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The Diana Wortham Theatre presents the comic brilliance of Tomas Kubinek – Mainstage Special Attractions 2013. PAGE 2

North Carolina Stage Company’s 11th Season includes The Complete Works of William Shakespeare. PAGE 21 The Asheville Symphony Orchestra begins its 52nd season with a performance by violinist Chee-Yun. PAGE 7

AND MORE! HART presents Neil Simon’s comedy Lost in Yonkers. PAGE 3 Asheville Chamber Music Series.

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Magic of the Smokies Art Receptions. PAGE 11

INTERVIEWS WITH: Charlie Gerencer and Greg Brown

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William Locklear

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Holly McFarling

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Guillermo Leon

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Laugh Your Asheville Off Comedy Festival PAGE

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2012-2013 SEASON

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 15, 2012

NOV.17, 2012 Rachmaninoff’s Paganini Variations

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION 828.254.7046 U www.ashevillesymphony.org

FREE

Labor Day, September 3rd at 7:00 PM VIP seating: $35 Lawn seating: FREE OUTDOOR for more info: call 828-254-7046 CONCERT or visit www.ashevillesymphony.org

See all the events at www.CLAPAsheville.com 2 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

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2012/2013 MAINSTAGE SEASON

Symphonie fantastique

OCT. 13, 2012 Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2

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The Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place

OPENING NIGHT:

SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE 8.13.2012

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performance

Daniel Meyer, Music Director Concerts take place in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

Falla Ritual Fire Dance Glazunov Violin Concerto Chee-Yun, violin Berlioz Symphonie fantastique

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Tomas Kubinek: Certified Lunatic and Master of the Impossible – January 2013

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he Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack The 2012/2013 Mainstage Special AtPlace Mainstage Series will showtractions Series showcases four performanccase a wide range of top touring es that cross multiple genres. The Capitol artists in music, theater, dance, Steps (October 17 & 18, 2012) provide song comedy, and other performing arts. parodies and skits. Motet: Circo Aereo + The Mainstage Series season opens on Gandini Juggling (November 1 & 2, 2012), September 14, 2012 with Grammy-winenthralling, gravity-defying movement. A ning singer/songwriter Kathy Mattea in her Swannanoa Solstice (December 16, 2012), newest musical journey, Calling Me Home. a beloved holiday tradition featuring world Kathy’s brand new project is a collection of renowned musicians Al Petteway, Amy songs exploring Appalachia – as a wild and White and Robin Bullock who are joined by beautiful mountain land, a genre of distincta wealth of storytellers, dancers and special ly American music, and for many, the deep guest musicians. Tomas Kubinek: Certiroots of family. fied Lunatic and Master of the Impossible The 2012/2013 Mainstage Music Series (January 19, 2013), an exuberant show that at Diana Wortham Theatre features some of is equal parts comic brilliance, virtuosic the nation’s top touring acts: Jeremy Kittel vaudeville, and irresistible charm. Band (October 12, 2012); Janis Ian & Tom The Annual Theatre Benefit Party + Paxton – Together at Last (October 20, Performance on April 27, 2013 begins with a 2012); Mountain Heart (November 9, delectable pre-performance dessert and wine 2012); The Kruger Brothers (Noreception for VIP ticket holders at 7:30 p.m. vember 17, 2012); John McCutchThen the party moves into the theatre at eon (February 23, 2013); Leahy 8:30 p.m. for Broadway’s Next H!T Musi(March 5 & 6, 2013); and Jimmy cal. Master improvisers gather made-up, hit Webb (March 15, 2013). songs suggestions from the audience and The 2012/2013 Mainstage create a spontaneous evening of music Dance Series opens with a fierce and laughter. and eclectic evening of Spanish The 2012/2013 Matinee Series dance and music with Flamenco for Students and Families is a full Vivo Carlota Santana (Februschedule of shows to complement ary 21 & 22, 2013). Followed the classroom curriculum of area by the gutsy and entertaining students and teachers. River North Dance Chicago This year’s Mainstage (March 8 & 9, 2013). PiloMatinee Series inbolus returns (March 19 & cludes: Martha Speaks 20, 2013) to wow Asheville (October 9 &10, 2012), audiences with its athleticism, The Giver (October 23, invention, and grace. 2012), Skippyjon Jones (October 30, The 2012/2013 Mainstage 2012), Motet: Circo Aereo + Gandini Theatre Series features three Juggling (November 1, 2012), The Pilobolus compelling performances. Civil War (January 28 – 31, 2013), returns in American Place Theatre’s LiteraThe Taming of the Shrew (FebruMarch 2013. ture to Life® presents The Giver ary 4, 2013), Flamenco Vivo Carlota (October 23, 2012), a John NewSantana (February 22, 2013), River bery Medal-winner and critically acclaimed North Dance Chicago: Street Beat – Dance canonical work. Aquila Theatre Company Through the Decades (March 8, 2013), and brings two nights of entertainment: first Click, Clack, Moo (May 7 & 8, 2013). Edmond Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac (February 1, 2013), follwed by The Taming IF of the Shrew (February 2, 2013). YOU Tickets for all performances go GO on sale August 21 and are available The 2012/2013 Mainstage Celtic Series online at www.dwtheatre.com as presents four unforgettable bands in the well as from the box office at (828) 257Scots-Irish tradition: FullSet (February 4530. The theatre offers flexible discount 28, 2013); Altan (March 21, 2013); Comas packages. Savings range from 10% to (April 25, 2013); and one of Scotland’s most 20% off regular prices. Packages available popular musicians, Dougie MacLean (May through the Diana Wortham Theatre box 12, 2013) for a special Mother’s Day concert. only by calling (828) 257-4530.


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stage preview HART presents Neil Simon’s Classic Comedy

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Lost in Yonkers

ART’s next production is one of the most celebrated comedies by Broadway’s most successful playwright, Neil Simon. Lost in Yonkers which will run August 17-26 at the Performing Arts Center in Waynesville, debuted at the Richard Rogers Theater in February 1991 and won the Pulitzer Prize and Tony award, marking the high point in Simon’s career. He would never reach such heights again. Neil Simon is perhaps America’s most underrated playwright. He is also by far the most successful. His career began during the golden age of television, writing for Sid Caesar’s “Your Show of Shows,” and the “Phil Silvers Show,” among others. On Caesar’s show his collaborators were Woody Allen, Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner. Each would go on to make major contributions to the world of comedy and the world of entertainment, Allen in film, Brooks in film and on Broadway, Reiner in television, and Simon with his plays. Starting in 1961 with “Come Blow Your Horn,” he seemed to have a gift for creating sharp, witty, satirical slap stick. As a child he was a fan of Charlie Chaplin and anyone reading a Simon play can see the influence. In 1963 he created the first of a legendary series of hits on Broadway: Barefoot in the Park (1963), and The Odd Couple (1965), for which he won a Tony Award, follwed by The Good Doctor God’s Favorite, Chapter Two, Doctor, They’re Playing Our Song Song, and I Ought to Be in Pictures. During 1966 Simon had four shows playing in Broadway theaters at the same time: Sweet Charity Charity, The Star-Spangled Girl, The Odd Couple, and Barefoot in the Park Park. Other plays of the period include The Sunshine Boys, and the musical Promises Promises. On film Simon created The Odd Couple (1968), Sweet Charity (1969), The Out-of-Towners (1970), Plaza Suite (1971), The Last of the Red Hot Lovers (1972), The Heartbreak Kid (1972), The Prisoner of Second Avenue (1972), The Sunshine Boys (1975), Murder by Death (1976), The Goodbye Girl (1977), and California Suite (1978). In 1983 he became the only living playwright to have ever had a Broadway theater named in his honor. But critically the success had a price. He was also derided for his light comedies. But Simon was about to

enter his greatest period, creating a series of personal works that remain his masterpieces. In March 1983 Simon debuted Brighton Beach Memoirs, and stunned the theater community. The play was funny but also a deeply felt look at a Jewish family in the late 1930’s. It was his own story he was finally telling. He followed it with Biloxi Blues (1985), then Broadway Bound (1986). The public flocked to the trilogy and they became his most successful and critically acclaimed works, but in 1991 he topped them all with Lost in Yonkers. The play tells the story of two young brothers left to live with their grandmother when their traveling salesman father can no longer take care of them. Living with them is Bella, their aunt, a mentally slow and excitable woman intimidated by her immigrant mother and also on the scene is their hoodlum uncle. It is a coming of age tale, but with a family dynamic worthy of any classic drama. Simon was blessed with a stellar cast with Tony awards going to all of the leads, including Irene Worth, Mercedes Ruehl and Kevin Spacey. Simon followed Yonkers with his final memory play, Laughter on the 23rd Floor, which enjoyed a modest success and mixed reviews. His last Broadway production, 45 Seconds from Broadway, opened for a short run in 2001. Simon is now 85, and has effectively retired as a playwright, but he has left behind an amazing body of work that continues to delight audiences. We have produced many of his works, and Yonker’s director Wanda Taylor has previously directed the Brighton Beach trilogy of plays for HART. It is fitting that she should oversee this production. Her cast includes: Sean Bruce, Zak Shanken, Jessica Bachar, Michael Lodico, Lyn Donely, Scott Shanken and Beth Johnson.

6HDVRQ

* Friday, September 21 ~ 8 pm David Finckel & Wu Han Duo Friday, November 2 ~ 8 pm The Jupiter Quartet Sunday, February 10 ~ 4 pm Windscape Friday, March 8 ~ 8 pm Jasper String Quartet Friday, April 5 ~ 8 pm Trio Solisti * Debut of the new Asheville Chamber Music Series Steinway grand piano.

828.575.7427 | ashevillechambermusic.org Unitarian Universalist Church of Asheville | 1 Edwin Place at Charlotte Street

BE MOVED. 2012/2013 MAINSTAGE SERIES

IF YOU HART presents Lost in Yonkers GO on August 17, 18, 23, 24, 25 at

7:30, and Sundays August 19 and 26 at 3 p.m. Tickets; $20 for adults, $18 for seniors, students $8. Special $5 discount tickets for students for Sunday’s and Thursdays. Box Office opens Monday, August 6. Call (828) 456-6322 for reservations. Tickets available online at www.harttheatre.com. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville, NC.

River North Dance Chicago

Find your passion at dwtheatre.com New season: Tickets on sale August 21st Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 3


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performance INTERVIEW WITH

Charlie Gerencer and Greg Brown Producers of Laugh Your Asheville Off 2012

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he Laugh Your Asheville Off Comedy Festival (LYAO) is the country’s leading non competitive format stand up comedy festival. The festival prides itself on showcasing some of the country’s best untapped talent as well as delivering some of the comedy world’s most accomplished stand up comedy performers annually.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little bit

about Laugh Your Asheville off and how it first came about?

Charlie Gerencer: Greg put together the

first LYAO festival six years ago out of the desire to stop driving back and forth to Charlotte to see comedy. I teamed up with

RRM: What

are some of your future plans for LYAO?

INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

him shortly after the first event and we designed a model for what we thought an Asheville comedy festival could be and put it into effect.

Greg Brown:

Greg Brown

RRM: What were you doing before LYAO and what do you do the rest of the year when not working on this festival?

CG: Greg was working in Asheville as a writ-

er and chef and I came from the television development and live event business in Los Angeles. Greg wrote a NY times best selling cookbook and I was a key development executive that produced NBC’s Last Comic Standing. Greg currently is a working stand Standing up comedian and runs the Altamont Theatre and I recently was named head of television and film development for Pygmy Wolf Productions in L.A.

Our goal is to continually grow this great event. Our original vision came together Charlie Gerencer organically and because of the natural appeal and growth of how we produce we have garnered attention from the television and live event world. We constantly field attention from some of the biggest networks and event organizers in the country.

RRM: Are you still planning on opening a comedy club in Asheville again?

GB: It’s always on our radar. Comedy is a

trending art, so if we decide to do something permanent and weekly we would have to stay true to our beliefs, and a traditional club is appearing a little outdated these days. Asheville has many tremendous alterna‘LYAO Interview’ continued on page 8

THE LAUGH YOUR ASHEVILLE OFF COMEDY FESTIVAL – AUGUST 14-18

Tom Simmons

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4 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

Tim Northern

M Dickson

he five-day, multi-venue Festival begins Tuesday August 14, with the “Local Laughs for Brother Wolf” charity show at The Magnetic Field. All door proceeds from the show will be donated to Brother Wolf Animal Rescue. On Wednesday August 15 the festival moves to the Highland Brewing Company for the widely popular Laugh Your Asheville Off Launch Party. Comedian Matt Fulchiron will be the featured performer. Following the Highland Launch Party the festivities continue to downtown for a late night showcase at the Lexington Avenue Brewery featuring Internet phenom Seaton Smith. On Thursday, the festival then travels to the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium, for a blockbuster performance by stand-up megastar Jim Gaffigan, followed by a festival comedic showcase at the “Pulp” located in

Jim Gaffigan

Ryan Singer

the Orange Peel featuring the talented Los Angeles based comedian Nate Craig. The Diana Wortham Theatre then plays host to the “LYAO Famous Showcases” on Friday night, with national touring stand-up comedian and newly published author of “Dear Dad, It’s Over,” M. Dickson. In addition, The Altamont Theater will present the “LYAO Live at the Altamont” showcase late Friday night, with Ryan Singer. On Saturday August 18, the festival takes over the Diana Wortham Theatre for two shows. Cerebral favorite Tim Northern will close the 7 p.m. show, and the 9:30 p.m. show will feature Comedy Central’s Tom Simmons. IF YOU Full lineups and ticket GO information available at

www.laughyourashevilleoff.com.


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we love this place RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Fifteen, Number Twelve

AUGUST 2012

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Poetry Editor: Ted Olson Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, Judy Ausley, Kathey Avery, Jenny Bunn, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Amy Ammons Garza, Beth Gossett, Chall Gray, Steven R. Hageman, Max Hammonds, Phil Hawkins, Marilynne Herbert, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, JéWana Grier McEachin, Kay S. Miller, Marcianne Miller, April Nance, Ted Olson, Kathi Petersen, T. Oder, R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Marisa Whitaker. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St. Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, August 2012 Vol. 15 No. 12

2 Performance

Diana Wortham Theatre. . . . . . . . . . 2 NYS3 Professional Youth Program . 6 Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . . 7 Free Labor Day Concert . . . . . . . . 20

3 Stage Preview

HART – Lost in Yonkers . . . . . . . . . 3 North Carolina Stage Company . . 21 ACT – The Odd Couple . . . . . . . . 27 Magnetic Field. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

4 Interviews

Charlie Gerencer and Greg Brown William Locklear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holly McFarling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guillermo Leon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 19 31 37

8 Columns

Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon. . 8 Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . 13 James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . 14 Ted Olson - Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . 17 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . 18 Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . . 22 Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . 23 Michael Parker – Food & Wine . . . 28 Max Hammonds, MD - Health. . . 33

Help Kinsey Claire Vaitkus Reach the Miss North Carolina Pageant Kinsey Claire Vaitkus was awarded the title of Miss Appalachian USA 2013 through the Miss North Carolina pageant in High Point, North Carolina last Kinsey Claire Vaitkus November. The winner of the 2013 title is awarded a chance at Miss America, and a spectacular scholarship! Vaitkus will be attending Western Carolina University this month, enrolling in the Bachelor’s in Computer Science program. She is offering sponsors the opportunity to advertise on her website and on the banner she’ll use for public events. Your support will help Vaitkus reach the Miss North Carolina Pageant. Please visit her Facebook page, www. facebook.com/MissAppalachian, and send her a message for more details or volunteer opportunities.

Stories of Mountain Folk The hour-long radio show Stories of Mountain Folk is aired every Saturday morning from 9-10 a.m. on WRGC Jackson County Radio, 540 AM on the dial. The show, which broadcasts out of Sylva, NC, contains four interviews with interesting people from all cultures whose heritage grew out of western North Carolina, woven together with original songs and the musical talents of local songwriters and entertainers.

performance The Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place 2012/2013 Season Schedule

ARTICLE ON PAGE

2

Asheville Chamber Music 2012/2013 Season Schedule

ARTICLE ON PAGE

7

NC Stage Company 2012/2013 Season Schedule ARTICLE ON PAGE

21

Haywood County Arts Council Friday, August 10

Pianist Margarita Shevchenko. ARTICLE ON PAGE

39

NYS3

August 12-18 Professional youth program for television, commercial, voiceover, film, and theatre. ARTICLE ON PAGE

6

Lost in Yonkers August 17-26

HART presents Neil Simon’s classic comedy. ARTICLE ON PAGE

3

Symphonie Fantastique Saturday, September 15

The Asheville Symphony Orchestra begins it's 52nd season. ARTICLE ON PAGE

7

9 Fine Art

Folk Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Rapid River Magazine Receptions . 11

13 Music

Eilen Jewel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 David Roth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Drunken Prayer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us On Facebook – Win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

24 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 24

34 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

35 35 35 35 35

32 Healthy Lifestyles On the Cover: The Laugh Your

ABIPA – Preventive Care . . . . . . . . 32

Asheville Off Comedy Festival, August 14-18. PAGE 4

Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 5


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noteworthy Professional Youth Program for Television, Commercial, Voiceover, Film, and Theatre

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his fall the New York Studio for Stage and Screen (NYS3) is officially launching its Professional Youth Training Program. With Agents, Producers and Directors watching your work, the opportunities at NYS3’s don’t just stop at mastering your craft. The staff collectively has over 300 years of professional work experience and includes: 17 year Soap Opera Star and 18 year teaching veteran Timothy O’Keefe; SAG Agent Sharon Martin; former Artistic/Managing Director of Gotham City Improv/Groundlings East and Improv/Acting on Film Instructor at NYU’s Tish theatre program Tom Chalmers; 12-year veterans LA Voiceover professionals Sharon Martin, and head of the Atlanta division of Voice Talent Productions, a NYC based talent agency Lisa Biggs; international teacher and 35-year veteran to movement and Alexander Technique Idelle Packer; NYC actor, director and dancer Richard Handy; and many more. The first semester of the program offers courses in Improv, Commercial/ Television Acting, Film Acting, Commercial and Animation Voiceover, Auditioning for Theatre and Film, Movement, Swordplay, and even a Flash Mob class that just so happens to end around Halloween (Thriller/ the Time Warp). Additionally there will be workshops in: Stage Combat, Technical Theatre, Make-Up, Musical Theatre, the Business of Acting and informational seminars with Casting Directors, Voiceover Agents and SAG Agents. They offer over 30 different classes and workshops, NYS3 will help you firmly solidify your skills, raise your confidence and teach you to seamlessly weave between the camera and the stage. If a school is only as good as its instructors then this is one of the best. As one student put it: “Who would have thought I could have received NYC caliber actor training in the mountains of NC?” NYS3 operates with the highest level of integrity in its pursuit to have its students successfully master the craft of acting on stage and screen. “Backed by so much experience, the instructors at NYS3 know what it is like at every level of the industry. They know what works and what it takes to be successful in the business. Though more importantly than that 6 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

- they are teachers who are able to effectively develop your foundation and find the core issues instead of treating the symptoms. “They give you a process and a foundation on which you can always stand and depend on. They are here to provide an option to serious students, ultimately get you work and, as the director of NYS3 Richard Handy put it, “change your life in the process. To train at this level changes you in so many extraordinary ways - ways that are applicable to all walks of life.” Lisa Biggs, founder of Voxy Girls, the voiceover industry’s first professional collective female voiceover group based out of LA and Asheville, will be teaching the voiceover animation classes. She says, “If you have the proper training there is so much work out there to be had if people only knew how to get it - especially for kids and especially in voiceover. The problem is that most people aren’t well trained and they don’t even realize it. “You never stop growing with this work. You never stop studying, but even if you are well trained you have to know how to get the job - make connections and know what resources are out there for you. It’s an extraordinary art, but there is also a business side that is essential to succeed. “So if you want to do this... get trained - REALLY well trained so you have a versatile and solid foundation from which to work. Then figure out the business side and go for it. It will give you the best chance to get paid to do what you love and do it well. That’s the reason I work here. It’s exactly what they do and they do it right. It’s amazing that something like this is actually in Asheville, NC. Who knew?” So why Asheville? The NYS3 director put it simply: “NYS3 was developed out of a passion and a need for sharing the craft of acting at the highest level possible in one of the most beautiful locations on the planet. Asheville has long been known for its music, arts and crafts, outdoor adventure, world renowned local organic food and micro breweries, homeopathic medicine, warm culture and the endless beautiful scenery of the Blue Ridge Mountains. It is also home to one of the most progressive arts movements in history with the Black Mountain College

and the first ‘Happening’. Asheville is a perfect fit in an already dynamic and creative culture. It gives serious students the opportunity to study with NYC/LA instructors without having to pay big city prices (and they can go kayaking behind the studio on the French Broad River after class).” Who can argue with that? The NYS3 Program is open to students of all levels and backgrounds who are prepared for the rigors and serious commitment necessary to effectively participate in the program. You must be at least 12 years old to participate and there is an interview process prior to being accepted into the program. Interviews are being held the week of August 12-18. Grand Opening Discount packages are available. For more information or to schedule an interview please go to www.nys3.com or call (917) 7102805 or email info@nys3.com

Auditions for HART’s “Light In The Piazza ” The Haywood Arts Regional Theatre will hold auditions for its October production of the hit Broadway musical “The Light in the Piazza” Sunday and Monday, August 5 & 6, at 6:30 p.m. The production is being directed by Charles Mills. There are leading roles for four women and four men with additional supporting roles and chorus. Auditions will be held in the Feichter Studio of the HART Theatre, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville, NC. More details at www.harttheatre.com.


