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THE

2013

REGIONAL NEWS looks back:

The Your YearIndependent in Review

Community Newspaper Wanted: Images depicting Palos Park’s past

The Voice of Palos - Orland Since 1941

Library, village compile photos for book

(From Jan. 10, 2013) At one time, Palos Park was a place where buffalo roamed and marksman from all over the country with nicknames such as “The Terrible Dane,” “The Stock Crank” and “Our Ammunition Factory” came to compete in sharpshooting contests. It was once a place where writers such as Pearl S. Buck and Sherwood Anderson and sculptor Lorado Taft hung out. In 2014, the village turns 100 years old and one of the special projects that will take place will be the debut of a book jammed with photos and stories about Palos Park’s first century of existence. While members of the Palos Park Public Library have been gathering material for this book in recent weeks, they are still seeking out more photos and information.

THE

73nd Year, No. 1

They have pushed their original deadline from Jan. 31 to mid-February and people can share their history by dropping items off at the library, 12330 S. Forest Glen Blvd., or at the Kaptur Center, 8999 W. 123rd St. The library requests that people place is the photos and information in an envelope marked “Palos Park Centennial Pictures” and to provide their name, address, e-mail address and phone number on the back of each photo and that the story is attached to the photo. The library is working in conjunction with Arcadia Publishing, which has produced hundreds of books like this under its “Images of America” series, including books about nearby Worth and Oak Lawn. Administrative Librarian Sheila Sosnicki and Public Services Librarian Jeannine Kacmar are helping to oversee the project.

Named best small weekly in Illinois — five times

“These books are usually a compilation of photos of an area,” Sosnicki said. “We’re looking at doing this for Palos Park. We also want to emphasize some of the interesting parts about Palos Park’s history. Horseback riding was really huge back then. It was interesting to hear stories about farms that the families had. People are really interested in their history and they are happy to share their stories and talk. Someone brought in school pictures from the 1920s and from the 1940s and it was fun looking at those.” They discovered that buffalo had roamed in the village limits in the 1920s. “The Cook County Forest Preserve stocked buffalo,” Kacmar said. “I’m not sure why they did that, but we have photos of them grazing in the forest preserve. We have photos of people hunting them.”

REGIONAL NEWS 2 Sections

— Illinois Press Association

1.00 per copy

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From The Regional archives

Realtor Lauren Blount operated a surrey at the Village Courtyard he owned at 123rd Street and 81st Avenue Palos Park librarians Sheila Sosnicki (left) and in Palos Park more than 50 years ago. Photos such Jeannine Kacmar pore over files of photos from as this capturing Palos Park’s past are sought by The Regional’s archives in the newsroom, as the village and public library for the publication of an they seek photos for a historical book on Palos “Images of America” edition covering Palos Park in time for the village’s centennial in 2014. Park’s first 100 years.

Serving the Palos, Orland and Worth townships and neighboring communities. The village’s rich history in shooting will be highlighted. Palos Park once housed the Sharpshooter’s Association, which hosted competitions for regional and national

shooters. In the 1910s, the village hosted the George Washington Birthday Cup Shoot. Marksmen from all over the country to compete including C.T.

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Westergaard, who was known as the “Terrible Dane”, C.L. Forsythe, otherwise known as “Our Ammunition Factory” and Frank Dulleck — a.k.a. “The Stock Crank.”

Heights’ wintry chill covers some hopeful seeds Convicted Heights to a mostly bank drab 2013. robber   Yet like crocus shoots poking a top student; through erotic model the winter snow, there

by Tim Hadac staff reporter

    Like a summer drought clear of new life in Heights Palos between (From February 14, 2013)followed Bank in Palos attorney’sare claims thatsigns the robperformed by a white July and November, 2010 and by a harsh winter, 2013 was abery try-was Heights. Little did people know it at person. Edwards is an African- robbed it to pay back $23,000 ing time for economic the city’s the time, but when twodevelopment suspects American.    Mona Lisa Boutique, that she allegedly stole from a donned nuns outfits and masks á bank in Country Club Hills, where Kennelly was quoted of by flair Sun- and in Palos Heights. epicenter panache, rela the film “The Town” to rob a Times in reference to Edwards’ she had worked.     Despite Mayorin Robert Straz’s inmasks grand instory its broke newlast week, bank at gunpoint Palos Heights After that purchase opened of the nun at fashion $120,000 May, 2011, that an onlinelocation costume store, saying the London Daily Mail unearthed publicof call lastinFebruary for “fordowntown. may have actually been the most “The only conceivable purpose that Edwards participated as an ward thinkers” to “come in and     Harvest Room transformed a such as normal part of the story. model, using aliases for purchasing nun masks and erotic A sign outside the firehouse honored former Palos Heights Fire Protection District Chief Roger Bushee, week,ofthe story took a robes wasvacant Nicci Nikole Yasmine Waters to do something nefari- house changeLast some those buildings” pancake atand127th who died earlier this month in Arkansas. couple of odd turns when a judge ous with them — let’s just say it and that she was employed by the — buildings Straz called “1965 andnear Harlem intoerotic a site destination at the Dirksen federal courthouse Miyami Blue featuring was nowhere Halloween.” a nun’s uniform toward He titillating photos and videos and also said “It’s not plausible,” storesdonned up and down Harlem Avrestaurant with class and cutting the end of a three-day bench trial when addressing Edwards’ claim using the name Marc. enue”before — stagnation and same-old, edge cuisine, creating a buzz that finding one of the suspects, She was also named a “Model of that a white person was behind 25-year-old Navahciaappeared Edwards, theto the foodies Week” for the week of Feb. 20, mask.still ripples among same-old thinking across guilty. Prosecutors alleged that Lyn- 2010 on the Great Model Search dominate localstories landscape. the Chicago area.website. The site said she lived And the interesting of Ed- don Germel Wesley and Edwards wards’ past as an erotic model in Matteson. dressed as nuns for the     A downtown face still pocked     white Royalberry restaurant emerged (From January 17, 2013) department what it is today.” the Palos Heights Fire District with a near-perfect college Edwards also made the Moraine but tellers at the TCF Mr. Bushee was born in Chi- starting in 1950 and was one of vacant storefronts, littlerobbery, with apfrom a fire better and stronger grade-point average have also Valley Community College PresiBank told police that black A former Palos Heights fire cago and attended Fenger High the original paramedics when the visibleever. through the dent’s List in March, 2011 — two parent progress on the muchskin an-wasthan Photo by Tim Hadac chief who once served in the Army School, where he graduated in program started. He also had a surfaced. Multiple news agencies reported eye holes of the masks, which months before the robbery. under General George Patton died 1943, according to an obituary 10-year stint as a trustee on the ticipated Palos Place development     CNB Bank & Trust is set open The only sign of life at Dominick’s last Friday was to be found at its that on Feb. 6, U.S. District Court Edward reportedly had no emois why Judge Kennelly tested Jan. 6 in Bella Vista, Ark. on the Benton County (Arkan- district’s board before moving to Kennelly donned tion when Kennelly proclaimed out the theory. (in theJudge oldMatthew Ben Franklin building), its new Palos Heights location gas pumps, as motorists lined up at the eight pumps to take advanRoger Bushee, who served as sas) Memorial Park website. He Arkansas in 1990. a nun costume in order to try Prosecutors also told the judge her guilty. Sentencing is scheduled the fire chief from 1976-80 and entered the army and saw action “It’s a strange feeling moving outlying strip malls struggling with within weeks near 127th and tage of a “going out of business” price drop of 50 cents a gallon. served the department in various in France and Germany and was a down here permanently,” Bushee to support or debunk Edwards’ that Edwards worked for TCF for May 1. their own vacancies, a still-vacant Ridgeland. capacities from 1950 to 1991, died soldier in the Battle of the Bulge told the Regional after he moved. Saturday after battling an illness, as a part of Patton’s army. He Photo “I’ll miss fireHadac department but bythe Tim community development position     The long-vacant Footlocker store     There appears to be forward gateway. according to current Fire Chief reached the rank of staff sergeant I know they will carry on.” A lonely table of was the last cluster of merchanin city government, and a year-end at 128th and Harlem will spring to progress, after years of crippling     “We’re definitely moving forTim Sarhage. Hedented was 87. miscellany and received the Purple Heart. He Moving to Arkansas didn’t slow “In 1988 interviewed me was named an honorary colonel him at down any. and body blow with the loss of Domi- life in 2014 with a Lou Malnati’s dise sold lastheFriday at the Dominick’s supermarket 127th debates and delay, with the old ward with this,” Charles Allenson, when I was testing for a position of the 95th Infantry Division and He sang in a church choir, Ridgeland, a day before the store closed after 40 years of business the city’s top generator of carryout pizza parlor and a Jersey Crown Buick parcel at 119th and as a full-time fireman,” Sarhage later helped create a World War II played trombone in the Bellanick’s, Vista said. “He was a great guy. He was Memorial Museum in Oklahoma Community Band and served as tax revenue, all contributed in Palos Heights. sales Mike’s sandwich shop. Harlem at the city’s northern (See Heights’ chill, Page 3) soft-spoken and a gentleman. He

Roger Bushee, retired Heights fire chief and trustee, at 87

was classy. When you are going for an interview like that with a man like that, it can be intimidating but he was a professional, wellspoken and smart man. “He had a lot of history with this department and I was sad to hear he passed away. He was one of the people who made this

City, Oklahoma. He held several jobs when he returned to the Chicago area, including working at the Chicago Tribune, Daily News, Sun-Times and other papers as a pressman. He was also a real estate broker, an appraiser and partner at JayBush Realty in Palos Heights. He served as a volunteer for

president of the Bella Vista Ambulance Service, where he helped catch an office manager who embezzled more than $30,000. Bushee suffered two strokes in December, 2002 and remained in a wheelchair the rest of his life. The department hosted a Roger and Maxine Bushee day in honor of he and his wife on July 19, 1990.

Pavlatos appointed to return term on Park Village Council

(From February 28, 2013)

“We have ushered in many improvements, including the conEven though he’s been gone struction of the Holy Family Villa from the Palos Park Village complex of assisted senior housCouncil for close to two years, ing; the Shadow Ridge subdivision James Pavlatos said “It feels like of multi-million dollar homes and I haven’t been gone at all.” the upgrades to the village water The council voted unanimously tower and reservoir,” he wrote. Monday night to confirm Mayor “We take special pride in the John Mahoney’s appointment steady administration of village of Pavlatos as the village’s next government, including keeping finance commissioner. He will our tax rates low and our service fill the vacant seat left by Kent levels high during this recession, Oliven, who resigned Dec. 31 due and upgrading the expertise of to conflicts with a new job. Pavservices provided by all departby Tim Hadac Ridgeland Avenue. cameras. Jim Pavlatos latos, a dentist in Palos Heights, ments. It has been gratifying for assume his new role at theto lot staff reporter     Thewillapp enabled them im   and Brown and Schaffer then called with the me to have introduced of work he put in a great March 11 meeting. Department more than care of her for many years. deal of time in his role as com(From January 31, 2013) mediately check the views of their relatives in the Building Chicago area, Pavlatos was in Tucson, Ariz., missioner and attacked it with a 17 code upgrades so far, includ“He was so kind and thoughtto tee-off for     While an unoccupied home is has residence provided bya round multiple, whoof immediately contacted Palos tree conservation, with several ful,” Chatham said. “He so getting ready good amount energy and will ing Who knew? more on the way soon.” much patience with mom. Some of of golf Tuesday morning when continue to do so presently.” Michael “Skip” Lombardo was often an invitation for burglars, motion-sensitive surveillance Heights police. With assistance Pavlatos is a graduate of Loyola the issues that she went through he found out he was back in the “I think it’s a great choice,” a popular figure at Rini’s Palos fold. He served on thehome. a tech-savvy Paloscould Heights coupleof a cameras mounted back fromNicole other localUniversity law enforceSchool of Dentistry try the patience lot of Palos Park Commissioner MilovichHeights Pharmacy for years until people. But he was so patient with village’s planning commission from Walters added. “He was here last and has 25 years of experience the beloved institution closed in recently proved that 21st century The images provided by the cam- ment agencies, officers swiftly 2005-2007 and on the council as term and he understands what’s in the field of surgical and prosher and was just a good guy.” 2007. By most accounts, he was a from— 2007surveillance tools — deployed eras building raisedcommissioner red flags twogoing ofon and surrounded townhome. Af- He has implant dentistry. Family membersand said Michael the direction wethe are thetic guy people talked to and sometimes 11, but did not run for a second going. I welcome him.” lectured locally, nationally, and up theand nickname told their troubles to. But few knew monitored wiselypicked — can do “Skip” the cameras showed nothing Inat2011,ter requesting and receiving the when he was 6-months-old. An term. But he took this opportunity when he decided not internationally, according to his the troubles he had seen. after Oliven’s departure. thwart criminals.aunt saw a picture of himall, they were apparently go-ahead from to break online biography. in abecause to run again, Pavlatos wrote a let- Brown Mr. Lombardo died Jan. 23 at age serve,” he said. “This ter to the editor to The Regional artist, he is also an avid sailor’s and said he looked 70 and friends and family mem    Joshua Schaffer andoutfit Shantera covered“I love by tothe intruders. down the front door,Anpolice entered like a little skipper and the name is a great community and there lauding the council’s work for the photographer whose works are bers remembered him for his sweet are a lot of things moving forBrown had just arrived in Hawaii     A view from another camera, theyears. dwelling and apprehended two frequently on exhibit. stuck. previous four personality and bright outlook on ward. There is some unfinished He attended St. Michael School life. They said he rarely complained on Nov. 26 — two days before however, showed a light on that men—one in the attached garage, in Orland Park and split time at business to be done and I feel I even though he probably had the can and step inSchaffer right away knew without they the other in a bedroom. Photo Tim Hadac Thanksgiving — and were sit- Brown right to, given some of theby health Michael “Skip” Lombardo, of Leo High School and Blue Island any transition because I know School and attended Parsons he was dealt with. Palos Heights, many rememPaloscards Heights resident Joshua tingasdown to a High relaxing dinner had turned off before they left.     As reported in the Dec. 5 ediIn the 1960s, he was diagnosed ber him, clad in his trademark College in Iowa and was “darn the process and I know how the council works.” Schaffer stands near onesweater of vest. in the tropical paradise they     Schaffer then used a second cell tion of The Regional News, two close” towhen receiving a master’s with a brain tumor, his brother, One piece of unfinished busiNorthern Illinoisphone UniPaul,cameras said. Michaelmounted was actually in his were notified via degree several a cellatphone app app to turn on every light Chicago men were charged with We believe that renancing blind for a period of time until them. But only close friends and versity in industrial engineering, ness he would like to take care of is or purchasing home of townhome, while showing family the knew that there was trouble their in the “That spooked felonytheresidential burglary. They Photo source: Joshua Schaffer/Facebook the dwelling. annexation of unincorporated of his hard times. according toat Paul. he had surgery. your dreams should be a west of Bell Road. In The hundreds of customers who He was also 4,000 involved inthem,” civic property “The tumor was pressing on his viewsoptic they send to his smarttownhome — more than Brown recalled, saying remain in custody and are due In a photo posted publicly to Facebook, Joshua Schaffer and Shancomfortable and nerve,” Paul said. “He had knew him were not privy to any organizations. He reached the 2009, the village’s Comprehenphone, andandother commumiles to away 3900 block of ofthat thePlan burglars flushed tera Brown enjoy themselves in Hawaii, just days after they successtargeted thewere Bell Road of that, according Paul. in the level of vice president the sive threeiPad surgeries back then, pain-free process. “He would never dump his prob- Palos-Worth Jaycees and was a corridor as an area for potential theredevices. were no guarantees. But nication Spyglass Circle, near 135th and into the hallways and spotted We byoffer the(See Burglar app, Page 3) fully thwarted a burglary more than 4,000 miles away. following he was one of the first people to lems on people,” Paul said. “People longtime member of the Palos commercial development but has programs for residential run into some disagreements with would dump their problems on Heights Lions Club. get his eyesight back.” mortgages: Bruce Frazer, who used to drive the Village of Lemont. But Michael was prone to seizures him. He wouldn’t tell you he was “Maybe that’s an area I can help • Fixed Rate Loans with and when he had a job selling Cadil- having a bad day – he would try Mr. Lombardo and another group terms ranging from lacs, he had a seizure and rammed to figure out how to help you out. of Lions members to and from out in,” Pavlatos said. “It’s been LOOK FOR AREA an ongoing process and I know the He would never put himself above meetings, appreciated Lombardo’s 10 to 30 years one of the company cars into the MORTGAGE RATES EVERY ins and outs of that process.” ability to volunteer. • Adjustable Rate Loans back of an 18-wheel truck, according anyone or anything else. WEEK IN THE REGIONAL Veteran council members are “He was a man of simple means. “Whatever he could do, he • Balloon Loans to his cousin, Lou Rini. NEWS! A P P LY Rini, who owned the pharmacy, He was not possessive of worldly would be the first to jump up happy to have Pavlatos back. OW! N “He is eager to fill the role,” said Michael was eventually let things. His pleasure in life was and volunteer,” Frazer said. “He ing and selling colorful, stylish rishioners to order scarves and bins fluctuates in size from week MayorHadac John Mahoney said. “I whenTim go from his job and his driver’s knowing he was helping someone would pass out brochures by he would be someone who we had guest speakers. If we had think license was taken away. He came else.” staff reporter scarves, as well as potholders, potholders through Lilli’s mother, to week, from as little as a half Michael’s sister, Cecelia Cha- raffles, he would volunteer to call could step right in and complete to the store to help out with pafor $10 each. Jennifer. dozen volunteers to more than perwork and manning the soda tham, said that the family’s mother, out the numbers. He didn’t do a the term until May, 2015 without 12330 S. Harlem Avenue | Palos Heights, IL 60463 having to get up to speed in what fountain and being a goodwill 93-year-old Josephine Lombardo, lot out in public recently because     Most 10-year-olds — like most     In August, Lilli made an appeal     Proceeds from the sales go to 20. In addition to individual famihas experienced various medical is- of his health, but he was a huge we are trying to accomplish. ambassador for the store. ph 708/728-9900 | www.utbhome.com adults “We — react to because human suffer- through the weekly bulletin at St. the local chapter of Pro Labore Dei lies that participate, local clubs thank him it’s a Bad days? Michael had plenty of sues of her own and Michael took help at meetings.”

Heights man tells how phone app alerted himLombardo, of burglars in his home Michael ‘Skip’ Palos Lion helped run Rini’s

Financing a home should be exciting and easy!

Girls crochet to help neediest neighbors

ing with expressions of sympathy that are short lived.     Lilli Hansen of Palos Heights turned her sympathy into action.     Seeing abject poverty a few miles east among homeless men, women and children in Robbins, she turned to her mother, Jennifer, and said “Mom, this is terrible. We have to do something.”     That “something” is a project that has raised $1,000 in a few Photo by Mary Hadac short months to help the needy. Chloe Ayres (left) and Lilli Hansen, both of Palos Heights, show just     Along with her friend and Naa few of the colorful scarves and potholders they have made in their vajo School fifth grade classmate quest to help feed the homeless in Robbins. Chloe Ayres, Lilli has been mak-

Alexander Parish. “I am 10 years old, and my name is Lilli,” the appeal read. “You are probably thinking, ‘Isn’t she a little young to be doing this?’ Well, today I will prove you wrong. Yes, I am young, but that doesn’t stop me.     “I am part of an organization for the homeless. I make lunches for the homeless, and I feed the homeless. These people are suffering and need your help,” her appeal continued. “You are saying to yourself right now, ‘How can I help?’ That’s what I thought when I first started doing this.”     The appeal then encouraged pa-

(“We Shall Serve God”), a charitable organization founded in 1990 in Nigeria to serve the poorest of the poor, providing food, clothing, shelter, health care, education and more with respect and dignity. The Pro Labore Dei chapter in the U.S., based in Madison, Wis., was founded a decade ago.     Chicago-area volunteers with Pro Labore Dei typically minister to the homeless at two sites each weekend — in a community room at the Robbins Police Department headquarters and on Lower Wacker Drive in Chicago.     The group that goes to Rob-

from churches and schools often assist.     Volunteers, including Lilli’s family, typically make about 125 meals — paid for out of their own pockets — and bring them to the site.     The meals are simple, yet nutritious and delicious, Jennifer Hansen said. A typical meal is a sandwich with an ample slice of ham or turkey, cheese, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise with chips, cookies, a drink and sometimes more.     The guiding principle for volun(See Girls crochet, Page 3)

Photos by Tim Hadac

A living manger greets worshipers on Christmas Day     Parishioners at Christmas Day Mass at Our Lady of the Woods Church admire a pair of donkeys, Daisy and Annie, that were part of a live Nativity scene staged near the west entrance of the building, 10731 W. 131st St., Orland Park.     Rounding out the menagerie at the manger were llamas and sheep, all animals owned by Palos Park resident and Our Lady of the Woods parishioner Paul Lally (photo at right), well known as an accomplished local masonry company owner.     Popular with parishioners were two lambs born on Christmas Eve, delivered by Lally himself — “with

my own two hands” — and named Mary and Joseph.     Lally, an Irish immigrant, has owned sheep and other animals for more than seven years, as a way “to bring a bit of the old country here” and to bring joy to people, especially children “and the grownup kids, too.”     With more pregnant ewes about to give birth this week, Lally expects to be elbow-deep in lambs in the days ahead. All of his animals are housed at the Children’s Farm at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, which will re-open on March 1 after its annual winter break.


 The Regional News Thursday, January 2, 2014 New Year, fresh start

Let us resolve to build a better 2014     (Editor’s note: the opinion piece below was written by correspondent Joan Hadac and is adapted from something she published online a year ago. It serves as a timeless reminder that New Year’s resolutions can and should be about more than losing weight or quitting smoking.) by Joan Hadac correspondent     Well, now that most of us have broken our New Year’s resolutions…     OK, kidding. Sort of.     It seems to me that most New Year’s resolutions involve personal behavior: lose weight, stop smoking, exercise regularly, etc.     But fewer resolutions involve social behavior — that is, changing the way we act in our neighborhoods, city, state, nation and world. With that in mind, here are 10 social resolutions I suggest all of us think about.     In 2014, resolve to:     • Introduce yourself to six neighbors you currently do not know. By “six” I mean six households — not the mom, dad, two kids, dog and cat living next door. By “introduce” I mean face to face — not Facebook friending or anything similarly lacking in the human touch. And by “face to face” I mean something more than a smile, wave or head nod. Invite them over to dinner — or meet them at one of your local restaurants, who could certainly use the business.     • Support your local newspaper. Buy a gift subscription for your neighbors. Patronize the paper’s advertisers and let them know you saw their ad. Community newspapers are an important part of the local social fabric, and they offer something important that the downtown papers can’t possibly give. A community that loses its local paper is a community in decline.     • Live your faith. If you are a believer, support your local house of worship with more than lip service. Participate in services regularly and con-

tribute your time, talents and treasure to give glory to God.     • Send someone flowers or a fruit basket. Just once in 2014, send a gift to someone you have never sent a gift to before — preferably someone taken for granted by others. A crossing guard, a school or church secretary, someone like that.     • If you are eligible to vote, register to vote and vote in every election. Ever wonder why some parts of the greater Chicago area seem to get more attention from elected officials than others? It’s because they produce votes, and in big numbers. Also, cast an informed ballot. Know the issues and the candidates.     • Support your local police. They can’t be everywhere, and they need extra sets of eyes and ears to keep them informed. If you see something, say something. And get involved in your local neighborhood watch or whatever works best for you.     • Consider adopting a dog or cat from a local shelter. In addition to saving the life of an animal that might otherwise be killed, a good house pet can actually improve your physical and spiritual well being.     • Attend and support local public events. Check out your local civic association, historical society and chamber of commerce. And attend events that support our local boys and girls. Granted, it’s not always easy shoveling down Cub Scout pancakes, Boy Scout spaghetti, or potluck whatever — but these are the types of events, small as they are, that help build and strengthen the fabric of our communities.     • Shop locally. The small businesses within a mile or two or your home pay local taxes, employ local men and women, and donate to local organizations like schools, churches, Little League, Scouting groups and more.     • Finally, resolve to smile, laugh and spread cheer among people you meet — whether you’ve known them all your life or whether you met them five minutes ago.

Inside the First Amendment

Letters Policy

From a 5th-grader, uncomfortable truth by Charles C. Haynes     When children speak the truth, adults often squirm and shut them up.     That’s apparently what happened to Zachary Golob-Drake last week after he delivered a speech entitled “In the Name of Religion” to his 5th-grade class at Patel Partnership School in Tampa, Fla.     The teacher initially applauded Zachary’s speech, awarding him first prize and an opportunity to compete to represent his school at the regional 4-H Tropicana Public Speech Contest.     But later that same day, school officials had second thoughts.     An assistant principal took Zachary aside and explained that the speech wasn’t appropriate for 4th- and 5th-graders. As Zachary told WFLA-TV, “She thought that probably I would have to rewrite my speech, take the religion out or not compete.”     Stripped of his blue ribbon, Zachary was found crying when his older brother came to pick him up at school.     After family members protested, the school returned the ribbon. But still-worried administrators postponed the schoolwide contest until parents signed permission slips allowing their children to hear the speeches.     What’s the scary, controversial, age-inappropriate content in Zachary’s speech that young children shouldn’t hear without parental consent?

    “The world’s major religions all have messages about coexisting,” he writes. But sometimes people “use religion as an excuse to take each other’s lives.” He cites the Crusades, Genghis Khan, and the terrorist attacks on 9/11 as examples.     Despite news reports to the contrary, school officials now claim that the “topic of mass murders” and not religion is the issue.     That’s strange, because Zachary’s short speech isn’t graphic or inflammatory. He merely states the obvious: “Religious differences have always sparked conflict, even leading to warfare and mass murder.”     If Zachary’s school doesn’t teach young kids (or allow them to discuss) the truth about religious conflict in history, what exactly does it teach?     I suspect that Zachary’s school, like many public schools, is afraid to touch “religion” with the proverbial ten-foot pole. Even when religion is mentioned in the upper elementary grades — holidays, places of worship, and other basic facts — there is rarely discussion of the role of religion in society, for better and for worse.     It may be uncomfortable and politically incorrect, but Zachary is saying what 4th and 5th graders need to hear about one of the greatest challenges we face in the 21st century.     “In the name of religion,” Christians and Muslims are fighting in northern Africa;

Sunni and Shiite Muslims are at war in the Middle East; Buddhists are attacking Muslims in Burma; extremists are perverting Islam to justify violence across the globe — and the tragic list goes on.     As only a child can do, Zachary calls attention to the contradiction between the message of compassion found at the heart of the major world religions and the failure of many adherents to live that message in their relationships with people of other faiths.     Fortunately, however, little Zachary is smart enough to recognize that there is more to the story — that religion can also be a force for great good in the world.     Zachary ends his speech by telling us “religion provides moral guidance for most of the seven billion people on the earth.” He quotes the admonition of Confucius: “Do not do to others what you do not want them to do to you,” an early version of the Golden Rule found in many of the world’s great faiths.     “This world would be a better place,” writes Zachary, “if everybody followed that rule.”     From the mouths of babes comes truth and wisdom. Charles C. Haynes is director of the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum Institute, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20001. Web: religiousfreedomeducation.org Email: chaynes@newseum.org

New laws take effect in 2014 Photo by Jeff Vorva

WHATIZIT?     Oh, you guys couldn’t wait to step into this hornet’s nest.     At 5:44 a.m. the day after Christmas Oak Lawn’s James Wucka opened the floodgates guessing correctly that last week’s photo was a hornet’s nest. Because our cranky board of directors are out of town, we will allow wasp nest guesses as well as a New Year’s present.     Good buzzes go to Evergreen Park’s Jan Merchantz, Vince Vizza, Hickory Hills’ Jack and Griffin Burke Faddis and Robert Beegle, Worth’s Donna Hirsch, Celeste Cameron, Carol and Jerry Janicki, Theresa and George Rebersky and Robert Solner, Willow Springs’ Harrison Debre, Chicago Ridge’s Dana Oswald and Jim Cap from parts unknown.     This week’s clue: This is no angel.     Send those guesses to thereporter@comcast.net by Monday night with WHATIZIT? on the subject line. Make sure you have your name and home town.

    Illinois State Sen. Bill Cunningham is reminding his constituents that with the New Year holiday comes a host of new laws for Illinois residents.     Laws affecting everything from social media privacy, to tanning bed regulation, to cell phone usage while driving took effect on Jan. 1.     A few of the most notable changes are listed below.     1. Talking on a cell phone while driving is now banned, unless it is completely hands free. Blue Tooth headsets and speakerphone are still allowed as long as they can be activated by a voice-command or singlebutton touch.     2. Use of commercial tanning beds is banned for children under the age of 18. Countless studies link tanning to an increased risk of skin cancer, especially at a younger age.     3. 17 year olds that will turn 18 before the day of the general election can now vote

in primary elections.     4. New pet owners that purchase sick cats and dogs can be reimbursed for the cost of veterinary visits for up to 21 days after the purchase. They also have the option to exchange the pet for a refund.     5. Those caught littering in Illinois will now face a $50 fine. Cigarette butts are included as litter.     6. Schools are banned from checking students’ Facebook pages without permission.     7. The state speed limit increases from 65 mph to 70 mph. Counties near Chicago and St. Louis have the ability to opt out.     8. Fines for speeding in construction zones while workers are not present were lowered. Additionally, fines were increased for speeding in construction zones if workers are present.     9. To help protect schoolchildren, cameras will be placed

on school buses to watch for drivers that pass stopped buses.     10. If a divorced couple has joint custody of children, one parent must ask the other if he or she would like to take care of the children before hiring someone else.     11. Instead of being forced to throw extra wine away at a restaurant or winery, they can now cork an unfinished bottle to send home with you. The wine must be re-corked and placed in a tamper-evident bag.     12. The Illinois Tollway will begin posting names of people with the highest outstanding tolls on its website to help crack down on people skipping tolls.     To learn about these and other new laws go to illinoissenatedemocrats. com/index.php/caucus-news/ feature-story-archive/3829-14for-14-top-14-new-illinois-lawsfor-2014.

Inge Calderone, Oak Forest     “I don’t have one. I’m unreliable.”

Mark Kuruc, Bradley     “To follow God more closely.”

Evelyn Flynn, Palos Hills     “To help who I can.”

