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Area gymnasts, bowlers, wrestlers are vying for state glory: SPORTS

REPORTER INSIDE, Section 2

THE Volume LVII, No. 49

Serving Chicago Ridge, Evergreen Park, Hickory Hills, Oak Lawn, Palos Hills and Worth

USPS 118-690

$1 Newstand 2 SECTIONS 18 PAGES

Thursday, February 16, 2017

St. Laurence going co-ed, will enroll Peace girls By Tim Hadac Tears of joy were shed across Chicago and the southwest suburbs earlier this week as Queen of Peace High School students, parents, alumnae and others cheered the news that their current students will be accepted this fall at their “brother” school, St. Laurence High School. “I don’t know if the timing is coincidental, but this is the Valentine’s Day gift of a lifetime. Our hearts are bursting with joy,” said Michelle Garcia, an aunt of a currently enrolled Peace girl. “If I bump into anyone from St. Laurence today, I’m giving them a hug and a kiss. In fact, I might bake a heart-shaped cake and bring it

decision will make it even more so… it will ultimately make the school a stronger and better place,” Madera said. Queen of Peace students who choose to enroll at St. Laurence in the fall will still enjoy the benefits of all-girl classes. “It is a top priority to provide current St. Laurence and Queen of Peace students the single-gender education they signed up for, so all current and incoming students will remain in single-gender classrooms,” according to a statement by St. Laurence Board Chairman George Ruebenson and President Joseph Martinez, both alumni of the Burbank school. “This

“Our hearts are bursting with joy.” ­— Michelle Garcia, aunt of a Queen of Peace student over to the school.” This week’s news was largely predicted in a front-page story that appeared in last week’s Reporter. That story revealed that St. Laurence — an all-boys school since its founding in 1961 — was quietly surveying thousands of its alumni and presenting four options relating to possible responses to Queen of Peace’s announcement that it was closing its doors for good, due to declining enrollment and mounting debt. Three of those St. Laurence options involved going co-ed in some way.

This week’s decision was announced to St. Laurence students at an all-school assembly on Tuesday morning — and almost at the same time, to parents, alumni and other friends of the school via an email blast. Students who heard the news “were very supportive,” said St. Laurence spokesman Mike Madera, who added that as a 2010 graduate of the school, he finds the decision “smart and forwardthinking. “This already is an exciting time of growth at St. Laurence, and this

See ST. LAURENCE, Page 7

Remembering Eugene Siegel

‘A legend in Chicago Ridge’ Former mayor fondly remembered for the impact he had on the village and beyond

Mayor shows lots of love for Oak Lawn By Dermot Connolly

the Stony Creek Promenade, at 11006 S. Cicero Ave.),” she said, Since it was Valentine’s Day, adding that the new businesses Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury created 1,500 new jobs last year. chose “Love Oak Lawn” as the The mayor also said that 2,787 theme of the State of the Vil- building permits were issued in lage speech she gave Tuesday at 2016, more than in any of the past a luncheon that the 16 years. She said Oak Lawn Chamber of that single-family What Commerce hosted at home permits were the Hilton Oak Lawn. also up last year. Oak Lawn “Oak Lawn is our Bury said Oak home, our heart. is doing is Lawn proper ty What’s not to love values have been about it?” the mayor exceptional. steadily increasing said as she launched It is unheard in recent years, and into her speech about showed graphs illusall the good things that trating how they have of. are happening in the overtaken those in ­— Oak Lawn village. Mayor Sandra Bury Evergreen Park and She said that the $57 Alsip. million annual budget “With Oak Lawn’s is funded by $13.9 million in prop- success, we’ve narrowed the gap erty taxes, with the rest covered by with Tinley Park, and we paralother revenue, primarily sales tax. lel Orland Park,” she said. “We “Just 11 percent of your prop- would like to see the gap narrowed erty tax goes to the village,” she further there, and we think we noted. “That is an average of $50 can do it.” a month. Who spends that and Bury also highlighted the sucmore on coffee? It is a great value cesses of the fire and police defor all the services provided. We partments, citing statistics and work very hard to keep these costs cited data available on city-data. down. com that showing that most crime “We’ve lowered the tax levy by categories are on a downward 6 percent over the last four years. trend from 2001 to 2015, the And we’ve lowered the debt as latest year available. well,” the mayor continued. “What “Oak Lawn is rated among the Oak Lawn is doing is exceptional. best the surrounding communiIt is unheard of. ties,” she added, pointing out that “How were we able to do it? only Hometown, which is oneIt came from growing the sales tenth the size of Oak Lawn, has a tax, and that is a credit to you,” better “crime average” compared she told the many business own- to the surrounding communities. ers in the audience. “Residents “This is a team effort,” said are getting our Shop Oak Lawn Bury, thanking members of the message.” village board and the department “Business licenses are growing heads “for making it all possible”. by leaps and bounds,” the mayor Among those on the dais with said. She pointed out that the Bury that she singled out for praise Chamber of Commerce is “385 included Village Manager Larry members strong,” with 59 new Deetjen, finance director Brian members joining in 2016. Hanigan, Police Chief Michael “We had 16 ribbon-cuttings in Murray, Fire Chief George Sheets, 2016, and one just this morning See OAK LAWN, Page 9 for Raising Cane’s restaurant (in

By Joe Boyle Former Chicago Ridge Mayor Eugene Siegel frequently mentioned that he was no better than anyone else and that it was a privilege to serve his constituents Local mayors were in agreement that Siegel, 84, who died Saturday at a hospital in Boynton Beach, Fla., where he had a winter home, was devoted to the residents of Chicago Ridge and built up longtime alliances. “He was very personable and very down to earth,” said current Chicago Ridge Mayor Chuck Tokar. “He was a very wonderful person.” Tokar was chosen by Siegel to serve as a member of his board when Siegel became mayor in 1975. Tokar also served as village clerk under Siegel, who retired as mayor in 2013. Tokar then became mayor in an uncontested race that year. “I remember when I was village clerk and I tried to come up with ideas that I discussed with him,” said Tokar. “He would always remind me that you don’t just represent the people who live on your block, you represent the whole community. I never forgot that.” Visitation for the longtime mayor will be held from 2 to 9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, at Lawn Funeral Home, 7732 W. 159th St., Orland Park. Services will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 at Our Lady of the Ridge Church, 10811 S. Ridgeland Ave., Chicago Ridge. Interment will follow at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery. Siegel moved to Chicago Ridge in 1956 and won his bid for mayor in 1975. He was reelected nine times. He also See SIEGEL, Page 7

Submitted photo

A few Queen of Peace girls have worn the St. Laurence colors over the years, including as Viking cheerleaders at football and basketball games.

Photo by Jeff orva

Eugene Siegel, who served as Chicago Ridge mayor from 1975 to 2013, greets the crowd during a parade marking the 100th anniversary of the village in 2014. Siegel died on Saturday.

Development plans for former Sabre Room property will be reviewed By Sharon L. Filkins Hickory Hills Mayor Mike Howley told city council members at last Thursday’s board meeting that proposed development plans for the former Sabre Room property will be discussed later this month. Howley informed the board the old Sabre Room property as 8900 W. 95th St. will be the topic of discussion at the Feb. 23 council meeting. In early January, Howley had an-

nounced that the proposed development plan, known as Sabre Woods Plaza, had been deferred indefinitely because there were still a lot of unanswered questions. At that time, the mayor explained that the plans which had been presented at the Nov. 10 council meeting by Jim Louthen, development project manager, and Charles Cornelius, Jr., of Chicagoland Realty Service, did not fit the expectation of the city’s zoning board. Plans presented at that meeting in No-

vember for the 30-acre property called for six single-family homes on the west side of the property, a Senior Village, for ages 55 and over, an assisted living campus, including a memory unit, possibly two five-story apartment units and retail/commercial fronting on 95th Street along the eastern edge of the property. Also proposed was an open civic area, green space and retention ponds. Louthen had stated that the best use for a large portion of the property on

the northwest corner could be a park-like location with walking trails, benches, etc., because it is in a wetlands, floodplain area. Many questions were raised by council members at that meeting regarding retention ponds, apartments units and who would be responsible for the suggested park-like area. At last Thursday’s meeting, Howley said new information had been presented by the developer so the council will re-

view it on Feb. 23. There is also a committee of the whole meeting at 6:30 p.m., just prior to the regular council meeting at 7:30 p.m. The council also approved a request from the Hickory Hills Park District to conduct a carnival at the Kasey Meadow Park, located at 8047 W. 91st Place, beginning May 11 and continuing through May 14. See HICKORY HILLS, Page 7

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2 The Reporter

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Worth businesses pleased with code changes approved by village board By Sharon L. Filkins The Worth Village Board unanimously approved a modification to the municipal code that will bring smiles to the faces of some local business owners The approved modification made at the Feb. 7 board meeting affects the village’s internal structure visibility regulations. Ground floor businesses will no longer be required to provide clear visibility from the front windows to the back of the facility. Worth Mayor Mary Werner stated that the original business regulation prohibited ground floor businesses from covering their front windows with signs, curtains, partitions, or anything blocking the view from the street. “We found this stipulation was just not working for many of our businesses,” said Werner, citing an example of a restaurant that could have its kitchen at the

back of the building. “Requiring a clear line of vision from the street and into the kitchen could place a hardship on the business owner, particularly if the kitchen is located behind a wall.” Other businesses affected by the previous visibility regulation include offices, banks with vaults, and pharmacies with medication storage areas. Consequently, the board presented the proposed amendment last month to the village’s Real Estate Development Board (REDB). In response, the REDB conducted a public hearing on Jan. 23 to discuss the issue. At the hearing, Village Attorney Greg Jones spoke on behalf of the village explaining why the existing visibility regulations created practical difficulties for many ground floor businesses. “Eliminating the visibility requirements would enhance the community’s business environment without compro-

Submitted photo

Sgt. Chris Hernandez shakes hands with police officer Louise Nugent after she received a commendation at the Feb. 7 Worth Village Board meeting for her act of bravery after she discovered a burglary in progress and arrested the perpetrator.

mising the public health, safety, and welfare,” said Jones.

Lipinski introduces ‘Buy American’ bill Cong. Dan Lipinski (D-3rd) introduced the Buy American Improvement Act of 2017 that he said will create American jobs, promote the domestic manufacturing industry, increase transparency and accountability in government procurement, and ensure that taxpayer dollars are spent in the U.S. whenever practicable. “Despite the fact that too many Americans still can’t find good jobs, the federal government continues to buy many products outside our country instead of using our hard-earned tax dollars to buy American products and hire American workers,” said Lipinski. “The Buy American Improvement Act will change that. “Specifically, my bill will apply ‘Buy American’ requirements to federal spending programs that are not covered in current law and will close gaping loopholes in programs where ‘Buy American’ requirements are already law. This commonsense, bipartisan legislation is especially important now with interest from the President and the new Congress in passing a comprehensive and transformative transportation infrastructure bill.” The bill also sets domestic content standards for indirect purchases by U.S. Department of Transportation grantees, en-

Chicago Ridge

suring that tax dollars spent on aviation, highway, transit, and rail infrastructure will support U.S. manufacturing and mining jobs, rather than jobs in other countries. While “Buy America” has traditionally applied only to transportation projects, Lipinski said his bill would expand these requirements to a number of other federal grant programs. Lipinski said his legislation will help American companies and workers by requiring federal agencies to publicly disclose “Buy American” waivers in the Federal Register and to explain their justification for the waiver. He added that this will also create a consolidated annual report that lists the total amount and dollar value of all foreign purchases and the number of waivers granted. This transparency will allow American companies to see where there are opportunities to sell to the federal government and put more Americans to work. Other organizations endorsing the bill include the AFL-CIO Transportation Trades Department, BlueGreen Alliance, Coalition for a Prosperous America, International Association of Machines and Aerospace Workers, Lake Carriers’ Association, Steel Manufacturers Association, Teamsters, and United Steelworkers.

Drug charges Two men face felony drug charges after tactical officers arrested them in a convenience store parking lot in the 9900 block of South Harlem Avenue at 5:15 p.m. Saturday. Police said the tactical team investigating reports of drug activity in the area made the arrests after observing a drug transaction. Jose Garcia, 46, of the 9700 block of Nottingham Avenue, Chicago Ridge, was charged with unlawful delivery of a controlled substance. Police said he handed 1.85 grams of cocaine to James A. Nehring, 52, of the 10000 block of Anderson Avenue, Chicago Ridge, who was charged with illegal possession of a controlled substance. They were both held for a bond hearing on Tuesday.

Criminal trespassing Edward McNamara, 49, of the 10000 block of South Sayre Avenue, Chicago Ridge, was charged with criminal trespassing following a disturbance on his block at 9:15 p.m. Saturday. Police said they were called to the scene because he refused to leave a residence. He was also charged with two counts of resisting arrest for not obeying commands and refusing to be handcuffed. He is due in court on Feb. 27.

Retail theft • Shermaine English, 22, of the 5900 block of South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, was charged with retail theft at Kohl’s in Chicago Ridge Mall at 2:52 p.m. Saturday. Police said she took clothing worth $545 out of the store without paying for it. She is due in court on April 5. • Uqba Othman, 55, of the 10500 block of South Ridgeland Avenue, Chicago Ridge, was charged with retail theft at 1:50

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On another matter, police officer Louise Nugent, a 17-year veteran with the Worth Police Department, was recognized with a commendation for her bravery and diligence in discovering a burglary in process at a business on 111th Street and apprehending the burglar, single-handedly. Presenting the commendation was Sgt. Chris Fernandez, her commanding officer. “While on night patrol, she saw the door to the business was open and called for back-up. By the time we arrived, she had already caught the guy and had him in handcuffs,” said Fernandez. Werner stated that it is always a pleasure to include commendations to police officers at the meetings. “We are very proud of our police department. They do an incredible job in protecting our village 24 hours a day,” she said.

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In a memo presented to the board, the REDB stated that based on the findings of the public hearing and all evidence presented, they agreed the proposed amendment is in the public interest. They unanimously recommended that the village board approve the proposed amendment. The modification applies to structures located in the Restricted Retail Business Zoning District (B1) and the General Business Zoning District (B2). Approval of a second resolution authorized the village’s participation in the Northern Illinois Municipal Electric Collaborative (NIMEC). Werner then approved a contract with the lowest cost electricity provider for a period of up to 36 months. The mayor said that the contract pertains to public works and the pumping station. Approval was also granted to the village to close 111th Street from Ridgeland Avenue to Harlem Avenue on Aug. 27 for the 2017 Worth Days parade.

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p.m. Sunday at Kohl’s in Chicago Ridge Mall. Police said he took watches worth $99. He is due in court on April 5.

Domestic battery Abdulrahman Aduib, 26, of the 9100 block of South Thomas Avenue, Bridgeview, was charged with domestic battery at 11:30 p.m. Saturday in the 10300 block of South Ridgeland Avenue. Police said he allegedly stopped the car he was driving and punched a female passenger in the face. She got out of the car and he drove away. He was later arrested at his home and held for a bond hearing on Tuesday.

Evergreen Park Drug possession • Earl Weaver, 46, of Chicago, was charged with felony possession of a controlled substance following a traffic stop at 5:04 p.m. Feb. 3 in the 2600 block of West 95th Street. Police said he was carrying .6 grams of cocaine. • George Delatorre, 52, of Chicago, was charged with felony possession of a controlled substance following a minor traffic collision at 6:18 p.m. Feb. 3 in the 2300 block of West 91st Street. Police said he drove away after bumping another car stopped in traffic. They said he was carrying 1.1 grams of cocaine, and was leaving the scene of an accident and driving without a valid license.

Retail theft • Lynette Green. 23, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St., at 10:20 a.m. Feb. 3. Police said she took 17 items of baby clothing valued at $173.11. • Marcus Allen, 23, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St., at 7:41 p.m. Feb. 3. Police said he took two Bluetooth headsets worth $199.79. • Chicago residents Tracy Blankson, 18, and Tywaun Matthews, 19, were both charged with retail theft at 2:10 p.m. Feb. 4 at Walmart, 2500 W. 95th St. Police said Blankson took three miscellaneous personal care items worth $19.84, and Matthews took five items worth $20.50.

Theft charge Anthony Berry, 32, of Calumet

Park, was charged with theft at Carson’s, 9700 S. Western Ave., at 2:14 p.m. Jan. 26. Police said he worked at the store, and returned several items for cash that he had never actually purchased, costing the business $290.40.

Hickory Hills Outstanding warrants • Tina M. Willibanks, 36, of the 8200 block of South Archer Avenue, Willow Springs, was arrested at her home on an outstanding Hickory Hills warrant at 11:39 a.m. Feb. 8. Police said the warrant was issued for failure to appear in court on a charge of driving without a valid license. She is due in court on March 27. • Maria Segura, 44, of the 7100 block of West 107th Street, Worth, was arrested in Woodridge on an outstanding Hickory Hills warrant and turned over to Hickory Hills police at 12:34 p.m. Feb. 1. She is due in court on March 9.

Oak Lawn DUI charges • Nicholas R. Klein, 29, of Oak Lawn, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop at 2:16 a.m. Jan. 28 at Southwest Highway and 95th Street. Police said he registered .156 blood-alcohol count on a breath test. He was also cited for disobeying a traffic control signal, improper lane usage and aggravated speeding. He was scheduled to appear in court on Feb. 15. • Gerardo Rodriquez, 26, of Chicago, was charged with DUI following a traffic stop at 3:43 a.m. Feb 1 at 101st Street and Pulaski Road. Police said he registered a blood-alcohol count of .095 blood-alcohol count on a breath test. Police said he was also cited for driving on the median and improper lane usage. He is due in court on March 8. • Leo J. Sanders, 28, of 95th Street in Oak Lawn, was charged with DUI following a traffic stop at 1:44 a.m. Feb. 3 in the 6800 block of West 95th Street. Police said he registered .158 blood-alcohol count on a breath test. He was also cited for aggravated speeding 64 mph in a 35 mph zone, and failure to inform the secretary of state of a change of address. He is due in court on March 9.

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• Nadan Renee Groce, 24, of Worth, was charged with DUI following a traffic crash at 10:30 p.m. Feb. 5 at 95th and Keeler Avenue. Police said her car struck another vehicle in the intersection. The other driver complained of neck pain and was taken across the street to Advocate Christ Medical Center. Groce registered a .191 blood-alcohol count on a breath test and was cited for disregarding a traffic light and failure to reduce speed to avoid a crash. She is due in court on March 7. • Fernando M. Rodriguez, 55, of Midlothian, was charged with DUI, following a traffic stop at 1:26 a.m. last Thursday at 106th Street and Pulaski Road. Police said he registered .134 bloodalcohol count on a breath test. He was also cited for driving on a suspended license, no insurance and speeding. He is due in court on March 8.

Catalytic converter is stolen A catalytic converter was reported stolen off a 2004 Chevrolet Venture while it was parked between 10:30 p.m. Feb. 1 and 6:30 a.m. Feb. 2 in a 54th Avenue driveway. The victim said the vehicle, which she uses for work, was parked in her driveway. Police said the woman discovered the theft of the converter when she turned the ignition and the vehicle started making noises.

Palos Hills Criminal trespassing Bridget Klecan, 33, of Palos Hills, was charged with criminal trespassing and unlawful deception at 2 a.m. Feb. 8. Police said she took a person’s car and wallet without permission, and used the victim’s credit card to buy alcohol and cigarettes. She is due in court on March 3.

Vandalism reports • Police responded to numerous complaints of suspicious circumstances and criminal damage to property at 1 p.m. Feb. 6 in the 7800 block of West 100th Place. Police said that an unknown person had caused damage to a residence and the property around it. • Vandalism to an electrical meter on a building in the 11200 block of Moraine Drive was discovered at 6 p.m. Sunday. Police assisted the North Palos Fire Protection District at the scene and there were no reported injuries.

Harassment complaint

A woman filed a harassment by telephone complaint on Feb. 8. She said she had been receiving inappropriate photos on her cellphone from an unidentified person.

Cellphone thefts Police are investigating a reported theft of cellphones that occurred at 11 a.m. Saturday at Hi-Phone store, 10142 S. Roberts Road. Employees told police called to the scene that three males had damaged a display case and stole approximately 20 cellphones from the store before fleeing on foot.

Identity theft

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A woman reported being the victim of identity theft at 6 p.m. Feb. 11. She said that when she attempted to file her income tax return, she was told that an unknown person had already filed using her information. Police reports are provided by law enforcement agencies. Charges are not evidence of guilt. They are a record of police actions taken, and persons charged with a crime are presumed innocent until proved guilty in a court of law.


Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Reporter

Sweet salute to veterans Kathy Lovitt, of Palos Heights, joins local veterans for a photo at the Valentine’s Day party she hosted on Tuesday morning at McDonald’s, 11050 Southwest Highway, Palos Hills. Beside her (from left) are World War II veterans Ray Munoz, of Chicago; Rich Olund, Palos Park; Barney Janecki, Oak Lawn; and Lee Calzavara and John Szostak, of Palos Hills. Photo by Dermot Connolly

OAK LAWN VILLAGE BOARD MEETING

Chuck E. Cheese’s will close its doors by the end of the year By Dermot Connolly The Chuck E. Cheese’s restaurant in Oak Lawn, which has been plagued by violent incidents in recent years, will close by the end of this year, fulfilling an agreement between its parent company and the village. At the village board meeting on Tuesday night, trustees unanimously passed a resolution approving a business license termination and relocation agreement between the village and CEC Entertainment Inc., the parent company of Chuck E. Cheese’s. The move follows the surprise announcement that CEC Entertainment made Dec. 7 that the restaurant and entertainment center located at 4031 W. 95th St. since the 1980s would leave town. The village board had planned to begin the legal proceedings required to revoke the business license on the same day the announcement was made. “It should be noted that there will be no cost whatsoever to the Oak Lawn taxpayers from this agreement,” said Trustee Tim Desmond (1st). Trustee Terry Vorderer (4th), whose district includes the restaurant and entertainment center, has been working with company officials to resolve the chronic problem of violent altercations involving patrons in and around the business. He said license revocation should

The Chuck E. Cheese’s restaurant in Oak Lawn will close by the end of the year, thanks to an agreement between the establishment’s parent company and the village.

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be a last resort, and the company had added more security and lighting improvements in an effort to curtail problems. But a Dec. 3 drive-by shooting of a man who had just left the restaurant led to the decision for Chuck E. Cheese’s to leave. “I would like to thank Terry for his leadership on this issue. He handled it the right way and saved the village from costly litigation,” said Trustee Michael Carberry (6th), adding that Mayor Sandra Bury deserves credit, too. “Chuck E. Cheese’s acted responsibly as well,” said Trustee Bud Stalker (5th). “They were a responsible business, but it

just didn’t work out here,” Vorderer agreed. Vorderer said that under the terms of the agreement, Chuck E. Cheese’s will not apply for a new business license at renewal time in April. Instead, it will be licensed monthto-month until Dec. 1, the closing deadline. Closing time also will be moved to 8 p.m., from 10 p.m., beginning July 22. If another problem occurs, the month-to-month license could be pulled. “They could be gone before December if they find a new location. But they have also agreed to keep the extra security and lighting in place while they are here,” Vorderer said.

Dare we say it? Spring is not far away A s we enter the middle of February, I’m thinking we are entering a period of anticipation. The Super Bowl, the Patriots’ comeback and Lady Gaga are now a memory. Chance the Rapper, from Chicago’s South Side, collected some Grammy Awards on Sunday night. Hey, that’s great. I can’t say I know a lot about Chance the Rapper. He did do a series of TV promos for the Chicago White Sox last summer and threw out the first ball on Opening Day. I’m glad he is a White Sox fan and his spots called for the team to “step up.” Obviously, they didn’t. The Academy Awards are coming up on Sunday, Feb. 26. I will probably watch at least some of it. I like to watch to get an idea of what some of the better films of the past year were. Some of the recipients who receive Oscars could be longtime favorites who finally receive the honor. And perhaps you are rooting for a certain film or actor because you have actually seen the movie. In many cases, I have seen very few or none at all. This past year, I did see “Arrival” starring Amy Adams. I thought it was a great film and worthy of being nominated for Best Picture. Adams is not up for Best Actress but probably should be. What that means for me is that this movie is the only one I saw that is up for an award. The only reason I’m going on about the Academy Awards is that it’s the only big event coming up in the near future. But if I have not seen many of the movies, my

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interest level drifts, especially when the awards show clocks in at three hours. It may be time to channel surf. Perhaps there might be a limited series on HBO that is coming up that may catch my interest. Joe Netflix has an interesting lineup of shows to view Boyle as well. For college basketball fanatics, “March Madness” is approaching. I hear a lot of discussion about tournament picks and who may win and so on and so on. Even former President Obama would be interviewed on ESPN and other sports programs about his choices. I read and watch TV reports with some curiosity over the enthusiasm some sports reporters and broadcasters show over the “Big Dance.” Personally, I just don’t get that pumped about the tournament. I guess I’m not a big basketball fan anyway and less so when it comes to college. I just don’t follow it. At one time I was more interested if I knew someone who was playing at that level. If there were athletes my kids or nieces or nephews knew, I would show more interest. But that’s about it. One sport I’m not thinking about is football. The Patriots won the Super Bowl but I think we can give football a rest for a while. I think I saw somewhere that someone is counting off the days for foot-

ball training camp in June. I can’t believe that. Maybe this person is a Patriots fan. He can’t be a Bears fan. I’m not counting the days for football training camp to see stories on the Bears, who finished 3-13 last year. This is the time of the year when I actually start thinking about spring, which is still a month away. The Cubs and White Sox actually began spring training this week in Arizona. All major league teams began their workouts this week in Arizona and Florida. For me, that’s something to look forward to. Yes, we have had a mild winter so far. We’ve had just over 18 inches of snow this winter and the majority of that came in December. Maybe the unseasonably warm temperatures have me thinking more about spring. Of course, I have lived here long enough to know that the weather can change in a hurry. Hey, we can always hope. February is a short month and perhaps March can enter and exit more like a lamb. That means baseball, watching a variety of sporting events, and taking walks at our local parks and forest preserves. Spending more time outdoors and actually seeing the sun more often would be a welcoming sight indeed. I look forward to that, with great anticipation.

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‘Celebrate’ is theme of Together We Cope dinner dance on March 3 Together We Cope celebrates its annual dinner dance and auction at 7 p.m. Friday, March 3 at the Odyssey Country Club, 19110 S. Ridgeland Ave., Tinley Park. Reservations, at $100 per person, can be made by calling (708) 263-0302, ext. 6101 or krogge@ togetherwecope.org. This year’s event celebrates the courage of the agency’s client families, the dedication of TWC’s volunteers, compassion of the staff and generosity of the donors. The dinner dance is Together We Cope’s major fundraiser each year, and supports client programs for food, clothing, shelter and emergency funds. Together We Cope is a nonprofit homeless prevention agency based in Tinley Park and serving residents of 27 south suburban communities.

The evening includes a buffet dinner, open bar and entertainment by Chicago Keys Dueling Pianos. Hundreds of items are featured in a silent auction, while

other grand prizes will be offered in a live auction. Raffle prizes include $1,000 cash, a diamond and ruby necklace, and a 40-inch HD Smart TV.

Several levels of sponsorships, as well as event program advertising, are available by contacting Linda Lopez, director of development, at (708) 263-0302, ext. 6104.

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4 The Reporter

Our Neighborhood

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Shepard AP students challenged to ‘change the world’ When they learn the depth of the “Change the World” assignment, it’s easy to imagine Shepard High School students with their jaws falling open. The project, a mountain of work comparable to what students will encounter in college courses, causes Advanced Placement English students to extend themselves as never before. But teacher Jeff Vazzana offers no apologies. “This is one of my favorite units from the whole year. Kids really get to put their English skills to work,” he said. Topics this year included food waste, altering the District 218 health curriculum, how minority

Shepard High School student Kareema Keshta discusses the issue of food waste during Advanced Placement English Language and Composition. Her group chose the subject for their “Change the World” assignment.

groups can work together to benefit one another, how to help immigrant students adapt to America, and preventing animal cruelty. They interviewed experts or leaders in the community. Then, based on their research and interviews, they developed a plan of action to “change the world,” or at least an aspect of theirs. Finally, they must deliver a presentation to Vazzana and their peers on all they learned and the solutions they propose. While the enthusiasm and capabilities of the teams never surprises him, Vazzana found this year’s projects especially well-developed.

Submitted photos

Shepard High School student Kiley Boerma discusses changes her group proposed for the District 218 health curriculum. They chose this topic for the “Change the World” assignment in AP English Language and Composition.

Kostecki named executive director of Crisis Center of South Suburbia Pamela Kostecki has been appointed as the new executive director of the Crisis Center of South Suburbia. “The Crisis Center has and will continue to play a unique and vital role in services for victims of domestic violence. The Crisis Center is blessed with passionate employees, dedicated to ending the suffering that violence has fostered in their lives,” Kostecki said. “I am honored to have the opportunity to lead this amazing team of professionals in engaging the community, our stakeholders, and critical community partners to fully realize our shared vision for a world free of violence. ” Kostecki has over than 20 years of non-profit experience to her role, including direct services to homeless individuals, veterans, children, students and others. The staff at the Crisis Center said that Kostecki’s experience as an executive director, adjunct professor, social worker, counselor and program manager makes her qualified for this new

“This year, the kids were particularly tenacious. They called mayors, interviewed (Shepard and District 218) administrators, and really dug deep to elicit the change they wanted to see. I’m proud of how above-and-beyond this group of students went,” he said. A good example: The group that studied how to prevent animal cruelty contacted the Animal Welfare League in Chicago Ridge to bring an injured dog to school. The presentation, featuring Mindy the Chihuahua, was conducted in this way “so that their classmates could really feel the effects of animal abuse,” Vaz-

position. She also has experience in crisis intervention, conflict management, program development and management, Kostecki along with analytical thinking and strategic planning will be valuable assets to her work at the Crisis Center, according to staff members. The Crisis Center for South Suburbia’s mission is to provide emergency shelter and other essential services for individuals and families victimized by domestic violence and address the societal issues that contribute to domestic violence. “The board’s action comes with the fullest confidence that Ms. Kostecki will be an excellent steward of the Crisis Center’s mission, as well as a leader and advocate for our clients,” said David Anders, board president for

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Crisis Center for South Suburbia. “Her leadership and experience are vital to the organization as we look forward with passion and vision to the future. “ A recipient of the Lewis University De La Salle Award for Service and Leadership in the Community in 2009, Kostecki has been recognized by her colleagues and the communities she has worked in for her strong work ethic and strategic leadership, according to the board. Kostecki is a licensed clinical social worker with the State of Illinois. She holds a master’s degree in social work from Aurora University and received her undergraduate education from Illinois State University. She completed the Mission-Based Leadership and Organization Development program at Notre Dame University, and is a certified trainer in Non-Violent Crisis Intervention. More information about the Crisis Center can be obtained at www.crisisctr.org.

Shepard High School student Thamer Yasin holds Minday, a Chihuahua that had suffered terrible abuse before rescue. Yasin invited representatives from the Animal Welfare League to school to serve as guests during the presentation on prevention of animal cruelty — part of the “Change the World” project in AP English.

‘Evergreen Reads’ encourages community to pick up a book The staffs at the Evergreen Park Elementary School District 124 and the Evergreen Park Library may have found a common ground among bakers, construction workers, third-graders, bus drivers, high school athletes and retired empty nesters in a new community initiative called “Evergreen Reads.” The goal of Evergreen Reads is to bring voices across the entire village together to learn from and about one another in a fun and unique way. “The objective is to get the entire community to share the experience of reading and discussing the same book, kind of like a village-wide book club,” said Dr. Robert Machak, the District 124 superintendent. The novel the Evergreen Reads planning committee has selected for its inaugural event is Richard

Peck’s “A Long Way from Chicago,” a Newbery Honor Book and National Book Award finalist. The novel details the adventures of a brother and sister who leave the Windy City each summer to visit their grandmother in a small Illinois farm town during the Depression. “It’s a story that’s enjoyable to read on many different levels,” said Machak, “which is really why we selected it – its appeal spans age groups and demographics.” The library and school district have planned a number of Evergreen Reads events in March in conjunction with themes of the story. First, the committee wants everyone in Evergreen Park to read the book. To accomplish this goal, the committee would like to have several hundred copies of the novel available. Each school

Dog owners reminded of canine flu danger The canine flu has re-emerged this year, and Cook County Animal and Rabies Control is advising pet owners to vaccinate their dogs in order to protect them from the disease. Some animal shelters and veterinarians in Cook County have reported dogs infected with the canine influenza virus, said Dr. Donna Alexander, administrator of Cook County Animal and Rabies Control.

zana said. Such dedication offered a kind of subtext to the assignment: Students learned the extent of their capabilities. “This kind of work absolutely helps students in both the real world and in college. In the real world, people have to make phone calls, look people in the eye and ask questions, and figure out answers to problems. This project really helps them do just that — they get to take a look at the world around them, figure out what they don’t like about it, and try to make a change,” Vazzana said.

library in the School District 124 has 12 copies available for student to check out. The public library has 25. On Jan. 20, more than 275 students at the District’s Central Middle School took part in a dance to contribute and support Evergreen Reads, with all admission and concession proceeds going towards copies of the book. The students raised $600 in one hour. Donations were also provided by state Rep. Kelly Burke (D36th), US Bank, County Fair and Corporate Headshot Fundraiser. The donations funded another 150 books. To get involved, contact Angala Iverson at aiverson@d124. org or reach out through the Evergreen Reads Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/EvergreenReads/

Compiled by Joe Boyle

News and events from our archives Local high school districts want southwest suburban junior college • 50 years ago From the Feb. 16, 1967 issue The story: Residents of six local high school districts will go to the polls Saturday to vote on a proposal that would establish a southwest suburban junior college. The referendum was set by Cook County Superintendent of Schools Noble J. Puffer after months of study by a citizens committee working under the leadership of Evergreen Park resident Theodore F. Lownik. Monsignor Edward Roche, pastor of Our Lady of the Ridge Parish, joined many area private and parochial leaders in endorsing the junior college. Almost every local community organization has registered its support of the proposal.

Oak Lawn student is selected to U.S. National Honor Roll • 25 years ago

From the Feb. 13, 1992 issue The story: Oak Lawn Community High School sophomore Terra Fredrick was recognized for academic achievement as a United States National Honor Roll winner. With this honor, Fredrick, 16, will be listed in the United States Achievement Academy official yearbook. She will also be eligible for several scholarships because of her academic standing. Fredrick has received other awards. She was the salutatorian when she graduated from Simmons Middle School in Oak Lawn and managed to maintain a straight “A” average. The quote: “I try to study at least three hours every night,” Fredrick said. “I’m used to it, it comes natural to me. I get home from track at about six, so after supper I start to do my homework.”

Hickory Hills business owners debated no-smoking policy • 10 years ago

From the Feb. 15, 2007 issue The story: Hickory Hills business owners are divided on whether the city should let them decide if smoking is allowed in their establishments, according to a citywide survey. Nearly all owners of alcohol-serving establishments oppose a restrictive smoking ban, fearing a negative economic impact, according to the survey. Ald. Thomas McAvoy (3rd Ward) conducted the survey. He said the results may be somewhat skewered because some non-smoking businesses had no vested interest in responding. The quote: “I was surprised that so many took the time to write letters and really get their views heard,” McAvoy said.


Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Reporter

WHATIZIT?

5

SXU students get uplifting advice Advocate Christ Medical Center president gives tips to unlocking potential By Kelly White

Photo by Joe Boyle

The clue for this week’s Whatizit photo (above) is: Water walk. Send your responses with your name and hometown by noon Monday to thereporter@comcast.net. We had a few readers who correctly answered last week’s quiz. The correct answer was the Hamilton B. Maher Community Center at 3450 97th St., just across the street from Klein Park (also known as Circle Park) in Evergreen Park. This was previously a school and is now used as a recreation facility. Evergreen Park resident Rich Rahn had the right answer. Evergreen Park resident John Schikora also knew it was the Hamilton B. Maher Community Center. John informed us that Maher was a justice of the peace until 1964 when the state removed that position. Maher was elected village clerk in1965 and served until 1985, when he died at 85 years of age. Oak Lawn resident Steve Rosenbaum also knew it was the Maher Center. He said he knew Maher personally and mentioned that he was known by his nickname of “Ham.”

SUDOKU

Kenneth Lukhard, president of Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn, advised students at St. Xavier University to set the bar high for academic success and strive for career goals. Lukhard talked to about 80 students and faculty members last week on “Intellect, Emotional Intelligence and Spirituality — The Three Pillars of Success” as the keynote speaker during the Graham School of Management’s Spring Speaker Series last week at the Chicago university. “Think about the legacy of building your life,” Lukhard said during presentation to students and staff. “Will you strive to be the very best version of you?” The Graham School of Management’s Mentoring Program is where students can meet their mentor/advisor, plan their professional career path and learn the importance of planning for the future. This is the first time that Lukhard has spoken at the event. “I have attended almost every Speaker Series Mentoring Event since my freshman year,” said St. Xavier student Madison Lembeck, 21. “I always feel more inspired when I leave these events and I always gain new knowledge. I was especially looking forward to hearing what Mr. Lukhard had to say in his speech.” In his speech, students were able to hear about his life journey

Eighty students and faculty members at St. Xavier University listened to Kenneth Lukhard, president of Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn, during a talk on achieving your goals last Thursday at the Chicago campus. Photo by Kelly White

and his professional success story, and how he got to where he is today. Lukhard also explained the three pillars of success in his eyes. “Your minds are extraordinary,” said Lukhard. “Every person in this room has huge potential. The key to unlock that potential is the desire to learn, and the desire to learn sets you on a destination to a lifelong journey of learning.” Lukhard encouraged students to think and dream big. He discussed how self-regard, in his opinion, is a corner stone to having a successful life. “Self-regard, optimism, selfrespect, independence, motivation and confidence are the keys to having a deep emotional intelligence,” said Lukhard. “You need to allow for mistakes, correct them and only hold yourself responsible.”

As president of Advocate Christ Medical Center, Lukhard serves a 749-bed campus that is ranked one of the nation’s top five large healthy systems by Truven Analytics in 2013. With 12 hospitals and more than 250 sites of care, it performs as the largest integrated health system in Illinois. Lukhard’s current team has won numerous awards and received recognition for clinical outcomes, patient and associate satisfaction and nursing excellence. Over the course of his 30 years of hospital CEO experience, four of his hospitals have achieved the “100 Top Hospital” designation during his tenure. He originally studied to be a Presbyterian minister and subsequently earned his bachelor of arts degree in theology and his first graduate degree in counseling. After several years as a minister

and psychological counselor, he entered healthcare and earned a graduate degree in health services administration from the University of San Francisco. He is married and has seven children and six grandchildren. St. Xavier’s Dean of the Graham School of Management Asghar Sabbaghi chooses the business leaders who have been successful and can reflect on their mentoring experience and success stories that could be inspiring to our students for the annual mentoring event. Sabbaghi had met Lukhard through the GSM Business Advisory Council members and identified him for this event, because he felt Lukhard would be an inspiring speaker for the university’s students. “He (Lukhard) is one of the key leaders in the healthcare management field,” Sabbaghi said.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

HICKORY HILLS Hickory Hills Park District to host preschool open house

Answers on Page 9

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

The Hickory Hills Park District will host a preschool open house from 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23 at the Cynthia Neal Rec Center, 8047 W. 91st Place, Hickory Hills. The open house is for those parents who would like to enroll their child in a preschool program for the first time for the 2017-18 school year. An informational pamphlet on the preschool program will be available that night or by calling (708) 598-1233 to have one mailed.

OAK LAWN Learn to Swim Lessons with Oak Lawn Park District

ACROSS

DOWN

1 One capsule, say 5 Metaphorical sticking points 10 Jacob’s twin 14 App that connects riders with drivers 15 Hard pattern to break 16 Prominent giraffe feature 17 *Sing on key 19 Skedaddle 20 “Please, I’ve heard enough,” in texts 21 Speaker on a soapbox 22 Cutlass automaker 23 Jungle adventure 25 Store with Kenmore appliances 27 Sloppy 30 Corsage flower 33 Players in a play 36 Severely injure 38 Crystal-bearing rock 39 Illuminated 40 *Try, with “at” 42 Civil War soldier 43 Desert building brick 45 Fashion magazine that’s also a French pronoun 46 In-flight predictions: Abbr. 47 Trickery 49 Discourage 51 24-__ gold 53 Draft choices 57 Whitewater ride 59 One with a bleeping job 62 Feel sorry about 63 Notable periods 64 Make available, as merchandise ... and a hint to the start of the answers to starred clues 66 Law business 67 Entices 68 Continent explored by Marco Polo 69 “__ old thing” 70 Lyric poem 71 Neighbor of Kent.

