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RailStaff Issue 184 / March 2013

THE MOST POPULAR PUBLICATION IN THE UK RAIL INDUSTRY

Winner. Rail Team of the Year.

stobartrail.com

www.railstaff.co.uk

Rod Reid joins Bridgeway

PAGE 9

CROSSRAIL TRAINS

GUARANTEED

Record Numbers Take IRO Certificate A record number of people enrolled on IRO certificate courses.

PAGE 18

Crossrail’s new-build train fleet will be publicly funded to guarantee the start of rail services on the new railway in 2018. The five year countdown has started as five tunnel boring machines pushed ahead under the capital.

Rail Safety Summit 2013 Pull Out Section

Over 7,000 people are now working on the project. The new specially built trains will be ready for test running in 2017.

Safety and productivity should go hand in hand...

Continued on PAGE 4

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McGinley Infrastructure Services Experts IN minor civil packages, engineering specialist infrastructure works and ATWS, TWS and LOWS services. For more information please contact Alan Gregory: T: 07770 444 202 E: alan.gregory@mcginley.co.uk


COMMENT

RailStaff Contact us:

Publisher:

Paul O’Connor

Editor:

Andy Milne

Production and design:

Adam O’Connor

Senior Reporter:

Jonathan Webb

Writer:

Nigel Wordsworth

Track Safety:

Colin Wheeler

Pictures:

Colin Garratt

Advertising:

Asif Ahmed Craig Smith Danny Rowbotham Paul Curtis

Contact Email Addresses News: news@rail-media.com Pictures: pictures@rail-media.com Adverts: adverts@rail-media.com Subscriptions: pat@rail-media.com

Contact Details RailStaff Publications Ltd Ashby House, Bath Street, Ashby de la Zouch, Leicestershire, LE65 2HF. Tel: 01530 56 00 26 Web: www.railstaff.co.uk Email: hello@rail-media.com Printed by Pensord. RailStaff is published by RailStaff Publications Limited. A Rail Media Publication.

Jaundiced commuters occasionally complain about the length and frequency of on-train announcements. Our buffet is open…the next station is...change here for services to... Of course it could be much worse. The conductor works in an optimistic industry, expanding and improving. She might go on to say welcome aboard the 9.22, a recently refurbished unit, this train is double the length it was last week. We are travelling on lines relaid over a 60 hour possession last weekend. Only a long distance journey would afford the announcer enough time to catalogue the achievements being notched up by railway staff, contractors and companies. Stations finished months ahead of schedule, capital investment secured for new fleets. Away from main line services, cities are alive with the added swish of new tram lines. London, if it weren’t for the buzz of Europe’s busiest city, would reverberate with the distant growl of tunnelling machines deep underground. Railway announcers are in fact modest to a fault. Historically, there was much that was wrong with the industry - failed services, cancellations, and strikes. Certainly such a vast undertaking will always have challenges and no one should underestimate the discomfort people suffer without

SPECIAL FOCUS

The railway is buzzing Passenger satisfaction is up as major projects are delivered on time

“Welcome aboard the 9.22, a recently refurbished unit, this train is double the length it was last week…”

seats or adequate rush hour services. However the industry has changed. That it has done so with daring and aplomb is as much the result of hard work on the part of railway staff as it is of the confidence evinced by national and local political leaders. Railway services are in the main safe - as we discuss in our Safety Conference feature - and popular.

PAGE 58

Satisfaction levels are better and major projects are delivered on time and on budget. Even so change can’t happen fast enough in an industry keen to control costs, attract more investment and skilled staff. Expansion is essential. Reading all this, the grizzled commuter might grudgingly forgive the announcer her spring message of optimism and good fortune.

PAGE 24

Stations Focus In May’s RailStaff

The Fall and Rise of Britain’s Railways

Everyone Home Safe, EVERY DAY

Stations are busy places. Refurbishment and alterations are taking place right now across the network. RailStaff brings you the latest news.

‘The Re-Shaping of British Railways’ Colin Garratt of Milepost 921⁄2 continues his report with Part 2: State Ownership and Reparations.

Gareth Llewellyn, Director of Safety and Sustainable Development for Network Rail, talks us through the journey from safety targets to a safety culture.

If you want to contribute, get in touch now. Please contact Danny, Paul or Tom on 01530 560026. www.railstaff.co.uk

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Trains for Crossrail to be publicly funded In a move which has delighted supporters and staff Transport for London the Government and the Mayor of London have agreed to adopt a fully publicly-funded procurement system for a new fleet of trains and requisite maintenance facilities for Crossrail. Secretary of State, Patrick McLoughlin, agreed the change proposed by the Mayor. The huge

infrastructure project, which is scheduled to open in 2018, is progressing well. Five tunnel boring machines are now at work: Phyllis and Ada in west London, Elizabeth and Victoria in east London, and Sophia in Plumstead, southeast London. Already the TBMs have created three miles of tunnels. Says Andrew Wolstenholme, Crossrail’s Chief Executive, ‘With 26 miles of new tunnels to be built for Crossrail, we are delivering our own London marathon beneath the streets of the capital. This is a huge and complex task with work underway 24 hours a day below London’s streets but our first few

miles of tunnel are now completed. These new underground images show the scale of transformation taking place beneath London and the essential new transport links being created with every metre of new tunnel built.’ From 2018 when it opens, Crossrail will increase London’s rail capacity by 10 per cent. TfL wants to make sure the new specially designed and specially built fleet is ready and fully commissioned in good time. Says Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, ‘Crossrail is now hitting its stride with tunnels being bored and stations being built at

lightning pace. Nothing must get in the way of this fabulous new railway and it is fantastic news that we can now crack on with buying the wonderful fleet of brand spanking new trains. With more than 600 carriages providing a 10 per cent increase in London’s rail capacity, Crossrail will transport not just passengers but jobs and growth across the city and beyond.’ The previous proposal to procure Crossrail rolling stock included a £350m public sector contribution. The revised arrangement will see the public sector finance increase to 100 per cent or around £1bn.

“With 26 miles of new tunnels to be built for Crossrail, we are delivering our own London marathon beneath the streets of the capital. This is a huge and complex task with work underway 24 hours a day…” ANDREw wOLSTENHOLME, CHIEF ExECUTIVE, CROSSRAIL

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www.railstaff.co.uk


NEwS

European Link for Birmingham

Visualisation of the interior at Birmingham Curzon Street station.

John McNicholas, chairman of Centro, wants to make sure the west Midlands is served by direct high speed rail services to Europe. McNicholas said the current proposal for a single track HS1-HS2 link may prove inadequate to meet future demand. Local leaders also want to see customs and passport controls handled in Birmingham. A direct link means high speed rail services would be able to reach Paris and Brussels from Birmingham in less than three hours. Says John McNicholas, ‘High speed rail presents a tremendous opportunity for the West Midlands, bringing jobs and investment. Journey times from Birmingham to London, Leeds and Manchester will be halved by high speed services, but it is essential we’re also able to take full advantage of improved European connections.’ He went on, ‘I urge the Government to consider a fully segregated two track link between HS2 and HS1, which could cater not only for high speed rail services from the West Midlands to a range of destinations on the continent but which would also facilitate new high speed rail links between the region and economic centres in East London and Kent. High speed rail is great news for our region and we want to see fast, direct links with European cities.’

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NEwS

Extreme weather patterns, flooding and frost means the railway is more in need of investment than ever, says Network Rail. Heavy rain destabilised embankments and damaged track beds. Railway staff were praised for keeping services going and working round the clock to restore track and signalling. Says Network Rail’s chief executive, David Higgins, ‘We recognise that this has been a difficult period for passengers, with disruption on many lines due to extreme weather. Our staff worked tirelessly, often in difficult circumstances, to get the railway back up and running and we would like to thank passengers and train operators for bearing with us during this time.’ Responding to the Office of Rail Regulation’s quarterly performance monitor, which highlighted the impact of extreme

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weather on train performance, ‘The damage that extreme weather can do to a Victorian rail network which was neither designed nor built for such challenges is clear. ‘Whole lines were closed by flooding and tracks came close to being washed away by rivers which burst their banks. On the worst affected parts of the network, torrential rain caused up to sixty landslides in a single day. This has been a wake up call for the whole industry which we ignore at our peril. ‘As we set out when we launched our strategic business plan in January, we are playing catch up on decades of underinvestment. Nowhere is this more apparent than with the embankments, cuttings,

bridges, tunnels and other structures which have struggled to cope with extreme weather alongside the burden of carrying more passengers than they were designed for. Our submission to the regulator for the next five-year funding settlement reflects our plan to tackle this.’ Throughout the extreme weather, the railway continued to carry people safely and efficiently. ‘Despite considerable challenges, the industry still managed to move more than 3m people a day by train during this period, with almost nine-outof-ten trains arriving on time.

‘This is testament to the hard work of all our staff and those working for our partners. However, this does not undermine the need for us to do even more, including better investment in our assets, to be able to improve resilience and recovery during extreme weather in the future.’

High Pressure

Lives on the line

Contracts let for HS2

David Maidment, founder of the Railway Children charity, has published a new novel. ‘Lives on the Line’ tells the story of two locomotive drivers in the early 1960s facing changes in their work and family situations as steam gives way to diesel traction. The two men react in very different ways to this change and their relationships with colleagues. Based on authentic and detailed railway history, the story is set in a large London steam locomotive depot. This novel will be published by Max Books.

Three contracts have been let for the next stage of High Speed 2, Birmingham to Manchester and Leeds. The contracts will provide preparatory engineering and environmental services for each leg of the route. AECOM Ltd wins the £3.1m contract covering engineering services for the west leg of the route, from Birmingham to Manchester. Mott MacDonald has been awarded the contract, valued at £3.2m, for the east leg of the route, from Birmingham to Leeds. Arup has been awarded a £1.1m contract covering environmental services for both legs of the route. Says Alison Munro, Chief Executive of HS2 Ltd, ‘HS2 will transform the UK through bringing our major cities closer together,

helping to promote economic growth, driving regional regeneration, creating thousands of jobs and providing a long-term solution to the capacity crunch facing our existing rail network. ‘We have already created 1,200 jobs through our Professional Services Framework for Phase One

of the scheme and Phase Two will create thousands more. We have achieved a tremendous amount so far and we now have an excellent team in place to take Phase Two forward to the next stages, including the consultation which has been brought forward to start later this year.’ www.railstaff.co.uk


Morson move for Gary Smithson

Morson International has promoted Associate Director, Gary Smithson, to the company’s Rail and Automotive divisions. Gary previously held the position of Executive Manager at the global recruitment company for two years. Says Gary, ‘The Rail and Automotive divisions at Morson International are a key component in the company’s continuing development. We have over 25

years experience in delivering targeted recruitment solutions to high profile clients in the rail industry, and I’m looking forward to achieving further success in my new position as Associate Director of the division.’ Morson International is a global supplier of specialist technical personnel and in 2012 was named as the UK’s No.1 Rail Recruiter in the recruitment industry’s Top 250 Report.

New rail job for Ian Rothery North Midland Construction plc has appointed Ian Rothery as its first Executive Director for Rail as it prepares for further growth in the rail sector. Ian Rothery has 39 years experience in the rail and civil engineering industry. During his career he has covered major design and build rail projects, from station refurbishment to multidisciplinary packages including track renewal and signalling. NMC, headquartered in Nottinghamshire, already has extensive experience delivering contracts within the rail sector, in particular working with Network Rail on a range of projects including; footbridge refurbishment, repair and replacement at a number of stations across the UK and the building of a new maintenance and training facility in Walsall. Under Ian’s leadership the new division will be built up using NMC’s extensive pool of resources to deliver larger scale infrastructure rail projects across the UK. Says Ian, ‘NMC has clearly built up extensive experience in the rail

sector and I’m delighted to be heading up this new approach that will build on this. We have a clear strategy for the next three years and are building on existing skills and resources to efficiently and effectively meet the requirements of the rail sector on a wide range of projects.’ Ian was previously construction director at C Spencer Ltd, which he joined in 2008. He has worked for Jackson Civil Engineering and was construction director at Norwest Holst.

Graham Smith appointed Director General RDG Graham Smith MBE is to head the newly formalised Rail Delivery Group Ltd as director general. The Rail Delivery Group became a company limited by guarantee on 18th February. Tim O’Toole CBE continues as chairman with Sir David Higgins as deputy chairman. The RDG brings together the owners of Britain’s passenger Train Operating Companies, Freight Operating Companies and Network Rail to provide leadership for the rail industry. Graham Smith, 57, who had been working as secretary to the RDG, caps a successful career in the industry by taking on the new role. In a helpful preparation for a railway career, Graham Smith read History and Politics at Hull University. He joined BR in 1978. 8

During his 34 years in the industry, he has spent much of his time arguing the case for rail with politicians, local leaders and stakeholders. At British Rail he worked for Trainload Freight. Later he worked as Planning Director at English Welsh & Scottish Railway, continuing in the role when it became DB Schenker Rail. Graham worked on McNulty’s Rail Value for Money Study. He is a member of the Freight Transport Association’s Rail Freight Council and the Railway Heritage Committee. Smith joined the Rail Delivery Group in 2011. His broad experience of the national network whilst working in the burgeoning rail freight industry gives him first hand knowledge of the need to

expand capacity and investment. Says Chairman of Rail Delivery Group Limited, Tim O’Toole, ‘Leadership comes from deeds and actions; it is not something that is created by legal structures. However, by making participation in the Rail Delivery Group an obligation we can ensure that the most senior people in the industry are focused on achieving the Group’s objectives of setting the policies and strategies for a growing railway.’ Welcoming Graham Smith he went on, ‘Graham brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the post of Director-General. He has been instrumental in the development of the Group since its formation ensuring that the RDG focuses on cross-industry

efficiencies in areas such as asset management, technology, innovation and working practices.’ Graham Smith is a Life Governor of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution. He was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the 2008 New Year’s Honours list.

www.railstaff.co.uk


PEOPLE NEwS

Rod Reid joins Bridgeway Rod Reid has joined Bridgeway Consulting as a Specialist Consultant focussing primarily on safety management systems both internally at Bridgeway and also externally for a number of high profile clients. Rod Reid is an experienced senior manager with a background of over 30 years in the rail industry. He joined British Rail as a graduate management trainee in 1979 and spent the first half of his career in front line operational management in Glasgow, Inverness, Leeds and Newcastle. In the 1990s, Rod held a number of senior safety management roles at Railtrack and Network Rail including Head of Safety Validation and Head of Health & Safety Management Systems until June 2012. A chartered member of IOSH, Rod Reid has an MBA in Transport Studies from Leeds University.

Howard Smith appointed Operations Director Howard Smith has been appointed Operations Director at Crossrail. Smith, a popular figure in the industry, is currently Chief Operating Officer for Rail at Transport for London where he successfully led the East London Line extension project and launched London Overground. Howard will join Crossrail on 25th March 2013. He will be responsible for leading the development of Crossrail’s operational strategy and will develop the new railway’s operating and maintenance organisations. In addition he will lead the arrangements for the future Crossrail operating concession. A noted strategist, Howard Smith studied economics at LSE before joining British Rail where he

gained valuable operating experience running trains and stations in south and west London. In the 1990s he worked for Railfreight Distribution, BR’s international freight organisation charged with opening up the Channel Tunnel for freight. Smith pioneered freight services over Britain’s first land link with the continent establishing joint ventures with Belgian and Swiss partners and, importantly, working with SNCF. In 1998 Howard joined the Docklands Light Railway as Planning and Development Director. He played an important role in developing projects such as the extensions to London City Airport and Woolwich Arsenal. Howard moved to London Rail as

Chief Operating Officer at the end of 2004 where he has had responsibility for the successful delivery of a £3 billion investment programme which created London Overground and expanded and upgraded the DLR and Tramlink, as well as planning for Crossrail operations. More recently Smith was part of the rail industry push to provide trouble-free transport during the London Olympics. DLR and London Overground delivered record levels of performance whilst moving up to twice the regular number of passengers. Howard Smith will report jointly to Crossrail Chief Executive Andrew Wolstenholme and London Underground’s Managing Director Mike Brown.

Neal Lawson goes to Network Rail Neal Lawson has joined Network Rail as director, maintenance and operations services. The former managing director of First Capital Connect will lead central maintenance and operations. It’s a new position designed to bring about a strategic cross-network view of the operational railway. Neal will be responsible for the operating strategy, timetabling, national performance management, improving infrastructure reliability, improving operational and workforce safety and level crossings. His remit also includes CrossCountry and open access operators, stations and depots, and the coordination of a £1 billion capital investment

programme during control period five.  Lawson will be involved in the implementation of the European Train Control System. Neal has extensive industry and technical experience. Prior to joining FCC, he was senior vice president, asset engineering at Metronet and vice president, engineering and product development at Bombardier. Neal joined FCC in May 2009 as engineering and new trains director. He became managing director in January 2010. An Australian, Neal was educated at Queensland University of Technology where he read Mechanical Engineering. Originally he worked in the Australian railway industry.

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9


RAIL ALLIANCE NEwS

Join the Rail Alliance now Rail Alliance membership starts from just £500 per year

Busy spring for Rail Alliance It has been a remarkably busy month for the Rail Alliance across a number of fronts. We have been supporting the roll out of the new Link-up Engage programme with Colin Flack, our CEO, becoming a member of the new Railway Industry Supplier Qualification Scheme (RISQS) Management Board, which provides over-watch and scrutiny of the scheme for the industry. We have supported Link Up Engage seminars all over the country and this new scheme was the central theme of our first meeting of the year held in Derby, at the Derby Conference Centre. It was one of our biggest events yet with almost 100 people attending. After this highly successful event, our focus moved north for a few days and we held another inaugural networking meeting in Glasgow, kindly hosted by Scottish Enterprise. One outcome of the meeting is that we have decided to host a Scottish Conference later in the year which, along with our other meetings south of the border for 2013, will be focusing on a theme of “Route to Market – Beyond the Valley of Death”. Whilst in Scotland, we also visited new member Aeropair Ltd (www.aeropair.co.uk) in Renfrew and, in the company of Ivan Youd, the Rail Sector Liaison Officer for the Department for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS), we spent a day with Independent Glass in Glasgow. (www.independentglass.co.uk) This latter visit was part of a fact-finding mission where we are

assisting BIS to better understand what drives the sector at Tier 2 supplier level and below… more to follow later in the year on that subject. Both of these visits, and the networking meeting hosted by Scottish Enterprise, showed just how vibrant our members are in Scotland. We have also been busy back at base on a number of fronts with our website and database going through a much needed update. Moreover, we have been working closely with the team from NSARE. We were pleased to host their CEO, Gil Howarth, to visit our site and to show him our plans for the Rail Development Centre which includes extensive training facilities. Finally we are delighted to announce that we are the delivery partner with the Centre for Rail Research and Education at the University of Birmingham. For the next 3 years we shall deliver the £1.2M European Regional Development Fund Hi-Tech Rail Programme in the West Midlands, with trials and concept demonstrator work being based at Long Marston. We have a series of events in the lead up to Railtex which is our biggest show ever, with some 20 companies on the hub with us and some 70 members in total exhibiting. Rail Alliance members comprise approximately 20% of the floor-space of the whole show and demand is so strong that we may in fact be opening a second hub so … if you are thinking about exhibiting at the UK’s largest Rail Expo, it’s not too late!

Rail Alliance events

SIFER 2013 26th-28th March Lille, France

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log on to www.railalliance.co.uk email info@railalliance.co.uk or call 01789 720026.