The Regional News encourages letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and the name of the writer will be published. Include your address and telephone number for verification purposes. Limit letters to no more than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters. Mail or bring Readers Write letters to: The Regional News, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463, or e-mail us at theregional@comcast.net

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REGIONAL NEWS

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Publisher Amy Richards Editor Jack Murray Sports Editor Ken Karrson Advertising Sales Val Draus Phone: 448-4001 Classified Manager Debbie Perrewe Phone: 448-4002 Graphic Design and Layout Rebecca Lanning Jackie Santora Deadlines: Editorial: Noon Saturday Advertising: 5 p.m. Monday Subscription rates: Local, delivered by mail, $45 a year in advance. Out-of-State, $54 a year. Single copies, $1.00. Postmaster: Send address changes to THE REGIONAL NEWS, 12243 S. Harlem Ave., Palos Heights, IL 60463-0932. The Regional News cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material. USPS 419-260 Periodical postage paid at Palos Heights, IL 60463 and additional post offices. Entered as periodical mail at the Post Office at Palos Heights, Illinois, 60463 and additional post offices under the Act of March 3, 1879. (©Entire contents copyright 2014 Regional Publishing Corp.)

This newspaper is dedicated to the memory of those who gave their lives to protect America’s freedom of the press, whenever and however it may be threatened.

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What is Your New Year’s Resolution? (Asked the Palos Heights Public Library)

Photos by Bob Rakow

Michelle Egan, Worth     “To relax about things.”

Lorraine Skorz, Palos Hills     “To try to keep myself well and as happy as I can.”


The Regional News Thursday, January 2, 2014



Heights Olympic hopeful readies for Russia by Tim Hadac staff reporter     When it comes to raising funds for their trip to the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia, the family of Palos Heights hockey star Kendall Coyne not only met its goal, but added a hat trick.     “We set out to raise enough money to send me and [my husband] John, but we did so well that our two sons and daughter (Kevin, 24, Jake, 18, and Bailey, 17) will be heading to the Olympics, as well,” Ahlise Coyne told The Regional News last Friday from Boston, as she described the effort to get the family to Sochi, Russia in February to see her daughter, Kendall, 21, skate for the gold as a member of the U.S. Women’s Hockey Team.     The women’s team lineup was announced yesterday at the

us,” Ahlise Coyne said. “At our fundraiser [at B.J. McMahon’s in Oak Lawn in November], we thought we’d get about 50-75 people, but 200 showed up. I thought I was at a college party.     “I was so overwhelmed by the outpouring of support, I walked around crying much of the night,” she added. “People I hadn’t seen since grade school were there. It was amazing.”     The fundraiser in Oak Lawn raised about $11,000 — nearly double what the Coynes had anticipated — and another event in Oak Brook pulled in about $6,000. usahockey.com Beyond that, people unable to atKendall Coyne tend the fundraisers sent donations. “I’d walk out to my mailbox NHL’s annual Winter Classic and I’d find checks from people hockey game, held this year in I don’t know,” she added. “It’s Ann Arbor, Mich. been unbelievable, especially in     “I can’t begin to describe my these hard times where so many gratitude to everyone who helped people are still out of work — for

them to write a check for $20 or $25, that’s a sacrifice.”     All that remains, Coyne said, is to sell the remaining commemorative T-shirts — which were discussed publicly at the Nov. 19 Palos Heights City Council meeting, where city officials wished the Coyne family well in their fundraising efforts.     Just 250 or so shirts remain from the original 1,000 purchased by the Coyne family. Those interested in purchasing an official USA Women’s Hockey National Team Fundraising T-shirt are encouraged to visit usatshirtscoyne. com. Shirts are priced at $20 each. The sizes remaining are medium, large and extra-large.     The T-shirts are expected to be collectors’ items, since “the U.S. women’s ice hockey team has medaled at every Olympic Winter Games since the sport was

    “She lived [hockey], it just oozed out of her,” Coyne added. “She watches an NHL game like none other. She sees things, and it’s just been a part of her for years.”     The second of four Coyne children, Kendall is often the smallintroduced at the Nagano 1998 est player on the ice at 5’2 and Olympic Winter Games, winning 125 pounds but is known nationone gold (1998), two silvers (2002, ally and even internationally for 2010) and one bronze (2006),” ac- her explosive speed, skills and cording to a U.S. Olympic Com- savvy. mittee website.     All four Coyne children play     As originally reported in a Nov. ice hockey, including oldest son 21 story in The Regional News, Kevin, 24, a freelance news reKendall Coyne has been on the porter whose work has appeared ice since age 3, and on hockey in The Regional News, as well as teams since age 4 or 5. She was The Reporter. initially given figure skates, “and     Ironically, neither Ahlise nor was on them for about a week her husband, John, skate. Both when she said asked to switch to are athletes themselves, however. hockey skates by saying, ‘I need Ahlise was a competitive gymnast, the sport.’ She loved the idea of and John was a baseball star and being on a team. That’s what she base-stealing legend at Brother wanted,” Ahlise Coyne said. Rice High School.

Man charged with battery     Orland Park police arrested Isidoro Peralta, 22, of Orland Park, at 11:52 p.m. Nov. 17 and charged him with battery and two counts of criminal damage to property. Peralta, who police said was intoxicated when he entered Burrito Jalisco, 9182 W. 159th St., allegedly became angry when employees refused to serve him additional alcohol, according to the police report. He allegedly destroyed a paper towel dispenser in the women’s bathroom, tearing it from the wall and leaving it in pieces and then kicked and broke the glass front entrance door, police said. An employee and a manager scuffled with Peralta outside the restaurant after the incident and the manager injured his knee, police said. Peralta had a court date of Dec. 20 at the 5th Municipal District Cook County Courthouse in Bridgeview.     In other Orland Park police news, Donna J. Barkowski, 47, of Orland Park, was arrested at 6:08 p.m. Nov. 16 and charged with driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol and failure to reduce speed to avoid a crash. Barkowski was not injured when the vehicle she drove struck and came to rest on the center median near 143rd Street and La Grange Road, police said. An off-duty firefighter reportedly told police he saw Barkowski’s vehicle swerve into oncoming lanes while driving very slowly and then make a sharp turn back in the intersection. She hit a least one traffic sign

ORLAND PARK POLICE before coming to a stop straddling the median, police said. Barkowski was also charged with operation of an uninsured motor vehicle. No court information was provided in the arrest report.     Michael T. Piazzolla, 26, of Orland Park, was arrested at 12:47 a.m. Nov. 27 and charged DUI and improper lane usage. Police said they stopped Piazzolla near West Avenue and 148th Street after seeing him cross into oncoming traffic twice and noticing his vehicle registration was expired. Piazzolla’s Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus test results showed four of the six indicators of impairment, police said. His eyes were bloodshot and glassy and he smelled of alcohol, according to the police report. Piazzolla was also charged with driving with expired registration. He has a court date of Jan. 21 in Bridgeview.     Izabela J. Zalesko, 18, of Homer Glen, was arrested at 6:54 p.m. Nov. 26 and charged with retail theft. Zalesko exited a fitting room in a store at the Orland Square shopping center carrying fewer items than when she went in, police said. Employees checked the room and found nothing but clothing tags and empty hangers, according to the police report. A loss prevention agent confronted Zalesko outside the store and recovered six items — four articles of clothing and

two pieces of jewelry — with a total retail value of $186, police said. She was also banned from the store for one year, police said. Zalesko has a court date of Jan. 10 in Bridgeview.     Jeremy Skupien, 21, of Frankfort, was charged with reckless driving and speeding in a construction zone. Skupien reportedly drove 80 mph in the construction zone on La Grange Road near 154th Street where the speed limit is 35 mph. Skupien braked hard when the vehicle he drove passed an oncoming squad car, police said. He then reportedly pulled over onto the center median strip. Skupien has a court date of Jan. 10 in Bridgeview.     Vidal Romero-Segura, 35, of Orland Park, was arrested at 1:16 a.m. Nov. 21 and charged with speeding in a construction zone, driving with only one headlight, driving without a valid driver’s license, and driving without a rear registration plate light. Romero-Segura drove 45 mph in the construction zone, which runs from 128th Street to 161st Street, police said. He had a court date of Dec. 27 in Bridgeview.     Ricardo A. Herrera, 36, of Orland Park, was arrested at 2:32 P.M. Nov. 26 after he turned himself in at the Orland Park police station, 15100 Ravinia Avenue, on an outstanding warrant, police said. The warrant, issued Oct. 31, was for failure to appear in court on a charge of DUI, police said. No additional court information was provided.

Girls crochet

Photo by Wehmeier Portraits

Orland Chamber orientation invitation     The Orland Park Area Chamber of Commerce invites all current and prospective members to a member orientation on Thursday, Jan. 22, from 7:45 to 9 a.m., at Homewood Suites, at 16245 S. La Grange Road. There is no cost for this event and a light snack will be served.     Member orientations are held throughout the year to acquaint all members and prospective members with the benefits of a chamber membership.     Jayne Miller of Peace Village is shown giving a talk at the previous member orientation held Sept. 24.     For more information or to RSVP, call the Chamber at 349-2972 or RSVP through the Chamber’s website calendar at orlandparkchamber.org.

Heights’ chill (Continued from page 1) a representative of the Loop-based Trean Development Co., told The Regional News in a recent conversation. He added that Trean expects to submit detailed plans to city officials this month and hopefully break ground in late summer on a development that includes a “restaurant campus” of eight high-end eateries, a boutique hotel with a banquet room, and a 48-unit condominium building.     Additionally, the slow-rising

dough of Bella’s Bakery & Breakfast — which had been promised to be open by Christmas, will now be open within a month, according to co-owner Elvis Hall.     “We are thrilled to be opening in the old Baumann’s Bakery space, a place that so many people in Palos Heights and beyond have frequented for decades,” Hall said last week.     The delay was caused by the county health department’s permit process that required Hall and co-owner Michael Spizzirri to submit detailed construction plans regarding their two-storefront business near 123rd and

Harlem.     Hall said the bakery portion of Bella’s will be open traditional bakery hours, roughly 6 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily.     The breakfast area, in a connecting storefront that once housed a coffee house, will be open from about 6 a.m. to noon and will offer, Hall said, an interesting and delicious variety of meals prepared from scratch. “We’ll have omelets, bacon and sausage, biscuits and gravy, french toast, raisin bread, and so much more. Really, how many places offer freshly baked bread with your breakfast?” Hall asked.

(Continued from page 1) teers is to make the lunch as if they were preparing it for Jesus Christ, reflecting the famous passage in the Book of Matthew: “The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’”     The weekly ministry is important for all the homeless, but especially impoverished children, according to Pro Labore Dei area leader Ann De Angelis of Oak Lawn.     “Children typically receive some sort of breakfast and/or lunch through schools, but in the summer months, as well as over the Christmas holiday when school is not in session, many of these kids [in Robbins] are on their own, abandoned,” she said. “They often have nothing to eat. We think they should have something.”

Burglar app (Continued from page 1) in court on Jan. 14. One of the two was a friend — a false friend — of Brown, who reportedly knew they were away on vacation and that there was a large amount of cash in the residence.     Were it not for the cameras connected to the cell phone app, Brown and Schaffer agreed in a conversation with The Regional News last Saturday, they would be just another statistic.     As it was, they almost ignored the alert they received in Hawaii, because they had recently received a number of false positives. “These cameras are really sensitive,” Brown explained. “Sometimes, they’ll be triggered by shadows or a car driving by.”     Since returning from Hawaii, the couple has installed additional electronic security measures designed to make their home nearly impregnable.     They still have their own clips of surveillance footage, including one showing officers in a hallway shouting demands and warnings at one of the two intruders, followed by the man’s scream as a police dog bites him in the leg.     Schaffer, 23, who is planning a career as a storm-chasing meteorologist, noted that people don’t have to be as tech-smart as he is to protect themselves. He said that the Dropcam units and apps he uses are readily available online.     Law enforcement authorities

CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

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PER ROOM

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L-shaped rooms & Great rooms are considered 2 rooms.

Submitted photo

WHOLE HOUSE SPECIAL Any 6 Rooms.

Lilli Hansen (left) and her friend, Chloe Ayres, receive a congratulatory hug from Ann De Angelis of the Pro Labore Dei organization after they presented her with a check for $1,000 — proceeds from their sale of homemade scarves and potholders.     Both Lilli and Chloe received a new supply of yarn as Christmas gifts (in multiple colors) and are already busy crocheting new scarves to fulfill requests that just came in.     Those interested in ordering a scarf or potholders or obtaining

more information about donating to the effort are encouraged to email Jennifer Hansen at foreverfragrant@comcast.net.     To learn more about helping the poor in Robbins with Pro Labore Dei, inquire via email to gentleanniegirl@yahoo.com.

contacted by The Regional News praised the couple’s use of hightech tools.     “Palos Heights is a very nice community, and our biggest challenge, as always, is simply getting people in the habit of locking their doors and windows,” said Palos Heights police detective Mike Yott. “But yes, video surveillance tools can work well, if the quality of the video is good enough. People need to protect their stuff, and this is one way to do it.”     “We are big proponents of 24/7 video surveillance for home security,” added Palos Park Police Chief Joe Miller. “The new generation of smart video cameras make it easy to watch what is happening at home, no matter where you are. Modern cameras come with wifi connectivity and the ability to watch from anywhere on your smartphone, tablet or computer.

    “The Palos Heights case is the perfect storm: tech-savvy homeowner and alert police officers armed with real-time video of the offenders inside the home, committing the crime. Even if they are not caught at the scene, the video provides a permanent record of the crime for when they are caught and charged later,” Miller added.     “While there is no substitute for neighbors watching out for each other and calling 911 when they see something suspicious, it’s good to see people embrace 21st century technology as a crime fighting tool,” added Paul Rutherford of Cook County CrimeStoppers, a non-profit agency that offers cash rewards to people who report crimes anonymously and which launched its own smartphone app earlier this year. “It’s another arrow in the quiver, and people should make good use of it.”

Mortgage Rates Around the Area

L-shaped rooms & Great rooms are considered 2 rooms.

UPHOLSTERY SPECIALS:

Sofa Loveseat Chair

RATES 4.625 3.625 3.500

APR 4.627 3.614 3.471

POINTS 0  0  0

Mount Carmel High School has outstanding academic scholarship opportunities for incoming freshmen who take the Entrance Exam at Mount Carmel on January 11.

Score

Academic Scholarship Award

99%

Full tuition scholarship for the student’s freshman year; $4000 reduction per year for the student’s sophomore through senior years if the student maintains a GPA of 4.0 or higher.

90-98% $2000 reduction per year for the student’s freshman through senior years if the student maintains a GPA of 3.75 or higher.

APR 4.539 4.303 3.565

POINTS .25  .25  .25

Prospect Federal (as of Dec. 23) 30-year fixed 20-year fixed 15-year fixed

RATES 4.500 4.250 3.500

All rates subject to change daily. Equal opportunity lenders.

2 Cushions

$

Entrance Exam: Saturday, January 11, 8 a.m.

United Trust Bank (as of Dec. 30) 30-year fixed 15-year fixed 10-year fixed

35 30 $ 20 $

3 Cushions

773.324.1020, ext. 265 or 281 www.MCHS.org




The Regional News Thursday, January 2, 2014

What’s your vision of retirement?     When you start out in your career, you’re probably not thinking much about retirement. At this point, your picture of a “retirement lifestyle” may be, at best, hazy, hidden as it is behind a veil of experiences you’ve yet to encounter. But as you move through the years, your view of retirement comes into clearer and closer focus — and this vision will have a big impact on your savings and investment strategies.     Consequently, to create and implement those strategies effectively, you’ll need to define your retirement vision by identifying its various parts. Here are some to consider:     • Travel — If you’re like many people, you may dream of traveling during your retirement. But what does “travel” mean to you? Do you envision taking a cruise or an international trip every year? Or is your idea of travel just a short jaunt to a popular destination, such as a lake or the mountains or the beach? The difference in costs between global and U.S.-based travel can be enormous, so you’ll need to

affect your finances much. But if you are particularly ambitious, and your volunteerism involves travel, renting space, purchasing equipment and so on, you might be Jim looking at some large cash outlays. Van Howe Furthermore, if you host people at your house, you may be incurring some types of liability risk, which you might need to address through appropriate insurance coverage. define your goals and estimate     • Hobbies — During your your expenses. working years, you may pursue     • Second home — Once you your hobbies always with the retire, you’ll have to make thought that you can devote a some housing-related decisions. lot more time to them after you Should you sell your home and retire. However, expanded hobby “downsize”? Or do you want activities may involve expanded to keep your current residence costs. For example, if you’re good and possibly purchase a second with cars, you might decide to home, such as a condominium, invest in that foreign sports car in another part of the country? of which you’ve dreamed. Or, if Obviously, you’ll need to factor you’re fascinated by genealogy, in these choices when you think perhaps you’ll start traveling to about how to invest before you places once inhabited by your retire and how to manage your ancestors. These types of activiwithdrawals from your 401(k), ties can be expensive, so you’ll IRA and other accounts during have to evaluate your saving, your retirement. spending and investing habits to     • Volunteer activities — You determine how to accommodate might think that your volunteer your increased expenditures on activities during retirement won’t your hobbies.

Pick of the Litter By John R. Fleming, DVM Dear Dr. Fleming:     Did you see the hatchet job that the TV show “20/20” did to all veterinarians? Ruth, Orland Park Dear Ruth:     I rarely watch TV and when I do it’s either the History channel, an old Sherlock Holmes or Perry Mason show, maybe a documentary or cable news. To me mainstream television programming is mindless and not worth watching. So no, I didn’t see the segment but I’ve read about it in some of our veterinary literature and I’ll be glad to respond to two of the issues in the show.     One of the implications in the show was that veterinarians unnecessarily vaccinate for a profit. As veterinary journalist Steve Dale said, “Vaccination is a big ticket item; really? Cancer surgery, now that’s big ticket.”     Vaccinations save a lot of pets from serious illnesses. My friends who are practicing veterinarians vaccinate dogs for viral infections like rabies, parvovirus and distemper every three years. The few clinics that still vaccinate yearly for these diseases hopefully have a medical reason for doing so. Vaccines for bacterial diseases such as leptospirosis and Lyme disease unfortunately do not induce long-lasting immunity in dogs and need (sorry) to be boosted yearly. The infectious cat diseases that we commonly vaccinate for are viral in nature and can be given every three years for distemper and feline leuke-

    • Second career — Many people look forward to retiring from one career so they can start another — opening a small business, consulting or even taking a parttime job. Clearly, if you were to start your own business, some expenses would be involved, so you’ll have to plan for them. Even if you become a consultant or work part time, you could incur various costs, including travel. And, in relation to these types of work, you may also have insurance and health care issues to address.     By identifying the various components of your retirement vision, and estimating their respective costs, you can make those saving, spending and investment choices that can help you work toward your retirement dream. Jim Van Howe is a financial advisor with Edward Jones Investments, in Palos Heights. His office is at 7001 W. 127th St. He can be reached at 361-3400. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

League of Voters will delve genetically modified foods     The next regular meeting of the League of Women Voters of the Palos Orland Area will feature a discussion of GMOs, genetically modified organisms.     League members will learn about the potential consequences of GMOs on Saturday, Jan. 11, at the Palos Heights Public Library — coffee at 9:30 a.m., meeting at 10. League meetings are always open to the public.     As part of a national LWV study, local League members are educating themselves about this relatively new aspect of agriculture, in particular food production.     Susan Busen is a well-known author, practitioner and speaker in the field of environmental awareness. She has worked with the Institute for Responsible Technology to raise awareness on the dangers

of genetically modified foods.

Day of Reflection for the New Year     A Day of Reflection for the New Year will be offered at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park, on Tuesday, Jan. 7, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.     The Rev. Chris Hopkins and program director Lois Lauer will lead the program, which will include a guided meditation, labyrinth walk, and sharing, all for the purpose of entering the new year in a mindful way. Participants are encouraged to dress warm for an outside walk to the labyrinth, or may choose to sit by the fireside and use a lap labyrinth.     The program includes a new year’s luncheon and costs $17 per person. Reservations are required. For more information, interested persons should call The Center at 361-3650.

St. Patrick’s Day parade invites Queen candidates

    The Chicago St. Patrick’s Day parade queen contest is underway.     “Chicago’s fairest Colleen” will represent the Chicago Irish community as the Queen of the Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade. The Queen and her court of four will be expected to attend civic, neighborhood, parish and Irish events on behalf of the parade committee. my physician will darn straight     Any girl of Irish ancestry, never tell me whether it scares me or married, 17-27 years old, is eliginot. Veterinarians I know, and ble to enter the contest. Entrants have known, charge clients to should send a snapshot with name, pay for clinic overhead, lab tests and treatment, not to be thieves. Almost every conversation with clients is emotional and almost all veterinary medical decisions Candy cane hunt revolve around cost. The producers of ABC’s New’s “20/20” show in Palos Park don’t know their butts from a hole in the ground.     The Palos Park Recreation     Allow me to quote from one Department, 8901 W. 123rd St., of our veterinary publications: will hold a candy cane hunt on “The segment (on “20/20”) was Tuesday, Jan. 14, from 4:15 to 5 based on allegations made by An- p.m., on the Village Green. drew Johnson, DVM, a former     It will be transformed into a veterinarian in British Columbia, candy cane forest where children Canada. Jones was an odd choice ages 3 to 8 will search for candy to base the segment on. He’s no canes. longer a practicing veterinarian. In 2010 he quit the profession after being assessed the highest fine ever levied by the British Columbia Veterinary Medical Toastmasters Club Association.”     Perhaps it’s all about ratings. ABC bashes veterinarians Nov.     The Center Toastmasters Club 22 under the title “True Confes- will meet on Wednesdays, Jan. 8 sions,” which also had a segment and 15, at 7 p.m., at 12700 Southon how bartenders can short- west Highway, Palos Park. change and cheat their customers.     Toastmasters International is an At least we are in good company. organization for people interested November is one of the “sweeps in improving and practicing their “months when the Nielsen TV public speaking skills. Members ratings service determines the take turns leading the meetings ratings which becomes the basis and giving speeches, gaining confor advertising rates. ABC needs fidence from the encouragement a lot help with its ratings, and of each other. maybe A&E Channel jumped     New members and guests are all over Phil Robertson down in always welcome. For more informaMonroe Louisiana last week as a tion, call Dave Sanders or Lois Lauway to boost its ratings. er at The Center at 361-3650.

age, address, phone number and brief biography and explanation on why you want to be Queen. To download an application, visit the website at chicagostpatsparade. com.     Contest finals will be held Sunday, Jan. 19, in the Stephen M. Bailey Auditorium, 1340 W. Washington Blvd., Chicago. Deadline for entries is Friday, Jan. 10.     The parade will be held in Downtown Chicago on Saturday, March 15.

Recreation Roundup

Submitted photo

Meet Marilyn and Nancy from Orland Park and their new little Rosie. mia. Rabies vaccine in cats can be given every three years if you are willing to accept a vaccine with adjuvant in it, otherwise, get a one-year non-adjuvanted rabies vaccine yearly. If a cat is strictly indoors the leukemia vaccine can be stopped for life after the first adult leukemia vaccine. If you find something different on the internet go for it.     Another implication in the show was that veterinarians, in general, “up charge” their clients playing off their “emotional attachment” to their pets. It would be naïve to think that every single vet that ever practiced is not guilty of bad behavior, however, 99.9 percent

of all veterinarians I have ever known since I was 12 years old are hard-working, ethical, peopleloving and pet-loving individuals who would quit practice if they felt that their clients didn’t trust them.     ABC New’s “20/20’s” implication disgusts me. Practically everything we tell our clients about their pets is seen through a petowner’s emotional lens. If we tell a client that their pet may well die if we don’t do some testing and find out what the problem is and don’t do some treatment, does “20/20” think we are trying to B.S. or scare the client into spending money? If I need a test

    Children’s vaccines that are available include DTaP, DTaPHep B-IPV, DTaP-IPV-Hib,     Orland Township, 14807 S. Ra- DTaP-IPV, Hep A, Hep B, Hep Bvinia Ave., provides free blood Hib, HPV, Meningococcal, MMR, pressure screenings from 9 a.m. IPV, Pneumococcal, Rotavirus, to 11 a.m. on the first Friday Tdap and Varicella. Adult vacof the month. No appointment cines that are available include is necessary. HPV, Pneumococcal, Hep A, Tu    In addition to blood pressure berculosis, Hep B, Tdap, IPV, screenings, on the first Friday of Meningococcal, Hep A-Hep B, the month, VCP Home Health MMR, Typhoid and Shingles. Care Inc. will conduct balance (orlandtwp.org) screenings, which can help prevent dangerous falls. Glucose Smith Village screenings are also available on caregivers support group this day for $5 ($10 for nonresidents) (403-4222).     Residents with family members or friends living with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia Immunization clinics are invited to a free monthly at Orland Twp. meeting that will focus on “Tak    Orland Township will hold ing Care of the Caregiver” at its monthly immunization clinic 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 7, at this Saturday, Jan. 4, from 9 a.m. Smith Village, a continuing care to 11 a.m., Tuesday, Feb. 4, from retirement community at 2320 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday, W. 113th Place in Chicago. March 8, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.     Smith Village’s memory supat the township building, 14807 port coordinator Diane Morgan S. Ravinia Ave. will be joined by Carly Carney,     Vaccines are available to chil- owner of the Beverly Yoga Center dren 18 and under who are ei- at 1917 W. 103rd St., to explore ther uninsured, underinsured, ways caregivers can take care of Medicaid-eligible/All Kids (card themselves by meditating. Carneeds to be displayed), Native ney will explore the process of American or Alaskan Native. developing a meditation pracUnderinsured means that the tice through visualization and child has health insurance, but breathing exercises that can it does not cover any vaccines, lead to a feeling of inner wellcertain vaccines, or it has a fixed being. dollar limit or cap for vaccines,     Before the hour-long meeting and once that cap is reached a ends, Morgan and Carney will child is ineligible. be open to questions and com    With valid proof of Orland ments from the assembled group Township residency, vaccines are and light refreshments will be free of charge. For children re- served. siding outside of the township’s     To reserve a seat, call (773) boundaries, a $20 administra- 474-7300, or go to familyandtion fee per vaccine will be friends@smithvillage.org. collected. An up-to-date shot record is mandatory to receive Orland Township any vaccine, and children must wellness program be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian.     Orland Township residents

    After participants collect all the various candy canes, they will head into the Recreation Center for hot chocolate and cookies, holiday music, and make a candy cane craft.     Registration is required by Tuesday, Jan. 7. Fee is $3 for Palos Park residents, $3.75 for unincorporated Palos Park residents and $4.50 for non-residents. (671-3760; palospark.org)

Club Activities Palos Heights Woman’s Club     The Palos Heights Woman’s Club first meeting of 2014 will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 7, at 7 p.m., at the Palos Heights Recreation Center, 6601 W. 127th St.     Members and guests will enjoy the program “Rusty Hinges — How to Manage Arthritis without pills, potions or lotions,” presented by Dr. Mary Peterson of the Great Lakes Health and Wellness Center.     Refreshments will be served. For more information about the club, call Janeen at 989-3000.

Library Notes

Health Beat Health screenings at Orland Twp.

Community Notes

in need of medical services may purchase a discounted wellness program voucher at the township, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., during office hours: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Tuesday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Proof of residency is required.     The Wellness Program offers services at a discount of up to 50 percent. The services include adult and children’s physicals ($40 and $35), podiatry screenings ($30 and $25-senior), dental screenings ($15), dental examinations and cleanings ($50), dental examinations, cleanings and X-rays ($100), nutrition consultations ($40), vision examinations ($45) and chiropractic examinations ($45).     Residents may choose a participating doctor from the Wellness Program doctors list, which can be found at www.orlandtwp. org, and once the voucher is purchased, an appointment can be scheduled directly with the doctor’s office (403-4222).

Temporary disability parking placards     Residents in need of a temporary Illinois disability parking placard may pick up required paperwork at Orland Township, 14807 S. Ravinia Avenue, between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, and from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Tuesday.     The paperwork must be completed and signed by a physician and returned to Orland Township. The temporary placards are valid for a length of time indicated by the authorizing doctor (not exceeding 90 days). Placards may only be used in a vehicle in which the authorized holder of the parking placard is either the driver or a passenger.

Book & Film     The Book & Film Series returns to the Palos Park Public Library on Wednesday, Jan. 8, at 2 p.m., with the film “The Great Gatsby,” starring Tobey Maguire and Leonardo DiCaprio in this adaptation of the classic novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald.     This program is free and open to the public. All who attend will be entered in a raffle to win a free copy of the book.     The library is at 12330 Forest Glen Blvd. Call the library to register at 448-1530, or for more information, visit the library online at palosparklibrary.org.

Heights library youth activities     • Yo-Yo Man Show — Children ages 3 and up are invited to see yo-yo champion Barry North perform his yo-yo tricks, and teach you how to do a trick of your own on Friday, Jan. 3, at 10 a.m., at the Palos Heights Public Library.     • Rainbow Bracelet Making — Bring your loom to the library! We’ll supply the rubber bands on Tuesday, Jan. 7 at 4 p.m. for kids in grades 1 and up.     • Pajama Time — All ages are invited to listen to a story and create a craft. Wear your pjs and bring your blankie on Tuesday, Jan. 7 at 7 p.m.     • Drop in Story Time — For children ages 2-6. No registration is required. The theme for Wednesday, Jan 8, at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. is cozy sweaters.     • Chicago Wolves Player Visit — Score a goal with reading this winter. Sign up for the Wolves Winter Reading Program at the Youth Services desk starting Jan. 8. Winter Reading program kicks off with a visit from right wing Shane Harper Jan. 8 at 7 p.m. All ages are invited.

Heights library upcoming programs

Mollie’s War.”     Program registration is always appreciated. Register online at     The following will take place at palosheightslibrary.org, by phone the Palos Heights Public Library, at 448-1473, or in person. All 12501 S. 71st Ave. programs are free and open to the     • Bring your projects to the public unless otherwise noted. Needle Club and enjoy the company of others while working on Heights library Tuesday, Jan. 7, from 10 a.m. featured database to noon. New members always welcome.     Whatever your goal, Learning     • Join others who love the Express Library’s resources will game at the Scrabble Club on help you succeed. Tuesday, Jan. 7, from 1 to 3 p.m.     Each Learning Center offers New players always welcome. the practice tests, exercises,     • On Tuesday, Jan. 7, at 6:30 skill-building courses, eBooks, p.m., attend Clean Up Your Com- and information you need to puter with Steve from Computer achieve the results you want Greeks and learn how to get rid — at school, at work, or in of the clutter on your computer. life: elementary, middle and This class will also cover basic high school level language arts, security issues and how it affects math and science practice, GED, speed. ACT, SAT and college admissions     • Join in the iPad/iPhone User prep, skill building for adults and Group on Thursday, Jan. 9, at 2 much more. p.m., and share what you know     Access is available in the library and learn new tips/tricks from or online at palosheightslibrary. others. Bring your device for org/services/online-databases. practice and to share your fa- html by clicking “Alphabetical vorite app. If there is interest, List.” Scroll down and click on this group will continue to meet “Learning Express Library” to on a monthly basis. begin. Use your Palos Heights     • On Sunday, Jan. 12, at 2 library card number to register as p.m., author Cyndee Schaffer will a new user. Your password must discuss her mother’s World War be a minimum of six characters II experiences as a member of with no spaces. Enter your email the Women’s Army Corps in a so they can send you a new passprogram titled, “The Journey of word if you forget yours.

