Page 1

BY NOVA LORRAINE

VOL 35 QUARTERLY

Jean Shafiroff

n o i t i d E l a i c e p S e n i t of Ra

Bes D I S C O V E R

T H E

N E W

&

R I S I N G

I N

F A S H I O N .

C U L T U R E .

T E C H N O L O G Y .


MIDTOWN MANHATTAN’S boutique hotel gem Archer welcomes you to his chic boutique hotel nestled in New York City’s storied Garment District. Experience the bold American menu of Charlie Palmer Steak, unwind at the Foyer Bar or raise a toast to the breathtaking view of the Empire State Building from the stunning Spyglass Rooftop Bar.

Your room is ready.

archerhotel.com ARCHER NEW YORK

RESERVATIONS

LOCAL

45 WEST 38TH STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10018

855.200.9061

212.719.4100


MA GA Z I N E

RAINE INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS [I.C.E.]

VOL 35

BEST OF RAINE FASHION

DAYMOND JOHN NICKY HILTON NALA WAYANS MARIA VALENTINO BEVERLY JOHNSON KENDALL JENNER

10 12 16 22 24 28

CULTURE ROMERO BRITTO PETER MAX EMMA MCQUISTON FABIEN COSTEAU ALICIA MARIE BEN CARSON

33 38 40 44 48 54

MUSIC,FILM & TV CONSUELO COSTIN SEAN KINGSTON KATHLEEN ROBERTSON DIANNE GUERRERO ADRIENNE + JULISSA PRIYANKA CHOPRA MARK CUBAN

NEW FOR VOL. 35 JEAN SHAFIROFF ATTITUDE IS EVERYETHING RUIA AHMADZADA ANASTASIA SHERGINA SELF LOVE VIETMAN'S HO TRAM BEACH JULIUS NASSO NIKKI DELOACH VICTORIA KONEFAL RALPH JOHNSON VITAL ABIGALOW

58 60 66 72 74 80 86

91 96 100 102 104 108 112 114 116 118 120


MA GA Z I N E

RAINE VOL 35

INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS [I.C.E.]

F O U N D E R , C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R & E D I T O R I N C H I E F

N OVA L O R R A I N E

M A NA G I N G E D I TO R LI Z C AMP E SE

S E N I O R E D I TO R K R I S TOP H E R J OH N S ON

ADVISORY BOARD B E V E RLY J O H NSO N C O N S U E LO VAND E RB I LT CO STI N

SPECIAL THANKS F R E D E R I QU E P ORT E R T I N A L I T T L E J OH N J AV I E R H E R N A N D E Z N ATA S H A B I S H OP

INTERNS ALE X I S DARKO D I AMO ND H E MRI CK SAG E LI TTLE J O H N

COVER CREDITS C OV E R P H OTO B Y M I C H A E L PA N I C C I A D R E S S B Y V I C TOR D E S OU ZA

CONTENT ADVISORS D E RRO N F O RRE ST

ART DIRECTION M A RT I N A M I C KO V I D E O C O N T E N T D I R E C TO R J AV I N F OR R E S T

RAINE MAGAZINE

NEW YORK * LA * SAN FRANCISCO * MIAMI CORRESPONDENCE Raine Magazine 13506 Summerport Village Pkwy Windermere, FL 34786 Raine Magazine is a trademark of Raine Creative Holdings LLC and is published quarterly. All contents, logos, and articles are copyrighted materials and all rights are reserved. Any reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of Raine Creative Holdings is prohibited.The publisher also reserves the right to refuse any advertising material for any reason deemed inappropriate by publisher. To distribute Raine at your business, please email editors@rainemagazine.com. RAINE MAGAZINE INQUIRIES General: editors@rainemagazine.com submissions@rainemagazine.com


NOVA’S NOTES WELCOME TO RAINE MAGAZINE I am absolutely thrilled about the journey that I have taken so far with Raine. Since launching, it’s been 12 long yet rewarding years of exploration, discovery, and growth both for the magazine and myself. What started as a passion project has morphed into an international platform. Steady on its course, Raine Magazine inspires millions worldwide through authentic and visual storytelling. Stories vary greatly from creative to creative, but all guide others to never give up on their dreams. The Best of Raine Special Edition represents some of the incredibly brilliant gems that we have uncovered over the last 35 volumes produced.The Rainemakers featured within have all went on to accomplish incredible feats since their interviews. For example, Priyanka Chopra has taken Hollywood by storm, Kendall Jenner is one of the world’s most notable fashion models, Ben Carson ran for President, Mark Cuban shows no signs of stopping his success in business, and Alicia Marie is now an online phenomenon, just to name a few examples. As you flip through the stories, take time to delve into each of the Q & As and see if you can find the nuggets or hints into their future that now ring true. I am humbled and proud for my vision has always been for Raine to serve as a platform to help others take their dreams to the next level. I am grateful to all the team members that have supported me along the way, including family and friends, as we are all part of the Raine Family. This is dedicated to all of you.Thank you for sharing my vision with me and helping me create 35 volumes of Raine. I am excited for what the future will bring. Let it Raine! Truly,

Nova Lorraine Founder | Editor in Chief

Previously printed content featured in this edition of Raine Magazine has been edited and modified.


I LIVE TO CREATE AND CREATE TO LIVE. -Nova


FASHION

BEAUTY & STYLE


IF YOU ARE ABLE TO BEND LIKE A BAMBOO TREE, EVEN THE STRONGEST WINDS CAN’T BREAK YOU. -Nova


THE BEST OF RAINE 12 YEARS OF MAKING RAINE E NJ OY O UR CE LE B RAT I ON OF S OM E OF OU R FAVORI T E R AI NE M AK E R S TORI E S OVE R T H E YE A RS . FRO M THE E AR LY DAYS OF K E N DA L L J E N N E R TO P R I YANKA CHO P RA A N D M A RK C U B A N , YOU W I L L L OVE J O UR NE YI NG DOW N M E M ORY L A N E W I T H U S .


RAINEMAKER 10

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


I N V E S TO R ,

AU T H O R

A N D

E N T R E P R E N E U R

Founde r of F U BU, DAY M OND J OHN, D o e s i t Al l !

BY NOVA LORRAINE

Daymond John always had an entrepreneurial spirit. At six he was selling pencils, and by the time he was ten, he was shoveling snow in the winter and raking leaves in the summer to make money to spend on candy. Now, at age 43, Daymond John is an extremely successful American entrepreneur, investor, author, branding strategist, and motivational speaker. He is world-renowned for founding the global fashion brand FUBU, as well as for his role on the hit ABC business-reality TV series Shark Tank. Raised in Queens, New York, John developed a love for fashion through his intense fascination with hip-hop during his adolescent years. Set on creating a new trend within the urban music community, John sought out the help of his biggest supporter, his mom, and began brainstorming ways to make an impact on the culture. “My mother made her own clothing; she had a strong sense of style. I would see her late at night cutting patterns on the floor and sewing things.” He began to make his own hats from home and sold them in front of the New York Coliseum, making about $800 on the first day. That was the start of something huge for the business mogul-in-training. Raine Magazine had the opportunity to speak with entrepreneur Daymond John about his struggles, journey to success, and life at the top of the Shark Tank.

RAINE: Who inspires you? Who is your biggest supporter and what was your greatest struggle? JOHN: My fellow Sharks, my kids, and a lot of people around me inspire me. My mother was my biggest supporter. My greatest struggle was to find financing and good partners. RAINE: Lastly, what are your future goals? JOHN: Doing everything I like, and also trying to educate as many entrepreneurs as I can. For more information on Daymond John you can visit his site at: daymondjohn.com or @thesharkdaymond at twitter.com

RAINE: How did you launch FUBU? What were the financial circumstances? JOHN: FUBU had slow growth. I started it in 1989, and closed it three times until 1992; it grew faster between 1992 and 1997. We started looking for financing around ‘94 and got turned down by 27 banks, so I mortgaged my home. Then, we turned my home into a factory for two years, and slept next to the sewing machines. We put out an ad in the newspaper and found financing. Then, we found a private investor connected with Samsung America. The investor liked the fact that we had good sales and that a lot of rappers were wearing our brand. RAINE: What was it like growing up? Did your family have any influence on the start up? JOHN: My father was a computer programmer at that time. He would come home and be very hard on me about schoolwork. He was a very strong father figure, but not very nurturing. My mother worked just as hard as my father did; she always had a business on the side. My parents divorced when I was around 12 and I became the man of the house. Eventually, FUBU became a real brand. The PR for FUBU was mainly word of mouth, besides product placing—we would put FUBU shirts on various rappers appearing in videos and on magazines. RAINE: Tell us a little about your hobbies and interests outside of the office. JOHN: I’m a big outdoors guy and would describe myself as an avid fisherman and snowboarder. I love motorcycles. My favorite foods are seafood and eggplant parm. My favorite musicians are Fleetwood Mac, Prince, Bob Marley, Maxwell, Stevie Wonder, and Michael Jackson.

Images courtesy of Damon John

RAINE: What do you love most about being an entrepreneur? JOHN: What I love most about being an entrepreneur is being responsible for my own actions, whether they are good or bad. RAINE: Shark Tank turned out to be a huge success, tell us about that. JOHN: I never check my office phone, but one day I did, and to my surprise, I received a call from Mark Burnett’s office. His message informed me that he was shooting this show called Shark Tank, An American, loosely-based version of the international show, Dragon’s Den. Mark Burnett went on to explain that I would be shelling out between one and two million of my own money each season. Although apprehension initially set in, I wanted to diversify my portfolio, so I took a shot at it. The other “Sharks” and I invest in the best products and businesses that America has to offer. We give budding entrepreneurs the chance to make their dreams come true and possibly make a business deal that will earn them millions.

FASHION. ENTERTAINMENT. CULTURE. TECHNOLOGY

INNOVATE! ISSUE VOLUME 12

KENDALL JENNER what you don’t know

MEET SHARK TANK’S

DAYMOND JOHN PALAYE ROYALE ROCK & ROLL IS REBORN GILT.COM invitation only

D I S C O V E R

T H E

C R E A T I V E

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

A N D

U N C O N V E N T I O N A L

E N T R E P R E N E U R

11


NICKY HILTON

EFFORTLESS STYLE:

Photographer – Luis Guillen; Photographer’s Assistant - Gabriel Brandt; Hair Stylist – Takayoshi Tsukusawa; Makeup Artist – Griselle Rosario, using Artis Makeup Tools, Chanel Skincare & Tarte Makeup; Manicurist – Angel Williams; Stylist – Liz Teich; Stylist Assistant – Nick Adedokum, & Sydney Lawson; ELUXE by Nicky Hilton dress, L.A.M.B shoes, Parulina earrings and cuff, both rings by Larucci. 12

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


Georgine dress, L.A.M.B shoes, E. Kammeyer, Parulina Ring, Nicky’s own engagement ring (worn throughout) and custom bag by Sara Battaglia. R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

13


HILTON: I am glad my father instilled that work ethic in us—my siblings and me. At every step of the way, I found myself wanting to outdo myself and be better than I was. When we started making money from our endeavors, it was very fulfilling. We have worked for everything we have. We’ve made some mistakes along the way—we were young and thought we knew it all—but at the end of the day, our parents knew best.

Nicky Hilton has made her mark in the business world. As an entrepreneur, model, and fashion designer, the glamorous socialite wears many hats. And even though the “Hilton” name was once synonymous with luxury hotels, her success expanded it to include some of the fashion industry’s top brands. Hilton built up her brand after launching her first fashion line Chick by Nicky Hilton, designing handbags for the Japanese company Samantha Thavasa, and debuting her second fashion line Nicholai at New York City’s MercedesBenz Fashion Week in 2007. This fashion-forward businesswoman is now also an author, sharing her personal stories, style successes, and fashion mishaps in the ultimate guidebook to fashion, 365 Style (2014). Nicky Hilton built an internationally recognized brand that is flourishing faster than anyone could have imagined and, by the looks of it, she has no plans to slow down anytime soon. RAINE: Can you talk about your new book, 365 Style?  What would you like for the readers to take away from it? HILTON: I love fashion, so I wrote this book. I cover all sorts of different things, from style advice to quick fixes and tips. I’ve dedicated a whole chapter to travel—like what to pack and what to wear—as well as tried to educate the reader on what to save on and what to spend on. RAINE: What was the “Aha!” moment? HILTON: A few years ago, I became active on social media. People starting writing me and asking for style advice. I then thought it would be fun putting all of what I’ve learned into a book. It balances all sides of the spectrum— what happens behind the scenes from the perspectives of the spectator to the designer. RAINE: If you could offer one tip, what would it be and why? HILTON: Wear what makes you feel good. Don’t be a slave to trends; it is the fastest way to burn through money. Really ask yourself: Is it me? Is it flattering? Does it fit? And, be unique; don’t copy your favorite celebrities’ styles. That is so boring. Also, create a mood board to help you find yourself. It can be anything— flowers, colors, architecture, clothes, etc. Fashion is supposed to be fun. Don’t take it too seriously.  RAINE: How would you describe your sense of style? HILTON: I would say it is pretty reflective of my lifestyle in NYC—sophisticated with an edge. RAINE: Do you have a signature go-to piece?  HILTON: I love blazers, in many variations. They are sort of my staple. They look good and I feel good in them. Also, ballet flats—love them! They are chic, simple and comfortable, which is a bonus. RAINE: Why should people take an interest in their personal style? HILTON: I think that when you look good, you feel good. I read this book, The Happiness Project (2009), and one of its mantras is: Act how you want to feel. My Mantra is: Dress how you want to feel. RAINE: At the age of 17, you were already a budding entrepreneur. Would you say that starting early prepared you for your future endeavors as a businesswoman?

14

RAINE: Will you tell us about your forthcoming capsule collection for Eluxe? HILTON: Eluxe is a Canadian retailer that carries some of the coolest brands, and they came to me with that idea, and I loved it. As a bonus they agreed to give me complete creative control. RAINE: Can you talk about your design inspiration for Eluxe? HILTON: I divided this collection into three [types of] women. California transplant: The bohemian girl with some cover-ups and dresses. Uptown NY: A preppy uptown girl.  Downtown NY: The sexy downtown girl with lace tops and dresses. (I love lingerie inspired pieces. They are effortlessly sexy.) RAINE: Has being a Hilton allowed you more access to business opportunities that helped you build your brand as an entrepreneur? HILTON: I would be lying if I said that my last name didn’t open doors for me. At the same time, it closed doors. At the end of the day, the product will speak for itself.  RAINE: From your experience, what’s the most helpful piece of business advice you could offer a budding entrepreneur? HILTON: Be humble. At my first job, I was taking out the trash and taking lunch orders. It didn’t discourage me, because everyone starts from somewhere; don’t think you are too good for menial tasks. RAINE: As an entrepreneur, what was your biggest challenge, and what steps did you take to successfully reach your goals? HILTON: When I was younger, people mistook my shyness [for weakness] and tried to take advantage of me. I was baffled: Why would people want to do this to me? Ultimately, I worked hard to prove them wrong. At the end of the day, I love fashion, and I love dressing up. I feel grateful that I found my calling at a very young age. I ALWAYS I wanted to be in fashion. I couldn’t imagine doing anything else. RAINE: What is your ultimate goal in fashion? HILTON: I don’t look at it as a race, but I know I will definitely expand my brand. I love accessories, eyewear and footwear. Something that had always interested me is home décor; I love picking up things for my home.  RAINE: Who has been the biggest influence on your life as an entrepreneur and why? HILTON: My sister, because she is a businesswoman. She has over 20 brands and a vision, and it’s very reflective of her; even the logo with the tiara is very her. It wasn’t an overnight thing. She was very strategic about it. She was also one of the pioneers of reality television—getting paid to show up somewhere. Once she conquered that, she evolved and started deejaying, now getting paid to entertain the party.  RAINE: What are some of your other passions? HILTON: I love to cook, especially Italian. I love reading, especially now, since having written my own book. These days I am burning through a book a week.   RAINE: The pursuit of happiness. What does that mean to you? HILTON: Balance in your personal and professional life. If you can achieve both of those, and not let one take priority over the other, you are in good shape.  RAINE: What words of wisdom would you like to share with other entrepreneurs? HILTON: Write your ideas down, or type them into your cellphone. The best ideas come when you least expect them.  

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS [I.C.E]

F A S H I O N

&

S T Y L E

VOL 21

QUARTERLY

EFFORTLESS STYLE WITH NICKY HILTON A BILLIONAIRE’S STORY - FRED MOUAWAD

THE FASHIONABLE MELANIE IGLESIAS

DREAM BIG AT JADE MOUNTAIN THE SMOOTH SOUND OF LAURIANA MAE

Kevin Johnn top, belt and skirt, ELUXE by Nicky Hilton camisole (worn underneath), L.A.M.B. shoes, Pico earrings and ring

T H E

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

W O R L D ’ S

M O S T

F A S H I O N A B L E

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

15


PHOTOGRAPHERS: Quintin Perez & Ron Erick Odchigue instagram.com/quintinandron MODEL: Nala Wayans @ NY Models instagram.com/nalawayans STYLIST: Marcus Ivory instagram.com/marct._ HAIR: Michael David Warren instagram.com/md.warren MAKEUP: Eric Vosberg instagram.com/ericvosburg NAILS: Michelle Matthews instagram.com/nailsbychellz SET: Pier 59 Studios instagram.com/pier59studios

EARRINGS - CLOSER BY WWAKE BODY SUIT - WOLFORD LINGERIE - WOLFORD JACKET - ALEXANDER WANG STOCKINGS - WOLFORD BOOTS - MARK FISHER 16

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


NALA WAYANS AMERICAN FASHION MODEL

BORN IN NEW YORK CITY,

22 year-old Nala is a famous Model is set to makeactor Nala Wayans is aWayans 22-year-old model. American The daughter of who popular American her markIvory in the ever changing fashionstar industry. Also knownis the as the daughter Keenen Wayans and TV reality Daphne Wayans second oldest of siblings. Her previous on-camera work includes The Daphne Guest House offour popular American Actor Keenen Ivory Wayans and co-hosting TV reality Star with friend Instagram Jordyn Woods. Now, Wayans her eyes on her Wayans, she and is the second star, oldest of four siblings. Nala is no set stranger to the modeling goals. of Raine took a moment to speakco-hosting with NalaThe Wayans camera as some her Magazine previous on camera work includes Guestabout her latest and Instagram what inspires to move forward. House withprojects friend and star her Jordyn Woods. Now, Nala has all eyes on her goals within the world of billboards, runways and magazine covers. Raine takes a moment with Nala her before her latest projects unfold, to discuss what inspires her.

different from most models. Another model I love is Christy Teigen, especially RAINE: Can you describe your experiences in modeling and how you have because she has cookbooks and cooking accessories and I have a passion for fine-tuned your craft? NALA: When I was 19 or so, I decided to take my interest in modeling cooking. RAINE: Can you describe your experiences with modeling how youabout have fineseriously. Whenever I am interested in something, I want toand learn more tuned your craft? words? it. I study modeling in order to get better at it. I read magazines and anything RAINE: How would you describe a creative entrepreneur in your ownVOL NALA: When I was 19 or so, I decided to take my interest in modeling seriously. else that I can learn from. I am one of those people that when I want to do NALA: Someone that makes his or her own job in a specific field in32which Whenever I am interested in something, I want to learn more about it. I study not a job something, I obsesses over it and want to learn everything about it. I am a that job doesn’t currently exist. For example, Creative Director wasQUARTERLY modeling. I read magazines and anything else that I can learn from. I am a visual visual learner, so watching behind the scenes interviews and flipping through that existed 50 years ago. Those individuals had to create that opportunity F A S H I O for N learner, so watching behind-the-scenes interviews and flipping through magazines ISSUE magazines like Harper Bazaar inspire me. I think Harper Bazaar still takes the art themselves. like Harper’s Bazaar inspire me. I think Harper’s Bazaar still takes the art of modeling of modeling seriously. It’s one of the few big magazines that are still very true to seriously. It’s one of the few big magazines that are still very true to the fashion RAINE: What wellness tips do you swear by? the fashion industry, and for that reason, I appreciate it. industry, and for that reason, I appreciate it. NALA: I only drink water or tea. I don’t drink soda or coffee. I eat until I am RAINE: If you could change or impact the modeling industry, how would you satisfied and not until I am full. I am very big on “me”. You’ve got to put yourself RAINE: If you could change or impact the modeling industry, how would you do first in everything. You have to consider mental wellness in everything, which is do that? that? very important for your physical, and body wellness. With everything, ultimately NALA: At the moment, there is so much change in the industry, which is NALA: At the moment, there is much change in the industry due to social media. great, especially due to social media. However, it’s a double-edged sword. For It’s a double-edged sword. For example, social media gives many people a chanceyou have to put yourself first. example, social otherwise media gives so the many people a chance that wouldn’t otherwise who wouldn’t have opportunity to model, and that’s amazing. On the AMERICAN FASHION MODEL FILMMAKER AWARDor in creative pursuits have opportunity to model amazing. Onwho the didn’t other necessarily hand, theseworkRAINE: What is your best advice in battling boredom RAINE otherthe hand, these same changesand canthat’s reward people DESTINATION NEWARK creative entrepreneurship? same changes can reward people that didn’t necessarily work hard for the hard for the opportunity given, which others have had to work so hard for in the opportunity given,that in which in the past,message. others have had to work so hard for and NALA: For me, I get stressed more than I get bored.To battle that, I step away past, and I think gives the wrong and try to do something else and then come back to it. I think that gives the wrong message. RAINE: Who is your guidepost in the modeling industry? RAINE: Whoare is your guidepost in the modeling NALA: There a lot of models that I admire, butindustry? I’d rather make my own path andRAINE: What would be a project that you would like to do or be excited NALA: I think are a off lot of models that I look at love and admire I rather not try to base there my career someone else’s. I do Chrissybut Teigen, becauseabout. make mycookbooks own path and cooking not try to base my career off of someone For NALA: I would love a Vogue Cover. Also, I would like to do a collaboration she has accessories, and I have a passion forelse’s. cooking. example, I have studied Naomi and the 90’s era of supermodels but I don’t want with a brand. I would want something that would feel organic, so it would to be them neither do I idolize them because I think long term, my life path is depend on the brand. INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS

NALA WAYANS

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

17


RAINE: How would you describe a creative entrepreneur in your own words? NALA: Someone that makes his or her own job in a specific field in which that job doesn’t currently exist. For example, Creative Director was not a job that existed 50 years ago. RAINE: What wellness tips do you swear by? NALA: I only drink water or tea. I eat until I am satisfied and not until I am full. I am very big on “me.” You’ve got to put yourself first in everything. You have to consider mental wellness in everything, which is very important for your physical wellness. RAINE: What is your best advice for battling boredom in creative pursuits or creative entrepreneurship? NALA: I get stressed more than I get bored. To battle that, I step away and try to do something else, then I come back to it. RAINE: What project would you like to take on or would be excited about? NALA: I would love a Vogue cover. Also, I would like to enter a collaboration with a brand. I want something that would feel organic, so it would depend on the brand. RAINE: Word to the wise: What advice would you lend to a budding talent in your chosen field? NALA: Go for it. However, be realistic. Modeling is not for the naïve. It’s not the hardest job, but it’s probably the hardest on your ego and self-esteem, as well as your mental wellness. It comes with a lot of criticism. Technically, everyone can do this job, but not everyone can handle the rejection this job brings. The number one thing to remember is it’s a job, so don’t take it personally and be nice to everyone! Finally, go into castings knowing that the project has a look, so if you don’t get it—it’s nothing against you.

to you. Take it and grow from it. If you move forward, you are still succeeding because you are going for whatever your goal is. RAINE: What are your superpowers? NALA: In terms of superpowers, I’d be more like Batman. He is technically not a superhero, but a guy that does the right things and is an above average human being. RAINE: Describe yourself in five words or less. NALA: 1. Laid-back. 2. Cozy. 3. Nonchalant. 4. Goofy. 5. Straightforward. RAINE: If there was one thing you could have changed on your journey as a creative entrepreneur, what would it be and why? NALA: I wouldn’t change anything. I could have taken a different path, for example, started younger. However, if I started younger, others could have more easily influenced me in shaping my career. Now, I have a better idea of how I want my career to be. RAINE: Regarding fashion, what would you describe as your signature “look”? NALA: My go to outfit: mom jeans (higher waist / straight leg), boots, crop top/ body suit (all black), and—of course—a very nice bag. RAINE: Who are some of your fashion role models that have inspired your current style? NALA: I love the Olsen Twins, Nicole Richie, and Quincy Jones’ style.

RAINE: What is your viewpoint of failure? NALA: I think failure is when you let obstacles or any kind of rejection get 18

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


BRACELET - CLOSER BY WWAKE DRESS - DION LEE R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

19


EARRINGS - CLOSER BY WWAKE CROP TOP SWEATER - ALEXANDER WANG SEQUIN PANTS - ALICE AND OLIVIA SHOES - GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI 20

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


EARRINGS + BRACELET - CLOSER BY WWAKE TOP - MICHAEL KORS PANTS - ALEXANDER WANG SHOES - SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

21


VIVACIOUS, CONFIDENT AND HARDWORKING:

MARIA VALENTINO O N BE AU T Y ’ S B I G B U S I N E SS BY MIMI HAYDEN

Photographed by Lucy Helena Wearing Maria Eliza Collection MV by Maria Valentino cosmetics 22

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


“That has always been my goal—to build an empire by the time I was 30,” says Maria Valentino. “I come from a family of strongwilled Italians—very hard-working and a huge influence on my life, as you can imagine.”

what you want, and you’re going to have to work for it. You have to be very careful about how you execute your plans and how you handle your funding. From the day you decide to start a business to the day you decide that you want to sell it, and every day in between, make sure that you have goals set for your business and that you are properly allocating your time.” Planning is crucial to Valentino’s success. But, it can’t always be about work, can it? In those rare moments that Valentino does take breaks, she manages to oil paint. “I will pull out a huge canvas and just mix colors and paint. But, somehow I’ll mix the colors and say, ‘That would make a great color for an eye shadow.’ ” Maria Valentino has achieved a lot for her 23 years, when most other young adults are still trying to figure it all out. Her undeniable style and beauty lead to the creation of two successful businesses—a swimwear line and now, the launch of a cosmetics line. “Fashion and beauty empire by 25?” She laughs. “Sure. No pressure.”

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

RAINE

MAGAZINE

MV, as she is affectionately called by those closest to her, is speaking about swimwear, the MariaEliza Collection. From patternmaking, fabric selection, and trying on the samples to the choice of hardware that is incorporated into each piece, Valentino has her hand in everything. “I make exclusive and very high-end swimwear. All of the fabrics are from Milan and all of the hardware is 18k gold-plated. It’s not something that I am trying to mass-produce,” she explains. While listening to Valentino, it’s obvious that she pays fine attention to detail. “[I design something with] a limited quantity so that I can say, ‘Only a 100 pieces of this particular bathing suit are available.’ You know you’re getting an exclusive piece of fashion, which adds a lot of value to it.” Valentino coupled her love of fashion with another passion—beauty. Considering the current economic landscape, which makes it difficult to start one business and ensure its success, launching a second business, like Valentino decided to do, is very difficult. Valentino is an incredibly beautiful woman. She pursued pageantry in her teen years, and won awards in both national and international competitions. Around that time, Valentino realized that she couldn’t use typical run-of-the-mill beauty products—they simply didn’t agree with her. Out of this dilemma, an idea for a product emerged. “I’ve always had custom makeup formulated for me,” enthusiastically recalls Valentino. “There’s a woman who formulated makeup for a lot of the major beauty brands, like L’Oreal and Chanel. She is a good friend of mine—she created this line for me, it has all natural anti-aging additives, and it’s firming. I also worked with a top dermatologist. So, now, you can literally have flawless skin and all day coverage; you don’t have to worry about touchups. It’s great for the woman on the go.” When it was time to design the packaging, she kept it sleek, elegant, and simple, by creating a matte black and gold logo that reads MV, which aligns with her carefully strategized brand. Valentino has a loyal fan base on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, collectively topping out at around 500k and increasing by the thousands. Using this to her advantage, she asked her followers about what they were looking for in a skin and beauty line. “I wanted to help other women achieve this beautiful look without having to pay a fortune. I wanted to create something that was affordable without compromising quality. I did not think it was going to be this huge. As soon as I am done making these products, shipments are literally going out the door.” With her social media followers, Valentino takes the time to clue them in on the latest product developments and ask for customer feedback in real time. “I think it’s so important to get involved with your target market— engage your followers. When I have a new product, I like to use a lot of media. It gets people excited! I give them imagery to check out. I like to take pictures of my products and tweet them out. I’ll put them on Facebook. I’ll put them on Instagram. I’ll ask my followers for their opinions and really get them involved in the process.” Valentino exhibits an aptitude for entrepreneurship. “At heart, I am a businesswoman. I saw a huge opportunity—there were things missing in the marketplace and I wanted to fill the void, she explains. Of course, challanges are inevitable in business. “There are going to be a million road blocks and [more than a] million people saying that you can’t do it. You have to be confident, believe in

INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS [I.C.E] F A L L F A S H I O N & S T Y L E I S S U E

QUARTERLY

VOL 17

MEET FASHION RAINEMAKERS: MARIA VALENTINO, SHAWNE MERRIMAN & SAM SARPONG

THE COOL SIDE OF LUXURY

10 NEW ENTREPRENEURS TO WATCH!

FLIPPING OVER FLIPZ HEADPHONES CHARMED BY CHARLESTON PLACE

T H E

W O R L D ’ S

M O S T

F A S H I O N A B L E

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

23


Photographer- Dove Shore, dove@doveshore.com Hair: Emily Kate Warren; emilykatewarren.com Makeup: Luke Chamberlain of Starworks; starworksartists.com Stylists: Luke Storey; luke@ lukestorey.com and Lauren Messiah; laurenmessiah.com

Printed Blouse-Theory Skirt- Prabal Gurung Earrings- Givenchy Bracelet- Alexis Bittar Suede Pumps- Pradat 24

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


b e v e r l y j o h n s o n R A I N E M A K E R

A N D

M O D E L P R E N E U R

BY NOVA LORRAINE

Beverly Ann Johnson is an American model, actress, writer, and businesswoman. She rose to fame and garnered international attention when she became the first African-American model to appear on the cover of American Vogue in 1974. Not only did it change how people perceived and understood beauty in the US fashion market, it set a new standard for inclusivity in the industry that was quickly adopted by the rest of the fashion world. Breaking ground once more, Johnson became the first black woman to appear on the cover of French Elle in 1975. In 1981, Johnson published the first of her many books, Guide to a Life of Health and Beauty. Around the same time, she also got involved in the entertainment industry, appearing in numerous films and television series. These include Ashanti (1979), The Meteor Man (1993), Def Jam’s How to Be a Player (1997), and Crossroads (2002), among others. From there, she also got involved in reality television as a guest judge on She’s Got The Look.  In 2012, Johnson starred in her own reality series, Beverly’s Full House, which aired on the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN). The New York Times named Johnson one of the 20th century’s most influential people in fashion in 2008. Today, Johnson is still very active, making appearances as a guest speaker at various events and conventions, talking about her experience as a businesswoman, an icon, and an influencer. The groundbreaking model and creative entrepreneur opened up to Raine Magazine about her life, work, and aptitude for business. 

RAINE: What impact did modeling have on your goals and dreams? JOHNSON: I started modeling very young. My dream was to be financially independent, and I thought I would achieve that via college and a law degree. My lucrative modeling career [helped me] realize my dreams. RAINE: There has been an explosion of diversity in the advertising world in the past four years, what trends do you foresee in the coming years? JOHNSON: As the world recognizes and acknowledges our likenesses as well as our differences, I foresee continued diversity in [represented] nationalities as well as plus size models and mature models.

RAINE: What did you love most about modeling? JOHNSON: I love the art of modeling— working with some of the greatest photographers and designers in the world. And, trying to create an exciting, magical, and timeless photo when being photographed.

RAINE: The Beverly Johnson Luxury Brand includes fashion, jewelry, perfume, & houseware. What is the anticipated launch date for the additional products you will introduce to the market? JOHNSON: Please visit Fredericks.com for product updates.

RAINE FASHION. ENTERTAINMENT. CULTURE. TECHNOLOGY

QUARTERLY

FASHION & STYLE ISSUE VOLUME 13

RAINE: What are your thoughts on shows like Top Model and Make Me a Supermodel? JOHNSON: I love and watch all modeling shows. RAINE: What is the number one thing a young girl should focus on if she wants to become a high fashion model? JOHNSON: She should assess whether she meets the requirements: height, weight, age.

RAINE: What was your most challenging venture? JOHNSON: I would say being in business. It takes a team of professional people and it is a slow process.

mAGAZIne

RAINE: As a model trying to “make it,” how does a young star avoid the dark side of the industry? JOHNSON: I think by continuing to educate yourself and preparing for the day when you are no longer modeling.

RAINE: You’re an actress, author, spokesperson, manufacturer, retailer, and you have your own TV series. Which of these pursuits, outside of modeling, are you most proud of? JOHNSON: I love what I am doing now. And that is going into business for myself. Instead of being the pretty face on the box, I now own the box my pretty face is on. Very empowering!

RAINE: Who has been the most instrumental person in helping you launch your various projects? JOHNSON: My business partner Brian Maillian. He is a brilliant businessman.

Rainemaker and Supermodel

B e v e R ly J o h n So n

Anne hAthAwAy on MovieS, BRoAdwAy And oySteRS

$250,000 diAMond Studded nAil PoliSh Coo l A nd St y l iSh te C h toyS SwAg Style foR hiM

I n s p I r e .

e m p o w e r .

D e l I v e r

t h e

m u s t

K n o w

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

RAINE: Will Target be the exclusive retailer of all your future products? JOHNSON: No, Target is not [the] exclusive [retailer]. I am in selective Target Stores and in Frederick’s of Hollywood’s Beauty division, 117 stores as well as online.

Scan and check out our Blog!

RAINE: What words of wisdom would you share with other working models or creative entrepreneurs? JOHNSON: Have faith, stay in action, and never give up!

e n t r e p r e n e u r .

25


Blouse - Rachel Zoe White Blazer - Jason Wu Pants- Alexander Wang Broach - Alexis Bittar Leopard Heels- Giuseppe Zanotti 26

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


Blazer-Theory Blouse- Vince Brocade Pants- Dries Van Noten Shoes-Marc by Marc Jacobs Horn Necklace- Tory Burch Ring- Alexis Bittar R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

27


BY NOVA LO R R A I N E R ESEA R C HED BY C A R LOT TA HA R R I N GTO N

- w ha t you d on’ t k now

KENDALL JENNER

I C O N F A S H I O N

PHOTOGRAPHER: CHRISTOPHER BEYER, WWW.CBEYERPHOTO.COM STYLING: LUKE STOREY, WWW.LUKESTOREY.COM ASSISTANT STYLISTS: NICO X. ORTEGA & MICKAELA ADAMS

28

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

Sequined black and white striped dress - Alice + Olivia; Yellow peep toes - Shoes of Prey; Floral leggings - H&M; Bracelets - Ted Baker; Necklace - H&M OPPOSITE PAGE: Sunglasses - Dior; Printed silk blouse - Versace; Turquoise blazer - Rag & Bone; Pink tweed shorts - Zara; Pink patent leather wedges - Vera Wang Lavender; Rose gold necklace - H&M


Meet Kendall Jenner, one of fashion’s newest rising icons. Jenner is the daughter of Kris and Bruce Jenner, and the younger sister of Kourtney, Kim and Khloe Kardashian. She has recently endorsed deals with OPI Nicole Nail Polish, Venus Gillette Razors, and—along with her sister Kylie—is now a “West Coast Fashion Contributor” for Seventeen Magazine. Kendall is known for her keen sense of fashion on the red carpet, and is a social media sensation with over three million Twitter followers! Raine Magazine had the pleasure of catching up with Kendall and getting to know this dynamic entrepreneur! RAINE: How would you describe yourself? JENNER: I’m kind of a shy, but fun person when I get to know you. I love being with my friends and my family. I like being outside-—snow boarding, riding horses, and boogie boarding; I love the beach! RAINE: What are some fun facts about Kendall? JENNER: I’m loyal, protective, and picky. RAINE: What don’t we know about Kendall? JENNER: I have to have everything perfect. It works in my favor when I’m getting ready. For example, when someone is doing my makeup, if I see something that no one else sees, I can fix it and feel confident.

JENNER: Sometimes it’s easier, because of what I have going for me already. However, I feel that I have had to work a little harder, in a sense, because everyone around me sees the pictures that I take, so I have to watch out for everything. RAINE: Do you have an interest in becoming an actress? JENNER: No. I think it would be cool, but modeling is my passion. RAINE: Who is your favorite supermodel? JENNER: I love Giselle B. RAINE: Who are your favorite designers? JENNER: Alice + Olivia Chanel Louis Vuitton Dolce & Gabbana RAINE: Are you in a relationship? JENNER: No. RAINE: What advice would you give to someone without the name recognition trying to break into the modeling world? JENNER: Follow your heart. Contact an agency; put your all into everything you do; and talk to your parents to see what they think. RAINE: What else do you have coming up? JENNER: I have a bunch of stuff going on! Stay tuned.

RAINE: What are some of your hobbies? JENNER: During the summer I try to go surfing as much as I can with my sister. We have a lot fun with it because we’re not trying to be pro’s. I love horses! I rode for ten years; that was my main thing since I was two years old. Also, a year after I started modeling, I got into cheerleading at school.

RAINE: What’s your dream?

JENNER: My dream is to walk the runway for a huge designer, or be on the cover of an amazing magazine. RAINE: Who was the first person that inspired you to go into modeling? JENNER: My whole family inspired me. I would take pictures of myself and they would be on my computer. My sisters and my mom would say that they looked amazing and that I have to do something about it. My dad, at first, preferred me being a horseback rider, but now the modeling has grown on him. He thinks it’s good at my age to have a job; it will prepare me for the future. RAINE: Is modeling everything you thought it would be? JENNER: Yes. I love being able to dress up and feel confident in front of the camera. It’s also fun to meet new people. However, I didn’t know how tiring it would be. Sometimes I want to pass out at the end of the day. RAINE: What is the most challenging moment you’ve had so far in your modeling career? JENNER: Missing school is challenging. It’s hard to make up the work, and having my teachers get mad at me. RAINE: What was your scariest moment on the runway? JENNER: For a second, my dress wouldn’t zip, and the scariest thing was that it would look stupid. Though, it was an adrenaline rush. RAINE: How does having famous sisters negatively and positively affect your pursuit of your career? R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

29


FASHION. ENTERTAINMENT. CULTURE. TECHNOLOGY

INNOVATE! ISSUE VOLUME 12

KENDALL JENNER what you don’t know

MEET SHARK TANK’S

DAYMOND JOHN PALAYE ROYALE ROCK & ROLL IS REBORN GILT.COM invitation only

D I S C O V E R

30

T H E

C R E A T I V E

A N D

U N C O N V E N T I O N A L

E N T R E P R E N E U R

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

White silk blouse - Alice + Olivia; Black and white striped bow tie - www.JillPineda.com; Green patent skinny belt - J. Crew; Cut off denim shorts - H&M; Black creepers - H&M Cover Credits: Yellow tweed blazer: Zara; White blouse Theyskens Theory; Sequined tank; J. Crew; Pants - H&M; Silver pumps - Lanvin; Lala flower necklace - Ayana Designs The Backyard - W Los Angeles Hotel Westwood


Gold silk top - Lanvin; Green floral blouse - Amber Patton; Yellow gem and pearl necklace - Kate Spade; Leopard suede printed shoes - Giuseppe Zanotti; Floral neoprene skirt - Elizabeth and Jamest R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

31


C U LT U R E

T R AV E L . L I V I N G . A RT S . E V E N T S . B O O K S .


ROM E RO BR IT TO

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

33


Hailed as one of the 21st century’s masters, internationally renowned pop artist Romero Britto uses elements of Cubism to create masterful visions of vibrant colors and bold patterns. His is a visual language of hope and happiness, reflecting his optimistic faith in the world around him. Born in Recife, Brazil, in 1963, Britto was mainly selftaught, painting what he saw as well as what he imagined on newspapers, cardboard, or on any scraps that he could find. Although young Britto excelled in the classroom, he expressed himself and his passion for life through his art. In 1983, he traveled to Paris where he was introduced to the works of Matisse and Picasso. After exhibiting in a few galleries and private shows, Britto was encouraged to travel to the United States where Pop Art was flourishing. Britto moved to Miami and set up a studio open to the public. Years later, after much recognition as an artist, Romero Britto continues to inspire millions with his whimsical style.

INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS [I.C.E]

“INTERNATIONAL” ISSUE

VOL 22

THE ART EDITION

FLYING HIGH WITH FLY LONDON

MEET RAINEMAKER ROMERO BRITTO THE RAINE AWARD

T H E

W O R L D ’ S

M O S T

F A S H I O N A B L E

B U S I N E S S

QUARTERLY

M A G A Z I N E

RAINE: After traveling to Paris in 1983, how did experiencing the works of other great artists influence your style? BRITTO: The works of Picasso and Matisse tremendously inspired me. Being introduced to so many creative and accomplished people, and learning from the works of these masters really drove me to hone in my own personal artistic style.