New Members Phoenix Contact Ltd

Mott MacDonald

(Manufacturers of electrical

(Mott MacDonald employs 14,000

connection & automation technology.) www.phoenixcontact.co.uk Don and Low Ltd (Manufacturer and supplier of geotextile materials) www.donlow.co.uk

people making it one of the biggest design houses in the world. It has the capability to design just about anything construction related and has been and continues to be involved in many major projects.) www.mottmac.com

RGS Executive (Managerial and professional

Permaquip Ltd

level recruitment business with

(Manufacturer of Rail

a very strong involvement in

maintenance equipment)

railways)

www.permaquip.co.uk

www.rgsexecutive.co.uk Solo Fabrications Ltd (Fabricated metal products from a washer to a fully fitted out ceiling module for a railway carriage.) www.solofabs.com

GLS Coatings Ltd (Specialists in specifying and applying protective spray coatings. From protecting the chassis of rolling stock to coating platforms and underpasses in an anti-skid surface and protecting exposed steelwork on bridges and

Aeropair Ltd

gantries.)

(Aeropair provides an array of

www.glscoatings.co.uk

parts and services for the maintenance and upgrade of

Samuel Taylor Ltd

aircraft and is looking to

(At the forefront of engineering

diversify into the rail sector.) www.aeropair.co.uk NSARE Ltd (The National Skills Academy for Railway Engineering, established with industry-wide support, helps tackle current and future skills needed within the railway engineering

technology for over 100 years supplying sophisticated bonding of base and precious metals to bespoke process optimisation.) www.samueltaylor.co.uk S.E.T. Ltd (Electrical engineering company specialising in high efficiency energy saving designs for rail

industry.)

traction systems)

www.nsare.org

www.set.gb.com

Metrorail 2013 9th-11th April Madrid, Spain

Railtex 2013 30th April - 2nd May Earls Court, London

www.railstaff.co.uk


NEwS

Virgin’s Man in the North

Heritage salute for Bath Spa

Gary Iddon has been appointed as General Manager, North and Scotland for Virgin Trains. Mr Iddon, who has been with Virgin Trains for 15 years, is delighted with his new job and undaunted by the high drama of the franchise process. ‘We will be focusing even harder on driving improvements for customers,’ says Gary, adding, ‘It is an exciting time for the company and for me.’ Gary Iddon will be managing onboard services and staff as well as serving as a member of the regional executive, which includes the management of stations and drivers. His area stretches as far south as Preston, where Sarah Jones is the new Station Manager. In the Autumn 2012 National Passenger Survey, published by rail watchdog Passenger Focus, Virgin scored its best-ever score for overall satisfaction - 92 per

Bath Spa station has been nominated as a Transport Heritage Site by the Transport Trust. The graceful station was built in 1840 for the Great Western Railway by Brunel. President of the Transport Trust, Sir William McAlpine, unveiled the red wheel placque at a special ceremony. The award recognises the site as a place of significance and a point of focus of Brunel’s Great Western

cent. All good ammunition when it comes to trying to retain the franchise. Gary points to a petition started by customer Ross McKillop. It attracted 174,000 signatures, prompting a parliamentary debate, which was a key element in getting the decision overturned. The completion of the Pendolino lengthening project means there are 106 additional carriages in use on the West Coast Main Line. Most LondonPreston-Glasgow services are now 11-car Pendolinos, each providing an additional 150 seats.  The new timetable that started on December 9 included an hourly service between London and Glasgow for the first time, following 50% growth in passenger numbers on the route in the last three years. The job, already a demanding one, looks like getting busier.

railway through Bath. Says First Great Western Station Manager Peter Rignall, ‘The Great Western network showcases a pioneering phase of railway construction in this country’s history. Recent improvement work has seen the forecourt of the station renovated in keeping with its famous history. We are proud to see Bath Spa station recognised in this way.’

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Signalman praised for averting van crash

Blanket cover First Great western has donated over 200 blankets from its Night Riviera sleeper service to help the homeless of Cornwall. Modern day duvets mean the blankets are no longer needed. Staff have collected, cleaned and split the blankets between two Cornish charities. FGW’s Vince Nichols, Depot Manager of Longrock Depot where the sleeper service is based, came up with the idea. ‘Chatting with Big Issue sellers I discovered that St Petroc’s is their lifeline in helping the homeless to get back into the community. They

Underscoring the rail industry’s commitment to a green and clean future, First TransPennine Express has teamed up with the Forestry Commission to donate tens of thousands of pounds to woodland and conservation projects in northern England and Scotland. Donating a total sum of £23,000, the money goes to community groups, charities, schools and individuals who allow open access to their land. Participants in the scheme were invited to apply for green grants up to a value of £2000. Grants go to projects near FTPE routes, including the planting of new woodland near Seamer Station and the restoration of the 700 year old grounds at Malton Castle. St Barnabas Primary School in York applied for £1690 to run a yearlong educational programme, Wild Wednesdays. One of fourteen projects to benefit from Green Grants, Wild Wednesdays will facilitate learning in outdoor spaces and engage children with the wildlife around them. 12

provide a roof over your head and a means to earn your own money a lot of the things we take for granted,’ says Vince.‘When we visited St Petrocs we saw this for ourselves, and a number of their staff are out on cold watch tonight, checking on rough sleepers - our blankets will be a great help.’ Vince had the old blankets stockpiled and then delivered them by hand to Oxfam in Penzance and the St Petroc’s Society, a housing and accommodation support service, in Truro.

A Peterborough signalman, Dharmesh Patel (right), has been praised by a judge for his prompt actions which saved a man’s life and averted a serious train crash. Dharmesh Patel noticed on CCTV that a van had dodged under a descending level crossing barrier. The van was unable to get out the other side as the barriers by now were down and he was trapped in the middle. Mr Patel lifted the barriers. The van accelerated away seconds before a train passed over the level crossing. Mr Patel collected a framed certificate and a cheque for an undisclosed amount at a ceremony at Luton Crown Court. Judge Richard Foster said the driver would have undoubtedly been killed in the incident in Sandy, Bedfordshire. Dharmesh Patel was managing controls for junctions and level crossings from a Network Rail

control centre in Peterborough on 3 October 2011. Says Judge Foster, ‘Mr. Patel was watching many, many CCTV screens at the time and because of his diligence in his job, he saw the predicament. Without his actions the driver would have undoubtedly been killed and there is the chance that the train would have derailed causing many casualties. There is not enough praise given to people when they do their job to a very high standard.’

Forest Trans-Pennine Says Simon Barber, Environmental Manager for FTPE, ‘This year we received a high standard of entries from worthwhile woodland and conservation projects across the FTPE routes. We’re pleased to have been able to contribute to 14 projects, some of which wouldn’t

have been able to go ahead without Green Grants funding and I look forward to seeing how each applicant benefits from the funds.’ First TransPennine Express (FTPE) has been helping to improve the environment and encourage the growth of wildlife since 2007.

Grants go to projects near FTPE routes, including the planting of new woodland near Seamer Station… www.railstaff.co.uk


NEwS

Long term solution for Kehoe Rail The Shorterm Group has secured the long term future of Kehoe Rail Services. Kehoe Rail Services, after a long trading history as specialists in the provision of rail services direct to a host of key clients such as Network Rail, London Underground and mainstream construction companies, called in the administrators early in 2013. Paul Kehoe, owner of Kehoe Rail Services, was already in advanced discussions with Shorterm Group regarding a merger, when the funding position of Kehoe altered dramatically. Operating under very tight timeframes, the Shorterm Group was able to obtain the licence and secure the future of the contract workforce -

now operating their payroll. To provide security, not just to Kehoe’s clients but to its employees as well, Shorterm is now employing all back office and support staff. This has been a seamless transfer and has not resulted in a single failure for any of Kehoe’s staff, clients or contractors. The team are delighted to be part of the Shorterm Group. Says Paul Kehoe, ‘Having already selected Shorterm Group as our partner in 2012, I am able to be confident that this arrangement is the right one for our business: our clients are protected; our contractors are being paid; and our staff are not facing redundancy. I look forward to a long future with the Shorterm Group.’

Says Steve Gallucci, CEO of Shorterm Group, ‘Operating this business complements our existing rail offerings ensuring our clients a full service, even in highly specialist sectors. It complements our business model and we are delighted to have Paul and his team on board already.’ Shorterm Group is a leading specialist recruiter and supplier of technical staff, professional engineers, skilled trades staff and commercial and industrial workers.

Reading Rocks Young musicians from the Reading Rock Academy have been adding a little musical cheer to passenger journeys at Reading. Says FGW’s Reading Station Manager Maggie Rolfe, ‘First Great Western is committed to supporting the communities we serve, and what better way to do that than by allowing our up and coming musicians to have a stage to play and the chance to brighten passengers’ journeys.’ The Rock Academy is based on Reading University’s Bulmershe Campus and was founded in 2009 by Pete Doyle, a local guitar teacher from Reading. Chasing Waves and Jack Knight performed at the station and commuters and staff are looking forward to more.

www.railstaff.co.uk

Story Contracting comes out top February 2013 saw Cumbria-based rail contractor Story Contracting Limited reach the number one spot on Network Rail’s PRISM performance delivery league table. Story Contracting attributes its success to all who have worked with them over the past twelve months.

Collaborative working is key, and by keeping lines of communication open from contract award to the end of the works on site, any potential issues can be foreseen and appropriately dealt with minimising any disruption to projects and ensuring project delivery requirements are met. Without the collaboration of Network Rail and its teams, such accolades wouldn’t be possible and it is vital that all companies work well together and utilise the PRISM scores to drive the industry forward in a sustainable, innovative and positive way.

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PEOPLE NEwS

Catapult chair for will whitehorn will whitehorn, former public affairs supremo at Virgin Group and erstwhile head of Virgin Galactic, is to head the Technology Strategy Board’s new venture,

wilkinson joins DfT Peter wilkinson is joining the Department for Transport for six months as Interim Franchising Director. Mr Wilkinson is a managing partner of First Class Partnerships. He has been working on Richard Brown’s independent review of franchising. Wilkinson has helped develop new industry collaborative and alliancing arrangements, taking forward government requirements for improved efficiency and reduced costs between train operators and Network Rail. Peter Wilkinson has had a long career in the rail industry, spanning the privatisation of British Rail’s train operating units, leading franchise procurements for the Strategic Rail Authority and franchise and concession bidding both in the UK and abroad. He was commercial director of the British Railways Board and before that worked for London Underground. He studied Industrial Science at Sheffield Hallam University.

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Transport Systems Catapult. As chairman of the ‘Catapult,’ a technology and innovation centre being set up by the Technology Strategy Board, Whitehorn will focus on innovation for efficient and sustainable ways to move people and freight. Says Universities and Science Minister David Willetts, ‘An efficient transport system that can move people and goods in a cost effective way is vital to the success of the UK economy. The Transport Systems Catapult will make sure that new and emerging technology systems across road, rail, sea and air can be tested and demonstrated, helping to create a world class transport network. ‘Will Whitehorn is a real expert

in the transport field, with years of experience and a vast amount of knowledge. He will be able to take forward the development of the Catapult.’ A former helicopter pilot, Will Whitehorn joined Virgin in 1987. Encouraged by the success of Virgin Trains, Whitehorn had been organising the Bransonian space bid, Virgin Galactic. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy and Aberdeen University. As President of Virgin Galactic he

Australian move for Howard Collins Howard Collins, Chief Operating Officer of London Underground, is heading for Sydney, New South wales, to head up the city’s fast developing urban rail system. Collins is a respected figure noted for his hands on approach on the Underground. He was awarded an OBE for his work at the London Olympics. Joining London Transport aged 18, Howard worked his away up and has been with LT and TfL ever since. As well as operational roles, he worked on the completion of the Jubilee line. The Sydney rail system is in need of modernisation and upgrading. Collins appears ready for the challenge. ‘When I travelled

it reminded me of the London Underground 25 years ago in terms of the ticketing, the technology, the environment,’ he said. ‘That’s what I want to help improve.’ However he emphasised the success of London’s Oyster card and expects great things of its Sydney equivalent, the Opal card. ‘What did surprise me in Sydney was the amount of traffic congestion and people struggling to get into work. A lot of people don’t have an alternative other than them driving a car for an hour or so. If you want to make Sydney feel like a world city, you have got to put public transport in, in a big way.’

pioneered the development of commercial spaceflight. Virgin plans to provide sub-orbital spaceflights for tourists as well as satellite deployment and space science services.

Farewell Over 700 people crammed into Victory Christian Centre in Govan to celebrate the life of railway chaplain, Stevie Black. Railway chaplain for Glasgow and the west of Scotland, Stevie, as he was affectionately known to his friends and colleagues, is survived by his wife Alison and four children. Many rail industry colleagues packed out the church to pay their respects to the hard working and popular chaplain. A deep man of God, he was well known in the rail industry for his care and concern for all who came across his path. In a statement, Liz Fleming of the Railway Chaplaincy said, ‘Stevie will be missed greatly by those on the West Coast of Scotland rail network who were under his care, by the people of Govan and by his colleagues at the Railway Mission.’

WE ARE RECRUITING Details in next months issue See us at Railtex on Stand C21

14

www.railstaff.co.uk


TRAINING... sponsored by Vital Skills Training

Helping young people to get back on track By Lawrence Dobie, Education and Training Director at Vital Services Group.

There are advantages to keeping an open mind when it comes to recruitment. While it is tempting to simply take on young people who have followed a fairly traditional route towards their chosen career, the pool of talent can be widened considerably by looking at the bigger picture. Working in partnership with A Fairer Chance, a social enterprise that provides people who are not in education, employment or training with an opportunity to get their lives back on track, we have succeeded in opening up employment opportunities for a number of former offenders.

Young offenders Of 109 teenagers taken on to work on London-based rail projects in the past 12 months, 17 are young exoffenders who have demonstrated that they are keen to settle down into a worthwhile career. With support from A Fairer Chance, they have all completed a pre-employment training course, qualified for their LUCAS card, and presented to us about why we should employ them. The 17 successful candidates represent more than half of the 31 original applicants, proving that this is an untapped pool of potential talent and one that we are keen to continue using.

Vital expansion at Salford

Manchester-based Vital Services Group is setting up a new training academy at the Soapworks, in Salford. The move will see the creation of 20 posts, including managers, trainers and administrators.

Situated within a 20,000 sq ft space at the Boilerhouse and comprising 16 classrooms and workshops, the academy will have the capacity to support up to 258 trainees, including commercial learners and apprentices. Vital recruited more than 300 rail engineering apprentices during 2012, a third of which are based in Manchester. The remaining apprentices are based at other Vital training academies across the country including York, Leicester, Kidderminster and London. As part of its growth strategy, Vital will be launching a new range of training and apprenticeship programmes in rail, power and technology to help address the

Education with detention

Nyroe Roberts (22)young ex-offender on the as This attitude is very Rail Engineering Apprenticeship much much in-line with Scheme with Vital. as the government thinking and the cost of Green Paper, ‘Transforming Youth sending them to a custody: Putting Education at the top private school. Heart of Detention’, which Ultimately, however, actions recognises that something needs speak louder than words. Their to be done to shift the emphasis to pride in having permanent work is education with detention rather such that their high-vis jackets are than detention with education. the equivalent of a status symbol, It makes a lot of sense: why write worn both on and off the job. Not off young people who, with a little only that, they are now support and guidance, could be encouraging their peers to follow offered a real job opportunity? in their footsteps; an incredible Research shows that it costs outcome. £245m each year to detain 1,800 young people - about three times

growing need for skilled staff in these sectors. The training provider, which was graded ‘outstanding’ in July 2012 following an inspection by the National Skills Academy for Rail Engineering (NSARE), is one of only six in the UK to hold this grade.

New contract wins Says Lawrence Dobie, education and training director at Vital, ‘Energy, utilities and technology are within our specialisms and a raft of new contract wins, combined with recent government announcements regarding infrastructure investment, highlights the need to ensure that there is a skilled workforce available to deliver such projects. ‘By 2024 the UK power industry will need to have recruited around 45,000 to 55,000 new employees

and, alongside this, technology skills are becoming increasingly sought after so it’s important for us, as an engineering and training company, to act now. ‘We are recruiting now for a number of administrative, managerial and training positions. In addition to providing employment opportunities, our Salford training academy will provide specialised training to employers in the rail, power and technology sectors to equip their people with the skills and qualifications they need to work efficiently and effectively.’ Vital’s target for 2013 is to recruit apprentices aged between 16 and 24 years old across the UK in areas including software engineering, installation and maintenance, and overhead power line engineering.

Helping our clients get from... Track

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0845 894 9699 15


The Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC) Continuing our series looking at people and organisations in the rail industry, RailStaff asks the question: What do they do?

Marc Johnson reports © SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

The Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC) is 20 years old this year. ATOC has been a common link for train operators since the early days of privatisation, but with more and more organisations finding their voice in the industry, will ATOC continue to frame the debate? It’s not an easy line to walk, supporting both passengers and train operators whilst retaining the overall aim - like most of the organisations covered by this series - of creating an efficiently run good-value railway.

Rail Settlement Plan

Michael Roberts, Chief Executive Officer, ATOC.

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Established under the Railways Act 1993, one of ATOC’s key responsibilities is dividing up ticket revenue among franchise operators through its Rail Settlement Plan division. For customers, ATOC has undoubtedly shaped their experience of Britain’s railway post privatisation through the creation of National Rail Enquiries (NRE). With TOCs required by law to set up a telephone enquiry phone line for customers, ATOC took the step in 1996 to connect operators around the country under the NRE service. Says ATOC’s chief executive Michael Roberts, ‘It started life off as a call centre operation, but now the main contact with customers is through the online services,

whether that’s the website or mobile. ‘People use it because it is a highly trusted and regarded source of information about service times, fares and so on. It’s inconceivable today to think that there wouldn’t be a national source of information about fares and services and that you’d leave it all simply to individual operators.’

Simplifying ticketing As well as making it easier for passengers to access vital information about services, ATOC is simplifying the tickets we use and how we buy them. Over the

next six to twelve months, passengers will notice a change when they arrive at the station. The iconic orange magstripe tickets are undergoing a redesign as part of ATOC’s ongoing rethink of ticketing. Says Michael, ‘Fares and ticketing are a big priority area for us. The government is due to publish its review of fares and ticketing in the spring. We, like others, have put our submission into that and hopefully we will continue to engage with the department to try and shape its thinking. ‘We have also been working on a redesign of the ticket just to www.railstaff.co.uk


© SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

FEATURE

“Fares and ticketing are a big priority area for us. The government is due to publish its review of fares and ticketing in the spring.” MICHAEL ROBERTS, CHIEF ExECUTIVE OFFICER, ATOC

Trade Association ATOC is at heart a trade association seeking to influence policy and stand up for the industry when it’s brought under the critical media spotlight. Only recently, ATOC exercised this role in response to research carried out by consumer group Which? suggesting that more than half of train operators had received passenger satisfaction scores below 50 per cent. ATOC responded by highlighting a contrasting study by Passenger Focus, which surveyed around eight times as many people as Which? With each fare increase, ATOC puts forward a representative to defend the industry against the backlash from a decision made in Westminster. www.railstaff.co.uk

Says Michael, ‘We’re not trying to say to the outside world that the railways are perfect and people shouldn’t criticise us because obviously, like any other sector, we’re not perfect. ‘There are always things we can do to make things better and the improvements we’re trying to make reflect that we understand that people rightly expect a high level of service and we need to continue to respond to that.’