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Thursday, January 2, 2014 The Regional News

THE

5

2013

REGIONAL NEWS looks back:

The Year in Review

Wanted: Images depicting Palos Park’s past Library, village compile photos for book

(From Jan. 10, 2013)

They have pushed their original deadline from Jan. 31 to mid-FebAt one time, Palos Park was a ruary and people can share their place where buffalo roamed and history by dropping items off at the marksman from all over the coun- library, 12330 S. Forest Glen Blvd., try with nicknames such as “The or at the Kaptur Center, 8999 W. Terrible Dane,” “The Stock Crank” 123rd St. and “Our Ammunition Factory” The library requests that people came to compete in sharpshooting place is the photos and information contests. in an envelope marked “Palos Park It was once a place where writers Centennial Pictures” and to provide such as Pearl S. Buck and Sherwood their name, address, e-mail address Anderson and sculptor Lorado Taft and phone number on the back of hung out. each photo and that the story is In 2014, the village turns 100 attached to the photo. years old and one of the special projThe library is working in conjuncects that will take place will be the tion with Arcadia Publishing, which debut of a book jammed with photos has produced hundreds of books like and stories about Palos Park’s first this under its “Images of America” century of existence. series, including books about nearby While members of the Palos Park Worth and Oak Lawn. Public Library have been gatherAdministrative Librarian Sheila ing material for this book in re- Sosnicki and Public Services Librarcent weeks, they are still seeking ian Jeannine Kacmar are helping out more photos and information. to oversee the project.

“These books are usually a compilation of photos of an area,” Sosnicki said. “We’re looking at doing this for Palos Park. We also want to emphasize some of the interesting parts about Palos Park’s history. Horseback riding was really huge back then. It was interesting to hear stories about farms that the families had. People are really interested in their history and they are happy to share their stories and talk. Someone brought in school pictures from the 1920s and from the 1940s and it was fun looking at those.” They discovered that buffalo had roamed in the village limits in the 1920s. “The Cook County Forest Preserve stocked buffalo,” Kacmar said. “I’m not sure why they did that, but we have photos of them grazing in the forest preserve. We have photos of people hunting them.”

From The Regional archives

Realtor Lauren Blount operated a surrey at the Village Courtyard he owned at 123rd Street and 81st Avenue Palos Park librarians Sheila Sosnicki (left) and in Palos Park more than 50 years ago. Photos such Jeannine Kacmar pore over files of photos from as this capturing Palos Park’s past are sought by The Regional’s archives in the newsroom, as the village and public library for the publication of an they seek photos for a historical book on Palos “Images of America” edition covering Palos Park in time for the village’s centennial in 2014. Park’s first 100 years. The village’s rich history in shooting will be highlighted. Palos Park once housed the Sharpshooter’s Association, which hosted competitions for regional and national

shooters. In the 1910s, the village hosted the George Washington Birthday Cup Shoot. Marksmen from all over the country to compete including C.T.

Westergaard, who was known as the “Terrible Dane”, C.L. Forsythe, otherwise known as “Our Ammunition Factory” and Frank Dulleck — a.k.a. “The Stock Crank.”

Convicted Heights bank robber a top student; erotic model (From February 14, 2013) Little did people know it at the time, but when two suspects donned nuns outfits and masks á la the film “The Town” to rob a bank at gunpoint in Palos Heights of $120,000 in May, 2011, that may have actually been the most A sign outside the firehouse honored former Palos Heights Fire Protection District Chief Roger Bushee, normal part of the story. Last week, the story took a who died earlier this month in Arkansas. couple of odd turns when a judge at the Dirksen federal courthouse donned a nun’s uniform toward the end of a three-day bench trial before finding one of the suspects, 25-year-old Navahcia Edwards, guilty. And interesting stories of Edwards’ past as an erotic model (From January 17, 2013) department what it is today.” the Palos Heights Fire District Mr. Bushee was born in Chi- starting in 1950 and was one of with a near-perfect college A former Palos Heights fire cago and attended Fenger High the original paramedics when the grade-point average have also chief who once served in the Army School, where he graduated in program started. He also had a surfaced. Multiple news agencies reported under General George Patton died 1943, according to an obituary 10-year stint as a trustee on the Jan. 6 in Bella Vista, Ark. on the Benton County (Arkan- district’s board before moving to that on Feb. 6, U.S. District Court Judge Matthew Kennelly donned Roger Bushee, who served as sas) Memorial Park website. He Arkansas in 1990. the fire chief from 1976-80 and entered the army and saw action “It’s a strange feeling moving a nun costume in order to try served the department in various in France and Germany and was a down here permanently,” Bushee to support or debunk Edwards’ capacities from 1950 to 1991, died soldier in the Battle of the Bulge told the Regional after he moved. Saturday after battling an illness, as a part of Patton’s army. He “I’ll miss the fire department but according to current Fire Chief reached the rank of staff sergeant I know they will carry on.” Tim Sarhage. He was 87. and received the Purple Heart. He Moving to Arkansas didn’t slow “In 1988 he interviewed me was named an honorary colonel him down any. when I was testing for a position of the 95th Infantry Division and He sang in a church choir, as a full-time fireman,” Sarhage later helped create a World War II played trombone in the Bella Vista said. “He was a great guy. He was Memorial Museum in Oklahoma Community Band and served as soft-spoken and a gentleman. He City, Oklahoma. president of the Bella Vista Amwas classy. When you are going for He held several jobs when he bulance Service, where he helped (From February 28, 2013) an interview like that with a man returned to the Chicago area, in- catch an office manager who emlike that, it can be intimidating cluding working at the Chicago bezzled more than $30,000. Even though he’s been gone but he was a professional, well- Tribune, Daily News, Sun-Times Bushee suffered two strokes in from the Palos Park Village spoken and smart man. and other papers as a pressman. December, 2002 and remained in a Council for close to two years, “He had a lot of history with He was also a real estate broker, wheelchair the rest of his life. James Pavlatos said “It feels like this department and I was sad an appraiser and partner at JayThe department hosted a Roger I haven’t been gone at all.” to hear he passed away. He was Bush Realty in Palos Heights. and Maxine Bushee day in honor of The council voted unanimously one of the people who made this He served as a volunteer for he and his wife on July 19, 1990. Monday night to confirm Mayor John Mahoney’s appointment of Pavlatos as the village’s next finance commissioner. He will fill the vacant seat left by Kent Oliven, who resigned Dec. 31 due to conflicts with a new job. Pavlatos, a dentist in Palos Heights, will assume his new role at the March 11 meeting. care of her for many years. (From January 31, 2013) Pavlatos was in Tucson, Ariz., “He was so kind and thoughtful,” Chatham said. “He has so getting ready to tee-off for a round Who knew? much patience with mom. Some of of golf Tuesday morning when Michael “Skip” Lombardo was the issues that she went through he found out he was back in the a popular figure at Rini’s Palos could try the patience of a lot of Palos Park fold. He served on the Heights Pharmacy for years until people. But he was so patient with village’s planning commission from the beloved institution closed in 2005-2007 and on the council as her and was just a good guy.” 2007. By most accounts, he was a Family members said Michael building commissioner from 2007guy people talked to and sometimes picked up the nickname “Skip” 11, but did not run for a second told their troubles to. But few knew when he was 6-months-old. An term. But he took this opportunity the troubles he had seen. aunt saw a picture of him in a after Oliven’s departure. Mr. Lombardo died Jan. 23 at age “I love to serve,” he said. “This sailor’s outfit and said he looked 70 and friends and family memlike a little skipper and the name is a great community and there bers remembered him for his sweet are a lot of things moving forstuck. personality and bright outlook on He attended St. Michael School ward. There is some unfinished life. They said he rarely complained in Orland Park and split time at business to be done and I feel I even though he probably had the right to, given some of the health Michael “Skip” Lombardo, of Leo High School and Blue Island can step in right away without any transition because I know cards he was dealt with. Palos Heights, as many remem- High School and attended Parsons In the 1960s, he was diagnosed ber him, clad in his trademark College in Iowa and was “darn the process and I know how the close” to receiving a master’s council works.” with a brain tumor, his brother, sweater vest. One piece of unfinished busidegree at Northern Illinois UniPaul, said. Michael was actually blind for a period of time until them. But only close friends and versity in industrial engineering, ness he would like to take care of is the annexation of unincorporated family knew of his hard times. according to Paul. he had surgery. He was also involved in civic property west of Bell Road. In “The tumor was pressing on his The hundreds of customers who optic nerve,” Paul said. “He had knew him were not privy to any organizations. He reached the 2009, the village’s Comprehenlevel of vice president of the sive Plan targeted the Bell Road three surgeries and back then, of that, according to Paul. “He would never dump his prob- Palos-Worth Jaycees and was a corridor as an area for potential there were no guarantees. But he was one of the first people to lems on people,” Paul said. “People longtime member of the Palos commercial development but has run into some disagreements with would dump their problems on Heights Lions Club. get his eyesight back.” Bruce Frazer, who used to drive the Village of Lemont. But Michael was prone to seizures him. He wouldn’t tell you he was “Maybe that’s an area I can help and when he had a job selling Cadil- having a bad day – he would try Mr. Lombardo and another group lacs, he had a seizure and rammed to figure out how to help you out. of Lions members to and from out in,” Pavlatos said. “It’s been one of the company cars into the He would never put himself above meetings, appreciated Lombardo’s an ongoing process and I know the ins and outs of that process.” ability to volunteer. back of an 18-wheel truck, according anyone or anything else. Veteran council members are “He was a man of simple means. “Whatever he could do, he to his cousin, Lou Rini. Rini, who owned the pharmacy, He was not possessive of worldly would be the first to jump up happy to have Pavlatos back. “He is eager to fill the role,” said Michael was eventually let things. His pleasure in life was and volunteer,” Frazer said. “He go from his job and his driver’s knowing he was helping someone would pass out brochures when Mayor John Mahoney said. “I we had guest speakers. If we had think he would be someone who license was taken away. He came else.” Michael’s sister, Cecelia Cha- raffles, he would volunteer to call could step right in and complete to the store to help out with paperwork and manning the soda tham, said that the family’s mother, out the numbers. He didn’t do a the term until May, 2015 without fountain and being a goodwill 93-year-old Josephine Lombardo, lot out in public recently because having to get up to speed in what has experienced various medical is- of his health, but he was a huge we are trying to accomplish. ambassador for the store. “We thank him because it’s a Bad days? Michael had plenty of sues of her own and Michael took help at meetings.”

Sudoku

Roger Bushee, retired Heights fire chief and trustee, at 87

attorney’s claims that the robbery was performed by a white person. Edwards is an AfricanAmerican. Kennelly was quoted by SunTimes in reference to Edwards’ purchase of the nun masks at an online costume store, saying “The only conceivable purpose for purchasing nun masks and robes was to do something nefarious with them — let’s just say it was nowhere near Halloween.” He also said “It’s not plausible,” when addressing Edwards’ claim that a white person was behind the mask. Prosecutors alleged that Lyndon Germel Wesley and Edwards dressed as white nuns for the robbery, but tellers at the TCF Bank told police that black skin was visible through the eye holes of the masks, which is why Judge Kennelly tested out the theory. Prosecutors also told the judge that Edwards worked for TCF

Bank in Palos Heights between July and November, 2010 and robbed it to pay back $23,000 that she allegedly stole from a bank in Country Club Hills, where she had worked. After that story broke last week, the London Daily Mail unearthed that Edwards participated as an erotic model, using aliases such as Nicci Nikole and Yasmine Waters and that she was employed by the erotic site Miyami Blue featuring titillating photos and videos and using the name Marc. She was also named a “Model of the Week” for the week of Feb. 20, 2010 on the Great Model Search website. The site said she lived in Matteson. Edwards also made the Moraine Valley Community College President’s List in March, 2011 — two months before the robbery. Edward reportedly had no emotion when Kennelly proclaimed her guilty. Sentencing is scheduled for May 1.

Pavlatos appointed to return term on Park Village Council

Michael ‘Skip’ Lombardo, Palos Lion helped run Rini’s

“We have ushered in many improvements, including the construction of the Holy Family Villa complex of assisted senior housing; the Shadow Ridge subdivision of multi-million dollar homes and the upgrades to the village water tower and reservoir,” he wrote. “We take special pride in the steady administration of village government, including keeping our tax rates low and our service levels high during this recession, and upgrading the expertise of services provided by all departJim Pavlatos ments. It has been gratifying for lot of work and he put in a great me to have introduced with the deal of time in his role as com- Building Department more than missioner and attacked it with a 17 code upgrades so far, includgood amount of energy and will ing tree conservation, with several more on the way soon.” continue to do so presently.” Pavlatos is a graduate of Loyola “I think it’s a great choice,” Commissioner Nicole Milovich- University School of Dentistry Walters added. “He was here last and has 25 years of experience term and he understands what’s in the field of surgical and prosgoing on and the direction we are thetic implant dentistry. He has lectured locally, nationally, and going. I welcome him.” In 2011, when he decided not internationally, according to his to run again, Pavlatos wrote a let- online biography. An artist, he is also an avid ter to the editor to The Regional lauding the council’s work for the photographer whose works are frequently on exhibit. previous four years.

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6

The Regional News Thursday, January 2, 2014

The Regional reviews the news of 2013 They all fall down in Dist. 135 Voters sweep incumbents off school board (From April 11, 2013)

(From March 7, 2013)

Chief Larry Yott Day Palos Park Police Chief Larry Yott celebrated his 40th year with the force last Thursday. Friends, co-workers and family gathered at City Hall as the city hosted a luncheon/reception in the Worth native’s honor. The City Council had proclaimed the date “Chief Larry Yott Day.” All five of his grandchildren were present for the event. Pictured from left to right on the bottom are McKenna Yott, age 5, Gavin Yott, 3, Lincoln Yott, 3 and Cooper Yott, 2. In the back, Chief Yott holds his youngest grandchild, Ian Yott, who is 6-months-old.

Palos Place wins two panels’ nods

During an investigation, other adjourned, emotions ran high as unflattering information came a reporter and board member enPalos-Orland’s wildest election out about what went on at the gaged in a heated exchange in showdown ended with four new school and Russell brought that to the hallway of the Administrafaces on the board and three in- the public’s attention on Monday tion Center. cumbents voted off. night after obtaining information Cunningham, an eight year vetOrland School District 135, in the firings via the Freedom of eran, lost the District 135 seat but which has featured two years of Information Act. was elected to a two-year seat on controversy leading up to a night That set the stage for an argu- the Moraine Valley Community of fireworks during Monday’s ing session between Cunningham College board of trustees Tuesboard meeting regarding three and board member Joe LaMargo day night. recently fired paraprofessionals, with Gentile, John Carmody and “Am I disappointed about the will have four new faces after Bragg joining in. Accusations flew District 135 election? Yes,” Cunvoters cast their final ballots on that decisions were made because ningham said. “But guess what? Tuesday. of politics. During the board’s It was a joy to win the Moraine Michael Carroll garnered the bickering, a female in the audi- Valley election. I went to school most votes with 3,504, followed by ence used an audible obscenity there. I have a chance to help Sandra Kulak (3,492), Laura Ber- while candidate Maratea shook that school. I’m very excited about ry (3,423) and Michael Maratea his head in disgust at the spec- that. (2,964). tacle. “The voters who came out spoke Incumbent Ann Gentile missed Even after the meeting was and I respect that.” the cut with 1,598, incumbent Tom Cunningham had 1,368 and incumbent Mary Bragg had 1,018. Newcomer Nathan Jaisingh finished eighth with 621. In recent years, the board has come under fire for issues involving athletic fields, a large $52 million fund balance, poor technology available and the dismissal or demotions of employees and the court costs incurred in the aftermaths. During a recent candidate’s forum, some newcomers accused the board of not acting professionally. The most recent controversy involved the firing of three employees in late March after an incident happened at Park School in October and a father, John Russell, complained to the board that Tom Cunningham participated in one of his final meetings as a Disit was not reported to the Illi- trict 135 trustee Monday night after he and two incumbents were nois Department of Children and voted off the board after Tuesday’s election. Cunningham did earn Family Services until February. a two-year spot on the Moraine Valley Community College board.

72nd Court, she asked that a berm be extended or a cul de sac built to prevent its traffic from using In short order Monday night, a the portion of the street passing Palos Heights developer obtained the front of her and her neightwo positive recommendations for bors’ homes. his plans to build a mixed-use Commissioners suggested that retail, office and residential buildshe air her concerns to the city ing on the site of the former Ben at a later time, stating that they Franklin dime store in downtown were outside the scope of the comPalos Heights. mission, concerned only with the After a hearing that lasted no issue of rezoning. Then, at the more than 15 minutes, the city PUD Commission hearing that folZoning Commission voted unanilowed, Alderman Alan Fulkerson mously to recommend the rezoning told Schwartz the proper venue for of the site, 12306-12320 S. Harlem her concerns is the next meeting Ave., from business to a planned of the City Council’s Roads and unit development district, and a Construction Committee, which home to be demolished at 12312 because of the April 9 election S. 72nd Court from residential to might not meet until the second serve as a parking lot for the proTuesday of May. posed Palos Place development. Since the very first PUD ComAfter waiting until 8 p.m. for the mission hearing of his plans some second of the back-to-back heartwo weeks ago, Coogan revised (From April 11, 2013 ings to start, zoning commissioners his plans to show the landscape were then joined by the aldermen Brent Woods is a huge Blackwork, improved lighting in the who serve on the City Council’s parking areas and the 50 stalls hawks fan. Planning and Zoning Committee to He said that through this magic in the rear parking lot, he told conduct the hearing of the Planned season he hasn’t missed a Blackcommissioners. Unit Development (PUD) Comhawks game all year. Until Tuesday. With the Blackhawks/Minnesota game on and the volume down at Hackney’s Restaurant in Palos Park, Woods and three other Republican candidates for the Palos Township board were more intent on watching the election results on a Mac computer than the Hawks, White Sox or Cubs games on the restaurant’s TVs. All four Republicans snared the four open trustee spots over four United Party candidates, including three incumbents, as the unofficial totals were announced Tuesday night. Republicans Richard C. Riley had 2,934 votes, followed by ShaCourtesy Brigid Capital LLC The Palos Heights City Council voted Tuesday to draft ordinances granting the rezoning of the former ron Brannigan with 2,879, Woods Ben Franklin site on Harlem Avenue for the development of Palos Place. This exterior perspective is with 2,792 and Michael Lebarre 2,672. The slate was backed by the view from 72nd Court toward Harlem Avenue. (From March 21, 2013)

mission to consider approval of the final plat for the mixed-use development by petitioner Michael Coogan of Brigid Capital LLC, Palos Place’s developer. Coogan plans a three-story, 33,000 square-feet building, with restaurants and stores on the ground floor, medical, dental and other offices on the second, and six one-bedroom apartments marketed to professionals on top. In front of a crowd of residents packing the council chambers, the PUD Commission voted, also without dissent, to recommend approval of Coogan’s $4 million project, subject to final engineering and landscaping review and approval by the city. Jane Schwartz, who lives two doors south from the home to be demolished for parking just south of the Art Park on 72nd Court, was the sole resident to address the Zoning Commission at the early hearing. Concerned by the increased traffic she believes the development may produce on

Palos GOP slate sweeps township trustee seats Palos GOP Committeeman Sean Morrison. Don Mahoney, a newcomer with the United Party, was fifth with 2,148 followed by incumbents Lauralee Conway (2140), Sandra Carbonara (2096) and Peter Poulos (1,945). United incumbents Colleen Grant-Schumann (supervisor), Mary Jane Nolan (clerk), Robert E. Maloney (assessor) and Gene Adams (highway commissioner) ran unopposed, so future board of trustee meetings will be a mix of United and Republican party members. “I think things will be harmonious,” Woods said. “We’re here to work in the best interest for everyone who elected us. Colleen, Jane and Gene are excellent to work with. And I can’t wait to work with Bob Maloney. “We’re not looking to uproot anything or make any big changes. We just want to accomplish the goals that we set out to do in our campaign.” Woods said he hopes the board

will work with area veterans group to create and assistance program for area vets without using tax dollars to do it. The Republicans are looking over at Orland Township and using that government body as a model on how they divvy up college scholarship money to area students. While most candidates talk about keeping taxes flat, Woods said his group hopes to do the best it can on that front. “We would like to push for a revision on the way property tax assessments are done,” he said. “We’re not in a powerful position. But we’ll use what power we can to step in and try to do something because people are losing their homes.” Woods said that when the results started coming in online, the Republicans started strong and never let up. “That surprised me a lot,” he said. “We never trailed all night.”

Ruth McGinnis, celebrated poet and columnist (From April 18, 2013) Ruth McGinnis, a former awardwinning columnist for The Regional News who taught poetry classes at The Center, died April 7 at her home in Peace Village in Palos Park. She was 102 years old. Ruth began writing human interest profiles for The Regional in May 1993 after she moved to Palos Park in May 1989 to be near her daughter, Sonya Snyder. Ruth’s weekly column for The Regional, titled From This View, received several journalism awards from both the Illinois Press Association and Northern Illinois Newspaper Association. She won the prestigious Peter Lisagor Award for Excellence in Journalism bestowed by the Chicago Headline Club in April 2000. The following September, she received the Sarah Brown Boyden award from the Chicago Press Veterans for her columns in The Regional. She wrote her final column for The Regional in 2010, when she was 99. Ruth Babbitt was born April 1, 1911 in the small Kansas town of Miltonvale, the only child of Amy and Lovell Babbitt, according to a brief bio compiled by her daughter Sonya titled “Ruth McGinnis: A Twentieth Century Woman.” Her father was a veteran of World War I. Ruth often revisited her childhood in rural Kansas in her columns, drawing on vivid, sometimes painful memories. She went to college in 1929, an era when few women did. At Kansas State University, she met her beloved “Mac,” Velmer McGinnis at a TKE fraternity party

in October 1930. They would become engaged on Valentine’s Day, 1931. They wed in the height of the Depression in December 1931. It was not until 1944, however, that Ruth was able to graduate from KSU while Mac was overseas during World War II. As the wife of a career Army veterinarian, Ruth raised two children, Wayne Babbitt McGinnis and Sonya Ruth McGinnis, the latter born at Fort Leavenworth, Kans. For 25 years the Army family moved often to Mac’s new postings. Many of Ruth’s columns took Regional readers with them across the country, through the Panama Canal and into the Pacific and Asia beyond. An officer, Mac retired as a colonel in the Army in 1958, after which the couple started a cattle ranch, the Sierra Charolais Ranch, in the foothills of the Sierra mountain range in Springville, Calif. They lived there 25 years. During their years on the ranch, Ruth began her teaching career in March 1966 and finished her master’s degree from the University of California in June 1973. She would retire from teaching in 1980 before writing human interest profiles for the Tule River Times in 1983. It was writing such profiles that she began her later career at The Regional. In her Regional columns, Ruth often wrote of her and Mac’s sad odyssey in and out of veterans and other hospitals when he first became ill with cancer. At the Presidio in San Francisco, and elsewhere, he underwent treatment. In an understated style, Ruth’s words simply painted the

Photo by Dolores Barnes

Ruth McGinnis with daughter Sonya Snyder and Sonia’s husband Dan (left) outside their church. picture of the horror the couple faced and endured in the many months before he died on March 2, 1986, after almost 55 years of marriage. He was 74. Nearly three years after Mac’s death, Ruth moved to Palos Park. Soon after, she began her second career, encouraged by daughter Sonya, wife of former Palos Park village Commissioner Dan Snyder, who took her to events at The Center, where she began teaching a poetry workshop. The poetry teacher published her poetry collection, “She Celebrates,” in January 1994. It was the late Regional editor Richard Parmater who recognized Ruth’s writing talent and recruited her to write for this newspaper. The two developed a close friendship that ended only with his death. It was at The Center that Ruth began her friendship and collaboration with its program director

Lois Lauer, who eulogized Ruth at her funeral on April 10 at Palos Park Presbyterian Community Church. That was Ruth’s church, where Sonya and Dan took her for weekly worship services and other activities she enjoyed, such as a course called Forty Days of Purpose that she wrote about in The Regional. On Sunday afternoons after church, Ruth composed her columns for The Regional on a computer at Sonya and Dan’s home before dinner. That was when she famously enjoyed a martini or two. Sonya proofread her works before the pair would drop off a few at a time at our office in Palos Heights. The Rev. James Tony, Palos Park Presbyterian’s pastor, noted that although Ruth was hard of hearing it always amazed him that Ruth’s summaries of his sermons in her columns always made them sound better than

he thought they were. He called her funeral service a celebration of her life, sermonizing Christ’s words that in His Father’ House are many mansions. In conversations about life after death, Ruth knew she had a place ready for her in heaven when the time would come, Tony recalled. In her memories of Ruth McGinnis, Lois Lauer called her “a lovely lady, a truly gracious woman of many talents and a huge heart.” She shared her talents and her love with so many, including her students and friends at The Center in Palos Park. Ruth taught poetry classes at The Center for 10 years beginning in 1996. She encouraged her students to write poems about things that touched them deeply. She read and critiqued each poem and offered suggestions and encouragement and praise. “After 10 years, Ruth retired from The Center at the age of 94,” Lauer said. “Her desire was for her students to continue to learn together, and so the poetry group still meets and has grown and continues to publish their poetry and to have a poetry reading every spring. “After she stopped teaching, Ruth still occasionally came to Center events, coming in on the arm of her daughter, the late Sonya Snyder, the two of them arriving in their matching mink coats in winter, or big flowered hats in spring — surely two of the classiest ladies in town! Ruth seemed to love being at an event even though she couldn’t hear much of what was going on. Because she loved life, she saw the activity around her and her eyes

sparkled with delight. “Five years ago, along with Sonya and Dan Snyder, Ruth generously funded the construction of a an additional art classroom building at The Center, enabling a large expansion of The Center’s art program. “Ruth has left her mark on the world and has left quite a legacy at The Center: she’s left a building, she’s left a program, and most importantly, she’s left us with an enduring memory, of a gracious, smiling, vital woman whom we will dearly miss. Bobbie Genemaras wrote another poem for Ruth’s 95th birthday in 1995, titled My Teacher, some lines from which I use for a final farewell to our dear friend, Ruth McGinnis. I ferret out words that somehow will reach her. Spirit to spirit my words long to travel to nest in her heart, then gently unravel feelings of admiration and love that are so much alive for this sleek silver fox... Dolores Barnes, of Palos Park, a friend of Ruth’s from church and admirer of her columns, said of Ruth: “I have been privileged to be able to read her words for many years in The Regional. Every week when the Regional was delivered I turned immediately to the page that contained Ruth’s article. After reading it and pondering what she had shared, I would then read the other portions of the newspaper. Ruth shared her life with us and always included these statements of faith and truth.”


Thursday, January 2, 2014 The Regional News

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The Regional reviews the news of 2013 Ald. Bylut joins Heights Council (From May 16, 2013)

the gallery. Don’t mistake his absences for indifference, however. Bylut and his D&D Printing teammates were wrapping up their Tuesday Classic Bowling League at Palos Lanes and fending off teams with humorous names such as “Just Here For Beer” “Pull Down Your Pants”

and “Bleep You!!!.” Yes, Tuesday nights are going So, where was Don Bylut all to get a lot more serious and the of this time? 66-year-old retired teacher said Bylut ran uncontested for the he’s up for the task as he takes City of Palos Heights 1st Ward over Prestinario’s seat for his first alderman spot vacated by 12-year full meeting Tuesday. Bylut was veteran Jeff Prestinario, but in resworn in on May 7. cent weeks and months, he hadn’t “I hope to bring stability to the been at meetings to watch from board,” he said. “This city is in good shape, unlike other cities. But there are still too many business vacancies. I’m hoping that in the next four years, we can draw interest in the property at 119th and Harlem Ave. This should be a jewel. It should be a gate to our city. Now it’s just a lot full of weeds. That’s something that shouldn’t be. We’ve had a couple of opportunities in the past to build something there but it didn’t work out. “There are too many vacancies in every strip mall that we have. The old Baker’s Square restauAlderman Jack Clifford (2nd Ward) is sworn in to his new term by rant [6431 127th St.] is looking his brother, Robert, a Cook County Circuit Court judge assigned to bad. There are areas that need the 6th District Courthouse in Markham. work on.”

Bylut has stayed in tune with recent action in the approved Palos Place development in which the old Ben Franklin building in the 12300 block of Harlem Ave. will be torn down and replaced with a three-story multi-purpose structure with retail on the first floor, office space on the second and apartments on the top floor. “Harlem Avenue could use a little height,” Bylut said. “There are so many one-story structures that it has a 1950s feel to it. I like the idea of having a larger building there and from what I’ve seen of the plans, it looks like it will be very attractive. It’s a welcome addition and maybe after it gets built up, something else good can happen on Harlem Avenue.” He calls the city a potential “dining destination of the future” and lauds eateries such as the Harvest Room, Capri, Bon a Pit among others as independent quality restaurants people from all over the area flock to. He said that

Don Bylut is sworn in by Cook County Circuit Court Judge Robert J. Clifford on May 7. huge corporations such as Kmart or Wal-mart may not be interested in coming to the city, but quality independent businesses could draw people. Bylut is a former teacher and bowling coach at Reavis High School and helped guide the Rams to a second-place finish in the Illinois High School Association state tournament and a thirdplace finish in 1984 and 1989.

He was born and raised in Chicago and lived in Evergreen Park before moving to Palos Heights 11 years ago. He spent two terms on the District 124 school board and two more on the District 231 board. For Palos Heights, he will serve as the head of the Water and Sewer Committee and will serve on the Recreation, Finance and Building and Grounds committees.

