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Celebrating

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100 YEARS OF ROTC | 1916-2016

F R I E N D S

CALLI MCMULLEN: FIRST GMC FEMALE APPOINTED TO WEST POINT | MILITARY SCIENCE BUILDING GROUND BREAKING | JESSE NEGRI: #1 CADET IN NATION

GMC’S MILITARY 4 HERITAGE


The magazine for GMC alumni and friends

Summer 2016 Georgia Military College Office of College Relations 201 East Greene Street Milledgeville, GA 31061 Phone: (478) 445-0202 Fax: (478) 445-2867

Read The

Cadence online:

Mark Strom Senior Vice President for College Relations Executive Director for The Georgia Military College Foundation Sally Thrower Associate Vice President for College Relations Janeen Garpow Director Alumni Affairs and Communications Marissa Hughes Director Planning and Administration Denise Wansley Business Manager - GMC Foundation Ravonda Bargeron Communications Officer Jennifer Jones Alumni Affairs Officer Eric Schmidt Database Administrator Carol Vance Data Entry Specialist Becky Brown Administrative Assistant Liz McRoberts Anna Lynn Garrett Contributing Writers Dylan Stephens Contributing Photographer

The images and information contained herein are the property of Georgia Military College. Unauthorized use of this material for commercial or other purposes that are inconsistent with the goals and policies of Georgia Military College is prohibited.

F E A T U R E S

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Calli McMullen

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Heather Jantsch

First GMC Female to Attend West Point GMC’s First Female Regimental Commander

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Tom Nelson: GMC’s Cadet Program

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Jesse Negri: Top Military JC Cadet in Nation

Military Science Building Ground breaking

CPT Charlie Moore, MD: Alumni Spotlight COL Fred Van Horn:

Champion for Character Development


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Celebrating

100 YEARS OF ROTC | 1916-2016

Duty. Honor. Country. Since 1879, students have passed through the gates of Georgia Military College to invest in their education and ultimately, their future. Our three outstanding values have served as guides as they have gone out into the world to make a difference. An influential aspect of GMC’s history is our ROTC program, and this year we celebrate 100 years of this program changing lives at Georgia Military College. We are so grateful to the amazing men and women who have gone before us and so beautifully exemplified our core values of duty, honor and country. Throughout this upcoming year, we will take a look back at our esteemed history to celebrate our past and how it impacts the future generation of GMC students.

D E P A R T M E N T S

30 Campus News . . . . . . 35 Class Notes . . . . . . . . . . 42 Share Your News . . . . 44 Taps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . .

VISIT US ONLINE: alumni.gmc.edu


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GMC Prep Senior

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Calli McMullen Attends U.S. Service Academy rom the time Calli McMullen (HS ’16) was a high school freshman, she knew she wanted to study life sciences in college. Then, a conversation with a GMC friend added an interesting twist to her plans.

Calli explains. “A few months ago, I was talking to my friend,

Delarion Milner (HS ‘14), about my studies and he was helping me manage the stress of my senior year. Delarion was a battalion commander at GMC and is now attending the U.S. Air Force Academy, and he asked if I’d consider going to one of the academies. That wasn’t originally my plan, but I decided to explore it.” Meanwhile, General Caldwell invited Calli to GMC’s Academy Day, where she met U.S. Congressman Jody Hice (R-Ga), District 10. “We formed a relationship; then, just a few weeks later, I got a call from the track and field coach at West Point,” said Calli. “That’s when I knew this was really happening.” General Caldwell guided Calli through the rigorous academy application process and she eventually received a nomination from Congressman Hice. On January 16, Calli made GMC history by becoming the school’s first female to receive a fully qualified acceptance into any US. Service Academy.

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Brother Calvin M. McMullen, Jr. (HS’04), Calli and General Caldwell at GMC’s graduation in May.


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Calli is GMC’s first female to receive a West Point appointment.

U.S. Congressman Jody Hice (R-Ga), District 10 (left) and Calli’s mother, Rebecca McMullen (right) look on as Calli signs her certificate with the U.S. Military Academy.

Cali has danced for about 16 years, beginning as a preschooler in The Nutcracker. SUMMER 2016

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AN IMPRESSIVE JOURNEY In addition to her outstanding academic record and role as battalion commander, Calli can run like the wind. But it was photography that initially led her to the track. “I was on the yearbook committee my freshman year and went to the track to take some pictures. The track coach knew I was a dancer and could jump, so I was recruited to be a high jumper.” Once the coach discovered Calli’s gift of speed, her camera took a back seat. During her time at GMC, Calli has earned 15 state championships, including the 400-meter dash, the 4x4 relay, the 4x1 relay, the high jump, and team high point scorer. In addition, the girls’ track team, coached by Steven Simpson, Andre Warthen and Shawn Dennis, won the state championship meet two years in a row. Calli is probably the most decorated female track athlete in GMC’s history. When she’s not running, studying, or commanding her fellow cadets, Calli is making plans to pursue a career in the medical field, possibly oral surgery. In the meantime, she’s grateful to her parents, Calvin and Rebecca, as well as her teachers, coaches, General Caldwell, Delarion, Congressman Hice and all who’ve helped her on this path. “I couldn’t have made it here without them,” she says. “As I begin this next step, I know it’ll be a difficult journey. But I look forward to knowing what it means to follow before I lead.”

Calli speaks at graduation as GMC’s valedictorian for the class of 2016.

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For Alumna Heather Jantsch, the Sky is the Limit As a teenager, Heather Jantsch handling visitor and event protocol, (formerly Stacey) knew she wanted to followed by another year-long join the military, but didn’t quite know deployment to Afghanistan. how she should go about it. Back in the States, Heather “I grew up in Kathleen, Georgia, attended Captain’s Career Course in about 10 miles from GMC Warner South Carolina before transferring Robins. I applied to that campus to Joint Base Lewis-McChord in because I wasn’t sure I could afford to Washington state. There, she was the live away from home,” she explains. Battalion S1 (personnel officer) for officers in their Chemical Corps at Fort Carson, “But my application somehow got the Group Support Battalion, part Colorado, so they assigned Heather to a four-year routed to Milledgeville and I was offered a full of the First Special Forces Group Airborne. Once stint there, with the promise of a Military ROTC scholarship.” Fortunately, it was a detour again, Heather was responsible for personnel Intelligence post to follow. The assignment was that would set Heather on the path to an readiness, this time for the Green Berets. And once known for its lackluster job duties and little impressive military career. again, she was quickly ready for more. opportunity for advancement. But true to form, Soon, Heather encountered another unexpect“I was interested in being promoted to the Heather took it and ran. ed fork in the road. In 2006, the commandant of Company Commander, but it’s not a position “I was responsible for brigade readiness, which cadets, and then president of the college, General typically afforded to someone with my backgave me the chance to learn about everything from Boylan, asked her to become the Regimental ground,” she says. “I spoke to my commanding equipment to training to healthcare, ” she says. “I Commander, responsible for directing the school’s officer about it and he basically advised me to stay loved getting to know the subject matter experts entire corps of cadets. Not only was it a big the course, and to become a Jump Master.” and seeing how the Army works from a big picture responsibility, Heather would become the first A Jump Master is an expert paratrooper in an perspective.” That’s when she discovered her female to fill the role. The decision was a big one. Airborne unit who trains others on techniques for passion for human resources and opted to leave “I’d always considered myself more of a follower jumping from airplanes. Never one to shy away Military Intelligence behind. than a leader. But I took the position and from a challenge, Heather went back to school and During her five years at Fort Carson, Heather something just clicked. As the Regimental successfully earned her Jump Master certification. deployed for a year to Afghanistan, where she was Commander, I was put in a situation that made me This May, Heather became the Army’s first in charge of protocol for her brigade. Next came a uncomfortable, but I was surrounded by support female to command the 1st Special Forces Group, promotion to Captain, a transfer to a Garrison unit from the school and the cadets,” she says. “I quickly Group Support Battalion, Headquarters & found I really enjoyed Headquarters Detachment making decisions and at Fort Lewis. “There are a leading others.” lot of ‘female firsts’ After graduating from happening in the military GMC and commissionright now,” she says. “I’m ing as a Second Lieutenhonored to have played a ant, Heather earned a tiny part and hopefully set bachelor’s degree in an example for others.” political science with an What’s next on Heather’s emphasis on international radar? Ideally, a promotion affairs in 2008 from North to Major and more Army Georgia College and school, then an assignment State University. Based on to an Airborne unit in Italy. her impressive academic That’s a long way from and leadership record, she Milledgeville, but proof landed her first choice positive that from GMC, service assignment: you really can start here and Military Intelligence. But go anywhere. once again, her future took an unexpected turn. The Army needed Heather Jantsch assuming command of 1st Special Forces Group, Group Support Battalion, Headquarters & Headquarters Detachment at Fort Lewis.

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COL Tom Nelson

Raises the Bar for GMC’s Cadet Program In just two years, COL Tom Nelson has left an indelible mark on GMC’s Military Science program. As the program’s director and professor of military science, COL Nelson has helped bring a renewed commitment to the school’s Early Commissioning Program through expanded recruitment, enriched training and increased program awareness. In June, he deployed to Afghanistan to serve as the Afghan National Defense Security Forces Operations Director. During his deployment, the Nelson family – wife Michelle and their

as a military science instructor, he was delighted to stay close to

three children, Catherine, Emma, who attends GMC Prep, and Miles,

daughter, Katie, a student at Georgia Tech. “When I visited GMC and

will continue to call Milledgeville home. Meanwhile, GMC will contin-

got a firsthand feel for its mission of developing leaders of character,

ue to build on the many achievements COL Nelson has set in motion.

I quickly knew GMC was right for me,” he said. “Also, Milledgeville is

When COL Nelson learned the Army had selected him for a position

such a great little town; I knew it would be a good fit for my family.” So after a 20+ year military career – that includes deployments and recent stints as professor of military science in Minnesota and Battalion Commander at Fort Benning – Nelson agreed to lead GMC’s ROTC program. Once he’d finished his initial assessment and met the team of professionals at GMC, he knew he’d taken a position rich in opportunity. “GMC’s cadet program was built on a solid foundation, but there was definitely room for improvement and growth,” he said. “At about the same time, General Caldwell was turning his attention to the program, renewing the school’s commitment to the ROTC, so the time was right for change.” Putting his master’s degree in organizational change and psychology and his in-depth leadership experience, to work, Nelson took a closer look at program policies, procedures and organizational dynamics, identifying obstacles and opportunities. Just two years later, Nelson considers it his proudest accomplishment that, “GMC’s cadets can stand shoulder to shoulder with members of any of the 275 ROTC programs in the country, most of which are at four-year schools,” he said. “GMC has invested in providing the right environment and the right amount of caring and cultivation, to develop quality cadets and attract high caliber candidates. Now we’re getting the local

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and national attention a program of this level deserves.”

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THE ROADMAP FOR SUCCESS It wasn’t so very long ago that few people knew about GMC’s Early Commissioning Program. How did Nelson take the program come so far so fast? By focusing on three areas: Recruitment. Nelson made recruiting his top priority, adding recruiters, traveling to high schools across the state and raising the bar on the selection process. Today, candidates’ SAT scores are up significantly, but academics isn’t the only measure of a well-qualified applicant. “We’re looking at the whole student, paying attention to extracurricular activities, athletics and leadership roles, as well as academics,” he said. “We’re also looking for students with exemplary communications skills, fitness to serve, work ethic – a range of

Lt. Gen. Caldwell and Col. Nelson

attributes that tell us the candidates we choose are among the best.” Development. Going beyond GMC’s walls, Nelson carefully

“Cadets are the heart of GMC, the nucleus of our school. COL

chose a number of events to hone the cadets’ skills, broaden their

Nelson has done a tremendous job of taking our Corps of Cadets to

military learning, advance their teamwork goals and expand the pro-

a higher level and we owe him a debt of gratitude,” said Lieutenant

gram’s national exposure. The group traveled to Washington, D.C.,

General William B. Caldwell IV, GMC president. “As we celebrate the

for the Army 10-miler competition, as well as a tour of the nation’s

100th anniversary of the ROTC, we also look to the future, committing

capital and personal meetings with military leaders. Other events

to another century of a vibrant program that produces quality officers,

have included the Fort Benning Soldier’s Marathon and the Bataan

ready to respond to the call of our country, in whatever form it takes.”

