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Utah’s News & Entertainment Magazine for the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community | FREE

salt lake Issue 163 September 16 2010

TREVOR SOUTHEY’S LIFE IN ART McAdams vs. Nimer in Senate 2

Cedar City the Next Common Ground City?

Layton PFLAG Starts Up

Salt Lake Consignment Shops


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publisher/editor Michael Aaron

busine aiance

The Q Business Alliance is starting up next month and all gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and ally business owners are invited to join and network with us. Corporations, small businesses, sole proprietors and independent agents are welcome to join, regardless of sexual orientation.

JOIN US AT OUR

first social event AT

FRIDAY

september 17 FROM 5:30 TO 8PM

FOOD, DRINKS, DOOR PRIZES, DJ MATT FREE B-12 SHOTS FREE FIRST LASER HAIR REMOVAL TREATMENT (lip, underarm or neck) RAFFLE PRIZES ART EXHIBITION OF JOSHUA L. JOHNSTON FREE AND OPEN TO ALL QSALTLAKE READERS

assistant editor JoSelle Vanderhooft arts & entertainment editor Tony Hobday graphic designer Christian Allred contributors Chris Azzopardi, Lynn

Beltran, Turner Bitton, Dave Brousseau, Brad Di Iorio, Chef Drew Ellswroth, Greg Fox, H. Rachelle Graham, Bob Henline, Tony Hobday, Christopher Katis, Keith Orr, Petunia Pap-Smear, Anthony Paull, Steven Petrow, Hunter Richardson, Ruby Ridge, Ryan Shattuck, A.E. Storm, JoSelle Vanderhooft, Ben Williams, Troy Williams, D’Anne Witkowski, Rex Wockner contributing photographers Ted Berger, Eric Ethington, Honey Rachelle Graham, Chris Lemon, Brent Marrott, Carlos Navales, Scott Perry, Deb Rosenberg, Chuck Wilson sales manager Brad Di Iorio office manager Tony Hobday distribution Brad Di Iorio, Ryan Benson, Gary Horenkamp, Nancy Burkhart publisher

Salt Lick Publishing, LLC 1055 East 2100 South, ste 206 Salt Lake City, Utah 84106 tel: 801-649-6663 toll-free: 1-800-806-7357 for general information:

info@qsaltlake.com for editorial queries:

editor@qsaltlake.com QSaltLake is a trademark of Salt Lick Publishing, LLC. Copyright © 2010, Salt Lick Publishing LLC. All rights reserved. No material may be reprinted or reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Copies of

QSaltLake are distributed free of charge in 200 locations across Utah and in Idaho

QSaltLake.com/QBA

for more info and an online application to join.

and Nevada. Free copies are limited to one per person. For additional copies, contact us at 801-649-6663. It is a crime to destroy or dispose of current issues or otherwise interfere with the distribution of this newsmagazine. Publication of the name or

T H E

B E N E F I T S

Monthly Business Breakfasts

Each third Friday of the month, a themed breakfast will be held at various restaurants in the Greater Wasatch Front with guest speakers and the ability to introduce your business and hand out company literature to other owners and professionals

O F

photograph of any individual or organiza-

J O I N I N G :

Monthly After-Work Socials

Meet and mingle with other entrepreneurs and professionals, as well as QSaltLake readers, at different businesses in the valley

Service Guide Ads

Expose your business to thousands of QSaltLake readers with a listing or display ad in the Service Guide on the first Friday of each month.

2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Online Exposure through QSaltLake.com QSaltLake readers turn to our web site for help finding services in the community. They can be referred to your web site in a click of a button.

Member Newsletter Promote your business, introduce new products and announce upcoming events to other Alliance members

Swag Bags Place marketing materials or samples in highly-sought “swag” bags or at tables at large community events through the year More We will be announcing more opportunities for members as the Alliance grows

tion in articles or advertising in QSaltLake is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of such persons. Printed in the U.S.A. QSALTLAKE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/QSALTLAKE MYSPACE.COM/QSALTLAKE


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Q staff

publisher/editor Michael Aaron

busine aiance

The Q Business Alliance is starting up next month and all gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and ally business owners are invited to join and network with us. Corporations, small businesses, sole proprietors and independent agents are welcome to join, regardless of sexual orientation.

JOIN US AT OUR

first social event AT

FRIDAY

september 17 FROM 5:30 TO 8PM

FOOD, DRINKS, DOOR PRIZES, DJ MATT FREE B-12 SHOTS FREE FIRST LASER HAIR REMOVAL TREATMENT (lip, underarm or neck) RAFFLE PRIZES ART EXHIBITION OF JOSHUA L. JOHNSTON FREE AND OPEN TO ALL QSALTLAKE READERS

assistant editor JoSelle Vanderhooft arts & entertainment editor Tony Hobday graphic designer Christian Allred contributors Chris Azzopardi, Lynn

Beltran, Turner Bitton, Dave Brousseau, Brad Di Iorio, Chef Drew Ellswroth, Greg Fox, H. Rachelle Graham, Bob Henline, Tony Hobday, Christopher Katis, Keith Orr, Petunia Pap-Smear, Anthony Paull, Steven Petrow, Hunter Richardson, Ruby Ridge, Ryan Shattuck, A.E. Storm, JoSelle Vanderhooft, Ben Williams, Troy Williams, D’Anne Witkowski, Rex Wockner contributing photographers Ted Berger, Eric Ethington, Honey Rachelle Graham, Chris Lemon, Brent Marrott, Carlos Navales, Scott Perry, Deb Rosenberg, Chuck Wilson sales manager Brad Di Iorio office manager Tony Hobday distribution Brad Di Iorio, Ryan Benson, Gary Horenkamp, Nancy Burkhart publisher

Salt Lick Publishing, LLC 1055 East 2100 South, ste 206 Salt Lake City, Utah 84106 tel: 801-649-6663 toll-free: 1-800-806-7357 for general information:

info@qsaltlake.com for editorial queries:

editor@qsaltlake.com QSaltLake is a trademark of Salt Lick Publishing, LLC. Copyright © 2010, Salt Lick Publishing LLC. All rights reserved. No material may be reprinted or reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Copies of

QSaltLake are distributed free of charge in 200 locations across Utah and in Idaho

QSaltLake.com/QBA

for more info and an online application to join.

and Nevada. Free copies are limited to one per person. For additional copies, contact us at 801-649-6663. It is a crime to destroy or dispose of current issues or otherwise interfere with the distribution of this newsmagazine. Publication of the name or

T H E

B E N E F I T S

Monthly Business Breakfasts

Each third Friday of the month, a themed breakfast will be held at various restaurants in the Greater Wasatch Front with guest speakers and the ability to introduce your business and hand out company literature to other owners and professionals

O F

photograph of any individual or organiza-

J O I N I N G :

Monthly After-Work Socials

Meet and mingle with other entrepreneurs and professionals, as well as QSaltLake readers, at different businesses in the valley

Service Guide Ads

Expose your business to thousands of QSaltLake readers with a listing or display ad in the Service Guide on the first Friday of each month.

2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Online Exposure through QSaltLake.com QSaltLake readers turn to our web site for help finding services in the community. They can be referred to your web site in a click of a button.

Member Newsletter Promote your business, introduce new products and announce upcoming events to other Alliance members

Swag Bags Place marketing materials or samples in highly-sought “swag” bags or at tables at large community events through the year More We will be announcing more opportunities for members as the Alliance grows

tion in articles or advertising in QSaltLake is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of such persons. Printed in the U.S.A. QSALTLAKE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/QSALTLAKE MYSPACE.COM/QSALTLAKE


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Q staff

publisher/editor Michael Aaron

busine aiance

The Q Business Alliance is starting up next month and all gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and ally business owners are invited to join and network with us. Corporations, small businesses, sole proprietors and independent agents are welcome to join, regardless of sexual orientation.

JOIN US AT OUR

first social event AT

FRIDAY

september 17 FROM 5:30 TO 8PM

FOOD, DRINKS, DOOR PRIZES, DJ MATT FREE B-12 SHOTS FREE FIRST LASER HAIR REMOVAL TREATMENT (lip, underarm or neck) RAFFLE PRIZES ART EXHIBITION OF JOSHUA L. JOHNSTON FREE AND OPEN TO ALL QSALTLAKE READERS

assistant editor JoSelle Vanderhooft arts & entertainment editor Tony Hobday graphic designer Christian Allred contributors Chris Azzopardi, Lynn

Beltran, Turner Bitton, Dave Brousseau, Brad Di Iorio, Chef Drew Ellswroth, Greg Fox, H. Rachelle Graham, Bob Henline, Tony Hobday, Christopher Katis, Keith Orr, Petunia Pap-Smear, Anthony Paull, Steven Petrow, Hunter Richardson, Ruby Ridge, Ryan Shattuck, A.E. Storm, JoSelle Vanderhooft, Ben Williams, Troy Williams, D’Anne Witkowski, Rex Wockner contributing photographers Ted Berger, Eric Ethington, Honey Rachelle Graham, Chris Lemon, Brent Marrott, Carlos Navales, Scott Perry, Deb Rosenberg, Chuck Wilson sales manager Brad Di Iorio office manager Tony Hobday distribution Brad Di Iorio, Ryan Benson, Gary Horenkamp, Nancy Burkhart publisher

Salt Lick Publishing, LLC 1055 East 2100 South, ste 206 Salt Lake City, Utah 84106 tel: 801-649-6663 toll-free: 1-800-806-7357 for general information:

info@qsaltlake.com for editorial queries:

editor@qsaltlake.com QSaltLake is a trademark of Salt Lick Publishing, LLC. Copyright © 2010, Salt Lick Publishing LLC. All rights reserved. No material may be reprinted or reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Copies of

QSaltLake are distributed free of charge in 200 locations across Utah and in Idaho

QSaltLake.com/QBA

for more info and an online application to join.

and Nevada. Free copies are limited to one per person. For additional copies, contact us at 801-649-6663. It is a crime to destroy or dispose of current issues or otherwise interfere with the distribution of this newsmagazine. Publication of the name or

T H E

B E N E F I T S

Monthly Business Breakfasts

Each third Friday of the month, a themed breakfast will be held at various restaurants in the Greater Wasatch Front with guest speakers and the ability to introduce your business and hand out company literature to other owners and professionals

O F

photograph of any individual or organiza-

J O I N I N G :

Monthly After-Work Socials

Meet and mingle with other entrepreneurs and professionals, as well as QSaltLake readers, at different businesses in the valley

Service Guide Ads

Expose your business to thousands of QSaltLake readers with a listing or display ad in the Service Guide on the first Friday of each month.

2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Online Exposure through QSaltLake.com QSaltLake readers turn to our web site for help finding services in the community. They can be referred to your web site in a click of a button.

Member Newsletter Promote your business, introduce new products and announce upcoming events to other Alliance members

Swag Bags Place marketing materials or samples in highly-sought “swag” bags or at tables at large community events through the year More We will be announcing more opportunities for members as the Alliance grows

tion in articles or advertising in QSaltLake is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of such persons. Printed in the U.S.A. QSALTLAKE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/QSALTLAKE MYSPACE.COM/QSALTLAKE


I

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O

D

U

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I

N

G

T

H

E

Q staff

publisher/editor Michael Aaron

busine aiance

The Q Business Alliance is starting up next month and all gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and ally business owners are invited to join and network with us. Corporations, small businesses, sole proprietors and independent agents are welcome to join, regardless of sexual orientation.

JOIN US AT OUR

first social event AT

FRIDAY

september 17 FROM 5:30 TO 8PM

FOOD, DRINKS, DOOR PRIZES, DJ MATT FREE B-12 SHOTS FREE FIRST LASER HAIR REMOVAL TREATMENT (lip, underarm or neck) RAFFLE PRIZES ART EXHIBITION OF JOSHUA L. JOHNSTON FREE AND OPEN TO ALL QSALTLAKE READERS

assistant editor JoSelle Vanderhooft arts & entertainment editor Tony Hobday graphic designer Christian Allred contributors Chris Azzopardi, Lynn

Beltran, Turner Bitton, Dave Brousseau, Brad Di Iorio, Chef Drew Ellswroth, Greg Fox, H. Rachelle Graham, Bob Henline, Tony Hobday, Christopher Katis, Keith Orr, Petunia Pap-Smear, Anthony Paull, Steven Petrow, Hunter Richardson, Ruby Ridge, Ryan Shattuck, A.E. Storm, JoSelle Vanderhooft, Ben Williams, Troy Williams, D’Anne Witkowski, Rex Wockner contributing photographers Ted Berger, Eric Ethington, Honey Rachelle Graham, Chris Lemon, Brent Marrott, Carlos Navales, Scott Perry, Deb Rosenberg, Chuck Wilson sales manager Brad Di Iorio office manager Tony Hobday distribution Brad Di Iorio, Ryan Benson, Gary Horenkamp, Nancy Burkhart publisher

Salt Lick Publishing, LLC 1055 East 2100 South, ste 206 Salt Lake City, Utah 84106 tel: 801-649-6663 toll-free: 1-800-806-7357 for general information:

info@qsaltlake.com for editorial queries:

editor@qsaltlake.com QSaltLake is a trademark of Salt Lick Publishing, LLC. Copyright © 2010, Salt Lick Publishing LLC. All rights reserved. No material may be reprinted or reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Copies of

QSaltLake are distributed free of charge in 200 locations across Utah and in Idaho

QSaltLake.com/QBA

for more info and an online application to join.

and Nevada. Free copies are limited to one per person. For additional copies, contact us at 801-649-6663. It is a crime to destroy or dispose of current issues or otherwise interfere with the distribution of this newsmagazine. Publication of the name or

T H E

B E N E F I T S

Monthly Business Breakfasts

Each third Friday of the month, a themed breakfast will be held at various restaurants in the Greater Wasatch Front with guest speakers and the ability to introduce your business and hand out company literature to other owners and professionals

O F

photograph of any individual or organiza-

J O I N I N G :

Monthly After-Work Socials

Meet and mingle with other entrepreneurs and professionals, as well as QSaltLake readers, at different businesses in the valley

Service Guide Ads

Expose your business to thousands of QSaltLake readers with a listing or display ad in the Service Guide on the first Friday of each month.

2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Online Exposure through QSaltLake.com QSaltLake readers turn to our web site for help finding services in the community. They can be referred to your web site in a click of a button.

Member Newsletter Promote your business, introduce new products and announce upcoming events to other Alliance members

Swag Bags Place marketing materials or samples in highly-sought “swag” bags or at tables at large community events through the year More We will be announcing more opportunities for members as the Alliance grows

tion in articles or advertising in QSaltLake is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of such persons. Printed in the U.S.A. QSALTLAKE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/QSALTLAKE MYSPACE.COM/QSALTLAKE


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GAINING GROUND Presented by Bruce Bastian and Jane & Tami Marquardt

T U E S D AY, S E P T E M B E R 2 8 , 2 0 1 0 Salt Palace Grand Ballroom 5:30pm Capitol Club Private Reception 6pm Cocktails | 7pm Dinner | Dress Sharp

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B e n e f i t i n g E q u a l i t y U t a h ’s Po l i t i c a l Ac t i o n Co m m i t te e : Wo r k i n g to e l e c t fa i r - m i n d e d c a n d i d ate s 4 | QSa lt L a k e | issue 161 | Augus t 18 , 2010


KINGSBURY HALL PRESENTS Don’t miss this all-new entertainment experience combining the classic Lon Chaney film with a rock musical theatre production!

VOX LUMIERE

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA ROCK MUSICAL MEETS SILENT FILM IN THIS NEW PRODUCTION!

October 8 | 7:30 pm Tickets: 801-581-7100 I www.kingtix.com

Tickets starting at $29.50 TM

U of U Discounts Available


NATIONAL NEWS

BY REX WOCKNER

Federal Judge Strikes Down Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips in Riverside, Calif., struck down the military’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell ban on open gays in the military Sept. 9. Phillips found that the ban violates the U.S. Constitution’s guarantees of free speech and due process under the First and Fifth Amendments. “The Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Act infringes the fundamental rights of United States servicemembers in many ways,” Phillips wrote in her 86-page opinion. “The Act denies homosexuals serving in the Armed Forces the right to enjoy ‘intimate conduct’ in their personal relationships. The Act denies them the right to speak about their loved ones while serving their country in uniform; it punishes them with discharge for writing a personal letter, in a foreign language, to a person of the same sex with whom they shared an intimate relationship before entering military service; it discharges them for including information in a personal communication from which an unauthorized reader might discern their homosexuality. In order to justify the encroachment on these rights, defendants faced the burden at trial of showing the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Act was necessary to significantly further the government’s important interests in military readiness and unit cohesion. Defendants failed to meet that burden.” Phillips said the government’s contention that letting gays be open in the military harms its functioning is fully undermined by the fact that the military delays discharge of gays and lesbians who violate DADT until they return from combat deployment. The six-year-old case, brought by the gay group Log Cabin Republicans, was heard without a jury in July. Phillips said she will issue a permanent injunction prohibiting the military from enforcing Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. She gave LCR until Sept. 16 to submit proposed language for the injunction and gave the U.S. government until Sept. 23 to respond to LCR’s submission. “She could at that point stay the injunction pending an appeal or, as Judge (Vaughn) Walker did (in the federal Prop 8 case), she could deny such a stay but grant a temporary stay to allow the government to seek a stay pending an appeal from the 9th Circuit,” said Jon Davidson, legal director of Lambda Legal. If no stay is issued, it is unclear whether Phillips’ ruling would take effect nationwide or just in California’s Central District of the federal courts. “This is an historic moment and an historic ruling for the gay military community,” said Servicemembers United Executive Director Alexander Nicholson, who was kicked out of the Army under DADT. “As the only named injured party in this case, I am

exceedingly proud to have been able to represent all who have been impacted and had their lives ruined by this blatantly unconstitutional policy. We are finally on our way to vindication.” Gay activists responded to the ruling by calling on President Barack Obama to cease enforcement of DADT immediately and demanding that the U.S. Justice Department decline to appeal Phillips’ decision.

tantamount to a daily dose of torture,” commented National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Executive Director Rea Carey. “In too many cases, harassment, taunting and abuse are allowed to go on unabated in our nation’s schools. We have repeatedly seen the tragic consequences of this pervasive problem: Young people are left emotionally damaged, physically hurt, or feel they have no other option than to take their own lives out of hopelessness and despair. Youth who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender — or simply perceived to be — are often the targets of this abuse. Today, New York said enough is enough.” Fifteen states and the District of Columbia have enacted similar laws to protect gay/lesbian and, in some cases, transgender students.

California Supremes Rebuff Prop 8 Proponents

New York Governor David Paterson

N.Y. Governor Signs Law Protecting LGBT students New York Gov. David Paterson signed a bill Sept. 7 protecting students in New York public schools from bias-based bullying and discrimination. He signed the legislation in a ceremony at the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center in New York City. “The Dignity for All Students Act will provide important new safeguards to ensure that schools are places where students can concentrate on learning and personal growth, not on avoiding taunting or violence,” said Ross Levi, executive director of the Empire State Pride Agenda. The new law targets harassment based on race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity and expression. It requires teacher training on discouraging bias-based harassment, inclusion in coursework of discrimination and harassment awareness, and reporting of bias incidents to the state Education Department. The law marks the first time New York state has legislated explicit protections for transgender people. A 2007 study by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network found that 33 percent of LGBT students skip school in any given month because they fear for their safety, compared with only 4.5 percent of the general student population. “For some young people, going to school is

6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

The forces that want to keep Proposition 8, the voter-passed constitutional amendment that re-banned same-sex marriage in California, can’t catch a break. The state Supreme Court on Sept. 7 slapped down an effort by conservative activists to force Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Attorney General Jerry Brown to defend Prop 8 in the federal case that was appealed to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals after U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker found in August that Prop 8 violates the U.S. Constitution. None of the governmental entities that were sued in the federal case is interested in defending Prop 8, so the appeal to the 9th Circuit was filed by the activists who put Prop 8 on the ballot. It is unlikely, however, that the activists have “standing” to mount an appeal, since it’s not their job to defend California’s constitution. Worried about such a determination, conservative forces have been trying to find some other route to assure that the 9th Circuit hears the appeal, including pressuring defendants Brown and Schwarzenegger and pushing to add Imperial County, located in the southeast California desert, as an official defendant. The 9th Circuit will make the call on the county’s long-shot effort, probably in December, when it also will take up the question of whether the pro-Prop 8 activists have standing. If they do, the 9th Circuit will then move on to hear the appeal of Walker’s actual ruling. If the activists do not have standing and Imperial County can’t become a defendant, the case is over and same-sex marriage is legal again in California, unless the activists attempt to appeal the standing question to the U.S. Supreme Court. That, too, would be a long shot, many legal experts believe. They say the Supreme Court would be unlikely to conclude that displeased citizens can step into a state government’s shoes to defend a state law that the state government itself refuses to defend and, indeed, believes violates the U.S. Constitution. In rejecting the activists’ latest move, the California Supreme Court denied review without comment.

Quips & Quotes ❝

More than anything else, what I’m doing is giving the Republicans and independents an alternative to vote for.” —Melvin Nimer, telling The Salt Lake Tribune about his run for Utah Senate District 2

So, if McAdams [a gay-friendly Mormon who replaced openly gay Sen. Scott McCoy] weren’t interesting enough all on his own, now he’s being challenged by a gay man, a gay Republican, no less, and they’re always interesting.” —Jesse Fruhwirth on City Weekly’s news blog

Personally, I think this is a simple way for the Republican Party to throw Mel Nimer and the Utah Log Cabin Republicans under the bus. With two months until the election, and with all of the qualified candidates they could have picked from, the Repub’s decided to throw the gay head of a gay political group into a race against the biggest ally the State has in the Senate? With virtually no time to raise funds or to get a campaign off the ground. Sounds very….. Republican to me.” —Eric Ethington of Pride in Utah

The fact that the Utah Republican Party nominated an openly gay man is amazing no matter how you slice it. We’re talking about the reddest of red states here kids.” —Commenter “Michael M.” on the same post

I want to bring awareness to Tooele, especially since it’s a smaller city. I know there could be youth out there struggling with issues and I want people to know that there are other people out there.” —Robin Sheehy, founder of Come Out Tooele, in the Tooele Transcript Bulletin


Pro-gay Mayor Daley Will Not Seek Re-election Strongly pro-gay Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, who has led the city for 21 years, announced Sept. 7 that he will not run for a seventh term. Apart from a series of run-ins with ACT UP/Chicago in the late ’80s and early ’90s, Daley has been nothing short of a hero to most of the city’s LGBT community. In 1989, he became the first mayor to ride in the Chicago gay pride parade while in office. Two years later, Daley set up the nation’s first municipally sponsored Gay and Lesbian Hall of Fame and proceeded to personally hand out the awards nearly every year since. In 1998, he redecorated the city’s gay business strip, North Halsted Street, with a series of giant Flash-Gordon-esque retrofuturistic rainbow pylons. When some residents objected to the official gayification of the street, fearing for their property values, Daley thundered, “I won’t let the homophobes run this city!” He has been a supporter of same-sex marriage since 2004. Daley went on to serve as honorary cochair of Gay Games VII in 2006 and, in 2007, was honorary chair of the capital campaign to get the city’s new LGBT center built. At the Games’ opening ceremonies, Daley said: “Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community have contributed to Chicago in every imaginable way — in business, education, the arts and neighborhood development. They deserve to have the city of Chicago standing on their side, and it will continue to do so, as long as I am mayor of this great city.” Daley was pro-gay before it was cool. He decided long ago that gays make neighborhoods better, and that seemed to be that for him. He never wavered. His spoken defenses of the city’s gays were straightforward and from the gut. The mayor’s conflicts with ACT UP/Chicago came to a head on Feb. 12, 1992, when he and six members of the group engaged in a shouting match at a meeting of the gay business group Chicago Professional Networking Association. ACT UP members were angry that the city’s AIDS budget allegedly had been stagnant for several years and that, due to a then-new policy of not working on Sundays, Daley had missed AIDS Walk and the gay pride parade, among other issues. “I have been in the forefront as a public official dealing with the gay and lesbian community,” Daley told the hecklers. “You don’t see the governor, you don’t see any other elected official. I’m right here! And I don’t hide! I don’t hide from the gay and lesbian community as mayor of the city of Chicago! The gay and lesbian community has a (yearly) reception not at a Hilton hotel but at the mayor’s City Hall on the

fifth floor (where my office is). ... And the AIDS budget each year goes up in the city of Chicago.” “That’s a lie!” the protesters yelled back. “It hasn’t gone up in three years! It’s a million dollars. It’s the same as it was! ... You’re lying!” “I’m just as concerned as anybody else,” Daley said. “Don’t make me one who’s insincere and not concerned about the AIDS issue.” The protesters then lambasted Daley for having attended the wake of Danny Sotomayor, who had been ACT UP/Chicago’s spiritual leader and perhaps Daley’s fiercest critic ever. “Liar!” they shouted. “Why did you go to Danny Sotomayor’s funeral? Why. Did. You. Go. To. Danny. Sotomayor’s. Funeral?!” At that point, pandemonium ensued and CPNA ejected ACT UP from the gathering. Daley then said: “I always remember Danny Sotomayor. I went to his wake. ... I went there out of respect for him and his family. Now, he’s a strong advocate. I used to see him all the time. He’d, you know, scream and yell in my face. I said: ‘Danny, why you yelling at me? I’m here. This is a reception we’re having. This is what we’re doing. I’m not perfect. But don’t try to make me the one, like, insensitive or not concerned. There’s a lot of other people who won’t even talk to you, won’t even shake your hand, listen to you, won’t understand what you’re saying.’” As for ACT UP’s tactics, Daley said: “To get up and say anything, that’s their right to do anything, but after a time you have to say: ‘Hey, let’s move on. I’ve heard. I’ve listened. We are trying to do it. It’s not fast enough. You’re right, it’s not fast enough.’” “You know why it’s not fast enough?” he continued. “When one person dies, you’re right, it’s not fast enough. It’s not fast enough for you or me or anybody else when you see one person die. And one thing I found out — that we’re all in this together. We’re not separate, we’re not higher or lower, we’re all together. And these issues that confront any community confront the city of Chicago. And what we’re trying to do here in our city is to truly work together.” A little more than three months after the showdown — and an even worse blowup seven weeks later, when 40 furious AIDS activists torpedoed the mayor with vicious insults for 90 minutes as he and more than 500 gays and lesbians marched through gay neighborhoods in response to an anti-gay shooting — Daley relented on AIDS spending, and the City Council voted 46-0 to boost funding to $3.57 million. “This is a very serious health and emotional problem and we have to recommit ourselves,” Daley said. According to Windy City Times and the Chicago Tribune, one of the people who may run to replace Daley is Alderman Tom Tunney, who is openly gay.

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 7


LOC AL NEWS

McAdams: Not Taking Election for Granted Just before Christmas 2009, Democratic delegates from Utah’s Senate District 2 came together to perform a difficult task: pick a replacement to finish outgoing — and out — Sen. Scott McCoy’s term. Following McCoy’s resignation in order to devote needed time to his law practice, a number of candidates contacted delegates for consideration. These included Arlyn Bradshaw who, like McCoy, is openly gay — and who is now the favorite in a race for Salt Lake County Council’s District 1 seat. In the end, however, the delegates chose Ben McAdams, an aide to Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker and a straight ally, to take over for McCoy. Less than a year later, it’s time for McAdams to run on his own terms. This time, he’ll be doing so against Mel Nimer, an openly gay candidate from across the aisle who entered the race after McAdam’s original challenger failed to file her paperwork in time to run. “This is my first time introducing myself to the voters,” said McAdams, taking QSaltLake’s interview while canvassing the neighborhoods in his heavily Democratic district. “I was disappointed when my previous opponent dropped out because I think I owe it to the district, and we deserve a race.” McAdams comes to voters after a session where he had little time to debate gay- and transgender-rights issues. A compromise between pro-gay Democrats and Republi-

can leadership tabled all such bills in order to save Salt Lake City’s gay and transgender-inclusive employment and housing nondiscrimination ordinances from bills seeking their cancellation. Still, he has been a strong advocate for this part of his constituency, having promised to take up McCoy’s bill that would give same-sex couples rights to sue in cases of a partner’s wrongful death. In this sense, both he and Nimer are of the same mind. “It’s refreshing to have a Republican candidate who agrees with me on LGBT issues,” said McAdams who, like Nimer, promised to run a clean campaign that focused on the areas in which both men differ, rather than in attacking one another. “This was the first time I’ve met him, but he seems like a great guy,” he said of his opponent. “We have a lot of mutual friends so I’d heard of him, and I look forward to getting to know him better as we go through the campaign. We agreed for the sake of the LGBT issues that we both care about that we’d keep it clean and make sure we’d finish the election with the good reputation we each had going in.” “We shouldn’t’ cannibalize our own and we agreed not to do that,” he added. Like Nimer, McAdams noted that budgeting, education and immigration would top his list of concerns during the race. “It is an incredibly difficult year for the state budget,” he said, referring to the sluggish economy that has plagued every state

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in the Union. “My perspective is before we raise taxes, we need to understand this economy is no easier on tax payers than it is on government.” When making state budget cuts, McAdams said that lawmakers need to ensure that “necessary social services for those who have been hit by the economic downturn” remain, such as the Meals on Wheels program for elderly residents as well as insurance coverage for children. “Utah has ranked 50th in Medicaid access for kids, and that’s not good enough,” he said. ‘I don’t like tax increases and I want to stay away from that, but I think it’s important for the government to keep performing its essential functions. It’s going to depend on what we’re cutting. This is s a scale and you’ve got to balance both sides of the sale.” Like Nimer, McAdams is also concerned about Utah’s education system and particularly in what he calls its decline in quality over the last two decades. “It used to be that we could stack ‘em deep and teach ‘em cheap,” said the senator. But Utah’s increasingly diverse population — which includes several students for whom English is a second language — means that these days are over, he added. “The state’s financial commitment to education has gone down significantly. We’re last in per-pupil spending, and that’s not good enough,” he said. “I feel strongly that we need to provide equal opportunity to anyone who needs to reach out and grab it.” McAdams also said he feels Utah may go in the wrong direction on immigration issues. He is opposed to a bill proposed by Sen. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, that closely mirrors Arizona’s controversial SB 1070, which critics accused of encouraging racial profiling. “He’s called it Arizona-light, but I’ve read the bill. There’s nothing light about it,” said McAdams. “Make no mistake: It’s unconstitutional and un-American.” McAdams’ biggest objection to Sandstrom’s bill, he said, was that it would take away police and prosecutors’ right to “express discretion” in which illegal immigrants to pursue — such as those who are responsible for violent crime and drug trafficking rather than those who are abiding by the law. In that vein, McAdams also said he would not support any resolutions in the Utah State Senate or the House in support of overturning a clause in the 14th Amendment that grants citizenship to children born within U.S. borders to immigrants who are here illegally. “If we deny children who are born in the

United States the right to citizenship that dates back to the Civil War and the abolition of slavery, that would, in my mind, create a permanent under class in the United States — people with no citizenship in any country” who government would then deny “the opportunity to become contributing members of our society.” “For me, it’s a consistent message: looking out for our minority community whether they’re sexual or ethnic minorities,” he continued. “We need to send a message and be a welcoming society. That’s what America was founded on, and that’s who we need to be.” While Nimer and his supporters have argued that a gay and transgender-friendly Republican would get more done in the state’s conservative government than would a Democrat, McAdams countered that his ability to work with Republican lawmakers “being critical on some issues and working collaboratively on different issues” was more important. “My distinct point of view is reflective of the district,” he said. “The district wants a counterpoint on many issues and in my short time in the Legislature, I believe I’ve offered that counterpoint.” And although his district has wanted that counterpoint for decades (McAdams noted that it hadn’t been represented by a Republican in at least 35 years), the senator said he’s still not taking the election for granted. “It means I’ll have to continue to work hard, and I should,” he said. “We should expect that of our elected officials.” Q


Mel Nimer: Red Candidate in a Blue District Mel Nimer is no stranger to Utah politics. As the President of the Utah Log Cabin Republicans, a gay and transgender-friendly GOP caucus, he has worked to give gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Utah Republicans a voice in Utah’s ruling party. As a Precinct Chair and former state delegate, he has worked to get Republicans sympathetic to gay and transgender issues into office. And as of this month, Nimer is now a candidate for political office. When Nancy Davis, the Republican challenger to Sen. Ben McAdams’ District 2 Senate seat failed to file all her paperwork by the registration deadline, the Utah Elections Office disqualified her, leaving the party just one day to find a replacement. “The county [party] called and asked me to fill in the spot that got vacated,” said Nimer. “They said, ‘We can’t think of anybody better than you to fill in that spot. Will you run?’” Nimer’s response catapulted him fairly late into the race in this heavily Democratic district. Nonetheless, he said that he and his campaign volunteers are working quickly to put up a website, print fliers and hit the streets for canvassing. Although the election is still in its early stages, one thing at this point is certain: gay and transgender rights will not be a wedge issue. Perhaps for the first time in Utah political history, both the Republican and Democratic candidate agree on practically everything from the importance of job and employment protections to the need for same-sex partners to be able to sue in cases of wrongful death. “Senator McAdams has done a great job representing our community and filling Sen. Scott McCoy’s shoes,” said Nimer, who like the senator that McAdams replaced is also openly gay. The real contention in the election, he said, will thus be about both candidates’ different approaches to several issues affecting not only their district, but the state at large. “The only other big advantage I offer everyone in the district is that they’ll have a seat at the Republican table, so they’ll have a seat at the super majority table, which may be good, may be bad. But for our community, for the first time ever, they’ll have someone they can count on to try and swing the Republican majority more clearly in our favor.” Some of the main issues that Nimer and McAdams consider to be highly important are state budget cuts, education and immigration. Like many people from all party affiliations, Nimer said that the state’s budget has been on his mind a lot lately. While Nimer said that programs such as the state’s AIDS Drug Assistance Program

“need to be funded, totally,” he said that his main concern about the state’s economy is the complex interplay between job creation and a strong education system. “They’re not separate topics,” he said. “They’re all combined and interlinked and there is no one answer for each problem. We have to look at the much bigger picture in order to solve all these little problems.” To solve the state’s budget crisis, Nimer said that Utah must support small businesses, which are the state’s economic backbone. To this effect, he said that the state should lessen government controls on business creation. As an example, he cited Utah’s heavy regulation of liquor licenses, which he said prevent many would-be restaurateurs from going into business and therefore costs the state jobs and revenue. “We don’t need a whole bunch of rules and micromanaging what everyone does with all their time in building businesses,” he said. While both candidates agree that the state is not adequately serving its pupils, their ideas for improving the system — and especially getting it more money — differ considerably. In order to better fund the system, Nimer said he would support changing how the state handles taxation. Currently, he said, 70 percent of Utah is owned by the federal government, meaning that the state government has only 30 percent of the state to draw upon when crafting its budget. “One way to finance education is through property taxes,” he said. “In New Jersey, where only 7 percent of the land is federally controlled, they fund their education system the same way we do. And where we spend just $5,000 per student they can spend $13,000 per student because they have control of the land and we don’t. We need to change that and work things out with the federal government where we can use [this land].” In order for Utah to get the most out of its acreage, Nimer proposed coming to terms with the federal government on issues such as mining in federal monuments like the controversial Grand StaircaseEscalante National Monument, which sits atop a vast coal reserve. He said that the monument could be treated much the same way as are ski resorts in Utah’s national forests, which he calls “a good use of federally-owned land that the state gets money from.” “Mining that could easily be done [at Grand Staircase] without any harm to the environment or to the monument,” he said. “It won’t affect anything anyone’s going to enjoy and we’d be able to get thousands of tons of some of the cleanest burning coal

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 9

available.” A plan such as this, he said, would also boost the state’s sluggish economy, creating jobs and putting more money in the hands of citizens. But one thing Nimer said should not be in the hands of Utah residents is immigration, which he called the purview of the federal government. To that effect, he said he opposed a bill by Rep. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, that mirrors a controversial Arizona law. “[Bills like Sandstrom’s are] a simplistic answer to a really complex problem. It’s trying to take on a federal issue at a state level and that’s not appropriate,” he said. However, Nimer said that Utah could set up a system to help employers understand how to verify the resident status of their employees and to get illegal immigrants “help to become legal rather than deporting them.” The United States, he said, has historically depended upon a migrant workforce of foreigners from a number of nations, so taking a hard-line stance against illegal immigrants would be counterproductive. “We have to respect the fact that those people are human beings and we need to develop a system [that treats them with dignity], he said.

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Another person that Nimer said he will be treating with dignity is his opponent, who he has met and who has also promised to stick strictly to the issues facing the district and the state. And while he acknowledges that a Republican win in a heavily blue district will be “an uphill battle,” he said that it’s one in which he will engage wholeheartedly. “This is not a game,” he said. “We are in this as a serious campaign.” Q

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Treat yourself or a loved one to cooking classes with Chef Drew Ellsworth, 34-year chef, wine manager of the Third West Wine Store, QSaltLake’s Restaurant reviewer. With small groups of no more than 8 students, Ecole Dijon gives you the opportunity to watch and interact with a professional chef preparing foods in an exciting and expeditious way. The atmosphere is very casual and warm and students can freely move around to see what the chef is doing. “Hands on” training is available when possible.

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LOC AL NEWS

Allies To Be Honored at Annual Equality Utah Dinner board hired Mike Thompson. “I did a lot of legal work to help them grow Equality Utah’s annual Allies Dinner is one from being just Equality Utah to the three of the highlights of the year for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer organizations it is today: Equality Utah, community. Sponsored by Jane and Tami Equality Utah PAC and Equality Utah FounMarquardt and philanthropist Bruce Bastian, dation,” she said. “I realized that was a good the dinner is one of the gay and transgender structure, to combine a political action comrights organization’s biggest fund-raisers, as mittee, a lobbying arm and a political founwell as a day for it to honor individuals and dation. I think I followed the lead of the Huorganizations that have provided exemplary man Rights Campaign, which is set up in a similar way.” service to Utah’s queer community. Marquardt is legally married to her partNamed “Gaining Ground,” in honor of the spread of job and employment protections ner, Tami, in Canada and in a number of for gay and transgender people, this year’s U.S. states that have legalized same-sex mardinner will feature Dustin Lance Black as riage. Tami Marquardt served as the Utah its keynote speaker. A writer for the televi- Pride Center’s interim director in 2004 before the hiring of Valsion show Big Love, Black has won numererie Larabee and is a ous Writers Guild of America awards for his member of the Center’s work on the HBO drama about polygamy in board today. Utah. In 2009, he won an Academy Award for “Tami had a real Best Original Screenplay for Milk, a dramainterest in youth,” tization of the life and assassination of gayMarquardt explained. rights activist and public official Harvey “She has a real passion Milk. He also narrated 8: The Mormon Propofor talking to young sition, Reed Cowan’s controversial documenpeople, so when she tary about the LDS Church’s involvement in was at the Center she the passage of California’s Proposition 8. Tami Marquardt helped to run programs During the dinner, Equality Utah will also for youth. In life now she’s always willing give its Allies for Equality Award to five reto talk to people having issues coming out. cipients: Jane and Tami Marquardt, Gary and She’s so good at it people come to find her.” Millie Watts and the Salt Lake City Human Like Tami Marquardt, Gary and Millie Rights Commission. Watts have also helped gay, lesbian, bisexual Once a practicing and transgender youth, as well as their famiattorney from 1979 to lies as the leaders of LDS Family Fellowship. 2007, Jane Marquardt Although the two did not found the organizahas served Utah’s gay, tion, they joined soon after its formation in lesbian, bisexual and 1993; two of their six children are gay, and transgender citizens one of them, Craig, has been excommunicatsince 1982, when she ed from the LDS Church. started offering semi“Our love for Craig lead to a family comnars on establishing mitment to do all we can to help people underpowers of attorney, stand more about same-sex orientation,” the wills and other direc- two wrote in a 1994 letter viewable on their Jane Marquardt tives to same-sex cou- website, ldsfamilyfellowship.org, shortly beples. In 1996, she also helped organize training fore they began holding Family Fellowship sessions for Utah judges about “the cutting- meetings in their Utah County home. “Not edge issues of the day like employment non- only do we share the scientific research that is discrimination” affecting gay, lesbian, bi- coming forth, we also try to help people realize sexual and transgender people. During those how much discrimination hurts, not only the sessions, she faced off against psychologists homosexual person, but family and friends as and BYU professors who presented what she well. It [Craig’s coming out] has opened our called “the other side” of the debate. eyes to the world of “justified” discrimination “It was a chance to be a competent gay per- that exists in many aspects of society.” son standing up in front of a group of judges As leaders of the support group, the Wattwho may have thought they didn’t know gay ses not only provide council and support for people,” she said. “That was a fun thing to be parents struggling to come to terms with involved in. It was a landmark that the Utah their child’s sexual orientations, but tireSupreme Court even wanted to be educated less advocacy for gay, lesbian, bisexual and on these issues in the middle of the ’90s.” transgender people. Marquardt also served as a board member “Education is one of our major goals, and for Equality Utah from 2001–2007, starting to just try to get the parents and siblings to when the organization was known as Unity love their gay child and keep their gay child Utah, and is still a member of the group’s under their wing, not kick them out of the advisory council. In 2004, she served as the house like happens so many times with gay chair for the Don’t Amend campaign, Equal- children,” said Millie Watts in an interview ity Utah’s effort to stop a state constitutional with KUED for Friends and Neighbors: A ban on same-sex marriage. When founder Community Divided, a 1999 documentary Michael Mitchell departed the organization, about the families and friends of gay and lesshe also acted as interim director until the bian Utahns. by JoSelle Vanderhooft

1 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Throughout the ’90s and 2000s, the Wattses have spoken to journalists and organizations alike about their work, and have spoken out against anti-gay pronouncements made by LDS officials. A number of organizations have recognized them for these efforts, including Affirmation: Gay and Lesbian Mormons, a support group for former and current gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender members of the LDS Church. “Gary and Millie possess a genuinely charitable spirit,” said Family Fellowship supporter Marge Bradshaw in a 2006 ceremony where Affirmation honored the couple with an award for outstanding leadership. “They give. They give time; they give money; they give love. We spend four nights or so each year, with several other couples, at the dining room table in their home stuffing and addressing envelopes Millie and Gary Watts that contain a flyer announcing the upcoming Family Fellowship gathering. They provide the home, the pizza and root beer, and contribute to the spirit of friendship. There are no aides or secretaries; there is only Watts’ generosity.” The eight-member Salt Lake City Human Rights Commission has been an invaluable part of making the capital city a safer and more just place for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender residents. In 2009, its report on discrimination within the city’s boundaries revealed that discrimination based on race, sexual orientation and gender identity were significant problems. The report was the cornerstone upon which Mayor Ralph Becker based two ordinances prohibiting housing and employment discrimination against gay and transgender residents. The Salt Lake City Council ultimately passed the ordinances near the end of last year, and seven other municipalities have adopted them since. Lisa Harrison Smith, Becker’s deputy director of communications, said that the commission was “honored and excited” to receive the recognition. “We’re really thrilled that we’re recognized by Equality Utah. They’re a big part of many, if not all, of the initiatives that come out in the city. It means a lot to us.” Upon entering office, said Smith, Becker created the commission with Coordinator Yolanda Francisco-Nez at the helm “with the charge to make some very big changes” in how the city handled matters relating to diversity. “I think that set the tone for a pretty progressive agenda when it comes to LGBT rights,” she said, adding that the mayor’s office appreciated EU’s recognition of Francisco-Nez’s efforts. Francisco-Nez was out of town and could not be reached for comment. Q “Gaining Ground” will be held Sept. 28 at the Salt Palace. Tickets are $100 per person or $900 for a table of 10. Proceeds will go to Equality Utah Political Action Committee, to help elect fair-minded candidates who support equal rights for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender citizens. Vegetarian options are available. For more information visit alliesdinner.com.

Shades of Queer In October, the University of Utah’s LGBT Resource Center will present its annual Gay-la Dinner and Silent Auction, the theme of which will be “Shades of Queer: Connecting Through Difference.” The evening’s keynote speaker will be Reed Cowan, the director, writer and producer of 8: The Mormon Proposition, a popular documentary about the LDS Church’s involvement in California’s Proposition 8. The evening will also include performances by Keila Michiko Cone-Uemura and Baron Daniel Cureton. Dress is business casual and vegetarian and vegan options are available. WHEN: Oct. 22, 6 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. dinner WHERE: IJ and Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center, 2 North Medical Drive COST: $65 per person, $650 per table of 10, $45 per student (available upon request) INFO: To purchase tickets contact Cathy Martinez at cmartinez@ sa.utah.edu or Kathleen Boyd at kboyd@sa.utah.edu or 801-5877973

Fashion Stroll #10 Salt Lake City’s Fashion Stroll will celebrate its 10th incarnation by turning its outdoor market into a Halloween party. Attendees and merchants are encouraged to dress in costume, and prizes will be awarded to the most creative. Likewise, the event’s runway show and entertainment — including dancers, local bands and street performers — will all have a Halloween flair. Sponsorship opportunities are available. WHEN: Oct. 29, 6–10 p.m., East Broadway (300 South between State Street and 300 East) COST: Free to the public INFO: SLCFashionStroll.com or contact organizer Matt Monson at 801-671-4304 or slcfashionstroll@ gmail.com.

Family Conference The Utah Pride Center will host “Bringing Families Back Into the Room,” a regional conference, Oct. 8-10, for families with gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer youth. The keynote speaker will be Dr. Caitlin Ryan, head of the Family Acceptance Project at San Francisco State University, which is studying ways to help families support queer children. For more details, check utahpridecenter.org.


Will Cedar City Be Next to Pass Gay/Transgender Ordinance? So far, seven Utah municipalities have passed ordinances protecting residents from job discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. With less than four months of 2010 left, Equality Utah is hoping that at least three more will join their ranks. Currently, the gay and transgender rights group has approached mayors and city councils around the state about the ordinances, which Salt Lake City first approved in 2009. The discussion is especially developing in Holladay, Ogden and Cedar City, said Executive Director Brandie Balken. Although Equality Utah’s staff discussed the ordinances with the Ogden City Council earlier this year, the body voted to put off considering them until they had dealt with pressing budgeting concerns. Balken said that she hopes to meet with Mayor Matthew R. Godfrey in mid-September. Meanwhile, Holladay’s city council discussed whether or not to move forward on the ordinances during a Sept. 2 work meeting. Here, Councilman Barry Topham touched off controversy by saying that he didn’t know why the council was discussing this “can of worms” issue. “I think you should be able to discriminate if you don’t want a cross-dresser living in your house,” he said in the meeting. His remarks prompted Councilman Jim Palmer to call Topham’s position discriminatory and in violation of “the equalprotection clause of the Constitution that

we’ve all sworn to uphold.” Balken said that Equality Utah is encouraging Holladay residents to contact their councilmembers and let them know they support passing these ordinances. “I think in some cases it’s good for people to express their deeply held opinion. It gives us an opportunity to discuss what those concerns are,” said Balken of Topham’s remarks. “We’ve got some outreach to do.” Out of all three cities, progress is happening the fastest in Cedar City, where Equality Utah has been working closely with Southern Utah University’s QueerStraight Alliance to educate residents about the protections the ordinances offer. Along with speaking to Mayor Joe Burgess and the six-member city council, the organization held a series of three public meetings about the proposed measures at the mayor’s request. “We got on the radio, we got fliers out, we papered the town in an attempt to get as many people from as many backgrounds as possible to come and talk about the ordinances because no one wants to pass something they don’t understand,” said Benjamin King Smith, QSA president. “We’ve had a lot of people who have come to them wanting to know if they’ll be protected. It’s nice to have these conversations.” The council and mayor, said Smith, gave QSA positive feedback about the meetings and are planning to discuss the ordinances

throughout October. On Oct. 6, QSA members will ask the council to meet with the mayor about drafting the ordinances during the body’s weekly meeting. On the following week, Smith said the council will vote on whether or not to accept the ordinances. “There will be another vote after that, but if they pass the first vote, it’s pretty much guaranteed,” he said. Following this meeting, said Balken, Cedar City residents will be able to weigh in on the ordinances, and then the council will vote on whether or not to pass them.

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contestants and the audience. Rox is a retired police officer and law enforcement educator who now works full time as a BDSM and leather lifestyle educator. He is a graduate of the Journeyman III Academy, a BDSM school which closed in 2009. He also is the key organizer of Utah Rebellion, Head Master of Salt Lake’s BDSM201 Intermediate educational series, and is an administrator of and presenter coach for the Path 101 BDSM Group. He has taught at several clubs as well as major events such as Thunder in the Mountains, Maui Kink in Hawaii, DomCon Los Angeles, and DomCon Atlanta. Rox won the title of Mr. Rocky Mountain Olympus Leather in April at the first annual Rocky Mountain Olympus Leather Competition held in Salt Lake City, making him eligible to compete in the international competition. RMOL is a regional leather group which covers Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. Sythen of Salt Lake City was named runner-up for the International Ms. Olympus Leather 2010 at the event.

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Utah Rox Wins Int’l Mr. Olympus Leather Utah Rebellion organizer Utah Rox earned the title of International Mr. Olympus Leather 2010 at the International Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather contest held in Los Angeles. The contest was created to “promote a positive image of the Leather lifestyle,” according to its statement of purpose. “It is our belief that the leather community is comprised of an extremely diverse group of people ranging from the motorcycle and leather/Levi clubs to the heaviest SM edge player and all of the leatherfolk in between. The Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather title seeks to make all leatherfolk feel good about themselves regardless of race, religion, political beliefs, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, age, size, handicap, or health condition. It is the goal of Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather to make all those who wish to be a part of the leather community feel welcome in doing so.” Contestants competed in four categories — interview, fantasy, fetish image and stage presence. During the fantasy category, contestants staged a 5- to 7-minute erotic production, involving judges, other

“We think it’s likely we’ll have a vote in Cedar City before the end of October,” she said. The meetings will take place on Oct. 6, 13, 20 and 27. To date, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Park City, Summit County, West Valley City, Logan and Taylorsville have passed the measures, which impose fines against businesses with 15 or more employees and landlords renting at least four units who discriminate against gay and transgender people. Religious organizations are exempt.