RAINE: 100 Years from now, what will art historians and enthusiast say about your work? BRITTO: 100 Years from now, I hope that the love that inspires me to create still radiates through; I hope that it is as enduring as the body of work I will leave behind. Love is the only enduring thing, and I think that if I can

34

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


Images courtesy of Romero Britto

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

35


still reach people with it 100 years from now, then that would be a wonderful legacy as an artist. RAINE: What significance does your art play in today’s modern culture? BRITTO: The new generation of artists believes in making art accessible to the masses. In my view, art is too important not to share. RAINE: How did growing up under modest circumstances push you to greater outcomes? BRITTO: My success story is a prime example [of what one can accomplish if] one is willing to work hard; you can change your life.The world is such a big place, and I’m so blessed to have experienced it through my art. RAINE: What is the strongest memory of your childhood? BRITTO: I always remember my extremely humble background. It pushes me to work harder every single day! RAINE: What are your thoughts on art education today? Do we invest enough resources in the arts towards the development of budding artists? BRITTO: I truly believe in the power of the arts—to transform somebody’s life and have a positive impact on society. For this reason, I champion the continued investment in art education, and education in general.

36

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

37


C U LT U RE A PA R K WE S T G A L L E RY F E AT U R E D ARTIST

Peter Max emerged as a powerful force in the Art World as an American illustrator and graphic artist with paintings on exhibition in hundreds of museums and galleries worldwide, Peter is and a powerful force colors in the have art world. Thepart American PeterMax Max his vibrant become of the illustrator and graphic artist exhibited his work in hundreds of fabric of contemporary culture. museums and galleries worldwide. His work speaks for itself as a part of the American pop-culture His work influencing generations generations of of art art enthusiasts. enthusiasts. sceneisinfluencing InInaddition to being called a Pop Icon, Max has also been called a addition to being called a Pop Icon, Max has been successful Neo Fauvist, Abstract Expressionist, and the United States successively called, Neo Fauvist, Abstract Expressionist and “Painter Laureate. ” “Painter Laureate.” The artist has had the the United States distinct Ahonor lot could be said the aboutlast Peter Max,Presidents but what comes of painting seven of the across very clearly is his immense love for American culture. The United States and the world’s best loved celebrities, among esteemed artist has had the distinct honor of painting the last them the young sensation Taylor Swift. seven Presidents of the United States and the world’s best-loved So much could be said about Peter Max as an artist, celebrities; among them, the young sensation Taylor Swift. As such, but what comes across very clear is his immense love for Peter Max and his vibrant colors have become part of the fabric of American culture, and appreciation for the various art forms contemporary culture. that have influenced his work. RAINE: How has living in Paris influenced your art? RAINE: How did you get interested in art? MAX: Well, I got influences from Paris, but also from MAX: When I was a little boy, my father—a very successful everywhere—I was so lucky. When I was a little boy, maybe businessman—used to draw a little bit. I thought I would fiddle 2 or 3 years old, although he was very successful business around with drawing too. I remember my mother got me these man, my father used to draw a little bit. I thought I would fiddle crayons one day, and to the left of where my father used to sit, there around with drawing too and he liked it. I remember one day was a very big beautiful peach wall. I took my crayons and went to my mother got me these crayons, and to the left of where my draw on the wall. My mother said, “No, no! Don’t draw on the wall,” father used to sit was a very big beautiful peach wall. I took and my father said, “No, no! Let him.” He encouraged me. Thus, I my crayons and I went to draw on the wall, and my mother drew on the wall and added to it every day. After four or five days, said, “no, no, don’t draw on the wall,” and my father said, my mural was about ten feet wide. When anyone would come to the “no, no let him.” He encouraged me. Thus, I drew and added house, my mother would show it off. This built me up. It developed to it every day and after four or five days, it was maybe ten my love for art and being recognized for it. feet wide. When anyone came to the house, my mother would show itHow off, did andyou this me up.inItAmerican developed my love for art RAINE: getbuilt interested culture? and being MAX: When recognized I was a little for kid it.living in China, we got our first radio,

Photos courtesy of Peter Max

and there were two or three Chinese stations. One day, I turned up RAINE: When you think of your art now, howI asked does my it influence the radio, and they were playing American music. mother, present day art themother perception of the “What is that?” andormy said, “Oh, it’sworld? an American station,” MAX: know it is interesting, arewas living and afterWell that, you I went to that station every day.we That whentoday I fell inof course in an ageculture! of media—media is all around us. You can’t love with American go out of yoursoldiers house without touched by media. As you Then, American came tobeing Shanghai. My father had a tenant walk outside there are who newspapers As who hadout a 19-year-old daughter, was going on outthe withdoorstep. an American you go further there are with advertising on them. You go soldier. She introduced me cars to him. I remember that the guy was to the corner is a“Hey guy kid, selling 40 happening?” different newspapers chewing gum. Heand saidthere to me: what’s I liked the andheperhaps 60me—it or 80 magazines. to your television way talked to sounded so You cool!go That was when I fell set in andwith you’ve got like about love American soldiers, the1000 styledifferent they had,channels. and the freedom they I was little kidfan living represented.When I became thea biggest ever.in China, we got our first radio andAmerican there were twoI or threelisten Chinese stations. One and day, Also, I love music; would to Lionel Hampton I turned up theI enjoyed radio, and werewould playing music Benny Goodman; the they way they playAmerican music. I was just and I asked mybymother, “what and mycountry mothercalled said, completely taken what came outisofthat,” this beautiful “oh, it’s an American station,” and after that, I went to that America—jazz, bee-bop, and the blues. station every day. That was when I fell in love with American culture! RAINE: When were you first noticed? Then soldiers came to Magazine Shanghai. MAX: When I wasAmerican fairly young—maybe 23—Life didMy a father had a tenant who had a 19 year old daughter and the - VO L Uword M E 3 5was out, and people were talking about how she was going out with an American soldier. Then I saw him pick up

38

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E


cover story on me. Since Life Magazine until today, I have been on 2600 magazine covers. RAINE: Where do you get your inspiration? MAX: All I need is the desire and will to be creative. I put the canvas on the easel, I open my paints, and there I am. I have a bunch of brushes, the music begins playing, and I just go at it. I don’t even plan what to do. You know, it’s like dancing on the floor—you don’t know what steps to take and what you will be doing five minutes from now, you just go at it and let it happen. RAINE: What are some of your other interests? MAX: I am very much into creativity, color, composition, and yoga meditation. I love all of that stuff!

FASHION.CULTURE.TECHNOLOGY

VOL 23

QUARTERLY

THE HOLLYWOOD AND GLAMOUR ISSUE

Meet Starlet Diane Guerrero

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

39


Emma McQuiston A Foodie Fairytale BY NOVA LORRAINE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER KENDALL Dress: Suzie Turner; Necklace: Anton Heunis at Maggie Owen; Stylist: Patrice Hall Photographer - Jennifer Kendall Fashion Styling - Jess Broadhead and Patrice Hall Make-up and Hair - Zoe Gale using Mac cosmetics Photography Assistant Oliver Coltman Videographer - Antony Burger

40

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


Things are heating up for Emma McQuiston.

The esteemed culinary artist is not only a rising celebrity in the food world, she is also set to become England’s first black marchioness when she marries Ceawlin Thynn, Viscount Weymouth in June. The 26-year-old beauty has a passion for helping young girls discover the joy of cooking. Between hosting her own popular online cooking show, sharing her life and recipes through her incredible blog, and planning one of the most exciting aristocratic weddings of the year, Emma found time to sit down with Raine Magazine and give a behind-the-scenes glimpse of her modern day fairytale. RAINE: Tell us about your love of cooking. MCQUISTON: It all started with my mother. She is one of my kitchen heroes and a very traditional chef. She taught me the basics, starting with how to bake bread. We always cooked for our family and friends, and even for events with 100 people. Cooking came naturally to me and I have a passion for trying new things. I enjoy being in the kitchen. I like to share new food discoveries, or dishes I’ve invented. I love the presentation of food in the markets. RAINE: What was your favorite experience in culinary school? MCQUISTON: I went in knowing what I liked to make, but enjoyed learning new skills and experiencing different flavors, like ravioli with a saffron cream. I learned how to make South Indian curry. I found it interesting and liked experimenting with heating the coriander seeds with the dry spices; that was the first place I ever did that. Red chili became one of my favorite ingredients; I love spicy things and chili boosts the metabolism. RAINE: How did you get the opportunity to host your own show on E.Food.com? MCQUISTON: E.Food.com contacted me to reference recipes relevant to celebrities, while putting together short and seasonal dishes. It’s been about a year now, since I started with them. Commissioning a show and talking to various production companies takes a long time. My blog has been an incredible outlet for growing my audience. I would love to have my own show, where my blog comes to life. People could see my day-to-day search for new recipe inspiration. Or, I’d love a travel food show; I’d love to go to Croatia and show how they prepare seafood because it’s so different.

the processes and equipment on shows like Master Chef, my style is homier than that. I’m a cook, not a chef in a restaurant. It’s more free. I try to keep it healthy, interesting, and uncomplicated. I don’t promote anything I won’t do in real life. I’m not saying I am a guru—I just LOVE it! A lot of girls my age don’t cook; even if they do, they make desserts or pasta. I came across a niche and wanted to encourage them to make interesting stir-fry dishes or fitness recipes. It shouldn’t be intimidating. RAINE: What is Ceawlin’s favorite dish that you have prepared for him? MCQUISTON: He likes eating very healthy, which is brilliant. He loves kale, roast chicken—we have quite similar tastes. RAINE: Do you prefer cooking for large parties or intimate groups? MCQUISTON: It depends. When you are cooking for a lot of people, you have to do something that can stretch. I like to make food versatile when preparing for a big group. I was making pizza almost every day last summer and everyone loved it. I even thought of opening my own pizza shop. I wanted to open a frozen yogurt shop, too, it’s one of my favorite things, but a perfect location is hard to find in London. RAINE: Do you have a favorite celebrity chef? MCQUISTON: Jamie Oliver. He was an unconventional chef when he was young. And his show was in a loft; it was very different. Now, he is an industry himself, he’s a brand. He has his own culinary school and quite a following. He’s a really good chef and person. He did a project where he helped underprivileged teens get jobs in his kitchen. He’s the chef who makes me want to cook the most; I’ve watched every one of his shows. RAINE: How will your new life change your career aspirations as a culinary artist? MCQUISTON: Ceawlin is very supportive, and what’s brilliant is my job doesn’t tie me to a desk. I’m currently speaking with a literary agent about an upcoming book. I think it’s good that I’m honest with my cooking, and that will continue to grow as I grow. I can’t wait to teach my children to cook one day. RAINE: Where do you hope to be in five years? MCQUISTON: Hopefully, I will have my book finished and will have my own show on television—a travel food show. I’d also like to have a column in a London or US magazine. RAINE: What about your new role in British Aristocracy is most exciting? MCQUISTON: It’s very exciting to be married, and the wedding is all about happiness and turning a new leaf and starting a new life. I can’t wait to share all the things I discover after being married on my blog.

RAINE: What do you love most about hosting your own show? MCQUISTON: It gets easier the more you do it. You have to stay calm and not forget to breathe, and make sure nothing is on fire behind you. My acting background really helps. The reaction I get is nice; people are able to get to know what I like from my videos. My audience can build a relationship with me through the show. RAINE: What do you like least? MCQUISTON: It’s the hectic element—just nervousness before the camera comes on, or getting tongue-tied while trying to enunciate in front of the camera. Also, continuity is quite tricky. You have to be able to think forwards and backwards at the same time. I’m getting better at it. I hope!

MAGAZINE

RAINE S U M M E R

RAINE: What is your favorite dish? MCQUISTON: I love healthy food. Everything in moderation, not deprivation. I enjoy Provencal cuisine—the food is amazing. One of my favorite things in the world is sea bass with Chilean garlic wrapped in tin foil and cooked in the oven for 15 minutes. My favorite things to eat in the summer are raw vegetables with a mayonnaise-like sauce made with olive oil, mustard, anchovy, and pepper. RAINE: How does your cuisine or cooking style differ from most chefs? MCQUISTON: I am quite Mediterranean in my taste, in my style. My food looks good, tastes good, and it’s good for you. I love food you can pick up with your hands and share. While I enjoy watching

I N N O V A T E !

I S S U E

VOL 16

QUARTERLY

A FOODIE FAIRYTALE MEET EMMA MCQUISTON

TOP 1O MOST AMAZING SPAS SWIM LOOKS THAT WILL INSPIRE! A SNEAK PEEK OF FALL FASHION THE NEW. THE RISING. THE MUST KNOW T H E

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

F A S H I O N

&

L I F E S T Y L E

R E S O U R C E

F O R

C R E A T I V E

E N T R E P R E N E U R S

41


THIS PAGE: Dress: Bruce Oldfield; Matching Earrings and Bracelet: Anton Heunis at Maggie Owens; Shoes: Gina PREVIOUS PAGE: Top: Printed Jacquard top, available at Zara.com; Shorts: Flower print shorts, available at Zara.com; Necklace: Stylist’s own (similar available at Topshop.com); Shoes: Christian Louboutin, see similar at christianlouboutin.comt Stylist: Jessica Broadhead R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

43


COUSTEAU: THE FAMILY LEGACY LIVES ON


R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

45


Fabien Cousteau is on a mission to save Earth’s magnificent oceans. By title, Cousteau is an aquanaut, oceanic explorer, conservationist, and documentary filmmaker. His mission is the continuation of a family legacy that started with his grandfather, Jacques-Yves Cousteau; the French naval officer, explorer, filmmaker, scientist, photographer, and author of a series of books that document his underwater research, took his grandson along on many of his adventures, teaching him scuba diving and how to explore the world below. Cousteau is well known for his study of sharks in the early 2000s, with National Geographic as well as several other nonprofit organizations dedicated to restoring our waters. His most recent venture is Mission 31—the longest science expedition to take place in the world’s only underwater marine laboratory. He hopes to document the process for a feature film and eventual book about these adventures. Cousteau broke new ground by spending 31 days 63 feet beneath the sea.

this in smaller, localized efforts within communities and governments around the globe.

RAINE: What was the premise behind Mission 31? What were some major differences between your expedition and that of your grandfather, Jacques Cousteau? COUSTEAU: The target was a broadcast platform for the world’s oceans for 31 days—a communication platform highlighting the thrills, fragility, and connectivity between humans and the oceans. At the end of the mission, we had over 20 billion impressions and reached 70 thousand students within the classrooms live, via Skype. We also used phones provided by Nokia to upload photos to our website, to show the mission in real-time. The major difference between this expedition and that of my grandfather is that he didn’t have the live element.

RAINE: How does where you are now compare to where you thought you would be? COUSTEAU: I never look at the past. My life’s work keeps me focused on the present, and my mission to improve the oceans for the benefit of our future. Saving the oceans seems like an overwhelming challenge at times. I have asked myself: How can one person feel like they are making a notable difference protecting the oceans? The answer is education; it is the foundation of a solution. Making better decisions at the supermarket as well as restaurants will help bring about meaningful change. A free app that consumers can use is called Seafood Watch Guide. It helps people make better choices when selecting seafood. Cutting down on the amount of pollution in the water is another way we can help solve this global crisis. We dump 100 pounds of plastic in our water per day. If we reduce the amount of plastic in our daily lives, we can do a lot to decrease our impact on the environment.Two things that everyone can do, that won’t cost a thing and will do a lot of good in the long run, is volunteering and starting initiatives in the local community.

RAINE: Can you talk about your experience studying and filming great white sharks in a custom built sub called Troy? COUSTEAU: Troy was an equally crazy project from a few years ago that accomplished a dream of mine, to become a shark, and approach sharks in a way that has not been done before. RAINE: It has been reported that our oceans are in trouble due to a number of factors. What are the biggest challenges we need to confront and what steps do we take to reach our goals? COUSTEAU: Our ocean support system is crumbling and dying, and it’s due to one species—us. It’s due to our actions and inactions. There are a lot of challenges, including depletion of resources, pollution, corrosion of coral reefs, etc. The good news is that we can change the course that we set for ourselves; we have seen

FASHION.CULTURE.TECHNOLOGY

VOL 24

RAINE: Talk about the “Aha!” moment, when you realized that oceanographic exploration and filmmaking would be your life’s work? COUSTEAU: For me, it was more of a reoccurring theme while growing up, because I was exposed to a unique part of the world that most people don’t get to see. I realized how difficult it was for other people to get access to this part of the world. The work that my grandfather did was no less astounding than the first walk on the moon. RAINE: What’s your most prized possession? COUSTEAU: The unique and invaluable experiences that have made me who I am, thanks to my grandparents and parents. 

RAINE: What would you like for your legacy to be? COUSTEAU: I want to positively impact future generations, so that they make better decisions and become better stewards of the environment.

QUARTERLY

COUSTEAU THE FAMILY LEGACY LIVES ON

I

46

N

N

O

V

A

T

E

I

S

S

U

E

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

47


48

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


Photography By CHAZ PHOTOGRAPHICS R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

49


Alicia Marie is a model, television personality, author, fitness entrepreneur, gamer and cosplayer. While she accomplishes her goals by doing her best in every arena she enters, she constantly finds new ways of challenging herself and trying new things—by writing a book, entering fitness competitions, or hosting a television event. Raine Magazine caught up with Alicia Marie to discuss her blossoming career and goals for the future. RAINE: As a celebrity fitness and nutrition consultant, what do you love and hate about your job? MARIE: I don’t hate anything. I am having the time of my life. I am very, very lucky to be doing what I love and making a living. It took a whole lot of work to get to where I am today, so I just enjoy the journey!

their clothing. That was in 2005. Now, we are launching ALICIA MARIE by ROGIANI. The simple pieces will be as functional as they will be flattering. That is what women want for their workouts and yoga classes—to feel good. Some of my designs have already been featured in Shape Magazine and Fitness.

RAINE: You went from being a model to a fitness and nutrition guru. Can you take us through that journey? MARIE: I have actually been a “gym bunny” since childhood. I remember being obsessed with Mousercize (via the Disney Channel) and Kathy Smith in the fourth grade! By age 12, I happened to be tall enough to enter and win a model search in a mall. I modeled throughout high school, doing catalogs for JC Penney, Marshall’s, and other big department stores until I was in my 20s. I also signed with Ford Models at 19, and began runway modeling. I have modeled for top designers such as Versace and Vivienne Westwood. I still modeled when I moved to New York, doing more television spots (MTV, HBO, Comcast, Comedy Central), and I even did voiceover work for MTV. [Meanwhile,] I still kept up with my fitness. Late one night, in 2011. I watched a fitness competition on ESPN. A year later, I competed and won. Then, the following year, I won the world championship, which began my career in fitness and modeling—I have been on over 25 magazine covers since 2005—combined with my other true love, media! That is where I am today. It’s been quite the ride.

RAINE: Many models as well as TV stars become obsessed with their weight and then develop an unhealthy eating pattern. What advice could you give to combat that? MARIE: The pressure to look “perfect” is part of what Hollywood is built on. It’s tough, ESPECIALLY when you have studio people telling girls that in order to “get the part”, they’d have to lose weight. You can see how easy it is to resort to unhealthy and dangerous ways of making that happen. I am not a psychiatrist, but I can say that it is healthier and more realistic to try and block all of that out. I see people fall victim all the time. It’s disheartening.

RAINE: As a model, TV host, fitness competitor, and now consultant to the stars, you wore many hats throughout your career. Which role was your favorite and why? MARIE: I am also a writer. I have a syndicated column in Oxygen Magazine, a monthly ”ASK ALICIA.” And, I am about to release my fitness and beauty ebook series in the Spring of 2011, it is something I am very excited about. So, picking a favorite is tough, because I love it all!!! My dream job is hosting a talk show, like Tyra Banks or Ellen— something along those lines. RAINE: You also hosted your own fashion television show and have been a featured trainer on MTV’s Made. How did you make the transition from runway to television? MARIE: MTV is my FAMILY. I have been with MTV in some capacity since I was right out of my teens. I have worked behind and in front of the camera, and even did voice-over work. When the position for a fitness trainer came up on a new show called Made, (which won multiple Emmy Awards for MTV)—I jumped at the opportunity. It is a very rewarding experience. RAINE: Along with everything else you are doing, you now have your own clothing line. Can you tell us more about it? MARIE: We “officially” launched in December of 2010, but I have had my own pieces since ’08. This is the first of my own lines. I partnered with an Italian design company, ROGIANI, because I love

50

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


Image courtesy of Fitness Rx

RAINE: Many of our readers are executives, creative entrepreneurs, and entertainers with busy schedules. How can they maintain a healthy diet? MARIE: EVERYONE IS BUSY. People make what they want their priorities. They are “too busy” to get in an hour of cardio, but they have time to watch Real Housewives or Idol (Helllooooo TIVO!). There are results and there are excuses. Which are you about? People who are in shape and look good make the time. For me, it’s part of my business, but it is also part of who I am. I like being strong and fit, and I plan to stay healthy for the duration of my life. Did you know that I go to the 24-hour gym sometimes at two in the morning?