Death March Marathon in White Sands, NM, plus educational visits to a number of historical military sites across the Southeast. Promotion. “Each time our cadets represent GMC in an event or our recruiters represent us in the community, or the media cover an activity, we gain visibility and build equity in our program,” said Nelson. “Every success our cadets have, whether it’s while they’re in school or after they graduate, helps elevate our reputation and attract quality candidates to the program.”

BREAKING NEW GROUND In May, as Nelson was preparing for his tour in Afghanistan, GMC was breaking ground on its new Military Science building, a state of the art facility designed to continue the momentum Nelson has built.

Duty

Lt. Gen. Caldwell, Col. Nelson and Brig. Gen. Curt Rauhut celebrate the ground breaking for the new Military Science Department building.

Honor

Country 1924 1920

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GMC Breaks Ground for new

Military Science Building On May 6, Georgia Military College officials ceremoniously broke ground for its new Military Science Department building, part of the school’s ongoing investment in its Cadets/ROTC programs.

The ceremony was well attended by GMC alumni, friends, Milledgeville Corps of Cadets and community members, including speakers state Representative Earl Ehrhart (chair of Appropriations Committee), Milledgeville Mayor Gary Thrower, Mr. Randy New, GMC Board of Trustees Chairman, and Lt.Gen. William B. Caldwell IV, GMC president. “Over the past five years, the GMC ROTC program has answered the call and met the needs of the Army by producing an average of more than 40 officers a year. During the last two years in particular, we’ve set the conditions to bring in the most talented and potentially largest class ever to our Early Commission Program. We’ve also become recognized as the strongest of the country’s five military junior colleges,” said Lt. General William B. Caldwell IV, GMC president. “Against that backdrop, we’ve broken ground on this new Military Science Building as a show of our continued dedication to enabling Cadet success and improving their infrastructure to meet the future needs of the Army.”

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Scheduled for completion in August 2017, the new 13,500 square foot, one-and-a-half-story building will house two state-of-the-art classrooms, as well as a conference room, an administrative office, three private offices, two 4- to 6-person offices, a cadet workroom, a reception area, a recruiting office and a break room for the cadre. Located at 430 S. Lincoln Street, the new building will facilitate interaction between the Military Science Department, the GMC Corps of Cadets staff and students by bringing expanded classroom and training space adjacent to cadet living quarters and program offices. The building is also close to the Oconee River Greenway, where cadets regularly carry out physical training. “As we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the ROTC, the new Military Science building is a tangible reminder of our renewed commitment to the Corps of Cadets at GMC,” said Lt. General Caldwell. “Here, our cadets will hone their leadership skills, build on their academic acumen and fortify their physical abilities to prepare them for the future.”


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About the GMC Cadet Program GMC is one of only five Army-designated junior military colleges in the U.S. that commission officers into the US Army. Comprised of about 250 cadets of the school’s over 13,000 students statewide, the Corps of Cadets live in Baugh Barracks on the Milledgeville campus and belong to one of five developmental program categories: • Early Commission Program/ROTC cadets receive their commission as 2nd Lieutenants after receiving their Associate’s degree (typical time to commission is four years).

The new building will also honor the past with a “Hall of Heroes,” featuring GMC military program alumni whose service and achievements reflect the values and benefits of a GMC education. “Ultimately, our credentials as a school rest on the success of our graduates once they leave GMC,” said COL Thomas M. Nelson, professor of Military Science, who will deploy to Afghanistan next

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• Cadets in the Georgia State Service Program are members of the Georgia Army National Guard. • Cadets in the Civic Leader Program are imbued with the same program of selfless service and commitment to the nation, along with the discipline and academic support of the other programs. • Service Academy Prep Cadets are those preparing academically for one year at GMC for acceptance into a Service Academy to continue their education and commissioning. • Cadet Athletes are members of the GMC JC Football Team. Students in the Corps of Cadets are eligible to receive varying levels of scholarship funds.

month after heading the school’s Military Science department for the past two years. “Backed by GMC’s investment in program operations, re-energized recruitment efforts and strong support for student development, our cadets are poised for success, regardless of where their life’s journey takes them.”

(L-R): Mr. Charlie Garbutt, Garbutt Construction; Mr. John Jefferson, Georgia State Financing and Investment Commission; COL Reginald Neal, Commander, 48th Brigade, Georgia National Guard; Honorable Gary Thrower, Mayor, Milledgeville; Honorable Earl Ehrhart, Georgia House of Representatives District 36; Lt. Gen. William B. Caldwell, IV, President, Georgia Military College; Mr. Randy New, Chairman, GMC Board of Trustees; COL Thomas Nelson, GMC Professor of Military Science; Mr. Dudley Rowe, Chairman, GMC Foundation; Cadet COL Kurtis (Lee) Hemrick, Regimental Commander, 137th Corps of Cadets.

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JESSE NEGRI

ANNOUNCED AS THE

TOP MILITARY JUNIOR COLLEGE CADET IN THE NATION

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veryone who has had the privilege to meet Cadet Jesse

CDT Negri was a member of the Army Ten Miler team, as well as

Negri knows that he exemplifies all of the qualities of an

the Georgia Military College Ranger Challenge Team. Additionally, he

outstanding student leader, and the U.S. Army Cadet

has achieved the Georgia Military College standard to be an Order

Command agrees. Among his many accomplishments

of Centurion and ran the Soldier Marathon at Fort Benning, GA. CDT

during his time so far at Georgia Military College, Cadet Negri was

Negri also participated in the Bataan Memorial Death March Mara-

chosen in September 2015 as the top Cadet out of all five Military

thon, the ruck march up Currahee (twice in the same day), and most

Junior Colleges in the nation by the U.S. Army Cadet Command.

recently earned the German Armed Forces Proficiency Badge at Mis-

Negri has truly excelled in all arenas of student life, ranging from academics, service and athletics. He maintained a 4.0 cumulative

Cadet Negri demonstrates a steadfast commitment to serve the

academic GPA for all five quarters as a student at Georgia Military

military, his subordinates, and the entire nation. He excelled at the

College and made the President’s List Honors each quarter.

Cadet Summer Training and also participated in Cadet Troops Leader-

“Cadet Negri is the most talented and naturally gifted Cadet leader

ship Training with the 3-1 CAV at Fort Benning. Additionally, CDT Negri

that I have encountered in three years as a professor of military science.

received the Superior Cadet Award at the annual Military Ball for his

While at GMC, he was the number one Cadet on the GMC Order of

outstanding performance.

Merit List and as Cadet Battalion Commander, he consistently

sissippi State University.

Along with the esteemed honor of being named the top Military

demonstrated a servant-leadership style which produced exceptional

Junior College Cadet, CDT Negri received a $2,500 cash scholarship.

results,” said COL Thomas M. Nelson.

Congratulations, Jesse!

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GMC PRESIDENT VISITS USMA CADETS

First GMC West Point Appointment GMC’s first appointment to West Point was for Cadet Issac Newell in 1891. Cadet Frank Shealy was the second cadet to receive an appointment to West Point in 1901. Below is the original newspaper clipping.

Lt. Gen. William B. Caldwell, IV, caught up with GMC alumni and current USMA cadets John David “J.D.” Mote (JC’15), and Logan Trust (JC’13) (above), Robert Koontz and Liam Fairbrass (below), during a recent trip to the United States Military Academy, West Point, N.Y. Watch for J.D. on the football field as #98 on the Army team.

Union Recorder - Vol. 72, Issue 16 October 15, 1901; page 2

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M I L I T A R Y

ARMY RANGER CPT CHARLIE MOORE, MD Charlie Moore (HS ’03) has never shied away from a challenge. At just 31, his CV includes a medical degree, positions as a flight surgeon and 2nd Ranger Battalion and, most recently, successful completion of Army Ranger School. What’s his proudest accomplishment? None of the above. At eight years old, Charlie Moore told his parents he wanted to be

geville. Charlie and his younger sister, Mandy, enrolled at GMC, where

in the Army. It wasn’t a passing phase. “That desire stuck with me

Charlie recalls “amazing teachers, counselors ... positive interactions,

through everything I did, every encounter, every activity, especially

principles, values ... great experiences with sports and JROTC. My

as I got into middle school and high school,” he said. “My dad was a

GMC years definitely helped me, both in the civilian and military

retired Army Ranger and I had an older cousin go through ROTC and

world. From the leadership skills I learned and developed through my

into the Army. Both inspired my own goals and dreams.”

time at GMC, and serving as the high school Battalion Commander,

When Charlie was nine, his father took a job in the engineering de-

to my time playing football on Davenport field or just hanging out with

partment at GMC and the family moved from Ft. Drum, NY to Milled-

friends ... GMC, and the values taught and upheld there, helped guide

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me towards accomplishing my goals.”

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Aviation Brigade within the Third Infantry Division, supervising inflight

With a full ROTC scholarship, Charlie earned a bachelor’s degree and medical degree from Mercer University. Mandy (GMC HS ’06)

medical care to critically ill and injured patients. The job was intense and satisfying, but the goal of attending Ranger

attended Valdosta State University, earning her master’s degree and

School was never far from Charlie’s mind. After taking a position in

pursuing a career as a teacher in McDonough, GA.

the Second Ranger Battalion in Fort Lewis, Washington, the time for

Meanwhile, Charlie was deciding how best to serve his country. “During the officer basic training course in Fort Sam Houston after my

tackling “the toughest combat course in the world,” was right. On April 1, Charlie received his Ranger tab, pinned on his left sleeve

first year of medical school, I met a lot of physicians who’d deployed.

by his father, with his mom Linda proudly looking on from the audi-

Their stories about being put into trauma situations helped me decide

ence. Then, it was back to work, overseeing the medical section and

to pursue a career in emergency medicine.”

serving as medical advisor to the battalion commander.

After finishing a three-year, combined civilian/Army emergency

With so many accomplishments already under his belt, which is his

medicine residency program at Medical College of Georgia in Au-

proudest? “It would definitely be my wife, Emily, and our kids, Henry,

gusta, Charlie was eager for action. Army Ranger School was highly

5, and Oliver, 2,” he said. “Emily has been incredibly supportive of my

appealing, but a timing problem prevented it. Instead, he worked as a

career all along. My family means the world to me and I wouldn’t be

flight surgeon at Hunter Army Airfield in Savannah in the Third Combat

where I am without them.”

Twins Jack and Edward Moore at Widener College Ranger School, 1973.

Ed pinning Ranger Tab on Charlie.

(left photo) Charlie’s family: wife Emily and sons, Henry and Oliver.

(right photo) Charlie with parents, Linda and Ed Moore.

GMC, and the values taught and upheld there, helped guide me towards accomplishing my goals. – Charlie Moore

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A L U M N I S P OT L I G HT

AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN Memorial Lt. Colonel William L. Turner, known as “Billy” to his friends, was

In July of 1942, Billy trans-

killed in action in France, the day after D-Day, while in service with the

ferred to the paratroops, and

506th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division. He

was sent to Camp Toccoa,

commanded the First Battalion of that regiment.

Ga., where he was one of

Born June 18, 1916, in Sparta, Georgia, the son of Dr. and Mrs. Den-

the first officers to report

nis T. Turner, Billy moved at an early age to Milledgeville, Ga., where

to the newly formed 506th

he grew up and attended Georgia Military College before entering the

Parachute Infantry Regi-

Military Academy.

ment, with which regiment

Billy, who was a member of F Co. at the Military Academy, was al-

he remained until his death.

ways remembered by his classmates as a Georgia boy who never lost

While with the 506th, Billy

his drawl through his years at the Point and in the Army afterwards.

was stationed at Ft. Ben-

After his graduation, Billy reported to Van De Graf Field, Alabama, for flight training. After a short while at this, he was assigned to the

ning, Camp Mackall, N.C., and Fort Bragg.

William L. Turner GMC Class of 1939

Cavalry and reported to the Fifth Cavalry at Ft. Bliss and later at Ft.

