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GAIETY THEATRE

Rathmines and Rathgar Musical Society present

THE

MIKADO

Wednesday 13th, Friday 15th, Wednesday 20th, Saturday 23rd

THE YEOMEN OF THE GUARD Tues. 12th, Satur. (Mat. & Eve.) 16th, Tues. 19th, Thurs. 21st

PATIENCE M onday 11th, Thursday 14th, M onday 18th, Friday 22nd, Saturday 23rd


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D U B L IN .

T e le p h o n e 7 8 2 0 5

Proprietors: T H E GAIETY T H E A T R E

Nightly 8 p.m.

(DUBLIN) LTD.

Matinee: Saturday 3 p.m.

COMMENCING M O NDAY, 11th NOVEMBER, 1963

Rathmines and Rathgar Musical Society IN ITS GOLDEN JUBILEE YEAR presents

THE

MIKADO

W EDNESDAY, 13th November FRIDAY, 15th November

W EDNESDAY, 20th November SA i’U R D A Y (Mat.) 23rd November

YEOMEN OF THE GUARD TUESDAY, 12th November TUESDAY, 19th November

TH U RSD AY, 21st November SA T U R D A Y (Mat. & Eve.) 16th Nov.

PATIENCE MONDAY, 11th November M O N D A Y , 18th November THURSDAY, 14th November FRIDAY, 22nd November SA T U R D A Y (Eve.) 23rd November Choreography: DOLORES D E L A H U N T Y M usical D irecto r: TER R Y O ’C O N N O R Settings designed b y JAM ES M A H O N a n d executed by B R IA N COLLINS ENTIRE PRODUCTION BY N O R M A N

Dress Circle 10/6

MEADMORE

PRICES OF ADMISSION P a rte rre G ran d Circle 8/6 and 6/6 6/6 and 4/6

T h e M a n a g e m e n t re s e rv e t h e r i g h t t o r e fu s e a d m is sio n a ls o t o m a k e a n y a l t e r a t io n s in th e cast w h i c h m a y b e r e n d e re d n e c e s s a ry b y illn e ss o r o t h e r u n a v o id a b le causes. T h e pubJic m a y le a v e a t t h e e n d o f t h e p e r f o rm a n c e b y all e x i t doors. Pe rsons s h a ll n o t be p e r m i t t e d t o s ta n d o r s i t in a n y o f t h e g a n g w a y s in t e r s e c t in g t h e s e a t in g , o r t o s i t in a n y o f th e o t h e r g a n g w a y s .— C o p y B y e -L a w . T H E T A K I N G OF P H O T O G R A P H S I N TH E A U D I T O R I U M IS S T R IC T L Y F O R B ID D E N .


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THE YEOMEN OF THE GUARD

THE M I K A D O The

M ik a d o

N a n k i-P o o h K o -K o

.........................................................................................

R O D E R IC K

........................................................................................................ L I A M

...................................................................................................................

Pooh B ah

Yum Y um

................................................................................................................

P itti

S in g

......................................: ...............................................

Peep

Bo

HUBERT

ROGERS

...........................................................................................

L eo n ard

................................................................................................... T O N Y

DESM OND

JA N E

CARTY

M e ry ll

J a c k P o in t W ilfre d The

......................

O ’C O N N O R

C o lo n e l F a i r f a x

G E R A L D IN E H A N N IG A N

..............................................................

..........................................................

S e rg e a n t M e ry ll

.......................................................................................................... E D M U N D B A R R Y .............................................................................................. L E O N A R D

