develop and improve fundamental basketball skills through instruction, group and individual drills, and team play.   Former Cyclones volleyball coach Gloria Coughlin will host a camp in that sport July 14-17 from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. daily. The program, which is open to players entering grades 5-9, will improve fundamental skills through individual attention and group work.    Moraine women’s tennis coach NAYS tournament coming Nicole Selvaggio will instruct to Bolingbrook in July youngsters entering grades 5-12 in   A National American Youth

Sports basketball tournament will be held July 23-27 at various sites in Bolingbrook.   Included among them will be Bolingbrook High School, the Annerino Recreation Center and Bolingbrook Recreation and Aquatic Center. The entry fee is $600 per team with a nine-game minimum, and the deadline to enter is July 1.   For more information, call 1-866-352-9215 or visit www. northamericanyouthsports.org.

Girls’ basketball camp to be offered at SXU

   St. Xavier University women’s basketball coach Bob Hallberg will host his annual basketball camp for girls aged 7-15 the week of June 16-20 at the Shannon Center.   Sessions will run from 1:30-4 p.m. daily. Participants will be grouped according to age and ability, and Hallberg will actively teach each day. SXU assistant coaches and players will also be on hand to instruct campers.   The cost is $135 per individual, and includes a camp T-shirt. Enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis. Applications are available through the SXU athletic department or online at www.sxucougars.com under the “summer camps� link.    For more information, call Laura Kurzeja at (773) 298-3785.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.MARGARET ZYDEK, CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 9/21/2000 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1109002, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED 9/21/2000 A/K/A TRUST NO. 1109002, DENNIS DEGREGORIO, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 13 CH 010485 8123 BOB-O-LINK ROAD ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 13, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 6, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8123 BOB-O-LINK ROAD, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14-212-038. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-08883. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-08883 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 010485 TJSC#: 34-7680 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I607165

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF CAROL POTTER, IF ANY, CATHERINE E POTTER, JUNIOR CLAYTON POTTER, SR, WILLIAM BUTCHER, SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF CAROL POTTER, DECEASED, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, GIBRALTAR PRIVATE BANK & TRUST Defendants 12 CH 15825 8909 HUGUELET PLACE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 12, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 16, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 8909 HUGUELET PLACE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-15-201-007-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family home with an attached 2 car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce. com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1208332. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1208332 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 15825 TJSC#: 34-4320 I606883

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S ďż˝ COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, v . ďż˝ VLADAS LIMANAUSKAS, LINA LIMANAUSKIENE, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK FSB Defendants 10 CH 12128 10248 SOUTH 86TH AVENUE Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 20, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 23, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10248 SOUTH 86TH AVENUE, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-11-306-030-0000. The real estate is improved with a two level single family beige wood house with an attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver's license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA0937603. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA0937603 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 10 CH 12128 TJSC#: 34-5327 I607624

    

Call to put your ad on the Real Estate page!

ILLINOIS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK ADVERTISING SERVICES

HELP WANTED DRIVERS

Need to place your ad throughout Illinois? Call Illinois Press Advertising Service 217-241-1700 or visit www.illinoispress.org

40¢ ALL MILES! MACHINERY HAULERS. Flatbed, Stepdeck & RGN. $.34 ALL MILES! VAN DIVISION! Practical miles paid weekly! $1000 sign-on bonus. Paid health insurance + Much More! Class A CDL. Call Dawn at 309-946-3230 or apply at www.tennanttrucklines.com OWNER OPERATORS WELCOME!

AUCTION HAS AUCTION MANSION 55 EXPO ANTIQUES – FURNITURE – PAINTINGS – MORE! FRIDAY MAY 30TH 4PM SATURDAY MAY 31ST 10AM 34382 East Frontage Road Virden, IL. 217-414-6634 www.hasauction.com

BOATS THE BOAT DOCK We Buy & Consign Used Boats! 217-793-7300 theboatdock.com

CAMPERS/RVS Colman’s RV - We Buy And Consign Used RV’s And Campers 217-787-8653 www.colmansrv.com

CAREER/EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE BECOME AN AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECH. FAA APPROVED TRAINING. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AND JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AIM 800-481-8312.

Company Drivers – Average over $1000 per week Home Weekends & every other day. Industry leading pay. CDL Class A + 1yr driving exp. Call Linda at 740-755-8663 DriveForCardinal.com DRIVERS: Tired of OTR? We have THE OPPORTUNITY for YOU! $6000 Sign-On, $66,000/year, Home Weekly, 23 Day Routes. 1-year T/T Experience Required. Apply: www.MBMcareers.com REGIONAL & OTR TANKER DRIVERS WANTED: Up to $5,000 Sign-On! Up to 51cpm + additional for pump-offs, safety bonuses! 1-year OTR w/in last 36-mos. Call 888.799.4873, www.drive4oakley.com

AVERITT EXPRESS New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post-Training Pay Increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608 Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Flatbed Drivers Starting Mileage Pay up to .41 cpm. Health Ins., 401K, $59 daily Per Diem pay. Home Weekends. 800-648-9915 or www.boydandsons.com Driver Regional LTL Runs $1500 SIGN-ON Bonus Home Every Weekend Paid Orientation Great Pay EEOE/AAP 866-323-7875 www.driveFFE.com Drivers Prime, Inc. Company Drivers & Independent Contractors for Refrigerated, Tanker & Flatbed NEEDED! Plenty of Freight & Great Pay! Start with Prime Today! Call 800-277-0212 or apply online at driveforeprime.com TanTara Transportation is seeking owner Operators to join our Dry-Van or Flatbed division. Home Time as requested. Call Dave at 800-650-0292 or apply online www.tantara.us

Drivers - CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! TOTAL Respect TOTAL Sucess Start up to 38¢ / mile OTR & Regional Runs. CDL Grads Welcome. 700+ Trucks & Growing! 888-9286011 www.Drive4Total.com NEW TRUCKS ARRIVING EXPERIENCED OTR DRIVERS VAN DIVISION: Runs 48 States, heavy from WI to Philadelphia- BaltimoreMD area. Flex home time. 99% No-Touch, Top Pay! Vacation/401K/Vision/ Dental/ Disability/Health. Require Class A CDL, 2yrs OTR exp. good MVR/ References. Call Ruth/Mike TTI, Inc 1-800-558-2664 www.TTItrucking.com

HELP WANTED SALES EARN $500 A-DAY; Insurance Agents Needed; Leads, No Cold Calls; Commissions Paid Daily; Lifetime Renewals; Complete Training; Health & Dental Insurance; Life License Required. Call 1-888-713-6020

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE HOMEOWNERS WANTED!! Kayak Pools is looking for demo homesites to display our maintenance-free pools. Save thousands of $$$ with this unique opportunity. CALL NOW! 800.315.2925 kayakpoolsmidwest.com discount code: 521L314