At Toccoa, Billy reported as a Captain and was assigned to the

Clark, Texas. Following this duty he was with the 10th Cavalry at Ft.

Regimental S3 Section. He approached his job with enthusiasm, but

Riley, Kansas.

with the reservation that he wanted command duty, whatever it was.

In December of 1941, Billy transferred to the Armored Force and

He was soon given the First Battalion, which he trained from then until

was sent to Pine Camp, New York, for duty with the Fourth Armored

D-Day. He qualified as a parachutist at Toccoa on a most difficult and

Division, where he remained until April, at which time he was trans-

improvised jump field.

ferred to Ft. Knox, Ky., and the Eighth Armored Division.

The Turner legacy at GMC includes: Jack Thornton, Sr. (JC’38) (married to Frances Turner)

Dennis Turner (HS’39) Rozier Turner (HS’40) Jack Thornton, Jr. (HS‘61) Martha Turner Wright (HS‘71)

Turner with his company, while at GMC.

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Billy was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his action in France, which is described in the following letter from one of his company commanders:

“We dropped in France about 1:30 a.m., on D-Day. The enemy was thick below, and they put up heavy fire at the planes and at us as we descended. I was not in the same plane with Billy, and we were separated by strong enemy action throughout the hours of darkness. Shortly after daylight I arrived at the command post, and I learned that Billy and a group of 40 men had set out to accomplish a battalion mission. They had gone to an extremely important enemy strongpoint which had to be knocked out before the seaborne troops arrived. Billy’s group and groups from other units accomplished this mission. “Bill and his group returned to the command post about 5 p.m., and the battalion was assembled as a tactical unit. The Third Battalion had not been heard from, and the Second was only partly assembled. The beach landing troops had made contact and had suffered unbelievably few casualties as a result of the action of Bill’s group and the others who went down to the beach early that morning. “At two o’clock the next morning we were ordered to attack Vierville by daylight. We moved out in forward again, where he observed the target and called for artillery fire. Each time he got in and out of the tank he was exposed to machine gun fire, because it was on the open road and he had to climb on top of the tank to get inside it. Due to his observation and direction of artillery fire, an extremely heavily defended enemy position was reduced. “While directing the artillery, he observed a wounded sergeant lying in the ditch. Billy called for Lieut. O.E. Wilson, a Georgia boy from Thomaston. Then he turned to issue instructions to the tank driver and was shot by a sniper. Death was instantaneous. “Later that day we pushed on and we saw the damage that the artillery, which he had called for and adjusted, had done. Germans, equipment, guns, horses and the debris of a once strong position were everywhere in evidence.”

The 506th left for England in August of 1943, where it remained until the invasion.

about St. Come du Mont on June 7th. The Army lost

Besides his parents, Billy is survived by his wife, the former Miss Marjorie Jack-

a young officer of the greatest promise through his

son of Little Rock, Ark., whom he married in December of 1941; a brother, Rozier

untimely death”.

Turner, a former lieutenant of the Engineer Amphibious Corps; and a sister, Mrs. John P. Thornton. One other brother, Lt. Dennis T. Turner, Jr., of the 28th Infantry Regiment was killed in France on July 12, 1944.

His Regimental Commander says of Billy: “From the day of his reporting to duty at Toccoa until his untimely death on 7 June, Bill Turner fulfilled his role

Major General Taylor, Division Commander, states:

as soldier. He trained his battalion with a singleness

“There was a striking contradiction between the slow Southern speech

of purpose, preparation for combat, with devotion and

of Colonel Turner and his brisk energy on the battle field. After observing him

conscientiousness. His stature was small, his heart

in handling his Battalion during the training period in England, I formed the

was big, his head was clear, his mind was sharp and his

opinion that he was a fine officer of upstanding character but possibly a little

courage unlimited. His battalion reflected his fighting

too gentle in his exercise of command. The latter impression changed rapidly

spirit and tenacity of purpose”.

in those critical early days in Normandy when he led his men with the utmost vigor and effectiveness until the fatal action in which he lost his life. “Although he never lost his quietness, he had the gift of doing the right thing with determination but without excitement. It was this characteristic that gained the trust and respect of subordinates and superiors alike. “It was with great sorrow that I learned of his death in the sharp fighting

In the words of an officer of Billy’s Battalion: “I never knew a person so sincere and so completely devoted to duty. He molded a battalion and won the respect and admiration of every man in it. In combat we did not let him down”.

Article reprinted with permission of the West Point Association of Graduates. Cullum No. 11656 | June 7, 1944 | Died in Vierville, Normandy

2016

2007

17


M I L I T A R Y

H E R I T A G E

2016 COMMISSIONING CEREMONY GMC’s Early Commissioning Program, one of only five such programs in the nation, is a demanding program in which cadets develop the skills necessary to be leaders in the United States Army within a period of two years.

Twenty-six GMC Junior College cadets received their commissioning into the U.S. Army as second lieutenants on May 27 in the Goldstein Center for the Performing Arts. The guest speaker was the Honorable Jody Hice, U.S. House of Representatives, District 10. During the commissioning ceremony, the cadets recited the Oath of Office, after which family members pinned on bars denoting

their new rank. Finally, the new second lieutenants were saluted for the first time by an enlisted person of their choosing. The hand salute is centuries old and probably originated when men in armor raised their hands to their helmets and lifted the visors so they could be identified. The salute has always been one of the essentials of military courtesy and is considered a symbol of

mutual respect and a sign of the camaraderie among service personnel. As a standard practice, the junior initiates the salute, and the senior returns it. In keeping with a time- honored tradition, the newly appointed officers presented a silver dollar to the first enlisted person to salute them after they received their commission.

2LT Nathan Crutchfield was honored to receive his first salute from his greatgrandfather, Chief Master Sergeant John Simpson, US Army Air Corps, who served in World War II.

Coast Guard Academy Scholars Back Row L-R: Reginald Robiskie, Kane Alleztzhauser, Colton Rausch, Eric Gimple, Dennis Koenig, Christopher Shields Front Row L-R: Sophie Kay, Jacquline Jones, Elizabeth Miller, Emma Compagnoni, Kacie-Ann Mau, Emily Conner, Morgan Corliss

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1 0 0

Y E A R S

O F

R O T C

COL Fred Van Horn SE RVANT L E ADER . CH A M PION FOR CHAR ACTER DEVELOPMENT.

From the small North Carolina mountain town where he was raised, to the jungles of Vietnam where he served his country, to the halls of GMC where he imparted invaluable life lessons, Colonel Fred Van Horn has spent his life learning and leading by example. To mark his retirement in March from Georgia Military College, we’re taking a look at what COL Van Horn brought to GMC and what he has indelibly left behind.

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M I L I T A R Y

H E R I T A G E

“You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the thing you think you cannot do.” --Eleanor Roosevelt The former First Lady in two sentences poignantly defines one of Col. Fred Van Horn’s most memorable traits as Commandant of Cadets during my tenure at Georgia Military College. Whatever the fear-whether it was leading cadets from different walks of life, preparing for an inspection, making the Dean’s List, working through conflict (of course those never occurred in the college barracks) Van Horn always had a great retort: “continue to march”. As the Cadet Regimental Commander during the 1998-1999 school year, my greatest fear was determining what I would do with my life after being denied the Army ROTC Academic Scholarship given a non-waiverable refraction in my eye sight. I had served for three years in JROTC at Griffin High School, and I made the personal decision to attend two additional years at Georgia Military College to solidify my preparation for a career in the US Army as an officer. After my first year at GMC I knew I wanted to be like Col. Fred Van Horn-to retire as a Colonel with a career of distinction. The day I returned to GMC from Robins Air Force Base with the disappointing news I went straight to Col. Van Horn’s office-tears in my eyes. As he always did, he listened intently to what I had to share, and then he said, “you’ll be great at whatever career you pursue-continue to march”. I pulled myself together and did just that as hundreds of cadets have down through the years as a result of Col. Van Horn’s mentorship, friendship, and leadership. A paragraph, nor a page of tribute does justice for all the impressive work Col. Fred Van Horn has accomplished in his career. All I can say is that Col. Van Horn is someone who I will forever respect and admire. From the 1998-1999 cadet corps we love you Col! Thanks for your service. You will be missed in retirement. Tom Wyatt, IOM Cadet Regimental Commander 1998-1999

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1 0 0 COL Van Horn has said that, for him, the essential drama of life is the drama to construct character. “On a list of first-things-first, this should always be number one. I believe character is formed in community, that each member raises the standards of excellence for the others, and we do this by setting a good example,” he says. “I believe example is the best teacher.” It’s a foundational conviction he shares with GMC. It’s also the reason our faculty, staff, students and supporters alike consider COL Van Horn a teacher of the highest order. “There are these rare times in one’s lifetime that one meets a person who possesses all of the qualities that exemplify and define a leader. In the thirty years I have known Fred Van Horn I have never known a man, a soldier, who so completely evidenced all of the qualities inherent in the Socratic ‘good,’” says Peter J. Boylan, Major General, USA(Ret) President Emeritus GMC. “His qualities of character have always been everywhere evident in his intellect, his pronouncements, and his actions. It has been one of the great good fortunes of my life to have known and served with Fred Van Horn. Our country, the US Army, and GMC have been well served by this distinguished man.”

Raising the Bar COL Fred Van Horn came to GMC in 1995, following a distinguished military career spanning more than 30 years. During his time here, he served as Commandant of Cadets, Dean of Students, Character Educator, Executive Vice President, Interim President and Special Assistant to the President for Accreditation. Most recently, COL Van Horn was recognized by GMC’s Board of Trustees as the school’s first Executive Vice President Emeritus.

Y E A R S

O F

R O T C

school’s character development program and improvement of the Corps of Cadets. To sharpen the school’s focus on character development, COL Van Horn authored a white paper, which detailed the definition of character and offered clear examples of character in action. He also established the ‘Word of the Week,’ which corresponds to a character theme and is sent out with a definition and practical applications to students and local media. Additionally, an intensive character education program was developed, with a dedicated course required for graduation, designed to help students develop critical thinking and decision making skills by examining the foundations of ethical reasoning. To strengthen the cadet program, he led the effort to establish and enforce high standards of behavior and appearance, including the dismissal of student-cadets who repeatedly demonstrated an unwillingness to follow established rules and regulations. Aroundthe-clock staff supervision and presence among the cadets was enacted to aid in this effort. Further, a recognition program was established that placed an emphasis on setting the right example. To provide cadets with ample opportunities to set those good examples and serve others, he involved them in community service projects, such as Habitat for Humanity, community clean-up projects and visits to hospitalized veterans at the Georgia War Vets Home.

Leading by Inspiration Randy New, chairman of the GMC Board of Trustees, says COL Van Horn is someone he seeks out for advice. “Anytime I have had something I needed help with, either personally, or pertaining to GMC, I would ask my wife and she’d always say, ‘You should go talk to COL Van Horn, he’s pretty level-headed.” Fred’s leadership style was the perfect complement to General Boylan’s in that if a person was ‘called on the carpet’ when General Boylan got through with them, there was steam running out of their ears. If they had to go to COL Van Horn, he talked to them for a few minutes and they’d leave and it may be an hour later before they realized ‘He just blessed me out!’ That’s how smooth Fred is.”

“Fred is an icon here at GMC. He personifies the ideals of duty, honor and country,” said Lieutenant General William B. Caldwell IV, President, GMC. “All of us at GMC have been blessed to know and have the opportunity to work with Fred. He is a true selfless servant, a tireless champion of GMC, always giving of himself for the betterment of our students.” COL Van Horn’s accomplishments are many, but two in particular mean the most to him: elevation of the

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Duty, Honor,Country Of course, any recognition of COL Van Horn wouldn’t be complete without mention of his profound sense of duty, honor and country. A lasting symbol of his love for country is the Grand Tattoo, a military tradition COL Van Horn brought to GMC 15 years ago. During the Tattoo, the ceremonial performance of military music is followed by the formal retirement of our nation’s colors to mark the end of the day. Making GMC’s tattoo especially stirring is the playing of ‘Il Silencio,’ a powerful and soulful rendition of ‘Taps.’ “Nearly everyone has a chord that, when they hear it, touches their soul. When people hear music that represents the history and spirit of our nation, like-minded people can be touched and can go away with a renewed promise to do better by their country,” he says. “Every time I hear ‘Il Silencio,’ or hear the GMC chorus sing ‘Here’s to the Heroes,’ like so many, I am inspired and energized.” Col. Fred Van Horn pins medal on cadet during the President’s Day Parade

That level-headedness is fortified by a true gift for listening. “When you speak to him, you know he’s present, fully in the moment and listening intently,” says Janeen Garpow, GMC Director of Alumni Affairs and Communications, who served under COL Van Horn’s leadership for 10 years. “COL Van Horn also instinctively knows what to say to make you feel valued and appreciated. He wants the people around him to succeed more than he wants success for himself. It’s never about him; it’s about the people and the institution – and doing what’s right.”