Eateries want Heights to OK video gambling (From May 23, 2013) Owners of three establishments licensed to serve liquor in Palos Heights are asking the City Council to rescind the city’s ban of video gambling, which is allowed by most nearby suburbs under the terms of the Illinois Video Gaming Act. Representatives of Sam Buca’s restaurant, Trio and X’s & O’s outlined their case for allowing video gambling on their premises before the City Council’s Licensing, Permits and Franchises Committee, chaired by Alderman Michael McGrogan (4th Ward), at the panel’s meeting a week ago Tuesday. Mike Pappas, of Orland Park, of Fair Share Gaming in Tinley Park, a supplier of video gambling machines, also spoke to the panel. He noted that Worth, Palos Hills, Crestwood are Palos Heights’ neighbor suburbs that allow video gambling in establishments licensed to serve liquor by those municipalities. Palos Park and Orland Park, like Palos Heights, have banned

the video gambling that a growing number of localities across the state allow under the terms of the state gaming act. Three residents who are proponents of retaining the city’s video gambling ban, including former mayor Dean Koldenhoven, attended the Licensing panel meeting to oppose lifting the ban. Alderman McGrogan noted that the issue had been brought before his committee earlier this year in a presentation by Sam Buca’s. The panel had asked for information on how much revenue could be generated to the community by video gambling in addition to the permit fees the city could levy on each machine. Pappas and the restaurant owners said video gaming has allowed many struggling establishments to stay in business in tough economic times that have been “rough on bar owners and restaurant owners,” especially since the state’s indoor smoking ban took effect. “The governments in our towns are not supposed to be a moral compass for our people,” Pappas

told the panel. Towns without gaming are losing food and drink sales above and beyond the money they could make from gaming, he added. Pappas also noted that video gaming is a funding source for the state’s “capital bill to rebuild Illinois,” noting that unions are “behind this.” “If I want to gamble, I could walk a few blocks to the gold course, Water’s Edge, and gamble,” he said. Of the 200 or fewer towns in Illinois that have opted out of video gaming, more towns are “jumping in,” Pappas added. Revenues broken down by locality generated by the machines are posted on the Illinois Video Gaming Commission’s website. Trio representative Mike D’Antonio noted that local establishments give to the community by their support of fundraisers for a variety of causes, from local schools to individuals struggling to pay medical bills. “This will give us a shot,” he said. D’Antonio indicated Trio would work hard to make sure the

machines cause no problems for law enforcement. He noted Trio employs doormen. “I will take the machines out of the riff-raff comes in.” Taking his turn at the podium to address the panel, former mayor Koldenhoven urged keeping the ban. “Gambling for some people is an addiction,” he said. “We can live without the revenues. Some people burn up a whole paycheck in the machines. Palos Heights as a city should turn it down.” Karen Hayes added her voice in opposition to rescinding the city’s ban. “We’ve been through this once before — this is not good public policy,” she said. She prefers the status quo of Palos Heights as a “gambling-free zone, a family friendly community,” she said. “I ask this committee to stop it at this point and not send it to the City Council.” Beth Paschall told aldermen she appreciated the previous vote to ban video poker in Palos Heights. She said gambling in neighborhood businesses would create new customers who were not planning on gambling. “Young people don’t

have to have a car, they could go on foot or bicycle. It’s a small step to start gambling. At least in casinos there is strict observation.” Paschall argued also that the city would be on the “low end of the stick” in terms of revenues. She said the cut of every dollar gambled away in the machines would give the operators and bar owners a split of 35 percent each, the state gets 25 percent and the city gets only 5 percent. She argued that video gambling would not be good for the businesses that “are here now.” “The money comes from the pockets of the citizens, our own pockets, and that’s money not being spent at stores.” Sam Buca’s Dominick Buscemi hit the addictions issue. He noted that the city allows the sale of liquor and cigarettes, both of which can be addictive. He added that the machines would be placed in a controlled environment with barriers to prevent those under 21 from gambling. His business is down, as customers dine or drink in towns that allow video gaming, Buscemi noted. “The

rooftop bailed us out, but we are down 15 percent since gaming came in.” Hayes countered that there is a social cost to video gambling. She called it the “crack cocaine” of gambling. She noted local clergy and the League of Women Voters are against video gambling as a revenue source for government period.” Pappas countered that every church he knows of except for the Methodists” do raffles or other types of games of chance to raise revenue. Ending the debate, Alderman McGrogan said he will ask Police Chief Larry Yott to get information and statistics from neighboring towns on any problems they may have with video gaming. “It’s an important decision. It could mean a lot of money that would trickle into our community.” He added that it’s foolish to allow Internet gambling online, yet not in local establishments, and that he found some of the “data compelling” for rescinding the ban.

Pat Bouchard, local journalist helped found the Crisis Center self, she would find someone who did. Once she found a news nugget about a Rhode Island researcher When Pat Bouchard wrote colwho claimed that more people are umns for the Regional News and likely to strike their kids than Reporter in the 1980s, readers were smack their dogs so she talked never sure what they were in for. to a friend who had raised five But it usually wasn’t going to teenagers. be an easygoing read. “Sounds reasonable to me,” the While she concentrated on unnamed friend was quoted as trying to keep local government saying. “My dog never snitched officials on their toes, she was my pantyhose or makeup, he outspoken on a ton of other topics, never told my family secrets to from Grenada to Nazis and somemy in-laws, never borrowed the times got into heated arguments car and got a ticket… with co-workers in the office on “There is just no temptation to columns she penned due to her Pat Bouchard hit a loving beast who accepts you left-of-center viewpoint. Genevieve “Pat” Bouchard year-old Rudolph Hess — Adolpf as you are … however when your died last Thursday at age 85 at Hitler’s right-hand man — being darling blond daughter shows up Autumn Leaves of Orland Park denied televised news and political with pink and blue hair or your son sneaks a beer out of the refrigerator care center. She had served ap- debates in prison. “I think Hess should be exposed … well, that’s another story.” proximately three decades as a Mrs. Bouchard was also a columjournalist, editor and columnist to the blatherings of world politiin the area who once ran for the cians and to the other realities nist for other area newspapers and that are carried into our homes was a past president and founding mayor of Worth in 1981. Pat Bouchard had an eye — and by the nightly newscasts,” she board member of the Crisis Center opinion — for the odd stories in wrote. “Why should a Nazi suffer for South Suburbia. She remained active for 26 years less than the rest of us?” the news. If Mrs. Bouchard couldn’t come with the Crisis Center, serving as For instance, on Sept. 4, 1986, she highlighted an item about 92- up with the right sentiment her- board president from 1985-89. At one time, she was the editor of The Reporter when the paper was owned by the Roelofs family, and she went toe-to-toe and locked horns with then-Regional editor Charles Richards. “Of all the editors they had, she was by far the best,” Richards said. “She was tough. It was difficult for the Regional to compete with her. She beat me more times than I beat her as far as timeliness and depth of a story. She was a key to the success of the Worth-Palos Reporter.” When the Richards family Photo courtesy Crisis Center bought the Reporter in 1986, Pat Bouchard shown at a Crisis Center board meeting. Attorney Charles Richards hired her on General Lisa Madigan is seated at the table. as a columnist. “A large number of people knew of her work and I respected her work,” Richards said. “When she started doing columns for us, her humor began to come out. She was without discount service. a good columnist for us.” Pat Bouchard ran for Worth It’s accident no accidentmore morepeople people trust It’s no trustState StateFarm. Farm. mayor in 1981, bucking up in a ErikR RNelson, Nelson, Agent Agent Erik three-way dance against incum10200S SRoberts Roberts Road Road 10200 bent Dan Kumingo and fellow Palos PalosHills, Hills,ILIL60465-1539 60465-1539 Bus: Bus:708-430-7575 708-430-7575 challenger Arthur Gnech. Kumerik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com erik.nelson.hr35@statefarm.com ingo won his second term, with 1,673 votes followed by Bouchard (822) and Gnech (376). “She was a good public watchdog for the people and the vilP040036 StateFarm FarmMutual Mutual Automobile Insurance Company in NJ), Bloomington, IL P040036 02/04 02/04 State Automobile Insurance Company (Not in (Not NJ), Bloomington, IL lage of Worth,” Kumingo said Monday. (From June 6, 2013)

D IDSI SCCOOUUNN TT RRAT ATEESS without discount service.

The Rev. Stanley Rudcki led the Palos Symphony under his capable baton.

Photo courtesy Paul Knez

Father Rudcki leaves Palos Symphony legacy (From June 13, 2013) The way the Rev. Martin Michniewicz pastor of St. Alexander Church, sees it, God reveals himself in many ways, including through the arts. So when it comes to the legacy of the late Rev. Stanley Rudcki, Michniewicz said “He gave us Christ through his music.” Rev. Rudcki died May 22 at age 85 and as long as Michniewicz is in charge, Father Rudcki’s name and spirit will live on in the St. Alexander and the entire Palos community. The first step in that direction comes June 23, when conductor Patrick Mooney and the Palos Symphony will perform its annual Independence Day Concert in Father Rudcki’s honor at 3:30 p.m. Sunday, June 23 at the Parish Center. It will be a part of a huge day at the parish as the annual summer picnic also takes place that day, from noon to 6 p.m. The two events traditionally have been separate, but there will be construction done at the center in July and the concert needed to be moved up. The pastor hopes this works out to be a good combination. “There might be some people at the picnic who want to enjoy the concert,” Michniewicz said. “The 10-year-olds are probably not coming to the concert, but we hope some of the adults will want to attend. We want to keep

Rev. Stanley Rudki Father Rudcki’s legacy here for as long as possible.” Many in this area knew Rudcki as an associate pastor from 19951999 and as the driving force behind the Palos Symphony putting on Independence Day and Christmas concerts. The local concerts started at St. Alexander Parish under the Rev. Crosby and continued under the Rev. Edward Cronin. It was a couple of years before Father Rudcki started using the “Palos Symphony” instead of the Niles Symphony that he had up North. Before coming here, he had a rich career as a priest, teacher, musician and conductor that started at St. Michael’s in Orland Park in 1953 and took him

through the Quigley Preparatory Seminary and Niles College Seminary. He was an eight-time conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and conductor of the Niles Symphony Orchestra. In the early 2000s, the Niles Symphony, which features some heavy-duty talent from the Chicago Symphony, Grant Park Orchestra and the Lyric Opera Orchestra, became the Palos Symphony. There were some ideas kicked around about naming it the Palos Heights Symphony, but that was scotched in favor of a more regional-sounding moniker. Palos Fine Arts board member Arlene Sypniewski, who was a part of the think tank that came up with the name, said that Rev. Rudcki meant so much to the Palos area. “He truly elevated the community,” she said. “He brought culture to this area and an appreciation for classical and semiclassical music.” Longtime friend Paul Knez, who knew Rev. Rudcki for 59 years, said Rudcki was a “Renaissance man” who put his faith ahead of all else. “He was a priest first, then a teacher and a musician in that order,” Knez said. “He had a chance to do other things. He was offered a chance to be the director of the Notre Dame Glee Club but turned it down to continue his work as a priest and teacher here.”


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The Regional News Thursday, January 2, 2014

The Regional reviews the news of 2013

New Dist. 135 schools chief hits positive notes (From July 11, 2013)

I attended, but it has been a wonderful experience. It’s been Although Janet Stutz may have an awesome start to a wonderful a hard time with all of the names journey that we’re going to take of the summer festivals in the together and we’re ready to move area, the new Orland School Dis- forward.” Stutz was announced as the new trict 135 superintendent is quickly trying to soak in as much of the superintendent by the previous board last December after a long area ambiance as she can. “I moved into Orland Park and search to replace Paul Howell, who I am currently a resident,” she resigned in January, 2012. Since said at Monday night’s board of then, the district has gone through education meeting, her first since two interim superintendents — she officially took over the top Dennis Soustek and Carol Kunst. job. “I have been participating Soustek, a former superintendent in several summer events that was called out of retirement to Orland Park has to offer. It has serve only for a couple of months. But the board could not agree been very, very exciting. “We visited the Farmers Mar- on a superintendent choice last ket already. I went to Pet-Palooza summer during its first search, Photo by Jeff Vorva even though I didn’t have a dog so Kunst was brought in to serve then. I have one now. We went to until the end of June of this year. Janet Stutz attended her first board meeting as the new Orland the Orland Days … I don’t know Kunst was a candidate for this School District 135 superintendent on Monday and has a 90-day all of the names of the events position, which pays $175,000 a plan to get to know the district.

year. The new superintendent’s three-year contract begins at a time when the district’s new board put out a few controversial fires in recent months, including rehiring four fired paraprofessionals (teachers aides) and rescinding the resignation of Special Education Director Ellen Belotti after several incidents were brought public on a teacher’s treatment of special education students at Park School. Stutz told the board that she is implementing a 90-day strategy plan and hitting hard on topics such as governance, organizational structure, academic achievement curriculum and technology integration, operations and communications and community outreach. “Basically I’m coming in as a

brand new superintendent and what I’m really looking at is to try to understand the culture, the community, the schools, the teachers and everybody involved and really get a hold on what the current practices are,” Stutz said. “That allows me to say what the superintendent goals should be and what I believe the board’s goals should be. “And this allows me to assist the schools in the designing the development of their school improvement plans. Obviously they have plans they have targeted but it’s important to note that I see where they are at.” Stutz came from Hinsdale School District 181, where she was an assistant superintendent. She was also a principal and assistant principal at schools in Yorkville and Oswego.

Welcome Back

Trinity Christian College open again for business of higher education here The Trinity Troll, portrayed by senior Aaron Hamstra of Palos Park, greets incoming freshmen Molly Toepper (left) of Manteno and Rachel Kuipers of Grand Rapids, Mich. After two days of orientation this week, classes started in earnest yesterday.

Mary Johnson, Head of Public Services at the Palos Heights Library, was on hand to acquaint freshmen with library services and encourage them to utilize the facility. Students with photo ID can sign up for a temporary library card which grants them privileges at the facility. Also on hand at the hospitality tent were volunteers who encouraged students to visit the Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens.

(From Aug. 29, 2013) Palos Heights Business/Economic Advisory Committee Chairman Robert Grossart (right) shares information about the local business community with freshman Chris Riersma (from left) and his parents, Brian and Diane, from Zeeland, Mich. The “welcome back” campaign includes a head-to-toe range of discounts to Trinity students and faculty. Details about the discounts are available online at palosheights.org.

Trinity President Steven Timmermans (second from left) discusses the upcoming year with junior Cody Rhorer (from left), senior Jeff Jefferson and junior Mike Sutter. Timmermans, whose wife, Barbara, serves as an associate professor of nursing at the school, said that Trinity is a good choice as a faith-based institution of higher learning that “really prepares students to step out into the world” and which is located a “scenic, beautiful, safe part of a really, cool, vibrant global city.” Two of the Timmermans’ children attend Trinity.

Sharing a moment of fellowship are Troy Schemper (from left), Trinity Coordinator of Student Services, Diane Goerg, Palos Heights Tastee Freez owner and mother of an incoming freshman, and Mark Hanna, Trinity Dean of Students. “This is absolutely a year for optimism,” Hanna said, noting that enrollment is stable and the college has just finished improvements to its residence halls.

Near Baumann’s: New bakery on horizon (From August 29, 2013)

(From August 15, 2013)

Patrol car heralds centennial Palos Park Police Department officials last week unveiled a new patrol unit that will soon roll on streets in the village. Designated as car number 2014, the patrol vehicle will help the village celebrate its centennial next year, according to Police Chief Joe Miller, who added that Palos Park officers will be sporting centennial badges this fall and all through next year. The new unit’s graphics, designed by Officer Ross Chibe, note the village’s 100th anniversary. A refurbished 2008 Ford Crown Victoria purchased from the Palos Heights Police Department for $10,000, the squad car has already logged 50,000 miles, but was “very well maintained” by Palos Heights, according to Sgt. John Sawyer, a 23-year veteran of the force who oversees the department’s day shift. Sawyer will use the new patrol unit, which he called “definitely a step up” from the vehicle he currently uses, which shows about 100,000 miles on its odometer. That vehicle will be shifted to service for other uses by the village. Unit 2014 is expected to be put into service as early as the end of this week , Miller added, as soon as its computer console is installed.

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six years. Both men live in the western suburbs, Hall said, but plan to move to Palos Heights in the months ahead. “We see our future here. We want to be a part of Palos Heights and give back to the community,” Hall added, saying he likes to build gingerbread houses and plans to shape one into a bank that customers can drop donations in for a local charity. “This is a really good space, better than what we had anticipated,” Hall said of the storefront. “We pulled off the drywall and discovered this really beautiful red brick underneath, which we will keep to give the place a more traditional feel.” Workmen have also stripped the floor bare to the concrete below and filled a Dumpster in the rear of the building with construction debris. If the sentiments of several local men and women are any indication, there is plenty of good will to leaven Hall’s efforts. “We certainly wish them well and hope they follow through [to completion],” Mayor Robert Straz said after a recent City Council meeting. “With Baumann’s gone,

it would be good to have a bakery there again. If it’s done right, there would be no shortage of support from the community.” Barbara Pollick from Palos Heights agreed, as she looked at layer cakes at the Jewel Bake Shop near 127th and Harlem. “If [this new bakery] can do atomic cakes [as Baumann’s did], I’ll be first in line,” she said. “The people here [at Jewel] are very nice, but I miss having an old-fashioned bakery in town.” “I liked Baumann’s chocolate doughnuts,” added Jewel customer Shari DuLong, of Palos Park. “I’ll give this new bakery a try when they open. If they’re good, they’ll be my new go-to place for a chocolate fix. Plus, it will be fun to bring my mom a dozen doughnuts and say ‘Elvis baked these for you.’”

lem into a three-story Palos Place complex that will feature retail, office space and apartments. Coogan reported that he has considerable cause to be optimistic about the project, but declined to name any potential tenants at such an early and sensitive stage. Demolition of the current building is anticipated for late February or early March. Coogan advised the committee to engage in “tenant focused marketing” of the city. “Developers come and go,” he said, “but tenants are there every day. That’s who the message should be tailored to. Palos Heights has so many advantages. We need to shout about that from the rooftops.” Coogan also offered some advice regarding the look of Harlem Avenue, particularly between 122nd and 124th Streets. He said that the frontage needs to be in line and consistent, with uniform distances from the curb, as is the case in downtown La Grange. He cautioned against allowing setbacks that would create a “hodgepodge” as he said can be found in parts of some other suburbs.

Like children peering into an oven to see if a batch of cookies is ready, passersby have been pressing their noses against the glass of the storefront at 12246 S. Harlem Ave. in recent weeks to check progress on a new bakery planned for the site. “When are these guys going to open?” asked Bob Wilkes, of Palos Heights, as he looked inside the barren space that once was home to Gourmet Coffees Etc. “I’m in Baumann’s withdrawal, and I need a good almond coffee cake.” The storefront is next door to the iconic Baumann’s Bakery, a Palos area favorite that closed last year after 29 years in the community. The new bakery will likely open in the first week in October, according to co-owner Elvis Hall. Whither Palos Place? “This will be a top-quality, In other local business news, scratch bakery that will serve Brigid Capital owner Michael many of the types of favorites that Coogan told the city’s Business/ people enjoyed [at Baumann’s], Economic Advisory Committee rebut newer items that are popular cently that progress remains slow with young people, like gourmet and steady — by design — on cupcakes,” Hall said. “For whatthe redevelopment of the old Ben ever reason, the older bakeries Franklin building at 12306 S. Hararen’t doing high-end cupcakes. We will.” Currently a baker with the Strack & Van Til grocery store chain, Hall says the new bakery [its name has not yet been disclosed] will also include limited seating for customers to enjoy baked treats and gourmet coffee, cappuccino and more. Hall “grew up in baking,” starting at age 17, scraping floors and moving up at several places, learning a variety of styles that include Swedish, German and Polish, he said. He later graduated from Kendall College, one of the better culinary institutions in the Chicago area, he added. Hall was an owner of the Wheaton Bakery, as well as the Lilac Bakery in Lombard, both closed, he also said. Hall’s cakes have earned a measure of Hollywood fame, he said, appearing in the 2006 film “The Lake House” with Sandra Bullock and Keanu Reeves. His partner in the new venture is Michael Spizzirri, him- Two bakers aim to open a full-service bakery in October next door to the old Baumann’s bakery, self a baker for about the last which closed last summer.


Thursday, January 2, 2014 The Regional News

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The Regional reviews the news of 2013

Coyote Country: Palos hears tips to coexist (From Sept. 26, 2013 The Palos Park Police Department receives approximately 50 calls each month from residents reporting coyote sightings in the village. The canines have even been spotted crossing La Grange Road, village Commissioner James Pavlatos said. Those encounters aren’t likely to stop anytime soon. “They are here and they are not going anywhere,” said John Basile, the owner and director of the Lockport-based Big Run Wolf Ranch. “It’s impossible to eradicate them.” Basile made his annual visit to the Kaptur Administrative Center on Monday, in an effort to better educate residents on coyotes,

which he said are very prevalent in Illinois and surrounding states. During his 45-minute presentation to the Village Council, Basile told the council he is unaware of any cases in which a coyote has attacked an adult or a child unless the animal is cornered. “They are not a threat to humans,” Basile said. “They are afraid of humans.” But man’s best friend and other pets are a different story. Basile said coyotes can weigh up to 40 pounds and have been known to attack animals as heavy as 60 pounds. “If you live in coyote country you better have your pet on a leash or you’re going to lose him,” Basile said. With so many forested areas,

Palos Park certainly meets the criteria of “coyote country,” Basile said. But with every new development, a number of coyotes find themselves looking for new territory and that can lead them onto a resident’s property searching for food. “Their food supply is greatly depleted [by new development] so that has made them quite bold,” said Basile, who noted coyotes have been known to leap fences to attack dogs. “You just have to make sure you’re watching your dog when it is outside.” Palos Park Mayor John Mahoney said he wasn’t looking to eradicate coyotes from Palos Park, but would like to make their life “uncomfortable.” Basile said there isn’t much in the way of a natural deter-

rent for a coyote other than a resident having a Great Pyrenees in their yard. Some people have tried sprinkling wolf urine around their property, but Basile said that has not been a proven method to scare off coyotes. Installing motion-sensored lights could be a temporary fix, but Basile said the coyote would likely get accustomed to the lights and not run away when they are activated. Basile, who brought a full-grown male coyote to the council meeting for village officials and residents to view, warned all to never feed or leave food out for a coyote. “People who feed them are asking for it,” he said. “Let them Photo by Dave Kenyon, michigan.gov find their own food. You’re encouraging them to lose their fear Never feed coyotes. It reduces their natural fear of people, a canine expert told the Palos Park Village Council Monday. of people.”

Orland trustee confirmed to replace O’Halloran (From Sept. 19, 2013) Orland Park village trustees on Monday unanimously approved Mayor Dan McLaughlin’s appointment of Dan Calandriello to fill a vacancy on the Village Board. He will replace Brad O’Halloran, who resigned as both a village trustee and from the Metra board in early August. Calandriello’s appointment is the second change on the Village Board since 2011, when Carole Ruzich was elected to take over the seat of Bernie Murphy, who retired after serving since 1985. It will be just the second change since 2003. A Cook County assistant state’s attorney, Calandriello will be sworn in at the board’s Oct. 7 meeting. “I’ve lived in the village my entire life, and I’m looking forward to serving the community,” said the new trustee in a prepared statement released by the village. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to serve as a village trustee, being able to give back to the town where I was raised.” Calandriello holds a law degree from John Marshall Law School and received his undergraduate degree from Marquette University, where he served as student government president. The Marist High School alumnus served as a staff assistant at the U.S. House of Representatives after graduating college. Also Monday evening, the mayor presented a Community Pride Award to Lynne Donegan for her work in recent years to have auto-

Orland Park Village Trustee Patricia Gira gives a warm welcome to incoming Trustee Dan Calandriello after Monday’s Village Board meeting. He is expected to be sworn in and begin his duties next month. mated external defibrillators (AEDs) installed in schools, gyms, sports arenas and other public places, and for staff to be trained in their use. She is the driving force behind the Colleen O’Sullivan Law, which requires every physical fitness facility in Illinois to have an AED. The law was the first of its kind in the nation. Her work, which has been credited with helping save hundreds of lives in recent years, honors the memory of her niece, Colleen, a Tinley Park native who died at age 30 in 2002 after suffering an arrhythmia at a health club where no AED unit was available and precious time was lost while waiting for paramedics to arrive.

(From Oct. 24, 2013)

A grateful People honor Don Dahl’s memory Barbara Dahl, comforted by Mayor Bob Straz and her son-in-law Alderman Alan Fulkerson, was given the fitting honor of cutting the ribbon before the unveiling of the Veterans Playlot dedicated to the memory of her late husband, Don. The two wed in June 1947, a few years after Don saw combat in Italy during World War II. Mr. Dahl died on Aug. 27, 2012. He was 87. A large assembly gather at the start of the dedication of Palos Heights’ Veterans Playlot in honor of Don Dahl, Palos Heights’ “Veteran’s Veteran,” who served in both the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion and chaired Palos Heights’ Veterans Commission. The dedication was held last Saturday afternoon at Natchez Park, 123rd and Natchez in Palos Heights’ Navajo Hills neighborhood.

Heights faces certainty of losing Dominick’s What future will bring, however, still unclear (From October 17, 2013) Unease and uncertainty abound at 127th and Ridgeland in the wake of last week’s announcement that Safeway will close all 72 Chicago-area Dominick’s stores within the next few months. “This is not a good time to be unemployed, and I have to say I’m scared,” said Dave, one of several Dominick’s employees who spoke only on condition of full or partial anonymity. “Over the years, there have been so many rumors [about Dominick’s stores closing], we’ve learned to live with that and almost ignore it. So in that light, this [announcement] hit us like a bomb.” The Palos Heights Dominick’s had dodged bullets in the past. In 2004 Safeway shut a dozen Dominick’s, including its Oak Forest store on 159th Street and an Oak Lawn store near 111th and Cicero. In 2007, doors were closed at 14 Dominick’s, including the Crestwood store near 131st and Cicero

and the Bridgeview unit at 89th and Harlem. In 2011, Safeway closed the Dominick’s in Orland Park, near 151st and La Grange Road. “I’ve worked at Dominick’s for years, and I’m not looking forward to losing all my seniority and starting at the bottom of the ladder in some non-union grocery store — if I get a job, that is,” added another employee at the store. “This is not the type of news I was hoping for as we head towards Christmas.” The dozens of employees at the store — long represented by the United Food & Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) Local 881 — have been working without a new contract for a year, according to Local 881 President Ronald E. Powell. While four Dominick’s stores — including the one on Bell Road in Homer Glen — are being purchased by Jewel/Osco, most locations are question marks at the moment. Regarding the Palos Heights

unit and other stores with uncertain futures, Powell said, “We don’t know yet the status of those stores. But once we know who the new owners are, Local 881 will sit down and negotiate a collective bargaining agreement that will be fair to the new employers and importantly, will fairly compensate the employees who will be charged with building the business.” Another Palos Heights Dominick’s employee called Powell’s prediction “posturing” and “cold comfort.” “If Aldi or Food4Less or some joe-blow warehouse store comes in here, we won’t even be in a union,” said the staffer as he gathered shopping carts in the parking lot. “I don’t think the union has done much for us — at least not that I can see.” Customers expressed disappointment and even anger with Safeway’s decision. “I’ve shopped at Dominick’s for 30 years. I rely on this place. I enjoy shopping here on Saturdays. This is my store,” said Palos

Heights resident Joan Henkel. Ever since Safeway took over [in 1998], they’ve done nothing but tinker and mess things up. “They got rid of the Dominick’s [house] brands and brought in new items that nobody wanted,” she continued. “Two years ago, they completely mishandled the Just 4 U coupon program. Then there was that scandal where [coupon blogger] Jill Cataldo found all the outdated food sitting on shelves at Dominick’s. The only thing that stayed the same was the friendliness of the workers — and sadly, they’re the ones who will suffer most.” Echoing the assertion was Bill Davies of Worth. “[Dominick’s] used to have a slogan that ‘Our store is your store.’ I guess we learned that’s nothing but an empty advertising jingle. Where will I shop [after the store closes]? I have no idea,” he said. Beyond the fate of the employees and the convenience of grocery shoppers, the coming shutdown poses yet another dilemma for the Indian Trails shopping center, already

Dominick’s has anchored the Indian Trails shopping center at 127th and Ridgeland for more than 30 years. A Dominick’s gas station was added about a decade ago. struggling in a continued sluggish economy and pocked with vacant storefronts and the black eye of a still-shuttered Bakers Square restaurant on a high-visibility outlot. Palos Heights officials say they are on top of the situation. “We have already spoken with Dominick’s corporate [officials], and we will work with them to market the property,” said Palos Heights City Administrator Dan Nisavic.

“We will also do some marketing ourselves. It’s early [in the process], but we are moving forward.” Nisavic predicted that the Dominick’s store and gas station will be sold off separately. He added that the impact of the loss of sales tax revenue from Dominick’s will not be felt until months into 2014. Nisavic said the store is in the “top 20” among sales tax generators in the city.

McCord gets down with a Little Bit Country

(From Oct. 10, 2013)

Photos by Patt Bailey and Jessica Loftus

It was Arlene Adams, a lead organizer of the gala, shown with her husband Pierre to the right of Joel Daly, who invited him to attend as the guest of honor of the McCord Gallery’s Little Bit of Country gala fundraiser last Saturday at the Willowbrook Ballroom.

Will Martin, of Palos Park, who just published his acclaimed non-fiction work “So I Bought an Air Force,” greets newsman turned actor Joel Daly.

Cynthia Weglarz and Beverly Opelka were ready to do some line-dancing.


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The Regional News Thursday, January 2, 2014

The Regional reviews the news of 2013 Lindberghs’ story packs the room

Palos Reads author draws large crowd (From Nov. 7, 2013 In a pop culture era when many arts organizations struggle to fill seats, Palos Fine Arts struggled to find seats, as an overflow crowd converged on the group’s annual Palos Reads celebration last week. “If you have to have a problem, this is the kind to have,” said Bev Opelka, Palos Fine Arts board member and event chair, as she thanked the audience for their patience and cooperation. The room at the Palos Country Club had been set up to accommodate about 150 people, roughly the size of last year’s Palos Reads turnout to meet and hear author Debra Dean. Well before the 7 p.m. scheduled start of the Oct. 30 event, however, it became apparent that

attendance would surge past last year’s mark, even on a cold, rainy Wednesday evening, with people clamoring to see and hear author Melanie Benjamin discuss her history-based novel, “The Aviator’s Wife,” inspired by the life of Anne Morrow Lindbergh. “This [turnout] is awesome,” Palos Park Mayor John Mahoney said to Commissioner James Pavlatos, seated next to him in the third row, as they both watched workers wheel in stacks of extra banquet chairs and even upholstered chairs and an ottoman from the country’s club’s reception area. In the end, at least 300 women and men were in attendance at the event that could be described as “standing room only” if standing room had been available. Every spot along the walls was filled

with local arts enthusiasts. “This is a very popular event with the public, as you can see,” Opelka smiled. “It helps that [“The Aviator’s Wife”] is a very popular read, and that so many people [here] have enjoyed it. I suspect we would have had this same [overflow] turnout if there had been three feet of snow on the ground.” Benjamin, whose two previous historical novels focused on the wife of General Tom Thumb and on Alice Liddell Hargreaves, the inspiration for “Alice in Wonderland,” told the audience that she was inspired to write about Anne Morrow Lindbergh after she learned that she had chosen not be to buried next to the grave of her husband, Charles, the internationally acclaimed aviation pioneer and hero to millions around the world.