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

51


Photography By GEORGE KONTAXIS www.georgekontaxis.com


MAGAZINE

RAINE INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS [I.C.E]

H O L L Y W O O D

I S S U E

VOL 19

QUARTERLY

QUARTERLY

VOL 25 FASHION.CULTURE.TECHNOLOGY

STYLE ISSUE

Y

PRIYANKA CHOPRA’S TAKING OVER! THE SERIOUS PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS SIMPLIFYING BUSINESS FINANCING HI-CAN’S $57,000 HI-TECH BED HOLLYWOOD HEALTHY

T H E

W O R L D ’ S

M O S T

F A S H I O N A B L E

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

GET YOUR RAINE APP TODAY!

WWW. R A I N E M A G A Z I N E . C O M


RAINE INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS [I.C.E]

I N N O V A T E !

VOL 20

QUARTERLY

DR. BEN CARSON TALKS ENTREPRENEURSHIP PENTATONIX OPENS UP

DISCOVER TOBAGO

T H E

54

W O R L D ’ S

M O S T

F A S H I O N A B L E

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E


Dr. Ben Carson came from humble beginnings. Carson’s mother raised him and his brother, after she divorced their dad when they were still very young. Although she did not have much of an education herself, she made it a priority for her sons, encouraging them to read vigorously and teaching them to appreciate the value of a good education. As a result, Dr. Carson studied at Yale Medical School and became a pediatric neurosurgeon, one of the most intense specialties in medicine. At age 33, Dr. Carson went on to become the Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery at John Hopkins Medical Center, which is regarded as one of the leading medical institutions in the country. He rose to fame for being the first surgeon to successfully separate conjoined twins joined at the back of the head. His story was turned both into a book and feature film called Gifted Hands (2009). Carson’s passion for education led him to create The Carson Foundation, which celebrates academically accomplished youths. Over 5000 recipients have been awarded to date. His entrepreneurial spirit extended beyond his not-for-profit and poured into a desire to share his story from a different perspective in both America the Beautiful (2011) and his newest work, One Nation (2014). Dr. Ben Carson—the academic luminary, accomplished neurosurgeon, and political activist—spoke to Raine Magazine to discuss how his newest literary creation relates to entrepreneurism. RAINE: How would you equate your journey to someone who is looking to start his or her business? CARSON: When I started as a pediatric neurosurgeon, there were a lot of challenges—there were a lot of things that people said shouldn’t or couldn’t be done. People who are trying to start their own businesses encounter these things too. Similarly to business, medicine requires conviction and courage to do things that are new and different. RAINE: How would you inspire entrepreneurs to move forward with their goals and increase the number of small businesses growing in America? CARSON: What we have to do starts with the government. Right now, there are dozens of new regulations that come out every week, encircling business, industry, and academia. That’s not helpful. We should be looking at all of the energy resources we have and finding the safest and the most environmentally friendly ways of producing things. That is what will increase entrepreneurship and, at the same time, encourage new sources of renewable energy.

RAINE: Some say that running the country is like running a business. Do you agree? And, if so, how? CARSON: You have to be able to take into consideration what is good for all people. That is the key to good government. The same goes for business; when people feel like they are a part of the process, they are willing to throw themselves into it and the whole organization benefits. RAINE: In your book, you wrote: “Tomorrow is not a guarantee, if something needs to be done, just go ahead and do it.” Can you share how entrepreneurs can use that principle? CARSON: Things have a tendency to change fairly rapidly, therefore, if you have a good idea, there is absolutely no benefit to waiting, because the situation may change, and the window of opportunity may close. Besides that, time goes by really fast and the older and wiser one gets, the more one recognizes that procrastination is not a good thing. RAINE: Historically, physicians have been some of the most notable entrepreneurs in our country. What are your thoughts on that? CARSON: A lot of people don’t know that physicians were involved in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence—five of them signed it. Unfortunately, over the last few decades, they have withdrawn to their laboratories, clinics, and operating rooms. I think this had been a detriment to society; physicians are trained to make decisions based on evidence and not on ideology. We’ve reached a point in our nation where those who subscribe to one ideology or another propose something that doesn’t work, they just say: “We didn’t do enough of it. Let’s just do more of it.” I encourage people to start thinking about getting involved in their communities again; fortunately, this year there are 24 physicians running for Congress, so things are starting to change. RAINE: Which cultural or historic figure have you been compared to the most? CARSON: It depends on whether you are talking about people on the right or people on the left. I don’t really care about that; what I do care about is doing the right thing. I also happen to be a person of faith, and I believe that there is a difference between right and wrong, so when I talk about compassion, I am talking about improving people’s lives.

RAINE: The points you brought up in the book about visionary leadership—wisdom versus knowledge—can you talk about them a little bit? CARSON: Early on in our nation, we created an environment where if somebody did something very productive, they would become wealthy, their families would become wealthy, and their communities would become wealthy. Unlike the land barons of Europe, our people created factories, textile mills, and things that allowed others to work—creating the most dynamic middle class that the world had ever seen. That is really where our economic power came from. The whole world recognizes us as entrepreneurs, and acknowledges the fact that the system we have promotes people doing new things. The more we stifle that with rules and regulations, the less common it is going to become.

RAINE: What words of wisdom would you share with rising entrepreneurs? CARSON: Everybody learns in a different way; play to your strengths and away from your weaknesses. The more you know, the more valuable you become and the more options you have. In terms of entrepreneurship, don’t close yourself off to anything. RAINE RAPID FIRE QUESTIONS: Dr. Carson had only a few seconds to answer each. Sprite or 7-up? Sprite Volleyball or kickball? Volleyball Tea or coffee? Neither “Purple Raine” or “Thriller”? “Thriller” Kakis or blue jeans? Kakis Gucci or Calvin Klein? Calvin Klein, only because I know the owner. Pizza or hamburgers? Pizza Star Wars or Avatar? Avatar Montego Bay or St. Tropez? Montego Bay

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

55


NOTHING IN LIFE IS BLACK OR WHITE. ONCE YOU SEE THE GREY IN EVERYTHING, LOVE AND PATIENCE FLOW MORE ABUNDANTLY. -Nova


MUSIC

FILM & TELEVISION


RA I NEMAKE R I N T E R N AT I O N A L

CON S U ELO

ARTIST

&

All Jewelry by Rj Graziano; Mustique Kaftan Gasparee by Gillian Harding 58

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

CO S T I N

ENTREP RENEUR


–Just Me by Marilyn R. Wilson

Photographed by VITAL AGIBALOW for HENSEL; Styling by MINDY SAAD; Hairstyles by YASU NAKA- MURA for ORIBE products; MakeUp by KATE ROMANOFF for STILA; cover beauty products by Kate Romanoff fotr STILA; Sheer color tinted moisturizer spf 20; Lip Glaze in apricot; Custom Color Blush - Coral; Magnificent Metals Foil Finish Eye Shad- ow in comex gold; Smudge Stick Waterproof Eye Liner in lionfish; MAJOR Major Lash Mascara; Stay All Day Waterproof Brow Color in medium

Since the release of her single “Naked” two years ago, dance-pop artist Consuelo Costin has been burning up the charts. “Naked” was on the Billboard Charts for 16 weeks, reaching #11. Next came “Feel So Alive”; it spent 21 weeks on the charts and earned her the title of Billboard’s #2 Breakout Artist. Now, “Here We Go” is proving to be an international sensation—in the top 40 on all German Dance Charts, #11 on the UK Music Week Charts, and #3 on the Polish DJ Charts. The singer also just signed a deal for distribution in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland. What’s next? It’s the highly anticipated release of her first solo album, Just Me. Costin credits her musicality to a wide variety of influences, the first, though, is probably family vacations in the Caribbean.The soulful sound of reggae artists, such as Buju Banton, along with the freedom, warmth, and vibrancy of island culture were a revelation. “I remember visiting a wonderful village in Montego Bay. Inside the village market there were six of the most outrageous, colorful, and vibrant Jamaican women dancing. They brought me into the circle with them and taught me how to dance—how to feel the music—because I had never been exposed to this type of genre before. It was a huge moment in my life and it transformed me.” A deep love for island culture draws her back often. In fact, she chose to celebrate the 2013 New Year on the beautiful island of Barbados, at the home of one of her long-time friends. As her journey to become a recording artist unfolded, those island experiences helped Costin open up stylistically—to reach deep and draw from a more soulful place. Big life moments also influenced that journey. At the age of 19, Costin was involved in a devastating car accident that smashed the left side of her face. Thanks to the support of her mother, she was back on her feet a year later, with renewed determination and focus.The only evidence of the accident is a small dimple christened an “angel’s kiss.” A year after that, she signed her first contract. Soon, however, her mother was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The singer wrote “Better Days” as a tribute to her mother and her journey—a song the American Cancer Society ended up licensing. Proceeds from another single, “Find A Way,” were donated to the Ovarian Cancer Coalition of Greater California, where she continues to give back as the organization’s Vice President. Proceeds from numerous performances at fundraising events all went to charity. When it comes to her music, Costin trusts her intuition and a very talented support team. Her latest single, “Here We Go,” has an amazing and contagious hook. While in development, they chose to test it out on the European market, because of the strong, positive response to her recent tour. It was a validating moment she will never forget: “I was performing on this phenomenal boat in the French Riviera with my dancers, and the people listening went insane for the song. Crazy.” Then, an opportunity to launch the single in Germany came around. The video was released at the same time. Costin was featured on Rockin Berlin—a popular show on Pro7, one of Germany’s largest networks. It was basically a day in the life of an international artist trying to break into their market. Cameras followed her around, as she prepared for a live performance, finding a studio, working with a new choreographer, etc. The show was a hit and garnered the station’s highest ratings in its 17-year history. Costin embraces responsibility across all areas of her vast career as a recording artist and as an entrepreneur. She writes most of her lyrics and launched her own label, C & R Productions, which handles distribution and territory deals. “It’s a very interesting time in social media. Being your own best advocate is the only way to go. If you can start your own label, own your own masters, have the creative control to be the kind of artist you want to be—it’s extraordinary, what you can do.” The experience in Germany with Rockin Berlin reinforced her belief in that there was a strong need in the industry for a trusted and reliable “black book” of resources that artists could access. Work is almost complete on this new venture, which she developed with business partner Umi McGuckin. Called SohoMuse, the website is scheduled to launch in 2014, it is positioned as the industry’s “Trusted Source for Creativity.” At the same time, Costin will be embracing a new role, as television co-host on RTL Network’s exclusive Das Starmagazin segment covering the Oscars. Balancing daily life, a viral solo career and several new business opportunities, is a challenge Consuelo Costin handles with grace. She has a refreshing, down-to-earth attitude and a great sense of humor. “I’m a little bit quirky and love to laugh. I have a white Pomeranian named Bugsy Malone and a beautiful husband who makes everything real. I feel blessed every day.” Check out her new album, appropriately called Just Me. For more information on Consuelo Costin go to www.costinmusic.com or www.sohomuse.com. R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

59


RAINEMAKER

Up Close and Personal with Music Sensation

Sean Kingston 60

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


WHETHER IT’S “BEAUTIFUL GIRLS,” “EENIE MEENIE” OR “FIRE BURNING,” WE ALL HAVE A FAVORITE SEAN KINGSTON TUNE THAT MAKES OUR BODIES TWIST. SEAN KINGSTON, OTHERWISE KNOWN AS KISEAN PAUL ANDERSON, IS A WELL-KNOWN JAMAICANAMERICAN SINGER. IN THIS ISSUE, WE ARE TAKING YOU UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL WITH KINGSTON TO GET INTO THE MIND AND LIFE OF THE RENOWNED HITMAKER. RAINE MAGAZINE PRESENTS: THE SEAN KINGSTON INTERVIEW

Photo Credits: Imani Blackman

RAINE: Can you describe some of

your early experiences and how they fine-tuned your craft? KINGSTON: I started [dabbling in] music at eight—rapping in the bathroom and just playing around. I didn’t take it very seriously until my sister overheard me and told me that I could do this music thing for real. [When I was] around ten, I used to go and chop it up at the Barber Shop by singing; the older folks started to respond positively, as if they wanted more. They made comments like:“You’re really good at this.” This led to my older sister bringing me to perform at local talent shows, where I would always come in second or third place. When I was 12, I won first place [after breaking] a tie, [as a result] my mom invested in me and allowed me to go to a recording studio. Once I was there, I never wanted to leave. No, seriously! I knew from that moment on that all I wanted to do was music. So, I began to put in the work and pursue recording in the studio daily. It was a truly great day when I got a record deal off of MySpace. With 100 dollars to my name, I was able to work my finesse by finding someone to fly me to Los Angeles. When I arrived, I was beyond excited! All I was thinking was: I cannot leave. I cannot leave! There was no way I was going back to Miami without a record deal. I was 16 and wanted to show

how hungry I was. I was feeding off the energy from the feelings [stemming from] my mom being away. Many don’t know this, but she was in prison for five years. I was her youngest child, and there was a lot of pressure building up on my siblings’ shoulders, when they were forced to become parents overnight. To me, it was time to bring my career

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

into full drive by going out and making a real impact. RAINE: Knowing what you know

now, what advice would you have given yourself five years ago? KINGSTON: To have more patience and to be cautious— [and not] rush into anything. I realized that having the right people around me was key. You

61


62

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


have to protect your energy. It’s not all about what you give [to others]; it’s [also] about what [you keep] within. Be aware; many people around you could have an agenda that is not in your favor. RAINE: How

would you describe a creative entrepreneur in your own words? KINGSTON: Someone who is the boss—the CEO. Entrepreneurs are very artsy. They are always thinking about their next invention, [often] while they are working on their current one. Thoughts about how to be better every day flood their minds, along with how to best help and impact the people around them. I most definitely consider myself a creative entrepreneur. I have the pleasure of saying that I’ve discovered some true talent with my own label. That’s rare! I’ve signed artists, too. I am currently finding artists right off of YouTube and walking them into stations [where they] begin to write on the spot, with no time being wasted. RAINE: If you had to relate what you do to sports,

how would you describe how you have followed, changed, or disrupted the game? KINGSTON: I relate my music journey to boxing. You are going to have stuff come in your way. You’ll also have opponents that are going to throw punches, so sometimes you’ll have to bob and weave through the game. So, if and when something connects, you’ll simply learn from your mistakes, take notes, and keep pushing. RAINE: If someone asked you how they could

stimulate their creativity, what advice would you give? KINGSTON: Our brains don’t stop. So, if you have a quiet place in your house, go there. Light some candles, relax, and start praying; start talking to the Lord and see what happens after that. RAINE: What three traits do you feel are most needed

to pursue entrepreneurship? KINGSTON:

1. Work ethic. 2. Staying ahead of the game. 3. Anticipating the next move. You have to be a student of the game. You’ve got to want to get into it—to get behind-the-scenes. When I entered the game, I wasn’t blessed with what I thought was the best deal, but I learned as I moved forward about how to handle things. Knowledge is a huge component of this game.

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

63


RAINE: Have you ever faced the issue of burnout in your career? If so, how

did you overcome it? KINGSTON: For me, this boils down to keeping God first in everything! I pray every day. I talk to Him in public; I praise Him; I love to let Him know how much He has done for me. RAINE: What wellness tips do you swear by? KINGSTON:

1. Peanut Punch. It’s good for stamina and energy. 2. Prayer. It is my biggest medicine. 3. Magnum Stout. This will give you that boost of energy. 4. I recommend a lot of walking. I used to walk from place to place all the time. And when I’m on a treadmill, I’m always on an incline. RAINE: Describe yourself in five words or less. KINGSTON:

that city, Ocho Rios, and where I come from. I understand my roots and am proud of them as well as of the overall culture of Jamaica. Jamaica will always give me that peace of mind vibe. RAINE: What are you most excited about regarding your come back? KINGSTON: To go on tour again, and to see all my fans’ faces again. I

really want to start building right from where I left off! My mother and sister, along with consistent prayer, are helping me get through these last few years. RAINE: What artists would you love to work with? KINGSTON: I would love to work with Kanye West, Jay-Z and Pharrell

Williams. I can just imagine Pharrell and I making some crazy music together. He is a producer that is very wise and has a high level of artistry that I certainly respect.

1. Creative. 2. (An) Entrepreneur. 3. Persistent. 4. Immaculate. 5. Diverse.

RAINE: What words of wisdom can you share with rising music

RAINE: What is the biggest problem that creatives face today and how

would you solve this problem? KINGSTON: Many people in the music world aren’t spending much time on their music anymore. Some of the guys are only spending 15-20 minutes on a track. Speaking as someone who needs quality, I spend about two hours on a single track. Sometimes, I get writer’s block—to my writers reading this—and that’s okay.Take your time with it. Figure out what the melodies are and different methods of mixing and matching them with the concepts. The concepts have to be universal so that the people can relate—to keep it real.

64

RAINE: What inspired you when it came to the Made in Jamaica title? KINGSTON: Well, I have a place in Kingston, Jamaica. I wanted to tap into

entrepreneurs? KINGSTON: Be original. Stay hungry. Leave fear at the door. Stay in your lane. Never give up. Keep God first, and have faith. If you don’t believe, that is when you make mistakes. If you don’t believe, your spirit will always be down. You have to not only have faith, but also keep the faith.

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


THE POWER OF THE COLLECTIVE CONSCIOUS IS LIMITLESS. -Nova


66

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

Photos by Collin Stark

Photos by Collin Stark

KATHLEEN ROBERTSON

RAISING THE BAR AS A TRIPLE THREA T. MEE T WRI TER, PRODUCER AND AC TOR,


R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

67


INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS

VOL 33 QUARTERLY T R AV E L ISSUE

RAINEMAKER

KATHLEEN ROBERTSON RAISES THE BAR

MEET WENGIE: THE AUSTRALIAN YOUTUBE SENSATION

WELCOME TO BREATHTAKING

MALDIVES

KATHLEEN ROBERTSON IS SET TO STAR IN NETFLIX’S ANTICIPATED FAMILY DRAMA NOR THERN RESCUE PREMIERING ON MARCH 1ST. Additionally, Robertson recently appeared in the critically acclaimed TNT crime drama, Murder in the First. Simultaneously, she had a pivotal recurring role, on A&E’s acclaimed Emmynominated series Bates Motel. She also garnered attention for her starring role in the Golden Globe-winning drama Boss, as the brilliant, broken, and duplicitous Kitty O ‘Neill. Prior to this succession of shows, she starred in IFC’s award-winning improvisational mockumentary series, The Business, for which she also served as Executive Producer. Other notable television credits include a starring role ain SyFy’s Tin Man—a reimagining of The Wizard of Oz, which received multiple Emmy nominations and garnered 68

NOVA LORAINE

the highest ratings in the network’s history; as well as a starring role in Seal Team Six from the producers of The Hurt Locker. As a writer and a producer, Robertson is building an impressive career. She is currently adapting The Possibilities for Fox Searchlight and Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Jason Reitman, who is attached to direct. Furthermore, she is adapting Little Bee for Amazon Studios, with Academy Award-winning actress Julia Roberts attached to star. Robertson was also recently brought on to adapt the comic book series Lady Killer for Dark Horse, with Michelle MacLaren (Westworld / Game of Thrones) directing. Impressively, Robertson recently signed an overall deal with Universal Cable Productions to create as well as produce original content. She also sold Your Time is Up to Lifetime, an adaptation of Swimming with Sharks to USA Network, Shooting Stars to E!, and Hollywood Babylon to Warner Brothers—with John Wells set to direct and exec produce alongside Robertson. As an actor, Robertson also appeared in many films: The Vatican Tapes alongside Michael Pena, Hollywoodland alongside Ben Affleck and R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

Adrien Brody, XX/XY opposite of Mark Ruffalo, I Am Sam alongside Sean Penn, Beautiful with Minnie Driver, Speaking of Sex opposite of Bill Murray, and had a starring role in the sequel to Scary Movie. Robertson is a five-time Canadian Screen Award nominee for Best Actress. Her first nomination was for her starring role in Torso, where she played the notorious Canadian murderer Evelyn Dick based on a grizzly 1946 true story. Next came her nomination for portraying a struggling single mom who underwent a mental and physical breakdown in Last Exit. Her most recent nomination was for her portrayal of Colleen Howe in Mr. Hockey; she played the controversial wife of hockey legend Gordie Howe and the first female agent in sports history. Robertson also received a Leo Award for that performance. A native of Hamilton, Ontario, Robertson currently resides in Los Angeles.


Photos by Tony Duran

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

69


70

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


RAINE:We love transformation. If you experienced a personal or professional evolution, what was the inspiration behind it and how have people reacted? ROBERTSON: When I first decided I wanted to write professionally, people thought I was crazy. I was on a successful TV show (Boss with Kelsey Grammer) and the idea of an actress wanting to be taken seriously as a writer felt foreign five years ago. I’m glad I didn’t listen to all the noise and just went for it. Being a writer changed everything for me.