Continuing to March Although COL Van Horn has closed his official chapter with GMC, his continued commitment to the school remains. “General Caldwell is a brilliant and accomplished leader, whose goals are set up to bring success. Everything I would wish for the school fits into the kinds of things it continues to do under his leadership,” he says. Over the years, the history of GMC has been built brick by brick. Countless faculty and staff have toiled, mostly in anonymity, each giving time and talents to ensure the bricks continue to align and the foundation remains firm. And so it is with COL Van Horn. Thank you and God speed!

COL Patrick J. Beer, GMC Dean of Students & Commandant of Cadets has known COL Van Horn for almost 20 years and says he has led “an honorable life, lived well. He is a role model who readily carries the heavier load and is very forgiving of others’ mistakes. There are three key attributes that I associate with him: loyalty, scholar, and dynamic speaker. Fred is the most loyal person I’ve ever known—loyal to his family, his school, his president and his nation. He is a scholar with an absolutely brilliant mind—his innovative ideas have done much to advance the lives of many, many people,” says COL Beer. “However, I most remember the opportunities I had to hear him speak. He speaks with such candor and conviction that his speeches are remembered years, even decades, later. I distinctly remember the little hairs on the back of my neck standing up after some of his inspirational speeches. He is a Randy New, Tomi Van Horn, Col. Fred Van Horn, Lt. Gen. William B. Caldwell, IV and truly great man.” Dudley Rowe at the 2016 Grand Tattoo.

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G R A D U A T I O N S

Prep School

G E O R G I A M I L ITA RY C O L L E G E DEVELOP THE INTELLECT

|

ELEVATE THE CHARACTER

Prep School

G E O R G I A M I L ITA RY C O L L E G E DEVELOP THE INTELLECT

|

ELEVATE THE CHARACTER

The GMC Prep School graduation was the first for our new principal, COL Pam Grant. The weather was perfect, with many family and friends present, and it was a wonderful end to the school year. To quote what Pam Grant shared: “All 67 members of the GMC Prep School Class of 2016 walked across the stage to receive their diplomas and be inducted into the GMC Alumni Association by Mr. Joe Mobley. We are proud to once again have a 100% graduation rate! Of these 67 graduates, 65 of them plan to attend college in the fall with the other 2 choosing to serve our county by enlisting in the United States Navy. This class has accomplished outstanding things during their time at the Prep School. These seniors have been a part of 11 State Championship Teams, and 1 National Championship Team! We wish them the best as they begin the next stage of their journey!”

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G R A D U A T I O N

Junior College | GMC-MILLEDGEVILLE

Congressman Jody Hice spoke at the graduation for GMC-Milledgeville.

Former College Relations Intern, Jade Thompson (left)

GMC campuses all over the state of Georgia celebrated the Class

Award this year. This has occurred only one other time and that

across stages to receive their diplomas.

individual is now a Cadet at the United States Military Academy. Ms.

The Milledgeville Junior College Class of 2016 had 259 walk across

Meghan Dietrich has fulfilled Governor Nathan Deal’s Move On When

the stage with 28 different associate degrees and 19 dual associate

Ready intent of graduating high school and then graduated from

degrees. GMC Milledgeville graduated 38 cadets and 27 early

college less than a week later with her Associate’s Degree.

commissioning cadets. Cadet Lee Hemrick was selected for both the

Distinguished Graduating Student and Outstanding Cadet Leader

of 2016 this spring as countless talented and driven students walked

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G R A D U A T I O N

Junior College | CAMPUSES ACROSS GEORGIA GMC’s Columbus campus had 38 graduates. The Distinguished Graduate of 2016 was awarded to Ms. Ashley Paige Josey. Mr. Jerry “Pops” Barnes, City of Columbus District One Councilor was the commencement speaker.

There was a combined Fairburn-Fayette-

GMC’s Valdosta campus had a total of 353

graduates, and 48 Cum Laude graduates

ville-Stone Mountain graduation ceremony

graduates in 2016. Colonel Fred Van Horn was

this year at the Georgia World Congress

the graduation speaker, and he encouraged

Center in downtown Atlanta. Of the 103

the graduates to show character in everything

and know that they are entering college, the

graduates who participated in the ceremony,

they do. Scott Dickson was awarded the GMC

military and the workforce well-equipped to be

five were from the Fayetteville Campus (the

Educator of Year award by Dr. Mike Holmes,

leaders in their fields.

inaugural graduating cohort); the very first

GMC Senior VP for Academic Affairs and Dean

Fayetteville Distinguished Graduate was

of Faculities. GMC Valdosta had 27 Summa

Isabella Cuneo.

Cum Laude graduates, 26 Magna Cum Laude

this year. We are so proud of each of our graduates

(Left) Graduates wait to receive their diplomas at GMC’s Warner Robins campus. (Above) Dr. Mike Holmes presents Scott Dickson with the Educator of the Year Award at GMC’s Valdosta campus.

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P E R F O R M I N G

A R T S

S E R I E S

Katie Deal in

TODAY, TOMORROW & FOREVER

A TRIBUTE TO

PatsyCline

G

Tommy Williamson, Katie Deal and John Williamson.

eorgia Military College Performing Arts Series presented Katie Deal in Today, Tomorrow & Forever: A Tribute to Patsy Cline, on March 19, 2016, in the Goldstein Center for the Performing Arts. The sold-out crowd enjoyed Deal taking the stage with her own story of how the music and style of Patsy Cline has changed her life. A coffee and dessert reception with the artists followed the concert.

The Boston Brass is scheduled for our 2016 Holiday Concert on December 15 in the Goldstein Center.

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Harold and Brenda Mason shown with Katie Deal.


P E R F O R M I N G

A R T S

S E R I E S

24-Hour Play AN EVENING OF SHORT PLAYS

U

nder the direction of Amy Zipperer, GMC Junior College Drama students presented its Annual 24-Hour Play Festival, An Evening of Short Plays, on March 21, 2016, in the Goldstein Center for the Performing Arts. This memorable event featured short plays written, designed, directed and performed in only 24 short hours.

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R E U N I O N S

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R E C E P T I O N S

Class of 1953 Scholarship Since 2006, The GMC Prep School Class of 1953 has generously worked to fund a scholarship to benefit the lives of very deserving GMC students. To further the impact of this scholarship fund, the GMC Class of 1953 reached an agreement with GMC President General William Caldwell and Senior Vice President for College Relations Mark Strom in December 2015 establishing an eighteen-month period where donations to the pioneering GMC High School Class of 1953 Award Fund were matched, dollar for dollar. For every dollar given from a donor to the Fund, the GMC Office of the President contributed 50 cents, and the GMC Foundation contributed 50 cents to the Fund. This award, based on financial need, character and scholarship, is aimed to help a needy student attend GMC Prep School and realize his/her potential as a future leader in the community. This scholarship will be awarded in the upcoming school year.

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In addition to helping one outstanding student, the Fund also gifts the graduating Prep School Valedictorian with a $500 award and a plaque to document the student’s achievement. This year’s Prep School Valedictorian is Calli McMullen. In January

“We’d love to keep in touch with more members of the Class of ’53. Please let us know how by contacting the Alumni Office at 478-387-0230 or alumni@gmc.edu. Or, update your profile online at alumni.gmc.edu. We look forward to seeing you in May 2017!” – Ellen Goodrich

2016, Calli made GMC history by becoming the school’s first female to receive a fully qualified acceptance into any US. Service Academy. She will be attending West Point in the Fall where she will also run on the Track & Field team. An honorary plaque for teaching excellence will also be given to a Prep School teacher as a part of the scholarship. Thanks to the generosity of many donors, as of June 30, 2016, the Fund totals $106,000. The GMC Class of 1953 would like your help in providing an opportunity to a deserving Prep School student. More information on this scholarship and how to donate can be found at the GMC Alumni Association website: https://alumni.gmc.edu/gmc53


R E U N I O N S

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R E C E P T I O N S

GMC Basketball Players Reunion A reunion reception was held in the new Alumni House for the 1978-81 Basketballers honoring Coach Rick Steinke. We look forward to having them return home to Alumni Weekend this Fall (October 14 & 15) to help celebrate former teammate BG Francisco Espaillat receiving the Distinguished Alumni Award.

Those in attendance were: Coach Rick Steinke and wife, Pam; BG Francisco Espaillat and wife, Margie; Tom and Christina Beatty; Carlton Lewis, Lenny Breehl, Tony Brayboy, Joe Mobley, BG Curt Rauhut, Coach Sean Gillespie and Coach Bert Williams.

BILL CRAIG MEMORIAL PHEASANT HUNT GMC alumni and friends continued a tradition honoring Bill Craig’s legacy with the “Bill Craig Memorial Pheasant Hunt and Auction” on February 27, 2016. The event raised $13,751.56 for the William R. “Bill” Craig Scholarship Endowment, which benefits deserving students who desire a

quality education at GMC Prep School. A lifelong resident of Milledgeville, Bill Craig devoted himself to his family, the family business and many charitable and civic causes, including, first and foremost, Georgia Military College. Craig, himself a 1971 graduate of GMC High School, had a heart for the

institution, and especially for the students of today’s GMC Prep School. His service to GMC and his positive impact on the entire community will not be forgotten by those whose lives he touched . . . and his legacy will impact lives for years to come through the scholarship endowment in his name.

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A T H L E T I C S - Preparatory School

The Prep School Girls Track Team Captured a Second Consecutive State Title Congratulations to the GMC Prep Girls Track Team, who captured a second consecutive state title this spring. School records were broken in the 1600 meter run, the 3200 meter run, the 800 meter run, the 300 meter hurdles, and the 4X400 meter relay! Calli McMullen was the State High Point Champion, earning 33 individual points; State Champion in High Jump; State Champion in the 400 meter dash and earned 2nd place in the 200 meter dash. Abigail Kirkland was the State Champion in 300 the meter hurdles; finished 4th in triple jump and 4th in 100

GMC Prep Girls Track Team in Albany at state competition

Prep 2016 Football Schedule AU G U ST 8/19

Treutlen County H.S. Location: Soperton, GA

8/26

Wheeler County H.S. Location: Alamo, GA

9/2

Fulton Leadership Acad. Location: Home

7:00pm

9/9

Schley County Location: Home

7:30pm

meter dash. Two relay teams earned State Championships: Lauryn Barber, Calli McMullen, Taylor Curtis, Abigail Kirkland were named State Champions in the 4X100 meter relay; and Calli McMullen, Allie Kauzlarich, Cire Foston and Abigail Kirkland earned the State Championship in the 4X400 meter relay . Allie Kauzlarich earned 2nd place in 1600 meter run and 2nd place in 800 meter run. Emma Mercer placed 3rd in the 3200 meter run and 4th in the 1600 meter run. Other third place winners included Taylor Scott in High Jump and Mary Elizabeth Jones in discus.

John Milledge Academy and Georgia Military College Prep to Renew Football Rivalry

7:30pm

7:30pm

S E PTEM B ER

9/16

Oglethorpe County Location: Home

7:00pm

9/30

Temple High School 7:30pm Location: Temple, GA

10/7

John Milledge Academy 7:30pm Location: Home

10/14

Glascock County Location: Home

10/21

Riverside Military Academy 7:30pm Location: Home

10/28

Montgomery County H.S. 7:30pm Location: Mt. Vernon, GA

O C TO B ER

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7:30pm

(L-R) Mr. Mark Hopkins, Coach J.T. Wall, Coach Steven Simpson, COL Pam Grant.