Sharing a lighter moment before the beginning of last week’s event with popular author Melanie Benjamin (third from left) are Palos Reads Committee members Joyce Penney (from left), Arlene Vanderbilt, and Bev Opelka, event chair. “I found that fascinating, and I decided to kind of work my way back [in time] from that point,” Benjamin said. “[As a writer], I’m drawn to

the hidden corners and locked closets of history,” she told the audience. She added that as an author, she was able to use artistic license

and engage in speculation in her attempt to — in a work of fiction — fill in some of the “huge gaps of [public] knowledge about the Lindberghs.”

St. Michael joins U.S. Blue Ribbon School elite (From Nov. 14, 2013) St. Michael School Principal Bernadette Cuttone will be 30,000 feet above the earth this Sunday, as she flies to Washington, D.C., to accept a prestigious award on behalf of her high-flying school. “This is an exciting time for all of us, and I am proud of everyone who had a hand in this,” said Cuttone of the school being identified by the U.S. Department of Education as a National Blue Ribbon School for 2013. “It was definitely a team effort.” The Orland Park school is one of just 286 schools nationally to earn the designation this year. Just 50 private schools earned the designation this year — nine of them in Illinois and none other in the Southwest Suburbs. While the designation is coveted and not easy to attain, some other private schools in the area have earned the Blue Ribbon in recent years, including St. Alexander in Palos Heights, St. Damian in Oak

Forest, and Cardinal Bernardin in Orland Hills. Schools were selected either because their standardized test scores in reading and math placed them among the top-performing schools in the nation or state, or because they served disadvantaged students and made extraordinary progress in improving performance. St. Michael School earned its designation in the “top performing” category. “Excellence in education matters, and we should honor the schools that are leading the way to prepare students for success in college and careers,” said U.S. Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan. “National Blue Ribbon Schools represent examples of educational excellence, and their work reflects the belief that every child in America deserves a world-class education.” Cuttone said that among other things, the Blue Ribbon designation reflects the school’s “transformation into the 21st century” as well as a “ratcheted-up cur-

riculum” that challenges students to learn yet offers enhanced individual instruction to ensure that all students receive the assistance needed to succeed. Now in her ninth year as principal at the school, Cuttone said that achieving Blue Ribbon status has been a goal of hers, but the rigorous and time consuming application process sidetracked several previous attempts. She credits Curriculum and Testing Coordinator Kathleen Siberz with being “the driving force” behind getting the school over the top. “She is an outstanding statistician, a data collection expert and truly a great overall organizer,” Cuttone said of Siberz, who will join her on Sunday’s flight to the nation’s capital. The school applied once before for Blue Ribbon designation, in the early 1990s when Cuttone was a teacher at St. Michael, but fell short because much of its success was still in the planning phase, she said. “But we just came to the point [last year] where I said, ‘That’s

it, we’re getting it, we have to go for it,’” she said, noting that the school embarked on a process to raise its reading scores and pull together a solid and convincing application. “We have an excellent science program, especially in our junior high, with students getting involved in robotics and more. We have an updated computer lab, and our students are using iPads and whiteboards,” she noted about the school’s ongoing commitment to science and technology. In the end, school officials decided to highlight St. Michael’s commitment to foreign language instruction, which begins in preschool and accelerates to full time in junior high. The Blue Ribbon designation is more than a banner on a wall, Cuttone said, and will be used as a marketing tool. “I think this designation matters, especially to this new generation [of parents] coming along,” she said. “Frankly, they shop [when looking for a school for their children].”

Photo by Studio 42 Inc. courtesy St. Michael School

Saint Michael School in Orland Park this week celebrated being named a National Blue Ribbon School by the US. Department of Education. A whole-school rally attended by Mayor Dan McLaughlin was held Tuesday. This photo shows the student body in Blue Ribbon formation.

‘Palos Park’ pictorial history arrives in time for centennial (From Dec. 5, 2013)

Orland Park Lions Club stalwarts Herb Zimmermann (from left), Jim Smith, and Sandra, Jim and James Jankowski show some of the useful, practical items they would later donate to people of Washington, Ill. Minutes after posing for a photograph, the quintet headed south on a three-hour trip to the tornadoravaged community in Central Illinois.

Orland Lions send supplies to Washington tornado victims (From Nov. 28, 2013) While most people slept in the pre-dawn hours on Monday, five Orland Park Lions hitched a trailer to a truck and headed south to deliver much-needed relief to the people of tornado-ravaged Washington, near Peoria. “This is going to be a sobering [three-hour] ride,” predicted Jim Smith, as he drank some coffee in the unseasonably cold weather at 5:40 a.m. “But we’re up for it.” Smith was joined in the relief effort by fellow Lions and Orland Park residents Herb Zimmermann and Jim Jankowski, whose daughter, Sandra, and son, James, pitched in and made the trip. Both young adults were taking the day off school to participate in the mission of mercy — Sandra from Moraine Valley Community College and James from Sandburg High School. The Lions managed to just about fill their trailer in a mere 48 hours after they put out the call to help Washington in the wake of the Nov. 17 tornado that killed at least one person, injured many others and damaged about 20 percent of the

Central Illinois city of 15,000. The trailer was loaded with items requested by authorities leading the clean-up: buckets, mops, sponges, paper towels, trash bags, bottled water, large and small plastic storage bags, manual can openers, baby formula and more. About half of the items in the trailer were purchased by the Lions. The rest was donated by people in the area, as well as a few outside organizations like the Mt. Greenwood Lions and Chicago Heights Lions. Also in the trailer was a good deal of school supplies, some of it donated. “[The tragedy] touched the hearts of a lot of teachers in this area, and they responded well with donations,” added Jim Jankowski. Keeping with their nearly centuryold mission to prevent blindness and improve eye care for people around the world, the Lions brought with them a supply of vouchers that the people of Washington can use to obtain prescription eyeglasses at a nearby LensCrafters shop. “A lot of people lost their glasses [in the tornado], either through damage or simply because with a tornado coming, they had no time to grab anything, even their glass-

es,” Jim Jankowski observed. “We can’t erase the pain that the people of Washington went through. That never goes away. To see 1,500 homes just flattened like that, to see them turned to rubble in a matter of seconds — what do you say about that? Do you say that things are going to be OK? I don’t know how or if you can do that,” Smith added. “But there are some things we can do, which is why the Orland Park Lions did what we did,” he continued. “This is a very good organization that does a lot for the [Orland Park] community, and now we’re reaching out to others in their time of need.” Shortly after 6 a.m., the truck, trailer and another vehicle pulled out of the Orland Park Lions Christmas tree lot near 143rd and La Grange Road. At about midday, Smith called The Regional News from the road, shortly after the Orland Park Lions had unloaded their trailer and headed back. “If there’s one thing I can say, it was a sobering experience, that’s for sure,” Jim Smith said, echoing what he had predicted hours earlier.

A new book chronicling the rich history of Palos Park—from its origins as a sylvan retreat for well-heeled Chicagoans in the 19th century to its present-day role as one of the area’s most attractive suburbs—debuted this week. “Palos Park” is part of the “Images of America” series of local history books published by the South Carolina-based Arcadia Publishing. “This has been a challenging and rewarding experience, without a doubt,” said author Jeannine Kacmar, public services librarian at the Palos Park Public Library. The 127-page paperback, rich in vintage photographs as Arcadia titles tend to be, is a quick and pleasant read—filled with familiar Palos Park touchstones and sprinkled with a few surprises. Kacmar will be on hand from 4 to 9 p.m. tomorrow (Friday) at Palos Park’s annual holiday market and tree lighting, available to autograph copies of the book. The Christmas-themed event will be held at the Village Green and recreation center, 8901 W. 123rd St. “This book attempts to tell to story of Palos Park by taking a look at the people who came to create a life for themselves, and in doing so created a community,” Kacmar said. “I hope the people of Palos Park will feel more connected not only to the history and lives of those who came before us, but also to the future and their place in it.” The book’s publicity blurb states, “Wooded ravines, natural springs, and fertile farmland attracted the first settlers to Palos Park in the mid-1800s. With the Wabash Railroad expansion in the 1890s, Chicagoans seeking relief from crowded urban conditions traveled 20 miles for the great outdoors. The Sharpshooter’s Club opened in 1894 as the first recreational development in the area. “Soon after, the village of Palos Park incorporated in 1914, and the forest preserves were formed, attracting weekend Prairie Club hikers and outdoor enthusiasts to the trails and the Swallow Cliff toboggan slides. Artists such as Claude Buck, Felix Russmann, sculptor Lorado Taft, and author Sherwood Anderson, along with his young protégé Ernest Hemingway, retreated from Chicago to summer cottages in Palos Park

Surprised by her library colleagues with a congratulatory cake on Monday morning, author Jeannine Kacmar (center) poses for a photo with Village Manager Rick Boehm and Administrative Librarian Sheila M. Sosnicki. seeking the beautiful, serene setting for their work. Many historic homes and buildings still exist, including the McCord House and the Plush Horse ice cream parlor.” Kacmar is quick to point out that the book was a group effort. In fact, listed as co-authors on the book’s cover are the Palos Park Public Library and the village of Palos Park. “Our bibliography goes like this,” she said earlier this week, smiling and stretching out her arms to indicate daunting length. People and organizations contributed greatly to the book. Sources include museums, government agencies, academia, The Regional News, the Palos Historical Society, local clubs, private collectors and individuals from Palos Park and elsewhere. People from as far away as Wisconsin, Vermont, Florida and California contributed photos and personal recollections to add richness to the book. The book has been more than a year in the making, although “work began in earnest in December of 2012,” Kacmar said, to meet an April 30 publishing deadline. Some 700 photos were scanned, with about 200 making the final cut. To expand upon the book, Kacmar and library staffplan to use a number of the unpublished photos in a public presentation to

be held in January. In response to a question, Kacmar said there is no one part of the book that she likes more than another. Instead, she talks about a common thread. “One thing that was really evident in all the interviews, all the emails, all the phone calls—I’m telling you—was the strong sense of pride people have in Palos Park,” she said. “Whether they have lived here all their life, all grew up here decades ago and moved away, there’s this same joy, this same happiness over growing up in such a beautiful place. Palos Park has been a great foundation for the lives of so many.”


The Regional News Thursday, January 2, 2014

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Centenary Tribute to Virginia Richards Born on Jan. 2, 100 years ago Former Co-Editor and Columnist The Palos Regional News By Emma Lee Chilton     Virginia Upton Richards was born Jan. 2, 1914 in Branson, Mo., the location of the nearest hospital to her parents home in Virginia’s grandmother, Nannie Eldorado Springs. Her father, a Upton, with cousin, Joe Weaver. weekly newspaper publisher, died when she was only 7. She had an older sister, Geneva.     When Virginia was of high school age, Mrs. Upton moved to St. Louis so the girls could have better educational opportunities. Virginia and Geneva were both brilliant students. Virginia ranked near the top of her class of 400 in high school and was Valedictorian of her class in college. Geneva worked at Shell Oil Co. in St. Louis and attended law school at night. She passed the bar and joined the law firm of Lachly, Miller and Clifford. She worked for Clark Clifford who later served in President Johnson’s cabinet and advised three other Presidents.     Virginia entered Harris Teachers’ College in St. Louis in 1931. Because there were no teaching jobs open at the time of her graduation in 1935, she went to work in Joe Upton was Virginia’s father. the advertising department of the St. Louis daily Globe-Democrat newspaper.     In Sept. 1936, at a beautiful ceremony at Shaw Ave. Methodist church, Virginia married Carl Edward Richards. Carl and Steve Chilton were friends from Fredericktown, Mo. Later Virginia’s close friend, Emma Lee, married Steve. The couples became lifelong friends.     Virginia and Carl’s son, Charles, was born in 1942. In 1945 Carl accepted a position as advertising manager of Diversy Chemical Co. in Chicago’s Loop. They moved to Palos Heights. There was a small neighborhood newsletter that was distributed there. In 1947, they purchased this publication and turned it Virgie Upton was Virginia’s moth- into a successful local weekly er. newspaper, “The Palos Region-

al.” In 1951 they also started a full-service commercial printing business. From the beginning, Virginia helped edit the paper and wrote a weekly column which she continued until her death.     Mrs. Richards assisted the Infant Welfare League in providing needed medical services to Palos Heights’ early residents. She also served as one of the first volunteer librarians at the Palos Heights Public Library along with neighbor Dorothy Anderson.     In 1949 Carl and Virginia were blessed with the birth of their daughter, Emily Jean. In 1958 Virginia started teaching fourth grade in nearby Tinley Park.     In 1951 Carl’s love of fishing motivated him to buy a 22 acre property with a lake in northern Wisconsin. This became their weekend retreat and later, after retirement in 1970, they spent winters in Texas and summers at their Wisconsin home, north of Hayward.     Carl’s last few years were difficult ones. Virginia took care of him, as his mind deteriorated because of Alzheimer’s disease. After Carl’s death in 1988, Virginia and her sister, Geneva, and a cousin, Rosemary Upton, made their home together in Houston. After Geneva died in 1991 Virginia moved to Presbyterian Village Retirement Community near her daughter in Dallas. There she continued her writing. She wrote a biographical sketch for each new resident for the newsletter there. She also assisted an Alzheimer patient, a blind man and other residents. She also managed the library.     Her greatest pride and joy came from her grandchildren, Emily Jean’s triplets, Kyle, Julie and Mindy and Charles’ daughter, Amy.     Virginia passed away in 1995 of heart disease at age 81. Had she lived, she would have turned 100 this year. This portrait is used above Virginia Richards’ weekly column.

Virginia at the Texas retirement village.

Virginia’s college graduation picture from 1935.

Virginia and three year old son Charles, age 3. Portrait taken in 1945.

Geneva Upton Kerlin, Mrs. Richards’ sister.

Picture taken at Virginia’s wedding in 1936 with her sister, Geneva, and the bride’s mother, Virgie.

The primary author of this story, Emma Lee Chilton, is shown second from the left in the front row. In the same row are Virginia in the center and Carl on the far right. Photo taken in 1937. This portrait of Virginia was taken about 1970.

Virginia and Carl at a picnic on one of their trips from Wisconsin to Texas in the 1970s.


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The Regional News Thursday, January 2, 2014

Virginia  Richards   (1914 1995) (From Jan. 2, 1986)     Emily’s note on her Christmas card read, “Laura has been in and out of the hospital lately. She’s home now and has full-time help.�     My thought was, “It’s about time!�     Emily is a friend who lives in our summer home town of Iron River, Wis. Laura, her next-door neighbor, has been in declining health for several years. I don’t know exactly how old she is, but if she isn’t 80, she’s close to it.     Laura’s family were early settlers of Iron River. Her father was a judge and her uncle was the founder of the Iron River Pioneer, a weekly paper which he published for about 60 years.     Laura’s brother, who is a teacher at the University of Wisconsin, wrote two books about the history of Iron River. They’re interesting.     Laura was a teacher, too. After finishing college she taught for many years in Iron River and other Wisconsin towns. After that she taught in army camps overseas and

Houses of Worship Living Word Lutheran Church Orland Park     Learn God’s ways of handling money with Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University.     Nine-week course begins Tuesday, Jan. 14, at 7 p.m., at the church, 16301 S. Wolf Road, Orland Park. (403-9176)

School Notes Marist H.S. entrance exam     Marist High School’s entrance exam for current 8th-grade students will take place on Saturday, Jan. 11.     Students should arrive at 8 a.m. and enter through the gym doors, located on the east end of the school. There is a $25 test fee, however preregistration is not needed. Students should bring two No. 2 pencils and are asked not to bring a calculator. The approximate dismissal time is 11:45 a.m.     In order to be considered a candidate for 2014-15 admission at Marist, prospective students must test at Marist High School, 4200 W. 115th St., Chicago. (773881-5330)

Senior Notes Grandparents raising grandchildren support group     PLOWS Council on Aging will host a grandparents raising grandchildren support group beginning Wednesday, Jan. 15, at 11 a.m., at the Palos Township office, 10802 S. Roberts Road, Palos Hills.     Each of the 10 sessions will focus on a specific topic, including financial and legal assistance, technology skills, and self-care. Knowledgeable and experienced guest speakers will be invited to provide additional information and guidance.     For information and registration, contact Maria or Amanda C. at PLOWS, 361-0219. Do not contact Palos Township regarding this program.

Determination keeps her going saw a lot of the world that way.     Laura is highly intelligent, talented, of good character, and capable of many things. She and her husband, Jim, belonged to many organizations. They had been president of most of them at one time or another.     For years now Laura has been program chairman of the church Women’s Society and the County Historical Society. The programs she provides are outstanding.     Jim was an elder in the church and active in the other organizations. Jim and Laura had married late in life. Jim was a perfect gentleman, always attentive and polite to Laura. She is a tiny thing and one got the feeling, as she became more and more frail, that Jim was all that supported her.     Laura broke a hip and spent time in the hospital and nursing

home, but she walked again, with the help of a cane. She survived a bleeding ulcer of the esophagus and other ills.     But when Jim died two years ago, we all thought that would be the end of Laura. Not so. She has continued to live alone in her home, relying on the help of “meals on wheels,� a weekly cleaning woman, and her indulgent neighbors. Her many friends visit her often, take her food, and run her errands. Emily picks up her mail each day.     All summer long, Emily’s husband, George, went to Laura’s house every night at 8 to help her upstairs to bed. Every morning he went to help her downstairs.     Laura lives in an attractive older house which has bathrooms upstairs and down. And there is a small room downstairs which she could use for a bedroom. Or she

could get rid of her dining room furniture and make that room into a bedroom.     But Laura is very strong willed. Some folks say stubborn. She is determined to keep things as they are. Nothing must change and don’t mention nursing home to her. She is likely to explode.     So now, at last, she has full-time help. Now George and Emily can go out in the evening without his having to run to Laura’s to help her upstairs. It isn’t as if Laura couldn’t afford help. She has plenty of money. I think she just hated to admit that anything had changed.     I was amazed to read in the paper a couple of weeks ago that Laura had accepted the job of program chairman for the Historical Society for another year. She’s determined to maintain the status quo.

“One Last Look Mini-Open House� Thursday, January 9 The evening begins at 7:00 p.m. with a brief presentation in the Auditorium. An encore presentation will be held at 7:15 p.m.

R.S.V.P. to 773-881-7171

High School Placement Exam Saturday, January 11 at 8:00 a.m. (Doors open at 7:30 a.m.)

Please bring your $25 fee and two #2 pencils. No calculators.

3737 W. 99th St. Chicago, IL 60655 I 773-881-6566 I www.mothermcauley.org

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Orland Senior American Idol plans auditions     Orland Township’s Senior American Idol auditions soon open for the second season of the fundraiser for the Orland Township Scholarship Foundation.     Auditions will be held on Thursday, Jan. 23, at 6 p.m., in the township Activity Center, 14807 S. Ravinia Ave., Orland Park.     Check in on Jan. 23 is at 5:45 p.m. Auditions are open to seniors age 55 and require participants to perform a song of their choice (no more than two minutes long) acapella in front of a panel of judges.     Auditions are free. If chosen to be a Senior Idol Contestant for the show in May, participants will be required to pay the contestant fee of $30. Call Orland Township at 403-4222 to register for auditions.     The township’s Senior American Idol live show will be held at Georgio’s Banquets, 8800 W. 159th Street, Orland Park, from 5 to 10 p.m. on Tuesday, May 6. Tickets will be sold starting Feb. 6.

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EntrancE Exam Saturday, January 11, 2014 at 8:00 a.m. Bring 2 no. 2 pencils and a $25 testing fee www.stlaurence.com 5556 West 77th Street, Burbank, IL 60459, PH: (708) 458-6900 12-26-13

A Great Future

January 11, 2014 8:00 am

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We are very excited to see you at our entrance exam on January 11th at 8 am! until then, We hope you had a Wonderful christmas and have a happy neW year! ed leiser ‘04 director of admissions No pre-registration is necessary. Please bring two #2 pencils and a $25 testing fee. Calculators will not be needed or allowed during the exam. Students with IEPs or 504-plans should contact Ed Leiser, Director of Admissions, at 773-925-RITA. Please plan on picking up your son at 11:30 am. 7740 s. Western ave. chicago, illinois 60620 WWW.stritahs.com

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Sports S

10 The Regional News - The Reporter

Ken Karrson, Sports Editor

TOP

outhwest

sports@regionalpublishing.com

Thursday, January 2, 2014 Section 2

Page 1

SPORTS STORIES of 2013

By Jeff Vorva

    Triumphs.     Disappointments.     The area had no shortage of drama and excitement in 2013 with teams and individuals going deep into state and national tournaments and making waves on the professional level.     Here is a look at the top 10 sports stories from the Reporter and Regional area.

   2. Sandburg pins down another wrestling crown     Sandburg’s wrestling team won back-to-back state title in Class 3A after beating Marmion 38-17 on Feb. 23. Earlier in the day, the Eagles beat Oak Park, 3323, to make it to the finals in Bloomington.     C.J. Brucki, Colin Holler and Ricky Robertson also won Illinois High School Association Class 3A individual titles in their respective weight divisions.

   4. Moraine Valley hoops second in the nation     The Cyclones called their style of play “94-feet-of-heat” and the team scorched most opponents and reached the national championship game of the NJCAA National Tournament before falling short with an 87-69 setback to Rend Lake College March 23 in Danville. It was the first time two teams from the same state played in the DII title game.     “It was a great run, and I enjoyed every step. This was great for Moraine Valley. It was the chance of a lifetime for these guys,” said outgoing coach Dedrick Shannon.“After the game there was no holding our heads down. These schools we played have big scholarships for players. They have recruits from all over the country. We have local kids, and our biggest guy is 6’7”. Rend Lake had five guys over 6’7”. But we played impressively.”     Lockport’s Karrington Ward had 11 points and 11 rebounds and was named to the All-Tournament team.

    Ryan Pollack of the Camden Chat Blog also pointed out this unusual accomplishment.     “In the 112-year history of the American League, only six 24-year-old rookie left-handed relievers threw at least 74 innings in a season,” he wrote. “Five of them pitched in the 1980s; the sixth [McFarland] pitched in 2013.”

   6. Bob Hallberg is courted     Oak Lawn’s Bob Hallberg, a longtime basketball coach, was honored by St. Xavier Univer    1. Macs Mighty again     Mother McAuley’s girls volley-    3. Richards football second sity on Nov. 13 when the school dedicated the court at the Shanball team won its 14th Illinois High in state School Association state champion-     Richards made it all the way non Center in his name before his Cougars women’s team went ship Nov. 16 but just its first since to the Class 6A state championout and beat Trinity International 2004. That’s the longest stretch the ship game and the usually reliUniversity 87-46. school has gone without a title. able defense had a tough time     “This is a very memorable     The Mighty Macs knocked off two- in a 34-14 loss to Batavia in occasion for me,” Hallberg told time defending Class 4A state cham- November in DeKalb. Richards the crowd after the game. “It’s pion Benet 25-22, 25-19 at Illinois had beaten Batavia earlier in a fantastic night for me and my State University in Normal. The the season. family. And what makes it so team finished 40-2 with both losses     Despite the lopsided final memorable for me is that I alscore, Richards amassed 389 coming to out-of-state teams.     Coach Jen DeJarld called it “an yards. Quarterback Hasan Muways thought when they name a amazing season.” court after you, you would have hammad-Rogers threw for 226     “There is such an incredible yards on an 18-of-41 perforto be dead. But I am still around satisfaction in what this team mance, which included a touchhere to enjoy it.” accomplished by keeping focused down toss to Dedrick Shannon.     He opened this season with 905 throughout the season from Aug. Shannon had eight catches in    5. T.J. McFarland’s season wins on the high school and college 14 through Nov. 16.”     Former Stagg High School level and all came while coaching all for 112 yards.     Kayla Caffey and Mallory Max-     Romeo Johnson paced the standout T.J. McFarland spent a schools in Chicago. well each led the Macs with eight ground attack with 97 yards full season in the major leagues kills while the coach’s daughter, on seven carries, while Muham- and was 4-1 with a 4.22 ERA    7. TCC’s Reidsma’s running Ryann DeJarld, added seven and mad-Rogers added 65 yards on for the Baltimore Orioles. The exploits Kelsey Clark six in the state cham- 16 carries and accounted for the left-hander made 38 appearances     Trinity Christian College’s Andy including one start. Bulldogs’ other score. Reidsma finished fourth in the pionship match.

nation in the NAIA Men’s Cross Country Championship on Nov. 24 in Lawrence, Kansas. That came a week after winning the NCCAA National Championships.     The senior from Michigan completed the NAIA 8K race in a time of 24 minutes, 35.69 seconds, which bested his school record time by 26 seconds. He outdistanced all but three other competitors in the field of 313 runners from 96 schools. Included in that field were six runners who finished ahead of him in the conference championship of which he finished in eighth place.    8. Kentner’s monster volleyball season     Moraine Valley Community College Kara Kentner, a Sandburg High School alum, had a monster sophomore season as she helped her team finish in the top 10 in the nation in volleyball at the junior college Division II level.     She led the nation with a .436 hitting percentage and seventh in the nation with 514 kills. She earned several individual honors including two All-America awards.     “She is one of those players that makes me sad that his is a twoyear college and not a foury-year,” Cyclones coach Gloria Coughlin said.

   9. Sky’s the limit     Shepard freshman gymnast Skylor Hilger tied for fourth in the all-around event at the Hinsdale Central Sectional in March to qualify for the state tournament. But the night before the state meet, she fell ill and was not able to compete.     Hilger’s state qualifying run was even more amazing considering she returned to the sport after three years of concentrating on other sports.    10. Coach Dooley hangs up the spikes     Palos Heights resident and longtime head St. Xavier baseball coach Mike Dooley will have one more ride before calling it a career. Dooley announced he will retire after the 2014 campaign — his 22nd year at the helm.     The SXU Athletics Department announced that current assistant coach Rocco Mossuto will take over for Dooley after July 1.     The Cougars program has been around 42 years and had just three head coaches — John Boles (197379), John Morrey (1980-92) and Dooley.     “After 42 years as an educator and 33 years with the Saint Xavier University baseball program, including the last 21 years as the head coach, I felt that at the end of the school year and baseball season was the right time to step aside,” Dooley said.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Mother McAuley’s volleyball team, top photo, Sandburg wrestler John Pellegreno, left photo, St. Xavier basketball coach Bob Hallberg, center photo and the Richards football team, right photo, all helped shape the top 10 sports stories of the year in the Reporter/Regional area.


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Section 2 Thursday, January 2, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Nothing phone-y about this competition Bartosh (Reprinted from Sept. 13, 2012)     Alexander Graham Bell is probably turning over in his grave right about now.     Then again, maybe he’s known about this for a while and already completed his postburial, human tilt-a-whirl reaction. After all, the activity that would cause such a dramatic response has been going on for over a decade.     News of it has only recently come my way, which I’d normally be embarrassed to admit. However, there’ve been more important stories to pursue, and even the most intrepid news gatherer can’t be everywhere at once, can he?     Anyway, this latest tale involves a bizarre endeavor, one that takes its rightful place among the ever-growing list of so-called “sporting competitions” that are wrongly categorized. Through the years, readers familiar with this column have been told of many others — lawn-mower racing, iron-man ironing, pole dancing and beer pong, just to name a few — and, in case you haven’t heard about it before, mobile phone throwing now can be included.     If you’re like me, you actually appreciate the general concept. To truly capture the public’s full attention, though, there should be a stipulation that, in order to be declared victorious, participants must toss both a mobile phone and the gadget’s high-decibel user as far as possible.     Mobile phone tossing would seem a rather new phenomenon, but, in fact, it dates back to 2000, when some Finnish folks beset by boredom decided this was something they simply couldn’t live without any longer. Had it not extended beyond the city of Savonlinna, phone tossing probably would have remained a mystery to normal folks to this day.

    But for some inexplicable reason, a regional endeavor went national a few years later. And in 2005, the first winter championships were held in Switzerland, with the competitive field comprised of first-place finishers in various national events, which by that time included a number of European nations besides Finland.     Interestingly, the grand prize for winning the world championships is — you guessed it — a new mobile phone. And so the cycle begins in earnest.     What’s even stranger is that the competition encompasses more than just your basic heaveand-retrieve exercise. According to its entry in Wikipedia — now that’s scary — mobile phone tossing can be broken down into several divisions.     Personally, I like what is called “freestyle.” Entries in this category get points for “aesthetics and creative choreography.”     Choreography? I don’t believe that was even a part of the judging for pole dancing, which, if you recall my previous column on it, has had some people lobbying for its inclusion in the Olympics. That was right before those same individuals excused themselves to take cold showers.     So how exactly does one combine choreography with mobile phone throwing? Does executing a pre-toss pirouette, for example, accumulate style points for the participant or simply make him the object of manly ridicule? How about if someone slow-dances with the mobile phone before deciding to hurl it through space or goes under the limbo bar while shouting, “How low can I go in embarrassing myself?”     As for the creative part, I suppose just about anything should be allowed. After all, nothing can be sillier than the main activity.     But why stop at tossing mobile phones? Let’s make the contest

more challenging by having competitors yank out pay phones from no-longer-in-use booths and then see how far those can be thrown. The winner gets to keep whatever coins are still inside his phone.     And let’s look beyond phones. Build the competition around all items that society has deemed past their prime and ready for the scrap heap. Think of the possibilities:     • The cassette-tape roundup, where contestants try to rope a small animal using only the material found inside what was once considered a cutting-edge recording device. (Eight-track music tapes and Beta videocassettes may be substituted when attempting to tie up larger critters).     • Incandescent-bulb juggling, where participants seek to keep as many government-disapproved lighting sources balanced in the air without having any of them break.     • Typewriter Scrabble, where competitors must break off machine keys and form as many different words as possible in a predetermined time limit.     • The analog-TV obstacle course, where contestants are made, at various junctures, to sidestep, hurdle and disassemble television sets that are no longer operational.     • The 45-record distance fling.     You get the idea. The above suggestions may seem outlandish, but no more so than many of the activities already masquerading as “sports.”     I guess I can’t blame anyone for developing something they think might intrigue more gullible factions of the public, nor can I fault the latter for trying their hand at an endeavor that offers prizes. There is only one thing I ask:     If you ever take part in an incandescent bulb-juggling contest, please remember it was my idea.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

SXU’s Brad Karp was named the MVP of the Midwest Tournament.