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performance ASHEVILLE SYMPHONY PRESENTS

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Symphonie Fantastique

he Asheville Symphony Orchestra begins its 52nd season on Saturday, September 15 at 8 p.m., at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in downtown Asheville. The concert will consist of works by de Falla, Glazunov, and Berlioz, conducted by Music Director Daniel Meyer, and featuring the world-renowned violinist Chee-Yun. The concert opens with the popular “Ritual Fire Dance” from El amor brujo by Manuel de Falla. “With its churning rhythms

and authentic Spanish flavor,” says Meyer, “this music pulsates with abandon.” Dating from 1916, the original ballet is most famous for this excerpt, a short dance in which the heroine of the story banishes evil spirits. The major work of the first half of the evening is the Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 82 by Alexander Glazunov. Born in St. Petersburg in 1865, the composer was not interested in “modern” music, and famously walked out of a Prokofiev performance, commenting that encouraging such works

Asheville Chamber Music Series 60th Anniversary Season

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he Asheville ChamBY MARILYNNE HERBERT ber Music Series (ACMS) presents its SEASON SCHEDULE 60th anniversary seaDavid Finckel and Wu Han son featuring a roster Duo – Friday, September of internationally acclaimed 21, 2012 at 8 p.m. Celartists including cellist, David list David Finckel and Finckel and pianist, Wu Han; pianist Wu Han were one of the most sought-after named Musicians of the quartets, The Jupiter Quartet; Year for 2012 by Musical Windscape, America’s top America, the first duo rated wind ensemble; the to win this prestigious next generation of chamber award. music “stars,” the Jasper String Quartet; and Trio The Jupiter Quartet – FriSolisti, “the most exciting David Finckel and pianist, day, November 2, 2012 piano trio in America” (The Wu Han at 8 p.m. Formed in New Yorker). 2001, the Jupiter String For more than a half a century the Quartet earned first prize in the Banff InterACMS has taken its place as an important national Quartet Competition, followed in cultural resource in Asheville, bringing 2008 by an Avery Fisher Career Grant. world-renowned chamber artists to the city. Windscape – Sunday, February 10, 2013 at As one of the nation’s oldest continuous 4 p.m. America’s top rated wind ensemble. performing chamber music organizations, Windscape was founded in 1994 by five emiit has been recognized for its outstanding nent woodwind soloists. programs, and for its collaboration with the strings program of the Asheville-Buncombe Jasper String Quartet – Friday, March 8, 2013 Schools. at 8 p.m. The Jasper String Quartet received Says Richard Wrightson, ACMS presithe Cleveland Quartet Award to quartets on dent, “As the opening performance of the the way to establishing major careers. sensational 2012-2013 season, the return Trio Solisti – Friday, April 5, 2013 at 8 p.m. of David Finckel and Wu Han to Asheville The Trio Solisti has been hailed as “the will be a major musical event. Wu Han will most exciting piano trio in America,” by The perform on our newly acquired magnificent New Yorker. Steinway B Grand Piano. This will be its public debut.” The ACMS season runs from SeptemIF YOU Season tickets are $135 each, a $40 ber 2012 through April 2013, and includes GO savings on the $35 individual ticket five concerts at the Unitarian Universalist price. Students may attend free of Church of Asheville located at 1 Edwin Place charge. To purchase tickets or for more at Charlotte Street. Concerts begin at 8 p.m. information call Nathan Shirley at (828) on Friday evenings with the exception of the 259-3626, email acmspam@aol.com, or visit February 10 concert, which will take place on www.ashevillechambermusic.org. Sunday at 4 p.m.

BY

STEVEN R. HAGEMAN

would only encourage “harmful trends.” In 1899 he was appointed professor at the St Petersburg Conservatory and in 1905 became its director. His name appeared regularly on American concert programs and he traveled extensively conducting his own music. For a while, his eight symphonies were held in high esteem, and regarded as – next to Tchaikovsky’s six – the most substantial contribution to the Russian symphonic repertoire. This concerto, composed in 1904, has become Glazunov’s best known work. Its two movements are played without interruption and are separated by an elaborate solo cadenza, a showpiece for a virtuoso violinist. Chee-Yun, winner of the 1989 Young Concert Artists International Auditions and the 1990 Avery Fisher Career Grant, performs regularly with the world’s foremost orchestras, including the Philadelphia Orchestra, the London Philharmonic, and the Toronto, Houston, Seattle, Pittsburgh, Atlanta and National symphony orchestras. Her numerous recordings have received wide acclaim, starting with her debut album of virtuoso encore pieces in 1993. Her recent CD of the Penderecki Violin Concerto No. 2 on Naxos was acclaimed as “a performance of staggering virtuosity and musicality” (American Record Guide). Maestro Meyer is looking forward to featuring her “sweet tone and dynamic stage presence.” After intermission, the Symphony performs the provocative and mystical Symphonie Fantastique by Hector Berlioz, a work described by Meyer as “an infamous musical depiction of an obsessive infatuation.” Berlioz wrote it in 1830, at the age of 25, as a testament to his infatuation with the Shakespearean actress Harriet Smithson. (He eventually married her, only to find that reality did not meet the expectations of fantasy – the marriage was a disaster.) The brilliant and troubled piece is united by an Idée fixe, a musical theme

Violinist Chee-Yun

depicting the beloved, which is developed in each of its five movements. This approach to art was the natural outcome of Berlioz’ belief in the kinship of music and ideas. For him, music and literature were inextricably connected as the quintessential expression of human imagination and emotion.

IF YOU Tickets for the performance are GO available through the Symphony

office or the US Cellular Center Asheville box office, and range in price from $58 to $20. Subscriptions are available for the entire season of seven concerts from $346 to $100, or on a “pick three” basis for $167 to $55. Discounts for students are also available. Visit www.ashevillesymphony.org or call (828) 254-7046 for more details.

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the curmudgeon Take a Try at Spelling

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oy,” asked the breadman as he entered the general store with an armload of hard rolls and familysized loaves of whole wheat, “have you guys been following the various TV and newspaper stories about the decline of spelling ability in the country?” “No,” replied the man who was delivering gasoline as he sat eating a Moonpie dipped in coffee from the communal pot, “but I actually graduated from high school and went on the a community college and only have this job because my company downsized a lot of workers in the computer department, none of them having to do with spelling, and most of our jobs were outsourced to India.” He paused to move old newspapers that crowded the radiator in the front window and sat down while he flipped through a pile of credit card receipts with the same flair that a Las Vegas gambler would approach a deck of blackjack cards. “Yep,” said the line installer for the folks looking to replace disc TV with various receptions using phone lines, “I never

Can We Talk?

Let us help with your education in preventive care and life style changes.

Asheville Buncombe Institute of Parity Achievement We can speak to your church, community, civic group, or organization on numerous topics vital to their health. Call us at 251-8364 between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., Monday through Thursday to schedule a time when our our dedicated team can assist you in creating a healthier lifestyle. To learn more about us visit www.abipa.org

BY

PETER LOEWER

knew that anybody cared much for spelling these days.” “For your information,” piped up the Illustration by Peter Loewer Curmudgeon, “I’m one of the few residents who noticed when signs were spelled wrong at intersections that time when the ambulance painter got hired at the county maintenance shop.” “What signs were spelled wrong,” asked bread, gasoline, and TV in unison? “Why the stop signs, of course,” said the curmudgeon. “I just got my new Ford pick-up — that mighty nice red one that lasted me from 1972 up to last year — anyway I was dricing along to the four corners to pick up some bailing wire from the store over there since he didn’t have none here, and I came to the sign that’s been there since the late 60’s and it said “POTS in big white letters. “POTS?” his audience asked. “POTS,” he answered, “and not only there but the sign at Wiggley’s Road where it runs into Nittling’s Road, and the one at County Road 118 when it hits the never-tobe-finished Interstate. Every one of the signs that once read STOP now read POTS.

• Breast cancer • Prostate cancer • Chronic illness management • Healthy heart education • Colon cancer prevention • Diabetes prevention and management • Resources in the community • Cervical cancer • and more

Sunday, August 26, 2012 at 5 p.m. Join us at the historic Sherrill Inn for our annual fundraiser, featuring food, music, and games. We will also share the wonderful work we have provided to the community this year, along with our plans for the coming year.

8 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

“Why?” they all asked. “Seems the county hired a guy who worked in the city painting those ambulance fronts; he’s been painting ECNALUBMA for so long I guess he thought it was the correct way to spell the rest of the road signs. The only signs he had an easy time with were the railroads ‘cause RR backwards is still RR. “LLIH PEETS, RAEG WOL were toughies for him. And if I hadn’t gone over to the town barn and told them all, they’d still be wrong today. So don’t say I don’t know how to spell or know the finer points for those foreign codes.” “Foreign codes?” they asked. “Yeh, the words that TV newsmen use, like ‘sagging economy.’ Any dummy knows that sag spelled backwards is gas and that’s a big problem with this economy.” “Do you believe it?” asked the breadman. “Some days I do,” said TV. “You better,” said the curmudgeon.

Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

you have learned from doing LYAO for so many years now?

that we are a nationally recognized event and word got out that we are a fun event we open the submission process to every comic in the country that wants to submit. Performers submit from about January to June. We then organize a focus group and review every clip. We do a focus group because we feel that there should be an unbiased point of view on the selection process. After all, comedy is an extremely subjective art.

CG: Good question. This may sound ridicu-

RRM: How much time have you spent craft-

‘LYAO Interview’ continued from page 4

Learn more about:

LOW GEAR, STEEP HILL

tive style comedy shows weekly and we feel that continuing to support and help them is more cutting edge and ultimately better for the scene, which we are so proud of.

RRM: What are some of the huge mistakes

lous but with our combined passion and experience we tend to correct each other before huge mistakes are made. Interestingly enough Greg and I were born on the exact same day. We have this intuitive reaction to automatically cover each other. So when a situation has the potential to go the wrong way we balance each other and correct it before it has the opportunity to be a mistake. Not saying we’re perfect, just lucky to have each other to keep the focus of what we want to accomplish. 12 years of live event producing certainly helps that too.

RRM: What process do you use in choosing

the comics who will perform here each year?

GB: In the beginning we sought out comics we liked and that were available. But now

ing LYAO over the past 12 months since the end of the last festival?

CG: We begin in early December every year. The entire festival takes about 8 months to put together. We take our time and try to work every detail including working only with local sponsorship. It would be easy to sell out and slap corporate America on our festival but we are true to supporting local businesses and encouraging our fan base to appreciate everything Asheville has to offer. IF YOU Laugh Your Asheville Off, GO August 14 to August 18. Tickets

call 800-927-0939. Visit www. laughyourashevilleoff.com.


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fine art August at the Folk Art Center

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ugust will be an exciting month at the Folk Art Center with daily craft demonstrations, exhibitions, a theatrical performance, and Wood Day. The Southern Highland Craft Guild will host the stage performance of Tom Godleski’s original play, Fresh Preserves August 3-5, 2012. Admission is $15 for adults and $10 for students. Fresh Preserves is the 2009 winner of Southern Appalachian Repertory Theatre’s Annual Scriptfest Playwright Competition. A wonderful blend of mountain storytelling and songwriting, the play is a true expression of southern Appalachian culture. Lyle Wheeler The Folk Art Center will host its annual celebration of wood crafts at Wood Day on Saturday, August 11 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Folk Art Center’s auditorium will be filled with lathes, sawhorses, wood tools and the master craftspeople who know how to use them. Demonstrations include carving, wood turning, broom making, and furniture design and construction. Southern Highland Craft Guild members Sandra Rowland and Jan Morris will host activities for children. The festivities include the Twelfth Annual Carve-Off Competition from 1 to 3 p.m. For the contest, participants have two hours to turn a simple block of wood into a work of art. Carvers must sign up by 12:30 to Jim McPhail participate.

BY

APRIL NANCE

Wood Day takes place Saturday, August 11.

Marlow Gates

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PG.

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Against The Forest Wall

IF YOU Admission to Wood Day and the GO Folk Art Center is free. The Folk

Art Center is located at Milepost 382 on the Blue Ridge Parkway in east Asheville. Headquarters to the Southern Highland Craft Guild, the Center also houses three galleries, a library, Allanstand Craft Shop and a Blue Ridge Parkway information desk and bookstore. For more information, call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org.

Aidan’s Walk

Sam's Gap After the Storm

Original Oil Paintings • Giclee Prints Commissions Accepted

www.mountainbrushworks.com • 828-734-9304 Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 9


RAPID RIVER MAGAZINE’S

MAGIC OF THE SMOKIES ARTISTS RECEPTIONS

Gallery 262 Photo: Marisa Whitaker

Magic of the Smokies Reception Friday, August 10 5-8:30 p.m. On display through August 28, 2012 PG.

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Riverside Studios Photo: Marisa Whitaker

Custom Designed Jewelry ❖ Local Arts & Crafts ❖ Jewelry Repair

Join us on Thursday, September 6 at Neo Cantina in Biltmore Village for the Awards Party and Reception, 5:30-9:30 p.m. On display through September 17, 2012.

29 Biltmore Ave. :: www.vandykejewelry.com :: (828) 281-4044 PG.

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10 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

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magic of the smokies art receptions Join us at these

FUN EVENTS for Rapid River Magazine’s Top 20 Winning Artists

Studio B Custom Framing & Fine Art

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ormerly located in The Shoppes at Beaver Lake, Studio B relocated 2 miles up the road in April 2010 to 171 Weaverville Highway. Patti Bell established Studio B Custom Framing in 1981 in Ohio and relocated to Asheville in October of 2006. Studio B specializes in museum, conservation, textile and shadowbox framing and offers a large selection of framing choices, some exclusive to the Asheville area. With more than 40 years of custom framing experience and 30 years of owning a gallery/custom framing business, owner Patti Bell offers extensive knowledge of color and design and competitive pricing on anything from a simple photo to your most valued artwork or keepsake. All work is done on-site by the owner with attention to detail. Studio B also offers consulting and hanging services for business, corporate and residential spaces. The expanded gallery area showcases artwork by regional, national and international artists. Currently on exhibit are original paintings by Brennen McElhaney, Jim Hefley, Carol Branton Morrow, and Stuart Roper; fiber tableau by Andrea Knott Brewer; small quilts by Marla Hattabaugh (Scottsdale, Arizona); and giclee prints by

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sheville’s Frame It to a T offers quality custom framing and design at a reasonable price. Using only materials of high quality and craftsmanship, Frame It to a T can frame that priceless photograph or piece of art in a unique and creative manner. Owner Sean Robbins and Designer Jasmine Collins combined 40 years of experience and extensive knowledge of framing, art and interior design make Frame It to a T one of Asheville’s best kept secrets. Frame It to a T has been in business since 1998 and is one of Asheville’s longest running frame shops. Frame It to a T is located at 1103 Brevard Road. Contact them at (828) 665-7730 or check out www.frameittoat.com. Artist discounts available.

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Asheville artists Ray Byram, Deborah Squier and Coralie Tweed. The gallery also Home Sweet Home features original porcelain ceramic by Sarah Jaeger (Helena, Montana) and one-of-a-kind jewelry pieces by Amy Jacob (Charlotte, NC). Please stop by and see what we have to offer. We’re located just 0.2 of a mile north of the Merrimon Ave./ Woodfin exit on the right.

an Dyke Jewelry and Fine Craft will host a reception on August 10, as part of Rapid River Arts and Culture Magazine’s cover art competition. The theme of the competition is “Magic of the Smokies.” Works by the 20 finalists will be displayed at the 29 Biltmore Avenue space through August 28, 2012. Owner and local jeweler Christopher Van Dyke takes great pride in having a space where established, as well as emerging artists, have an opportunity to display their work in a gallery setting. Van Dyke Gallery strives to be a vital component to the community’s artists, and since there is nothing much more fun than seeing great art, and seeing it done locally, it is a pretty darn fun goal to try and achieve.

IF YOU GO: Reception held Friday,

IF YOU GO: A reception for the artists will

August 3 from 5:30-8 p.m. On display through August 16. Studio B Custom Framing & Fine Art, 171 Weaverville Hwy., Asheville, NC 28804. Phone (828) 225-5200 or visit www. galleryatstudiob.com.

Studio B hosts Reception Friday, August 3

Vote for Your Favorite Artwork!