S ir R i c h a r d C h o l m o n d e l e y

DEVALLY

D A V ID

P ish T u s h

K a tish a

T IE R N E Y

S h a d b o lt

F irst Y eom an

FOSTER

DOLAN

F i r s t C it iz e n

ACT I C o u r t y a r d o f K o - K o 's O fficial R e s i d e n c e . A C T II K o - K o ’s G a r d e n . The Mikado, first produced in March', 1885, came after a period of strain betw een Gilbert and Sullivan. The com poser was fretful over Gilbert’s fanciful plots, and th e collaboration seemed t o be broken. T h en Gilbert, always sensitive to w hat was in th e air, was inspired by a Japanese exhibition at Knightsbridge and a wave of in terest in Japanese a r t to plan The M ikado. Sullivan, w ho had dem anded a story o f " hum an interest and probability ”, was captivated at once by w hat seems th e m ost Gilbertian of pieces, in which English char­ acter an d institutions are satirised u n d er an oriental disguise. I t was their greatest success and b ro u g h t them world-wide fame. Sullivan is at his happiest in the musical ta ct and delicacy th a t softens down th e asperities of Gilbert, removing offence from the supposed fate of N anki-P ooh and the to u c h of ferocity which appears in Katisha and even in th e charming toilette of Yum-Yum. N o t long afterw ards he produced w hat he considered his greatest work. The Golden Legend, b u t the tw entieth century has approved the fo rth rig h t judgment of Dame Ethel Smyth— " I t is very fine, b u t to tell you the tr u th , Sir A rthur, I th ink that your masterpiece is The M ikado.”

..........................

LEONARD

.............................................................................................. T O M M Y

C itiz e n

M aynard

P h o e b e M e ry ll

J. H E N R Y

........................................................................................................ T O M

............................................................................................................ P A T R I C I A

K a te

................................................................................................... P .

BYRNE O ’B R I E N

C O R IS H

Second Y eom an

D am e

E O IN

D IC K

BURKE

E ls ie

C O R IS H

....................................................................................................

CARM EL

Chorus o f School-girls, Nobles, Guards and Coolies— Misses M. Cowle, M. McCann, D. O’H agan, P. H ough, M. Pierce, E. Stavely, S. Sweeney, N. Cashell, B. Boylan, F. Kavanagh, P. Carroll, N. Burbi idge, M. Healy, T. Reid, J. Walshe, N. Byrne. Messrs. T. O ’Dwyer, F. D unne, J. Dillon, B. Grace, T. Sweeney, J. O’Brien, T. M urtagh; K. Hough, B. Sinnott, P. Lawlor, N. Byrne, N. Magee, F. Maher, J. McEvoy, R. McLoughlin, S. W oods, F. McKevitt, C. Grant. A. Salmon, S. Cronin, P. Walsh, B. McMahon, R. Taylor. Geishas— Misses D. D elahunty and C. Geary.

COMYN

.......................................................................................................

H eadsm an

Second

JO H N F IN T A N

.................................................................................. ........................................................................................... .............................................................................

C a rru th e rs

...............................................................

DESM OND O ’D W Y E R

JO H N F IT Z P A T R IC K L O U IS E

STUDLEY

C A T H E R I N E O 'C O N N O R JA C Q U E L IN E P O M E R O Y

...........................................................................................................................

MARY

HEALY

Chorus of Y eo m en of the Guard, G entlemen, Citizens, etc.— Messrs. J. Maguire, P. Camp­ bell, S. D ooney, F. Taylor, N. Byrne, T. Sweeney, J. O ’Brien, F. Dunne, S. Woods,- T. O ’Dwyer, J. Dillon, J. Fitzpatrick, G. Simpson, F. McKevitt, C. G rant, A. Salmon, S. Cronin, P. Walsh, B. MacM ahon, J. R. Clark. Misses E. Staveley, D. O’Hagan, M. McCann, H. Cowle, J. Campbell, J. Walshe, E. Boylan, N. Cashell, F. Kavanagh, B. Farrar, P. Carroll, E. O ’Reilly, M. Cowle, K. Ahern, M. Flood, N. Burbridge, E. Mulvey. Scene: T o w e r G reen .

D a t e : 1 6 th C e n t u r y .

The Yeom en of the Guard was first produced in O ctober, 1888. G ilbert’s story came to him when he saw th e traditional figures of the Tower w arders used in an advertising display, and The Beefeaters was his first name for a piece which un der its final magnificent title was the favourite of th e collaborators. To Gilbert, sensitive to atm osphere and to public taste, the Tower and its guardians embodied the patriotic em otion and th e interest in England’s historic past sum m oned up by the Jubilee of 1887. H e had, besides, as a comic poet the satisfaction of pitting himself against Shakespeare, whose professional jesters irritated him. Sullivan responded very happily to the opportunity of writing more serious music th a n had been possible in his earlier work for Gilbert. The fun and comedy w ere there, b u t beyond them Gilbert gave him lyrics of real beauty and tenderness. As th e shadow falls th e grim old fortress and th e dreadful axe and block take on reality, and the m ost hum an and to u c h ­ ing of the operas can rise beyond sentim ent to tragedy.