Mr. Mark Hopkins, John Milledge Academy Head of School, JMA Head Coach J.T. Wall, COL Pam Grant, Georgia Military College Prep Principal, and GMC Prep Head Coach Steven Simpson, announced in May that JMA and GMC will renew their football rivalry October 7, 7:30 p.m. at JMA’s Trojan Field. The game will be one of the first GISA-GHSA competitions in Georgia and the first meeting of the two teams since 1986-87. In conjunction with the game, JMA and GMC will sponsor a joint Pink-Out and will sell t-shirts to benefit the Georgia Cancer Treatment Center in Milledgeville. COL Pam Grant said, “This will be a healthy competition and a great way to bring the schools and students together, and the community, as well as supporting a wonderful cause.” “More than just a game, more than just a hometown rivalry, this is an opportunity for our two great schools to make a difference in our own community,” Mark Hopkins quoted. JMA Head Coach J.T. Wall and GMC Prep Head Coach Steven Simpson attended preschool together and played football together at John Milledge before graduating from the school in 1998.


Preparatory School - A T H L E T I C S

Devin Hill signs to play football with Samford University.

Tyler McCartee signs to play football with LaGrange College.

Kaylie and Karlie Harding sign to play on the University of Georgia’s softball team. They were an integral part of GMC’s state championship wins for the 2014-15 and 2015-16 teams.

Standout player Karlie Harding was chosen as the Girls Basketball All-County Player of the Year for the 2015-2016 season.

Prep 2016 Softball Schedule 8/11 8/13

vs Mary Persons (JV) 5:00pm (V) 6:30pm

9/3

vs Prince Avenue (V) 5:30pm

9/17

vs Glascock County (V) DH 4:30pm & 6pm

9/30

vs Union Grove (JV) 5:30pm (V)7:00pm

@ Union Grove (V) 6:30pm

9/5

@ Tattnall Square (JV)12:30pm (V)2:00pm

9/18

@ Greenbrier (JV) DH 2:00pm & 4pm

10/2

SENIOR NIGHT vs Woodland-Henry (V) 7:00pm

8/15

vs Tattnall Square (JV)10:30am (V)12pm

9/8

@ Glascock County (V) 5:00pm

9/22

@ Aquinas (V) 5:00pm

8/18

@ Eagles Landing (V) 5:00pm

9/10

vs Aquinas (V) DH 4:30pm & 6pm

9/24

@ Lincoln County (V) DH 4:30pm & 6pm

8/21

@ Morgan County (JV) 5:00pm (V) 7:00pm

9/11

Score Int Tournament Chattanooga, TN (V) TBA – Game 1

9/25

vs Morgan County GC&SU, Milledgeville (V) 3:15pm

8/24

@ Mary Persons (JV) 5:00pm (V) 6:30pm

8/26

vs West Laurens (V) 5:30pm

9/12

Score Int Tournament Chattanooga, TN (V) TBA – Game 2 (V) TBA – Game 3

9/25

vs Heritage GC&SU, Milledgeville (V) 5:15pm

8/29

@ Greenbrier (V) 1:30pm

9/15

vs Lincoln County (V) 5:00pm

9/28

@ West Laurens (V) 5:00pm

10/5, 10/7, 10/9 Region Tournament 10/14

vs ELCA (V) 5:30pm

10/19

1st Round State 2-of-3 Series

10/28-31 Elite 8, Final 4, State Finals

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A T H L E T I C S - Junior College

GMC Rifle Team Retains National Title Fourth Consecutive Year Georgia Military College competed with shooters from across the United States in March at the National Rifle Association Intercollegiate Rifle Club Championship at Ft. Benning, Ga. The annual championship determines the National Collegiate Rifle Club Individual and Team Champions, and ROTC Individual and Team Champions. The event features small bore rifle and air rifle competitions, training summits for all participants and coaches, and an opportunity for coaches and shooters to

meet others in the sport they may not usually see during the regular season. Georgia Military College’s Collegiate Rifle Team placed seventh in small bore and fourth in air rifle competition. The GMC small bore team consisted of two commuter students and three cadets. The top four scores of each shooter counted for the team’s overall score. Cadet Donald Preston, of Duette, Fla. was awarded the gold medal as the top individual ROTC winner in small bore. Cadet Sarah Conners, of LaGrange, Ga., earned the silver

medal in ROTC individual competition. Cadet Drae Robinson from Merritt Island, Fla. was awarded the bronze medal as the third highest ROTC shooter in individual small bore competition. Cadet Sarah Conners scored the top score in ROTC individual air rifle competition and received the gold medal. Cadet Donald Preston received the ROTC silver medal. Cadet Drae Robinson was awarded the bronze medal for third overall in the individual ROTC category.

GMC Rifle Club places at National Championship

Alumni & friend s WEEKEND

EVERY DOG HAS HIS DAY GMC’S IS COMING SOON ...

Register now!

alumni.gmc.edu Katie has sold out two national tours and takes the stage with her own story of how the music and style of Patsy Cline has changed her life forever.

OCT. 14-15

2016

&

“Deal inhabits rather than impersonates Cline, grasping the essence of her distinctive voice and rhythms without pushing them into caricature and appearing thoroughly comfortable in Cline’s skin.”

Add to your calendar! Margaret Quamme --The Columbus Dispatch

For more information, Call the Office of College Relations: 478-387-0230 | alumni.gmc.edu

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Junior College - A T H L E T I C S

GMC Softball Smashes their Way to Record Breaking Season

Men’s Soccer Schedule AUG UST Fri. 19 Tue. 23 Sat. 27 Wed. 31

SCAD # at Truett McConnell JV at Thomas University JV Oxford College of Emory University

6:00 PM 5:00 PM 1:00 PM 7:00 PM

SEPTEMBER

What a season it has been for the GMC JC Softball 2015-16 team as there were 26 single season, career and team records set this year for the Bulldogs. After winning the GCAA Conference Championship for the first time in program history, they competed in the NJCAA National Championship for the first time in May in St. George, Utah. They would lose both of their games in the National Championship against top 10 ranked teams in the country, but the program has laid a great foundation for future success.

Tue. 6 Sat. 10 Sun. 11 Fri. 16 Sun. 18 Fri. 23 Tue. 27

USC Salkehatchie 4:00 PM Patrick Henry Community College 1:00 PM @ Louisburg College at Louisburg College Louisburg, NC 2:00 PM Spartanburg Methodist 7:00 PM Daytona State College 12:00 PM at Andrew College * 5:00 PM at Oxford College of Emory University 6:45 PM

Sat. 1 Wed. 5 Sat. 8 Sun. 9 Fri. 14 Thu. 20 Sun. 23 Sat. 29

at Spartanburg Methodist Spartanburg, SC Thomas University JV at Broward College at ASA College (Miami) Andrew College * Young Harris JV Broward College at Andrew College *

OCTOBER 4:00 PM 3:00 PM 1:00 PM 1:00 PM 5:00 PM 3:00 PM 11:00 AM 4:00 PM

Women’s Soccer Schedule AU GU ST

GMC JC Softball team won their first ever Conference championship in program history. The team competed in the NJCAA Softball National Championship held in Utah in May.

Mon. 15 Thu. 18 Sat. 27 Sun. 28 Wed. 31

at GCSU 6:00 PM Faulkner Univeristy 5:00 PM at Spartanburg Methodist 1:00 PM Spartanburg, SC vs. Louisburg College @ Spartanburg, SC TBA at Abraham Baldwin Agr. College * 5:00 PM

Sat. 3 Fri. 9 Sun. 11 Fri. 16 Wed. 21 Fri. 23 Tue. 27 Fri. 30

vs. Daytona State College 1:00 PM @ Andrew College at Oxford College of Emory University 6:45 PM at Darton State College * 6:00 PM at Gordon State College * 7:00 PM South Georgia State College * 5:00 PM at Andrew College * 3:00 PM Abraham Baldwin Agr. College * 5:00 PM Gordon State College * 7:00 PM

Wed. 5 Fri. 7 Fri. 14 Fri. 21

Oxford College of Emory University Darton State College * Andrew College * at South Georgia State College *

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

The softball team was honored to spend time with Mr. and Mrs. Hyrum Smith in their home while in Utah.

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A T H L E T I C S

SPRING GAME! ALUMNI FLAG FOOTBALL GAME & GMC FOOTBALL SPRING GAME On April 30, Bulldog fans had the chance to get an early look at the Fall 2016 Football team as they played their Spring Game on Davenport Field. Preceding the Spring Game was the First Annual Football Alumni Flag Football game featuring GMC Lettermen. Playing were some of the former GMC players that have contributed to the success of the program throughout the years, such as: · Daniel Wilcox - former player for New York Jets, Tampa Bay Bucs, Baltimore Ravens, NFLE Rhein Fire and current Assistant Coach for GMC JC Football · Jermaine Smith - former player for the Green Bay Packers, Tampa Bay Storm, Orlando Predators, San Jose Sabor Cats and current Assistant Coach for GMC JC Football · Peppi Zellner - former player for the Washington Redskins, Dallas Cowboys and Arizona Cardinals · Allen Williams - former player for the Detroit Lions · Casper Brinkley - Carolina Panthers · Jasper Brinkley - New York Giants, Dallas Cowboys, Arizona Cardinals and Minnesota Vikings · Coswell Simms - wide receiver at the University of Louisville

Junior College Football Schedule AU G U ST Thu. 25 Navarro College

Corsicana, TX

7:00 PM

S EPTEM B ER Sat. 3 Middle Georgia State University Home 6:00 PM Sat. 10 Palmetto Prep Academy Home 1:00 PM Sun. 18 ASA College James Madison University 1:00 PM Sat. 24 College of DuPage Glen Ellyn, IL 2:00 PM

O C TO B ER Sat. 1 Sat. 8 Sat. 15 Sat. 29

ASA College (Miami) Hialeah, FL 1:00 PM Hocking College Home 1:00 PM Jireh Prep Home 2:00 PM Arkansas Baptist College Little Rock, AR 2:00 PM

N OV EM B ER Sat. 5 ASA College (Miami) Sun. 13 Lackawanna College @ Marshall University

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Home

1:00 PM

Huntington, WV

1:00 PM

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

It was entertaining to watch these ‘old timers’ relive their glory on the football field. They signed autographs and were available for pictures with fans after the game.

GMC alum, Devaroe Lawrence (JC’14) has been called the most talented defensive lineman on Auburn’s roster by position coach Rodney Garner for more than two years. Lawrence, entering his senior season, was named one of college football’s 25 “breakout players” to watch in 2016. “After transferring from JUCO, Lawrence saw the field for only 26 snaps in 2014 before seeing action on 287 plays last season,” PFF wrote. “He was stout against the run, finishing at 82.2, including a strong late-season stretch against SEC rivals Ole Miss, Texas A&M, Georgia, and Alabama. He led Auburn defensive linemen with a run stop percentage of 7.6, putting him in line for more early down snaps this season. Lawrence added in a sack, two QB hits and six hurries on his 105 rushes, good for a XX rush, so he’s not just a one-dimensional player.” Lawrence has appeared in 17 games the past two seasons since joining the Tigers as a junior college transfer in 2014. Lawrence has recorded 32 tackles (three for loss) and half a sack during his Auburn career.


C A M P U S

ROTC SIGNINGS

N E W S

PASS IN REVIEW Students, faculty and staff at Georgia Military College have been so fortunate to meet and learn from the many distinguished guests who have passed through campus this year.

Hannah Lorraine McTyre: signs ROTC scholarship with U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Hannah is shown with her parents.

COL Fred Van Horn, USA, (Retired) PRESIDENT’S DAY PARADE February 12, 2016

Richard H. Brown

MILITARY HONORS PARADE March 18, 2016

Mark McCabe: signs ROTC scholarship with Liberty University.

Representative Carl Rogers ACADEMIC HONORS PARADE April 8, 2016

Patrick Lewis: signs ROTC scholarship with the University of Florida.