RAINE: Your love of art flourished from an early age. Can you describe your experiences and how they helped fine-tune your craft? ROBERTSON: When I was a kid, my dad took me to the Art Gallery of Hamilton. I was probably around eight or nine at the time. I grew up in a steel town an hour outside of Toronto. Nobody in my family was in the entertainment business. There was a Paul Knee Exhibit and I remember being oddly moved by it. It sort of crept up on me and I was curious. It was the first time I remember being awake to that kind of feeling. RAINE: If someone asked you how they could stimulate their creativity, what advice would you give them? ROBERTSON: I think we all know what we are instinctively drawn to. Trust the things that pull you in creatively—whether it’s a specific photograph or a song or a book. Allow yourself time to find the things that inspire you. RAINE: What wellness tips do you swear by? ROBERTSON: Cliché, but tons of water, tons of walking, and tons of time in nature with people I love. RAINE: What did you want to be when you grew up? Has this stayed the same or changed throughout the years? ROBERTSON: Well, I grew up wanting to be an actor. Now I’m an actor, a writer, and a producer. So, it’s changed and grown a bit from when I was a kid.

Photos by Guy Aroch

RAINE: Word to the wise: What advice would you lend to a budding talent on the rise in your chosen field? ROBERTSON: For writers, I always say: “It’s very simple—just write, a lot. Most of it will be bad, some will be mediocre. But, all of a sudden, something may be good and that growth is fun to experience.”

RAINE: If there was one thing you could have changed during your journey as a creative entrepreneur, what would it be and why? ROBERTSON: I wish I had let people read my stuff earlier. I could have been doing all of this for the last 20 years. RAINE: What has been the most valuable tool in your arsenal of apps, gadgets, or software? ROBERTSON: I love the app Headspace for grounding, Voice Memo for notes and script ideas, and Genius Scan is a lifesaver. RAINE: How does being an independent brand or artist allow you to have more creative freedom? ROBERTSON: Unlike acting, writing allows me to be creative on my terms; I don’t have to wait for an incoming call to get hired. I can wake up and sit at my laptop and write stuff. RAINE: Do your fashion choices affect your success in meetings or pitches? ROBERTSON: Well, I have to say that after so many years of being in front of cameras, I am not big on spending any time I don’t have to in hair/make-up and wardrobe. It’s literally my least favorite part of my job! So, with writing, I just want to be in sweatpants and my glasses sitting at my laptop. That is success to me. RAINE: What is your favorite city for work and play and why? ROBERTSON: I love Toronto. It’s close to my hometown of Hamilton where all my family is. It has everything. If only it wasn’t so bloody cold.

RAINE: How did you overcome the setbacks, let downs, and obstacles of your career? ROBERTSON: Keep your blinders on and keep digging. Acting and writing are both not for the faint hearted. It’s a ton of rejection and people telling you you aren’t good enough. You really have to love it and desperately want to do it, or it’s just not worth it. But work ethic is number one.

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

71


Diane Guerrero Photographer – Vaughn Eric Stewart Hairstylist – Takayoshi Tsukisawa Wardrobe Stylist – Janet Igah Makeup Artist – Derek Medina Manicurist – Narina Chant 72

Dress by Cynthia Rowley Necklace by bcbg max azria Leopard print fur coat by Michael Kors Sandals by Edelman Gold cuff by Michael Kors R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


FASHION.CULTURE.TECHNOLOGY

VOL 23

QUARTERLY

THE HOLLYWOOD AND GLAMOUR ISSUE

Meet Starlet Diane Guerrero

Actress Diane Guerrero’s

best known for her role on the hit NETFLIX series Orange is the New Black and, more recently, Jane the Virgin. Guerrero is quickly skyrocketing to the top with a new leading role, opposite of Charlie McDermott, in Greg Garcia’s CBS comedy pilot Super Clyde, as well as a book deal scheduled for a 2016 release. Born in New Jersey to Colombian parents, Guerrero had her family ripped away from her at the age of 14. Due to fraudulent misrepresentation, Guerrero’s family was deported without warning, leaving her to fend for herself. Although, Guerrero faced circumstances that would test even the strongest of wills, her determination led to quick success. RAINE: What would you say are the three words that have helped you the most in terms of going after your dreams? GUERRERO: Let me start off by saying that I have a long way to go and much to learn.These are some of the ideas I have formed through my trials and tribulations. 1. Persistence. You have to be willing to keep pushing forward. If something is not working, you have to be willing to try different ways to improve and achieve your goals. The entertainment business is about people who really want “it”; if you are not prepared, you can miss an opportunity. It’s a lot of sacrifice. You have to deal with yourself and your bad habits. I go through many moments of thinking: Did I do everything in my power to get this? 2. Flexibility. In life, you have to be open and able to adapt to every situation. One has to be empathetic. 3. Determination / Integrity. Do not give up. I set goals for myself—I want to be challenged. I used to say, “I just want to work!” and although that is still true, I am more conscientious about the kind of work.

wanted to be a performer. I liked all aspects of performing and wanted to do it all—sing, dance, and act. One day, at 24, the light bulb went off. I got sick to my stomach that I wasn’t pursuing something in the creative arts. I decided that I would give it a try. Each and every day I am getting over my fears and getting less and less scared. RAINE: What was your first break? GUERRERO: It really clicked when I got cast in the ABC drama Body of Proof. The audition was to pretend to fall asleep while driving and running over a dead body. I got the part, and it meant the world to me. It brought me so much happiness—just the idea of entering different worlds. It took me back to my childhood and all those wonderful feelings. It was then that I decided that this had to be my life. RAINE: Was there an agent or manager that helped you on this journey? GUERRERO: I started in Boston and then moved to New York. It was after doing a showcase that I met my manager Josh Taylor. He was genuine, and I felt like he really understood me. In classic 1940s manager style he said: “You’ve got moxie kid.” At least this is how I remember it—he may disagree. Josh has been there for me ever since, and has guided me through this whole process. I am so grateful for him and the amazing team at Abrams. RAINE: What is the best piece of advice someone gave you? GUERRERO: My friend Andrea and I always get together and discuss “the industry.” One day, she said something that stuck: “Be the last man standing.” It goes back to having resilience and determination. You have to crawl your way through all the no’s for the one yes and go through all the rounds. YOU ARE GOOD ENOUGH. RAINE: What are some goals that you have outside of your acting career? GUERRERO: I know it’s still an acting goal, but I really want to do musical theater one day. I’m always on the lookout for little magic moments in my life, and I’m a huge fan of travel and adventure—hopefully I’ll get to travel more. I also want to have a family of my own and live a life that is exemplary for others, especially for those that relate to my story. I believe in a better world—I want to be a part of the solution; because it affects me so personally, immigration reform in this country is on the top of my list. The importance of fighting for human rights and the environment goes without saying. This is just the beginning and there is much to be done. I know I have to work hard for the rest of my life, and that is OK.

RAINE: Acting is obviously your passion, when did you first know that this is what you wanted to do? GUERRERO: Well, throughout my childhood I always R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

73


Dress by BCBG Max Azria Pony hair Cropped top by RN Shoes by Alice & Oliva Necklace by Kenneth Cole R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

75


BY NOVA LORRAINE AND RESEARCHED BY CARLOTTA HARRINGTON

76

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

Top and Pants- K.Top Borgella; - Earrings Betsey-Johnson; Necklace and - Laruicci; Jeffrey Campbell and Pants-Earrings K. Borgella; Betsey Johnson; Necklace andHandcuffs Handcuffs - Laruicci; BootsBoots - Jeffrey- Campbell

THE UNSTOPPABLE


Gown - Marteal and Headpiece - Sugar Scout; Booties - Betsey GownEstrada; - Marteal and Estrada; Headpiece - Sugar Scout; Booties - Betsey JohnsonJohnson PHOTOGRAPHER: Manny Roman ; MAKEUP ARTIST: Derek FASHION EDITOR: Renessta Olds; PHOTOGRAPHER: Manny Roman ; MAKEUP ARTIST: Derek Medina; Medina; FASHION EDITOR: Renessta Olds; STYLIST: Brittany Morales; ASSISTANT STYLIST: ShiSeer James; HAIRSTYLIST: Johnny Gonzalez STYLIST: Brittany Morales; ASSISTANT STYLIST: ShiSeer James; HAIRSTYLIST: Johnny Gonzalez

ADRIENNE BAILON JULISSA BERMUDEZ

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

77


“I always knew I wanted to be in entertainment,” reveals Adrienne Bailon. “After booking my first commercial, I never looked back,” states Julissa Bermudez. Bailon and Bermudez are best friends and the Style Network’s Empire Girls. While most may still remember Bailon as one of the popular Cheetah Girls, she is no longer a teenage starlet but a stunning woman with a burning passion for music, acting and producing. Bailon is keeping very busy these days with the X-Factor’s preshow, her new album with Neo, and launching a New York inspired nail polish line, Fingertip Fetish. Bermudez, on the other hand, is a natural born television presenter and crowd-pleaser. After becoming the first Latina host on BET, Bermudez is travelling the nation with Steve Madden, showcasing his newest collections. The girls take a break in their busy schedule to share some insight on what they are doing now and their plans for the future. RAINE: When The Style Network took on the project of your own reality show with Bailon, what was the first thing that ran through your mind? BERMUDEZ: At first it was exciting, to be able to work with one of my best friends, but it was also intimidating based on what I saw with other reality shows. I was a little hesitant because I never had a full camera crew in my personal space and life. That’s when I had a mini breakdown, because I was so brand new to reality TV. Then I calmed down and thought: Hmmm...maybe my reality would hit a cord with a lot of the audience watching. That’s when I decided to go full on. RAINE: Any regrets? BERMUDEZ: I don’t have any because they taught me a lot. Other people can learn from my experiences. RAINE: Are we going to see another season? BERMUDEZ: We are still in creative talks. We want to maintain the integrity of the show and do certain things creatively. We are on the West Coast working on different things. It would depend on our schedules, our creative control and maintaining a certain aspect of the show. We’re still figuring things out. RAINE: On the show you talked about being the next Latin Tyra Banks. Are you any closer to accomplishing that? BERMUDEZ: I mean, in the sense of having people look at me as more than one thing. Women like her inspire me; ones who have been able to hone their craft and turn it into a big movement. She has become this big brand. RAINE: What’s the update on your digital talk show? BERMUDEZ: I shot a couple of things; it’s a new space for me, so I want to make it perfect and make the most of it. It’s an exciting opportunity with Uno, Dos, Trés and the YouTube Channel. Digital content is getting bigger, and I’m excited to be a part of this project. However, I’m still very old school regarding social media. I just got my Instagram a month ago, and I’m tweeting more. It’s a new experience and a new world for me. It’s exciting and I look forward to putting out more digital content through Uno, Dos, Trés and my personal social media.

Jacket - Krisa; Glitter tank A Stars; Skirt - The Limited; Necklace and Bracelet - Laruicci; Shoes - Betsey Johnson

Adrienne is keeping very busy these days with the X-Factor’s preshow, her new album with Neo and launching a New York inspired nail polish line, Fingertip

Fetish. Julissa on the other hand, is a natural born Television host and crowd pleaser and after becoming

RAINE: What’s one word that describes you? BERMUDEZ: Determined. Follow Julissa: @OfficiaJulissaB

78

burning passion for music, acting and producing.

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


the time and my mom said no. She didn’t know

nor trust the industry. I’m glad I didn’t do it that

Dress - K Borgella; Necklace - Circa Sixty Three; Bracelets - Stylist own

LEFT: Jacket - Krisa; Glitter tank - A Stars Skirt - The Limited Necklace and Bracelet - Laruicci Shoes - Betsey Johnson THIS PAGE: Dress - K Borgella; Necklace - Circa Sixty Three; Bracelets - Stylist own

I was signed to Sony. I was 15 years old at the time. My career took off from there. Disney was

doing a show about a young girl’s singing group; I auditioned and got a role, playing of the a doctor and started an internship at Bethone Israel Cheetah Girls. states, Hospital. Then I metAsa Oprah guy, Reggie. He luck cameisupwhen preparation. to opportunity me and said:meets “Hey, you’re kind of cute, do you know how to sing?” He wanted me to audition for RAINE: usfully about your stint on the a small group.Tell I was prepared. I had a gospel Kardashians? song in Spanish and English. That group turned In real this was I was dating. outBAILON: to be 3LW andlife, by August ofwhom that year, I was signed to invited Sony. I was career- took fromwere I was over15. forMy dinner thenoff there there. Disney rolling. was doing a show youngare girl’sreally camera’s I love that about family.a They singing group; people. I auditioned anddating got a him role, for playing fun loving I was 2 years oneand of then the Cheetah Oprah is to it didn’tGirls. workAsout. The states, break luck up had when meets preparation. do opportunity with growing up. He is a good guy but at the time not ready to be in as serious a relationship RAINE: Tell us about your Keeping with with as I wanted to be in.stint He on also neverUp dealt TheCelebrity Kardashians? and that might have also contributed BAILON: to it. I love that family. They are really funloving people. In real life, I was dating Robert. I RAINE: Why the Empire Girls? was invited over for dinner and then there were BAILON: I was trying to re-introduce myself cameras rolling. I dated him for two years and as who I really am. Being on the Kardashians, it didn’t work out. The break up had to do with people got the wrong idea. Many people thought growing up. He is a good guy but, at the time, he I was an L.A. girl, a Kardashian, a socialite. I was was not ready to be in as serious a relationship as I in Los Angeles based on my Disney contract wanted to be in. He also never dealt with celebrity but moved back to NY after Disney and began and that might have also contributed to it. working for MTV. We had spoken about doing a possible show. Julissa has always been RAINE: Whyreality the Empire Girls? my best friend and frequently wentmyself on tour BAILON: I was trying to re-introduce as with us. Julissa had an idea – she wanted to who I really am. Being on Keeping Up with Thedo a Latina Laverne type show. She had Kardashians, peopleand gotShirley the wrong idea. Many a general the Stylea Network thought I was meeting an L.A. girl,with a Kardashian, socialite. I and they offered her on a reality showcontract, and asked wasthen in Los Angeles based my Disney could back come show withworking her. There butifI Imoved toon NYthe when I began for are many Latinspoken Americans that aspeak English MTV. We had about doing possible reality and show. has always been my best we friend and to whoJulissa are mainstream. Ultimately, wanted frequently wentworking on tourgirls withbuilding us. Shetheir wanted to show hard careers. do a Latina Laverne & Shirley type show. She had a general meeting with the Style Network and RAINE: On the show, we see you in thethey studio offered her a reality show and asked if I could working with Ne-Yo. How did you linkcome up with on Ne-Yo with her. There aremade manyyou Latinwant Americans and what to signthat on his speak English and who Ultimately, label for your first are solomainstream. gig? weBAILON: wanted toI am showsohard working girlsfinally building excited. I am doing their careers. what I want to do while working with Compound Entertainment and Tishwan, who is both my RAINE: On the show, we see you in the studio and Ne-Yo’s manager. My dream is to do a working with Ne-Yo. How did you link up with NeLatin infused album but I don’t want to do J-Lo. Yo and what made you want to sign on his label for That isn’t my vision, so I am also working with your first solo gig? Adam Torres, Bruno Mars Manager and I’m now BAILON: I am so excited. I am finally doing what recording in that direction. Besides the album I wanted to do, while working with Compound being released soon, I have a new movie coming Entertainment and Tishwan, who is both my and out with Jane Seymour, and Sarah Ne-Yo’s manager. My dream Chelsea is to do a Kane, Latin-infused Paxton: Elixir. It’s a fun musical by ABC album but I don’t want to do JLo. That isn’tFamily. my vision, so I am also working with Adam Torres, RAINE: that wouldindescribe Bruno Mars’What’s managerone and word I’m now recording that you? Besides the album being released soon, I direction. BAILON: Ambitious. have a new movie coming(Smiling) out with Jane Seymour, Chelsea Kane, and Sarah Paxton: Elixir. It’s a fun musical by Adrienne: ABC Family.@Adrienne_Bailon Follow

RAINE: Tell us how you got started in the age – I had an amazing childhood. Later, I was entertainment business? attendingWe thegrew TheupClinton for Writers BAILON: on theSchool Lower East Side anddidn’t Artists - aanyone high school creative arts. At and know famousfor or in the business. the time I was to audition for ILawas Guardia Entertaining was going a passion of mine. in High school or Julliard the approached last minute, I Community Theater whenbut an at agent didn’t apply. I instead was to be my parents about acting. Idecided was nineI at thegoing time and my mom said no. She didn’t know nor trust the industry. I’m glad I didn’t do it at that age, I had RAINE: What’s one word that would describe you? an amazing childhood. Later, I was attending The BAILON: Ambitious. Clinton School for Writers and Artists, a school for creative arts. At the time I was going to audition Follow Adrienne: @AdrienneBailon for LaGuardia or Julliard but, at the last minute, I didn’t apply. Instead I decided I was going to be R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

79


Earrings - Delphine Charlotte Parmentier; Caftan - SoignĂŠ Kt 80

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


PRIYANKA CHOPRA

capturing hearts capturing hearts around around the the world world By Nova Lorraine

BY NOVA LORRAINE

Driven and focused are two words that come to mind when describing Priyanka Chopra. With 52 films under her belt and the recipient of countless acting awards, she is one of the world’s most accomplished actresses. She speaks confidently about the beginnings of her acting career when she began her streaks of remarkable performances, causing peers and fans alike to stand up and take notice. She once played the role of a disabled girl when everyone told her not to, and she won critical acclaim for doing so. In terms of her music, she faced naysayers who told her it couldn’t be done – a successful music career and acting career. Her recent single with Pitbull hit 32 million views on You Tube alone and went Platinum in India. She has reached a level of success that most don’t achieve in a lifetime. It began with Chopra winning Miss World at age 17. She beams when discussing her receiving the best actress award by the President of her country, just 3 short years into her acting career. With great pride, Chopra acknowledges her excitement of furthering diversity as the first Indian to don the iconic Guess by Marciano ad campaign. Extremely grounded and smart, she recites a quote she remembers reading very early on in her career: “Failure in not an option.” “I am very hardworking and very competitive not to mention, an extremely sore loser”. With that in mind, Chopra strives for nothing less than excellence in everything she does. Join our very intimate discussion with one of the world’s rising stars.

Two words come to mind when describing Priyanka Chopra—driven and focused. With 52 films under her belt, the recipient of countless acting awards is one of the world’s most accomplished performers. She speaks confidently about the start of her acting career, when she began a streak of remarkable performances that caused peers and fans alike to stand up and take notice. Once, she even played the role of a disabled girl when everyone told her not to, and won critical acclaim for doing so. She faced naysayers who told her that balancing successful acting and music careers couldn’t be done, and yet her single with Pitbull hit 32 million views on YouTube alone and went platinum in India. She has reached a level of success that most RAINE: You appear in the upcoming biopic of Olympian Mary Kom. don’t achieve in their lifetime. It all began with What would you say has been the most rewarding aspect of preparing Priyanka Chopra winning Miss World at age 17. for this unique role? CHOPRA: At the it’s painful; I’m training hours a day. I’m She beams as moment, she discusses receiving the 6best actress exhausted. The reward will be once people watch the movie. This story award fromgirl theoutPresident ofgoing her tocountry, three to be is about every there that is say, “I’mjust not going limited”.years Mary is a daughter of a rice farmer;With she went on topride, be a 5-time short into her acting career. great world champion. She is a mother of 3, and an Olympian, and has won Chopra acknowledges her excitement at furthering national awards from the President. The amazing thing is, she is just 33 years old! She against all odds. It’s a story not just on her diversity as went the first Indian person to head thebased iconic life but it’s for me - for you and for every girl out there. I want everyone Guess by Marciano ad campaign. Extremely grounded to feel the feeling of “not giving up”. and smart, she recites a quote: “Failure in not an RAINE: What are remembers you most excited about it regarding your latest option.” She reading very early on inproject her with Director, Zoya Ahktar? career. “II’mam very hardworking and very competitive, CHOPRA: most excited about spending 2 1/2 months on an exotic cruise. It’s going to be completely opposite of what I’ve done - it’sin very not to mention an extremely sore loser.” With that versatile. I am always looking for films that inspire me and that only mind, Chopra strives for nothing less than excellence happens when I am being challenged. in everything she does. Check out our very intimate RAINE: Beyond Bollywood…What aspirations do you have for discussion with one of the world’s rising stars. Hollywood?

CHOPRA: I am an entertainer; I just like being excellent and being really RAINE: You appear in the upcoming biopic of Olympian boxer Mary Kom. good at what I do. I just want to do the best at what I do; if that means What has been the most rewarding aspect of preparing for this unique Hollywood, music and working with the best with the business, then I role? will do it. I treat my work like art. I treat it as a very spiritual experience.