Saturday, Sept 18th, 10am – 6pm Hosted by ELPCO – The East Liberty Park Organization and the East Centrsl Community Council

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 1 1


LOC ALNEWS

Layton PFLAG Launched Layton has become the latest of several Utah cities to start a chapter of the political, social and support group Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. “I’ve decided to make a goal of starting more PFLAGs in more cities,” said activist Turner Bitton, who recently held a Rally for Equality this summer to address the suicides of several Layton PFLAG President young gay Utahns. Cynthia Stevens “There’s really nothing for people up north,” he continued. “Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County have so much support for people, but Davis and Ogden have no support.” Bitton announced his intentions to several friends in Layton and the fledgling group met for the first time on Sept. 9 on

Weber State University’s campus. Here, the 25 attendees voted to make Cynthia Stevens president and Barb D’Arco vice president of Layton’s PFLAG chapter. Bitton will serve as vice president of public relations, a title he also holds in Ogden’s group. “I figure since the chapters are so close in proximity I’ll be able to do both at the same time,’ he said. The group will now focus on filing paperwork with PFLAG’s national body to become an official chapter. They expect to hold their first official meeting in October. For now, the group is meeting at 6:30 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month in the main building of Weber State University’s Davis campus, room 306. The first meeting is scheduled for Oct. 14. A support group will meet in the same room an hour before official business begins.

For more information about Layton PFLAG contact Turner Bitton at Bitton.politico@gmail.com or 801- 814-3660.

National Coming Out Brunch to Reveal Big PFLAG News For the sixth year in a row, the Utah Pride Center will celebrate National Coming Out Day, held nationally on October 11, with a brunch and awards ceremony. This year’s celebration in honor of the coming out process and the individuals and organizations that have served gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer Utahns will take place on Oct. 10 at the Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel. John Cepek, president of the national Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, will be the day’s keynote speaker at the brunch. The Center will also honor the 2010 recipients of its Lifetime Achievement Award, Community Organization of the Year Award and Volunteer of the Year Award. Marina Gomberg, the Utah Pride Center’s director of development and marketing, said that the Center is pleased to have Cepek visit — especially because “he will be delivering some very big news to us on that day.” “We’re very excited to have him and to be able to have that announcement made because it impacts us here in Utah,” she said. Although past recipients Nikki Boyer, Joe Redburn and Becky Moss are still deliberating over the winner of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award, the Center has announced the other two winners. Volunteer Chris Coon will receive this year’s Volunteer of the Year award for his three years of service at the Utah Pride Center as an administrative assistant.

“He has been incredible,” said Gomberg. “Day after day, week after week, month after month, and year after year, he remains as happy and dedicated as the first day he started. We’ve been extremely lucky to have Chris as part of our staff not only because of his dedication but because of his spirit.” The award for Community Organization of the Year will go to Salt Lake City’s PFLAG chapter, which Gomberg praised for its support in a number of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights causes. “We’ve seen the impact of their work under the leadership of [President] Kathy Godwin, and the impact has been very positive,” she said. “We’re really glad to be able to award them for their great work this year.” This year’s National Coming Out Day celebration will also be held on the last day of the Center’s inaugural Family Acceptance Regional Conference (Oct. 8-10). Geared toward making families safe and affirming environments for queer youth and toward keeping families with queer youth together, the conference is a perfect match for National Coming Out Day. Because of overlap with the conference, Gomberg said that the Center hopes “this will be one of our largest NCOD celebrations.”

Registration for both the NCOD brunch and conference are open on the Utah Pride Center’s website, utahpridecenter.org. Sponsorship and table captain opportunities for the brunch are available.

12 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Creative Minds Shine on Homeless Youth by JoSelle Vanderhooft

In 2009, Utahns Chloe Noble and Jill Hartman walked across the United States to raise awareness of the challenges facing homeless youth — over 40 percent of whom identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning or “nonstraight.” Their journey took them from Seattle to Washington, D.C., where they participated in and helped organize October’s March for Equality. Nearly one year later, the foundation the two women created, Operation Shine America, has announced the launch of a new campaign. Kicked off this August, Creative Minds 2010 is a national campaign offering homeless youth and their allies what Noble calls “a platform to be seen and heard.” It will work in tandem with a number of local organizations such as the Homeless Youth Resource Center, Volunteers of America, Urban Village Cooperative, the Inclusion Center, Community In-Roads Alliance, the Utah Pride Center and the Utah chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. These organizations, said Noble, who is OSA’s founding director, will work together to sponsor community awareness training about homeless youth in which participants will learn how to help these youth and how to work toward solving social problems that lead to youth homelessness. “This is about extending core family values like acceptance, patience, compassion, generosity, protection and love, beyond ourselves and our personal family unit,” said Noble. “This epidemic [of homelessness facing youth] can not be solved simply by donations, emergency services, or even emergency over night shelters; although all of these things are essential in keeping these children safe and alive long enough for them to enter into recovery. What is needed to end youth homelessness is a complete transformation of our systems of care, a rebuilding of our local communities, and a strong awareness of the trauma

that these homeless youth experience on a daily basis.” During last year’s Homeless Youth Pride Walk, Noble said that she and Hartman interviewed the youth they met about what brought them to the streets. They found, she said, that although the causes were numerous, they all tied back into communityrelated problems such as familial rejection and a lack of access to services. Overall, Noble said that there are two million homeless youth in the United States. And given that queer youth are disproportionately represented in that number, Noble said that gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights were inseparable from the homeless youth epidemic. “This means that huge causal factors in youth homelessness are homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia,” said Noble. “If we are going to eradicate youth homelessness, we are going to have to come to terms with the negative and oppressive belief systems that teach us to treat LGBTQ citizens with anything less than dignity, respect, love and acceptance. This certainly includes our amazing youth, especially those who are now homeless.” “This diverse group of homeless youth, whether LGBTQ or heterosexual, has a profound and powerful voice,” agreed OSA director of administration Ginger Phillips. “We want to support them in their progress and give them many creative ways to be seen and heard. Studies show that many homeless LGBTQ youth who receive appropriate guidance, support, protection and resources, eventually become successful members of the community.” In order to help provide youth with this help, OSA will also participate in a number of events throughout autumn and winter. These include NAMI’s annual walk to raise awareness of mental illness, which will begin at Mobile Ballpark at 9 a.m. on Sept. 18. In Oct., OSA will take part in Utah Pride Center’s Family Acceptance Regional Conference (Oct. 8–10), which is targeted

toward creating safe and affirming family environments for queer youth. Throughout the month Creative Minds 2010 will also host Creative Freak Boutique, a shop selling arts and crafts created by homeless youth and where homeless youth will be able to express themselves through open mic and music. From Oct. 14 through Nov. 6 Creative

Minds 2010 will also be a part of the NAMI Art Project at the Patrick Moore Gallery, 2233 S. 700 East. Homeless youth will also participate in NAMI’s Holiday Boutique from Dec. 3–5 at Pioneer Craft House, 3271 S. 500 East. Q

For more information about OSA visit operationshineamerica.blogspot.com.

Pro-Prop 8 Lawyer Lectures at BYU The attorney who represented proponents of California’s Proposition 8 in U.S. District Court lectured Brigham Young University law students at a J. Reuben Clark Law School forum sponsored by the BYU chapter of the Federalist Society. Charles J. Cooper’s argument for upholding Prop 8 was that marriage is, by definition, a union between a man and a woman. “A marriage between a man and a woman is not the core of the institution, it defines the institution,” he said. Cooper’s testimony before U.S. Judge Vaughn Walker mirrored his talk at BYU. Walker decided against Prop 8 proponents, saying that it infringes on gay and lesbian couples’ 14th amendment rights under the U.S. Constitution. Cooper said that marriage benefits society because the union produces children. “Child-rearing and procreation is important in matrimony,” Cooper said. “but also to nature and society.” Cooper said same-sex marriage could harm heterosexual couples in the long run. “The question is not can a same-sex couple raise a child as well as a heterosexual couple,” Cooper said. “It is about the longterm effects, including contributions to society.” In a question-and-answer period following his presentation, Cooper was asked how same-sex marriage would harm heterosexual marriage. According to BYU student Marshall Thompson, his reply was, “Recognizing homosexual marriage would not harm heterosexual marriage at

Prop 8 attorney Charles J. Cooper

all,” and that it was never a point he felt he needed to prove in court. In a document written to the District Court, Cooper cited statistics from the Netherlands, which instituted same-sex marriage in 2001, showing trends of fewer marriages, more single-parent families, more unmarried parents raising children and more opposite-sex couples choosing an alternative status over marriage. He also argued in the memorandum that same-sex marriage deinstitutionalizes marriage. Allowing same-sex marriage weakens the social norms with respect to marriage and shifts the focus from fulfilling socially valuable roles such as parent and spouse to “personal choice and selfdevelopment,” his legal team wrote.

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 13


OUR VIEWS

guest editorial HIV/AIDS: The Best of Times and the Worst of Times by David Mixner

I

N RECENT MONTHS, THE MEDIA has been filled with encouraging news about progress in treating HIV/AIDS. At the very same time, we have been dealt some real setbacks. The lesson is the same as it always has been: embrace and celebrate the progress, and don’t let up the pressure until there is a cure. The good news is indeed reason to celebrate. From the International AIDS Conference in Vienna came word that promising new gels have been developed that could dramatically lower the infection rate among at-risk women. The Wall Street Journal recently published a story indicating that scientists have discovered three powerful antibodies that can neutralize 91 percent of HIV strains. The bad news is that the economic situation is wrecking havoc with HIV/AIDS budgets — both here and abroad. Many states are freezing the ability of people with HIV/AIDS to receive treatment. AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) funds have either been cut way back or frozen, making it impossible for new clients to access them. Unless this is corrected, it could mean a death sentence for some people. It’s crucial for every American that cares about this horrendous epidemic to keep up the pressure, seek new funds and hold lawmakers accountable for their actions. Given the uncertainty with the economy and ADAP, it makes Medicare funds for treating HIV/AIDS even more critical in assisting people with the disease. Medicare provides a vital source of health coverage for around 100,000 people with the disease. In 2006, Medicare became the single largest source of federal financing for HIV

care. The number of people with HIV receiving Medicare benefits has grown over time, reflecting growth in the size of the of the HIV-positive population and an increased lifespan for people with the virus. As thrilled as I was with the new health care law, there is one part that is extremely disturbing. Especially since my journey over the years has taught me the urgent need to hold public officials accountable for their actions in this battle for a cure. Quite simply, with the creation of an entity called the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), we could lose our ability to pressure lawmakers for change. This new board is simply not accountable to anyone. While the IPAB is tasked with cutting Medicare spending, it is exempt from any judicial or administrative review of its decisions, and is barred from probing the government’s spending patterns on specific health care providers, such as hospitals. Shackled by such restraints and yet dangerously unaccountable to Congress, the people or the courts, this board could turn its attention to successful programs in Medicare to carry out its cost cutting mission. The mere existence of an unchecked,

powerful agency making life-determining decisions should be worrisome to everyone. Draconian decisions by IPAB to limit access to medicines to treat HIV will be free from judicial review, the need for advance public notice, or even appeals from patients. The fact of the matter is that the IPAB, like any other agency of government, can make bad decisions. And if they do, we have absolutely no recourse to change them. Personally, I can’t think of a worse scenario than for our research leaders to be on the cusp of a cure, only to be denied the necessary resources because a government panel has blown research and development into the Stone Age. We must not be shortsighted in our zeal to bring down health care costs by thwarting future research and reversing already achieved progress. Stated simply, if we go this route, we would only blunt the more laudable and courageous goal of saving lives and one day eliminating this horrific disease once and for all. Q David Mixner has been involved in public life creating policy and as an activist and writer for over 40 years. He has had two bestselling books, Stranger Among Friends and Brave Journeys, both published by Bantam Books.

leers

Editor, I just wanted to say that Issue 160, August 5, 2010, was the best you have ever put out. I normally don’t respond to such incredible insight and eloquent writing because I generally think it’s too late for words, but you have impressed me with your ‘first person’ insight and articles “Utah’s Gay Community Reel from Recent Suicides” and especially “Full Spectrum Social Justice.” I will eventually read the entire issue and will cut it out and journal it. The cover story, “My Last Shot,” intrigued me initially because it seems to be such a taboo subject that really needs to be addressed. I have been that gay man who turned to drugs and got judged, so I appreciate the compassion in your article. For the first time in my history with Salt Lake City I feel there is hope. Please continue to spread ‘happy’ pleasure as much as you can, but thank fucking god you are not afraid to bring up the real issues. I truly hope your publication can make a difference here in this coping state.

Darren Carlson Salt Lake City

QSaltLake welcomes your feedback Please send your letters to the editor to letters@qsaltlake.com 1 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


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by Bob Henline

NN RECENTLY POSTED an opinion piece by Bishop Harry R. Jackson, Jr. entitled “Same-sex Marriage Will Hurt Families, Society.” In this lovely bit of drivel, Jackson first goes after the validity of “openly gay” (although that has yet to be confirmed) Judge Vaughn Walker’s ruling in the matter of California’s Proposition 8. After that, he attempts to explain why samesex marriage represents the end of civilization as we know it. Let’s take a look at Bishop Jackson’s bullshit. First and foremost, I think it’s important to note that Jackson does what all ignorant “Christians” do in this situation: rely on selected biblical passages. According to Jackson, “All the scriptures in the Bible concerning marriage presuppose heterosexual marriage.” While this is certainly true, who decided that this outdated bit of fiction should determine the laws of our nation? Also, if we determine that we are to follow biblical law, why is it that we should only follow the parts of biblical law that serve the interests of bigots like Jackson? Should we go back to stoning adulterers? People the world over have been up in arms for months over the sentencing of an Iranian woman to death by stoning, yet this is also a biblical punishment for adultery. All one need do is read Leviticus to find all kinds of interesting “rules” that modern Christians don’t follow. This book mentions the legitimacy of slavery, as long as the slaves are from a “neighboring nation.” It references putting to death any who work on the Sabbath, and decrees that eating shellfish is an “abomination.” Not only are these rules not incorporated into our legal system, I’d be willing to bet that Pastor Jackson doesn’t follow them all, either. As a full-time pastor, he certainly “works” on the Sabbath, right? “A marriage requires a husband and wife, because these unions are necessary to make new life and connect children to their mother and father.” While Jackson goes so far as to later declare in his statement that our society should place a greater emphasis on preserving marriages, he doesn’t go so far as to advocate a ban on divorce, separation or abandonment. Why is that? If the sole purpose of marriage is to produce children, shouldn’t we then ban marriage for people who are unable to reproduce? Should we force married couples without children to breed? What about people who choose not to marry at all? If procreation is the point of life, should we not arrange and enforce marriages for all, complete with impregnation?

Of course, Jackson also has to resort to the traditional fear tactic: “These kinds of ill-advised social experiments may produce a host of unintended consequences. If gay marriage is allowed, the nation will soon begin to experience an increased degradation of the nuclear family — resulting in fewer kids being raised by a mom and dad.” And yet again, as with others of his bigoted ilk, Jackson makes this ridiculous statement with no real argument to support it. How exactly does the marriage of two homosexuals degrade the nuclear family? Jackson immediately follows this assertion with: “What will the landscape of America look like if same-sex marriage is legalized across the country? Social scientists report what most Americans have always known: Both boys and girls are deeply affected in biological and physical ways by the presence of their fathers.” Finally, something that makes sense — if you ignore the first sentence. Yes, social scientists agree that a good father figure provides an element of stability and support for children. But the question still remains: what does that have to do with gay marriage? Most gay and lesbian couples don’t have children, but if they do, a stable, married couple (even a same-sex one) is definitely a much better option than an unstable (even hetero) couple. How many hetero couples shouldn’t have children? You can’t read the news without seeing a story about neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse or even murder of children — by hetero parents, Bishop Jackson. Again, the assumption Jackson makes is that the purpose of marriage is children. Why is that? People who are unmarried have children all the time, so should this be prohibited? Should society remove children from single parents and place them with hetero couples? I don’t see Bishop Jackson arguing this point, but it’s the next “logical” step in his illogical path to a better society. The bottom line on this one is freedom of choice. While the Constitution doesn’t specifically protect choice, it is the most fundamental of freedoms. Without free choice, there is no other freedom. What is freedom of speech if you can’t choose what to say? What is freedom of religion if you can’t choose what to believe (or not to believe at all)? There is no logical or legal reason that all people should not be allowed to choose who to love and marry. Q

Bob Henline is a straight man. Don’t hold that against him — he was born that way. He is also a professional author and editor. His blog can be read at nonpart.org.

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 15


OUR VIEWS

I

guest editorial Mental Illness Stigmatized in Utah’s Gay Community by Kyle Foote

WAKE UP PARALYZED with anxiety and fear. I stare at the ceiling, willing myself to sleep a little longer so I won’t have to face the day just yet. I secretly wish that I had simply died in my sleep as I apprehensively ponder all the things that I need to get done today knowing I won’t be able to. I slept through class this morning and I’m already going to be late for work. I purposefully ignore the repeated calls and text messages from my family and friends, I’ll avoid their disappointment for a few more hours. I just want to die right now. But how should I do it? Razor blades? No, I don’t think I could cut myself. How about a rope? Nah, then I’d have to find a rope and I’d probably mess up the knot and just fall on my ass. Alcohol and pills? Hmm, that’s the way I’ll do it. But not today, I’m too tired to kill myself today. I’ll take a shower, have some coffee and see how I feel after that. The scenario above isn’t all that made up. It’s exactly how many people, gay or otherwise, wake up each morning. It’s a story I’ve heard from many different people with whom I have worked and befriended over the past two years as a volunteer with the National Alliance on Mental Illness and other Utah mental health organizations. Many of us may have had a morning like the one I describe above. The sad truth is that many people have mornings like this every day of their life. They are paralyzed by depression and anxiety. This type of paralysis, however, isn’t something that people can just get over or ignore or avoid. Fashion, shopping, boyfriends, drinking, sex and illicit drugs won’t make it go away. Major depression and anxiety are typical symptoms of a mental illness. People who suffer from

a mental illness have a real and palpable chemical imbalance in their brain. They need to seek out support from those around them. In many cases, they may also need medication and counseling to be able to cope with the realities of life. As we know, recently we have had a number of suicides in our community. The first

The primary reason for these suicides was that the young people were suffering from a mental illness reaction to them, by some, was to blame their families, their church, and the straight community in general. The truth is, however, they didn’t kill themselves because they may not have been accepted by their family or a church or by straights for being gay. The primary reason for these suicides was that the young people were suffering from a mental illness and either weren’t able to get or didn’t seek out the support they needed to deal with their disease. In the gay community we often stigmatize anything or anyone that’s different. We reject people based on their looks, physique,

clothes, job, income, education and anything else we deem as being substandard for some pseudo gay norm. We also tend to discard the reality of the pervasiveness of mental illness in our community. This appears to be especially true amongst the youth of our community. We ignore that our friends and loved ones may be suffering from major depression, or bi-polar or other forms of mental illness. By doing so, we fail to support them in their efforts to cope with life. When we avoid the tough conversations and judge those who are different than ourselves, in effect we are placing the blame for suicides within our population on everyone but our own community. As a community we need to embrace the truth that there are many people in our community, especially those who are under 25, who are suffering from mental illnesses and who lack the support or have not yet learned the tools to cope and/or to survive day to day. With the aim of creating resources for our community, NAMI is working together with the Utah Pride Center and other gay community organizations to eliminate the stigma of mental illness and providing our community with resources to support, nurture, and heal those among us who are suffering. In an effort to provide this support, NAMI is launching a support group called “Connection.” This mental health support group is offered at no charge and is organized specifically for those under 30 in the GLBTQ community. It is a place where people who are suffering from a mental illness or who know or love someone who is can gather together on a weekly basis to learn from and share with each other. By the end of the year NAMI will also launch a Connection group for those in the community who are 30 and older. A Facebook group called “Mind Games” has also been formed to provide information on all mental health resources and events available to the local GLBTQ Community. Q Starting September 21st Connection meetings will be held every Tuesday night at the Salt Lake City Main Library at 7pm. If you would like to find out more about how you can participate or help please contact NAMI Utah or join us on Facebook/Mind Games for regular updates.

snaps & slaps SNAP: Ben McAdams vs. Mel Nimer Utah’s State Senate District 2 has been boggling out-of-staters for nearly a year now. Last December, they were shocked to learn that the seat was not only in a Democratic district, but also respresented by an openly gay man, Scott McCoy. Then they were shocked that a straight but gay-friendly Mormon, Ben McAdams, took over. And now they’re shocked that a gay non-Mormon Republican, Mel Nimer, is seeking McAdams’ job (remember, most Americans think Utah is only good for polygamy and incoherent alcohol laws). While it’s always funny to watch people learn and re-learn that gay Utahns exist and that they sometimes do things other than be oppressed, the McAdams/Nimer race is interesting for a number of reasons. While it shows that Utah’s queer and allied community is diverse, it also shows that Democrats and Republicans can agree on fundamental questions about gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender equality. And that Utah’s Republican Party is willing to front an openly gay candidate — albeit in a heavily blue district. Still, if this signals a more gay-friendly turn in Utah’s GOP, we’re all for it.

SNAP: Turner Bitton At just 19, Turner Bitton has accomplished a lot for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community. Now, along with several friends, he’s started a chapter of Parents,

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1 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

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OUR VIEWS

I

lambda lore I Am Shocked! Shocked, I Tell You! by Ben Williams

LIKE TO TELL PEOPLE THAT I was clinically insane until I was 23 years old. I know some of you are saying that explains a lot. But really, so was every other homosexual born before April 9, 1974. In case you think I am exaggerating a tad, I assure you I am not. The American Psychiatric Association’s Bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders classified homosexuality as being “among the sociopathic personality disturbances” in its first edition in 1952, and there the definition it remained until 1974. The American Psychiatric Association’s board of trustees voted in December 1973 to remove homosexuality from the DSM lists of disorders. However, some conservative members of the APA called for a full vote by the group’s 17,905 eligible members to settle the matter. On April 9, 1974 the results were announced. With only 10,555 eligible APA members participating, 3,810 psychiatrists voted to keep “homosexuality” in the DSM as a mental disorder. However 5,854 voted to remove it. So, the next day, on my 23rd birthday, I was no longer considered a mental case. After the 1974 vote, the American Psychiatric Association dropped homosexuality as “a psychiatric disorder,” and even began to advocate for laws to protect lesbians and gay men from discrimination in employment, housing, transportation and licensing. They also encouraged “the repeal of all legislation making criminal offenses of sexual acts performed by consenting adults in private.” Prior to 1970, most trained psychiatrists generally considered desires for someone of the same sex to be a disorder. Karoly Maria Kertbeny’s 19th century term “homosexual” was the official moniker for those inflicted by this mental-physical disassociative disorder. In the early 20th century, thanks to Dr. Freud and Dr. Jung, psychiatry exercised an “authoritative voice” on public opinion. By mid-century, psychiatry’s “scientific opinion” and Alfred Kinsey’s sexology studies began to change the judicial view that homosexuality was a criminal deviancy to a mental illness. Believe it or not, this was a vast improvement. Homosexuals were now being ordered into treatment instead of prison. But in Utah, it would appear that treatment was as bad as prison. Cleon Skousen, while Chief of Police in Salt Lake City, was dismayed that some city judges were sending offending homosexuals to psychiatric treatment, rather than charging them with a felony and sending them to

the state pen for up to 20 years as state law mandated. To sidestep the judges, Skousen got the city fathers to adopt as code the 1952 state provision which ordered sex offenders to the Utah State Hospital. In this way, Skousen said, “a conviction would enable authorities to commit offenders for life if medical examinations showed them mentally ill.” Previously, persons charged with indecent exposure or lewdness were tried in police court in Salt Lake City. Records show that homosexuals were being sent to the state mental institution in Utah County through much of the 1950s. By the 1960s, aversion therapy or electroshock therapy was promoted as means to cure homosexuality. As early as 1935 the American Psychological Association was told of a doctor successfully treating homosexuality by using electro-shock therapy “delivered at intensities considerably higher than those usually employed on human subjects.” Dr. Frankenstein meets Dr. Freud. Electro-shock therapy was readily adopted in Utah to cure homosexuals, especially at LDS Church-owned college campuses. During the ’60s one man stood out as the premier proponent of this therapy: Dr. Robert D. Card, a Salt Lake psychologist. Dr. Card practiced the highly controversial bio-feedback therapy to cure homosexuality for nearly 20 years, explaining it simply as a “pairing of noxious stimulus with the stimulus trying to be reduced.” Dr. Card was judges’ and bishops’ go-to guy to fix queers, and he found no want of clients desperate to be heterosexual to fit in with the state’s dominant culture. Dr. Card’s credibility in the professional world was spotless. He published several academic and professional papers advocating aversion therapy to eliminate homosexuality from a patient’s personality. He worked out of offices in Salt Lake City and on the BYU campus with gay Mormons. His BYU clients were treated by having electrodes attached to their genitals and then shown homosexual pornography. If they got a stiffy they were zapped. A member of our community wrote an account of his therapy session with Dr. Card in his Salt Lake office. It goes like this: “The doctor would turn on a very graphic porno video of two or more men having sexual intercourse (and other activities). As I became excited and started to get an erection, the little ring around my penis would measure the slightest growth in circumference. This would then register on the device where the doctor sat, and he would hit me with a

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few seconds of volts. He would then sharply tell me to control my arousal. After a few minutes he would hit me with a few more seconds of electricity. This would go on for about five to 10 minutes. I would get aroused no matter how hard I tried not to, and I would be shocked again and again.” Dr. Card defended this acceptable medical practice by stating, “I have an ethical responsibility to help anyone who wants to change.” However, by 1985 Dr. Card stated that he had abandoned the electro-shock therapy. When asked if he was ever successful in introducing heterosexual feelings in his homosexual patients, he was silent. He may have abandoned electro-shock therapy but it is interesting to note that in 1998 Dr. Card patented a sexual arousal device with the US Patent Office. Today, reparative therapy, also known as conversion therapy, has generally replaced aversion therapy as a cure for homosexuality by those who have not accepted the APA’s 1974 decision. Reparative therapy states that homosexuality is a learned behavior, not truly an orientation. In 1998, the American Psychiatric Association passed a resolution rejecting this “treatment.” The resolution stated that attempts to change a person’s sexual orientation can cause “depression, anxiety and self-destructive behavior.” The APA feared that even the existence of reparative therapy spreads the idea that “homosexuality is a disease or is evil and has a dehumanizing effect resulting in an increase in discrimination, harassment, and violence against gays, lesbians and bisexuals.” And yet here in Utah, Evergreen International, which embraces reparative therapy has had an annual conference for nearly 25 years feeding off referrals from LDS Family Services and from Mormons who are taught to despise their nature. Dr. Allen E. Bergin, a psychology professor at BYU, sums up the LDS position on why homosexuals must become heterosexual: “Though a person may suffer from homosexual inclinations that are caused by some combination of biology and environment, the gospel requires that he or she develop firm self-discipline and make an energetic effort to change.” The American Psychiatric Association repeated in 2009 that reparative therapy is not “clinically sound.” However, LDS General Authority Elder Bruce C. Hafen, at that year’s Evergreen Conference, criticized the APA for claiming that sexual orientation is unchangeable. Hafen told attendees to “find a therapist who can help you identify the unmet emotional needs that you are tempted to satisfy in false sexual ways.” In 1990, Boyd K. Packer wrote this regarding the church’s stance on homosexuality: “We are sometimes told that leaders in the Church do not really understand these problems. Perhaps we don’t. There are many ‘whys’ for which we just do not have simple answers.” This is about the only thing Packer has ever said that I agree with. Q

Q on the strt Who is your favorite ❝ Utah artist and why?”

Dan Q. Tham Ruby Chacon — her art is vibrant and expansive and deeply personal.

Dave Bastian Trent Harris because he holds a magnifying glass up to all the wonderful weirdness that is Utah. Jonathan Krausert Harry Francis Sellers — he’s a great painter and nice to have a conversation with over a couple a beers on Saturdays at Juniors. Ann Clark Benjamin Wiemeyer ... I love that he is so diverse. He has such an incredible art talent, anywhere from his self portraits, to beautiful pieces on canvas to incredible graffiti art found on walls all over the city. Brandon Burt I’ll admit to a longtime fetish for Arnold Friberg’s heroic genre paintings of hunky Nephites and Lamanites. But Lee Deffebach’s abstract expressionist colorfields were truly revolutionary — and she was kind enough once to give me season tickets to the Utah Opera, so she’s got my vote! Maureen Duffy-Boose Trevor Southey. He has made Utah culture famous far, far beyond Utah.


bushauck Ken Mehlman, the Hypocrite by Ryan Shattuck

C

OMING OUT OF THE CLOSET as a gay man or women is not an easy process. There’s a lot of paperwork to fill out; a new state identification card has to be issued; there are separate gay tax forms to be filed; and the federally mandated homosexual agenda has to be memorized. So it makes sense why it took Ken Mehlman, former Chairman of the Republican National Committee as well as George W. Bush’s former campaign manager, many years to come out of the closet. The dust has mostly settled since Mehlman came out a few weeks ago in The Atlantic. In the article written by politics editor Marc Ambinder, Mehlman explains why it took him so long to publicly admit that he is a gay man: “It’s taken me 43 years to get comfortable with this part of my life ... Everybody has their own path to travel, their own journey, and for me, over the past few months, I’ve told my family, friends, former colleagues, and current colleagues, and they’ve been wonderful and supportive. The process has been something that’s made me a happier and better person. It’s something I wish I had done years ago.” Although opening up about his sexuality has made Ken Mehlman “a happier and better person,” many people are quite angry at the former RNC Chairman, for coming out years after leading the Republican Party through some of its most anti-gay years in recent history. Under Mehlman’s direction, several states passed legislation banning same-sex marriage in 2004, and promoted a political aura of intolerance and discrimination that has plagued the Republican Party for years to follow. Naturally, many gay and lesbian men and women have labeled Mehlman a “hypocrite,” have satirically awarded him the “Roy Cohen Award” for “managing the most anti-gay Presidential campaigns in history” and have even called Mehlman a “Quisling Homophobic scumbag.” Is Ken Mehlman a hypocrite for coming out as a gay man after leading anti-gay political party? Or does he deserve our sym-

pathy for being ‘brave’ and admitting his sexuality in the midst of an anti-gay political party? Mehlman is currently in the process of repenting for his past sins by working with the American Foundation for Equal Rights, which supports a legal challenge to California’s anti-same-sex marriage proposition, and is attempting to garner sympathy with statements such as the following: “I can’t change the fact that I wasn’t in this place personally when I was in politics, and I genuinely regret that. It was very hard, personally ... If they can’t offer support, at least offer understanding. “What I do regret, and think a lot about, is that one of the things I talked a lot about in politics was how I tried to expand the party into neighborhoods where the message wasn’t always heard. I didn’t do this in the gay community at all.” Although some members of the gay community, such as Oscar-winning screenwriter and gay activist Dustin Lance Black, believe that “Ken represents an incredible coup for the American Foundation for Equal Rights,” the aftermath of damage caused by Mehlman during his anti-gay reign of political terror is so deep and entrenched in society that any apology and action is too little, too late. Mehlman states that, in regard to his traitorous, self-internalized homophobia, “At least for me, it wasn’t like there was a light-bulb moment,” and “The reality is, it’s taken me 43 years to come to terms with this part of my life.” Yes, some people take a long time to come to terms with who and what they are. Some gay men and women come out of the closet when they are teenagers; others take several decades to deconstruct and determine their sexuality. Other excuses and justifications may also be applied to Mehlman’s situation, such as: Are Americans not allowed to have opinions and political beliefs that evolve and shift with time and experience? Haven’t we all belonged to a job, a political party or another organization that made a decision with which we disagreed?

Ken Mehlman is no ordinary American, because he changed history in ways that very few Americans have

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 19

Aren’t public figures allowed to maintain a semblance of privacy in regard to their personal lives? Aren’t Americans afforded the right to have private lives that are not dictated by their politics? Yes, Americans can change their minds; yes, most of us have belonged to an organization that may have made a decision with which we disagreed; yes, public figures deserve privacy; yes, Americans have the right to support politics that disagree with their private lives. Nevertheless, most Americans are not in positions of power to affect national policy that affects the lives of millions of fellow Americans. Although all Americans are afforded the right to be as public or as private about their lives as they desire, most Americans do not influence policy that prevents other Americans from marrying, from visiting their partners in the hospi-

tal, and do not help create a political atmosphere that leads to the potential suicides of closeted gay teenagers. Ken Mehlman is no ordinary American, because he changed history in ways that very few Americans have. He does not deserve the privacy or sympathy of the average citizen. He gave up those rights long ago, when he started receiving a regular paycheck from the Republican National Committee, encouraging him to strip as many rights away from gay men and women as possible. No, coming out of the closet is not easy for anyone, even Ken Mehlman. And I doubt he’s even started filling out his paperwork. Q

Ryan Shattuck is the author of “Revolutions for Fun and Profit,” at revolutionsforfunandprofit. com

Friday Nights on Monument Plaza in Sugar House!

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by Christopher Katis

I

REMEMBER WHEN MY COUSIN LAURA’S husband was transferred to Golden, Colo. After settling in, she e-mailed me their new address and gave me some details about the house: it was only a couple of years old, had been in the Parade of Homes and was located in a great school district. I asked her if it had any charm. That, I learned, wasn’t one of her priorities. When Kelly and I bought our first place a couple of years later, I e-mailed the address to Laura and mentioned that our new place was nearly 100 years old and sat square in the middle of one of the worst school districts in Northern California, but man did it have charm! Charm used to be a requirement for us in homes, but once we became dads, our priorities in houses evolved. Last month, Kelly and I closed on a new house. It wasn’t a pretty experience. Our realtor Yvonne, another one of my cousins, claimed that in her 30 years in real estate she’d never seen a couple disagree with one another so consistently. Everything he liked, I pretty much hated. And vice versa. When we started, I told Yvonne I had three criteria for any house: at least two bathrooms, a place for an office/spare room and driving distance from my parents. Being a mother herself, she knew that a nice, safe neighborhood with kids in it, a decent-sized back yard and a good school district were also on the list even if we never mentioned them. Kelly had his own criteria: a unique home that oozed charm and was close to the private school at the Greek Church the boys started this year. That proved to be a tough order to fill. We’ve lived in “not perfect for us” houses before, and we’ve always managed to turn them into show pieces. Okay, Kelly’s always been able to turn them into show pieces. He got the gay decorating gene, I got the Greek one ... you know, the gene that makes you think everything blue and white and covered in plastic works. Take, for example, the nondescript illegal garden apartment we rented when we lived in San Francisco. I hadn’t wanted to move into it, but Kelly persuaded me by promising “we can make it cute.”

Within a couple of years he had taken a dark, forgettable apartment and turned it into, well, PeeWee’s Playhouse. From the wisteria-purple and corrugated metal walls in the living room to the giant sun blazing down in the sea blue kitchen, the place was a freakin’ masterpiece! So I know he can do it. But this time we’ve headed to the suburbs. It’s a different world out there. Somehow I doubt our new neighbors will mirror those we’ve enjoyed during the past 16 months in the Avenues. Last week, while we were unloading the first of the seemingly never-ending boxes at the new house, one of the neighbors introduced himself. No matter how clearly we explained our relationship, he still walked away confused. Now that I think about it, this move to the suburbs could be a chance for us to be good gay ambassadors! I’m going to bet that for more than a few of our neighbors we may be the first honest-to-goodness homos they’ve ever met live and in-person. This move is making me venture outside of my comfort zone. Once again, the boys are forcing me to head in an unpredictable direction. And I think that’s a good thing. And even though the house isn’t the perfect place for the two men in our family, it is pretty close to perfect for the two boys. Even Kelly has to admit that to a certain degree. There’s something to be said about a neighborhood where ducks swim in the canal, and grazing horses come right up to people to bum a cube of sugar or bite of apple. The house does have a lot to offer as well, and I like it a whole lot more than Kelly does. In fact, I was the one who said we should pull the trigger and buy it. Partly because I was sick of looking at houses. But it also met all of my criteria. (Although, apparently, my parents live close enough to drop by unexpectedly. That’s a little scary.) As time goes by, and as we make that house work for us, as we get used to living in a suburban neighborhood and being the only gay family for miles around, I know we’ll love it. Even Kelly. Maybe even as much as the boys and I do. Q

Charm used to be a requirement for us in homes

2 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


L

crp of the wk Charlie Crist by D’Anne Witkowski

OOK, I DON’T KNOW IF Florida Gov. Charlie Crist is gay. And while it really should be a non-issue because being gay is not this scandalous thing that makes a person unfit for public office like some loonies on the far right believe, the fact is: it matters. It’s an issue because Crist is making it an issue by reiterating his support for a constitutional ban on same-sex couples getting married. Granted, this isn’t the first time Crist has said he supports such a thing. Apparently he mentioned it at some point while running for governor and governors don’t really have much power when it comes to the United States Constitution. But now he’s running for Senate as an Independent. The United States Senate. On Aug. 29 during an interview on CNN, Ed Henry brought up the issue of same-sex marriage and pointed out that Marco Rubio, one of Crist’s opponents in the Senate race, supports a constitutional ban. “The former Republican Party Chairman Ken Mehlman came out and said he’s gay and he called on conservatives to kind of move to the political center and be more tolerant on this issue,” Henry said. “Now that you’re trying to occupy the political center, are you still in favor of a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage?” “I feel the same way, yes, because I feel that marriage is a sacred institution, if you will,” Crist responded. “But I do believe in tolerance. I’m a live-and-let-live kind of guy, and while I feel that way about marriage, I think if partners want to have the opportunity to live together, I don’t have a problem with that.” So he’s a “live-and-let-live kind of guy” who believes in “tolerance,” eh? And while marriage is “sacred,” thereby rendering homos unfit for such an institution, he doesn’t mind partners living together. So long as their relationship isn’t in any way recognized or protected and the law treats them as legal strangers then Crist doesn’t “have a problem with that.” Oh, how very magnanimous of him. “I think that’s where most of America is,” Crist continues. “So I think that, you know, you have to speak from the heart about these issues. They are very personal. They have a significant impact on an awful lot of people and the less the government is telling people what to do, the better off we’re all going to be.” Since telling the government to stay out

of people’s personal lives and writing discrimination into the constitution seem to be contradictory, Henry accuses Crist of trying to have it both ways (no pun intend-

ed, I’m sure). But Crist doesn’t budge. “Well, everything is in a matter of degree, Ed, and when it comes to the institution of marriage, I believe that it is between a man and a woman; it’s just how I feel,” he says. Call me crazy, but “it’s just how I feel” is a pretty flimsy argument for amending the Constitution to keep gay people from marrying each other. Hell, it’s a flimsy reason to amend it for anything. By itself, Crist’s unabashed support of writing discrimination into one of our nation’s founding documents is alarming to say the least. But it’s even more alarming

if he is, indeed, gay. And he is widely rumored and believed to be just that. Yes, he’s married. To a lady. Since 2008. Which, of course, proves that he’s not gay because of how getting opposite-sex married automatically makes you not gay. So who knows? Maybe all of the gay rumors are wrong. Either way, Crist is still a creep. Q

D’Anne Witkowski has been gay for pay since 2003. She’s a freelance writer and poet (believe it!). When she’s not taking on the creeps of the world she reviews rock ‘n’ roll shows in Detroit with her twin sister.

The YWCA Salt Lake City is pleased to invite you to the 22nd annual celebration of women in our community!

YWCA LeaderLuncheon • September 17, 2010 Grand America Hotel • 555 S. Main Street, Salt Lake City Reception 11:30 a.m. • Luncheon 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Keynote speaker: Jeannette Walls, author of the New York Times best-seller The Glass Castle. The 2010 Outstanding Achievement Awards will be presented at LeaderLuncheon to: Lynne N. Ward - Government/Public Service Marian Ingham - Community Service Cynthia A. Bioteau - Education Deborah S. Bayle - Health/Human Services

Tickets: $60, $50 for YWCA members/associates Sponsorships are available. Visit www.ywca.com to register online or call 801.537.8619.

salt lake city

Celebrating the Accomplishments of Women...Supporting Women and Children Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 2 1


SALT L AKE CONSIGNMENT SHOPS

Coming Home with Home Again by Joselle Vanderhooft

M Abode Brightens Up Any Abode by Joselle Vanderhooft

I

T’S NOT EVERY CONSIGNMENT SHOP that combines vintage clothing, crystal chandeliers, flea markets and mannequin parts, but few consignment shops are like Abode, where “shabby chic” meets “subtle elegance.” That’s how owner Miriam Sabir Venkataramanan describes her store, which she opened in 2005, after a few years managing Simply Home, another consignment shop on 1300 S. 900 East. And a peek inside Abode’s brightly painted building shows just how apt the description. There, decorators and collectors can find any number of unusual and striking items to brighten up their abode, from vintage theater marquee letters and unusual step stools to bigger pieces like armoires and even sofas, on occasion. “If it’s funky and interesting and vintage, we’ll take it,” said Venkataramanan. “Our bottom line is fun, funky and functional. I think we like to focus on the unusual while still remaining utilitarian. [For example], right now we have a shocking turquoise massage chair.” For even more unusual fare, visitors are invited to check out the store’s vintage children and baby section and its salvage room where unusual doorknobs, drawer knobs, mirrors, and even doors and windows are waiting. There’s even a back section which Venkataramanan lovingly calls “the Paris Flea Market,” which she describes as consignment with “a little Victorian and Edwardian thrown in.” There, crystal chandeliers can be found alongside Audrey Hepburnstyle little black dresses. “We call it our well-behaved side. So you know what the rest of the shop is like,” Venkataramanan joked. Unlike many consignment shops which spe-

cialize solely in furniture and home accessories, Abode also accepts vintage clothing, which Venkataramanan describes as anything “pre1960.” Though, she says that she’s particular about what she accepts because “there are so many things that can be wrong with clothes, like tears or damage.” Even so, the store’s mannequins are well-clothed and ready to be sold or rented for any number of events. Venkataramanan admits that she’s partial to mannequins, which are ubiquitous throughout Abode, from displays using their hands to an unusual sculpture in the bathroom. “In our restroom we have the bottom half of a female mannequin. Essentially she’s naked, and that holds our toilet paper,” she said. For those who can’t get enough of Abode’s classy flea market ambiance, the store holds an outdoor flea market in its parking lot each year from April through September. In fair weather and foul, up to 30 vendors meet once a month to hawk their wares, which have included clothing, homemade lemonade, “truly vintage, antique religious relics” and dolls bearing the likeness of Mexican artist and feminist icon Frida Kahlo. Venkataramanan, who provides breakfast to the vendors, said that she hosts the monthly market to draw attention not only to Abode but to the creative artisans who populate the surrounding neighborhoods. “We love Sugar House and the Avenues neighborhoods,” she said. “We love the people. It’s really our niche.” The final Abode flea market for the season will be held Sept. 18 from 9 a.m.–4 p.m. in the store’s parking lot at 1720 S. 900 East. For more information about the store visit abodepfm.com or abode-abode.blogspot.com. Q

22 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

AKING A HOME’S INTERIOR truly unique and beautiful is often a challenge in this contemporary world of cheap, mass-produced furniture. Thankfully, consignment shops like Home Again are there to help add a touch of class and beauty to any home with unique furniture in a variety of styles — including some items that most people wouldn’t think of as decorative. “We’ve even had a reclining wheelchair made out of wood,” said Kathryn Blomquist, manager of the Sugar House store. “That was kind of interesting. And right now I have a tortoise shell with a net on it to hang on a wall.” A canoe, she added, has also found its way into the store to be snapped up, as have antique watering buckets and horse troughs. Typically, however, both Home Again locations specialize in what Blomquist calls “eclectic and fun” furnishings in styles ranging “from Asian to French and Italian to German,” and which include everything from armoires and kitchen hutches to headboards and benches crafted by local artisans. “They’re all very unique in their own way,” she said. The Sugar House store was opened in 2002 by Lisa Herbold, the owner of a consignment clothing store near the University of Utah’s lower campus. Herbold moved to Jackson Hole several years ago, and the store is now owned by Emily Larsen, as is the Midvale location, which opened in 2007. While many furniture consignment stores

(such as Now & Again, which is also featured in this issue) specialize in small items that fit well in downtown apartments, Home Again carries larger items like book cases, dressers and coffee tables. Most of these items, said Blomquist, are imported by consignors, but both shops also accept consignment items from locals. “We have to see pictures of large items before they’re brought in,” said Blomquist, noting that both locations are highly selective about what they take. Small items, on the other hand, can be brought in any time. “We get really great dishware, china, all different kinds of stemware,” said Blomquist. If the item does not sell in 90 days, consignors must pick it up. Although Home Again has some pricier pieces — the most expensive in the Sugar House store, said Blomquist, is valued at $10,000 — both locations have a wide selection for shoppers, decorators and bargain-hunters of all budgets. Some classy end tables, for example, start at just $30. “It all depends on the piece,” said Blomquist. And while some pieces are vintage, several are brand new, a fact which only adds to the eclectic charm of both stores, which Blomquist described as “very different” from each other. “We don’t just specialize in old furniture. It’s a mix of new and old,” she said. Home Again is located at 1019 E. 2100 South and 7490 Holden St. in Midvale. For hours call 801-487-4668 for the Sugar House location and 801-255-5457 for the Midvale store. Q


Now & Again’s Styles from Now & Then by Joselle Vanderhooft

S

TEP INTO NOW & AGAIN in search of a cute end table and you might just leave with a giant golden rooster that greeted you at the door. “It was posted [to the shop’s website] in the evening and it sold within the first 20 minutes of business the day after,” said Michael Sanders, owner of the downtown consignment store which regularly sees such unusual items as the rooster, which he described as a decorative object made in the 1960s by Syroco, a company famous for its “hard plastic and painted gold” objects including wall sconces and rococo-style mirrors. The memorable fowl is one of many unique furnishings from past times and present day rubbing shoulders at the store. And that’s just the way Sanders likes it. “To me, it’s all about the mix,” he said. “I think the modern home is not filled with dusty antiques nor is it a sterile environment filled with stark hardness. It’s a mix in the middle, and I love our store to reflect that mix. I like to say we’re not looking for folks to come in and furnish their entire house from the store. We provide the “wow pieces,” the fun accessories that give a room personality.” And how does the golden bird fit in? “We love to display things that are kind of kooky and whimsical,” he said. His customers agree. Since the shop’s opening in May 2009, people from downtown, the Avenues and Capitol Hill have scoured its two daily-changing floors for tables, chairs, bathroom and kitchenware from all decades. “Pretty much from the moment I opened I was busy,” said Sanders. And while he opened the shop with overflow items from his friends’ garages, today he takes in goods from 300

consignors. “The merchandise comes in a pretty steady clip every day,” he said. “One of the things many people mention — especially those who make the rounds in the secondhand stores in Salt Lake — is that our store seems different every time they come in.” Sanders credits this to his policy of leaving merchandise in the store for no longer than three months. If it doesn’t sell, he explained, the owners must pick it up. “I think I’ve earned a reputation as a fair businessperson,” he said. “We’re kind and considerate to our customers and we pay everyone on time.” Sanders and Now & Again’s consignors also regularly donate items to a number of charities including Big Brothers, Big Sisters Club and Our Store, the thrift shop run by the People With AIDS Coalition of Utah. “Through our consignors, we’ve donated through the course of the year to yard sales benefiting people in need throughout the valley,” Sanders added. “We love giving to those.” And Sanders has loved consignment ever since he discovered 1950s clothing as a teenager. After a grueling life on the East Coast opening and planning events for night clubs and restaurants, Sanders decided to turn his lifelong passion for collecting into his livelihood. Having fallen in love with Utah on visits to his sister, who lives in Park City, Sanders moved to Salt Lake City in 2008 to embrace “a simpler life.” “I’ve always found Salt Lake to be an interesting city and one of America’s great secrets,” he said. “I felt it would be a wonderful quality of life here. I’ve always been very impressed at not only the natural beauty and friendliness of people, but of the very large gay and lesbian community here, and the fact it’s such a politically active

and exciting community. Back east in New York you can be whoever you want to be and no one says anything, so you get a bit complacent about being politically active, where in Utah it really makes a difference. I love that.” Although Sanders loves his store on 501 E. 300 South, he would also love to open a second location in Sugar House, where he is currently looking for the perfect storefront. There he would like to sell larger furniture, which he cannot do for his uptown clients who tend to live in small apartments. He is also preparing to expand his downtown store to take in more “really fabulous” vintage clothing, for which he says there is a mostly unfulfilled demand in the city. When this happens, he also hopes to offer alterations on site, a service he said that many clothing consignment stores on the East Coast offer. In the meantime, visitors to the shop will be greeted by Jolie and Bijoux, Sanders’ toy poodles whom he calls “one of the main attractions.” And if they’re looking for more funky items like the golden rooster, they only need to wait awhile for something unusual. “Once someone brought in a poster that I thought was fabulous,” said Sanders. “To me, at first glance, it was this fabulous deco poster of this jazz musician playing a trumpet. I said,

“I love the poster of a jazz musician!” and the woman [who brought it in] replied, “That’s the Angel Moroni!” Visit Now & Again online at nowandagainslc. com. Q

Like a Gay Man with Amnesia — We Come Out Every Two Weeks

salt lake Utah’s gay and lesbian news & entertainment biweekly magazine

The 2010 edition of TheQPages is out! Get one! or go to TheQPages.com

801-649-6663 QSaltLake.com

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 23


TRE VOR SOUTHEY

Trevor Southey’s

Oxymoronic Life on Display

“ The p ur sui t of t r u t h in one ’s life and art of ten le ads to conflict

in

one’s

self

and

conf rontat ion w it h ot her s.” – Robe r t Fly nn Johnson , cur ator in ch a rge , Ache nb ach Foundat ion for Gr aphic Arts, Fine Arts Museums

of

San

Fr ancisco

MOM, 1970

2 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

T

by Michael Aaron

REVOR SOUTHEY is a man who has lived several lives in one lifetime. Born in Africa, studied in England, converted to the Mormon Church and served a mission, graduated from Brigham Young University, married a woman, sired four children, founded the Mormon Art and Belief Movement, developed an artists’ commune in Alpine, came out as a gay man, moved to San Francisco, and through all of it, expressed himself through his art. “My work reflects my life ... Sometimes to an embarrassing degree,” Southey said during a lunch at Café Trio with myself, friend and art collector Jim Dabakis, and Day Christensen, fellow artist and curator of Southey’s show at the University of Utah Museum of Fine Arts. Indeed, you can see transformations in Southey’s life as you look at his art. That will become eminently clear during his show at UMFA, which will run from Oct. 21 through Feb. 11. Titled “Reconciliation,” his show is a “retrospective of [his] life and work,” through “four life passages that have defined

DAD, 1970

Southey’s character and his art: his youth in Rhodesia and education in England; his life as a married, practicing Mormon and his desire for a utopian lifestyle created around family, farming and art; Southey’s decision to acknowledge his homosexuality in 1982, which coincided with the first major public awareness of the AIDS NANNY, 1969 epidemic; and the reconciliation of his life decisions as expressed in his revised artistic approach to the human form,” according to the UMFA website. “Reconciliation” is also the title of his book, a nearly 200page piece of art in itself. “I was shocked at how autobiographical the book was,” Southey said.