The Honorable Brian Kemp Secretary of State MOTHER’S DAY PARADE May 6, 2016

GMC President, Lt. Gen. William B. Caldwell, IV is a featured endorser of Mr. Hyrum Smith’s new book, “You Are What You Believe.” GMC was honored to have Mr. Smith on campus in the Fall of 2015 to speak with junior college and prep students, as well as to share his wisdom with GMC faculty, staff and members of the community.

Ike Thomas (HS’57, JC’59) MEMORIAL DAY PARADE May 20, 2016 SUMMER 2016

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C A M P U S

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Cadets Provide Service to the Milledgeville Community Cadets from Georgia Military College provided tremendous service to the greater Milledgeville Community by giving unselfishly of themselves as they moved three millstones for the Oconee River Greenway Authority. The millstones were donated by Alice Reynolds to go back to the Greenway where a mill once stood adjacent to the Oconee River where the Greenway is now. The millstones are to be used to develop signage and to tell the historical story where the Greenway now is located. However, the signage is a future project for the Greenway authority and the movement of these

millstones is the first step in this future project. This movement of these three millstones was a tremendous effort in teamwork, and an outstanding exercise mentally and physically. The cadets were asked several weeks ago to take a look at the possibility of moving these millstones and they took on the project enthusiastically. Cadet Negri, the leader of the team, developed a plan and rounded up volunteers he felt would be able to execute the mission. They team of 10 cadets worked exceptionally well together to get the extremely large and bulky millstones moved. “The teamwork

the cadets used was tremendous to watch,” stated Marion Nelson and Bo Edwards, the President of the Oconee River Greenway Authority and member of the Oconee River Greenway Authority, respectively. These young men were amazing to watch as they approached the site, developed their plan, and then executed the plan with care and precision. However, their teamwork was a sight to see as they used cadence to get the movement desired as they methodically moved the millstones little by little ensuring the safety of each of the cadets involved.

GMC

VIETNAM MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP DEDICATED TO GEORGIA MILITARY COLLEGE ALUMNI WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE VIETNAM WAR

Honor

the brave individuals who served our nation by

Supporting

a Military Cadet on the Milledgeville campus

Giving provides a gateway to brighter futures for thousands of students Gifts to the GMC Foundation are deductible for tax purposes as allowed by law and will benefit the Vietnam Memorial Scholarship Fund.

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From exciting classical arrangements, to burning jazz standards, and the best of the original brass quintet repertoire, Boston Brass treats audiences to a unique brand of entertainment, which captivates all ages. Boston Brass has been featured on The CBS Early Show, National Public Radio’s Performance Today, The Great American Brass Band Festival and has recorded several diverse albums.

For giving inquiries or to make your gift by phone, please call: 478-387-0230. To give online: alumni.gmc.edu/vietnamveterans

Thurs., December 15, 2016, 7:00 pm

GMC is grateful for our Vietnam veterans who risked everything to protect our country. We thank and honor these heroes and their families by recognizing their service, valor and sacrifice.

Goldstein Center for the Performing Arts 325 S. Elbert St. | Milledgeville

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Georgia Military College


C A M P U S

N E W S

The College Relations Office has moved! Please stop by and see us. Alumni House 410 South Jefferson Street just across from the South Gates

The GMC Hero Race was held on May 21. Shown are awesome GMC cadets who ran. This was a wonderful community event and we had great representation from several GMC departments. Weather was poor but we still had 55 show up to run a new course for a 5k and 10k. Allie Kauzlarich was the overall top female runner and Jerry Herrin (Milledgeville running legend) was the overall top male. GMC staff age group winners included Ralph Kauzlarich, Rob Manchester, Sally Thrower, and Yancey Walker.

DONATE NOW TO GMC ’73 SCHOLARSHIP SCHOLARSHIP

On Feb. 1, 2014, the GMC ‘73 Scholarship was established to honor all GMC Alumni from the ’70s era (1970-1979) who have passed away. Sadly, the number of deceased alumni from this era is more than 110. This Scholarship Fund gives us the opportunity to remember our deceased classmates and help pass on their spirit to deserving Prep School students in the form of a GMC education. The GMC ‘73 Scholarship achieved Endowment status in 2014. As an Endowed Scholarship, the GMC ‘73 Scholarship is now selfsupporting, using interest and dividends each year to cover the cost of multiple $500 scholarships. The GMC ‘73 Scholarship is awarded annually to a Prep School freshman. The recipient retains the scholarship for four years, through graduation, as long as the selection criteria continue to be met: financial need, academic good standing and a minimum GPA of 2.73. Thus, four $500 scholarships are awarded annually: one to a Prep School freshman, sophomore, junior and senior. These four scholarships can be supported by an endowment fund totaling $100,000. The GMC ’73 Scholarship is currently more than three quarters of the way there to achieving this $100,000 goal. A goal that is attainable with your support in 2016 because of a renewed pledge from both LtGen Caldwell, President of GMC, and the GMC Foundation to match every GMC ‘73 Scholarship donation received by Dec. 31, 2016, up to $12,500. One hundred percent of your donation goes to the GMC ‘73 Scholarship. Please help honor our deceased GMC Alumni from the ’70s era with your donation. Additionally, your gift will assist deserving GMC Prep School students in their pursuit of a GMC education. To donate, call (478) 387-0230 or give online: alumni.gmc.edu/gmc73.

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C A M P U S

N E W S

GMC PROFESSOR KARA J. MADDOX PUBLISHED IN USA TODAY Kara J. Maddox, the Learning Support Department Chair and Humanities Coordinator at GMC’s Warner Robins Campus, was recently published in USA Today on how the Millennial generation will affect the future of news consumption. According to the Pew Research Center, Millennials (ages 18-34) now outnumber the Baby Boomer generation. In her opinion piece, Maddox shares the insight that this generation does not consume news in traditional formats like older generations, but they will pay for content that appeals to them. She notes that news publishing sites should take advice from Facebook (88% of Millennials turn to Facebook for their news) and offer engaging content in shorter quantities to gain the attention of a generation who has grown up with digital content at their fingertips. Maddox’s article highlights that this country is at a tipping point due to Millennials in general and how we need to reshape our thinking in order to best capture the attention of this growing generation.

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Macon Author Sherry Meeks Takes Finalist Spot at Georgia Author of the Year Awards Debut novel Finding Tambri makes its mark in Literary Fiction category ATLANTA, GA – Author Sherry Meeks was honored to be nominated in the 2016 Georgia Author Of The Year Awards category of Literary Fiction, the category with the most nominees, and experienced a surreal moment when called to the stage. Georgia native and now Philadelphia Sherry Meeks resident Joe Samuel Starnes judged this group of strong writers with the directive to choose one finalist and one winner. Starnes, a novelist who also writes for Publishers Weekly, the New York Times, and Washington Post, ruled Finding Tambri, Meeks’ novel in stories, worthy of being named the Literary Fiction Finalist. Tambri is a woman who has suffered the loss of her young son and the disintegration of her perfect marriage to her high school sweetheart, Daniel. She struggles with feelings of loss and guilt, and not being good enough for this world as she discovers one wrong man after another. Mitch Wieland, editor of The Idaho Review described it as “a haunting exploration of the aftermath of losing a child. These stories have true emotional depth and staying power. Over the course of this fine book, our hero emerges as a psychologically complex character, a woman who holds crushing grief at bay.” Since the launch of her ‘Wildly Unconventional Finding Tambri Book Tour’ in November Meeks has been on brisk tour of the southeast and now the midwest embracing art galleries, wine bars, wellness centers, restaurants – including Macon’s El Sombrero - and Barnes & Noble Bookstores. The media tour has been a heavy schedule of television and radio interviews including SiriusXM’s Tim Ridley Show, plus being a featured author this year at Book Expo America in Chicago. Finding Tambri is available at your favorite bookseller or online. Finding Sherry Meeks is a little bit harder these days!


C A M P U S

N E W S

Father Shares GMC’s Impact on Son Derrick Shields says Georgia Military College (GMC) continues to make a difference in his son’s life. 18- year-old Chris Shields, who is from Columbus, Ga., is starting a new journey in the United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA). He was appointed to the USCGA in May 2016 and was sworn in on June 27. In 2015, Chris enrolled in GMC through the selfprep program for the Coast Guard Academy. “There were over 2,000 applicants from around the world that applied to be a part of the class of 2020,” said Derrick Shields, Chris Shields’ father. “For Chris to have been accepted is a testimony to how prepared he was thanks to GMC.” Derrick said his son developed an interest in attending the USCGA during his senior year at Brookstone School in Columbus, Ga. He said Chris decided to attend GMC after hearing that GMC is one of only a few schools in the nation that offer

the prep program for service academies. As a self-prep cadet, Chris successfully completed the same curriculum taken by cadets who are selected each year to enter the Coast Guard Academy. “This program was designed to prepare him for the rigorous academic and physical demands of the United States Coast Guard Academy,” said Shields. “Coming to GMC confirmed his decision to pursue entering into the Coast Guard Academy. Being in class with the other scholar program cadets and being exposed to the military lifestyle enabled him to determine that this was the career choice for him.” Derrick Shields said GMC provides endless opportunities for students to prepare them for anything they want to achieve in life. “I would recommend GMC to other students and their parents because of the individual attention that GMC affords,” said Shields. “GMC is for the student who knows exactly what their future goals are and for

the student who has not settled on a particular path. GMC is an excellent school. The facilities are excellent with a great teacher to student ratio in all classes. The adminChris Shields (far right) istration has a hands-on approach to helping families make good decisions about college and career choices. Going to GMC will prepare a student to go anywhere in the nation.” The USCGA swore in Chris Shields along with 307 other cadets who are currently beginning a seven week indoctrination program.

GMC Prep had 43 cadets attend the JCLC Camp, which was GMC’s largest group ever.

GMC Hosts First Ever JROTC Cadet Leadership Camp Students in the Junior ROTC (JROTC) program at Georgia Military College (GMC) Prep School attended the JROTC Cadet Leadership Camp (JCLC) at GMC’s Milledgeville campus from May 31- June 3, 2016. GMC Prep was one of 14 schools that attended and contributed to the 290 students who participated in the inaugural camp. GMC Prep had 43 cadets attend the camp, which was the largest group of cadets from GMC Prep to ever to attend a JCLC. JCLC is a US Army Cadet Command sponsored program that provides JROTC cadets an opportunity to practice

leadership skills, team building and adventure training in a hands-on military environment. The camp is limited to the top 10% of cadets from each JROTC high school. This year’s “Camp GMC 2016” experience included living in a military barracks, intramural sports, negotiating obstacle courses, rappel towers, drown proofing, canoeing, and the Leaders’ Reaction Course. The cadets developed critical thinking skills, fostered camaraderie, and were familiarized with educational opportunities at GMC.

Throughout the camp, the cadets held various leadership positions and were evaluated on their performances. Out of the 18 awards presented, GMC Prep earned seven. The award winners from GMC Prep were: Davis Isley-Most Improved, Basic Cadet Leadership Award; Chase Rauhut-Advanced Cadet Leadership Award; Hailey Wilkinson-Most Improved, Basic Cadet Leadership Award; Trevor Yeager-Most Improved, Advanced Cadet Leadership Award; Niko Urias-Advanced Leadership Award; and Anna Caldwell-Basic Cadet Leadership Award. Jack Watkins earned the Camp Commander’s Advanced Cadet Leadership Award, which was awarded to the number one cadet at the camp.