Frame It to a T

Van Dyke Jewelry and Fine Craft

Frame It to a T hosts Reception Friday, August 17

IF YOU GO: Reception held Friday,

August 17 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. On display through August 23. Frame It To a T, 1103 Brevard Road, Asheville, NC, (828) 665-7730, www.frameittoat.com

be held Friday, August 10 from 5-8:30 p.m. On display through August 28. Van Dyke Jewelry and Fine Craft, 29 Biltmore Ave., downtown Asheville. Phone (828) 281-4044, visit www.vandykejewelry.com

Food & Fun!

G

Leukos Lux

Van Dyke Jewelry and Fine Craft hosts Reception Friday, August 10

Meet the Artists! Silent Auction! A portion of the proceeds from the auction benefit Friends of Great Smoky Mountain National Park.

Great Smokies Creations

reat Smokies Creations, LLC is professionals. We take pride in providing hosting a reception of selected quality artwork and framing design for your works from Rapid River Magtreasured artwork. azine’s GSC is proud “Magic of to announce that we the Smokies” cover now offer fine art redesign contest, on production services. Saturday, August Our giclee prints are 25, from 2-5 pm. made with the latest The Village Green technology available is providing hors to ensure the highest d’oeuvres. quality. We offer a Enjoy our gallery variety of printing of local and regional surfaces, including artists, including Jocanvas and art papers. seph Meigs, Jo Ridge Bring us your artKelley and Michael work to photograph Robert Ludlow – giclee prints available M. Rodgers. Browse or you can provide our broad selection of prints, frames, pre-cut us with a digital file. We also offer profesmats, and accessories which allow you to sional custom canvas stretching and vacuum frame-it-yourself, or have a one of a kind press mounting. Your art will be ready for treasure designed just for you by one of our exhibition!

Great Smokies Creations hosts Reception Saturday, August 25

IF YOU GO: Reception held Saturday,

August 25 from 2-5 p.m. On display through September 4. Great Smokies, Creations Gallery, 85 Muse Business Park, Waynesville, NC 28786, (828) 452-4757

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 11


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sound experience Eilen Jewel at the Grey Eagle

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lthough her country-flavored and blues-infused version of contemporary folk – combined with a smattering of rockabilly and even surf music – has drawn comparisons to Lucinda Williams and Gillian Welch, Eilen Jewell’s strongest influences are Bessie Smith and Billie Holiday. Holiday in particular has served as inspiration for Jewell’s characteristic calculatingly stretched vocal style, one that changes tempo as the song dictates. Born and raised in Boise, Idaho, Jewell was playing both piano and guitar by the time she became a teen. Falling under the spell of Smith and Holiday, along with Bob Dylan and Howlin’ Wolf, she began playing local farmers’ markets and bars, all the while attending community college and trying to decide upon her next move. That move meant first relocating to Los Angeles and then, deciding the “city of angels wasn’t right for me” moving across country

to western Massachusetts. In 2005 she settled in Boston, where she quickly threw herself into the vigorous local music scene. Later that year she made the audacious decision to release a live album for her debut; the self recorded Nowhere in No Time sold briskly at her shows, giving Jewell the money needed for her first studio effort. The critical response to 2006’s Boundary Country led to a deal with Signature Sounds with her first national release, Letters from Sinners & Strangers, coming out a year later. Since then Jewell has released three more studio efforts, the newest being last years’ exquisite Queen of a Minor Key. Like the best of her music it inhabits a space between vintage country and the blues, with her straightforward but artful songs serving as an apt reminder that the history of those two styles are inextricably intertwined. It’s a loving tribute to Patsy Cline by way of Loretta Lynn. One can almost hear the late

BY JAMES

CASSARA

night laments of broken hearts and faithless men, told in hushed tones to the accompaniment of tinkling cocktail glasses with the scent of tobacco lingering. Her quiet, insistent delivery carries the day while the songs themselves, all 14 of which she wrote, provide ample evidence to her growth as a songwriter and keen observer of human nature. Her crackerjack band conjures up variations of the honky tonk sound, each song given careful consideration. It’s a welcome respite to the bluster and overkill that dominates so much of contemporary music with songs that demand to be heard from the stage.

WNC Jazz Profiles: Zack Page “Zack is a bassist who elevates the sound of the whole group.”

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e bridges any and all gaps stylistically simply because his sense of time and harmony are impeccable, and his sound is always up-to-date. Plus, Zack’s a blast to hang with, so being on the bandstand with him always feels natural and comfortable.”

~ Aaron Price

Zack Page has been performing as a professional bassist since the early ‘90s. His work with various jazz ensembles, theater companies and the cruise industry has taken him to all 50 U.S. States, the Caribbean islands, Australia, South America, Europe and the Far East. Born in Virginia, Zack primarily grew up in New Jersey, but his early days placed him in Cincinnati, parts of NC and Los Angeles. “While growing up I listened to a lot of heavy metal: Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden and Judas Priest. My father was a huge blues and jazz fan, so I also heard a lot of that growing up. He’d take my brothers and me into NYC to see Les Paul, the Mingus Big Band and others. My mother was an avid choral singer at church and both my brothers are musicians (guitar and piano). My grandfather, whom I never really knew, was a big jazz fan and he’d take my

Eilen Jewell at the Grey Eagle IF YOU on Thursday, August 16. Tickets GO are $10 in advance and $12 day or

show for this all ages limited seating performance. Visit www.thegreyeagle.com for more information.

BY

of gypsy jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt. Following time father from small-town spent in LA and NC up to Philadelphia New York City, and New York to see Zack relocated Miles Davis, Horace Silver to Asheville four and other jazz greats. My years ago. father would introduce my “In NY, I brothers and me to Oscar enjoyed living Peterson and the Modin such a rich ern Jazz Quartet through musical environalbums he played at home. ment with so He never pushed us into many players, all jazz or blues, but in later performing at a high school and college we very high level. I ended up heading in that noticed that the direction.” focus of the muZack began musisicians was always Zack Page Photo: Frank Zipperer cally on acoustic guitar intense, but there and piano, so I asked him was generally a relaxed, fun mood and I how he got started on the bass. “My father learned to appreciate every playing situation was a big fan of it and I received an electric from a musical standpoint.” bass for Christmas when I was 11. He’d Here in WNC, Zack enjoys a busy point out the bass lines of Ray Brown, Duck freelance schedule with many of North Dunn and Jerry Jemott on records he played Carolina’s finest musicians. “One Leg Up, at the house. I didn’t start playing the acousAsheville’s gypsy jazz band, is my main tic bass until I got to college in 1991.” While project. I also play with The Page Brothin college, Zack had the chance to play at ers Quartet, The Archrivals, The Hard Bop the prestigious Montreaux Jazz Festival in Explosion, Alien Music Club, Wendy Hayes Switzerland. Quartet, Crybaby, Satin Steel, and Russ In a jazz setting, Zack has had the Wilson.” good fortune to play and/or record with In terms of listening these days, Zack’s Billy Higgins, Marvin Stamm, Eddie favorite musicians have been coming out of Daniels and Babik Reinhardt, the son Eastern Europe and Scandinavia, specifically

EDDIE LESHURE

the Polish piano trio, Marcin Wasilewski Trio. “I also like the cutting edge jazz from Puerto Ricans Miguel Zenon and David Sanchez, plus lots of great jazz musicians in New York from Israel. As for non-jazz players, I like the Polish extreme metal band Behemoth and the New Orleans funk band, Dumpstaphunk.” Asked about his composing and recordings he’s on, he replied, “I’d like to do more composing. I have an album’s worth of material that’s been recorded. I think of myself more as a sideman or arranger, but again, I’d like to do much more writing. I’ve done a lot of sideman work with singer-songwriters, jazz singers, children’s music and instrumental jazz recordings. I did a recording with French musicians Francois Vola and Babik Reinhardt.” “Zack has the hallmark of every great musician: he makes everyone around him better!”

~ trumpeter Justin Ray www.onelegupjazz.com

Eddie LeShure is a jazz radio host, currently off-the-air, who encourages all readers to enthusiastically support local jazz.

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 13


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Long time Neko Case backing vocalist Kelly Hogan steps out to embrace her inner band leader, and does so in rather spectacular fashion. Abetted by a raft of songwriting friends, including such notables as the Magnetic Fields’ Stephin Merritt, Robyn Hitchcock, Andrew Bird, and M. Ward, Hogan has put together a disc that revels in its own heartache while keeping the pity quotient mercifully in check. Her first solo release in eleven years is a soulful gathering of kindred spirits. Backed by such legends as Booker T. Jones and Marvin Gaye drummer James Gadsen (along with some of this era’s finest players) Hogan infuses these songs with just the right mix of down home soul and country twang. Much like fellow songstress Shelby Lynne, her strength lies in a knack for spicing up a stylistic gumbo that includes a bit of everything while retaining its own flavor. Despite a highly acclaimed four album catalog Hogan has yet to break into the spotlight; this exceptional set shows she’s ready, willing, and more than able to do so. ****

Jesse Terry Empty Seat on a Plane Jesse Terry writes the sort of songs that may not immediately grab your attention but certainly require repeated listens. The pared down nature of his music – and this is never more evident than on Empty Seat on a Plane – hardly lends itself to hooks that engage or melodies that implant in your cranium. What they do is settle into your subconscious, and once there they don’t let go. “Let the Blue Skies Go to Your Head” is a prime example: Its insidiously cheerful melody contradicts the girl it portrays; one who is “afraid to take chances” and lives a life of missed adventure. That sentiment is balanced out with “Wishful Thinking” in which the protagonist unabashedly believes “anything is possible.” And how could you not love a line such as “But what I fear most is waking uninspired?” To be sure this is ‘message music’ and while it occasionally trips over its own sentiment it still works on its own unassuming terms. The piano and guitar dominated 14 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

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Welcome back to another go round at sharing some of my favorite recent discs; I am again sworn to cover as much music as possible while keeping my comments short and sweet. As always be sure to legally purchase these albums from your local record store of choice. Without them Asheville would be a little less cool of a town.

Kelly Hogan

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arrangements give the songs an uncluttered feel and when Terry does stretch out, such as in the soulful “Bitterroot Valley” or the country tinged mourn of “Coyotes,” it offers a glimpse of what else he might have up his sleeve. It’s the sort of lovely simplicity that makes this album a quiet joy, and one worthy of your attention. ****

Don Williams And So it Goes Sugar Hill Music Even during his hit making 1970s and 80s peak Don Williams sounded forty years older than he was, a world weary troubadour of hard times and hard living. Now that he’s reached his eighth decade the man hasn’t changed much, even if the industry has. On his first album in eight years Williams brings along such high profile friends as Alison Krauss, Vince Gill and Keith Urban but there’s no doubt whose show this is. Williams’ everyman supple delivery, coupled with stripped down arrangements and a flair for laid back tempo may seem stylistically out of touch, but the truth is he was cool long before country was. Such low key delights as “I Just Come Here for the Music” and “Imagine That” are ideal examples that less can be more. At ten tracks and less than 40 minutes And So It Goes may leave you wanting more but don’t worry: Williams’ catalog stretches back to1966 and includes nearly fifty amazingly consistent albums. And while those looking for the overblown arrangements and vocal theatrics that inhabit too much of modern country music will be sadly disappointed, for my money the economical approach of the singer known as “the Gentle Giant” is a very welcome guest. ***1/2

Various Artists Pa’s Fiddle: the Music of America This remarkable DVD captures a January 2012 performance from the Loveless Barn in Nashville. First aired (in truncated form) on PBS, the entire concert, based on the music referenced in The Little House on the Prairie books by Laura Ingalls Wilder, is headed by musical director Randy Scruggs and showcases an all-star backing band (Music City vets Matt Combs, Dennis

Crouch, Chad Cromwell, Hoot Hester, and Shad Cobb) along with featured artists Randy Travis, Rodney Atkins, Ronnie Milsap, Ashton Shepherd, The Roys, Natalie Grant, and Committed. As with any ensemble effort the show is a bit uneven – depending on how well the viewer likes any given singer – but what doesn’t waver is the genuine passion and reverences these top flight musicians have for the material and the intent. Randy Travis’ “The Sweet By and By” is stunning in its complexity while Natalie Grant extracts every nuance out of “My Old Kentucky Home.” All of this builds to a grand finale; a cascading all star rendering of “Ol’ Dan Tucker” that nearly blows off the roof. It’s the sort of moment that reminds us of the intrinsic power of these songs – some of which date back nearly two centuries –and how timeless they truly are. Pa’s Fiddle is a celebration of artistry, faith, heritage, and the genius of a woman named Laura Ingalls Wilder. *****

Chris Smither Hundred Dollar Valentine Signature Music While known for having penned hits for the likes of Bonnie Raitt and Dr. John Chris Smither has sporadically released a stream of consistently engaging studio albums. Paying the bills by way of incessant touring (Smither regularly plays 250 gigs a year) keeps him busy, as Hundred Dollar Valentine is only his twelfth studio album (and his first of all original material) over a forty year career. And while it’s great to see him again making records, I still have the sense that Smither views each subsequent release as little more than an excuse to get back on the road; the laid back performances are as comfortable as well worn shoes but lack the crackle and intensity of seeing him on stage. His deep, mellifluous rural (despite growing up in New Orleans as the son of college professors) tinged voice has aged well and certainly longtime collaborator David Goodrich’s sympathetic production lends just the right touch of down home gentility. But when his right hand man Stephen Bruton passed away in 2009, Smither’s music seemed to lose its focus, and this effort gives little indication that he’s yet recovered. ‘CD’s’ continued on page 15


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sound experience ‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

It sounds much like a group of talented players gathering on someone’s front porch, tossing around a few ideas and having a heck of a good time. But when the last guitar case is closed little of what was made lingers on. **1/2

Laetitia Sadier Silencio As the vocalist for Stereolab, Laetitia Sadier embraced a style that could be both hypnotic and off putting, a dreamy mix of Kraut Rock (the band formed while she was living in Europe) and lounge-pop that was both intoxicating and grating. For her second solo release Sadier has toned down the harsher elements of her music – the abrupt shifts of tone and volume that were often ideas rather than songs – in favor of a more deliberate and cohesive entity that is no less fascinating. It is in fact a huge step forward and the most satisfying record she’s ever made. Her songwriting is more focused and deliberate; with lyrics that easily bring to mind a less analytical Sam Phillips, and arrangements – even when they occasionally overpower her supple voice – that allow the band and singer to float effortlessly from mood to mood. Sadier, who wrote all the songs herself, has learned how to pare the excess from her songs and let the songs speak for themselves. She steadfastly refuses to back down from her leftist leanings – nor should she – but in such gems as “Silent Spot” and “There Is a Price to Pay for Freedom (And It Isn’t Security)” she’s able to make her point without overstating it. Written in the midst of the European debt crisis, “The Rule of the Game” clearly states her case: “The ruling class neglects again responsibility, over-indulged children drawn to cruel games and pointless pleasures” (touché!). They get even more so in “Auscultation in the Nation” as she eviscerates the faceless bankers whose rolling of the dice affects us all; “who are these people? What do we care about their self-proclaimed authorities?” she ponders, even as the question goes unanswered. The remainder of the album tones it down a bit, and by turning her attention to the complexity of building relationships in a seemingly uncaring world Sadier gives us a glimmer of hope. Woody Guthrie famously emblazoned his guitar case with a sticker proclaiming “This Guitar Kills Fascists.” Sadier does so in a more indirect fashion, with voice, lyrics, and a determination to not be overcome by the indifference of others. Bravo and more power to her. ****

David Roth at Mountain Spirit Coffee House David Roth is many things; a noted singer/songwriter, speaker, workshop leader, and instructor in the harmonious arts.

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ut first and foremost he is a traveling musician. During his more than two decades as a performing musician Roth has earned top honors at such sought after competitions as The Kerrville Folk Festival and Falcon Ridge NY, taking his message and music to a wide variety of venues both here and abroad. A native of Chicago, the 45 year old Roth credits his high school music teacher (a former keyboardist for acts like Sinatra, Peggy Lee and Sammy Davis Jr.) for helping to chart his course. Once the music bug bit, Roth became enamored with the then burgeoning American folk scene. Enrolling in the University of Illinois, where “the shadows of Steve Goodman and Dan Fogelberg still fell on the walls at the Red Herring Coffeehouse in Urbana,” Roth and a friend began playing the local scene. After receiving a degree in radio and television communications Roth took a job as a copywriter at a small ad agency in Anchorage, Alaska. “My advertising career lasted exactly five months before I lost interest and resigned.” Roth was 23 years old and without a job, so he hopped over to Moby Dick’s Lounge in Anchorage, where they were looking for someone to play music during Happy Hour. “I walked in, borrowed a guitar, and got my first professional music job. I stayed in Alaska for three years, playing music, working as a corrections counselor for a juvenile facility, and doing some acting for the Alaska Repertory Theater.” In between he somehow found time as the front man for a local country-rock/ bluegrass band. But the itinerant itch struck yet again. Acting on a longtime promise for “a big travel adventure” Roth

Dark Dark Dark Wild Go Supply and Demand Music The music of Dark/Dark/Dark could have easily emerged from 1950, 1920, or 2010, and that is most certainly what the point of the band is all about. There’s plenty in the way of jaunty

and a friend procured oneway tickets from Los Angeles to Sydney, Australia. The next stop was NYC where, in the summer of 1980 Roth found himself in Greenwich Village “one Monday night where I stumbled into Folk City and the Cornelia Street Cafe to meet some of the singer songwriters of the day: Suzanne Vega, Cliff Eberhardt, Shawn Colvin, Lucy Kaplanski.” Roth was “hooked, intimidated, intrigued, addicted, and an obvious neophyte.” “It wasn’t a showcase for greatest hits or polished jewels, rather the rawest and most recent writing that anyone was willing to put out in front of the group. My ‘visit’ to New York City lasted a decade, and my nights of open mikes and all-night cafes proved to be an inspiring songwriting workplace and training ground.” Roth decided the time had come to really get serious. In 1985 he entered the Kerrville Folk Festival’s songwriting contest and managed to crack the list of forty finalists. He entered again the next year and earned another trip to Texas. “A friend holding up a walkman tape recorder in the audience gave me what turned out to be the demo tape I used to get bookings for almost two years.” Around that time Roth met a promoter who specialized in organizing motivational programs to a wide variety of audiences. He invited Roth on a Florida tour, doing 30 shows in 31 days, finding an audience very different from those he was familiar with. “This proved a springboard to more work as a musician and presenter at a variety of conferences, symposiums, camps, work-

piano, rumbling percussion, and coolly detached mid-20th century vocal jazz (courtesy of lead singer None Marie Invie) to intrigue any listener with an open mind, but what really makes this bubble is the effortless way in which the band genre hops – in much the same vein as The Dresden Dolls – without the slightest hint of conceit. Subtle touches such as the feedback that anchors the background of “Daydreaming,” letting brushed cymbals, piano, and vocals take the lead, helps underscore the idea of rock & roll as a means rather than an

BY JAMES

CASSARA

shop centers, retreats, and special events of all kinds.” In December of 1987 he said goodbye to the last of his part time jobs. Since then Roth, now a resident of Cape Cod, has garnered accolades for his performances, workshops, writing, and recordings. His David roth shows, often called “a cross between James Taylor and Jerry Seinfeld” are known for their spirited atmosphere and audience participation. Come out and enjoy this talented signer songwriter and while you’re doing so, why not sign up to help? Series organizers Don and Louise Baker are looking for volunteers to sell tickets, help with promotion, bake desserts or work in the kitchen. It’s a great way to enjoy music and support this most worthwhile endeavor. If interested, call them at (828) 299-4171.