SXU men

SXU men claim tourney title By Anthony Nasella     After posting two big-scoring efforts in the first two games of the SXU Midwest Tournament, the St. Xavier men’s basketball team kept its offensive groove on track, enroute to an 85-76 victory over Bellevue University on December 23 at the Shannon Center in Chicago.     Capping the championship game of the tournament with 23 points and 10 rebounds, senior guard Brad Karp earned the tournament’s Most Valuable Player award in leading No. 10 ranked Cougars to the championship on Bob Hallberg Court.     “Bellevue is a very good team,” St. Xavier Coach Tom O’Malley said. “They were a 10-2 team coming in that beat a 10-4 team and a 10-2 team. We played them well. We had multiple substitutes, and we played a very good second half. We we’re down by seven at

halftime and had a nine-point advantage in the second half.     “Brad Karp was instrumental again for us. He had a great game overall. He had 12 points at the half and 11 points and seven rebounds in the second half. We had a lot of contributions and five guys in double figures.”     The Cougars (13-2 overall) came alive scoring 51 points and shooting 56 percent (18-for-32) in the second half after trailing 41-34 at the break.     Junior guard Jack Krieger was instrumental in the second-half surge scoring 21 points, including three three-pointers.”     Senior point guard Michael Simpson finished with 14 points, four rebounds and four assists. Sophomore forward Josh Mawhorr was a force as well recording 12 points, six rebounds and teambest five assists.     “Jack Krieger scored 12 of his points in the second half,”

O’Malley said. “He was 4-for4 from the free throw line and had three 3-point baskets. We’ve won nine in a row, and a lot of that is due to the fact that Jack Krieger has come back and has been effective. He can shoot the ball and is a great player all the way around.”     “Mike Simpson had just two points in the first half and ended with 14 points and 7 out of 8 free throws. The guys inside were also big for us.”     Bellevue controlled the tempo of the game in the first half and Saint Xavier never led in the opening frame despite tying the score seven different times. The Bruins built their largest lead of the night, 47-36, in the first minute of the second half.     The three-pointer lit a fire under the Cougars, who went on a 16-0 run over the game’s next five minutes to take a 52-47 lead. (Continued on page 5)

SXU women

Cougars women go 8-0 in December By Anthony Nasella     For the St. Xavier women’s basketball team, December has been an undefeated month — which was capped off this weekend with a pair of victories at the two-day SXU Holiday Classic at the Shannon Center in Chicago.     The Cougars began the tournament with 76-66 victory over Ashford University on Saturday and followed that up with a 70-48 win over Lourdes University of Ohio on Sunday to extend their current winning streak to eight games and an 8-0 mark in December.     In the win over Ashford, junior forward Morgan Stuut scored 32 points and pulled down 10 rebounds to lead the No. 8-ranked SXU. Stuut posted team-bests of 16 points, 19 rebounds, four steals and two blocks in the victory over

Lourdes University.     But what has been a hallmark in the Cougars 13-3 season, as well as in the two weekend wins, is the continued contributions from multiple players. A total of 11 players scored against Lourdes, and nine players scored against Ashford.     “We’re very pleased with the way we’re playing,” St. Xavier coach Bob Hallberg said. “A lot of people are contributing to our success — whether it’s two points or six points. We have a lot of playing coming off the bench and playing well.     “Morgan’s 32 point-10 rebound performance was big. We’re 13-3 right now, and we’re happy to be there going into the new year. We shot the ball pretty well at times this week. It looks like we have the makings of a good season if we keep playing well.”

Photo by Jeff Vorva

The Courgars’ Maloree Johnson fires a pass on Saturday.

    On Saturday, the Cougars frustrated the visiting Saints with tough defense, which helped lead to 17 Ashford turnovers. Stuut has now topped the 30-point threshold three times this season and posted 10 double-doubles.     Junior guard Suzie Broski was the other St. Xavier player to reach double figures in scoring with 14 points to go along with her five rebounds. Senior point guard Jordan Brandt had a solid all-around game with five assists, four rebounds and three steals; while senior forward Chrissy Heine provided a lift off the bench with six points, three rebounds, two assists and two blocks.     The Cougars struggled early falling behind by nine points, 16-7, in the opening seven minutes of action. However, the team used a 14-5 run to tie the game, 2121, at the 8:27 mark of the first half. The Cougars finished the final five minutes of the frame strong as well scoring 15 points over the stretch to build a 43-34 halftime lead.     St. Xavier, despite falling behind to open the game, led by double figures for a majority of the second half with the Saints unable to get closer than seven points the rest of the way.     “We were down 16-7 and bounced back,” Hallberg said. “It’s one of those slow starts that I really have no answer for. But whenever we do fall behind, we do much better job of turning around and upping our intensity level.     “We’re doing it with defense. It’s not just winning by the margin we won — but it’s also what you have to battle back from. It was a good turnaround by the team.”     On Sunday, the Cougars held the Gray Wolves to just 29 percent shooting (17-for-59) from the field and used 12 steals to help force 18 turnovers. After the game, Stuut was named to the Classic’s alltournament team.     Senior point guard Niara Harris converted six of her seven shot attempts on the day for 13 points for the Cougars, while Broski chipped in 10 points and four rebounds. Senior point guard Jordan Brandt hit a pair of threepointers en route to eight points and two steals.     St. Xavier also received production from its bench Sunday, with 29 of its 70 points coming from the reserves. The Cougars also took full advantage of the turnovers

Photo by Jeff Vorva

SXU’s Morgan Stuut drives in Saturday’s win over Ashland. by Lourdes scoring 29 points off the miscues.     Three-pointers by freshmen Meaghan McMahon and Mikayla Leyden highlighted a 10-1 run by the Cougars to open the game. The Gray Wolves crept back and closed to within a basket, 16-14, with just over eight minutes to play in the half.     However, St. Xavier closed out the frame strong outscoring Lourdes, 26-8 over the final eight minutes to build a 42-22 halftime advantage. The Cougars shot 50 percent from the field (17-for-34) in the first half, which included seven three-pointers. The second half was more of the same as the team extended its lead as high as 28 points and held at least a 20-point edge for most of the frame.     “I was able to play 12 people, and 11 out of 12 scored,” Hallberg said. “Naira Harris was off the bench. Somebody different seems to sparking us every game. We always have consistency out of Susie and Morgan, too.     “It was total team effort today. We were 9-for 25-three point land (36 percent), which is pretty good. All in all, it was a good December.”     St. Xavier returns to action and Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference play on Wednesday, with a 5 p.m. home game against Trinity Christian College.     “We’re playing good basket-

ball, but I have to get the girls to understand that we’re not going to blow out every team that we play. We have a lot of conference ball games — Cardinal Stritch,

Purdue Calumet, Robert Morris, Roosevelt — and we need to keep focused and playing well. It’s a tight schedule… We have eight home games and seven away.”

Photo by Jeff Vorva

St. Xavier’s Caitlin McMahon tries for a basket against Ashland.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, January 2, 2014 Section 2

3

Stagg winning but coach wants to see better shooting By Anthony Nasella     By winning two of its first three games at this past week’s 32-team Jack Tosh Holiday Tournament at York High School in Elmhurst, Stagg improved its record to 113.     Yet, to hear Chargers Coach John Daniels tell it, his team is struggling in its ability to effectively make baskets.     Imagine if and when Stagg begins to find a hot hand as the second half of the season nears?     But the Chargers shooting woes were very evident in Saturday 5642 defeat to Lake Forest. From 5 minutes, 37 second to :11 left in the game, Stagg failed to convert a free throw and managing just five points in the final eight minutes.     Jeff Goral scored 19 points to lead the Chargers, which fell behind three points at halftime and nine points after the third quarter.     “We just have to start making shots,” Daniels said. “We’re 11-3, and we’re not shooting the ball well at all. Once the shots start falling for us, I think we have a good chance of being a 20-win team — which is a big accomplishment for a team in this region.     “We need to figure out how to

execute better. We were getting good looks against Lake Forest, but we were missing layups, pullup’s and three-point baskets — especially in that stretch of the fourth quarter where we didn’t convert one field goal.”     Stagg was only down 45-40 early in the fourth quarter when the offensive well went dry. The team committed just one turnover in the period.     “We played a good, competitive first half,” he said. “They were physical, and we didn’t have an answer for one of their kids. We just have to start making our shots consistently.” Stagg 57 Lane Tech 56     The Chargers started the tournament on a winning note, defeating Lane Tech 57-56 in last Thursday’s action. However, Daniels was not pleased with the overall performance.     Max Strus had 24 points, nine rebounds, five assists and three steals to lift Stagg, which fell behind 8-0 to start the game before closing out the first quarter with a 17-6 run. Kevin White added 21 points in the winning effort.     “It wasn’t a very good game for us,” Daniels said. “We had a hard time scoring early. We started out sloppy and behind early. We

also had issues with turnovers. We committed 21 for the game and seven in the fourth quarter and only scored three points in the last four minutes.     “We had a nine point lead with four minutes to go the game, and we had a hard time holding the lead. They went on a 10-0 run the last three minutes of the game and briefly took a one-point lead. We had five turnovers in that stretch. It was a game of poor execution. Stagg 45 Schaumburg 33     Behind a 13-5 second quarter, the Chargers took control of Friday’s contest against Schaumburg, coming away with a 45-33 victory.     White poured in a team-high 19 points, and Strus added 11 points for Stagg, which held a commanding 22-11 lead at halftime. Photos by Jeff Vorva     “We played a tremendous defenKevin White of Stagg looks like he is involved in a wrestling match in a scramble for the ball sive game Friday,” Daniels said. “We held Schaumburg to 11 points against Lake Forest on Saturday. in the first half and 18 through Stagg 17 9 17 14 - 57 sists: Strus 2. Statistics three quarters. Lane Tech 14 8 14 20 - 56 9 13 9 14 - 45 Stagg 13 13 11 5 - 42     “This game was one of the best Stagg 6 5 7 15 - 33 Lake Forest 13 16 17 10 - 56 of the year from a defensive stand- Schaumburg Stagg Scoring: Kevin White 21, Sebastian point. And we had the lead. So Stagg Scoring: Kevin White 19, Sebastian Stagg Scoring: Kevin White 6, Sebastian Kolpak 0, Brett Stratinsky 2, Max Strus we didn’t have rely on making Kolpak 2, Brett Stratinsky 0, Max Strus Kolpak 2, Brett stratinsky 0, Max Strus 24, Nick Sims 6, Jeff Goral 0, Anthony mistakes. We controlled the lead 11, Nick Sims 5, Jeff Goral 5, Anthony 9, Nick Sims 4, Jeff Goral 19, Anthony Gardner 4. Rebounds: Strus 9. Assists: and game. Strus 5. Gardner 3. Rebounds: Gardner 9. As- Gardner 2.

Eagles top Bremen but drop next three at York By Anthony Nasella     Sandburg’s boys basketball team was a minute away from a 2-2 record at the 32-team Jack Tosh Tournament at York High School in Elmhurst.     The Eagles had the ball and a one-point lead thanks to an Eric Straka basket with 1:35 left in the game against Providence Catholic Monday morning in a consolationround game.     But the Eagles turned the ball over and Providence’s two-sport star Miles Boykin put in a layup with 19 seconds left for a 50-49 victory. Straka finished with 15 points in the setback and Sandburg finished 1-3 in the tournament. Sandburg 49 Bremen 33     Behind a solid second quarter, the Eagles opened up the York Tournament with a 49-33 victory over Bremen last Thursday.     Nico Cahue scored 20 points, Alec Martinez added 12 and Straka pitched in with ten to lead Sandburg, which grabbed a 25-13 halftime lead compliments of a 12-3 second quarter.     The Braves were able to stay close in the second half with a 15-5 third quarter before the Ea-

gles responded with a 19-5 fourth quarter to close out the game.     “We played fairly well,” Sandburg coach Todd Allen said. “We had a poor third quarter; we missed five free throws and let them back into the game. They made shots, but we held them to five points in the fourth quarter.     “We played well for three quarters. We had a decided size advantage. We had three guys in double figures. It was our first game in ten games, so it was a good first win to start the tournament.” York 65 Sandburg 45     A 17-2 second quarter doomed the Eagles in a 65-45 defeat to host York in championship bracket action on Friday.     York, the No. 1 seed in the tourney, possessed a great deal of height, began to dominate as the second quarter open and never looked back.     Cahue scored 15 points to lead Sandburg.     “York is a very good team and executed very well,” Allen said. The first problem was the 172 second quarter. We missed a lot of shots. They made trio of three’s in that quarter, and we were never able to really recover

from that.” Riverside-Brookfield 69 Sandburg 59     In what Allen described as the worst first-quarter performance of the year, the Eagles were outscored 12-2 in the first eight minutes and shot just 3-for-19 from the floor in the first half with 14 turnovers in a 69-59 defeat to Riverside-Brookfield Saturday in the consolation round.     Sandburg came alive in the second half, scoring 46 points in the final 16 minutes – but it wasn’t enough to make up for the deficit. Niko Kogionis scored all 18 of his his points in the second half, and Niko Cahue scored 16 of his 18 points also in the second half.     “I was not happy at all with our performance in the first quarter or the first half,” Allen said. “We had the chance to cut the lead to four points a number of times, but we just could never get it down to a one or two possession game. Shot ourselves in the foot in the first half.     “And they weren’t really pressuring us; it was just a lot of unforced turnovers. We just got really careless with the basketball and missed a lot of open shots. Riverside-Brookfield is a good team, and you can’t spot a quality team

like that such a lead and expect to win. We expended a lot of energy trying to get back into the game in the second half.”

Statistics Sandburg R-B

2 11 24 22 - 59 12 23 21 13 - 69

Sandburg Scoring: Niko Cahue 18, Niko Kogionis 18, Omar Manusour 2, Matt Piazza, Peter Paxinos, Eric Straka 7, Alec Martinez 3, Joe Ruzevich 4, T.J Vorva 1, John Manthey 6. Rebounds: Straka 9. Assists: Martinez 4. Bremen Sandburg

10 3 15 5 - 33 13 12 5 19 - 49

Sandburg Scoring: Niko Cahue 20, Niko Kogionis 0, Omar Manusour 0, Matt Piazza 0, Peter Paxinos 0, Eric Straka 11, Alec Martinez 12, Tommy Demogerontas 0, T.J. Vorva 1. Rebounds: Cahue 13, Martinez 2, Cahue 2. Sandburg York

12 2 16 15 - 45 11 17 24 13 - 65

Sandburg Scoring: Niko Cahue 15, Niko Kogionis 6, Omar Manusour 6, Matt Piazza 0, Peter Paxinos 2, Eric Straka 4, Alec Martinez 9, Tommy Demogerontas 2, T.J. Vorva 1. Rebounds: Cahue 6. Assists: Straka 1.

Photos by Jeff Vorva

Alec Martinez fires a pass for Sandburg in the Eagles’ win over Bremen last Thursday at the Jack Tosh Tournament in York.

Rice drops two of three at York By Anthony Nasella

Dan Scanlon tacked on 12 points and 11 rebounds for the Crusad    Brother Rice lost two of its ers, who were 20-of-20 from the first three games at the Jack free-throw line. Tosh Tournament at York High     Brother Rice used a 20-10 School in Elmhurst. second quarter to take a 38-27 halftime lead. Schaumburg 57 Brother Rice 48 Waubonsie Valley 48     The Crusaders were unable to Brother Rice 45 overcome a ten-point halftime     The Crusaders were unable to deficit during last Thursday’s overcome a hot-shooting opponent opening round game against in Saturday afternoon’s contest, Schaumberg, resulting in a 57- dropping a close 48-45 decision 48 setback. to Waubonsie Valley.     Leading the way for Brother     Waubonsie shot 60 percent from Rice offensively was Quinn Neigo, the floor compared to 47.6 percent who scored a team-high 22 points from Brother Rice, which found and a team-tying three assists. itself behind 27-22 at halftime Dan Scanlon added 13 points, and before cutting the deficit to two Ray Rubio pitched in with ten. at the end of three.     Schaumburg took control of     Quinn Niego’s baseline jumper the game with a 14-6 second quarter to take a 29-19 halftime advantage. Brother Rice 71 Lane Tech 57     In contrast to their first round contest, The Crusaders used a strong second quarter effort in Friday’s contest against Lake Tech – coming away with a 7157 victory.     Rubio scored 22 points and Niego netted 17 to power Brother Rice (5-6) in consolation action.

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Brother Rice coach Rick Harrigan.

with 3:15 remaining in the third quarter gave Brother Rice its first lead of the game at 32-31.     Brother Rice (5-7) had a chance to tie the game after Waubonsie Vallehy missed the front end of a one-and-one. After a timeout, the Crusaders inbounded from near half court with 3.6 seconds left but Ray Rubio’s three-point attempt failed.     Quinn Niego paced the Crusaders with 12 points and six rebounds, and Rubio added 10 points.

Statistics Brother Rice Waub. Valley

11 11 14 9 - 45 16 11 11 10 - 48

Brother Rice Scoring: Jimmy Gallagher 0, Jack Conlisk 6, Ray Rubio 10, Quinn

Niego 12, Connor Finn 9, Jack Gorman 0, Dan Scanlon 8, Jack Mahay 0. Rebounds: Niego 6. Assists: Rubio 3, Conlisk 3. Schaumburg Brother Rice

15 14 10 18 - 57 13 6 12 17 - 48

Brother Rice Scoring: Jimmy Gallagher 0, Jack Conlisk 0, Ray Rubio 10, Quinn Niego 22, Connor Finn 3, Jack Gorman 0, Dan Scanlon 13. Rebounds: Rubio 6; Assists: Scanlon 3, Niego 3. Lane Tech Brother Rice

17 10 15 15 - 57 18 20 16 17 - 71

Brother Rice Scoring: Jimmy Gallagher 0, Jack Conlisk 2, Ray Rubio 22, Quinn Niego 17, Connor Finn 5, Jack Gorman 0, Dan Scanlon 12, Jack Mahay 9, Sal Perez 2, Joe Swiatek 2. Rebounds: Scanlon 11. Assists: Rubio 4.

Injury takes toll on Astros

By Anthony Nasella     After suffering back-to-back losses against Oak Forest and Hillcrest the previous week, Shepard opened the Romeoville Tournament with a pair of victories and was positioning itself for a run at the tournament championship.     But one of the Astros’ biggest inside forces, Kyle Longfield, severely sprained his ankle in the tournament’s second game against Lincoln-Way East. On Saturday against Oswego East, Longfield was still out of the lineup — and Shepard’s rebounding ability took a beating.     Worse, Oswego East grabbed 18 offensive rebounds — which led many second-chance points. Meanwhile, the Astros didn’t help their cause, either, by committing 26 turnovers. All of it added up to a 64-51 defeat to Oswego East. Jacob Littleton scored 26 points to lead Shepard (5-6), which was outscored 39-29 in the second half.     “Oswego East is a good team,” Shepard head Coach Tony Chiuccariello said. “We watched them against Reavis, and they have some very athletic kids. They knocked down baskets and three’s and forced us into a lot of turn-

overs.     “The story was two-fold: We got outrebounded by Oswego East, and they scored second-hand points. We try to limit offensive rebounds against us to one a quarter. We didn’t take care of the ball; we try to limit turnovers to ten per game.”     Chiuccariello said that Oswego East’s aggressive play was successful in taking Shepard out of its traps. Meanwhile, he said that other players are going to have to step on the boards until Longfield gets back into the lineup.     “We have to do better job of boxing out,” he said. “We have to a better job of taking care of the ball — whether it’s driving in and someone coming to help and we ended up with the charge. I credit to them for pressuring us and taking us out of our offense and traps.     “We definitely miss Kyle Longfield. He’s our big man help on the boards, but someone has to step, box out and rebound. We definitely need to fill that void. Despite the loss, we’re happy where we are and how we played in the previous two games.” Shepard 63 Lincoln-Way East 56     Down three points to Lincoln-

Way East with one second left in the third quarter, the Astros set up quarter-ending play for a three-point attempt.     The ball wound up in hands of Darren Cohen, who swished a three-quarter court shot at the buzzer and tied the game at 46-all. From there, Shepard outscored Lincoln-Way by seven points in the fourth quarter and prevailed 63-56.     Cohen finished with a gamehigh 22 points for the Astros, who started the game with a 15-7 first quarter before Lincoln-Way East rallied to take a one-point halftime lead. The momentum shifted back after Cohen’s heave.     “That basket was definitely a momentum changer for us,” Chiuccariello said. “In the fourth quarter, the kids were able to close out game. Cohen is a fantastic player; this was the best game he played all year.”     “In the second quarter, LincolnWay East adjusted to what they were doing defensively, and they rebounded. We were down in third period by as much as six points, but we just kept scrapping and got some big shots late in game and Jacob Littleton hit some big (Continued on page 5)

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist will host a party for grade school kids to watch Nic Weischar play on television on Saturday.

Marist to host Weischar party on Saturday     Call it a Weischar wingding.     Marist High School invites all sixth, seventh and eighth graders to watch the Army AllAmerican Bowl at the school on Saturday.     Marist senior Nic Weishar (Midlothian) will play in the elite game that features 90 high school seniors from across the country.     The Marist receiver was named the Regional Publishing Player of the Year for 2013 for his success both on offense as a receiver and defense as a linebacker.     The event at Marist begins at 11:30 a.m. with the kickoff at noon.     The game will be broadcast live on NBC.     Pizza, games, giveaways and more will be provided. Students interested in attending should

email hogan.patrick@marist. net or call (773) 881-5302 to reserve a spot. Students should enter Marist through the main gym doors. The event will end at 2:30 p.m.     Weishar’s career at Marist includes 256 receptions — an Illinois state record, 3,284 receiving yards, and 28 touchdown catches. He also had a great run on the other side of the ball, becoming a dominant force for the RedHawks as an outside lineman. Weishar was selected by the U.S. Army All-American Bowl Selection Committee, which consists of All American Games and 247Sports. U.S. Army All-Americans are eligible for a variety of personal awards as well. — Submitted by Marist High School


4

Section 2 Thursday, January 2, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Mustangs are finding ways to win By Kevin M. Coyne     For five games, Evergreen Park’s boys basketball team found just about every way to lose.     They lost in a blowout. They lost a one-point game. They lost in double overtime. They lost with 1.2 seconds left. They lost a game they led in for most of the contest but missed six free throws during crunch time.     Why bring all of this up?     That losing streak is now a memory.     Coach Pat Flannigan, who recently said his team might be the best 0-5 team ever, doesn’t have to worry about calling his team the best 0-8 team ever. His team not only won a game — it got on a roll.     The Mustangs made three trips to Elmhurst and came away with three victories in the eight-team

Immaculate Conception Tournament. The Mustangs faced St. Edward in the championship game Monday night but the game was played after the Regional/Reporter’s holiday deadline. Details of that game will appear Jan. 9.     The Mustangs’ 64-47 victory over the host team in pool play Saturday went down to the wire. In the fourth quarter the game was nearly even, until the Mustangs tallied 19 points to the Knights’ six points, to capture the team’s third victory.     “We shot the ball well and handled the different defenses they threw at us,” said Flannigan.     Prior to the tournament, the Mustangs fell short in every other contest, most recently dropping the Dec. 20 game to Lemont 47-42. The ICCP tournament revitalized the team’s spirit and provided much needed motivation

to capture three victories on the road.     “We were a pretty good 0-5 team going into the tournament and we lost most of our games by one possession to some pretty good teams,” Flannigan said. “We are a hard working team and outworking teams is what’s paying off.”     The Mustangs had an optional workout, which everyone attended on Sunday to prepare for the title game. Evergreen Park 67 Latin School 56     The bigger Latin Romans squad was outlasted by the Mustangs late in the game last Thursday. Evergreen’s Isaac Matthews tallied 17 points and three rebounds against the Romans.     “Latin School had a pretty good sized team they had a big post and big swinger,” Flannigan said.

“We came out to our traditional slow start but battled back after an 18-17 first.” Evergreen Park 64 Elmwood Park 50     The Mustangs were put to the test during Friday’s battle with the Elmwood Park Tigers, who came into the game after a 73-50 victory over Immaculate Conception. Feeding off of their 11-point victory over the Romans, Evergreen Park played a tight defensive game, forcing the Tigers to change up their offense.     The Mustangs were put to the test during Friday’s battle with the Elmwood Park Tigers, who came into the game after a 73-50 victory over Immaculate Conception. Feeding off of their Photo by Jeff Vorva 11-point victory over the Romans, Evergreen Park played a tight de- Tony Weathersby, shown earlier in the season, and Evergreen Park fensive game, keeping the Tigers have picked things up since playing in the Immaculate Conception Tournament. to 50 points.

Spartans start 1-2 at E. Aurora Long trip to pick up hardware By Kevin M. Coyne

Redhawks travel 257 miles to bring home consolation trophy

    Oak Lawn’s first trip to the East Aurora Holiday Tournament was met with mixed results.     The Spartans were one of four new teams in the eight-team tournament and were able to go 1-2 in their pool play games. They hoped for a 2-2 finish with a win in the fifth place Monday night in a game that was too late for the Reporter-Regional holiday deadline. Geneva 63 Oak Lawn 36     The Mustangs suffered a beating the first game of the tournament losing by 27 points to the Geneva Vikings (11-3) last Thursday. The Vikings went on to defeat every other opponent in the pool and played in the championship Monday night.     As a side note, a Geneva player was bloodied but it didn’t come from the Spartans. Vikings teammates Nate Navigato and Chris Parrilli collided and Parrilli suffered a bloody nose.     Mitch Swatek had 13 points for Oak Lawn and David Stacy chipped in with 12.

By Tim Cronin

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Oak Lawn’s Ibrahim Samra, shown in a contest earlier this season, and Oak Lawn lost two of their first three games in the East Aurora Tournament. Neuqua Valley 65 Oak Lawn 51     Oak Lawn had a one-point lead in Friday’s game but the Wildcats (9-4) ended up taking control of the game late in the fourth, as the Spartans couldn’t hold on for a victory. Later in the

tournament the Wildcats put up a fight against the Geneva Vikings but lost 60-55. Oak Lawn 63 Hubbard 35     During the third game of the tournament Saturday, the Spartans came up with the victory.

Shannon hurt in Kankakee tourney as Richards finishes in fourth place By Anthony Nasella     Even though Richards was playing without Dedrick Shannon Jr. in Saturday’s Kankakee Holiday Tournament contest against Carver Military Academy, the Bulldogs’ performance against the Challengers was indicative of team in need of significant improvements.     A rough second quarter put Richards behind ten points at halftime. The team bounced back in the second half and forced overtime; however, ten missed free throws by the Bulldogs doomed them in a 64-62 defeat in the large school third-place contest.     It was the second loss in a row for Richards (9-3), which dropped a 66-60 defeat to host Kankakee on Friday. Wasted in the loss to Carver was a monster performance by Josh Meier, who finished with 28 points and 21 rebounds.     “Right now, we’re just a not a good team,” Richards head Coach John Chappetto. “Obviously, we were without Dedrick (out with a foot injury suffered earlier in the tournament), but when you couple missed free throws with defensive mental mistakes and some bounces that just didn’t go our way — you have two-game losing streak.”     The mental mistakes were definitely evident in the second quarter, when Carver outscored Richards 14-4 to take a commanding 27-17 halftime lead and extended the lead further to 14 in the third. The Bulldogs bounced back and took the lead with seven seconds left in regulation on a three-point basket, but they fouled Carver — and free throws forced the extra period.

    Two free throws by Carver in the closing seconds of overtime sealed the Bulldogs’ doom.     “We had the chance to win the game on our last possession, but we were unable to score,” Chappetto said. Kankakee 66 Richards 60     Behind what Chappetto called one of the worst first quarter he’s ever seen in his time at Richards, the Bulldogs were outscored 23-9 in the first eight minutes in a 6660 loss to Kankakee on Friday.     Josh Meier racked up 19 points and 12 rebounds to lead Richards, which lost Shannon to the injury. Shannon had been nursing a foot issue all season long, and Friday’s injury turned out to a serious one.     The Bulldogs were down as much as 20 points yet bounced back with a 21-10 second quarter and took the lead behind a 17-14 third quarter. Worse, Richards missed 12 free throws in the contest.     “Kankakee played great, and we probably played one of our worst first quarters since I’ve been around,” he said. “We trailed big and came all the way back from down 20. They took the game over, and we just weren’t able to come back for a second time.     “And those missed free throws made the situation even worse.” Richards 85 Lincoln-Way North 59     After a relatively even first quarter, Richards exploded for most of the remainder of last Thursday’s opening contest against Lincoln-Way North, rolling to a 85-59 victory.     Spencer Tears recorded 18

points and six assists to pave the way for Richards, which recorded 19 steals.     Meier added 17 points and 10 rebounds and Shannon Jr. finished with 10 points, seven steals and six assists. In all, Lincoln-Way North committed 29 turnovers.     “We were able to turn up the pressure in the first quarter,” Chappetto said. “In the first quarter into the second, we were really able to separate ourselves from them.”     Lincoln-Way North kept the game in reach, down just 15, heading into the fourth quarter, as Richards posted a 23-20 third period; however, the Bulldogs outscored their opponents 13 points in the fourth quarter.     “The third quarter was a sloppy, as was the game,” the coach said, “Maybe it was because it was the day after Christmas. Our guys figured we were the higher seed. Once were able to get the lead and hold onto it, we built on it.”     Waiting for Richards in the coming week is no easy assignment — Marian Catholic — and Chappetto is looking forward to getting his back on the floor to make some necessary adjustments.     “The best thing about a tournament ending is we can get into the practice floor and get back to work,” he said. “We have a tough second half of the year. Our next game is against Marian Catholic, which is probably one of the better teams in the state.”