ďż˝ ďż˝


6

Section 2 Thursday, May 22, 2014

������������ ����������

The Regional News - The Reporter

���������������

�����������

����

�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

For Sale

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE RELATING TO CHEVY CHASE FUNDING LLC MORTGAGE BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-1 Plaintiff, -v.BENJAMIN C. GUZMAN AKA BENJAMIN GUZMAN, ANGELINA C. GUZMAN AKA ANGELINA GUZMAN, MUTUAL OF OMAHA BANK Defendants 12 CH 36433 12910 SOUTH SENECA ROAD Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 28, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 1, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12910 SOUTH SENECA ROAD, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Property Index No. 23-36-213-012-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $483,353.19. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, or a unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). In accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(h-1) and (h-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the property, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subsections (g)(1) and (g)(4) of section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Anthony Porto, FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC, 1807 W. DIEHL ROAD, SUITE 333, NAPERVILLE, IL 60563, (866) 402-8661 For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com.. Please refer to file number F12080167. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 W. DIEHL ROAD, SUITE 333 NAPERVILLE, IL 60563 (866) 402-8661 E-Mail: foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com Attorney File No. F12080167 Attorney ARDC No. 3126232 Attorney Code. 26122 Case Number: 12 CH 36433 TJSC#: 34-6069 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I606364

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.MICHAEL GONZALEZ, CYRENE MARIE GILBERT, BMO HARRIS BANK, N.A. F/K/A HARRIS N.A., TIMBERLINE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 13 CH 25170 9366 MEADOWVIEW DRIVE ORLAND HILLS, IL 60487 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 24, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 24, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9366 MEADOWVIEW DRIVE, ORLAND HILLS, IL 60487 Property Index No. 27-22-112029-1036. The real estate is improved with a two story townhouse with a one car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce. com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1313717. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1313717 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 13 CH 25170 TJSC#: 34-4985 I607981

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION MARQUETTE BANK Plaintiff, -v.LAWRENCE C. WALL, KATHERINE A. WALL, WESTGATE VALLEY TOWNHOMES CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 11240 1001 SPYGLASS CIRCLE, UNIT #1001 Palos Heights, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 2, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on July 3, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 1001 SPYGLASS CIRCLE, UNIT #1001, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-31-404-056-1027. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $167,676.99. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Kimberly A. Padjen, GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC, 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410, CHICAGO, IL 60604, (312) 332-6194. Please refer to file number 44883. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410 CHICAGO, IL 60604 (312) 332-6194 Attorney File No. 44883 Attorney Code. 90334 Case Number: 12 CH 11240 TJSC#: 34-6603 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I606947

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION OLD PLANK TRAIL COMMUNITY BANK, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO FIRST UNITED BANK Plaintiff, -v.CHICAGO TITLE LAND TRUST COMPANY, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO LASALLE BANK, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST CO. OF CHICAGO, AS TRUSTEE OF TRUST AGREEMENT DATED MAY 4, 1987 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NO. 102384-00, JOHN E. BOVA DDS, P.C., JOHN E. BOVA, WINTERSET III OFFICE PARK CONDO ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES, STANDARD BANK AND TRUST CO., ORLAND PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS, UNKNOWN OWNERS, NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS AND OCCUPANTS Defendants 2013 CH 02323 16636 S. 107TH CT. Orland Park, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 17, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 13, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 16636 S. 107TH CT., Orland Park, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-20410-010-1001. The real estate is improved with a commercial condominium. The judgment amount was $219,770.86. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: ASHEN FAULKNER LTD., 217 N. JEFFERSON ST., STE. 601, Chicago, IL 60661, (312) 655-0800. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. ASHEN FAULKNER LTD. 217 N. JEFFERSON ST., STE. 601 Chicago, IL 60661 (312) 655-0800 Attorney Code. 39733 Case Number: 2013 CH 02323 TJSC#: 34-7923 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I608531

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION REGIONS BANK, P l a i n t i f f � V . � JOHN E. DETHMER; NANCY DETHMER A/K/A NANCY L. DETHMER; BAYTREE LENDING COMPANY F/K/A ST. FRANCIS MORTGAGE CORPORATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN O C C U P A N T S , � D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 23265 Property Address: 9647 WOODED PATH PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 12-060579 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on May 30, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on June 12, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 9647 Wooded Path, Palos Hills, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � Permanent Index No.: 23-10-207-009-0000 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 160,080.47. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I606440

����

�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� ��������������

�����������������

For Sale

For Sale

������������ ����

�������������

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS T R U S T E E , � SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF A M E R I C A , � NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE AS S U C C E S S O R � BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BEAR STEARNS A S S E T � BACKED SECURITIES I LLC, ASSET BACKEDCERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-EC1 P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � THERESA POSPISIL; DAVID POSPISIL D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 18345 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on November 4, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, June 16, 2014 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real e s t a t e : � Commonly known as 8812 West 103rd Place, Palos Hills, Il 60465. P.I.N. 23-15-202-008-0000. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call Sales Department at Plaintiff's Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC, One East Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601. (312) 651-6705. 1 3 0 2 2 4 5 1 � INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I606541

Call today to place your ad!

Schneider has freight to move right now!

LOcAL HIRING EvENTS: visit schneiderjobs.com/events for dates and locations

Apply: schneiderjobs.com/newjobs | Info: 800-44-PRIDE

EOE M/F/D/V

Intermodal | Dedicated | Tanker UP TO $7,500 SIGN-ON BONUS | Paid CDL training for OTR tanker drivers | Home Daily or Weekly Experienced drivers and recent driving school grads should apply ($6,000 tuition reimbursement)

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, P l a i n t i f f � V . � DONNA PLAIA, D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 34985 Property Address: 8051 WEST 91ST STREET HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Fisher and Shapiro file # 10-033128 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 27, 2014, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on June 30, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 8051 West 91st Street, Hickory Hills, IL 60457 Permanent Index No.: 23-02-422-001 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment amount was $ 377,644.94. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I600643

Your Message Gets Across Better in the Want Ads!

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � GHADA SHAABNAH; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE F O R � COUNTRYWIDE BANK, N.A.; D e f e n d a n t s , � 10 CH 37060 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on March 25, 2014, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, June 27, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-14-217-037-0000. Commonly known as 10601 South 80th Court, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1020618. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I608125

Do you have an apartment or townhome for rent? Call today to place your ad!

JU

Stunning & impeccable home offering livable elegance, on a gorgeously wooded .9 acre site. 1st floor master suite; a master chef’s dream kitchen with every imaginable convenience. Call for details & appointment. $1,145,000.