IF YOU Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse GO Concert with David Roth at the

UU Congregation of Asheville on Sunday, August 5. The doors open at 6:30 with the music starting at 7 p.m. The suggested donation is $15 for adults and $10 for full time students. Music lovers under 14 years old are free. For more information you can go to www.uuasheville.org.

end. The languid flow of “Celebrate” with its bounce between lead and backing vocals exemplify just how audacious this quintet can be. Even the vaudevillian tone of “Say the Word” works as a study in melancholic sing along. Marshall LaCount’s occasional vocal leads only highlight how good Invie is in contrast; it may be nice to spread the wealth around but this band works best when its principle voice is front and center. ***1/2

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 15


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poetry & music

Alive and Well

Jogging Through Jane Austen

POEMS FROM NEW BOOKS BY WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA POETS Sepia Print: Nov. 2, 1919 They sit on the old wooden swing, The sun on their faces. They are nineteen and in love. She leans against him And looks as happy as She said she once was. Clasping her tightly, Claiming her, He is handsome and sober.

We never saw those November lovers, Gone long before that Rainy Saturday we spent looking At the old picture album And finding them there– Two young strangers In unfamiliar dress And unfamiliar closeness.

What did they know then of Distances That would cause him to Loosen his clasp– Her to move to the Far end of the swing, Her smile fading?

We knew two gray persons Meshed by Forty years and Four children, Distanced by The people they had become, Their hearts grown numb.

Ted Olson is the author of such books as Breathing in Darkness: Poems (Wind Publications, 2006) and Blue Ridge Folklife (University Press of Mississippi, 1998). He is the editor of numerous books, including The Hills Remember: The Complete Short Stories of James Still (University Press of Kentucky, 2012). Olson’s newest collection of poetry, Revelations: Poems, will be published this fall. His experiences as a poet and musician are discussed on www.windpub.com/books/breathingindarkness.htm

But we wished all our lives, As children do, To see those lovers in the print Close on the swing. And at last, 63 years later In this sunless November ground They are side by side again With hardly any distance at all Between them. ~ Donna Lisle Burton From “Letting Go: Poems, 1983-2003” (Pisgah Press, 2012)

Poets who would like for their poetry to be considered for a future column may send their books and manuscripts to Ted Olson, ETSU, Box 70556, Johnson City, TN 37614. Please include contact information and a SASE with submissions.

Drunken Prayer Gets Down

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he bi-coastal configuration of Drunken Prayer – with roots in both Asheville and Portland – is again hitting the road, this time in support of Into the Missionfield, their second full-length release. It’s an 11 song collection of what Christopher Geer refers to as “dark tales and darker melodies… it’s a journey down the path less traveled, the one that’s always more rewarding.” Alternately labeled as Americana, folk-rock, or the all encompassing alt-country, the band revels in its ability to defy simple classification. For Geer, the songs aren’t trying to be anything; they’re just his way of letting out a howl formed by life and the history of music he loves. “It’s not representing any one style of music,” he claims. “It really doesn’t represent much at all, just being in the moment and making records out of the reservoirs left by living and listening to humanity.”

Described by music journalist (and former Asheville resident) Fred Mills as “one part the Band, one part Tonight’s The Night and several parts sinner’s remorse, they sound like Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds in New Orleans noir.” The performances are notoriously riotous, high energy affairs that pull no punches and never repeat themselves. Geer, whose towering stage persona and a raspy voice brings immediate comparisons to Tom Waits (a chance meeting with Waits inspired Geer to pursue music full time) or Warren Zevon, combines entertaining wit and charismatic delivery in ways that would suggest someone far older and more worldly wise. Despite being a largely solo effort, Into the Missionfield is by no means an ordinary “singer-songwrit-

16 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

BY JAMES

CASSARA

er” record. It’s heavy on percussion, with layers of gut-bucket guitars and keyboards. The horn arrangements are as loose and buoyant as a New Orleans Jazz funeral, while the lyrics are equal parts salvation and damnation. With guest appearances by players from such diverse bands as The Breeders, Beck, and Bright Eyes, Geer’s friends help flesh out the songs in ways that one player never could; no word as to who will be joining Geer at the Get Down, but in some ways that is irrelevant. The songs are his and his alone.

IF YOU GO: Drunken Prayer at the

Get Down in West Asheville on Friday, August 31. Show times at the club vary, so call (828) 505-8388.

He has been through most of the books in the libraries around town and discovered the best places tend to be in British novels of the nineteenth century, as long as they aren’t set in London or the industrial north. Twentieth century literature is too riven with wars, class struggles, grammatical experiments, identity upheavals. The ground continuously shifts, and he’s always in danger of turning an ankle. As for the Renaissance, he tried working out there for a while attracted by the easy access to Shakespeare, but found the weather too unpredictable. Tempests would suddenly appear, making it difficult to find the way home, plus no one would leave him alone. In a world of witches, no one is too strange, even a man in blue Nikes, headband, and running shorts. So now he sticks mostly to Austen novels, loping along paths between Bath and Bristol. If anyone sees him, they’re either too polite or too skeptical to say anything. Or maybe, in this milieu, no one can admit they’ve seen a bare-legged man covered with sweat, scissoring rhythmically across the countryside. In these stories, he feels safe. He knows where they go, the twists and turns, everything as comfortable as broken-in running shoes. ~ Joseph Mills From “Sending Christmas Cards to Huck and Hamlet” (Press 53, 2012)

Domestic The sows are in heat, squealing and pink. The wild boar comes from the forest to batter at their pen. I go out and smash the ice on the trough. The water breaks free. This takes a pick ax. Wielding it, I feel wild. But the only strength in this story is the fences’. Not even boars are wild imported for hunting a hundred years ago, crossing the sea in a rich man’s crate. When I hang up the pick ax it freezes to the nail, clinging as I do, making my living elsewhere and returning to farms after sunset, the barns symbols just discernible in the dark. ~ Rose McLarney From “The Always Broken Plates of Mountains” (Four Way Books, 2012)


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authors ~ books ~ readings Staubs and Ditchwater

A FRIENDLY AND USEFUL INTRODUCTION TO HILLFOLKS’ HOODOO Written by H. Byron Ballard

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yron Ballard is a local writer, former Rapid River Magazine contributor, theatre director, avid gardener, community activist, wife and mother, a teacher, a preacher, and a raconteur. She’s also a witch. She’s no wallflower witch, hiding in her broom closet. Byron is a buzzing bee, constantly in service to friends and clients, handling a popular blog and a busy speaking schedule. She’s a long-time participant in the city’s interfaith coalitions and civil rights efforts. A visionary, she’s a moving force behind Mother Grove, the local goddess temple, now located in a few rooms H. Byron Ballard

WOMEN ON WORDS READ FROM NEW POETRY COLLECTION Continuing its publishing foray with Burning Bush Press, Malaprop’s presents its second book, Remember Me as a Time of Day, a collection from the Women on Words poetry group, compiled by Emoke B’Racz, poet, translator, and founder of Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe. The poets are: Alicia Valbuena, Barbara Gravel, Eileen Walkenstein, Emoke B’Racz, Genie Joiner, Maryann Jennings, Nancy Sanders, Patricia Harvey, Sena Rippel, Virginia Haynes Redfield, Zoe Durga Harber.

IF YOU GO: Poetry anthology book

launch and celebration takes place Sunday, August 26 beginning at 3 p.m. at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Phone (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

downtown and heading toward a grand space in the future. What kind of witch are you?” people ask. “Are you a good witch or a bad witch?” “I’m an excellent witch,” she laughs. In her just-published book, Staubs and Ditchwater: A Friendly and Useful Introduction to Hillfolks’ Hoodoo, Byron reveals why she’s both an excellent witch and a unique one. A Buncombe County native, Byron comes from a family of Appalachian witches, Methodist churchgoers from ancient British stock who were born with “gifts.” Her great grandmother was a healer, her grandmother saw prophetic dreams, and her mother recognized discarnate spirits, a gift Byron’s daughter has inherited. From her forebears and other “granny women,” Byron learned the skills of Appalachian folk magic, a kind of “kitchen witchery,” that uses down-home ingredients and materials. She expanded her native knowledge by learning from other folk traditions, becoming what is called a “rootworker,” someone who practices “rootwork” or cross-cultural folk magic. Enthused by the early feminist movement, she became a Wiccan priestess. In time, she married folk magic with paganism to create an exciting new witchcraft hybrid. Her magical skillset became eclectic and wide-ranging. She would put salt, grits, vervain, and corn liquor into her basket to bring to neighbors who feared there were spirits in their house. Fresh from her garden, or dried and compounded on the old Welsh dresser workbench on her porch, she would make a concoction to help a friend recover from a summer cold. Byron rejects the honorific “wise woman,” in favor of simply being an “urban cove woman.” Several years ago, I pleaded with Byron to teach others her knowledge of Appalachian magic. She almost chewed my head off. Wasn’t it enough, she complained, that “outsiders” had already taken the land’s music, dug out its coal, and ruined its hilltops with their fancy mansions? Couldn’t the mountain people keep this one aspect of their tradition to themselves? She didn’t exactly say, “Yankee Girl, go home,” but she came close. Flash forward. It seems I wasn’t the only person who begged Byron to share her knowledge. And the passage of time had emphasized the harsh reality of the moun-

REVIEW BY

MARCIANNE MILLER

tains’ changing demographics – young people were leaving the area without learning its traditions. Byron’s choice was difficult – should she hold onto the secrets of her native witchcraft tradition and risk letting it die out, or share it with outsiders? She started teaching private workshops on Hillfolks’ Hoodoo – folk magic from the hills. The classes covered such topics as magic tools, working with your allies (such as ancestors and land spirits), and divination and omen-reading (my favorite). She offered many “receipts” (formulas or recipes) both from Appalachia and “borried” (borrowed) from other folk traditions, such as citrusy Florida water. She also included clever ideas of her own, such as an Energy Filter made of salt, black rocks, and a pie tin that clears out negative flow in a house. The response to the workshops was so positive that Byron decided the time was right for a book – thus Staubs and Ditchwater Ditchwater. By the way, staubs are short, stout pieces of wood, often driven into the ground. They can be used as property markers, or to “drive in” intentions. Ditchwater is standing water, water that has lost its ability to flow. It’s particularly potent in many workings (don’t drink it!), such as anointings or in jar talismans. Bottomline: This slim book, part memoir,

part hoodoo primer, is not only lovely to read, but packed with hard-to find information for the beginning rootworker. Highly recommended. Available at local bookstores and author’s website. Staubs and Ditchwater: A Friendly and Useful Introduction to Hillfolks’ Hoodoo; written by H. Byron Ballard; Silver Rings Press (2012); 122 pp.; paper $19.95 Visit www.myvillagewitch.com For speaking engagements, email byronotthepoet@gmail.com IF YOU Friday, August 10 at 7 p.m. H. GO Byron Ballard reads from and signs

AUGUST

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING More events posted online.

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Tuesday, August 7 at 7 p.m. – Wild author CHERYL STRAYED. Tiny Beautiful Things brings the best of the Dear Sugar columns together in one place and includes neverbefore-published columns. Thursday, August 9 at 7 p.m. – ANNA NORTH & ERIC SASSON. North’s America Pacifica is set on the island of that name. Sasson’s Margins of Tolerance focuses on gay men in flux. Saturday, August 11 at 7 p.m. – LAMA KHANDRO discusses Buddha Nature. Tuesday, August 14 at 7 p.m. – Chinese Medicine Health with KATH BARTLETT. Thursday, August 16 at 7 p.m. – Stitchn-Bitch with fiber artist STACEY BUDGEKAMISON. Sunday, August 19 at 3 p.m. – GWENDOLYN OXENHAM, author of Finding the Game: Three Years, 25 Countries, and the Search for Pickup Soccer. Tuesday, August 21 at 7 p.m. – Enneagram, a form of self-discovery. Workshop with ANDREA FORD. Thursday, August 23 at 7 p.m. – DR. HAROLD E. LITTLETON, JR. author of the historical novel, Jesus: A Would Be King. Friday, August 24 at 7 p.m. – MARGARET DUNBAR CUTRIGHT presents A Case for Solomon: Bobby Dunbar and the Kidnapping that Haunted a Nation. Saturday, August 25 at 7 p.m. – COURTNEY MILLER SANTO, author of The Roots of the Olive Tree. Wednesday, August 29 at 7 p.m. – DEBORAH BOLES WATERMAN presents her workbook Before (I Die), During (the Process), and After (You’re Gone).

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 36 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

“Staubs and Ditchwater: A Friendly and Useful Introduction to Hillfolks’ Hoodoo.” Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. For more details phone (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com. Marcianne Miller is an Asheville writer/reviewer. She can be reached at marci@aquamystique.com.

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 17


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southern comfort COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

Memories of My Grandmother USING SNUFF CALMED HER NERVES – A PROPER HABIT IN HER DAY

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ne of the funniest things that happened in my childhood was watching my Grandmother dip and spit snuff. Three Thistle Snuff was the brand. It was in the 1940s and we lived with my grandmother and grandfather until I was almost 6. By the time my brother was born and later when he was older, I was excited to tell him about it. She would usually use an empty can from the kitchen and sit it on the floor beside her favorite rocking chair. When dinner came and we were served peas, I thought to myself, Nanny needs a new spit can. My Mother, who was embarrassed by the whole thing, used to complain to my Father when he came home from work in the afternoon. My father was an only child and adored his Mother. He was not about to say something to her that would hurt her feelings. Anyway my Grandmother told my dad that it calmed her down. We had a cook at the time named Rosa and often after she was tired and hot from cooking in the Florida summer, she and my granny would disappear on the back porch to take a good dip of snuff, that powered dark stuff that was in this little small can with the Three Thistle Snuff brand printed on the label. My Grandmother was from a background of English/Scottish descent. She

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was very perky and always was telling jokes. She was a little short woman like me now. I watched when she dressed to go shopping or to choir practice at the Baptist church in town; she once told me that short women shrink in height when they age. I thought that was funny too at the time. She also told me that it was proper for English women to sniff and spit snuff in early England. That is true certainly in some early novels we read of that era. It is always done in quite a sophisticated way on the theater screen at the local movie house. Sometimes, I had to touch up the corner of her mouth where the wrinkle showed a little leftover snuff, especially before my Mother noticed. Late in the afternoon it was porch time when the cool winds drifted in from the ocean not very far away. It was my most favorite time of the day, when my Grandmother would sit me in her lap and rock me and tell me all kinds of tales of what I was going to do someday when I grew up. She would read me books and poetry and I was mesmerized. My dreams began to grow on that day. Now that I am aging it seems so long ago. So far from the way people live today. Lucky for me, under her early influence, I grew into a full-fledged dreamer. I used to tell friends do not ever stop following your

Billy Ray’s Chevrolet

rowing up at the end of Bull Creek Road in east Asheville, author, pianist-singersongwriter and amateur photographer Dave Turner drove by an old Chevrolet flat bed truck for years before deciding to stop one day and ask the owner, Bill Ray, if he could takes some photographs of it. The experience ultimately led Turner to write a book with photographs entitled Billy Ray’s Chevrolet and Other Writings and Photographs From a Southern Appalachian Valley. There’s even a song he wrote that goes with the eBook entitled Billy Ray’s Chevrolet, inspired by the title chapter. Anyone who buys the eBook also receives a download copy of Turner’s album Could Have Talked All Night Night, which includes the song about Ray. “I wanted to preserve the elements of 18 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

the mountain culture I experienced growing up here in the 1970s.” Turner has provided a personal account, adding to what so many others have shared about their mountain experiences. The first chapter, Billy Ray’s Chevrolet, tells a story about how an old truck is a symbol of mountain nobility and one man’s life in the valley and his perspective on life. Leafless Trees contemplates the winters of childhood. Friends tells about friendships from a 12 year-old’s perspective set in a small cabin, involving a Vietnam vet, an old VW, and a German shepherd named Rommel. Wildflowers and a Daydream explores how hard times can be put on hold by walking in a meadow and gathering wildflowers. Turner’s ebook can be found at www.daveturnermusic.com/davesebook.cfm

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

dreams. Look at me, I never did and I still dream big dreams. When I went home to Florida to bury my Mother in 2004, I went to the old house where my Grandparents lived until their deaths. In spite of Florida weather, it still stands in majestic beauty in my mind. My Grandmother willed it to me when she left us long ago. The screen door squeaked a bit as I pulled it open. I spotted one of Nanny’s old coffee cans in a corner, a hole had rotted in the tin. I reached down to pick it up and it crumbled in my hand. I could almost smell the dusting powder she always wore back then. A cool breeze slipped in from the east and the fresh smell of new rain coming in to touch and wash the sultry day. I was reminded of times so very long ago when I was a child. A time that many generations have never known. I was so lucky to be there. It is where my strong character was nurtured and strengthened. It is why I am a writer. A time when I was a child without a care in the world. I didn’t care that my Nanny took an occasional dip of snuff to “calm her nerves.” An absolutely proper habit for a lady, in my opinion.

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

HOUSE FOR SALE 2 bedroom, 2 bath town home close to town, university, Greenlife (Whole Foods), Lexington and Merrimon Avenues. Large screened porch and screened entrance. Home of writer. Special laminated floors, some carpet, all appliances. Complete garage underneath home. Call (828) 253-3655 for more details.


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unique shops INTERVIEW WITH

William Locklear Owner of the Octopus Garden Smoke Shop

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n 1993 William Locklear opened the first Octopus Garden Smoke Shop and is now the proud owner of seven locations across western North Carolina. From Asheville to Arden, to Brevard and Hendersonville, with products ranging from smoking pipes and incense, to darts and body jewelry, Octopus Garden Smoke Shop has been helping out the Asheville area for almost 20 years. Mr. Locklear and his coworker Greg Casey were kind enough to sit down to an interview with Rapid River Magazine.

INTERVIEWED BY

MARISA WHITAKER

RRM: What do you do that’s differ-

ent from other smoke shops around here?

WL: We do a lot with the commu-

nity, try to give back. The SPCA in Hendersonville got broken into, we donated $1000 to help them do their repairs and stuff. And we give the best customer service, you greet the customers when they go in, you greet them when they go out. Greg Casey: We donate a lot to the programs the police department does like “Shop with a Cop” and we help out the Special Olympics. Help out the Kiwanis club. We managed a food bank one year for Christmas.

RRM: What other products do you sell?

