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DEC 2013 #16 For girly girls in a brutal world rebeliciousmagazine.com

La Carmina

Plus: Washout Clothing • Eustratia • Scarlett Ward • blacklite Bonnie candy Valentina • Nandi Forward Photography • Black Swan Persona London Edge • And more!


COVER CREDITS Modeling & Makeup: La Carmina Photography: Melissa Rundle & Eric Bergemann First Mate: Naomi Rubin Hair Accessories: Angelica Brigade www.angelica-brigade.com Dresses: Vaute Couture www.vautecouture.com Hair Color & Style: Stephanie Hoy of Avant Garde Hair, Vancouver


#16 | DEC 2013 www.rebeliciousmagazine.com 4 Rebel Radar: Londonedge 6 Editor's Picks 10 Washout Clothing 14 Eustratia 18 Off With Their Heads 26 La Carmina 34 Abandoned Beauty 42 Evil Clown 48 Blacklite Bonnie 52 Katie Red Photography 54 Smoke And Mirrors 62 Candy Valentina & Nandi Forward Photography 70 Scarlett Ward, Jemma Dodd Photography & Amy Murray 76 Black Swan Persona 78 Abandoned

Editor & Creative director Dominique Marshall CONTACT US Email: rebeliciousmag@gmail.com Facebook: facebook.com/rebeliciousmagazine Twitter: twitter.com/rebeliciousmag INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/rebeliciousmagazine Pinterest: pinterest.com/rebeliciousmag WANT TO see your work FEATUREd IN REBELICIOUS? Read the submission guidelines on our website for more information: rebeliciousmagazine.com/submissions

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SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: In 2014 Rebelicious Magazine will be published MONTHLY! Starting from January we want to feature more of you than ever before, so submit! www.rebeliciousmagazine.com/submissions


Fashion

Rebel Radar: Londonedge

The world's number one alternative fashion trade show LondonEdge is returning for another season in february 2014, and back by popular demand will be their entertainment acme, the LondonEdge Fashion Show! After being absent for the past two seasons, the LondonEdge Fashion Show is coming back to LondonEdge and will include bigger brands and ranges than ever before. Each day two different fashion shows will take place on the centre stage, featuring brands from LondonEdge Fashion and LondonEdge Original, so attendees will no doubt be treated to an eyeful of what's to come within the alternative fashion world in the spring and summer. Renowned brands such as Hell Bunny, Voodoo Vixen, Purplish London, Iron Fist, Spin Doctor, Queen Of Darkness, Kreepsville 666, Banned Apparel, Dead Threads, Phaze and Jawbreaker will be showcasing their SS/14 collections during the LondonEdge both on and off stage, with themes focusing on nautical sailor stripes and polka dots, playful prints, punk, gothic and steampunk styles, mystical symbols, tattoo inspired designs, horror, heavily printed attire and lots more.

Jawbreaker

Banned Apparel

As well as the returning fashion show there will be an array of performers, exhibitors and more at February’s LondonEdge, so it’s definitely not something you will want to miss! LondonEdge is strictly a trade only event taking place 2nd4th February 2014 at The National Hall, Olympia, London. Register online now for your passes on their website.

Iron Fist

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londonedge.com

Kreepsville 666


Golden Steampunk X Phaze Clothing

Dead Threads

Purplish London

Bettie Page

Fashion

Hell Bunny

Queen of Darkness

Voodoo Vixen

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Editor's Picks

Classic titanium Blue Titanium Band £80.91; etsy.com/uk/ shop/ClassicTitanium

KILLSTAR CLOTHING Split Personality Hoodie £60; killstar.com

Rock 'n' Needle Ladies Three Skulls T-Shirt £25; rocknneedle.com

dolly cool Black Sugar Skull Kitty Necklace £7; dollycool.co.uk battie clothing Pentagram Leg Garter £18.50; etsy.com/uk/ shop/BattieClothing Recluse Colony Custom TMNT Vans Trainers £95; facebook. com/RecluseColony MISS FORTUNE Betty Bow Swing Dress £54.99; missfortune.co.uk *Available Mid-Dec* 6 | rebelicious magazine


THIS ISSUE'S TOP ALTERNATIVE FASHION PICKS! IRON FIST Timmy Chew Super Platform £60; ironfistclothing.com

VelvetVolcano Sparkly Snowflake Star Accessory £8.95+; etsy.com/shop/VelvetVolcano

Dolly Dripp 'True Love' Satin Bomber Jacket £97; dollydripp.com Intersecting Designs Captain America & Thor Earrings £9.41; etsy.com/ shop/IntersectingDesigns

If you run a clothing brand, create jewellery or any other accessories and want YOUR products to feature on this page in future issues, please email rebeliciousmag@gmail.com with the following information:

Little Miss Delicious Stay Sweet Beanie £12; littlemissdelicious.com

Hysteria Machine Custom Cosplay Gothic Maenad Aatyr Faun Rose Antlers Headdress £40; etsy.com/uk/ shop/HysteriaMachine

WANT TO SEE YOUR PRODUCTS FEATURE IN FUTURE EDITOR'S PICKS?

• Your company name & a short description. • A high resolution image of the product you would like featured (please refrain from sending a model image if possible) • The product name and the price • Your website where the product can be purchased • Title your email as [Your Company Name] - Editor's Picks Re-fashioned Upcycled Jeans Dress £60; re-fashioned.co.uk

You will receive a confirmation email if your product has been chosen to feature. Please ensure that you send an item that is available for purchase! rebelicious magazine | 7


Find us online & keep in touch! facebook.com/ rebeliciousmagazine

twitter.com/ rebeliciousmag

instagram: pinterest.com/ @rebeliciousmagazine rebeliciousmag

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Photographer: Luca Cassarรก Model: Miele Rancido Hair Stylist: Stefania Gilardi MUA: Stefania Giilardi Wardrobe: Shitesville clothing Uninvited guest stylegroup


Fashion

washout clothing

What is Washout Clothing all about? Washout Clothing is about self-expression and being comfortable within one’s own skin, whoever you are and however strange people think you may be you should always be yourself because that’s what makes people truly happy. I really wanted to create something that not only had alternative designs but also clearly reaches itself towards alternative people who live that kind of lifestyle. What inspires you the most when it comes to figuring out new designs? I am inspired mostly by anatomy and geometry; I love the blend of fine lines and mathematical details present in geometric images with the contrast of rough and gritty designs. I am also greatly inspired by classic gothic artwork and symbolism as well as modern avantgarde, usually bending more towards the abstract. On the other scale of things I love decay, urban decay and grunge. It’s really quite contrasting with one source of inspiration being so neat cut and the other being quite chaotic and it’s a challenge to mix the two into something. Very rewarding though once I have captured the essence of what I am trying to convey with my designs. What are your personal favourite items? My personal favourite is actually the Scarab T shirts, it was the third one I created and I feel that its symmetry is quite beautiful. It has that finely laid out appearance but yet the details are quite intense. I also very much like that I managed to work medical calipers into the design, that was actually by far the hardest aspect to design due to a desire not to create something too overbearing. However I think it turned out really well and I’m really happy with the results.