Africa Southey was born in Rhodesia, Africa (now Zimbabwe) in 1940 of European parents. As a child he was timid, skinny and plagued with bouts of rheumatic fever. He wrote of his childhood in his book: “There is a photograph of my mother and myself. It is very revealing, though the imperfect skills of the photographer may have contributed to the sense of uncertainty, as the figures lean on the tilted ground. My mother’s feet are placed together, her plain cotton dress buttoned from neck to knee. She smiles in frank confidence of her essential beauty, though her hair is thin and parted with casual style. She is a young woman, evidently of few means but firm conviction. “I am a skinny boy, perhaps age 7 or so. I lean in toward my mother as if regretting ever having left the safety of her womb. I stare out of sunken, dark eye sockets, serious, a deep sense of my peculiarity already clear in my bearing. From the outset I did not fit well into the larger world. My mother and family, especially the women, secured any sense of well being I had at all. My essential timidity and then my illness justified my


clinging to her and her powerful, protective certainty. She was a fierce, strong woman. “My father was off to war, and after that off in his difficult world of survival, a world always challenging to his kind and gentlemanly soul.” He was forbidden from taking art courses in secondary school, and therefore chose to abandon his schooling before he received a diploma. He was, however, able to take special afternoon classes offered by the school principal’s wife. He also was able to find a handful of art books at the school library. He was enthralled by classical statuary of male nudes. His parents then gave him two volumes of reproductions of Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks for his 16th birthday, which greatly inspired his later work.

BLESSING, 1974

Mormonism

INTERCESSION AT GETHSEMANE

abstract was lost on the general population.” He and a few other artists began creating artwork in a Mormon theme. As their work grew, Brigham Young University “caught wind” of them and began watching. In 1969, “We had an exhibition at the library at BYU,” he said. “And what came out of that was the Mormon Festival of Arts.” That led to what would soon be called the Mormon Art and Belief Movement. He became an instructor of art at BYU, but was frustrated by the regimented attitudes toward art there. He was commissioned to do a piece of art for a show. As he presented the painting, which included male full frontal nudity, he was told, “Trevor — this is magnificent work, but we can never exhibit it.” He was forced to cover the groin area with gouache. “You could lick a thumb and wash the gouache off,”

He went on to study art in Sussex, England at the age of 17 and then the Natal Technical College in South Africa, where he met two Mormon missionaries. Drawn to the structured environment and spiritual system that meshed with the utopian views of his youth, he began a tumultuous relationship with the church. At the time of his conversion in the early ’70s, the church denied the priesthood to black members — a fact that mirrored the racism of his home country, where blacks couldn’t vote. He was also aware of the church’s stand on homosexuality, but was suppressing those feelings in himself anyway. The form of his art had already taken shape before his conversion to Mormonism. He had already begin his life of oxymoron. He says at the time he entered the Mormon Church, “I was only beginning to sense the terrible paradox of the solitude of the soul in its eternal, excruciating, wonderful dance toward union with another.” He then moved to the United States, what he called the “promised land.” He landed in New York City in the heat and humidity of July and was presented at the feet of the Statue of Liberty. He had come to the States to “serve the [LDS] Church and serve the Lord,” he said. He took in the World’s Fair and came across the Catholic Pavilion with Michelangelo’s Pieta and the Mormon Pavilion full of “mediocre art” actually painted by Seventh Day Adventists. “I knew that greater art was possible in the spirit of the restored church,” he wrote in his book. “Perhaps I was to be one vehicle for that new Renaissance.” “Mormon art,” at the time, he said, was an “oxymoron. The EDEN FARM, 1971

Southey laughed. Eventually, Southey had to leave BYU. “I didn’t quit BYU,” he said. “They fired me.”

Eden Farm In 1967, he married his wife, Elaine Fish. “I knew I must find a companion,” he wrote. “Some fine woman who would be with me through all eternity.” He met Elaine through a woman he had dated while seeking his eternal companion. “She was earnest and learned and beautiful,” he wrote. “She has a wide and generous face, a smile of perfect teeth with large eyes, clear and certain. We immediately related in a most vital and extraordinary way, sharing ideals and hopes in an openness rare on a first date.” —Continued on page 28

—Continued on page 28

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 2 7


TRE VOR SOUTHEY Dabakis negotiated the four-month-long exhibit of Southey’s work and life at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. Starting with an Oct. 21 special event, his exhibition will last through Feb. 11. The exhibition will follow Southey’s work, and therefore his life, from his time in Africa to his latest project, Warriors, in five adjoining galleries. In the first gallery, his work during his time in Africa will be displayed. The second will show his Mormon art. Then Eden Farm, then art as he was coming out. In the final gallery will be his current work. The last gallery, Southey said, is very different than the previous four. “There is not as much cohesiveness in the final gallery,” he said. “Once removed from the dogma, you can go anywhere.” Southey was diagnosed with prostate cancer shortly before Christmas in 2002 and currently lives with his daughter in the San Francisco Bay area. He is still close to his wife and children and considers himself a family man. He is not a fan of the word gay, finding it frivolous.

SAMARITAN, 1978

Trevor Southey Continued from page 27

Their courtship was short and they decided to marry, even though Southey was “haunted by [his] reality.” They moved to Alpine, in what would eventually be called Eden Farm, and had several children. “My children were, as babies, and are now, as adults, a consuming passion for me,” he said. “I cannot imagine life without them.” Southey talks of his life in oxymorons. “My life is like black and white,” he says. “My time in Alpine [Utah] was the most spectacular/heartbreaking/ blissful situation. The property was beautiful, the art was transforming. Everything was beautiful on the outside. On the inside there was grief.” “It was the best of times and the worst of times, as they say,” he continued.

VLADIMIR, 2003

Coming Out By the time his last child was born, however, his capacity to “suppress his nature” had reached its end. Doubts of his religion and its condemnation of what he perceived was his “natural way” took its toll on his marriage and his faith. He and Emily divorced and he moved to Salt Lake City. “Coming out was huge to me,” Southey reflected. “I went from the beautiful, large estate in Alpine to a shack on 8th East.” “I remember sitting among boxes in the middle of the room in November and I started to howl like an animal,” he said. “At the same time it was pain and relief.” “A lot of people experience this,” he said. “At one time they are surrounded by family and friends ... then not.” He said those days were a tough and wonderful period. Southey then met Jim Dabakis when he was interviewed by him for KTALK Radio as his painting, “Flight Aspiration,” was removed from the Salt Lake City International Airport because a woman said it might inspire rape. Dabakis called the interview a failure because Southey wouldn’t rise to the bait of his art being risqué in any way. Their resulting friendship, however, was anything but a failure. Dabakis has since represented Southey’s work at his gallery in Park City, the Thomas Kearns McCarthy Gallery. “Jimmy has pushed and pushed my art work,” Southey said. “This [show at the University of Utah Museum of Fine Arts] would have never happened without him.”

2 8 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

VYACHESLAV, 2001

FARM EGGS, 1979

“You can’t deny the deep spiritual calling for love,” he explained. Q

Trevor Southey: Reconciliation will run from Oct. 21 through Feb. 11, 2011, at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. More information at umfa.utah.edu and at trevorsouthey.com


Illuminating risks to LGBTQ youth and providing strategies for keeping families united.

Honoring families with keynote speaker, John Cepek, National PFLAG President and presenting Volunteer of the Year Award, Organization of the Year Award, and the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award.

October 8-10, 2010 Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel $125

October 10, 2010 Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel $35/ticket, $350/table sponsorships available

Pricing, registration, agenda, and presenter bios can be found at www.utahpridecenter.org space is limited

Registration, sponsorships, and more information can be found at www.utahpridecenter.org

PRESENTERS Dr. Caitlin Ryan, Family Acceptance Project Trevor Project Massachusetts Commission on GLBT Youth National Youth Advocacy Coalition Legal Services for Children Gender Spectrum Planned Parenthood of Utah ACLU of Utah and more!

John Cepek National PFLAG President

WWW.UTAHPRIDECENTER.ORG


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

gay agenda Happy Bir... by Tony Hobday

OK, so I didn’t say “Screw you Labor Day weekend!” Instead, I said, “I want to have your babies, Labor Day Weekend!” I ventured to the Gorge with my lil sister, Jake. When we arrived, it became Flaming Gorge. We went wake boarding, cliff-jumping and jellyfish hunting (we didn’t see any, dammit!). I even scratched a park ranger’s kitty. Alright, I can’t lie to you, we actually only played Gin, drank iced tea and took afternoon naps (rubbed down with Ben-gay and wearing pink ‘Sleeping Beauty’ sleep masks); it was like heaven in a vodka bottle.

17

FRIDAY — There’s a new tenant at Armadillo Acres and she’s wreaking havoc all over Florida’s most exclusive trailer park in Dark Horse Company Theatre’s production of THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER PARK MUSICAL. Pippi is a stripper on the run (the tassels are just a spinnin’), and when she comes between an agoraphobic (that’s the fear of wool) housewife and her less-than-affluent husband, she causes a mighty hurricane. This campy, caustic musical fable has everything from spray cheese to road kill to (or at) Costco. 8pm, Thurs.–Sat., 6pm, Sun., through Oct. 3, Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main St., Park City. Tickets $18–25, 435-649-9371 or parkcityshows.com. Q It has been called the greatest play produced in the English language in 400 years, and now Pioneer Theatre is proud to present a production of William Shakespeare’s HAMLET. It’s part ghost story, part murder mystery, part psychological thriller and part hard-to-understand. Tehehe! 7:30pm, through Oct. 2, Pioneer Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, UofU. Tickets $24–42, 801-581-6961 or pioneertheatre.org. Q In 1988, one of the greatest rock bands formed — THE SMASHING PUMPKINS. Though the band has led a tumultuous career, they are one of the most diverse, densely layered, and guitar-heavy groups. Their music contains elements of gothic rock, heavy metal, dream pop, psychedelic rock, arena rock, electronica and a shoegazer-style production. My favorite is “1979” ... yes, I am gay! 7pm, In The Venue at Club Sound, 219 S. 600 West. Tickets $40, 801-467-8499 or smithstix.com.

18

SATURDAY — Happy Birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy bir .... oh lord, I’m getting as old as Gene Gieber because I don’t remember the rest. Anyhoo, the old fart is celebrating his birthday tonight with an UNDERWEAR PARTY. And the old perv loves Baskits. Love ya long time, Gene! 8pm, Club Try-Angles, 251 W. 900 South. For more info, call 801-364-3203 or visit clubtry-angles.com. Q Happy Birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy bir ... shit, I did it again! Anyhoo, The Trapp is celebrating 20 years of supporting alcohol abusers — just kidding ... well, sort of, because Jabe serves a drink called the Drunken Tony — I wonder who that’s named after? Double anyhoo, join Joe Redburn and his clan at their 20TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY, it’ll be a freakin’ hoot! 7pm, The Trapp, 102 S. 600 West. 801-531-8727. 3 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

19

SUNDAY — Equality Utah’s monthly sociopolitical event, PILSNERS AND POLITICS, is held on the third Sunday of each month at Squatters. The restaurant has a butt-load of beer to choose from: staples to seasonal brews to limited releases, like Provo Girl, Nitro Cream, Monkey’s Dunkle and Hell’s Keep. EU also has a butt-load of Utah politics to discuss, so be there, get your butt loaded (but don’t drive!) and hear from candidates about their races. 4pm, Squatters Brewery, 147 W. Broadway. Cost $5, 801-355-5020 or equalityutah.org.

22

WEDNESDAY — Direct from the Las Vegas Strip comes drag sensation EDIE. She will perform her solo cabaret show, a fastpaced hour — and then some — of the leggy showgirl singing her favorites, all with her signature ’60s gogo flair. Look out for high-kicking choreography and witty off-the-cuff banter. 8pm, Black Box Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. Broadway. Tickets $25, 801-355-ARTS or arttix.org.

23

THURSDAY — Sugar Space’s 2010 Artist in Residence (recipients receive 40 hours of free space, approximately $500 allotted to staff, marketing materials, etc., and artists receive a percentage of the door) recipient, INFLUX DANCE, from SLC/Charlottesville, Va., perform an original dance theatre piece exploring women throughout history based on writing by Margaret Atwood. 8pm, through Saturday, Sugar Space, 616 Wilmington Ave. Tickets $10/adv.–12/door, 888-300-7898 or thesugarspace. com. Q Become absorbed in the CONFIGURATIONS of contemporary dance as Ririe-Woodbury explores the depths of the human experience with four cutting-edge choreographers. The performance will feature a newly commissioned work entitled “Duet” by Tony Award-winning choreographer, Bill T. Jones. The uncompromising and unapologetic political and social views of Jones have always laid the foundation for his dances. He has taken considerable strides in merging art with social commentary on topics such as being African American, homosexual, and HIV positive in today’s society. 7:30pm, through Saturday, Jeanne Wagner Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. Broadway. Tickets $30, 801-355-ARTS or arttix.org.

Q This event sounds like more fun than a night with Ryan Kwanten (Jason Stackhouse) ... OK, not really! The first annual POWELLAPALOOZA is packed with tons of music, games and beach parties. Taking place on the Arizona side of Lake Powell, the four-day festival includes over 50 bands, a golf tournament, poker run, hot air balloon rides and more. Through Sept. 26 in Page, Az. Tickets $35–105, VIP tix $290. For more information, powellapalooza.com.

24

FRIDAY — Nestled in the majestic Zion Canyon is an adorable little town named Springdale, and this weekend the adorable little town is host to the ZION CANYON MUSIC FESTIVAL. Performers include Thriftstore Cowboys, Sputnik, Mother Hips and Crippled Stripper. And may I recommend that you stay at Under the Eaves Bed & breakfast — the gay couple that owns it are fantabulous! 5pm tonight & 11am Saturday, Springdale Town Park, Springdale. Tickets $15/Friday, $20/Saturday or $30 for both days, zioncanyonmusicfestival.com.

25

SUNDAY — “Women fake orgasms because they have excellent time management skills.” That’s a Dottie Dixon quote ... I mean WANDA SYKES. Anyhoo, the ultra-hip gay comedian will be bringing down the house in Wendover. Don’t miss it. “Drinking will make you feel like a sexy 26-year-old.” That’s what Michael Aaron believes! 7pm, Peppermill Concert Hall, 680 Wendover Blvd., Wendover, Nev. Tickets $40–70, 800-217-0049 or wendoverfun. com.

UPCOMING EVENTS OCT 16 NOV 26-29 APR 11

Spencer Day, Rose Wagner The Rockettes, Maverick Ctr Lily Tomlin, Kingsbury Hall


save the date

hear me out By Chris Azzopardi

Robyn Body Talk, Pt. 2

September 18 sWerve’s Oktoberfest swerveutah.com September 18 Walk for Life, Bike for Life utahaids.org September 25 ROTC Military Ball rotcslc.com September 25 Wanda Sykes, Wendover, Nev. wendoverfun.com September 28 Equality Utah Allies Dinner equalityutah.org October 9 National Coming Out Day Breakfast utahpridecenter.org October 16 sWerve’s Halloween Bash swerveutah.com October 16–20 Living With AIDS Conference pwacu.org October 18–22 UofU Pride Week emanzanares@sa.utah.edu November 25 Thanksgiving Dinners at the Utah Pride Center, Club Try-Angles and The Trapp December 1 World AIDS Day worldaidsday.org December 10–11 Salt Lake Men’s Choir Christmas Concert saltlakemenschoir.org January 5–9 Utah Gay & Lesbian Ski Week, Park City communityvisions.org January 20–30 Sundance Film Festival, Park City sundance.org

On “Hang with Me,” Robyn’s lead single from part two in her Body Talk series, the every-girl of (smart) pop is hesitant to fall in love. We, though, hardly had a choice. Just coming off the June release of the first installment, she’s adorably irresistible, emotionally exposed like the BFF you never had, but in Robyn’s wonderfully up-front way, almost do. That single from this edition — slightly beginning-to-end better than the first — is too good for words; a slice of bursting dream-pop that’s so honest and innocent that it reads like a diary entry and feels more real than anything on the radio, right where this particular charmer belongs. It’s heartily inviting, just like the two addictive openers before it, “In My Eyes” and “Include Me Out” — the latter featuring the silliest and sweetest of Left Eyelike breakdowns. Both songs are the consoling friends she needed when a lover broke her heart on the first disc’s “Dancing on My Own.” Sadness mostly sits out this time around, while Robyn warns that “Love Kills” and then shakes out some sass on “Criminal Intent” and the hardcore toughie “U Should Know Better,” alternating boasts with Snoop Dogg like a tag-team fierce enough to take down Osama bin Laden. She closes with “Indestructible,” and like the acoustic version of “Hang with Me” from Body Talk Pt. 1, it’s string-powered and sweetly melancholy. When the song is, as her cycle suggests, cut for the clubs on the third and final chapter, we’ll be right there — hanging with her.

how truly atrocious they really are. Otherwise, she’s stuck with slapped-together songwriting that even Mary J. Blige couldn’t salvage: “Bittersweet,” the first single, is one big, crying Hallmark card that Fantasia bellows like she means every trite line she’s emoting; so is “Even Angels,” a trendy R&B jam with a walk-then-run motto that at least corks a singable melody within its glimmering synth groove. Old-school soul sweeps through “The Thrill is Gone” and “Trust Him,” calling up Lauryn Hill, and it’s invigorating to hear Fantasia sing something that suits her ragged, old-soul voice. Her shining coup, though, isn’t even studio produced; it’s her live version of “I’m Here” from her role in The Color Purple musical. From the gut, it’s a reminder that Fantasia can be great when the music allows her to be.

Zayra Baby Likes to Bang Now that Gaga’s set the precedence for dancepop, wannabes want a piece of her disco ball. A chunk of it goes to this Puerto Rican vixen, who gives glam a go with songs on her debut disc, which includes six originals and five remixes. She goes M.I.A. with “Feel Good,” and on the fierce “V.I.P.,” a top-10 dance single, she’s too cool for you. If Zayra wasn’t so much like everyone else, that just might be true.

Reach Chris Azzopardi at chris@pridesource.com.

Grade: C+

Also Out Kristine W Straight Up with a Twist Dance divas shifting outside the box sounds so Cyndi Lauper, but another big voice is going for beyond-her-roots glory. Kristine W’s doing it over two discs: a laid-back, Latin-seasoned mix of covers and dance-songs-turned-ballads paired with a livelier, Sade-sounding second disc. Ms. W sounds divine, her silky pipes rising high above some pedestrian production, but scene queens will be looking for less chill, more kill.

Grade: A-

Fantasia, Back to Me Fantasia Barrino has never reached the heights of American Idolwinning peers Kelly Clarkson or Carrie Underwood, but she has just as much talent wringing from her. Talent that, again on her third album Back to Me, is squandered on songs that reek of regurgitation, forcing Fantasia into the simplest of R&B conventions that almost completely ignore her instinctual passion. She has a better backstory — single mom, reality show champ and, now, suicide-attempt survivor — than hit-making catalog, which has left nary a blip on the radio and turned some horribly embarrassing jams. But at least she’s consistent; both “I’m Doin’ Me” and “Collard Greens & Cornbread” are almost funny enough to forget Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 1


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Girls Just Want to Have Big, Gay Fun

Over 50 people joined QSaltLake on the Big Gay Fun Bus to West Wendover to watch Cyndi Lauper croon her new and old songs to a rambunctious (sometimes too) crowd. A pool party the next day and back home. Bingo, Jello shots, prizes and Sin Delopper, not to mention a rowdy crowd, made the trip memorable and fun. Watch for the next Big Gay Fun Bus to Wendover and make sure you’re on it!

Did we mention the pool party? 

32 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Don R. Austin, LCSW

Quries By Steven Petrow

I’m not stalking him, but ...

Q

I connected with this really nice guy on Facebook and have been perusing his profile ever since. We are actually going to meet for coffee , as our first date. So am I allowed to “know” as much as I do about him? I don’t want to creep him out.

A

Unless your new friend has signed up for an app that reveals who’s been reading his page, ignorance is bliss. But your instincts are good: People don’t always like the idea of new friends or beaus knowing all about them. In fact, when the two of you get together, try to pretend you don’t know what you do. Don’t bring up out of the blue his entire work history (yes, that’s creepy) and avoid comments like “So, I saw you and Mike broke up on Facebook...” But if you

both love Lady Gaga or volunteer at the local LGBT center, it’s fine — and actually very helpful — to talk about what you have in common to break the ice and discover what else you may share. Online relationships are just like offline ones. Peeling back the layers of someone’s life and personality should happen in a gradual way, as you build up trust. And hearing someone describe his life in his own words is a great way to get to know someone. It’s entirely possible that your new friend would rather tell you himself about his beloved pets and what he wore for Halloween last year.

Dressing for success or myself

Q

Usually when I’m applying for a job I set aside the real me—the butch dyke, if you will—and dress up a little feminine (different hair, different suit, everything). As I get older, this makes me feel less and less comfortable, as though I’m not being the real me. How do you suggest I dress for interviews?

A

That’s a tough question. Ideally, it’s essential not to disguise yourself or to appear other than who you are. Still, there’s something to be said for having your “interview suit” — and doing some extra grooming — especially because we all know how others’ prejudices can work against us. Think of it this way: The idea is to take appearances completely out of the equation so that you can explain your qualifications and sell yourself without distraction. Once you land the job, you can be freer in how you dress. You’re not selling out to adopt a more mainstream look for the interviews; this is just another step to get you in the door. In my experience, most people try to pick up a company’s dress code once they start work. But if you don’t think you can do that — or want to dress butch all the time — then go ahead and do it for the interview. If the company can’t take it then, you’re wasting your time considering this particular employer.

Gay male Psychotherapy group forming. Limited to 6 – 8 members.

801-485-9225

Tickets for Hamlet On Sale Now! 2010-11 Season tickets now available! Hamlet Sept. 17 – Oct. 2, 2010 Bram Stoker’s

Dracula

Oct. 22 – Nov. 6, 2010 Irving Berlin’s

White Christmas Dec. 3 – Dec. 24, 2010

Black Comedy Jan. 14 – Jan. 29, 2011

In Feb. 18 – Mar. 5, 2011

Hamlet

Sept. 17 – Oct. 2, 2010

The Diary of Anne Frank Mar. 18 – Apr. 2, 2011 Andrew Lloyd Webber’s

Sunset Boulevard

Apr. 29 – May 14, 2011 Special Event!

Rent

Jun. 10 – Jun. 25, 2011

Exploring the Breadth of Human Experience 801.581.6961 | www.PioneerTheatre.or g A professional theatre in residence at the University of Utah

Major Season Suppor t Provided By:


FOOD&DRINK

restaurant review Basque Supper at La Caille by Chef Drew Ellsworth

O

N A SUNDAY NIGHT TWO weeks ago, I went, unannounced, to La Caille for their Basque family-style supper. I was very pleased. Let me tell you about it. I haven’t been to La Caille for years, so I had been looking forward to this visit for days with great anticipation. I went with friends from work and we all brought great wine. Some of the younger guys don’t drive, so I picked them up and we drove south to the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon. The epic grounds of La Caille are secluded and overgrown on the sides of the old gate — far

more than I remembered. I actually drove past a couple of times before realizing what it was! The beautiful, filigreed gate which screams France, is taller and narrower than I had it in my mind, and the red brick lane leading up to the château is now older, bumpier and even more old world than ever before. My young friends thought we had been transported to another place and time. The lane, by design, meanders and serpents its way toward the restaurant, through a beautiful park of lawns and mature trees. There were families of black rabbits dining on the grasses and many peacocks strolling around as though they owned the place. The magic is still there!

We used the valet parking at the entrance where the red brick becomes a circular plaza. The Art Nouveau glass work around the gables of the château is so authentically reminiscent of France at the turn of the last century, it is almost breathtaking to a Francophile like me. Old neighborhoods in Paris, like Montmartre and Montparnasse, still display this beautiful architectural style. You can say what you want about the French, but secretly we all admire their art. What’s cool about La Caille is the attention to detail in everything. When you enter, there are high ceilings and cracked stone walls with gorgeous, old antique armoires on each side of the vestibule. As you proceed upstairs, you pass the seemingly ancient wine cellar which is stocked by my friend Joe Wright, who has been the sommelier at La Caille for a decade. The bottles are placed in handmade ceramic pipes that have been set in concrete. Other bottles are crammed into old world wrought iron racks so you read the impressive lables: Château Mouton Rochchilde, Château Margaux, Echezeau and Clos de Beze, Caymus and Silver Oak from California, and Brunellos from Italy. We were led by our hostess, a pretty blond woman dressed in the famous La Caille bustier, to a small, semi-private dining room. We had a view of the eves of the château and the park with the ever-present peacocks. A cool breeze was blowing and the French doors throughout the dining rooms were open to the outdoors. Our dining room had a coffered ceiling of botanical relief sculptures depicting roses and bay leaves. By now, the boys from the Wine Store were enthralled! For newcomers, La Caille is truly amazing and a little overwhelming. It was fun for me to introduce young people to Europe via Little Cottonwood Canyon. We were, as it should be in a French restaurant, brought baskets of bread with hand-piped, butter roses. The bread was the best French bread I’ve had in Salt Lake, which says a lot because I make a lot of French bread myself: crispy, crusty, golden on the outside and spongy, chewy and full of holes on the inside. Our first course was a flavorful black bean country soup in a rich broth with a lot of vegetables. We had cracked open a bottle of Silverbirch New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc and a beautiful ’03 Grand Cru

Chablis which was showing a little age and was fragrant, honeyed and delicious. Next, we were served a Caprese salad on a long, rectangular plate — a simple dish with large slices of fresh mozzarella, tomatoes and basil. The salad was drizzled with very good olive oil and tangy balsamic vinegar — classically done and perfect! The entrée was just so beautifully homemade, I almost couldn’t believe I was in a restaurant. Sometimes La Caille gets bad reviews for its food, but on this night I felt like I was at the home of a French friend. There were crisp, braised short ribs on one end of a huge platter and baked halibut on the other end. In the center was a bouquetiere of vegetables: steamed asparagus, new potatoes and broccoli. The fish was served on a bed of creamed spinach which I thought was just delicious. The veggies were perfectly cooked and the melt-in-your-mouth short ribs were laced with a flavorful Bordelaise sauce which I wanted to drink! This night, the food at La Caille was fully matched to the beautiful surroundings. Our wine servers poured us a Premier Cru Mercurey red Burgundy and I brought a Nicolas Cole “Camille” Bordeaux-blend. The wines were awesome with our entrees. We had our choice of three desserts: crepes, Bananas Flambé and crème brulee. How very, very French! We tried all three and although the desserts were quite predictable, they were nicely done and presented with a lot of show. My visit to La Caille was random and they didn’t know I was writing an article so there is no prejudice here or any connection. I can freely say I just love the total experience. If I made any little comments at all, it would be that the bean soup, to my taste, was a little salty — something which no one else mentioned. I also thought the fish, although nicely cooked, had very little flavor or seasoning, something which was only noticed by one other person. But the delicious sauces and vegetables made up for any misgivings or criticisms. I rate my visit at La Caille at 90+. The plus is for the grounds and building which are incomparable to anywhere in Utah. Sadly, La Caille has just gone up for sale and has an iffy future as a time-honored restaurant in Salt Lake City, so please go again soon. The Sunday brunch and Basque Supper are, indeed, memorable. Q

3 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


BIG Chimichangas!

2 TUESDAY

$

ALL BEERS JUST $2

• 25 WINGS FLAVORS • PATIO OPEN • FREE PARKING AT TROLLEY SQUARE • OPEN AT NOON EVERY DAY • OPEN SUNDAY FUN DAY

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Make Love to our Food Experience sophisticated Mexican gastronomy, wines and spirits in a hip, relaxed atmosphere. Fresh, flavorful, festive and sexy… As Frida would have desired.

For Reservations: 801-983-6692 545 West 700 South, Salt Lake City

WEEKLY SPECIALS

www.fridabistro.com

Sunday • Fajitas $11.99

Try our wild coconut, curried wild rice

Monday • 1/2 Off Select Apps Pitchers of Bud Light $8.00 Taco Tuesday • Tacos $2.00 Tecate Beer $2.50 Wednesday • Beef Barbacoa $14.99

2148 Highland Drive

Thursday • Chipotle BBQ Ribs $11.99 Bucket of 5 “Coronitas” $10

801-486-0332

www.omarsrawtopia.com

Food Specials Start at 4 pm till items run out.

noW oPen

tueSdayS g eve4npmin – dusk

Park City at Kimball Junction I-80 & Hwy. 224 (Behind Wells Fargo Bank)

from uce-only for a prod ring the market du tiful most boun ar! e ye time of th

435-645-7000 Weekly Specials are available for Dine In only and may not be used with any other offers. Offer expires June 30th, 2010.

Saturday MorningS

at HiStoric Pioneer Park (300 South, 300 West)

September

18 Cooking Demos Viking Cooking School 25 Art and Culture Day Eve

october

2 Cooking Demos Viking Cooking School 9 Dutch Oven Cook Off City Weekly

Super-sized sunflowers are a sure sign of a bountiful harvest.

QSaltLake Tweets @qsaltlake

Visit slcfarmersmarket.org for market updates Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 35


FOOD&DRINK

cocktail chaer Drag Not a Drag with Brass Monkeys By Ed Sikov

Visit 41 of Salt Lake City’s finest restaurants between September 17 – October 2 and choose a three-course dinner for either $15 or $30. Some participating restaurants offer a delicious two-item lunch special for only $5 or $10. 15

$15 Dinner

Acme Burger Company 30 10 Bambara 30 Bayleaf Café 15 10 Biaggi’s Ristorante Italiano 15 Buca di Beppo 15 10 Caffe Molise 30 10 Cannella’s 15 10 Caputo’s by Night 15 Cedars of Lebanon 15 10 Christopher’s Seafood & Prime Steakhouse 30 10 Copper Canyon Grill House & Tavern 15 10 Copper Onion 30 10 Donovan’s Steak & Chop House 30 Eva Restaurant 30 10

30

$30 Dinner

5

$5 Lunch

Faustina 30 10 Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse and Wine Bar 30 Garden Restaurant 15 Gracie’s 5 Green Pig Pub 15 5 Iggy’s Sports Grill Downtown 15 10 J. Wong’s Asian Bistro 15 5 Lamb’s Grill Café 15 10 Market Street Grill 30 10 Market Street Oyster Bar 30 10 Martine 30 10 Melting Pot 30 Metropolitan 30 10 Naked Fish Japanese Bistro 30 10

10

$10 Lunch

New Yorker 30 10 Oasis Café 15 Olive Bistro 15 10 Red Rock Brewing Company 15 10 Robin’s Nest 5 Ruth’s Chris Steak House Sage’s Café 15 10 Sandbar Mexican Grill 15 10 Settebello Pizzeria Napoletana 15 10 Squatters Pub Brewery 15 10 Star of India 30 10 Takashi 30 Tin Angel Café 30 10 Vienna Bistro 30 10 Wild Grape Bistro 30 10

Presented by:

Supported by:

For information visit www.dineoround.com

30

T

HE LABOR DAY DRAG PARTY in Fire Island Pines is either a hilarious gender circus or a reason to blow some queen’s brains out. Drag is fabulous. It’s the sweating, stinking, drunken guys in wigs who brazenly stick their tongue in your ears that’s either a kick or a nightmare. It’s a party for Pines boys who have discovered the glamour girl within. I wasn’t about to reveal mine in public. I’d make an incredibly ugly Nancy Sinatra. (I’d call to mind a blonde Cynthia Ozick in white leather boots.) Dan wouldn’t do it, either. He’d just look like Dan in a dress. But our housemates all brought suitcases stuffed with secrets; nobody named their inner woman until the big reveal. Jack Fogg came downstairs first. Sammy had put him up to doing it. Jack was clearly miserable — he was wearing a burqa. (His eyes said it all.) Sammy followed in a luxurious purple sari and a bhindi on her forehead. “So what drink are you sending us off with, dude?” Sammy asked. “Miss Jackie-Anne Taliban here needs a drink.” Jackie-Anne was fussing with her crotch. “There’s a pitcher of Brass Monkeys in the fridge,” I said. “What’s a Brass Monkey?” Ms. Taliban asked through the slit in her headpiece. “Rum, vodka and orange juice. The color resembles buffed old brass.” “Make mine a double,” the Islamic fundamentalist begged her Hindu girlfriend. Frankie and Ian then made their entrance. I’d expected more, but all they did was put on long blonde wigs and matching white tennis outfits. Ian immediately sensed my disappointment. “Don’t you know who we are?” He asked in disbelief. I shook my head no. “We’re the Doublemint Twins,” they sang out in unison. “Brava, divas!” Dan said, applauding. “It’s delicious and really strong!” The non

sequitur came out of the burqa’s mouth slit. Sari Sammy agreed. “Seriously, dude!” She said. “I’ll be on my ass before we get to the party.” Then Sal and Sean came down, reminiscent of grizzled, gray Old Year and adorable Baby New Year. Sal went for distinctly middle-aged laughs; he was “Edie Gourmet.” With his face framed by Edie’s signature hairdo, Sal actually looked like her in a most disturbing way. Of course this Edie was carrying a copy of M.F.K. Fisher’s The Art of Eating and had a can of duck confit serving as a hat. Being brilliant himself, Sal persistently overestimates the average gay man’s wit. My unspoken prediction: nobody at the party would get the joke. I was right. It was Sean who stole the show, not only at our place but at the party, too. With his actor’s make up skills, a copper-colored wig and naturally voluptuous body, he was an eerily perfect Beyoncé. When he grabbed the burqa woman by the waist, yanked her close and began singing “We’re your dream girls” in precisely the voice of Ms. Knowles, it was way too much, and I shot some of my Brass Monkey out my nose.

The words ‘rum,’ ‘juice,’ and ‘you’re such an asshole’ formed the foundation of our debate

The Brass Monkey 1 part dark rum 1 part Absolut 2 parts orange juice Pour the ingredients into a shaker filled with ice, and after shaking it just enough to chill it, pour the contents into the prechilled glass of your choice. This drink shouldn’t be served on the rocks. Note: the original (some might call it real) recipe contains much more OJ. It’s boring. My version is a lot more fun. Q Ed Sikov is the author of Dark Victory; The Life of Bette Davis and other books about films and filmmakers.

3 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


BIG Chimichanga!

dining guide Frida Bistro Sophisticated Mexican cuisine, wine and spirits 545 W. 700 South 801-983-6692 Loco Lizard Cantina Serious mexican food since 1999 at Kimball Junction. 1612 Ute Blvd., Park City 435-645-7000 Meditrina Small Plates & Wine Bar Encouraging gastronomic exploring in tapas tradition 1394 S. West Temple 801-485-2055 Metropolitan Handcrafted new American cooking 173 W Broadway 801-364-3472 Off Trax Internet Café Coffee, wi-fi and pool 259 W 900 South 801-364-4307

For people of all ages to hang out, play pool, get on the internet, play music COFFEE BURGERS SANDWICHES SOUPS SALADS APPETIZERS BREAKFAST BRUNCH POOL TABLE VIDEO GAMES JUKE BOX FREE WIFI OPEN Mon-Thur 7a–7p Friday 7a-3p AND After Bar Closing Fridays and Saturdays

259 W 900 S 801 364-4307

Next to Club Try-Angles, Half Block from TRAX in the NEW Gayborhood!

Home of the Happy Hangover Sunday Brunch 11am–2pm Q PON

Free Soda or Coffee with food purchase

www.offtraxslc.com

Omar’s Rawtopia Restaurant Organic live food 2148 S. Highland Dr. 801-486-0332 Sage’s Cafe The freshest and healthiest cuisine possible 473 E 300 South 801-322-3790

Monday • 1/2 Off Select Apps Pitchers of Bud Light $8.00 Taco Tuesday • Tacos $2.00 Tecate Beer $2.50 Wednesday • Beef Barbacoa $14.99 Thursday • Chipotle BBQ Ribs $11.99 Bucket of 5 “Coronitas” $10

Park City at Kimball Junction I-80 & Hwy. 224 (Behind Wells Fargo Bank)

10 AM Gardeners, bring your produce to sell or trade!

FROM

SUNDAYS

Trolley Wing Company We’re Back! Open daily noon to 11pm 550 S 700 East 801-538-0745

The Wild Grape Bistro Eat where the locals eat 481 E South Temple 801-746-5565

Sunday • Fajitas $11.99

Food Specials Start at 4 pm till items run out.

Tin Angel Cafe Local food, music, art. Serving lunch, dinner and Saturday brunch 365 W 400 South 801-328-4155

Vertical Diner Vegetarian restaurant open seven days a week 10 a.m.–9 p.m. 2280 S West Temple 801-484-8378

WEEKLY SPECIALS

435-645-7000 Weekly Specials are available for Dine In only and may not be used with any other offers. Offer expires June 30th, 2010.

JUNE 13 THRU OCTOBER 24

INT’L PEACE GARDEN 1060 SOUTH 900 WEST www.slcpeoplesmarket.org

OUR 2010 SPONSORS

To get listed in this section, please call 801-649-6663 and ask for Brad or e-mail brad@qsaltlake.com Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 7


NIGHT LIFE

bar map

Q

J

Salt Lake City

E 600 N.

by Hunter Richardson

Temple Square

Gateway Mall

200 S

Salt Palace

300 W

S R

Trax Line

Arena

100 S. 200 S.

Intermodal Hub

400 S MAIN ST

500 S

STATE ST

900 W

600 W

V 300 S. City Hall

300 W

600 S

Trax Station

900 S

900 E

1300 S STATE ST

South Salt Lake City

Sugar House

Trax Station

Trax Line

T 3300 S

300 W

nonetheless. Additionally there is The Trapp which has been alive and well for years, serving great drinks in big jars — it reminds me of a cabin filled with booze and games (what could be better than that on a cold evening?). Moving on, there is Club Try-Angles with a pool table and my personal favorite thing: text messages that you can send to the TV for everyone to see (childish, yet completely satisfying). Edge and Fusion are where to go on a night where you find yourself wanting the environment of an old, classic New York City gay bar with lasers and smoke — and to me, that’s a lot better than snow and cold. Ultimately, I feel as winter comes closer and the layers get thicker, the place to be will be anywhere that has the closest parking and best atmosphere. Bar hopping doesn’t become an issue as most people park and stay because wiping snow off the car just isn’t that appealing more than twice a night. Actually, I would bet that the first club to have covered parking would be the most popular during the cold months strictly because no one (gay, lesbian, bisexual or straight) likes cleaning off a snow-covered automobile. So bid farewell to the skimpy clothing. Let’s see the style the Salt Lake City gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community can bring to the table. This winter I challenge you all to be more sophisticated than trendy. More classy than sassy. Refine yourselves in the fact you can outwardly project the great character within, rather than defining yourself through the façade of “individual expression.” You are all beautiful, so show it with your style, not your skin this winter. See you this weekend. Q

Trax Line

F

IRST THINGS FIRST: I REFUSE to get involved in the drama of a situation which I am not directly a part of or cannot single-handedly solve within a reasonable period of time. That said: bars, clubs and lounges, play nice or your “customer” may start to feel uncomfortable. Just saying. OK, to the point now. I am happy to announce that tank top season is over. For all of you who love them: knock it off. That time has passed and the rest of the world can live without being subjected to open armpits, budging necklines and people who should just never wear a tank top in the first place. This is Salt Lake City, not the Jersey Shore. That said, this means fall (and soon winter) is around the corner. So grab your layers because patios will be chilled, the glasses cooled and, of course, the air will be slightly below comfortable. Of course, I understand that this is Utah and guessing the weather is like throwing darts at a board, but still, one can hope. Still, I see a few spots becoming “hot spots” even in the cold weather. Namely, JAM. This well-known and well-loved place may not have the heated rock seat bench anymore, but needless to say they understand how to market in a cold climate (one has to love the many heaters). Also, Püre. On a Friday night, who doesn’t want to park close to an arena filled with warm bodies drinking and having a good time? I think no more explanation is needed. There’s also Babylon. Same-same-but-different to the reasoning above. So, where else is there to go? As I’ve mentioned, Studio 27. It is having a slow start, but it’s been steadily rising in popularity

200 EAST

Q scene No More Tank Tops!

K 2100 S

P 3900 S

Q bar guide WEEKLY BAR EVENTS E CLUB EDGE ●

615 N 400 W • D M K X tinyurl.com/clubedgeslc

T CLUB TRY-ANGLES ●

251 W 900 S • D M N 801-364-3203 • clubtry-angles.com

SUNDAYS

MONDAYS

LATIN GAY NIGHT

KAROAKE W/KADE STEEL

KARAOKE $1 DRAFTS BBQS AT 4PM

BEER-SOAKED WEENIES

●J JAM

BEER BUST BBQ AT 4PM BLOODY MARYS

K KARAMBA ●

LATIN GAY NIGHT DJ FRANK GO-GO DANCERS

751 N 300 W • D F M N 801-891-1162 • jamslc.com 1051 E 2100 S • D M X 801-696-0639 • klubkaramba.com

P PAPER MOON ●

3737 S State St • J K L 801-713-0648 • thepapermoon.info

S STUDIO 27 ●

615 W 100 South • D M 801-363-2200 • studio27slc.com

V TAVERNACLE ●

201 E 300 South • K X 801-519-8800 • tavernacle.com

R THE TRAPP ●

102 S 600 West • B N D K M 801-531-8727 • tinyurl.com/trappslc

FREE POOL $1 DRAFTS $1 MIMOSAS

FREE TEXAS HOLD-EM $4 PAPER MOON STEINS

TUESDAYS

PIANO KARAOKE WITH ERIC 8–11PM

BBQ at 4PM

KARAOKE WITH JAMIE 9PM

THURSDAYS

HIP HOP NIGHT DJ WONDERBOY

DANCE EVOLUTION W/DJ DC

$1 DRAFTS BACKROOM BLUES

SATURDAYS FUSION W/ROBBIE ROB & TIM

KARAOKE

$1 DRAFTS DJ D / DJ BOYTOY

DANCE! DANCE! DANCE!

SUPERSTAR KARAOKE WITH BRIAN G

BLACK OUT DEEP HOUSE W/ DJ MIKE BABBITT

FRIDAY FIX WITH DJ \V/

BOOM BOOM ROOM WITH DJ MIKE BABBITT

KARAOKE W/ MR. SCOTT 8PM $1 CORONAS, RED STRIPE

WHITE TRASH BINGO FREE POOL $2 WELLS, $3 BIG BUD CANS

COUNTRY LINE DANCING 7–9PM WILD WEE KARAOKE 9PM

POLES, CAGES, SEXY WOMEN BEST FEMALE DJs

WOMEN! WOMEN! WOMEN!

SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE

DJ BRENT VINCENT $3 JAGER SHOTS $4 JAGER BOMBS

DJ NAOMI $5 LONG ISLANDS

DJ TONY MARINOS SUMMER MARTINI LUGE

DUELING PIANOS 9PM $3 BIG BUD LIGHT

DUELING PIANOS 9PM $3 BIG BUD LIGHT

DUELING PIANOS 9PM

DUELING PIANOS 9PM

DART TOURNAMENT 7PM DJ DENNIS

DJ DENNIS

POWERBALL KARAOKE W/ TROY 9PM

B = BEAR/LEATHER | D = DANCE FLOOR | F = FOOD | K = KARAOKE NIGHTS | L = MOSTLY LESBIAN | M = MOSTLY GAY MEN | N = NEGHBORHOOD BAR | T = 18+ AREA | X = MIXED GAY/STRAIGHT OR GAY CERTAIN NIGHTS

3 8 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

FRIDAYS

JAM U GAY COLLEGE NIGHT

LATIN NIGHT

$1 DRAFTS KARAOKE W/KEVAN 9PM

WEDNESDAYS


CLUB MILITARY ID ID S L R A E V B H M E IT M W S O ER REE T SERVICEMEMB IVILEGES - EFR R R U P O S R IT O S F A H V IP MEMBERSH TELL — NO CO ’T N O D , K S A DON’T

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! R E V O N E Z O R HELL HAS F E R E H S I E K ys a d s r u h T KARAoO & s y a n Sund MONDAYS

ERTS C N O C O E D I V TUESDAYS

S E U L B M O O R BACnK t 7pm a in g e b s n o s s le ce

, After the boar nues ti n the party c next door at

ers Da e u q y r lt u s r fo Dancing

WEDNESDAYS

NTS E M A N R U O T POOL eturning October 6 R

AYS $1 DRAFTS D S E U T ▼ S IE N ONDAYS WEE J BOY TO M ▼ TOY, $1 DRAFTS TS F A R D 1 D $ S • Y m A p 4 RAOKE, BBQ at HURSDAYS KARAOKE ▼ FRID A K S Y A D N U S T OPEN DAILY 2PM LY O PEN D AIL Y AT AT 2 PM $1 DRAFTS ▼ S Y A L NIGHT L D A S E E U C T N A ▼ -D E 801-364-3203 251 W 900 S C R S DANCE-DAN GHOUT THE BA 1/2 BLOCK FROM 9th S TRAX STATION U O R ▼ SATURDAY TH S N E E R C

m • offtraxslc.co 259 w 900 s

ON SHY? TEXT HIM

OUR S

WWW.CLUBTRY-ANGLES.COM

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 9


FUN&GAMES

Turn of Phrase Across

1 Pitcher’s rubber 5 Whitman’s dooryard bloomers 11 Get ready for action 15 Succotash bean 16 Tennis star Mauresmo 17 Little Caesar gangster 18 Crude cartel 19 Scent of a Woman Oscar winner 20 Point of view intro, at Gay.com 21 Start of a quip 24 Sault ___ Marie 25 Start of a footnote abbr. 26 Threesome 28 Doesn’t feel up 32 Buster Brown’s bulldog 35 End of the quip 39 Victor/Victoria actor Peter 40 Verdi opera 41 ___ Gay Hamilton 42 Liam of Kinsey 44 Straw hat 46 Beginning to whiz 47 k.d. lang’s “___ Gal” 52 Barrie’s precipitation 53 Source of the quip 55 No note for a butch 58 “The Mod Squad” character

59 Edmund to Colette? 63 Saying 64 “Village Voice” honor 65 Three Tall Women writer 66 Material on a drag queen’s legs 67 Tony-winning musical 68 Defamation in print 69 Forest opening 70 Like Izzard’s comedy 71 Rock Hudson roles, usually Down

1 Lagging behind 2 Prefix with suction 3 Nat. counterpart in MLB 4 Bottoms 5 Memory gap 6 “___ my wit’s end!” (cry of a bottom comic’s lover?) 7 One who says, “Let us prey” 8 You could get caught in this 9 Armed Forces VIP 10 Capital of Margaret Cho’s ancestral home 11 Adventurous desert queen 12 Hoar 13 Alpine feedback 14 Billy Elliot epithet 22 “Believe ___ not!”

23 Mil. student body 26 Number of sides to a gay symbol 27 Transsexual Richards 28 Queen of the hill 29 Dick’s running mate 30 Like Abner, before Viagra? 31 NBC sketch source 33 Stud’s strides 34 To eat, to Ulrichs 35 Tart taste 36 Kind of column 37 Old TV comedian George 38 Poet Teasdale 43 Like antigay language 45 Third testacle? 48 Pussy’s last name, in Goldfinger 49 Greased the palm of 50 With title to 51 Fine point 53 George Burns film 54 Gay porn director Francis 55 Dangle like a package 56 Pastoral poem 57 The Oscars, e.g. 60 “Dancing Queen” band 61 Have-not’s condition 62 Disney pictures PUZZLE ANSWERS ON PAGE 47

Cryptogram

A cryptogram is a puzzle where one letter in the puzzle is substituted with another. For example: ECOLVGNCYXW YCR EQYIIRZNBZN YZU PSZ! Has the solution: CRYPTOGRAMS ARE CHALLENGING AND FUN! In the above example Es are all replaced by Cs. The puzzle is solved by recognizing letter patterns in words and successively substituting letters until the solution is reached. This week’s hint: S = W Theme: A quote by Eliza Byard of GLSEN on the correlation between anti-gay bullying and religious views.

VZY SFIR ‘LECCFV’ WX AFV OEIV FL EAB IYPWCWFQX KIYYR.