ST

LI

ST

ED

!

www.prublount.com L.T. Blount, REALTORS

L.T. Blount, REALTORS

Palos Park, IL 60464

®

(708) 448-6100

Serving the Palos area for over 50 years

5-15-14 Serving Your Community for 30 Years

Tom Maloney, Selling or Buying? RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE #

Expect the Best

1 in Sales in Palos Park & Palos Heights

Call Tom Maloney at

(708) 903-9865 Save this ad for a FREE Market Analysis!

For Rent Condo for Rent Scarborough Fare

34

A Palos resident since 1963

Your Palos Realtor

708-369-9327

“Follows Me Everywhere!” ®

“10 in the Park” NEW as of 7/7/11 For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff, -v.ADAM J. WALTON Defendants 08 CH 039133 15134 HUNTINGTON COURT ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on September 26, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 18, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 15134 HUNTINGTON COURT, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-16-109-008. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-08-23239. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-08-23239 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 08 CH 039133 TJSC#: 34-8343 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I608752

Call today to place your ad!

Quiet no-smoking 2 bedroom, 2 bathrm w/garage, 147th and Scarborough Ct., in Oak Forest. Central AC, new furnace, in-unit washer and drier, all appliances, new side-by-side fridge. Rent $1,275 per month; one month’s security deposit. You pay NO natural gas, garbage or water bills. Swimming pool, tennis courts on grounds. Photos and more details on rentlinx, zillo.com or Trulia. Perfect for older couple.

Call Jack Murray 396-2710

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BRIDGEVIEW BANK GROUP, AN ILLINOIS BANKING CORPORATION Plaintiff, -v.ABDELRAHMAN M. MUSLEH, HIDDEN LAKES ESTATE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 13 CH 28117 50 W. LUCAS DRIVE UNITS 19 & 20 Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 9, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 18, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 50 W. LUCAS DRIVE UNITS 19 & 20, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-22-200-082-1044; 23-22200-082-1045. The real estate consists of 2 vacant lots in a townhome development. The judgment amount was $144,498.68. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: KEVIN AMERIKS, CORPORATE COUNSEL BRIDGEVIEW BANK GROUP, 4753 N. BROADWAY AVE, Chicago, IL 60640, (773) 989-2418 FAX #: 708-728-7572. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I608628


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 22, 2014 Section 2

Real Estate

The Classifieds

Property Listings

Little Want Ads do big jobs? Try one and see for your self.

7

Call Debbie 448-4002 Deadline 5 p.m. Monday Hours: M-F 9 to 5 Sat. 9 to Noon

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-2 Plaintiff, -v.MARIA EVELINA CRUZ AKA MARIA EVELINA L. CRUZ, DARLENE CURRY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY-INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, TOWN OF CICERO, TARGET NATIONAL BANK FKA RETAILERS NATIONAL BANK, ERIN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, LLC, PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOCIATES LLC, NORTHERN ILLINOIS GAS COMPANY DBA NICOR GAS COMPANY, MIDLAND FUNDING LLC Defendants 13 CH 16202 50 Ruggles Ct. Orland Park, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 19, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 20, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 50 Ruggles Ct., Orland Park, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-06-303-011-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $270,321.92. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. Where a sale of real estate is made to satisfy a lien prior to that of the United States, the United States shall have one year from the date of sale within which to redeem, except that with respect to a lien arising under the internal revenue laws the period shall be 120 days or the period allowable for redemption under State law, whichever is longer, and in any case in which, under the provisions of section 505 of the Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701k), and subsection (d) of section 3720 of title 38 of the United States Code, the right to redeem does not arise, there shall be no right of redemption. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 13 CH 16202 TJSC#: 345894 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I603852

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N , � P l a i n t i f f � V . � UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF DONALD S. MAROSITZ, DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MARY L. MAROSITZ, DECEASED; RIVIERA REGAL II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION; RIVIERA REGAL ASSOCIATION; ANGELA JONES, AS INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF DONALD S. MAROSITZ, DECEASED; ANGELA JONES; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD C L A I M A N T S , � D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 36775 Property Address: 11106 SOUTH 84TH AVENUE UNIT 2A PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE C O N D O M I N I U M � Fisher and Shapiro file # 10-043819 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 30, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on July 3, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 11106 South 84th Avenue, Unit 2A, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Permanent Index No.: 23-23-101-116-1021 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). The judgment amount was $ 133,700.10. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I606261

Call now to put your ad in the Service Directory!

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC Plaintiff, -v.MARIA GOMEZ, MATTHEW C. ARNOUX OF NADLER PRITIKIN & MIRABELLI, CITY OF CHICAGO, STATE OF ILLINOIS, ADVANCE CAPITAL, INCORPORATED, PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOCIATES, L.L.C., SPRINGLEAF FINANCIAL SERVICES OF ILLINOIS, INC., LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER Defendants 13 CH 016979 7825 W. 102ND STREET PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 17, 2014, at The The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7825 W. 102ND STREET, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 2312-308-007. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Effective May 1st, 2014 you will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-09436. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-09436 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 016979 TJSC#: 34-8393 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I608735

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � IMAN EL BANNA A/K/A IMAN ELBANNA, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. Defendants 13 CH 14838 11126 S. DEERPATH LANE Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 13, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 17, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 11126 S. DEERPATH LANE, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-22-201-005. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $304,680.86. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: LAW OFFICES OF IRA T. NEVEL, LLC, 175 N. Franklin Street, Suite 201, CHICAGO, IL 60606, (312) 357-1125 Please refer calls to the sales department. Please refer to file number 13-02461. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. LAW OFFICES OF IRA T. NEVEL, LLC 175 N. Franklin Street, Suite 201 CHICAGO, IL 60606 (312) 357-1125 Attorney File No. 13-02461 Attorney Code. 18837 Case Number: 13 CH 14838 TJSC#: 34-4852 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I604625

Call today to place your ad!

For Sale Help Wanted IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC P l a i n t i f f , � v . � SUSAN E. ALBRECHT A/K/A SUSAN ALBRECHT, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 13 CH 23746 10604 SOUTH 82ND AVENUE PALOS HILLS, IL 6 0 4 6 5 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 10, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 10, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10604 SOUTH 82ND AVENUE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-213-010-0000. The real estate is improved with a gray aluminum siding single family home; two car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1314241. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1314241 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 13 CH 23746 TJSC#: 34-4166 I605030

Palos area Insurance Agency looking for part-time help. Experience preferred. Fax resume to: (708) 478-1846

Chimney Experts

Security Officer Part-time/Full-time. PERC card and vehicle required. Starting at $8.50 to $9.00 per hour. Call: (708) 590-6099

WE BUY

Cars • Trucks • Vans Runing OR Not Top Dollar Paid Call (708) 205-8241

Expert Chimney & Fireplace Inspection & Repairs:

Over

708.687.6826

Small engines, snowblowers, regular and riding lawnmowers, bicycles.