RAINE: Regarding your bucket list -- What director and actor would you like to most work with in Hollywood? CHOPRA: Cameron.I’m I LOVE bigsixmovies, artistic and CHOPRA: James At the moment, training hours awhich day; I’mare exhausted. The have drama. They are almost like a painting; I love filmmakers that reward will come once people watch the movie. This story is about every create It’s art that“I’m everyone in the wants to sit is upaand watch.of girl outart. there saying: not going toworld be limited. ” Mary daughter

a rice farmer who went on to be a five-time world champion. She is a

RAINE: Does being a celebrity prevent from being doing mother of three, an Olympian, and the winneryou of national awardsorfrom the something you really like? President. The amazing thing is, she is just 33! She went against all odds. CHOPRA: I do everything I want; I justfor hide really well. It’s not justNo, a story based on her life—it’s me,it for you, andI’ve for been every ingirlthe public eye since I was 17, so I’ve learned how to keep what’s out there; I want everyone to [experience] the feeling of not giving up. personal to me, personal.

RAINE: What are you most excited about in regard to your latest project RAINE: What are some things that you can’t leave the house without? with director, Zoya Akhtar? CHOPRA: Number one: my about cell; number two: bag – it’smonths my lifeon and CHOPRA: I’m most excited spending twomy and a half an weighs about 20 pounds. It has my makeup, camera, and since I’m exotic cruise. It’s going to be the complete opposite of what I’ve done.a I geek and LOVE technology, it also hasme myand iPad, bandaids, everything am always looking for films that inspire that only happens when I else. Number three: my confidence. I never leave home without it!

am being challenged.

RAINE: What is your most embarrassing moment on set for a film or RAINE: Beyond Bollywood, what aspirations do you have for Hollywood? video? CHOPRA: I am an entertainer; I just want to be the best at what I do. If CHOPRA: I’m really great at covering those up. I’m an inherently a shy it means [I go to] Hollywood, [make] music, and/or work with the best in person and I was performing once on stage and wearing leather pants the business, then I will do it. I treat my work like art—I treat it as a very and they split right in the middle.

spiritual experience.

RAINE: Regarding your bucket list, what director would you like to work

with most in Hollywood? CHOPRA: James Cameron. I LOVE big movies that are artistic and have RAINE: Rapid Questions - you have 10that seconds drama; they are almost likeFire a painting. I love filmmakers create art; it’s to answer each: art that everyone in the world wants to sit up and watch. RAINE: Coke or Pepsi? RAINE: Does being a celebrity prevent you from doing something you CHOPRA: Pepsi really like? Lauren or Gucci? CHOPRA:RAINE: No! I doRalph everything I want—I just hide it really well. I’ve been in CHOPRA: Gucci the public eye since I was 17, so I’ve learned how to keep what’s personal RAINE: Red or Purple? to me personal. CHOPRA: Red RAINE: St Tropez orthat Montego Bay? RAINE: What are some things you can’t leave the house without?  CHOPRA: St Tropez CHOPRA: 1. My cell. 2. My bag; it weighs about 20 pounds and has RAINE: Comedy or Mystery? my makeup, camera, Band-Aids, and—since I’m a geek and LOVE CHOPRA: Mystery technology—it also has my iPad, and everything else. 3. My confidence; I or NBA? never leaveRAINE: home NFL without it! CHOPRA: NFL RAINE: IPhone or Samsung? RAINE: What is your most embarrassing moment on set of a film or CHOPRA: IPhone video? Painting orshy Photography? CHOPRA:RAINE: I’m an inherently person [and] I’m really great at covering CHOPRA: Photography those up. Once, I was performing on stage and wearing leather pants— RAINE: Pizza or Sushi? they split right in the middle. CHOPRA: Pizza - 100 times over!

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5 RAINE MAGAZINE - VOLUME 19

79

81


Rapid Fire Questions. You have 10 seconds to answer each. RAINE: Coke or Pepsi? CHOPRA: Pepsi RAINE: Ralph Lauren or Gucci? CHOPRA: Gucci RAINE: Red or Purple? CHOPRA: Red  RAINE: St Tropez or Montego Bay? CHOPRA: St Tropez RAINE: Comedy or Mystery? CHOPRA: Mystery RAINE: NFL or NBA? CHOPRA: NFL RAINE: iPhone or Samsung? CHOPRA: iPhone RAINE: Painting or Photography? CHOPRA: Photography RAINE: Pizza or Sushi? CHOPRA: Pizza—100 times over!

82

Jacket - Ports 1961; Bodysuit - Triumph; Skirt- Ports 1961; Earrings - Laruicci; Cuff- Laruicci R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


MAGAZINE

RAINE INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS [I.C.E]

H O L L Y W O O D

Photographed by VITAL AGIBALOW for HENSEL MakeUp by Kate Romanoff for TEMPTU Hairstyles by YASU NAKAMURA for ORIBE Fashion Editor - Renessta Olds Fashion Assistant William ShiSeer James

I S S U E

VOL 19

QUARTERLY

PRIYANKA CHOPRA’S TAKING OVER! THE SERIOUS PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS SIMPLIFYING BUSINESS FINANCING HI-CAN’S $57,000 HI-TECH BED HOLLYWOOD HEALTHY

Dress - Jose Duran Shoes - Authentic by John Ashford R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

T H E

W O R L D ’ S

M O S T

F A S H I O N A B L E

B U S I N E S S

83

M A G A Z I N E


Fueled by the passion and industry experience of both Manuela Nigro and Tina Johnson, ImageLab was founded to promote a new era of fashion professionals.

Practical learning: 
ImageLab offers practical expertise through its courses, so the student can feel fully prepared and capable for real work in the industry after completion.

ImageLab provides specially crafted workshops in the art of fashion. Students are introduced to renowned market leaders who help them develop new skills, so that the students become successful and creative artists in their own right.

International qualification: 
ImageLab’s courses are fully accredited and give its participants the chance to work in the industry throughout the UK as well as internationally.

WHY IMAGE LAB

Unique and engaging: 
ImageLab offers courses that provide students with a complete knowledge base of the fashion industry, preparing them for work both nationally and internationally. Industry leaders: ImageLab’s highly regarded teachers have years of experience within the industry and share their flair and creativity to immerse students into the past, present, and future of the fashion world.

ImageLab is in Manchester UK: ImageLab is a hub for students from all over the world. Manchester is known for its welcoming and friendly atmosphere. It’s vibrant, diverse, and culturally rich, which makes it the perfect backdrop for an exceptional fashion-focused education. The fastest growing city in the UK is buzzing with fun activities, but still features plenty of relaxing green spaces just minutes away from the bustling center.


TAKING THE TELEVISIO

RAINEMAKER

Meet one of today’s most successful entrepreneurs: Billionaire Mark Cuban. Adding Author, to his list of titles with a new book, How to Win at the Sport of Business, Mark shares a few minutes with Raine Magazine.

86

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


RAINE: Being involved in everything from technology to film, which of your business ventures bring you the most excitement? MARK: They all do. I’m not going to get involved with something unless I really like it. And I love competing, so all are great sources of competition.

RAINE: What skills helped you the most in successfully selling your first two companies? MARK: My ability to position the companies at the forefront of an industry. RAINE: Regarding business, your portfolio is very diverse. Do you seek out investments that are of personal interest or select from readily available opportunities? MARK: I have so many opportunities that come to me on a daily basis as well as through Shark Tank, I just pick and choose. RAINE: What has drawn you to the entertainment world for your business pursuits? MARK: Mostly my partner Todd. He always wanted to do movies. I wanted to support him in his effort. RAINE: Most businessmen don’t get the opportunity to act on television. What opened the doors to your first television role? MARK: Walker Texas Ranger was filmed in Dallas. After they ran through every other actor wanna-be in Dallas, they got to me, and I was in three episodes. RAINE: What do you enjoy most about appearing on television? MARK: I just like acting. It’s left brain compared to the right brain of the business world. Which makes it very hard for me; that’s why I like the challenge. RAINE: Do you have any new television projects in the works? MARK: Shark Tank is enough for me. RAINE: What inspired you to invest in the film and television industry? MARK: I saw an opportunity to create HDNet as a way to leverage the coming explosion of HDTV. No one else saw it, so I jumped on it.

RAINE

MAGAZINE

Mark Cuban is one of the most creative and unconventional entrepreneurs in the world. Widely known for his business pursuits in sports and technology, he is continually making his presence felt in the world of film and television. After several onscreen roles, Cuban is now an unyielding investor in ABC’s Shark Tank. In 2003, Cuban, along with his business partner Todd Wagner, acquired Landmark Theaters, the largest art house movie theater chain in the US, as well as Magnolia Pictures, an American film distributor. Cuban is also the owner of the Dallas Mavericks and the founder of HDNet, which is currently being rebranded as AXS TV. Cuban’s AXS TV is co-owned by Ryan Seacrest Media, eMARG, and Creative Artists Agency (CAA). Before he entered the world of sports and entertainment, Cuban sold Microsystems to CompuServe and, subsequently, Broadcast.com to Yahoo! for two and half billion dollars in 1999. Mark Cuban is the true definition of a Rainemaker. His passion for business, ability to think out of the box, and drive for pushing the envelope, are empowering; he never stops seeking to be the greatest at what he does and never lets anyone tell him that there’s something he can’t do. Mark Cuban took a moment to speak with Raine Magazine to share some insight into why his bold moves, on and off the court, continue to inspire entrepreneurs around the globe.

FASHION. ENTERTAINMENT. CULTURE. TECHNOLOGY

QUARTERLY

HOLLYWOOD ISSUE VOLUME 11

RAINE: Your 2011 book, How to Win at the Sport of Business, is packed with many great tips. What is the single most important piece of advice from the book that you would recommend to new business owners? MARK: You have to know your industry better than anyone, otherwise the folks that know it better have a big edge over you. RAINE: Most entrepreneurs build one company and stick with it. You’ve built several and have invested in many. Why have you chosen this strategy? MARK: I love the excitement and energy of taking on the challenge of a new business and competing with the establishment. It’s just in my DNA. RAINE: What were the challenges of building your first company? MARK: Surviving. Most small businesses fail. I had to find ways to make sure my company would grow and succeed. I really didn’t know what to expect when I started MicroSolutions, but I figured it out and we did very well. RAINE: What three things attributed to the rapid success of your first company? MARK: Sales effort, knowledge effort, and customer support effort.

TROY GARITY

THE FONDA LEGEND CONTINUES

S A M I G AY L E HOLLYWOOD’S TRIPLE THREAT

MARK CUBAN TV PERSONALITY. RAINEMAKER. BILLIONAIRE.

I N S P I R E .

E M P O W E R .

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

AN INSIDER'S GUIDE TO HOLLYWOOD

D E L I V E R

T H E

M U S T

K N O W

E N T R E P R E N E U R .

87


“Everything started as nothing.” – Ben Weissenstein


W H AT ’ S N E W F O R VOLUME 35


RAINEMAKER


RAINEMAKER

Jean Shafiroff changing Photographer- Michael Paniccia Hair- Henry de la Paz for Warren Tricomi Make-up Kimara Anhert​ Dress- Zang Toi

the world though philanthropy

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

91


Dress- Victor dE Souza

Jean Shafiroff is a leading philanthropist, who puts her boundless energy and know-

how behind worthy charitable organizations, working to raise funds and improve the lives of underserved people both locally and internationally. Today, she is at the center of New York’s philanthropic circles—sitting on the boards of multiple foundations, chairing numerous events, and donating to various causes. Shafiroff earned an MBA from Columbia University. She worked in public finance as well as private partnerships on Wall Street, and her business acumen is in high demand among charitable organizations. She also holds a BS in Physical Therapy from Columbia. As a humanitarian and the author of Successful Philanthropy: How to Make a Life By What You Give (2016), Shafiroff is often hailed as New York’s “First Lady of Philanthropy.” A fixture at charity galas in Manhattan and the Hamptons. Shafiroff loves fashion and is known for her on-point sense of style, which often lands her on Best-Dressed lists. Last year, Look Online recognized Shafiroff on its international list alongside Anna Wintour and Meghan Markle. “I was in good company!” she says with a laugh. 92

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


RAINE: From an early age your love for people flourished allowing you to give back. Can you describe your experiences and how they helped fine-tune your craft? SHAFIROFF: I was taught that it is very important to give back and to have compassion for underserved people. My parents brought me up to consider others. My father, a schoolteacher, was always concerned about his students and talked about their progress. The civil rights movement was very important to my parents; they greatly admired Dr. Martin Luther King, as do I. All of this left its mark on me.

RAINE: Who have been the most memorable people you have worked alongside and why? SHAFIROFF: Ana Oliveira, the president of the New York Women’s Foundation. She really made this organization powerful by motivating women. Although I have not worked directly with Cherie Blair, I support and admire the work she does to empower women through her namesake foundation. I also admire my daughters who work with animal welfare, and recently my youngest daughter founded Global Strays, an organization that works with animal rescue groups in developing nations.

RAINE: Knowing what you know now, what advice would you have given yourself five years ago? SHAFIROFF: I would have gotten involved with social media earlier. I think five years ago I was more reticent about sharing—about acceptance. But I’ve gotten past that; it’s a huge platform to reach an audience, to try to promote philanthropy and motivate people to become involved.

RAINE: Word to the wise: What advice would you lend to a budding talent on the rise in your chosen field? SHAFIROFF: Follow the law, work hard, learn about human relations, and always treat others with dignity and respect. And, be humble—that is key.

RAINE: If someone asked you about how they could stimulate their creativity, what advice would you give? SHAFIROFF: Take a good look at yourself, [think about] what really interests you, and follow those passions. RAINE: What three traits do you feel are most needed to pursue entrepreneurship? SHAFIROFF: Independence—you have to be willing to do things on your own. Perseverence and confidence­—you may not always be successful, but you have to keep pushing ahead and believing in what you’re doing. RAINE: Name your top three hacks for battling the loneliness of entrepreneurship. SHAFIROFF: Taking the time for family and friends. I enjoy social media and the friendships/connections it affords. In my case—because philanthropy helps people, the environment, and animals—there isn’t much loneliness since I’m always reaching out. One of my favorite quotes is by Harvard and Stanford theologian David E. Trueblood: “It takes a noble man to plant a seed for a tree that will someday give shade to people he may never meet.” RAINE: What wellness tips do you swear by? SHAFIROFF: Daily excercise, no smoking, and a healthy diet with moderate portion size. RAINE: What is your best advice for battling boredom in creative pursuits or creative entrepreneurship? SHAFIROFF: Take more time for reading. Don’t be afraid to try new things. There are so many things I want to do. Every time I visit an art museum, I want to paint. RAINE: What did you want to be when you grew up? Has this stayed the same or changed throughout the years? SHAFIROFF: It completely evolved. As our lives change, the things we want change. I was a student, then a working person, then a full-time mother, and then I got involved with philanthropy. I write during the summer, and now I’m thinking about doing something with art. I keep changing.

RAINE: Describe yourself in five words or less. SHAFIROFF: Hardworking, considerate, law-abiding, independent, and respectful. RAINE: We love transformation. If you experienced a personal or professional evolution, what was the inspiration behind it and how have people reacted? SHAFIROFF: I’m in a position where I am able to do the philanthropic work that I do. My education helped enormously; and I have some financial resources available to me that others may not have. I believe that anyone who has these resources available, has an obligation to give back to society. When we share our resources, personal wealth, time, or knowledge, we ultimately come closer to understanding the meaning of life. RAINE: What are your superpowers? How have they helped you excel? SHAFIROFF: I have no superpowers. But, I have strength because of my belief in God. And God, I believe, has been very good to me—and I have to be, in turn, good to people and try to be helpful. The only one that has superpowers is God. RAINE: How does being an independent brand or artist allow you to have more creative freedom? SHAFIROFF: It allows tremendous freedom. I have a lot of responsibility, but I have a little more flexibility with my time, say, to write a book. But, I use time productively; I often get up in the middle of the night and work for an hour or two, and then go back to sleep. RAINE: Regarding fashion, what would you describe as your signature “look”? SHAFIROFF: My signature look is a ballgown. RAINE: Who inspired your current style? SHAFIROFF: I’m enjoying what the royal family is wearing: Kate Middleton, Meghan Markle, and Queen Elizabeth. Also Queen Rania of Jordan, Queen Letizia of Spain, Anna Wintour, and Iman. Lady Gaga has great style, as do the Kardashian women. And Katy Perry, who steps out of the box; she wore a chandelier to the Met gala. It inspires me to take chances.

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

93


Dress- Caroline Z.


Dress- Carolina Herrera R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

95


ATTITUDE IS EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHED by VITAL AGIBALOW for HENSEL Style @ibizaNYC MakeUp by KATE ROMANOFF for MAC cosmetics Hair for ORIBE Model Roza Rashidova Top ZARA, Skirt TOP shop Shoes Christian Louboutin 96

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


Head piece GUCCI Leather Jacket CUCCI Dress VELVET

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

97


Earrings Oscar De LaRenta Dress Roza Rashidova Shoes TOM FORD


Top XCVI Pants LUNA LUZ Shoes TOM FORD


RUI A

A H M ADZ A DA

Ruia Ahmadzada is the founder of NARI Skincare. The driven executive holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Leadership and Management from New York University and has over 30 years of business experience. As a true visionary, she is using her skills to build a better world for her family, our communities, and for future generations—one NARI product at time.   Seeking to create a community of conscientious consumers committed to their physical and spiritual health, Ms. Ahmadzada founded NARI in 2015. It is the world’s first purpose-driven luxury skincare line that is safe, vegan, cruelty-free, non-GMO, and 100% Halal certified, which means NARI also meets the needs of one of the world’s most underserved demographics. Along with an outstanding R&D team, led by a renowned chemist and a highly credible board of advisors —including Tariq Farid, Founder & Chairman of Edible Arrangements; Adnan Durrani, 100

Photographer Emron Ah

I S R E D E F I N I N G B E AU T Y W I T H N A R I S K I N C A R E

CEO & Founder of Saffron Roads; Ali Bouhouch, former CTO of Sephora; and Farha Aslam, Managing Partner at Crescent Capital—NARI is looking to be the next disruptor of the beauty industry! “We, at NARI, wholeheartedly believe in individual and corporate responsibility to do good by our clients and community. As such, a percentage of our profits goes toward funding projects to empower women and educate orphans around the world, as well as to advocate for endangered wildlife around the world.” 

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


RAINE: Knowing what you know now, what advice would you have given yourself five years ago? AHMADZADA: To be less of a perfectionist and critical of myself. I wish had taken on chances earlier and worked on improving as I went along, and not waited for everything to be perfect!   RAINE: What three traits do you feel are most needed to pursue entrepreneurship? AHMADZADA: In my opinion, the three traits most needed to pursue entrepreneurship are passion, resilience, and being a self-starter with a great work ethic.   RAINE: What wellness tips do you swear by?  AHMADZADA: Proper sleep, a wholesome diet,  a  daily fitness routine and, most of all, a daily meditation practice. Also, drinking a lot of WATER!   RAINE: What major upcoming project are you most excited about?  AHMADZADA:  NARI  was one of the finalists at the 2019 INNOCOS Startup Challenge in Seoul. Industry leaders from across the world gather at The INNOCOS International Beauty Innovation Summit to explore the latest trends— in marketing, product placement, and retail—that are rapidly transforming the beauty, personal care, and fragrance industries. At NARI, we hope to be at the forefront of that transformation.    RAINE: Word to the wise: What advice would you lend to a budding talent on the rise in your chosen field?  AHMADZADA: Make your dream purposeful. Be the change you want to see in the world!   RAINE: What is your viewpoint of failure and how to deal with it? AHMADZADA: I see it as an opportunity to learn and grow! Without failure there would be no success. I have had my share of failure, but it only made me resilient, discerning, and strong! I dealt with it by staying positive and moving forward!   RAINE: Describe yourself in five words or less.  AHMADZADA: Visionary. Passionate. Discerning. Resilient. Innovative.   RAINE: Talk about how technology has changed your industry for newcomers? AHMADZADA: Newcomers are entering a new era in the beauty industry. As technology continues to advance, products and services that increase personalization and improve the consumer experience are becoming more and more innovative. AI/AR technologies are among these.   RAINE: In regard to your unique selling advantage, explain how you made the choice to break the mold? AHMADZADA: We are not only meeting the needs of the much ignored $81 billion Muslim beauty market, we are offering a collection of premium anti-aging products with no dilution (no water added). All of our products have the

highest level of potency and are made with safe, natural active ingredients that are easily absorbed by the skin and work in less time! RAINE: Regarding fashion, what would you describe as your signature “look”? AHMADZADA: Feminine. Classic. Timeless.    RAINE: Do your fashion choices affect your success in meetings or pitches? AHMADZADA: As an aspiring entrepreneur, it’s important to dress the part. Your personal brand is as important as your business brand. Looking your best during a pitch while on stage is always a great way to

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

stand out from the crowd. So, take the opportunity to make every element work for you. Stay authentic and develop your personal style just as you would your leadership style.   RAINE: What is your favorite city for work and play and why? AHMADZADA: NEW YORK CITY. It’s one of the world’s business hubs, the fashion capital of the world, and the ultimate destination for FUN! From its high-rise financial district to the views from the High Line, no matter where you are from, you will never be bored in the city that never sleeps!