___ ____ ‘______’ __ ___ ____ __ ___ _________ _____. 4 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Team Avalanche Fund-raiser for Gay Bowl The Mountain West Flag Football League will host a fundraiser pool party for Salt Lake City Avalanche at Rick and Kyle’s pool at 259 N. State Street from 2–7 p.m. on Sept. 18. The league will send players from the four teams that participated in this past summer’s league play to the national championship, Gay Bowl X, in Phoenix, Oct. 8–10. Each year, the National Gay Flag Football

League hosts a national championship in the city of a participating team that ran a summer flag football league and tournament. For 2010, Phoenix was previously chosen to host over 16 teams from all over the United States and Canada. Twenty dollars will get you entrance, two free drinks, a free BBQ, music and a chance to meet this year’s flag football players. Jump in the pool and play water badminton or volleyball, and relax in the last days of summer in Salt Lake City.

Q les

Saturday, Sept 18 Come Celebrate the Trapp’s

20 ANNIVERSARY TH

Q doku Q doku

Each Sudoku puzzle has a unique solution which can be reached

logically without Enterwhich digitscan 1 through 9 into the Each Sudoku puzzle has a guessing. unique solution be reached logically withoutblank guessing. EnterEvery digitsrow 1 through into theone blank Everyasrow spaces. must 9contain of spaces. each digit, must must contain one of each digit, as must each column and each 3x3 square. column each but 3x3connected, square. Qdoku is puzzles. actually five Qdoku each is actually five and separate, Sudoku

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separate, but connected, Sudoku puzzles.

Level: Medium

5 7 1 8 2 5 9 1

8 9 5 1 1 6

2

9 7

3

6 4 7 5

3 9 1

9 3 5

3

3

4 5 5 4 8 7

4

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6 4 6 5 9 4 9 3 1 6 3 8 4 5 3 7 9 9 6 3 7 1 9 3 5 8 2 7 6 2 1 9

5 6

1

8

5 2 8

4

1 3 5

2 1 8

4 5

3

2

5 4

3 5

6

4

Sundays 1

5 9 7 4 1 5 1 9 4 7 1 6 4 1 3

All day, all night Showtime at 7pm

3 7 6

BBQ, 4pm

Fridays

Dart Tournament, 7pm

8 7 2 4 3 8 2 6 102 SOUTH 600 WEST 1 5

801–531–8727

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 1


QMMUNIT Y

Quni groups

Utah has a vibrant gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community with many organizations for nearly any activity or interest you may have. Try these organizations out. For corrections or additions, please email editor@qsaltlake.com

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL Aetna ANGLE * HuntR@Aetna.com . . 801-256-7137 Armed Forces Support . 801-581-7890 LGBTQ-AFFIRMATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPISTS GUILD OF UTAH A professional group for mental-health providers. We meet monthly to network, educate ourselves, and improve the counseling services of LGBTQ individuals. www.lgbtqtherapists.com

Disability Law Center. . . . . . 801-(800) 662-9080 * info@disabilitylawcenter.org EQUALITY UTAH  equalityutah.org * info@equalityutah.org Working for a fair & just Utah 175 W 200 S, Ste 3001 . 801-355-3479 Human Rights Campaign, Utah  hrcutah.org * HRCSaltLakeUT@aol.com

National Organization for Women PO Box 57816, Murray . . . . . 801-268-0363

LOG CABIN REPUBLICANS, UTAH  logcabinutah.org * ut@logcabin.org

Pride at Work, Utah . . . . 801-531-6137

UTAH STONEWALL DEMOCRATS  utahstonewalldemocrats.org 455 S 300 E, Ste 301 . . . . . . . 801-328-1212 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-532-5330

Q BUSINESS ALLIANCE A guild of business owners, professionals, entrepreneurs and non-profit organizations that holds social events on the first Friday of the month and business breakfasts on the third Friday of the month. qsaltlake.com/qba . . . . . . . . 801-649-6663 Salt Lake County Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Employees * jdonchess@slco.org. . . . 801-273-6280

HEALTH & HIV Hermanos de Luna y Sol * arman@utahAIDS.org 1408 S 1100 E . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-487-2323 MEDICRUISER  medicruiser.com Gay, lesbian, transgender friendly staff and providers. Low cost, high quality Medical Care. Testosterone & hormone therapy, HIV/STD, weight management, addiction treatment 1850 S 300 W, Ste A . . . 801-484-5504 No. Utah HIV/AIDS Project Walk-Ins Welcome. Every other Monday 5–7pm 536 24th St, Ste 2B, Ogden . . . . 801-393-4153 PEOPLE WITH AIDS COALITION OF UTAH  pwacu.org 358 S 300 E . . . . . . . . . . 801-484-2205 PLANNED PARENTHOOD 654 S 900 E . . . . . . . . . . 800-230-PLAN SALT LAKE VALLEY HEALTH DEPT. — HIV/STD CLINIC  slvhealth.org/hiv/ 610 S 200 E . . . . . . . . . . 801-534-4666 University of Utah Department of Family and Preventative Medicine  uuhsc.utah.edu/dfpm 375 Chipeta Way, Ste A . . . . . 801-581-7234 UTAH AIDS FOUNDATION  utahaids.org * mail@utahaids. org 1408 S 1100 E . . . . . . . . 801-487-2323

HOMELESS SERVICES Center for Women and Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-261-9177 Homeless Youth Resource Center Youth ages 15-21. 655 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-364-0744 The Road Home  theroadhome.org 210 Rio Grande St . . . . . . . . . 801-359-4142 YWCA 322 E 300 S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-537-8600

POLITICAL American Civil Liberties Union  acluutah.org * aclu@acluutah.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-521-9862

RELIGIOUS & SPIRITUAL AFFIRMATION SALT LAKE  affirmation.org/saltlake Affirmation: Gay & Lesbian Mormons serves the needs of gay Mormon women and men, as well as bisexual and transgender LDS and their supportive family and friends, through social and educational activities. . . . . . 801-486-6977 BOUNTIFUL COMMUNITY CHURCH  bountifulucc.org * regal66@ yahoo.com 150 N 400 E, Btfl . . . . . . 801-295-9439 Cache Valley Unitarian Universalists 596 E 900 N, Logan . . . . . . . . 435-755-2888 CHRIST UNITED METHODIST  christumcutah.net Regular Sunday Worship Schedule: 8am, 9am, 10:30am Fellowship Time: 10am Childcare available 8:45am-11:45am Sunday mornings 2375 E 3300 S . . . . . . . . 801-486-5473 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF SLC  firstbaptist-slc.org * office@firstbaptist-slc.org Jesus didn’t discriminate and neither do we. Please join us. 777 S 1300 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-582-4921 First Unitarian Church * slcuu.org 569 S 1300 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-582-8687 Gay Latter-day Saints  gaylds.net Glory to God Community Church 375 Harrison Blvd, Ogden . . 801-394-0204 Holladay United Church of Christ 2631 E Murray-Holladay Rd . 801-277-2631 Inner Light Center . . . . . 801-268-1137 * innerlightcenter.net Integrity/Utah St. James Church . . . . . . . . . 801-566-1311

QUEER SPIRIT * info@queerspirit.org Men loving men, gathering together in loving and intimate ways to explore, dialog, enjoy, dream and celebrate the “who” and “what” we are in the broader community through weekend retreats, vision quests, monthly gatherings . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-557-9203 Restoration Church of Jesus Christ 2900 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . 801-359-1151 Sacred Light of Christ 823 S 600 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-595-0052 Salt Lake Center for Spiritual Living 870 E North Union Ave, Midvale . . . . . . . . . 801-307-0481 St. Paul’s Episcopal Church 261 S 900 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-322-5869 SOUTH VALLEY UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST SOCIETY  www.svuus.org * svuus@xmission. com An intentionally diverse religious community. You are welcome here, no matter your age, race, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity. South Valley is the place where U can be U. 6876 S Highland Dr (2000 E). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-944-9723 Unitarian Universalist Church Ogden 705 23rd St, Ogden . . . . . . . . 801-394-3338 WASATCH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  www.wpcslc.org No matter who or where you are on your journey of faith, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ – you are welcome at Wasatch Presbyterian Church. Ours is a community committed to the nurture of Christian faith through worship, learning and service – and we hope to share our enthusiasm and care with you. 1626 S 1700 E . . . . . . . . 801-487-7576

SOCIAL ALTERNATIVE GARDEN CLUB  altgardenclub.org Meets 1st Weds at 7:30PM in Sugar House Park Garden Club Building Bisexual Community Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 ext 14 Meets the 2nd Thurs each month at 7pm in the Multi-purpose room at the Center. Engendered Species  es-transgender.com * deborahthai@yahoo.com801-320-0551 Gamofites  gamofites.org . . . . . . . 801-444-3602 Gay and Lesbian Parents of Utah * glpu@hotmail.com

LDS Reconciliation  ldsreconciliation.org Activity Info Line . . . . . . . . . . 801-296-4797

Imperial Rainbow Court of Northern Utah  irconu.org, PO Box 3131, Ogden, UT 84409

Lifebreath Center/Interfaith Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-363-9229

Kindly Gifts by Stitch & Bitch . . . . . . 801-487-7008

Provo Community United Church of Christ 175 N University Ave, Provo . 801-375-9115

Ogden OUTreach Resource Center  ogdenoutreach.org 705 23rd Street . . . . . . . . . . . 801-686-4528

4 2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

PARENTS, FAMILIES AND FRIENDS OF LESBIANS & GAYS  pflag.org Ogden: 3rd Thursday, 705 E 23rd St * ogdenpflag@q.com Salt Lake City: 1233 S 1000 E 801-244-6423 * slcpflag@gmail.com St. George: 823 Harrison * pflagsaintgeorge@gmail.com

UTAH PRIDE CENTER  utahpridecenter.org * thecenter@utahpridecenter.org Community Events • Lending Library • Assembly Room • Support Groups • Resource & Referral • Utah Pride Organizers • Youth Activity Center 361 N 300 W . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Toll-free . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-874-2743

University of Utah Women’s

QUEER VILLAGE  queervillage.blogspot.com

UTAH QUEER EVENTS  groups.yahoo.com/group/ UtahQueerEvents

Utah State University Gay and

Western Transsexual Support Group . . . . . . . . . 435-882-8136

(GLSRC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435-797-4297

SPORTS

* usuglsrc@yahoo.com

QUEEREADS  twitter.com/queereads Book club hosted by Sam Weller’s Bookstore and co-sponsored by the Utah Pride Center that discusses queer literature. 254 S Main St . . . . . . . . 801-328-2586 QVINUM GAY & LESBIAN WINE TASTING GROUP  www.qvinum.com Fun and fabulous wine tasting club for gay and lesbian and other fabulous wine lovers. Monthly wine tastings at members’ homes. Join us – bring the wine of the month or some delicious yummy. Mix, mingle, slurp – but don’t spit. We’re not that kind of group. RAINBOW CLASSIC CAR CLUB Don R. Austin. . . . . . . . . 801-485-9225 ROTC-SLC  rotcslc.com * rotcslc@yahoo.com ROTC-Salt Lake City is a performancebased organization, centered in the lesbian and gay community. Men and women, straight and gay, we come together to form a modern-day color guard. . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-261-3694 Royal Court of the Golden Spike Empire  rcgse.org * chairman@rcgse.org SimplySocial  simply-social.org A group of gay men dedicated to building a vibrant community through friendship. SOUTHERN UTAH GLBT COMMUNITY CENTER * suglbtcc@yahoo.com . . . . . . 801-(435) 313-GLBT  groups.yahoo.com/groups/suglbtcc SOUTHERN UTAH PRIDE  southernutahpride.org Strength In Numbers(Sin) SL  groups.yahoo.com/group/ SINSaltLake A social network for gay men living with HIV and AIDS. sWerve  swerveutah.com

Resource Center  sa.utah.edu/women 200 S Central Campus Dr, Rm 411 . 801-581-8030 Utah State University Pride Alliance  groups.yahoo.com/group/usupride/

Lesbian Student Resource Center  usu.edu/glsrc

Frontrunners Utah . . . . . 801-519-8889

Utah Valley State College Gay

Lambda Hiking Club  gayhike.org

Straight Alliance

Mountain West Basketball League angst2008@gmail.com . . . . 801-598-3844

 uvsc.edu/clubs/club.cfm?clubID=251

Mountain West Flag Football League  mwffl.org . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-359-2544 Mountain West Volleyball League  slcgaa.org . . . . . . . . . 773-301-5343 Northern Utah Women ROC  groups.yahoo.com/group/ OgdenOutdoorWomen Social organization of lesbian and straight women interested in walking, camping, festivals, cook outs, shows, skiing and creative workshops.

 groups.yahoo.com/group/uvscgsa Weber State University Gay Straight Alliance  organizations.weber.edu/dlsu/  groups.yahoo.com/group/WeberDLSU * WeberDLSU@yahoo.com

YOUTH Homeless Youth Resource Center Youth ages 15-21.

Pride Community Softball League  prideleague.com * pcsl@prideleague.com . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Ext 21

655 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-364-0744

Salt Lake City Gay Athletic Association  slcgaa.org

TINT (TOLERANT INTELLIGENT

QUAC – QUEER UTAH AQUATIC  quacquac.org * questions@ quacquac.org Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and straight swimming team. All swimmers of any skill level welcome. See web site for swim schedule . . . . . . . 801-232-7961 Salt Lake Goodtimes Bowling League  saltlakegoodtimes.com Sundays starting in August . . 801-832-9745 Ski Out Utah  skioututah.com STONEWALL SHOOTING SPORTS OF UTAH  stonewallshootingsportsutah.org Utah Gay and Lesbian Ski Week communityvisions.org . . . . . . 877-429-6368 Utah Gay Men’s Tennis Group groups.yahoo.com/group/ utahgaymenstennis Utah Gay Mountain Bike Riders groups.yahoo.com/group/ utahgaymtnbike

Gay LDS Young Adults  glya.com

NETWORK OF TEENS) The Utah Pride Center’s youth activity center provides a safe place for people ages 14-20 regardless of race, ethnicity, physical ability, religion, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation or identity. It provides social and support groups for GLBTQ youth and offers food, a big screen TV, video games, computers, a library, a pool table, and much more! Drop-in hours: Tuesday thru Friday 3pm-9pm, Saturday 5pm-9pm 355 N 300 W . . . . . . 801-539-8800 x14

Not Listed?

UTAH BEAR ALLIANCE  utahbears.com * info@utahbears.com Social/service group for Bears, Cubs and their admirers. Check the web site for a calendar of our activities

UNIVERSITY & COLLEGE

Utah Families Coalition * admin@utahfamilies.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Ext. 23

Gay and at BYU  groups.yahoo.com/group/ gayandatBYU/

UTAH MALE NATURISTS  www.umen.org A social group for gay, bisexual and gaypositive men that holds nonsexual naked social and recreational events, including pool/hottub parties, cocktail parties, potlucks, movie nights and overnight campouts throughout the year. Guests are welcome at most events.

Gay-Straight Alliance Network  gsanetwork.org/

with your organization

Salt Lake Community College Coloring Outside the Lines . . . . . . . . 801-957-4562 * coloring_outside_lines@yahoo.com

name, url, address

Southern Utah University Pride  suu.edu/orgs/pride/

and a short paragraph

Utah Polyamory Society 801-309-7240  groups.yahoo.com/group/ UtahPolyamorySociety 1st Friday of the month, 6:30pm, Utah Pride Center, 4th Sunday of the month at Grounds for Coffee/Clrfld

University of Utah Lesbian & Gay Student Union  utah.edu/lgsu/

on what your group

University of Utah LGBT Resource Center  sa.utah.edu/lgbt 200 S Central Campus Dr, Rm 409 801-587-7973

does and when and

Delta Lambda Sappho Union Weber State Univ. . . . . . . . . . 801-627-1639

email editor@qsaltlake.com

and/or phone number

where it meets.


Q Scopes You are as beautiful as you feel, Scorpio! by Jack Fertig

Venus is in Scorpio, tempting deep, dark passions, both erotic and aesthetic. Mercury in Virgo sextile Venus brings in critical insight and shrewd vision. Saturn is right in the middle, adding focus and structure. Put up that sling and/or take that art history class.

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ARIES (March 20 – April 19) Working out, tight-fitting clothes and chit-chat in the bar can get you lots of places, but never very far. Superficial charm will work, but more mature and darker will help you find a solid match. Try quoting Dorothy Parker.

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TAURUS (April 20 – May 20) Want to please your sweetie? His or her secret desire could be a naughty, nude maid. It’s one way to get the housework done. No sweetie? Someone at work wants to put some sugar in your bowl.

Better yet, make a very serious and practical plan about how you’re going to increase your earnings. It will take hard work, but you can do it!

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LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Worries may be exaggerated, but still point to real problems. You have strength and value you don’t realize, and those buried talents can get you through. Critical self-analysis should always include the positive.

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SCORPIO (October 23 – Nov. 21) You are as beautiful as you feel, and however you feel about yourself is how the world will see you. If you need support and convincing, let a friend help you create a new look.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 – Dec. 20) Trust your instincts – but only so far – for inspiration to get through the maze of politics and hierarchies that stands between you and success. Run those notions past a good friend who can improve your ideas.

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GEMINI (May 21- June 20) Staying home and doing housework can be more fun than you expect. Take it as a creative challenge. You could also expand that creativity to some efforts in the community, or share an adventure with some nephews and/or nieces. CANCER (June 21- July 22) Write a letter to – or draw a picture of – the parents you always wanted. Then write a letter telling your real parents of all your disappointments, how they failed you and you them. Don’t mail it! Just get it off your chest and forgive everyone involved.

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LEO (July 23 – August 22) A serious talk about bills, accounting and fairness can save you and your housemates some decent money. Live alone? At least go over the bills and consider how your parents or grandparents got through the depression. Those pennies add up!

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VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Sit down and have a serious discussion about how you can economize.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 21 – January 19) While you’re at the top of your game, new ideas and self-criticism to hone your skills will help you to rise even higher. Suggestions and praise from admiring friends should be happily accepted, although with a grain of salt. AQUARIUS (January 20 – Feb. 18) Wise as you are, are you smart enough to keep ego and pride out of your own way? The more you try to look good, the less you will. Let your facts and figures do the talking and you’ll sizzle.

Free Cover All Night Don’t Miss Out on this !!! Over 300 People Every Sunday

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PISCES (February 19 – March 19) Acting as (or actively seeking) the wise and well-traveled voice of mature experience can help you find passion, if not actual love. What does your partner say? New adventures are good; they don’t necessarily require a new playmate.

Jack Fertig, a professional astrologer since 1977, is available for personal and business consultations in person in San Francisco, or online everywhere. He can be reached at 415-864-8302, starjack.com or qscopes@qsaltlake.com.

anagram An anagram is a word or phrase that can be made using the letters from another word or phrase. Rearrange the letters below to answer:

Name the out comedian who plays Wendover on Sept. 25.

DYKE WAN ASS _____ _____ PUZZLE SOLUTIONS ARE ON PAGE 47

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 3

THE BEST LATINO GAY NIGHT WITH THE BEST MUSIC BY DJ FRANK THE HOTTEST GO- GO DANCERS SHOWS & ENTERTAINMENT AND THE BEST CROWD IN UTAH...


BE AR ACUDA

JAM Welcomes Bearracuda and Blue Alley Fair by Brad Di Iorio

The Marmalade District’s only gay bar, Club JAM, will pay tribute to Salt Lake’s leather, fetish and Levis crowd with the revival of the Blue Alley Fair, welcoming San Francisco’s Bearracuda, and presenting an alternative tattoo and spit-shine Sunday event. Seen as Salt Lake’s prelude to San Francisco’s ultimate leather fest, the Folsom Street Fair, the Blue Alley Fair is a tamer version, celebrating leather, kink and fetish accoutrements and self-expression. On Sept. 18, Bearracuda promoter, Matt Mikesell will bring his successful bear party to Salt Lake City for the first time. “We basically go to our favorite cities that we have a connection in,” said Mikesell. “Our connection in Salt Lake City was my old, old friend, Princess Kennedy. She hooked us up with the great guys at JAM.” Bearracuda started at a small club in San Francisco as an alternative to other bear hangouts, featuring great music, dancing, and a focus on making friends and connections. “I’m a 34-year-old guy who has lived in San Francisco off and on for 15 years. I started Bearracuda in 2006, because I thought that bears really deserved more in San Francisco,” explained Mikesell. “All that was offered back then were bars that never changed their décor and didn’t really make much of an effort to draw people in. If you wanted to dance, then the parties were few and far between as well as being pretty expensive.” Two years ago, the first satellite party was held

in Seattle — adding Portland and New Orleans, the following year. This year, 12 cities are included in the tour, including Atlanta, Sydney, Vancouver, and, of course, Salt Lake City. “We’re a bear event, but we get every type of guy coming to the club … with the majority of them having facial hair,” said Mikesell. “We were voted ‘Best Club for Queer Men’ in San Francisco’s weekly paper in 2008, 2009 and 2010.” Mikesell creates and promotes the events on his own and has worked with other promoters, deejays and event coordinators to make the Bearracuda event a large and fun party. Attending to the tunes at Bearracuda SLC is famed circuit party DJ Matt Consola, who is now considered a Bearracuda mainstay. DJ Consola began spinning when he was 15 years old, and for the last 20 years has performed as resident DJ at Metropolis (San Francisco), Crobar (Miami and Chicago) and Pure/Amsterdam (Denver). Consola has also spun at raves and circuit parties for both San Francisco and Los Angeles Pride Festivals, and at both Black and White Parties in Palm Springs. He has also recently opened for The Pet Shop Boys for their sold out Pandemonium World Tour when they played in San Francisco for two nights at the historic Warfield Theater in 2009. Consola also co-owns record label Redzone Records that produces and promotes dance music and dance artists. “You can expect a very busy night full of beef and fur with fantastic tunes from Mike Babbit

and Matt Consola,” said Mikesell. “We’ve had sexy video visuals done for this event and there will be a snack table for our guys at the club. [Consola] is putting a very special set for this evening with many of the songs he’s remixed himself.” For Saturday night’s Bearracuda at JAM, there will be a $5 cover charge before 10 p.m. and $7 after. “We’re hoping that people are going to enjoy the friendly atmosphere and the great tunes,” added Mkesell. On Sunday, beginning at 4 p.m., JAM will present the Blue Alley Fair with vendors as diverse as tattoo artists and leather and costume clothing makers. In years past, the Blue Alley Fair was presented as an alternative, fetish-styled street fair in Salt Lake City, but a promoter has not

taken the reigns to organize the event on a continuing yearly basis. Brian Morris of JAM would like the event to continue as a prelude and nod to the West Coast’s larger leather and fetish celebration, the Folsom Street Fair, which attracts over 600,000 visitors to San Francisco during the last weekend of September each year. JAM will feature drink specials and a BBQ, along with various local and national vendors who will provide attendees with opportunities to explore their kinky side. Attendees can get a military haircut, get their army boots shined, or add to their personal collection of toys. Q

Bike For Life 2010

the Walk For Life. “Last year we had about 60 riders who raised more than $5000,” said Measom. “We’d love to exceed those numbers — so far we’re at about half that, so hopefully we can get the word out and get people registered.” Cyclists set their own fund-raising goals, and there is no minimum in fund raising required. Participants create their own fund-raising pages from UAF’s website through the First Giving link that collects and documents online donations. The pages can be sent out in an e-mail or be directed to a Facebook page, where contributors can pledge by mile, for the whole ride, or in any way cyclists have chosen for their donations to be collected. “We will have a van trailing the route to watch for any kind of emergency situations, as well as crossing guards along the route to report anything that may happen,” stressed Measom. “There will be two water stations along the route — one near Hogle Zoo, which is the turn around point for the low intensity course, and another at the top of Emigration Canyon, which is the turn around point for the full intensity course.” Funds from the Bike For Life event will support the UAF HIV/STD test site, fund the purchase of condoms and safe-sex devices, and go to prevention programs for those at risk of getting HIV. They will also contribute to services for people living with AIDS, including case management,

health-related workshops and the on-site food bank at the UAF office. “Helmets and bikes are mandatory; [a] raincoat is optional depending on the weather, and we highly recommend bikers bring a water bottle,” added Measom. Bike For Life will end at the 9th and 9th Street Festival which will be in full swing at 10 a.m. and will end at 6 p.m. in the very gay-friendly neighborhood of 900 E. 900 South. Fund-raising incentives include a Bike For Life T-shirt for raising $40 or more, a T-shirt and a special UAF water bottle for those raising $150 or more, a T-shirt, UAF water bottle and a special UAF hat for $250 or more, and a T-shirt, water bottle, hat, and a specially designed 500 Club hooded sweatshirt as well as an invitation to the UAF’s 500 Club party, for those cyclists raising over $500. Adam Frost, who was a founding member of Cycle Out, Utah’s gay and lesbian cycling club, will be participating in Bike For Life again this year. “The event is fun and at the same time helps people in the local community. Plus, I get to see some friends that I wouldn’t otherwise run into,” Frost said. “I have ridden this year’s course up Emigration Canyon a couple of times in the past months and have really enjoyed it. The scenery is amazing.” Last year, Frost said he did have a slight run-in with a motorist as the course wound through

downtown Salt Lake City. “Being the first year, there weren’t as many riders as other events I’ve attended, but that comes with being a new event,” he added. And Larry Lee, silver team medalist in bowling at this year’s Gay Games in Cologne, Germany is participating again. “My commitment to my sponsors last year was that I would ride 90 miles for the Bike For Life,” he said. “At that time, I lived in Layton. As to the course changes, I hate hills, so I am not excited about the change to Emigration Canyon. Still, it will be different and certainly a challenge.” Lee’s children have participated in Walk For Life events for years and will support him in this year’s Bike For Life efforts. “My goal this year is $1,200 and so far I am at $700. Anything I raise will be matched up to $1,000,” said Lee. “Most importantly, I get to help a wonderful organization that is working hard to help people impacted by HIV and to reduce the rate of HIV infection.” For more information about Walk For Life or Bike For Life, go to the Utah AIDS Foundation’s website at uaf.org and click on either event. If you would like to contribute to a specific cyclist, go to Facebook and type in Walk For Life or look up specific names of participating cyclists. Bike For Life will begin at 8 a.m. on the north end of Liberty Park, located between 600 and 700 East and 900 South. Q

by Brad Di Iorio

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HE SECOND ANNUAL BIKE FOR Life will take place Sept. 18, marking 25 years of fund raising by the Utah AIDS Foundation for Utahns living with HIV and AIDS. Accompanying the popular (and older) Walk For Life event at Liberty Park on Saturday morning, interested cyclists can register the day of the event at 8 a.m., but many cyclists have already registered and are raising money on their sponsorship pages which they created on UAF’s website. “Bike For Life is a powerful public awareness event and one of our most exciting new fund-raisers,” said Nathan Measom, UAF’s development director and Bike For Life program coordinator. “The route has changed from a city course to a challenging canyon course.” There are two ride options for cyclists this year: a high-intensity 22-mile from Liberty Park to the top of Emigration Canyon and back, and a low-intensity ride, or about 11 miles. Both rides will take place on the same route where there will be hills. “The low intensity ride is about half of the regular ride,” added Measom. “Theoretically, riders can turn around on the route and head back whenever they feel like they need to.” Registration is free for both Ride For Life and

4 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Club JAM is at 751 N. 300 West. For more information on Bearracuda visit bearracuda.com, or look for the party on Facebook, where several parties are also scheduled for Folsom Street Festival.


spinning Top 40 remix on Fridays

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 5


Come get Hunky Every Sunday night at The Tav

KARAOKE

SUNDAYS AND TUESDAYS DOLLAR DRAFTS Sundays, Mondays and Wednesdays OLDIES Mondays DUELING PIANOS Wednesdays through Saturdays

Non-Smoking

Corner of 3rd South and 2nd East for 7 years 801-519-8900 www.tavernacle.com A Private Club for Members

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QTALES

the perils of petunia pap-smear A Tale of a Job Called Blow by Petunia Pap-Smear

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HE ROAD TO CHOIR PRACTICE is fraught with danger and excitement. It is very easy as a drag queen to imagine that, when dressed to the nines in my finest polyester, I assume the identity of a drag queen super hero. Petunia Pap-Smear! Protector of Prissy Princesses, and defender of all things sparkly. I see myself just like Captain James T. Kirk commanding the Starship Enterprise, commanding my own personal starship — my large land yacht Queer-Tanic — maneuvering about the Intermountain West in an ongoing mission to “Go where no man has gone before,� while dispensing etiquette lessons, beauty tips and makeovers to biker gangs and Relief Society sisters. Sadly, in reality, I’m much less like Captain Kirk and more like Barbarella, the intergalactic slut. But a super hero must go with her strengths. Nevertheless, I do, on occasion, remove the fake boobs, take off the tiara and use an industrial paint stripper to remove my makeup. Then, my jewelry safely under lock and key and my hair consigned to the shelf, I slide into some Fruit of the Looms. A pair of Dockers and a polo shirt later, I begin my once weekly pilgrimage to sing with the Salt Lake Men’s Choir. This rather plain and unadulterated appearance is my civilian disguise which I don in order to be able to move about the community with anonymity. One typical Thursday during evening rush hour, I was at the helm of Queer-Tanic proceeding at maximum warp speed to choir practice. Having safely negotiated the treacherous Spaghetti Bowl Nebula, I was going east

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through the Interstate 80 worm hole, nearing the Foothill System. Suddenly, Queer-Tanic’s engine coughed and died, ceasing all forward propulsion. Luckily, I was able to coast in to the very, very narrow emergency lane and turn on my emergency beacons. No problem, the drag queen motto (which has been plagiarized by a para-military youth organization which shall remain nameless) is “Be prepared.� As a 10-year Car Talk listener, I prepared to exit the craft to diagnose and perhaps even fix the problem. But as I cracked open the hatch, a huge triple trailer truck more ominous than a Klingon Bird of Prey, zoomed by at Warp 9, within about 18 inches of the side of QueerTanic’s port side. Because Commander Scott has gone to that great engine room in the sky and is not available to make it go, and there was not a single lesbian with a tool box within sight, I flipped open my communicator (styled cell phone) and issued a distress call to Starfleet (Triple A) command. The operator asked if I was in a safe location. I looked out the window at the continuing maelstrom of speeding traffic and replied, “No.� She immediately contacted the Highway Patrol to send protective escort. Very shortly, a most handsome Utah Highway Patrolman looking ever-so-stunning in his tight fitting uniform (economic stimulus money well spent, if you ask me) arrived and began flashing his lights. I thought to myself: please don’t let this be like an episode of Star Trek where the gorgeous unnamed crewman accompanying the landing party is the first one killed. Before long, a Federation tow

Cryptogram: The word ‘faggot’ is not part of any religious creed.

Anagram: Wanda Sykes

honor ro These businesses brought you this issue of QSaltLake. Make sure to thank them with your patronage. vessel arrived and captured Queer-Tanic in its tractor beam and brought me safely to choir practice a little flustered, but no worse for the wear. Except, that is, for a nasty case of cotton mouth (usually when faced with a handsome man in uniform, I tend to drool, but the extreme heat of the day left me parched instead). Once again, I followed our motto and popped a Ricola throat lozenge to help keep things lubricated. (Cue the alpenhorn and yodeler.) Well, as it just so happened, that was the night a brand new, hot looking guy joined the choir and came and sat right beside me. Since hospitality is a queen’s greatest virtue, I engaged the new stud in friendly conversation between songs to make him feel welcome. He asked if I could smell licorice and I told him that it was probably the Ricola and pursed my lips in order to produce a gentle blow job of air to confirm my theory. During my high school and college years, I spent about 10 years playing trombone in the marching band. Did you know that tromboners “do itâ€? in seven positions? Anyway, all that boner blowing must have left me with a very strong diaphragm, because the resulting flow of air created a vortex into which the Ricola was sucked, and subsequently launched from between my lips like a slippery wet Photon Torpedo. To my great dismay, I could not close my lips around it quickly enough and it took flight. I watched in horror as it arched into the air, as if in slow motion, and landed right on the new hottie’s arm. I learned as a little princess that it’s not nice manners to spit on new acquaintances. It just isn’t a good way to win friends and influence people. Not knowing exactly the best course of action at this juncture, after staring at the offending lozenge for a moment, I quickly retrieved it from his arm and returned it from whence it flew. He graciously excused my blow job faux pas. Being highly embarrassed, I turned and paid extra attention to the director so as to pretend that the unfortunate blow job never occurred. To my amazement, the stud returned the next week, undaunted and ready to sing. What a guy! Like always these events leave us with many eternal questions: 1. According to the hanky code, what color kerchief is spit? 2. Must I wear Lederhosen to suck on Ricola? 3. Must I learn to yodel and play the alpenhorn? 4. Would a Certs breath mint be as aerodynamic as Ricola? 5. Is there a blow job mishap support group? These and other important questions to be answered in future chapters of “The Perils of Petunia Pap-Smear.â€? Q

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 7

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NATIONAL NEWS

BY REX WOCKNER

Federal Judge Strikes Down Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips in Riverside, Calif., struck down the military’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell ban on open gays in the military Sept. 9. Phillips found that the ban violates the U.S. Constitution’s guarantees of free speech and due process under the First and Fifth Amendments. “The Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Act infringes the fundamental rights of United States servicemembers in many ways,” Phillips wrote in her 86-page opinion. “The Act denies homosexuals serving in the Armed Forces the right to enjoy ‘intimate conduct’ in their personal relationships. The Act denies them the right to speak about their loved ones while serving their country in uniform; it punishes them with discharge for writing a personal letter, in a foreign language, to a person of the same sex with whom they shared an intimate relationship before entering military service; it discharges them for including information in a personal communication from which an unauthorized reader might discern their homosexuality. In order to justify the encroachment on these rights, defendants faced the burden at trial of showing the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Act was necessary to significantly further the government’s important interests in military readiness and unit cohesion. Defendants failed to meet that burden.” Phillips said the government’s contention that letting gays be open in the military harms its functioning is fully undermined by the fact that the military delays discharge of gays and lesbians who violate DADT until they return from combat deployment. The six-year-old case, brought by the gay group Log Cabin Republicans, was heard without a jury in July. Phillips said she will issue a permanent injunction prohibiting the military from enforcing Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. She gave LCR until Sept. 16 to submit proposed language for the injunction and gave the U.S. government until Sept. 23 to respond to LCR’s submission. “She could at that point stay the injunction pending an appeal or, as Judge (Vaughn) Walker did (in the federal Prop 8 case), she could deny such a stay but grant a temporary stay to allow the government to seek a stay pending an appeal from the 9th Circuit,” said Jon Davidson, legal director of Lambda Legal. If no stay is issued, it is unclear whether Phillips’ ruling would take effect nationwide or just in California’s Central District of the federal courts. “This is an historic moment and an historic ruling for the gay military community,” said Servicemembers United Executive Director Alexander Nicholson, who was kicked out of the Army under DADT. “As the only named injured party in this case, I am

exceedingly proud to have been able to represent all who have been impacted and had their lives ruined by this blatantly unconstitutional policy. We are finally on our way to vindication.” Gay activists responded to the ruling by calling on President Barack Obama to cease enforcement of DADT immediately and demanding that the U.S. Justice Department decline to appeal Phillips’ decision.

tantamount to a daily dose of torture,” commented National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Executive Director Rea Carey. “In too many cases, harassment, taunting and abuse are allowed to go on unabated in our nation’s schools. We have repeatedly seen the tragic consequences of this pervasive problem: Young people are left emotionally damaged, physically hurt, or feel they have no other option than to take their own lives out of hopelessness and despair. Youth who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender — or simply perceived to be — are often the targets of this abuse. Today, New York said enough is enough.” Fifteen states and the District of Columbia have enacted similar laws to protect gay/lesbian and, in some cases, transgender students.

California Supremes Rebuff Prop 8 Proponents

New York Governor David Paterson

N.Y. Governor Signs Law Protecting LGBT students New York Gov. David Paterson signed a bill Sept. 7 protecting students in New York public schools from bias-based bullying and discrimination. He signed the legislation in a ceremony at the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center in New York City. “The Dignity for All Students Act will provide important new safeguards to ensure that schools are places where students can concentrate on learning and personal growth, not on avoiding taunting or violence,” said Ross Levi, executive director of the Empire State Pride Agenda. The new law targets harassment based on race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity and expression. It requires teacher training on discouraging bias-based harassment, inclusion in coursework of discrimination and harassment awareness, and reporting of bias incidents to the state Education Department. The law marks the first time New York state has legislated explicit protections for transgender people. A 2007 study by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network found that 33 percent of LGBT students skip school in any given month because they fear for their safety, compared with only 4.5 percent of the general student population. “For some young people, going to school is

6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

The forces that want to keep Proposition 8, the voter-passed constitutional amendment that re-banned same-sex marriage in California, can’t catch a break. The state Supreme Court on Sept. 7 slapped down an effort by conservative activists to force Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Attorney General Jerry Brown to defend Prop 8 in the federal case that was appealed to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals after U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker found in August that Prop 8 violates the U.S. Constitution. None of the governmental entities that were sued in the federal case is interested in defending Prop 8, so the appeal to the 9th Circuit was filed by the activists who put Prop 8 on the ballot. It is unlikely, however, that the activists have “standing” to mount an appeal, since it’s not their job to defend California’s constitution. Worried about such a determination, conservative forces have been trying to find some other route to assure that the 9th Circuit hears the appeal, including pressuring defendants Brown and Schwarzenegger and pushing to add Imperial County, located in the southeast California desert, as an official defendant. The 9th Circuit will make the call on the county’s long-shot effort, probably in December, when it also will take up the question of whether the pro-Prop 8 activists have standing. If they do, the 9th Circuit will then move on to hear the appeal of Walker’s actual ruling. If the activists do not have standing and Imperial County can’t become a defendant, the case is over and same-sex marriage is legal again in California, unless the activists attempt to appeal the standing question to the U.S. Supreme Court. That, too, would be a long shot, many legal experts believe. They say the Supreme Court would be unlikely to conclude that displeased citizens can step into a state government’s shoes to defend a state law that the state government itself refuses to defend and, indeed, believes violates the U.S. Constitution. In rejecting the activists’ latest move, the California Supreme Court denied review without comment.

Quips & Quotes ❝

More than anything else, what I’m doing is giving the Republicans and independents an alternative to vote for.” —Melvin Nimer, telling The Salt Lake Tribune about his run for Utah Senate District 2

So, if McAdams [a gay-friendly Mormon who replaced openly gay Sen. Scott McCoy] weren’t interesting enough all on his own, now he’s being challenged by a gay man, a gay Republican, no less, and they’re always interesting.” —Jesse Fruhwirth on City Weekly’s news blog

Personally, I think this is a simple way for the Republican Party to throw Mel Nimer and the Utah Log Cabin Republicans under the bus. With two months until the election, and with all of the qualified candidates they could have picked from, the Repub’s decided to throw the gay head of a gay political group into a race against the biggest ally the State has in the Senate? With virtually no time to raise funds or to get a campaign off the ground. Sounds very….. Republican to me.” —Eric Ethington of Pride in Utah

The fact that the Utah Republican Party nominated an openly gay man is amazing no matter how you slice it. We’re talking about the reddest of red states here kids.” —Commenter “Michael M.” on the same post

I want to bring awareness to Tooele, especially since it’s a smaller city. I know there could be youth out there struggling with issues and I want people to know that there are other people out there.” —Robin Sheehy, founder of Come Out Tooele, in the Tooele Transcript Bulletin


Pro-gay Mayor Daley Will Not Seek Re-election Strongly pro-gay Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, who has led the city for 21 years, announced Sept. 7 that he will not run for a seventh term. Apart from a series of run-ins with ACT UP/Chicago in the late ’80s and early ’90s, Daley has been nothing short of a hero to most of the city’s LGBT community. In 1989, he became the first mayor to ride in the Chicago gay pride parade while in office. Two years later, Daley set up the nation’s first municipally sponsored Gay and Lesbian Hall of Fame and proceeded to personally hand out the awards nearly every year since. In 1998, he redecorated the city’s gay business strip, North Halsted Street, with a series of giant Flash-Gordon-esque retrofuturistic rainbow pylons. When some residents objected to the official gayification of the street, fearing for their property values, Daley thundered, “I won’t let the homophobes run this city!” He has been a supporter of same-sex marriage since 2004. Daley went on to serve as honorary cochair of Gay Games VII in 2006 and, in 2007, was honorary chair of the capital campaign to get the city’s new LGBT center built. At the Games’ opening ceremonies, Daley said: “Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community have contributed to Chicago in every imaginable way — in business, education, the arts and neighborhood development. They deserve to have the city of Chicago standing on their side, and it will continue to do so, as long as I am mayor of this great city.” Daley was pro-gay before it was cool. He decided long ago that gays make neighborhoods better, and that seemed to be that for him. He never wavered. His spoken defenses of the city’s gays were straightforward and from the gut. The mayor’s conflicts with ACT UP/Chicago came to a head on Feb. 12, 1992, when he and six members of the group engaged in a shouting match at a meeting of the gay business group Chicago Professional Networking Association. ACT UP members were angry that the city’s AIDS budget allegedly had been stagnant for several years and that, due to a then-new policy of not working on Sundays, Daley had missed AIDS Walk and the gay pride parade, among other issues. “I have been in the forefront as a public official dealing with the gay and lesbian community,” Daley told the hecklers. “You don’t see the governor, you don’t see any other elected official. I’m right here! And I don’t hide! I don’t hide from the gay and lesbian community as mayor of the city of Chicago! The gay and lesbian community has a (yearly) reception not at a Hilton hotel but at the mayor’s City Hall on the

fifth floor (where my office is). ... And the AIDS budget each year goes up in the city of Chicago.” “That’s a lie!” the protesters yelled back. “It hasn’t gone up in three years! It’s a million dollars. It’s the same as it was! ... You’re lying!” “I’m just as concerned as anybody else,” Daley said. “Don’t make me one who’s insincere and not concerned about the AIDS issue.” The protesters then lambasted Daley for having attended the wake of Danny Sotomayor, who had been ACT UP/Chicago’s spiritual leader and perhaps Daley’s fiercest critic ever. “Liar!” they shouted. “Why did you go to Danny Sotomayor’s funeral? Why. Did. You. Go. To. Danny. Sotomayor’s. Funeral?!” At that point, pandemonium ensued and CPNA ejected ACT UP from the gathering. Daley then said: “I always remember Danny Sotomayor. I went to his wake. ... I went there out of respect for him and his family. Now, he’s a strong advocate. I used to see him all the time. He’d, you know, scream and yell in my face. I said: ‘Danny, why you yelling at me? I’m here. This is a reception we’re having. This is what we’re doing. I’m not perfect. But don’t try to make me the one, like, insensitive or not concerned. There’s a lot of other people who won’t even talk to you, won’t even shake your hand, listen to you, won’t understand what you’re saying.’” As for ACT UP’s tactics, Daley said: “To get up and say anything, that’s their right to do anything, but after a time you have to say: ‘Hey, let’s move on. I’ve heard. I’ve listened. We are trying to do it. It’s not fast enough. You’re right, it’s not fast enough.’” “You know why it’s not fast enough?” he continued. “When one person dies, you’re right, it’s not fast enough. It’s not fast enough for you or me or anybody else when you see one person die. And one thing I found out — that we’re all in this together. We’re not separate, we’re not higher or lower, we’re all together. And these issues that confront any community confront the city of Chicago. And what we’re trying to do here in our city is to truly work together.” A little more than three months after the showdown — and an even worse blowup seven weeks later, when 40 furious AIDS activists torpedoed the mayor with vicious insults for 90 minutes as he and more than 500 gays and lesbians marched through gay neighborhoods in response to an anti-gay shooting — Daley relented on AIDS spending, and the City Council voted 46-0 to boost funding to $3.57 million. “This is a very serious health and emotional problem and we have to recommit ourselves,” Daley said. According to Windy City Times and the Chicago Tribune, one of the people who may run to replace Daley is Alderman Tom Tunney, who is openly gay.

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 7


LOC AL NEWS

McAdams: Not Taking Election for Granted Just before Christmas 2009, Democratic delegates from Utah’s Senate District 2 came together to perform a difficult task: pick a replacement to finish outgoing — and out — Sen. Scott McCoy’s term. Following McCoy’s resignation in order to devote needed time to his law practice, a number of candidates contacted delegates for consideration. These included Arlyn Bradshaw who, like McCoy, is openly gay — and who is now the favorite in a race for Salt Lake County Council’s District 1 seat. In the end, however, the delegates chose Ben McAdams, an aide to Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker and a straight ally, to take over for McCoy. Less than a year later, it’s time for McAdams to run on his own terms. This time, he’ll be doing so against Mel Nimer, an openly gay candidate from across the aisle who entered the race after McAdam’s original challenger failed to file her paperwork in time to run. “This is my first time introducing myself to the voters,” said McAdams, taking QSaltLake’s interview while canvassing the neighborhoods in his heavily Democratic district. “I was disappointed when my previous opponent dropped out because I think I owe it to the district, and we deserve a race.” McAdams comes to voters after a session where he had little time to debate gay- and transgender-rights issues. A compromise between pro-gay Democrats and Republi-

can leadership tabled all such bills in order to save Salt Lake City’s gay and transgender-inclusive employment and housing nondiscrimination ordinances from bills seeking their cancellation. Still, he has been a strong advocate for this part of his constituency, having promised to take up McCoy’s bill that would give same-sex couples rights to sue in cases of a partner’s wrongful death. In this sense, both he and Nimer are of the same mind. “It’s refreshing to have a Republican candidate who agrees with me on LGBT issues,” said McAdams who, like Nimer, promised to run a clean campaign that focused on the areas in which both men differ, rather than in attacking one another. “This was the first time I’ve met him, but he seems like a great guy,” he said of his opponent. “We have a lot of mutual friends so I’d heard of him, and I look forward to getting to know him better as we go through the campaign. We agreed for the sake of the LGBT issues that we both care about that we’d keep it clean and make sure we’d finish the election with the good reputation we each had going in.” “We shouldn’t’ cannibalize our own and we agreed not to do that,” he added. Like Nimer, McAdams noted that budgeting, education and immigration would top his list of concerns during the race. “It is an incredibly difficult year for the state budget,” he said, referring to the sluggish economy that has plagued every state

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in the Union. “My perspective is before we raise taxes, we need to understand this economy is no easier on tax payers than it is on government.” When making state budget cuts, McAdams said that lawmakers need to ensure that “necessary social services for those who have been hit by the economic downturn” remain, such as the Meals on Wheels program for elderly residents as well as insurance coverage for children. “Utah has ranked 50th in Medicaid access for kids, and that’s not good enough,” he said. ‘I don’t like tax increases and I want to stay away from that, but I think it’s important for the government to keep performing its essential functions. It’s going to depend on what we’re cutting. This is s a scale and you’ve got to balance both sides of the sale.” Like Nimer, McAdams is also concerned about Utah’s education system and particularly in what he calls its decline in quality over the last two decades. “It used to be that we could stack ‘em deep and teach ‘em cheap,” said the senator. But Utah’s increasingly diverse population — which includes several students for whom English is a second language — means that these days are over, he added. “The state’s financial commitment to education has gone down significantly. We’re last in per-pupil spending, and that’s not good enough,” he said. “I feel strongly that we need to provide equal opportunity to anyone who needs to reach out and grab it.” McAdams also said he feels Utah may go in the wrong direction on immigration issues. He is opposed to a bill proposed by Sen. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, that closely mirrors Arizona’s controversial SB 1070, which critics accused of encouraging racial profiling. “He’s called it Arizona-light, but I’ve read the bill. There’s nothing light about it,” said McAdams. “Make no mistake: It’s unconstitutional and un-American.” McAdams’ biggest objection to Sandstrom’s bill, he said, was that it would take away police and prosecutors’ right to “express discretion” in which illegal immigrants to pursue — such as those who are responsible for violent crime and drug trafficking rather than those who are abiding by the law. In that vein, McAdams also said he would not support any resolutions in the Utah State Senate or the House in support of overturning a clause in the 14th Amendment that grants citizenship to children born within U.S. borders to immigrants who are here illegally. “If we deny children who are born in the

United States the right to citizenship that dates back to the Civil War and the abolition of slavery, that would, in my mind, create a permanent under class in the United States — people with no citizenship in any country” who government would then deny “the opportunity to become contributing members of our society.” “For me, it’s a consistent message: looking out for our minority community whether they’re sexual or ethnic minorities,” he continued. “We need to send a message and be a welcoming society. That’s what America was founded on, and that’s who we need to be.” While Nimer and his supporters have argued that a gay and transgender-friendly Republican would get more done in the state’s conservative government than would a Democrat, McAdams countered that his ability to work with Republican lawmakers “being critical on some issues and working collaboratively on different issues” was more important. “My distinct point of view is reflective of the district,” he said. “The district wants a counterpoint on many issues and in my short time in the Legislature, I believe I’ve offered that counterpoint.” And although his district has wanted that counterpoint for decades (McAdams noted that it hadn’t been represented by a Republican in at least 35 years), the senator said he’s still not taking the election for granted. “It means I’ll have to continue to work hard, and I should,” he said. “We should expect that of our elected officials.” Q


Mel Nimer: Red Candidate in a Blue District Mel Nimer is no stranger to Utah politics. As the President of the Utah Log Cabin Republicans, a gay and transgender-friendly GOP caucus, he has worked to give gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Utah Republicans a voice in Utah’s ruling party. As a Precinct Chair and former state delegate, he has worked to get Republicans sympathetic to gay and transgender issues into office. And as of this month, Nimer is now a candidate for political office. When Nancy Davis, the Republican challenger to Sen. Ben McAdams’ District 2 Senate seat failed to file all her paperwork by the registration deadline, the Utah Elections Office disqualified her, leaving the party just one day to find a replacement. “The county [party] called and asked me to fill in the spot that got vacated,” said Nimer. “They said, ‘We can’t think of anybody better than you to fill in that spot. Will you run?’” Nimer’s response catapulted him fairly late into the race in this heavily Democratic district. Nonetheless, he said that he and his campaign volunteers are working quickly to put up a website, print fliers and hit the streets for canvassing. Although the election is still in its early stages, one thing at this point is certain: gay and transgender rights will not be a wedge issue. Perhaps for the first time in Utah political history, both the Republican and Democratic candidate agree on practically everything from the importance of job and employment protections to the need for same-sex partners to be able to sue in cases of wrongful death. “Senator McAdams has done a great job representing our community and filling Sen. Scott McCoy’s shoes,” said Nimer, who like the senator that McAdams replaced is also openly gay. The real contention in the election, he said, will thus be about both candidates’ different approaches to several issues affecting not only their district, but the state at large. “The only other big advantage I offer everyone in the district is that they’ll have a seat at the Republican table, so they’ll have a seat at the super majority table, which may be good, may be bad. But for our community, for the first time ever, they’ll have someone they can count on to try and swing the Republican majority more clearly in our favor.” Some of the main issues that Nimer and McAdams consider to be highly important are state budget cuts, education and immigration. Like many people from all party affiliations, Nimer said that the state’s budget has been on his mind a lot lately. While Nimer said that programs such as the state’s AIDS Drug Assistance Program

“need to be funded, totally,” he said that his main concern about the state’s economy is the complex interplay between job creation and a strong education system. “They’re not separate topics,” he said. “They’re all combined and interlinked and there is no one answer for each problem. We have to look at the much bigger picture in order to solve all these little problems.” To solve the state’s budget crisis, Nimer said that Utah must support small businesses, which are the state’s economic backbone. To this effect, he said that the state should lessen government controls on business creation. As an example, he cited Utah’s heavy regulation of liquor licenses, which he said prevent many would-be restaurateurs from going into business and therefore costs the state jobs and revenue. “We don’t need a whole bunch of rules and micromanaging what everyone does with all their time in building businesses,” he said. While both candidates agree that the state is not adequately serving its pupils, their ideas for improving the system — and especially getting it more money — differ considerably. In order to better fund the system, Nimer said he would support changing how the state handles taxation. Currently, he said, 70 percent of Utah is owned by the federal government, meaning that the state government has only 30 percent of the state to draw upon when crafting its budget. “One way to finance education is through property taxes,” he said. “In New Jersey, where only 7 percent of the land is federally controlled, they fund their education system the same way we do. And where we spend just $5,000 per student they can spend $13,000 per student because they have control of the land and we don’t. We need to change that and work things out with the federal government where we can use [this land].” In order for Utah to get the most out of its acreage, Nimer proposed coming to terms with the federal government on issues such as mining in federal monuments like the controversial Grand StaircaseEscalante National Monument, which sits atop a vast coal reserve. He said that the monument could be treated much the same way as are ski resorts in Utah’s national forests, which he calls “a good use of federally-owned land that the state gets money from.” “Mining that could easily be done [at Grand Staircase] without any harm to the environment or to the monument,” he said. “It won’t affect anything anyone’s going to enjoy and we’d be able to get thousands of tons of some of the cleanest burning coal

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 9

available.” A plan such as this, he said, would also boost the state’s sluggish economy, creating jobs and putting more money in the hands of citizens. But one thing Nimer said should not be in the hands of Utah residents is immigration, which he called the purview of the federal government. To that effect, he said he opposed a bill by Rep. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, that mirrors a controversial Arizona law. “[Bills like Sandstrom’s are] a simplistic answer to a really complex problem. It’s trying to take on a federal issue at a state level and that’s not appropriate,” he said. However, Nimer said that Utah could set up a system to help employers understand how to verify the resident status of their employees and to get illegal immigrants “help to become legal rather than deporting them.” The United States, he said, has historically depended upon a migrant workforce of foreigners from a number of nations, so taking a hard-line stance against illegal immigrants would be counterproductive. “We have to respect the fact that those people are human beings and we need to develop a system [that treats them with dignity], he said.