1 Tear conduits 2 Bush successor 3 Sans __: type style 4 Make a mistake 5 Compelling charm 6 Pro __: in proportion 7 Share a border with 8 Lushes 9 Hi-fi system 10 Implement, as laws 11 *Underestimate 12 Breezed through, as a test 13 Luau instruments 18 Days of old 24 Tsp. or tbsp. 26 Constellation named for a mythological ship 28 Rescue 29 On-ramp sign 31 Original thought 32 Belles at balls 33 Not naked 34 Teacher’s helper 35 *Cattle enterprise 37 Bachelor party attendee 40 Estate beneficiary 41 Warm up for the game 44 “I’m baffled” 46 Unit of work 48 Bring down the running back 50 Make, as a living 52 Prepare to drive, as a golf ball 54 Wipe clean 55 Altercation 56 Family auto 57 Foul callers, at times 58 Operatic song 60 Fictional sleuth Wolfe 61 Went like the wind 65 It may be tipped by a gentleman

Answers on Page 9

The Oak Lawn Park District is offering a variety of Learn to Swim Lessons, levels 1-5, for ages 5 and up, on Saturdays, Feb. 18 through March 25, at Oak Lawn Community High School, 9400 Southwest Highway. Lesson times will be held from 9 to 9:50 a.m., 10 to 10:50 a.m. and 11 to 11:50 a.m. The program is designed to teach swim skills to toddlers, children and adults in a positive and safe environment. With an emphasis on fun, the park district offers lessons that emphasize logical skills progression, water-safety awareness and endurance. Participants are assessed on their individual ability and will be promoted to the next level when they have completed the necessary skill requirements. The registration fee is $63 for residents and $69 for non-residents. Registration will be offered by calling (708) 857-2225 or visiting www.olparks.com.

Listen to rock ‘n’ roll and support veterans Residents can listen to support veterans by listening to The Heartbeats in s tribute to “The Legends of Rock ‘n Roll” from 7:30 to 11 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 at the Johnson-Phelps VFW Post, 9514 S. 52nd Ave., Oak Lawn. The band will play the music of Elvis Presley, The Buckinghams, Jay and the Americans, Neil Diamond and more. Donation is $20 per person and includes dinner and the show. An open bar will be available. No tickets will be sold at the door. Reservations can be arranged by calling (708) 423-5220 or stop in at the post after the noon hour daily. More information can be obtained at www.oaklawnvfw.com.

Oak Lawn film group to view, discuss the movie ‘Stardust’ CineVerse, the Oak Lawn Park District’s weekly film discussion group open to anyone age 17 and older, will screen and discuss the 2007 movie “Stardust” from 7 to 10 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22 at the Oak View Community Center, 4625 W. 110th St., Oak Lawn. Members can check the building signage for the correct room numbers. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 529-9028 or visit cineversegroup.blogspot.com.

Worship service to be held at Grace Community Church The Oak Lawn Clergy and Religious Workers Association will host a service of Worship and Prayer for Christian Unity at 3 p.m. Feb. 26 at Grace Community Church, 10415 S. Kedvale Ave., Oak Lawn. The theme of the Christian unity service is “The Love of Christ Compels Us.” It was prepared by church leaders in Germany shaped by the Lutheran-Roman Catholic Commission on Unity’s report, “From Conflict to Communion.” With this year marks the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, the service focuses on a celebration of Jesus Christ and his work of reconciliation. The service will include a celebration of God’s love and will also address the deep

divisions that afflict the church and take steps toward reconciliation. Participants from a broad number of Oak Lawn churches will include musical groups, musicians, pastors and lay people. A time of refreshments and fellowship will follow

Fish Fry Fridays to begin at Stony Creek Restaurant Fish Fry Fridays are being offered at the Stony Creek Restaurant and Banquets, 5850 W. 103rd St., Oak Lawn. Open seating is available from 3 to 8 p.m. through April 14. The all-you-can-eat menu price includes fresh made creamy clam chowder or Stony Creek garden salad, dinner rolls, homemade coleslaw, lightly seasoned and breaded fresh fruit, homemade hush puppies, baked potato or french fries. Shrimp po’ boy is made to order for $6.95 a sandwich. The cost is $12.95 for adults and $7.95 for children, ages 10 and under. Tax and gratuity are not included in price. A cash bar is available. For more information, contact (708) 857-2433.

Oak Lawn Park District to take trip to see ‘Saturday Night Fever Show’ The Oak Lawn Park District is headed to the Drury Lane in Oakbrook on Thursday, March 2 for the “Saturday Night Fever Show.” The bus will depart at 11 a.m. from the Community Pavilion, 9401 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Lawn, and is scheduled to return at 5 p.m. The fee is $80 for residents and $90 for non-residents. The show is recommended for ages 13 and over. Some of the material may be sensitive for younger viewers. The production is based on the 1977 hit film. “Saturday Night Fever” follows Brooklyn teen Tony Manero in his attempt to escape his tribulations by spending weekends at the local discotheque. Tony tries to win the admiration of the crowd and his heartthrob, Stephanie Mangano, with his dance moves. The show features Bee Gees songs from the movie such as “Stayin’ Alive,” “More Than a Women,” and “Night Fever.” Lunch will be a choice of pecan crusted tilapia with creamy roasted garlic butter, or grilled boneless pork chop with apple sauerkraut, garden salad, dinner rolls, choice of non-alcoholic beverage, chef’s selection of potato, vegetable and dessert. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 857-2200.

these two open the door for others to shine as well, in this popular, big song and dance musical for the whole family. Tickets are available at the Oak View Center by calling (708) 857-2200 or online at www.olparks.com.

PALOS HILLS

Playschool open house to be held at Recreation Center Open houses for Playschool and SMALL programs will be held from 10 a.m. to noon Monday, Feb. 20 and 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23 at the City of Palos Hills Resource and Recreation Center, 8455 W. 103rd St. The Playschool program is offered to kids ages to 5. The SMALL program is offered to 2- and 3-year-olds not old enough for our Playschool program. Teachers from both programs will be on hand to show parents and kids each room as well give an explanation of each program’s curriculum.

Free financial seminar to be held at Community Center The Palos Hills Resource and Recreation Department will be hosting a free financial seminar for recent retirees or close to retirement at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28 at the Palos Hills Community Center, 8455 W. 103rd St., Palos Hills. Scott Johnson, from the Palos Hills Office of Edward Jones Investments, will be the guest speaker at the 30-minute program. Johnson’s financial advisor columns appear each week in The Reporter. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 430-4500.

WORTH ‘Princess Ball’ at Terrace Centre The Daddy-Daughter Night “Princess Ball” will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24 at the Worth Park District Terrace Centre, 11500 S. Beloit Ave. Little girls can dress up like the fairy princess and attend the ball with her Prince Charming. Music and food will be offered and each couple will be able to take a photo together to remember the night. A balloon drop will also be held. The registration fee is $30 for residents and $35 for non-residents. The registration deadline is Feb. 17. For more information on the Daddy Daughter Ball and other Worth Park District programs and services, call (708) 448-7080 or visit the park district’s website at www.worthparkdistrict.org.

Spring craft and vendor fair will be held at Pilgrim Faith

Lunch Story Craft Mania to be held in Worth

A spring craft and vendor fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 11 at Pilgrim Faith United Church of Christ, 9411 S. 51st Ave., Oak Lawn. Besides 25 crafters and vendors, lunch and coffee will be available for purchase. A raffle will also be offered.. Proceeds from this event will benefit our high school students who are going on a mission trip. More information can be obtained by emailing Kathy Faulkner at kathyf8@yahoo. com No more crafters or vendors are needed.

Lunch Story Craft Mania will be held from noon to 12:45 p.m. Wednesdays, Feb. 22 through March 15, at the Worth Park District Terrace Centre, 11500 S. Beloit Ave. The program is for children ages 3 to 5. The first session will have a different story each week from the same author. Children will explore different stories, discussing them, and making a related project. The registration fee is $20 for residents and $25 for non-residents. For more information can be obtained by calling 708) 448-7080 or visit the park district’s website at www.worthparkdistrict.org.

Oak Lawn Park District Teen Theatre to present ‘High School Musical’ Tickets are available for the Oak Lawn Park District Teen Show Theatre Production of “High School Musical.” The production will run at the Oak View Center, 4625 W. 110th St., Oak Lawn, on Friday, Feb. 10 and Friday, Feb. 17 at 8 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 11 and Saturday, Feb. 18 at 8 p.m.; and Sunday, Feb. 12 and Sunday, Feb. 19 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $17. Disney’s smash hit movie musical comes to life as the star athlete and brainy girl he meets at East High decide to audition for the high school musical. Although many students resent the threat posed to the “status quo,”

Tumbling Toddler sessions will be held at Terrace Centre The Tumbling Toddlers sessions will be held from 10 to 10:45 a.m. Mondays, Feb. 27 through April 3, at the Worth Park District Terrace Centre, 11500 S. Beloit Ave. The classes are for toddlers 18 months to 36 months with an adult. Toddlers will be participating in some gross motor activities such as climbing, running and jumping. The registration fee is $20 for residents and $25 for non-residents. For more information on Tumbling Toddlers and other Worth Park District programs and services, call (708) 448-7080 or visit the park district’s website at www.worthparkdistrict.org.


6 The Reporter

COMMENTARY

THE

Thursday, February 16, 2017

REPORTER

An Independent Newspaper Published Weekly Founded March 16, 1960

Ray Hanania

No simple answers (or tweets) to prevent the violence in Chicago

Common sense approach to illegal immigration needed

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hicago has been in the spotlight the past couple of years for all the wrong reasons. Dealing with crime and how to prevent it has been debated at great length, with no magic formula to dispense with the violence. President Trump has been talking about and tweeting often in regard to Chicago’s crime problems dating back to when he was a candidate. Trump has been, if anything, quite active in his first several weeks in office. He has demanded that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel do something about violent crime in the city. Emanuel and other city officials are correct that the president needs to stop talking about it and start doing something. It’s time for constructive conversations on how to curb crime. Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president, indicated that Trump wants to talk to Emanuel about Chicago violence. Trump has referred to the violence in Chicago about eight times since taking office. It’s about time that Trump and Emanuel actually have a conversation. It’s about time Trump actually visits Chicago and talks to people who live here. First, we agree that there are too many shootings and killings in Chicago. From Jan. 1, 2016 to Dec. 31, 2016, there were 4,367 shootings in the city. This year, from Jan 1 through Feb. 7, there were 359 shootings in Chicago. That is far too many. However, it is too simplistic to say bring in “the Feds,” as Trump suggests, in an effort to curb the crime. Emanuel is correct when he responds that more funding needs to be provided for mentoring programs and to help create jobs in neighborhoods where opportunities are limited. Chicago gets a bad rap overall. Most of the shootings and deaths occur in certain neighborhoods on Chicago’s South Side and the West Side. Armed robberies and shootings don’t occur that often on the city’s North Side and far Southwest Side. And this is not just a Chicago problem. This also is a problem in major cities across the United States. Dr. Darrell Scott, pastor of New Revival Center in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, mentioned to Trump during a recent roundtable discussion that he had conversations with gang members from Chicago willing to talk to the president. After being questioned later by reporters, he said he misspoke and said he had not spoken to any active gang members in Chicago. He blamed the mistatement on fatigue. Perhaps the pastor should worry more about Cleveland, which just completed its deadliest year in terms of shootings in over a decade. Other major U.S. cities that have seen a rise in shootings in 2016 were Baltimore, Houston, Milwaukee, Nashville and Washington, D.C. So, it is not just Chicago. But since the president seems fixated on Chicago, it leaves a negative impression with many people. Fortunately, many people from across the nation and overseas realize there is more to the city than these negative reports. Several first-run commercial TV shows are produced here. We have a beautiful downtown that has Lake Michigan in its front yard. The Chicago Cubs won a World Series, and the Blackhawks have won three Stanley Cup championships this past decade. But it is often a tale of two cities. Emanuel is right. Jobs and training would help eliminate some of the crime that occurs in cities like Chicago. Business and community leaders have to provide a better life for people who face only despair. And in many cases, parents have to provide a better example for their children. We believe Chicago has a lot of offer. That includes the suburban communities that surround it. Our southwest suburbs provide great walking and jogging paths that can be found throughout the Cook County Forest Preserves. Park districts offer programs for kids and adults. A look through our paper also points out there are a lot of fun and educational activities at local libraries. Yes, there is crime in the southwest suburbs, too. But crime does not define these communities. The one advantage our city and suburban communities have over Chicago is that they are not as large and therefore are more manageable. That is why we don’t like it when Chicago takes a lot of hits from people who don’t live in the city or our suburbs. Criticisms of Chicago can extend to our communities as well. We know that Chicago has problems, like other major cities. But making statements that the National Guard has to come in and more people need to be locked up is not solving the real problem. Getting together to discuss solutions is the key. The business owners and the community leaders can play a major role in reviving these neighborhoods. The residents themselves also have to rise to the occasion. And the federal government could be a force in turning this tide instead of just tweeting criticisms.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Citizens irrelevant during state budget mess The word irrelevant has a nasty tone to it. The dictionary definition is “not pertinent, not to the point, and not relating to the subject.” As a citizen of Illinois, I feel very irrelevant when it comes to participating in the democratic process of electing our representatives. As a result of years, even decades, of power hungry politicians whose primary focus is staying in office (rather than representing issues of most benefit to the majority of people), we have become irrelevant to the process. Just look at the gerrymandering of the voting districts in and around Cook County, and you can see the political hacks at work. The result is that the elected officials choose their voters instead of the voters choosing their representatives. This allows for entrenched politicians to stay in office and continue to hire their relatives, friends and connected individuals rather than the most qualified. It also permits those beholden to these scoundrels to provide services and gather votes which will ensure that they continue to dole out favors and jobs on their behalf. Most prominent are the labor unions and those “connected” people and companies who live in a world of their own. The legislature created the financial dilemma we are currently facing. By failing to act to correct past mistakes, most

notably a state employee pension plan that was fine for the police and firefighters but went so far that state workers, other than fire and police, enjoy substantially better benefits than their private industry counterparts. Rarely do you hear of a state employee being fired of suspended for poor job performance. Rather, they’re absorbed under the protection of their “sponsor.” Bruce Rauner was elected governor to change the direction in which the state of Illinois was heading. The Democratic controlled House and Senate, who got us into this financial mess over the past 10 or more years, have failed to correct this mess and blame it all on Rauner Why are we the people not screaming for them to act? Until we the voters decide that Madigan’s excuse for not attending critical meetings to discuss solutions, by stating he had a “schedule conflict” is completely bogus, it will continue to speak volumes about how he can refuse to work on a solution and feel no public outcry for his inaction and deceit. This message is not written as a Democrat, Republican or Independent, but a lifelong Illinois citizen that shudders at the thought of our state or cities being forced into bankruptcy because our elected leaders lacked the will or determination to do their job. — Michael Sutko, Oak Lawn

Trump’s comments, actions impeachable Well, here we go again. President Trump has shown the world that he had no manners. Judge James Robart, of the U.S. District Court in the state of Washington, ordered a nationwide temporary restraining order against a travel ban for refugees that President Trump had ordered against seven countries. When President Trump was notified, he responded by saying, “This so-called judge,” and then called it ridiculous. It is evident that Mr. Trump does not understand the Constitution or the court system. Now Trump says that “if anything happens, blame him (the judge).” That reaction is so juvenile. President Trump had an executive order for a travel ban against seven countries that just so happen to be Muslim countries. There was no reason to just pick on these seven countries. No person or persons had any connection to the 9-11 incidents from those countries. However, there is one country that has had 15 persons of the 19 involved in 9-11 and that country was Saudi Arabia. That question has to be asked of Mr. Trump and his chief assistant, Steve Bannon, as to why Saudi Arabia is not on the list of countries to be banned from travel? Fortunately, the Appeals Court in Washington upheld the stay on the travel ban. The refugees and immigrants can come into the U.S.

Another of Trump’s major insults was the very derogatory comments he made about Judge Criel, of the U.S. District Court, who was to hear Trump’s case about his Trump University. He claimed that the judge was no good because he had Mexican parents. It is hard to imagine anyone saying such an insult, but especially a person who is our president. Australia has been a true friend of the U.S. In time of peace and war, they were with us. President Trump has embarrassed the American people again by having a heated exchange about the refugee issue by telephone with Malcolm Turnbull, the prime minister of Australia. If President Trump does not control his conduct with Iran, he could get the U.S. into a nuclear war. There are peaceful ways to talk with an adversary about critical issues. But he has not demonstrated any professional conduct on any issue. If Trump starts a war with Iran, they will answer by sending most of their nuclear weaponry aimed into Israel. Then it gets complicated! The American people deserve an honorable president and in only four weeks, he is not fit to be our president. The U.S. Congress should start the impeachment process for his removal from office now. — Dean Koldenhoven, Palos Heights

Thanks to ‘Good Samaritan’ who returned wallet Saturday morning, Feb. 4, I inadvertently dropped my wallet while loading groceries in the Hickory Hills Fairplay parking lot. About an hour later, our front doorbell rang. I opened the door to see someone holding my wallet. At the time I didn’t even realize it was missing. I was a bit dumbfounded to see him with my wallet which contained over 60 dollars, two credit cards, and driver’s license. I didn’t know quite how to react and began thumbing through the wallet to give

him a reward. He replied, “The money’s all there.” (He probably thought I was checking to see if any money was missing.) He did not want a reward and began walking away. I was able to shake his hand and ask his name, which was John. I wish I would have asked his full name. John, you have restored my faith in the goodness of mankind. The world needs more men as honorable as you. — Lee Fahrner, Hickory Hills

We want to hear from you! Letters should be 350 words or less.  Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Writers must also include their address and phone number for verification, but that information will not be published and will remain otherwise confidential. Mail letters to the editor to: The Reporter, 12247 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463 or e-mail us at thereporter@comcast.net

ot being a politician, President Trump probably rushed too quickly to crack down on the nation’s immigration problem. America has an immigration problem that’s not about losing jobs or even protecting civil rights, but rather is about being able to control who enters this country to keep the criminals out. An estimated 13 million illegal immigrants live in America. President Trump and others estimate about 3 million of them are engaged in crimes, other than being illegal immigrants. A common problem involves illegal immigrants who drive without insurance and get in accidents with other citizens who are left holding the bag. The illegal immigrant can hide and “disappear,” leaving the victim dealing with the terrible costs of bad accidents that sometimes involve serious injuries and hospitalization costs. That’s unfair. Illinois adopted a law allowing illegal immigrants to obtain a special driver’s license if they obtain insurance and pass basic driving instructions, including knowing and understanding English. It helps, but it’s not a solution. Politics has enflamed the debate pushing people to either the extreme right or the extreme left. We need to get people back in the middle. The common sense approach mandates a system that stops the illegal flow of immigration into America, not just from Mexico, but from Canada, too. Both Canada and Mexico have large immigration. Canada will arrest and deport you while Mexico did the same until only a few years ago. The largest illegal immigration into Mexico comes from Guatemala. Trump’s idea to build a wall sounds worse than it really is. All he is doing is reinforcing border restrictions that are in place to prevent people from entering the country illegally. We must know who is coming in and who is going out to protect our citizens. Every nation does the same thing. Many of the illegals crossing the border are like El Chapo Guzman, the murderous drug kingpin who runs the Sinaloa Drug Cartel and who has taken the lives of hundreds of thousands of innocent people, including many Americans. El Chapo crisscrossed the MexicanU.S. border for years but was arrested in 1993. He managed to bribe his way out of a Mexican jail, exploiting Mexico’s massive government corruption. He was only recently re-arrested and extradited to the United States where hopefully he will rot until he dies. Sinaloa is but one of a dozen cartels that operate in Mexico but rely on bribery and violence to protect their drug sales. The politics of immigration fuels the anger and the growing hatred that has divided this country. On the right, there is tendency to want to crack down hard. On the left, there is a tendency to issue a blanket amnesty and leave the borders open for anyone to enter. I fault people like Cong. Luis Gutierrez (D-4th), who has advocated for immigration reform for two decades but has achieved nothing because he refuses to compromise. But Gutierrez benefits politically from the debate. As long as illegal immigration remains unresolved, he will benefit politically. The politics of illegal immigration needs to stop. In 1986, President Reagan signed a sweeping immigration reform bill that gave amnesty to every illegal immigrant in the country before 1982. He also said he would tighten the border to prevent more foreigners from illegally entering the country, but he failed. And the problem started all over again. There is a middle ground. We need a reasonable immigration policy that imposes effective controls on who enters to keep the bad guys like El Chapo out. It also needs to show compassion for many illegal immigrants who have lived here for years abiding by our other laws while the issue has remained unresolved. No one has proposed a commonsense middle ground solution to end the problem. We can’t do that if everyone takes sides and calls each other names, fear-mongering for political benefit. That’s the real immigration challenge we face. Ray Hanania is an award-winning writer and author and former Chicago City Hall reporter. Email him at rghanania@gmail.com.


Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Reporter

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St. Gerald Parish brings back 1920s era with Bootlegger’s Ball By Kelly White St. Gerald parishioners boogied the night away on Saturday as the Catholic community hosted a Bootlegger’s Ball dinner dance for staff members, faculty, parishioners and parents with a jazzy 1920s theme. “We’ve never been to a Bootlegger’s Ball before so we decided to enjoy a night out and have a good time with the St. Gerald community,” said Tim Selvage, of Oak Lawn. Selvage attended the event at the parish, 9320 S. 55th Court, Oak Lawn, with his wife, Katie, and the couple joined many others in being decked out in complete 1920’s attire. The age 21 and older event attracted 200 people, surpassing the 125 people that attended the 2016 event. All attendees were asked to dress in 1920’s attire to coincide with the night’s theme. The annual dinner dances have been taking place at St. Gerald

for over 20 years, focusing on a different theme every year. St. Gerald School principal, Al Theis, said this year has been his favorite theme yet. “This year’s dinner dance has been the most fun ever, even in the preparation stage,” Theis said. “I think everyone who attended will be buzzing with excitement throughout the coming year. This was truly one not to miss.” “People who attended were able to enjoy a fun evening with fellow parishioners,” said the Rev. Lawrence Malcolm, pastor of St. Gerald. “It strengthens the community and provides a means of supporting our school, which also strengthens our community.” The event brought together former Oak Lawn community members as well, including Dave Suszek and his wife, Sherri, of Clarendon Hills. “I grew up in Oak Lawn,” Suszek said. “It’s always nice

Photo by Kelly White

Joseph Tauer (from left), of Oak Lawn, and his wife, Julie, attended the St. Gerald Bootlegger’s Ball on Saturday night in Oak Lawn, with their friends, Dave and Sherri Suszek.

to come back to the area.” The Suszeks attended with their friends, Joseph and Julie Tauer,

of Oak Lawn, and St. Gerald parishioners. “St. Gerald is the oldest Cath-

olic Church in Oak Lawn and we are an active and vibrant parish,” said Annemarie Blaha, volunteer committee member and event marketer for St. Gerald. “Our annual dinner dance is open not only to parishioners, but friends, too. It’s a chance to spend the evening enjoying good food, socializing with friends.” The event was organized by Debbie Janicke, director of development at St. Gerald. She said she has a huge hardworking and committed committee of volunteers who helped put together the event. To attend, tickets were sold at $50 per person with all proceeds from the event go directly to the school’s operating expenses to fill the gap between tuition received and school expenditures that have accumulated throughout the school year. The $50 ticket price included a catered dinner buffet and dessert. To keep the crowd on their toes,

DEATH NOTICES

Memories of snowy days, watching from the window

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f you’re from Chicago, if you know someone from Chicago, or if you want to be from Chicago, then you’ve heard of the Great Blizzard of ’67. For those of you from Des Moines or further west, just know it was a huge deal. On Jan. 26, 1967, snow began falling and did not dissipate for 29 hours. Approximately 23 inches fell. The front pages of the newspapers showed abandoned and mostly buried cars littering the streets and expressways. Time seemed to stand still. Well, maybe not time itself, but just about everything else. I was just a little girl then, a scrappy 7-year-old with braids and freckles. We lived out in the prairies, which are now the far western suburbs. I sat on the back of the sofa with my nose pressed to the window watching my sisters and the neighborhood kids sledding down the huge drifts in a sea of white. Every winter I had to sit out of a lot of outdoor activities due to severe asthma. So I watched, sometimes laughing as they tumbled off their sleds at the bottom of the hills and drifts. When they would come in red-faced and shivering, dropping their wet clothes near the back door, I would pick up a random mitten with bits of crusted snow and hold it to my cheek. We have a cottage on a lake in Michi-

St. Laurence Continued from Page 1

will allow our students to see very little change in their school day. To foster collaboration, we will open up activities before and after school and will develop a selection of coed electives to provide students opportunities to interact.” The relatively small number of eighth-grade girls who took the entrance exam at Queen of Peace last month will not be offered spots at St. Laurence in the fall, officials said, but the school will begin marketing itself to both boys and girls and will accept both in the freshman class starting in the fall of 2018. At that point, St. Laurence’s plan is to educate freshmen and sophomores as separately as possible under one roof and then move those students into co-educational classes as juniors and seniors. St. Laurence officials also indicated they will not assume control of any Queen of Peace property, including its financial debt. They also were clear that the move does

Siegel

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served as deputy Cook County coroner from 1962 to 1971. He worked as the assistant chief to the Cook County Sheriff’s Office from 1971 to 1986. He was the administrative assistant to the state treasurer from 1986 to 1992. He became a full-time mayor in 1993. Prior to that, it was a part-time position. In a story that appeared in The Reporter at the time of his retirement, he said his first salary was $1,500 a year and he had to have a second job to support his family. At the time of his retirement, he was making over $80,000 a year. Siegel first ran for mayor when Joe Coglianese, the previous mayor, and five village trustees were indicted on charges of receiving kickbacks for rezoning properties. “He became mayor in difficult times,” said Palos Hills Mayor Gerald Bennett. “I’ve

Hickory Hills Continued from Page 1

Presenting the request was Dan Maier, recreation director, who said this will be the first carnival for the park district. “We are planning to hold it

gan. It’s a year-round home and although our kids spent the first few winters ice skating and learning to ski, summer will always be the main draw. In an effort to get everyone up to the cottage last month, we put together a weekend Janet sledding event for our Boudreau family, including our two little granddaughters. We pulled out all of the old sleds from the garage rafters, bundled up in layers and headed off to a nearby state park. In all of these years I’ve never sledded. I thought I broke my ankle the first time I stood on ice skates and skiing is pretty much a death wish as far as I’m concerned. Yet I never forgot that feeling of being left out years ago, wanting to feel that rush of air and thrill of almost flying as all the kids did during that blizzard. This time around I wanted to be the one sailing down the hill, rolling in the snow and laughing. My daughter and I stood inside the warming shelter, which is much like a metal shed with windows. There’s a huge stone fireplace and chopped wood if you are making a day of it. Emily held her

little baby, Madelyn, just 3 months old, wrapped in layers and layers of warm blankets. We watched out the windows as our crazy family flew down the hill, screamed, tumbled, rolled and dragged themselves back up for ... just one more! I was wrapping my scarf around tighter, fixing my eyes on the top of the hill, ready to make that climb. Surprisingly, it was taking a lot more courage than I thought I would need. Then Emily turned to me. “Mom, will you hold Madelyn? I want to give it a try.” And suddenly I was looking into the eyes of another little girl, my Emily. The one always trying to catch up with her daredevil brothers; the tiny little girl who sat on the beach while everyone swam to the raft and dived off; Dad’s little helper in cleaning up the boat every spring but rarely going on the lake. This was going to be a big deal. I took the baby from her and smiled. I watched through the window as she climbed the hill while I cradled and cooed to little Maddie. And I knew the thrill was all mine. Janet Boudreau is a writer, blogger, and a longtime resident of Evergreen Park where she enjoys cooking, gardening, reading and generally anything that doesn’t require a lot of energy. You can reach her at blndy9@yahoo.com.

not represent a merger with Queen of Peace — that the girls will be St. Laurence students. Many questions about Queen of Peace itself remain unanswered, including what will happen to the Queen of Peace building and grounds at 7659 S. Linder. A request for comment on St. Laurence’s announcement yielded a more general expression from Anne O’Malley, president of Queen of Peace. “We are grateful to the St. Laurence community and excited about what the future holds for our young women,” she said, in part. “While we are broken hearted to see Queen of Peace close, we find solace in the fact that many of our students will remain together until they graduate. The Queen of Peace leadership will work diligently with St. Laurence to make sure this is a smooth and successful transition for the students of both schools.” As they did a week ago, graduates of both schools, as well as mothers, fathers and even grandparents registered their opinions on Facebook and other social

media sites. “A week ago, my daughter and her (Queen of Peace) classmates were panicked and distraught, holding each other and crying,” one mother posted in a Facebook group. “Today, they’re holding each other and crying — but for a very, very different reason. They’re relieved and overjoyed. They’re at peace. Thank you so much, St. Laurence. What you did today is literally life-changing for my daughter and her friends.” Going co-educational was something St. Laurence had started to consider, even before Queen of Peace announced its shutdown. “St. Laurence has seen growth in its enrollment in recent years, but the trends of Catholic education in Chicago cannot be ignored,” its statement on Tuesday added. “Fewer and fewer students are going to single-sex high schools.” St. Laurence officials made it clear Tuesday that their decision was not an act of charity. They said Peace students are “a strong group of young women

who, should they choose a St. Laurence education, will offer our community a new and valuable dynamic as they finish their high school careers together. These young women will bring intellectual opinions and experiences that differ from our male students, yet their familiarity and background with Queen of Peace’s STEAM program will align well with St. Laurence’s project-based curriculum. In the end, we believe our team-driven environment will only improve the exchange of ideas between students and help all of them prepare for the challenges ahead.” To begin the transition, St. Laurence was set to host two town hall-style meetings this week — one for parents of its own students and another for Queen of Peace parents. To a limited degree, the schools have conducted co-educational activities over the years, most notably the inclusion of Peace girls in the St. Laurence band and rebranding it with Queen of Peace’s name.

known Gene for 32 years. It’s a sad day. He has been a legend in Chicago Ridge and his many accomplishments for the village are remarkable. He really built Chicago Ridge back up.” Bennett added that he served with Siegel on the Southwest Conference of Mayors, the Illinois Municipal League, Metropolitan Mayor’s Caucus and Southwest Central Dispatch. Bennett is the current president of the Southwest Conference of Mayors. “It’s a personal loss for me,” Bennett said. “Everyone who knew him liked him. He was a tremendous family man. He loved his kids and his grandkids.” In a previous story that appeared in The Reporter, Siegel said his first major project was creating a two-million gallon reservoir. The village bought its water from onetime Oak Lawn Mayor Fred Dumke, who advised Siegel to build a pumping station and reservoir in case there were problems with Oak Lawn’s

distribution system. But the project that Siegel has been most hailed for was the development of the Chicago Ridge Mall and later the adjacent Chicago Ridge Commons. “The mall made us. It made Chicago Ridge,” Siegel once told The Reporter. “The mall was built in the early 1980s, and it gave Chicago Ridge a tax base. We didn’t have paved sidewalks to go from one side of the street to the other, so this was a big improvement. With that money, we were able to pave the streets, put in curbs and gutters, and put in storm sewers and low-vapor street lights. Our little village became modern.” “Out of the few dealings I had with him, I learned a lot from Gene,” said Evergreen Park Mayor James Sexton. “He was the consummate professional. He worked a lot with Tony Vacco (the longtime mayor of Evergreen Park before Sexton). He was always stumping around the state

for Chicago Ridge. He was a fine man.” Tokar also mentioned that Siegel wanted to reopen the firehouse at 107th and Lombard, which became a reality last year. Creating a fire department with full-time and part-time employees was a goal of his, along with adding certified paramedics. Tokar said that Siegel oversaw the creation of the tax increment financing district along 100th Street along Harlem Avenue and as far as Southwest Highway. The Chicago Ridge Board unanimously approved the rezoning for that TIF District last month. “He was a great guy,” added Tokar. “He took me by the hand and taught me about politics.” Siegel’s first wife, Virginia, died in 1996. Survivors include his wife, Linda (nee Wilkins); daughter, Janet Kappel; sons, Gary, Andrew and Matthew Siegel; stepson, John Herring; sister, Loretta Dubovik; brother, Jerome Siegel; and seven grandchildren.

at the bottom of the hill in the park. ... It will be very familyoriented, with rides and games for the kids,” he said. Maier listed the hours as 5 to 10 p.m. on Thursday, May 11; 5 to 11 p.m. on Friday, May 12; noon to 11 p.m. on Saturday, May 13; and noon to 10 p.m. on Sunday,

May 14. He added that on May 12, the carnival will also be open from 3 to 5 p.m., for people with special needs and their families. “It will be free to them for those two hours,” Maier said. Howley told Maier that he did not have any concerns regarding

the carnival. “I have seen how you and your crew have run many successful events. You are professionals. I have no worries about how this event will go,” he said. Also approved was a $200 donation made annually to the Hills Baseball/Softball Association.

music was played from the 1920s through contemporary tunes by the Outcast Jazz Band, led by Tom Fagan. The Outcast Jazz Band emerged from Chicago’s Beverly area in the early 1980s, founded in the summer of 1981 by the late Gilbert “Smokey” Robinson. They currently have 17 members with five saxophones, four trombones, four trumpets, a full rhythm section, as well as several vocalists. The band also played at the 2016 event. “They’re really good and they’re also good ole Catholic boys,” Blaha said. “Guests were able to listen to one of the finest bands in Chicago, all while raising money for St. Gerald School.” “We had some of the most talented entertainers that wowed the crowd,” Theis said. Roaring Raffles also took place throughout the event, which included a deluxe remote car starter, a 39-inch class full array LED Smart TV, and a Chromebook.

Ann Ethell Ann M. Ethell, 73, a Hickory Hills resident, died Feb. 7 in Fort Myers, Fla. Ms. Ethell once worked for a travel agency in Hickory Hills. She left no immediate survivors. Visitation is from 3 to 9 p.m. today (Thursday, Feb. 16) at Lack & Sons Funeral Home, 9236 S. Roberts Road, Hickory Hills. Services are at 9:30 a.m. Friday from the funeral home to St. Patricia Church, 9050 S. 86th Ave., Hickory Hills, for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment will be private.

Rita Olewinski Rita K. Olewinski (nee Halper), 90, a Palos Hills resident, died Saturday at Palos Hospital. Mrs. Olewinski was a member of the Englewood Outdoor Club and many years of service with Time, Inc. Survivors include a son, Rob; sister, Frances Jeziorski; brother, Donald Halper; and many nieces and nephews. Services were Tuesday at Palos-Gaidas Funeral Home. Interment took place at Resurrection Cemetery.

Elizabeth Shaughnessy Elizabeth Shaughnessy (nee Whitman), 68, a resident of Hickory Hills, died Feb. 8 at Loyola Medical Center. Mrs. Shaughnessy was an employee for 30 years at Heinemann’s Bakery. Survivors include sons, Paul Smith, David Smith and Wayne Powers; five grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a nephew and a niece. Services were Monday at Central Funeral Chapel. Interment followed at Resurrection Cemetery.

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8 The Reporter

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Don’t keep family in the dark about your plans

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Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers restaurant is now open in Oak Lawn.

Photo by Bob Bong

COMINGS & GOINGS

Raising Cane’s opens in Oak Lawn

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ouisiana-based Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers opened its second Chicago-area restaurant in Oak Lawn on Valentine’s Day. The first opened Jan. 31 in North Riverside. The location at 11006 S. Cicero Ave. is the site of the former Abracadabra Salon and Spa and opened to the public at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 14. “The people of North Riverside welcomed our first area restaurant with open arms just a couple of weeks ago, and we can’t wait to start sharing our one love Bob Oak Lawn,” General Bong with Manager Melissa Cowell said in a release. “My awesome crew and I have already started partnering with the local community and we’re looking forward to opening our doors and showing our new neighbors just how great chicken finger meals can be.” Along with its focus on chicken fingers, Raising Cane’s is renowned for its commitment to active involvement in its local communities. On Feb. 8, Cowell and her fellow crewmembers volunteered their time at the Children’s Museum in Oak Lawn, interacting with the kids during story time and at the building stations and arts and crafts areas. The crew also helped with a deep cleaning of the facility. “The Children’s Museum is one of the true treasures of Oak Lawn, so we we’re honored to pitch in there for our pre-opening service project,” said Cowell. “And we’re just getting started with our outreach initiatives. We’ll be partnering with the schools and other local organizations in the coming weeks and months to do our part to support this wonderful community.” Hours will be Sunday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to midnight. The eatery has about 75 employees. The company was founded by Todd Graves in 1996 and named for his yellow Labrador. The Oak Lawn location is the

311th in the chain. A third Raising Cane’s is projected to open in Naperville in April.

Aldi unveils nationwide remodeling plan Aldi last week announced that it will spend $1.6 billion over the next three years to remodel and expand more than 1,300 stores in the U.S. including stores in Frankfort and Orland Park. That’s on top of its $3 billion plan to open 650 new stores in the U.S. by the end of 2018. One of those new stores will be built at the corner of Archer and Harlem avenues in the Garfield Ridge neighborhood of Chicago across the street from southwest suburban Summit. A company spokesman said, “We are committed to opening an Aldi store in Chicago at Archer Avenue and Harlem Avenue, with construction currently planned to begin in spring 2017 and an anticipated opening by the end of 2017.” The new store will be built on the former site of Joe & Frank’s Market, which will be razed, along with two other buildings immediately south on Harlem Avenue and a couple of nearby homes. The new store will be an L-shaped format similar to the Aldi location at 132nd Street and LaGrange Road in Orland Park. After the new store opens, a traditional warehouse-style store operated by Aldi at 5775 S. Archer will close.

Jeweler closes in Frankfort Dreher-Weber Jewelers at 21116 S. LaGrange in the Frankfort Crossing shopping center closed recently after 33 years in Frankfort. If you see a new business in town or wonder what happened to an old favorite, drop me a line at bobbong@hotmail.com. You can also catch up on Comings & Goings in other parts of the Southland at www. southlandbusinessnews.com and www.southlandsavvy.blogspot.com.

AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERS Following are the property transfers in the area, according to the latest report, as received from the Cook County Recorder of Deeds Office. The Reporter Newspaper does not attempt to correct errors made by that office.

Evergreen Park

Foley Ann T to Manilla Catherine, 2836 W 102nd Pl, $115,000; Molis Derek J to Orourke Daniel, 9904 S Trumbull Ave, $129,000; PB-SW SFR LLC to Signature Homes 4U Inc, 9400 S Avers Ave, $120,000; Keos Realty LLC to Muzereus John P, 9531 S Francisco Ave, $210,000; Lepkowski Sylwester to Vielgo Arnulfo V, 9558 S California Ave, $254,500; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr to Hibbler-Ringo Angela, 3040 W 96th Pl, $155,000; Deutsche Bk Natl Trust Co to Campos Maria D, 10229 S Sawyer Ave, $122,000; Scanlon Victoria Tr to Hannon Kira, 9129 S Hamlin Ave, $150,000; Horvath Mary M to Mcdonnel Craig, 9201 S Lawndale Ave, $115,000.

Hickory Hills

Meyer James E Tr to Marquette Bk Tr, 9201 S 85th Ct, $185,000; Wagner Wanda to Piwowarski Pawel, 9407 S 87th Ave, $240,000; Norville Karen L Tr to Dehaan John E, 9018 Forest Ln, $189,000; FV-1 Inc to Kozieja Katarzyna, 9105 S Roberts Rd, Unit #1C, $95,000; Karatoola Series LLC-8901 Forest Lane LLC to Ahmad Iftikhar, 8901 Forest Ln, $250,000.

Oak Lawn

Masood Saba to Flores Juan A, 9742 S Nashville Ave, $135,000; HSBC Bk USA to Wicherek David V, 9802 Karlov Ave, Units #100&100G, $68,000; American Revival Co to Vera Anna, 11012 Kilpatrick Ave, Unit #11012NE1, $81,000; Alfarah Ayed T to Sweiss Jerry, 4925 W 103rd St, $163,000; Miller Bobby to 6161 W 95th St LLC, 6161 W 95th St, $300,000; Marquette Bk Tr to Rangel Raul, 9930 Cook Ave, $185,000; Casey Sean M Tr to Garcia Fernando Jr, 5729 W 89th Pl, $205,000;

Shalabi Hamzah to Benavidez Belinda J, 4833 109th St, Unit #10204, $75,000; TCF Natl Bk to Arnett Jimmy, 9949 Elm Circle Dr, $100,000; Starostka Sherry A to Leeds Gabriela, 5701 W 88th Pl, $134,500; Celauro Eric to Comiskey Kevin J, 10341 Georgia Ln, $305,000; Genesis Grp Service Co to Jones Benjamin G, 9054 S Parkside Ave, $278,000; Murray Kathy Tr to Ealy Brittany, 9840 Pulaski Rd, Unit #3104, $44,000; EGJK Inc to Hernandez Jeffery L, 9400 S Major Ave, $245,000; Malatt Robert J to Celauro Eric, 5424 W 108th Pl, $382,000; Federal Home Ln Mtg Corp to Mangialardi Gregory, 9912 S Cicero Ave, $92,000; Jennings Claire to Qualls Caius, 9740 Pulaski Rd, Unit #9740509, $52,500; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr to Pena Rosalina, 5273 Kimball Pl, $115,000; Robinson Phyliis to Scott Jacqueline M, 10418 S Keating Ave, Unit #3F, $128,000; Cardenas Alicia to Macmillan John M, 10340 Minnick Ave, $233,000; Krese Michael to Schulz Amy T, 4104 105th St, $185,000.