101


FRESH FACE MODEL

ANASTASIA SHERGINA HEIGHT: 5’9” HOMETOWN: YAKUTSK, REPUBLIC OF SAKHA SIBERIA, RUSSIA PHOTOGRAPHED by VITAL AGIBALOW for HENSEL Hair by COREY TUTTLE for ORIBE MakeUp & Nails by KATE ROMANOFF for MAC cosmetics DRESSES by TenbyNYC 102

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


Photographer Vital Agibalow

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

103


SELF-LOVE&

WHY IT’S ON TREND 104

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


“This above all: to thine own self be true.” —Shakespeare It’s no surprise that self-love is on trend. In this culture, being busy is worshipped and speed dating is as prevalent as fast food.  We are burned out.  When there is an overlay of disconnection, the need for a self-love revolution is bound to arise with urgency.   Self-love is: 1. Self-value. 2. The ability to care for yourself with pride and simplicity.  3. Feeding yourself what you actually need, NOT what you think you need.  This means knowing what your needs are in the first place.

Photo by: Anthony Grasso

In Ayurveda, we emphasize rituals and self-nourishment as the foundation of all wellness practices. In modern culture, basic needs and

true intimacy have been replaced with technology and digital connections through a screen. The ability to love ourselves has to be re-taught.  

Questions to ask yourself daily:

We need time for space and silence.  This allows for self-awareness and self-love to arise.We need to cultivate this awareness, so we can listen to it.  Daily listening to this inner voice allows you to make good choices, and choices are everything.  

Don’t accept constant stress as a normal state. Create space in your life for daily pauses by applying the following principles:

Remove everything that is a distraction, and get back to yourself. Once you purge the poison in your life, you will access pleasure and you will get in touch with joy. Outer care or self-care trends are not true self-love.  The key is to connect the dots between ALL your habits—everything you consume throughout the day: social media, food, conversation, etc.

Dr. Karuna Sabnani is the founder of Karuna Naturopathic Healthcare. For over 15 years, patients have come to Dr. Sabnani to learn how to get a lean body, restful sleep, restored energy, clear skin and strong digestion. She works with patients nationally + internationally, and has been a health & beauty advisor to IMAN’S company, Iman Cosmetics, as well as a writer for The Huffington Post and other magazines. 

1. What mood do you want to be in AND how does what you allow in your sphere affect this choice? 2. What’s on your technology plate AND is it what you want to consume today?”

1. Know your essentials and give them to yourself. 2. Know your non-negotiables and don’t compromise on time/space/rest/relationships. 3. Know your limits.  Stick to them. It’s not about what’s right or not, it’s about what YOU need and what feels good to you. Self-love is about balance. Get back into alignment with the natural practices.  Detox and allow the longing to be replaced with fulfillment. 

She has been featured on Dr. OZ and Judy Greer’s Reluctantly Healthy on The CW Network. Dr. Sabnani speaks about the importance of beauty & pleasure in wellness.  She is also launching her new programs The Real Detox + Pleasure Rx in Fall of 2019. Visit Dr. Karuna at: www.karunanaturopathic.com

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

105


HAVE YOU HEARD? Amora is about love...love of family, love of quality and of course love of coffee! We want you to be the newest member of the Amora family so we are going to share some Amora secrets with you. Here goes...  What if I told you that Amora Coffee can provide a completely personalized experience of the flavor you want, when you want it - right to your door. What if I told you that we are the second generation of coffee makers. What if I told you that Amora means love in Italian and represents our love for family, our products, and our customers.  What if I told you, we strive to make the world more sustainable, by bringing coffee from paper cups to homes and reusables.  What if I told you that by supporting Amora Coffee, not only are you getting an amazing cup of coffee, but you’re helping bring clean water to thousands of people in Ethiopia. Through Project Waterfall, a charity initiative that brings clean drinking water, sanitation and education to coffee growing communities, we are doing our part to help with the water crisis this world is facing.  Help us help 10,000 people! What if I told you that your first trial of Amora coffee is practically free and that once you taste our coffee, you will be able to tell the Amora difference. What if I told you that we are your new coffee family, and just one try away. Now that you know all of our secrets, what are you waiting for? Get your Amora today! 
From our home to yours, Jim and Marina.


T R AV E L

VIETNAM’S HO TRAM BEACH WELCOMES COOL NEW BEACH CLUB 108

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


Meliá Ho Tram Beach Resort is Vietnam’s first Spanish beach club, with panoramic views of one of the country’s best beaches, entertainment in spades and a distinct Mediterranean vibe. Dubbed “the place to be,” Breeza Beach Club brings the spirit of the world-famous Mediterranean chill-out beach clubs and bars to Vietnam’s south, perched on some of the five-star resort’s most inspiring ground right on Ho Tram beach and adjacent to a 1491-square-metre pool at the heart of the 17-hectare property. Breeza Beach Club is home to an open kitchen, a bright and airy interior that seats up to 160 people, as well as a capacious terrace with an outdoor cocktail bar at its centre designed to take advantage of Ho Tram’s sunsets, and picture-perfect cabanas peppered between coconut trees on the beach. Referencing the beach clubs of Ibiza and Bali, yet exuding its own boho chic, Mediterranean feel, Breeza is open from 10.30am until 12.30am daily. The venue hosts live music by saxophonists, trumpeters and violinists, DJs spinning the decks, themed parties, dancing shows, large bonfires and more. To pay homage to Spain’s famed gastronomy, the beach club’s chefs specialise in curing, then fire-grilling their own meats. Their colourful yet simple dishes include crudos, ceviches, and flamed and grilled seafood.

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

Breeza has concocted a selection of imaginative cocktails in consultation with celebrity New York mixologist Joseph Boroski, recognised as one of the globe’s top bartenders, and Hendrick’s ambassador Charmaine Thio, who is also a bartender at one of the world’s top 50 bars, Singapore’s 28 HongKong Street. “Life is a breeze at Breeza and there isn’t a better place in Vietnam to be on the water,” said Meliá Ho Tram Beach Resort’s general manager Manuel Ferriol. “Our beach club is a tribute to Spain’s unique way of life, where we celebrate the pleasures in life such as delectable Spanish cuisine, chilled out entertainment and spectacular sunsets.” Dotted with sofas, Breeza’s outdoor terrace lends itself to BBQs. The private cabanas, sprinkled around the beach club on the sand, come with exclusive premium drinks packages. The beach club’s design, like the 152-room and 61-villa resort in general, deploys a neutral palette of colours as a complement to Ho Tram’s sandy shore. Deemed one of the most prestigious properties in the global Meliá Hotels and Resorts portfolio, Meliá Ho Tram Beach Resort is a two-hour drive from Vietnam’s largest metropolis Ho Chi Minh city.

109


R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

111


E N T E RTA I N M E N T

JULIUS NASSO I N N O VAT I V E D I R E C TO R AND PRODUCER Julius Nasso produced a series of action blockbusters during his 17-year partnership with Warner Bros. Studios. He later went on to co-found Manhattan Pictures where he produced and distributed films, such as Enigma (2002) starring Kate Winslet. He also founded Julius R. Nasso Productions, known for films such as Prince of Central Park (2002) starring Kathleen Turner. His most acclaimed achievement is the production of Narc (2002) starring Jason Patric, Ray Liotta, and Busta Rhymes. It earned a nomination at the Sundance Film Festival and won the Special Prize Policier at the Cognac Film Festival. Nasso was also awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Ischia Global Fest this year. Most recently, Nasso has delved into the music world, producing concerts for legendary opera singer Andrea Bocelli. His company, Ma Nasso Productions, created a record-breaking performance for Bocelli during the Asian Culture Carnival this past May. Nasso has plans for several more global events with the artist.  RAINE: Can you describe your experiences and how they helped fine-tune your craft? NASSO: I started working at a local drugstore as a delivery boy at an early age. Through that experience, when it was time to go to college, I decided to become a pharmacist. Eventually, I bought the drugstore I worked at, when the pharmacist I worked for retired. As I knew that I did not want to be behind the counter for my entire career, I decided to expand and, eventually, started the BuyWise Pharmacy chain. During this time, I noticed that the big chain stores were buying up all of the independent drugstores; I sold all of my retail pharmacies in 1988. Parallel to this, I created Universal Marine Medical Supply (UMMS), which gave me more of an opportunity to travel throughout the US. My company equips shipping and commercial vessels with medical supplies required by the World Health Organization. After selling my chain of drugstores, I devoted all of my time to building up UMMS, opening offices nationwide. Today, the company is one of the largest maritime medical suppliers, servicing over 300 cruise ships and 16,000 commercial vessels, including those offshore. The

112

company has offices across the country and around the world. RAINE: What’s been a funny behind-the-scenes moment that you could share? NASSO: The way I got involved in the entertainment business is a funny story! While opening an office in Los Angeles for UMMS, I stayed at the homes of my neighborhood friends that I grew up with—Scott Baio, Jimmy Baio, Tony Danza, Billy Crystal, and Penny Marshall. At a certain point, Phil Goldbar, a friend I grew up with in Brooklyn, was producing a TV show called Hill Street Blues. He called and told me that a famous Italian director named Sergio Leone needed a bilingual interpreter, because he was coming to our neighborhood to scout locations for the film Once Upon a Time in America. I told him I would help him out, and for six weeks, I worked as his assistant on the production. RAINE: Knowing what you know now, what advice would you have given yourself five years ago? NASSO: I probably would have told myself to stick with it, relax

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


a little bit, and that it was all going to turn out even better than I imagined.

theatrical action film and a TV series, which will be announced in November!

RAINE: How would you describe a creative entrepreneur in your own words? NASSO: A creative entrepreneur is a person that utilizes the same fundamentals in any type of business. The rules are really the same for any business that you start.

RAINE: Who have been the most memorable people you have worked alongside and why? NASSO: I have been fortunate to have a few memorable experiences, and to work with some incredible talent. One of these was when I was producing the documentary of Harry Belafonte, Sing Your Song. The other was producing and directing Andrea Bocelli’s largest concert, at the Asian Culture Carnival that took place last May in Beijing. Part of what made both of those projects so memorable was that they presented me with an opportunity to work with my son, Frankie Nasso, who I had not worked with since he acted in one of my films (cast by Kathleen Turner, without knowing he was my son), The Prince of Central Park.

RAINE: Describe how you have followed, changed or disrupted the game? NASSO: Changed the game by not becoming pigeonholed. RAINE: If someone asked you how they could stimulate their creativity, what advice would you give? NASSO: You have to target what it is that you want to create. You don’t give up; you keep pursuing your goal. RAINE: What three traits do you feel are most needed to pursue entrepreneurship? NASSO: First and foremost, I believe you have to be able to multitask! You have to understand how to distribute and departmentalize. You also have to understand how to instruct your workers across all departments clearly and concisely. These principles are the standard principles for any business or introduction. As a motivational speaker at numerous colleges and universities around the world, when I explain what a producer does, I always use a builder analogy. A general contractor is given the blueprints to a house, just like the producer is given the script. From there, it is up to them to galvanize their entire team, to get them to work together and create something bigger—the building or the film. RAINE: Have you ever faced the issue of burnout in your career? If so, how did you overcome it? NASSO: Burnout occurs when you are multitasking and trying to meet deadlines. When that pressure builds up, you need to step back a little bit, regroup, and have a hobby of some sort to help you refresh and move on. RAINE: Name your top three hacks for battling the loneliness of entrepreneurship. NASSO: The entertainment industry is very collaborative, and I am most frequently working with others—there is little room for feeling lonely. That said, I maintain strong relationships with my family and friends, which help me feel connected on a deeper level. RAINE: What did you want to be when you grew up? Has this stayed the same or changed throughout the years? NASSO: It certainly changed. When I was younger, I wanted to be a pharmacist. When the opportunity with Sergio Leone presented itself and I fell in love with the entertainment industry, I used the same rules of hard work and determination to help me succeed. RAINE: What major project coming up are you most excited about? NASSO: We’re in the process of developing a big

RAINE: Word to the wise: What advice would you lend to a budding talent on the rise in your chosen field? NASSO: An internship in any career is critically important. It’s OK to start on the ground level and gradually show your talent in whatever field you choose to work in. RAINE: How have you overcome the setbacks, letdowns, and obstacles of your career? NASSO: It’s normal for every entrepreneur to experience setbacks, my motto is: You never give up, and you regroup. Target your goal and pursue it. RAINE: Describe yourself in five words or less. NASSO: I’m just a regular guy. RAINE: If you experienced a personal or professional evolution, what was the inspiration behind it and how have people reacted? NASSO: My career has been one of transformation! I started as a pharmacist, and then became an entrepreneur with BuyWise Pharmacy and Universal Marine Medical Supply, and by creating the Cabbage Patch Babyland General Hospital Play Set with Xavier Roberts. Then, after being presented with the opportunity to work with Sergio Leone, I got into the entertainment industry. I took classes at Cinecitta Studios in Rome. My career as a director and producer started with action films. After starting Julius R. Nasso Productions, I was able to work on dramas and documentaries, which helped me become who I am today.

RAINE: What tech do you use to increase your productivity? NASSO: I use IMDb, LinkedIn, and Studio System to connect with my industry. I use Twitter to catch up on the news, and I use the sleep mode on my phone, so that when I finally am able to sleep, I am not disturbed, leading to a much more productive day! RAINE: Are there any plans to partner with a major celebrity, brand, or organization in the future? NASSO: I have several projects planned with major A-list talent in the film and music world—all of which will be revealed in due time! RAINE: Regarding fashion, what would you describe as your signature “look”? NASSO: My signature look is all black. I’m not a shirt and tie guy! Only when required. RAINE: What is the biggest problem that creatives face today, and how would you solve it? NASSO: I think that one of the biggest problems that we face, generally, is apathy. It’s been changing slowly, but by in large, we need to get more involved in the causes that we care about. I have always been a philanthropist, and take my work very seriously. Most recently, I was in Italy with the Andrea Bocelli Foundation to help unveil a new school that was built following the devastating earthquake. And while I think that everyone can make a difference, I think that those in the entertainment industry have been given a tremendous platform that they need to use to make positive change. RAINE: What is your favorite city for work and play and why? NASSO: New York, Rome, and Miami. All three have incredible and different cultural atmospheres.

RAINE: If there was one thing you could have changed during your journey, what would it be and why? NASSO: I would have diversified my film career sooner. I did not want to be known as an action filmmaker only; as a result, I diversified to many different types of filmmaking in 2000. RAINE: Talk about how technology changed your industry for newcomers? NASSO: The movie business entirely changed from 2000 to today. Films are no longer being shot on 35mm, and with all of the new technology, it’s lowered the cost and shortened the time needed to make films.

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

113


Photographer Inda Reid

FILM | TV

A C

T O

R

,

W R

I

T

E

R

,

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R

NIKKI DELOACH O N O B S TA C L E S , T H E N O W, A N D H E R S U P E R P O W E R

Nikki DeLoach, born in a small town in South Georgia, always knew she wanted to be an entertainer. She started dancing at the age of three, eventually adding singing, modeling, and acting to her repertoire. All her hard work paid off when, at the age of 12, she became a member of The Mickey Mouse Club (MMC), alongside Justin Timberlake, Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera, and Ryan Gosling. After MMC, DeLoach spent several years in Los Angeles pursuing acting. She landed a starring role opposite Mark Wahlberg and Bill Paxton in the feature film Traveller, and the TV series Misery Loves Company. She also played Anthony LaPaglia’s daughter in the television movie Never Give Up: The Jimmy V Story. In 1997, DeLoach put her acting career on hold to enter the world of pop music, signing with RCA and BMG Records to become part of the girl group Innosense. When the group disbanded in 2003, DeLoach returned to Hollywood, enjoying a successful and diverse acting career. 114

DeLoach’s recent credits include her starring role on MTV’s critically acclaimed series, Awkward, where she was considered one of television’s “hottest moms” as Lacey Hamilton.  DeLoach also guest starred on some of TV’s biggest hit shows, including NCIS, Criminal Minds, CSI, CSI: NY, Cold Case, Mad Men and Without a Trace, among many others. She was also a series regular on the popular show North Shore.  Her films include  Love & Other Drugs, Flying Lessons, opposite Maggie Grace and Hal Holbrook, and the French comedy Hollywood.  Hallmark Channel viewers will also recognize DeLoach from her starring roles in the network’s original movies The Perfect Catch, Christmas Land, A Dream of Christmas, Truly, Madly, Sweetly, and  Love Takes Flight. She also developed, executive produced, and starred in Reunited at Christmas, which premiered on the network last November. DeLoach is set to return to the Hallmark Channel in the R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

upcoming Christmas movie Two Turtle Doves, opposite Michael Rady. Outside of acting, DeLoach is dedicated to sharing her passions and ideas with others. She cofounded What We Are, a community for women that celebrates their unfiltered selves.  She is also a passionate supporter and spokesperson for Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and The Alzheimer’s Association. DeLoach shares her love for acting by coaching at the renowned Warner Laughlin Studios. RAINE: Can you describe your experiences and how they helped fine-tune your craft? DELOACH: I would say that everything I’ve experienced in my life helped me fine-tune my craft. You learn something new at every job you say yes to. However, there were a few experiences that really helped me take it to the next level. The Mickey Mouse


Club gave me a strong education and foundation for any creative path I want to explore, whether that be acting, music, writing, or directing. It also taught me a lot about having a good work ethic, being a team player, and how the work should feel when you are doing it. Something else that became a game changer for me was becoming a teacher. I started teaching acting at Warner Loughlin Studios when I was 29. I had fallen in love with Warner’s technique and had been a student there for many years. When you are responsible for teaching others, you really start to own your skill set. You are working that muscle, constantly. It was instrumental for my growth not only as an actor, but also as a writer and director. RAINE: What’s been a funny behind-the-scenes moment that you could share? DELOACH: We had a lot of fun on Awkward. It was this gem of a show that was on MTV. The kids were always pulling pranks on everyone. Several times, I would leave set and open the door to my car only to find it filled with balloons. RAINE: Knowing what you know now, what advice would you have given yourself five years ago? DELOACH: In the last five years, I’ve had two children, so a lot has changed for me. My second son was born with multiple heart defects and has had three heart surgeries thus far. He’s not two yet. If that doesn’t shift your life perspective, nothing will. There are so many things I would tell myself—calm down, stop worrying, nothing is going to look like you want it to so just surrender. I could go on. The biggest thing that I now understand, after experiencing a life and death situation, is that it’s not that important; the red carpets, the photo shoots, the auditions, the job. It’s a great job—a fun job, a lovely job—but it’s just a job. We place so much importance on “making it” in this industry. People’s self-worth and self-love is often dependent on their success or how this business sees them. And it’s really unfortunate.YOU are important, no matter what you do or how much money you make or how many Instagram followers you have. I know what actually matters now. My baby is alive and thriving. My oldest son is starting kindergarten and is healthy and happy. My husband and I love each other more now than ever. I have a strong community of friends and family around me that I love. And I take every opportunity to give back and help others. These are the important things. Everything else is just icing on top of a really delightful cake. RAINE: If someone asked you how they could stimulate their creativity, what advice would you give? DELOACH: Get out of your head and get out of your own way. Actors can get tunnel vision where the only thing we think about, talk about, or obsess over is our career. I found that to be exhausting, draining, narcissistic, and essentially not helpful in terms of stimulating your creative self. Instead, live an interesting life. Do things that bring you joy, pleasure, and adventure. Do things for others. Being a person of service and giving back is one of my favorite ways of kickstarting my creativity. RAINE: What three traits do you feel are most needed to pursue entrepreneurship?