Over the past few years there has been a surge of people trying their hand at starting up their own clothing lines. What are your thoughts on this and how do you make sure that your brand stands out from the pack? I think it’s really cool that people are trying to turn their artwork into something more than just a canvas 10 | rebelicious magazine

or painting on a wall bought by a select few. The artwork also obliterates anything on the high street, which goes for almost all Indy brands I’ve seen. Personally I feel the community is quite tight knit too, there doesn’t seem to be some sort of competition between brands. Most seem to have a quite well defined niche they are targeting and that’s exactly what I’m trying to do. My designs are quite dark and aggressive without appearing too Heavy Metal or Gothic. Those kind of distinct designs are already out there and I want to do my own thing. I listen to a lot of 80’s industrial and dark electronic music as well as ambient work that often blends analog and digital together, with the analog being scratchy and messy and the digital remaining quite clean and smooth. This is probably why that contrast resonates in my work so much. I think that music has the strongest influence on my designs, more so than existing artwork, trends or other designs and I think it’s important to find that key thing that inspires you as a unique individual, away from most influences. I always felt music is something that brings out your true character and thus enables me to be more creative. It’s so much more rewarding to work it out yourself and do your own research. I find a lot of inspiration in Leonardo Da Vinci and other renaissance artists, especially in regards to anatomical study. So yes, I think that’s what makes Washout Clothing stand out.

Any tips for those wanting to get into the fashion industry? If you want to start your own independent brand, find yourself before you do anything; think about who you are and what you want to be in life and what your core values are, how are you different? Sure, we are all different and that’s what makes us the same but you can find what is missing out there in the market by searching deep inside your own psyche. Influence yourself by what gives you an emotional reaction, I find music to be the best starting point, not the disk art or how band members look but the music itself. Instrumental is what


Fashion

“Washout Clothing is about selfexpression and being comfortable within one’s own skin.”

Photography: Ravenblakh Photography facebook.com/Ravenblakhphotography Models: Emma J Black facebook.com/emmajblackuk Whiplash facebook.com/whiplashmodel rebelicious magazine | 11


Fashion Clothing is run by myself alone. They produce amazing quality prints using digital printing, which are longer lasting and far better quality than screen printing without me having to pay for such incredibly costly equipment. All of it is done to my specification just like a normal supplier, but I am not able to deliver myself and they do take a considerable cut of the profits and it requires a subscription but it’s a great way to start. There is a certain satisfaction to doing it all completely solo, and I don’t wish to compromise on product quality as that is key feedback I have received from my fanbase. They always say how amazed they are at the product quality and running my business through Spreadshirt ensures that quality. However, I do hope that when Washout Clothing becomes something bigger in a year or so that I will be able to invest in high end equipment and run it myself or with a small team. To have little black bags with stickers and personalized thank you messages in my deliveries would be a really nice touch, there are lots of little things I can’t quite do yet being such a young startup. That pretty much sums up the highs and lows for me, with everything there are pros and cons but as long as people love my work and support Washout Clothing by buying my stuff then I am as happy as can be.

drives me most, lyrics can be distracting to me but it might be different for you. Also, don’t go into it for the money or the fame, it’s not an easy ride and it takes a lot of money and effort to get a brand moving. There will be a lot of mistakes made along the way too but don’t let them hurt you; let them build you as a brand and as a person. Learn from everything that goes wrong and use that to build a more coherent plan of action. It’s business as well as art and it helps to separate the two mentally, no artist really wants to feel like a suit and tie but only the ones with a keen sense 12 | rebelicious magazine

for professionalism can truly make it, it’s your baby and there will be a lot of bumps along the way but keep going and you’ll get there eventually. Running your own business must have its high points as well as its low points? Yes, to be my own boss is very satisfying as I have control over it all. However, unless you can find the finances you do need help with starting a brand. Currently all my designs are printed and delivered through Spreadshirt, it’s great because it means I can focus on building my brand and the designs because Washout

What has been the main highlight of running Washout Clothing so far? The main highlight has definitely been delving into the underground scene; it’s crazy and amazing. I tend to keep to myself a lot as I occupy my time with designing, playing music or various other creative endeavors so I rarely get time to be part of a community on a regular basis. I have a lot of friends in that kind of world but never really jumped head first into it. Creating Washout Clothing has definitely exposed me to the alternative scene and that’s really awesome, I feel totally at home and it’s good to see that my brand reflects that too. Working closely with the models I’ve met and my regular photographer Charlotte has been really amazing, getting to know those people on a professional and personal level and seeing how each of them openly expresses themselves is a really great thing to see, I think the openness we all


Fashion shared together leads to great kindness too. People break down their barriers very fast and aren’t on the defensive and it shows they are all such good people. Having that kind of buzz around me is definitely a highlight.

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Is there anyone in the world who you would love to see wearing your clothing? If I could see anyone wearing my clothing I would have to say Trent Reznor, he never wears anything with designs or patterns and never has done and I’d love my work to be the first emblazoned across his chest. It would be a real challenge to get him to do that because he is Trent Reznor after all, but it would be really awesome and would make me super happy. Second choice would absolutely be Greg Puciato from Dillinger Escape Plan. What does the future hold for you and your brand? Onwards and upwards, I will continue to move Washout Clothing forward and keep making new designs. Every time I make a new design I am more than happy with the results and I really feel that I am growing quickly as an artist and as an Indy retailer. I already have so many designs that are lined up and waiting for release at the beginning of each month starting January and I’m really excited about that. I love creating designs and I love everything that goes into running an independent clothing brand so I will keep going and keep working hard to get my gear out there.

washoutclothing.com

WIN A BRAND NEW WASHOUT CLOTHING T-SHIRT! Click on the Rebelicious competition image over on their official facebook page, comment with 50 words or less about why you love Washout Clothing and be entered into a prize draw to win a new T-shirt due for retail release in January! Winner announced on January 1st. www.facebook.com/WashoutClothing rebelicious magazine | 13


Eustratia

Fashion

Describe Eustratia in five words? Flattering, innovative, handcrafted latex fashion. What inspires you the most when it comes to drawing up new designs? I’m inspired by a wide variety of subjects, but opposites and historical themes nearly always feature in my work. I also usually add in a couple of key details I’ve seen on the catwalk or a new feature I’ve been experimenting with. Over recent years latex has become an incredibly popular choice for both models and new fashion designers trying to break into the industry. What are your thoughts on this and how do you make sure your brand stands out from the pack? I love the fact that more people are being inspired by latex and discovering its possibilities, I think it’s wrong of designers to assume that they own it because they discovered it first. On the other hand though, as most people who have been in scene for a few years, I dislike how the 14 | rebelicious magazine

market has become saturated. I want customers to feel like they are buying something special when they purchase from Eustratia, I try to add personal and unique touches to all aspects of business and use signature pieces to promote the Eustratia look. Do you have any tips for anyone wanting to work with latex? Make sure you have a unique outlook and have identified a gap in the market. I don’t think we need any more of what’s already out there at the moment. You’ve been a part of several fashion shows this year. Have any stood out as personal favourites for you? Each of my shows are uniquely special and important to me, but this year I especially enjoyed the Manospychotisches Ballroom and Vau Vau Part II: Fashion Circus because the organization and space allowed for more creative shows that were more in keeping with the Eustratia ideology and the mood I like to create for the onlookers.