Palos Hills

Davis Sandra L to Skermont Kathleen, 7859 W 101st Pl, $340,000; Boyle Amy to Fielding Christopher II, 11104 Heritage Dr, Unit #2AB, $122,000; Nowogrodzki Maria to Campas John, 10 Cinnamon Creek Dr, Unit #103N, $143,000; Chicago Title Land Trust Co Tr to Abdelnabi Nisreen, 23 Cour Deauville, $101,000.

Worth

Reitz William E Tr to Jibawi Hussam A, 10850 S Oak Park Ave, $200,000; Sadler Michael W to Raske Mack P Sr, 7514 W 109th Pl, $193,000; Dunajczan Jan to Raj Adam, 6720 W 111th Pl, $225,000; Strejc Jack to Keating Therese M, 11505 S Normandy Ave, $270,000; South Port Desperados Inc to Summitt Real Estate Associates Inc, 11425 S Harlem Ave, $775,000.

ou might work give one of your grown diligently at children the durable building a power of attorney to financial roadmap for pay bills and make your retirement years financial choices on and a comprehensive your behalf if you are estate plan. But you unable to do so. can’t just create these • Estate executor: strategies – you also An executor is the have to communicate person or entity you Scott them. Specifically, Johnson name in your will to you need to inform carry out your wishes. your spouse and your An executor has a grown children what you have variety of responsibilities, so in mind for the future – beyou’ll want to choose someone cause the more they know, the who is honest and capable of fewer the surprises that await dealing with legal and financial them down the road. matters. Again, you could ask Let’s start with your spouse. a grown child to serve as your Ideally, of course, you and your executor, but, to avoid potenspouse should have already tial conflict of interests among communicated about your your children, you might want respective ideas for retirement to go outside the family. Talk and have come to an agreement with an attorney about how on the big issues, such as when best to name your executor. you both plan to retire, where • Status of will and living you’ll live during retirement, trust: Assuming you have and what you want to do as already drawn up a will, retirees (volunteer, travel, work share it with your grown part-time and so on). children. The same is true But what you both might with a living trust, a popuhave let slip through the cracks lar estate-planning tool that are the important specifics may allow your survivors related to financing your retire- to avoid going through the ment. You’ll need to answer time-consuming, public and several questions, including expensive process of probate. these: A will and a living trust will • When will you each start obviously contain a great deal taking Social Security? of information your children • Are there strategies for should know about — so maximizing both of your Sotake the time to explain your cial Security payments? thinking when you created • When will you need to these documents. start tapping into your respecYou want to enjoy a comtive retirement accounts, such fortable retirement, and you as your IRA and 401(k)? And, want to leave a meaningful once you do start withdrawlegacy through your estate ing from these accounts, how plans. To help accomplish both much should you take out each these goals, you need to inyear? clude your loved ones in your You may want to work arrangements – so open those with a financial professional lines of communication. to address these issues, but Edward Jones, its employees however you proceed, you and and financial advisors are not your spouse need to be “on the estate planners and cannot prosame page” regarding the key vide tax or legal advice. You financial components of your should consult your estateretirement. planning attorney or qualified Now, consider your grown tax advisor regarding your children. You need to clearly situation. communicate your estate plans to them, not only for the sake Scott Johnson, CFP, is a of openness and honesty, but financial advisor with Edward also because they may well Jones, 8146 W. 111th St., Palos play active roles within those Hills, (708) 974-1965. Edward plans. So when talking to your Jones does not provide legal children, make sure you cover advice. This article was writthese areas: ten by Edward Jones for use • Durable power of attorby your local Edward Jones ney: You may well decide to financial advisor.

Advocate Christ Medical is ranked 8th-best heart transplant center in U.S. Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn is ranked one of only eight hospitals nationally and the only Chicago-area hospital cited for best heat-transplant outcomes, according to data collected by the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, as reported by Becker’s Hospital Review. The Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR), using data collected from other organizations, assesses outcomes of centers that perform organ transplants. SRTR reports it uses a risk-adjusted assessment to evaluate how often patients are alive with a functioning transplanted organ one year after the transplant and then assigns a score of one (the worst) to five

(the best). “These quality outcomes are the result of teamwork and collaboration between the patient, the patient’s family members, the surgeons, anesthesiologists, cardiologists, nurses and the entire transplant team,” said Pat Pappas, MD, FACS, FACCP, medical director and heart transplant surgeon, Advocate Heart Institute at Christ Medical Center. “I am incredibly humbled by the faith and trust our patients have for our multidisciplinary team and their continued fight for life until a heart becomes available. We are honored to be part of their journey, before, during and after heart transplantation.”

Mortgage Rates Around the Area First Midwest Bank (as of February 13) RATES 4.125

APR 4.160

POINTS 0

15-year fi ed

3.375

3.430

0

30-year fi ed Jumbo

4.250

4.295

0

30-year fi ed

RATES 4.125

APR 4.146

POINTS 0

15-year fi ed

3.375

3.411

0

10-year fi ed

3.250

3.303

0

Prospect Federal (as of February 13) 30-year fi ed

RATES 4.125

APR 4.171

POINTS .25

20-year fi ed

3.875

3.938

.25

15-year fi ed

3.375

3.438

.25

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, DOING BUSINESS AS CHRISTIANA TRUST, NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY, BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE FOR BCAT 2015-14ATT Plaintiff, -v.STANISLAWA MAREK, GREEN OAKS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 2015 CH 11510 9986-9998 S 84TH TR UNIT 109 Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 2, 2017, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 13, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PARCEL 1: UNIT 32-109 IN GREEN OAKS CONDOMINIUM, AS DELINEATED ON A PLAT OF SURVEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND: PARCEL 1: THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, (EXCEPT THAT PART LYING SOUTH OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LINE: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, SAID POINT BEING 12.50 FEET NORTH OF THE NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4; THENCE EASTERLY ON A LINE 12.50 FEET NORTH OF AND PARALLEL WITH SAID NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH 1/2 OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, 225.79 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, 87.31 FEET ALONG A CURVED LINE CONVEX TO THE NORTHEAST HAVING A RADIUS OF 72.50 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY AT AN ANGLE OF 69 DEGREES, AS MEASURED FROM EAST TO SOUTHEAST FROM SAID NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH 1/2 OF THE SAID EAST 1/2 OF THE SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, 118.31 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, 81.29 FEET ALONG A CURVED LINE CONVEX TO THE SOUTHWEST HAVING A RADIUS OF 67.50 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE EASTERLY ON A LINE 187.50 FEET SOUTH OF AND PARALLEL WITH SAID NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH 1/2 OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, 51.62 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY, 192.77 FEET ALONG A CURVED LINE CONVEX TO THE SOUTHEAST HAVING A RADIUS OF 117.50 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY AT AN ANGLE OF 86 DEGREES, AS MEASURED FROM EAST TO SOUTHEAST FROM SAID NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH 1/2 OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4,99.79 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY AT AN ANGLE OF 24 DEGREES, 18 MINUTES, 21 SECONDS, AS MEASURED FROM EAST TO NORTHEAST FROM SAID NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH 1/2 OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, 736.91 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE EASTERLY, AT RIGHT ANGLES TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, 84.68 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, SAID POINT BEING 341.28 FEET NORTH OF THE NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 11) AND ALSO (EXCEPT THAT PART LYING WEST OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LINE: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, SAID POINT BEING 847.38 FEET EAST OF THE WEST LINE OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4; THENCE SOUTHERLY AT RIGHT ANGLES FROM SAID NORTH LINE OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 40 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY AT AN ANGLE OF 77 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 26 SECONDS AS MEASURED FROM EAST TO SOUTHEAST FROM A LINE DRAWN PARALLEL WITH SAID NORTH LINE OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4 A DISTANCE OF 172.21 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE; THENCE SOUTHERLY 169.09 FEET ALONG A CURVED LINE CONVEX TO THE EAST HAVING A RADIUS OF 800 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTHERLY AT AN ANGLE OF 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 04 SECONDS AS MEASURED FROM EAST TO SOUTH FROM A LINE DRAWN PARALLEL WITH SAID NORTH LINE OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 480.05 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE; THENCE SOUTHERLY 101 .91 FEET ALONG A CURVED LINE CONVEX TO THE WEST HAVING A RADIUS OF 417.25 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTHERLY AT AN ANGLE OF 75 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 25 SECONDS AS MEASURED FROM EAST TO SOUTHEAST FROM A LINE DRAWN PARALLEL WITH SAID NORTH LINE OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 14 A DISTANCE OF 159.78 FEET TO THE AFORESAID DESCRIBED LINE FORMING AN ANGLE OF 24 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 21 SECONDS AS MEASURED FROM EAST TO NORTHEAST FROM THE NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4) EXCEPTING THEREFROM SAID TRACT OF LAND, THE NORTH 40 FEET THEREOF AND THE EAST 40 FEET THEREOF (EXCEPT THE NORTH 40 FEET) HERETOFORE DEDICATED, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS PARCEL 2: EASEMENTS FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL 1 SET FORTH IN THE DECLARATION BY MILES L. COLEAN, PAUL P. SWETT, JR. AND ARTHUR W. VINER AS TRUSTEE AND MARQUETTE NATIONAL BANK, AS TRUSTEE UNDER TRUST 369 RECORDED JUNE 24, 1970 AS DOCUMENT 211192785 WHICH PLAT OF SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT ‘’C’’ TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED APRIL 20, 2004 AS DOCUMENT 0411118002 TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS PARCEL 3: EASEMENTS FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL 1 SET FORTH IN DECLARATION BY AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY OF CHICAGO AS TRUSTEE UNDER TRUST AGREEMENT DATED DECEMBER 21, 1976 AND KNOWS AS TRUST NUMBER 39811 RECORDED FEBRUARY 14, 1980 AS DOCUMENT 25362209 Commonly known as 9986-9998 S 84TH TR UNIT 109, Palos Hills, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-11-301-006-1045. The real estate is improved with a condominium. The judgment amount was $122,863.61. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information.

30-year fi ed

United Trust Bank (as of February 13)

LEGAL NOTICE

If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff s attorney: MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C., 134 N LaSalle St., STE 1900, Chicago, IL 60602, (312) 940-8580 Please refer to file number 16-03376. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C. 134 N LaSalle St., STE 1900 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 940-8580 E-Mail: mlgil@mlg-defaultlaw.com Attorney File No. 16-03376 Attorney Code. 59049 Case Number: 2015 CH 11510 TJSC#: 37-1274 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.


The Reporter

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Crisis Center Heart to Heart Gala is accepting reservations

Local legislators will host women’s self-defense seminar State Rep. Frances Hurley (D35th) and state Sen. Bill Cunningham (D-18th) are holding a free seminar to assist women in learning tactics to defend themselves during a session planned from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28 at the Chicago School for Agricultural Sciences, 3857 W. 111th

St., Chicago. Pre-registration is not required but encouraged. The Women’s Self-Defense Seminar will be led by a trained law enforcement officer. More information can be obtained by calling the Hurley’s constituent office, (773) 445-8128.

Beverly Theatre Guild to present ‘Amadeus’ The Beverly Theatre Guild will present Peter Shaffer’s “Amadeus” beginning at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17 and Saturday, Feb. 18 at the Morgan Park Academy Arts Center, 2153 W. 111th St., Chicago. A matinee performance will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19 at the Morgan Park Academy Arts Center. Parking is free. The cast members include Rocco Ayala, Jennifer Schreiner,

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK TRUST, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LSF9 MASTER PARTICIPATION TRUST Plaintiff, -v.GLORIA LEWIS A/K/A GLORIA D LEWIS, BAYPORT CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 16 CH 02685 9840 S PULASKI RD APT 202 Oak Lawn, IL 60453 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 12, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 14, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF COOK AND STATE OF ILLINOIS: UNIT 202-4, IN BAYPORT CONDOMINIUM, AS DELINEATED ON A SURVEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED REAL ESTATE: THE EAST 1/2 OF LOT 3 AND THE EAST 1/2 OF THAT PART OF LOT 2 LYING SOUTH OF THE NORTH 535.48 FEET THEREOF IN BARTOLOMEO AND MILARD SUBDIVISION OF THE SOUTH 36 1/2 ACRES OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 13, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, EXCEPT THE SOUTH 8 1/4 ACRES OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 13, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN COOK COUNTY ILLINOIS WHICH SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT ‘’A’’ TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 25 295 899 TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS. Commonly known as 9840 S PULASKI RD APT 202, Oak Lawn, IL 60453 Property Index No. 24-10-226-066-1074. The real estate is improved with a condominium. The judgment amount was $76,468.11. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff s attorney: MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C., 134 N LaSalle St., STE 1900, Chicago, IL 60602, (312) 940-8580 Please refer to file number 15-15136. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C. 134 N LaSalle St., STE 1900 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 940-8580 E-Mail: mlgil@mlg-defaultlaw.com Attorney File No. 15-15136 Attorney Code. 59049 Case Number: 16 CH 02685 TJSC#: 36-14219 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

9

Photo by Dermot Connolly

Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury talks to Oak Lawn Community High School District 229 Superintendent Michael Riordan following her “State of the Village” address to the Chamber of Commerce during a luncheon Tuesday at the Hilton Oak Lawn, 9333 S. Cicero Ave.

Crisis Center for South Suburbia is inviting community members to reserve seats at their annual Heart to Heart Gala from 6 to 11 p.m. Saturday, March 4 at the Hilton DoubleTree Chicago-Alsip, 5000 W. 127th St. Reservations can be made online at www. crisisctr.org/events/heart-to-heart-gala. The gala, sponsored by Advocate Christ Medical Center, Exelon, InTech Insulation Technology, and Mechanical Equipment, will benefit victims of domestic violence. The Crisis Center welcomes back awardwinning reporter Andrea Darlas, from WGN radio and TV and long-time CCSS honorary board member, as host of the annual benefit. The evening, priced at $100 per ticket, includes cocktails, a four-course dinner, mobile bidding on live and silent auction items, dancing to live entertainment by The Jimmy O and Rhonda Lee Duo, raffles, and more. For reservations, sponsorship opportunities, and additional information visit the website at www.crisisctr.org/events/heartto-heart-gala or contact Christopher Beele at (708) 429-7255, ext. 118.

Brandon Vlach, Thomas Moran, an Evergreen Park resident; Daniel Grillo, Joseph Nowinski, Chicago patch center. She said the to thank Bury and Deetjen Ridge; Ellliot Palmer, Julie Ze911 center handled 182,128 for helping him through bleckis, Meg Massaro, Wayne Continued from Page 1 calls last year. some difficulties when he Wendell, Dave Alberts, Bonnie No one asked questions first bought the business forRyniec, a Palos Hills resident; and and Diana Tousignant, com- following her speech, but merly known as Big Pappa’s Angela Piet Campbell. munications director of the Frank Saez, who owns Gyros at 10806 S. Cicero In the court of the Austrian Em- village’s 911 emergency dis- Papa Frank’s Gyro’s, rose Ave. last year. peror Josef II, Antonio Salieri is the established composer. That it is until Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart arrives. Salieri has devoted himself to God in a bargain so that 12 can take part in a program from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 where they can make various at the Oak Lawn Public Library, he might realize his sole ambition to be a great composer. Mozart is Kids make emoji pillows designs from 7 to 8 p.m. Tues- 9427 S. Raymond Ave. The event day, March 14 at the Chicago will be held in the downstairs foul-mouthed and graceless and over four sessions Ridge Library. Participants can theater at the library. For more has ability beyond Salier’s grasp. Emoji pillows sessions will be use beads and an iron to create a information, call (708) 422-4990 Tickets are $20 and can be obheld from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays, tained by calling (773) 284-8497 March 14 through April 11 at the melted design. More information or visit cineversegroup.blogspot. or visit beverlytheatreguild.org. Chicago Ridge Library, 10400 S. can be obtained by calling the com. library, (708) 423-7753, or visit Oxford. the website at www.chicagoridge- Volunteers to work in Children ages 5 to 12 can come library.org. LEGAL NOTICE the Friends Bookstore to the library and sew a two-sided The Friends of the Oak Lawn IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, emoji pillow. One side will be ILLINOIS Library is accepting applications COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVIa smiley and the other will be for bookstore volunteers, which SION heart eyes. All the supplies will Author, photographer consists of sorting book donations TCF NATIONAL BANK be provided to make this a fun and stocking the store. One fourto discuss his book, Plaintiff, session for kids. The program is hour shift per week is required. -v.‘Chicago Monuments’ limited to 10 participants. JOSEPH P. MANZO JR., CROWN MORTGAGE Volunteer forms are available at COMPANY, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONAuthor and photographer Larry the Customer Services Desk on Kids who take part are expected RECORD CLAIMANTS to attend all four sessions. More Broutman will talk about his new the first floor of the Oak Lawn Defendants information can be obtained by book, “Chicago Monumental” at Library, 9427 S. Raymond Ave. 16 CH 10771 calling the library, (708) 423-7753, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 9 at For more information, call Carole 10950 S. NAGLE AVENUE or visit the website at www.chi- the Evergreen Park Library, 9400 Onwiler at (708) 422-8646. Worth, IL 60482 S. Troy. The book is a photocagoridgelibrary.org. NOTICE OF SALE graphic tribute to over 250 of the Conversation circle will PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Human tic-tac-toe monuments, fountains, memori- be provided for new pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale is offered at library entered in the above cause on November 30, als, and statues in Chicago’s parks English speakers 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales CorporaHuman tic-tac-toe will be held and cemeteries, as well as those tion, will at 10:30 AM on March 22, 2017, at The A conservation circle for new from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, March on the city’s streets and buildings. Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker English speakers will take place Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at 21 at the Chicago Ridge Library. public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth Library hosts Social from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays The program is for children from below, the following described real estate: through May 24 at the Oak Lawn Scrabble Tournament grades six through 12. More inLOT 5 (EXCEPT SOUTH 60 FEET THEREOF) The Social Scrabble Tourna- Library. formation can be obtained by callIN BLOCK 10 IN F.H. BARTLETT’S RIDGELAND Participants and trained voluning the library, (708) 423-7753, ment will be held Saturday, March ACRES, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN THE EAST teers will work together in large 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 18, 11 at the Evergreen Park Library. or visit the website at www.chiTOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 13, EAST OF Players of all ability levels are and small groups. The wintercagoridgelibrary.org. THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDwelcome. Check-in is at 12:45 spring session will be held in the ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED Jumbo fun in JUNE 1, 1935 AS DOCUMENT NO. 11626307 IN p.m. The registration fee is $15 Quiet Study Room on the second COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. library competition in advance or $20 at the door. floor. Beginning, intermediate Commonly known as 10950 S. NAGLE AVENUE, The Jumbo Connect Tourna- This includes tournament play, and advanced English learners Worth, IL 60482 ment will be held from 7 to 8 snacks and soft drinks. The first are welcome (students must have some English training). p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28 at the Chi- game begins at 1 p.m. Property Index No. 24-18-412-027-0000. The fall 2017 session will start The contests will be three cago Ridge Library. The program up again in September. More inThe real estate is improved with a single family is for children from grades six rounds with timed matches and residence. formation will be provided in upthrough 12. Friends can join to one-on-one game play. Proceeds The judgment amount was $112,666.83. take part in the tournament in will benefit the “Evergreen coming newsletters. More inforan effort to become champion. Reads” community reading mation can be obtained by calling Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to More information can be obtained event. Registration is requested Mary Williams, the head of the The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party by calling the library, (708) 423- from the library website at ever- adult and young adult services checks will be accepted. The balance, including 7753, or visit the website at www. greenparklibrary.org or call (708) department, at (708) 422-4990, the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential or visit www.olpl.org. Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is cal422-8522. chicagoridgelibrary.org.