The structure is changing Where ATOC was one of just a few industry groups back in the early 90s, it is now flanked by the likes of Passenger Focus and the Rail Delivery Group (RDG). The structure is changing around ATOC. Franchising in particular is an area where Michael believes the baton has now been passed to the RDG. ‘We at ATOC are here very clearly to champion the interests of passenger rail operators so they can serve customers and deliver a better railway, but we are fundamentally here to represent their interests. ‘What the RDG brings to the party is that industry-wide

context. We would argue that both while I’ve been here and before my time we have been very effective in articulating the views of the train operators in influencing the earlier debates about the shape of franchising, but the RDG gives the industry the opportunity to ensure that the views are integrated with others. ‘We see a really important role in continuing to deliver the business services we offer in a way that people are happy with and that are

cost effective, but we also have a role to help support the RDG in developing ideas around the wider environment for our industry. “We’re also very keen that the long-term vision about the role of the regulator is much clearer than is currently the case. ‘Ultimately we should be looking to have an industry which works efficiently as a market where you only need regulation in the very small circumstances where there is some genuine failure.’

© SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

simplify the information that’s on it. It’s a simple thing, but it’s an important thing to try and give people confidence that they know what type of ticket they’re buying.’ As well as customer-facing services, ATOC, through its Rail Staff Travel Limited scheme, controls discounted travel passes for railway employees.

17


NEwS

Record Numbers Take IRO Certificate

A record number of people enrolled on Institute of Railway Operators certificate courses last year. Says Fiona Tordoff, chief executive of the IRO, ‘Our basic purpose is to help railway professionals make the most of themselves and their railway, so obviously a lot of what we try to do is open up access to the widest number of people to the learning opportunities that suit them. ‘We reviewed what might be stopping people from coming on to the programme and took quite a radical step by cutting back on the price of the course to make it ultra affordable for organisations and individuals who pay for themselves.’ Other barriers to learning which 18

the IRO has tried to resolve are to do with how people think of themselves in relation to formal learning. Under a scheme called ‘Recognising Prior Learning’ it is possible for work and life experiences to give weight to an application, so people who don’t think of themselves as ‘academic’ don’t have to. The Institute of Railway Operators offers three levels of programmes which are accredited by the Glasgow Caledonian University. The Certificate is seen as the entry level and is open to anyone who went straight to work after school or those new to the rail industry. It takes just a year to complete and is a great way of getting an overview of all aspects of railway operations.

How hard is the course once you’ve decided to go for it and worked out your money? Says Lynda Dixey, who started the course in October 2012 and is now half way through, ‘I’ve been out of formal learning for over 10 years and left school around 30 years ago. I have a busy job and a busy family life so returning to learning was a bit of a shock – but in a good way! I’ve been to about four Saturday tutorials in the six months and managed to submit all my work on time, so it can be done.’ If you are interested in the Certificate, Diploma or Degree courses, you can register your interest on the IRO website at: www.railwayoperators.co.uk/register or call for a copy of the new brochure on 01785 248113. www.railstaff.co.uk


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NEwS

Railtex visitors As Railtex 2013 gets closer, we have more details of what visitors to the exhibition can expect to see. In the rolling stock sector, Bombardier will present its solutions for future UK rolling stock needs, such as its Aventra EMU and the TRAXX P200 AC electric locomotive, while Hitachi Rail Europe will feature bogie innovations as well as giving an update on IEP developments in the Project Update Theatre. Both Voith and ZF will showcase new vehicle transmission products and Knorr-Bremse will launch a new train monitoring system. There will also be plenty that’s new for vehicle maintainers, including developments in lifting systems from Mechan. Tata Steel, sponsor of The Track display area, will reveal plans to introduce its 108 metre ‘stress-free’

20

heat treated rail, while among other products will be a family of points machines from Germany and new trackbed geosynthetic materials. The display in The Yard will include a newly developed Rail-Ability road-rail vehicle. Several exhibitors will show level crossing safety systems and there will be a strong focus on security products, ranging from CCTV through cable theft detection and prevention to access control and graffiti management. Major suppliers of signalling technology will include Bombardier, Invensys Rail, Siemens and Signalling Solutions Ltd. From the telecommunications sector telent Technology Services will be present, as well as firms showing new GSM-R trackside phones and the latest in onboard communications. Among customer information systems innovations will be a touch screen help point plus wireless service update boards. In the electrification sector an innovative

regenerative energy storage system will be unveiled by ABB. This gives a brief foretaste of just some of the innovations on display at Railtex. With an expected 400 organisations taking part, there will be much more to see, as well as a comprehensive programme of supporting events to make a visit worthwhile. Railtex 2013 takes place at London’s Earls Court exhibition centre from 30 April to 2 May. Entry is free for visitors who have pre-registered via the show website www.railtex.co.uk. An entry fee of £20 is payable by nonregistered visitors. The website also provides a full list of Railtex exhibitors plus full details of the free seminars, project updates and other activities taking place during the show. www.railstaff.co.uk


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BIG

CHARACTER LEADERSHIP

Mature receptive leadership from the top by individuals with a presence and credibility is what our industry needs. Following the failed General Election in Italy and downgrading of this country’s credit rating, it seems a little odd to be writing about the expanding success of rail in Britain. But Crossrail is progressing with Tunnel Boring Machines working flat out. High Speed 2 looks destined to happen at last; Network Rail’s project organisation is set to deliver its projects with the end in sight for Reading; and the proposed Control Period spend from 2014 is £37.5 billion. Overdue is the investment now being made by ‘150 years young’ London Underground. Its 11 lines are being upgraded to provide a capacity increase of around 30%. David Waboso of London

Underground says they are engaged with a supply chain of 25,000 people and are spending £4 million every day (total £1.4 billion a year) on project works. Safety and productivity should go hand in hand. Safety is too important to be delegated to support professionals, yet many seem to have learnt to say all the right things without convincing workers of their commitment. The debates about what constitutes a reportable accident damaged workers views of the sincerity of managers and supervisors. Now safety statistics have plateaued. We need individuals with the stature of David Waboso to spend time on track and in depots talking to people and listening to concerns. Visits must be unannounced and unexpected. Before mobile phones etc. this was easily done.

Thirty years ago, one safety consultant convinced enlightened organisations that their chief executive and his board members needed to spend three days each week walking the job. Campaigns heralding targets of zero and the publication of statistics are loved by safety specialists. But, if we are to improve our safety performance whilst expanding our railway, we need visible big character leadership. Last year, I suggested that we needed to tackle the safety culture and leadership in our industry. I hope you will come and add your views to the Rail Media Safety Summit at Loughborough University on Thursday 14th March so that we can once again achieve a fatal accident free year!

Colin wheeler BSc (Eng), CEng, FICE, FPwI

Rail Safety Summit Host

AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00 CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

11:10 Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

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RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

Everyone Home Safe, EVERY DAY Safety 365’s 180

Gareth Llewellyn, Director of Safety and Sustainable Development for Network Rail, talks us through the journey from safety targets to a safety culture.

Two years ago, Network Rail was running the very successful Safety 365 campaign, a hardhitting look at safety aimed specifically at our frontline employees. It had been in place for almost five years and led to the development of numerous videos, materials and awareness campaigns. Safety 365 had worked well, encouraging our people to work towards year-long periods without any safety incidents, accidents or injuries. But we were conscious that, by focusing on reducing the number of incidents, we might drive under-reporting and so a different approach was important if we were to make a step change in our performance. Network Rail’s approach to safety had to change, and its safety communications had to follow suit. Research, benchmarking and expert guidance from across the industry called for a more mature approach to safety, and specifically a focus on creating the type of culture in which safe behaviours can thrive. For me, this meant changing the way we think moving away from the idea that safety is 24

somehow mandated through a plethora of standards and towards a culture in which everyone is included, feels able to identify safer ways of working and where the safety critical expectations are clear to all.

A new vision for safety Safety & Sustainable Development (S&SD) began supporting this shift by defining exactly what the company wanted to be in relation to safety. What did we want to achieve and what were we all working towards? This was an important step in setting our course for the future, and led to the development of our safety vision, everyone home safe every day. This vision highlighted three key points: • We want everyone to get home safely every

day: passengers, public, employees, and anyone who comes into contact with the railway. • Safety is about everyone, whether they work in an office, in a signal box or on the front line. Everyone has a role to play and everyone’s decisions should have safety at their heart.

• This is a constant part of what we do, it’s every single day, well beyond the next 365. Each day is just as important as the last. For these reasons, ‘everyone home safe, every day’ replaced Safety 365 as our safety brand. It maintains all the elements that made Safety 365 so effective, the thought-provoking campaigns and targeted, emotive content that gets us all thinking about the consequences of compromising on safety. But it also reflects the way we’re thinking about safety now. Importantly, it sums up the reality of safe working: it’s about making sure we can all get to our homes each night, unharmed. Putting in place a new vision and brand was just the starting point. It’s essential we all know where we’re headed, but we also need to make significant practical changes and improvements. These improvements began with the development and widespread adoption of our Lifesaving Rules.’

Lifesaving Rules and a fair culture Iain Boardman, head of S&SD engagement, and one of our Rail Safety Summit speakers, was responsible for consulting with the trades unions on the Rules themselves, as well as the fair process for applying them across Network Rail. ‘The Lifesaving Rules are a first step in simplifying our standards and safety rules. Gareth was clear that we needed to address www.railsafetysummit.com


the company’s biggest safety risks as soon as possible, and the Rules are designed to do exactly that. They all relate directly to the biggest threats to life in our industry, and are based on over 12 years’ worth of data from our safety management information system (SMIS). We wanted everyone to own the Rules and understand their importance, which is why we consulted with over 1,300 of our own people, as well as our contractors and the unions, to make sure they felt like everyone’s Rules. ‘Now that the Rules are well-known throughout Network Rail, we’re introducing the consequences guide that accompanies them. This next step is arguably more important because it’s the part that will help the company demonstrate a fair framework for dealing with rule breaking, a framework that allows us to understand why a Rule gets broken. If we know why Rules are being broken, whether it’s human error or systemic failure, we can learn from what’s happened and take steps to stop it happening again. ‘If we can show that we will always do this fairly and sensibly, we can encourage people to feel more comfortable opening up about their mistakes, which will give us a better understanding of what goes wrong and why. The consequences guide also encourages us to recognise and build-on the successes of those who are getting it right, so we don’t miss out on that learning.’ www.railsafetysummit.com

10 point workforce safety plan Emma Head, head of workforce safety and a fellow speaker at the summit, works alongside Iain in S&SD. ’We established a vision, the Lifesaving Rules, and have now put in place a full strategy for safety and wellbeing focused on the elimination of fatalities and injuries. Now that the Rules and their fair consequences are being embedded, we are sharing the practical delivery of the strategy with our people through a 10point workforce safety plan. ‘The plan focuses on key safety improvements such as technology interventions, defining roles and responsibilities and encouraging effective safety conversations. A good way to describe it would be as the roadmap to achieving everyone home safe every day. It’s a tangible way of looking at our safety culture and practices and demonstrating how we’ll change them for the better.’

“The Lifesaving Rules are a first step in simplifying our standards and safety rules…” IAIN BOARDMAN, HEAD OF S&SD ENGAGEMENT, NETwORK RAIL

Everyone, every day The work my colleagues are sharing at the Rail Safety Summit is a series of practical and cultural solutions that will allow Network Rail to achieve its safety goals. A real ‘safety culture’ means continually facilitating innovation, learning, fairness, openness, risk awareness and inclusiveness. All of the activities we’re undertaking now and in the future are designed to address all of the different elements that make-up our safety

performance, and equip everyone in Network Rail to handle them in an exemplary fashion. There is no one solution and no one group of individuals who will make these positive, sustainable changes. We truly have to reach everyone, every single day, from the visible brand of everyone home safe every day, through to the obvious changes to our safety practices and approaches.

25


RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

we asked Dr. Ian Gaskin & Jill Collis... 1) Visible and committed leadership is essential if rail safety is to improve? Transport for London (TfL) has an enviable safety record. But this leaves no room for complacency and the role of leaders at all levels of an organisation is to set and “live” the safety norms they want to see in place.

2) Communication by email and mobile phone can never be as effective as face to face. All can be effective and have their place. It depends on the context. If you want to influence someone though, face to face engagement is the most effective means.

3) A policy step-change is needed away from “measure it to manage it” to a co-operative listening management style that values people and fosters a better safety culture. The two are not mutually exclusive. Indeed the opposite, they reinforce one another. Accurate measurement of safety performance is vital - and should not be underestimated. Much of the gains in safety made over the past decades stems from better root cause analysis and understanding informed by safety data and trend analysis. A listening management style is equally vital. Leaders in an organisation do not have a monopoly of the truth - or good ideas. It is essential to create dialogue at all levels so that an organisation understands the perceptions of employees. In TfL we have a number of ways of achieving this including managers and senior managers talking to front line staff; annual employee surveys; regular meeting with staff representatives.

4) The word “zero” has been overused in safety management jargon and is no longer respected. Simple “strap lines” (preferably developed with employees) can be powerful – but they must be backed by solid actions.

5) Groups who regularly work together can outperform others in both safety and productivity. Identifying good practice, learning lessons and sharing this across the workforce is important. TfL has a number of mechanisms for capturing lessons learnt from delivery of capital programmes and to reflect on good operation practices. These are shared and built into our management system to ensure all areas perform increasing well.

7) A respected and independent accident, incident and concern reporting system is essential for the safety culture of the rail industry. Robust, reliable and trusted corporate reporting systems are the essence here. In TfL, as in other large organisations, we do of course have an independent “concern” hot line, and for safety matters there is CIRAS. But these are backstops, and our approach has been to develop corporate systems that work.

8) Railway Rule Books should no longer be regarded as working documents for front line staff. N/A

6) Most senior managers still spend too little time walking the job on the front line and listening to the workforce. Most major companies in the rail industry – and indeed elsewhere – have a requirement for senior managers and directors to  “get out” and see what’s happening. The key here is not the “volume” of such activity but its quality. Real engagement with staff means listening and giving time. A quick spin around a work site with only a few words here and there isn’t likely to bring results. Oddly, in part, it is sometimes a question of confidence on the part of senior managers – they are not in their usual environment and can feel constrained. Preparation and gaining some familiarity with work processes in advance, can help here. Following up on actions and giving feed back on suggestions made by employees is also vital.

In addition we have recently undertaken a safety climate survey to good effect in this way and the Managing Director of Rail and Underground and the Managing Director of Surface Transport organised events to communicate in person to the majority of Transport For London staff future plans and to receive their feedback

26

www.railsafetysummit.com


AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

A conversation on safety leadership Safety management systems, rules and procedures are vital – but not enough. what is the role of leaders throughout an organisation in creating the right safety culture?

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00 CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

TfL contributed to the most amazing Olympic and Paralympic Games ever. Jill Collis and Ian Gaskin would like to show you what Safety Leadership looks like across TfL and invite you to comment on TfL's approach and also to share what safety leadership looks like in your organisation.

11:10 Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

Dr. Ian Gaskin General Manager - HSE Transport for London Dr. Ian Gaskin is responsible for developing management systems at Transport for London. He started his career as an Inspector with the Health and Safety Executive in Yorkshire, later transferring to the Railway Inspectorate. Since 2001 Ian has worked primarily in the Safety Directorate of LU in a number of roles: auditing; developing safety strategy; providing a safety, health, and environment advisory service; and as programme manager for a number of business improvement projects.

www.railsafetysummit.com

Jill Collis Director of Health, Safety and Environment Transport for London Jill joined London Underground (LU) in 1997 from the nuclear industry. She has held a series of senior safety management roles including development of London Underground`s Major Accident Risk Model, leading development of  LU`s Safety and Environment improvement plan and leading the HSE teams that provide support to LU Operations and Maintenance teams. She has recently been appointed Transport for London`s Director of Health, Safety and Environment and is looking forward to enhancing further TfL`s excellent safety, health and environment record.

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

27


RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

we asked Paul Russell... 1) Visible and committed leadership is essential if rail safety is to improve. Difficult not to agree with this as there is compelling research demonstrating that visible management and strong leadership is the key to high safety performance. Those rail companies that have seen improvements in their accident and incident rates are those that, year in year out, provide a high level of management commitment and employee involvement. In well performing organisations, safety gets the same air time that other key critical business activities attract. Whilst I have yet to come across a culture that is utopia, organisations that display behaviours which promote respect, positive feedback and is open to suggestions, will always outperform those that do not. 

2) Communication by email and mobile phone can never be as effective as face to face. Well it depends on the message being delivered. Communicating a simple no-risk message can be as effective as delivering it face to face and can also, when using emails, reach a wider audience across many miles quickly. However non-verbal communicating can transmit messages that emails and mobile phones may miss, such as expression, body language, better understanding and instant feedback. Communicating by other non-face to face means can often get lost in what is known as interference - or noise. Face to face, whilst the most effective means of communicating, is not always practical so clarity of message being communicated, its completeness and accuracy are all important factors as is the information being shared being challenged should it be misunderstood.

3) A policy step-change is needed away from “measure it to manage it” to a co-operative listening management style that values people and fosters a better safety culture. I’m not sure we need a policy step-change to move away from a “measure it to manage it” approach. For us to know what is working and what is not, we need to be able to measure whether it is better or worse. Such indicators inform us of improvements we may need or verify success or failure. I also believe that you can measure and manage

28

whilst also having a co-operative listening organisation that values and fosters a better safety culture. I believe they go hand in hand.

4) The word “zero” has been overused in safety management jargon and is no longer respected. I have no problem with zero and if it means what is says with regard to injury or worse, then we should embrace it. It is aspirational, a goal or objective that is desirable and aiming for it should never be discouraged. Is it overused? Maybe not overused but misused, yes. Often targets that are set for zero are not realistic and not achieving them can have a negative impact on morale.

5) Groups who regularly work together can outperform others in both safety and productivity. N/A

6) Most senior managers still spend too little time walking the job on the front line and listening to the workforce. The industry culture has improved significantly over the past decade or more and I believe that senior management have become more engaged than ever before. Some organisations I know have really made significant efforts in engaging front line staff but there is always room for improvement and we should always promote sharp end involvement. Communicating is always a two-way process and important grass roots intelligence often helps inform senior managers of exactly how it is at the front line.

accept that this situation may be a long time in coming to pass in the industry. In the meantime I fully support and encourage the CIRAS system.” Eighteen years later, CIRAS continues to deliver a service to the rail industry that helps provide both staff and management with a safety net, an insurance policy, and whilst I would welcome a culture where we find an independent confidential reporting system being unnecessary, I cannot see this happening nor do I believe that this would be desirable. Even in a strong just culture, such systems provide organisations with a last line of defence should internal reporting means become exhausted or indeed, be inappropriate. What is important is for CIRAS to work closely with industry in identifying reasons why staff feel the need to either by-pass internal reporting channels or having used them feel that the safety issue remains unresolved. We need to feed this back to organisations, whilst retaining confidentiality, therefore potentially helping inform them of future company needs, whether these are training, culture issues or process improvements. I believe such independent confidential reporting systems are a small but important component of a company’s safety management system and collectively and collaboratively help the industry to promote a strong safety culture.

8) Railway Rule Books should no longer be regarded as working documents for front line staff. N/A

7) A respected and independent accident, incident and concern reporting system is essential for the safety culture of the rail industry. I am slightly biased if questioned about this as my organisation, CIRAS, provides a confidential reporting and analysis system. Lord Cullen said in his Ladbroke Grove report: “It is hoped that in the longer term the culture of the industry would be such as to make confidential reporting unnecessary. I

www.railsafetysummit.com


AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00

CIRAS – Its purpose CIRAS is going through a period of change and reassessing itself after 18 years of operation. It is rightly proud that in those 18 years there have not been any breaches of confidentiality. However, it recognises that the rail industry has changed and continues to do so. For CIRAS to continue to serve its subscribers well, it needs to re-engage and emphasise what its true purpose is. This presentation explores the opportunities that exist to help subscribing organisations improve their internal reporting systems as well as introduce collaborative learning across an ever growing rail community.

CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

11:10 Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

Paul Russell Head of CIRAS Paul has worked in a wide range of fields including health & safety and operations as well as retail management. He has international experience having worked in Australia, United Arab Emirates, India and across Europe. As well as playing a significant role in the London Olympics arrangements, he has played a leading role at senior level in shaping and implementing a wide range of strategies including the development and delivery of a risk-based competence management system within leading transport operators.

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

29


RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

we asked Richard Sharp... 1) Visible and committed leadership is essential if rail safety is to improve? Agree: Leaders do not always realise the shadow that they cast among their workforce. Words are not enough to convince people to change for the better, it is how you act that make the difference. You must lead by example if you expect your workforce to work safely.

2) Communication by email and mobile phone can never be as effective as face to face? Agree: Only 7% of any communication is verbal the rest is through body language and intonation. If this is lost then the meaning of the message is often also lost.

3) A policy step-change is needed away from “measure it to manage it” to a cooperative listening management style that values people and fosters a better safety culture? Agree: In an industry as regulated as our own there will always be a need to measure, it is striking the right balance and not trying to measure everything that we need to get better at. Companies always want to be able to see the improvement that any program is giving, until a generative culture is achieved the measurement of leading indicators will be the best we can hope for.

30

4) The word “zero” has been overused in safety management jargon and is no longer respected? Disagree:  As an aspiration no one can fault aiming for zero, however you have to define what you are trying to make zero. As with all buzz words, once it is seen to benefit the business and clients use it as a best practice then others will want to follow. Zero as a target for reduction can never be overused. However, it must be lived and not just used as a tool for business development.

5) Groups who regularly work together can outperform others in both safety and productivity?

7) A respected and independent accident, incident and concern reporting system is essential for the safety culture of the rail industry? Agree: But that system must be user friendly and allow data imports from company’s systems. I feel that for close calls this should be open to all and confidential to promote use.

8) Railway Rule Books should no longer be regarded as working documents for front line staff? Agree: With the removal of the actual process and a move to purely documenting rules, I feel that any usefulness for the trackman has been taken away.

Disagree: This can be true in the short-term but over time they can also get complacent. I always use the phrase “familiarity breeds contempt”.

6) Most senior managers still spend too little time walking the job on the front line and listening to the workforce? Agree: It is a very difficult line to walk. Being visible is important especially in relation to Question 1. Too much time on site and other parts of the job suffer. I feel that senior managers must ask themselves every month: “Have I been visible enough?”

www.railsafetysummit.com


A collaborative approach to improving health & safety This presentation gives an overview of the Industry Safety Liaison Group, a truly collaborative group with representation from the larger contracting companies, infrastructure managers and the RSSB.

AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00 CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

Richard will talk about the group aims, which include identifying risks, ďŹ nding solutions and sharing best practice among the industry, and to do this by working together and sharing information with both our peers and supply chains.

11:10

Including a look at the work that has already been done to help improve health and safety for the industry and what ISLG are aiming to do over the next 12 months.

11:30

Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

Richard Sharp Chairman Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group Richard has been newly appointed as Chair of the ISLG, a leading forum for GB railway contractors working together and with the wider industry to improve health, safety and environmental performance by sharing experiences, good practice and knowledge. He started his working life in the Royal Air Force as a Weapons Engineer and has since worked in a number of industries before moving into rail. He has worked in the rail industry in both labour supply and for a main contractor for the last ten years and is currently employed as the Compliance Manager for J Murphy and Sons Ltd. Responsible for ensuring the company’s processes meet the requirements for working within the rail industry.

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

31


RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

we asked Allan Spence... 1) Visible and committed leadership is essential if rail safety is to improve. Absolutely, this is a core element of the Network Rail Safety and Wellbeing Strategy, and is a focus for the Safety Leadership and Culture Change Team.  The presentations being delivered by Network Rail will concentrate on the role of leadership in improving safety.

2) Communication by email and mobile phone can never be as effective as face to face. While electronic methods of communication can be made innovative and engaging these only really act to reinforce messages.  Nothing replaces face to face communications for delivering a message.

3) A policy step-change is needed away from “measure it to manage it” to a co-operative listening management style that values people and fosters a better safety culture. Agreed, Network Rail is focusing within the strategy on “competent people taking sensible risk based decisions”, within a much simplified framework of rules.

32

4) The word “zero” has been overused in safety management jargon and is no longer respected. Network Rail consciously chose a vision that is ambitious and positive in tone – the intent is the same but it does not focus on numbers or risk a focus on measures.

5) Groups who regularly work together can outperform others in both safety and productivity. There is a fine balance to be struck. Workgroups with local knowledge and developed working relationships that respect each other can definitely achieve safe and productive delivery, but close relationships can also lead to complacency.

6) Most senior managers still spend too little time walking the job on the front line and listening to the workforce.

7) A respected and independent accident, incident and concern reporting system is essential for the safety culture of the rail industry. Network Rail has established a Close Call Reporting Line to enable the reporting of all unsafe acts and conditions observed by the workforce.  This is key to the delivery of our strategic objectives in terms of building a reporting culture, but also focusing on a learning culture where we can eliminate repeat accidents using this precursor knowledge.

8) Railway Rule Books should no longer be regarded as working documents for front line staff. A few simple, easy to understand rules, such as the Network Rail Life Saving Rules, are essential in providing a framework for individuals to make risk based decisions within. However, too many overly complex rules are counterproductive in enabling a competent workforce to make safe decisions.

Definitely – Network Rail is focusing on a move away from Safety Tours, which have been a measure of the number of safety checks undertaken, to a programme of Leading Safety Conversations.  This has a deliberate focus on the quality of open questioning and active listening to gain a better insight into safety issues from the workforce’s perspective.

www.railsafetysummit.com


AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

Safety strategy seizing the agenda As a real example of industry collaboration, Allan was seconded into Network Rail’s Safety and Sustainable Development team in 2012 to develop a long term safety strategy. That strategy is now endorsed by the Board, strongly supported by the Regulator and becoming embedded in business plans. In the past, Network Rail has been criticised for being slow to identify weak areas and to react to adverse events and issues identified by the regulator or accident investigation body.

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00 CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

11:10

The new Strategy for Safety and wellbeing establishes a series of principles and measures to significantly improve our safety performance, and to more clearly lead safety management in our business and with industry partners. It demonstrates our ambition to radically change our safety performance, recognising that this cannot all happen within the short horizon of one control period. The strategy reinforces that safety is at the core of everything we do, enabling the company to deliver business improvement through more mature safety management. with strands addressing risks to passengers, public and the workforce, the strategy sets the path towards the company’s vision of everyone going home safe, every day.

Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

Allan Spence Director of Safety Strategy Network Rail Allan is currently seconded into Network Rail as Director, Safety Strategy and has led the development of the company’s ambitious Safety and Wellbeing Strategy to achieve the company vision of “Everyone home safe, every day”. With over 25 years’ experience as a health and safety regulator, initially in agriculture, Allan led all the operational inspectors dealing with the mainline railway infrastructure in Great Britain’s Office of Rail Regulation (ORR) until March 2012.

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

33


RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

we asked Emma Head... 1) Visible and committed leadership is essential if rail safety is to improve. Absolutely, this is a core element of the Network Rail Safety and Wellbeing Strategy, and is a focus for the Safety Leadership and Culture Change Team.  The presentations being delivered by Network Rail will concentrate on the role of leadership in improving safety.

2) Communication by email and mobile phone can never be as effective as face to face. While electronic methods of communication can be made innovative and engaging these only really act to reinforce messages.  Nothing replaces face to face communications for delivering a message.

3) A policy step-change is needed away from “measure it to manage it” to a co-operative listening management style that values people and fosters a better safety culture. Agreed, Network Rail is focusing within the strategy on “competent people taking sensible risk based decisions”, within a much simplified framework of rules.

34

4) The word “zero” has been overused in safety management jargon and is no longer respected. Network Rail consciously chose a vision that is ambitious and positive in tone – the intent is the same but it does not focus on numbers or risk a focus on measures.

5) Groups who regularly work together can outperform others in both safety and productivity. There is a fine balance to be struck. Workgroups with local knowledge and developed working relationships that respect each other can definitely achieve safe and productive delivery, but close relationships can also lead to complacency.

6) Most senior managers still spend too little time walking the job on the front line and listening to the workforce.

7) A respected and independent accident, incident and concern reporting system is essential for the safety culture of the rail industry. Network Rail has established a Close Call Reporting Line to enable the reporting of all unsafe acts and conditions observed by the workforce.  This is key to the delivery of our strategic objectives in terms of building a reporting culture, but also focusing on a learning culture where we can eliminate repeat accidents using this precursor knowledge.

8) Railway Rule Books should no longer be regarded as working documents for front line staff. A few simple, easy to understand rules, such as the Network Rail Life Saving Rules, are essential in providing a framework for individuals to make risk based decisions within. However, too many overly complex rules are counterproductive in enabling a competent workforce to make safe decisions.

Definitely – Network Rail is focusing on a move away from Safety Tours, which have been a measure of the number of safety checks undertaken, to a programme of Leading Safety Conversations.  This has a deliberate focus on the quality of open questioning and active listening to gain a better insight into safety issues from the workforce’s perspective.

www.railsafetysummit.com


AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

workforce safety the 10 point plan As part of our Safety and wellbeing Strategy 2012-2024, Network Rail has identified outcome objectives of eliminating all fatalities, major injuries and repeat incidents. This has been developed into strategic themes focused on improving the safety of the workforce, including:

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00 CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

• The development and implementation of the Safety Leadership & Culture Change programme, including the Life Saving Rules, to embed a culture that encourages open and honest reporting; • The rationalisation of company standards to create clear executive rules and systems of work that are pragmatic and risk-based; • The improvement of our competence arrangements to reduce bureaucratic barriers and focus on creating a more broadly skilled workforce with the competence and skills to work safely. The workforce Safety 10 Point Plan is designed to align these core work-streams into one focused plan, to deliver immediate and measurable improvements in workforce safety performance. The workforce Safety 10 Point Plan is ambitious, for example looking to deliver a 50% reduction in repeat accidents within the next 12 months. with each of the ten points being sponsored by an Executive Board Member, Network Rail is looking to achieve a step change in performance.

Emma Head Head of workforce Safety Network Rail Emma is a new addition to the Safety and Sustainable Development (S&SD) Team at Network Rail, having gained a wealth of experience in the rail sector over the last 13 years. Emma is a career safety professional, and has worked with a number of contractor organisations, gaining core knowledge in rail construction projects, track renewals, safety critical labour supply and on-track plant operations. Emma is passionate about making a difference to the safety of the frontline workforce, and is therefore delighted to have been asked to be the custodian of the Safety Leadership and Cultural Change Programme as well as continuing in the role of Head of Workforce Safety, enabling Network Rail to best align its Workforce Safety agenda with a positive shift in safety culture.

11:10 Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

35


RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

we asked Ian Boardman... 1) Visible and committed leadership is essential if rail safety is to improve. Absolutely, this is a core element of the Network Rail Safety and Wellbeing Strategy, and is a focus for the Safety Leadership and Culture Change Team.  The presentations being delivered by Network Rail will concentrate on the role of leadership in improving safety.

2) Communication by email and mobile phone can never be as effective as face to face. While electronic methods of communication can be made innovative and engaging these only really act to reinforce messages.  Nothing replaces face to face communications for delivering a message.

3) A policy step-change is needed away from “measure it to manage it” to a co-operative listening management style that values people and fosters a better safety culture. Agreed, Network Rail is focusing within the strategy on “competent people taking sensible risk based decisions”, within a much simplified framework of rules.

36

4) The word “zero” has been overused in safety management jargon and is no longer respected. Network Rail consciously chose a vision that is ambitious and positive in tone – the intent is the same but it does not focus on numbers or risk a focus on measures.

5) Groups who regularly work together can outperform others in both safety and productivity. There is a fine balance to be struck. Workgroups with local knowledge and developed working relationships that respect each other can definitely achieve safe and productive delivery, but close relationships can also lead to complacency.

6) Most senior managers still spend too little time walking the job on the front line and listening to the workforce.

7) A respected and independent accident, incident and concern reporting system is essential for the safety culture of the rail industry. Network Rail has established a Close Call Reporting Line to enable the reporting of all unsafe acts and conditions observed by the workforce.  This is key to the delivery of our strategic objectives in terms of building a reporting culture, but also focusing on a learning culture where we can eliminate repeat accidents using this precursor knowledge.

8) Railway Rule Books should no longer be regarded as working documents for front line staff. A few simple, easy to understand rules, such as the Network Rail Life Saving Rules, are essential in providing a framework for individuals to make risk based decisions within. However, too many overly complex rules are counterproductive in enabling a competent workforce to make safe decisions.

Definitely – Network Rail is focusing on a move away from Safety Tours, which have been a measure of the number of safety checks undertaken, to a programme of Leading Safety Conversations.  This has a deliberate focus on the quality of open questioning and active listening to gain a better insight into safety issues from the workforce’s perspective.

www.railsafetysummit.com


AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00

Lifesaving rules Looking at Network Rail's introduction of 11 simple rules that were developed to address the key risks to life in the industry.

CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

11:10 Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

Iain Boardman Head of S&SD Engagement Network Rail Iain has worked in the construction, consultancy and rail industries for approaching 20 years, most recently in Network Rail’s Safety & Sustainable Development function as Programme Lead for the Safety Leadership & Culture Change team. This role saw Iain develop Network Rail’s Lifesaving Rules and lead collaborative work with the trade unions, developing the Fair Culture programme that supports the Lifesaving Rules’ implementation. Prior to joining S&SD, Iain spent seven years as an Infrastructure Maintenance Manager at various delivery units on the West Coast, managing safe delivery on some of the most congested infrastructure on the UK rail network.

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

37


RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

we asked Simon French... 1) Visible and committed leadership is essential if rail safety is to improve. All managers will state that they are ‘committed’ to safety.  Good visibility of managers will achieve little unless this is matched by a determination to understand and address areas of risk, and to take the decisions that are necessary to drive improvements.

2) Communication by email and mobile phone can never be as effective as face to face. This is often the case but not always true. Clarity of communications is of such importance that it can sometimes be better to craft a well worded email before discussing the issue.

3) A policy step-change is needed away from “measure it to manage it” to a co-operative listening management style that values people and fosters a better safety culture. N/A

38

4) The word “zero” has been overused in safety management jargon and is no longer respected.

7) A respected and independent accident, incident and concern reporting system is essential for the safety culture of the rail industry.

N/A

5) Groups who regularly work together can outperform others in both safety and productivity. N/A

6) Most senior managers still spend too little time walking the job on the front line and listening to the workforce. Many RAIB investigations have highlighted the importance of managers being aware of what is happening in the world beyond their office.  One technique is to walk the job and talk to the staff.  However, there are other means by which managers can become aware of the real situation, such as an effective regime for communicating with staff, monitoring work activities and measuring the quality of the ‘endproduct’.

One of the principles that led to the establishment of the RAIB was the importance of learning lessons from accidents and nearmisses, and disseminating those lessons to those who need to take actions.  It is therefore important to the railway industry that staff feel able to report unsafe events or any safety concerns that they may have.

8) Railway Rule Books should no longer be regarded as working documents for front line staff. Railway safety is reliant on the competence of its staff.  However, it is important that competent staff exercise judgement within a clearly defined and commonly understood framework that lays down key safety requirements.  The Rule Book is one means of documenting these requirements.

www.railsafetysummit.com


AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon will outline the role of the Rail Accident Investigation Branch and then seek to answer three questions: why investigate railway accidents? what does a good investigation look like? what recurrent factors have been identiďŹ ed in RAIB investigations? The presentation will include reference to some recent RAIB investigations and areas of recommendation. It will conclude by highlighting some important areas of safety improvement now being addressed by the railway industry and some themes of particular concern to the RAIB.

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00 CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

11:10 Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

Simon French Deputy Chief Inspector Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) Simon French is a graduate of the London School of Economics and joined the railway industry in 1982 as a management trainee.  He held a number of operational posts in British Rail and worked on a number of major railway projects including the Channel Tunnel and Heathrow Express. In 1998 he joined the client organisation for the Channel Tunnel Rail Link (now known as HS1) as the Head of Operations and Safety. In 2004 Simon joined the newly formed Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) as a Principal Inspector and in 2011 was appointed to the role of Deputy Chief Inspector. The RAIB is the independent body tasked with the investigation of railway accidents in the UK.

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

39


RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

we asked Colin Dennis... 1) Visible and committed leadership is essential if rail safety is to improve. Safety leadership has to come from the top. Senior managers must work with frontline staff to establish effective safety strategies, policies and actions and then work as a team to deliver them. A commitment to safety must be demonstrated at all levels.   

2) Communication by email and mobile phone can never be as effective as face to face. Communication by both email and mobile has its place in the running of a modern business but it must not be used as the only means of communications. Effort should be made where appropriate and possible to have face to face conversations, particularly where the intended recipient of the communication is in the same building/close by at the time.  

3) A policy step-change is needed away from “measure it to manage it” to a co-operative listening management style that values people and fosters a better safety culture. Development of a good safety culture requires a dialogue between managers and staff to establish effective team working. There remains the need to measure safety performance to understand what is happening within the business and to highlight areas which may need enhanced/further control measures to ensure safety continues to be managed to a level that is as low as reasonably practicable. There are also benefits from being able to learn from the operational experience recorded in safety management information systems and benchmarking – but this should not be the only means of managing safety within a business.   

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4) The word “zero” has been overused in safety management jargon and is no longer respected. The problem with using the word ‘zero’ in an industry such as the rail industry is that realistically it is never achievable, so a business using it will always be considered to have failed. Having achievable and well structured  targets and being actively seen to manage risk provides a more realistic basis on which to manage a business.  

5) Groups who regularly work together can outperform others in both safety and productivity.

7) A respected and independent accident, incident and concern reporting system is essential for the safety culture of the rail industry. Agreed. I believe that, with the Safety Management Information System (SMIS), the Close Call reporting System and CIRAS, the GB has one of best safety reporting systems within the rail industry in the world.

8) Railway Rule Books should no longer be regarded as working documents for front line staff. N/A

The benefits of effective team working and respect are well known. 

6) Most senior managers still spend too little time walking the job on the front line and listening to the workforce. This is probably true because most people have high workloads to accommodate within their working days. However, getting out and seeing what is going on and talking to the workforce is essential to effective team working and safety management  

www.railsafetysummit.com


Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving Introduction to the incident factor classification system

This is a joint RSSB and Network Rail initiative to better understand and classify the human factor-related causal factors within RAIB reports and formal investigations to enable improved human factors understanding, cross-industry learning and future accident investigations.

Risk from road vehicle driving

AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00 CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

11:10

This is an RSSB led initiative looking at the high level of risk from road vehicle driving that affects most rail companies. In collaboration with the industry, this initiative seeks to develop reliable arrangements for reporting and analysing road traffic accident events and provide a resource centre on road driving risk to help rail managers to understand and share good practice and continually raise awareness.

Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

Colin Dennis Director RSSB Colin Dennis is a Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers with a degree in Energy Technology from Aston University. He has over 30 years experience in safety and reliability engineering. During his career, he has been involved in the development and application of safety and reliability analysis techniques to the nuclear, railway and other industries. Prior to joining Railway Safety (the company that preceded RSSB) in September 2000 he worked for Atkins consultancy, Ontario Hydro (the nuclear power plant operator) in Ontario Canada and the Central Electricity Generating Board in the UK. From 2004 to 2012 he was Head of Safety Knowledge and Planning in RSSB responsible for producing the rail industry safety performance reports, the industry safety risk profile and industry risk assessments. In the early 90s he was responsible for the development of the first integrated railway risk model for the Channel Tunnel Rail Link going on to lead the development of the RSSB Safety Risk Model.