Can you tell us a bit about any new collections you’re currently working on? At the moment I’m working on the vanguard collection, which will be my first non-latex collection as well as some stand-alone showpieces. I’m also going to release a doll range in the spring including the new pieces that were seen on the catwalk at Vau Vau. What’s next for Eustratia? As I mentioned briefly in the previous question, Eustratia is looking to venture out of the world of latex. I wanted to create some more wearable pieces for more casual situations, to be worn on their own or alongside latex; an idea that I’ve been trying to promote for a while. In general I’m planning on making 2014 a year of refinement and trying to get all aspects of the business up to a professional standard.

eustratia.com


Fashion

Photographer: Richard Ayres Model: Biomechanina Wardrobe: Eustratia (latex) and Richard Ayres (headpiece) Styling and post-producting: Stacey Black

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Fashion

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Fashion

Photographer: Richard Ayres Model: Biomechanina Wardrobe: Eustratia (latex) and Richard Ayres (headpiece) Styling and post-producting: Stacey Black rebelicious magazine | 17


Off With Their Heads! Model and Styling: Tea Time Photography: Josefine JÜnsson Hair/Make Up: Katrin Unge Crown and Jewellery: Sarah Burchill Dress: Elegance 50´s www.josefinejonsson.com www.facebook.com/InsaniteaTime www.katrinunge.com

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Model and Styling: Tea Time Photography: Josefine JÜnsson Hair/Make Up: Katrin Unge Crown and Jewellery: Sarah Burchill Dress: Elegance 50´s 20 | rebelicious magazine


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Model and Styling: Tea Time Photography: Josefine JÜnsson Hair/Make Up: Katrin Unge Crown and Jewellery: Sarah Burchill Dress: Elegance 50´s www.josefinejonsson.com www.facebook.com/InsaniteaTime www.katrinunge.com

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Off With Their Heads! Model and Styling: Tea Time Photography: Josefine JÜnsson Hair/Make Up: Katrin Unge Crown and Jewellery: Sarah Burchill Dress: Elegance 50´s www.josefinejonsson.com www.facebook.com/InsaniteaTime www.katrinunge.com

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back issues of rebelicious are available to read online, on tablets, mobiles and in print!

visit rebeliciousmagazine.com


La Carmina With a love of sharing stories, exploring new cultures and food around the world, alternative fashion blogger, tv personality and author La Carmina’s every-growing body of work has helped her to establish a very passionate fanbase and career in TV hosting and journalism over recent years. We talk to her about some of her journeys so far, extreme alternative lifestyles that she has encountered, Japanese alternative street fashion and more.

Interview: Victoria Elizabeth Modeling & makeup: La Carmina Photography: Melissa Rundle & Eric Bergemann First Mate: Naomi Rubin Hair accessories: Angelica Brigade www.angelica-brigade.com Dresses: Vaute Couture www.vautecouture.com Hair color & style: Stephanie Hoy of Avant Garde Hair, Vancouver

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“I love learning firsthand about people and cultures around the globe and telling positive stories about them.” La Carmina, you have hosted and appeared in a long list of International news and media outlets, including Andrew Zimmern’s Bizarre Foods, Huffington Post Travel TV, and National Geographic. Your work in the alternative fashion scene and coverage of Asian pop culture has been seen and spread around the world. With such a busy schedule, can you catch us up on what you are up to nowadays? After all these years, I still maintain my love of sharing stories through blogging, journalism and TV. I post every few days on my La Carmina blog (www. lacarmina.com/blog/); the focus has broadened from Japanese Goth fashion to alternative subcultures and travel worldwide. I also work as a TV presenter and production coordinator for various networks; I’ve appeared on Bizarre Foods (Travel Channel), World’s Weirdest Restaurants (Food Network), Oddities (Discovery Science) and more. We just wrapped up a shoot with a German TV program about body modifications. Finally, I’m constantly on the road with my filmmaking team, Melissa Rundle and Eric Bergemann, who also shot these photos for Rebelicious. We make travel videos about alt culture worldwide including Maldives, Dubai, Belgrade and Zagreb. Your blog has been an amazing success and has featured your food and fashion adventures from one continent to the next. What drives your passion for sharing your stories? My current focus - telling personal stories of alternative culture around the world - was majorly influenced by my friend Andrew Zimmern (host of Travel Channel’s Bizarre Foods). Like him, I love learning firsthand about people and cultures around the globe and telling positive stories about them. Hopefully, this can help open 28 | rebelicious magazine

people’s minds and make them more understanding. Some of the alternative lifestyles you cover have been viewed as extreme and taboo in certain parts of the world. What trend would you consider to be extreme even for La Carmina? The more I travel, the more I realize that “extreme” and “taboo” are a matter of perception. For example, cheese is considered bizarre and inedible in some parts of the world. I try my best to be flexible and dive into the local culture without judgment. Can you tell us a little bit about bagel-heading and where it came from? Japan’s underground has wonderful creativity and imagination. Many of these expressions, such as extreme body mods, are misunderstood and misrepresented in the Western media. Bagelheads, or saline forehead inflation, is a perfect example of this. Unfortunately, media coverage has led to much misunderstanding. Many people have a false impression of how it’s done and how widespread it is - it’s certainly not a trend. Keroppy Maeda pioneered bagelheads in Japan and this niche community performs about 10 saline inflations a year. They’re a form of play, body-morphing, and individual expression. My company, La Carmina & The Pirates (http://www.lacarmina. com/pirates/), works closely with this group, and arranged four TV shows about bagelheads to date. You also have a La Carmina Youtube channel that features videos of your travels and explorations into the strange and cute. What would you say has been your favourite scene to produce? I am fortunate to travel with filmmakers who are also my dear friends, and we

always have fun on the road. With each shoot, we try to improve our videos. I especially loved presenting inside the largest mosque in Abu Dhabi, wearing a traditional black robe. I feel we were able to capture the beauty and spirituality of the place.  Tell us a little bit about what coolhunting means and your coolhunting production company, La Carmina and the Pirates? Since we kept getting TV offers, my First Mate Naomi and I began a “TV fixing” company, La Carmina & The Pirates. We’re arrangers and consultants for travel, culture and food shows filmed in Japan and worldwide. As fixers, we do local production coordination, translating and presenting for shoots. Last year we worked on shows for Food Network, Pro Sieben Germany, National Geographic, Discovery and more. We also do consulting about underground and emerging trends, which some people call coolhunting. Where do you see the cute horror of Tokyo’s alternative pop culture going? Japan’s street fashion scene never stops evolving - I am constantly amazed by the creativity of the makeup, outfit coordinates, and alt parties. It’s nice to see my friends starting to take leadership roles; my evil queen Yukiro has debuted a Goth-glam party that will shake the scene up.  Your cookbook Cute Yummy Time, which showcases the Japanese charaben style of bento, is all about making cute animals out of food. Can you share the location of your #1 charaben restaurant or shop? Can we find one in London? Even in Japan, there aren’t restaurants that exclusively serve cute bentos. However, many Tokyo chefs delight customers with dishes that are


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“Japan's street fashion scene never stops evolving - I am constantly amazed by the creativity of the makeup, outfit coordinates and alt parties.�

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decorated to match the theme of the restaurant. The Alice in Wonderland cafe does a great job, serving caterpillar sushi, Cheshire cat sundae, and Queen of Hearts pizza.  Where do you see yourself and your work in the alternative fashion and food scene going? Any new projects we can hear about? I’m very excited to be traveling to new destinations in the next months with my film team. These include countries in Asia and the Middle East. We’ll be making episodes that will appear on my site and my journalism outlets, Huffington Post AOL and Business Insider.  Is there anything else that you are just dying to talk about, or any final travel advice you would like to leave us with? I’ve tried many paths throughout my career, and found it’s important to pursue something that you are truly passionate about and consider something meaningful in a larger sense. Personally, I am motivated to do stories that encourage people to travel and think of subcultures in a positive way. I’m keen to work hard when I feel my coverage has meaning and hopefully helps open peoples’ eyes. You can always find my latest spooky-cute adventures and TV clips on my site, www.lacarmina.com - and on my social networks @lacarmina.

lacarmina.com

Interview: Victoria Elizabeth Modeling & Makeup: La Carmina Photography: Melissa Rundle & Eric Bergemann First Mate: Naomi Rubin Hair Accessories: Angelica Brigade www.angelica-brigade.com Dresses: Vaute Couture www.vautecouture.com Hair Color & Style: Stephanie Hoy of Avant Garde Hair, Vancouver