Call (815) 468-7819

Paul Lally’s Masonry Inc. (708) 448-8866 ALL CHIMNEY REPAIRS Not affiliated with Lally Brothers Masonry.

See our ad under MASONRY

Call today to place your ad!

BOOKLETS PRINTED IN ONE DAY

Cleaning Services

TIMESAVERS Residential & Commercial CLEANING Also Carpet & Floor Care

708-489-2112

30 Years in Business 1st time customers $25 OFF 2nd visit

Call today to place your ad ON the real estate page!

— Since 1988 —

TUCKPOINTING • BRICK WORK ALL CHIMNEY REPAIRS CONCRETE WORK Free Estimates • Fully Insured 5% OFF with this ad

(708) 448-8866 For Sale Service Landscaping/Lawn Notice

Don’s Custom Landscaping, Inc. LAWN MAINTENANCE

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTY SERVICES Regular weekly services include: EDGING, WEED-WHACKING & LEAF CLEANUP • Garden Wall Blocks • Shrub Trimming Removal • Bobcat Services Available 31st Season

Free Estimates

708.425.1227 www.donslandscaping.com

We accept credit cards

Personal Assistant Construction

FROM YOUR DISK

FROM YOUR COPY

DO ME A FAVOUR

LUSKEY CONSTRUCTION All Kinds of Carpentry 25 Years Experience

• Sales Manuals

Let us do the running for you!

Errands/Shopping Party Planning: Set Up/Take Down

SUZANNE DOLL,Personal Concierge domeafavour911@gmail.com

Call: 815.325.7656

Call Kevin (630) 235-5492

• Parts Books

Plumbing & Sewer

• Condominium Documents IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION FIRST MIDWEST BANK AS SUCCESSOR TO PALOS BANK AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, -v.FIRST MIDWEST BANK AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO PALOS BANK AND TRUST, UNDER TRUST AGREEMENT DATED FEBRUARY 25, 1974 AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 1-0595, WILLIAM LOEFFEL A/K/A WILLIAM C. LOEFFEL, SANDRA D. LOEFFEL, DECEASED, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF SANDRA D. LOEFFEL, JAMES JOHNSON, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 2013 CH 21123 9225 WEST 144TH PLACE Orland Park, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 20, 2014, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on June 23, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9225 WEST 144TH PLACE, Orland Park, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-10106-001-0000. The real estate is improved with a multi-family residence. The judgment amount was $161,143.91. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Kimberly A. Padjen, GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC, 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410, CHICAGO, IL 60604, (312) 332-6194. Please refer to file number 45920. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. GOMBERG, SHARFMAN, GOLD & OSTLER, PC 208 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1410 CHICAGO, IL 60604 (312) 332-6194 Attorney File No. 45920 Attorney Code. 90334 Case Number: 2013 CH 21123 TJSC#: 34-7192 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I606102

Paul Lally’s Masonry Inc.

30 Years of Integrity & Pride

Fully licensed•Insured•Bonded

Chimney Repair

Reasonably priced or free.

Masonry

LALLY BROS. MASONRY

• Chimneys Rebuilt Quality • Tuckpointing • Waterproofing and Safety 1st • Liners

Wanted

• Training Manuals

For Sale

Business & Service Directory

Landscaping

• Handbooks • Employee Handbooks

Ed’s

• Manuscripts

LANDSCAPING

• Rulebooks • Club Bylaws

Lawn Maintenance Hedge Trimming Retaining Walls Snow Removal Complete Landscaping

On-site binding, plus mailing and pick-up services

EDWARD SIEARS Business:

Cell:

773.767.2095 312.446.9035

REGIONAL PUBLISHING CORP. 12243 S. Harlem Ave. Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932

Call (708) 448-4000

Flood Control Specialists All Types of Plumbing Repairs • • • • • •

Hot water tanks • Bathroom installations Toilets, Tubs, Sinks & Faucets Sewers rodded • Sump pumps Sewers inspected by camera Foundation leaks repaired Battery back-up systems

FREE ESTIMATES (most cases) Quality Work - Reasonable Prices 40 years experience -Lic. #SL574

708.952.1833

Landscaping Snowblower Repair

SOUTH SIDE BRICK PAVERS

Driveways • Patios Walkways • Retaining Walls NO JOB TOO SMALL

Free Estimates

HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sat. 9 A.M. to Noon

GEORGE’S PLUMBING & SEWER

Snow Blowers Lawn Mowers This newspaper strives to monitor the clas-

sified ads its prints. However, when an ad is submitted from outside this area, it is often impossible for us to check its credibility.

Repair/Tune-Up

Will fix at your house

Lic./Bonded/Ins.

Therefore, we suggest caution when answering ads with offers that seem too good to be true.

Spring Special

For more information regarding financing, business opportunities and/or work-athome opportunities in this newspaper, we urge our readers to contact the Better Business Bureau, 330 N. Wabash Ave. #2006, Chicago, IL 60611, (312) 832-0500.

(708) 932-2262 Book NOW and receive

10% Off w/ad

Help Wanted

Holland’s Recruiter will be at the Joliet terminal on June 3, 4 & 5 from Noon to 5pm at 3801 Mound Road in Joliet taking applications for FT local and regional drivers & PT dock workers. Drivers must be 21 yrs old, having a CDLA w/ hazmat & tanker w/ 1 yr or 50k miles experience. Dock must be 18 yrs old. Apply online: www.hollandregional.com/careers. Company paid health insurance for full time drivers after probation. EEO/AAE Minorities/Females/Persons with Disabilities/Protected Veterans

5-22 and 5-29-14

Call today to place your Help Wanted ad!

Reasonable Rates

Call: (815) 468-7819 ������

������� �� ������ ����� ������ ����������������������������� ���������������������������� ������������������������������� ����������� ������������ ���� ������������������������������� ������� ���� ����� ����� ���� ����������������������������� ���� ���� ��������� ���������� �� ����������������������������� ��� �� ������ ���������� ������ ��� ����� ��������� ��� �� ������� ���� ����������������������������� ���� ��������� ������������

������ ������� �� ��������� ��� ��� ��������� ������������ ����� ������������������������������� ���������� ����� ��� ���������� �������������������������������� ������������������������������ ����������������������������� ��������������������������� ������������������������������� �������������������������������� ��������� ��� �� ������ ��������� ������ ������� ��������� ��� � ������������������������������ ��������������������������� ������

Put your business in the Service Directory!