PATIENCE C o lo n el

Calverley ........................................................................... BRIAN KISSANE

Major M urgatroyd ........................................................... M AURICE O ’SULLIVAN Lieut, the Duke of Dunstable ...................................................... PAUL DEEGAN Reginald. Bunthorne ........................................................................ VICTOR LEESON Archibald Grosvenor ..................................................................

JACK O’CONNOR

Mr. Bunthorne’s Solicitor ..................................................... R. H. McLOUGHLIN The Lady Angela ..............................

LUCY MacCARTHY

The Lady Saphir ................................................................................... VERA HEADE The Lady Ella ............................................................... The Lady Jane ......................................................................... H EATHER HEWSON Patience ............................................................................................. EILEEN DONLON C h o ru s o f R a p tu r o u s M a id e n s a n d O fficers o f D ra g o o n G uards— Misses C. G eary, I. C a m p ­ bell, J. M u rn a g h a n , D. O ’C a lla g h an , P. H o u g h , K. A h e rn , D. O ’H a g a n , S. Sweeney, N . Byrne, E. Boylan, M. H ealy, I. W alsh e , M. F lo o d , M. W illm an , E. M ulvey, N. B u rb rid g e. M essrs. R. D o o n e y , F. D u n n e, J. D illon, D. D easy, T . Sweeney, J. O ’B rien , T. B y rn e, K. H o u g h , B. S in n o tt, P. Lawlor, N. Byrne, N. M agee, D. Byrne, G. R y an , N . M cG u in n ess, J. M aguire, I. F itzp a tric k .

ACT I Exterior of Castle Bunthorne. ACT II A Glade. P a tie n ce w as first p r o d u c e d at th e O p era C o m iq u e in April, 1881. L a te r in th e y e a r it m o v ed to th e n e w t h e a t r e w ith w h ic h th e p a r tn e r s h ip of G ilb e rt a n d S u lliv an is associated. I t w as th e first of t h e “ Savoy O p eras G ilb ert h a d p la n n e d a piece b a s e d on o n e of his B a b Ballads, b u t as h e w o rk e d h e b e c a m e uneasy, t h in k in g t h a t his s to ry of T h e R iva l C u ra tes m ig h t give offence, a n d b y a h a p p y t h o u g h t h e a lte r e d it t o m ak e it a s a tire o n th e a e s th e tic m o v em e n t. T h a t h e h a d a h e alth y b u t q u ite p h ilistin e d islik e of “ th e p re p o s te ro u s sch o o l ” o f O scar W ild e is c e r ta in , b u t his s a tir e w as far fro m disp o sin g o f th e a es th e te . In effect, G ilb ert a n d S u lliv an a d v e rtis e d W ild e, and W ild e a d v ertis e d G ilb e rt a n d Sullivan. W ild e w a s d elig h ted , a n d d i d e v ery th in g p ossible to fo ste r th e a sso c iatio n w h ich t h e p u b lic a t o n c e m ad e b e tw ee n h im s elf a n d G ilb ert's B u n th o r n e . G ilb e rt a n d S ullivan m a d e a f o r tu n e o u t o f t h e opera, w h ic h w a s o n e of th e ir g r e a te s t successes. W ild e ’s fa m o u s t o u r in A m e ric a w as m a d e p ossible b y t h e p u b lic ity which t h e opera gave h im . I t w as an a d v e rtis e m e n t fo r th e a e s th e tic school, b u t it w as d esig n ed a ls o as an a d v e r tis e m e n t for t h e opera w h ic h rid ic u le d it.

TERRY REID


For R athm ines & R athgar M usical Society Stage D irectors A ssista n t Stage Directors C h oru s M istress H on. Secretary H on. T reasurer -

/ \ / \

SE A M U S O'NEILL CH RIS. F. B R U T O N AVEEN ARCHER A N N KIN G E IL E E N KN O W LES C L EM P. R Y A N THOM AS M U RTA G H

For G aiety T heatre Stage D irector Stage M anager Chief Electrician C atering M anager W a rd ro b e M istress

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1963 the mikado, the yeoman of the guard, patience