WL: We do

darts, we have cigars at all our locations except Patton. We do pool sticks. We give the dart league a discount. We’re really the only people in town who sell dart supplies.

Rapid River Magazine: How did you get started?

William Locklear: I asked a guy to

send me a wholesale catalog, so he sent me a wholesale catalog and I said “great!” and I bought a box of pipes and that’s how I started selling pipes. Then I borrowed $2000 from my brother and me and Greg got started with a shop. and two employees. This was in 1993 when I had one shop. Then I was open 365 days a year. People said we’d be out of business. Nineteen years later, seven shops, twenty employees. Now I only close Thanksgiving and Christmas – early on Christmas Eve.

RRM: How are the stores doing? WL: The Brevard store is kicking butt

– it just opened. Arden used to be our number two, but then the Hendersonville location opened up. Brevard is beating some stores I’ve had open for five or six years. Patton is our main warehouse, then we ship to the other stores Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays.

GC: We really have a great variety of

stuff. We get 70 year old ladies coming in for incense and candles. And we got the young kids buying hacky-sacks. People like the imported cigarettes – it’s kind of a specialty thing.

RRM: How do you all decide on what products to sell?

WL: Well it used to be I did all the

ordering in person. But Greg’s a lot younger, his brain is shaper so I let him figure out what we’re going to sell. GC: I look for trends in the market and try to get stuff before anyone else has it. We actually go to a lot of the shows to find products before they hit the mass market and look for new merchandise all the time.

RRM: What would you say is the best aspect of your job?

WL: Seeing my customers, seeing

my employees. I have a good time with them here. They say I’m retired but I’m still here all the time. Greg makes my life easy, and we got the

William Locklear Photos: Marisa Whitaker

best group of employees. Once a year we have a big employee party at Greg’s house and we feed them, play games.

GC: I’m obligated to say my boss

(laughs). Absolutely. Will is very good to his employees The Octopus Garden Smoke Shop is open seven days a week. Call (828) 232-6030 for more information.

Octopus Garden Smoke Shop Hendersonville, Arden, and Brevard

2000 Spartanburg Hwy #300, Hendersonville 28792. Phone: (828) 697-1050. Hours: M-Th 11-8; F-Sat 11-9; Sun 1-6. 140 Airport Rd. Suite M, Arden 28704 Phone: (828) 654-0906. M-Th 11-8; F-Sat 11-9; Sun 1-6. 210 Rosman Hwy Suite C, Brevard, NC 28712 Phone (828) 884-8796. Hours: M-Th 11-8; F-Sat 11-9; Sun 1-6. Asheville

1062 Patton Ave., Asheville, NC 28806 Phone: (828) 232-6030. Hours: M-Th 10-8; F-Sat 10-9; Sun noon-6.

PG. 36

RH

80 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville, NC 28801 Phone: (828) 254-4980. Hours: M-Th 10-7; F-Sat 10-7; Sun noon-5. 1269 Tunnel Rd. Suite B, Asheville, NC 28805 Phone: (828) 299-8880. Hours: M-Th 11-8; F-Sat 11-9; Sun 1-6.

Performing Arts/Theatre Preview Part II

660 Merimon Ave., Asheville, NC 28804 Phone:(828) 253-2883. M-Th 11-8; F-Sat 11-9; Sun 1-6.

Call for Reduced Ad Rates • Web Banners (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

September 2012

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 19


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performance Free Labor Day Concert Asheville Symphony Orchestra performance in Pack Square Park

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n Monday, September 3, the Asheville Symphony Orchestra will present a free concert in Pack Square Park in Asheville, NC. Members of the Symphony will perform on the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Stage in front of the County Courthouse and City Hall. The concert will be conducted by Music Director Daniel Meyer.

BY

STEVEN R. HAGEMAN

Starting at 7 p.m. music will fill the park for 90 minutes. Lawn seating is free. Concertgoers are encouraged to bring a lawn chair or blanket. Tickets are available for reserved seating in front of the stage for $35. Tickets must be purchased by August 31,

20 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

2012. Only 475 seats are available. Monday’s activities will begin at 1 p.m. with a performance by the Montford Park Players. At 5:30 p.m., the Asheville Buncombe County Youth Orchestra will perform under the direction of Ron Clearfield. Asheville’s popular food trucks and beverage vendors, including beer and wine, will be conveniently located. The Asheville Music Director Daniel Meyer will direct the Asheville Symphony Symphony is pleased to Orchestra’s free concert in Pack Square Park, Monday, September 3. collaborate with several other performing arts organizations to present a weekend of activities. CLAP! AsheIF ville (Celebrate Live Arts Performances) YOU Call (828) 254-7046 or visit brings together Shindig on the Green, the GO www.ashevillesymphony.org Montford Park Players, Lexington Arts and for more information about Fun Festival, and the Asheville Symphony the concert, to purchase tickets, or to in presenting a Labor Day weekend full of inquire about subscription tickets for the Symphony’s upcoming season. activities for everyone. Visit www.clapasheville.com for more details.


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stage preview

todd reed since 1992

North Carolina Stage Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 11th Season!

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ince 2002, NC Stage has been prewhat about his old business partner Marley? senting some of the most exciting and In this funny and touching holiday play entertaining theater in the region. The Jacob Marley attempts to save Scroogeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soul company specializes in award-winning â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and in the process, save his own. Written plays that might be called â&#x20AC;&#x153;contempoby Tom Mula. Directed by Andrew Hamprary classics,â&#x20AC;? (as well as ton Livingston, a few out-and-out clasand starring sics from Shakespeare, Michael MacIbsen, and Tennessee Cauley. Williams). Recent seasons The have included both Understudy parts of Tony Kushnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s February 13 Angels in America, and March 10, 2013 an impressive selection of Pulitzer Prize and A hilarious comTony Award winners. edy about sour Visitors and new grapes, backstage transplants to Asheville love affairs, and are frequently surprised the lure of Holto find a professional, lywood glitz and regionally acclaimed glitter. WritThe Complete Works of William Shakespeare. theatre in a city of this ten by Theresa size. NC Stage, the only professional Equity Rebeck, who built her career as a respected theatre in Asheville, hires actors and other playwright and has gained recent acclaim as theatre artists from an impressive pool of lothe creator of the hit television show Smash. cal talent, as well as bringing in guest artists as needed. Shipwrecked! An Entertainment For those who plan to see more than The Amazing Adventures of Louis de a handful of shows in the next 12 months, Rougemont (as told by himself) the Super FlexPass subscription is the best March 27 - April 21, 2013 value. For $12 a month, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll receive an unlimited pass to see every show as many This delightful play is full of excess and times as you want. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the All-You-Can-Eatimagination. Based on historical events (...or Buffet approach to theatre: the more you is it?), Shipwrecked! tells the story of Louis see, the more you save! de Rougemont, a sickly boy who grows up to become one of the most talked-about 2012-2013 SEASON explorers of the Victorian era. Shipwrecked! is the rare play that is as captivating for R. Buckminster Fuller: The History children as it is for adult theatre-goers. By (and Mystery) of the Universe Donald Margulies. Co-produced with ImSeptember 12 - October 7, 2012 mediate Theatre Project Renowned local actor and storyteller David This Novak embodies the life and ideas of R. Buckminster Fuller. This utterly compelling May 15 - June 9, 2013 and exhilarating play is part autobiography, This is a wonderfully rich and poignant play part TED talk. Written by D.W. Jacobs. about old friends and the pitfalls of looming middle age. Melissa James Gibson won The Complete Works of William acclaim for her finely drawn characters and Shakespeare (abridged) scintillatingly funny dialogue. Written by November 21 - December 16, 2012 Melissa James Gibson. An irreverent yet surprisingly comprehensive romp through all thirty-seven of Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plays (plus a sonnet or two). Written by Adam Long, Daniel Singer, and IF Jess Winfield. Starring Charlie Flynn-McYOU Tickets range from $16 to $28. Iver, Scott Treadway, and Damian Duke GO Ask about student tickets and Domingue Pay-What-You-Can Nights, as well as value added nights. For more information visit www.ncstage.org, or call Jacob Marleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christmas Carol the box office at (828) 239-0263. December 19 - 30, 2012 North Carolina Stage Company, 15 Stage We know what happens to Scrooge, but Lane, downtown Asheville.

Fine Jewelry and Design Studio gold and silver jewelry with rough diamonds

PG. 36

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www.jewelsthatdance.com

+D\ZRRG6WÄ&#x161;$VKHYLOOH1&Ä&#x161;Ä&#x161;+RXUV0RQ6DW

Allanstand Craft Shop at the Folk Art Center

Milepost 382 Blue Ridge Parkway | Asheville, NC Open Daily 9am-5pm | 828-298-7928

Guild Crafts

930 Tunnel Road/Hwy 70 | Asheville, NC Open Mon.-Sat.: 10am-6pm | 828-298-7903

Supporting mountain artists and setting the standard for fine crafts since 1930.

Shop online: www.craftguild.org The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

work shown: Jim McPhail

Vol. 15, No. 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; August 2012 21


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fine art October 2012

Art Collecting 101

Fall in Love with Art Profiles of Area Artists

Reserve Space Today! Call for Reduced Ad Rates Web Banners (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

22 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

SOME THOUGHTS ON BRINGING HOME WHAT YOU WANT

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ollecting BY GREG VINEYARD art can be a rewarding aspect whole room or house, of creating and how it’s all going a happy home (or to look, or what your office) environment, friends will think. especially in Western Lean into it a bit, enNorth Carolina, where joy this one painting, it is such a hugemonor ceramic sculpture, gous industry. There or amazing chair. is SO much to choose Revere it like a newlyfrom here that some adopted puppy. folks could encounter Secondly, let the art-buying paralysis, new arrival nudge resulting in Perpetual something out of the Odes to Blankness on way, if need be. A one or several walls. small rearrangement Which is a conceptual to feature a new item statement in itself, but can be refreshing, I’d rather be stimulated providing a chance to by Walls Of Awesome really celebrate it. And Stuff, as if I’m living rotating objects out in The Louvre. Or can provide the joy perhaps in a back-alley of re-engaging with a Collect, Collect, Collect! curio shop. stored item later on, I often encounter or after a move. shoppers who love And I encourart, but are unsure age you to embrace Don’t worry about the of what they want. your Inner Eclectic! whole room or house, and Initially, it can be Not everything how it’s all going to look. fairly easy to say: has to match and “If you like it, just be Architectural get it!”, but I know Digest cover-woractual commitment can be a challenge. As thy. Although my thoughts here are really consumers, we’re bombarded with so many more about the plethora of original art in glamorous product and lifestyle suggesour region, old finds are fun, too. But if you tions that, when combined with subtle (and realize you are unable to resist antique malls, not-so-subtle) hints that we must achieve be specific in your goals. “Today, I will only perfection in our lives, we can become artbuy National Park Salt & Pepper shakers blocked. from the 1960’s!” (I’d like to say I made that To use an ice cream metaphor (I’ve example up. But I can’t.) shifted from sci-fi to ice cream references If an item hits you viscerally, take it lately – probably due to this hot weather!), home! You will have the additional satisfacsociety tells me that I should want comtion of knowing that you made an artist’s plexities that transport me to some magical day by giving their creation a chance to shine land, where the perfect way to enjoy it is to in a new place. lap it neatly from a cone, while meandering Interacting with and choosing art can be down a beautiful riverfront pathway with a a lot like that ice cream scenario: there are supermodel, amidst happy Europeans sitting no bad choices, it’s just about going for what on benches overlooking grassy hillocks full feels right to you today. Long live art - and of cute, frolicking bunnies. It’s all good, of your enjoyment of it! course, but my reality is that I really like gluten-free vanilla. In a cup. And I’m very Greg Vineyard is an OK and happy with my choice. artist, writer and creative Buying art is akin to this. Like what you consultant in Asheville, like! At times, I gain a new understanding of NC. Find his clay works an art style and become a fan of an artist, but at Constance Williams most often, I already know what knocks me Gallery in Asheville’s River over, and what I’d enjoy in my surroundArts District & at Gallery ings. 262 in Waynesville. His illustrations are My first suggestion to the hesitant at ZaPow Gallery in downtown Asheville. collector: Try buying what hits you in your www.creativewayfinding.byregion.net. gut, just this once. Don’t worry about the


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artful living

I

On Being Nobody

n Zen, there is a concept utterly foreign to the American mind. This concept is an ideal; a goal of Zen practice; and it is, paradoxical for an ambition, to be “nobody.” In Japanese, this concept is communicated with the word, “mushin,” or, in Chinese, “Mu,” which translates as “nomind.” No-mind means to be without ego, to stand in the world as a phenomenon no more important than a bird or a flower, yet equally, no less important than the galaxies themselves. It means, in the lexicon of Zen, “emptiness.” The way of the no-mind person is the way of living as “nobody.” Not a nobody, for this implies you ought to be somebody special, but are not. To be nobody is a conscious and positive stance in the world, not a lack or failure of stance. It is about living as a being of and within Nature, not outside it. It is in understanding that to live from ego, as if the structures of ego are who you are, is the “fall from grace,” the “original sin,” the loss of your true harmonious self. To be nobody is to live from the natural and spontaneous source of your own being, using your intelligence and faculties to be skillfully in rather than above or attempting to control life.

and without, is their natural abode. “The adept in Zen is one who manages to be human with the same artless grace and absence of inner conflict with which a tree is a tree.” – Alan Watts In the modern world, where we are over-burdened with the weight of our own insecure identity, with the obsessive and desperate need for significance, to be “somebody,” to contemplate the meaning of “nobody” can be a valuable reference point. It reminds us that we have fallen into a terrible hubris, into an arrogance that places us quite outside and at opposition with Nature, and with what Buddhists would call our own original nature. We have become quite caught in our egoic self-centeredness, our ambitions, opinions and judgments; afraid of being a nobody. We With no-mind, blossoms invite the butterfly; take everything personally and With no-mind, the butterfly visits the blossoms. are filled with When the flower blooms, the butterfly comes; inner conflict. When the butterfly comes, the flower blooms. This is a most uncomfortable I do not “know” others; and graceless Others do not “know” me. place to live. Not-knowing each other we naturally follow After all, what is it that the Way. we get so upset about? Usually ~ 18th Century Japanese poet, Ryokan it is about not having things go the way we The “Way” that is being referred to is want them to, or feeling injured, slighted, the ancient Chinese Taoist Way, the Way insulted or discounted in some way. Being that Lao Tzu, described in the Tao Te Chupset is usually about the ego-self wanting ing as the “origin of heaven-and-earth, it is more control and importance than it has. nameless.” It is the way beyond intellectuThis can be true over real injury, certainly, alization, categorization and judgment. It is or, as is often the case, in just not getting the way of Nature, not of the egoic human our way the way we want it. The modern mind. The “not-knowing” that Ryokan is spiritual teacher, Eckhart Tolle, describes referring to, is not having preconceived ideas our emotional distress as the result of being about others and about life, rather, allowing resistant to what is. What a simple and clear each encounter to be fresh, completely and teaching. So too then, when we don’t find naturally what it is. our identity in ego, we can face many threats Without a preconceived identity and and losses, real and imagined, even death, without preconceived ideas about life, self and remain calm and accepting. We take and others, I am, in this sense, nobody nothing personally. Few bits-of-advice can experiencing with no-mind. Anxiety, anger, be given that contain greater wisdom. depression, arrogance and selfishness are so It is important to realize - this is not clearly harmful and unnecessary to a person about being passive. Activity and creativity who is, in consciousness, “nobody.” The joy are in our nature and to be active and creof living in Creation, harmonious within ative in the expression of life are appropriate

BY

BILL WALZ

In the service of ego, action is seldom harmonious. and harmonious. In the service of ego, however, action is seldom harmonious. Certainly, there are times to resist cruelty and stupidity, but it does not have to be from a place of fear, anger, or violent emotion. It is just the necessary thing to do. In the parlance of Zen it is then ‘”nondoing”. Certainly there are times to use effort for the benefit of our person, others and human society. Our choice is whether the effort is ego-directed, or from the place of just doing what needs to be done. Non-doing follows our deepest natural imperative, and “betterment” means to become more conscious, alive, and balanced with others, society and Nature within and around us. As we assert ourselves, face a challenge, respond to injury or disappointment, whether it is slight or great, we can let go of our ego, be nobody, and in so doing, become more in harmony with life as it is, and with our own life as it is meant to be. We can engage a moment that could have been one of struggle and suffering for others and ourselves, and instead, turn it into a moment of mastery. We can be masterfully active and creative just because it is in our nature to be so, noting that to “nobody,” mastery is no big deal. No big deal, but oh, how splendid. Like the stars in the night sky or the butterfly visiting the blossom, like a tree being a tree, we can be naturally human, as is said in Zen, “Just so.”

LITURGICAL ARTS CONFERENCE

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iscover or develop your personal creative abilities August 19-24 during the Liturgical Arts Conference at Kanuga Conferences Inc. This 15th annual event provides expert instruction in embroidery, flower arranging, photography, sewing banners and vestments, needlepoint, and choir singing and direction. Daily worship services will be led by the Rev. Kevin Johnson, rector of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Washington, N.C.

IF YOU GO: Affiliated with the

Episcopal Church since 1928, Kanuga is a 1,400-acre retreat center near Hendersonville, NC. Group discounts or financial aid are available. For more information call (828) 6929136 or visit www.kanuga.org.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Visit www. billwalz.com

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 23


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

The Amazing Spiderman ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Remake of the first Tobey McGuire Spiderman film is well acted, well staged, and well photographed but winds up being totally forgettable.

REEL TAKE: It would appear that we

have now reached the stage where it is necessary to reboot successful comic book hero movies of the recent past. The first Tobey McGuire Spiderman was only 10 years ago and it was tremendously successful, but Tormented villain Dr Curt Connors (Rhys Ifans) is the best thing about the lackluster that’s not the reason for the remake. The Amazing Spiderman. The reason is that it was too comic bookish. As evidenced by the ChrisBecause they were so realistic and lifetopher Nolan Batman series and the recent like, the comic book sense of wonder and attempts at transferring The Incredible Hulk artificiality was completely absent leaving to the screen, the trend is to make our sume to get lots of jaw exercise because of all perheroes depressed and dour with serious the yawning. To me the point of a comic personal issues just like real human beings. book movie is that it’s supposed to be…a There are notable exceptions like comic book movie. That’s not the case here. Marvel’s Iron Man series and the recent It’s a large scale action adventure picture like Avengers box office phenomenon, but Transformers or Roland Emmerich’s 1998 overall it would seem that gloom is in. To remake of Godzilla and just as pointless. borrow a line from Heath Ledger’s Joker, It would seem that several critics agree “Why so serious?” There was nothing wrong with me as The Amazing Spiderman gets a with the first series of Spiderman movies. 74 rating on Rotten Tomatoes compared to Number 2 was better than #1, but by #3 it the original’s 89 rating. It also is 20 minutes had run its course. Why Sony would want to longer. Some of that is endless end credits of spend all the money they did ($230 million) course but then the first one had them too. on this effort is beyond me especially since The biggest overall problem is pace. It takes the results were so tepid. too long to set up and, once it is, it takes too It has only been a few days since I saw long to go anywhere. The ending mayhem the film and already I am hard pressed to was tedious and ordinary. The recent movie remember much of it. Of the performances, Chronicle had effects that were as good and only two stand out; Emma Stone as new even more exciting and they did it for only female interest Gwen Stacy and Rhys Ifans $12 million. as the Doc Ock-like villain Dr Connors (he The Amazing Spiderman is not a bad means well but things go wrong). Andrew movie but it’s a classic example of a paintGarfield as Peter Parker seemed like a surly by-numbers one that’s trying to cash in on teenager and little else. I could have cared the new found respectability of the comic less about what happened to him. Sally Field book film genre by playing it as if it were and Martin Sheen do well as Aunt May and Eugene O’Neill (if you don’t recognize the Uncle Ben but Cliff Robertson and espename, google him). As for me, I’d rather cially Rosemary Harris left a more lasting have more like Iron Man, Captain America, impression. and The Avengers. Next we come to the much touted Rated PG-13 for sequences of action and special effects. From a technical standpoint violence. they are clearly superior to those of the first REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN series, and I had a real problem with that.