8

Section 2 Thursday, May 22, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Are you storing too much stuff? Everyone has things they’ve been saving, but no longer use. And these items are in good condition & could be of use to someone else. By cleaning out your garage, basement or closets you can turn your unwanted stuff into cash by having a garage or yard sale! Call today to advertise your sale! THE

REGIONAL NEWS

12243 South Harlem Avenue Palos Heights, Illinois 60463-0932 Phone (708) 448-4000 e-mail: regionalads@regionalpublishing.com

THE

REPORTER

12247 South Harlem Avenue Palos Heights, Illinois 60463-1431 Phone (708) 448-6161 e-mail: reporterads@regionalpublishing.com

Still... 20 words for $25 Deadline - 5 p.m. Monday Call (708) 448-4002 Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 9 - 5 • Saturday 9 - Noon


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, May 22, 2014 Section 2

Out & About

9

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Part ‘Moneyball,’ part ‘Miracle,’ ‘Million Dollar Arm’ entertains “Million Dollar Arm” is like two movies in one. The first half is almost like a game show while the second half seems more like real life. It’s about super-agent J. B. Bernstein, played by Jon Hamm. Bernstein was once a big-time sports agent who represented well-known clients, such as Barry Bonds and Barry Sanders. He fell on hard times after he decided to go into business for himself and open up his own agency with his friend, Ash Vasudevan, played by Aasif Mandvi. After a night of drinking, the duo are watching cricket because the Indian-born Ash has an affection for the sport. Bernstein doesn’t seem thrilled to be watching cricket and he basically mocks the sport. That fateful evening leads to Bernstein having an epiphany while flipping through television channels. He lands on a channel with Susan Boyle singing, which somehow gives him the idea for a pitching competition. In a bit of overdone movie magic, he is shown flipping rapidly back and forth between a cricket match and Susan Boyle. Bernstein travels to India with talent scout Ray, played by Alan Arkin. The two scour India looking for a cricket player they can turn into the next great pitcher. They find Rinku Singh, played by Suraj Sharma, and Dinesh Patel, played by Madhur Mittal. The two win the chance to come to America to learn how to pitch.

Broaden Your Horizons This Week

a computer and how they work. Trail Mix and Hiking — 4 to 6 p.m. May 27, a hiking program in which students can make their own trail mix before heading out for a hike in a local forest preserve. Journal Through Art - 4:30 to 6 p.m. May 28, art program for students to express their thoughts through various artistic mediums. Game Day — 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. May 29, The Bridge Teen Center will host a game day to celebrate the arrival of summer. These Downton Abbey free events are for teens in 7th dramatic review through 12th grade. A dramatic book review of For information on any proLady Armina from Downton gram, call 532-0500. Abbey will be held on Tuesday, May 27 at 1 p.m., at The Center, New Spirituality 12700 Southwest Highway in DVD discussions Palos Park. Brian Swimme’s Powers of Actress Lynn Rymarz will portray Lady Armina in the form of the Universe DVD series will a historical book review, reveal- be shown and discussed for 12 ing the real lady Armina of Brit- weeks beginning Tuesday, May ain’s Highclere Castle and her 27, at 6:30 p.m., and Thursday, family and staff and the events May 29, at 10 a.m., at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, that really took place there. Rymarz is a popular perform- Palos Park. In the DVDs, Brian Swimme er and the Downton Abbey series an extremely popular televi- explores the powers coursing sion show. The noon luncheon through the Universe since the which precedes the program is beginning of time. The Rev. already filled, but guests may Chris Hopkins will lead the discall in a reservation for the 1 cussions following the films and p.m. program which costs $10. welcomes all to participate. The cost of participation is $5 Call The Center: 361-3650. per week. Pre-registration is required. Call 361-3650. The Bridge Teen  

and very one-note. It felt like you could easily see what was coming next before it happened. It’s a movie that you can easily see through. Some of these characters by are hard to sympathize with, Tony Pinto especially Bernstein. How long does it take for someone While in America, Dinesh to recognize that he is a horriand Rinku experience a culture ble person? At times the movclash. Their adventure becomes ie does make you feel genuine more than them just learning to emotion but those times are pitch. It becomes them learning few and far between. basic things that they never did The end is apparent fairly back in India and even seeing early on. It is loosely based on a things they had never have seen true story, so you know that it’s or imagined before. going to have a happy ending. These scenes will make you The ending is kind of deceivcherish what you have even ing if you know anything about more than you already do. baseball and how baseball playLike most movies, there is also ers get signed. Just because a a love interest. That is Brenda, player is signed to a professional played by Lake Bell. Brenda organization, there is no guarand Bernstein’s romance in the antee he will ever play in the movie seems sort of just tossed major leagues. in like an afterthought. A little It stays in line with most more time spent writing these scenes might have done the other popular sports movie and doesn’t try to reinvent the movie some good. At about two-hours long, it wheel. It’s a cross between the films can become a bit slow moving at times. Considering the fact that “Miracle” and “Moneyball” they don’t delve too deep into which were both good sports the story, they could have easily movies. “Million Dollar Arm” has the underdog sprit of “Mircut out about 30 minutes. With that in mind, the biggest acle” and the ferocious nature of flaw is that it plays off the same the business side of sports from stereotypes throughout. With “Moneyball.” Overall, the film’s not a home more back-story and more huCenter programs manizing of the characters, the run; it’s more like a double and film wouldn’t have had to play to some moviegoers maybe a triBuild Your Own Computer — off the same things over and ple. 4 to 6 p.m. today (Thursday), over again. The Bridge Teen Center, 15555 Tony Pinto’s grade: B Most of the characters are flat S. 71st Court, Orland Park, will hold a program that will teach students the different parts of

Pinto’s Popcorn Picks

Videoview by Jay Bobbin

  (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.)   STARTING THIS WEEK: “ENDLESS LOVE’’: Also the source of a 1981 Brooke Shields movie that yielded a classic title song (no trace of which is found here), Scott Spencer’s novel also is the basis of this passable update starring Alex Pettyfer (“Magic Mike’’) as a young man whose involvement with a former classmate (Gabriella Wilde, “Carrie’’) leads her to change her plans for her future ... which makes her father (Bruce Greenwood) determined to break them up, with unforeseen results. Joely Richardson and Robert Patrick also star. DVD extra: “making-of’’ documentary. *** (PG-13: AS, N, P) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)   “STALINGRAD’’: Originally shown in 3-D and IMAX, this drama by renowned director Fedor Bondarchuk (son of iconic filmmaker Sergei Bondarchuk) examines the World War II invasion of the title city from several perspectives ... those of the Russian soldiers trying to protect it, a civilian who remains there and the German military men determined to overtake the locale. The highest-grossing movie in its native country to date, the film includes Thomas Kretschmann (“King Kong,’’ TV’s “Dracula’’) in its cast. DVD extra: “making-of’’ documentary. *** (R: V) (Also