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Abandoned Beauty Photographer: Jannine Timms (Jannine T Photography) facebook.com/jannineTphotography Model: Charlotte Norris facebook.com/CharlottteModel Hair Stylist & MUA: Cherylee Caunt facebook.com/CkFacePainting Clothing: Andre Nicole andrenicole.com Assistant: Simon Blower

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Dress: Kimberley Megan Shoes: Kurt Geiger

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Abandoned Beauty

Photographer: Jannine Timms (Jannine T Photography) facebook.com/jannineTphotography Model: Charlotte Norris facebook.com/CharlottteModel Hair Stylist & MUA: Cherylee Caunt facebook.com/CkFacePainting Clothing: Andre Nicole andrenicole.com

Shoes: Jeffery Campbell Assistant: Simon Blower rebelicious magazine | 41


EVIL CLOWN Photographer: Gunther Frans Model: Riona Noire Hair Stylist & MUA: Stefanie Grootaers Clothing: Westward Bound

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Photographer: Gunther Frans Model: Riona Noire Hair Stylist & MUA: Stefanie Grootaers Clothing: Westward Bound 44 | rebelicious magazine


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EVIL CLOWN

Photographer: Gunther Frans Model: Riona Noire Hair Stylist & MUA: Stefanie Grootaers Clothing: Westward Bound

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Exposed

blacklite bonnie

When you first started out as a model, did you have any preconceptions on how the industry would be? Were there any shocks along the way for you as your career progressed? Between the ages of 16-18, I was signed to an agency where I worked under contract for a short amount of time. I was accustomed to doing photo shoots, working with hair/ makeup artists and wardrobe stylists, so I sort of had a feel for what I was doing once I began to break into the alt industry. I would have to say the only real shocker I’ve encountered while working as an alternative model is how much TFP work is expected of models, designers, and even of photographers in the industry these days. For example, a majority of the fashion shows I have done have been on a TFP basis. Even though talent showcasing is what brings the guests and money in at the door, promoters in charge of the party are working just to make enough to pay the venue and be left with a little pay at the end of the day for themselves too. I’ve learned to do this for the love of my art, not for the love of money. What are your favorite styles/themes/ concepts to shoot? My portfolio consists of a variety of themes and concepts, from pin-up to latex, to promotional designer work, to cosplay, to editorial. I like to switch it up a lot. Latex is by far my favorite to shoot, the material being so sensual and satisfying to wear, especially the colorful and bubbly kinds of outfits I’ve had the chance to model. Some of my favorite concepts to shoot are sugar skull sets, and I tend to work with Charlie Waffles Makeup Artistry. After shooting a few sugar skull sets, Charlie and I worked on a number of cosplay shoots afterwards, where I portrayed characters such as The Wicked Witch of the West from the Wizard of Oz, Queen of Hearts, Cheshire Cat, Jack and Sally 48 | rebelicious magazine


Exposed from the Nightmare Before Christmas where my boyfriend posed as the Pumpkin King, with me as Sally! Most recently I portrayed the character Queen Frostine, from the board game CandyLand, where I was surrounded by cotton candy filled ice cream cones, rock candy popsicles, and colorful marshmallows on a pink cloud made from a fluffy pink rug. Cosplay inspired shoots are really lots of fun to shoot because I get to portray characters I loved as a child. I love bringing dreams to reality, one photo shoot at a time. Are there any styles/themes that you would love to explore in the future? Yes! I would love to do a shoot under UV/black light. That is actually one of the next things on my to-do list! I recently changed my pink/black hair to neon green/black so I was waiting to undergo the color change before I made this kind of photo shoot happen. I am really psyched to see how the new colour is going to react under the black light! Modeling involves having a lot of confidence in front of the camera, but does this confidence always transfer away from the lens too? Not always. I have been modeling in print and on the runway for some time now and I still get nervous once in a while. When doing a fashion show, it can be a little nerve wracking getting hair and makeup done on time, changing into wardrobe and knowing where to walk as you are showcasing a designer’s garment. Sometimes I need to take a second to breathe once it’s time to go on and I know there is a big audience with a lot of photographers waiting to take my photo. But confidence is key and it is important to keep your head up and chin high. What have been some of your most memorable photoshoots? This is such a tricky question because each photo shoot is so memorable, each in it’s own way! I’d have to say my first most memorable shoot would be shooting the Nightmare Before Christmas concept, Jack and Sally, with Charlie Waffles Makeup Artistry and photography by CandyLust.org. Charlie had to spray my entire face and body blue, in order for me to portray the ragdoll character without the use of Photoshop. She put me in Candy’s shower and sprayed me down blue head to toe! The spray was really cold and it got everywhere! When we were finished the whole shower and was covered in a blue residue with track marks from my feet. It was a hell of a job to clean up, but the photos came out phenomenal! rebelicious magazine | 49


Exposed

“I’ve learned to do this for the love of my art, not for the love of money.”

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Exposed

My second most memorable shoot would be my first latex shoot that was also photographed by CandyLust. The wardrobe was provided by designer Bellatrixx Capella and was a light turquoise and baby pink skirt and top outfit. It was so pretty! Candy took one look at the outfit and disappeared into the depths of her studio to set up. Once we were both ready, I stepped on set to see Candy had set up a baby pink background, with a round glass table covered in synthetic cupcakes she had made, along with bright coloured glass gems all over with a hot pink and metal chair for me to pose with. The set design was so gorgeous, I almost cried out of excitement. With so many trying to break into the industry, what is your personal view on the current alternative modeling scene? The alt modeling scene is a lot of fun to be a part of and you get to meet a lot of cool people being a part of it too. It can get a little competitive at times, but what isn’t these days? The important thing is to focus on you and enjoy what you get to

do and what you are a part of at the end of every day. We are all in the industry for similar reasons, with a similar objective: to do what we love most. How has being a model affected your life so far? Being an alternative model has opened so many new doors and opportunities for me over the last 2 years. I have had the chance to meet and work with some amazing designers, and become good friends with several of them too. I’ve been given the opportunity to be a part of many awesome fashion showcases and installations at venues all around the city as well. So many new opportunities and new friendships have come my way since I broke into the industry. Being an alt model, on top of being a full time student, also makes my life that much busier too. Is there anyone that you would like to collaborate with one day? Raquel Reed, Kandy K, and Amelia Nightmare are my 3 all-time favourite models. I’ve had the chance to meet Raquel a few times at shows both her and I have been a part

of in NYC and she is sweet as pie. Sadly I have not had the opportunity to meet Amelia or Kandy yet, but would love to collaborate with one, if not all, of these girls someday. What does the future hold for you? I am currently working on my degree in college, studying to become a K-2 teacher, so teaching is definitely sometime I see happening for me in the near future. Once I am financially established, I plan on travelling out of state more and even overseas someday for collaborative works with photographers, designers and makeup artists outside of the tri-state area. I can definitely see a trip to L.A. for new collaborations happening for me sometime in the near future as well. facebook.com/Blacklitebonnie Model: BlackLite Bonnie Photography: CandyLust.org MUA: Charlie Waffles Makeup Artistry Fascinator: Divine Grotesque Designs Latex: Bellatrixx Capella rebelicious magazine | 51


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katie red

photography

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What initially got you into photography? I began modeling about 4 years ago, and found myself incredibly interested in the other side of the artistic process. In February, I knew I was going to be retiring from performing burlesque, and needed a new creative outlet. My husband got me my first DSLR camera for my birthday and I began shooting my burlesque friends. What inspires you the most when it comes to thinking of new concepts to shoot? My inspiration comes from so many places. I really like to pull influences from the past and present to incorporate them into a theme. A lot of my work has been creative collaborations with my models and creative director, Annabella Lugosi. Living in the hill country, and close to San Antonio, I am surrounded by so many inspiring locations as well. Are there any photographic styles/themes that you haven’t tried yet, but would love to have a go at in the future? I like to try anything from pinup to horror and everything in between. I am so in love with beautiful underwater shots, and hope to be able to do something like that in the future.