Oak Lawn

LIBRARY HAPPENINGS

CHICAGO RIDGE

EVERGREEN PARK

culated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact DAVID T. COHEN, DAVID T. COHEN & ASSOCIATES, 10729 WEST 159TH STREET, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467, (708) 460-7711 THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. DAVID T. COHEN & ASSOCIATES 10729 WEST 159TH STREET ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 (708) 460-7711 Attorney Code. 25602 Case Number: 16 CH 10771 TJSC#: 36-13862 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

Tooromeen School of Irish Dance to perform Children in grades six through at library

Youths can make bead crafts at library LEGAL NOTICE

WWR #10139550 STATE OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OF COOK IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION BMO HARRIS BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. FRANK GASCA; MARGARET GASCA; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants. CASE NO: 16 CH 02849 CALENDAR NO. 63 Property Address: 10650 82nd Avenue, Palos Hills, IL 60465 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given you, Frank Gasca, Margaret Gasca, Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants, Defendants in the above entitled suit, that the said suit has been commenced in the Chancery Department, Cook County, Illinois, by the Plaintiff against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: Lot 248 in FRANK DELUGACH’S WOODED HILLS, being a subdivision of the South 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 14, Township 37 North, Range 12 East of the Third Principal Meridian, in Cook County, Illinois. Commonly known as 10650 82nd Avenue, Palos Hills, IL 60465. Parcel Number: 23-14-213-018-0000 and which said Mortgage was made by Frank Gasca and Margaret Gasca, Mortgagors, to Harris Trust and Savings Bank, as Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Cook County, Illinois as Instrument Number 0533235209; And for such other relief prayed; that summons was duly issued out of the said Chancery Department, Cook County, Illinois against you as provided by law, and that the said suit is now pending. NOW, THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU, the said above defendant, file an answer to the complaint in the said suit or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Office of the Clerk of Chancery Department, Cook County, Illinois, at the Courthouse, in the City of Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, on or before the 13TH day of MARCH, 2016, default may be entered against you at any time after that day and a decree entered in accordance with the prayer of said complaint. Weltman, Weinberg & Reis Co., L.P.A. 180 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400 Chicago, IL, 60601 Telephone: 312-782-9676 Facsimile: 312-782-4201 ChicagoREDG@weltman.com ARDC No. 6289784 Cook Atty. ID No. 31495

Students from the Tooromeen School of Irish Dance will entertain with a performance of classic Irish dance at 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 13 at the Evergreen Park Library. Registration is requested from the library website at evergreenparklibrary.org or call (708) 422-8522.

OAK LAWN Screen, celebrate 40th anniversary of ‘Annie Hall’ Cineversary, the Oak Lawn Public Library’s monthly film discussion group open to anyone age 17 and older, will celebrate the 40th anniversary of Woody Allen’s “Annie Hall” with a screening and discussion of the movie

Make crafts and singing songs can be sweet

Patrons can read stories, make a craft and sing songs all about sweets from 3:45 to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21 at the Oak Lawn Library. For more information about this and other youth programs, call (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

Family Storytime to be held at library Family Storytime will be held from 9:30 to 10 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22 at the Oak Lawn Library. Stories, songs and dancing will be offered at the quality family time event. For more information about this and other youth programs, call (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

Oscar Trivia Night at library Patrons can test their knowledge of the upcoming 89th An-

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that an order entered by the circuit court, Cook county, on the 10th day of March, bearing Case Number 17M50271, located at 10220 S. 76th Ave. Bridgeview, IL 60457, in room number 203, grants me the right to assume the name of Wyatt Matthew Miller. The city and state of my address are Chicago Ridge, IL; the month and year of my birth are July 1996; place of my birth is Chicago, IL; my present name is Sabrina Marie Miller. LEGAL NOTICE

nual Academy Awards with an Oscars Trivia Night at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23 at the Oak Lawn Library. Friends can attend Oscar Trivia Night and test their Oscar knowledge. Guests can bring refreshments and take part in trivia and giveaways. Prizes will be awarded. The event is for adults ages 21 and over. The actual Academy Awards will be held Sunday, Feb. 26. More information can be obtained by calling (708) 422-4990 or visit www.olpl.org.

Families can attend ‘Macaroni Soup’ concert Guests can sing along with Miss Carole and Clarence at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 25 at the Oak Lawn Library. “The Family Concert: Macaroni Soup” is for all ages. For more information about this and other youth programs, call (708) 422-4990 or visit www. olpl.org.

Accepting reading material donations at library Patrons can donate “gentlyused” books, magazines, CDs and videos to the Friends of the Oak Lawn Library Outgoing Book Sale at the Oak Lawn Library. Due to space limitations, the Friends will not accept Readers Digest Condensed Books, encyclopedias and older text books. The donation drop-off area is near the library’s Cook Avenue entrance. Interested parties may fill out a short form at the Customer Service desk to receive a tax letter by mail that acknowledges their donation. The Friends Ongoing Book Sale provides a variety of books, magazines and other forms of media at bargain prices. Hardcover books cost 50 cents each, paperbacks are 25 cents and magazines cost 10 cents each. Audio visual items are priced as indicated. Funds collected from the book sale support library programming and purchases that are beyond their regular budget.

PALOS HILLS Patrons can see ‘Sully’ movie and have catered dinner Guests can see a movie and have dinner at 6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16 at the Green Hills Library, 8611 W. 103rd St., Palos Hills. The movie “Sully” will be presented and will include a catered dinner. One lucky person will win a copy of the movie. Registration is limited to 45. The movie and dinner is for adults only. Register online at greenhillslibrary.org.

SUDOKU Answers

CROSSWORD Answers


10 The Reporter

SCHOOL NEWS

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Richards speech team places 2nd at IHSA regional meet

Local students honored in annual All-American Eagles contest The annual Bill Lipinski’s All-American Eagles Program essay contest for sixth- seventh- and eighthgraders was held last month on the topic, “Why I Love America.” Awards will be given to the first-, second- and third-place winners for each grade. In addition, a cash prize of $200 will be given to the winner in the eighth grade, and a cash prize of $100 will be given to the seventh-grade winner. The essay contest winners from last month for the sixth grade were Patrick Marcella, third place, St. Symphorosa; Cailyn McLean, second place, St. Cajetan; and Ryan Lanigan, first place, St. Christina. The seventh-grade winners were Emily Minyard, third place, St. Albert the Great; Nathan Tueres, second place, St. Patricia; and Caroline Knight, first place, St. Cajetan. The eighth-grade winners were Jeni Ivengar, third place, St. Patricia; Madison Sanchez, second place, St. Symphorosa; and Grace Rowan, first place, St. Cajetan. The first- and second-place winner in each grade of the January essay contest will participate in a history quiz in April. A $500 cash award will be presented to the first-place winner; $250 for the second-place winner; and $100 for the third-place winner. The cash award for the first-place winner will go toward the school they attend.

Celebrating 100 days

Submitted photo

Students at Worthwoods School in Worth had some dress-up fun as they celebrated their 100th day of school recently. They celebrated 100 days of attendance, friendship and days of learning.

Vanquishing Varicose Veins

Saturday, February 25 at 9 am

o t r e t s i g Re WIN A ! Y A D A SP

Pre-treatment

Enjoy complimentary breakfast and giveaways

3 months post-treatment

Doors open at 8:30 am

N I E V E E FR ! G N I N SCREE

Yale fellowship trained vascular surgeon Dr. Sanjeev Pradhan and University of Chicago fellowship trained Dr. Michael Shao, assisted by Courtney Stanford, NP will: • explain the causes of varicose veins and why they should be treated • explain why varicose veins are not just a cosmetic problem • describe newest and latest types of treatments available for vein problems • explain why it is best to seek treatment for your vein problems from a board-certified vascular surgeon • provide free screening and consultation to interested registrants

with Dr. Sanjeev Pradhan and Dr. Michael Shao as they explain Vanquishing Varicose Veins.

Screening, breakfast and presentation are FREE. Please reserve a seat by Thursday, February 23. Call 708-475-0746 or email to jcardenas@vascspecialists.org.

Saturday, February 25 9 am - 10 am Doors open at 8:30 am

Trinity Christian College Grand Lobby, Palos Heights 6601 College Drive on Rt 83 just west of Ridgeland

815-824-4406 VeinCareInstitute.org VascSpecialists.org

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EP School Dist. 124 invites residents to enjoy ‘delicious’ fundraiser The Evergreen Park School District 124 is inviting residents to take part in the Second Annual Delicious Competition to be held at Culver’s at 9515 S. Kedzie Ave. in the village through next month. “The Evergreen Park Culver’s has been a great friend to District 124,” said Dr. Robert Machak, District 124 superintendent. “Last year, Culver’s management brought us an idea that would provide monetary support to our schools while also allowing families to enjoy a great meal.” The Delicious Competition is a contest among all five D124 schools to see which building can get the most families to dine at Culver’s on their school’s designated night. Culver’s keeps track of each school’s performance by tallying their nightly sales during the competition’s allotted time period. Last year, the D124 Delicious Competition was fierce as most nights crowds inside grew to standing room only. The drivethrough proved to be an alternate way to participate with the mention of the school at the top of the order. However, it wasn’t long before even that line wrapped around the building. “Here at Culver’s, we take pride in having a strong connection with our community and we try to give back,” said Bridget Barker, Culver’s shift leader.

And give back they did. Barker said last year’s Delicious Competition was a huge success, bringing in approximately $25,000 among all of the schools. “Of the $24,647 raised, Culver’s donated back a cumulative 12 percent totaling nearly $3000,” said Barker. On each school’s designated night, teachers volunteered to serve customers. Students said they enjoyed having their teachers and friends from school all together during dinner. Culver’s also provided a custard party and trophy to the school with the highest per capita sales total on their school’s night. Northeast School was the Delicious Competition Champions last year. “We gave them a check for $320 and served their students about 600 scoops of custard during their year-end school celebration,” said Barker. The rest of the Delicious Competitions will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21 for Southeast School; Wednesday, Feb. 22 for Northwest School; Tuesday, March 7 at Central Middle School; and Wednesday, March 8 at Northeast. “Thank you to Bridget Barker and all the great folks at Culver’s for offering us this ‘delicious’ opportunity to support our schools,” said Machak.

STUDENTS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

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The Richards High School varsity speech team placed second on Feb. 4 at the Illinois High School Association regional competition at Reavis High School. The Bulldogs took second place, advancing to the sectional tournament in 11 of the 14 events (the most in the past three years.) Performance-In-The-Round also advanced with a second place finish. “To advance an event, a competitor must place in the top four in their event, and 11 was the highest amount we’ve advanced out of the last three years. This is significant because, once again, our regional was statistically the most difficult for both individual events and PIR out of the three that feed into our sectional,” Sean Harrigan, the Richards coach, said. Richards students who advances were from the championship bracket that included Peter Forberg, Extemporaneous Speaking, and Abby Hanrahan, Impromptu Speaking; and Katharine Azem, Humorous Interpretation. Placing second were Devin Jackson, Dramatic Interpretation; Grace Cook, Radio Speaking and Performance in the Round; and Forberg, Original Oratory. Placing third were Azem and Brian Carpenter, Humorous Duet Acting. Carpenter also place third in Prose Reading.

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Chicago Ridge resident earns honors at University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point A local student earned academic honors for the 2016-17 fall semester at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in Stevens Point, Wis. Kelly Mares, a Chicago Ridge resident, was honored for having a grade-point average between 3.50 and 3.74.

Oak Lawn resident is selected to the Concordia University honor roll A local student has been selected to the fall honor roll list or the 2016-17 school year at Concordia University in Concordia, Wis. Oak Lawn resident Julia Volk was named to the honor roll at Concordia. The senior is an exercise physiology major.

Local students are named to Saint Mary’s College dean’s list Two local students have been selected to the dean’s list for the fall 2016 semester at St. Mary’s College in Notre Dame, Ind. Earning dean’s list honors were Alison Alberts, a resident of Evergreen Park, and Shannon Haak, a resident of Oak Lawn.

Local students earn dean’s list honors at Marquette University A group of local students have been named to the dean’s list for the fall 2016 semester at Marquette University in Milwaukee. Evergreen Park residents earning dean’s list honors at Marquette University were Liam Cimaglia, bachelor of science, civil engineering; Timothy McGinnis, bachelor of science, exercise physiology; and Jessica Prendergast, bachelor of science, nursing; Oak Lawn residents earning dean’s list honors were Brea Brennan, bachelor of science, biomechanics; Michelle Frederick, bachelor of science, finance; Cody Haberkorn, bachelor of science, electrical and computer engineering; Kyle Haberkorn, bachelor of science, electrical and computer engineering; Luke Haberkorn, bachelor of science, electrical and computer engineering; Abigail Leo, bachelor of science, nursing; Sean Roberts, bachelor of science, electrical engineering; John Rolence, bachelor of science, middle/secondary education; Vivian Sanchez, bachelor of science, environmental engineering; Mary Sullivan, bachelor of science, nursing; and Robert Tracy, bachelor of science, mechanical engineering. Palos Hills resident Allison Peters also earned dean’s list honors at Marquette University. She is earning a bachelor of arts degree in communication studies.

Evergreen Park resident earns dean’s list honors at Shawnee State University A local student has been selected to the dean’s list for the 2015 fall semester at Shawnee State University in Portsmouth, Ohio. Ryan Minard, an Evergreen Park resident, earned dean’s list honors. He is a political science major.

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Chicago Ridge student earns dean’s list honors at Aurora University

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A local student has been selected to the dean’s list for the fall 2016 semester at Aurora University in Aurora. Peter Vasquez, a Chicago Ridge resident, was selected to the dean’s list. He is majoring in criminal justice.


SPORTS The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, February 16,2015 2017 Thursday, March 5,

Vorva,Sports SportsEditor Editor••sports@regionalpublishing.com sports@regionalpublishing.com KenJeff Karrson,

Southwest • Section 2, Page 1 1 Southwest • Section 2, Page

STATEMENT GAMES

Area athletes flying into state competition

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Freshman Maddie Giglio (above) burst onto the scene for Sandburg/Stagg by qualifying for state in four events. Sandburg/Stagg’s Maddy Roe (right) soars through the air during the floor exercise Thursday at the Oswego Sectional.

As a Madd-er of fact, Sandburg/Stagg co-op teammates dominate sectionals By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

A few years ago, the Sandburg/Stagg co-op girls gymnastics team had the Anna/Hannah one-two punch with Anna Girlich and Hannah Mussallem leading the way. This year, it’s the Maddy/Maddie Show. Junior Maddy Roe is heading to the Illinois High School Association state meet on Friday and Saturday at Palatine High School for the third time in her career. She will compete in four of

the five events. Freshman teammate Maddie Giglio will join her and also will compete in four events. Roe finished 21st in the state in allaround as a freshman and last year took eighth in the state in the vault, ninth in all-around and a disappointing 11th in her bread-and-butter event — the balance beam — after falling twice. The two area stars won all five events on Thursday at the Oswego Sectional, which is just the second time in Sandburg-Stagg history that has happened. It also happened in 2009 when Krystyn

POWERING TO PALATINE Area girls gymnasts who will participate in the IHSA state meet Friday and Saturday at Palatine High School:

SANDBURG/STAGG CO-OP

• Maddie Giglio: All-around, floor, beam, vault • Maddy Roe: All-around, vault, beam, bars

Misheck won all five of her sectional events. Misheck is the team’s co-coach

with veteran Mike White. Giglio tied Lyons’ Olivia Kalata with a 36.5 in the all-around while Roe finished fourth with a 36.425. Roe was in a little trouble after falls on the beam and the floor exercise, but recovered to win on the uneven bars (9.45) and vault (9.5). “It was rough, I’m not going to lie,” said Roe, a Stagg junior from Palos Heights. “It wasn’t going the way I expected it to go. Things happen, but it’s all about the comeback. I was upset and used the aggression and anger and gave it my all in the last two events. What

else are you going to do?” White thinks Roe has a shot at a state title in the beam. Giglio is making a huge first impression in an area that is not rich in gymnastics. She won all-around, the beam (9.325) and floor exercise (9.325) and tied for fifth on the vault. “I wasn’t as nervous as I thought I would be, but I was nervous,” Giglio said. “Once I saw my score on the beam, I gained confidence.’’ Despite the strong 1-2 punch, Sandburg-Stagg finished fifth in the sectional with a 136.825.

Richards’ Wozniak rolls perfect game to end sectional By Aaron FitzPatrick Correspondent

Photo by Jason Maholy

Marist’s Diata Drayton has the upper hand against Nick Sondag of Waubonsie Valley in the Downers Grove North Class 3A Sectional title match at 220 pounds.

Despite being marked man, Drayton stays unbeaten By Jason Maholy

CLINCHING TO CHAMPAIGN

Correspondent

Diata Drayton believes no wrestler in his weight class can beat him when he is at his best. “That’s my mentality — the winner’s mentality,” the Marist senior said after winning the 220-pound title last Saturday at the Illinois High School Association Class 3A Downers Grove North Sectional. And Drayton must be at his best every time he steps on the mat. He will enter the state tournament 40-0, and as the wins piled up this season while the losses remained at zero, he became a marked man. He understands that for a while now he has had to be prepared to thwart every opponent’s greatest effort as they’ve tried to drop him from the ranks of the unbeaten. “It only makes me work harder because everyone’s gunning to beat me, so I’ve got to do my best out there,” he said. Drayton cruised to the sectional title, pinning Adnane Lanaati of Oak Lawn in 2:21 and Jesus Lopez of Glenbard East in 44 seconds before handling Nick Sondag of Waubonsie Valley, 11-3, in the championship bout. Sondag entered the final 36-1.

A list of area wrestlers who will compete at the IHSA individual state meet in Champaign from Thursday through Saturday:

CLASS 3A

• Sandburg: Pat Nolan (120 pounds), Patrick Brucki (195), Cole Bateman (220) and Malik Scates (285). • Stagg: Domenec Zaccone (113) and Noah Price (132) • Marist: Jacob Dado (120) and Diata Drayton (220)

CLASS 2A

• Brother Rice: Hassan Johnson (120), Angel Granado (126), Rahman Johnson (145), Dominick Murphy (152), Paul Gilva (160), Jake Hutchinson (170), Scott Sierzega (220) and Myles Ruffin (285). • Richards: Basil Muhammad (113) and Anthony Quinn (195)

Drayton will be making his third appearance at the state tournament, which begins today at the University of Illinois’ State Farm Center in Champaign. He placed fourth last season at 220 pounds. See WRESTLING, Page 2

You can’t beat perfection. For 12 frames, Richards High School senior bowler Alexandra Wozniak was as good as a bowler can be during last week’s Oak Lawn Sectional Saturday at Palos Lanes in Palos Hills. In the sixth and final game of the tournament, Wozniak rolled a perfect 300 and helped lift the Lady Bulldogs to the state tournament, which starts Friday at Cherry Bowl in Rockford. Richards head coach Emily Gesell said Wozniak is “the calm through the storm,” for the Bulldogs. That description was tested in the sectional as Wozniak continued to post one “X” after another on the scoreboard. As the strikes piled up, so did the crowd around her lanes to witness a rarity in the sport. Wozniak, whose previous best was a 279, appeared to be calm and just having fun after each frame. However, she said that internally it was just the opposite, especially in the later frames. “I’ve been shaking since the ninth frame,” Wozniak said. “I had a rhythm going but I pulled that last ball. You need a little luck in bowling sometimes.” Wozniak said the thought of a perfect game never enters her mind during a match. “Of course it would be awesome if I did, but I didn’t think it was going to happen today,” she said. “Well, maybe after seven strikes I thought maybe I could do this.” Gesell said Wozniak has always had the potential for a 300 game. “I knew she had it in her. She’s one of our most consistent and level-headed bowlers,” said Gesell. “I knew she had the potential to do that this year, but over those last couple of balls it was, ‘All right, Alex. Stay calm. Just stay calm.’” How does a coach deal with the situation as she watches one of her own try to achieve perfection? “I may appear calm, but inside I’m a little bit jittery,” Gesell. “It happened. So I guess I was calm enough.” Wozniak’s score solidified a spot for Richards in the state tournament for the second year in a row

Photo by Aaron FitzPatrick

Richards’ Alexandra Wozniak soaks in her 300 game at the Oak Lawn Sectional.

ROLLING TO ROCKFORD Area participants in the IHSA state bowling tournament Friday and Saturday in Rockford: TEAMS • Richards • Oak Lawn INDIVIDUALS • Emily Schrader (Sandburg) • Sophia Jablonski (Sandburg, wheelchair division)

and propelled her to a second-place individual finish with a 222.7 average. She finished just six pins behind sectional champion Serenity Quintero of Waubonsie Valley. Waubonsie Valley also brought

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See BOWLING, Page 4


2

Section 2 February 16, 2017

The Regional News - The Reporter

FOCUS ON COLLEGE SPORTS

SXU women’s team closing in on double figures for triple figures

By Jeff Vorva

set loss to St. Ambrose on Feb. 7. Former Marist setter Aaron Kummer had 23 assists and three block assists against the Bees.

For the ninth time this season, the St. Xavier University women’s basketball team went over the century mark as the Cougars, ranked third in the nation in NAIA Division II, beat Roosevelt, 103-78. That sets a school season record for most 100-ormore-points games in a season. Brittany Collins led the Cougars (25-2 overall and 16-2 in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference) with 17 points, 11 rebounds and five blocked shots. Men’s basketball: The Cougars’ Quinn Niego scored 21 points and added nine rebounds in a 6955 victory over Roosevelt on Saturday. Kyle Huppe (17 points) hit a 3-point basket to spark a run in which the Cougars outscored Roosevelt 21-7 to close the game. Men’s volleyball: The Cougars dropped a 2519, 25-23, 25-14 decision to No. 9 Lourdes on Saturday. Evergreen Park native Dan O’Keefe had six kills and four digs for the Cougars. O’Keefe was also strong with 12 kills in a four-

Moraine Valley

Sports Editor

SXU’s Thomas Matonis racks up a kill on Feb. 7 in a four-set loss to St. Ambrose.