on Blu-ray)   “THE BOB NEWHART SHOW: THE COMPLETE SERIES’’: In one of the classic sitcoms of the 1970s — back in the days when Saturday nights were a television powerhouse — famously low-key comic Newhart transfers his persona onto the role of Dr. Bob Hartley, a Chicago psychologist. He has a level-headed schoolteacher wife (Suzanne Pleshette), an airline pilot neighbor (Bill Daily), a dentist (Peter Bonerz) sharing his office suite, and a wisecracking receptionist (Marcia Wallace). Jack Riley and John Fiedler also gets considerable laughs as a couple of Hartley’s patients. Still funny after all these years, the show is bound to stir nostalgic feelings for more than a few viewers. *** (Not rated: AS)   “CIMARRON STRIP: THE COMPLETE SERIES’’: It lasted only one season on CBS (1967-68), but this Western was distinctive for several reasons ... one evident in the opening credits, a theme by celebrated movie composer Maurice Jarre (“Doctor Zhivago’’). Also, it was one of the rare 90-minute series, and star Stuart Whitman was among its producers. He plays Marshal Jim Crown, who tries to keep residents of the Kansas frontier region safe. Jon Voight, Robert Duvall and Telly Savalas are among the many guest stars. DVD extra: interview with Whitman. *** (Not rated: AS, V)   “THE KENNEDYS: TRIUMPH AND TRAGEDY’’: Two programs related to the legendary

political family are compiled in this box set, along with memorabilia connected to the JFK assassination. “The Kennedys’’ is a two-part documentary that uses the lives of John, Robert and Edward (aka Ted) as springboards to profile the entire clan, while “Oswald’s Ghost’’ uses interviews — with Dan Rather and author Norman Mailer, among others — to reconstruct that fateful day in Dallas in November 1963. *** (Not rated)   “PIONEERS OF TELEVISION: SEASON 4’’: Shown recently by PBS, the fourth of the miniseries detailing homescreen history starts with a look at stand-up comics who transitioned to sitcom success, such as Jerry Seinfeld, Roseanne Barr and Bob Newhart. Other episodes consider medical shows (with actor Chad Everett’s final interview included), the TV styles of such comedians as Robin Williams and Tina Fey, and the racial barrier breakthroughs made by such stars as Desi Arnaz and Bill Cosby. *** (Not rated)   COMING SOON: “LONE SURVIVOR’’ (June 3): Navy SEALs find themselves in extreme danger during a mission in Afghanistan. Mark Wahlberg, Emile Hirsch, Taylor Kitsch and Eric Bana star in the true story. (R: AS, P, GV)   “ROBOCOP’’ (June 3): Joel Kinnaman plays the half-man, half-robot police officer in this remake of the adventure. Gary Oldman, Michael Keaton and Samuel L. Jackson also star. (PG(Continued on page 10)

Womantalk discussion

The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, will host its monthly Womantalk coffee hour and discussion on Tuesday, May 27, from 10 to 11:30 a.m.

Led by MaryAnn Grzych, ladies are invited to join the discussion of Simple Abundance by Sarah Ban Breathnach or other inspirational readings that participants wish to bring. There is no cost, but advance reservations are required. Call The Center at 361-3650.  

Family art tie-dye workshop

A tie-dyeing art workshop for families will be hosted at the Log Cabin Center for the Arts on Wednesday, May 28, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. The Log Cabin is located at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. Families with children of any age are invited to tie dye t-shirts in brightly colored swirls, stripes, and splotches. Family art teacher Heather Young invites participants to bring socks, pillowcases, or other articles to dye in addition to the t-shirts which are provided. The class fee is $10 per person. Reservations are required, and families will be asked to indicate youth and adult T-shirt sizes upon registration. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Papercraft workshop

The Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park, will offer a papercraft workshop on Tuesday, May 27, from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Ann Fowler will teach students to make greeting cards with a “Make You Smile” theme. The workshop costs $18, plus a $6 materials fee. Registration is required. For further information, call The Center at 361-3650.

Omarr’s Weekly Astrological Forecast by Jeraldine Saunders   ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your capacity for forgiveness is at an all-time high this week. Habitual schedules seem unsatisfactory and you may be feeling restless. A lack of money could cramp your style.   TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Remain skeptical of the advice you receive. You may be able to voice some convictions of your own this week, but arguing over the beliefs held by others could stir up trouble.   GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You could binge when buying in bulk. You could be convinced that you’re handling your money in a reasonable manner this week, but may overspend because you go to extremes.   CANCER (June 21-July 22): Develop insights about business matters by catching up on a backlog of reading. Others may be able to sway your opinions this week with an appeal to your fair and generous nature.   LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): It might be a very good idea to review the lyrics of the Logical Song to prepare for the week ahead. People may make promises they can’t keep or come to decisions based on scanty facts.   VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Your enthusiasms are contagious and likely to set off sparks of friendliness with interesting new people this week. Adventures that provide a break from routine are in the stars.   LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

When something goes wrong, there are those who insist that it’s someone else’s fault, and refuse to take the blame. A lack of responsibility or extravagance could irk you in the upcoming week.   SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You could be possessed by a wild urge to do something entirely foolhardy as a spotlight on finances causes friction. Keeping up with the Joneses’ will only cause problems this week.   SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your inner wisdom receives an opportunity to grow and flourish in the week ahead. Your belief system may alter as you learn to test your viewpoints.   CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.

19): Thoughts are like bubble gum; you chew them until they lose their flavor and toss them aside. Refine and re-evaluate your views, and remain honest with yourself in the coming week.   AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Finances may be the focus of your drive and initiative this week, as you weigh the pros and cons of different ways to handle your budget. Take the lead from those you trust.   PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A creative idea of yours is worthy of effort. Maintain your serenity, even if others are unreliable or if cash seems to slip through your fingers this week. Kindness and sympathy are assets.

ANTIQUE AUCTION - Mansion 55 Expo FRIDAY, MAY 30th 4:00pm & SATURDAY, MAY 31st 10:00am 34382 East Frontage Road Virden, IL. 62690

(Off I-55- take Exit 80 or Exit 72 - Watch for Signs) Preview: 5-29-14 Thursday Noon-6:00pm - Saturday Doors open at 8:00am 12 MARBLE TOP TABLES * 20+ GONE WITH THE WIND LAMPS * 150+ OIL PAINTINGS VICTORIAN FRAMES * BELTER FURNITURE * WALNUT BEDROOM SETS GLASSWARE * CLOCKS * JEWELRY * MORE!

FOR DETAILS, PHOTOS & MORE: www.hasauction.com

Auctioneer: Bill Houchens Lic. # 4410000796 217-414-6634

Come on in...the door is open!