Can you tell us a bit about what inspired the featured photoshoot with Babara New? Barbara and I have been bouncing concepts around with each other for a while. I had mentioned to her that I wanted to do something dark, but with a little bit of a romantic feel with balloons. She was sold. I had her at ‘balloons’. Within a few days, she was at my house in the country with a basket full of gorgeous corsets and skirts. We worked together on the makeup and hair, and headed out to shoot. Angel, my dog, found her way into some of the shots, as she normally does. What have been some of your favourite experiences since becoming a photographer? Some of my favorite experiences have been being able to meet and work with new models and fellow photographers. I love learning and growing my art with the help and inspiration from so many talented people. Everyone has been incredibly supportive and open to a newbie coming into the scene. If you could do a shoot with anyone in the world, who would you pick and why them? Stevie Nicks. Hands down. I have always been her biggest fan (I know all of her fans say that). She has been a guiding inspiration in everything I do artistically,

and in life in general. She is stunning. With the photography industry becoming even more saturated as the months go by, how do you make sure that your work stands out from the pack? I just try to do my best. I love to learn, improve, and continue to grow. I try to incorporate new techniques and soak up any constructive criticism given. I don’t know if I necessarily “stand out from the pack,” as there are so many incredible photographers in San Antonio. I just try to make sure that I am happy with my final product. Finally is there anything that you would like to say to our readers? I cannot wait to continue my work with the help of the amazing people I have in my life. My team, my friends and models, my fellow photographers, my supporters and my family. I truly hope to be able to bring some more of the creative concepts I have to life. Model: Barbara New MUA and Hair Stylist: Katie Red Corset: Azrael's Accomplice Earrings: Karen White Jewelry Designs Location: Lytle, TX.

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& Mirrors Model (Right): Michaela M. Model (Left): Amy Yen Photographer: Yellow Bubbles Makeup: Spoiled Cherry rebelicious magazine | 55


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Model (Left): Michaela M. Model (Right): Amy Yen Photographer: Yellow Bubbles Makeup: Spoiled Cherry rebelicious magazine | 57


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Model (Right): Michaela M. Model (Left): Amy Yen Photographer: Yellow Bubbles Makeup: Spoiled Cherry rebelicious magazine | 59


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Smoke & Mirrors Model (Left): Michaela M. Model (Right): Amy Yen Photographer: Yellow Bubbles Makeup: Spoiled Cherry rebelicious magazine | 61


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candy valentina When you first started out as a model, did you have any preconceptions on how the industry would be? Were there any shocks along the way for you as your career progressed? When I started modelling, I was already training to be a professional performer at Reynolds Performing Arts. I knew what the performing industry was like and expected the modelling industry to be the same… I wasn’t far off. The competitiveness and heavily saturated industry works across the board for both. Performing definitely showed me the ropes. Shock wise – Yes. I have come a lot further with modelling then I ever imagined. I have met and worked with some incredible models, had the opportunity to collaborate with some amazing designers and meet some genuine people who have now become my good friends. I’m grateful for every opportunity I have been given so far. What are your favourite styles/themes/ concepts to shoot? The weirder the better, from dark fairytales, to mythology, right the way through to shooting pin up with a twist. I will literally get a concept idea in my head. Jot it down, collect inspiration images and send it over to Nandi and be like, “We are shooting this, ok?” I love creating images that stand out and work as both a piece of art and a great shot.

Are there any styles/themes that you would love to explore in the future? I get inspired by almost anything, with a long list of conceptual shoots already lined up with Nandi, and themes forever floating around in my head I don’t want to give too much away. Let’s just say one might involve a big head dress and the other might involve a circus. Conceptual shoots aside; I would like to explore working on clothing look books and brand promotion a bit more in the near future. You and Nandi Forward Photography ventured to the woods for the featured photo shoot. What was that experience like and what was the inspiration behind the shoot? The whole day was hilarious! As you can tell by the pictures I had very little on, in a forest which we didn’t think would be busy because of the strong winds we had had a couple of days before, we couldn’t of been more wrong! There were people everywhere, asking if they were in the shots and if we wanted them to move etc. I even got my leg licked by a dog. It was just a priceless day, but the shots we got were totally worth it. Working with Nandi is always a treat. We are both on the same wavelength when it comes to knowing what we want to get out of a shoot. The inspiration actually came when a shoot we already had planned for the same day was postponed because the company we wanted to collaborate with couldn’t do

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so till the New Year. We decided to shoot another concept instead because we haven’t worked with each other in a while. We had been discussing an Elvin theme for quite a long time, so we elaborated on the idea and came up with an Elvin set based on the seasons. This set is the autumnal one. We both worked hard creating the outfit for the shoot as it was too short notice to collaborate with any designers. Modelling involves having a lot of confidence in front of the camera, but does this confidence always transfer away from the lens too? I am a confident person away from the lens as I’m a performer by heart so it is in my genes. I am quite a solitary person though who does worry about the same things as everyone else. What have been some of your most memorable photoshoots? For me there has been two memorable photo shoots in particular. The Harley Davidson shoot I did back in May 2012 was my first 64 | rebelicious magazine

“My advice to new models wanting to enter the ‘alt’ industry is very importantly don’t get heavily covered in tattoos and piercings if it isn’t you. People will see right through you.” Candy Valentina conceptual shoot I ever did with Nandi. It was also my first experience of wearing a designers clothes (Boom! Boom! Baby!) and having a prop lent out for a shoot. This prop happened to be a beautiful white Harley Davidson. I feel so lucky to have been involved in this shoot and for Nandi to have found me and had faith in me that I could pull the whole concept off. These photos were the beginnings of my love for conceptual photography and are still some of my favourite images to this date. The second shoot was from a competition I won on Facebook through Moments Studios, to shoot in Catalyst Latex and have modelling advice from Ruby True. I was so excited to meet Ruby and shoot in latex, as I had never had the opportunity to do so till now. The whole

team on this shoot was so lovely, and I had a real relaxed day and got some great images to add to my portfolio. I also made a very good friend this day and I now work in the Ignition Kittens thanks to meeting Ruby. ‘Alt modelling’ has become an incredibly popular industry over the past few years. What are your views on this and what advice would you give to those wanting to enter the industry? ‘Alt modelling’ becoming popular I think is a great thing to see. The beauty of alternative modelling is that you can be, look and create images that you want without any rules to conform. My advice to new models wanting to enter the ‘alt’ industry is very importantly don’t get heavily


Exposed covered in tattoos and piercings if it isn’t you. People will see right through you. Not everyone in the ‘alt’ industry has loads of tattoos and piercings so you can still make a name for yourself without them. Before you do any shoots decide what levels of nudity you are willing to shoot up to – implied nude etc. Don’t worry if you draw the line at lingerie, you can still make it! WORK HARD. I cannot stress how important this is. If you want to make it you have to work hard at it, it doesn’t come to you. Make yourself a Model Mayhem account and approach photographers you want to work with on a TF basis (Time for. You both give up your time to create some amazing images) with any ideas and concepts you have to start building up your portfolio of work. Shoot a wide range of different styles as it gives you variety and also leaves people wondering what you are going to do next. Remember to be realistic on photographers you contact, maybe start local to you and

then go from there. Don’t be discouraged if someone says no or does not reply to your email. This industry is all about what you look like; you might not be right for what the photographer is looking for. Just suck it up and move on. There is a lot of rejection in this industry so you need to be thick skinned. All doom and gloom aside have fun with it! The more fun you have the more relaxed you look on camera. This isn’t me giving you the green flag to be unprofessional and immature, by fun I mean have a laugh in between with the photographer and don’t take it too seriously otherwise this industry will eat you alive. How has being a model affected your life so far? Being a model has allowed me to meet a lot of cool people and have a lot of awesome opportunities. I also know how to eat fire, breathe and body burn because of modelling and have a place in the troupe Ignition Kittens.