24 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

The Dark Knight Rises ∑∑∑∑∑ Short Take: The last film in Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy turns out to be the best thanks to a story that has plenty of heart to go along with Nolan’s typically heavy head games.

REEL TAKE: It’s unfortunate that the

tragedy of what happened opening night in Aurora, Colorado will forever be associated with this movie, since it turns out to be the best film in Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy and a fitting conclusion to one of the most successful and most talked about series ever made. It is now possible, in hindsight, to see all three films as a large scale mythic drama (like The Lord of the Rings) with a beginning, a middle act, and a proper ending. It makes for a complete eight hour extravaganza on the rise, fall, and redemption of the Bruce Wayne / Batman character. Nolan likes complicated characters; with the three Batman films he finally has the proper canvas, unlike Inception or The Prestige, to do his overall vision justice. It is eight years since the events of The Dark Knight. Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale), his body crippled by injuries as Batman, has become a recluse. He spends his time funding the development of a clean and perpetual energy source. Enter Bane (Tom Hardy), a super villain with a mask and a voice like Darth Vader, who plans to bring Gotham City to its knees through a series of terrorist acts. Assisting Bane, but with her own agenda, is Selina Kyle (Anne Hathaway) an extraordinary cat burglar with a costume to match. Their actions force Batman out of retirement much to the dismay of Bruce Wayne’s loyal butler Alfred (Michael Caine) who resigns. With Commissioner Gordon (Gary Oldman) in the hospital, the only friend Batman has is a young, unorthodox police officer (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) who seeks to be like him. A confrontation with Bane leads to Batman’s defeat and imprisonment. In Bruce Wayne’s absence a rich and powerful businesswoman (Marion Cotillard) and old ally, Lucius Fox (Morgan Freeman), try to keep Wayne Enterprises going but are

thwarted by Bane’s economic terrorism (he bombs the Gotham Stock Exchange) and sabotage. In order to defeat Bane, Bruce Wayne / Batman must summon everything he has and then some to turn the tables. In order to succeed, he finds he needs the assistance of Catwoman. As you would expect from Christopher Nolan, things are a good bit more complicated than that and it is those complications and their resolutions that makes The Dark Knight Rises the Crown Jewel of the set. The film easily stands on its own as first class entertainment but when put into context with the other two then it becomes something else, something richer and deeper. The only drawback to the film, from

Archvillain Bane (Tom Hardy) and Batman (Christian Bale) square off in the finale of The Dark Knight Rises.

my perspective, is the amount of time devoted to the IMAX action set pieces. At 164 minutes the movie, like its predecessors, is just too long. At least this time the action sequences are well integrated into the flow of the film just like an installment of the Bourne franchise. The performances from all concerned, even Christian Bale, hit all the right notes. Wally Pfister’s cinematography guarantees an excellent thrill ride while Hans Zimmer’s music provides a powerful emotional accompaniment. Now that you’ve read about it, go and see it then see how you feel once you’ve left the theater. I’ll bet you’ll be talk‘Movies’ continued on page 25


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ing about it for some time afterwards. Rated PG-13 for sequences of intense violence, some sensuality, and language.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

The Intouchables ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Based on a true story, when a young ex-con from the projects becomes the unlikely care giver, for a middle aged quadriplegic from the top of the 1%, both lives are forever changed.

REEL TAKE: The Intouchables has been

Omar Sy and Francois Cluzet in the irreverent yet touching story of a wealthy paraplegic and his care giver in The Intouchables.

a box office sensation in its native France, topping even The Artist for several awards including Best Actor, which went to Omar Sy. The film is based on a true story of a young man from the wrong side of the tracks who became the unlikely caregiver for a wealthy quadriplegic. For the film they cast Francois Cluzet (best known to American audiences for Tell No One)) and French comedian Omar Sy. There was apparently a bit of hubbub about the casting of Sy, because the real fellow wasn’t black. But the box office, critical and popular success of the combination of Cluzet and Sy has pretty much silenced objections. Philippe (Cluzet) is a millionaire who became a quadriplegic from a paragliding accident. Driss is an ex-con from the projects who reluctantly accepts the job after initially trying to extend his unemployment benefits. Philippe is cultured, educated and refined; Driss is coarse, ignorant and a bit of a joker. Philippe is drawn to Driss’ lack of pity and his boisterous behavior. What ensues is fairly predictable – the two become friends. Philippe becomes a happier man and Driss becomes a better man. The film succeeds on it the merits of irreverent attitude and its actors. Cluzet and Sy are the real deal. Some of the dialogue even seems fairly unscripted. Whether it is or

not, I have no idea, but either way it works. Much has been made of Sy’s performance; he is the crowd pleaser. He rises to the dramatic moments, but he really shines when he’s allowed to play to his comedic, less staid strengths. Personally, I think Cluzet deserves a nod as well. His entire performance is from the neck up, and that Aubrey Plaza and Mark DuPlass in the wonderfully takes some doing. He plays the offbeat Safety Not Guaranteed. part with strength, not pity. an old girlfriend, and Arnau is looking to exIt’s not about the man being handicapped. pand his academic C.V. They travel to a seaIt’s about being a man, about being a human side town where they find Kenneth (Mark being regardless of circumstances. Duplass, recently seen in Your Sister’s The Intouchables is now the highest Sister), a reclusive, conspiracy theorist type, Sister grossing non-English language film. It’s who happens to be building a time machine done well by critics, but even better by audiin his garage. What ensues next takes them ences. It’s a buddy picture with a Maserati all on a hilarious, offbeat and heartfelt jourinstead of a bucket list. At the end of the day, ney of self discovery. The Intouchables is quite embraceable. The story is complete fiction, but was Rated R for language and some drug use. allegedly inspired by a classified ad that REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN made the Internet rounds a few years back. I believe it was worded exactly as they have Safety Not Guaranteed it in the film. Writer Derek Connolly and ∑∑∑∑1/2 director Collin Trevorrow apparently pondered what kind of person would write this Short Take: After seeing a personal ad for a companion for a time travel ad, and the character of Kenneth was born. experiment, three Seattle Magazine Kenneth is a grocery store clerk by day and a writers decide to track the person who time machine builder at night. No surprise placed the ad to get the story. he’s a totally paranoid weirdo. But if ever there was a sympathetic likeable paranoid REEL TAKE: I watched Safety Not Guarweirdo, it’s him. anteed recently at an Asheville Film Society Darius connects with Kenneth and gets screening. Prior to the start of the film, my him to trust her, and they (of course) evencolleague Chip Kaufmann and I were swaptually fall for each other. Plaza and Duplass ping movie opinions with Mountain Xpress do a great job, but even as sympathetic as movie critic and AFS Program Director, Ken Duplass makes Kenneth, he’s still an uber Hanke. He told us the film moves along weirdo. So much so that it’s hard to imagine wonderfully and that he kept expecting them any girl really falling for Kenneth, but then to screw it up. Much to his utter and most that’s what, at its heart, this movie is really pleasant surprise, they didn’t. He also told about – trust, compassion, and a leap of us, “It may not be the best film you see this faith. Safety Not Guaranteed is definitely a year, but it may just be one of the most speleap of faith worth taking. cial films you see this year.” As both a critic and as plain old moviegoer, I quite agree with his assessment.

Rated R for language, including some sexual references.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Trishna ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: A retelling of the Thomas Hardy classic “Tess of the D’Urbervilles” set in modern day India.

REEL TAKE: Director Michael WinterbotThis is the classified ad that inspires three employees of a Seattle magazine to find out who placed the ad and the story behind it. Jeff (Jake M. Johnson) is a slick talking writer, who enlists the help of two interns, Darius (Aubrey Plaza) a brooding misfit, and Arnau (Karan Soni), a shy nerd. Darius is immediately curious about the ad, whereas Jeff is primarily looking for a paid vacation and hoping to hook up with

tom apparently has a bit of thing for the writings of Thomas Hardy. Having previously adapted Hardy’s “Jude the Obscure” in 1996’s Jude and “The Mayor of Casterbridge” in 2000 with The Claim, it only seems fitting that he’d eventually get around to some of Hardy’s biggest titles. Trishna is the retelling of the Hardy’s tragic “Tess of the D’Urbervilles,” set in modern day India. Trishna (Frida Pinto) is

The Monthly Reel by Michelle Keenan

W

e are in the dog days of summer and the peak of summer blockbuster season with the release of The Amazing Spiderman and The Dark Knight Rises. Chip has the take on Spidey and the Caped Crusader on page 24. Chip, who rarely (if ever) bestows a film with a five star rating, happily gave the nod to the third and final film in Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy. While I am looking forward to seeing the latest from Gotham City, I have been watching some smaller films. Fortunately, for those movie goers preferring something besides big budget CGI fests for fan boys, there are some fine independent and art house releases coming down the pike as well. Moonrise Kingdom, To Rome with Love, and Your Sister’s Sister continue to play. The Intouchables and Safety Not Guaranteed are hitting Asheville as we go to press (see reviews on this page). The latest low budget movie in theatres right now is Safety Not Guaranteed, and for my money it is (along with Moonrise Kingdom) one of the best movies of the year so far. In August, we’ll also see Trishna, a 21st century, Indian version of Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles, as well as this year’s Sundance fave, Beasts of the Southern Wild. In fact, The Fine Arts Theatre is using its downtime during Bele Chere to convert to digital projection systems and will re-open on August 3 with Beasts of the Southern Wild and Moonrise Kingdom. With all of the theatres in our area now projecting in digital, the era of film and its reels of beautiful celluloid has passed. But, for sentiCharlie Chaplin directed and mental starred in Modern Times. See reasons, the Asheville Film Society we’ll keep schedule on page 27 for details. bringing you our Reel Takes on what’s new and what’s newly re-discovered in film each month.

Enjoy the show!

‘Movies’ continued on page 26

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 25


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film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 25

the oldest daughter of a poor family in Rajasthan. While working part time at a nearby resort she meets Jay (Rizwan Ahmed), the son of a wealthy property developer. He takes a genuine interest in her and, after her father suffers an accident which prevents him from earning a living, he helps her find work at one of his father’s hotels. The two fall beautifully in love, and even though it is set in a caste society, it is the 21st century; one can’t help but think these two lovebirds will find their happily ever after together. For a little while it even seems possible, when they run away to Mumbai – he a Bollywood proudcer wannabe and she a Bollywood dancer wannabe. But then again, this is Thomas Hardy, so that means their love is of course doomed

Riz Ahmed and Frida Pinto star in Trishna, a 21st century adaptation of Tess of the D’urbervilles in Trishna.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Chronicle”

to go south (and how). The first half of the film works brilliantly. We understand Trishna. We understand Jay. We understand the differences of their lives and the difficulties befalling their love. It also struck me that if one were going to adapt “Tess of the D’Urbervilles for modern day, setting it in India is actually a very smart call. Unfortunately the second half becomes a tad frustrating. When Jay returns from a trip home to England to see his ailing father, he decides it’s time do right by him and the family business. In doing so, he becomes a cruel, arrogant, chauvinistic

August DVD Picks

Chronicle (2012)

Oops! Last month the review for

Moonrise Kingdom erroneously cited The Squid and the Whale as one of Wes Anderson’s films. Um ... hello, that would be Noah Baumbach, not Wes Anderson. Our apologies!

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

Since I reviewed the two latest installments of the Spiderman and Batman franchises in this issue (combined budgets: $490 million), it only seems fitting that my DVD pick of the month was a movie that I enjoyed more than both of them and it cost a whopping $12 million to make and runs for an astounding 83 minutes. Here is a small, independent film which emulates the B movies of yore in its presentation while delivering thrills and chills and a degree of creativity that The Amazing Spiderman could have used and The Dark Knight Rises rarely achieves. While I have nothing against epics and big budget extravaganzas, I have found that it’s the little films from the silent era to the present that make a greater impact and stay with me longer. Chronicle is one of those films. It takes the “found footage” genre and takes it to a different level. Three high school friends discover a large hole in the ground with something mysterious inside (we’re never told what) that enables them to develop super powers just like comic book heroes. One of the teens (Dean DeHaan) comes from an abusive home and is bullied at school. Benign and helpful at first, he ultimately loses control of his emotions a la Carrie and proceeds to wreck most of the city of Seattle. The well mined storyline is given several new twists, the effects are simple but awesome, and the performances by a group of unknowns could not be bettered. The direction by Josh Trank is as tight as a mainspring, and he brings the whole project in at less than 90 minutes. If you’re looking for something familiar yet different and something

26 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

that won’t take up a lot of your time, give Chronicle a try. The story should keep you engrossed and the ending will astound you. What more could you ask of a summer movie or any movie for that matter.

The Great Escape (1963) On a recent Sunday night, my fiancé and I happened to catch The Great Escape on Turner Classic Movies. It had been a while since either of us had seen it, and I knew that (like many men) this was one of my sweetie’s favorites, so we didn’t even look to see what else was on the TV that night. We settled in and had one of the best movie nights we’ve had in a while. In 1943, the Germans opened Stalag Luft North, a maximum security prisonerof-war camp, designed to hold even the craftiest escape artists. In doing so, however, the Nazis unwittingly assembled the finest escape team in military history. The Great Escape is based on the true story of ragtag band of allied forces joining forces to plot quest for freedom. Led by Steve McQueen in of his definitive roles, the film boasts a stellar ensemble including James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Donald Pleasance, Charles Bronson, James Coburn and a slew of other notable and lesser known actors. Since it debuted almost fifty years ago, The Great Escape has ranked as one of the best “guy movies” of all time and with good

and cold person. He reduces Trishna to his sex slave and maid. The understanding of the characters we had in the first half, dissipates in the second half, particularly with Jay’s character. Trishna has sacrificed her reputation and her family’s reputation to be with Jay, so our sympathies are with her of course. As their love is destroyed, unwittingly they are as well. By the time tragic climax hits, it doesn’t particularly pack much punch, when it really should have leveled the audience. Frida Pinto gives her best performance ‘Movies’ continued on page 27

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “The Great Escape” reason. Based on a memoir by one of the Luft III escapees and directed by The Magnificent Seven director, John Sturges, the film is smart, yet unpretentious, suspenseful and heroic, and it (of course) is outfitted with an unmistakable score by Elmer Bernstein. The Great Escape is at once humorous, tragic, and at all times entertaining. Watching the intricacies of the plan unfold is half the fun. Although many of the characters are mish mash of the actual men who were at Stalag Luft, the story stays true to history and the outcome of their daring escape. Its three hour running time is excessive and could easily have been trimmed, but when there’s this much fun to be had, I can’t really complain. What really sets The Great Escape apart from the pack for me is how it handles a serious story without taking itself too seriously. At the time it was made, acting methods and filmmaking were shifting away from the melodrama of previous decades, but we hadn’t quite gotten to the brooding, altogether too realistic epics of the post-Vietnam era. This balance of humor, bravado and truth is the secret to its charm and lasting power. There are several different editions of The Great Escape available on DVD. I would recommend the one shown above, The Great Escape - Special Edition. This two disc set shows the film in its original anamorphic ratio, and it’s chockablock full of worthwhile goodies, including a documentary of the production as well as a docudrama about the real escape. Ladies, the next time your fella endures one of your chick flick estrogen fests, reward them with a proper screening of The Great Escape.


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film & stage reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 26

to date and the movie is, for the most part, very good. Some of the camera work was too busy for me, echoing the overcrowded, bustling streets of Mumbai, but to no great purpose. Winterbottom does a great job showcasing the caste society of India rather matter-of-factly, without making it look to dreadful or too beautiful, and without getting into the morality of it. If you want to see something uplifiting this month, see The Intouchables or Safety Not Guaranteed. If on the other hand tragic love is your cup of tea, then by all means, Trishna it is. Rated R for sexuality, some drug use and violence.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY Films are shown every Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Lake Pointe Landing Retirement Community (behind Epic Cinemas) in Hendersonville. August 5

A Countess From Hong Kong Charlie Chaplin’s final film (and only one in color) tells the story of a stowaway Countess (Sophia Loren) causing problems for a married diplomat (Marlon Brando). Directed by Charlie Chaplin (1967). August 12

The Old Fashioned Way A rarely seen W.C. Fields comedy about a struggling theatrical troupe that performs the 19th century melodrama The Drunkard. Directed by William Beaudine (1935). August 19

Eye of the Needle

First class adaptation of the Ken Follett bestseller about a German spy during World War II who is stranded on a small Scottish island with a lonely woman and her crippled husband. Directed by Richard Marquand (1981). August 26

Stranger Than Fiction Will Farrell gives an unusually restrained performance in this unique fantasy about a lowly tax auditor who discovers that he might be the leading character in an ongoing novel. Directed by Marc Foster (2006).

The Odd Couple

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY SCREENINGS The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 in the Cinema Lounge at the Carolina Cinema. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into members-only events and screenings. August 8

Love and Death

In czarist Russia, a neurotic soldier and his distant cousin formulate a plot to assassinate Napoleon. Stars Woody Allen and Diane Keaton. Directed by Woody Allen (1975). August 14

The Testament of Dr. Mabuse A new crime wave grips the city and all clues seem to lead to the nefarious Dr. Mabuse, even tough he has been imprisoned in a mental asylum for nearly a decade. Directed by Fritz Lang (1938). August 21

The Knack … And How To Get It In England, the times are a changing: it’s mods and rockers. Colin is an uptight schoolteacher who decides he’s had enough of missing out on the sexual revolution. Stars Michael Crawford. Directed by Richard Lester (1965). August 28

Modern Times

This episodic satire of the Machine Age is considered Chaplin’s last “silent” film, although Chaplin uses sound, vocal, and musical effects throughout. An assembly-line worker is driven insane by the monotony of his job. After a long spell in an asylum, he searches for work, only to be mistakenly arrested as a Red agitator. Stars Charlie Chaplin and Paulette Goddard. Directed by Charles Chaplin (1936).