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

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Bridgeway rated as the UK’s only large outstanding rail training and assessment provider Following the inaugural NSARE/RTAS Rail Training Inspections which are aligned with OFSTED standards, Bridgeway Consulting have been named the UKs only Outstanding “Large� Track Safety Training Provider and ranked Number 1 in the whole UK. We have capabilities to deliver the following for you nationally: ‡1&&$6HQWLQHO5DLO7UDFN6DIHW\7UDLQLQJ$VVHVVPHQWV ‡6PDOO3ODQW (TXLSPHQW ‡3HUPDQHQW:D\7UDLQLQJ ‡$XWKRULVHGDQG1RPLQDWHG3HUVRQV2+/ ‡0DFKLQH &UDQH&RQWUROOHU ‡5DLO7UDLQ2SHUDWRU&RPSDQ\2SHUDWLRQV7UDLQLQJ ‡.H\5DLOZD\3ULQFLSOHV ‡3$60$6FDIIROG7UDLQLQJ ‡+HDOWKDQG6DIHW\7UDLQLQJ We are also able to deliver a managed competence management service that is tailored to your needs: ‡0DQDJHPHQW6FKHGXOLQJDQGGHOLYHU\RI5DLO 7UDLQLQJ0HQWRULQJDQG$VVHVVPHQWV ‡7UDLQLQJ1HHGV$QDO\VLV ‡3UH3RVW5DLO7UDLQLQJ$GYLFHDQG6XSSRUW ‡5XOHERRN0DQDJHPHQW Contact: 0115 919 1111 / 01277 812 855 WUDLQLQJ#EULGJHZD\FRQVXOWLQJFRXN ZZZEULGJHZD\FRQVXOWLQJFRXN


AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

Complacency – the hidden hazard Complacency on the job has the potential to seriously injure and kill staff.

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00 CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

It’s as dangerous as any other workplace hazard such as machines and chemicals but is harder to spot.

10:45

Complacency happens when staff perform the same duties on a regular basis without thinking about or recognising the risks that they are exposed to.

11:10

Complacency is nothing to new to railways and doesn’t discriminate who it it chooses to buddy up with; young, old, experienced or inexperienced. “It’ll never happen to me” may still be in some railway workers minds – complacency has no place on the railways and we must work together to identify and banish it.

Coffee | Exhibition

Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

Steve Diksa Assurance Services Director Bridgeway Consulting Ltd Steve is responsible for the Business Development, HSQE and Training Departments at Bridgeway Consulting. Bridgeway Consulting is a Principal Contractor to Network Rail and delivers multiple discipline solutions nationwide and abroad to clients which are cost and time effective.

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

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RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

we asked Darren Selman... 1) Visible and committed leadership is essential if rail safety is to improve? Agreed. Unless leadership is committed and seen to be committed, any safety message will only ever be seen as ‘words from the ivory tower’. Leadership needs to be seen ‘in the field’ demonstrating their understanding of safety related issues and their commitment to making the workplace safer. Management safety tours are a good starting point, but participation needs to be more than an hour a month – it should be regular and should give the workforce an opportunity to express their concerns to people who are in a position to make change.

2) Communication by email and mobile phone can never be as effective as face to face? Email is an extremely useful tool but has become an abused one. It is far too easy to cc in everyone and assume that a message has been relayed. The truth is that many people filter out cc’s in an effort to avoid their inboxes becoming clogged - this leads to an ever present risk of important information being ignored. Mobile phones are a much better mode of communication – the conversation is between two people and the exchange of information is personal and direct. But nothing is as effective as face to face communication where body language becomes part of the discussion; messages are relayed completely and effectively and there is less room for misinterpretation.

3) A policy step change is needed away from “measure it to manage it” to a cooperative listening management style that values people and fosters a better safety culture? Both measurement and interaction are essential tools in effective safety management. It is impossible to target areas for improvement if there is no method for identifying those areas. Measurement and analysis provide a quantitative indicator of safety performance and where efforts need to be focussed to bring about improvements. However, managing by numbers is impersonal and mechanical and shifts the focus away from actual human behaviour which provides a more qualitative measure. It is key to safety improvement that the human element exists so that personnel have an opportunity to express concerns and participate in addressing them. In essence, effective safety culture improvement arises from a combination of measurement and co-operative listening. 44

4) The word “zero” has been overused in safety management jargon and is no longer respected? Although it is something of a cliché to use the word ‘zero’ in safety improvement initiatives, there does not appear to be a real alternative. Safety regulations instruct us to reduce risk to ALARP; zero has to be the target. We all want there to be no injuries, no harm, no damage in our workplaces – what can we aim for if it isn’t zero? In addition, we can quantify against zero it is an absolute which enables us to measure our performance in our efforts to eliminate risk and harm in the workplace. So while ‘zero’ may have lost some if its impact through overuse, it provides a clear target to aim for whether it is respected or not.

5) Groups who regularly work together can outperform others in both safety and productivity? Agreed. There is plenty of anecdotal evidence that groups who work together closely build bonds which lead to a camaraderie. This in turn generates a “watching each others” back mentality - this evolves naturally, rather than being forced by safety campaigns and initiatives. This evolved shared respect and understanding leads to an innate link between members of a team; they know how each other works, and develop their own methods to accommodate these. Looking out for someone you know comes more naturally than with a stranger, so safety performance improves by default.

6) The most senior managers still spend too little time walking the job on the front line and listening to the workforce? Yes. As with question 1, senior managers need to spend more time ‘in the field’ with the workforce. This will, as a minimum, give a level of assurance to the workforce that management are aware of (and engaged in addressing) workplace issues. More importantly, it will enable managers to get a real understanding of the risks that their people are exposed to – an understanding that cannot be gained by only reading performance reports which give a very sterile view of safety in the workplace.

7) A respected and independent accident, incident and concern reporting system is essential for the safety culture of the rail industry? Agreed. Both local and national systems are essential to enable workers to report concerns without fear of repercussions. It is important that the owners of any system are even-handed in their approach. There is always a risk that some reporters will use the system to gain leverage on issues which management already believe have been addressed. As long as the system is demonstrably impartial it will be used as a tool across the industry for identifying areas of both concern and best practise – this is invaluable. It is important that all users of any system understand what it is for and how it is to be used. Any reports issued as a result of data entered into the system should be transparent – and users should understand this to be the case. Appropriate training in the use of both the system and the reports that are generated by it should be available.

8) Railway Rule Books should no longer be regarded as working documents for front line staff? Rule Books have always been the ‘go to’ whenever there has been any lack of clarity over what actions to take in the railway environment. They give explicit instructions over what can and can’t be done, are a fundamental part of training for railway operatives and are an invaluable source of information for users. Although they may be seen as cumbersome, they are necessary. There would have to be a fundamental change in working culture for staff to agree not to have them. If Rule Books were to be withdrawn what would they be replaced with? And how would users gain critical information if they were no longer available? In the absence of a suitable replacement, Rule Books should be made available to workers for as long as the rules within them remain valid.

www.railsafetysummit.com


Target Zero – raising safety standards across multiple sites The Crossrail project is the largest civil engineering programme in Europe that, by 2018, will be an operational railway. Darren explains how Crossrail has implemented a project-wide Target Zero strategy which aims to steer all contractors in the same direction to improve safety. This is being done against a background of multiple contractors who have their own initiatives and across many sites working in a wide variety of disciplines. Crossrail has introduced Golden Rules as a consistent set of requirements across all sites, and has initiated the Gateway Programme which recognises contractors which demonstrate a positive approach to improving safety. As the nature of the work changes, the safety focuses will change, so the safety management systems which are in place are having to evolve to reflect the work being carried out. The initiatives that are in place have shown a demonstrable improvement in the way that Crossrail analyses safety performance of the project and how it is able to identify areas to focus on.

AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00 CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

11:10 Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

Darren Selman Health & Safety Manager Assurance Crossrail Darren has worked in the railway industry for nearly twenty years and has held safety management roles covering activities in the UK and abroad including 11 years at Eurostar where he led the team responsible for fleet engineering safety. He has managed teams overseeing fleet, stations, track, signalling and civil engineering safety on London Underground and was most recently at Bombardier as part of the London Underground signalling upgrade team. At Crossrail he leads the Assurance team which is tasked with overseeing the activities of multiple contractors as the project moves from construction through to railway installation and delivery.

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

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RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

we asked Syd Scrace... 1) Visible and committed leadership is essential if rail safety is to improve? I fully agree. Rail safety needs to be one of the highest priorities for companies in the railway industry and only clear and committed leadership can ensure that this is regarded as such in each organisation.

2) Communication by email and mobile phone can never be as effective as face to face? Both email and phone communication can be very effective when conducted in a constructive way. Ultimately, I believe that face-to-face meetings are necessary to ensure a closer working relationship than emails and phone conversations can facilitate.

3) A policy step-change is needed away from “measure it to manage it” to a cooperative listening management style that values people and fosters a better safety culture?

4) The word “zero” has been overused in safety management jargon and is no longer respected? I fully agree with this statement. Through overuse, the work “zero” has lost its impact and we need to find new ways of expressing our goals that do not position the ultimate goal as the everyday attainable.

5) Groups who regularly work together can outperform others in both safety and productivity? A close working relationship within a group is highly effective and can lead to high levels of performance in all areas.

6) Most senior managers still spend too little time walking the job on the front line and listening to the workforce? I fully agree. However, the size of the organisation has a dramatic effect on the senior managers’ ability to do this. A smaller organisation should be able to easily achieve this goal.

7) A respected and independent accident, incident and concern reporting system is essential for the safety culture of the rail industry? I agree to some degree. I fully believe that it is essential to capture and understand the causes of accidents and incidents and to learn from these. There is probably more than one way these can be captured and reported.

8) Railway Rule Books should no longer be regarded as working documents for front line staff? It is important to have railway procedures and to have common rules in place that each organisation involved adheres to. However, it could be debated whether this should be up to each employer, who needs to set the rules in line with each employee’s roles. Although I agree that this needs to happen under an overall framework of industry rules.

N/A

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www.railsafetysummit.com


Rolling stock introduction – a collaborative approach to safety strategy we all want to learn from experiences and improve our safety record so that employees and their families know that when they go to work, at the end of the day they will come home safely. Hitachi takes safety very seriously and we fully embrace those principles in what we do. There can be no excuses for any short cuts or cost cutting exercises that compromise safety.

AGENDA 08:30

Registration and exhibition viewing

09:20 Conference opening Colin Wheeler

09:30 A conversation on safety leadership Dr. Ian Gaskin and Jill Collis from Transport for London

10:00 CIRAS - Its purpose Paul Russell from CIRAS

10:15 A collaborative approach to improving health and safety Richard Sharp from Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30 Q&A with speakers

10:45 Coffee | Exhibition

11:10

This presentation looks at how Hitachi Rail Europe has developed safety strategies, working in an open and collaborative way, ensuring integration into previous, current and future projects.

Safety strategy - seizing the agenda Allan Spence from Network Rail

11:30 Workforce safety - the 10 point plan Emma Head from Network Rail

11:50 Lifesaving rules Iain Boardman from Network Rail

12:15 Q&A with speakers

Syd Scrace Approvals and Homologation Manager, Projects and Operations Hitachi Rail Syd joined Hitachi Rail Europe in 2007, and is responsible for ensuring train projects comply with the Railway Group Standards, UK laws, EU TSI and customers’ safety requirements. Upon joining the company, Syd mainly worked on the Class 395, ensuring compliance on all levels. Syd has been in the railway industry for almost 40 years, joining British Rail as an apprentice in 1974. He remained with the company for almost 20 years, focusing more and more on safety. Following the privatisation of British Rail, Syd transferred to Connex South Eastern, South East Trains and Southeastern as the franchises changed.

12:30 Lunch | Exhibition

13:30 The investigation of railway accidents in the UK Simon French from Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50 Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving by Colin Dennis from RSSB

14:10 Complacency - the hidden hazard Steve Diksa from Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30 Q&A with speakers

14:45 Coffee | Exhibition

15:15 Target Zero - raising safety standards across multiple sites Darren Selman from Crossrail

15:35 Rolling stock intro - a collaborative approach to safety strategy Syd Scrace from Hitachi Rail

15:50 Q&A with speakers

16:20 Conference close

www.railsafetysummit.com

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RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

Mission Room systems bring the trackside environment into the office, giving safe and instant access to the complex and hazardous assets that make up the UK’s railways.

They provide a highly immersive experience that enhances a user’s understanding of real situations. A single system can be used for a wide variety of applications such as design, planning, induction, briefings and training. Mission Room helps to increase safety by reducing the need for access to track and reduces costly mistakes by ensuring better preparation for

those involved with infrastructure projects. First introduced into the UK railways at the beginning of 2012 with an installation on the Finsbury Park to Alexandra Palace (F2A) project in North London, Mission Room was a finalist in the 2012 Network Rail Partnership Safety Awards. Recent installations at Swindon for Great Western are

• Network Rail Approved • Ability to hear speech, warnings and alarms • All day wear-ability • Easy to clean • SNR 29 • Lifespan of 5 years • Will not affect other PPE • CE Marked

At Source QX Ltd is a privately owned company specialising in personally moulded hearing protection and communication accessories into the rail industry for over five years.

Our agents will arrange to take your crews impressions for any shift, at any depot. Speak to your delivery unit manager and protect your hearing.

Our earplugs, called ProtectHear, are tailor-made for each individual and offer a life span of 5 years. Made with medical grade silicone making them easy to clean. ProtectHear allows all day wear-ability.

For more information on any of our products please call 01507 604322 or visit our website www.protecthear.co.uk 48

www.railsafetysummit.com


Mission Room Continues to Grow being followed up by more in York and Peterborough for SNE as interest continues to grow within the rail sector.

Immersive experience Mission Room consists of an integrated set of components which are configured to provide immersive experiences, surrounding viewers with images, video and sound, giving them a true understanding of what it is actually like to be on site. The media is captured using the Mission Cam system, which can be mounted on a tripod, a backpack or even on a vehicle to facilitate

the capture of wider area. A simple edit system allows users to quickly produce media in a form that can be played on various display systems. The Mission Room Arena is a 360 degree immersive display room that is highly immersive and suitable for smaller groups. The Mission Room Open is a 270 degree, widescreen theatre format, suitable for larger groups. All installations are designed and built to order, based around a modular set of core technologies with on-going upgrades and maintenance typically included in the package. The technology is

highly cost-effective with typical long-term installations costing from as little as £1,500 a month and benefits way in excess of this, achievable through lower track access costs, fewer mistakes and overrun reduction. Implicit in the approach is improved safety through better understanding.

Constant development Mission Room Limited is constantly focused on developing the hardware and software required to produce immersive technologies that bring real world benefits to industry. It also continues to broaden the range

of applications Mission Room can offer. One example is the recent development of BIM add-ons that allow users to ‘stand inside’ 3D and 4D CAD models of future designs. This approach also enables an augmented view of real world and computer generated imagery. These enhancements provide a simple but powerful way of understanding future ideas and improving safety through better design. For further information or to arrange an on-site demonstration of the technology please contact Dr Bryan Denby via bryan.denby@missionroom.com.

See More, Save Time, Stay Safe Mission Room brings the track side environment into the office, giving safe and instant access to complex and hazardous assets. The highly immersive experience enhances understanding of real situations and has applications in design, planning, induction, briefings and training. Mission Room increases safety by reducing the need for access to track and reduces costly mistakes by ensuring better preparation.

For further information or to arrange an on-site demonstration contact info@missionroom.com or call 0115 951 6800 www.railsafetysummit.com

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RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

Shunter Safety: The industry’s hidden concern

Risk and effect There is no doubt that the rail industry is a potentially dangerous place to work. After all, there are not many industries that expect employees to deal with high voltage electricity, speeding vehicles, powerful machinery and thousands of members of the public on a daily basis. Because of the obvious dangers, the industry as a whole is very aware of the need for the implementation of highly-tuned systems in order to guarantee the safety of both the public and those employed to keep the UK’s rail infrastructure on track. However, despite this, there are still areas of the industry that remain a dangerous place to work. According to a recent study carried out by the Rail Safety and Standards Board (RSSB), shunter safety still remains a serious concern across the board in the UK rail industry. Shunters, working in both the commercial and freight areas of the industry, are key to ensuring that trains are able to proceed safely from depots or sidings, and are critical to the maintenance and safekeeping of the UK’s rolling stock. 50

Shunters are very much “on the ground” and working in the thick of the action. The RSSB’s report reflected that, and showed that the rates of shunter fatalities and RIDDOR-reportable injuries suggest a significantly higher level of risk than other workforce groups. According to the study, the average shunter working for a freight operator (FOC) loses 0.7 working days a year as a result of injuries sustained whilst at work, whilst on average a train operator’s shunter was reported to lose around 0.2 days. The occupational health risks that such a job entails are great. Operating heavy manual points, sometimes when standing on an uneven surface or working in poor conditions, could lead to lasting damage to the back, neck or shoulders, which not only causes the employee suffering and lost working days, but could also lead to a more serious accident. Thankfully, these are less common, but the rate of RIDDORreportable injuries reported by shunters in 2008 is still nearly twice that of the next highest category, the track worker. RIDDOR-reportable injuries are not something to be taken lightly, and include traumas such as

fractures; amputation; dislocation of the shoulder, hip, knee or spine; temporary or permanent loss of sight; penetrating injury or burn to the eye; electrical shock or burn resulting in unconsciousness; resuscitation or the need for 24 hour hospital admittance; heat or cold induced illness resulting in unconsciousness, resuscitation or the need for 24 hour hospital admittance; unconsciousness caused by asphyxia or any injury that results in workforce lost-time of over three days. Shunters reported a RIDDOR-reportable injury rate of over 20 per 1000 workers per year, compared to only around 7 per 1000 train drivers, and 10 per 1000 track workers. Considering the safety requirements that are put into place across the rail network, that’s significantly higher.

Accidents Research has shown that 25% of the accidents that caused shunters to lose working days were attributed to slips, trips and falls sustained whilst moving between work areas. Of course, part of the shunter’s job can require them to move about in the depot in order to operate hand points and switches. Negotiating rails, www.railsafetysummit.com


The disparity in risk between the shunter and the track worker shows the stark reality facing the industry. Something needs to be done…

ballast, cabling and potential hazards that may be in their way is an occupational hazard, and whilst shunters still have to move around in the depot, these dangers will remain. Fatalities are also a huge concern. Between 1998 - 2008 there were four reported shunter fatalities, all involving FOC shunters who lost their lives whilst working on the ground. Although, when related to the injury rate, the fatality rate is comparably low, the fatality risk for a shunter compared to other railway occupations is still startlingly high. According to data taken from an RSSB survey carried out for the 5½ year period between January 2002 and June 2007, the average fatality risk per worker was 1 in 5,200 for a shunter, compared with 1 in 7,500 for a track worker and only 1 in 28,000 for a train driver. Whilst the comparison with the train driver is somewhat more understandable, the disparity in risk between the shunter and the track worker shows the stark reality facing the industry. Something needs to be done in order to improve safety for shunters.