Is there anyone that you would like to collaborate with one day? I would like to work with Claire Seville at some point. I love her photography style and her shoots always look fun and well thought out. I would also love to do a conceptual shoot using some of Pearls and Swine’s amazing creations. They totally rock! What does the future hold for you? Everything I can imagine. Like Walt Disney once said, ‘if you can dream it, you can do it’… I live by this quote. Don’t set yourself any boundaries on what you can and can’t achieve. Anything is possible if you work hard enough. Over the next couple of months I will be filming a show reel and shooting promotional images to hit the performing circuit hard with my own acts. I have a lot of big plans and goals set for my career in both industries so fingers crossed all will be achieved. candyvalentina.co.uk

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nandi forward photography What initially got you into photography? I initially got into photography in my early teens. I am an artistic person; my whole family are artistic in some shape or form. Whether it’s crafts, drawing, sewing – I enjoy it. I became very interested in everything Japanese and quickly started to draw in an anime style. I wanted to become an animator, however I quickly turned to a camera, as it was easier for me to portray my concepts. I still enjoy drawing when I get the chance. My auntie is also an incredible photographer. She is a huge inspiration and every time I go to her house I STILL can’t believe she has taken these images. They are mostly of dramatic landscapes with loads of colour and depth, which is something I enjoy trying to convey in my images – but with a more conceptual edge. What inspires you the most when it comes to thinking of new concepts to shoot? I’m inspired by a lot of things – it could be an advert, magazine, an amazing location, but mainly moving image. I love Tarantino, other films such as Hugo, Kick Ass, Looper and many more in many different genres. I admire TV shows such as Game of Thrones and Boardwalk Empire. Every time I watch something that has an edgy concept or a period theme, I’m inspired. Are there any photographic styles/themes that you haven’t tried yet, but would love to have a go at in the future? I’m always thinking of different styles and concepts I can shoot – I constantly have ideas and think about how I can approach it in a different way. I’m particularly interested in the aesthetics of 1920/30’s America – I would love to photograph a range of conceptual images that represents the different aspects of this era. One thing I’m now doing, which is something I’ve always wanted to do, is a performance shoot in a location set-up. Looking for different props and ideas that I can incorporate into an extraordinary image is hard, but I’m finding that using a performer, such as Candy Valentina, grants a lot of flexibility within your limits. Making any idea that seems impossible, possible.

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Photographer: Nandi Forward Photography www.nandiphotography.co.uk Models: Candy Valentina & Emily Halliday www.candyvalentina.co.uk www.modelmayhem.com/emihalliday Hair Stylist: Make-up by Leanne make-up-by-leanne.com make-up artist: Leanne Bisson using Yaby Cosmetics make-up-by-leanne.com Clothing: Miss Fortune www.missfortune.co.uk

Skates: Rio Roller www.rioroller.com Jewellery : Dolly Cool www.dollycool.co.uk Shoot Location: Ink Bar Maidstone (Kent, UK)

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Exposed You and Candy Valentina ventured to the woods for the featured photoshoot. What was that experience like and what was the inspiration behind the shoot? The whole experience was overwhelmingly amazing. The whole thing came together so quickly, the momentum just took us with it and we managed to create something we’re both incredibly proud of. Working with Candy Valentina in the past has always been a great experience. We became friends quickly once we had worked together on our first test shoot back in early 2012. We totally get each other and therefore bounce ideas all the time. We’ve been talking about a shoot that has a fairy/elfish feel for a while. I wasn’t keen on making it too traditionally fairy like, but more of an art form, being part of nature. With this in mind we both created different parts of the outfit in hope that it would come together nicely – and boy, did it! As soon as Candy Valentina put her amazing homemade headdress on, it just all pulled together. That and coupled with the autumnal light, we were fortunate to have a rain free day and the beauty of the location. Our original location was something special but we couldn’t get to it due to all access roads being closed, so we drove for 2 hours, in a massive circle, up and down windy roads driving up private roads without realising, to find this alternative forest. We had a lot of laughs and thoroughly enjoyed this shoot. Our banter helped us plough through the cold weather - which is where I have to say; Candy Valentina dealt with the temperature like a boss and still got in trees, laid on soggy cold leaves and have big ants appearing all over her legs! What have been some of your favourite experiences since becoming a photographer? I have had so much fun whilst photographing and have a collective of favourite experiences. I think one of my top experiences has to be photographing MOON Kana for the American Gothic & Lolita Bible back in 2007, which was in itself an awesome experience but I got in trouble for photographing on a location that you had to pay to use. Whoops! We managed to find another suitable location though. I spent the whole day with her and her crew and got the opportunity to walk around Camden market with her and photograph her live performance. Another

is receiving an email from model, Legs LaRue, who is married to the drummer of GWAR, asking if I would be interested in shooting with her. Not only is this girl absolutely drop dead gorgeous, but I got to go to Bloodstock Festival, have the VIP experience and get to hang out with these amazing people on their tour bus. She gave me the chance to photograph her in some amazing outfits (hats off to her for pre-planning so far ahead!) and we had the most amazing time hanging out. I don’t think she realises how dearly I hold our shoot, it was truly perfect and rock n roll in every shape and form. Has anything strange/out of the ordinary happened during a photoshoot? I think the most surreal experience I’ve had is on my first ever shoot, which was with Sophie Roach in London’s China Town. We had a big crowd around us and one woman asked to take a portrait of us together. I went to upload my image to DeviantArt to find that on the main page was a photo, of Sophie, cropped almost identically to mine. I couldn’t believe it! It was identical. I emailed her immediately and asked for it to be taken down, she complied. Other than that, it doesn’t get much more surreal than walking around with a model dressed in some crazy outfit whilst carrying random props to our location! If you could do a shoot with anyone in the world, who would you pick and why them? That’s a really good question...I have goals and aspirations but I don’t really have a particular person I’m dying to work with. My aim is to photograph models that have something unique to give. I guess if I had to pick a name, Kat Von D. Simply because she’s stunning and a walking piece of art. She likes weird and wonderful things like myself, so I know that if put her in a crazy situation, we would get the most amazing images from it. With the photography industry becoming even more saturated as the months go by, how do you make sure that your work stands out from the pack? I stick to what’s true to me. I’ve got my signature style but I like to push the boundaries more and try different lighting techniques and editing styles. I see new