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C A M P U S

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Georgia Military College hosts Dual Enrollment Summit Georgia Military College hosted its first school kids have made this Dual Enrollment (DE) Summit for nearly 50 a successful partnership. high school principals, counselors, and adminEverybody loves these istrators across the state. The two-day summit kids and everybody wants started June 22, and was organized by GMC’s to see them do well.” Online Campus. Jasper County High School “The purpose of the summit is two-fold,” partnered with GMC this said Jody Yearwood, GMC’s Online Campus past summer and Murner Executive Director. “First, we wanted high expects another 30 of her schools currently participating with GMC in students will take dual the DE program to come together to share enrollment courses with ideas and lessons learned on how to best GMC in July. manage their programs and also expand Murner was the recipient access to their students. Second, we invited of the GMC 2015-2016 new high schools that had not yet partnered MOWR Partner of the Year with us to learn about all the benefits of the Move-On-When-Ready (MOWR) program and to show them how GMC can open access to their students.” GMC’s dual enrollment program provides the opportunity for high school students to get a head start on college and their career. Students can begin taking college courses as early as ninth grade through the MOWR program in hopes of receiving their associate degree before high school graduation. The MOWR program will allow high school students to receive college and high school credit for the same coursework, and the the summit with hopes that her school will college credit can be transferred to any form a dual enrollment partnership with GMC. college in the nation. Through state funding Award and received her award at the recep“Being in Southwest Georgia you’re kind and GMC scholarship funds, all tuition and tion. Murner said this award is acknowledgeof limited as to your resources and getting books are free. GMC’s online dual enrollment ment of her team’s commitment to provide the kids in the DE program will cover our courses are also free and provide flexibility for opportunities to Jasper County HS students. Advanced Placement (AP) component,” said students. Aletha Armour, who is an Instructional Aletha Armour, Terrell County High School The DE Summit included sessions on Coach at Terrell County High School, attended Instructional how to process Coach. “It MOWR applications, will also give incorporate student students who resources, and how wouldn’t have to examine student an opportusuccess in the pronity to take gram. GMC currently college has dual enrollment courses to partnerships with 80 experience high schools in the it.” state with an enrollGeorgia ment of more than Military 1,000 students. College plans “The partnership to make the with GMC has been DE Summit phenomenal,” said an annual Camille Murner, event and Jasper County High expand School Principal. “It attendance has changed lives. each year. The weekly updates, conversations, BG Curt Rauhut, Amy Cox, Camille Murner, Jessica Sanders, Jody Yearwood and delivering books, Dr. Mike Homes. and meeting my high

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C A M P U S

S P O T L I G H T

Brig. Gen. Curt Rauhut, GMC Chief Operations Officer; Hon. Jimmy Pruett; Hon. Greg Kirk; Lt. Gen. William B. Caldwell, IV; Mr. Charles Williams; Mr. Erik Walton.

Georgia Military College Cuts Ribbon for New Campus in Eastman Georgia Military College, joined by members of the Dodge County community, celebrated the grand opening of its 13th campus, GMCEastman on May 13, 2016. Georgia Military College’s Eastman Campus is located in Dodge County, five minutes from Dodge County High School. Nestled in downtown Eastman, Georgia, this campus provides easy access to educational opportunity to traditional students and those seeking a continuing education. Like our other campuses, Eastman strives to produce educated citizens and contributing members of society in an environment conducive to the development of the intellect and character of it students. Speakers included Reverend Rick Mitchell, First United Methodist Church; Reverend Cecil Barden, Faith In Action Baptist Church; Mr. Charles Williams, President/Economic Developer, Eastman-Dodge County Chamber of Commerce; The Honorable Greg Kirk, Georgia State Senator, District 13; The Honorable Jimmy Pruett, Georgia House of Representatives, District 149; Lieutenant General William B. Caldwell IV, President, Georgia Military College; and Mr. Erik Walton, Director of the GMC-Eastman Campus. Classes began on August 1, 2016. For more information or to apply online visit www.gmc.edu or call 478-220-3014.

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C L A S S

N O T E S

’59

Leo Cancio (JC’59) was recently honored as the Lifetime Achievement Award winner and the newest member of the

Nonwovens Hall of Fame, an award given by INDA, the international organization of the nonwoven fabrics industry. Leo is well known in the industry, having a resume that spans more than the required 20 years for this award. He joined Clopay Corporation as Manager of Product Development in Plastic Technology. He completed his secondary education in Sancti Spiritus, Cuba, then attended Georgia Military College and upon completion of his studies there was admitted to Georgia Institute of Technology where he earned a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering in 1961 and a Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering in 1962. His major areas of concentration were fluid mechanics, physics and computers. Upon completion of college in 1962, Leo joined E.I. DuPont and Co. in the textile fibers department of DuPont Technical Station in Chattanooga, Tennessee. In this position, he worked with polyamides and polyesters and was a technical advisor for the rheology (co-extrusion) polymer stems; he also played a key role in the development of several new products. In 1967, Mr. Cancio joined Chemplex Company in Rolling Meadow, Illinois as senior research engineer and rose to assistant manager of the polymer research department. His responsibilities at Chemplex ranged from basic polymer physics research to

product process development and evaluation. In 1977, Mr. Cancio joined Clopay Corporation in Cincinnati, Ohio as Manager of Product Technology in Plastic Technology. His career advanced steadily to Associate Director, Director, Sr. VP of Technology & Operations, until he was named President of the Plastic Product Division of Clopay in 1986. He officially retired from Clopay in 2003 but still today is involved as a consultant and advisor. Clopay Corporation is a founding member company of INDA. Therefore, it goes without saying that Mr. Cancio has served on numerous INDA Boards, Committees and Task Forces during his almost 40 years of service as an industry leader. He was instrumental in insuring that INDA was a financially stable organization; he was also key in the recruitment of several key companies to join INDA. He has been a champion of the Association’s growth over the course of his career at Clopay. He recognized the key value of membership was being involved and insured that numerous Clopay employees were involved on INDA’s committees and task forces as well as participated in INDA events. He has served as Vice Chairman of Finance, Vice Chairman of Planning as well as Chairman of the Board on multiple occasions throughout his career. Mr. Cancio was involved in other endeavors throughout his career as well: • Society of Plastics Engineers; also served on the Board of Directors, Chicago Chapter from 1973-1976 • Society of Rheology; also Annual Meeting Co-Chair 1977 • Advisory Board, Indiana University, Dean of Students • College Advisory Council, University of Cincinnati, College of Engineering • Georgia Military College Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1992 • Board of Directors of Associate Clopay Europe, Liege, Belgium from 1984 – 1988; he also served as Vice President 1986 – 1987 and President 1987 – 1988 Mr. Cancio is recognized as a national and international authority in the field of polymer characterization, processing behavior and product properties. He has published extensively.

And those works cover a wide range from fundamental works like “The High Shear Flow Instability in High Density Polyethylene” presented to the American Chemical Society to practical applications like “High Molecular Weight Polyethylene – Blow Molding of Large Containers” which was prepared for the Society of Plastic Engineers. In addition, he holds more than 35 patents. Mr. Cancio, throughout his almost 40 year career at Clopay, has been a central figure in both the growth of the industry and our trade association. He and his wife, Silvia, reside in Vero Beach, Fla.

’75

On June 10, 2016, Brigadier General Doyle D. “Don” Broome, Jr. (JC’75) became the first GMC graduate inducted into the inaugural Army ROTC Hall of Fame. The induction was part of the ROTC’s 100th Anniversary celebration and included an esteemed group of just 326 service men and women from across the nation. Brigadier General Doyle D. “Don” Broome, Jr., (U.S. Army, Retired) is the tenth President of Hargrave Military Academy. He is a 1975 graduate (Distinguished Military Student) of Georgia Military College. He received a commission as an Army 2nd Lieutenant via the Early Commissioning Program with an Associate of Arts Degree; he entered active duty as a 19 year-old Infantry platoon leader. Through night and weekend classes, and eventually the Degree Completion Program he earned a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Management) from Troy University, graduating Cum Laude. Later, he earned a Master of Science in History from the Army’s Command and General Staff College. General Broome’s career spanned service in Infantry, Special Forces and Aviation units Band across 32 years, Company Summer which included Reunion was held at combat, training Amicalola Falls State Park and disaster near Big Canoe. assistance Those attending were: operations. (standing, L-R) Dess Smith, Significantly, he Cliff Owdom (JC’62), served as the Ben Underwood (JC’62), Deputy ComGraham Bird, Mark Strom, manding General of the famed VP for College Relations; 82nd Airborne (sitting, L-R) TerryJohnson Division over(JC’62), Al Blackburn and seeing combat Dean Smith. operations during

’62

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C L A S S Operation Iraqi Freedom. His last active duty assignment was as the Deputy Commanding General, US Army Cadet Command. In this role he was responsible for increasing Army ROTC accessions and commissions to meet the demands of post 9/11 combat requirements, revamping the Army ROTC nursing program and overseeing the ROTC programs at the nation’s eleven military colleges. He also served twice as the Director of Strategy and Policy (J5), first for U.S. Forces, Japan and then for U.S. Joint Forces Command. General Broome’s military education includes: the Infantry Officer Basic and Advanced Courses; the Special Forces Qualification Course; the Aviation Qualification Course; the Command and General Staff College; and the Air War College. General Broome and his wife, Donna, reside in Chatham, VA. They have three children, and three grandchildren.

civilian employees of the Department of Defense each year. Martin comes to DEOMI from her previous assignment as commander of the U.S. Army Garrison in Wiesbaden, Germany, where she served since July 2014. She has had a varied military career that included assignments in Egypt and Iraq. She served in the enlisted ranks as an administrative specialist before receiving a regular Army commission from Georgia Military College in 1991 as part of the service’s early commissioning program.

’00

Diana New Riner (HS’00) was the guest speaker during the GMC Prep School senior luncheon in May, held in the Legislative Chambers. Diana is an attorney in Perry for Utility Service Company, Inc.

’80

N O T E S

the ceremony. MAJ Tantawi was accompanied by his wife, Lori, his mother, Theresa Tantawi, and his sister, Leila Tantawi, as well as a host of special guests. Lori and Theresa pin on Ibrahim’s new rank. MAJ Jeremy Haynes (JC’04) congratulates newly promoted MAJ Ibrahim Tantawi. Haynes and Tantawi

MAJ Aurlbrio Fennell (JC’04) attended the promotion ceremony.

Fennell and Tantawi

LTC Russell “Neal” Bloodworth Jr. (HS’80, JC’82) retired from the US Army on November 3, 2015 after over 29 years of service. Neal entered active service in July 1986 and attended the Field Artillery Basic Course at Fort Sill, Ok. Neal’s first duty assignment was Nuremberg Germany from 1987 – 1990. He joined the Georgia Army National Guard in August 1990 and participated in the mobilization of the 48th Infantry Brigade while assigned to the 1-230 Field Artillery Battalion in Brunswick, Ga. He deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from 2004 -2006 while assigned as the Operations Officer for the 148th Support Battalion from Forsyth, Ga. Neal’s last deployment was in support of Class of 2016, Shannon New-Diaz (HS’75, JC’77), Diana New Riner (HS’00) and Joe Mobley (HS’63, JC’65) Operation Enduring Freedom from 2009 – 2010 where he served as Base Support Group Commander ISAF HQ in Kabul, Mandy Moore (HS’06) is in her Afghanistan. His last duty assignment was as John Sellers (JC’03) and sixth year of teaching in McDonough, Georgia. the Unit Mobilization Officer, US Army Forces Ibrahim Tantawi (JC’04) She taught kindergarCommand Fort Bragg, N.C. During his career are both assigned to the 377th Theater ten for one year he received a Bronze Star (one oak leaf), Sustainbefore moving to first Meritorious Service Medal, Iraq and Afghaniment grade. She loves stan Campaign Medals, Global War on Terrorism Command working with the Service Medal and the NATO-ISAF Medal. Neal here in young students as currently lives with his wife Shelia, their children, New everything is so new Vincent, Kyle and Kayley in Whispering Pines, N.C. Orleans, and exciting to them.

’06

’03|’04

’91

La.

COL Mary G. Martin, (JC’91) is the 16th military commandant of the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI), and the first Army female commandant in the 45-year history of the institute, headquartered at Patrick Air Force Base. In this role, which she assumed in June 2016, she will lead the training of 1,600 military and

Tantawi and Sellers

’04

Ibrahim Tantawi (JC’04) was promoted to Major at a ceremony held on NASJRB-New Orleans on April 15, 2016. MG Les Carroll, Commanding General of the 377th Theater Sustainment Command, presided over

During these six years, she’s earned her master’s degree in reading education, added special education to her teaching certificate, and completed the gifted endorsement. Mandy has been the grade level leader for the past four years, representing her grade level in leadership meetings, mentoring her co-workers and keeping them informed. She has taught multiple county-wide math professional learning seminars for elementary teachers and has helped revise the new state standards for math. Most recently, Mandy was named the Teacher of the Month which puts her in the running for being her school’s Teacher of the Year.