Women’s basketball: The Cyclones owned a 2019 lead over South Suburban College on Saturday but blew the game open in the final three quarters for a 75-49 win. Michelle Borgen led the Cyclones (26-2) with 26 points while Erin Drynan had 20 points, 18 rebounds, six blocks and five steals. Men’s basketball: Moraine Valley dropped an 86-71 decision to South Suburban, which is ranked seventh in the nation. LeRon Williams had 18 points for the Cyclones.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Trinity Christian College Women’s basketball: The Trolls beat Governors State, 79-70, on Saturday as Celina Wanta and Breanna Toppen each scored 20 points. Men’s basketball: TCC dropped an 88-83 decision to Governors State as Trey Johnson had 21 points. Myles Birgans added 20 as the Trolls shot 73 percent in the second half.

FOCUS ON HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS

A break in the action: No surprise: DeJarld named National Coach of the Year Hands-on Shepard By Jeff Vorva AD busts wrist during Astros hoops practice Sports Editor

Her team won three national championship honors. Her top player was named first-team AllAmerica. So it’s no surprise that Mother McAuley volleyball coach Jen DeJarld earned a National Coach of the Year honor from PrepVolleyball. com. The Migthy Macs finished the season 40-1 and won the Illinois High School Association Class 4A state title. That, coupled with playing a schedule that featured some top national teams, earned the Mighty Macs the mighty distinction of national champions by PrepVolleyball.com, USA Today/AVCA and MaxPreps. Junior hitter Charley Niego was named firstteam All-America by FloVolleyball, while sophomore setter Nancy Kane was named honorable mention. DeJarld’s honor comes 12 years after PrepVolleyball.com named former Macs coach Nancy Pedersen National Co-Coach of the Year.

Skating to nationals

S

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Shepard freshman Jenna Bader and Palos Heights eighth grader Gia Swanson advanced to the U.S. Figure Skating Synchronized Skating Championships starting Wednesday at the BMO Harris Bank Center in Rockford. They recently took second place in the Midwestern Synchronization Skating Sectionals in Fargo, N.D. Last year, Shepard’s Diana Garcia was a regional champion.

The dotted line

Brother Rice quarterback Dino Borrelli announced he will play football at St. Ambrose

Jen DeJarld, shown celebrating Mother McAuley’s state title in November, was named the PrepVolleyball.com National Coach of the Year.

next year. Sandburg’s Mike Murphy is heading to Illinois Wesleyan University and Chris Toth committed to the College of DuPage. St. Laurence baseball pitcher Angel Sandoval is heading to the University of St. Francis.

New AD at St. Rita Roshawn Russell was named the athletic director at St. Rita. Russell graduated from the school in 2008

Supplied photo

Gia Swanson (left) and Jenna Bader have qualified for a national skating event in Rockford.

and will continue his position as director of admission and sophomore basketball coach. New St. Rita President Mike Zunica of Palos Park will retain the athletic director position until July 1. He has held that position since 2009. Russell earned his master of business management degree at Fontbonne University. He also served as assistant men’s basketball coach, after two years as a graduate assistant. He was a four-year starter on the St. Rita basketball team.

FOCUS ON HIGH SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY SPORTS

Longtime Oak Lawn coach Kleemann honored The Oak Lawn Community High School boys’ basketball program honored longtime coach Mark Kleemann for his 43 years of contributions and dedication with a ceremony and commemorative plaque on Alumni Night. “It is difficult to put into words,” Kleemann said. “It was such a special night. (Head coach) Jason Rhodes was so generous with his comments and kind thoughts.’’ This celebration of Kleemann’s career comes as the veteran teacher and coach plans on retiring at the end of the school year. It is ending a career filled with involvement in the school and in athletics. Kleemann is a member of the Board of Directors of the Illinois Basketball Association, and he is a board member of the Basketball Museum of Illinois. In addition, Kleemann has held many positions at OLCHS including seven years as athletic director and nine years as assistant boys’ basketball coach. Kleemann was also honored earlier this month by the girls’ basketball program. Kleemann earned his 300th win during the last home game of his coaching career at Oak Lawn. The team honored Kleemann with a rocking chair.

Wrestling

Continued from Page 1 “It feels good; I worked hard for it,” he said of earning one last opportunity to win a state title. “I wrestled a lot over the summer, different guys, to help me get better. I said that I wouldn’t let (losing his final match of the season) happen again, so I’ve worked to get better and better every time out.” The biggest difference for Drayton this season is that he’s able to push himself late in matches when both he and his opponents are tiring. “Even though I’m up, I try to get more take-downs,” he said. Domenic Zaccone of Stagg also will enter the state tournament unbeaten after taking the Downers Grove North Sectional

hepard High School Athletic Director Curry Gallagher had participated in about a dozen practices this school year in trying to get to know his school’s athletes and for them to get to know him. On Feb. 8, he broke his right wrist during a boys basketball practice. It happened on the same day Chicago legend and Milwaukee Bucks star Jabari Parker suffered a season-ending knee injury, so it was a hard day on the hardwood for some. Gallagher went up for a drive after a shot fake and… “I did a terrible job with my layup and I fell,” he said. “I tried to break fall with my wrist and broke my JEFF VORVA the wrist.’’ Making the As of early Monday, he was waitExtra Point ing to hear when surgery will be performed. This is a guy whose last surgery was in 2015 — to have a brain tumor removed. The 40-year-old was optimistic about that procedure, despite losing hearing in his left ear, and said he is “blessed to be on the good side of the green.’’ So even though his wrist hurts like heck, you won’t hear any whining from him now. “I’m still going to go through with the practices,” he said. “It’s a lesson in perseverance. It’s parallel to the kids, who have to fight through their injuries and support their teammates. The two winter sports I have left were boys swimming and cheerleading. I will go and talk with those athletes. “But hopefully I’ll be able to heal and participate in the spring team practices. It’s going to be a month’s healing process, so I should be back to participate again.’’ In the fall, he said he started doing these practices so that he could learn from the student-athletes and they could see him as more than a guy behind a desk, Gallagher said he played football, baseball, tennis and bowling in high school in Philadelphia and ultimate Frisbee on the club level in college. He tried his hand at triathlons before his family (wife Carrie, daughters Deidre and Brigid and son Liam) started to grow. He has worked at Marist, St. Ignatius and Richards before landing the AD job at Shepard. Thus far, he said there haven’t been too many surprises along the way. But he said his eyes were opened as to how physically demanding the competitive dance team practice was. “To do all of the spins required and some of those routines — I really struggled,” he said. “I told the athletes after practice that I would love to see the football players or basketball players participate and they could learn what a challenge and workout it really is.’’ Shepard Athletic Director Curry Gallagher, shown in the fall practicing with the girls tennis team, broke his wrist practicing with the boys basketball team on Feb. 8. This school year, he is trying to practice with all of the school’s sports teams.

Supplied photo

Oak Lawn’s Mark Kleemann was honored with a rocking chair by the girls basketball team.

ALL IN to host tryouts ALL IN Southwest will host tryouts for its spring travel season. The first tryout is March 12 at the Swanson Center, 6652 S. 78th Ave., Bedford Park. Sixththrough-eighth graders tryout t from noon to 1 p.m., ninth and 10th graders try out from 1 to 2 p.m. and 11th and 12th graders from 2-3 p.m. The second date is March 13 at the Frontier Field House, 9807 Sayre Ave., Chicago Ridge. Sixth-through-eighth graders try out from 6 to 7 p.m., ninth and 10th graders from 7 to 8

crown at 113 pounds. The sophomore pinned two opponents and beat another by technical fall before earning a hard-fought 6-4 decision over Tommy Russell of St. Rita in the title match. Zaccone took fourth last season at 106 pounds and has ambitions to be a three-time state champion. That, of course, means he must win that first title this weekend. Despite his unblemished record, he acknowledged he has some work to do if he hopes to be atop the podium Saturday evening. “I just didn’t like the second and third periods (in the title match), how they went,” he said. “There’s a lot to improve on based on today. The semifinal match felt great, got two take-downs and back points right away, but then started getting slow.” Zaccone doesn’t think much

p.m. and 11th and 12th graders from 8 to 9 p.m. For more information visit wwwaiathletics.com

Shooters host tryouts The South Side Shooters girls third though 11th grade tryouts are Feb. 16, Feb. 21 or Feb. 23 from 6:30-8 p.m. at Stagg High School and March 7 and March 9 from 7 to 9 p.m. Players need to attend just one night. For more information, contact Gary Ferguson at 630-935-1150 or visit www.shootersbball.com.

Photo by Jason Maholy

Sandburg’s Pat Brucki is unbeaten against Illinois wrestlers and is gunning for his first state title this weekend.

about being undefeated — his focus is on dominating his opponent every time he steps on the mat, he said. After falling short of a state championship

last season, he doesn’t take anything for granted. “Coming into this year it was like, ‘OK, you need to step up your game. If you want to be a three-

time state champ you’ve got to get this first one. I’ve been working on everything to be the best. (Being undefeated is) fine, but I don’t really pay attention to it. I just try to pay attention to what’s in front of me. Numbers are numbers; when you’re wrestling there’s no numbers out there.” Pat Brucki of Sandburg is the other area wrestler who won a title in Downers Grove. The twotime state medalist will head to Champaign 40-1, and he’s unbeaten against Illinois wrestlers. He easily defeated Mason Kroening of Waubonsie Valley, 17-5, in the semifinals at 195 pounds, then beat Illinois Matmen’s No. 2-ranked wrestler, Downers Grove South’s Sergio Villalobos, 20-5, in the final. Other state qualifiers via the Downers Grove North Sectional are a pair of 120-pounders, Ja-

Photo by Jeff Vorva

cob Dado of Marist (second place) and Patrick Nolan of Sandburg (fourth place); along with Noah Price of Stagg, who finished fourth at 132; Cole Bateman of Sandburg, third at 220; and Malik Scates of Sandburg, third at 285.

Class 2A Brother Rice is sending eight wrestlers to state, including Thornridge Sectional champs Hassan Johnson (120 pounds) and Jake Hutchinson (170). Other Crusaders who qualified were Angel Granado (126), Rahman Johnson (145), Dominick Murphy (152), Paul Gilva (160), Scott Sierzega (220) and Myles Ruffin (285). Richards will bring two wrestlers to Champaign — Basil Muhammad (113) and Anthony Quinn (195).


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, Feburary 16, 2017 Section 2

3

AREA HOOPS AT A GLANCE BOYS Brother Rice Chicago Christian Evergreen Park Marist Oak Lawn Richards St. Laurence Sandburg Shepard Stagg

W-L STREAK NEXT

22-3 17-7 15-9 22-3 8-17 10-12 10-15 13-11 10-12 16-8

W11 W7 W2 W2 L1 L4 L1 L2 W1 W1

CCL Tournament at Ridgewood, Fri.; IHSA Class 3A Tournament at Argo Feb. 24 hosts St. Patrick, Fri. hosts Argo, Thurs. at Reavis, Friday, at Ag Science, Wed. CCL Tournament hosts Homewood-Flossmoor, Fri.; at Bolingbrook, Tues. hosts Eisenhower, at Manteno, Tues. at Lockport, Fri.

* Records through Sunday, Feb. 12; compiled by Jeff Vorva.

GIRLS Chicago Christian Evergreen Park Marist Mother McAuley Oak Lawn Queen of Peace Richards Sandburg Shepard Stagg

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist fans can cheer both the girls team, which is seeded second in Class 4A sectional play, and the boys team, which has a key East Suburban Catholic Conference showdown with St. Patrick at home on Friday.

W-L

STREAK

19-9 20-7 25-4 20-8 16-13 26-3 13-13 10-17 9-21 10-16

L1 W4 W4 W2 W4 W1 W1 L3 L7 L5

NEXT

Season completed IHSA 3A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 3A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals IHSA 4A Regionals

* Records through Sunday, Feb. 12; compiled by Randy Whalen.

BOYS BASKETBALL

FOCUS ON HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL

RedHawks eyeing icing on the cake: an ESCC title

Rice makes it to CCL tourney semis with OT victory over St. Laurence By Jeff Vorva Sports Editor

By Phil Arvia Correspondent

Whenever things got close between host Marist and St. Viator in the fourth quarter Friday — and despite the RedHawks’ 12-point edge heading into the period, things did get close — Marist managed to will itself to answer. RedHawks came out ESCC LOGJAM of The a timeout with a set play Top five teams in the that created a layup for Justin East Suburban Catholic Brown. Brown threw the exConference standings tra pass to find a cutting Bobheading into this week: by Hawkinson for another laMarist 6-1 yup. David Daniels threaded 5-2 the needle to get a dunk for Notre Dame St. Patrick 5-2 Brown. “There were a lot of what Marian Catholic 5-2 St. Viator 5-2 we call ‘one mores,’ ” Marist coach Gene Nolan said. “We were very unselfish. When you get the defense to play the third, fourth, fifth side of the floor, that’s when you get good looks.” Or you can give it to point guard Maurice Commander, who after the Lions cut Marist’s lead to four points, drove from the top of the key for a left-handed lay-in, forced two turnovers and added a pair of clinching free throws all in the final two minutes of a 46-37 win. As a result, Marist (23-3, 6-1 in the East Suburban Catholic Conference) celebrated Nolan’s 43rd birthday with the win over the Lions and the team needs one more win to clinch a share of its first league title since 1997. The RedHawks have a one-game edge over St. Patrick, St. Viator (9-14 overall), Marian Catholic and Notre Dame with two to play. On Friday, Marist hosts St. Patrick with a chance to clinch on Senior Night. “One more to seal this deal,” Commander said. “The conference championship is really big for us.” Against St. Viator, Commander was huge for the RedHawks, leading the way with 20 points. Brown added 10 points and 10 rebounds, Daniels seven points and Hawkinson eight boards. “Maurice did everything you could ever ask a point

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist guard Maurice Commander and coach Gene Nolan confer during a game earlier in the season. On Friday night, Commander scored 20 points in a win over St. Viator on Nolan’s 43rd birthday.

guard to do,” Nolan said. “He made big shots, he made tough shots. I thought the pace of the game was the pace he dictated and he played tremendous defense.” St. Viator got scoring from just four players — Daniel Morton led the Lions with 12 points and Jeremiah Hernandez added 11 — while shooting 13-of-39 (33 percent) from the field for the game. It was precisely the effort Nolan was looking for after the RedHawks played sloppy in a Tuesday win over Chicago Ag. “The coaches felt like we didn’t live up to the standards we usually play at,” Brown said. “They worked us pretty hard in practice to get us back to the state of mind we need to play with. It got us back to playing through and off each other.” Previously, Marist had just been off — owing perhaps to cumulative weight of three losses in five games after starting the season 19-0, or losing Morgan Taylor to a broken wrist in the Jan. 24 loss to St. Rita, or something else entirely. “It’s a confluence of things,” Nolan said. “As a coach, I know it’s normal to go through it. It’s how you respond to it that will determine the sort of team you have. “At this point in the season, there’s things you have to be doing at a different level. I don’t believe we played that way Tuesday, but I also thought we had our two best practices of the year since then and tonight was a very good night.”

A dozen days after beating St. Laurence 60-45 in a Chicago Catholic League South battle in Chicago, Brother Rice had to face its foe again on Sunday in the CCL tournament quarterfinals. This time, it wasn’t as easy. Mike Shepski hit a 3-pointer to send the game into overtime. He also had another game-tying trey and added what turned out to be the game winner in Brother Rice’s 4441 victory at Fenwick. The Crusaders were scheduled to face St. Joseph in the semifinals on Wednesday at Fenwick. St. Joseph is coached by Gene Pingatore, who won his 1,000th and 1,001st games in the first two rounds of what will be the final CCL Tournament. League officials are restructuring the league and eliminating the tournament. The championship is at Loyola at 8 p.m. Friday. Josh Niego scored 33 points for Brother Rice in a 72-61 win over Marmion to reach the quarterfinals.

South Suburban Red closing up For most of the South Suburban Red season, Richards has enjoyed a comfortable lead over the rest of the field, but after Evergreen Park knocked off the Bulldogs, 77-72 on Friday night, things have tightened up. Richards entered this week 6-4 and was scheduled to host Shepard on Tuesday, visit Reavis on Saturday and host Oak Lawn Feb. 24. Evergreen Park entered this week 6-5 and was scheduled to host Reavis on Tuesday and visit Argo on Feb. 24.

First team eliminated Chicago Christian’s girls basketball team

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Brother Rice’s Josh Niego scored 33 points in the Crusaders’ first-round win over Marmion in the final CCL Tournament on Saturday.

was the first area team eliminated from the postseason as the Knights dropped a 77-36 game to Illiana Christian, in the Chicago Christian Class 2A Regional final on Thursday. The Knights finished 19-9 in coach John Natanek’s first season — a huge turnaround from the 8-20 mark from last season.

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4

Section 2 Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Regional News - The Reporter

Images from another busy sports week

Balloons in a basket were a part of Evergreen Park’s Senior Night celebration for the girls basketball team on Feb. 7.

SXU men’s volleyball coach Bob Heersema gathers his troops during a four-set loss to St. Ambrose at the Shannon Center.

Shepard’s Kylie Radz yells instructions to her teammates during a recent game at Evergreen Park

Sandburg enjoyed a postgame pose after a historic sectional performance Saturday. In the front is Sophia Jablonski, one of the first two wheelchair bowlers to ever compete in an Illinois High School Association postseason event. In the second row, left, is junior Emily Schrader, who qualified for the state tournament and to the right is Zoe Schultz, who has helped Jablonski out all season. In the back row is Sandburg coach Joe Geiger and assistant Tim Walsh. Sandburg-Stagg girls gymnastics coach Mike White whoops it up as junior Maddy Roe performs on the uneven bars at the Oswego Sectional on Thursday.

St. Ambrose’s Morty Berglind, a Marist graduate, gets ready to let loose with a serve during a four-set men’s volleyball win at St. Xavier University on Feb. 7. He finished with eight kills and six digs in his homecoming.

Stagg’s Sydney Downs tries to get by 6-foot-5 HomewoodFlossmoor star Eva Rubin during a loss on Feb. 7 in Palos Hills.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Stagg’s Nicole Vacha drives to the basket against Homewood-Flossmoor.

Evergreen Park’s Kacey Gardner (left) lets teammate Emma O’Grady (No. 12) know she is open during a win over Shepard on Feb. 7.

Bowling

Continued from Page 1 home the sectional title with a 6,212, followed by Richards (5,949), York (5,428) and host Oak Lawn (5,407). It is Richards’ ninth appearance in the state tournament. The Bulldogs finished fourth in 1977 and 1986. Last year, the team took 13th and Wozniak finPhoto by Jeff Vorva ished 36th. Sandburg’s Emily This is Oak Schrader finished 10th in the state last year and Lawn’s state will return this season. debut as a team. Oak Lawn high scorer Allison Hebel said the team is looking forward to the challenge. “It’s crazy,” said Hebel. “We’ve been looking forward to it this whole season. We thought we had a really

Richards qualified for state for a second straight year. From left to right: Phoenix Lopez, Katie Strache, Gina Bartkus, Caitlyn Solomon, Alexandra Wozniak, Peyton Attig, Sarah Coffman and Mia Jones.

strong team coming this year and we have a lot of great freshman and sophomores who are helping us. It’s great to finally make it.”

Andrew sectional Sandburg junior Emily Schrader, who finished 10th in the state last year,

took fourth place in the Andrew Sectional Saturday at Orland Bowl and earned a return trip to Rockford. She opened with a 169 and needed a big finish in her last five games to qualify. She followed with a 257-227 to finish the morning session with a 653. She rolled a 204-228-266 for a 698 to vault

Photos by Aaron FitzPatrick

Oak Lawn qualified for the state tournament for the first time in school history. From left to right: coach Jim Mallek, Lena Rayas, Mia DiGrazia, Stephanie Gasca, LeAnne Kommenich, Jayna Greiman, Hailey Gershom, Allison Hebel and coach Kelly Rumel.

up the standings. “I was thinking too much the first game,” she said. “I was overhooking and changed my ball. It seems like lately my first game of each set has been lower. But I can’t get down on myself.’’ Eagles junior Sophia Jablonski be-

came one of the first two bowlers in Illinois to compete in the wheelchair division and she rolled a 459 in four games to qualify for state. — Sports Editor Jeff Vorva contributed to this report.