Solving the problem One of the simplest ways to improve safety is to remove individuals from situations that have www.railsafetysummit.com

proved to be the most dangerous. Recent advances in technology now offer the opportunity to reduce the dangers faced by shunters, with the implementation of systems such as Zonegreen’s Points Convertor. The system has been designed to increase safety and efficiency in railway depots and sidings, and allows the automation and remote operation of manually-operated switches and crossings. It can be controlled by an operator from a remote location using a portable or cabmounted device, removing the need for an individual to have to negotiate difficult terrain, rails or other potential hazards, thus minimising the risk of slips, trips and falls. Such a system allows the shunter to operate the points from a safe distance, thus reducing risk and lowering the accident rate. As well as assisting in the prevention of such accidents, a system such as the Zonegreen Points Convertor also greatly reduces the significant physical strains that shunters face with regards to operating points manually and the lasting damage this can have on the body, particularly the back and neck. In order to change the industry, one of the key considerations is changing the way the people

within it think. Understanding the human factor behind accidents can help the industry as a whole go some way to understanding incidents and implementing new products and guidelines to ensure that the same situation needn’t happen again. Technology such as the Points Convertor from Zonegreen has been developed with the needs of a fast-paced, developing industry in mind and it is clear that, in order to maintain the safety standards that the UK rail industry is proud to uphold, improvements are needed.

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Yesterday’s news

convertor powering your manual points

The Zonegreen Points Convertor is a safe, efficient and reliable solution designed especially for modern train care facilities. The Convertor allows the automation and remote operation of traditional manual points/switches and rail road crossings. • Enhanced safety by reducing the potential for slips, trips and falls. • Increased depot efficiency and speeding up of operations by eliminating stops and starts. • Train detection prevents damage to vehicles and infrastructure through operator error.

• Expandable. Routes can be pre-set, re-configured and upgraded at any time. • Traceability. Includes an event logging system to keep a record of the points operation. • Low cost. • LUL approved.

Find out more at www.zonegreen.co.uk Tel: +44 (0)114 230 0822 Fax: +44 (0)871 872 0349 Email: info@zonegreen.co.uk


Short possessions reduce productivity Carrying out maintenance work on the busiest lines under possession is likely to get more difficult as steps taken to implement a seven day railway continue. An extended timetable means more trains with correspondingly more maintenance work, but shorter possession availability to achieve it. ‘Some delivery units already experience short and unreliable line blockages which impacts on productivity,’ said Chris Foreman. ‘In addition, some contractors have told us that although they pay their track workers for a full shift, they may only get a few hours of productive time on the track. What’s frustrating is that the contractor can see the benefits of using an ATWS system but hasn’t the motivation to use it when the network are happy to pay for the cost inefficiencies’.

productive use of ATwS According to the Swiss Association of Public Transport, there is nowhere in the world where the rail network is so intensively used as Switzerland. At an average of 93 trains per day per kilometre of track there’s no doubt that this is probably the case. However, as train travel continues to increase in the UK, some might argue that several of our main routes are close to capacity and not far behind in terms of train density. With high train density comes the challenge of maintaining the track and gaining safe access without disrupting trains. It might be no surprise then that ATWS is widely used in Switzerland. Automatic Track Warning Systems (ATWS) use train detection devices fixed to the track and deliver a warning to workers through a series of lights and sounders. Providing track access to maintenance personnel, there can be as many as 100 ATWS systems in use at the same time on the Swiss rail network. With a rail network 10 times the size of the Swiss, one might expect there to be similar numbers in use in the UK. However it’s likely www.railsafetysummit.com

that less than five ATWS systems are operating at the same time in this country. So why isn’t ATWS more widely used in the UK? ‘It’s a lot to do with a perception that ATWS is expensive and an inconsistent implementation of RIMINI,’ commented Chris Foreman, General Manager of Schweizer Electronic Ltd. ‘Although ATWS is taught as part of Personal Track Safety (PTS), there’s not enough understanding of what it does and its cost benefits compared to traditional forms of track worker protection.’

High cost of line blockages The cost savings of ATWS can be dramatic when you compare the true cost of using ATWS compared to blocking a line outside a white period. White periods are specific times during the week when no trains are scheduled, and track is available for maintenance work. It is widely reported that if Network Rail blocks a line for maintenance work during a scheduled train service it pays fines to the train operating companies for delays or cancellations. These potential costs, however, rarely seem to be taken into account when comparing the costs of using ATWS as an alternative.

A mistake every 1000 actions Perhaps more concerning than the wasted productivity opportunities are instances where ATWS has not been fully evaluated as an option before reverting to lookouts. With more stringent legislation, one might expect delivery units to be more conscious of proving that appropriate steps have been taken to minimise risks. ‘ATWS providers still come across instances where ATWS could have provided a cost effective form of work protection, taking less than 25% of the total project time to install it,’ continued Chris Foreman. ‘But for whatever reason, an ATWS system was not even considered. An ATWS system rated at SIL3 (Safety Integrity Level 3) only theoretically fails once every 10,000 years, or practically never, whereas a lookout rated at SIL0 is likely to make a mistake every 1000 actions’. With such compelling reasons to use it, how can ATWS providers help the rail industry increase the usage of ATWS and benefit from its safety and productivity improvements? ‘It’s probably just as simple as giving an ATWS provider a chance to quote’ claimed Chris Foreman. ‘We believe that most delivery units that trial ATWS will not want to revert back to the traditional ways of warning track workers. At the moment, most use of ATWS in the UK is concentrated to localised areas of the rail network that tried it and now adopt it for much of their works. With CP5 and future rail maintenance budgets under continued pressure, ATWS could help make significant savings, while maintaining high levels of safety’.

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RAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

YOUR BOSS NEEDS TO WORK NIGHTS AND WEEKENDS FOR SAFETY’S SAKE! SAFETY Colin Wheeler colin@rail-media.com

“Leadership and safety cultures within the industry have long been my chief concern. There is now a new determination to tackle these problems” and a heading of “we must all take our share of the responsibility.” I made these comments in a foreword to a Rail Safety Special issued a year ago in the run up to the annual Rail Safety Summit at Loughborough University. Regrettably, they are still as relevant as we approach this year’s Safety Summit on March 14th! Whether or not my assertion of a “new determination” was true, there has not been a dramatic improvement in the frequencies of accidents and incidents. I still live in hope that one day we will see both the Office of Rail Regulation and the Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) looking for smaller accommodation to house dwindling staff numbers!

Real primary objective The fact is that we have stagnated in our drive towards fewer accidents. I still see placards heralding millions of accident free hours worked and safety posters advocating the achievement of zero!

I have listened to those most at risk on track and on trains who are even more cynical than I. Meanwhile, with the best of intentions, we continue to tweak more and more rules and instructions whilst those doing the real work believe (maybe rightly) that top management’s real primary objective is to get the job done well and quickly without the need to report anything!

Telephone conference calls Large numbers of safety support professionals meanwhile continue to tinker. Network Rail’s laudable safety focussed website now features some good examples. One of their “Life Saving Rules” is “Working with Electricity”. A new guidance pack has been issued to employers prior to a campaign launch on April 30th. Meanwhile, recipients will be able to take part in telephone conference calls using 70 dedicated telephone lines on 28th February, 7th and 8th March. By the time you read this they may all have taken place. I regret the fact that these events have not been done face to face. However good the technology (and I have taken part in video conferencing and used Skype) being able to look into the eyes of others and feel their emotional responses can only be done in person.

Boxes of Eggs In mid-February, Network Rail issued two related Infrastructure Group Safety Bulletins. Number 272 advised of the withdrawal of “Product Acceptance” from the wellknown “Box of Eggs” equipment used for testing that the third rail has been isolated. The proper name for this kit is CRTLS (Conductor Rail Test Lamp Sets) which indicates why they are known as boxes of eggs! Alternatives were phased in during January this year. Not a sophisticated piece of kit, but effective provided it is used as intended by competent individuals with knowledge of its limitations.

Non-rules! Reasonable versus Unreasonable Bulletin 278 is about “Inspection and Work with signalling power

supply systems containing equipment above nominal system voltage of 175 volts”. It draws attention to the following rule, “Work should be carried out with the supply dead, unless it is unreasonable to work dead, and it is reasonable to work live”. I am not sure that is worth setting down. Does it really say anything? Why not simply rely on the other two quoted rules which include the words “never assume, always test before touching” and “don’t do it unless you are trained and have the right equipment”? On reflection I question whether we need either! Safety committed staff will not try and deal with electrical equipment unless they have been trained to do so and always testing before touching is surely a part of the basic competence training of those

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working with electricity on our railways? If this bulletin is of little use to the workforce, for whom was it drafted?

Tyne and Wear Metro South Gosforth On Tuesday January 8th at 14:08 hours near South Gosforth Metro Station (between it and Long Benton) a fire broke out under a two car Metro train. The investigation is looking into the cause of the electrical fault that resulted in the overhead conductor wire parting. After it fell onto the roof of the train, arcing in the under-floor equipment lasting some 45 seconds caused a fire to break out. The result was that “a large amount of smoke entered the rear car”- the 45 passengers used the emergency release handles to open the doors so they could get out onto the track from where Metro staff escorted them all to a place of safety. The initial bulletin says that the RAIB Inquiry will focus on the reasons why the arcing persisted for so long.

Sandilands identified as highest risk The (RAIB) has also issued its report on an accident that happened on May 16th last year when a pedestrian was hit by a Croydon tram approaching a tram stop and seriously injured. The injured lady was using a footcrossing on the approach to Sandilands Tram Stop when she was struck and fell into the space between the platform and the tram. The report comments that risk assessments on foot crossings had www.railsafetysummit.com

been carried out in 2008/9. More were carried out in 2011, including one in May of that year at Sandilands looking specifically at filling in between the rails. Fifty two similar crossings were assessed and Sandilands was identified as having the highest risk of them all. The report says that “London Tramlink chose not to take any action as a result but introduced a 25 kph speed restriction for trams passing over foot crossings on the approach to tram stops”.

Working nights and weekend shifts I am left wondering just when the industry will realise that refining rules, method statements, risk assessments, instructions etc. using more and more words will never alone result in the achievement of zero fatalities and serious accidents. Do I dare to suggest that those who drafted the words used in Network Rail’s Bulletin 278 (the reasonable one), should meet with a group who regularly work in third rail electrified areas and discuss the need for the bulletin and its wording? I recall my early days on bridge design and how a good set of foremen steel-fitters, shutteringjoiners, crane-men and plant operators then taught me the practicalities on site. Minimising the exposure of mainly office-based staff to working red zone on track with trains running is sensible, but those who seek to improve working methods for safety reasons need to understand how the work is done. For this, they need to work a few

complete shifts – both nights and weekends. I did it spending six weeks “on the shovel” as a graduate trainee and I still remember how much I learnt.

Face to Face is always best We are suffering from excess paperwork and form filling which

diverts supervisory and management time away from safety and productivity. A particular bêtenoir of mine is the use of e-mails, video and telephone conferencing. These methods of communication have their place; but they can never be as good as two-way face-to-face communication and anyone who thinks that they can is in the wrong job! If we are serious about reducing accidents and incidents and achieving zero reportable accidents, including fatalities, then the most senior people need to be big personalities who are committed and spend at the very least half of their working hours at the workface being seen, talking with the workforce and listening. These Chief Executives and Managing Directors need to work every kind of shift including nights and weekends. I know of one or two who already do, but sadly only one or two. From personal experience I recommend early Sunday mornings at around 2 to 3 am to see what really goes on!!

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360° interactive media system

14th March 2013, Loughborough University 08:30

Registration

09:20

Opening comments

Colin Wheeler, Host

09:30

A conversation on safety leadership

Dr. Ian Gaskin & Jill Collis, Transport for London

10:00

CIRAS – Its purpose

Paul Russell, CIRAS

10:15

A collaborative approach to improving health and safety

Richard Sharp, Infrastructure Safety Leadership Group

10:30

Q&A

10:45

Coffee break

11:10

Safety strategy - seizing the agenda

Allan Spence, Network Rail

11:30

Workforce safety - the 10 point plan

Emma Head, Network Rail

11:50

Lifesaving rules

Iain Boardman, Network Rail

12:15

Q&A

12:30

Lunch

13:30

The investigation of railway accidents in the UK

Simon French, Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)

13:50

Introduction to the incident factor classification system and the risk from road vehicle driving

Colin Dennis, RSSB

14:10

Complacency – the hidden hazard

Steve Diksa, Bridgeway Consulting Ltd

14:30

Q&A

14:45

Coffee break

15:15

Target Zero – raising safety standards across multiple sites

Darren Selman, Crossrail

15:35

Rolling stock introduction – a collaborative approach to safety strategy

Syd Scrace, Hitachi Rail

15:50

Q&A

16:20

Conference close

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Britain’s last production run steam locomotive was ‘Evening Railways designs were built for mixed traffic operation with

THE FALL AND RISE OF BRITAIN’S RAILwAYS

heavy mineral trains. In the event, the 9Fs were so superbly

trains. Now preserved, ‘Evening Star’ is seen here at York wi

Photographs supplied by Milepost 921⁄2

Part 2: State Ownership and Reparations Colin Garratt reports

The Transport Act of 1947 brought the railway under the aegis of the British Transport Commission, eventually taking the name British Railways…

58

This year sees the fiftieth anniversary of Richard Beeching’s ‘The Re-Shaping of British Railways’. 2013 also sees the thirtieth anniversary of the Serpell Report. These two events mirrored the tempestuous undertones of railway policy in the years following World War Two. In this eight part series, Colin Garratt of Milepost 92½ outlines the turbulent events which led up to the privatisation of British Rail in 1993, concluding with an analysis of the current situation and where it might be heading.

Britain’s railway emerged from world war Two in a devastated state. It had served the nation magnificently during the six year conflict but the cost of restoring the network to pre-war standards was enormous. Massive government spending was essential but this was not forthcoming and inevitably the railway went into a loss making situation which was to haunt it through the turbulent years which lay ahead. The Labour Party had wanted to nationalise the railway since 1908 and the opportunity finally came with the 1945, post war, election victory in which Labour secured a large majority. The Transport Act of 1947 brought the railway under the aegis of the British Transport Commission, eventually taking the name British Railways. The government’s intention was to vest the BTC with all forms of public transport to create a vast monopoly, centrally co-ordinated.

The organisation and operation of the railway was overseen by the Railway Executive which consisted primarily of former railway men. One of the most exciting aspects of the 1947 Transport Act was the nationalisation of the road hauliers to create British Road Services and to dovetail their operations with those of the railways. Only by single ownership was integration possible. The cost of a privately operated, road based economy was, even then, seen as being inefficient and costly, not to mention the heavy toll of fatalities and serious injuries. The grouped companies which had created British Railways (LMS, LNER, SR and GWR) provided an excellent foundation for such aspirations. They were already transport systems in their own right and, prior to World War Two, the LMS alone had owned: 25 docks, harbours and piers; 66 ships; 4,000 lorries with 3,000 trailers; 8,000 horses and 29,000 road vehicles; 25 hotels; 2 tramway systems and 13 canals with 542 route miles. The LMS was also a major partner in railway air services.

Better times ahead British Railways began operating on the 1st January 1948 and at midnight on the 31st December 1947 the drivers of night trains sounded their locomotive whistles in recognition of, what they believed to be, better times ahead. The integration of the railway and road hauliers for the collection and delivery of goods was a bold decisive and dramatic move. The post war Labour government, with its huge majority, was emblazoned with socialist ideals enshrined in such timeless politicians as

Aneurin Bevin who, like other key socialist leaders, had his beliefs galvanised amid the tough world of the South Wales coalfields. Steel and coal were also brought into state ownership along with the railways.

20,000 locomotives British Railways continued to be worked almost entirely by steam and the new administration inherited some 20,000 locomotives, embracing hundreds of different designs. Many of these dated back to pre-grouping times when, prior to the creation of the Big Four in 1923, the nation’s railway network was made up by 120 different companies, all with their own individual designs, many of which were ailing and life expired. This diversity was delightful for railway historians but an anathema from an operational view point. A set of standard designs intended to cover all types of traffic nationwide www.railstaff.co.uk


FEATURE

Star’, one of the standard 9F type 2-10-0s. All the British the exception of the 9Fs which were intended for working balanced that they were equally at home on fast passenger

ith the Scarborough Spa Express.

was envisaged and this gave rise to the locomotive exchanges of 1948 which saw the leading designs of the Big Four tested on each other’s territory. The technical results were closely monitored but not really used in the preparation of twelve standard designs, the first example of which, a Pacific named ‘Britannia’, was exhibited at the Festival of Britain in 1951. The avid building of the standard designs through the 1950s reflected Britain’s intention to continue with steam traction, certainly until the end of the 20th century, despite the fact that it had all but disappeared from other leading economies such as North America and parts of western Europe. The concept of a fully integrated transport system was sadly destined to have a short life and no sooner was the plan in operation than the incoming Tory government of 1953, under the www.railstaff.co.uk

Transport Act of that year, put the road hauliers back in private hands, so opening a can of worms for the railway industry which remains in evidence to this day.

A Scammel Mechanical Horse and trailer, as operated by the Southern Railway during the 1940s.

Railway Boards The 1953 act also broke up the Railway Executive in favour of area railway boards which the new government saw as a better basis for the railway to compete. During its six year existence the Railway Executive had managed to marry together the Big Four into one entity but the Treasury remained reluctant or unable to allocate the necessary capital, rendering financial meetings with the railway’s paymasters ‘cap in hand’ affairs. Clearly the railway could not balance its books without government support. A number of strikes throughout the 1950s bedevilled the industry and played into the hands of the rapidly developing road hauliers

and invoked further financial instability for the railway. The allconquering system that had got Britain through World War Two became regarded by some as a loss making, strike bound industry. Fortunately the railway was still

regarded as essential, unlike Britain’s vast network of electric tramways which faced extinction following the war. One of the BTC’s first acts had been to prepare a railway modernisation plan but this came

59


The dying steam locomotive released hundreds of thousands of tonnes of scrap metal. So monumental was the task that many condemned engines were broken up in private yards like this one at Cohens of Cransley, who’s scrapyard was located on the former ironstone line from Kettering to Loddington.

British Railways emblem adopted upon nationalisation in 1948.

very low in the government’s priority of reconstruction. Also, looming problems of obtaining sufficient quantities of suitable coal for such a large fleet of steam locomotives became increasingly paramount with every passing year. During the early 1950s, the coal industry made it clear that they could not guarantee the railway’s needs. This situation was a major factor in the decision to abandon steam when the Modernisation Plan finally appeared in 1955. The plan was a vast project to refurbish the entire railway, restore its losses and enable it to win back traffic lost to roads and provide for 60

an effective business to compete with road transport. It also spelt the end of steam traction in favour of diesel and electric along with electrification of the busiest trunk route, the West Coast Main Line, between London Euston, Birmingham, Manchester and Liverpool. In the event, steam locomotives, in the form of the standard designs, continued to be built until as late as 1960 and it was ironic that this change of policy served to increase the different designs rather than reduce them. The standard designs were to total 999 locomotives.

Replacement of steam traction

Heavy financial losses

Many informed observers believed that the steam locomotive was such a fundamental aspect of our way of life that it could not possibly disappear until the end of the twentieth century at the earliest. However, BR ran its last mainline steam train in August 1968, after a 13 year witch hunt to be rid of steam at all costs. And the changeover was tortuous with too many untried diesel designs rife with teething problems and frequently needing steam locomotives to come to their rescue. On one occasion, a ‘Peak’ failed on the Settle to Carlisle line and was rescued by a former LMS Midland 4F 0-6-0 which, in its efforts to make up lost time, reached 77 mph! The replacement of steam traction was seen as essential as Britain began cleaning up the scars left on the landscape by the Industrial Revolution. Lancashire needed to look like Buckinghamshire. The railway was seen as a hangover from Victorian times; smoke and fire belching machines running through blackened, soot stained structures did not fit with the white collar revolution of the 1960s.