DELOACH: Vision/creativity, leadership, work ethic. RAINE: Have you ever faced the issue of burnout in your career? If so, how did you overcome it? DELOACH: YES! Sometimes the pursuit of your dreams wears you down. At that point, it’s time to take a beat and heal your creative wound. I really believe it’s easier to overcome these moments when you have a full life outside of the thing you are in pursuit of. I have kids, my husband, family, and friends. I work with Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles and The Alzheimer’s Association. I teach. I write. I cofounded a site for women called What We Are. The no’s are what created the entrepreneur inside of me. Also, I had a huge realization after Bennett’s first heart surgery, it can be summed up in this Alfred D’Souza quote: “For a long time it had seemed to me that life was about to begin—real life. But there was always some obstacle in the way, something to be got through first, some unfinished business, time still to be served, a debt to be paid, then life would begin. At last it dawned on me that these obstacles were my life.” Life can be hard and painful—sometimes, extraordinarily painful. We can keep telling ourselves that life can finally begin once we get (fill in the blank). Trust me when I say this: Don’t miss all the greatness, beauty, and blessings that life is giving you right now— in your obstacles. If you can allow yourself to stay open through the incredible and the painful, that is where you grow. That is where all the miracles and magic exist. When the burnout comes, answer it with openness. You’ll know what you need to do. RAINE: Name your top three hacks for battling the loneliness of entrepreneurship. DELOACH: I have two, actually. 1. Collaborate. I love being on a team. So, I collaborate as much as possible. 2. Get real and get vulnerable—with yourself, with others. Meditate. Exercise. Get that dopamine flowing. Reach out to a friend and talk about what you are really feeling. All of these things. RAINE: What wellness tips do you swear by? DELOACH: Sleep. Sleep. And more sleep. Lifting weights (big fan). Spinning. Meditation. I love to juice. And I am a big advocate of eating protein and good fats. These are the things that work for me. RAINE: What did you want to be when you grew up? Has this stayed the same or changed throughout the years? DELOACH: I wanted to be a storyteller. I thank God every day that I grew up to do the thing that I love. It has been a very long road. Lots of Ramen Noodles. Seriously, I wake up every day and give thanks that I get to pay my bills doing the thing that I dreamed about as a child.

DELOACH: My teacher on The Mickey Mouse Club, Mr. Chuck Yerger, was one of the most influential people in my life. He could make any subject exciting. He encouraged my curiosity and made me feel like there was a whole world out there waiting for me to discover it. I did a movie with Bill Paxton when I was 16. He was kind, funny, grounded, and committed. He taught me that as the lead of a movie (or anything), you have this beautiful opportunity to set the tone for everyone’s experience. Also, I have to give my Hallmark family a huge shout-out. They have taken such great care of my family and me. I have a blast working for them. It is very refreshing to be a part of a network that treats you with respect and kindness. RAINE: What are your superpowers? How have they helped you excel? DELOACH: Vulnerability is my superpower— openness in my superpower. We talk about that all the time on our site, What We Are. It takes great courage and it took me a long time to get there. And now that I am there, I find it to be a true strength of character. Also, being this way changed my work. RAINE: Talk about how technology changed your industry for newcomers? DELOACH: I think that it greatly changed my industry in a positive as well as negative way. How many followers people have on Instagram actually influences casting decisions, which is bananas. I am a purist in the sense that I feel like you should hire the best person for the job, and I say that as a producer as well. The way in which technology has positively impacted our industry is that there are so many different and more varied ways for people to produce content. If you have an iPhone and an idea, you can create something. I love that. It removes the “gate keepers”—the people who usually decide if you get an opportunity to bring something to life. RAINE: Are there any plans to partner with a major celebrity, brand or organization in the future? DELOACH: Right now, I just want to be the spokesperson for OxiClean. I have two kids. OxiClean is life. I really feel like they need to make my family the face of the brand. I don’t know anyone messier than my family. RAINE: What is the biggest problem that creatives face today and how would you solve it? DELOACH: People see something that was successful and try to do the same thing hoping to be just as successful. Why not do something different? Just like each and every human being is different, every creative idea is different—it has a pulse.

RAINE: What major project coming up are you most excited about? DELOACH: I have another wonderful Christmas movie called Two Turtle Doves that I did for Hallmark coming out later this year. So stay tuned for that. RAINE: Who have been the most memorable people you have worked alongside and why? R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

115


FILM | TV

TELEVISION’S

VICTORIA KONEFAL SHARES INSIGHT ON CREATIVITY, FAILURE, AND FASHION 116

Born and raised in Brooklyn, Victoria Konefal knew she wanted to be an actress at the age of seven. Her journey to the entertainment industry began in the fourth grade, when she went on a class trip to see an off-Broadway production of The Hobbit. She was so captivated during the show, her mother had to keep her from standing up and joining the performance. After the curtain closed, they sought out the director, who invited her to audition for a production of The South Pacific. She quickly booked the role and went on to perform with the theater company for the next six years. In an effort to hone her craft, Konefal attended Fiorello H. LaGuardia Performing Arts High School in New York City, where prestigious actors such as Ansel Elgort, Timothee Chalamet, Jennifer Aniston, Adrien Brody, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Al Pacino, Sarah Paulson, Adrian Grenier, and Liza Minnelli

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

also studied. Shortly after graduation, she made the decision to move to Los Angeles to pursue acting full-time. Konefal’s big break came when she was cast as Ciara Brady, the daughter of power couple Bo and Hope, on the Emmy-winning soap opera, Days of Our Lives. A fierce young woman who overcame issues with the law and her parents’ tumultuous relationship, Ciara is making her mark on Salem as she matures. Konefal’s portrayal of Ciara earned her a 2019 Daytime Emmy nomination in the Best Younger Actress in a Drama Series category. Other television credits include dramatic performances in The Wrong Crush alongside Vivica A. Fox and Lesli Kay as well as Deadly Exchange with fellow soap actress Lindsay Hartley. She was also seen in a guest role on the hit ABC comedy Modern Family. In addition to her work on the small


RAINE: Word to the wise: What advice would you lend to a budding talent on the rise in your chosen field? KONEFAL: Make sure your heart is in the right place and don’t allow yourself to be discouraged. It’s a grueling industry, and you have to make sure you’re in it for the right reasons. And work hard! Opportunities seldom fall into your lap. Expect rejection, but strive for the opposite. RAINE: Describe yourself in five words or less. KONEFAL: Brave, Głupawki (a polish word for someone who is silly), beautiful (inside and out), spiritual, and a risk taker. 

Photographer: Tim Schaeffer; Hair: Jerry Chang; Makeup: Anton Khachaturian

RAINE: If there was one thing you could have changed during your journey as a creative entrepreneur, what would it be and why? KONEFAL: I’m a believer in that everything happens for a reason, and everything that I’ve gone through in life is meant to teach me a lesson and help me grow. I wouldn’t change a thing.

screen, Konefal brought her talent to the world of film in Circus Kane, opposite Jonathan Lipnicki. She will further showcase her acting chops in the upcoming horror thriller Fog City, which is coming out later this year. When she is not busy acting, Konefal enjoys working out, traveling, camping, hiking, biking, and writing music. She loves to be outdoors, enjoying a good game of basketball or softball. A passionate environmental advocate, she lends her support to organizations dedicated to conserving our planet. Konefal currently resides in Los Angeles with her beloved Miniature Schnauzer, Lola. RAINE: What’s been a funny behind-the-scenes moment that you could share? KONEFAL: One of the funniest moments to date was this one time I thought we were rehearsing, but we were actually going straight to tape. I was goofing off the entire take. Instead of kissing my scene partner, I leaned towards his ear and started singing a butchered nursery rhyme. They yelled, “Cut! Moving on,” and the look on my face was as if I’d seen a ghost. They ended up keeping that take and it’s going to air pretty soon.

RAINE: If someone asked you how they could stimulate their creativity, what advice would you give? KONEFAL: Connect to your inner child as much as you can. When we are children, our imaginations run wild and we are able to create a magical fantasy land with a roll of aluminum foil, a plastic garbage bag, and some wooden spoons (I’m speaking from experience). Something happens as we age. We get caught up in being proper adults. Get out of your head and think with no limitations. Anything is possible with some faith, trust, and a little bit of pixie dust. RAINE: What wellness tips do you swear by? KONEFAL: Hydration, happiness, and sleep.  RAINE: What did you want to be when you grew up? Has this stayed the same or changed throughout the years? KONEFAL: I’ve always been a very inquisitive and adventurous person. I’ve wanted to be a doctor, a lawyer, the president, an astronaut, a race car driver, a fashion designer, a chef, a dancer, a musician, and an actress. But, I’ve found that my love for acting outweighed anything else. R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

RAINE: Talk about how technology changed your industry for newcomers. KONEFAL: Auditions are now 90% self-taping, which is great, but it also sucks. I like going in a room and showing the casting directors my energy. But the benefit of a self-tape is that you can take your time with it and perfect it. Then again, that opens the door to overthinking; I tend to get stressed out while filming a self-tape because I second-guess most of what I do. I would rather do it once and do my best. Whatever is meant to be will be. RAINE: Regarding fashion, what would you describe as your signature “look”? KONEFAL: I was born and raised in New York City, so that influences my fashion choices greatly. You can usually see me in a leather or denim jacket and sneakers. I love jackets, I have about 40 of them, and I can’t even wear them because Los Angeles is so hot all the time. I love wearing neutral colors, like black and gray, but a lot of my closet is also red. That’s my power color. Oh, you can also find me in a pair of black thigh high boots for most events. They’re comfortable and make me feel sexy and confident. RAINE: What is your favorite city for work and play and why? KONEFAL: New York City. It’s my hometown and the energy is so special. I’ve traveled quite a bit in my short life and have never seen anything like it.  117


MUSIC

M E E T

L I V I N G

L E G A C Y

RALPH JOHNSON O F

E A R T H ,

W I N D

&

F I R E

Photo by Jabari Jacobs

118

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


Ralph Johnson is the co-founder of the legendary band Earth, Wind & Fire. Today, with over 100 million albums sold worldwide, Earth, Wind & Fire is one of the most successful bands of all time. Earning nine Grammy Awards, including one for Lifetime Achievement, the band is rightfully featured in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In December, Earth, Wind & Fire will receive the prestigious Kennedy Center Honor, making it the first R&B group to do so. It’s been an inspiring and loving journey for Johnson, who joined the celebrated band when he was 19. And although it remains one of his biggest passions, Johnson likes to take the time to explore his other interests, one of which is jazz. He recently released a new single titled “Co-Swagit” (Everything’s Cool), a follow up to his 2017 “Aura,” which featured singersongwriter Siedah Garrett and fellow Earth, Wind & Fire bandmate Verdine White. The refreshing jazz groove, co-written by Johnson, features premiere guitarist Andrea Lisa and is currently #37 on the Smooth Jazz Network chart. “It was written utilizing the Yamaha Motif workstation,” shares Johnson. “I came up with the idea in the lounge of the tour bus one night. Co-Swagit means everything is cool, and for me nothing is cooler than creating uplifting music for all to enjoy.” It’s been an inspiring and loving journey for Johnson. He continues to blaze new trails with his music and is filled with gratitude for all he’s been able to contribute to the world. “Life is a one-time shot.You need to experience it.You need to live it,” says Johnson. “You need to go out and do all that you can do.” RAINE: What’s been a funny behind-the-scenes moment that you could share? JOHNSON: We were playing in Chicago at McCormick’s Place, I got off the elevator and there was a woman, buck naked, kneeling in front of my hotel door chanting. I turned around and called security. [At] my first gig in Oakland, a guy walked in to use the restroom; he was carrying a high hat, a part of the instrument from a drum set. At the beginning of the show, when I went to play, my high hat was missing. Turned out that the guy ripped off my high hat. RAINE: Knowing what you know now, what advice would you have given yourself five years ago? JOHNSON: To get more involved in the song writing. It’s very important, especially on this end—as we get in our later years. Songwriting and publishing royalties supplement your retirement along the way. For example, I was sampled by Jay-Z in 2001, on his first blueprint CD, and it’s called Song Cry; it still does quite well. RAINE: How would you describe a creative entrepreneur in your own words? JOHNSON: A creative entrepreneur is one that sets goals and doesn’t follow the crowd; one that is a bit of a maverick, and in their own way marches to the beat of their own drum. RAINE: If you had to relate what you do to sports, how would you describe how you have followed, changed, or disrupted the game? JOHNSON: We disrupted the game, because we came with something completely new that people hadn’t heard before. That brought us a lot of attention.

RAINE: If someone asked you how they could stimulate their creativity, what advice would you give? JOHNSON: The best thing you can do is surround yourself with people of like mind. Stay around people that are as creative as you are. Creativity stimulates creativity.

RAINE: How have you overcome the setbacks, letdowns, and obstacles of your career? JOHNSON: You have to rethink your approach, come back, and hit again. It’s kind of like if you meet somebody, and you two don’t hit it off. Well, maybe your approach is off.

RAINE: What three traits do you feel are most needed to pursue entrepreneurship? JOHNSON: Commitment. Strong faith. Openness to new ideas.

RAINE: What is your viewpoint of failure and how best to deal with it? JOHNSON: Failure is simply trying something and not succeeding. I play tennis a lot. If I hit a ball and the ball didn’t do what I wanted or expected it to do, maybe my stroke is off. Did I get my racket back enough? Was I too late? Also, ask yourself if you’ve done the proper research or preparation.

RAINE: Have you ever faced the issue of burnout in your career? If so, how did you overcome it? JOHNSON: No, not at all. We are still feeling it, and are still in it to win it. RAINE: Name your top three hacks for battling the loneliness of entrepreneurship. JOHNSON: I don’t really experience loneliness, period. I suppose you have to have something away from what you do that takes up your time. You need an escape. Maybe it’s tennis, golf, or something culinary. You need to have something away from your primary mission. RAINE: What wellness tips do you swear by? JOHNSON: I have a mantra: Drink the green tea, take the vitamins, and say your prayers. If you can do those three things, you are on a good program. Don’t take God for granted, and the other thing is, God is not your bellboy. RAINE: What did you want to be when you grew up? Has this stayed the same or changed throughout the years? JOHNSON: In the fourth grade I knew I wanted to be a musician. My mind was set very early on, and everything I did was to get better at what I was trying to do. RAINE: What major project coming up are you most excited about? JOHNSON: I am going to curate a CD of my own stuff—stuff I have written and produced over the years. I am doing it for a new company on the West Coast called House Productions. Essentially, it will be a CD of six to eight songs. I have a tremendous love for jazz because I was exposed to it when I was 14. Part of what I will do on this curated piece is big band stuff. I love big band swing. People like Count Basie or Duke Ellington, Oliver Nelson—they were all involved in big bands that I have listened to and loved. RAINE: Who have been the most memorable people you have worked alongside and why? JOHNSON: Well, at the top of the list was Maurice White, the person that started Earth Wind & Fire. He was a very driven person and was very committed. RAINE: Word to the wise: What advice would you lend to a budding talent on the rise in your chosen field? JOHNSON: First off, study your craft! Get with someone who can help you be a better you in whatever you are trying to do: acting, tennis, golfing, etc. Get with someone that can help you get to where you want to be. Another thing is, look at the body of work done by other people in your chosen field. Believe that you can do this!

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5

RAINE: Describe yourself in five words or less. JOHNSON: Dedicated. Caring. Sensitive (to the needs of others). RAINE: We love transformation. If you experienced a personal or professional evolution, what was the inspiration behind it and how have people reacted? JOHNSON: My transformation was martial arts. In school, I was not physically active; I hated PE. All I wanted to do was music. For me, earning a double Black belt is saying something. The idea of achieving the rank of Black belt—was always appealing to me, but I needed to be committed to that discipline. I am also a certified scuba diver, and now I am a student pilot. Mentally, you can’t stand still. You have to continue to grow. The only way you can continue to grow is by experiencing new things. You have to roll up your sleeves and get involved.The hardest thing about doing anything is starting. It’s impossible to grow if you are not taken out of your comfort zone. RAINE: What are your superpowers? How have they helped you excel? JOHNSON: I am highly intuitive. I have the ability to see auras; what I see is the actual aura. Some people see color, but I see the glow. When we first started traveling on the road, I saw the aura of my roommate—our first guitar player; I was looking at him and asked myself: Am I seeing an aura? My oldest son has the same ability. RAINE: What is the biggest problem that creatives face today and how would you solve it? JOHNSON: Not everyone wants to see you succeed; some people want to see you fail. You have to rid yourself of the detractors. I don’t allow people like that in my creative space. RAINE: What is your favorite city for work and play and why? JOHNSON: I love going to Brazil. I love Rio because I dig the Brazilian culture, and Brazilian music is probably my favorite in terms of music from other cultures. At the same time, I like going to Paris, because I get to work on my French. I love foreign languages, so I will roll up my sleeves and learn new words.

119


CELEBRITY PHOTOGRAPHER

VITAL AGIBALOW F O R G I N G A U N I Q U E PAT H IN PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRADY GOODMAN-WILLIAMS

When we imagine editorial and celebrity photo shoots, we tend to think of high intensity, glamour, and many moving pieces—makeup, hair, and fashion stylists running around with urgency, all under the direction of a demanding photographer. However, after seeing Vital Agibalow on set—working with big names, such as Nigel Barker, Carol Alt, Irina Pantaeva, and Iris Apfel—we can attest to the fact that this special photographer breaks that mold. As Agibalow works the camera, he does it with a professional yet pleasant half-smile on his face—and the effects of his calm approach are visible. Vital’s lighthearted and sensitive demeanor allows his subjects to open up in ways we haven’t previously seen. This results in stunning portraits of his subject’s inner being; you can see that each and every individual feels comfortable.The captured images, however, are raw, honest, and vulnerable. RAINE sat down with Vital to try and understand the mastery behind the Russian photographer’s approach. RAINE: Where are you from? How did you become a photographer? AGIBALOW: I’m based in New York, but my roots are Swedish, Russian, and Ukrainian. When I was seven, my dad gave me my first camera, a Leica, as a birthday present. I fell in love with it. I started taking portraits of the other kids in my neighborhood. There’s something about portrait photography that clearly inspired me since an early age. By the age of 20, I started working with local modeling agencies, and I opened my own business by the time I was 21.

but for the art. You’d be shocked how much money you can make when you prioritize the art first. RAINE: What new projects are you working on right now? Where can we see your work? AGIBALOW: Most recently, I worked with legendary supermodel Carol Alt for her new show on the FNL Network, Carol Alt’s Living Room. But there are some other interesting side projects! Lately, I’ve been working with beauty and fashion bloggers, like Kate Romanoff. RAINE: You have a brand partnership with HENSEL, right? Tell us a little about that. AGIBALOW: HENSEL is a German brand that produces professional lights for photographers. I’ve been the brand ambassador for this company since 2008. I’m using their lights on each and every shoot, and I’m proud to promote them in my studio and through my work. RAINE: Wonderful. Thank you so much for your time, Vital! You’re the best. AGIBALOW: My pleasure!

RAINE: It’s incredible that you started so young. Did your photography change since then? AGIBALOW:Those were the days of film [photography].As a photographer, you couldn’t afford to make a mistake back then. Now, everyone shoots digital, so you can see the shot on display, which makes it all so much easier. But I’m proud to say that I originally started as a film photographer. RAINE: Why does your background in film photography matter? AGIBALOW: Well, it builds credibility. It makes me [seem] more professional than any newbie these days, who starts with a digital camera and doesn’t know what it means to shoot slides.You have to be much more accurate when [shooting with film]. RAINE: You love portraits. Why are they your favorite? AGIBALOW: I love working with people and seeing their reactions when they see themselves from different angles; it is priceless! But I also work with fashion designers, which is a whole different world! RAINE: Who was the most challenging designer to shoot? AGIBALOW: Probably Karl Lagerfeld—shooting [his] portraits. Our time in the studio was limited to only 30 minutes, which is a photographer’s worst nightmare! But the results were so good. He really liked the images, which is huge, since he’s a photographer himself. Karl’s portrait was published in Bella Magazine and many others, so the hard work paid off. RAINE: Do you have any recommendations for others interested in pursuing a career like yours? AGIBALOW: Do it only if you really enjoy it. Don’t do it for the money, 120

R A I N E M AG A Z I N E - VO L U M E 3 5


MAGAZINE

RAINE INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS [I.C.E] INSPIRE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS [I.C.E]

HF OA LSLHY I W O O N O &D SI ST SY UL EE

VOL VOL 19 21

QUARTERLY QUARTERLY

EFFORTLESS STYLE WITH NICKY HILTON

QUARTERLY

VOL 25

A BILLIONAIRE’S STORY - FRED MOUAWAD

THE FASHIONABLE MELANIE IGLESIAS

DREAM BIG AT JADE MOUNTAIN

FASHION.CULTURE.TECHNOLOGY

STYLE ISSUE

THE SMOOTH SOUND OF LAURIANA MAE

Y

PRIYANKA CHOPRA’S TAKING OVER! THE SERIOUS PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS SIMPLIFYING BUSINESS FINANCING HI-CAN’S $57,000 HI-TECH BED HOLLYWOOD HEALTHY

T H E T H E

W O R L D ’ S W O R L D ’ S

M O S T M O S T

F A S H I O N A B L E F A S H I O N A B L E

B U S I N E S S M A G A Z I N E B U S I N E S S M A G A Z I N E

GET YOUR RAINE APP TODAY!

WWW.RAINEMAGAZINE.COM


ART BY Thomas Iser

Profile for Raine Magazine

Raine 35 - Quarterly  

Raine 35 - Quarterly