Statistics Carver Richards

13 14 13 18 13 4 18 23

6 - 64 4 - 62

Richards Scoring: Josh Meier 28, Thaer Othman 9, Spencer Tears 11, Jaylan Catledge 6 Jordan Cottrell 0, Evangelo Anagnostopolous 0, Deon Alexander 3, Ameen Hussein 3, Rob Jones 2. Rebounds: Meier 21. Assists: Tears 5. Richards Kankakee

    A long bus ride with a trophy in hand, no matter how it’s earned, makes a trip to a Christmas tournament a success.     Marist’s RedHawks experienced that on Sunday, the day after capturing the consolation bracket of the 71st Centralia Holiday Tournament. And that made the 257mile trip back from southern Illinois through sloppy weather a brisk five-hour jaunt.     The RedHawks (11-2) won three straight after dropping their first round game to the Egypt High Pharaohs of Raleigh, Tenn. That 48-47 setback was followed by a 60-38 defeat of Addison Trail, a 91-79 victory over Eisenhower, and a 57-52 win over Jacksonville to capture the consolation crown of the 16-team tournament, with the final two games played on Saturday.     “This was a great trip for our guys,” Marist coach Gene Nolan said. “The biggest thing we didn’t have coming into this year was experience. We’d graduated five starters. Now we have experience.”     And, perhaps, an identity. The RedHawks, playing to their gritty form, held their four opponents to 35.6 percent shooting (82 of 230). If that defense can hold up across the East Suburban Catholic wars, Marist has a chance to be part of the argument with Marian Catholic, Benet Academy and St. Viator.     “We’ve defended well throughout the year,” Nolan said.     This was a step up. And through it all in Centralia, Nic Weishar was a standout. When he wasn’t leading the RedHawks in scoring — as was the case against Addison Trail (20 points) and Eisenhower (28) — he was the leading rebounder. The consistent efforts earned Weishar a second-team all-tournament selection.     Since Marist’s next basketball game isn’t until next Thursday, when it hosts Lindblom, the Notre Dame commit won’t miss a game

while he plays in the All-American Bowl, a football showcase for high school seniors, Saturday at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Tex.     Weishar pulled down nine rebounds, a trio of them on the offensive glass, in the trophy-earning victory over Jacksonville, and added 10 points on 5-of-6 shooting, the only miss on a three-point attempt, to go with the 13 points of Bradley Hill and a dozen each from Brian Holland and Kevin Lerma.     The game was tied at 40 entering the final quarter, and Marist outscored the Crimsons 17-12 to emerge triumphant after Jacksonville had erased Marist’s 25-22 halftime advantage.     “If there’s ever a day you don’t want to play two games, it’s when you play Eisenhower,” Nolan said. “Playing Eisenhower is like playing two games, with 80 to 90 possessions.”     But the RedHawks gutted it out down the stretch against a much bigger, more deliberate club. Marist squandered a double-digit lead, trailed by a point, crept back into the lead, went up 56-52 on a timely jumper by Hill, and went up to stay when Weishar took a charge, quashing the last good chance of the Crimsons to rally.     Marist’s attack was all-encompassing from the start, a credit to Nolan’s system. The RedHawks had assists on 68 percent of their field goals, including 17 assists on 32 baskets in the helter-skelter victory over Eisenhower, which employs Grinnell’s run-and-shoot concoction. Weishar was 12-of-14 from the floor in that game, and four of his seven rebounds came on the offensive glass. Jeremiah Ferguson added 21 points for Marist, with Holland scoring 18 and Lerma 12. Calviontae Washington’s 15 paced Eisenhower.     The RedHawks started their Centralia adventure on Thursday, and were edged by the Egypt Pharaohs by a point, 48-47, after leading 128 through a quarter and 27-17 at

By Tim Cronin     St. Laurence doubled its win output of the season when it came out of Centralia with a second win this season, a 1-2 mark in the 16-team tournament, and a 2-9 mark for the season to date. But coach Mark Sevedge sees a parallel between last year, when the Vikings went 2-2 at Centralia, and this year.     “Last year this was the trip that turned our season around,” Sevedge said. “We ended on a good run (finishing 12-17). I hope this is going to be the same. The kids had a great time, did a lot of things together off the court.”     The victory was a 51-40 success over Kirby High of Memphis, Tenn. The Vikings, with balanced scoring led by 12 points each from Quentin Forberg and Tim Delaney, led throughout, and expanded a four-point lead after three quarters to the final margin with a 18-11 command of the

fourth period.     “The staff and I felt we played better in the two losses than in the game we won, but we played pretty good,” Sevedge said. “I sent the message to the team before the game that we were the better team in the game, and if we did what we were supposed to, we should win.”     They did what they were supposed to. St. Laurence dominated almost every category, and while Tyredius Woods and Desmond Johnson (18 and 12 points respectively) led the Cougars from the floor, the rest of the Kirby squad managed only six points, with a basket each from three other players.     It was St. Laurence’s first win since a 52-44 victory over Willowbrook on Nov. 30.     The consolation bracket appearance was triggered by a 55-35 loss to the Bears of Madison Prep. The Bears used a 31-17 margin across the second and third quarters to put the game away. The Vikings were un-

9 21 17 13 - 60 23 10 14 19 - 66

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Richards’ Dedrick Shannon Jr., playing in a game earlier in the season, suffered a foot injury in the Kankakee Tournament.

Egypt Marist

8 9 14 17 - 48 12 15 6 14 - 47

Marist Scoring: Holland 14, Weishar 10, Ferguson 8, Hill 8, Lerma 4, Hawkins 2, Burrell 1, Tucker 0, Barry 0. Rebounds: Weishar 12, Holland 4, Hill 4. Assists: Ferguson 6, Lerma 3. Marist Addison Trail

14 7 14 25 - 60 6 13 8 11 - 38

Marist Scoring: Weishar 20, Ferguson 12, Hawkins 10, Holland 9, Hill 7, Lerma 2, Rivard 0, Barry 0, Burrell 0, Tucker 0, Turner 0. Rebounds: Weishar 6, Lerma 6. Assists: Ferguson 4, Weishar 3, Hawkins 3. Consolation championship Marist 57, Jacksonville 52 Marist Scoring: Hill 13, Holland 12, Lerma 12, Weishar 10, Ferguson 4, Barry 3, Rivard 2, Burrell 1, Hawkins 0, Tucker 0. Rebounds: Weishar 9, Lerma 5. Assists: Ferguson 7, Holland 3.

able to stop Arlando Cook (18 points on 9-of-10 shooting), nor get to the boards. They were out-rebounded 33-14, with Madison enjoying a 1410 edge on its offensive glass.     Beating Kirby sent the Vikings into the consolation semifinals against Jacksonville, and the Crimsons were waiting for them. Jacksonville scored a 63-54 victory, pulling away in the second half after a 24-all deadlock at the break, having surmounted a sixpoint Viking lead. Forberg’s 14 points led St. Laurence.     The Vikings return to the court with a Catholic League contest against Loyola Academy on Tuesday.

Statistics St. Laurence Madison Prep

9 8 9 9 - 35 11 16 15 13 - 55

St. Laurence Scoring: Forberg 11, Lamb 7, Delaney 5, Condito 5, Aderman 4, Radford 3, Cummings 0, Gurgone 0, Curley, Dan 0, Witkowski 0, Gould 0, Curley, Don 0, Kelly 0. Rebounds: Delaney 3. Assists: Delaney 3. Kirby St. Laurence

8 12 9 11 - 40 13 10 10 18 - 51

St. Laurence Scoring: Forberg 12, Delaney 12, Kelly 8, Gurgone 3, Curley, Dan 2, Cummings 1, Gould 0, Curley, Don 0, Condito 0, Aderman 0, Witkowski 0. Rebounds: Lamb 8, Radford 6. Assists: Forberg 4, Gurgone 3.

15 14 20 10 - 59 17 27 18 23 - 85

Richards Scoring: Josh Meier 17, Dedrick Shannon Jr. 10, Thaer Othman 3, Spencer Tears 18, Jaylan Catledge 7 Jordan Cottrell 10, Evangelo Anagnostopolous 8, Deon Alexander 4, Spencer Tracey 3, Ameen Hussein 3, Marcus Burton 2. Rebounds: Meier 7, Cottrell 7. Assists: Tears 6, Shannon 6.

Statistics

Vikings vacuum up Kirby but drop two in Centralia

Richards Scoring: Josh Meier 19, Dedrick Shannon Jr. 13, Thaer Othman 11, Spencer Tears 7, Jaylan Catledge 5 Jordan Cottrell 0, Evangelo Anagnostopolous 2, Deon Alexander 3. Rebounds: Meier 12. Assists: Shannon 4. L-W North Richards

the half. Even with Weisher holding Egypt star Fatodd Lewis to 4 points, 23 under his average, Egypt cut the gap to 33-31 after three quarters and outscored Marist 17-14 in the final eight minutes with Arcaus McGhee (16 points, eight rebounds) leading the way. McGhee’s 3-pointer with five seconds to play trumped the 3pointer of Holland with nine seconds left, and set the final score.     The Pharaohs joined Richards as the only teams to beat Marist this season.     That dropped Marist to the consolation bracket, but it didn’t get much easier, thanks to Centralia’s penchant for drawing high-caliber teams from throughout the state and beyond. The RedHawks took out their frustrations against Addison Trail on Friday, expanding a 21-19 halftime lead to 22 points by game’s end. Weishar’s 20 was complemented by 12 points from Ferguson and 10 from Chamar Hawkins.

Jacksonville St. Laurence

Photo by Jeff Vorva

St. Laurence coach Mark Sevedge, shown during an earlier game this season, said his team played better in two losses than it did in a lone win in Centralia.

11 13 15 24 - 63 11 13 14 16 - 54

St. Laurence Scoring: Forberg 14, Lamb 9, Gurgone 9, Delaney 8, Kelly 7, Cummings 3, Curley, Dan 2, Radford 2, Witkowski 0, Aderman 0, Gould 0, Condito 0. Rebounds: Lamb 8, Forberg 4. Assists: Forberg 2, Gurgone 2, Delaney 2.


The Regional News - The Reporter

Thursday, January 2, 2014 Section 2

5

Girls Roundup

A shot away from perfection Eagles win two but suffer heartbreaking loss at Hillcrest By Anthony Nasella     Sandburg’s girls basketball team went 2-1 at this past weekend’s Hillcrest Holiday Classic, falling just a basket short of going undefeated.     Sandburg opened the tournament with a 47-46 victory over T.F North last Thursday, as Kate Ruzevich’s free throw with no time remaining lifted Sandburg in the first-round victory. The Eagles were led in scoring by Sam Youngwirth (15 points) and Julia Ruzevich (10).     Later that day, Sandburg played the host Hawks down to wire before being defeated 66-65 by a layup with two seconds left by Shayla Joyner in the second-round contest.     The Eagles were led by Youngwirth (20 points), Jessica Merino (14 points) and Victoria Stavropoulos (10 points, 10 rebounds).     Sandburg trailed 64-57 with 1:10 remaining when Merino turned a rebound into two fouls shots that began a seven-point game-tying burst.     With 11.1 seconds left, Stavropoulos canned two free throws for Sandburg, which rallied from as much as a 13-point fourth-quarter deficit to take the lead before Hillcrest’s last second heroics.     The team led 15-9 after the first eight minutes, converting inside with Ruzevich and from threepoint range by Lauren O’Leary and Youngwirth. Hillcrest fought back, aided by a 15-6 to take a lead 37-27 lead at halftime.     The Eagles bounced back from the Hillcrest nailbiter to nip Lockport 42-39 in Friday’s fifth place contest. Stavropoulos (13 points), Youngwirth (12) and Kate Ruzevich (12) provided balance for Sandburg (10-5). Stagg     The Chargers went 1-2 at this past week’s Hillcrest Holiday Classic, defeating Bloom 64-48 and losing to Joliet Catholic 57-33 and Rich South 53-37.     Stagg started its day with a first round victory against Bloom. Hannah Henderson (a game-high 21 points, 4 assists, 4 steals) jump started the offense, scoring the opening three baskets of the game and nine points in the first quarter

to help the Chargers to an 18-8 lead after eight minutes.     Mia DiGiacomo (16 points, eight rebounds) joined in the attack with six points of her own, and then added another seven points in the second quarter to stretch the lead 33-15 at the half.     Casey McMahon (10 points, six rebounds) took action in directing the offense and made two 3point field goals, when the Trojans started packing their defense into the lane in an attempt to stop our dribble penetration.     “We were able to get to the basket, running our spread offense, using a variety of back door cuts to get some layups,” Stagg head Coach Bill Turner said. “The girls did a good job of being patient and getting high percentage quality shots.”     When some of those shots did not fall, Stagg’s rebounding advantage (37-25) allowed for easy put-backs and an eventual 50-24 advantage heading into the final period.     “The girls’ did everything they needed to do: defend, rebound, and take care of the basketball to increase the lead at the end of three quarters,” Turner said. “Megan Hearne and Megan Sullivan did a nice job on the boards with six rebounds each.”     Against Joliet Catholic Academy, Stagg was behind just 14-10 after the first quarter, on with DiGiacomo (11 points, 11 rebounds) leading the way with six points in the first quarter.     “Facing the No. 1 seed in the tourney was going to be a challenge in our second contest of the day,” Turner said. “Joliet Catholic is one of the top ranked teams (No. 2 in the Chicagoland area). Things were going pretty good for us early as Mia was a huge presence inside against a much taller opponent.”     DiGiacomo continued her strong offensive scoring and rebounding effort with a couple of more baskets in the second quarter, sandwiched around a Noor Elmosa’s three-point field goal to keep Stagg within striking distance at the half, trailing just 29-21.     The opening four minutes of the third quarter was the turning

point in the game. Joliet Catholic turned up the pressure a little bit, forcing Stagg into a few turnovers that led to some easy baskets in transition. Meanwhile, the Lady Chargers could only muster up a three-point basket by Casey McMahon and a free throw for the entire quarter.     The deficit became 22 points, 47-25, entering the fouth quarter. Hannah Henderson and Kate Adams each had seven points, but the Chargers could never get any closer after the Angels run to open the second half.     “I thought the girls really competed against a quality team, holding a 33-30 rebounding edge, but their defensive pressure forced us into 24 turnovers, which resulted in uncontested lay-ups,” Turner said. “Our 9-for-36 shooting (25 percent) did not help matters either.     “That may be the best team that we will play this season. They are very long, athletic, and well coached.”     Against Rich South, Stagg was were unable to overcome a strong performance by the Stars, who shot the ball very well. DiGiacomo (12 points, six rebounds) and Hannah Henderson (10 points, five rebounds, four assists) again were the leading contributors to the Charger attack.     “Both players had a really good tournament all-around,” Turner said. “Our offense is struggling at times this season. This was our fifth game scoring in the 30’s. We have to do a better job of taking care of the basketball and value each possession.     “I think we are playing some pretty good defense, but we have to find scoring from some other players and our field goal percentage/free throw shooting percentage has to improve. I know this group will continue to work hard and find a way to be more consistent on offense in the second half of the season.”     Stagg is now 5-7 overall on the year and will next play a nonconference game at home against Lincoln-Way West on Friday. Marist     The RedHawks went 2-2 at this past week’s Hillcrest Holiday Classic— defeating Oak Forest and

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Marist’s Brooke Wyderski, shown earlier in the season, had 23 points in an overtime victory over Rich South at the Hillcrest Tournament. Rich South and losing to Hillcrest and Joliet Catholic.     Marist opened the tournament Thursday with a 54-30 victory over Oak Forest. Tehya Fortune (16 points) and Lorna McCall (10) led the way.     In Thursday’s second-round the Redhawks edged Rich South 64-61 in overtime. Brooke Wyderski had 23 points, while Tehya Fortune (12 points) and Skylar Patterson combined to hit 7-of-8 free throws in overtime for Marist (8-4).     In the semifinal on Friday, the RedHawks ran into a buzz saw, dropping a 71-48 decision to undefeated Joliet Catholic. Tehya Fortune finished with 20 points for Marist (9-5).     Already working with an 18-8 advantage through one quarter, Joliet Catholic exploded in the second period. In forcing eight turnovers and limiting Marist to just 3-of-13 shooting, the Angels went on an extended 18-0 run going into halftime with a 4616 lead.     On Saturday, the RedHawks losing streak reached two, as they dropped a 71-59 defeat to the host Hawks in the third-place game. Mother McAuley     The Mighty Macs captured a 56-54 quarterfinal victory over Barrington at Friday’s DundeeCrown Tournament. Molly

O’Malley poured in 17 points to boost Mother McAuley. Raven Willis (four rebounds) added 15 points for the Mighty Macs and Elizabeth Nye (four rebounds) scored 11.     In Saturday’s semifinal contest, the Mighty Macs were edged by New Trier 47-43. Molly O’Malley scored 11 points to lead Mother McAuley (11-3).     Later Saturday, The Mighty Macs were edged by New Trier 47-43 in the second semi-final contest. New Trier used a 21-point second quarter to grab a seven-point halftime advantage, as McAuley committed 19 turnovers.     With 4:20 left in the game, the Mighty Macs used a 10-0 run to cut the deficit to one. The Trevians responded with a 6-0 run to reclaim the lead as McAuley would get no closer than two points the rest of the way.     Junior forward Erin Drynan finished with a team-high 11 points for Mighty Macs (11-4). She added two blocks. Shepard     The Lady Astros came up empty in four contest at this past week’s Medieval Classic, dropping to 2-13 in the process.     Shepard opened up the tournament on December 23 with a 60-18 loss to Lincoln-Way East. The team was led by Dae Jae Wil-

liams (six points). Williams scored 14 points, Heather Banis had 13 points and Courtney Dalton’s added 10 in a 59-48 setback against Andrew last Thursday.     On Friday, the Lady Astros dropped a 53-19 decision to Minooka and on Saturday were edged by Plainfield South 47-43. Abby Newsome led Shepard with eight points on Friday, and Dalton tallied 12 points on Saturday. Chicago Christian     The Lady Knights split a pair of games at this past week’s Lisle Tournament — Losing to Coal City 54-43 last Thursday and defeating Mt. Assisi 50-44 on Friday.     Kaycee Pittman scored 19 points and Anna Persenaire (eight rebounds) added 10 to carry Chicago Christian (2-9) on Thursday. Pittman had 17 points to lead a balanced attack for Chicago Christian (3-9) on Friday. Abbie Bulthuis added 13 points for the Knights and AnicaPausma scored 10 against Mt. Assisi. Queen of Peace     The Pride dropped three games at the Hillcrest Holiday Tournament: Losing to Bolingbrook 53-3 on Thursday, Rich Central 42-23 on Thursday and Seton 49-18 on Friday. Jelyn Chua led Queen of Peace with nine points against Rich Central.

CC starts strong then Mustangs boosted by Ag School title, Larkin named tourney MVP drops two in Romeoville EP girls

By Anthony Nasella     Before Evergreen Park went 3-1 this past week on its way to capturing to the Agriculture Science School Tournament this past week, the team experienced a muchneeded confidence boost Dec. 20 in a big win over Lemont.     And to hear head Coach Bruce Scadutotell it, he said that win served as a catalyst for the Lady Mustangs success this past week.     Evergreen Park began the tournament with a 55-29 victory over Bremen on Monday and followed it up with a 55-15 win over Perspectives Math and Science on Thursday. After a 39-36 setback against the hosts on Friday, the Mustangs prevailed over Longwood 67-34 in the championship on Saturday. Nicole Parker was named the tournament MVP.     “The win against Lemont really built our confidence heading into the tournament,” Scaduto said. “We kind of came together that let us come in with a good feeling that we’ve been playing well.”     Against Bremen, Megan Pfister led the way with 11 points.

SXU (Continued from page 2) Six St. Xavier players scored on the key run, including five points by Simpson.     The Cougars sustained the momentum and extended their lead to 13 points, 67-54, with eight minutes remaining in regulation on a pair of Krieger free throws. The Bruins got no closer than six points the rest of the way as the Cougars hit crucial free throws down the stretch to ice the victory.     St. Xavier (13-2 overall) returns to action with a home game against Silver Lake College (Wis.) on at 3 p.m. Sunday.     “If you had told me would be 13-2 heading into the new year, I have would certainly settled for that,” O’Malley said. “Our two losses were to teams high in the national rankings (one NAIA Division 1 and the other NAIA Division 2). We were in the fight in those games.     “Sure I would have liked us to be undefeated, but we’ve been playing good basketball.”

    “I think we got Bremen on an off game,” Scaduto said. “We we’re hitting everything that we were throwing up. They couldn’t hit anything. We just kind of fed off of that. The girls played real well as a team.     “I was thinking that Bremen would be one of, if not the, best team in the tournament. We ended up beating them soundly, and I think the confidence just began to increase as we were playing.”     In the win over Perspectives Math and Science, Erica Carridine (14 points) and Tenesha Anderson (10 points) led the way.     “Perspectives is not a great team, but we were able to get everybody in during the first couple of games, which is always nice,” he said. Obviously, our main players — Megan Pfister and Nicoel Larkin did well     “Erica has been playing really nice defense for us. She’s like our stopper. She does real well and is the quickest player we have We managed to stop our opponents better players, and we built off of that.”     Despite the loss to Chicago Ag, where the Mustangs didn’t score

a point in the first quarter, they reached the title game due to the fact that every team in the field suffered on defeated and that they boasted the largest point margin in their victories.     “The loss to Chicago Ag was our worst game of the season,” he said. “We found ourselves behind 15-0 after the first quarter. We started to play OK in the second quarter; it took a while to get going, and we couldn’t do anything well until mostly in the second.     “The slow start basically killed us and it took us forever to catch up. We got back in the game, but it just wasn’t enough.”     In the championship game against Longwood, Larkin scored 14 points for Evergreen Park (11-7). Kortni Lewis and Jonie Nard added 11 points each for the Mustangs.     “Everyone had a loss, and we wound up in the championship,” he said. “We beat Longwood pretty good. It was another game we got everyone playing. It was actually a nice tournament as far as getting people to play.     “Whenever you can win a tournament, it’s a good thing.”

By Anthony Nasella

out of gas down the stretch in a stinging 62-36 defeat.     Behind a strong fourth quar-     “We played an awful first quarter, Chicago Christian captured ter,” Pittman said. “They came its opening game of Romeoville out and played physical, and we Tournament 51-48 victory over just backed down. We didn’t deLaSalle-Peru last Thursday. cide to play the game until the     Marcus Parker led a balanced second and third quarter, and yet offensive attack with 13 points we almost came back. for the Knights, who used a 24-17     “But you can’t play 16 minutes victory to seal the victory. of a 32-minute game and expect     “We played solid when it was to win. We also turned the ball needed,” Chicago Christian head over 20 times. We dug ourselves Coach Kevin Pittman said. “I felt too big of a deficit.” we really out played them in the first quarter, and in the second Lincoln-Way West 56 quarter I felt we gave a little bit of Chicago Christian 52 momentum back. We didn’t func-     Even though it was in a lostion real well offensively. ing effort, the Knights rebounded     “We talked about that at half- from disappointing performance time and getting better ball move- against Glenbard South to play ment and penetration — but not Lincoln-Way west very close — into trouble. I thought we did a dropping a close 56-52 decision better job of that in the third on Saturday. quarter and again in the fourth     Blaine Wright scored 16 points quarter. We had better ball move- and Marcus Parker added 13 ment and more people involved points for the Knights, which had tied the game up at 52-all in the offense.” with just eight seconds left before Glenbard South 62 Lincoln-Way West closed out the Chicago Christian 36 game with four free throws.     Falling behind 16 points af-     “I challenged my kids after the ter the first quarter of Friday’s Glenbard South game that our efgame against Glenbard South, fort was just not there,” Pittman the Knights found themselves said. “I told them I take losing to playing catchup throughout the teams when they’re better than entire contest. us and we’re playing hard. You’re     And while Chicago Christian not going to win every game, but cut the deficit to just five points to lose a game and playing with in the third quarter, the team ran no heart made me unhappy.

Astros (Continued from page 3) free throws.” Shepard 76 Little Village 50     Despite a 9 a.m. contest on the day after Christmas, Shepard was ready to compete in the opening game of the Romeoville Tournament against Little Village.     The Astros jumped to an early 18-10 first-quarter lead and built on the lead with a 15-9 second quarter. An even stronger second half led to an easy 76-50 victory on Thursday.     “We had the 9 a.m. game right after Christmas — and for having the early start, needing to be at Shepard 7:30 a.m., the drive to Photo by Jeff Vorva Romeoville, they did a really nice St. Xaiver’s Jack Krieger hits the ground after colliding with a job coming out and being ready to play,” Chiuccariello said. “I Bellvue player in the title game of the Midwest Tournament.

thought I had they good energy and focus. I was really proud of their effort.”     Shepard’s success on offense was also successful due an unselfish effort of various Astros’ players.     “The ball was moving real well,” he said. “The guys were being unselfish against the Zone. Zach Haxel helped with three baskets down low, and he gave us a lift off the bench. It was a great effort and a solid team effort for us. They played hard and together, and that’s what I ask of them every game.”

Statistics Shepard Little Village

18 15 28 15 - 76 10 9 11 20 - 50

Shepard Scoring: Darren Cohen 2, Malcolm Lawson 16, Jacob Littleton 28, Yakov Witherspoon 3, Malik Smith

    “I was happy with our performance against Lincoln-Way West. We played hard in this game. We challenged them, and I’m much happier with the way we played. We only had five turnovers.”

Statistics Chgo. Christian Glenbard South

18 12 13 9 - 52 15 16 9 17 - 56

Chicago Christian Scoring: Marcus Parker 13, Bradford Fitzpatrick 6, Blaine Wright 16, Trevor Wolterink 0, Jay Spencer 7, Tyrone Crider 0, Daylon Washington 6, Luke Boss 2 Ethan Frierson 0, Grant Van Buren 0, Nathan Leo 2. Rebounds: Fitzpatrick 11. Assists: Wright 4. Chgo. Christian LaSalle-Peru

14 6 13 24 - 51 9 11 12 17 - 48

Chicago Christian Scoring: Marcus Parker 13, Bradford Fitzpatrick 10, Blaine Wright 10, Trevor Walterink 9, Jay Spencer 8, Tyrone Crider 3, Daylon Washington 2, Luke Boss 2. Rebounds: Fitzpatrick 8. Assists: Wright 3, Fitzpatrick 3, Boss 3. Chgo. Christian Glenbard South

4 7 15 7 - 36 20 10 18 16 - 62

Chicago Christian Scoring: Marcus Parker 8, Bradford Fitzpatrick 0, Blaine Wright 4, Trevor Wolterink 5, Jay Spencer 4, Tyrone Crider 0, Daylon Washington 9, Luke Boss 0, Ethan Frierson 2, Grant Van Buren 2, Nathan Leo 2. Rebounds: Fitzpatrick 9. Assists: Wright 3. 0, Kyle Longfield 8, Nick Heidinger 4, Adebayo Ogungbemi 1, Kenny Gorski 8, Zack Haxel 6. Rebounds: Longfield 10. Assists: Longfield 6. Shepard Oswego

6 16 12 17 - 51 8 17 16 23 - 64

Shepard Scoring: Darren Cohen 5, Malcolm Lawson 6, Jacob Littleton 26, Yakov Witherspoon 8, Malik Smith 0, Kyle Longfield 0, Nick Heidinger 0, Adebayo Ogungbemi 0, Kenny Gorski 6, Zack Haxel 0. Rebounds: Heidinger 8. Assists: Heidinger 5. Shepard L-W East

15 10 21 17 - 63 7 19 20 10 - 56

Shepard Scoring: Darren Cohen 22, Malcolm Lawson 0, Jacob Littleton 7, Yakov Witherspoon 7, Malik Smith 0, Kyle Longfield 7, Nick Heidinger 2, Adebayo Ogungbemi 0, Kenny Gorski 4, Zack Haxel 6. Rebounds: Heidinger 8. Assists: Heidinger 5.


6

Section 2 Thursday, January 2, 2014 The Regional News - The Reporter

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�������� �������� ������������� ����� ���������� �������������� For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE CO. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � LORRAINE MCNEVIN A/K/A LORRAINE BRODERICK, FINTAN BRODERICK D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 037891 7848 W. 99TH STREET HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 23, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 27, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7848 W. 99TH STREET, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 Property Index No. 23-12-105-025. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-34450. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-34450 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 037891 TJSC#: 33-24092 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I581182

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL A S S O C I A T I O N � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � JOSEPH GUZOLEK, ANDREA FORTUNA A/K/A ANDREA GUZOLEK, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 021044 12537 S. MASSASOIT AVENUE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 6 0 4 6 3 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 10, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 13, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:Commonly known as 12537 S. MASSASOIT AVENUE, PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 Property Index No. 24-29-404-011. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-37989. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-10-37989 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 021044 TJSC#: 33-23122 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I577998

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����������������� For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. P l a i n t i f f , � v . � JOHN MCKEE A/K/A JOHN F. MCKEE, RUTH MCKEE A/K/A RUTH MARIE MCKEE, WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. S/B/M TO WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST, N.A. FKA WACHOVIA MORTGAGE FSB FKA WORLD SAVINGS BANK, F S B � D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 14680 11904 SOUTH 93RD AVENUE PALOS PARK, IL 6 0 4 6 4 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 7, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on February 3, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 11904 SOUTH 93RD AVENUE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-27-102-002-0000. The real estate is improved with a one story single family home with a two car detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1206369. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1206369 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 12 CH 14680 TJSC#: 33-24688 I580383

For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L P � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � EDWARD F. ANDJULIS A/K/A EDWARD FRANCIS ANDJULIS, GAIL E. ANDJULIS A/K/A GAIL ELIZABETH ANDJULIS A/K/A GAIL WALSHON D e f e n d a n t s � 11 CH 013891 10213 HIBISCUS DRIVE ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 19, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 17, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 10213 HIBISCUS DRIVE, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-09-310-013. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-11834. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-11834 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 11 CH 013891 TJSC#: 33-27083 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I580417

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST BY PURCHASE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION AS RECEIVER OF WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK FKA WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA Plaintiff, -v.MARQUETTE BANK FKA MARQUETTE NATIONAL BANK, SUCCESSOR TO TCF BANK, SUCCESSOR TO BANK OF CHICAGO GARFIELD RIDGE AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF A CERTAIN TRUST AGREEMENT, DATED THE 14TH DAY OF MAY 1977, AND KNOWN AS TRUST NUMBER 77-5-5, ORLAND GOLF VIEW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 13 CH 09361 15703 Old Orchard Ct. #2N Orland Park, IL 60462 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 28, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 29, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 15703 Old Orchard Ct. #2N, Orland Park, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-14401-034-1021. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $145,325.95. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 13 CH 09361 TJSC#: 33-24591 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I572521

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION RBS CITIZENS, N.A., P l a i n t i f f � V . � CAROLE A. MALIN A/K/A CAROLE MALIN A/K/A CAROLE ANN MALIN; RBS CITIZENS, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO CCO MORTGAGE CORP.; OAK HILLS COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION; OAK HILLS CONDOMINIUM FIVE TOWNHOUSE VILLAS, D e f e n d a n t s � 12 CH 14230 Property Address: 13495 TURTLE POND LANE PALOS HEIGHTS, IL 60463 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE C O N D O M I N I U M � Fisher and Shapiro file # 11-057425 (It is advised that interested parties consult with their own attorneys before bidding at mortgage foreclosure s a l e s . ) � PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on November 5, 2013, Kallen Realty Services, Inc., as Selling Official will at 12:30 p.m. on February 6, 2014, at 205 W. Randolph Street, Suite 1020, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real property: Commonly known as 13495 Turtle Pond Lane, Palos Heights, IL 60463 Permanent Index No.: 23-36-303-162-1081 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a dwelling. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). The judgment amount was $ 210,183.91. Sale terms for non-parties: 10% of successful bid immediately at conclusion of auction, balance by 12:30 p.m. the next business day, both by cashier's checks; and no refunds. The sale shall be subject to general real estate taxes, special taxes, special assessments, special taxes levied, and superior liens, if any. The property is offered "as is," with no express or implied warranties and without any representation as to the quality of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Prospective bidders are admonished to review the court file to verify all information and to view auction rules at w w w . k a l l e n r s . c o m . � For information: Sale Clerk, Fisher and Shapiro, Attorney # 42168, 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015, (847) 291-1717, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays only. I575057

Publisher’s Notice     All Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.     This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are herby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1 (800) 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is: 1 (800) 927-9275.