photographers emerging and instantly I think about how I can push my work to the next level so it doesn’t become dated. I live, sleep, eat and dream about photography. My 9-5 job is being a studio photographer, which means that all day every day I get to do what I’m truly passionate about. I am a firm believer that this shows in my work. As long as the passion is there, I think my work will continue to stand out. What are you thoughts on the debate about photographers ‘over-photoshopping’ models? I think that it’s not a bad thing to Photoshop your images afterwards to create an effect, I’m a firm supporter of it! But what I’m not so keen on, personally, is too much airbrushing on the face and re-shaping features where it’s just not necessary. It creates a false impression of the model and can lead to sticky situations in future bookings where the model doesn’t look a thing like her images. If you cant get it right the first time, perhaps spend more time whilst shooting and aim to get it right in camera rather than relying on editing it afterwards – as I feel that can lead to images looking ‘over-shopped’. I’ve been there myself where I’ve had negative comments about my postproduction and how ‘over shopped’ it is. I’ve toned down my airbrushing and try to pick models with good skin so I don’t have so much work to do afterwards! But people still leave comments about it being ‘too over exposed’ or ‘the colours are a bit much’. At the end of the day it’s art, therefore subjective. Finally is there anything that you would like to say to our readers? Most importantly, thank you all for the love and support! If it weren’t for you lovely readers, my work wouldn’t be where it is today. Also, no matter what, stick to what you love and believe your goals will be reached. Don’t listen to the negative, concentrate only on the positive. In this big bad world, there are a small selection of people who want to help and push others to succeed as well as themselves – take these people and treasure them as they may be the key to your success. Believe in yourself and don’t stop! facebook.com/ Nandi.Forward.Photography rebelicious magazine | 69


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Scarlett ward Model: Scarlett Ward Photography: Jemma Dodd Photography Make-up: Amy Murray

When you first started out as a model, did you have any preconceptions on how the industry would be? Were there any shocks along the way for you as your career progressed? I always knew modeling could be an incredibly competitive business, and when I first started I was worried how I’d cope in an industry that is based almost entirely on looks. However the one thing that surprised me is how supportive other female models are! I was worried there’d be so much bitchiness - and don’t get me wrong, there will always be elements of that - but I guess I’ve been lucky to have made friends with lots of girls along the way who are supportive and total babes! Something that a lot of models will tell you is that, often, the negative comments come from people who are not in the industry! I have been accused of being “improper”, “vain” and even “slutty” by people who I was once friends 70 | rebelicious magazine

with, but who clearly don’t understand the art of what modeling is about and who are unable to be happy for my success. I think this is why my friends who do modeling or photography are so supportive and lovely.

they did one shoot underwater in huge glass tanks and experimented with how hair and material flows in liquid. I’m totally afraid of deep water but it’s something I’d like to build up the courage to attempt in the future…maybe.

What are your favourite styles/themes/ concepts to shoot? I love doing pastel grunge style shoots. I’m so pleased that fashion has evolved to allow girls to dress grungy but still retain feminine features. There’s nothing cuter than a pair of bulky biker boots laced with pink flowers. I think that sums up my personality pretty accurately as well.

What have been some of your most memorable photoshoots? Probably the most memorable shoot I had was because it was so embarrassing - The shoot itself was brilliant; I was asked to smother my face and upper body in sticky chocolate sauce, but after we finished shooting I had to walk through a building full of offices half-naked and drenched in chocolate trying to find the bathroom to clean off. We forgot to bring baby wipes so I had to have a sink-bath while business women were walking in and out getting an eyeful of my body! However the pictures turned out great and that’s the main thing!

Are there any styles/themes that you would love to explore in the future? I’m addicted to America’s Next Top Model; I can sit and watch re-runs of episodes for hours because there is so much inspiration to be taken from their themes! I remember


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‘Alt modeling’ has become an incredibly popular industry over the past few years. What are your views on this and what advice would you give to those wanting to enter the industry? I think this rise in alternative modeling is wonderful - it’s all about being yourself and going against the grain, whilst still being inspired by awesome fashion trends. I’d hate to think young girls are going out getting a bunch of cheap tattoos just because they feel they have to fit in with a certain look, but at the same time the increase in alt fashion gives those of us who were previously considered the freaks, a little of the spotlight. For those aspiring to enter the industry, the best advice I’d give is to be SAFE. There are a lot of people out there who don’t deserve your trust, so always check out a photographer’s Facebook, online portfolio, email etc. If possible try to get a phone number too so you can check the person you’re

emailing is who you think they are. If I’m shooting with someone I don’t know I take a chaperone - DON’T let anyone EVER tell you this is unacceptable. A good photographer will not make a fuss about you taking safety precautions - in fact they should encourage it. How has being a model affected your life so far? The very best part is that I’ve worked with so many wonderful people that I’d now consider my friends. I guess I spend a little more money on my appearance than I did before - I’ve always taken pride in how I look, but when you’re shooting every weekend you have to make sure nails are maintained, hair is in order, legs are waxed. Nothing would ruin a picture more than chipped nail varnish but then I’m a perfectionist. As a full-time university student I also have to balance my photoshoots with studying. I love it though; as long as I’m busy I’m happy!

Is there anyone that you would like to collaborate with one day? I’ve been extremely lucky to work with some fabulous people this year, both models and photographers- but I guess my ultimate wish would be to work with Audrey Kitching. She’s absolutely my style icon and has been since she was the MySpace “scene queen” of ’09! I just want her to be my best friend. What does the future hold for you? Hopefully all good things! I’ve been working for a lot more clothing lines lately, which I really enjoy because I’m in love with fashion and I feel like it gives more of a purpose to my modeling - so keep an eye out for my face in the newest trends! facebook.com/ scarlettwardmodel rebelicious magazine | 71


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jemma dodd photography

What initially got you into photography and what are you mainly inspired by? I’ve always loved taking photographs and capturing memories, much to my family’s annoyance. I’d spend the majority of my holidays snapping away and telling everyone to get in a shot. At college I wanted to study photography but to take photography you also had to do art. I’ve always liked crafting but don’t have the patience or talent to draw, probably one of the reasons why I take photographs. It wasn’t until the summer that I was about to start Uni that I started to see photography as a career opportunity. A good friend of mine, Sarah Hassall, who is an amazing artist and at the time took a lot of photographs, inspired and encouraged me to join DeviantArt. From 72 | rebelicious magazine

then on it gave me a place to share work, which made me want to take even more photos. I had my first DSLR for my 18th birthday and then studied Media & Communication specializing in photography. Inspiration can come from so many different things; sometimes it’s just a feeling or emotion that comes over you unexpectedly. Other times it’s song lyrics, other people’s work. Creativity in the world always inspires me; it makes me want to create more myself.

Are there any photographic styles/ themes that you haven’t tried yet, but would love to have a go at in the future? There’s so much that I’d love to try, I wish I had more time and money to put into my photography work. I’d

LOVE to shoot latex, that’s definitely on my list. I want to be a lot more creative with my work rather than just shooting for clothing companies, I want to create more images that have a story or hidden message to them. Can you tell us about what inspired the featured photoshoot with Scarlett? In all honesty I think the overall shoot was inspired by Scarlett as a person herself. I’d shot with Scarlett before and thought she was absolutely lovely. She’s got the cute, girly girl-ness going on, but also that edge to her and I really wanted to capture that whilst making it more of a fashion shoot. I wanted to capture the innocence in Scarlett and make the most of her pale pink hair, whilst still showing that attitude. What have been some of your favourite experiences since becoming a photographer? I’ve had so many good experiences and most of those come from the amazing people I’ve been lucky enough to work with. Shooting some of my favourite bands and even getting to interview them in some cases will continue to be a highlight.


Working at Kerrang! Radio and getting to shoot some of the Live@Kerrang sessions had its awesome moments too. I once had some photographs featured in Topshop Birmingham on behalf of Frock On Vintage, which I’m always very grateful to have had the opportunity to do. I think overall my favourite experiences are the photoshoots themselves, every shoot is different, but it’s the team you’re working with that makes it fun and worthwhile.