Steam Train Rides, Cruise Night, County Fair and More in Northwest Illinois

Request a FREE 2014 FREEPORT/STEPHENSON COUNTY, IL Visitors Guide Call 800-369-2955 or email stephcvb@aeroinc.net

Name ___________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________ City, State, Zip ____________________________________________ Mail to: Freeport/Stephenson County CVB, 4596 U.S. Rt. 20 East, Freeport, IL 61032

www.stephenson-county-il.org

MT204419

A

C H I C A G O L A N D

P R E M I E R E

THEATRE AT THE CENTER presents

May 1 – June 1 2014 BY TOM DUDZICK

author of Over The Tavern

Directed by William Pullinsi

Submitted photo

Children’s Farm summer camp signup begins Children who love animals and nature can sign up for summer camp at the Children’s Farm, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. Children entering 4th through 7th grades in the fall will be attending the one- and two-week overnight camp which will begin its 78th season on June 15. Later summer sessions begin June 29, July 13, July 20, and July 27 Each day is packed with fun for the 24 farm campers who learn to ride horses, care for animals, hike in the woods and creeks, and make campfires. Campers enjoy campouts, hayrides, games, crafts, and new friends. Camp Director Amy DiDominicis encourages families to register as soon as possible, as some sessions are already filled. A scholarship fund makes camp possible for children who need financial assistance. Call 361-3650 for registration information.

“BEST COMEDY OF THE YEAR. A great hook that will keep generations laughing. You have to see it to believe it.” ■ Examiner.com

TheatreAtTheCenter.com

836-3255

219John W. Anderson Foundation

Groups of 11+ 219-836-3258


10 Section 2

Thursday, May 22, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

McCord’s summer classes for youth signup starts now

Submitted photo

Little Art Show ahead The Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park, will host a Little Art Show this Sunday, May 25, from 1 to 3 p.m. Teachers and students at the art center have organized a small art show of small artworks, including tiny pottery, tiny drawings and paintings, tiny weavings, tiny woodcarvings, tiny baskets, and more, on display and for sale. Pottery instructor Heather Young, pictured above working on a small piece of pottery for Sunday’s show, organized the idea of having it. She says tiny refreshments will be served to match the theme of the day. Weather permiting, The Little Art Show will take place on the log cabin lawns. In inclement weather, the show will be moved indoors. The public is invited. The Log Cabin offers six-week courses plus occasional one-day workshops for adults, teens, families, and chilontact your Account Coordinator: dren, and two-weekCsummer classes for kids.Service Classes are held in and around the log cabins in the woods, and are known for their warm and welcoming Andrew ambience. Solodky For more information, call The Center at 361-3650, or visit www. Team: 5E thecenterpalos.org.

CLIPPER MAGAZINE

   McCord Gallery & Cultural Center, located at 9602 W. Creek Rd. (129th and La Grange Road) in Palos Park has announced summer classes and camps for young people. To register call 671-0648 or visit www.mccordgallery.org. ABC’s of Summer: Art — Books — Creativity, Ages 4-6 with Beth Leahy Mondays, June 9 - 30 (4 weeks), 4 – 5:30pm. The perfect way to end a summer day! Your child will enjoy a story and then create an art project based on the book. A variety of art mediums will be used in a stimulating environment. $40 members/50 non-members. ABC’s of Summer: Art – Books – Creativity, ages 4-6 with Beth Leahy Tuesdays, June 10 - 24, July 1 (4 weeks), 4 – 5:30pm. See above description. Different stories and projects — not a repeat of Monday session. $40/50. Dino Draw, ages 4-6 with Beth Leahy Mondays, July 7, 14, 21, 28 (4 weeks), 4 – 5:30pm. Have a roaring good time learning about your favorite dinosaur. Little hands will cut, color, shape and create a variety of dinosaurs and learn some interesting facts along the way. Fossils, dino eggs, and a bronto-

Submitted photo

Children will create an art project based on the story of the day. saurus bank are just some of the projects we will make together. $40/50. Monet’s Garden Party, ages 4-6 with Beth Leahy Tuesdays, July 8, 15, 22, 29 (4 weeks), 4 - 5:30pm. This is a unique introduction to famous garden paintings and the artists who created them. After learning about the artwork, we will make functional art pieces to put in your garden:

stepping stones, birdfeeders, windsocks and more. $40/50. Portfolio Class for High School Students, Mary Michaelson Wednesdays & Fridays, June 11 – July 3, (8 sessions), 9:30 am – 11:30am. Colleges today rely more and more on the portfolio as a basis for admission and merit scholarship. This class is offered to high school art students who wish to

add to and improve their portfolio of work. Students will work on a different piece each week with a variety of media, content and format to create quality work that addresses intent, personal voice and theme. Instructor will supply some basic media, including paper. Students will be encouraged to bring in their own sets of pastels, markers, color pencils, etc. $130/145. American Folk Art, Ages 7-12 with Liz Wall Monday - Friday, July 14 July 18, 10 am – noon. Students will be introduced to many types of American Folk Art and spend the week creating their own painted functional fine art as well as paintings. This class will combine culture and creativity. All supplies included. $80/90. Around the World with Painting, Ages 7-12 with Liz Wall  Monday- Friday, July 21 - July 25, 10 am – noon. Students will travel around the world learning about the colors and patterns used in art work in many different countries. They will create their own paintings everyday using some of the special techniques used around the world. They may also choose to work on their own heritage if they like. All supplies included. $80/90.