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v . � RUSSELL W. NOWAK A/K/A RUSSELL NOWAK, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 12 CH 038382 8009 VALLEY DRIVE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 2, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 16, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 8009 VALLEY DRIVE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-14-401-002-0000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-26825. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-26825 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 038382 TJSC#: 33-22578 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I578652

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, SERVICING LP P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � ADIB KITTANA; THE RIVIERA IN PALOS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF ADIB KITTANA, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; D e f e n d a n t s , � 08 CH 37727 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on February 24, 2009, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Monday, January 20, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-23-111-091-0000. Commonly known as 19 COUR VERSAILLE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 0821720. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I578317

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For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY D I V I S I O N � BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L P � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � ANNA MAREK, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY BANK, LAS FUENTES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION D e f e n d a n t s � 10 CH 039155 9101 DEL PRADO DRIVE PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 25, 2011, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 22, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9101 DEL PRADO DRIVE, PALOS HILLS, IL 60465 Property Index No. 23-10-200-058. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-21639. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-10-21639 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 10 CH 039155 TJSC#: 33-25752 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I580444

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff, v . � ELIZABETH A. MERKLE A/K/A ELIZABETH ANNE MERKLE, WEST SUBURBAN BANK, THE VILLAGE SQUARE OF ORLAND CONDOMINIUM 1 ASSOCIATION Defendants 10 CH 21458 9304 WHERRY LANE UNIT 3 ORLAND PARK, IL 6 0 4 6 2 � NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 29, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 31, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 9304 WHERRY LANE UNIT 3, ORLAND PARK, IL 60462 Property Index No. 27-15-303-010-1003. The real estate is improved with a townhouse; one car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in � AS IS� condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1004448. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1004448 Attorney Code. 91220 Case Number: 10 CH 21458 TJSC#: 33-23936 I579727

For Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK County, Illinois, County Department, Chancery Division. Marquette Bank, P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � Heartland Bank and Trust Company, Successor Trustee to Western Springs National Bank and Trust Company, not personally but as Trustee under Trust Agreement dated February 3, 2003 and known as Trust No. 3987, Lawrence J. Gesiakowski, Gail T. Gesiakowski, Non-Record Claimants and Unknown O w n e r s , � D e f e n d a n t s . � 12 CH 12873; Sheriff's No. 130982-001F. Pursuant to a Judgment made and entered by said Court in the above entitled cause, Thomas J. Dart, Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, will on February 10, 2014, at 1:00 P.M. in Room LL06 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 W. Washington Street, Chicago, IL, sell at public auction the following described premises and real estate mentioned in said Judgment:PIN: 23-27-409-021-0000.Address: 8912 W. 125th St., Palos Park, IL 60464.Improvements: Single family residence.Sale shall be under the following terms: Not less than 10% of successful and highest bid to be paid at the time of sale, and the balance to be paid in full within 24 hours after the sale, all paid to the Sheriff of Cook County by cashier's check or certified funds.Sale shall be subject to general taxes, special assessments, and any prior first mortgages.Premises will NOT be open for inspection. For information: Paul J. Richter/James L. Stephenson, Kelly, Olson, Michod, DeHaan & Richter, LLC, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 333 W. Wacker Dr., Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606, Tel. No. (312) 236-6700.This is an attempt to collect a debt pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.I579674


The Regional News - The Reporter

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This newspaper strives to monitor the classified ads it prints. However, when an ad is submitted from outThis this newspaper to monitor the classide area, strives it is often impossible sified prints.its However, whenTherean ad is for usads toits check credibility. submitted outside this area, it when is often fore, wefrom suggest caution impossible us to check its that credibility. answeringforads with offers seem too good towe be suggest true. caution when Therefore,

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nancing, business opportunities and/ more information regarding in financorFor work-at-home opportunities this ing, business opportunities and/or work-atnewspaper, we urge our readers to home opportunities this newspaper, contact the Better in Business Bureau,we urge ourWabash readers to contact the Better Busi330 N. Ave. #2006, Chicago, ness Bureau, 330 832-0500. N. Wabash Ave. #2006, IL 60611, (312) Chicago, IL 60611, (312) 832-0500.

Real Estate Property Listings For Sale

For Sale

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, I L L I N O I S � COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION MOREQUITY, INC. P l a i n t i f f , � v s . � ANDRZEJ KULIKOWSKI; RENETA KULIKOWSKI; P N C � BANK, N.A. S/I/I TO MIDAMERICA BANK, FSB; D e f e n d a n t s , � 13 CH 5764 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on October 29, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Friday, January 31, 2014, at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 23-02-209-027-0000 Commonly known as 8115 WEST 90TH STREET, HICKORY HILLS, IL 60457 The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For information: Visit our website at http://service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1300840. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I579998

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT - CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, I N C . � P l a i n t i f f , � v . � JOSEPH F. VANDERWAL, PALOS COMMONS HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION D e f e n d a n t s � 13 CH 002455 37 BROOK LANE PALOS PARK, IL 60464 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 24, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 27, 2014, at the The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive - 24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 37 BROOK LANE, PALOS PARK, IL 60464 Property Index No. 23-26-201-032. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-01781. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-13-01781 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 13 CH 002455 TJSC#: 33-24171 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I581257

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8

Section 2 Thursday, January 2, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

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Out & About

7

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond The Regional News - The Reporter

Section 2

Broaden Your Horizons This week Art classes

    • Bottle Cap Magnets — 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Jan. 8, make bottle cap magnets to take home.     • Yoga — 5 to 6 p.m. Jan. 9, 16, 23 and 30.     This free event is for teens in 7th through 12th grade.     For more information, call 5320500 or visit thebridgeteencenter. org.

Band perform at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26, at the Beverly Arts Center, 2407 W. 111th St., Chicago. The Chicago Skyliners feature contemporary arrangements of traditional big band hits. The 14-piece band is led by founding drummer Bill O’Connell and showcases the swing sounds of Count Basie, Buddy Rich, Stan Kenton, Maynard Ferguson and many more. The band also performs original material. Tickets are $20 per person, or $18 for Spirituality book club BAC members. Tickets can be     The Center’s spirituality book purchased by calling the box ofclub is meeting on Monday, Jan. fice at 773-445-3838, or online at 13, from 10 to 11:30 a.m., at 12700 www.beverlyartcenter.org. Southwest Highway, Palos Park. BAC to Host     Led by Pastoral Director Chris Hopkins, the group will discuss Bluegrass Bands Don Miquel Ruiz’s “The Four Agreements,” a book of ancient     Chicago’s Henhouse Prowlers perform at 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. Toltec wisdom.     Pre-registration is requested. 18, at the Beverly Arts Center, 2407 W. 111th St., Chicago. The Call The Center at 361-3650. Leadfoot Band opens for the Henhouse Prowlers.

    New six-week sessions of adult art classes begin this month at the Log Cabin Center for the Arts, 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park. The Log Cabins are located in the woods and feature the natural beauty of the Palos area.     Classes which begin on Wednesday, Jan. 8, include Collage with April Schabes at 9:30 a.m., Quilting with Denise Dulzo at 1 p.m., and Watercolor Level 1 with Lenox Wallace at 6:30 p.m. Beginning Thursday, Jan.9, Harry Meneghini teaches Stained Glass at 6:30 p.m. Lenox Wallace teaches a 6:30 p.m. Thursday evening Watercolor class for experienced painters, while Lois Hrejsa offers classes in Drawing at 9 a.m. and Watercolor Painting for both beginning and experienced painters at 1 p.m.. Living history     Registration is required for all at Isle a la Cache classes at the Log Cabin Center for the Arts. Call The Center at     The Isle a la Cache Brigade will 361-3650 or check the website: bring insight into what life was thecenterpalos.org. like in the Illinois Territory during the mid-18th century during a living history demonstration on The Bridge Teen Sunday, Jan. 12, from noon to 3 Center events p.m., at Isle a la Cache Museum     • The Great Romance — 7:30- in Romeoville. The event is free of 10:30 p.m. Jan. 3, The Bridge Teen charge and open to all ages. Center, 15555 S. 71st Court, Or-     The Isle a la Cache Brigade is land Park, offers pizza and music. a volunteer group that demonWooden Paddle Pizza sponsors the strates skills used in the 18thnight with music from The Great century fur trade. The Brigade Romance. consists of re-enactors who rep    • Max Dvorak — 7:30-10:30 resent voyageurs, courier du bois, p.m. Jan. 4, The Bridge Teen French women, Metis and Native Center hopes you’re ready for a Americans, potters, musket shootsweet night. Singer/Song-writer ers, cooks, seamstresses or craftsMax Dvorak will be entertaining men sharing their talents. us as we enjoy awesome samples     Demonstrations will be ongofrom Cinnabon. It’s a night you ing from noon to 3 p.m., so the won’t wanna miss! This event is public can arrive at anytime to exclusively for students in 9th- observe the demonstrations and 12th grade and is free with a talk with the Brigade about life student membership application in the wilderness. or $5 with a school ID. For more     The program is offered inside the information call (708) 532-0500 or accessible museum building or outvisit thebridgeteencenter.org. doors (weather permitting). Outdoor     • Intermediate Acoustic Guitar programs will be held on unpaved — 5-6 p.m. Jan. 7, 14 and 21, The areas with uneven ground. Bridge Teen Center wants to know     While at Isle a la Cache, visit if you already know the basics the museum devoted to the furof playing the Guitar? If you do, trade era, open from noon to 4 build on those skills by learning p.m. on Sundays. new techniques and styles.     Isle a la Cache Museum is at     • Street Fighter Tournament 501 E. 135th St. (Romeo Road), — 4:30-5:30 p.m. Jan. 7, The ½-mile east of Route 53 in RoBridge Teen Center wants you meoville. (815-886-1467) to play this fun game by choosing your character from anywhere Skyliners perform in the world, and pick your own     The Chicago Skyliners Big unique fighting style!

Upcoming

    The Henhouse Prowlers play music that’s inspired by the roots of bluegrass while creating a sound that is their own. From lightning fast picking, to sentimental ballads, the Prowlers play original material, traditional songs and contemporary covers.     Founding members of the group include Ben Wright, banjo player, Jon Goldfine, bass player, Dan Andree on the violin, and Starr Moss, acoustic guitar. Their most recent album, “Breaking Ground,” was produced by Greg Cahill, the Grammy-nominated band-leader of Special Consensus. The band will be headed to Europe in 2014 for their largest tour abroad to date.     Chicago-based bluegrass/newgrass quartet, The Leadfoot Band, was founded on almost a decade ago. Their influences range from The Band to Hank Williams, Sam Bush to Metallica, Split Lip Rayfield to Lou Reed, and everything in between. Re-After a five-year hiatus, the group came back together in 2011. The Leadfoot Band lineup includes Steve Haberichter on mandolin, Mike Vanier on acoustic guitar, Garrett ‘Geebs’ Degnan on bass, and Mike Holtz on drums.     Tickets to see the Henhouse Prowlers and The Leadfoot Band are $15 per person, or $13 for BAC members. Tickets can be purchased by calling the box office at 773-445-3838, or online at www.beverlyartcenter.org.

Top Pop Albums     1. Blame it All on My Roots: Five Decades of Influences, Garth Brooks, Pearl Records     2. Britney Jean, Britney Spears, RCA     3. A Mary Christmas, Mary J. Blige, Verve     4. Midnight Memories, One Direction, Columbia     5. Christmas, Michael Buble, Reprise     6. PTXmas, Pentatonix, Madi­ son Gate Records, Inc.     7. Wrapped in Red, Kelly Clarkson, RCA

Top Country Albums

Submitted photo

Noël Coward comedy at McAuley theatre    The Mother McAuley High School senior theatre students will present “Waiting in the Wings” on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 31 and Feb. 1.    Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at the door.    Palos Heights resident, senior Mary Kate Gorman, plays two roles in the performances, as both Zelda Renwick and Doreen.    Shown here, Gorman performs with her Theatre Seminar class in a short skit for Mercy Day earlier this year.    “Waiting in the Wings,” written by Noël Coward, premiered in Dublin in 1960. The story focuses on actress May Davenport, who believes she is the leading lady at the retirement home where she lives. Everything is going well until a woman who held comparable star status in her day, and with whom May has been estranged for years, takes up residence at the home.    For the production, McAuley and Brother Rice students not only perform in the show, they create the costumes, build the set, and produce the play.    The play is directed by Patricia Haynes with technical direction by Kyle Dunleavy. For more information, call (773) 881-6512 or visit mothermcauley.org.

Thursday, January 2, 2014

New sessions of art classes for youths start at Log Cabin     New six-week sessions of Children’s Art Classes will begin at The Log Cabin Center for the Arts on Saturday morning, Jan. 11, at 9 and 10:30 a.m., at the Log Cabin Art Center, a part of The Center, at 12700 Southwest Highway in Palos Park.     Teen pottery classes begin Monday evening, Jan. 13, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. for six weeks.     Art instructors Heather Young and Jessie Schaar teach the children to use a variety of artistic media and techniques, including drawing, painting, papermaking, papier-mâché, printmaking, pottery, and more. Children are divided into two grade-level groups: K-2nd, and 3rd- through 8th-graders. The natural areas of The Center’s farm and woods provide subject matter, inspiration and sometimes the raw materials for the classes. Heather Young also teaches the teen potters, who learn to hand build clay pieces and throw pots on the wheels.     The classes combine the worlds of art and nature, and are kept small to encourage individual selfexpression. Class fees of $72 for Children’s Art and $78 for Teen Pottery cover all supplies for each Submitted photo six-week session. Registration is required. For more information, Gabiya Mazunaite studies art at The Center’s Log Cabin Center for the Arts. call The Center at 361-3650.

Videoview by Jay Bobbin     (NOTICE: Ratings for each film begin with a ‘star’ rating — one star meaning ‘poor,’ four meaning ‘excellent’ — followed by the Motion Picture Association of America rating, and then by a family-viewing guide, the key for which appears below.)     STARTING THIS WEEK: “DON JON”: Joseph GordonLevitt (“Inception”) turns auteur as director, writer and star of this enjoyable and often frank romantic comedy, and he makes Scarlett Johansson every bit his equal in the acting department. They play opposites who become involved, each supposedly knowing exactly what’s wanted from a relationship ... and it likely goes without saying that each is in for some big surprises, meaning a big education for the womanizing Don Jon. Julianne Moore, Tony Danza and Glenne Headly also star. DVD extras: theatrical trailer; HitRECord short subjects. *** (R: AS, N, P) (Also on Bluray and On Demand)     “HELL BABY”: The title is literal in the case of this horror satire from “Reno 911!” veterans Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant. Odd things start happening to a couple (Rob Corddry, Leslie Bibb) as soon as they move into their new home, and the pregnant wife starts to exhibit the sort of behavior that calls for an exorcist. Lennon and Garant play two such priests, and ridding the house of evil spirits won’t be easy for them. Thomas Ian Black and Paul Scheer (“The League”) also are in on the humor. *** (R and unrated versions: AS, N, P, GV) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)     “WHEN CALLS THE HEART”: Shown recently on Hallmark Channel, this drama based on books by Janette Oke (“Love Comes Softly”) is yielding a new series for that cable outlet. Though she won’t be in the weekly version, Maggie Grace (“Taken,” “Lost”) plays a novice educator who’s seen in flashback as her niece (Poppy Drayton) begins her own teaching career in a similar manner, starting hers at a frontier

    1. Blame it All on My Roots: Five Decades of Influences, Garth Brooks, Pearl Records     2. Duck the Halls: A Robertson Family Christmas, The Robertsons, Capitol Nashville (Universal)     3. Days of Gold, Jake Owen, Sony Nashville/RCA     4. Crash My Party, Luke Bryan, Capitol Nashville     5. Danielle Bradbery, Danielle Bradbery, Big Machine Records     6. Golden, Lady Antebellum,     1. The Monster, Eminem, Capitol Nashville (Universal) Aftermath

Top Pop Singles

Top DVD Rentals     1. Despicable Me 2, Universal Pictures, PG     2. Man of Steel, Warner Bros., PG-13     3. Fast & Furious 6, Universal Pictures, PG-13     4. The Lone Ranger, Walt Disney Pictures, PG-13     5. Elysium, TriStar Pictures, R     6. Monsters University, Dis­ ney/Pixar, G     7. Pacific Rim, Warner Bros., PG-13     8. The Wolverine, 20th Cen­ tury Fox, PG-13

    2. Timber, Pitbull, featuring Kesha, Mr.305/Polo Grounds Music/RCA Records     3. Let Her Go, Passenger, Nettwerk Records     4. Hold On, We’re Going Home, Drake, featuring Majid Jordan     5. Counting Stars, OneRepublic, Interscope Records     6. Wake Me Up!, Avicii, Island     7. Royals, Lorde, Lava Music/ Republic Records     8. Wrecking Ball, Miley Cyrus, RCA     9. Demons, Imagine Dragons, Interscope Records     10. Say Something, A Great Big World & Christina Aguilera, Epic

school. Lori Loughlin — who will return in the series — also stars along with Stephen Amell (“Arrow”) and Jean Smart. As director and executive producer here, Michael Landon Jr. continues his father’s goal of all-family entertainment. *** (Not rated)     “PERRY MASON MOVIE COLLECTION - VOLUME 1”: In one of the most successful comebacks any television show has had yet, Raymond Burr reprised the role of the Erle Stanley Gardner-created lawyer in a series of NBC movies ... which became an ongoing franchise after the first one, the aptly titled “Perry Mason Returns,” went through the ratings roof. That drama, in which Mason steps down from a judgeship to defend his longtime ally Della Street (Barbara Hale), is included in this set along with five other mysteries. Also a regular in the stories is Hale’s son William Katt, playing the detective offspring of another longtime Mason associate, Paul Drake. *** (Not rated: AS, V)     “MEANT TO BE”: Religion is a strong theme in this drama, casting Bradley Dorsey — also the film’s producer, director and co-writer — as a young man who decides to use his suddenly commitment-free status to search for his biological mother. With gentle guidance from a hotel worker (Della Reese), he locates his mom (Erika Eleniak), who continues to feel guilt over having given him up for adoption. Dean Cain and Michael Gross (“Family Ties”) also appear. *** (Not rated: AS)     “RITUAL”: The apparent collapse of a woman’s (Lisa Marie Summerscales) marriage isn’t her biggest problem in this thriller, made under the After Dark umbrella. She barely escapes an intended kidnapping by killing her attacker, then asks her estranged husband (Dean Cates) for support ... leading them to a videotape showing a woman’s murder and setting them on the trail of the cult responsible. The film’s writerdirector, Mickey Keating, also is in the cast. ** (R: AS, P, V)     COMING SOON: “CLOSED

CIRCUIT” (Jan. 7): Attorneys and former flames (Eric Bana, Rebecca Hall) are assigned to the same terrorism case. (R: AS, P, V)     “THE FOLLOWING: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON” (Jan. 7): A former FBI agent (Kevin Bacon) tracks a familiar foe (James Purefoy) again in the Fox suspense series. (Not rated: AS, P, V)     “RUNNER RUNNER” (Jan. 7): A student (Justin Timberlake) who falls prey to an online gambling site tracks down its operator (Ben Affleck) in Costa Rica. (R: AS, P)     “THANKS FOR SHARING” (Jan. 7): A man (Mark Ruffalo) with an addiction he’s trying to overcome falls for a woman (Gwyneth Paltrow) who tries to understand it. (R: AS, P)     “ENOUGH SAID” (Jan. 14): In one of his final roles, James Gandolfini stars with Julia LouisDreyfus in this comedy about a new romance potentially thwarted by the past. (PG-13: AS, P)     “RIDDICK” (Jan. 14): The brawny antihero (Vin Diesel) is stranded on a dangerous planet where bounty hunters arrive to claim his head ... literally. (R and unrated versions: (AS, N, P, V)     FAMILY-VIEWING GUIDE KEY: AS, adult situations; N, nudity; P, profanity; V, violence; GV, particularly graphic violence.

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10 Section 2

Thursday, January 2, 2014

The Regional News - The Reporter

Out & About

Your Guide to Arts and Events in the Southwest Suburbs and Beyond

Liz Smith by Liz Smith

Submittted photos

Arctic explorer at The Center    Arctic explorer John Huston will speak on Sunday, Jan.19, following a 5:30 p.m. dinner at The Center, 12700 Southwest Highway, Palos Park.    Huston was part of the first American team to reach the North Pole unsupported. He also completed major expeditions to the South Pole and Greenland. He uses his expedition stories to talk about bringing expedition mentality (leadership, teamwork, perseverance, and optimism) to personal and professional endeavors.    Dinner costs $18 per person and requires reservations. Call The Center at 361-3650.

Variety

by Brian Lowry Petty theft: crime-oriented reality TV recycles more scripted series, movies     It’s hardly a surprise to see a reality-TV show pretty slavishly seek to replicate scripted drama, and particularly its most durable genre, the crime procedural. What’s notable, at least this month, is how brazen and sometimes lazy producers and networks have become about it.     In 2010, Jerry Bruckheimer produced a short-lived NBC drama titled “Chase,” about a fugitive-apprehension team of U.S. Marshals, spearheaded by a couple of Texans and patrolling the Southwest. TNT is now essentially remaking it on the cheap, with the reality show “Marshal Law: Texas,” centering on “the elite Gulf Coast Violent Offenders and Fugitive Task Force” and produced by ... Jerry Bruckheimer.     “Marshal Law’s” competition will include “A Crime to Re­ member,” an Investigation Dis­

covery series that premieres two weeks earlier and which makes no bones about its inspiration in revisiting crimes from the 1950s and ‘60s: Originally titled “The Bad Old Days” — and featuring main titles that conspicuously resemble the movie “Anatomy of a Murder” — the six-episode program “is Investigation Discovery’s homage to the critically acclaimed ‘Mad Men,’” ID chief Henry Schleiff explains in the press release, adding that the “high-end recreations” play out “like a period thriller.”     Well, OK, at least ID believes in borrowing from the best — and brings a refreshingly gleeful quality to the process — having also built series around concepts that from a distance look a whole lot like “The Silence of the Lambs” and “Seven.”     For viewers, this represents a form of shorthand, enabling those who consume a fair amount of movies and TV to feel as if they’ve

joined such programs in progress. That’s helpful, especially if you simply happen to stumble upon one of them.     In terms of execution, the two shows are quite different. “Marshal Law” goes for a more verite-style feel, while the glossy recreations in “Crime to Remember” are about as close to scripted as reality gets, albeit with veteran reporters who covered the actual events testifying over most of what would otherwise be dialogue.     The general idea behind each, though, continues a longstanding trend to take stories viewers were accustomed to digesting as episodic crime and made-forTV movies and transform them into smaller, less expensive bites. (Tellingly, some of ID’s series contain two crime stories within each hour, distilling the essence of a TV movie into one quarter of the time.)     “Marshal Law” will be paired

with the return of “Boston’s Finest,” another show that seeks to provide a kicking-down-doors adrenaline rush with a cinematic producing pedigree (actor Donnie Wahlberg).     Cynically, one might ask why Bruckheimer, in particular, needs to mine this genre, having claimed such a sizable patch of real estate with his scripted stable of chalk-outline dramas, led by “CSI.” Then again, he’s hardly alone in that regard, with “Law and Order” producer Dick Wolf having expanded his portfolio to currently include a crime-solving TNT reality show, “Cold Justice” - a cross between “Cold Case” and “CSI,” and certainly not to be confused with the network’s upcoming missing-persons show “APB with Troy Dunn.”     Still, unlike most of the criminal acts we see in these reality shows, as cultural transgressions go, these cases of petty theft amount to misdemeanors.

Wolfgang Puck’s Kitchen by Wolfgang Puck

Classic hash recipe makes something new and delicious from holiday leftovers 1 medium organic leek, white and some light-green parts only, trimmed, halved lengthwise, thoroughly washed, and diced, to make 2/3 cup 4 to 5 pounds cooked roast beef, ham, turkey, or corned beef, well trimmed and diced, to make 5 to 6 cups 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon chopped fresh herbs such as thyme leaves, chives, or basil Freshly ground black pepper Salt Chopped fresh chives, for garnish Tomato ketchup, optional Hot pepper sauce, optional     First, poach the eggs up to several hours ahead of time. Fill a large skillet with water 3/4 of the way up its side. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Stir in the vinegar. Bring a separate skillet of water to a boil alongside.     One at a time, break an egg into a small ramekin or cup and gently slide it into the simmering vinegar-water. Repeat with as

many eggs as will fit in the pan without overcrowding, reserving for another use any eggs whose yolks you break.     Poach the eggs for 3 to 4 minutes, until the whites are set and the yolks are done softer or harder, as you like. As the eggs are done, use a slotted spoon to immerse them in the second pan of simmering water for 1 to 2 seconds to rinse away the vinegar flavor; then, lift them out with the slotted spoon and carefully transfer to a bowl of chilled water. Cover until cooking time.     Before cooking the hash, bring a clean saucepan of water to a boil on a burner near the 1 or 2 burners you’ll be using to cook the hash. Reduce

the heat to maintain a simmer.     In 1 or 2 skillets large enough to hold all the hash ingredients comfortably, or a large wok, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the potatoes, bell pepper, onion, and leek and sauté, stirring frequently, for about 5 minutes. Add the beef, ham, turkey, or corned beef along with the thyme or other fresh herbs, and season lightly with pepper and salt to taste. Continue sautéing, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are tender and lightly browned.     Divide the hot hash among 6 heated serving plates, mounding it in the center of each. Immediately, use a slotted spoon to remove the poached eggs from the

chilled water and immerse them in the simmering water for 3 or 4 seconds to warm them up; then, drain briefly on a clean kitchen towel and carefully transfer 1 or 2 eggs to each serving, nestling them on top of the hash. Garnish with chives. Serve immediately, passing ketchup and hot sauce at the table.

Ruben Studdard — sexier, slimmer, ready to give us his ‘unconditional love’     “DAVID FOSTER says, ‘From now on, everything you do has to be sexy!’”     That’s the advice Ruben Studdard’s new producer, Mr. Foster, gave the singer.     And Ruben is taking Foster’s advice. Ruben’s latest album, “Unconditional Love,” is the most romantic and swoony of his career.     Ruben, made famous via his “American Idol” win some years back, says he always wanted to be sexier, more romantic, but “I wasn’t sure in the beginning. I felt I was being made to be something I wasn’t, or something I didn’t feel. At the time, anyway. There’s a certain manipulation involved. That’s fine, but you have to be ready for it and on the same track.”     I MET Ruben in the office of his rep, Liz Rosenberg of Madonna, Cher, Michael Buble, Stevie Nicks, etc., fame. He’s a great big guy, but he settled comfortably onto Liz’s fabled red velvet couch. (It is here that La Liz comforts, advises and generally saves the lives and careers of so many. She is the maternal spider inviting ambitious — if sometimes misguided — stars and eager hopefuls, into her super-smart web.)     Ruben is now on Verve Records, and he was appreciative when I mentioned that Verve was the home of Billie Holliday in her “autumnal” years — the best years, in my opinion. He said, “When I go to the building, I’m overwhelmed when I realize how many great singers — Ella, Stan Getz, Ben Webster — were here. It’s a kind of humbling religious experience.”     Ruben — nominated for a Grammy for 2003’s “Superstar” — says that David Foster asked him, “You know, whenever I see you in concert, when you do a romantic ballad, there’s a standing ovation. Why don’t you have an album like that?” Studdard says, “I kind of laughed and said, ‘I guess because I haven’t done that album — yet.’” Well, he’s done it now, and he heaps praise on producer Foster as “a man who knows how to produce but not overproduce. You’re never lost, only enhanced.”     Ruben is currently recording a Christmas album — to be released next Christmas. I asked him if he’s going to be sexy on it, as per David Foster’s advice? He laughed, “Well, I don’t know. How sexy can you be? — ‘have yourself a very merry Christmas, emphasis on the ‘very!’”     Ruben thinks he’s ready to fill the smokin’-hot Luther Vandross slot, just as “Beyonce stepped into the Tina Turner space and Justin Timberlake stepped into the Michael Jackson space.”     The singer is a big guy, but comfortably big. He’s tall. He has struggled with his weight, but now he says, “I work out every day, and my goal is to be fit and healthy. I don’t know if I was meant to be actually thin!” Ruben is adorably

mellow, laid-back, no-drama. “I’m basically a relaxed guy. I’m not nervous and I don’t need to be catered to. No special M-and-Ms, no rare flowers, no a---kissing. I just want to sing!”     HE’LL be at NYC’s Beacon Theatre in February and on tour with Lalah Hathaway further into the new year. Of Lalah, daughter of the iconic Donny Hathaway, Ruben says, “It’s hard to believe I’m touring with her. I worshipped the work of her dad. She has this incredible thing she does with her voice. She can do three notes at once! I know it seems crazy, but she kind of makes her voice into a vocal triad. All I know is that I told her, ‘please, don’t do the triad when I’m onstage with you. I’m just one note at a time!’”     Ruben says, “No matter where my career is, or where people perceive it to be, I just love to sing. I think music can mean so much, on so many levels. And not simply for the average listener. I believe music inspires writers and artists - painters. They hear a song, it clicks and they write or create something based on that sound. Of course, I’m sure writers and painters feel the same way about their own art — it inspires music! But, as I’m a singer, I feel my art is the most expansive and influential. Not me, Ruben Studdard, but the art of song, of music, in general. It is so life-affirming.”     SO, Madonna and her 25-yearold boyfriend of the last three years, Brahim Zaibat, have split. Well, he’s a quarter-century now. Makes a girl think.     I WAS happy to see Showtime’s “Masters of Sex” nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Television Series, Drama. But I was stunned that none of the actors nabbed a nod, especially the great Allison Janney. (There isn’t a clunker amongst the cast, but Janney stood out even from this great ensemble. And I believe we were the first to write about the effectiveness of her heartbreaking performance.) I was hoping she would be nominated, since USA Today just did a big profile on the actress.     Even more surprising, “Masters of Sex” didn’t pick up any nominations at all from The Screen Actors Guild. But once again, SAG nominated Alec Baldwin for “30 Rock.” I adore Alec, but ... let’s give somebody else a try in that slot.     I was happy to see Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto pulling in SAG nods for “The Dallas Buyers Club.”     ENDQUOTE: “He better be careful, he might get elected!” That’s what Ron Paul quipped about his son, Rand Paul, possibly running for president in 2016.     (E-mail Liz Smith at MES 3838@aol.com.)

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