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Another person that Nimer said he will be treating with dignity is his opponent, who he has met and who has also promised to stick strictly to the issues facing the district and the state. And while he acknowledges that a Republican win in a heavily blue district will be “an uphill battle,” he said that it’s one in which he will engage wholeheartedly. “This is not a game,” he said. “We are in this as a serious campaign.” Q

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Treat yourself or a loved one to cooking classes with Chef Drew Ellsworth, 34-year chef, wine manager of the Third West Wine Store, QSaltLake’s Restaurant reviewer. With small groups of no more than 8 students, Ecole Dijon gives you the opportunity to watch and interact with a professional chef preparing foods in an exciting and expeditious way. The atmosphere is very casual and warm and students can freely move around to see what the chef is doing. “Hands on” training is available when possible.

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LOC AL NEWS

Allies To Be Honored at Annual Equality Utah Dinner board hired Mike Thompson. “I did a lot of legal work to help them grow Equality Utah’s annual Allies Dinner is one from being just Equality Utah to the three of the highlights of the year for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer organizations it is today: Equality Utah, community. Sponsored by Jane and Tami Equality Utah PAC and Equality Utah FounMarquardt and philanthropist Bruce Bastian, dation,” she said. “I realized that was a good the dinner is one of the gay and transgender structure, to combine a political action comrights organization’s biggest fund-raisers, as mittee, a lobbying arm and a political founwell as a day for it to honor individuals and dation. I think I followed the lead of the Huorganizations that have provided exemplary man Rights Campaign, which is set up in a similar way.” service to Utah’s queer community. Marquardt is legally married to her partNamed “Gaining Ground,” in honor of the spread of job and employment protections ner, Tami, in Canada and in a number of for gay and transgender people, this year’s U.S. states that have legalized same-sex mardinner will feature Dustin Lance Black as riage. Tami Marquardt served as the Utah its keynote speaker. A writer for the televi- Pride Center’s interim director in 2004 before the hiring of Valsion show Big Love, Black has won numererie Larabee and is a ous Writers Guild of America awards for his member of the Center’s work on the HBO drama about polygamy in board today. Utah. In 2009, he won an Academy Award for “Tami had a real Best Original Screenplay for Milk, a dramainterest in youth,” tization of the life and assassination of gayMarquardt explained. rights activist and public official Harvey “She has a real passion Milk. He also narrated 8: The Mormon Propofor talking to young sition, Reed Cowan’s controversial documenpeople, so when she tary about the LDS Church’s involvement in was at the Center she the passage of California’s Proposition 8. Tami Marquardt helped to run programs During the dinner, Equality Utah will also for youth. In life now she’s always willing give its Allies for Equality Award to five reto talk to people having issues coming out. cipients: Jane and Tami Marquardt, Gary and She’s so good at it people come to find her.” Millie Watts and the Salt Lake City Human Like Tami Marquardt, Gary and Millie Rights Commission. Watts have also helped gay, lesbian, bisexual Once a practicing and transgender youth, as well as their famiattorney from 1979 to lies as the leaders of LDS Family Fellowship. 2007, Jane Marquardt Although the two did not found the organizahas served Utah’s gay, tion, they joined soon after its formation in lesbian, bisexual and 1993; two of their six children are gay, and transgender citizens one of them, Craig, has been excommunicatsince 1982, when she ed from the LDS Church. started offering semi“Our love for Craig lead to a family comnars on establishing mitment to do all we can to help people underpowers of attorney, stand more about same-sex orientation,” the wills and other direc- two wrote in a 1994 letter viewable on their Jane Marquardt tives to same-sex cou- website, ldsfamilyfellowship.org, shortly beples. In 1996, she also helped organize training fore they began holding Family Fellowship sessions for Utah judges about “the cutting- meetings in their Utah County home. “Not edge issues of the day like employment non- only do we share the scientific research that is discrimination” affecting gay, lesbian, bi- coming forth, we also try to help people realize sexual and transgender people. During those how much discrimination hurts, not only the sessions, she faced off against psychologists homosexual person, but family and friends as and BYU professors who presented what she well. It [Craig’s coming out] has opened our called “the other side” of the debate. eyes to the world of “justified” discrimination “It was a chance to be a competent gay per- that exists in many aspects of society.” son standing up in front of a group of judges As leaders of the support group, the Wattwho may have thought they didn’t know gay ses not only provide council and support for people,” she said. “That was a fun thing to be parents struggling to come to terms with involved in. It was a landmark that the Utah their child’s sexual orientations, but tireSupreme Court even wanted to be educated less advocacy for gay, lesbian, bisexual and on these issues in the middle of the ’90s.” transgender people. Marquardt also served as a board member “Education is one of our major goals, and for Equality Utah from 2001–2007, starting to just try to get the parents and siblings to when the organization was known as Unity love their gay child and keep their gay child Utah, and is still a member of the group’s under their wing, not kick them out of the advisory council. In 2004, she served as the house like happens so many times with gay chair for the Don’t Amend campaign, Equal- children,” said Millie Watts in an interview ity Utah’s effort to stop a state constitutional with KUED for Friends and Neighbors: A ban on same-sex marriage. When founder Community Divided, a 1999 documentary Michael Mitchell departed the organization, about the families and friends of gay and lesshe also acted as interim director until the bian Utahns. by JoSelle Vanderhooft

1 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Throughout the ’90s and 2000s, the Wattses have spoken to journalists and organizations alike about their work, and have spoken out against anti-gay pronouncements made by LDS officials. A number of organizations have recognized them for these efforts, including Affirmation: Gay and Lesbian Mormons, a support group for former and current gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender members of the LDS Church. “Gary and Millie possess a genuinely charitable spirit,” said Family Fellowship supporter Marge Bradshaw in a 2006 ceremony where Affirmation honored the couple with an award for outstanding leadership. “They give. They give time; they give money; they give love. We spend four nights or so each year, with several other couples, at the dining room table in their home stuffing and addressing envelopes Millie and Gary Watts that contain a flyer announcing the upcoming Family Fellowship gathering. They provide the home, the pizza and root beer, and contribute to the spirit of friendship. There are no aides or secretaries; there is only Watts’ generosity.” The eight-member Salt Lake City Human Rights Commission has been an invaluable part of making the capital city a safer and more just place for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender residents. In 2009, its report on discrimination within the city’s boundaries revealed that discrimination based on race, sexual orientation and gender identity were significant problems. The report was the cornerstone upon which Mayor Ralph Becker based two ordinances prohibiting housing and employment discrimination against gay and transgender residents. The Salt Lake City Council ultimately passed the ordinances near the end of last year, and seven other municipalities have adopted them since. Lisa Harrison Smith, Becker’s deputy director of communications, said that the commission was “honored and excited” to receive the recognition. “We’re really thrilled that we’re recognized by Equality Utah. They’re a big part of many, if not all, of the initiatives that come out in the city. It means a lot to us.” Upon entering office, said Smith, Becker created the commission with Coordinator Yolanda Francisco-Nez at the helm “with the charge to make some very big changes” in how the city handled matters relating to diversity. “I think that set the tone for a pretty progressive agenda when it comes to LGBT rights,” she said, adding that the mayor’s office appreciated EU’s recognition of Francisco-Nez’s efforts. Francisco-Nez was out of town and could not be reached for comment. Q “Gaining Ground” will be held Sept. 28 at the Salt Palace. Tickets are $100 per person or $900 for a table of 10. Proceeds will go to Equality Utah Political Action Committee, to help elect fair-minded candidates who support equal rights for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender citizens. Vegetarian options are available. For more information visit alliesdinner.com.

Shades of Queer In October, the University of Utah’s LGBT Resource Center will present its annual Gay-la Dinner and Silent Auction, the theme of which will be “Shades of Queer: Connecting Through Difference.” The evening’s keynote speaker will be Reed Cowan, the director, writer and producer of 8: The Mormon Proposition, a popular documentary about the LDS Church’s involvement in California’s Proposition 8. The evening will also include performances by Keila Michiko Cone-Uemura and Baron Daniel Cureton. Dress is business casual and vegetarian and vegan options are available. WHEN: Oct. 22, 6 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. dinner WHERE: IJ and Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center, 2 North Medical Drive COST: $65 per person, $650 per table of 10, $45 per student (available upon request) INFO: To purchase tickets contact Cathy Martinez at cmartinez@ sa.utah.edu or Kathleen Boyd at kboyd@sa.utah.edu or 801-5877973

Fashion Stroll #10 Salt Lake City’s Fashion Stroll will celebrate its 10th incarnation by turning its outdoor market into a Halloween party. Attendees and merchants are encouraged to dress in costume, and prizes will be awarded to the most creative. Likewise, the event’s runway show and entertainment — including dancers, local bands and street performers — will all have a Halloween flair. Sponsorship opportunities are available. WHEN: Oct. 29, 6–10 p.m., East Broadway (300 South between State Street and 300 East) COST: Free to the public INFO: SLCFashionStroll.com or contact organizer Matt Monson at 801-671-4304 or slcfashionstroll@ gmail.com.

Family Conference The Utah Pride Center will host “Bringing Families Back Into the Room,” a regional conference, Oct. 8-10, for families with gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer youth. The keynote speaker will be Dr. Caitlin Ryan, head of the Family Acceptance Project at San Francisco State University, which is studying ways to help families support queer children. For more details, check utahpridecenter.org.


Will Cedar City Be Next to Pass Gay/Transgender Ordinance? So far, seven Utah municipalities have passed ordinances protecting residents from job discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. With less than four months of 2010 left, Equality Utah is hoping that at least three more will join their ranks. Currently, the gay and transgender rights group has approached mayors and city councils around the state about the ordinances, which Salt Lake City first approved in 2009. The discussion is especially developing in Holladay, Ogden and Cedar City, said Executive Director Brandie Balken. Although Equality Utah’s staff discussed the ordinances with the Ogden City Council earlier this year, the body voted to put off considering them until they had dealt with pressing budgeting concerns. Balken said that she hopes to meet with Mayor Matthew R. Godfrey in mid-September. Meanwhile, Holladay’s city council discussed whether or not to move forward on the ordinances during a Sept. 2 work meeting. Here, Councilman Barry Topham touched off controversy by saying that he didn’t know why the council was discussing this “can of worms” issue. “I think you should be able to discriminate if you don’t want a cross-dresser living in your house,” he said in the meeting. His remarks prompted Councilman Jim Palmer to call Topham’s position discriminatory and in violation of “the equalprotection clause of the Constitution that

we’ve all sworn to uphold.” Balken said that Equality Utah is encouraging Holladay residents to contact their councilmembers and let them know they support passing these ordinances. “I think in some cases it’s good for people to express their deeply held opinion. It gives us an opportunity to discuss what those concerns are,” said Balken of Topham’s remarks. “We’ve got some outreach to do.” Out of all three cities, progress is happening the fastest in Cedar City, where Equality Utah has been working closely with Southern Utah University’s QueerStraight Alliance to educate residents about the protections the ordinances offer. Along with speaking to Mayor Joe Burgess and the six-member city council, the organization held a series of three public meetings about the proposed measures at the mayor’s request. “We got on the radio, we got fliers out, we papered the town in an attempt to get as many people from as many backgrounds as possible to come and talk about the ordinances because no one wants to pass something they don’t understand,” said Benjamin King Smith, QSA president. “We’ve had a lot of people who have come to them wanting to know if they’ll be protected. It’s nice to have these conversations.” The council and mayor, said Smith, gave QSA positive feedback about the meetings and are planning to discuss the ordinances

throughout October. On Oct. 6, QSA members will ask the council to meet with the mayor about drafting the ordinances during the body’s weekly meeting. On the following week, Smith said the council will vote on whether or not to accept the ordinances. “There will be another vote after that, but if they pass the first vote, it’s pretty much guaranteed,” he said. Following this meeting, said Balken, Cedar City residents will be able to weigh in on the ordinances, and then the council will vote on whether or not to pass them.

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contestants and the audience. Rox is a retired police officer and law enforcement educator who now works full time as a BDSM and leather lifestyle educator. He is a graduate of the Journeyman III Academy, a BDSM school which closed in 2009. He also is the key organizer of Utah Rebellion, Head Master of Salt Lake’s BDSM201 Intermediate educational series, and is an administrator of and presenter coach for the Path 101 BDSM Group. He has taught at several clubs as well as major events such as Thunder in the Mountains, Maui Kink in Hawaii, DomCon Los Angeles, and DomCon Atlanta. Rox won the title of Mr. Rocky Mountain Olympus Leather in April at the first annual Rocky Mountain Olympus Leather Competition held in Salt Lake City, making him eligible to compete in the international competition. RMOL is a regional leather group which covers Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. Sythen of Salt Lake City was named runner-up for the International Ms. Olympus Leather 2010 at the event.

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Utah Rox Wins Int’l Mr. Olympus Leather Utah Rebellion organizer Utah Rox earned the title of International Mr. Olympus Leather 2010 at the International Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather contest held in Los Angeles. The contest was created to “promote a positive image of the Leather lifestyle,” according to its statement of purpose. “It is our belief that the leather community is comprised of an extremely diverse group of people ranging from the motorcycle and leather/Levi clubs to the heaviest SM edge player and all of the leatherfolk in between. The Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather title seeks to make all leatherfolk feel good about themselves regardless of race, religion, political beliefs, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, age, size, handicap, or health condition. It is the goal of Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather to make all those who wish to be a part of the leather community feel welcome in doing so.” Contestants competed in four categories — interview, fantasy, fetish image and stage presence. During the fantasy category, contestants staged a 5- to 7-minute erotic production, involving judges, other

“We think it’s likely we’ll have a vote in Cedar City before the end of October,” she said. The meetings will take place on Oct. 6, 13, 20 and 27. To date, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Park City, Summit County, West Valley City, Logan and Taylorsville have passed the measures, which impose fines against businesses with 15 or more employees and landlords renting at least four units who discriminate against gay and transgender people. Religious organizations are exempt.

Saturday, Sept 18th, 10am – 6pm Hosted by ELPCO – The East Liberty Park Organization and the East Centrsl Community Council

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 1 1


LOC ALNEWS

Layton PFLAG Launched Layton has become the latest of several Utah cities to start a chapter of the political, social and support group Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. “I’ve decided to make a goal of starting more PFLAGs in more cities,” said activist Turner Bitton, who recently held a Rally for Equality this summer to address the suicides of several Layton PFLAG President young gay Utahns. Cynthia Stevens “There’s really nothing for people up north,” he continued. “Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County have so much support for people, but Davis and Ogden have no support.” Bitton announced his intentions to several friends in Layton and the fledgling group met for the first time on Sept. 9 on

Weber State University’s campus. Here, the 25 attendees voted to make Cynthia Stevens president and Barb D’Arco vice president of Layton’s PFLAG chapter. Bitton will serve as vice president of public relations, a title he also holds in Ogden’s group. “I figure since the chapters are so close in proximity I’ll be able to do both at the same time,’ he said. The group will now focus on filing paperwork with PFLAG’s national body to become an official chapter. They expect to hold their first official meeting in October. For now, the group is meeting at 6:30 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month in the main building of Weber State University’s Davis campus, room 306. The first meeting is scheduled for Oct. 14. A support group will meet in the same room an hour before official business begins.

For more information about Layton PFLAG contact Turner Bitton at Bitton.politico@gmail.com or 801- 814-3660.

National Coming Out Brunch to Reveal Big PFLAG News For the sixth year in a row, the Utah Pride Center will celebrate National Coming Out Day, held nationally on October 11, with a brunch and awards ceremony. This year’s celebration in honor of the coming out process and the individuals and organizations that have served gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer Utahns will take place on Oct. 10 at the Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel. John Cepek, president of the national Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, will be the day’s keynote speaker at the brunch. The Center will also honor the 2010 recipients of its Lifetime Achievement Award, Community Organization of the Year Award and Volunteer of the Year Award. Marina Gomberg, the Utah Pride Center’s director of development and marketing, said that the Center is pleased to have Cepek visit — especially because “he will be delivering some very big news to us on that day.” “We’re very excited to have him and to be able to have that announcement made because it impacts us here in Utah,” she said. Although past recipients Nikki Boyer, Joe Redburn and Becky Moss are still deliberating over the winner of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award, the Center has announced the other two winners. Volunteer Chris Coon will receive this year’s Volunteer of the Year award for his three years of service at the Utah Pride Center as an administrative assistant.

“He has been incredible,” said Gomberg. “Day after day, week after week, month after month, and year after year, he remains as happy and dedicated as the first day he started. We’ve been extremely lucky to have Chris as part of our staff not only because of his dedication but because of his spirit.” The award for Community Organization of the Year will go to Salt Lake City’s PFLAG chapter, which Gomberg praised for its support in a number of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights causes. “We’ve seen the impact of their work under the leadership of [President] Kathy Godwin, and the impact has been very positive,” she said. “We’re really glad to be able to award them for their great work this year.” This year’s National Coming Out Day celebration will also be held on the last day of the Center’s inaugural Family Acceptance Regional Conference (Oct. 8-10). Geared toward making families safe and affirming environments for queer youth and toward keeping families with queer youth together, the conference is a perfect match for National Coming Out Day. Because of overlap with the conference, Gomberg said that the Center hopes “this will be one of our largest NCOD celebrations.”

Registration for both the NCOD brunch and conference are open on the Utah Pride Center’s website, utahpridecenter.org. Sponsorship and table captain opportunities for the brunch are available.

12 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Creative Minds Shine on Homeless Youth by JoSelle Vanderhooft

In 2009, Utahns Chloe Noble and Jill Hartman walked across the United States to raise awareness of the challenges facing homeless youth — over 40 percent of whom identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning or “nonstraight.” Their journey took them from Seattle to Washington, D.C., where they participated in and helped organize October’s March for Equality. Nearly one year later, the foundation the two women created, Operation Shine America, has announced the launch of a new campaign. Kicked off this August, Creative Minds 2010 is a national campaign offering homeless youth and their allies what Noble calls “a platform to be seen and heard.” It will work in tandem with a number of local organizations such as the Homeless Youth Resource Center, Volunteers of America, Urban Village Cooperative, the Inclusion Center, Community In-Roads Alliance, the Utah Pride Center and the Utah chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. These organizations, said Noble, who is OSA’s founding director, will work together to sponsor community awareness training about homeless youth in which participants will learn how to help these youth and how to work toward solving social problems that lead to youth homelessness. “This is about extending core family values like acceptance, patience, compassion, generosity, protection and love, beyond ourselves and our personal family unit,” said Noble. “This epidemic [of homelessness facing youth] can not be solved simply by donations, emergency services, or even emergency over night shelters; although all of these things are essential in keeping these children safe and alive long enough for them to enter into recovery. What is needed to end youth homelessness is a complete transformation of our systems of care, a rebuilding of our local communities, and a strong awareness of the trauma

that these homeless youth experience on a daily basis.” During last year’s Homeless Youth Pride Walk, Noble said that she and Hartman interviewed the youth they met about what brought them to the streets. They found, she said, that although the causes were numerous, they all tied back into communityrelated problems such as familial rejection and a lack of access to services. Overall, Noble said that there are two million homeless youth in the United States. And given that queer youth are disproportionately represented in that number, Noble said that gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights were inseparable from the homeless youth epidemic. “This means that huge causal factors in youth homelessness are homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia,” said Noble. “If we are going to eradicate youth homelessness, we are going to have to come to terms with the negative and oppressive belief systems that teach us to treat LGBTQ citizens with anything less than dignity, respect, love and acceptance. This certainly includes our amazing youth, especially those who are now homeless.” “This diverse group of homeless youth, whether LGBTQ or heterosexual, has a profound and powerful voice,” agreed OSA director of administration Ginger Phillips. “We want to support them in their progress and give them many creative ways to be seen and heard. Studies show that many homeless LGBTQ youth who receive appropriate guidance, support, protection and resources, eventually become successful members of the community.” In order to help provide youth with this help, OSA will also participate in a number of events throughout autumn and winter. These include NAMI’s annual walk to raise awareness of mental illness, which will begin at Mobile Ballpark at 9 a.m. on Sept. 18. In Oct., OSA will take part in Utah Pride Center’s Family Acceptance Regional Conference (Oct. 8–10), which is targeted

toward creating safe and affirming family environments for queer youth. Throughout the month Creative Minds 2010 will also host Creative Freak Boutique, a shop selling arts and crafts created by homeless youth and where homeless youth will be able to express themselves through open mic and music. From Oct. 14 through Nov. 6 Creative

Minds 2010 will also be a part of the NAMI Art Project at the Patrick Moore Gallery, 2233 S. 700 East. Homeless youth will also participate in NAMI’s Holiday Boutique from Dec. 3–5 at Pioneer Craft House, 3271 S. 500 East. Q

For more information about OSA visit operationshineamerica.blogspot.com.

Pro-Prop 8 Lawyer Lectures at BYU The attorney who represented proponents of California’s Proposition 8 in U.S. District Court lectured Brigham Young University law students at a J. Reuben Clark Law School forum sponsored by the BYU chapter of the Federalist Society. Charles J. Cooper’s argument for upholding Prop 8 was that marriage is, by definition, a union between a man and a woman. “A marriage between a man and a woman is not the core of the institution, it defines the institution,” he said. Cooper’s testimony before U.S. Judge Vaughn Walker mirrored his talk at BYU. Walker decided against Prop 8 proponents, saying that it infringes on gay and lesbian couples’ 14th amendment rights under the U.S. Constitution. Cooper said that marriage benefits society because the union produces children. “Child-rearing and procreation is important in matrimony,” Cooper said. “but also to nature and society.” Cooper said same-sex marriage could harm heterosexual couples in the long run. “The question is not can a same-sex couple raise a child as well as a heterosexual couple,” Cooper said. “It is about the longterm effects, including contributions to society.” In a question-and-answer period following his presentation, Cooper was asked how same-sex marriage would harm heterosexual marriage. According to BYU student Marshall Thompson, his reply was, “Recognizing homosexual marriage would not harm heterosexual marriage at

Prop 8 attorney Charles J. Cooper

all,” and that it was never a point he felt he needed to prove in court. In a document written to the District Court, Cooper cited statistics from the Netherlands, which instituted same-sex marriage in 2001, showing trends of fewer marriages, more single-parent families, more unmarried parents raising children and more opposite-sex couples choosing an alternative status over marriage. He also argued in the memorandum that same-sex marriage deinstitutionalizes marriage. Allowing same-sex marriage weakens the social norms with respect to marriage and shifts the focus from fulfilling socially valuable roles such as parent and spouse to “personal choice and selfdevelopment,” his legal team wrote.

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 13


OUR VIEWS

guest editorial HIV/AIDS: The Best of Times and the Worst of Times by David Mixner

I

N RECENT MONTHS, THE MEDIA has been filled with encouraging news about progress in treating HIV/AIDS. At the very same time, we have been dealt some real setbacks. The lesson is the same as it always has been: embrace and celebrate the progress, and don’t let up the pressure until there is a cure. The good news is indeed reason to celebrate. From the International AIDS Conference in Vienna came word that promising new gels have been developed that could dramatically lower the infection rate among at-risk women. The Wall Street Journal recently published a story indicating that scientists have discovered three powerful antibodies that can neutralize 91 percent of HIV strains. The bad news is that the economic situation is wrecking havoc with HIV/AIDS budgets — both here and abroad. Many states are freezing the ability of people with HIV/AIDS to receive treatment. AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) funds have either been cut way back or frozen, making it impossible for new clients to access them. Unless this is corrected, it could mean a death sentence for some people. It’s crucial for every American that cares about this horrendous epidemic to keep up the pressure, seek new funds and hold lawmakers accountable for their actions. Given the uncertainty with the economy and ADAP, it makes Medicare funds for treating HIV/AIDS even more critical in assisting people with the disease. Medicare provides a vital source of health coverage for around 100,000 people with the disease. In 2006, Medicare became the single largest source of federal financing for HIV

care. The number of people with HIV receiving Medicare benefits has grown over time, reflecting growth in the size of the of the HIV-positive population and an increased lifespan for people with the virus. As thrilled as I was with the new health care law, there is one part that is extremely disturbing. Especially since my journey over the years has taught me the urgent need to hold public officials accountable for their actions in this battle for a cure. Quite simply, with the creation of an entity called the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), we could lose our ability to pressure lawmakers for change. This new board is simply not accountable to anyone. While the IPAB is tasked with cutting Medicare spending, it is exempt from any judicial or administrative review of its decisions, and is barred from probing the government’s spending patterns on specific health care providers, such as hospitals. Shackled by such restraints and yet dangerously unaccountable to Congress, the people or the courts, this board could turn its attention to successful programs in Medicare to carry out its cost cutting mission. The mere existence of an unchecked,

powerful agency making life-determining decisions should be worrisome to everyone. Draconian decisions by IPAB to limit access to medicines to treat HIV will be free from judicial review, the need for advance public notice, or even appeals from patients. The fact of the matter is that the IPAB, like any other agency of government, can make bad decisions. And if they do, we have absolutely no recourse to change them. Personally, I can’t think of a worse scenario than for our research leaders to be on the cusp of a cure, only to be denied the necessary resources because a government panel has blown research and development into the Stone Age. We must not be shortsighted in our zeal to bring down health care costs by thwarting future research and reversing already achieved progress. Stated simply, if we go this route, we would only blunt the more laudable and courageous goal of saving lives and one day eliminating this horrific disease once and for all. Q David Mixner has been involved in public life creating policy and as an activist and writer for over 40 years. He has had two bestselling books, Stranger Among Friends and Brave Journeys, both published by Bantam Books.

leers

Editor, I just wanted to say that Issue 160, August 5, 2010, was the best you have ever put out. I normally don’t respond to such incredible insight and eloquent writing because I generally think it’s too late for words, but you have impressed me with your ‘first person’ insight and articles “Utah’s Gay Community Reel from Recent Suicides” and especially “Full Spectrum Social Justice.” I will eventually read the entire issue and will cut it out and journal it. The cover story, “My Last Shot,” intrigued me initially because it seems to be such a taboo subject that really needs to be addressed. I have been that gay man who turned to drugs and got judged, so I appreciate the compassion in your article. For the first time in my history with Salt Lake City I feel there is hope. Please continue to spread ‘happy’ pleasure as much as you can, but thank fucking god you are not afraid to bring up the real issues. I truly hope your publication can make a difference here in this coping state.

Darren Carlson Salt Lake City

QSaltLake welcomes your feedback Please send your letters to the editor to letters@qsaltlake.com 1 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


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by Bob Henline

NN RECENTLY POSTED an opinion piece by Bishop Harry R. Jackson, Jr. entitled “Same-sex Marriage Will Hurt Families, Society.” In this lovely bit of drivel, Jackson first goes after the validity of “openly gay” (although that has yet to be confirmed) Judge Vaughn Walker’s ruling in the matter of California’s Proposition 8. After that, he attempts to explain why samesex marriage represents the end of civilization as we know it. Let’s take a look at Bishop Jackson’s bullshit. First and foremost, I think it’s important to note that Jackson does what all ignorant “Christians” do in this situation: rely on selected biblical passages. According to Jackson, “All the scriptures in the Bible concerning marriage presuppose heterosexual marriage.” While this is certainly true, who decided that this outdated bit of fiction should determine the laws of our nation? Also, if we determine that we are to follow biblical law, why is it that we should only follow the parts of biblical law that serve the interests of bigots like Jackson? Should we go back to stoning adulterers? People the world over have been up in arms for months over the sentencing of an Iranian woman to death by stoning, yet this is also a biblical punishment for adultery. All one need do is read Leviticus to find all kinds of interesting “rules” that modern Christians don’t follow. This book mentions the legitimacy of slavery, as long as the slaves are from a “neighboring nation.” It references putting to death any who work on the Sabbath, and decrees that eating shellfish is an “abomination.” Not only are these rules not incorporated into our legal system, I’d be willing to bet that Pastor Jackson doesn’t follow them all, either. As a full-time pastor, he certainly “works” on the Sabbath, right? “A marriage requires a husband and wife, because these unions are necessary to make new life and connect children to their mother and father.” While Jackson goes so far as to later declare in his statement that our society should place a greater emphasis on preserving marriages, he doesn’t go so far as to advocate a ban on divorce, separation or abandonment. Why is that? If the sole purpose of marriage is to produce children, shouldn’t we then ban marriage for people who are unable to reproduce? Should we force married couples without children to breed? What about people who choose not to marry at all? If procreation is the point of life, should we not arrange and enforce marriages for all, complete with impregnation?

Of course, Jackson also has to resort to the traditional fear tactic: “These kinds of ill-advised social experiments may produce a host of unintended consequences. If gay marriage is allowed, the nation will soon begin to experience an increased degradation of the nuclear family — resulting in fewer kids being raised by a mom and dad.” And yet again, as with others of his bigoted ilk, Jackson makes this ridiculous statement with no real argument to support it. How exactly does the marriage of two homosexuals degrade the nuclear family? Jackson immediately follows this assertion with: “What will the landscape of America look like if same-sex marriage is legalized across the country? Social scientists report what most Americans have always known: Both boys and girls are deeply affected in biological and physical ways by the presence of their fathers.” Finally, something that makes sense — if you ignore the first sentence. Yes, social scientists agree that a good father figure provides an element of stability and support for children. But the question still remains: what does that have to do with gay marriage? Most gay and lesbian couples don’t have children, but if they do, a stable, married couple (even a same-sex one) is definitely a much better option than an unstable (even hetero) couple. How many hetero couples shouldn’t have children? You can’t read the news without seeing a story about neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse or even murder of children — by hetero parents, Bishop Jackson. Again, the assumption Jackson makes is that the purpose of marriage is children. Why is that? People who are unmarried have children all the time, so should this be prohibited? Should society remove children from single parents and place them with hetero couples? I don’t see Bishop Jackson arguing this point, but it’s the next “logical” step in his illogical path to a better society. The bottom line on this one is freedom of choice. While the Constitution doesn’t specifically protect choice, it is the most fundamental of freedoms. Without free choice, there is no other freedom. What is freedom of speech if you can’t choose what to say? What is freedom of religion if you can’t choose what to believe (or not to believe at all)? There is no logical or legal reason that all people should not be allowed to choose who to love and marry. Q

Bob Henline is a straight man. Don’t hold that against him — he was born that way. He is also a professional author and editor. His blog can be read at nonpart.org.

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 15


OUR VIEWS

I

guest editorial Mental Illness Stigmatized in Utah’s Gay Community by Kyle Foote

WAKE UP PARALYZED with anxiety and fear. I stare at the ceiling, willing myself to sleep a little longer so I won’t have to face the day just yet. I secretly wish that I had simply died in my sleep as I apprehensively ponder all the things that I need to get done today knowing I won’t be able to. I slept through class this morning and I’m already going to be late for work. I purposefully ignore the repeated calls and text messages from my family and friends, I’ll avoid their disappointment for a few more hours. I just want to die right now. But how should I do it? Razor blades? No, I don’t think I could cut myself. How about a rope? Nah, then I’d have to find a rope and I’d probably mess up the knot and just fall on my ass. Alcohol and pills? Hmm, that’s the way I’ll do it. But not today, I’m too tired to kill myself today. I’ll take a shower, have some coffee and see how I feel after that. The scenario above isn’t all that made up. It’s exactly how many people, gay or otherwise, wake up each morning. It’s a story I’ve heard from many different people with whom I have worked and befriended over the past two years as a volunteer with the National Alliance on Mental Illness and other Utah mental health organizations. Many of us may have had a morning like the one I describe above. The sad truth is that many people have mornings like this every day of their life. They are paralyzed by depression and anxiety. This type of paralysis, however, isn’t something that people can just get over or ignore or avoid. Fashion, shopping, boyfriends, drinking, sex and illicit drugs won’t make it go away. Major depression and anxiety are typical symptoms of a mental illness. People who suffer from

a mental illness have a real and palpable chemical imbalance in their brain. They need to seek out support from those around them. In many cases, they may also need medication and counseling to be able to cope with the realities of life. As we know, recently we have had a number of suicides in our community. The first

The primary reason for these suicides was that the young people were suffering from a mental illness reaction to them, by some, was to blame their families, their church, and the straight community in general. The truth is, however, they didn’t kill themselves because they may not have been accepted by their family or a church or by straights for being gay. The primary reason for these suicides was that the young people were suffering from a mental illness and either weren’t able to get or didn’t seek out the support they needed to deal with their disease. In the gay community we often stigmatize anything or anyone that’s different. We reject people based on their looks, physique,

clothes, job, income, education and anything else we deem as being substandard for some pseudo gay norm. We also tend to discard the reality of the pervasiveness of mental illness in our community. This appears to be especially true amongst the youth of our community. We ignore that our friends and loved ones may be suffering from major depression, or bi-polar or other forms of mental illness. By doing so, we fail to support them in their efforts to cope with life. When we avoid the tough conversations and judge those who are different than ourselves, in effect we are placing the blame for suicides within our population on everyone but our own community. As a community we need to embrace the truth that there are many people in our community, especially those who are under 25, who are suffering from mental illnesses and who lack the support or have not yet learned the tools to cope and/or to survive day to day. With the aim of creating resources for our community, NAMI is working together with the Utah Pride Center and other gay community organizations to eliminate the stigma of mental illness and providing our community with resources to support, nurture, and heal those among us who are suffering. In an effort to provide this support, NAMI is launching a support group called “Connection.” This mental health support group is offered at no charge and is organized specifically for those under 30 in the GLBTQ community. It is a place where people who are suffering from a mental illness or who know or love someone who is can gather together on a weekly basis to learn from and share with each other. By the end of the year NAMI will also launch a Connection group for those in the community who are 30 and older. A Facebook group called “Mind Games” has also been formed to provide information on all mental health resources and events available to the local GLBTQ Community. Q Starting September 21st Connection meetings will be held every Tuesday night at the Salt Lake City Main Library at 7pm. If you would like to find out more about how you can participate or help please contact NAMI Utah or join us on Facebook/Mind Games for regular updates.

snaps & slaps SNAP: Ben McAdams vs. Mel Nimer Utah’s State Senate District 2 has been boggling out-of-staters for nearly a year now. Last December, they were shocked to learn that the seat was not only in a Democratic district, but also respresented by an openly gay man, Scott McCoy. Then they were shocked that a straight but gay-friendly Mormon, Ben McAdams, took over. And now they’re shocked that a gay non-Mormon Republican, Mel Nimer, is seeking McAdams’ job (remember, most Americans think Utah is only good for polygamy and incoherent alcohol laws). While it’s always funny to watch people learn and re-learn that gay Utahns exist and that they sometimes do things other than be oppressed, the McAdams/Nimer race is interesting for a number of reasons. While it shows that Utah’s queer and allied community is diverse, it also shows that Democrats and Republicans can agree on fundamental questions about gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender equality. And that Utah’s Republican Party is willing to front an openly gay candidate — albeit in a heavily blue district. Still, if this signals a more gay-friendly turn in Utah’s GOP, we’re all for it.

SNAP: Turner Bitton At just 19, Turner Bitton has accomplished a lot for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community. Now, along with several friends, he’s started a chapter of Parents,

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1 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

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OUR VIEWS

I

lambda lore I Am Shocked! Shocked, I Tell You! by Ben Williams

LIKE TO TELL PEOPLE THAT I was clinically insane until I was 23 years old. I know some of you are saying that explains a lot. But really, so was every other homosexual born before April 9, 1974. In case you think I am exaggerating a tad, I assure you I am not. The American Psychiatric Association’s Bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders classified homosexuality as being “among the sociopathic personality disturbances” in its first edition in 1952, and there the definition it remained until 1974. The American Psychiatric Association’s board of trustees voted in December 1973 to remove homosexuality from the DSM lists of disorders. However, some conservative members of the APA called for a full vote by the group’s 17,905 eligible members to settle the matter. On April 9, 1974 the results were announced. With only 10,555 eligible APA members participating, 3,810 psychiatrists voted to keep “homosexuality” in the DSM as a mental disorder. However 5,854 voted to remove it. So, the next day, on my 23rd birthday, I was no longer considered a mental case. After the 1974 vote, the American Psychiatric Association dropped homosexuality as “a psychiatric disorder,” and even began to advocate for laws to protect lesbians and gay men from discrimination in employment, housing, transportation and licensing. They also encouraged “the repeal of all legislation making criminal offenses of sexual acts performed by consenting adults in private.” Prior to 1970, most trained psychiatrists generally considered desires for someone of the same sex to be a disorder. Karoly Maria Kertbeny’s 19th century term “homosexual” was the official moniker for those inflicted by this mental-physical disassociative disorder. In the early 20th century, thanks to Dr. Freud and Dr. Jung, psychiatry exercised an “authoritative voice” on public opinion. By mid-century, psychiatry’s “scientific opinion” and Alfred Kinsey’s sexology studies began to change the judicial view that homosexuality was a criminal deviancy to a mental illness. Believe it or not, this was a vast improvement. Homosexuals were now being ordered into treatment instead of prison. But in Utah, it would appear that treatment was as bad as prison. Cleon Skousen, while Chief of Police in Salt Lake City, was dismayed that some city judges were sending offending homosexuals to psychiatric treatment, rather than charging them with a felony and sending them to

the state pen for up to 20 years as state law mandated. To sidestep the judges, Skousen got the city fathers to adopt as code the 1952 state provision which ordered sex offenders to the Utah State Hospital. In this way, Skousen said, “a conviction would enable authorities to commit offenders for life if medical examinations showed them mentally ill.” Previously, persons charged with indecent exposure or lewdness were tried in police court in Salt Lake City. Records show that homosexuals were being sent to the state mental institution in Utah County through much of the 1950s. By the 1960s, aversion therapy or electroshock therapy was promoted as means to cure homosexuality. As early as 1935 the American Psychological Association was told of a doctor successfully treating homosexuality by using electro-shock therapy “delivered at intensities considerably higher than those usually employed on human subjects.” Dr. Frankenstein meets Dr. Freud. Electro-shock therapy was readily adopted in Utah to cure homosexuals, especially at LDS Church-owned college campuses. During the ’60s one man stood out as the premier proponent of this therapy: Dr. Robert D. Card, a Salt Lake psychologist. Dr. Card practiced the highly controversial bio-feedback therapy to cure homosexuality for nearly 20 years, explaining it simply as a “pairing of noxious stimulus with the stimulus trying to be reduced.” Dr. Card was judges’ and bishops’ go-to guy to fix queers, and he found no want of clients desperate to be heterosexual to fit in with the state’s dominant culture. Dr. Card’s credibility in the professional world was spotless. He published several academic and professional papers advocating aversion therapy to eliminate homosexuality from a patient’s personality. He worked out of offices in Salt Lake City and on the BYU campus with gay Mormons. His BYU clients were treated by having electrodes attached to their genitals and then shown homosexual pornography. If they got a stiffy they were zapped. A member of our community wrote an account of his therapy session with Dr. Card in his Salt Lake office. It goes like this: “The doctor would turn on a very graphic porno video of two or more men having sexual intercourse (and other activities). As I became excited and started to get an erection, the little ring around my penis would measure the slightest growth in circumference. This would then register on the device where the doctor sat, and he would hit me with a

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few seconds of volts. He would then sharply tell me to control my arousal. After a few minutes he would hit me with a few more seconds of electricity. This would go on for about five to 10 minutes. I would get aroused no matter how hard I tried not to, and I would be shocked again and again.” Dr. Card defended this acceptable medical practice by stating, “I have an ethical responsibility to help anyone who wants to change.” However, by 1985 Dr. Card stated that he had abandoned the electro-shock therapy. When asked if he was ever successful in introducing heterosexual feelings in his homosexual patients, he was silent. He may have abandoned electro-shock therapy but it is interesting to note that in 1998 Dr. Card patented a sexual arousal device with the US Patent Office. Today, reparative therapy, also known as conversion therapy, has generally replaced aversion therapy as a cure for homosexuality by those who have not accepted the APA’s 1974 decision. Reparative therapy states that homosexuality is a learned behavior, not truly an orientation. In 1998, the American Psychiatric Association passed a resolution rejecting this “treatment.” The resolution stated that attempts to change a person’s sexual orientation can cause “depression, anxiety and self-destructive behavior.” The APA feared that even the existence of reparative therapy spreads the idea that “homosexuality is a disease or is evil and has a dehumanizing effect resulting in an increase in discrimination, harassment, and violence against gays, lesbians and bisexuals.” And yet here in Utah, Evergreen International, which embraces reparative therapy has had an annual conference for nearly 25 years feeding off referrals from LDS Family Services and from Mormons who are taught to despise their nature. Dr. Allen E. Bergin, a psychology professor at BYU, sums up the LDS position on why homosexuals must become heterosexual: “Though a person may suffer from homosexual inclinations that are caused by some combination of biology and environment, the gospel requires that he or she develop firm self-discipline and make an energetic effort to change.” The American Psychiatric Association repeated in 2009 that reparative therapy is not “clinically sound.” However, LDS General Authority Elder Bruce C. Hafen, at that year’s Evergreen Conference, criticized the APA for claiming that sexual orientation is unchangeable. Hafen told attendees to “find a therapist who can help you identify the unmet emotional needs that you are tempted to satisfy in false sexual ways.” In 1990, Boyd K. Packer wrote this regarding the church’s stance on homosexuality: “We are sometimes told that leaders in the Church do not really understand these problems. Perhaps we don’t. There are many ‘whys’ for which we just do not have simple answers.” This is about the only thing Packer has ever said that I agree with. Q

Q on the strt Who is your favorite ❝ Utah artist and why?”

Dan Q. Tham Ruby Chacon — her art is vibrant and expansive and deeply personal.

Dave Bastian Trent Harris because he holds a magnifying glass up to all the wonderful weirdness that is Utah. Jonathan Krausert Harry Francis Sellers — he’s a great painter and nice to have a conversation with over a couple a beers on Saturdays at Juniors. Ann Clark Benjamin Wiemeyer ... I love that he is so diverse. He has such an incredible art talent, anywhere from his self portraits, to beautiful pieces on canvas to incredible graffiti art found on walls all over the city. Brandon Burt I’ll admit to a longtime fetish for Arnold Friberg’s heroic genre paintings of hunky Nephites and Lamanites. But Lee Deffebach’s abstract expressionist colorfields were truly revolutionary — and she was kind enough once to give me season tickets to the Utah Opera, so she’s got my vote! Maureen Duffy-Boose Trevor Southey. He has made Utah culture famous far, far beyond Utah.


bushauck Ken Mehlman, the Hypocrite by Ryan Shattuck

C

OMING OUT OF THE CLOSET as a gay man or women is not an easy process. There’s a lot of paperwork to fill out; a new state identification card has to be issued; there are separate gay tax forms to be filed; and the federally mandated homosexual agenda has to be memorized. So it makes sense why it took Ken Mehlman, former Chairman of the Republican National Committee as well as George W. Bush’s former campaign manager, many years to come out of the closet. The dust has mostly settled since Mehlman came out a few weeks ago in The Atlantic. In the article written by politics editor Marc Ambinder, Mehlman explains why it took him so long to publicly admit that he is a gay man: “It’s taken me 43 years to get comfortable with this part of my life ... Everybody has their own path to travel, their own journey, and for me, over the past few months, I’ve told my family, friends, former colleagues, and current colleagues, and they’ve been wonderful and supportive. The process has been something that’s made me a happier and better person. It’s something I wish I had done years ago.” Although opening up about his sexuality has made Ken Mehlman “a happier and better person,” many people are quite angry at the former RNC Chairman, for coming out years after leading the Republican Party through some of its most anti-gay years in recent history. Under Mehlman’s direction, several states passed legislation banning same-sex marriage in 2004, and promoted a political aura of intolerance and discrimination that has plagued the Republican Party for years to follow. Naturally, many gay and lesbian men and women have labeled Mehlman a “hypocrite,” have satirically awarded him the “Roy Cohen Award” for “managing the most anti-gay Presidential campaigns in history” and have even called Mehlman a “Quisling Homophobic scumbag.” Is Ken Mehlman a hypocrite for coming out as a gay man after leading anti-gay political party? Or does he deserve our sym-

pathy for being ‘brave’ and admitting his sexuality in the midst of an anti-gay political party? Mehlman is currently in the process of repenting for his past sins by working with the American Foundation for Equal Rights, which supports a legal challenge to California’s anti-same-sex marriage proposition, and is attempting to garner sympathy with statements such as the following: “I can’t change the fact that I wasn’t in this place personally when I was in politics, and I genuinely regret that. It was very hard, personally ... If they can’t offer support, at least offer understanding. “What I do regret, and think a lot about, is that one of the things I talked a lot about in politics was how I tried to expand the party into neighborhoods where the message wasn’t always heard. I didn’t do this in the gay community at all.” Although some members of the gay community, such as Oscar-winning screenwriter and gay activist Dustin Lance Black, believe that “Ken represents an incredible coup for the American Foundation for Equal Rights,” the aftermath of damage caused by Mehlman during his anti-gay reign of political terror is so deep and entrenched in society that any apology and action is too little, too late. Mehlman states that, in regard to his traitorous, self-internalized homophobia, “At least for me, it wasn’t like there was a light-bulb moment,” and “The reality is, it’s taken me 43 years to come to terms with this part of my life.” Yes, some people take a long time to come to terms with who and what they are. Some gay men and women come out of the closet when they are teenagers; others take several decades to deconstruct and determine their sexuality. Other excuses and justifications may also be applied to Mehlman’s situation, such as: Are Americans not allowed to have opinions and political beliefs that evolve and shift with time and experience? Haven’t we all belonged to a job, a political party or another organization that made a decision with which we disagreed?