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If you could do a shoot with anyone in the world, who would you pick and why them? Avril Lavigne. I am a HUGE fan of Avril Lavigne. I once shot her show in London but was that far away from the stage I didn’t get any usable photos. I’d love to shoot another show, but even more I’d love to do a fashion shoot with her! With the photography industry becoming even more saturated as the months go by, how do you make sure that your work stands out from the pack? All the time I see certain editing styles and particular themes trending and think maybe if I do that people will like my work more. But then I’m reminded that the people that do work with me work with me for my style. Rather than attempting to follow the crowd, I try to let my creativity take control to produce something that I feel reflects my own style. Finally is there anything that you would like to say to our readers? Thank you so much for taking the time to read this interview it means a lot! If anyone would like to work with me please get in touch! And a massive thank you to Rebelicious for this feature, it’s amazing to be featured in such an awesome magazine!! jemmadoddphotography.com

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amy murray

(make-up artist)

Model: Scarlett Ward Photography: Jemma Dodd Photography Make-up: Amy Murray 74 | rebelicious magazine


Exposed What inspired you to become a make-up artist? When I was younger I always knew I wanted to work in the film and theatre industry. It wasn’t until I got older that I noticed the make-up side of the industry and what make-up and prosthetics can actually do, how they can completely change the way a person looks. I then started looking further into make-up looks and into the fashion side of it; I started reading all the fashion magazines and trying out on myself and knew this was what I wanted to do. What looks/styles do you enjoy creating the most? I love all aspects of make-up but I especially love creating bold Avant-garde style make-up. Taking a theme and using all different materials and colours to create a look, using bright bold colours, body paints and glitters. I also love doing simple beauty make-up, using natural colours to enhance someone’s features. Are there any looks that you would like to explore more in your future work? I would love to be able to explore more of the prosthetics and special effects side of make-up to incorporate into some photoshoots. Can you tell us a bit about the thought process behind the make-up done for Scarlett in the featured photoshoot? Jemma had sent me pictures of Scarlett before hand and she said she wanted her make-up to really stand out. So looking at Scarlett’s gorgeous pale pink hair and pale skin I knew I wanted the make-up to be bold and dark. We wanted it to look gothic but with innocence to it. What would be your top tips for anyone wanting to become a make-up artist? Practice as much as you can on yourself or on friends and family! Get in contact with local photographers and models and try to organize your own photoshoots, this will help you get some good images for your portfolio which is key to getting work. Also get in contact with local make-up artists and try to assist them; its great experience and can help you meet some good contacts. If you could be the make-up artist for anyone in the world, who would it be? I would probably say Lady Gaga or Rihanna, as their make-up always looks so creative and stands out from the crowd. My dream is to work in the film industry so to work for someone like Tim Burton on one of his films would be amazing. amymurrayhairandmake-up.co.uk

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black swan persona What inspired you to become a model? I was getting frustrated with the monotony of the working world and needed an outlet to let me escape and also explore my creative side. I wasn’t sure what to do. Then, a photographer approached me at a friend’s party and asked if I wanted to shoot. I definitely didn’t consider myself model material and was afraid I would be really awkward, but it felt so natural to me when I started shooting. When I was younger, I did ballet for many years, and I found there were many ties with modeling: the costumes, the expressions. It was the outlet I had been looking for. What are your favourite styles/themes/ concepts to shoot? I have pretty diverse tastes when it comes to shooting, but there are certain styles I return to again and again. Gothic style is probably my favourite, whether classic or modern ‘goth.’ It’s lovely to explore my darker, moodier side. In my everyday life, that’s the style of clothing I wear most. I love the simplicity and innocence of 1950s pinup too where I get to be softer and more traditionally ‘feminine’ in vintage clothing. I also really like getting creative with alt girl styling as it’s bold, sexy and expresses a more edgy femininity. I really enjoy the fashion of subcultures like Steampunk, which is absolutely beautiful. It’s good to keep an open mind as all styles have something to offer. Are there any styles/themes that you would love to explore in the future? I would love to do a shoot inspired by the paintings of the pre-Raphaelites. Elizabeth Siddal, the red-haired model for Ophelia and many other famous paintings, had such powerful, sensuous expressions with her face and body. She

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is one of my favourite models. Also, I have never modeled latex before and it’s something I would love to try. There are so many amazing latex companies out there right now! What have been some of your most memorable photoshoots? I did a photoshoot for an Irish company called Perk-Up Vintage Clothing and one of my shots ended up in British Vogue. That was probably my most memorable shoot ever! Aside from that, I was lucky enough to shoot with some incredible people in Los Angeles during my trips there. Ama Lea is a fantastic pinup and alternative photographer. SH Photography was another fantastic collaboration. These guys regularly shoot with the likes of Mosh, Sabina Kelley, and Ulorin Vex who are amazing models I really look up to. With so many trying to break into the industry, what is your personal view on the current alternative modeling scene? The scene is jam-packed with alternative models and aspiring models trying to get a foot in the door. Social media means that everyone who wants to give it a try is able to. It’s fantastic that the opportunity is open to so many girls and that the scene is not as exclusive as the fashion industry. However I do think that the excessive number of people calling themselves models has lead to many people not taking the industry seriously. I see negative comments about it on the internet on a daily basis unfortunately. But, at the end of the day, there are some absolutely fantastic new models coming to the fore and they really do deserve to succeed. How has being a model affected your life so far? It has given me so much self confidence, a sense of achievement, and

also a thicker skin. When you become a model, you are given a platform to be the object of praise, and also negativity. You have to take the rough with the smooth. I definitely wouldn’t change it. Is there anyone that you would like to collaborate with one day? In my wildest dreams, I would love to have my makeup done by Alex Box. I was lucky enough to meet her when I modeled for the Illamasqua Distinction in Makeup Artistry Awards at BAFTA in September. She was absolutely amazing. Another crazy dream would be to model alongside Allison Harvard. She has such an ethereal look and beautiful expression. I would be too scared to stand beside her in a picture in case I looked like a potato. She’s unreal. What does the future hold for you? I hope to do as much modeling as I can as it is truly my passion. When my time is through and I’m beyond being on camera, I hope to start my own magazine so I can help the next generation of alternative models reach their goals. Model/MUAH: Black Swan Persona Photographer: Retro Dolly Photography Facebook.com/ BlackSwanPersonaModel

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Model: Sierra Salem www.facebook.com/sierrasalemxo Photographer/Stylist: RenĂŠe Laurin www.reneelaurin.com rebelicious magazine | 79


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Model: Sierra Salem www.facebook.com/sierrasalemxo Photographer/Stylist: RenĂŠe Laurin www.reneelaurin.com

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Model: Sierra Salem www.facebook.com/sierrasalemxo Photographer/Stylist: RenĂŠe Laurin www.reneelaurin.com rebelicious magazine | 83


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Photographer: Ebony Holden Photography Models: Rudigo & Lotti Bella Clothing: Kiku Boutique Hair: Jessica White Hair Artist MUA: Bambii Riiot

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Photographer: Ebony Holden Photography Models: Rudigo & Lotti Bella Clothing: Kiku Boutique Hair: Jessica White Hair Artist MUA: Bambii Riiot rebelicious magazine | 87


Photographer: Ebony Holden Photography Models: Rudigo & Lotti Bella Clothing: Kiku Boutique Hair: Jessica White Hair Artist MUA: Bambii Riiot 88 | rebelicious magazine


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Photographer: Ebony Holden Photography Models: Rudigo & Lotti Bella Clothing: Kiku Boutique Hair: Jessica White Hair Artist MUA: Bambii Riiot

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Rebelicious Magazine Issue 16