Car ownership was becoming a national obsession. By 1960, one in nine families had a car with two or even three car families. This demand fanned the road building programme which, in turn, gave rise to rampant heavy trucking and increasingly bigger lorries. Heavy financial losses continued to plague the railway industry through the late 1950s. In 1960 the deficit was £68M - around 1.34 billion in today’s terms - and this had risen to £87M by 1961, equivalent to approximately £1.68 billion. In 1956, the Conservative government stated that, in order to avoid spirals of inflation, every effort would be made to avoid price increases in basic industries. Part of this edict stated that any increases in railway charges should be avoided. The inevitable effect on the railway’s finances need hardly be stated. For some reason, the railway’s deficit received more than its fair share of adverse publicity and the future of the railways became a highly emotive topic. In 1960, the then Tory Prime Minister, Harold MacMillan, told the nation ‘you’ve never had it so good’, earning him the title of Super Mac. But he didn’t mean railways. MacMillan’s Minister of Transport, Earnest Marples, (who had www.railstaff.co.uk


FEATURE

considerable interests in road building) wanted money allocated to railways to go to road development. He determined to put an end to ‘the railway’s financial problems’ and to somehow strip the industry down to a level at which it ceased to lose money. One obnoxious, quick and easy answer to the railway’s problems which permeated the nation over these years was to turn the railway’s Permanent Way into roads; rubber tyres were the way forward! A committee of enquiry even advised Marples to stop work on the 1955 Modernisation Plan, including putting on hold the West Coast Main Line electrification.

Richard Beeching Disturbed by this report, Marples commissioned Richard Beeching, a technical director of ICI, to provide a solution to what he saw as an indefinite government subsidy to the railways. Beeching was appointed Chairman of the BTC in 1961 and Chairman Designate of the newly formed British Railways Board in 1962.

Heavy financial losses continued to plague the railway industry through the late 1950s… Marples, his parliamentary sidekick John Hay and Beeching were all outsiders to the railway and their odious presence in the realms of transport made one long for the aspirational ideals of the post-war Labour government’s integrated public transport system. This was the lowest point in British railway history and the actions of this time did not bode well for the industry. The witches brew which these three men came up with shocked the nation and recalled the rant of the three witches in Shakespeare’s Macbeth: ‘Double double, toil and trouble. Fire burn and cauldron bubble’.

Harold Macmillan, Conservative Prime Minister of Britain from 1957 to 1963, seen here with US President John F. Kennedy.

Depicted here is London route No. 72, Woolwich, New Cross and Victoria.

Part 3: Richard Beeching’s Re-Shaping of British Railways will be published in May.

The proper use of railways. Extra coaches were added to service trains to take school parties. I clearly remember my school booked three coaches from Leicester to London to visit the Festival of Britain in 1951. Most of us enjoyed the railway journey as much as the festival, especially as our train home from St Pancras was hauled by a Jubilee.

www.railstaff.co.uk

61


Swanage – wareham service resumes

Team building

New portal at Victoria Dock

Twenty graduates and apprentices from Invensys Rail have completed a five day training and team building exercise at the Ffestiniog and welsh Highland Railway (F&wHR) in North wales. The group worked on the new signalling system at Porthmadog Harbour station and a range of projects. Says Tim Maynard, a Solutions Architect at Invensys Rail and volunteer on the Ffestiniog Railway, ‘This is a great opportunity for engineers new to the signalling industry to get together as a team and learn some practical skills. ‘During the week away, the group had the opportunity to look behind the scenes of a working railway and also saw a demonstration of the unique ‘railto-rail’ level crossing at Cae Pawb on the Cambrian Coast Line which has been implemented by Network Rail and the F&WHR.’

Construction work is forging ahead on the new Crossrail tunnel portal at Victoria Dock. This will create a 1,000 metre tunnelled section for the new Crossrail route in east London. The Victoria Dock Portal will allow the new Crossrail trains on the existing surface railway from the east to move underground and into Crossrail’s tunnelled section beneath central London. Major engineering works were carried out over the Christmas period with 200 workers moving and renewing 420 metres of Docklands Light Railway (DLR) tracks to create space for the construction of the Victoria Dock Portal. With the DLR tracks moved, work is now underway to build the foundations for the portal structure which is close to Custom House DLR station. More than 700 piles - the columns that will

62

support the portal structures - will be driven into the ground to form the foundations for the 20 metre wide, 371 metre long and 13 metre deep portal. Once the first section of the Victoria Dock Portal has been completed in early 2014, a single tunnel boring machine (TBM) will be launched in summer 2014 from the Limmo Peninsula site near Canning Town, tunnelling its way

41 years after being axed, a regular service connecting Swanage and wareham is set to resume in two years time thanks to a £1.47m grant. Government funding will pay to upgrade track and bridges and two 1960s heritage diesel bus trains to mainline running standards. The Swanage Railway Company says the service will be on the metals by 2015. Says Peter Sills, chairman of Swanage Railway, ‘We are elated at this tremendous and very historic news because the Swanage Railway has been campaigning to bring back regular trains from Swanage and Corfe Castle to Wareham since 1972 when British Rail controversially axed the service.’ Local councils allocated £3.2m for new track and points at Worgret Junction. This was installed by Network Rail in December and will enable passenger trains to use the route. A £500,000 level crossing across the Wytch Farm oil field and a park and ride access road near Corfe Castle are being funded by BP and Perenco.

towards Victoria Dock Portal where it will break-through later in 2014. The TBM will then be taken back to the Limmo site so that it can create a second adjacent tunnel to Victoria Dock Portal, completing a crucial 1km section of the Crossrail route. Once the TBM has departed Victoria Dock, the construction of the remaining sections of the portal structure will continue and will be completed in 2015. www.railstaff.co.uk


NEwS

Tarka Line improvements Ahead of the summer season staff and contractors at Network Rail are carrying out vital improvement work on the Tarka Line between Exeter and Barnstaple during March. The work at Crediton and Barnstaple, with line closure from 10 March to 13 March and on the

weekend of 23 and 24 March, is for track relaying and bridge improvement works near Lapford, and further track renewals in the Umberleigh area and other essential maintenance along the line. The line in North Devon is popular with tourists and local people alike.

Double bonus for west Highlands

From May 2014, the number of trains to and from Oban in the west Highlands will double from three to six trains between Monday and Saturday. Funded by ScotRail, a new early morning service from Oban will reach Glasgow before 09:00, ideal for business travellers. A new evening service will connect with the southbound Caledonian Sleeper at Crianlarich. An additional afternoon service completes the trio. Northbound, a new early morning service will depart Glasgow Queen Street at 05:10, reaching Oban before 09:00,

with two further new departures at 10:37 and 16:37. Says Steve Montgomery, managing director of ScotRail, ‘Our original plan was to run five services a day. However, our early discussions with HITRANS and the Council revealed a compelling case for six each day. So much so, that we decided to fund this ourselves. This 2014 timetable will provide year round connections to the central belt and improved integrated transport options, with good connections to the majority of ferry services and even an opportunity to change at Connel Ferry for Oban airport.’

Conductor praised Keeping calm and keeping passengers informed A conductor on Northern Ireland Railways has been praised for her prompt action after the train she was in charge of hit a car on the track. Stacey Loughlin dealt with the situation with professionalism and courage. Says John Fowle, a passenger on the train, ‘When the Belfast/Londonderry train was hit by a car, Stacey the conductor did a fantastic job. She kept calm, kept everyone informed and dealt with a difficult situation in a professional manner. ‘We were two hours late but given the extent of the damage and the situation, everyone thought that was impressive. Translink staff were on site in moments and we got drinks and www.railstaff.co.uk

snacks which were by then very welcome. Everyone at Translink handled the crisis with good humour and understanding, especially Stacey. Well done.’

Over the past year NI Railways has recorded an average of 10 incidents of misuse at public crossings per month and almost 160 prosecutions have been made - 91 of which have been safety related. In the photo above, Translink NI Railways in partnership with Northern Ireland Fire & Rescue Service conducted a graphic re-enactment of a collision scene to remind pedestrians and motorists of the very serious consequences of trespassing on or near tracks.

63


Avoiding Diabetes Diabetes is on the rise, Dr Mark Vanderpump, of Express Medicals, reports. Type 2 diabetes is the form of diabetes that usually occurs in middle-aged and older persons. It is characterised by elevated blood glucose due to deficiency in the action (i.e. insulin resistance) and secretion of the hormone insulin. It is usually treated by diet, exercise and tablets and may eventually require insulin therapy in some cases. In up to 80% of cases it is associated with obesity.

Increase in obesity The number of people classified as obese has trebled since the 1980s and the projection is we should expect a 10% increase in the number of men who are obese and a 7% increase in the number of women, taking the population estimates up to 1 in 4 being obese in 2012. The increase in obesity has already caused an increase in type 2 diabetes which is expected to also rise significantly in the next 5 to 10 years. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is approximately 7% in London and by 2020 it is estimated to be nearer 10%. Even higher rates may be seen among people from South Asian origin.

Body Mass Index (BMI) The metabolic syndrome describes a collection of abnormalities including abdominal or central obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and fat levels and high blood sugars all of which increase risk of cardiovascular disease. Obesity is usually defined by the body mass index (BMI). This marker of obesity is calculated from the weight in kg divided by height in metres squared. A BMI greater than 30-35kg/m2 is thought to be significantly obese. However the key issue is where you have collected your weight not your total weight. Many patients with type 2 diabetes have a BMI in the slightly overweight range but who have collected significant fat centrally within the abdomen. European men are defined as being centrally obese once their weight circumference is above 37 inches (94cm) and their risk of diabetes is significantly raised once their waist circumference is greater than 40 inches (102cm). The equivalent figures for women are 31.5inches (80cm) and 34.5inches (88cm).

Waist circumference There is now strong evidence that your waist circumference is the first sign of an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The waist circumference is measured around the abdomen at the level of the belly button (umbilicus) and reflects the fat that collects inside the abdomen around the gut. Fat collects here if the insulin hormone which controls carbohydrate metabolism is not working effectively. Most patients assume the fat is collected under the skin (so called “love handles”) but in reality this subcutaneous fat does not differ as much as you might expect between thin and overweight people. This is the reason why the fat removed by liposuction usually reaccumulates within a year. Most men believe that their waist circumference is at least 3 inches less than measured as men are used to wearing their trousers around their hips and clothes manufacturers pamper their egos. 64

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HEALTH NEwS

Exercise The measurement of the waist circumference therefore allows us to identify people at risk of type 2 diabetes. It allows you the chance to stop or slow the progression to type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle modification is key with regular cardiovascular exercise (at least three 45 minute sessions per week) and grabbing every opportunity for exercise in your daily life such as avoiding lifts and walking up stairs etc. There is no doubt that we are eating too much carbohydrate which encourages insulin

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production so make the majority of your diet foods such as chicken, fish, fruit and vegetables and cut back significantly or your portion sizes of bread, pasta, rice and potatoes. If you manage to lose 10kg then you know you will have significantly reduced your blood pressure and cholesterol as well as your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. As there is a strong inheritance in type 2 diabetes (ie if your mother or father has type 2 diabetes then your risk is almost 50%) then there is also the opportunity to encourage the

younger members of your family regarding the benefit of keeping their waist circumference as low as possible as well. Dr Mark Vanderpump is a London-based consultant physician and senior lecturer in diabetes and endocrinology. See www.markvanderpump.co.uk. His email address is drvanderpump@kentmedical.co.uk Dr Vanderpump has provided some training to the medical staff at Express Medicals. See our website: www.expressmedicals.co.uk or call 020 7500 6900.

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eri eed l N cts pe nie y N l N s, ra ie S nd is tag R ew , T ra s, v tr ll an nt a io R Fr & e s st il pe ew Tra tin , R ry Bu ent uct ing d C s, T il O ns, ail eig T, S ub erg e N e, ai s, ra tin Ra ws w g , u in g C il , R ew H l, ec p H R h R ed s, in C ai Ne si s, r S t o a r o R a ag R R O om l I w ne In e, toc mp hn era SE ail t, S tio ys un s, igh ai ail Op om Ind ail e, ai ail pe p nd s, R ss, fra Pe k on ol tio Q, F & ns an d, He S l N Pr er p u B o s l p a r u o , H Hi , R Pr rat ani st ai Ra str pl nd en gy ns, Lig eig T, , S d U Fr rit ee ew oje ati ani try usi t g i u a o S r u e n l c a e , a i d e n s s n H h h l y C je e h ts g s N ne b t R c , B i , g s d n g R , nc rita Sp l N cts C , R Ne us Ev tur Ro om Te ail SE t R t, S atio wa er chi e, H ai Ra , T Co , R ew ss, e e l a a o c hi ge ee w , T m il ws ine n e, lin po h O Q, il & ns ys gr se ig l, il ra m ail s, Ra t R nd se , H d R s, R ra pa In , R ss s, I Peo g S ne nol per Lig , R T, , S an oun Ne h S ai Pro in O 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ri S ro e ies w in n uc , R d s, Op H a S io U un h er ee , R Tr C Ra ws ine ts, , P p e ai ai om i , R s In eo R , S , Su rgr his tag ee ws jec rat , R s, R es ts, tur ol Co Te er SE il, & ns nd d, ise ita d l m c s R Q , T s I R a ai & b o i n l l , t e e, d ng ai a , R n e, in p h , a , S Su er Fr Ne ge a P l O p In ai , R fr pl w u f n ti R R s, N R Fr T, S ay nd ew Hi ai ail Tr C l In il B ai ras Pe g S on ol on Lig il F ta bw gro an ws , H il, roj pe ani du l B ai ast e, R o g , ai ei e o s r c l t e i R e a o s u l l l, g ta s a Fr s, h , R Pr in m du us E tru pl toc nt gy , H ht re ion ay un hi , H gh ai ct rat s, tr si E uc ol ig Ra ht, tion nd an He Spe ai oje O pan str ine ven ct e, R k a s, T , R SE Ra igh s, s a d, se er Sp l N s, T ing Ra y N nes ven tur lin s h i r Q il t, S n F N it S t ur e g i t e s e lN c p e e r i y o n e a s U c io t R l F & , S nd his ita d R e ts, era es, Ne s, R s, I e, lli d ch il O , L , R S ub d U ran ew age ed ws ain Co l In ws , R s, I , P 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rgr e N eri d R il N il P rai om st il B Ev ast , R ock en , R ta n ts a o lo o n re R a r n s o O o d s, e Q il S b U n e e R l g a h a e p ry u e r , P Sto mp gy ra , L Fr & wa n d, N , H ail Pr p mp us R ai str oll an ts, y, tio t R eig s, an un ew ge il, ws roj Op an N si nt uc lli an , T il O ra eo ck on , R tio ig eig T, ys der Fr ew igh N oje era an try ail l E uc ing d C Te Ra ns, ail ht Su d U d, F s, H , H Ra , R ect er ie ew nes s, I tur ng d C ec pe e c t i st pl a en ai ns ht h St an gr an s, N Bu ve tur S om ch il H , R , S bw nd ra e ig il ai s, at s, R s, s, nf e, St om hn ra l a n t H S w ts in es r r T i t O S , h e l o r P n nt uc e, R d C ts, Op HS Ra , S tio d U oun ch er pee s, R , T g C , R ws sin ts e, P oc po nol pe EQ ail & ays erg nc ita S Ne Pr ra ng ai Ra Ra as eo ock po lo tion T, is ra o a g i l Te e i ,I e k w p il & n h t o i g C F n e p s, tu o o n i n l , l d d r r a n E r a a o t I , , s e e e r j s R s e y s, a r o B E u l d , m i o i n o a e g i a l i , R Inf re, lin mp chn ati Q, Ra T, , S er Fr N ge Ra l P n O p l In ai s, R fr pl nd nts y, R tio Lig eig Sta nd un se N , H ed , R ect Op m ndu us ve ct e, R nd nt , R H e u S s a S p u a a e o g L l i s R t i P a ra ta b n ew igh a ail , T era an str ine nts re ol Co , T il EQ r an w , H l, R roj pe ni du B ai st , R Co , T ai ns, ht ht io Un d, i l e g on o ru o m e l il li m e O ec r e ig s u l , u il st op Sto en log s, gh Fr ti wa ou ch s, P r i y , s t H R , S ns d F s

Skyfall Takes The Train

“East Coast is delighted to have worked on such an exciting project…”

KAREN BOSwELL, MANAGING DIRECTOR, EAST COAST

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Stars, producers and writers of ‘Skyfall’, one of the most successful films in cinema history, met at London King’s Cross station to unveil East Coast’s latest named train - SKYFALL. East Coast managing director Karen Boswell joined one of the film’s stars, actresses Naomi Harris pictured left (Moneypenny), producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, and writers Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, to name the train. Class 91 locomotive, 91107, was renumbered 91007 to mark the event. The locomotive, coupled with nine Mark IV carriages and a Driving Van Trailer (set BN29) was unveiled with a specially-designed livery featuring stars of the film and the iconic 007 insignia. The design includes Daniel Craig’s James Bond sliding on his back firing his

infamous Walter PPK pistol, the SKYFALL and 007 insignia, and East Coast’s magenta stripe. Railways feature regularly in Bond novels and movies including From Russia With Love, the Orient Express, The Man With the Golden Gun, Octopussy, The Spy Who Loved Me and Casino Royale. The film was released on Blu-Ray and DVD on Monday 18 February. The Mark IV carriages feature the 007 insignia on both sides and this design has also been replicated in the cafe-bar within the train’s catering vehicle. Says Karen Boswell, ‘East Coast is delighted to have worked on such an exciting project and to have renamed – and renumbered – locomotive 91007 as SKYFALL. We’re thrilled that actors, producers and writers from the latest Bond film joined us to

launch the train at a specially designated Platform 007. ‘They then travelled First Class on-board SKYFALL as it made its way on our prestigious London to Edinburgh route, following in the footsteps of Bond during the film as he travels north to his family home. It’s really exciting to launch an East Coast train as SKYFALL and I am sure our customers will look forward to travelling on it too.’ During its journey, which began at 08.33, 91007 completed a reduced speed crossing over the Royal Border Bridge pictured above, at Berwick-upon-Tweed. Champagne corks were popped to celebrate a scene in the film where Bond crosses the Varda Bridge in Kiralan, Turkey, which bears a passing resemblance to Robert Stephenson’s bridge across the River Tweed.

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us

ROLLING STOCK

Saving hospital honoured

Sportsman and Strictly Come Dancing star Michael Vaughan joined representatives from The Children’s Hospital Charity and East Midlands Trains to name Meridian 222 004 of East Midlands Trains ‘Children’s Hospital Sheffield.’ Staff at Sheffield station have been supporting the charity through fund-raising and auctions, as well as displaying charity promotional materials throughout the station. Owen Wilkinson, former hospital patient and cricket fan, helped name the train. Owen, aged 10 from Barnsley, had his life saved by surgeons at The Children’s Hospital when he had a fall at school and needed emergency surgery for severe bleeding on the brain.   Says Michael Vaughan, ‘I think it’s fantastic that East Midlands Trains have recognised the amazing work that goes on at The Children’s Hospital by naming one of their trains after it. Many people aren’t aware that there are only four dedicated children’s hospitals in the country and we are lucky enough to have one here in Sheffield. You only need to read Owen’s story to see what an extraordinary place it is.’ Owen’s mum Caroline, who is deputy head at Owen’s school, said, ‘Owen insisted he was fine after the fall, but later he became quiet and then started to feel sick. Myself and his class teacher thought it was probably a concussion but that he should be checked out, so I took him to Barnsley Hospital. When I was told Owen had a skull fracture and a severe bleed on the brain, it was as though I was in an imaginary bubble; you never think it will happen to your child. ‘Your initial thoughts are “will he

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survive?” Thankfully the support which staff gave me at Barnsley ensured that I remained positive and took things a step at a time.’