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’11

N O T E S

Neil and Dana Hamel (JC’11) are pleased to announce the arrival of their first child, Barrett Jameson Hamel, born on June 22, 2016 and weighing 7 lbs. 12.2 oz. Neil is currently deployed in Afghanistan.

1LT James P. Ramsey III (JC’11) received his promotion to CPT aboard the USS Missouri on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor. He serves in the 84th EN BN, FSC as Company Executive Officer and is stationed at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.

’12

Jacob Tilley (JC’12) graduated OTS June 16, 2016 and commissioned as a 2LT in the U.S. Air Force. Jacob graduated OTS 16-07 Flight 3-11 at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. He will be continuing his career in Intel. Jacob shared, “Finally decided to follow my dream and commission - I’m in the Georgia Air National Guard. I wouldn’t be where I am today if it wasn’t for GMC and its cadet corps cadre who taught me. Thank you!” Jacob is pictured and his girlfriend, Ashton Lee.

’14

Stan Raymond (JC’14) is in Delta Company at the United States Coast Guard Academy. He recently worked at a Coast

Guard small boat station called Ponce de Leon, near Daytona Beach Florida, before flying to London, England to board the Coast Guard Cutter EAGLE where he and his shipmates sailed from England to Portugal to Bermuda and back to United States. He is pictured at the fourth class formal, where his class crest was revealed.

’15

Analese Bridges (HS’15) has been named an official Class of 2019 Dukes & Duchesses member! Dukes and Duchesses was established in 1979 as an organization of volunteers dedicated to representing the Office of the University President and Duke University at large. As student ambassadors, members of Dukes and Duchesses provide a direct student contact to distinguished visitors, Trustees, and guests of the President. Responsibilities include leading campus tours, staffing the President’s Box during home football games, and assisting with special events such as the Board of Trustees dinner. Membership in this group is a privilege that requires great responsibility, as Dukes and Duchesses ambassadors are frequently university guests’ only contacts with undergraduates during their visit.

Share your news. The Cadence would like to keep your classmates up to date with your latest news. We want to hear if you have recently married, had a baby, received a promotion, retired, or accomplished some other noteworthy milestone. Please submit your news by email to: alumni@gmc.edu. You may also mail to: The Cadence, Office of Advancement, 201 East Greene Street, Milledgeville, GA 31061 Please provide your class year(s), degree(s), address, phone number and email. If you include a photograph, please be sure to identify all people pictured. We look forward to hearing from you!

November 17 is Georgia Gives Day! Help students succeed. If you plan to donate to The GMC Foundation this year, consider making your gift on 11-17-16 for Georgia Gives Day. With the incentives offered, your donation will go further to help students at GMC. Visit GAgivesday.org on November 17 and search for:

GEORGIA MILITARY COLLEGE FOUNDATION

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Visit alumni.gmc.edu to create your profile for our new online community of Georgia Military College Alumni and we will send you a small token of our appreciation!

It’s time to sign up or re-enroll!! Please go online (Kroger.com/communityrewards) to select GMC Foundation as your preferred organization. Our student scholarships will receive a percentage of qualified purchases from participating households when you scan your Kroger Plus card or enter your alternate ID. You are helping change lives, so please sign up! This year, Kroger donated $600,000 to local schools and nonprofits through this program! Kroger Community Rewards® Giving More Back to the Community!

Year after year, local schools, churches and other nonprofit organizations will earn millions of dollars through Kroger Community Rewards®. Fund-raising is easy ... all you do is shop and swipe your Kroger Plus Card!

DUTY 1938-39 This photo appears to have been taken on the south end of the east face of the OCB, based on the sandstone blocks and the trees in the background behind the edge of the building. They are possibly the rifle team. This was before the 1941 fire. If anyone can identify person(s) in this photo, contact the Alumni Affairs office: alumni@gmc.edu or 478-387-0230.

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HELP US FIND CLASSMATES who will celebrate their 25th and 50th reunions in 2016. If you have the address, phone number or email address of anyone listed below, please provide that information to the Alumni Office at (478) 387-0230 or email alumni@gmc.edu.

Junior College 1966

Thomas H. Acree Joseph Randall Adams Alex E. Anderson Lou Atwood Arthur S. Aubry George K. Bellinger Samuel A. Benson Stuart C. Blandford Bernard Holmes Brewer Thomas L. Brooks John A. Brown John Lewis Carpenter Dennis C. Carr Augustin Sturgis Carswell Noela M. Cartagena Jerry Alton Chambers Clayton Childers John Wayland Christmas Charles Lawson Coate Milton Frederick Coley Timothy P. Collins Thomas White Copeland Edwin Dekel Crawford Robert Crawford Randall Zachry Davis John Shannon DeBaun James David Dickson Daniel F. Doyle Jimmy A. Edenfield John H. Fowlkes Jackson Garald Gammell James Michael Jackson Brian Alan King Bruce Kenneth Langefeld William Reynolds LaRoche Henry Dolford Layson Ronnie N. Lindsey William R. Mehaffey Jimmy T. Mercer Warren Everett Mills Jeffrey James Pake James Hollis Parrott Thomas Joseph Pendino Edward B. Poe William R. Poston James Dixon Reeves Bernard A. Register Jose Manuel Ripoll Robert M. Rodriguez Donald Rossiter Royer Stanley A. Ruark

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David Neal Rudisill James Randolph Scott Richard Walter Silvey R. Lee Slater Charles C. Smith James Robert Sowers William H. Taylor Patrick B. Teagan Dabney B. Timmerman Ronald Lane Walter Thomas A. Walters Rodney King Weeks Don Preston Williams Roger Williams Ray Charles Worthington Aaron Youngblood

High School 1966

SUMMER 2016

Weyman Graves Allen David L. Armstrong George Terrell Bailey Kenneth A. Baker Barry Yale Begin Robert Rodriguez Blanch Kenneth Dowd Brown Tom Burgamy Gilberto M. Cartaya Fred C. Carter Bryan Alan Cofer Charles Harry Colvin Julian Thomas Cooper Jorge Gaspar Del Vallo James Michael Dunn Larry W. Ellington James Melton Eslinger Thomas Felix Findley Mills Warren Everett Robert M. Gilbert Ellis Randall Gilliam Joreg J. Gonzalez Lavoygie E. Green John Head Floyd E. Hendrickson Dan Murphy Hinnant Allan William Kelly John Cantey Knight William Randall Lindsey David Michael Marcum Ralph Paul Lipps Marvin Lucas Gary Lester McGlann Michael F. McNulty Joseph Harrison Milford

Robert Gregory Moore Bruce N. Morris Marshall Howard Murdock Robert L. Myatt Luther James Nunn Jerry Lawrence Owens Robert C. Owens Robert Arthur Parrott Calvin Eli Pope Richard Wise Prosser Mannie Wilson Rickenbaker Juan M. Sanchez Vance Allen Shaffer William Calvin Smith Joseph R. Webb

Junior College 1991 Frederick l. Arnold Gaston Berenguer Jorge I. Blanco Paige Leigh Boyce Paul J. Brodersen Fern F. Brodnax George J. Broussurd Douglas Brown Odell Brown Charles R. Carroll Pablo Castro-Hernandez Kevin D. Colton Rosario Alberto Cruz Cynthia E. Cummings Debra Delguidice Gregory Michael Estok Don A. Everitt George Forsberg Bobby Gates James George Howard Stephen Gibson David H. Gilliam Gary Gillingham Anna B. Glausier Thad Chapman Goodson Thomas Zane Gray Charles Richard Griffin Daniel A. Hayes Kevin Haygood Patrick W. Hickey Sarah F. Hogan Dana Hutchinson James R. Irby Chris James William Eugene Johnson Rutha M. King

Joseph LeBourgeois Fred Alexander Maddox Peter H. Manley Cary McDavid Frances Meeks Scott W. Mills Chauncie Myers Allan T. Nakama Scott Pauley Russell Perez Shirley F. Pettite Elwood J. Randolph George J. Reckentine John E. Roberts Rafael Sanchez Shawn P. Schoelsser Shelia F. Shazier Martin Donald Stein Craig Stokes Evelyn Lema Tankoh James D. Tyler Andrea Rowland Underwood Susan V. Volskay William J. Watson Thomas J. White Deneen G. Williams Ronald K. Wisdon

High School 1991 Ami Arnold Jennifer Fehlig Bender Libby Vinson Blair Brandon J. Brinson Clinton Brown Barry Butcher Elizabeth L. Cox Jean Davis Lyle R. Eaton Beverly Raenell Ehlert Bryan Frenzel Zoie J. Hodger Christopher Ryan Levi Dena Madden Mark F. Maynor Hamid Rauf Bradley Shawn Roberts William G. Rocker David Sallad James S. Stevens Theodore F. Surmeier John Robert Toroni Michelle M. Verneau


T A P S

“Let no one weep for me, or celebrate my funeral with mourning; for I still live, as I pass to and fro through the mouths of men.”

William Daniel (Danny) Warnell JC 1962 October 23, 2015

Edgar Wood JC 1941 April 21, 2016 Hilliard Gail Rogers JC 1957 April 9, 2016

Roy Gene Rountree Prep 1966, JC 1968 June 9, 2016

James Longstreet Sibley Jennings, Jr. JC 1959 March 31, 2016

GYSGT Milton A. Davis, USMC (Ret.) JC 1976 November 26, 2015

-- Quintus Ennius

Marvin Kilgore JC 1976 Aug 4, 2016

Adam Youmans HS 2013 April 11, 2016

James A. (Jay Jay) Fuller JC 2002 April 29, 2016

Lt. Col. Myron (Mike) Stouffer Former Director, GMC Moody AFB April 30, 2016

Rebecca Sue Davenport Cranford JC 2006 May 17, 2016

COL Charles W. Ennis A most cherished alumni In memory of alumnus, supporter and friend of Georgia Military College COL Charles W. Ennis graduated from both Georgia Military College Prep School (’38) and Junior College (’40). After 30 years of service in the U.S. Army, he as his late wife, Virginia, returned to Milledgeville where he served for 20 years as the Marketing Director for Exchange Bank and where the couple raised five children. He joined the GMC Board of Trustees in the 1970s and led the newly reactivated GMC Foundation in 1985, calling efforts to raise funds and secure land donations for expansion of the campus a “labor of love.” COL Ennis received the GMC Service Award in 1996 for attaining notable success in his field or profession, and for serving to inspire others to achieve excellence. To honor Virginia, who passed away in 1999, Ennis established the Charles W. and Virginia B. Ennis Fund for History and Political Science, an endowment to enhance the teaching of these subjects. He said, “GMC gave me the foundation to succeed in two careers. I love the school and want to see it continue to offer advantages for young people.” In 2012, in recognition of his continued love and support of GMC, COL Ennis was named Trustee Emeritus of The GMC Foundation. In recent years, he was the honored guest for many GMC events and widely recognized as one of GMC’s most cherished alumni.

HAS MOVED TO A NEW SCHEDULE. WE WILL PUBLISH IT IN THE WINTER (JANUARY/FEBRUARY) AND SUMMER (AUGUST/SEPTEMBER) TO BETTER FEATURE THE MAGAZINE FOR GMC ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

THE MANY ACTIVITIES DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR.

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NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID MACON, GEORGIA PERMIT NO. 280

GEORGIA MILITARY COLLEGE

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M I L I TA R Y C O

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OFFICE OF COLLEGE RELATIONS 201 EAST GREENE STREET MILLEDGEVILLE, GA 31061

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2016

1916

GE

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Celebrating

100 YEARS OF ROTC | 1916-2016

College Rings Are Now Available! • Cadet Rings for Male and Female Graduates of the Milledgeville Campus • College Rings for Male and Female Graduates of All Campuses • Prerequisite: · Completed at least one year of study at a GMC campus · Validation will be made with GMC prior to order Allow 6-10 weeks for delivery. For more information, contact Amanda Greene, Balfour, 478-452-1325.

Cadet Ring

College Ring

Georgia Military College - The Cadence Magazine - Summer 2016  

The Magazine for GMC Alumni and Friends

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