The Regional News - The Reporter

  

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Call 708-417-5983 For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE NORTHERN TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, -v.PAMELA CRAWFORD, OXFORD BANK AND TRUST, 10429 SOUTH AUSTIN AVENUE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, CHRISTINE BOYLE, MYRIAM MCREADY, RAYMOND CRAWFORD, MARGARET WALSH, EDWIN M. CRAWFORD IV, CONOR P. CRAWFORD, CATHERINE CRAWFORD, MADELINE PACKER, PATRICK CRAWFORD, WILLIAM CRAWFORD, CAITLIN CRAWFORD, CATHERINE CRAWFORD AS LEGAL GUARDIAN FOR JACK CRAWFORD, A MINOR, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF EDWIN M. CRAWFORD, JR., DECEASED, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 14 CH 04025 10429 S. AUSTIN, #B Oak Lawn, IL 60453 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 15, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 16, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10429 S. AUSTIN, #B, Oak Lawn, IL 60453 Property Index No. 24-17-214-023-1002. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $89,901.92. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff s attorney: HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD., 29 E. Madison, Ste. 950, CHICAGO, IL 60602, (312) 372-2020 Please refer to file number 16-5300-406. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales.

“10 in the Park� NEW as of 7/7/11 For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, -v.BRIAN JOYCE, BANK OF AMERICA, NA, RIVIERA REGAL II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, RIVIERA REGAL CONDOMINIUM UMBRELLA ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF GARRY JOYCE, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, WILLIAM P. BUTCHER, AS SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR GARRY JOYCE (DECEASED) Defendants 16 CH 007310 11120 S. 84TH AVENUE UNIT 3A PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 5, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 7, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11120 S. 84TH AVENUE UNIT 3A, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-23-101-116-1063. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-1606269. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-16-06269 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 16 CH 007310 TJSC#: 36-14269 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I713346

For Sale

For Sale

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.BRETT C. BENFIELD, EAGLE RIDGE VILLAS III ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 15 CH 011438 18145 OHIO COURT ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 14, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 16, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 18145 OHIO COURT, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467 Property Index No. 27-32-400-029-1145. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-15-12148. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-15-12148 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 15 CH 011438 TJSC#: 36-14633 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I713628

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.KISHA J. YORK, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, WESTGATE VALLEY TOWNHOMES CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 15 CH 016492 1403 SPYGLASS CIRCLE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 9, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 13, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 1403 SPYGLASS CIRCLE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-31-404-056-1170. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-15-17309. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-15-17309 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 15 CH 016492 TJSC#: 36-14485 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I713297

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR GSAMP 2002-HE2, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-HE2; Plaintiff, vs. PILARITA G. ESPINOSA; VICTOR F. ESPINOSA; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF PILARITA G. ESPINOSA, IF ANY; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF VICTOR F. ESPINOSA, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 16 CH 6599 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 23-14-115-024-0000. Commonly known as 8530 West Broadmoor Drive, Palos Hills, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 WA16-0071. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I714741

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF KURT F SCHMID, IF ANY, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., KURT F SCHMID JR, INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF KURT F SCHMID, DECEASED, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 15 CH 15475 12600 SOUTH 82ND AVENUE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 18, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on March 9, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 12600 SOUTH 82ND AVENUE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-26-414-015. The real estate is improved with a single family home with an attached 2 car garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \�AS IS\� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number 11688. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@pierceservices.com Attorney File No. 11688 Attorney Code. 60489 Case Number: 15 CH 15475 TJSC#: 37-804 I714037

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-11CB MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-11CB; Plaintiff, vs. MATTHEW J. SPECKHART; LISA M. SPECKHART; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF MATTHEW J. SPECKHART, IF ANY; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF LISA M. SPECKHART, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 12 CH 28814 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, March 10, 2017 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 23-33-204-022-0000. Commonly known as 12857 South Brian Place, Palos Park, IL 60464. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a mixed use property which may be used as commercial and/or residential. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 360-9455 W12-4204. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I713866

121736

client

1

00:45 02/01/01 kev

“ I FEEL LIKE

A FISH WITH NO WATER.� –JACOB, AGE 5

HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD. 29 E. Madison, Ste. 950 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 372-2020 E-Mail: smichaels@hrolaw.com Attorney File No. 16-5300-406 Attorney Code. 4452 Case Number: 14 CH 04025 TJSC#: 36-14331 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

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6

Section 2 Thursday, February 16, 2017

  

448-6161 

    



The Regional News - The Reporter



        Help Wanted

Suburban law firm seeking part-time receptionist with 1-2 years of related experience in an office environment.  Candidates must be able to multi-task without compromising on quality, be professional and courteous under stressful situations, be able to prioritize tasks in a fast paced environment, be able to collaborate and support fellow co-workers and be proficient in handling office equipment.  Job duties include greeting guests and visitors in an efficient, professional and pleasant manner, helping guests with appropriate information needed while maintaining confidentiality, answering phone calls and directing callers to the respective attorneys/departments, collecting, sorting and delivering incoming mail, file maintenance and assisting with clerical tasks such as copying and faxing on an as needed basis.  All inquiries and resumes should be directed to Kim Ooley, Office Manager, at kooley@odelsonsterk.com.

 

 



448-6161 

 



  

  

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The Regional News • The Reporter

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Section 2

7

Senior Spotlight Eat healthy at 50 and beyond

Seniors can overcome feelings of apprehension about going to the gym.

Seniors can overcome gym intimidation Regular exercise and a nutritious diet are two of the best things seniors can do to maintain their health. Exercise can delay or prevent many of the health problems associated with aging, including weak bones and feelings of fatigue. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a person age 65 or older who is generally fit with no limiting health conditions should try to get two hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, while also including weight training and muscle-strengthening activities in their routines on two or more days a week. Individuals often find that gyms have the array of fitness equipment they need to stay healthy. But many people, including older men and women who have not exercised in some time, may be hesitant to join a gym for fear of intimidation. Some seniors may avoid machines and classes believing they will not use the apparatus properly, or that they will be judged by other gym members. Some seniors may feel like gyms

do not cater to their older clientele, creating an atmosphere that is dominated by younger members and loud music. Such misconceptions are often unfounded, as many gyms welcome older members with open arms. But even if seniors find gyms intimidating, they should still sign up for memberships. In such situations, the following tips can help seniors shed their fears and adapt to their new gyms. • Start the process slowly. Shop around for a gym that makes you feel comfortable. Get fully informed about which classes are offered, and the benefits, if any, afforded to older members. • Get a doctor’s go-ahead. Make sure to clear exercise and gym membership with your doctor prior to purchasing a membership. He or she also may have a list of gyms where fellow senior patients have memberships. • Build up gradually. Begin with exercises you feel comfortable performing. Spend time walking on the treadmill while observing other gym members. Tour the circuit of machines and

Women • Not physically active: 1,600 calories • Somewhat active: 1,800 calories • Active lifestyle: between 2,000 other equipment. Find out if you and 2,200 calories can sample a class to see if it Men might be a good fit. • Not physically active: 2,000 • Find a gym buddy. Working out with a partner in your age calories • Somewhat active: between group may encourage you to keep going to the gym and increase your 2,200 and 2,400 calories • Active lifestyle: between 2,400 comfort level. You each can offer support and enjoy a good laugh and 2,800 calories through the learning process. When choosing foods to eat, • Don’t get discouraged. Anyone working out for the first time, the NIA recommends eating many regardless of age, will feel some- different colors and types of vegwhat out of place until exercise becomes part of a routine. Give it some time before throwing in the towel. Once you catch on, you may discover you enjoy working out. • Choose a senior-friendly gym. Some gyms cater to senior members. They may offer “SilverSneakers” classes at their facility. Other niche gyms may only accept members of a certain age group. Investigate these gyms if working out with a younger crowd is proving too great a deterrent. Fitness is important for healthy seniors. It can prolong life, help seniors maintain healthy weights and reduce their risk of injury.

because smell and taste are so closely related, foods enjoyed for years may no longer tantalize the taste buds. That can be problematic, as many people instinctually add more salt to foods they find bland. According to the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, older adults should consume no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. That equates to roughly 3/4 teaspoon of salt. Older men and women should resist the temptation to use salt to add flavor to foods, instead opting for healthy foods that they can still smell and taste. In addition, men and women should mention any loss of their sense of smell to their physicians, as such a loss may indicate the presence of Parkinson’s disease or Alzheimer’s disease. Maintaining a healthy diet after 50 may require some hard work and discipline. But the long-term benefits of a healthy diet make the extra effort well worth it.

A soft reset for Mary McAloon and her mother, Elizabeth Walsh

Submitted by Mercy Circle

Aging men and women may find that technology helps them simplify their everyday lives.

get in and out of their showers and bathtubs. Such bars are both effective and inexpensive, and some do not even require any drilling to install. Specialty grab bars, tub grips and tub transfer benches are just a few additional products that can make bathing easier for seniors who have lost or are starting to lose some of their physical strength. • Get “smart” on the road. Seniors who are experiencing mild difficulty driving can make getting about town that much easier by plugging their smartphones into their vehicles or making use of the various apps that have become standard in modern vehicles. For example, the maps app on a smartphone can be connected to a car and direct seniors to their destinations, saving them the trouble of remembering all the ins and outs of how to get a particular destination. Seniors also can employ apps to help them find their vehicles should they forget exactly where they parked in crowded parking

etables and fruits. Phytochemicals are substances that occur naturally in plants, and there are thousands of these substances offering various benefits. The Produce for Better Health Foundation notes that a varied, colorful diet incorporates lots of different types of phytochemicals, which the PBH says have disease-preventing properties. The NIA also advises that men and women over 50 make sure at least half the grains in their diets are whole grains. Numerous studies have discovered the various benefits of whole grains, which are loaded with protein, fiber, antioxidants and other nutrients. Whole grains have been shown to reduce the risk for diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some types of cancer. Another potential hurdle men and women over 50 may encounter is a change in their sense of smell and taste. A person’s sense of smell may fade with age, and

Close to Home: Mercy Circle resident Elizabeth Walsh rejuvenates her life

How seniors can simplify tasks The ability to perform everyday tasks is something many people take for granted. But as men and women approach or exceed retirement age, many may start to struggle with chores and tasks they have performed for decades. Physical limitations are a common side effect of aging. But such limitations do not have to prove too big a hurdle for seniors to clear. In fact, there are many ways for seniors to simplify everyday tasks while maintaining their independence. • Embrace technology. Even the proudest Luddites cannot deny technology’s potential to make seniors’ lives easier. Seemingly simple tasks like shopping for groceries and vacuuming a home can be difficult for seniors with dwindling or limited mobility. But seniors with Internet access in their homes can order their groceries online and then pick them up instore or have them delivered, saving them the trouble of walking around the store. With regard to vacuuming, autonomous vacuum cleaners have removed the need to use traditional vacuum cleaners. Certain autonomous vacuums employ sensors to detect dirty spots on the floor, and these vacuums can even be programmed to clean the home while residents are out of the house. • Upgrade bathrooms. Tasks associated with personal hygiene also tend to be taken for granted until they become difficult. But a few simple bathroom alterations can help seniors safely navigate the bathrooms in their homes so they can maintain their personal hygiene without fear of injury. Grab bars can be installed on shower walls so seniors can safely

A balanced diet is an integral element of a healthy lifestyle for men, women and children alike. But while kids and young adults might be able to get away with an extra cheeseburger here or there, men and women approaching 50 have less leeway. According to the National Institute on Aging, simply counting calories without regard for the foods being consumed is not enough for men and women 50 and older to maintain their longterm health. Rather, the NIA emphasizes the importance of choosing low-calorie foods that have a lot of the nutrients the body needs. But counting calories can be an effective and simple way to maintain a healthy weight, provided those calories are coming from nutrient-rich foods. The NIA advises men and women over 50 adhere to the following daily calorie intake recommendations as they attempt to stay healthy into their golden years.

lots. Such apps can increase seniors’ comfort levels on the road while helping them maintain their independence. • Downsize. Whether downsizing to a smaller home or simply downsizing a lifestyle, seniors may find that living smaller is akin to living simpler. Empty nesters may find they no longer need several bedrooms in their homes, and moving into smaller homes can reduce their daily workloads while also clearing out clutter that can make performing everyday chores more difficult. Men and women accustomed to hustle and bustle may also find that cutting back on professional and/or personal commitments gives them more energy for everyday activities while enriching the commitments they continue to maintain. Aging men and women can employ various strategies to simplify their lives and maintain their independence well into their golden years.

Mary McAloon’s mother, Elizabeth Walsh, always had a busy life. Mrs. Walsh was a secretary at City Colleges of Chicago until she retired almost 30 years ago, about the same time McAloon’s father died at age 63. Mrs. Walsh’s daughter explains, “My Mom went to Renaissance Academy classes and history classes. She went on adventurous trips, including expeditions to India and Africa.” Mrs. Walsh also traveled to visit McAloon’s two brothers and two sisters, who live with their families in other places across the country. When Elizabeth Walsh lived in a second-floor condo at 99th and Central Park in Oak Lawn, she attended daily mass at a nearby catholic church. Last summer, Mrs. Walsh, had “a medical event,” as McAloon says, that required rehab for a month. “It was clear my Mom would not be able to handle the stairs at her condo.” Elizabeth Walsh and her children faced a stark choice: Either they would hire a caregiver to live with her or she would move into assisted living, an option she had always rejected. “My Mother never told me the woman across the hallway at the condo, her friend, was Sister Alice Feehan. Sister Alice had moved to Mercy Circle. I said, ‘Mom, they are having fun over there,’ and why don’t we just give it a try. My Mom visited Mercy Circle and while she wasn’t thrilled about the decision to give up her own place, she agreed to move in.” McAloon, the oldest of Elizabeth Walsh’s children, is the only one who lives nearby. She also is the only one of Elizabeth Walsh’s children who is retired. Until four years ago, McAloon was a special needs supervisor with Chicago Public Schools. But now, she visits her mother at least three days each week.

Photo by Robert Knapp

Mary McAloon, daughter of Mercy Circle resident Elizabeth Walsh.

“I like that there are so many smart people there,” McAloon says. But other conveniences have been a blessing for our whole family. “A doctor has office hours at Mercy Circle. A podiatrist visits Mercy Circle, so I don’t have to take her to the foot doctor anymore. And a great coincidence is my Mom’s hairdresser has a salon on the first floor. And best of all, my mother has company during three meals a day served in the dining room and plenty of activities with other residents.” Thanks to the physical therapy routine at Mercy Circle, McAloon says, Elizabeth Walsh is healthier, happier and much more active. “She hated to be confined to a wheelchair and now she only needs a walker,” McAloon explains. “After her medical incident, she could no longer go to daily Mass. Now she attends Mass almost every day in the chapel at Mercy Circle.” “I know how hard it is to move after you have been living on your own,” says Sister Alice Feehan, who again is Mrs. Walsh’s neighbor, this time at Mercy Circle, and who helped her friend adjust to her new home. “But look at the community we found here at Mercy Circle. The beauty of it is in the people, just a wonderful feeling that is difficult to describe in words.” Looking back, Mary McAloon does not know how her mother lived on her own as long as she did. “These Sisters are wonderful and now Mercy Circle is admitting more laypeople. The

apartments are so nice and they encourage us to bring Mom’s own furniture.” One of Mary’s brother and his family visited Mercy Circle at Thanksgiving and a sister and her family visited Mercy Circle at Christmas time. Then Elizabeth Walsh “came home to my house,” on Christmas Day, Mary explains. “My grandmother, my father’s mother, always told me that nothing good comes after age 90,” Mary McAloon says, “She was wrong.”

About Mercy Circle

Welcoming older adults from all walks of life, Mercy Circle is a continuing care retirement community (CCRC) on the southwest side of Chicago near the Village of Evergreen Park. The not-for-profit has a no-entrance-fee policy and a five-star CMS rating. Sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy West Midwest, it is the only faith-based retirement community in the area. Mercy Circle offers spacious residences at all levels of care, along with thoughtful amenities, life enrichment programs, and opportunities for an engaged social life and fostering friendships. The senior living community provides a variety of dining options. In addition to programs and activities, sharing interests and making friends, Mercy Circle has activities designed specifically for each setting. For more information or to schedule a private appointment, please call 773.253.3600.


8 Section 2

Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Regional News • The Reporter

Senior Spotlight Smith Crossing residents enjoy tail wags from Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Submitted by Smith Senior Living For the last three years, Walter Olchawa and Abigail, his Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, have spent Wednesday afternoons from 1 to 3:30 p.m. visiting residents and staff at Smith Crossing, a life plan community at 10501 Emilie Lane in Orland Park. Olchawa of Orland Park and his six-year-old registered therapy dog start their weekly routine by checking in with the receptionist at the main lobby. Then, they visit with residents seated in front of a large fireplace in the nearby club room. “There she is,” said one resident, extending hand to Abigail. The dog responded by bowing her head and wagging her tail. “It’s Abigail, she’s here,” said another resident, talking excitedly into a smart phone. “I’ll call you back!” The scene repeats itself many times with residents dropping whatever their doing to pet the little brown and white dog with long floppy ears. Olchawa, a retired pharmacist, also gets a charge out of the exchanges. “With my career, I was so used to being around people,” he said. “Retire? What was I going to do? This keeps me interacting with people. It also keeps me out of trouble!” Besides greeting people in common areas, Olchawa knocks on the apartment doors of residents he knows will appreciate seeing Abigail. Smith Crossing resident Ginger Jarris moved from Naperville in 2014 to be closer to her daughter. She was all smiles recently, when welcoming Olchawa and Abigail into her apartment. The visit included a lesson in the dog’s lineage. “Cavalier King Charles Spaniels were bred by King Charles to be lap dogs and bird dogs,” Olchawa explained. As if on cue, Abigail accepted Jarris’ invitation to sit with her on a love seat. The dog then placed her head in Jarris’s lap. “But she’s also a good bird dog,” Olchawa continued. “One time a robin landed on the path where we were walking and Abigail took off like a bullet. I was running after her through the bushes, saying, ‘Abigail, where are you?!’” “Did she get the robin?” Jarris asked. Abigail looked intently at Olchawa, as if anticipating his response. “She had the bird in her mouth.” Olchawa said. “She’s a good girl, she’s a beauty,” said Jarris, smiling. Another resident Olchawa and Abigail visited was Gertrude Oliveri. “Where’ve you been?” she joked. “We didn’t miss you, Walter. We missed Abigail, of course. She’s the hit of the parade here!” To earn official registration with Therapy Dog International, Abigail requires a dog’s ability to understand and respond to simple commands. Abigail also was trained not to be startled by wheelchairs, walking devices and other dogs. To keep her certification, she must pass an annual physical and have all current vaccinations. Abigail visits residents in independent living, assisted living, memory support and skilled nursing care at Smith Crossing, as well as patients in the community’s Green Leaf rehab facility. “It means the world to be able to touch and pet and snuggle with a dog,” said Sally Morse, an Orland Park resident, recovering from a fall on ice that shattered her hip. “That’s one thing I really miss about being here—with my dog. Seeing Abigail sure helps.” Olchawa and Abigail are just two of many volunteers who serve residents at Smith Crossing and Smith Village, 2320 W. 113th Place in Chicago’s Beverly neighborhood. To learn more about volunteer opportunities at either community, consider attending a monthly volunteer orientation. Visit http://www. smithcrossing.org/about-us/volunteer-opportunities or http:// www.smithvillage.org/about-us/

All are welcome

“Here I don’t have to do it alone”

Photo of Fr. Jack Farry

When you move to Mercy Circle, you’ll find an engaged community—perfect for couples and individuals. “I’m enjoying my life,” says Fr. Jack Farry, who lives in an assisted living apartment at Mercy Circle. “And I’m meeting other people who share my interests.”

Visit Mercy Circle

Please join us for a tour and refreshments during our Sunday open house event

from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. on February 19, 2017

❆ Mercy Circle requires no entrance fee, has earned a five-star CMS rating, and promotes a spirit of inclusion and hospitality. Photo by Waldemar Reichert

Walter Olchawa, a retired pharmacist, volunteers every week at Smith Crossing with Abigail, his Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

volunteer-opportunities Or call Shelly Genis, Smith volunteer coordinator, at 708-326-2424.

About Smith Senior Living

Smith Senior Living, a not-forprofit organization serving older adults, sponsors the only life plan communities in the Southwest sector of metropolitan Chicago. An innovative leader in providing the finest services and care for seniors, Smith established its first community in 1924, on the same city block where Smith Village stands today.   

Both Smiths provide spacious independent living residences and apartments for assisted living, as well as memory support and skilled nursing care. In addition, they offer short-term rehab programs for residents and others who have had surgery or a medical incident. For more information about how Smith Senior Living can help seniors enjoy their retirement, contact Smith Crossing at 708-326-2308 or SmithCrossing. org, and Smith Village at 773-4747303 or SmithVillage.org.

We provide lifestyle programs for independent living residents, as well as healthcare services for assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing residents.

For more information or to schedule a private appointment, please call 773-253-3600

Sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy West Midwest 3659 West 99th Street Chicago, Illinois 60655 773-253-3600 mercycircle.org


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