BUDGET BIG SCREEN SHOWING Wednesday, August 15:

My Man Godfrey Godfrey is one of the definitive screwball comedies. A scatterbrained socialite hires a vagrant as a family butler...but there’s more to Godfrey than meets the eye. Stars William Powell and Carole Lombard. Directed by Gregory La Cava (1936). Show time for this special screening is 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5 for members, $7 general public.

Carolina Cinemas is located at 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www. facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

T

The Definitive Buddy Comedy Opens at Asheville Community Theatre

he award-winning American BY JENNY BUNN comedy The Odd Couple will open at Asheville Community Theatre on Friday, August 10 and run through Sunday, August 26. “We’re advising patrons to start laugh-training now,” says Susan Harper, Managing Director or Asheville Community Theatre. “Because their abdominal muscles are going to get quite the workout at this show!” The Odd Couple may just be the ultimate buddy comedy of all time. When fastidious Felix is thrown out by his wife, he moves in with his extremely Rare pair: Oscar (Jeff Catanese) and Felix messy friend Oscar. And hilarity (Adam Arthur) are best friends turned reluctant ensues. Really – it does! roommates in The Odd Couple. Penned by Neil Simon, the as Oscar opposite Adam Arthur as Felix, master of American comedy, this show who is making his mainstage debut. Also is truly textbook when it comes to smart in the cast are Craig Justus, Betsy Puckett, quips and quick wits. The Odd Couple Sara Fields, Walt Heinrich, Ben Puckett, and premiered on Broadway in 1965, rackWalter Goodrich. ing up a slew of Tony Awards including Best Actor in a Play (Walter Matthau), Best Author of a Play, and Best Direction of a Play. For more information about The Odd The play has also spawned several Couple or about Asheville Community movie adaptations, a successful televiTheatre visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. sion series, a female version, and even a cartoon. A who’s who of noteworthy comedians have filled the roles of Oscar IF and Felix, including Jack Lemmon, YOU The Odd Couple by Neil Simon, GO August 10-26. Performances Friday Tony Randall, Jack Krugman, Matthew and Saturday evenings at 7:30 p.m., Broderick, and Nathan Lane. Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Asheville Community Theatre’s production of The Odd Couple is Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East directed by Adam Cohen who helmed Walnut St., downtown Asheville. Tickets: last season’s classic comedy Arsenic $22 adults, $19 seniors/students, $12 children. Phone (828) 254-1320 or visit and Old Lace. Jeff Catanese, who is as www.ashevilletheatre.org. skilled an actor as he is a director, stars

N

Trouble the Water

ominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 2009, and winner of the Grand Jury Prize for Documentary at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival, Trouble the Water focuses on a couple who live through the ordeal of the flood and its aftermath.

Held in conjunction with the exhibition The Elemental Arts: Air | Earth | Fire | Water.

IF YOU GO: Trouble the Water screening, Saturday & Sunday, August 11-12 from 2-4 p.m. Free with membership or museum admission. Asheville Art Museum, 2 South Pack Square, downtown Asheville. Phone (828) 253-3227 or visit www.ashevilleart.org

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 27


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restaurants & wine Mix Those Flavors! Please That Crowd!

¡SANGRÍA!

A

ll this talk about a Trader Joe’s coming to town, a rumor-turnedreality that was (for reasons that must make sense in the newspaper world) front page news, above the fold, two days in a row. All this means to me is a coming glut of grocery stores, the destruction of already occupied buildings and displacement of their tenants, and the type of cluster at the intersection of Merrimon and Chestnut that is not fit to print.

August 2012 Events at The Weinhaus Wednesday, August 22 The Weinhaus and Vincenzo’s will co-host a wine dinner. Always a favorite with our diners, owner Dwight Butner will produce a feast paired with our selections of some great wines. Come and join us for a memorable meal. Time: 7:00 PM Place: The Weinhaus Price: $60 Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at 254-6453. Friday, August 31 Friday Night Flights presents A Night of Zin. Embrace the hedonism, as we go through a line up of Zinfandel. Our emphasis will be in pointing out the different styles of which the grape is capable of producing. The wine will be accompanied by light hors d’ouvres. The price is $10. Time is 5:30-7:30 PM. Held at The Weinhaus, 86 Patton, Ave. Asheville.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue Asheville, NC (828) 254-6453

But for a single exception, I’m sticking with my local wine shops. That exception is the box. I love 5 liter wine boxes. Wine that stays fresh for weeks is wine that is on hand for cooking, and a massively cost saving pour for guests who don’t care about the nuances. It is also essential for making practical Sangria. To begin with, there is the price-per750mL (the amount in a standard bottle of wine) most often below $3. I prefer a boxed Sauvignon Blanc to all the other choices of boxed white wine. Drier, it is also for use in spritzers and cocktails. Any drink can be made sweeter. This has been a summer for experimenting with gin. North Carolina made Cardinal is my favorite for $30, Citadelle is my favorite for $19. The cocktails are made with a splash of peach and orange liqueurs made by the beverage mixer-maker Stirrings. This brings us back to Sangria, and having a fun summer drink on hand in various forms with good and, in the spirit of my gin cocktails, safely random mixtures of flavors. Keep in mind that good Sangria requires good fruit. It is tempting, but too costly to buy pre-cut fruit. You really need to know how to slice and chop it on your own. If you are a danger to yourself with a knife, go to the kitchen store and buy a cheap mandolin. (Mine cost twenty dollars and has lasted for over a decade. It will quickly pay for itself.) Slice the fruit thin so more flavors get combined in the mix. There are many ways to make Sangria – no “right way,” but I have learned that there are some general tricks to remember. Red wine Sangria goes with better with fruits like apples and pears. Citrus should be reserved for white wine versions. Melon works with

both. Pink Sangrias can benefit from vodka and grapefruit. It is important to leave the ice out while the flavors blend, otherwise you will get diluted sangria. Also, if you like soda water, add it to your glass rather than the batch. Make an effort to discover your secret ingredient for a recipe you can call your own. I love watermelon. For another example, you can substitute brandy with rum. Think about adding mango. These recipes are for big batches. I use one of those huge orange coolers with a spout, the kind they use on construction sites.

SANGRIA BLANCA – WHITE WINE SANGRIA A 5 liter box of white wine Sugar is optional, how sweet do you want it? Always second-guess your choice for sugar Juice of three fat oranges Juice of three fat lemons Pint of cheap Gallo brandy Pint of cheap triple sec Three thin-sliced oranges

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You can follow the above for Red wine Sangria, just remember that apples and pears are better than citrus. Adding a hint of anise can be delightful here. Using rum, especially dark rum, can be better than brandy.

SANGRIA ROJA – RED WINE SANGRIA A 5 liter of cheap red 3 cups sugar (optional) 10 oz. brandy (dark spiced rum is good, too) 6 apples, thin-sliced 6 pears, thin-sliced 6 handfuls of thin-sliced watermelon Let it stand for several hours and hold the ice and club soda until serving time. Sangria Rosada – pink sangria (I like this one with grapefruit and vodka because I love Greyhounds. If bitter is not your taste, try strawberries and pineapples, or even a flavored vodka.) 5 liter box of pink wine 1 large grapefruit

A couple of handfuls of cantaloupe and honeydew

1 large orange juice of 1 lemon

Three handfuls of thin-sliced watermelon (Be sure the watermelon has not attained that weird flavor and smell it gets when warm and overripe.)

juice of 1 lime

FREE Wine Tastings on Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m.

www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com 555 Merrimon Ave. (828) 254-6500

MICHAEL PARKER

Let it sit for a while, chilled overnight is ideal, for the flavors to blend. If it doesn’t fit in the fridge, use ice or blue blocks sealed in a clean plastic bag. Hold the ice and club soda until serving time.

Three thin-sliced lemons

Great values & styles Tasting wine is not only fun, but it presents a chance to learn about wine and what it is about a particular wine that you like, or don’t like. You can sip while you shop. Find some new favorites — try it before you buy it. We will usually have a few whites and a few reds open, with the occassional guest speaker. Please stop by!

BY

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local favorites INTERVIEW WITH

Holly McFarling

Owner of Mr. Frog’s Soul and Creole Kitchen

M

r. Frog’s Soul and Creole Kitchen is a contemporary take on African inspired southern soul food and New Orleans Creole by award winning chef Vijay Shastri.

Rapid River Magazine: How did Mr.

Frog’s Soul and Creole Kitchen come about?

Holly McFarling: Vijay and I knew

Asheville had a need for a good French Creole and Soul Food restaurant. We worked together to develop Mr. Frog’s into a counter service concept, so we could use an abundance of high quality, local, and organic ingredients without passing on huge costs to our customers.

RRM: How did you get into the restaurant business?

HM: I started working for the Shastri

family in early 2003, and took a great interest in the business then. I am very thankful to have had Kiriti and Vijay training me – I enjoyed working with

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

and for them at The Flying Frog Cafe. I found my passion for this industry with them over the past decade.

RRM: You smoke your

meat and make cornbread from scratch. Tell us a little more about your menu and some of your most popular dishes? Holly McFarling and chef Vijay Shastri

HM: Smoking meats

and baking from scratch are the simplest of our daily endeavors. Everything is prepared using fresh vegetables, all stocks and sauces are made daily in house. We butcher our meats and there are no convenience products found in our kitchen. We make EVERYTHING from scratch!

RRM: What is your favorite dish? HM: I really don’t have a favorite dish, but I have tasted our entire menu and love every bit of it. Vijay has never really given me a chance to decide what I am hungry for, but he never disappoints my appetite.

RRM: You offer both beer and wine.

What wine and/or beer do you recommend to go with most soul and Creole dishes?

HM: As often as our menu changes,

even in regards to our main staple items, influences how we select our wines to fit our menu. I don’t feel as though a particular wine or beer is meant to be paired with all Soul Food

Photos: Erica Mueller

We make EVERYTHING from scratch! or Creole dishes. We are really trying to support our local beer trade, so our selection of beers is dependent on what is available through our breweries.

RRM: What do you have planned for

the restaurant in the coming months that our readers should look for?

HM: We will be starting with a series of wine and beer dinners, otherwise we are preparing ourselves to move Mr. Frog’s to a new venue next year due to the much needed redevelopment project of Eagle/Market Streets.

Mr. Frog’s Soul and Creole Kitchen 42 S. Market St., downtown Asheville (828) 505-4999, www.mrfrogs.com mrfrogsavl@gmail.com

ASHEVILLE WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL – SATURDAY, AUGUST 25

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ooking for a fun and delicious way to spend a Saturday afternoon? Head to the 4th annual Asheville Wine & Food Festival Grand Tasting on August 25. Sample creations prepared by Asheville’s celebrated chefs, and enjoy live entertainment, cooking demonstrations, and more. This highly anticipated event takes place inside the newly renovated (and air-conditioned!) U.S. Cellular Center (Asheville Civic Center). The event will be held from 1:30 to 5 p.m. General admission is $45. A limited number of VIP tickets ($65) provide exclusive entry to the VIP Lounge, where full

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pours of wine and delicious food samplings will be served in high style. The festival also features a mixologist contest, an amateur wine competition, and plenty of tasty products to purchase and take home. A new feature of the festival is The Fashion and Food Runway: Under the Appalachian Moon. Beginning at 3 p.m., local chefs and fashion designers present inspirations for evening wear and culinary regalia. Sandra Harvey Designs will be showcased, along with designer Mary Lou of Spiritex organics, and milliner Simone Bernhard.

Not a wine drinker? Come anyway – there’s something for every taste. Sample craft brews that have earned Asheville its status as Beer City USA. Or discover spirits from the region’s newest distilleries. The festival will be preceded on Friday, August 24 by SWEET, an after-dinner fete featuring sips and samples of luscious desserts, sparkling wines, and specialty cocktails. Held 7:30 to 10 p.m. at the elegant Grove Arcade downtown, tickets to SWEET are $35.

IF YOU GO: For tickets and more information please visit www. ashevillewineandfood.com.

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THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA AIDS PROJECT

DINNER & AUCTION

ART • ANTIQUES • FINE WINE • TRIP S

September 29, 2012 DoubleTree by Hilton, Asheville - Biltmore

TICKETS ON SALE NOW To learn more or make a donation, visit www.wncap.org/ryh or call 828.252.7489 Like us on Facebook & Follow us on Twitter @WNCAP

ASHEVILLE INTERNAL MEDICINE

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Affordable Care for All

Preventive Care

BY KATHEY AVERY, RN AND JÉWANA GRIER MCEACHIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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s you browsed we must have financial the pages of resources to feed our this issue, cells, minds, and souls. and your eyes We do specialized rested on this work in the African topic, you may have American commuwondered, “Why is nity because we believe health in an arts and that, to have a truly culture magazine?” healthy community, we It would also be fair start where the most for you to ask, what is problems materialize. ABIPA, what does it African Americans have mean, and what does shorter survival rates at it do? all stages of cancer diABIPA stands for agnosis than our white the Asheville Buncounterparts. combe Institute of Prostate cancer is Parity Achievement. the #1 cancer for AfriWe have been leaders can American men, folin providing health lowed by lung cancer, education service with colon and rectal cancer. a focus on preventaAfrican American tive care since 2004. In men develop prostate JéWana Grier McEachin (L), Executive this economic climate cancer 60% more often Director of ABIPA and Kathey Avery, RN. Photo: Marisa Whitaker it is amazing that we than white men and served 7,264 African are twice as likely to Americans, low-indie from it than men To truly lower the come, uninsured and in any other racial or underinsured people in ethnic group. cost of health care we Western North CaroAfrican Amerimust all change to the lina in 2011. Comcans have the highpreventive care model. munity collaborations est colorectal cancer helped us reach out incidence and mortality with life-saving healthrate of all racial groups care information, a 345% increase over the in the United States. African American number served just three years ago! women are more likely to die from heart We are dedicated to serving the people disease or stroke before age 60. Diabetes of WNC, however we also utilize our is a serious problem for African American resources for underserved individuals who families. About one in eight adult African may be uninsured, underinsured, or may Americans has diabetes. About 3 in 10 Afrihave insurance but still can benefit from can Americans age 35 or older with diabetes support, additional education for preventive also have heart disease. care, and lifestyle changes. To truly lower ABIPA wants to make sure our comthe cost of health care we must all change munity comes together as a whole, un-fragto the preventive care model. That is one mented, supportive group that is commuof the primary reasons we are important nity oriented. We are about building healthy to the health care community. All of us, as individuals and communities in WNC. we struggle to make permanent life style We need your help to successfully acchanges in our health care, can benefit from complish building a healthy community. To support and education. learn more about what we do in the comABIPA believes that holistic care is the munity please join us Sunday, August 26 key to excellent health. Excellent health at the historic Sherrill Inn at 5 p.m. for our depends on being whole, and that includes annual fundraiser. We will have food, music, mental, physical, financial, social and games, and share the wonderful work we spiritual health. A break in any one of these have provided to the community this year hierarchy of needs that support each other and our plans for the coming year. means we are not our complete and perfect selves. Eating healthy and moving physically with time to feed our mental, social, and ABIPA spiritual selves is the key. 39 South Market, Suite A We eat to feed our cells, but we must Asheville, NC 28801 also feed our minds and our souls. What we put into our body directly effects how well (828) 251-8364 our body and minds function. In addition www.ABIPA.org

32 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

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healthy lifestyles

2 4 TH A N N U A L

RAISE YO U R HAND

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healthy lifestyles A Quick Status Check

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om and Alice had a backyard barbecue on the 4th of July. They invited their neighbors, Bob and Nadine and George and Beth to join them. “Kids these days don’t know anything about what happens on the 4th of July,” Bob said around a mouthful of sandwich. “In my day, we decorated our bikes and rode in the parade down Main Street.” “In your day, they closed Main Street on the 4th,” his wife Nadine retorted. “It’s not safe to ride your bike on the street these days. Besides we stopped having parades about 25 years ago.” “Yeah, they stopped the parades because the drinking got out of hand.” George sat in a lounge chair, holding up the cold beer in his hand. “Didn’t stop the drinking though, did it?” Tom opined, as he turned the burgers on the grill. “Remember the two boys who died last month in that crash? Underage drinking.” “What do you suppose makes them drink to such excess?” Beth asked, looking at George. “We’ve got an 18 year old who is going to State

this fall. Quite frankly, we’re worried about all this binge drinking you hear about at these universities.” George nodded in agreement. “Our youngest son is only 12 but we know some of his friends are drinking already,” she added. “I was reading about a study recently,” Alice offered from where she was spreading mayonnaise on her burger bun. “It talked about the causes of alcohol use and binge drinking in young boys – about the age of your youngest.” She pointed the knife at Beth. Tom reached over and turned down the ballgame on the radio as everyone got quiet. “They said that kids start drinking and move on to binge drinking because of four major factors. Now let me think – oh, yes, it was the use of alcohol in movies that the kids see, use of alcohol by their parents in the home – more than once a week.” Beth looked at George, who sat his beer on the poolside table and slowly withdrew his hand. “Um, there were two more – uh, having items like waste baskets or drinking mugs with alcohol logos on them and, of course, their friends

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MAX HAMMONDS, MD

Underage drinking is caused by four major factors. who are drinking – peer pressure, you know.” She turned to her husband Tom. “Do you know where our 14 year old is?” Tom looked up from the grill. “He’s at the movies...” He paused. “With his friends.” “Any idea what’s in those movies?” Bob asked. Tom slowly shook his head. That evening after viewing the fireworks, Tom and Alice asked their son what movie he had seen and how he felt about seeing alcohol use in movies, what he thought it meant for him. Around the same time, George and Beth had a long, serious talk, just the two of them, in the kitchen, concerning alcohol use in their home. When their 18 year old came home around 1 am, George and Beth were waiting up. They shared with him what they had been discussing and asked how it had affected him. The discussion lasted until breakfast.

A COMPREHENSIVE GREENWAY PLAN

Connect Buncombe

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ver the past year Buncombe County has been conducting public meetings to learn how its citizen’s want to connect their community using greenways. It has been exciting to see the positive interest. The plan should go to the County Commissioners for adoption, soon. Support by the business community has been terrific, Ultimate Ice Cream and Dynamite Coffee have both developed greenway flavors and donated profits from them to developing greenways. A promotional video has One of over 700 people who have participated in the online “Greenways Please” photo campaign.

been developed through funds donated by local businesses. View the video at http://youtu. be/8p3H0X4SDzI. Having the plan adopted is the first important step in connecting Buncombe County. Until it is adopted community leaders have no recourse with NC DOT to consider the plan when making roadway improvements. Non approval would hinder the connectability of the plan. We hope many people will attend the Commissioner’s meeting to support the Plan. Please stay tuned.

If you would like to participate in the Greenways Please” photo campaign, go to www.buncombecounty.org/connect

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 33


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what to do guide Thursday - Saturday, August 2-4

85th Annual Mountain Dance and Folk Festival The nation’s longest running folk festival. This three-day event showcases the best of the region’s old-time and bluegrass musicians, mountain dance groups, cloggers, Clay Sutton, Cole and ballad singers. Mountain Cloggers 7 p.m. nightly at Photo by Jerry Nelson Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place in downtown Asheville, NC. Tickets: $20; children 12 and under $10; adult 3-night package $54. (828) 257-4530. Info: www. folkheritage.org.