Variety by Peter Bart

00182-04-14 audience that sees at least one fervently chasesA rea: fallen by Cook nearly 11Co.-S percent bedwells abroad: Summer films must film a month now owns at least tween 2004 and 2013, a decline The $35.9 billion global pot of win back apathetic Account #: 76828 Mail Week: 05/19/2014 four mobile devices. That’s a lot gold reflected an increase of 4 that has been masked by higher young ticket buyers Tracking #:for2872469.INDD of distraction. prices. Distributors of both percent over 2012. Box office in ticket    This is the moment of truth This ad is the property of Gannett publication and may not be reproduce art house films and tent poles up 27 percent two sectors of the movie business    The most loyal members of the China alone was Please review your proof carefully. Gannett is not responsible for any err Mike that are at opposite endsLucas of the film-going population are those (much of that admittedly due to know this charade cannot go not marked. from local on. Fewer people at the movie spectrum — opposite in terms of that neither distributors nor ad- an increase in returns phone: 708-489-2255 vertisers traditionally care about films). And it’sCOUPON means pain PRIOR in the TO wallet clear that kids house commerce and culture. PLACEMENT MAY CHANGE PUBLICATION    For the Hollywood studios, it’s — the 40-and-older crowd, which worldwide love superheroes, even to the exhibitor at the concession email: mlucas@wcthunderbolts.com launch time (and prayer time) for represents 30 percent of ticket superheroes in 3-D — a format stand. Blockbusters need to lure fax:the708-489-2999 summer blockbusters, wakeup buyers; and the 50-and-older that’s been less super of late in the kids back to the multiplexcalls for Spider-Man, the X-Men, group, which makes up more than the U.S. Their loyalties will be es; festival auteurs need to find phone: 717-509-9265 Captain America, Godzilla and all 20 percent. Ironically, advertisers tested later this month when a price point that will appeal to their superhero (or super-villain) still spent nearly $680 million to massive overseas “Spider-Man” the penny-pinching older crowd. email: 5E@cmag.com buy ads in movie theaters last and “Captain America” sequels   Discrete talks are under way brethren. fax: 717-358-2533 between distributors and the   Paradoxically, in Cannes, it’s year, up 6.5 percent from the year all but collide. also zero-hour for the auteur su- earlier, so someone must care    The daunting reality in the do- theater circuits to devise a plan perheroes of the festival circuit about geriatric purchasing power. mestic market, however, is that to sell discounted tickets at least Sales Rep: Suzanne Molchin — time for Mike Leigh, David   The audience Hollywood most the number of tickets sold has once a week.   1. 47 Ronin, Universal Pic-   1. All of Me, John Legend, Cronenberg, Lars von Trier and tures, PG-13 Columbia Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu toTHE APPROPRIATE BUTTON ABOVE OR SIGN YOUR PROOF COUPONABOVE. COUPON APPROVE ADWilliams, OR SUBMIT CHANGES BY CLICKING & FAX TO THE NUMBER   2. The Legend of Hercules,   2. Happy, YOUR Pharrell unveil their epiphanies. $ 00 $ 00 Lionsgate, PG-13 Backlot Music   Both sectors this year have Ad isAriana approved is Holapproved with changes Ad is not approved make changes indicated   3. Labor Day, Paramount Pic-   3. Problem, Grande, plenty to gain, and to Ad fear. Sump Pump tures, PG-13 featuring Iggy Azalea, Universal lywood is fretful about the sharply Battery   4. Homefront, Millennium Republic increased defection of the young Limit of 2. Expires 6/30/14 Films, R   4. Fancy, Iggy Azalea, featuring audience, but optimistic about the   5. The Wolf of Wall Street, Charli XCX, Island/Def Jam COUPON booming foreign box office. FestiSIGNATURE DATE PRINT NAME Paramount Pictures, R   5. Dark Horse, Katy Perry, val filmmakers fear the incursions $ 00   6. Frozen, Walt Disney Stu- featuring Juicy J, Capitol Records of Hollywood blockbusters but are Limit of 2. Expires 6/30/14 dios, PG (Universal) Motorcycle hopeful about the potential of dig® COUPON   7. Walking with Dinosaurs   6. Talk Dirty, Jason Derulo, ital and on-demand markets. Both Batteries $ 00 3-D, 20th Century Fox, PG featuring 2 Chainz, Warner Bros. have this in common: They know Limit of 2. Expires 6/30/14   7. Turn Down for What, DJ they need good product. COUPON Snake & Lil Jon, Columbia   Hollywood’s marketers can’t $ 99   8. Not a Bad Thing, Justin figure out why frequent filmgoers Timberlake, RCA in the 18-24 age group bought 21 Watch Battery   9. Let It Go, Idina Menzel, percent fewer tickets in 2013 — FREE Battery Walt Disney Records a formidable decline. One clue: & Installation Testing   1. Frozen, Soundtrack, Walt   10. Pompeii, Bastille, Virgin According to a new MPAA study, Limit of 2. Expires 6/30/14 Limit of 2. Expires 6/30/14 Disney Records (Universal) some 74 percent of the total film   2. Shatter Me, Lindsey Stirling, Lindseystomp Music   3. Supernova, Ray LaMon3x3 tagne, RCA both papers   4. Passion: Take It All, Passion, sixstepsrecords 5-1-14 MONDAY & TUESDAY   5. The New Classic, Iggy Azalea, Island/Def Jam   6. GIRL, Pharrell Williams, (Ask Your School Or Local Library If They Columbia   7. Honest, Future, Epic Are Participating In These Programs)    8. After Hours, Timeflies, Island   9. Crash My Party, Luke BryWEDNESDAY (Night Games Only!) an, Capitol Nashville (Universal)

Proof Release

WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS

Approve By: 05/06/14

Top DVD Rentals

Top Pop Singles

10 OFF ❑ Lawn &

10 OFF

Garden Battery

Outrageously Dependable

Top Pop Albums

10336 Cicero Ave. Oak Lawn 708.424.BATT(2288)

The SouthSide’s

Videoview

10 OFF

Any Automotive Battery

3

Incentive Days

Minor League Team!

50¢ Hot Dogs

THURSDAY & FRIDAY

(Continued from page 9) 13: AS, P, V)   “SON OF GOD’’ (June 3): Re-edited from the miniseries “The Bible’’ but also including previously unseen footage, this drama focuses on the life of Jesus. Diogo Morgado has the central role. (PG-13: AS, V)   “JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT’’ (June 10): Chris Pine assumes the role of novelist Tom Clancy’s CIA man, seen here in the early stages of his career. Kevin Costner also stars. (PG13: AS, P, V)   “NON-STOP’’ (June 10): A federal air marshal (Liam Neeson) tries to determine who is threatening to kill passengers on a plane he’s aboard. Co-stars include Lupita Nyong’o. (PG-13: AS, P, V)   “TRUE DETECTIVE: SEASON ONE’’ (June 10): Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson play investigators revisiting a serial murder case in the HBO series. (Not rated: AS, N, P, V)   FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.

10 OFF

$1.25 Domestic Draft Beers & $2.25 Domestic Bottles SATURDAY

Post Game Fireworks SUNDAY

Standard Bank Family Day

www.wcthunderbolts. www.wcThunderBolts.com 14011 South Kenton Ave • Crestwood

708-489-BALL (2255)

(4 Tickets, 4 Hot Dogs & 4 Sodas For $30) Stay After The Game To Receive Autographs From The ThunderBolts And Play Catch In The Outfield. OUR BEST DEAL!OF ONLINE/MOBILE BATTLE THE SEXESONLY!

versus the Chicago Bandits $20 Fastpitch Softball Team REG. $40

Purchase only at:

forMonday, 4 tickets, June 4 hot 23rd dogs, @ 7:05 p.m. 4 sodas & 4 activity passes

POST GAME WRESTLING following Thursday night games! Former WWE Wrestler Appearance.

HURRY! Quantities are very limited.

Reporter(2 sections) 5 22 14  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you