A top team of surgeons operated on Owen. Whilst Caroline and husband Mark awaited news of Owen, who was then eight, they met another couple whose 12-year-old son had also been rushed to surgery – with the very same condition. ‘What was even more incredible was that Mark recognised the other boy’s father from football,’ said Caroline. ‘When we realised that the boys needed the same emergency operation it made us even more anxious about them.’

Due to the dedication of the theatre team who opened two theatres, neurosurgeon Saurabh Sinha and his team were able to operate on the two boys

On Saturday 23rd March 2013 the Bluebell Railway plans to run the first passenger trains in and out of East Grinstead Station since 1958. The Bluebell Railway’s station is adjacent to the Southern Railway station and is linked to it by a footpath enabling passengers to walk the short distance between the two stations. The connection with East Grinstead is the culmination of a 39 year project which has entailed removing a considerable amount of waste from the former municipal tip, placed in the Imberhorne cutting, just south of East Grinstead in the 1960s immediately after the line was Michael Vaughan and Owen Wilkinson.

simultaneously, managing to save both of their lives. ‘When we were told that Owen was out of theatre and being taken to the intensive care unit the relief was unbelievable,’ said Caroline. ‘We were told Owen was a very lucky boy and he was doing really well. It’s amazing we’ve got a specialist hospital nearby. Who knows what could have happened if his journey had been further?

originally closed by British Rail. A special train service will run throughout the day at 45 minute intervals. The first train from East

Saving two lives like that at the same time takes such a highly skilled and dedicated team and we thank them all from the bottom of our hearts. ‘We wouldn’t have Owen today without their care and dedication. These people are special in every way. Dr Sinah and his team are dedicated professionals who go beyond the call of duty and perform miracles on a weekly basis.’

Bluebell Railway reaches East Grinstead

Grinstead will depart at 09:45 and will be formed of 1920s Southern Railway carriages hauled by the E4 Class Locomotive number B473.

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NEwS

English as a foreign language Greater Anglia is trying out an ESOL, English for Speakers of Other Languages, course. The rail industry traditionally attracts staff from all over the world and Europe. Kristine Talberga and Anda Paegle recently completed the course. Kristine and Anda, originally from Latvia, both now work for Greater Anglia in Norwich. Kristine is in customer service and Anda in train presentation. Says Andrew Goodrum, Greater Anglia’s customer service director,

‘I’d like to congratulate Kristine and Anda on completing the course. They have shown great dedication in doing so.’ The course was offered as part of a learning partnership between the trade unions ASLEF, RMT, TSSA, Unite, and the employer Greater Anglia. Trevor Southgate, ASLEF’s learning representative, organised the course, which was provided by City College, Norwich and run at Norwich Station.

Kristine and Anda with their course certificates at Norwich station.

Astute environmentalists at Network Rail are planting trees like rowan, yew, hazel and field maple alongside the railway line in whitstable, replacing those which were recently removed for safety reasons. Says Fiona Taylor, Network Rail’s route managing director for Kent, ‘The original trees were removed as they posed a risk to the stability of the track. These new trees won’t have this potential and won’t shed their leaves onto the tracks either, reducing the risk of delays for passengers in the future.’ Local wildlife will benefit. The embankments provide a valuable natural corridor linking green spaces throughout the district. Local people campaigned to protect the environment. 68

A portrait of Isambard Kingdom Brunel, which once hung in the office of Sir Peter Parker, famed chairman of British Rail, has been handed over to the Brunel Museum in south east London. The museum sits directly above Brunel’s Thames Tunnel which first opened to the public 170 years ago. Commissioned by the late Sir Peter Parker, the portrait hung for many years in the chairman’s private office at Paddington. Since privatisation, British Rail’s residuary body – BRB (Residuary) Ltd − has been quietly arranging for assets like this to be disposed of at auction or designated by the Railway Heritage Committee (RHC) for safe keeping for the nation. Further to a recommendation by RHC, this particular portrait has come back to Brunel’s first project in Rotherhithe, south east London. Sadly, the Committee itself is to be abolished on 31st March this year. However its statutory powers will

be transferred from 1st April to a new Railway Heritage Designation Advisory Board, reporting to the Trustees of the Science Museum Group. Peter Ovenstone - RHC Chairman, and Peter Trewin - BRB Residuary Secretary and Director, presented the picture to Brunel Museum patron Sir William McAlpine and museum director Robert Hulse, who gratefully accepted the gift on behalf of the charity. Also present were Lord Faulkner of Worcester (Richard Faulkner), chairmandesignate of the new Railway Heritage Designation Advisory Board, Sir Howard Newby and Neil Butters, RHC Secretary.

Clapham Junction celebrates 150 years © MATT BUCK

Leaves off the line

British Rail hands over Brunel

Clapham Junction celebrated its 150th anniversary on the 2nd March 1863. 150 years ago the station sat in rural splendour in an area blue with lavender fields and meadows – Lavender Hill is nearby. Since then, Clapham Junction station has attracted an ever greater number of people. Latest figures show over 40 million people using the station every year. Clapham Junction is now one of the busiest stations in Europe, with around 2000 trains passing through the station every day. The station is actually in Battersea – railway companies thought the name of the more prosperous Clapham near by would boost their fortunes. www.railstaff.co.uk


Play your part in railway history Here at the National Railway Museum we are very proud to be recognised as the world’s leading railway museum and the most visited museum outside London with over 800,000 visitors each year. Our visitors come from all over the world because they are fascinated by our collections and the story they represent. As a national charity, we rely on the support of people young and old to preserve and care for our collections now and for the generations to come. One way of supporting our work is to leave a gift to the National Railway Museum in your Will. A legacy gift of any size really does make a huge difference to our work and the future of the Museum. As a Railway Magazine reader, we know that you care as much about our railway heritage as we do, so if and when the time is right for you to include a legacy in your Will, please remember us. The National Railway Museum Development Team • Leeman Road • York • YO26 4XJ • 01904 686 285


NEwS

Foregate Conclusion worcester’s historic Foregate Street railway bridge has been officially reopened following much needed repairs and restoration. First built in 1860 and last replaced in 1906, the bridge, which crosses over the A38, has deteriorated over the years. Ominously, it was placed on Worcester City Council’s heritage-at-risk register. However, inspired work by engineers at Network Rail and J. Murphy & Sons Limited means the Grade-II listed structure is set for many more long years of

service. Says Philip Hanson, Network Rail’s scheme project manager, ‘The Grade-II listed bridge has required extensive work to maintain its structural integrity and return it to its former glory. ‘This has principally involved major steel girder repairs and work to the cast iron façades which will minimise the need for further intrusive maintenance and refurbishment for a number of years to come. It is now a familiar and historical landmark for which Worcester can truly be proud.’

Crossrail’s woolwich box ready Crossrail’s huge station box at woolwich has been completed. The new station box is 256 metres long, 26 metres wide and 18 metres deep. Developer, Berkeley Homes, completed the vast station box four months ahead of schedule. The Woolwich box will act as staging post for the two 1,000 tonne tunnelling machines, Sophia and Mary, that are digging twin bore tunnels from Plumstead, underneath the River Thames to

North Woolwich. Says Andrew Wolstenholme, Crossrail chief executive, ‘Berkeley Homes has completed the station box at Woolwich ahead of schedule, allowing Crossrail to get the site ready for the arrival of our thousand tonne tunnelling machine this spring.’ Crossrail staff plan to hold a charity fun run within the box, raising money for Demelza House Children’s Hospice. Berkeley Homes will begin the planned construction of 585 homes on the station box site later this year, of which at least 165 will be affordable homes. Retail and commercial space will be created contributing to the significant rail regeneration of Woolwich.

Name Czech for Railsport cyclists Rail cyclists are ramping up training as the evenings lighten in preparation for the next Railsport Cycling event, a road race at Oakley, Buckinghamshire, on Saturday 6th July 2013. Interest is high after a stirring performance by the team last year in the Czech Republic at the USIC (Union Sportif International De Cheminots) Railways Cycling World Championships at the northern city of Usti Nad Labem. A team of six from the rail industry in Britain travelled to compete against teams from other railways. The event consisted of three stages over four days against the best railway riders from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, India, Italy, Kazakhstan, Norway, Poland & Switzerland. Representing Railsport GB were: Greg Ashley (London Underground); Ian Cooper (Chiltern Railways); Rupert Denny (Network Rail - Dependant); Steven Golla (Morgan Sindall); David Nicoll (Thales); Daniel Smith (URS Infrastructure & Environment UK). 70

Stage One was a 55.3km Team Time Trial of three laps on an out-and-back circuit near Tremice in the southern suburbs of Usti Nad Labem. Great Britain were seventh in 1 hr 19 min 44 sec. Following a 30 degree heatwave the previous day, the start of Stage Two was drenched with torrential rain and a rather chilly 10 degrees. Ahead of the riders was a mountainous 85km circuit near Telnice on the German border. Early attacks from the French and Kazahkstan teams whittled the race down into a number of small groups with strong performances near the front by British riders Rupert Denny and Steve Golla. Three Kazahkstan riders finished on the podium. The first British rider to appear through the mist at the finish was Steve Golla in an excellent 17th place. Thankfully the weather and terrain improved again for the final stage - a 36km individual time trial on the Tremice circuit won by the French, with Steve Golla in 12th place in a time of 25

min 13 sec. The individual USIC champion 2012 was Frenchman Yohan Soubes, with top UK rider Steve Golla in a great tenth overall, the highest place ever for a GB rider. Overall the event was won by France, with Italy second and Czech Republic third. The Railsport Great Britain team also finished in their highest place ever, in a creditable seventh. The team wishes to thank Costain Hochtief JV, URS, Railsport GB and Thales for their support and sponsorship of the Railsport Team at the event. www.railstaff.co.uk


A soggy piece of toast? A hastily-grabbed bowl of cereal? A cold cup of coffee?

The UK railway industry will be stopping for the special Big Breakfast on 12 April 2013, all in aid of charity Railway Children and the International Day for Street Children. Railway Children is asking you to think big and come up with some egg-cellent fundraising ideas for a Big Breakfast with your work colleagues; if you’ve always wanted to see how many pancakes you can eat in one hour, to have a grown-up egg and spoon race at work or to paint eggs as your favourite celebrities, have a sponsored Big Breakfast! All funds raised will help make a difference to the lives of street children in the UK, India and East Africa. Already signed up for their own Big Breakfast events are East Coast Trains, Chiltern Railways, South West Trains, London Midland and Unipart Rail. Terina Keene, Chief Executive, Railway Children, said: “The Big Breakfast is a great day for our railway partners to come together and hold fundraising events in support

of Railway Children and the International Day for Street Children. Every penny from this campaign will be spent on worthwhile projects and go a long way towards helping street children have a better future; every year, thousands of children across the world run away or are forced to leave home because of unbearable poverty, abuse, violence or neglect. On 12 April, that morning – like every other – these children will wake up on the streets hungry and afraid. For most of them, breakfast that day will be just another meal they miss. “Railway Children provides protection and opportunity for children with nowhere else to go and nobody to turn to. Every day we fight to change their story. You can join our fight too by taking part in the Big Breakfast.” Vanessa Unwin, Internal Communications Business Manager, East Coast Trains, added: “We are delighted to be holding a Big Breakfast in support of Railway Children and the International Day for Street Children on 12 April. It’s a great way for our staff to get involved with our chosen charity and have fun raising lots of money in the process..”

A charity fundraising campaign in April wants you to have a Big Breakfast for one morning with your colleagues, helping to raise essential funds to change the lives of street children at home, and abroad.

Here’s how you can get involved: • Talk to your colleagues and ask them to join you in your Big Breakfast event. • Contact the Big Breakfast team at Railway Children and let them know about your event – bigbreakfast@railwaychildren.org.uk, telephone: 01270 757596. • Visit www.railwaychildren.org.uk/bigbreakfast to download your sponsorship forms, posters and press release templates. • Advertise – tell everyone you know about your Big Breakfast; contact your local media; publicise on your staff intranet, and social media channels. • Hold your event; if you’re scratching your head over what to do, here’s some tasty tips! 1)

A sponsored fast before your Big Breakfast

2) 3) 4) 5)

Wear pyjamas to work for the day Egg painting Eating challenges – man/woman Vs food! Breakfast Bake-Off

6) 7) 8) 9)

Egg and spoon race Bring and Buy Breakfast A swear teapot – naughty! A pancake flipping race

10) Russian ‘Omelette’ with a mixture of hardboiled and raw eggs – dare you play? • Collect in the money you have made from sponsorship / donations, and send to Railway Children. www.railwaychildren.org.uk/bigbreakfast

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CAREERS

IRSE Fitters, Testers and Installers

MSD

CONSTRUCTION

UK. LTD

ROUTEWORK GANGS REQUIRED MSD is looking for ready-made gangs for new projects nationwide. Due to our rapidly expanding rail business, SCUK Ltd require the following for short and long term project work covering The Western Region Areas: • IRSE Licensed Testers • Installers & Assistant Installers • IRSE Points Fitters • IRSE Team Leaders

Please forward your CV to: signallingconstruction@fsmail.net

Each gang must have 5-6 members and include the following: At least 1 x COSS 2 x LOOKOUTS 1 x 3/4-day first-aider 2 x cat scanners Small tools tickets Each gang must be experienced in troughing and cable works.

Signalling Construction UK Ltd.

Full gangs only please apply. Call 01709 878988 or email jobs@msdconstruction.com

www.msdconstruction.com MSD Construction (UK) Ltd, Manvers House, Pioneer Close, Wath upon Dearne, Rotherham, South Yorkshire, S63 7JZ.

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CAREERS

www.trsstaffing.com

Rail and Infrastructure Vacancies

Thermic Welders, Thermic Assistants, GSMs & Hand Grinders

TRS Staffing Solutions are international engineering recruitment specialists. We recruit for major National and International projects for leading National Rail organisations, main contractors and consultancies. Currently we have vacancies for the following:

Principal Civil/Structural Engineers (CRE)

Rail Environmental Engineers & Managers

London, Birmingham, Warrington & York - £50 - 60K or £350 - £450/day Rail experience including station, platform & bridge designs

London, Manchester & Birmingham £32 - 50K or £200 - 350/day Develop strategy and processes, monitor standards

Senior E&P/OLE Design/Project Engineers

Rail Quantity Surveyors & Estimators

UK wide - £45 - 70K or £400 - £550/day HV, Traction Power, AC/DC or construction experience

London, Barnsley & Cardiff£40-50K or £300 - 350/day Rail & Signalling experience

Rail Project & Programme Managers

Signalling/Telecom Project Engineer

London & Midlands - £50 - 75K Experience on rail & infrastructure projects

London, Birmingham & York £350-450/day FTN, GSM-R or Signalling (mainline) experience

Please send your CV or if you’d prefer to discuss a role in more detail and in confidence, please contact one of our specialist consultants on

+44 (0)20 7419 5800 or email rail@trsstaffing.com

Salary - £155 - £165 / 8 hr shift (Between 5 - 7 shifts per week) Good rates of pay & conditions. To apply, or for more information, please email fernando.cestari.gpx@ccs-group.co.uk

Rail, Infrastructure & Construction

TRS_NEWBrand_MarchAdvert2013.indd 1

Thermic Welders & Assistants / MMA Welders / GSMs and Hand Grinders, required for 5 year contract on London Underground and Network Rail.

04/03/2013 16:30

Head of Rail Business Development and Bid Management South Yorkshire c£60,000 - £70,000 plus other benefits

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As a substantial and growing civil engineering and infrastructure maintenance business in the UK rail industry, our client seeks to strengthen its' management team with the appointment of a senior level business development professional. The market is now offering many opportunities for development and our client intends to build upon its' success in recent years.

» Take ownership of strategic market intelligence initiatives and the delivery of business promotional activities » Manage tender feedback and input into post-tender analysis » Develop and implement an integrated submissions and proposals process across all functions

The key aspects of the role include: » Develop and deliver a strategic plan for business growth with new and existing clients » Lead the bidding processes, acting as Bid Manager as required, on major rail tenders » Ensure the quality of all proposals and submissions to clients and chair key tender and progress discussions

Candidates will have: » A track record of success in business development and knowledge of the multidisciplinary rail industry, particularly Network Rail » The ability to influence at senior levels and build strong relations » Experience of rail projects and knowledge of the civil engineering contract environment

“An outstanding opportunity to join a successful and well established business that has a strong sector reputation and is part of a UK quoted group of companies”

» Demonstrable commercial acumen with an enthusiastic and determined approach » Good personal skills in communication and presentation This is a business critical, professional level role reporting to the Managing Director and so relevant academic qualifications will be appreciated although the ability to exert influence in the rail industry will be equally beneficial. Please forward your cv and covering letter to enquiries@rgsexecutive.co.uk or call on 0115 959 9687 with any queries. www.rgsexecutive.co.uk

www.railstaff.co.uk


ARE YOU LOOKING FOR

Great opportunities with a fast moving company

Signalling Solutions is a company formed by combining the complementary signalling resources and products of Alstom Transport Information Solutions UK and Balfour Beatty Rail Projects. We provide individual products and complete solutions to any customer requiring design, installation, testing, commissioning and product support for signalling, power and telecommunications applications in the UK. With an unparalleled product range that includes UK compatible and approved equipment with cutting edge ERTMS and Traffic Management systems already in use across Europe, and a mounting order book, we have an exciting future that we want to share with you. Due to our growing reputation within the industry for delivering major projects, we continue to win new and exciting contracts UK wide. In order to deliver these projects Signalling Solutions has a range of exciting and demanding career opportunities.

something new?

Come and visit us at Railtex stand E21 or book a time to have a chat with us!

If you are looking for a new challenge and want to make a real contribution to the success of our business, we have opportunities in the following disciplines: • Design • Project Management • Project Engineering • Systems Engineering • Testing We’re seeking candidates who are keen to develop their skills and who can match our enthusiasm for success. In return for your commitment and contribution, you can expect an excellent package and the opportunity to shape your career the way that you want, with training, development and career planning. Please apply by sending your CV torecruitment@signallingsolutions.com

All the above positions have the following benefits: We offer a competitive salary plus a range of benefits including a contributory pension and 25 days holiday. For further information, or to make an application: Tel: +44 (0)1332 262179 email: recruitment@signallingsolutions.com

a Balfour Beatty and Alstom UK company


Drugs & Alcohol Testing: How does this impact on your organisation? 24th April 2013 – 1.30pm ~ Imperial College, London Imperial College London has organised an Occupational Drugs and Alcohol Testing Conference and Express Medicals is delighted to be the official sponsor. The conference will include: • Dr Genevieve Boshoff: Introduction to the principles of Point of Care Testing (PoCT) devices. • Dr Simon Davis: Introduction to 'real world' applications of PoCT devices. • Michalakis Michael (Toxicologist): A Case Study on the advantages and disadvantages of PoCT. • Dr Peter Feldschreiber (Barrister): The legal implications of workplace drug testing with particular reference to PoCT. • Question and Answer Session. We warmly invite you to attend this highly informative event. To reserve your place at the event simply email: workhealth@expressmedicals.co.uk or call the Express Medicals team on 020 7500 6901 with any further questions you might have.

Marketing and Sales Team

020 7500 6901 www.expressmedicals.co.uk


RailStaff March 2013