Ken Mehlman is no ordinary American, because he changed history in ways that very few Americans have

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 19

Aren’t public figures allowed to maintain a semblance of privacy in regard to their personal lives? Aren’t Americans afforded the right to have private lives that are not dictated by their politics? Yes, Americans can change their minds; yes, most of us have belonged to an organization that may have made a decision with which we disagreed; yes, public figures deserve privacy; yes, Americans have the right to support politics that disagree with their private lives. Nevertheless, most Americans are not in positions of power to affect national policy that affects the lives of millions of fellow Americans. Although all Americans are afforded the right to be as public or as private about their lives as they desire, most Americans do not influence policy that prevents other Americans from marrying, from visiting their partners in the hospi-

tal, and do not help create a political atmosphere that leads to the potential suicides of closeted gay teenagers. Ken Mehlman is no ordinary American, because he changed history in ways that very few Americans have. He does not deserve the privacy or sympathy of the average citizen. He gave up those rights long ago, when he started receiving a regular paycheck from the Republican National Committee, encouraging him to strip as many rights away from gay men and women as possible. No, coming out of the closet is not easy for anyone, even Ken Mehlman. And I doubt he’s even started filling out his paperwork. Q

Ryan Shattuck is the author of “Revolutions for Fun and Profit,” at revolutionsforfunandprofit. com

Friday Nights on Monument Plaza in Sugar House!

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by Christopher Katis

I

REMEMBER WHEN MY COUSIN LAURA’S husband was transferred to Golden, Colo. After settling in, she e-mailed me their new address and gave me some details about the house: it was only a couple of years old, had been in the Parade of Homes and was located in a great school district. I asked her if it had any charm. That, I learned, wasn’t one of her priorities. When Kelly and I bought our first place a couple of years later, I e-mailed the address to Laura and mentioned that our new place was nearly 100 years old and sat square in the middle of one of the worst school districts in Northern California, but man did it have charm! Charm used to be a requirement for us in homes, but once we became dads, our priorities in houses evolved. Last month, Kelly and I closed on a new house. It wasn’t a pretty experience. Our realtor Yvonne, another one of my cousins, claimed that in her 30 years in real estate she’d never seen a couple disagree with one another so consistently. Everything he liked, I pretty much hated. And vice versa. When we started, I told Yvonne I had three criteria for any house: at least two bathrooms, a place for an office/spare room and driving distance from my parents. Being a mother herself, she knew that a nice, safe neighborhood with kids in it, a decent-sized back yard and a good school district were also on the list even if we never mentioned them. Kelly had his own criteria: a unique home that oozed charm and was close to the private school at the Greek Church the boys started this year. That proved to be a tough order to fill. We’ve lived in “not perfect for us” houses before, and we’ve always managed to turn them into show pieces. Okay, Kelly’s always been able to turn them into show pieces. He got the gay decorating gene, I got the Greek one ... you know, the gene that makes you think everything blue and white and covered in plastic works. Take, for example, the nondescript illegal garden apartment we rented when we lived in San Francisco. I hadn’t wanted to move into it, but Kelly persuaded me by promising “we can make it cute.”

Within a couple of years he had taken a dark, forgettable apartment and turned it into, well, PeeWee’s Playhouse. From the wisteria-purple and corrugated metal walls in the living room to the giant sun blazing down in the sea blue kitchen, the place was a freakin’ masterpiece! So I know he can do it. But this time we’ve headed to the suburbs. It’s a different world out there. Somehow I doubt our new neighbors will mirror those we’ve enjoyed during the past 16 months in the Avenues. Last week, while we were unloading the first of the seemingly never-ending boxes at the new house, one of the neighbors introduced himself. No matter how clearly we explained our relationship, he still walked away confused. Now that I think about it, this move to the suburbs could be a chance for us to be good gay ambassadors! I’m going to bet that for more than a few of our neighbors we may be the first honest-to-goodness homos they’ve ever met live and in-person. This move is making me venture outside of my comfort zone. Once again, the boys are forcing me to head in an unpredictable direction. And I think that’s a good thing. And even though the house isn’t the perfect place for the two men in our family, it is pretty close to perfect for the two boys. Even Kelly has to admit that to a certain degree. There’s something to be said about a neighborhood where ducks swim in the canal, and grazing horses come right up to people to bum a cube of sugar or bite of apple. The house does have a lot to offer as well, and I like it a whole lot more than Kelly does. In fact, I was the one who said we should pull the trigger and buy it. Partly because I was sick of looking at houses. But it also met all of my criteria. (Although, apparently, my parents live close enough to drop by unexpectedly. That’s a little scary.) As time goes by, and as we make that house work for us, as we get used to living in a suburban neighborhood and being the only gay family for miles around, I know we’ll love it. Even Kelly. Maybe even as much as the boys and I do. Q

Charm used to be a requirement for us in homes

2 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


L

crp of the wk Charlie Crist by D’Anne Witkowski

OOK, I DON’T KNOW IF Florida Gov. Charlie Crist is gay. And while it really should be a non-issue because being gay is not this scandalous thing that makes a person unfit for public office like some loonies on the far right believe, the fact is: it matters. It’s an issue because Crist is making it an issue by reiterating his support for a constitutional ban on same-sex couples getting married. Granted, this isn’t the first time Crist has said he supports such a thing. Apparently he mentioned it at some point while running for governor and governors don’t really have much power when it comes to the United States Constitution. But now he’s running for Senate as an Independent. The United States Senate. On Aug. 29 during an interview on CNN, Ed Henry brought up the issue of same-sex marriage and pointed out that Marco Rubio, one of Crist’s opponents in the Senate race, supports a constitutional ban. “The former Republican Party Chairman Ken Mehlman came out and said he’s gay and he called on conservatives to kind of move to the political center and be more tolerant on this issue,” Henry said. “Now that you’re trying to occupy the political center, are you still in favor of a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage?” “I feel the same way, yes, because I feel that marriage is a sacred institution, if you will,” Crist responded. “But I do believe in tolerance. I’m a live-and-let-live kind of guy, and while I feel that way about marriage, I think if partners want to have the opportunity to live together, I don’t have a problem with that.” So he’s a “live-and-let-live kind of guy” who believes in “tolerance,” eh? And while marriage is “sacred,” thereby rendering homos unfit for such an institution, he doesn’t mind partners living together. So long as their relationship isn’t in any way recognized or protected and the law treats them as legal strangers then Crist doesn’t “have a problem with that.” Oh, how very magnanimous of him. “I think that’s where most of America is,” Crist continues. “So I think that, you know, you have to speak from the heart about these issues. They are very personal. They have a significant impact on an awful lot of people and the less the government is telling people what to do, the better off we’re all going to be.” Since telling the government to stay out

of people’s personal lives and writing discrimination into the constitution seem to be contradictory, Henry accuses Crist of trying to have it both ways (no pun intend-

ed, I’m sure). But Crist doesn’t budge. “Well, everything is in a matter of degree, Ed, and when it comes to the institution of marriage, I believe that it is between a man and a woman; it’s just how I feel,” he says. Call me crazy, but “it’s just how I feel” is a pretty flimsy argument for amending the Constitution to keep gay people from marrying each other. Hell, it’s a flimsy reason to amend it for anything. By itself, Crist’s unabashed support of writing discrimination into one of our nation’s founding documents is alarming to say the least. But it’s even more alarming

if he is, indeed, gay. And he is widely rumored and believed to be just that. Yes, he’s married. To a lady. Since 2008. Which, of course, proves that he’s not gay because of how getting opposite-sex married automatically makes you not gay. So who knows? Maybe all of the gay rumors are wrong. Either way, Crist is still a creep. Q

D’Anne Witkowski has been gay for pay since 2003. She’s a freelance writer and poet (believe it!). When she’s not taking on the creeps of the world she reviews rock ‘n’ roll shows in Detroit with her twin sister.

The YWCA Salt Lake City is pleased to invite you to the 22nd annual celebration of women in our community!

YWCA LeaderLuncheon • September 17, 2010 Grand America Hotel • 555 S. Main Street, Salt Lake City Reception 11:30 a.m. • Luncheon 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Keynote speaker: Jeannette Walls, author of the New York Times best-seller The Glass Castle. The 2010 Outstanding Achievement Awards will be presented at LeaderLuncheon to: Lynne N. Ward - Government/Public Service Marian Ingham - Community Service Cynthia A. Bioteau - Education Deborah S. Bayle - Health/Human Services

Tickets: $60, $50 for YWCA members/associates Sponsorships are available. Visit www.ywca.com to register online or call 801.537.8619.

salt lake city

Celebrating the Accomplishments of Women...Supporting Women and Children Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 2 1


SALT L AKE CONSIGNMENT SHOPS

Coming Home with Home Again by Joselle Vanderhooft

M Abode Brightens Up Any Abode by Joselle Vanderhooft

I

T’S NOT EVERY CONSIGNMENT SHOP that combines vintage clothing, crystal chandeliers, flea markets and mannequin parts, but few consignment shops are like Abode, where “shabby chic” meets “subtle elegance.” That’s how owner Miriam Sabir Venkataramanan describes her store, which she opened in 2005, after a few years managing Simply Home, another consignment shop on 1300 S. 900 East. And a peek inside Abode’s brightly painted building shows just how apt the description. There, decorators and collectors can find any number of unusual and striking items to brighten up their abode, from vintage theater marquee letters and unusual step stools to bigger pieces like armoires and even sofas, on occasion. “If it’s funky and interesting and vintage, we’ll take it,” said Venkataramanan. “Our bottom line is fun, funky and functional. I think we like to focus on the unusual while still remaining utilitarian. [For example], right now we have a shocking turquoise massage chair.” For even more unusual fare, visitors are invited to check out the store’s vintage children and baby section and its salvage room where unusual doorknobs, drawer knobs, mirrors, and even doors and windows are waiting. There’s even a back section which Venkataramanan lovingly calls “the Paris Flea Market,” which she describes as consignment with “a little Victorian and Edwardian thrown in.” There, crystal chandeliers can be found alongside Audrey Hepburnstyle little black dresses. “We call it our well-behaved side. So you know what the rest of the shop is like,” Venkataramanan joked. Unlike many consignment shops which spe-

cialize solely in furniture and home accessories, Abode also accepts vintage clothing, which Venkataramanan describes as anything “pre1960.” Though, she says that she’s particular about what she accepts because “there are so many things that can be wrong with clothes, like tears or damage.” Even so, the store’s mannequins are well-clothed and ready to be sold or rented for any number of events. Venkataramanan admits that she’s partial to mannequins, which are ubiquitous throughout Abode, from displays using their hands to an unusual sculpture in the bathroom. “In our restroom we have the bottom half of a female mannequin. Essentially she’s naked, and that holds our toilet paper,” she said. For those who can’t get enough of Abode’s classy flea market ambiance, the store holds an outdoor flea market in its parking lot each year from April through September. In fair weather and foul, up to 30 vendors meet once a month to hawk their wares, which have included clothing, homemade lemonade, “truly vintage, antique religious relics” and dolls bearing the likeness of Mexican artist and feminist icon Frida Kahlo. Venkataramanan, who provides breakfast to the vendors, said that she hosts the monthly market to draw attention not only to Abode but to the creative artisans who populate the surrounding neighborhoods. “We love Sugar House and the Avenues neighborhoods,” she said. “We love the people. It’s really our niche.” The final Abode flea market for the season will be held Sept. 18 from 9 a.m.–4 p.m. in the store’s parking lot at 1720 S. 900 East. For more information about the store visit abodepfm.com or abode-abode.blogspot.com. Q

22 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

AKING A HOME’S INTERIOR truly unique and beautiful is often a challenge in this contemporary world of cheap, mass-produced furniture. Thankfully, consignment shops like Home Again are there to help add a touch of class and beauty to any home with unique furniture in a variety of styles — including some items that most people wouldn’t think of as decorative. “We’ve even had a reclining wheelchair made out of wood,” said Kathryn Blomquist, manager of the Sugar House store. “That was kind of interesting. And right now I have a tortoise shell with a net on it to hang on a wall.” A canoe, she added, has also found its way into the store to be snapped up, as have antique watering buckets and horse troughs. Typically, however, both Home Again locations specialize in what Blomquist calls “eclectic and fun” furnishings in styles ranging “from Asian to French and Italian to German,” and which include everything from armoires and kitchen hutches to headboards and benches crafted by local artisans. “They’re all very unique in their own way,” she said. The Sugar House store was opened in 2002 by Lisa Herbold, the owner of a consignment clothing store near the University of Utah’s lower campus. Herbold moved to Jackson Hole several years ago, and the store is now owned by Emily Larsen, as is the Midvale location, which opened in 2007. While many furniture consignment stores

(such as Now & Again, which is also featured in this issue) specialize in small items that fit well in downtown apartments, Home Again carries larger items like book cases, dressers and coffee tables. Most of these items, said Blomquist, are imported by consignors, but both shops also accept consignment items from locals. “We have to see pictures of large items before they’re brought in,” said Blomquist, noting that both locations are highly selective about what they take. Small items, on the other hand, can be brought in any time. “We get really great dishware, china, all different kinds of stemware,” said Blomquist. If the item does not sell in 90 days, consignors must pick it up. Although Home Again has some pricier pieces — the most expensive in the Sugar House store, said Blomquist, is valued at $10,000 — both locations have a wide selection for shoppers, decorators and bargain-hunters of all budgets. Some classy end tables, for example, start at just $30. “It all depends on the piece,” said Blomquist. And while some pieces are vintage, several are brand new, a fact which only adds to the eclectic charm of both stores, which Blomquist described as “very different” from each other. “We don’t just specialize in old furniture. It’s a mix of new and old,” she said. Home Again is located at 1019 E. 2100 South and 7490 Holden St. in Midvale. For hours call 801-487-4668 for the Sugar House location and 801-255-5457 for the Midvale store. Q


Now & Again’s Styles from Now & Then by Joselle Vanderhooft

S

TEP INTO NOW & AGAIN in search of a cute end table and you might just leave with a giant golden rooster that greeted you at the door. “It was posted [to the shop’s website] in the evening and it sold within the first 20 minutes of business the day after,” said Michael Sanders, owner of the downtown consignment store which regularly sees such unusual items as the rooster, which he described as a decorative object made in the 1960s by Syroco, a company famous for its “hard plastic and painted gold” objects including wall sconces and rococo-style mirrors. The memorable fowl is one of many unique furnishings from past times and present day rubbing shoulders at the store. And that’s just the way Sanders likes it. “To me, it’s all about the mix,” he said. “I think the modern home is not filled with dusty antiques nor is it a sterile environment filled with stark hardness. It’s a mix in the middle, and I love our store to reflect that mix. I like to say we’re not looking for folks to come in and furnish their entire house from the store. We provide the “wow pieces,” the fun accessories that give a room personality.” And how does the golden bird fit in? “We love to display things that are kind of kooky and whimsical,” he said. His customers agree. Since the shop’s opening in May 2009, people from downtown, the Avenues and Capitol Hill have scoured its two daily-changing floors for tables, chairs, bathroom and kitchenware from all decades. “Pretty much from the moment I opened I was busy,” said Sanders. And while he opened the shop with overflow items from his friends’ garages, today he takes in goods from 300

consignors. “The merchandise comes in a pretty steady clip every day,” he said. “One of the things many people mention — especially those who make the rounds in the secondhand stores in Salt Lake — is that our store seems different every time they come in.” Sanders credits this to his policy of leaving merchandise in the store for no longer than three months. If it doesn’t sell, he explained, the owners must pick it up. “I think I’ve earned a reputation as a fair businessperson,” he said. “We’re kind and considerate to our customers and we pay everyone on time.” Sanders and Now & Again’s consignors also regularly donate items to a number of charities including Big Brothers, Big Sisters Club and Our Store, the thrift shop run by the People With AIDS Coalition of Utah. “Through our consignors, we’ve donated through the course of the year to yard sales benefiting people in need throughout the valley,” Sanders added. “We love giving to those.” And Sanders has loved consignment ever since he discovered 1950s clothing as a teenager. After a grueling life on the East Coast opening and planning events for night clubs and restaurants, Sanders decided to turn his lifelong passion for collecting into his livelihood. Having fallen in love with Utah on visits to his sister, who lives in Park City, Sanders moved to Salt Lake City in 2008 to embrace “a simpler life.” “I’ve always found Salt Lake to be an interesting city and one of America’s great secrets,” he said. “I felt it would be a wonderful quality of life here. I’ve always been very impressed at not only the natural beauty and friendliness of people, but of the very large gay and lesbian community here, and the fact it’s such a politically active

and exciting community. Back east in New York you can be whoever you want to be and no one says anything, so you get a bit complacent about being politically active, where in Utah it really makes a difference. I love that.” Although Sanders loves his store on 501 E. 300 South, he would also love to open a second location in Sugar House, where he is currently looking for the perfect storefront. There he would like to sell larger furniture, which he cannot do for his uptown clients who tend to live in small apartments. He is also preparing to expand his downtown store to take in more “really fabulous” vintage clothing, for which he says there is a mostly unfulfilled demand in the city. When this happens, he also hopes to offer alterations on site, a service he said that many clothing consignment stores on the East Coast offer. In the meantime, visitors to the shop will be greeted by Jolie and Bijoux, Sanders’ toy poodles whom he calls “one of the main attractions.” And if they’re looking for more funky items like the golden rooster, they only need to wait awhile for something unusual. “Once someone brought in a poster that I thought was fabulous,” said Sanders. “To me, at first glance, it was this fabulous deco poster of this jazz musician playing a trumpet. I said,

“I love the poster of a jazz musician!” and the woman [who brought it in] replied, “That’s the Angel Moroni!” Visit Now & Again online at nowandagainslc. com. Q

Like a Gay Man with Amnesia — We Come Out Every Two Weeks

salt lake Utah’s gay and lesbian news & entertainment biweekly magazine

The 2010 edition of TheQPages is out! Get one! or go to TheQPages.com

801-649-6663 QSaltLake.com

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 23


TRE VOR SOUTHEY

Trevor Southey’s

Oxymoronic Life on Display

“ The p ur sui t of t r u t h in one ’s life and art of ten le ads to conflict

in

one’s

self

and

conf rontat ion w it h ot her s.” – Robe r t Fly nn Johnson , cur ator in ch a rge , Ache nb ach Foundat ion for Gr aphic Arts, Fine Arts Museums

of

San

Fr ancisco

MOM, 1970

2 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

T

by Michael Aaron

REVOR SOUTHEY is a man who has lived several lives in one lifetime. Born in Africa, studied in England, converted to the Mormon Church and served a mission, graduated from Brigham Young University, married a woman, sired four children, founded the Mormon Art and Belief Movement, developed an artists’ commune in Alpine, came out as a gay man, moved to San Francisco, and through all of it, expressed himself through his art. “My work reflects my life ... Sometimes to an embarrassing degree,” Southey said during a lunch at Café Trio with myself, friend and art collector Jim Dabakis, and Day Christensen, fellow artist and curator of Southey’s show at the University of Utah Museum of Fine Arts. Indeed, you can see transformations in Southey’s life as you look at his art. That will become eminently clear during his show at UMFA, which will run from Oct. 21 through Feb. 11. Titled “Reconciliation,” his show is a “retrospective of [his] life and work,” through “four life passages that have defined

DAD, 1970

Southey’s character and his art: his youth in Rhodesia and education in England; his life as a married, practicing Mormon and his desire for a utopian lifestyle created around family, farming and art; Southey’s decision to acknowledge his homosexuality in 1982, which coincided with the first major public awareness of the AIDS NANNY, 1969 epidemic; and the reconciliation of his life decisions as expressed in his revised artistic approach to the human form,” according to the UMFA website. “Reconciliation” is also the title of his book, a nearly 200page piece of art in itself. “I was shocked at how autobiographical the book was,” Southey said.

Africa Southey was born in Rhodesia, Africa (now Zimbabwe) in 1940 of European parents. As a child he was timid, skinny and plagued with bouts of rheumatic fever. He wrote of his childhood in his book: “There is a photograph of my mother and myself. It is very revealing, though the imperfect skills of the photographer may have contributed to the sense of uncertainty, as the figures lean on the tilted ground. My mother’s feet are placed together, her plain cotton dress buttoned from neck to knee. She smiles in frank confidence of her essential beauty, though her hair is thin and parted with casual style. She is a young woman, evidently of few means but firm conviction. “I am a skinny boy, perhaps age 7 or so. I lean in toward my mother as if regretting ever having left the safety of her womb. I stare out of sunken, dark eye sockets, serious, a deep sense of my peculiarity already clear in my bearing. From the outset I did not fit well into the larger world. My mother and family, especially the women, secured any sense of well being I had at all. My essential timidity and then my illness justified my


clinging to her and her powerful, protective certainty. She was a fierce, strong woman. “My father was off to war, and after that off in his difficult world of survival, a world always challenging to his kind and gentlemanly soul.” He was forbidden from taking art courses in secondary school, and therefore chose to abandon his schooling before he received a diploma. He was, however, able to take special afternoon classes offered by the school principal’s wife. He also was able to find a handful of art books at the school library. He was enthralled by classical statuary of male nudes. His parents then gave him two volumes of reproductions of Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks for his 16th birthday, which greatly inspired his later work.

BLESSING, 1974

Mormonism

INTERCESSION AT GETHSEMANE

abstract was lost on the general population.” He and a few other artists began creating artwork in a Mormon theme. As their work grew, Brigham Young University “caught wind” of them and began watching. In 1969, “We had an exhibition at the library at BYU,” he said. “And what came out of that was the Mormon Festival of Arts.” That led to what would soon be called the Mormon Art and Belief Movement. He became an instructor of art at BYU, but was frustrated by the regimented attitudes toward art there. He was commissioned to do a piece of art for a show. As he presented the painting, which included male full frontal nudity, he was told, “Trevor — this is magnificent work, but we can never exhibit it.” He was forced to cover the groin area with gouache. “You could lick a thumb and wash the gouache off,”

He went on to study art in Sussex, England at the age of 17 and then the Natal Technical College in South Africa, where he met two Mormon missionaries. Drawn to the structured environment and spiritual system that meshed with the utopian views of his youth, he began a tumultuous relationship with the church. At the time of his conversion in the early ’70s, the church denied the priesthood to black members — a fact that mirrored the racism of his home country, where blacks couldn’t vote. He was also aware of the church’s stand on homosexuality, but was suppressing those feelings in himself anyway. The form of his art had already taken shape before his conversion to Mormonism. He had already begin his life of oxymoron. He says at the time he entered the Mormon Church, “I was only beginning to sense the terrible paradox of the solitude of the soul in its eternal, excruciating, wonderful dance toward union with another.” He then moved to the United States, what he called the “promised land.” He landed in New York City in the heat and humidity of July and was presented at the feet of the Statue of Liberty. He had come to the States to “serve the [LDS] Church and serve the Lord,” he said. He took in the World’s Fair and came across the Catholic Pavilion with Michelangelo’s Pieta and the Mormon Pavilion full of “mediocre art” actually painted by Seventh Day Adventists. “I knew that greater art was possible in the spirit of the restored church,” he wrote in his book. “Perhaps I was to be one vehicle for that new Renaissance.” “Mormon art,” at the time, he said, was an “oxymoron. The EDEN FARM, 1971

Southey laughed. Eventually, Southey had to leave BYU. “I didn’t quit BYU,” he said. “They fired me.”

Eden Farm In 1967, he married his wife, Elaine Fish. “I knew I must find a companion,” he wrote. “Some fine woman who would be with me through all eternity.” He met Elaine through a woman he had dated while seeking his eternal companion. “She was earnest and learned and beautiful,” he wrote. “She has a wide and generous face, a smile of perfect teeth with large eyes, clear and certain. We immediately related in a most vital and extraordinary way, sharing ideals and hopes in an openness rare on a first date.” —Continued on page 28

—Continued on page 28

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 2 7


TRE VOR SOUTHEY Dabakis negotiated the four-month-long exhibit of Southey’s work and life at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. Starting with an Oct. 21 special event, his exhibition will last through Feb. 11. The exhibition will follow Southey’s work, and therefore his life, from his time in Africa to his latest project, Warriors, in five adjoining galleries. In the first gallery, his work during his time in Africa will be displayed. The second will show his Mormon art. Then Eden Farm, then art as he was coming out. In the final gallery will be his current work. The last gallery, Southey said, is very different than the previous four. “There is not as much cohesiveness in the final gallery,” he said. “Once removed from the dogma, you can go anywhere.” Southey was diagnosed with prostate cancer shortly before Christmas in 2002 and currently lives with his daughter in the San Francisco Bay area. He is still close to his wife and children and considers himself a family man. He is not a fan of the word gay, finding it frivolous.

SAMARITAN, 1978

Trevor Southey Continued from page 27

Their courtship was short and they decided to marry, even though Southey was “haunted by [his] reality.” They moved to Alpine, in what would eventually be called Eden Farm, and had several children. “My children were, as babies, and are now, as adults, a consuming passion for me,” he said. “I cannot imagine life without them.” Southey talks of his life in oxymorons. “My life is like black and white,” he says. “My time in Alpine [Utah] was the most spectacular/heartbreaking/ blissful situation. The property was beautiful, the art was transforming. Everything was beautiful on the outside. On the inside there was grief.” “It was the best of times and the worst of times, as they say,” he continued.

VLADIMIR, 2003

Coming Out By the time his last child was born, however, his capacity to “suppress his nature” had reached its end. Doubts of his religion and its condemnation of what he perceived was his “natural way” took its toll on his marriage and his faith. He and Emily divorced and he moved to Salt Lake City. “Coming out was huge to me,” Southey reflected. “I went from the beautiful, large estate in Alpine to a shack on 8th East.” “I remember sitting among boxes in the middle of the room in November and I started to howl like an animal,” he said. “At the same time it was pain and relief.” “A lot of people experience this,” he said. “At one time they are surrounded by family and friends ... then not.” He said those days were a tough and wonderful period. Southey then met Jim Dabakis when he was interviewed by him for KTALK Radio as his painting, “Flight Aspiration,” was removed from the Salt Lake City International Airport because a woman said it might inspire rape. Dabakis called the interview a failure because Southey wouldn’t rise to the bait of his art being risqué in any way. Their resulting friendship, however, was anything but a failure. Dabakis has since represented Southey’s work at his gallery in Park City, the Thomas Kearns McCarthy Gallery. “Jimmy has pushed and pushed my art work,” Southey said. “This [show at the University of Utah Museum of Fine Arts] would have never happened without him.”

2 8 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

VYACHESLAV, 2001

FARM EGGS, 1979

“You can’t deny the deep spiritual calling for love,” he explained. Q

Trevor Southey: Reconciliation will run from Oct. 21 through Feb. 11, 2011, at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. More information at umfa.utah.edu and at trevorsouthey.com


Illuminating risks to LGBTQ youth and providing strategies for keeping families united.

Honoring families with keynote speaker, John Cepek, National PFLAG President and presenting Volunteer of the Year Award, Organization of the Year Award, and the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award.

October 8-10, 2010 Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel $125

October 10, 2010 Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel $35/ticket, $350/table sponsorships available

Pricing, registration, agenda, and presenter bios can be found at www.utahpridecenter.org space is limited

Registration, sponsorships, and more information can be found at www.utahpridecenter.org

PRESENTERS Dr. Caitlin Ryan, Family Acceptance Project Trevor Project Massachusetts Commission on GLBT Youth National Youth Advocacy Coalition Legal Services for Children Gender Spectrum Planned Parenthood of Utah ACLU of Utah and more!

John Cepek National PFLAG President

WWW.UTAHPRIDECENTER.ORG


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

gay agenda Happy Bir... by Tony Hobday

OK, so I didn’t say “Screw you Labor Day weekend!” Instead, I said, “I want to have your babies, Labor Day Weekend!” I ventured to the Gorge with my lil sister, Jake. When we arrived, it became Flaming Gorge. We went wake boarding, cliff-jumping and jellyfish hunting (we didn’t see any, dammit!). I even scratched a park ranger’s kitty. Alright, I can’t lie to you, we actually only played Gin, drank iced tea and took afternoon naps (rubbed down with Ben-gay and wearing pink ‘Sleeping Beauty’ sleep masks); it was like heaven in a vodka bottle.

17

FRIDAY — There’s a new tenant at Armadillo Acres and she’s wreaking havoc all over Florida’s most exclusive trailer park in Dark Horse Company Theatre’s production of THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER PARK MUSICAL. Pippi is a stripper on the run (the tassels are just a spinnin’), and when she comes between an agoraphobic (that’s the fear of wool) housewife and her less-than-affluent husband, she causes a mighty hurricane. This campy, caustic musical fable has everything from spray cheese to road kill to (or at) Costco. 8pm, Thurs.–Sat., 6pm, Sun., through Oct. 3, Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main St., Park City. Tickets $18–25, 435-649-9371 or parkcityshows.com. Q It has been called the greatest play produced in the English language in 400 years, and now Pioneer Theatre is proud to present a production of William Shakespeare’s HAMLET. It’s part ghost story, part murder mystery, part psychological thriller and part hard-to-understand. Tehehe! 7:30pm, through Oct. 2, Pioneer Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, UofU. Tickets $24–42, 801-581-6961 or pioneertheatre.org. Q In 1988, one of the greatest rock bands formed — THE SMASHING PUMPKINS. Though the band has led a tumultuous career, they are one of the most diverse, densely layered, and guitar-heavy groups. Their music contains elements of gothic rock, heavy metal, dream pop, psychedelic rock, arena rock, electronica and a shoegazer-style production. My favorite is “1979” ... yes, I am gay! 7pm, In The Venue at Club Sound, 219 S. 600 West. Tickets $40, 801-467-8499 or smithstix.com.

18

SATURDAY — Happy Birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy bir .... oh lord, I’m getting as old as Gene Gieber because I don’t remember the rest. Anyhoo, the old fart is celebrating his birthday tonight with an UNDERWEAR PARTY. And the old perv loves Baskits. Love ya long time, Gene! 8pm, Club Try-Angles, 251 W. 900 South. For more info, call 801-364-3203 or visit clubtry-angles.com. Q Happy Birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy bir ... shit, I did it again! Anyhoo, The Trapp is celebrating 20 years of supporting alcohol abusers — just kidding ... well, sort of, because Jabe serves a drink called the Drunken Tony — I wonder who that’s named after? Double anyhoo, join Joe Redburn and his clan at their 20TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY, it’ll be a freakin’ hoot! 7pm, The Trapp, 102 S. 600 West. 801-531-8727. 3 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

19

SUNDAY — Equality Utah’s monthly sociopolitical event, PILSNERS AND POLITICS, is held on the third Sunday of each month at Squatters. The restaurant has a butt-load of beer to choose from: staples to seasonal brews to limited releases, like Provo Girl, Nitro Cream, Monkey’s Dunkle and Hell’s Keep. EU also has a butt-load of Utah politics to discuss, so be there, get your butt loaded (but don’t drive!) and hear from candidates about their races. 4pm, Squatters Brewery, 147 W. Broadway. Cost $5, 801-355-5020 or equalityutah.org.

22

WEDNESDAY — Direct from the Las Vegas Strip comes drag sensation EDIE. She will perform her solo cabaret show, a fastpaced hour — and then some — of the leggy showgirl singing her favorites, all with her signature ’60s gogo flair. Look out for high-kicking choreography and witty off-the-cuff banter. 8pm, Black Box Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. Broadway. Tickets $25, 801-355-ARTS or arttix.org.

23

THURSDAY — Sugar Space’s 2010 Artist in Residence (recipients receive 40 hours of free space, approximately $500 allotted to staff, marketing materials, etc., and artists receive a percentage of the door) recipient, INFLUX DANCE, from SLC/Charlottesville, Va., perform an original dance theatre piece exploring women throughout history based on writing by Margaret Atwood. 8pm, through Saturday, Sugar Space, 616 Wilmington Ave. Tickets $10/adv.–12/door, 888-300-7898 or thesugarspace. com. Q Become absorbed in the CONFIGURATIONS of contemporary dance as Ririe-Woodbury explores the depths of the human experience with four cutting-edge choreographers. The performance will feature a newly commissioned work entitled “Duet” by Tony Award-winning choreographer, Bill T. Jones. The uncompromising and unapologetic political and social views of Jones have always laid the foundation for his dances. He has taken considerable strides in merging art with social commentary on topics such as being African American, homosexual, and HIV positive in today’s society. 7:30pm, through Saturday, Jeanne Wagner Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. Broadway. Tickets $30, 801-355-ARTS or arttix.org.

Q This event sounds like more fun than a night with Ryan Kwanten (Jason Stackhouse) ... OK, not really! The first annual POWELLAPALOOZA is packed with tons of music, games and beach parties. Taking place on the Arizona side of Lake Powell, the four-day festival includes over 50 bands, a golf tournament, poker run, hot air balloon rides and more. Through Sept. 26 in Page, Az. Tickets $35–105, VIP tix $290. For more information, powellapalooza.com.

24

FRIDAY — Nestled in the majestic Zion Canyon is an adorable little town named Springdale, and this weekend the adorable little town is host to the ZION CANYON MUSIC FESTIVAL. Performers include Thriftstore Cowboys, Sputnik, Mother Hips and Crippled Stripper. And may I recommend that you stay at Under the Eaves Bed & breakfast — the gay couple that owns it are fantabulous! 5pm tonight & 11am Saturday, Springdale Town Park, Springdale. Tickets $15/Friday, $20/Saturday or $30 for both days, zioncanyonmusicfestival.com.

25

SUNDAY — “Women fake orgasms because they have excellent time management skills.” That’s a Dottie Dixon quote ... I mean WANDA SYKES. Anyhoo, the ultra-hip gay comedian will be bringing down the house in Wendover. Don’t miss it. “Drinking will make you feel like a sexy 26-year-old.” That’s what Michael Aaron believes! 7pm, Peppermill Concert Hall, 680 Wendover Blvd., Wendover, Nev. Tickets $40–70, 800-217-0049 or wendoverfun. com.

UPCOMING EVENTS OCT 16 NOV 26-29 APR 11

Spencer Day, Rose Wagner The Rockettes, Maverick Ctr Lily Tomlin, Kingsbury Hall


save the date

hear me out By Chris Azzopardi

Robyn Body Talk, Pt. 2

September 18 sWerve’s Oktoberfest swerveutah.com September 18 Walk for Life, Bike for Life utahaids.org September 25 ROTC Military Ball rotcslc.com September 25 Wanda Sykes, Wendover, Nev. wendoverfun.com September 28 Equality Utah Allies Dinner equalityutah.org October 9 National Coming Out Day Breakfast utahpridecenter.org October 16 sWerve’s Halloween Bash swerveutah.com October 16–20 Living With AIDS Conference pwacu.org October 18–22 UofU Pride Week emanzanares@sa.utah.edu November 25 Thanksgiving Dinners at the Utah Pride Center, Club Try-Angles and The Trapp December 1 World AIDS Day worldaidsday.org December 10–11 Salt Lake Men’s Choir Christmas Concert saltlakemenschoir.org January 5–9 Utah Gay & Lesbian Ski Week, Park City communityvisions.org January 20–30 Sundance Film Festival, Park City sundance.org

On “Hang with Me,” Robyn’s lead single from part two in her Body Talk series, the every-girl of (smart) pop is hesitant to fall in love. We, though, hardly had a choice. Just coming off the June release of the first installment, she’s adorably irresistible, emotionally exposed like the BFF you never had, but in Robyn’s wonderfully up-front way, almost do. That single from this edition — slightly beginning-to-end better than the first — is too good for words; a slice of bursting dream-pop that’s so honest and innocent that it reads like a diary entry and feels more real than anything on the radio, right where this particular charmer belongs. It’s heartily inviting, just like the two addictive openers before it, “In My Eyes” and “Include Me Out” — the latter featuring the silliest and sweetest of Left Eyelike breakdowns. Both songs are the consoling friends she needed when a lover broke her heart on the first disc’s “Dancing on My Own.” Sadness mostly sits out this time around, while Robyn warns that “Love Kills” and then shakes out some sass on “Criminal Intent” and the hardcore toughie “U Should Know Better,” alternating boasts with Snoop Dogg like a tag-team fierce enough to take down Osama bin Laden. She closes with “Indestructible,” and like the acoustic version of “Hang with Me” from Body Talk Pt. 1, it’s string-powered and sweetly melancholy. When the song is, as her cycle suggests, cut for the clubs on the third and final chapter, we’ll be right there — hanging with her.

how truly atrocious they really are. Otherwise, she’s stuck with slapped-together songwriting that even Mary J. Blige couldn’t salvage: “Bittersweet,” the first single, is one big, crying Hallmark card that Fantasia bellows like she means every trite line she’s emoting; so is “Even Angels,” a trendy R&B jam with a walk-then-run motto that at least corks a singable melody within its glimmering synth groove. Old-school soul sweeps through “The Thrill is Gone” and “Trust Him,” calling up Lauryn Hill, and it’s invigorating to hear Fantasia sing something that suits her ragged, old-soul voice. Her shining coup, though, isn’t even studio produced; it’s her live version of “I’m Here” from her role in The Color Purple musical. From the gut, it’s a reminder that Fantasia can be great when the music allows her to be.

Zayra Baby Likes to Bang Now that Gaga’s set the precedence for dancepop, wannabes want a piece of her disco ball. A chunk of it goes to this Puerto Rican vixen, who gives glam a go with songs on her debut disc, which includes six originals and five remixes. She goes M.I.A. with “Feel Good,” and on the fierce “V.I.P.,” a top-10 dance single, she’s too cool for you. If Zayra wasn’t so much like everyone else, that just might be true.

Reach Chris Azzopardi at chris@pridesource.com.

Grade: C+

Also Out Kristine W Straight Up with a Twist Dance divas shifting outside the box sounds so Cyndi Lauper, but another big voice is going for beyond-her-roots glory. Kristine W’s doing it over two discs: a laid-back, Latin-seasoned mix of covers and dance-songs-turned-ballads paired with a livelier, Sade-sounding second disc. Ms. W sounds divine, her silky pipes rising high above some pedestrian production, but scene queens will be looking for less chill, more kill.

Grade: A-

Fantasia, Back to Me Fantasia Barrino has never reached the heights of American Idolwinning peers Kelly Clarkson or Carrie Underwood, but she has just as much talent wringing from her. Talent that, again on her third album Back to Me, is squandered on songs that reek of regurgitation, forcing Fantasia into the simplest of R&B conventions that almost completely ignore her instinctual passion. She has a better backstory — single mom, reality show champ and, now, suicide-attempt survivor — than hit-making catalog, which has left nary a blip on the radio and turned some horribly embarrassing jams. But at least she’s consistent; both “I’m Doin’ Me” and “Collard Greens & Cornbread” are almost funny enough to forget Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 1


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Girls Just Want to Have Big, Gay Fun

Over 50 people joined QSaltLake on the Big Gay Fun Bus to West Wendover to watch Cyndi Lauper croon her new and old songs to a rambunctious (sometimes too) crowd. A pool party the next day and back home. Bingo, Jello shots, prizes and Sin Delopper, not to mention a rowdy crowd, made the trip memorable and fun. Watch for the next Big Gay Fun Bus to Wendover and make sure you’re on it!

Did we mention the pool party? 

32 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Don R. Austin, LCSW

Quries By Steven Petrow

I’m not stalking him, but ...

Q

I connected with this really nice guy on Facebook and have been perusing his profile ever since. We are actually going to meet for coffee , as our first date. So am I allowed to “know” as much as I do about him? I don’t want to creep him out.

A

Unless your new friend has signed up for an app that reveals who’s been reading his page, ignorance is bliss. But your instincts are good: People don’t always like the idea of new friends or beaus knowing all about them. In fact, when the two of you get together, try to pretend you don’t know what you do. Don’t bring up out of the blue his entire work history (yes, that’s creepy) and avoid comments like “So, I saw you and Mike broke up on Facebook...” But if you

both love Lady Gaga or volunteer at the local LGBT center, it’s fine — and actually very helpful — to talk about what you have in common to break the ice and discover what else you may share. Online relationships are just like offline ones. Peeling back the layers of someone’s life and personality should happen in a gradual way, as you build up trust. And hearing someone describe his life in his own words is a great way to get to know someone. It’s entirely possible that your new friend would rather tell you himself about his beloved pets and what he wore for Halloween last year.

Dressing for success or myself

Q

Usually when I’m applying for a job I set aside the real me—the butch dyke, if you will—and dress up a little feminine (different hair, different suit, everything). As I get older, this makes me feel less and less comfortable, as though I’m not being the real me. How do you suggest I dress for interviews?

A

That’s a tough question. Ideally, it’s essential not to disguise yourself or to appear other than who you are. Still, there’s something to be said for having your “interview suit” — and doing some extra grooming — especially because we all know how others’ prejudices can work against us. Think of it this way: The idea is to take appearances completely out of the equation so that you can explain your qualifications and sell yourself without distraction. Once you land the job, you can be freer in how you dress. You’re not selling out to adopt a more mainstream look for the interviews; this is just another step to get you in the door. In my experience, most people try to pick up a company’s dress code once they start work. But if you don’t think you can do that — or want to dress butch all the time — then go ahead and do it for the interview. If the company can’t take it then, you’re wasting your time considering this particular employer.

Gay male Psychotherapy group forming. Limited to 6 – 8 members.

801-485-9225

Tickets for Hamlet On Sale Now! 2010-11 Season tickets now available! Hamlet Sept. 17 – Oct. 2, 2010 Bram Stoker’s

Dracula

Oct. 22 – Nov. 6, 2010 Irving Berlin’s

White Christmas Dec. 3 – Dec. 24, 2010

Black Comedy Jan. 14 – Jan. 29, 2011

In Feb. 18 – Mar. 5, 2011

Hamlet

Sept. 17 – Oct. 2, 2010

The Diary of Anne Frank Mar. 18 – Apr. 2, 2011 Andrew Lloyd Webber’s

Sunset Boulevard

Apr. 29 – May 14, 2011 Special Event!

Rent

Jun. 10 – Jun. 25, 2011

Exploring the Breadth of Human Experience 801.581.6961 | www.PioneerTheatre.or g A professional theatre in residence at the University of Utah

Major Season Suppor t Provided By:


FOOD&DRINK

restaurant review Basque Supper at La Caille by Chef Drew Ellsworth

O

N A SUNDAY NIGHT TWO weeks ago, I went, unannounced, to La Caille for their Basque family-style supper. I was very pleased. Let me tell you about it. I haven’t been to La Caille for years, so I had been looking forward to this visit for days with great anticipation. I went with friends from work and we all brought great wine. Some of the younger guys don’t drive, so I picked them up and we drove south to the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon. The epic grounds of La Caille are secluded and overgrown on the sides of the old gate — far

more than I remembered. I actually drove past a couple of times before realizing what it was! The beautiful, filigreed gate which screams France, is taller and narrower than I had it in my mind, and the red brick lane leading up to the château is now older, bumpier and even more old world than ever before. My young friends thought we had been transported to another place and time. The lane, by design, meanders and serpents its way toward the restaurant, through a beautiful park of lawns and mature trees. There were families of black rabbits dining on the grasses and many peacocks strolling around as though they owned the place. The magic is still there!

We used the valet parking at the entrance where the red brick becomes a circular plaza. The Art Nouveau glass work around the gables of the château is so authentically reminiscent of France at the turn of the last century, it is almost breathtaking to a Francophile like me. Old neighborhoods in Paris, like Montmartre and Montparnasse, still display this beautiful architectural style. You can say what you want about the French, but secretly we all admire their art. What’s cool about La Caille is the attention to detail in everything. When you enter, there are high ceilings and cracked stone walls with gorgeous, old antique armoires on each side of the vestibule. As you proceed upstairs, you pass the seemingly ancient wine cellar which is stocked by my friend Joe Wright, who has been the sommelier at La Caille for a decade. The bottles are placed in handmade ceramic pipes that have been set in concrete. Other bottles are crammed into old world wrought iron racks so you read the impressive lables: Château Mouton Rochchilde, Château Margaux, Echezeau and Clos de Beze, Caymus and Silver Oak from California, and Brunellos from Italy. We were led by our hostess, a pretty blond woman dressed in the famous La Caille bustier, to a small, semi-private dining room. We had a view of the eves of the château and the park with the ever-present peacocks. A cool breeze was blowing and the French doors throughout the dining rooms were open to the outdoors. Our dining room had a coffered ceiling of botanical relief sculptures depicting roses and bay leaves. By now, the boys from the Wine Store were enthralled! For newcomers, La Caille is truly amazing and a little overwhelming. It was fun for me to introduce young people to Europe via Little Cottonwood Canyon. We were, as it should be in a French restaurant, brought baskets of bread with hand-piped, butter roses. The bread was the best French bread I’ve had in Salt Lake, which says a lot because I make a lot of French bread myself: crispy, crusty, golden on the outside and spongy, chewy and full of holes on the inside. Our first course was a flavorful black bean country soup in a rich broth with a lot of vegetables. We had cracked open a bottle of Silverbirch New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc and a beautiful ’03 Grand Cru

Chablis which was showing a little age and was fragrant, honeyed and delicious. Next, we were served a Caprese salad on a long, rectangular plate — a simple dish with large slices of fresh mozzarella, tomatoes and basil. The salad was drizzled with very good olive oil and tangy balsamic vinegar — classically done and perfect! The entrée was just so beautifully homemade, I almost couldn’t believe I was in a restaurant. Sometimes La Caille gets bad reviews for its food, but on this night I felt like I was at the home of a French friend. There were crisp, braised short ribs on one end of a huge platter and baked halibut on the other end. In the center was a bouquetiere of vegetables: steamed asparagus, new potatoes and broccoli. The fish was served on a bed of creamed spinach which I thought was just delicious. The veggies were perfectly cooked and the melt-in-your-mouth short ribs were laced with a flavorful Bordelaise sauce which I wanted to drink! This night, the food at La Caille was fully matched to the beautiful surroundings. Our wine servers poured us a Premier Cru Mercurey red Burgundy and I brought a Nicolas Cole “Camille” Bordeaux-blend. The wines were awesome with our entrees. We had our choice of three desserts: crepes, Bananas Flambé and crème brulee. How very, very French! We tried all three and although the desserts were quite predictable, they were nicely done and presented with a lot of show. My visit to La Caille was random and they didn’t know I was writing an article so there is no prejudice here or any connection. I can freely say I just love the total experience. If I made any little comments at all, it would be that the bean soup, to my taste, was a little salty — something which no one else mentioned. I also thought the fish, although nicely cooked, had very little flavor or seasoning, something which was only noticed by one other person. But the delicious sauces and vegetables made up for any misgivings or criticisms. I rate my visit at La Caille at 90+. The plus is for the grounds and building which are incomparable to anywhere in Utah. Sadly, La Caille has just gone up for sale and has an iffy future as a time-honored restaurant in Salt Lake City, so please go again soon. The Sunday brunch and Basque Supper are, indeed, memorable. Q

3 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


BIG Chimichangas!

2 TUESDAY

$

ALL BEERS JUST $2

• 25 WINGS FLAVORS • PATIO OPEN • FREE PARKING AT TROLLEY SQUARE • OPEN AT NOON EVERY DAY • OPEN SUNDAY FUN DAY

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Make Love to our Food Experience sophisticated Mexican gastronomy, wines and spirits in a hip, relaxed atmosphere. Fresh, flavorful, festive and sexy… As Frida would have desired.

For Reservations: 801-983-6692 545 West 700 South, Salt Lake City

WEEKLY SPECIALS

www.fridabistro.com

Sunday • Fajitas $11.99

Try our wild coconut, curried wild rice

Monday • 1/2 Off Select Apps Pitchers of Bud Light $8.00 Taco Tuesday • Tacos $2.00 Tecate Beer $2.50 Wednesday • Beef Barbacoa $14.99

2148 Highland Drive

Thursday • Chipotle BBQ Ribs $11.99 Bucket of 5 “Coronitas” $10

801-486-0332

www.omarsrawtopia.com

Food Specials Start at 4 pm till items run out.

noW oPen

tueSdayS g eve4npmin – dusk

Park City at Kimball Junction I-80 & Hwy. 224 (Behind Wells Fargo Bank)

from uce-only for a prod ring the market du tiful most boun ar! e ye time of th

435-645-7000 Weekly Specials are available for Dine In only and may not be used with any other offers. Offer expires June 30th, 2010.

Saturday MorningS

at HiStoric Pioneer Park (300 South, 300 West)

September

18 Cooking Demos Viking Cooking School 25 Art and Culture Day Eve

october

2 Cooking Demos Viking Cooking School 9 Dutch Oven Cook Off City Weekly

Super-sized sunflowers are a sure sign of a bountiful harvest.