Friday, August 3

f/32 Photography Group Show Opening reception for the f/32 Photography Group show at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. John F. Orolin, State Street from Coiled Rope 6-8 p.m. The exhibit continues through August 31. For more information contact the Center at (828) 6690930 or www.blackmountainarts.org. More information on f/32 can be found at www.f32nc.com.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Michael Jefry Stevens Jazz Events Sunday August 5 - Hobknob

Restuarant, Brevard, NC. 7:30 to 11 p.m. No cover.

Sunday August 12 - St. Mat-

thias Episcopal Church, Asheville. Original music featuring Frank Southecorve on sax, Jason DeCristofaro on vibraphone and myself on acoustic piano. 3-4 p.m. No cover - donation only.

August 9-19

observation and obsessive precision as well as spontaneity and emotional expression back to her explorations in drawing and painting. She has exhibited in Brooklyn, NY as well as Athens, GA and Atlanta, GA. On display August 330, 2012. The ARTery, Asheville Area Arts Council, 346 Depot Street. Phone (828) 258-0710, www. ashevillearts. com

Saturday, August 11

Sylvia

RiverLinks Riverfest

Southern appalachian Repertory Theatre (SART) presents a modern romantic comedy about a marriage and a dog. Greg and Kate have moved to Manhattan after twenty-two years of child-raising in the suburbs. Greg’s career as a financial trader is winding down, while Kate’s career as a publicschool English teacher is beginning to offer her more opportunities.

Music, crafts, food, beer, and a parade of floats in French Broad River Park from 1-7pm. The park is located at Amboy Road at Riverview Drive in Asheville. Visit www.riverlink.org.

SART is located on the campus of Mars Hill college in mars Hill, NC. Call (828) 689 1239 for tickets. More details at www.sartplays.org

Fridays, August 3 and 10

Noontime Bag Lunch Series Enjoy an hour of presentations from noon to 1 p.m. Renowned jazz composer and pianist Michael Jefry Stevens and his wife, poet Tina Barr, will present “Jazz Poetry Michael Jefry Stevens and Music: Pas& Tina Barr. sionate Meetings” combining their areas of expertise to entertain and educate. Bring a bag lunch. No charge to the public, donations are accepted. The Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street. For more information call (828) 669-0930.

Friday, August 10

Pianist Margarita Shevchenko In concert at 7:30 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center, 250 Pigeon Street, Waynesville, NC. Tickets are $20. Visit www.haywoodarts. org or call (828) 4520593 for information.

Friday, August 10

Anna Jensen Exhibit Opening reception from 6-9 p.m. Anna Jensen brings both her love of natural

Sunday, August 12

A Tribute to Doc Watson with David Holt Four-time Grammy award winner David Holt traces the life and legacy of national treasure and folk legend Doc Watson. Holt pays tribute to his mentor through stories, songs and historic photographs, with proceeds benefitting Shindig on the Green. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place at 3 p.m. Tickets: $20. More details at (828) 257-4530 or visit at www.dwtheatre.com.

Sunday, August 12

The Appalachian Brass Quintet Second Sunday at 5 p.m. Pan Harmonia, in collaboration with the Altamont presents A Brass Menagerie. Premier chamber music in the heart of downtown Asheville! Tickets $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Buy tickets online at www.pan-harmonia.org. Altamont, 18 Church Street, Asheville, www. myaltamont.com

Wednesday, August 15

A Night of Cage In commemoration of composer John Cage’s centennial, percussionists Jason DeCristofaro, Laura Franklin and MatJohn Cage. thew Richmond will Photo: Hazel Larsen Archer play Cage’s Third Construction composed in 1941. Music Performance at 7:30 p.m. $10 / $5 for BMCM+AC members and students w/ ID. Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, 56 Broadway, downtown Asheville. www.blackmountain-

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college.org or (828) 350-8484 John Cage at Black Mountain College, ca. late 1940s-early 1950s. Photograph by Hazel Larsen Archer

Saturday, August 18

Jonas Gerard Paints Live An exciting afternoon of charity and creativity in Pack Square from 1-3p. In support of the local non-profit Caring For Children, Jonas Gerard will create and paint live to music, swiftly followed by a live auction of the paintings. Jonas Gerard Fine Art is located at 240 Clingman Avenue, Asheville, NC.

Sunday, August 19

The Haywood Community Band Free concert will start at 6:30 p.m. at the pavilion adjacent to the Maggie Valley Town Hall. The band will take you on a musical tour around the world with Touched by History History. Come and enjoy “A Morning in Madrid,” “One Night in Athens,” “In a Persian Market,” and other familiar music. Bring a picnic dinner and enjoy a beautiful Maggie Valley sunset. For additional information call Rhonda Wilson Kram at (828) 456-4880, or visit www.haywoodcommunityband.org.

Wednesday, August 22

Beverly McClellan The powerhouse opening act for virtuoso guitarist and visionary composer Steve Vai, Beverly has been seen playing alongside blues legend BB King, and on NBC’s hit television show The Voice under Christina Aguilera’s powerful and dynamic team.

GREED! Puppet Shows Wrinkly old white men have written economic history for centuries! It’s time for puppets to rise up and help silly humans see what’s really happening in the US economy! Now, for the first time, you can learn a people’s history of economics – from puppets!

Friday, August 24 at 7 or 9 p.m. at the BeBe Theater, 20 Commerce Street, Asheville.

Friday, August 31 at 8 p.m. at

the White Horse Black Mountain, 105 Montreat Road, Black Mountain. $12 advance or $15 at the door. Details at www.deepeconomics. com/greed-puppet-shows.html

Beverly has become a rising blues icon nationally, with the push of her newest album entitled Fear Nothing. 8 p.m. at The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., downtown Asheville. Tickets at www.

theorangepeel.net

Saturday, August 25

Local Spirits Mixology Competition Attention professional and amateur mixologists: step out from behind the bar and into the spotlight. The search for Western North Carolina’s most creative cocktails will be held during the 2012 Asheville Wine & Food Festival at the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville. Visit www.ashevillewineandfood.com or call Pack’s Tavern (828) 225-6944.

through August 31

Journey Works by two artists, Danie Janov and Mary Alice Braukman. Both work in mixed water media and collage. Their lives run similar paths of teaching, lecturing, and serving as exhibition jurors. Main Street LTD., 147 E. Main Street, Brevard, NC. Monday - Saturday 9-6 p.m. and Sunday 10-5 p.m. First painting is mine Mary Alice Braukman, 2nd painting is Danie Janov

Sunday, September 2

Historic 7th Avenue Local Farmer’s Market From 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Hendersonville, NC. A variety of local vendors will offer their healthy products for sale on Maple Street in front of the Historic Train Depot. Locally grown fruits, vegetables, dairy products, meats, organic & all natural products and more. Support your local growers and taste the difference today!

September 6-8

Spectra An evening of dance theatre featuring local female movement Photo: Arnold Wengrow artists spanning styles and generations. With Jenni Cockrell, Kathy Leiner, Lindsey Kelley, Julie Becton Gillum, Susan Collard, Malie Reeder, and Sarah Merritt. Thursday through Saturday, 7:30 p.m. at the Magnetic Field, 372 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District. Tickets $15. (828) 257-4003, www. magneticfield.com

Friday, September 7

Paula Hanke CD Release Celebration Fiery and soulful vocalist Paula

AUGUST EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12


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what to do guide Why Do You Love the Appalachian Trail?

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

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Artist Open House Friday, September 28 Come take in amazing local art and natural beauty at 23 Chestnut Forest Rd. This 3400 square foot home offers amazing views, gorgeous finishes and a heated 2200 square foot shop and artist studio. For more information contact The Matt & Molly Team by e-mailing info@TheMattAndMollyTeam.com or by calling (828) 210-1697.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Yuengling Barstool Cup 2012 Saturday, August 18

Hanke celebrates her debut cd release titled ‘The Only Voice’ Concert

with Free Planet Radio begins at 8 p.m. at Jubilee! 46 Wall St. Asheville. Tickets $12 advance, $15 at the door. Available at Malaprops. More details at (828) 225-3232.

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Deadline: September 2, 2012 To commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the completion of the Appalachian Trail (A.T.), the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) is hosting a video contest. The winner will receive several prizes including the opportunity to have their video screened in theaters during the ATC’s membership drive this fall.

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Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Nine local bars and restaurants in downtown Asheville are building their very own designer mini golf holes that will make up a unique bar crawl with a twist. Teams of four will compete for the lowest score and best dressed while enjoying beer and food specials at the following locations: Scully’s (13 West Walnut St); Tall Gary’s (4 College St); One Stop Deli and Bar (55 College St); Bier Garden (46 Haywood St); Hannah Flanagans (27 Biltmore Ave); Arcade Asheville (130 College Street); Yacht Club (87 Patton Ave); Pack’s Tavern (20 S. Spruce St); Circle in the Square (12 Biltmore Ave). 1 p.m. check in time; 6 p.m. after party at Wild Wing Cafe. Tickets for a team of four are $60. Purchase at any of the above establishments or at www.barstoolcup.com. 50% of the proceeds go to support Our Voice Rape Crisis and Prevention Center.

Saturday, September 15

Art in Autumn One of the premier juried art festivals in the Southeast. 110+ artists working in basketry, clay, digital art, drawing, fiber, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed Cindy Ricardelli media, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture and wood. Free admission and parking. The show opens at 10 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m. Downtown Weaverville, www. artinautumn.com

Call for Artists for Public Art Deadline: August 17

Dragin

by Michael Cole

One of the projects will be a water piece designed to be set at First Citizens Bank Plaza on the corner of Main Street and Sixth Avenue. The second project will be set on the corner of Main Street and Seventh Avenue, and will serve as a sculptural gateway element for entrance into Hendersonville’s Historic Downtown District. The deadline for submissions of interest is August 17, 2012.

through October

WNC Artist Showcase at Hilton A selection of intricate geometric drawings by Arden artist Austin Shears are currently on display at the Hilton Asheville Biltmore Park in the lobby level of the hotel, adjacent to the Pisgah Room. On display through A Fury of Angels October 17. Hilton, 42 Town Square Blvd, just off Long Shoals Road (I-26, Exit 37). Details at (828) 231-5355.

The Arts Council of Henderson County and the City of Hendersonville Main Street Advisory Committee are seeking artists who work with site specific public art for the creation of two pieces of public art planned for downtown Hendersonville.

More details are avilable by emailing Lew Holloway at lholloway@cityofhendersonville.org, or Patty Smyers of the Arts Council at acofhc@bellsouth.net.

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Atelier Gallery The Atelier Gallery has expanded it’s collection to include fabulous new work from local artists Lief Johannsen and Nissa Vrooman. We also have fresh, new work from many local, regional and national artists. Stop by 11-6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 11-7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday’s. Phone (828) 505-3663 or visit www. theateliergalleries.com. Atelier Gallery, 68 College St. in downtown Asheville, at the corner of College and Lexington Avenue.

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 35


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find it here Amici Music www.amicimusic.org

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

ArtEtude Gallery www.ArtetudeGallery.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Asheville Lyric Opera www.ashevillelyric.org

Ceramic Song www.ceramicsingingbowl.com

Asheville Symphony www.ashevillesymphony.org

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Beads and Beyond (828) 254-7927

The Chocolate Bear www.thechocolatebears.com

Bistro 1896 www.bistro1896.com

Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com

Double Exposure Giclee Fine Art Printmaking www.doubleexposureart.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Sagebrush of Waynesville (828) 452-5822

Magnetic Field www.themagneticfield.com

SIGNARAMA www.wncsigns.com

Maria’s Mexican Pueblo (828) 456-6413

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Mary Webster and Associates marywebsterandassociates.com

Studio B www.galleryatstudiob.com

The Matt & Molly Team

www.themattandmollyteam.com

Susan Marie Designs (828) 277-1272

Michael Hofman www.livelifeartfully.com

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

Mountain View Appliance

The Wine Guy www.theashevillewineguy.com

Great Trade Solutions www.greattradesolutions.com

Mr Frogs Soul & Creole Kitchen www.mrfrogs.com

Woolworth Walk www.woolworthwalk.com

Great Tree Zen Temple www.greattreetemple.org

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Green Light Cafe (828) 250-3800

Neo Cantina www.neocantina.com

Guild Crafts www.craftguild.org

The New York Studio of Stage and Screen www.nys3.com

El Charro Mexican Restaurant (828) 277-2248 Foundry www.digfoundry.com Frame It To a T www.frameittoat.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Gallery Two Six Two www.gallerytwosixtwo.com Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

Jack of Hearts Pub & Restaurant www.jackofheartspub.com

www.mountainviewappliance.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Jimmy John’s www.jimmyjohnsrestaurant.com

P.H. Best Fine Art www.mountainbrushworks.com

Karmasonics (828) 259-9949

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

Liberty Bicycles www.libertybikes.com

Sanctuary of Stuff www.sanctuaryofstuff.com

PATTON AVE.

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Low Weekly & Monthly Rates

NORTH ASHEVILLE

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Place Your Classified Ad on www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

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DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE - 28801 WAYNESVILLE

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36 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12

GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071


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local favorites INTERVIEW WITH

INTERVIEWED BY

Guillermo Leon

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MARISA WHITAKER

Owner of El Charro Mexican Restaurant

l Charro Mexican Restaurant is a widely known authentic Mexican eatery in the southern Asheville area. Guillermo Leon, 39, is the current owner. He sat down with Rapid River Magazine and told us a little bit about the place.

Photos: Marisa Whitaker

Rapid River Magazine: Tell

us a little about your Restaurant.

Guillermo Leon: The restau-

rant has been in this location since 1990. My family owns similar restaurants with different names.

RRM: What are the favorites on your menu? GL: The chimichangas, fajitas, and steak burritos. The food is authentic with a little TexMex. The specials are dishes that include seafood and fish and our fajitas are very popular.

RRM: How did you start? GL: I came here through my family. We

came to the Carolinas to look for business and my brother found this and we started.

RRM: What makes El Charro stand apart

GL: I like being with people. I’ve been in the restaurant business for 20 years. I like meeting the people who come in and taking care of my customers.

RRM: Are you planning any changes to the restaurant?

GL: I’m actually trying to start up a lunch

buffet, so people can be served faster. Sort of like a build-your-own lunch, kind of like what you’d see at a Chinese restaurant. We’ll have the chimichangas, fajitas, and our seafood featured.

from other Mexican Restaurants?

GL: We have dishes that nobody else is making: more traditional food, like our seafood and spices. We have 33 flavors of margaritas that people love. Anything from Sangria flavor, jalapeño, beer, and many berry flavors.

RRM: So, what would you say are the best aspects of your job here?

El Charro 1788 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 277-2248 Hours: Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. until 10:30 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. until 9:30 p.m.

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

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PG. 36

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Wireless Internet Access!

Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 37


PG. 36

NA

Best Selection of Bikes & Accessories in Western North Carolina. Top-Notch Service Dept.

1378 Hendersonville Rd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-274-2453 libertybikes.com WNC’s Favorite Bicycle Shop!

32 Years of Supporting and Promoting Bicycling in Western North Carolina!

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Guided Fly Fishing Trips

If[Y_Wb_p_d]_d0

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Beginners Welcome! All you need to do is show up. All gear is

provided. Our guides are excellent at casting instructions, relaying fishing techniques, and teaching basics or stream biology. If you have ever wanted to try fly fishing, this is where to start. Call for trip pricing. PG. 36

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Waynesville Fly Shop

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178 Waynesville Plaza • 828-246-0306

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www.waynesvilleflyshop.com

38 August 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 12


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performance Pianist Margarita Shevchenko

T

he Haywood County BY KAY S. MILLER Arts Council presents Russian-American Israel Philharmonic Orchespianist Margarita tra under Mendi Rodan, the Shevchenko, a musician Cape Town Symphony under of uncommon sensitivity and JoAnn Faletta, as well as the refinement, one of the leading Polish National Philharmonic, young pianists on the internathe Ohio Chamber Orchestional concert platform today. tra, New Arts Symphony Of a recent performance, The Orchestra, Russian National New York Times wrote, “...the Orchestra, and the Hamamatsu delicacy of her scurrying pianisSymphony Orchestra Japan. Russian-American simo passage work was exempianist Margarita Ms. Shevchenko will be plary....” Cleveland-based music Shevchenko a guest on WCQS Radio with critic Donald Rosenberg called host Dick Kowal on Friday, her “a musician to cherish.” August 10 at 2 p.m. The evening’s program will include: Scarlatti Sonatas, Handel’s Chaconne in Gmajor; Tchaikovsky’s Dumka op. 59; Sonata IF #2, op. 19; Valse op. 38 in A flat major by YOU Margarita Shevchenko in concert GO on Friday, August 10, at 7:30 p.m. Scriabin; the Chopin Barcarolle op. 60; and at the Performing Arts Center, 250 Sonata #3 in b minor, op. 58. Pigeon Street, Waynesville, NC. Tickets Highlights of Shevchenko’s many are $20. A reception follows the concert. orchestral appearances include performances with the City of Birmingham Symphony Visit www.haywoodarts.org for more information. Orchestra under Sir Simon Rattle, the

JOHN CRUTCHFIELD’S

Landscape With Missing Person

J

ohn Crutchfield’s latest play, Landscape With Missing Person, crosses America from coast to coast, from one dusty highway to the next, to roadside diners, dirty highway bars, bus stops, and all of the dark spaces in between. Crutchfield describes the play as an “existential rom-com,” in which a couple of misfits journey across America in search of True Love. When Rachel, a teenage railroad punk (played by Lisa Smith), meets Don, an odd and solitary middle-aged man (played by Crutchfield himself, in his return to the stage) on the streets of a small southern town, she thinks she’s found her free ride to Portland, Oregon. But soon she’s wrapped up in Don’s quixotic quest to find his wife, who has mysteriously disappeared. As the pair heads West, they meet a motley crew of characters (all played by Jennifer Gatti), each more desperate and deranged than the last. The play turns on a dime from quirky to lyrical to menacing to bizarre. Landscape With Missing Person is a gripping and poignant journey with a score of characters, three extremely talented actors, and John Crutchfield’s inimitable wit and style.

BY

CHALL GRAY

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Landscape With Missing Person: written by John Crutchfield; directed by Steven Samuels; lighting design by Jason Williams; set design by Don Baker; sound design by Mary Zogzas; costume design by Laura Tratnik; stage management and prop design by Rodney Smith; produced by Chall Gray. IF YOU Landscape With Missing Person: GO Performances: August 9-11, 16-18,

23-25. Tickets $12/15. For tickets please visit www.themagneticfield.com or stop by The Magnetic Field at 372 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District.

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Vol. 15, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2012 39


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PG. 36

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August 2012 Issue