QSaltLake Tweets @qsaltlake

Visit slcfarmersmarket.org for market updates Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 35


FOOD&DRINK

cocktail chaer Drag Not a Drag with Brass Monkeys By Ed Sikov

Visit 41 of Salt Lake City’s finest restaurants between September 17 – October 2 and choose a three-course dinner for either $15 or $30. Some participating restaurants offer a delicious two-item lunch special for only $5 or $10. 15

$15 Dinner

Acme Burger Company 30 10 Bambara 30 Bayleaf Café 15 10 Biaggi’s Ristorante Italiano 15 Buca di Beppo 15 10 Caffe Molise 30 10 Cannella’s 15 10 Caputo’s by Night 15 Cedars of Lebanon 15 10 Christopher’s Seafood & Prime Steakhouse 30 10 Copper Canyon Grill House & Tavern 15 10 Copper Onion 30 10 Donovan’s Steak & Chop House 30 Eva Restaurant 30 10

30

$30 Dinner

5

$5 Lunch

Faustina 30 10 Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse and Wine Bar 30 Garden Restaurant 15 Gracie’s 5 Green Pig Pub 15 5 Iggy’s Sports Grill Downtown 15 10 J. Wong’s Asian Bistro 15 5 Lamb’s Grill Café 15 10 Market Street Grill 30 10 Market Street Oyster Bar 30 10 Martine 30 10 Melting Pot 30 Metropolitan 30 10 Naked Fish Japanese Bistro 30 10

10

$10 Lunch

New Yorker 30 10 Oasis Café 15 Olive Bistro 15 10 Red Rock Brewing Company 15 10 Robin’s Nest 5 Ruth’s Chris Steak House Sage’s Café 15 10 Sandbar Mexican Grill 15 10 Settebello Pizzeria Napoletana 15 10 Squatters Pub Brewery 15 10 Star of India 30 10 Takashi 30 Tin Angel Café 30 10 Vienna Bistro 30 10 Wild Grape Bistro 30 10

Presented by:

Supported by:

For information visit www.dineoround.com

30

T

HE LABOR DAY DRAG PARTY in Fire Island Pines is either a hilarious gender circus or a reason to blow some queen’s brains out. Drag is fabulous. It’s the sweating, stinking, drunken guys in wigs who brazenly stick their tongue in your ears that’s either a kick or a nightmare. It’s a party for Pines boys who have discovered the glamour girl within. I wasn’t about to reveal mine in public. I’d make an incredibly ugly Nancy Sinatra. (I’d call to mind a blonde Cynthia Ozick in white leather boots.) Dan wouldn’t do it, either. He’d just look like Dan in a dress. But our housemates all brought suitcases stuffed with secrets; nobody named their inner woman until the big reveal. Jack Fogg came downstairs first. Sammy had put him up to doing it. Jack was clearly miserable — he was wearing a burqa. (His eyes said it all.) Sammy followed in a luxurious purple sari and a bhindi on her forehead. “So what drink are you sending us off with, dude?” Sammy asked. “Miss Jackie-Anne Taliban here needs a drink.” Jackie-Anne was fussing with her crotch. “There’s a pitcher of Brass Monkeys in the fridge,” I said. “What’s a Brass Monkey?” Ms. Taliban asked through the slit in her headpiece. “Rum, vodka and orange juice. The color resembles buffed old brass.” “Make mine a double,” the Islamic fundamentalist begged her Hindu girlfriend. Frankie and Ian then made their entrance. I’d expected more, but all they did was put on long blonde wigs and matching white tennis outfits. Ian immediately sensed my disappointment. “Don’t you know who we are?” He asked in disbelief. I shook my head no. “We’re the Doublemint Twins,” they sang out in unison. “Brava, divas!” Dan said, applauding. “It’s delicious and really strong!” The non

sequitur came out of the burqa’s mouth slit. Sari Sammy agreed. “Seriously, dude!” She said. “I’ll be on my ass before we get to the party.” Then Sal and Sean came down, reminiscent of grizzled, gray Old Year and adorable Baby New Year. Sal went for distinctly middle-aged laughs; he was “Edie Gourmet.” With his face framed by Edie’s signature hairdo, Sal actually looked like her in a most disturbing way. Of course this Edie was carrying a copy of M.F.K. Fisher’s The Art of Eating and had a can of duck confit serving as a hat. Being brilliant himself, Sal persistently overestimates the average gay man’s wit. My unspoken prediction: nobody at the party would get the joke. I was right. It was Sean who stole the show, not only at our place but at the party, too. With his actor’s make up skills, a copper-colored wig and naturally voluptuous body, he was an eerily perfect Beyoncé. When he grabbed the burqa woman by the waist, yanked her close and began singing “We’re your dream girls” in precisely the voice of Ms. Knowles, it was way too much, and I shot some of my Brass Monkey out my nose.

The words ‘rum,’ ‘juice,’ and ‘you’re such an asshole’ formed the foundation of our debate

The Brass Monkey 1 part dark rum 1 part Absolut 2 parts orange juice Pour the ingredients into a shaker filled with ice, and after shaking it just enough to chill it, pour the contents into the prechilled glass of your choice. This drink shouldn’t be served on the rocks. Note: the original (some might call it real) recipe contains much more OJ. It’s boring. My version is a lot more fun. Q Ed Sikov is the author of Dark Victory; The Life of Bette Davis and other books about films and filmmakers.

3 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


BIG Chimichanga!

dining guide Frida Bistro Sophisticated Mexican cuisine, wine and spirits 545 W. 700 South 801-983-6692 Loco Lizard Cantina Serious mexican food since 1999 at Kimball Junction. 1612 Ute Blvd., Park City 435-645-7000 Meditrina Small Plates & Wine Bar Encouraging gastronomic exploring in tapas tradition 1394 S. West Temple 801-485-2055 Metropolitan Handcrafted new American cooking 173 W Broadway 801-364-3472 Off Trax Internet Café Coffee, wi-fi and pool 259 W 900 South 801-364-4307

For people of all ages to hang out, play pool, get on the internet, play music COFFEE BURGERS SANDWICHES SOUPS SALADS APPETIZERS BREAKFAST BRUNCH POOL TABLE VIDEO GAMES JUKE BOX FREE WIFI OPEN Mon-Thur 7a–7p Friday 7a-3p AND After Bar Closing Fridays and Saturdays

259 W 900 S 801 364-4307

Next to Club Try-Angles, Half Block from TRAX in the NEW Gayborhood!

Home of the Happy Hangover Sunday Brunch 11am–2pm Q PON

Free Soda or Coffee with food purchase

www.offtraxslc.com

Omar’s Rawtopia Restaurant Organic live food 2148 S. Highland Dr. 801-486-0332 Sage’s Cafe The freshest and healthiest cuisine possible 473 E 300 South 801-322-3790

Monday • 1/2 Off Select Apps Pitchers of Bud Light $8.00 Taco Tuesday • Tacos $2.00 Tecate Beer $2.50 Wednesday • Beef Barbacoa $14.99 Thursday • Chipotle BBQ Ribs $11.99 Bucket of 5 “Coronitas” $10

Park City at Kimball Junction I-80 & Hwy. 224 (Behind Wells Fargo Bank)

10 AM Gardeners, bring your produce to sell or trade!

FROM

SUNDAYS

Trolley Wing Company We’re Back! Open daily noon to 11pm 550 S 700 East 801-538-0745

The Wild Grape Bistro Eat where the locals eat 481 E South Temple 801-746-5565

Sunday • Fajitas $11.99

Food Specials Start at 4 pm till items run out.

Tin Angel Cafe Local food, music, art. Serving lunch, dinner and Saturday brunch 365 W 400 South 801-328-4155

Vertical Diner Vegetarian restaurant open seven days a week 10 a.m.–9 p.m. 2280 S West Temple 801-484-8378

WEEKLY SPECIALS

435-645-7000 Weekly Specials are available for Dine In only and may not be used with any other offers. Offer expires June 30th, 2010.

JUNE 13 THRU OCTOBER 24

INT’L PEACE GARDEN 1060 SOUTH 900 WEST www.slcpeoplesmarket.org

OUR 2010 SPONSORS

To get listed in this section, please call 801-649-6663 and ask for Brad or e-mail brad@qsaltlake.com Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 7


NIGHT LIFE

bar map

Q

J

Salt Lake City

E 600 N.

by Hunter Richardson

Temple Square

Gateway Mall

200 S

Salt Palace

300 W

S R

Trax Line

Arena

100 S. 200 S.

Intermodal Hub

400 S MAIN ST

500 S

STATE ST

900 W

600 W

V 300 S. City Hall

300 W

600 S

Trax Station

900 S

900 E

1300 S STATE ST

South Salt Lake City

Sugar House

Trax Station

Trax Line

T 3300 S

300 W

nonetheless. Additionally there is The Trapp which has been alive and well for years, serving great drinks in big jars — it reminds me of a cabin filled with booze and games (what could be better than that on a cold evening?). Moving on, there is Club Try-Angles with a pool table and my personal favorite thing: text messages that you can send to the TV for everyone to see (childish, yet completely satisfying). Edge and Fusion are where to go on a night where you find yourself wanting the environment of an old, classic New York City gay bar with lasers and smoke — and to me, that’s a lot better than snow and cold. Ultimately, I feel as winter comes closer and the layers get thicker, the place to be will be anywhere that has the closest parking and best atmosphere. Bar hopping doesn’t become an issue as most people park and stay because wiping snow off the car just isn’t that appealing more than twice a night. Actually, I would bet that the first club to have covered parking would be the most popular during the cold months strictly because no one (gay, lesbian, bisexual or straight) likes cleaning off a snow-covered automobile. So bid farewell to the skimpy clothing. Let’s see the style the Salt Lake City gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community can bring to the table. This winter I challenge you all to be more sophisticated than trendy. More classy than sassy. Refine yourselves in the fact you can outwardly project the great character within, rather than defining yourself through the façade of “individual expression.” You are all beautiful, so show it with your style, not your skin this winter. See you this weekend. Q

Trax Line

F

IRST THINGS FIRST: I REFUSE to get involved in the drama of a situation which I am not directly a part of or cannot single-handedly solve within a reasonable period of time. That said: bars, clubs and lounges, play nice or your “customer” may start to feel uncomfortable. Just saying. OK, to the point now. I am happy to announce that tank top season is over. For all of you who love them: knock it off. That time has passed and the rest of the world can live without being subjected to open armpits, budging necklines and people who should just never wear a tank top in the first place. This is Salt Lake City, not the Jersey Shore. That said, this means fall (and soon winter) is around the corner. So grab your layers because patios will be chilled, the glasses cooled and, of course, the air will be slightly below comfortable. Of course, I understand that this is Utah and guessing the weather is like throwing darts at a board, but still, one can hope. Still, I see a few spots becoming “hot spots” even in the cold weather. Namely, JAM. This well-known and well-loved place may not have the heated rock seat bench anymore, but needless to say they understand how to market in a cold climate (one has to love the many heaters). Also, Püre. On a Friday night, who doesn’t want to park close to an arena filled with warm bodies drinking and having a good time? I think no more explanation is needed. There’s also Babylon. Same-same-but-different to the reasoning above. So, where else is there to go? As I’ve mentioned, Studio 27. It is having a slow start, but it’s been steadily rising in popularity

200 EAST

Q scene No More Tank Tops!

K 2100 S

P 3900 S

Q bar guide WEEKLY BAR EVENTS E CLUB EDGE ●

615 N 400 W • D M K X tinyurl.com/clubedgeslc

T CLUB TRY-ANGLES ●

251 W 900 S • D M N 801-364-3203 • clubtry-angles.com

SUNDAYS

MONDAYS

LATIN GAY NIGHT

KAROAKE W/KADE STEEL

KARAOKE $1 DRAFTS BBQS AT 4PM

BEER-SOAKED WEENIES

●J JAM

BEER BUST BBQ AT 4PM BLOODY MARYS

K KARAMBA ●

LATIN GAY NIGHT DJ FRANK GO-GO DANCERS

751 N 300 W • D F M N 801-891-1162 • jamslc.com 1051 E 2100 S • D M X 801-696-0639 • klubkaramba.com

P PAPER MOON ●

3737 S State St • J K L 801-713-0648 • thepapermoon.info

S STUDIO 27 ●

615 W 100 South • D M 801-363-2200 • studio27slc.com

V TAVERNACLE ●

201 E 300 South • K X 801-519-8800 • tavernacle.com

R THE TRAPP ●

102 S 600 West • B N D K M 801-531-8727 • tinyurl.com/trappslc

FREE POOL $1 DRAFTS $1 MIMOSAS

FREE TEXAS HOLD-EM $4 PAPER MOON STEINS

TUESDAYS

PIANO KARAOKE WITH ERIC 8–11PM

BBQ at 4PM

KARAOKE WITH JAMIE 9PM

THURSDAYS

HIP HOP NIGHT DJ WONDERBOY

DANCE EVOLUTION W/DJ DC

$1 DRAFTS BACKROOM BLUES

SATURDAYS FUSION W/ROBBIE ROB & TIM

KARAOKE

$1 DRAFTS DJ D / DJ BOYTOY

DANCE! DANCE! DANCE!

SUPERSTAR KARAOKE WITH BRIAN G

BLACK OUT DEEP HOUSE W/ DJ MIKE BABBITT

FRIDAY FIX WITH DJ \V/

BOOM BOOM ROOM WITH DJ MIKE BABBITT

KARAOKE W/ MR. SCOTT 8PM $1 CORONAS, RED STRIPE

WHITE TRASH BINGO FREE POOL $2 WELLS, $3 BIG BUD CANS

COUNTRY LINE DANCING 7–9PM WILD WEE KARAOKE 9PM

POLES, CAGES, SEXY WOMEN BEST FEMALE DJs

WOMEN! WOMEN! WOMEN!

SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE

DJ BRENT VINCENT $3 JAGER SHOTS $4 JAGER BOMBS

DJ NAOMI $5 LONG ISLANDS

DJ TONY MARINOS SUMMER MARTINI LUGE

DUELING PIANOS 9PM $3 BIG BUD LIGHT

DUELING PIANOS 9PM $3 BIG BUD LIGHT

DUELING PIANOS 9PM

DUELING PIANOS 9PM

DART TOURNAMENT 7PM DJ DENNIS

DJ DENNIS

POWERBALL KARAOKE W/ TROY 9PM

B = BEAR/LEATHER | D = DANCE FLOOR | F = FOOD | K = KARAOKE NIGHTS | L = MOSTLY LESBIAN | M = MOSTLY GAY MEN | N = NEGHBORHOOD BAR | T = 18+ AREA | X = MIXED GAY/STRAIGHT OR GAY CERTAIN NIGHTS

3 8 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

FRIDAYS

JAM U GAY COLLEGE NIGHT

LATIN NIGHT

$1 DRAFTS KARAOKE W/KEVAN 9PM

WEDNESDAYS


CLUB MILITARY ID ID S L R A E V B H M E IT M W S O ER REE T SERVICEMEMB IVILEGES - EFR R R U P O S R IT O S F A H V IP MEMBERSH TELL — NO CO ’T N O D , K S A DON’T

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! R E V O N E Z O R HELL HAS F E R E H S I E K ys a d s r u h T KARAoO & s y a n Sund MONDAYS

ERTS C N O C O E D I V TUESDAYS

S E U L B M O O R BACnK t 7pm a in g e b s n o s s le ce

, After the boar nues ti n the party c next door at

ers Da e u q y r lt u s r fo Dancing

WEDNESDAYS

NTS E M A N R U O T POOL eturning October 6 R

AYS $1 DRAFTS D S E U T ▼ S IE N ONDAYS WEE J BOY TO M ▼ TOY, $1 DRAFTS TS F A R D 1 D $ S • Y m A p 4 RAOKE, BBQ at HURSDAYS KARAOKE ▼ FRID A K S Y A D N U S T OPEN DAILY 2PM LY O PEN D AIL Y AT AT 2 PM $1 DRAFTS ▼ S Y A L NIGHT L D A S E E U C T N A ▼ -D E 801-364-3203 251 W 900 S C R S DANCE-DAN GHOUT THE BA 1/2 BLOCK FROM 9th S TRAX STATION U O R ▼ SATURDAY TH S N E E R C

m • offtraxslc.co 259 w 900 s

ON SHY? TEXT HIM

OUR S

WWW.CLUBTRY-ANGLES.COM

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 9


FUN&GAMES

Turn of Phrase Across

1 Pitcher’s rubber 5 Whitman’s dooryard bloomers 11 Get ready for action 15 Succotash bean 16 Tennis star Mauresmo 17 Little Caesar gangster 18 Crude cartel 19 Scent of a Woman Oscar winner 20 Point of view intro, at Gay.com 21 Start of a quip 24 Sault ___ Marie 25 Start of a footnote abbr. 26 Threesome 28 Doesn’t feel up 32 Buster Brown’s bulldog 35 End of the quip 39 Victor/Victoria actor Peter 40 Verdi opera 41 ___ Gay Hamilton 42 Liam of Kinsey 44 Straw hat 46 Beginning to whiz 47 k.d. lang’s “___ Gal” 52 Barrie’s precipitation 53 Source of the quip 55 No note for a butch 58 “The Mod Squad” character

59 Edmund to Colette? 63 Saying 64 “Village Voice” honor 65 Three Tall Women writer 66 Material on a drag queen’s legs 67 Tony-winning musical 68 Defamation in print 69 Forest opening 70 Like Izzard’s comedy 71 Rock Hudson roles, usually Down

1 Lagging behind 2 Prefix with suction 3 Nat. counterpart in MLB 4 Bottoms 5 Memory gap 6 “___ my wit’s end!” (cry of a bottom comic’s lover?) 7 One who says, “Let us prey” 8 You could get caught in this 9 Armed Forces VIP 10 Capital of Margaret Cho’s ancestral home 11 Adventurous desert queen 12 Hoar 13 Alpine feedback 14 Billy Elliot epithet 22 “Believe ___ not!”

23 Mil. student body 26 Number of sides to a gay symbol 27 Transsexual Richards 28 Queen of the hill 29 Dick’s running mate 30 Like Abner, before Viagra? 31 NBC sketch source 33 Stud’s strides 34 To eat, to Ulrichs 35 Tart taste 36 Kind of column 37 Old TV comedian George 38 Poet Teasdale 43 Like antigay language 45 Third testacle? 48 Pussy’s last name, in Goldfinger 49 Greased the palm of 50 With title to 51 Fine point 53 George Burns film 54 Gay porn director Francis 55 Dangle like a package 56 Pastoral poem 57 The Oscars, e.g. 60 “Dancing Queen” band 61 Have-not’s condition 62 Disney pictures PUZZLE ANSWERS ON PAGE 47

Cryptogram

A cryptogram is a puzzle where one letter in the puzzle is substituted with another. For example: ECOLVGNCYXW YCR EQYIIRZNBZN YZU PSZ! Has the solution: CRYPTOGRAMS ARE CHALLENGING AND FUN! In the above example Es are all replaced by Cs. The puzzle is solved by recognizing letter patterns in words and successively substituting letters until the solution is reached. This week’s hint: S = W Theme: A quote by Eliza Byard of GLSEN on the correlation between anti-gay bullying and religious views.

VZY SFIR ‘LECCFV’ WX AFV OEIV FL EAB IYPWCWFQX KIYYR.

___ ____ ‘______’ __ ___ ____ __ ___ _________ _____. 4 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Team Avalanche Fund-raiser for Gay Bowl The Mountain West Flag Football League will host a fundraiser pool party for Salt Lake City Avalanche at Rick and Kyle’s pool at 259 N. State Street from 2–7 p.m. on Sept. 18. The league will send players from the four teams that participated in this past summer’s league play to the national championship, Gay Bowl X, in Phoenix, Oct. 8–10. Each year, the National Gay Flag Football

League hosts a national championship in the city of a participating team that ran a summer flag football league and tournament. For 2010, Phoenix was previously chosen to host over 16 teams from all over the United States and Canada. Twenty dollars will get you entrance, two free drinks, a free BBQ, music and a chance to meet this year’s flag football players. Jump in the pool and play water badminton or volleyball, and relax in the last days of summer in Salt Lake City.

Q les

Saturday, Sept 18 Come Celebrate the Trapp’s

20 ANNIVERSARY TH

Q doku Q doku

Each Sudoku puzzle has a unique solution which can be reached

logically without Enterwhich digitscan 1 through 9 into the Each Sudoku puzzle has a guessing. unique solution be reached logically withoutblank guessing. EnterEvery digitsrow 1 through into theone blank Everyasrow spaces. must 9contain of spaces. each digit, must must contain one of each digit, as must each column and each 3x3 square. column each but 3x3connected, square. Qdoku is puzzles. actually five Qdoku each is actually five and separate, Sudoku

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separate, but connected, Sudoku puzzles.

Level: Medium

5 7 1 8 2 5 9 1

8 9 5 1 1 6

2

9 7

3

6 4 7 5

3 9 1

9 3 5

3

3

4 5 5 4 8 7

4

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6 4 6 5 9 4 9 3 1 6 3 8 4 5 3 7 9 9 6 3 7 1 9 3 5 8 2 7 6 2 1 9

5 6

1

8

5 2 8

4

1 3 5

2 1 8

4 5

3

2

5 4

3 5

6

4

Sundays 1

5 9 7 4 1 5 1 9 4 7 1 6 4 1 3

All day, all night Showtime at 7pm

3 7 6

BBQ, 4pm

Fridays

Dart Tournament, 7pm

8 7 2 4 3 8 2 6 102 SOUTH 600 WEST 1 5

801–531–8727

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 1


QMMUNIT Y

Quni groups

Utah has a vibrant gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community with many organizations for nearly any activity or interest you may have. Try these organizations out. For corrections or additions, please email editor@qsaltlake.com

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL Aetna ANGLE * HuntR@Aetna.com . . 801-256-7137 Armed Forces Support . 801-581-7890 LGBTQ-AFFIRMATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPISTS GUILD OF UTAH A professional group for mental-health providers. We meet monthly to network, educate ourselves, and improve the counseling services of LGBTQ individuals. www.lgbtqtherapists.com

Disability Law Center. . . . . . 801-(800) 662-9080 * info@disabilitylawcenter.org EQUALITY UTAH  equalityutah.org * info@equalityutah.org Working for a fair & just Utah 175 W 200 S, Ste 3001 . 801-355-3479 Human Rights Campaign, Utah  hrcutah.org * HRCSaltLakeUT@aol.com

National Organization for Women PO Box 57816, Murray . . . . . 801-268-0363

LOG CABIN REPUBLICANS, UTAH  logcabinutah.org * ut@logcabin.org

Pride at Work, Utah . . . . 801-531-6137

UTAH STONEWALL DEMOCRATS  utahstonewalldemocrats.org 455 S 300 E, Ste 301 . . . . . . . 801-328-1212 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-532-5330

Q BUSINESS ALLIANCE A guild of business owners, professionals, entrepreneurs and non-profit organizations that holds social events on the first Friday of the month and business breakfasts on the third Friday of the month. qsaltlake.com/qba . . . . . . . . 801-649-6663 Salt Lake County Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Employees * jdonchess@slco.org. . . . 801-273-6280

HEALTH & HIV Hermanos de Luna y Sol * arman@utahAIDS.org 1408 S 1100 E . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-487-2323 MEDICRUISER  medicruiser.com Gay, lesbian, transgender friendly staff and providers. Low cost, high quality Medical Care. Testosterone & hormone therapy, HIV/STD, weight management, addiction treatment 1850 S 300 W, Ste A . . . 801-484-5504 No. Utah HIV/AIDS Project Walk-Ins Welcome. Every other Monday 5–7pm 536 24th St, Ste 2B, Ogden . . . . 801-393-4153 PEOPLE WITH AIDS COALITION OF UTAH  pwacu.org 358 S 300 E . . . . . . . . . . 801-484-2205 PLANNED PARENTHOOD 654 S 900 E . . . . . . . . . . 800-230-PLAN SALT LAKE VALLEY HEALTH DEPT. — HIV/STD CLINIC  slvhealth.org/hiv/ 610 S 200 E . . . . . . . . . . 801-534-4666 University of Utah Department of Family and Preventative Medicine  uuhsc.utah.edu/dfpm 375 Chipeta Way, Ste A . . . . . 801-581-7234 UTAH AIDS FOUNDATION  utahaids.org * mail@utahaids. org 1408 S 1100 E . . . . . . . . 801-487-2323

HOMELESS SERVICES Center for Women and Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-261-9177 Homeless Youth Resource Center Youth ages 15-21. 655 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-364-0744 The Road Home  theroadhome.org 210 Rio Grande St . . . . . . . . . 801-359-4142 YWCA 322 E 300 S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-537-8600

POLITICAL American Civil Liberties Union  acluutah.org * aclu@acluutah.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-521-9862

RELIGIOUS & SPIRITUAL AFFIRMATION SALT LAKE  affirmation.org/saltlake Affirmation: Gay & Lesbian Mormons serves the needs of gay Mormon women and men, as well as bisexual and transgender LDS and their supportive family and friends, through social and educational activities. . . . . . 801-486-6977 BOUNTIFUL COMMUNITY CHURCH  bountifulucc.org * regal66@ yahoo.com 150 N 400 E, Btfl . . . . . . 801-295-9439 Cache Valley Unitarian Universalists 596 E 900 N, Logan . . . . . . . . 435-755-2888 CHRIST UNITED METHODIST  christumcutah.net Regular Sunday Worship Schedule: 8am, 9am, 10:30am Fellowship Time: 10am Childcare available 8:45am-11:45am Sunday mornings 2375 E 3300 S . . . . . . . . 801-486-5473 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF SLC  firstbaptist-slc.org * office@firstbaptist-slc.org Jesus didn’t discriminate and neither do we. Please join us. 777 S 1300 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-582-4921 First Unitarian Church * slcuu.org 569 S 1300 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-582-8687 Gay Latter-day Saints  gaylds.net Glory to God Community Church 375 Harrison Blvd, Ogden . . 801-394-0204 Holladay United Church of Christ 2631 E Murray-Holladay Rd . 801-277-2631 Inner Light Center . . . . . 801-268-1137 * innerlightcenter.net Integrity/Utah St. James Church . . . . . . . . . 801-566-1311

QUEER SPIRIT * info@queerspirit.org Men loving men, gathering together in loving and intimate ways to explore, dialog, enjoy, dream and celebrate the “who” and “what” we are in the broader community through weekend retreats, vision quests, monthly gatherings . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-557-9203 Restoration Church of Jesus Christ 2900 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . 801-359-1151 Sacred Light of Christ 823 S 600 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-595-0052 Salt Lake Center for Spiritual Living 870 E North Union Ave, Midvale . . . . . . . . . 801-307-0481 St. Paul’s Episcopal Church 261 S 900 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-322-5869 SOUTH VALLEY UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST SOCIETY  www.svuus.org * svuus@xmission. com An intentionally diverse religious community. You are welcome here, no matter your age, race, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity. South Valley is the place where U can be U. 6876 S Highland Dr (2000 E). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-944-9723 Unitarian Universalist Church Ogden 705 23rd St, Ogden . . . . . . . . 801-394-3338 WASATCH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  www.wpcslc.org No matter who or where you are on your journey of faith, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ – you are welcome at Wasatch Presbyterian Church. Ours is a community committed to the nurture of Christian faith through worship, learning and service – and we hope to share our enthusiasm and care with you. 1626 S 1700 E . . . . . . . . 801-487-7576

SOCIAL ALTERNATIVE GARDEN CLUB  altgardenclub.org Meets 1st Weds at 7:30PM in Sugar House Park Garden Club Building Bisexual Community Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 ext 14 Meets the 2nd Thurs each month at 7pm in the Multi-purpose room at the Center. Engendered Species  es-transgender.com * deborahthai@yahoo.com801-320-0551 Gamofites  gamofites.org . . . . . . . 801-444-3602 Gay and Lesbian Parents of Utah * glpu@hotmail.com

LDS Reconciliation  ldsreconciliation.org Activity Info Line . . . . . . . . . . 801-296-4797

Imperial Rainbow Court of Northern Utah  irconu.org, PO Box 3131, Ogden, UT 84409

Lifebreath Center/Interfaith Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-363-9229

Kindly Gifts by Stitch & Bitch . . . . . . 801-487-7008

Provo Community United Church of Christ 175 N University Ave, Provo . 801-375-9115

Ogden OUTreach Resource Center  ogdenoutreach.org 705 23rd Street . . . . . . . . . . . 801-686-4528

4 2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

PARENTS, FAMILIES AND FRIENDS OF LESBIANS & GAYS  pflag.org Ogden: 3rd Thursday, 705 E 23rd St * ogdenpflag@q.com Salt Lake City: 1233 S 1000 E 801-244-6423 * slcpflag@gmail.com St. George: 823 Harrison * pflagsaintgeorge@gmail.com

UTAH PRIDE CENTER  utahpridecenter.org * thecenter@utahpridecenter.org Community Events • Lending Library • Assembly Room • Support Groups • Resource & Referral • Utah Pride Organizers • Youth Activity Center 361 N 300 W . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Toll-free . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-874-2743

University of Utah Women’s

QUEER VILLAGE  queervillage.blogspot.com

UTAH QUEER EVENTS  groups.yahoo.com/group/ UtahQueerEvents

Utah State University Gay and

Western Transsexual Support Group . . . . . . . . . 435-882-8136

(GLSRC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435-797-4297

SPORTS

* usuglsrc@yahoo.com

QUEEREADS  twitter.com/queereads Book club hosted by Sam Weller’s Bookstore and co-sponsored by the Utah Pride Center that discusses queer literature. 254 S Main St . . . . . . . . 801-328-2586 QVINUM GAY & LESBIAN WINE TASTING GROUP  www.qvinum.com Fun and fabulous wine tasting club for gay and lesbian and other fabulous wine lovers. Monthly wine tastings at members’ homes. Join us – bring the wine of the month or some delicious yummy. Mix, mingle, slurp – but don’t spit. We’re not that kind of group. RAINBOW CLASSIC CAR CLUB Don R. Austin. . . . . . . . . 801-485-9225 ROTC-SLC  rotcslc.com * rotcslc@yahoo.com ROTC-Salt Lake City is a performancebased organization, centered in the lesbian and gay community. Men and women, straight and gay, we come together to form a modern-day color guard. . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-261-3694 Royal Court of the Golden Spike Empire  rcgse.org * chairman@rcgse.org SimplySocial  simply-social.org A group of gay men dedicated to building a vibrant community through friendship. SOUTHERN UTAH GLBT COMMUNITY CENTER * suglbtcc@yahoo.com . . . . . . 801-(435) 313-GLBT  groups.yahoo.com/groups/suglbtcc SOUTHERN UTAH PRIDE  southernutahpride.org Strength In Numbers(Sin) SL  groups.yahoo.com/group/ SINSaltLake A social network for gay men living with HIV and AIDS. sWerve  swerveutah.com

Resource Center  sa.utah.edu/women 200 S Central Campus Dr, Rm 411 . 801-581-8030 Utah State University Pride Alliance  groups.yahoo.com/group/usupride/

Lesbian Student Resource Center  usu.edu/glsrc

Frontrunners Utah . . . . . 801-519-8889

Utah Valley State College Gay

Lambda Hiking Club  gayhike.org

Straight Alliance

Mountain West Basketball League angst2008@gmail.com . . . . 801-598-3844

 uvsc.edu/clubs/club.cfm?clubID=251

Mountain West Flag Football League  mwffl.org . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-359-2544 Mountain West Volleyball League  slcgaa.org . . . . . . . . . 773-301-5343 Northern Utah Women ROC  groups.yahoo.com/group/ OgdenOutdoorWomen Social organization of lesbian and straight women interested in walking, camping, festivals, cook outs, shows, skiing and creative workshops.

 groups.yahoo.com/group/uvscgsa Weber State University Gay Straight Alliance  organizations.weber.edu/dlsu/  groups.yahoo.com/group/WeberDLSU * WeberDLSU@yahoo.com

YOUTH Homeless Youth Resource Center Youth ages 15-21.

Pride Community Softball League  prideleague.com * pcsl@prideleague.com . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Ext 21

655 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-364-0744

Salt Lake City Gay Athletic Association  slcgaa.org

TINT (TOLERANT INTELLIGENT

QUAC – QUEER UTAH AQUATIC  quacquac.org * questions@ quacquac.org Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and straight swimming team. All swimmers of any skill level welcome. See web site for swim schedule . . . . . . . 801-232-7961 Salt Lake Goodtimes Bowling League  saltlakegoodtimes.com Sundays starting in August . . 801-832-9745 Ski Out Utah  skioututah.com STONEWALL SHOOTING SPORTS OF UTAH  stonewallshootingsportsutah.org Utah Gay and Lesbian Ski Week communityvisions.org . . . . . . 877-429-6368 Utah Gay Men’s Tennis Group groups.yahoo.com/group/ utahgaymenstennis Utah Gay Mountain Bike Riders groups.yahoo.com/group/ utahgaymtnbike

Gay LDS Young Adults  glya.com

NETWORK OF TEENS) The Utah Pride Center’s youth activity center provides a safe place for people ages 14-20 regardless of race, ethnicity, physical ability, religion, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation or identity. It provides social and support groups for GLBTQ youth and offers food, a big screen TV, video games, computers, a library, a pool table, and much more! Drop-in hours: Tuesday thru Friday 3pm-9pm, Saturday 5pm-9pm 355 N 300 W . . . . . . 801-539-8800 x14

Not Listed?

UTAH BEAR ALLIANCE  utahbears.com * info@utahbears.com Social/service group for Bears, Cubs and their admirers. Check the web site for a calendar of our activities

UNIVERSITY & COLLEGE

Utah Families Coalition * admin@utahfamilies.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Ext. 23

Gay and at BYU  groups.yahoo.com/group/ gayandatBYU/

UTAH MALE NATURISTS  www.umen.org A social group for gay, bisexual and gaypositive men that holds nonsexual naked social and recreational events, including pool/hottub parties, cocktail parties, potlucks, movie nights and overnight campouts throughout the year. Guests are welcome at most events.

Gay-Straight Alliance Network  gsanetwork.org/

with your organization

Salt Lake Community College Coloring Outside the Lines . . . . . . . . 801-957-4562 * coloring_outside_lines@yahoo.com

name, url, address

Southern Utah University Pride  suu.edu/orgs/pride/

and a short paragraph

Utah Polyamory Society 801-309-7240  groups.yahoo.com/group/ UtahPolyamorySociety 1st Friday of the month, 6:30pm, Utah Pride Center, 4th Sunday of the month at Grounds for Coffee/Clrfld

University of Utah Lesbian & Gay Student Union  utah.edu/lgsu/

on what your group

University of Utah LGBT Resource Center  sa.utah.edu/lgbt 200 S Central Campus Dr, Rm 409 801-587-7973

does and when and

Delta Lambda Sappho Union Weber State Univ. . . . . . . . . . 801-627-1639

email editor@qsaltlake.com

and/or phone number

where it meets.


Q Scopes You are as beautiful as you feel, Scorpio! by Jack Fertig

Venus is in Scorpio, tempting deep, dark passions, both erotic and aesthetic. Mercury in Virgo sextile Venus brings in critical insight and shrewd vision. Saturn is right in the middle, adding focus and structure. Put up that sling and/or take that art history class.

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ARIES (March 20 – April 19) Working out, tight-fitting clothes and chit-chat in the bar can get you lots of places, but never very far. Superficial charm will work, but more mature and darker will help you find a solid match. Try quoting Dorothy Parker.

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TAURUS (April 20 – May 20) Want to please your sweetie? His or her secret desire could be a naughty, nude maid. It’s one way to get the housework done. No sweetie? Someone at work wants to put some sugar in your bowl.

Better yet, make a very serious and practical plan about how you’re going to increase your earnings. It will take hard work, but you can do it!

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LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Worries may be exaggerated, but still point to real problems. You have strength and value you don’t realize, and those buried talents can get you through. Critical self-analysis should always include the positive.

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SCORPIO (October 23 – Nov. 21) You are as beautiful as you feel, and however you feel about yourself is how the world will see you. If you need support and convincing, let a friend help you create a new look.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 – Dec. 20) Trust your instincts – but only so far – for inspiration to get through the maze of politics and hierarchies that stands between you and success. Run those notions past a good friend who can improve your ideas.

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GEMINI (May 21- June 20) Staying home and doing housework can be more fun than you expect. Take it as a creative challenge. You could also expand that creativity to some efforts in the community, or share an adventure with some nephews and/or nieces. CANCER (June 21- July 22) Write a letter to – or draw a picture of – the parents you always wanted. Then write a letter telling your real parents of all your disappointments, how they failed you and you them. Don’t mail it! Just get it off your chest and forgive everyone involved.

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LEO (July 23 – August 22) A serious talk about bills, accounting and fairness can save you and your housemates some decent money. Live alone? At least go over the bills and consider how your parents or grandparents got through the depression. Those pennies add up!

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VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Sit down and have a serious discussion about how you can economize.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 21 – January 19) While you’re at the top of your game, new ideas and self-criticism to hone your skills will help you to rise even higher. Suggestions and praise from admiring friends should be happily accepted, although with a grain of salt. AQUARIUS (January 20 – Feb. 18) Wise as you are, are you smart enough to keep ego and pride out of your own way? The more you try to look good, the less you will. Let your facts and figures do the talking and you’ll sizzle.

Free Cover All Night Don’t Miss Out on this !!! Over 300 People Every Sunday

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PISCES (February 19 – March 19) Acting as (or actively seeking) the wise and well-traveled voice of mature experience can help you find passion, if not actual love. What does your partner say? New adventures are good; they don’t necessarily require a new playmate.

Jack Fertig, a professional astrologer since 1977, is available for personal and business consultations in person in San Francisco, or online everywhere. He can be reached at 415-864-8302, starjack.com or qscopes@qsaltlake.com.

anagram An anagram is a word or phrase that can be made using the letters from another word or phrase. Rearrange the letters below to answer:

Name the out comedian who plays Wendover on Sept. 25.

DYKE WAN ASS _____ _____ PUZZLE SOLUTIONS ARE ON PAGE 47

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 3

THE BEST LATINO GAY NIGHT WITH THE BEST MUSIC BY DJ FRANK THE HOTTEST GO- GO DANCERS SHOWS & ENTERTAINMENT AND THE BEST CROWD IN UTAH...


BE AR ACUDA

JAM Welcomes Bearracuda and Blue Alley Fair by Brad Di Iorio

The Marmalade District’s only gay bar, Club JAM, will pay tribute to Salt Lake’s leather, fetish and Levis crowd with the revival of the Blue Alley Fair, welcoming San Francisco’s Bearracuda, and presenting an alternative tattoo and spit-shine Sunday event. Seen as Salt Lake’s prelude to San Francisco’s ultimate leather fest, the Folsom Street Fair, the Blue Alley Fair is a tamer version, celebrating leather, kink and fetish accoutrements and self-expression. On Sept. 18, Bearracuda promoter, Matt Mikesell will bring his successful bear party to Salt Lake City for the first time. “We basically go to our favorite cities that we have a connection in,” said Mikesell. “Our connection in Salt Lake City was my old, old friend, Princess Kennedy. She hooked us up with the great guys at JAM.” Bearracuda started at a small club in San Francisco as an alternative to other bear hangouts, featuring great music, dancing, and a focus on making friends and connections. “I’m a 34-year-old guy who has lived in San Francisco off and on for 15 years. I started Bearracuda in 2006, because I thought that bears really deserved more in San Francisco,” explained Mikesell. “All that was offered back then were bars that never changed their décor and didn’t really make much of an effort to draw people in. If you wanted to dance, then the parties were few and far between as well as being pretty expensive.” Two years ago, the first satellite party was held

in Seattle — adding Portland and New Orleans, the following year. This year, 12 cities are included in the tour, including Atlanta, Sydney, Vancouver, and, of course, Salt Lake City. “We’re a bear event, but we get every type of guy coming to the club … with the majority of them having facial hair,” said Mikesell. “We were voted ‘Best Club for Queer Men’ in San Francisco’s weekly paper in 2008, 2009 and 2010.” Mikesell creates and promotes the events on his own and has worked with other promoters, deejays and event coordinators to make the Bearracuda event a large and fun party. Attending to the tunes at Bearracuda SLC is famed circuit party DJ Matt Consola, who is now considered a Bearracuda mainstay. DJ Consola began spinning when he was 15 years old, and for the last 20 years has performed as resident DJ at Metropolis (San Francisco), Crobar (Miami and Chicago) and Pure/Amsterdam (Denver). Consola has also spun at raves and circuit parties for both San Francisco and Los Angeles Pride Festivals, and at both Black and White Parties in Palm Springs. He has also recently opened for The Pet Shop Boys for their sold out Pandemonium World Tour when they played in San Francisco for two nights at the historic Warfield Theater in 2009. Consola also co-owns record label Redzone Records that produces and promotes dance music and dance artists. “You can expect a very busy night full of beef and fur with fantastic tunes from Mike Babbit

and Matt Consola,” said Mikesell. “We’ve had sexy video visuals done for this event and there will be a snack table for our guys at the club. [Consola] is putting a very special set for this evening with many of the songs he’s remixed himself.” For Saturday night’s Bearracuda at JAM, there will be a $5 cover charge before 10 p.m. and $7 after. “We’re hoping that people are going to enjoy the friendly atmosphere and the great tunes,” added Mkesell. On Sunday, beginning at 4 p.m., JAM will present the Blue Alley Fair with vendors as diverse as tattoo artists and leather and costume clothing makers. In years past, the Blue Alley Fair was presented as an alternative, fetish-styled street fair in Salt Lake City, but a promoter has not

taken the reigns to organize the event on a continuing yearly basis. Brian Morris of JAM would like the event to continue as a prelude and nod to the West Coast’s larger leather and fetish celebration, the Folsom Street Fair, which attracts over 600,000 visitors to San Francisco during the last weekend of September each year. JAM will feature drink specials and a BBQ, along with various local and national vendors who will provide attendees with opportunities to explore their kinky side. Attendees can get a military haircut, get their army boots shined, or add to their personal collection of toys. Q

Bike For Life 2010

the Walk For Life. “Last year we had about 60 riders who raised more than $5000,” said Measom. “We’d love to exceed those numbers — so far we’re at about half that, so hopefully we can get the word out and get people registered.” Cyclists set their own fund-raising goals, and there is no minimum in fund raising required. Participants create their own fund-raising pages from UAF’s website through the First Giving link that collects and documents online donations. The pages can be sent out in an e-mail or be directed to a Facebook page, where contributors can pledge by mile, for the whole ride, or in any way cyclists have chosen for their donations to be collected. “We will have a van trailing the route to watch for any kind of emergency situations, as well as crossing guards along the route to report anything that may happen,” stressed Measom. “There will be two water stations along the route — one near Hogle Zoo, which is the turn around point for the low intensity course, and another at the top of Emigration Canyon, which is the turn around point for the full intensity course.” Funds from the Bike For Life event will support the UAF HIV/STD test site, fund the purchase of condoms and safe-sex devices, and go to prevention programs for those at risk of getting HIV. They will also contribute to services for people living with AIDS, including case management,

health-related workshops and the on-site food bank at the UAF office. “Helmets and bikes are mandatory; [a] raincoat is optional depending on the weather, and we highly recommend bikers bring a water bottle,” added Measom. Bike For Life will end at the 9th and 9th Street Festival which will be in full swing at 10 a.m. and will end at 6 p.m. in the very gay-friendly neighborhood of 900 E. 900 South. Fund-raising incentives include a Bike For Life T-shirt for raising $40 or more, a T-shirt and a special UAF water bottle for those raising $150 or more, a T-shirt, UAF water bottle and a special UAF hat for $250 or more, and a T-shirt, water bottle, hat, and a specially designed 500 Club hooded sweatshirt as well as an invitation to the UAF’s 500 Club party, for those cyclists raising over $500. Adam Frost, who was a founding member of Cycle Out, Utah’s gay and lesbian cycling club, will be participating in Bike For Life again this year. “The event is fun and at the same time helps people in the local community. Plus, I get to see some friends that I wouldn’t otherwise run into,” Frost said. “I have ridden this year’s course up Emigration Canyon a couple of times in the past months and have really enjoyed it. The scenery is amazing.” Last year, Frost said he did have a slight run-in with a motorist as the course wound through

downtown Salt Lake City. “Being the first year, there weren’t as many riders as other events I’ve attended, but that comes with being a new event,” he added. And Larry Lee, silver team medalist in bowling at this year’s Gay Games in Cologne, Germany is participating again. “My commitment to my sponsors last year was that I would ride 90 miles for the Bike For Life,” he said. “At that time, I lived in Layton. As to the course changes, I hate hills, so I am not excited about the change to Emigration Canyon. Still, it will be different and certainly a challenge.” Lee’s children have participated in Walk For Life events for years and will support him in this year’s Bike For Life efforts. “My goal this year is $1,200 and so far I am at $700. Anything I raise will be matched up to $1,000,” said Lee. “Most importantly, I get to help a wonderful organization that is working hard to help people impacted by HIV and to reduce the rate of HIV infection.” For more information about Walk For Life or Bike For Life, go to the Utah AIDS Foundation’s website at uaf.org and click on either event. If you would like to contribute to a specific cyclist, go to Facebook and type in Walk For Life or look up specific names of participating cyclists. Bike For Life will begin at 8 a.m. on the north end of Liberty Park, located between 600 and 700 East and 900 South. Q

by Brad Di Iorio

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HE SECOND ANNUAL BIKE FOR Life will take place Sept. 18, marking 25 years of fund raising by the Utah AIDS Foundation for Utahns living with HIV and AIDS. Accompanying the popular (and older) Walk For Life event at Liberty Park on Saturday morning, interested cyclists can register the day of the event at 8 a.m., but many cyclists have already registered and are raising money on their sponsorship pages which they created on UAF’s website. “Bike For Life is a powerful public awareness event and one of our most exciting new fund-raisers,” said Nathan Measom, UAF’s development director and Bike For Life program coordinator. “The route has changed from a city course to a challenging canyon course.” There are two ride options for cyclists this year: a high-intensity 22-mile from Liberty Park to the top of Emigration Canyon and back, and a low-intensity ride, or about 11 miles. Both rides will take place on the same route where there will be hills. “The low intensity ride is about half of the regular ride,” added Measom. “Theoretically, riders can turn around on the route and head back whenever they feel like they need to.” Registration is free for both Ride For Life and

4 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Club JAM is at 751 N. 300 West. For more information on Bearracuda visit bearracuda.com, or look for the party on Facebook, where several parties are also scheduled for Folsom Street Festival.


spinning Top 40 remix on Fridays

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 5


Come get Hunky Every Sunday night at The Tav

KARAOKE

SUNDAYS AND TUESDAYS DOLLAR DRAFTS Sundays, Mondays and Wednesdays OLDIES Mondays DUELING PIANOS Wednesdays through Saturdays

Non-Smoking

Corner of 3rd South and 2nd East for 7 years 801-519-8900 www.tavernacle.com A Private Club for Members

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QTALES

the perils of petunia pap-smear A Tale of a Job Called Blow by Petunia Pap-Smear

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HE ROAD TO CHOIR PRACTICE is fraught with danger and excitement. It is very easy as a drag queen to imagine that, when dressed to the nines in my finest polyester, I assume the identity of a drag queen super hero. Petunia Pap-Smear! Protector of Prissy Princesses, and defender of all things sparkly. I see myself just like Captain James T. Kirk commanding the Starship Enterprise, commanding my own personal starship — my large land yacht Queer-Tanic — maneuvering about the Intermountain West in an ongoing mission to “Go where no man has gone before,� while dispensing etiquette lessons, beauty tips and makeovers to biker gangs and Relief Society sisters. Sadly, in reality, I’m much less like Captain Kirk and more like Barbarella, the intergalactic slut. But a super hero must go with her strengths. Nevertheless, I do, on occasion, remove the fake boobs, take off the tiara and use an industrial paint stripper to remove my makeup. Then, my jewelry safely under lock and key and my hair consigned to the shelf, I slide into some Fruit of the Looms. A pair of Dockers and a polo shirt later, I begin my once weekly pilgrimage to sing with the Salt Lake Men’s Choir. This rather plain and unadulterated appearance is my civilian disguise which I don in order to be able to move about the community with anonymity. One typical Thursday during evening rush hour, I was at the helm of Queer-Tanic proceeding at maximum warp speed to choir practice. Having safely negotiated the treacherous Spaghetti Bowl Nebula, I was going east

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through the Interstate 80 worm hole, nearing the Foothill System. Suddenly, Queer-Tanic’s engine coughed and died, ceasing all forward propulsion. Luckily, I was able to coast in to the very, very narrow emergency lane and turn on my emergency beacons. No problem, the drag queen motto (which has been plagiarized by a para-military youth organization which shall remain nameless) is “Be prepared.� As a 10-year Car Talk listener, I prepared to exit the craft to diagnose and perhaps even fix the problem. But as I cracked open the hatch, a huge triple trailer truck more ominous than a Klingon Bird of Prey, zoomed by at Warp 9, within about 18 inches of the side of QueerTanic’s port side. Because Commander Scott has gone to that great engine room in the sky and is not available to make it go, and there was not a single lesbian with a tool box within sight, I flipped open my communicator (styled cell phone) and issued a distress call to Starfleet (Triple A) command. The operator asked if I was in a safe location. I looked out the window at the continuing maelstrom of speeding traffic and replied, “No.� She immediately contacted the Highway Patrol to send protective escort. Very shortly, a most handsome Utah Highway Patrolman looking ever-so-stunning in his tight fitting uniform (economic stimulus money well spent, if you ask me) arrived and began flashing his lights. I thought to myself: please don’t let this be like an episode of Star Trek where the gorgeous unnamed crewman accompanying the landing party is the first one killed. Before long, a Federation tow

Cryptogram: The word ‘faggot’ is not part of any religious creed.

Anagram: Wanda Sykes

honor ro These businesses brought you this issue of QSaltLake. Make sure to thank them with your patronage. vessel arrived and captured Queer-Tanic in its tractor beam and brought me safely to choir practice a little flustered, but no worse for the wear. Except, that is, for a nasty case of cotton mouth (usually when faced with a handsome man in uniform, I tend to drool, but the extreme heat of the day left me parched instead). Once again, I followed our motto and popped a Ricola throat lozenge to help keep things lubricated. (Cue the alpenhorn and yodeler.) Well, as it just so happened, that was the night a brand new, hot looking guy joined the choir and came and sat right beside me. Since hospitality is a queen’s greatest virtue, I engaged the new stud in friendly conversation between songs to make him feel welcome. He asked if I could smell licorice and I told him that it was probably the Ricola and pursed my lips in order to produce a gentle blow job of air to confirm my theory. During my high school and college years, I spent about 10 years playing trombone in the marching band. Did you know that tromboners “do itâ€? in seven positions? Anyway, all that boner blowing must have left me with a very strong diaphragm, because the resulting flow of air created a vortex into which the Ricola was sucked, and subsequently launched from between my lips like a slippery wet Photon Torpedo. To my great dismay, I could not close my lips around it quickly enough and it took flight. I watched in horror as it arched into the air, as if in slow motion, and landed right on the new hottie’s arm. I learned as a little princess that it’s not nice manners to spit on new acquaintances. It just isn’t a good way to win friends and influence people. Not knowing exactly the best course of action at this juncture, after staring at the offending lozenge for a moment, I quickly retrieved it from his arm and returned it from whence it flew. He graciously excused my blow job faux pas. Being highly embarrassed, I turned and paid extra attention to the director so as to pretend that the unfortunate blow job never occurred. To my amazement, the stud returned the next week, undaunted and ready to sing. What a guy! Like always these events leave us with many eternal questions: 1. According to the hanky code, what color kerchief is spit? 2. Must I wear Lederhosen to suck on Ricola? 3. Must I learn to yodel and play the alpenhorn? 4. Would a Certs breath mint be as aerodynamic as Ricola? 5. Is there a blow job mishap support group? These and other important questions to be answered in future chapters of “The Perils of Petunia Pap-Smear.â€? Q

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2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

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NATIONAL NEWS

BY REX WOCKNER

Federal Judge Strikes Down Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips in Riverside, Calif., struck down the military’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell ban on open gays in the military Sept. 9. Phillips found that the ban violates the U.S. Constitution’s guarantees of free speech and due process under the First and Fifth Amendments. “The Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Act infringes the fundamental rights of United States servicemembers in many ways,” Phillips wrote in her 86-page opinion. “The Act denies homosexuals serving in the Armed Forces the right to enjoy ‘intimate conduct’ in their personal relationships. The Act denies them the right to speak about their loved ones while serving their country in uniform; it punishes them with discharge for writing a personal letter, in a foreign language, to a person of the same sex with whom they shared an intimate relationship before entering military service; it discharges them for including information in a personal communication from which an unauthorized reader might discern their homosexuality. In order to justify the encroachment on these rights, defendants faced the burden at trial of showing the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Act was necessary to significantly further the government’s important interests in military readiness and unit cohesion. Defendants failed to meet that burden.” Phillips said the government’s contention that letting gays be open in the military harms its functioning is fully undermined by the fact that the military delays discharge of gays and lesbians who violate DADT until they return from combat deployment. The six-year-old case, brought by the gay group Log Cabin Republicans, was heard without a jury in July. Phillips said she will issue a permanent injunction prohibiting the military from enforcing Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. She gave LCR until Sept. 16 to submit proposed language for the injunction and gave the U.S. government until Sept. 23 to respond to LCR’s submission. “She could at that point stay the injunction pending an appeal or, as Judge (Vaughn) Walker did (in the federal Prop 8 case), she could deny such a stay but grant a temporary stay to allow the government to seek a stay pending an appeal from the 9th Circuit,” said Jon Davidson, legal director of Lambda Legal. If no stay is issued, it is unclear whether Phillips’ ruling would take effect nationwide or just in California’s Central District of the federal courts. “This is an historic moment and an historic ruling for the gay military community,” said Servicemembers United Executive Director Alexander Nicholson, who was kicked out of the Army under DADT. “As the only named injured party in this case, I am

exceedingly proud to have been able to represent all who have been impacted and had their lives ruined by this blatantly unconstitutional policy. We are finally on our way to vindication.” Gay activists responded to the ruling by calling on President Barack Obama to cease enforcement of DADT immediately and demanding that the U.S. Justice Department decline to appeal Phillips’ decision.

tantamount to a daily dose of torture,” commented National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Executive Director Rea Carey. “In too many cases, harassment, taunting and abuse are allowed to go on unabated in our nation’s schools. We have repeatedly seen the tragic consequences of this pervasive problem: Young people are left emotionally damaged, physically hurt, or feel they have no other option than to take their own lives out of hopelessness and despair. Youth who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender — or simply perceived to be — are often the targets of this abuse. Today, New York said enough is enough.” Fifteen states and the District of Columbia have enacted similar laws to protect gay/lesbian and, in some cases, transgender students.

California Supremes Rebuff Prop 8 Proponents

New York Governor David Paterson

N.Y. Governor Signs Law Protecting LGBT students New York Gov. David Paterson signed a bill Sept. 7 protecting students in New York public schools from bias-based bullying and discrimination. He signed the legislation in a ceremony at the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center in New York City. “The Dignity for All Students Act will provide important new safeguards to ensure that schools are places where students can concentrate on learning and personal growth, not on avoiding taunting or violence,” said Ross Levi, executive director of the Empire State Pride Agenda. The new law targets harassment based on race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity and expression. It requires teacher training on discouraging bias-based harassment, inclusion in coursework of discrimination and harassment awareness, and reporting of bias incidents to the state Education Department. The law marks the first time New York state has legislated explicit protections for transgender people. A 2007 study by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network found that 33 percent of LGBT students skip school in any given month because they fear for their safety, compared with only 4.5 percent of the general student population. “For some young people, going to school is

6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

The forces that want to keep Proposition 8, the voter-passed constitutional amendment that re-banned same-sex marriage in California, can’t catch a break. The state Supreme Court on Sept. 7 slapped down an effort by conservative activists to force Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Attorney General Jerry Brown to defend Prop 8 in the federal case that was appealed to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals after U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker found in August that Prop 8 violates the U.S. Constitution. None of the governmental entities that were sued in the federal case is interested in defending Prop 8, so the appeal to the 9th Circuit was filed by the activists who put Prop 8 on the ballot. It is unlikely, however, that the activists have “standing” to mount an appeal, since it’s not their job to defend California’s constitution. Worried about such a determination, conservative forces have been trying to find some other route to assure that the 9th Circuit hears the appeal, including pressuring defendants Brown and Schwarzenegger and pushing to add Imperial County, located in the southeast California desert, as an official defendant. The 9th Circuit will make the call on the county’s long-shot effort, probably in December, when it also will take up the question of whether the pro-Prop 8 activists have standing. If they do, the 9th Circuit will then move on to hear the appeal of Walker’s actual ruling. If the activists do not have standing and Imperial County can’t become a defendant, the case is over and same-sex marriage is legal again in California, unless the activists attempt to appeal the standing question to the U.S. Supreme Court. That, too, would be a long shot, many legal experts believe. They say the Supreme Court would be unlikely to conclude that displeased citizens can step into a state government’s shoes to defend a state law that the state government itself refuses to defend and, indeed, believes violates the U.S. Constitution. In rejecting the activists’ latest move, the California Supreme Court denied review without comment.

Quips & Quotes ❝

More than anything else, what I’m doing is giving the Republicans and independents an alternative to vote for.” —Melvin Nimer, telling The Salt Lake Tribune about his run for Utah Senate District 2

So, if McAdams [a gay-friendly Mormon who replaced openly gay Sen. Scott McCoy] weren’t interesting enough all on his own, now he’s being challenged by a gay man, a gay Republican, no less, and they’re always interesting.” —Jesse Fruhwirth on City Weekly’s news blog

Personally, I think this is a simple way for the Republican Party to throw Mel Nimer and the Utah Log Cabin Republicans under the bus. With two months until the election, and with all of the qualified candidates they could have picked from, the Repub’s decided to throw the gay head of a gay political group into a race against the biggest ally the State has in the Senate? With virtually no time to raise funds or to get a campaign off the ground. Sounds very….. Republican to me.” —Eric Ethington of Pride in Utah

The fact that the Utah Republican Party nominated an openly gay man is amazing no matter how you slice it. We’re talking about the reddest of red states here kids.” —Commenter “Michael M.” on the same post

I want to bring awareness to Tooele, especially since it’s a smaller city. I know there could be youth out there struggling with issues and I want people to know that there are other people out there.” —Robin Sheehy, founder of Come Out Tooele, in the Tooele Transcript Bulletin


Pro-gay Mayor Daley Will Not Seek Re-election Strongly pro-gay Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, who has led the city for 21 years, announced Sept. 7 that he will not run for a seventh term. Apart from a series of run-ins with ACT UP/Chicago in the late ’80s and early ’90s, Daley has been nothing short of a hero to most of the city’s LGBT community. In 1989, he became the first mayor to ride in the Chicago gay pride parade while in office. Two years later, Daley set up the nation’s first municipally sponsored Gay and Lesbian Hall of Fame and proceeded to personally hand out the awards nearly every year since. In 1998, he redecorated the city’s gay business strip, North Halsted Street, with a series of giant Flash-Gordon-esque retrofuturistic rainbow pylons. When some residents objected to the official gayification of the street, fearing for their property values, Daley thundered, “I won’t let the homophobes run this city!” He has been a supporter of same-sex marriage since 2004. Daley went on to serve as honorary cochair of Gay Games VII in 2006 and, in 2007, was honorary chair of the capital campaign to get the city’s new LGBT center built. At the Games’ opening ceremonies, Daley said: “Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community have contributed to Chicago in every imaginable way — in business, education, the arts and neighborhood development. They deserve to have the city of Chicago standing on their side, and it will continue to do so, as long as I am mayor of this great city.” Daley was pro-gay before it was cool. He decided long ago that gays make neighborhoods better, and that seemed to be that for him. He never wavered. His spoken defenses of the city’s gays were straightforward and from the gut. The mayor’s conflicts with ACT UP/Chicago came to a head on Feb. 12, 1992, when he and six members of the group engaged in a shouting match at a meeting of the gay business group Chicago Professional Networking Association. ACT UP members were angry that the city’s AIDS budget allegedly had been stagnant for several years and that, due to a then-new policy of not working on Sundays, Daley had missed AIDS Walk and the gay pride parade, among other issues. “I have been in the forefront as a public official dealing with the gay and lesbian community,” Daley told the hecklers. “You don’t see the governor, you don’t see any other elected official. I’m right here! And I don’t hide! I don’t hide from the gay and lesbian community as mayor of the city of Chicago! The gay and lesbian community has a (yearly) reception not at a Hilton hotel but at the mayor’s City Hall on the

fifth floor (where my office is). ... And the AIDS budget each year goes up in the city of Chicago.” “That’s a lie!” the protesters yelled back. “It hasn’t gone up in three years! It’s a million dollars. It’s the same as it was! ... You’re lying!” “I’m just as concerned as anybody else,” Daley said. “Don’t make me one who’s insincere and not concerned about the AIDS issue.” The protesters then lambasted Daley for having attended the wake of Danny Sotomayor, who had been ACT UP/Chicago’s spiritual leader and perhaps Daley’s fiercest critic ever. “Liar!” they shouted. “Why did you go to Danny Sotomayor’s funeral? Why. Did. You. Go. To. Danny. Sotomayor’s. Funeral?!” At that point, pandemonium ensued and CPNA ejected ACT UP from the gathering. Daley then said: “I always remember Danny Sotomayor. I went to his wake. ... I went there out of respect for him and his family. Now, he’s a strong advocate. I used to see him all the time. He’d, you know, scream and yell in my face. I said: ‘Danny, why you yelling at me? I’m here. This is a reception we’re having. This is what we’re doing. I’m not perfect. But don’t try to make me the one, like, insensitive or not concerned. There’s a lot of other people who won’t even talk to you, won’t even shake your hand, listen to you, won’t understand what you’re saying.’” As for ACT UP’s tactics, Daley said: “To get up and say anything, that’s their right to do anything, but after a time you have to say: ‘Hey, let’s move on. I’ve heard. I’ve listened. We are trying to do it. It’s not fast enough. You’re right, it’s not fast enough.’” “You know why it’s not fast enough?” he continued. “When one person dies, you’re right, it’s not fast enough. It’s not fast enough for you or me or anybody else when you see one person die. And one thing I found out — that we’re all in this together. We’re not separate, we’re not higher or lower, we’re all together. And these issues that confront any community confront the city of Chicago. And what we’re trying to do here in our city is to truly work together.” A little more than three months after the showdown — and an even worse blowup seven weeks later, when 40 furious AIDS activists torpedoed the mayor with vicious insults for 90 minutes as he and more than 500 gays and lesbians marched through gay neighborhoods in response to an anti-gay shooting — Daley relented on AIDS spending, and the City Council voted 46-0 to boost funding to $3.57 million. “This is a very serious health and emotional problem and we have to recommit ourselves,” Daley said. According to Windy City Times and the Chicago Tribune, one of the people who may run to replace Daley is Alderman Tom Tunney, who is openly gay.

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 7


LOC AL NEWS

McAdams: Not Taking Election for Granted Just before Christmas 2009, Democratic delegates from Utah’s Senate District 2 came together to perform a difficult task: pick a replacement to finish outgoing — and out — Sen. Scott McCoy’s term. Following McCoy’s resignation in order to devote needed time to his law practice, a number of candidates contacted delegates for consideration. These included Arlyn Bradshaw who, like McCoy, is openly gay — and who is now the favorite in a race for Salt Lake County Council’s District 1 seat. In the end, however, the delegates chose Ben McAdams, an aide to Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker and a straight ally, to take over for McCoy. Less than a year later, it’s time for McAdams to run on his own terms. This time, he’ll be doing so against Mel Nimer, an openly gay candidate from across the aisle who entered the race after McAdam’s original challenger failed to file her paperwork in time to run. “This is my first time introducing myself to the voters,” said McAdams, taking QSaltLake’s interview while canvassing the neighborhoods in his heavily Democratic district. “I was disappointed when my previous opponent dropped out because I think I owe it to the district, and we deserve a race.” McAdams comes to voters after a session where he had little time to debate gay- and transgender-rights issues. A compromise between pro-gay Democrats and Republi-

can leadership tabled all such bills in order to save Salt Lake City’s gay and transgender-inclusive employment and housing nondiscrimination ordinances from bills seeking their cancellation. Still, he has been a strong advocate for this part of his constituency, having promised to take up McCoy’s bill that would give same-sex couples rights to sue in cases of a partner’s wrongful death. In this sense, both he and Nimer are of the same mind. “It’s refreshing to have a Republican candidate who agrees with me on LGBT issues,” said McAdams who, like Nimer, promised to run a clean campaign that focused on the areas in which both men differ, rather than in attacking one another. “This was the first time I’ve met him, but he seems like a great guy,” he said of his opponent. “We have a lot of mutual friends so I’d heard of him, and I look forward to getting to know him better as we go through the campaign. We agreed for the sake of the LGBT issues that we both care about that we’d keep it clean and make sure we’d finish the election with the good reputation we each had going in.” “We shouldn’t’ cannibalize our own and we agreed not to do that,” he added. Like Nimer, McAdams noted that budgeting, education and immigration would top his list of concerns during the race. “It is an incredibly difficult year for the state budget,” he said, referring to the sluggish economy that has plagued every state

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8 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

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in the Union. “My perspective is before we raise taxes, we need to understand this economy is no easier on tax payers than it is on government.” When making state budget cuts, McAdams said that lawmakers need to ensure that “necessary social services for those who have been hit by the economic downturn” remain, such as the Meals on Wheels program for elderly residents as well as insurance coverage for children. “Utah has ranked 50th in Medicaid access for kids, and that’s not good enough,” he said. ‘I don’t like tax increases and I want to stay away from that, but I think it’s important for the government to keep performing its essential functions. It’s going to depend on what we’re cutting. This is s a scale and you’ve got to balance both sides of the sale.” Like Nimer, McAdams is also concerned about Utah’s education system and particularly in what he calls its decline in quality over the last two decades. “It used to be that we could stack ‘em deep and teach ‘em cheap,” said the senator. But Utah’s increasingly diverse population — which includes several students for whom English is a second language — means that these days are over, he added. “The state’s financial commitment to education has gone down significantly. We’re last in per-pupil spending, and that’s not good enough,” he said. “I feel strongly that we need to provide equal opportunity to anyone who needs to reach out and grab it.” McAdams also said he feels Utah may go in the wrong direction on immigration issues. He is opposed to a bill proposed by Sen. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, that closely mirrors Arizona’s controversial SB 1070, which critics accused of encouraging racial profiling. “He’s called it Arizona-light, but I’ve read the bill. There’s nothing light about it,” said McAdams. “Make no mistake: It’s unconstitutional and un-American.” McAdams’ biggest objection to Sandstrom’s bill, he said, was that it would take away police and prosecutors’ right to “express discretion” in which illegal immigrants to pursue — such as those who are responsible for violent crime and drug trafficking rather than those who are abiding by the law. In that vein, McAdams also said he would not support any resolutions in the Utah State Senate or the House in support of overturning a clause in the 14th Amendment that grants citizenship to children born within U.S. borders to immigrants who are here illegally. “If we deny children who are born in the

United States the right to citizenship that dates back to the Civil War and the abolition of slavery, that would, in my mind, create a permanent under class in the United States — people with no citizenship in any country” who government would then deny “the opportunity to become contributing members of our society.” “For me, it’s a consistent message: looking out for our minority community whether they’re sexual or ethnic minorities,” he continued. “We need to send a message and be a welcoming society. That’s what America was founded on, and that’s who we need to be.” While Nimer and his supporters have argued that a gay and transgender-friendly Republican would get more done in the state’s conservative government than would a Democrat, McAdams countered that his ability to work with Republican lawmakers “being critical on some issues and working collaboratively on different issues” was more important. “My distinct point of view is reflective of the district,” he said. “The district wants a counterpoint on many issues and in my short time in the Legislature, I believe I’ve offered that counterpoint.” And although his district has wanted that counterpoint for decades (McAdams noted that it hadn’t been represented by a Republican in at least 35 years), the senator said he’s still not taking the election for granted. “It means I’ll have to continue to work hard, and I should,” he said. “We should expect that of our elected officials.” Q


Mel Nimer: Red Candidate in a Blue District Mel Nimer is no stranger to Utah politics. As the President of the Utah Log Cabin Republicans, a gay and transgender-friendly GOP caucus, he has worked to give gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Utah Republicans a voice in Utah’s ruling party. As a Precinct Chair and former state delegate, he has worked to get Republicans sympathetic to gay and transgender issues into office. And as of this month, Nimer is now a candidate for political office. When Nancy Davis, the Republican challenger to Sen. Ben McAdams’ District 2 Senate seat failed to file all her paperwork by the registration deadline, the Utah Elections Office disqualified her, leaving the party just one day to find a replacement. “The county [party] called and asked me to fill in the spot that got vacated,” said Nimer. “They said, ‘We can’t think of anybody better than you to fill in that spot. Will you run?’” Nimer’s response catapulted him fairly late into the race in this heavily Democratic district. Nonetheless, he said that he and his campaign volunteers are working quickly to put up a website, print fliers and hit the streets for canvassing. Although the election is still in its early stages, one thing at this point is certain: gay and transgender rights will not be a wedge issue. Perhaps for the first time in Utah political history, both the Republican and Democratic candidate agree on practically everything from the importance of job and employment protections to the need for same-sex partners to be able to sue in cases of wrongful death. “Senator McAdams has done a great job representing our community and filling Sen. Scott McCoy’s shoes,” said Nimer, who like the senator that McAdams replaced is also openly gay. The real contention in the election, he said, will thus be about both candidates’ different approaches to several issues affecting not only their district, but the state at large. “The only other big advantage I offer everyone in the district is that they’ll have a seat at the Republican table, so they’ll have a seat at the super majority table, which may be good, may be bad. But for our community, for the first time ever, they’ll have someone they can count on to try and swing the Republican majority more clearly in our favor.” Some of the main issues that Nimer and McAdams consider to be highly important are state budget cuts, education and immigration. Like many people from all party affiliations, Nimer said that the state’s budget has been on his mind a lot lately. While Nimer said that programs such as the state’s AIDS Drug Assistance Program

“need to be funded, totally,” he said that his main concern about the state’s economy is the complex interplay between job creation and a strong education system. “They’re not separate topics,” he said. “They’re all combined and interlinked and there is no one answer for each problem. We have to look at the much bigger picture in order to solve all these little problems.” To solve the state’s budget crisis, Nimer said that Utah must support small businesses, which are the state’s economic backbone. To this effect, he said that the state should lessen government controls on business creation. As an example, he cited Utah’s heavy regulation of liquor licenses, which he said prevent many would-be restaurateurs from going into business and therefore costs the state jobs and revenue. “We don’t need a whole bunch of rules and micromanaging what everyone does with all their time in building businesses,” he said. While both candidates agree that the state is not adequately serving its pupils, their ideas for improving the system — and especially getting it more money — differ considerably. In order to better fund the system, Nimer said he would support changing how the state handles taxation. Currently, he said, 70 percent of Utah is owned by the federal government, meaning that the state government has only 30 percent of the state to draw upon when crafting its budget. “One way to finance education is through property taxes,” he said. “In New Jersey, where only 7 percent of the land is federally controlled, they fund their education system the same way we do. And where we spend just $5,000 per student they can spend $13,000 per student because they have control of the land and we don’t. We need to change that and work things out with the federal government where we can use [this land].” In order for Utah to get the most out of its acreage, Nimer proposed coming to terms with the federal government on issues such as mining in federal monuments like the controversial Grand StaircaseEscalante National Monument, which sits atop a vast coal reserve. He said that the monument could be treated much the same way as are ski resorts in Utah’s national forests, which he calls “a good use of federally-owned land that the state gets money from.” “Mining that could easily be done [at Grand Staircase] without any harm to the environment or to the monument,” he said. “It won’t affect anything anyone’s going to enjoy and we’d be able to get thousands of tons of some of the cleanest burning coal

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 9

available.” A plan such as this, he said, would also boost the state’s sluggish economy, creating jobs and putting more money in the hands of citizens. But one thing Nimer said should not be in the hands of Utah residents is immigration, which he called the purview of the federal government. To that effect, he said he opposed a bill by Rep. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, that mirrors a controversial Arizona law. “[Bills like Sandstrom’s are] a simplistic answer to a really complex problem. It’s trying to take on a federal issue at a state level and that’s not appropriate,” he said. However, Nimer said that Utah could set up a system to help employers understand how to verify the resident status of their employees and to get illegal immigrants “help to become legal rather than deporting them.” The United States, he said, has historically depended upon a migrant workforce of foreigners from a number of nations, so taking a hard-line stance against illegal immigrants would be counterproductive. “We have to respect the fact that those people are human beings and we need to develop a system [that treats them with dignity], he said.

A

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Another person that Nimer said he will be treating with dignity is his opponent, who he has met and who has also promised to stick strictly to the issues facing the district and the state. And while he acknowledges that a Republican win in a heavily blue district will be “an uphill battle,” he said that it’s one in which he will engage wholeheartedly. “This is not a game,” he said. “We are in this as a serious campaign.” Q

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Sunday, October 17

Treat yourself or a loved one to cooking classes with Chef Drew Ellsworth, 34-year chef, wine manager of the Third West Wine Store, QSaltLake’s Restaurant reviewer. With small groups of no more than 8 students, Ecole Dijon gives you the opportunity to watch and interact with a professional chef preparing foods in an exciting and expeditious way. The atmosphere is very casual and warm and students can freely move around to see what the chef is doing. “Hands on” training is available when possible.

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quni

LOC AL NEWS

Allies To Be Honored at Annual Equality Utah Dinner board hired Mike Thompson. “I did a lot of legal work to help them grow Equality Utah’s annual Allies Dinner is one from being just Equality Utah to the three of the highlights of the year for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer organizations it is today: Equality Utah, community. Sponsored by Jane and Tami Equality Utah PAC and Equality Utah FounMarquardt and philanthropist Bruce Bastian, dation,” she said. “I realized that was a good the dinner is one of the gay and transgender structure, to combine a political action comrights organization’s biggest fund-raisers, as mittee, a lobbying arm and a political founwell as a day for it to honor individuals and dation. I think I followed the lead of the Huorganizations that have provided exemplary man Rights Campaign, which is set up in a similar way.” service to Utah’s queer community. Marquardt is legally married to her partNamed “Gaining Ground,” in honor of the spread of job and employment protections ner, Tami, in Canada and in a number of for gay and transgender people, this year’s U.S. states that have legalized same-sex mardinner will feature Dustin Lance Black as riage. Tami Marquardt served as the Utah its keynote speaker. A writer for the televi- Pride Center’s interim director in 2004 before the hiring of Valsion show Big Love, Black has won numererie Larabee and is a ous Writers Guild of America awards for his member of the Center’s work on the HBO drama about polygamy in board today. Utah. In 2009, he won an Academy Award for “Tami had a real Best Original Screenplay for Milk, a dramainterest in youth,” tization of the life and assassination of gayMarquardt explained. rights activist and public official Harvey “She has a real passion Milk. He also narrated 8: The Mormon Propofor talking to young sition, Reed Cowan’s controversial documenpeople, so when she tary about the LDS Church’s involvement in was at the Center she the passage of California’s Proposition 8. Tami Marquardt helped to run programs During the dinner, Equality Utah will also for youth. In life now she’s always willing give its Allies for Equality Award to five reto talk to people having issues coming out. cipients: Jane and Tami Marquardt, Gary and She’s so good at it people come to find her.” Millie Watts and the Salt Lake City Human Like Tami Marquardt, Gary and Millie Rights Commission. Watts have also helped gay, lesbian, bisexual Once a practicing and transgender youth, as well as their famiattorney from 1979 to lies as the leaders of LDS Family Fellowship. 2007, Jane Marquardt Although the two did not found the organizahas served Utah’s gay, tion, they joined soon after its formation in lesbian, bisexual and 1993; two of their six children are gay, and transgender citizens one of them, Craig, has been excommunicatsince 1982, when she ed from the LDS Church. started offering semi“Our love for Craig lead to a family comnars on establishing mitment to do all we can to help people underpowers of attorney, stand more about same-sex orientation,” the wills and other direc- two wrote in a 1994 letter viewable on their Jane Marquardt tives to same-sex cou- website, ldsfamilyfellowship.org, shortly beples. In 1996, she also helped organize training fore they began holding Family Fellowship sessions for Utah judges about “the cutting- meetings in their Utah County home. “Not edge issues of the day like employment non- only do we share the scientific research that is discrimination” affecting gay, lesbian, bi- coming forth, we also try to help people realize sexual and transgender people. During those how much discrimination hurts, not only the sessions, she faced off against psychologists homosexual person, but family and friends as and BYU professors who presented what she well. It [Craig’s coming out] has opened our called “the other side” of the debate. eyes to the world of “justified” discrimination “It was a chance to be a competent gay per- that exists in many aspects of society.” son standing up in front of a group of judges As leaders of the support group, the Wattwho may have thought they didn’t know gay ses not only provide council and support for people,” she said. “That was a fun thing to be parents struggling to come to terms with involved in. It was a landmark that the Utah their child’s sexual orientations, but tireSupreme Court even wanted to be educated less advocacy for gay, lesbian, bisexual and on these issues in the middle of the ’90s.” transgender people. Marquardt also served as a board member “Education is one of our major goals, and for Equality Utah from 2001–2007, starting to just try to get the parents and siblings to when the organization was known as Unity love their gay child and keep their gay child Utah, and is still a member of the group’s under their wing, not kick them out of the advisory council. In 2004, she served as the house like happens so many times with gay chair for the Don’t Amend campaign, Equal- children,” said Millie Watts in an interview ity Utah’s effort to stop a state constitutional with KUED for Friends and Neighbors: A ban on same-sex marriage. When founder Community Divided, a 1999 documentary Michael Mitchell departed the organization, about the families and friends of gay and lesshe also acted as interim director until the bian Utahns. by JoSelle Vanderhooft

1 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Throughout the ’90s and 2000s, the Wattses have spoken to journalists and organizations alike about their work, and have spoken out against anti-gay pronouncements made by LDS officials. A number of organizations have recognized them for these efforts, including Affirmation: Gay and Lesbian Mormons, a support group for former and current gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender members of the LDS Church. “Gary and Millie possess a genuinely charitable spirit,” said Family Fellowship supporter Marge Bradshaw in a 2006 ceremony where Affirmation honored the couple with an award for outstanding leadership. “They give. They give time; they give money; they give love. We spend four nights or so each year, with several other couples, at the dining room table in their home stuffing and addressing envelopes Millie and Gary Watts that contain a flyer announcing the upcoming Family Fellowship gathering. They provide the home, the pizza and root beer, and contribute to the spirit of friendship. There are no aides or secretaries; there is only Watts’ generosity.” The eight-member Salt Lake City Human Rights Commission has been an invaluable part of making the capital city a safer and more just place for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender residents. In 2009, its report on discrimination within the city’s boundaries revealed that discrimination based on race, sexual orientation and gender identity were significant problems. The report was the cornerstone upon which Mayor Ralph Becker based two ordinances prohibiting housing and employment discrimination against gay and transgender residents. The Salt Lake City Council ultimately passed the ordinances near the end of last year, and seven other municipalities have adopted them since. Lisa Harrison Smith, Becker’s deputy director of communications, said that the commission was “honored and excited” to receive the recognition. “We’re really thrilled that we’re recognized by Equality Utah. They’re a big part of many, if not all, of the initiatives that come out in the city. It means a lot to us.” Upon entering office, said Smith, Becker created the commission with Coordinator Yolanda Francisco-Nez at the helm “with the charge to make some very big changes” in how the city handled matters relating to diversity. “I think that set the tone for a pretty progressive agenda when it comes to LGBT rights,” she said, adding that the mayor’s office appreciated EU’s recognition of Francisco-Nez’s efforts. Francisco-Nez was out of town and could not be reached for comment. Q “Gaining Ground” will be held Sept. 28 at the Salt Palace. Tickets are $100 per person or $900 for a table of 10. Proceeds will go to Equality Utah Political Action Committee, to help elect fair-minded candidates who support equal rights for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender citizens. Vegetarian options are available. For more information visit alliesdinner.com.

Shades of Queer In October, the University of Utah’s LGBT Resource Center will present its annual Gay-la Dinner and Silent Auction, the theme of which will be “Shades of Queer: Connecting Through Difference.” The evening’s keynote speaker will be Reed Cowan, the director, writer and producer of 8: The Mormon Proposition, a popular documentary about the LDS Church’s involvement in California’s Proposition 8. The evening will also include performances by Keila Michiko Cone-Uemura and Baron Daniel Cureton. Dress is business casual and vegetarian and vegan options are available. WHEN: Oct. 22, 6 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. dinner WHERE: IJ and Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center, 2 North Medical Drive COST: $65 per person, $650 per table of 10, $45 per student (available upon request) INFO: To purchase tickets contact Cathy Martinez at cmartinez@ sa.utah.edu or Kathleen Boyd at kboyd@sa.utah.edu or 801-5877973

Fashion Stroll #10 Salt Lake City’s Fashion Stroll will celebrate its 10th incarnation by turning its outdoor market into a Halloween party. Attendees and merchants are encouraged to dress in costume, and prizes will be awarded to the most creative. Likewise, the event’s runway show and entertainment — including dancers, local bands and street performers — will all have a Halloween flair. Sponsorship opportunities are available. WHEN: Oct. 29, 6–10 p.m., East Broadway (300 South between State Street and 300 East) COST: Free to the public INFO: SLCFashionStroll.com or contact organizer Matt Monson at 801-671-4304 or slcfashionstroll@ gmail.com.

Family Conference The Utah Pride Center will host “Bringing Families Back Into the Room,” a regional conference, Oct. 8-10, for families with gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer youth. The keynote speaker will be Dr. Caitlin Ryan, head of the Family Acceptance Project at San Francisco State University, which is studying ways to help families support queer children. For more details, check utahpridecenter.org.


Will Cedar City Be Next to Pass Gay/Transgender Ordinance? So far, seven Utah municipalities have passed ordinances protecting residents from job discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. With less than four months of 2010 left, Equality Utah is hoping that at least three more will join their ranks. Currently, the gay and transgender rights group has approached mayors and city councils around the state about the ordinances, which Salt Lake City first approved in 2009. The discussion is especially developing in Holladay, Ogden and Cedar City, said Executive Director Brandie Balken. Although Equality Utah’s staff discussed the ordinances with the Ogden City Council earlier this year, the body voted to put off considering them until they had dealt with pressing budgeting concerns. Balken said that she hopes to meet with Mayor Matthew R. Godfrey in mid-September. Meanwhile, Holladay’s city council discussed whether or not to move forward on the ordinances during a Sept. 2 work meeting. Here, Councilman Barry Topham touched off controversy by saying that he didn’t know why the council was discussing this “can of worms” issue. “I think you should be able to discriminate if you don’t want a cross-dresser living in your house,” he said in the meeting. His remarks prompted Councilman Jim Palmer to call Topham’s position discriminatory and in violation of “the equalprotection clause of the Constitution that

we’ve all sworn to uphold.” Balken said that Equality Utah is encouraging Holladay residents to contact their councilmembers and let them know they support passing these ordinances. “I think in some cases it’s good for people to express their deeply held opinion. It gives us an opportunity to discuss what those concerns are,” said Balken of Topham’s remarks. “We’ve got some outreach to do.” Out of all three cities, progress is happening the fastest in Cedar City, where Equality Utah has been working closely with Southern Utah University’s QueerStraight Alliance to educate residents about the protections the ordinances offer. Along with speaking to Mayor Joe Burgess and the six-member city council, the organization held a series of three public meetings about the proposed measures at the mayor’s request. “We got on the radio, we got fliers out, we papered the town in an attempt to get as many people from as many backgrounds as possible to come and talk about the ordinances because no one wants to pass something they don’t understand,” said Benjamin King Smith, QSA president. “We’ve had a lot of people who have come to them wanting to know if they’ll be protected. It’s nice to have these conversations.” The council and mayor, said Smith, gave QSA positive feedback about the meetings and are planning to discuss the ordinances

throughout October. On Oct. 6, QSA members will ask the council to meet with the mayor about drafting the ordinances during the body’s weekly meeting. On the following week, Smith said the council will vote on whether or not to accept the ordinances. “There will be another vote after that, but if they pass the first vote, it’s pretty much guaranteed,” he said. Following this meeting, said Balken, Cedar City residents will be able to weigh in on the ordinances, and then the council will vote on whether or not to pass them.

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contestants and the audience. Rox is a retired police officer and law enforcement educator who now works full time as a BDSM and leather lifestyle educator. He is a graduate of the Journeyman III Academy, a BDSM school which closed in 2009. He also is the key organizer of Utah Rebellion, Head Master of Salt Lake’s BDSM201 Intermediate educational series, and is an administrator of and presenter coach for the Path 101 BDSM Group. He has taught at several clubs as well as major events such as Thunder in the Mountains, Maui Kink in Hawaii, DomCon Los Angeles, and DomCon Atlanta. Rox won the title of Mr. Rocky Mountain Olympus Leather in April at the first annual Rocky Mountain Olympus Leather Competition held in Salt Lake City, making him eligible to compete in the international competition. RMOL is a regional leather group which covers Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. Sythen of Salt Lake City was named runner-up for the International Ms. Olympus Leather 2010 at the event.

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Utah Rox Wins Int’l Mr. Olympus Leather Utah Rebellion organizer Utah Rox earned the title of International Mr. Olympus Leather 2010 at the International Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather contest held in Los Angeles. The contest was created to “promote a positive image of the Leather lifestyle,” according to its statement of purpose. “It is our belief that the leather community is comprised of an extremely diverse group of people ranging from the motorcycle and leather/Levi clubs to the heaviest SM edge player and all of the leatherfolk in between. The Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather title seeks to make all leatherfolk feel good about themselves regardless of race, religion, political beliefs, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, age, size, handicap, or health condition. It is the goal of Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather to make all those who wish to be a part of the leather community feel welcome in doing so.” Contestants competed in four categories — interview, fantasy, fetish image and stage presence. During the fantasy category, contestants staged a 5- to 7-minute erotic production, involving judges, other

“We think it’s likely we’ll have a vote in Cedar City before the end of October,” she said. The meetings will take place on Oct. 6, 13, 20 and 27. To date, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Park City, Summit County, West Valley City, Logan and Taylorsville have passed the measures, which impose fines against businesses with 15 or more employees and landlords renting at least four units who discriminate against gay and transgender people. Religious organizations are exempt.

Saturday, Sept 18th, 10am – 6pm Hosted by ELPCO – The East Liberty Park Organization and the East Centrsl Community Council

Once again we bring you the 9th and 9th celebration of art, music, food, dance, song, antiques, crafts, collectables, people, neighbors, fun, play and more. 9thand9thStreetFestival.com

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 1 1


LOC ALNEWS

Layton PFLAG Launched Layton has become the latest of several Utah cities to start a chapter of the political, social and support group Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. “I’ve decided to make a goal of starting more PFLAGs in more cities,” said activist Turner Bitton, who recently held a Rally for Equality this summer to address the suicides of several Layton PFLAG President young gay Utahns. Cynthia Stevens “There’s really nothing for people up north,” he continued. “Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County have so much support for people, but Davis and Ogden have no support.” Bitton announced his intentions to several friends in Layton and the fledgling group met for the first time on Sept. 9 on

Weber State University’s campus. Here, the 25 attendees voted to make Cynthia Stevens president and Barb D’Arco vice president of Layton’s PFLAG chapter. Bitton will serve as vice president of public relations, a title he also holds in Ogden’s group. “I figure since the chapters are so close in proximity I’ll be able to do both at the same time,’ he said. The group will now focus on filing paperwork with PFLAG’s national body to become an official chapter. They expect to hold their first official meeting in October. For now, the group is meeting at 6:30 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month in the main building of Weber State University’s Davis campus, room 306. The first meeting is scheduled for Oct. 14. A support group will meet in the same room an hour before official business begins.

For more information about Layton PFLAG contact Turner Bitton at Bitton.politico@gmail.com or 801- 814-3660.

National Coming Out Brunch to Reveal Big PFLAG News For the sixth year in a row, the Utah Pride Center will celebrate National Coming Out Day, held nationally on October 11, with a brunch and awards ceremony. This year’s celebration in honor of the coming out process and the individuals and organizations that have served gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer Utahns will take place on Oct. 10 at the Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel. John Cepek, president of the national Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, will be the day’s keynote speaker at the brunch. The Center will also honor the 2010 recipients of its Lifetime Achievement Award, Community Organization of the Year Award and Volunteer of the Year Award. Marina Gomberg, the Utah Pride Center’s director of development and marketing, said that the Center is pleased to have Cepek visit — especially because “he will be delivering some very big news to us on that day.” “We’re very excited to have him and to be able to have that announcement made because it impacts us here in Utah,” she said. Although past recipients Nikki Boyer, Joe Redburn and Becky Moss are still deliberating over the winner of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award, the Center has announced the other two winners. Volunteer Chris Coon will receive this year’s Volunteer of the Year award for his three years of service at the Utah Pride Center as an administrative assistant.

“He has been incredible,” said Gomberg. “Day after day, week after week, month after month, and year after year, he remains as happy and dedicated as the first day he started. We’ve been extremely lucky to have Chris as part of our staff not only because of his dedication but because of his spirit.” The award for Community Organization of the Year will go to Salt Lake City’s PFLAG chapter, which Gomberg praised for its support in a number of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights causes. “We’ve seen the impact of their work under the leadership of [President] Kathy Godwin, and the impact has been very positive,” she said. “We’re really glad to be able to award them for their great work this year.” This year’s National Coming Out Day celebration will also be held on the last day of the Center’s inaugural Family Acceptance Regional Conference (Oct. 8-10). Geared toward making families safe and affirming environments for queer youth and toward keeping families with queer youth together, the conference is a perfect match for National Coming Out Day. Because of overlap with the conference, Gomberg said that the Center hopes “this will be one of our largest NCOD celebrations.”

Registration for both the NCOD brunch and conference are open on the Utah Pride Center’s website, utahpridecenter.org. Sponsorship and table captain opportunities for the brunch are available.

12 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Creative Minds Shine on Homeless Youth by JoSelle Vanderhooft

In 2009, Utahns Chloe Noble and Jill Hartman walked across the United States to raise awareness of the challenges facing homeless youth — over 40 percent of whom identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning or “nonstraight.” Their journey took them from Seattle to Washington, D.C., where they participated in and helped organize October’s March for Equality. Nearly one year later, the foundation the two women created, Operation Shine America, has announced the launch of a new campaign. Kicked off this August, Creative Minds 2010 is a national campaign offering homeless youth and their allies what Noble calls “a platform to be seen and heard.” It will work in tandem with a number of local organizations such as the Homeless Youth Resource Center, Volunteers of America, Urban Village Cooperative, the Inclusion Center, Community In-Roads Alliance, the Utah Pride Center and the Utah chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. These organizations, said Noble, who is OSA’s founding director, will work together to sponsor community awareness training about homeless youth in which participants will learn how to help these youth and how to work toward solving social problems that lead to youth homelessness. “This is about extending core family values like acceptance, patience, compassion, generosity, protection and love, beyond ourselves and our personal family unit,” said Noble. “This epidemic [of homelessness facing youth] can not be solved simply by donations, emergency services, or even emergency over night shelters; although all of these things are essential in keeping these children safe and alive long enough for them to enter into recovery. What is needed to end youth homelessness is a complete transformation of our systems of care, a rebuilding of our local communities, and a strong awareness of the trauma

that these homeless youth experience on a daily basis.” During last year’s Homeless Youth Pride Walk, Noble said that she and Hartman interviewed the youth they met about what brought them to the streets. They found, she said, that although the causes were numerous, they all tied back into communityrelated problems such as familial rejection and a lack of access to services. Overall, Noble said that there are two million homeless youth in the United States. And given that queer youth are disproportionately represented in that number, Noble said that gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights were inseparable from the homeless youth epidemic. “This means that huge causal factors in youth homelessness are homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia,” said Noble. “If we are going to eradicate youth homelessness, we are going to have to come to terms with the negative and oppressive belief systems that teach us to treat LGBTQ citizens with anything less than dignity, respect, love and acceptance. This certainly includes our amazing youth, especially those who are now homeless.” “This diverse group of homeless youth, whether LGBTQ or heterosexual, has a profound and powerful voice,” agreed OSA director of administration Ginger Phillips. “We want to support them in their progress and give them many creative ways to be seen and heard. Studies show that many homeless LGBTQ youth who receive appropriate guidance, support, protection and resources, eventually become successful members of the community.” In order to help provide youth with this help, OSA will also participate in a number of events throughout autumn and winter. These include NAMI’s annual walk to raise awareness of mental illness, which will begin at Mobile Ballpark at 9 a.m. on Sept. 18. In Oct., OSA will take part in Utah Pride Center’s Family Acceptance Regional Conference (Oct. 8–10), which is targeted

toward creating safe and affirming family environments for queer youth. Throughout the month Creative Minds 2010 will also host Creative Freak Boutique, a shop selling arts and crafts created by homeless youth and where homeless youth will be able to express themselves through open mic and music. From Oct. 14 through Nov. 6 Creative

Minds 2010 will also be a part of the NAMI Art Project at the Patrick Moore Gallery, 2233 S. 700 East. Homeless youth will also participate in NAMI’s Holiday Boutique from Dec. 3–5 at Pioneer Craft House, 3271 S. 500 East. Q

For more information about OSA visit operationshineamerica.blogspot.com.

Pro-Prop 8 Lawyer Lectures at BYU The attorney who represented proponents of California’s Proposition 8 in U.S. District Court lectured Brigham Young University law students at a J. Reuben Clark Law School forum sponsored by the BYU chapter of the Federalist Society. Charles J. Cooper’s argument for upholding Prop 8 was that marriage is, by definition, a union between a man and a woman. “A marriage between a man and a woman is not the core of the institution, it defines the institution,” he said. Cooper’s testimony before U.S. Judge Vaughn Walker mirrored his talk at BYU. Walker decided against Prop 8 proponents, saying that it infringes on gay and lesbian couples’ 14th amendment rights under the U.S. Constitution. Cooper said that marriage benefits society because the union produces children. “Child-rearing and procreation is important in matrimony,” Cooper said. “but also to nature and society.” Cooper said same-sex marriage could harm heterosexual couples in the long run. “The question is not can a same-sex couple raise a child as well as a heterosexual couple,” Cooper said. “It is about the longterm effects, including contributions to society.” In a question-and-answer period following his presentation, Cooper was asked how same-sex marriage would harm heterosexual marriage. According to BYU student Marshall Thompson, his reply was, “Recognizing homosexual marriage would not harm heterosexual marriage at

Prop 8 attorney Charles J. Cooper

all,” and that it was never a point he felt he needed to prove in court. In a document written to the District Court, Cooper cited statistics from the Netherlands, which instituted same-sex marriage in 2001, showing trends of fewer marriages, more single-parent families, more unmarried parents raising children and more opposite-sex couples choosing an alternative status over marriage. He also argued in the memorandum that same-sex marriage deinstitutionalizes marriage. Allowing same-sex marriage weakens the social norms with respect to marriage and shifts the focus from fulfilling socially valuable roles such as parent and spouse to “personal choice and selfdevelopment,” his legal team wrote.

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 13


OUR VIEWS

guest editorial HIV/AIDS: The Best of Times and the Worst of Times by David Mixner

I

N RECENT MONTHS, THE MEDIA has been filled with encouraging news about progress in treating HIV/AIDS. At the very same time, we have been dealt some real setbacks. The lesson is the same as it always has been: embrace and celebrate the progress, and don’t let up the pressure until there is a cure. The good news is indeed reason to celebrate. From the International AIDS Conference in Vienna came word that promising new gels have been developed that could dramatically lower the infection rate among at-risk women. The Wall Street Journal recently published a story indicating that scientists have discovered three powerful antibodies that can neutralize 91 percent of HIV strains. The bad news is that the economic situation is wrecking havoc with HIV/AIDS budgets — both here and abroad. Many states are freezing the ability of people with HIV/AIDS to receive treatment. AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) funds have either been cut way back or frozen, making it impossible for new clients to access them. Unless this is corrected, it could mean a death sentence for some people. It’s crucial for every American that cares about this horrendous epidemic to keep up the pressure, seek new funds and hold lawmakers accountable for their actions. Given the uncertainty with the economy and ADAP, it makes Medicare funds for treating HIV/AIDS even more critical in assisting people with the disease. Medicare provides a vital source of health coverage for around 100,000 people with the disease. In 2006, Medicare became the single largest source of federal financing for HIV

care. The number of people with HIV receiving Medicare benefits has grown over time, reflecting growth in the size of the of the HIV-positive population and an increased lifespan for people with the virus. As thrilled as I was with the new health care law, there is one part that is extremely disturbing. Especially since my journey over the years has taught me the urgent need to hold public officials accountable for their actions in this battle for a cure. Quite simply, with the creation of an entity called the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), we could lose our ability to pressure lawmakers for change. This new board is simply not accountable to anyone. While the IPAB is tasked with cutting Medicare spending, it is exempt from any judicial or administrative review of its decisions, and is barred from probing the government’s spending patterns on specific health care providers, such as hospitals. Shackled by such restraints and yet dangerously unaccountable to Congress, the people or the courts, this board could turn its attention to successful programs in Medicare to carry out its cost cutting mission. The mere existence of an unchecked,

powerful agency making life-determining decisions should be worrisome to everyone. Draconian decisions by IPAB to limit access to medicines to treat HIV will be free from judicial review, the need for advance public notice, or even appeals from patients. The fact of the matter is that the IPAB, like any other agency of government, can make bad decisions. And if they do, we have absolutely no recourse to change them. Personally, I can’t think of a worse scenario than for our research leaders to be on the cusp of a cure, only to be denied the necessary resources because a government panel has blown research and development into the Stone Age. We must not be shortsighted in our zeal to bring down health care costs by thwarting future research and reversing already achieved progress. Stated simply, if we go this route, we would only blunt the more laudable and courageous goal of saving lives and one day eliminating this horrific disease once and for all. Q David Mixner has been involved in public life creating policy and as an activist and writer for over 40 years. He has had two bestselling books, Stranger Among Friends and Brave Journeys, both published by Bantam Books.

leers

Editor, I just wanted to say that Issue 160, August 5, 2010, was the best you have ever put out. I normally don’t respond to such incredible insight and eloquent writing because I generally think it’s too late for words, but you have impressed me with your ‘first person’ insight and articles “Utah’s Gay Community Reel from Recent Suicides” and especially “Full Spectrum Social Justice.” I will eventually read the entire issue and will cut it out and journal it. The cover story, “My Last Shot,” intrigued me initially because it seems to be such a taboo subject that really needs to be addressed. I have been that gay man who turned to drugs and got judged, so I appreciate the compassion in your article. For the first time in my history with Salt Lake City I feel there is hope. Please continue to spread ‘happy’ pleasure as much as you can, but thank fucking god you are not afraid to bring up the real issues. I truly hope your publication can make a difference here in this coping state.

Darren Carlson Salt Lake City

QSaltLake welcomes your feedback Please send your letters to the editor to letters@qsaltlake.com 1 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


C

the straight line Leviticus, Stones and Same-Sex Marriage

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by Bob Henline

NN RECENTLY POSTED an opinion piece by Bishop Harry R. Jackson, Jr. entitled “Same-sex Marriage Will Hurt Families, Society.” In this lovely bit of drivel, Jackson first goes after the validity of “openly gay” (although that has yet to be confirmed) Judge Vaughn Walker’s ruling in the matter of California’s Proposition 8. After that, he attempts to explain why samesex marriage represents the end of civilization as we know it. Let’s take a look at Bishop Jackson’s bullshit. First and foremost, I think it’s important to note that Jackson does what all ignorant “Christians” do in this situation: rely on selected biblical passages. According to Jackson, “All the scriptures in the Bible concerning marriage presuppose heterosexual marriage.” While this is certainly true, who decided that this outdated bit of fiction should determine the laws of our nation? Also, if we determine that we are to follow biblical law, why is it that we should only follow the parts of biblical law that serve the interests of bigots like Jackson? Should we go back to stoning adulterers? People the world over have been up in arms for months over the sentencing of an Iranian woman to death by stoning, yet this is also a biblical punishment for adultery. All one need do is read Leviticus to find all kinds of interesting “rules” that modern Christians don’t follow. This book mentions the legitimacy of slavery, as long as the slaves are from a “neighboring nation.” It references putting to death any who work on the Sabbath, and decrees that eating shellfish is an “abomination.” Not only are these rules not incorporated into our legal system, I’d be willing to bet that Pastor Jackson doesn’t follow them all, either. As a full-time pastor, he certainly “works” on the Sabbath, right? “A marriage requires a husband and wife, because these unions are necessary to make new life and connect children to their mother and father.” While Jackson goes so far as to later declare in his statement that our society should place a greater emphasis on preserving marriages, he doesn’t go so far as to advocate a ban on divorce, separation or abandonment. Why is that? If the sole purpose of marriage is to produce children, shouldn’t we then ban marriage for people who are unable to reproduce? Should we force married couples without children to breed? What about people who choose not to marry at all? If procreation is the point of life, should we not arrange and enforce marriages for all, complete with impregnation?

Of course, Jackson also has to resort to the traditional fear tactic: “These kinds of ill-advised social experiments may produce a host of unintended consequences. If gay marriage is allowed, the nation will soon begin to experience an increased degradation of the nuclear family — resulting in fewer kids being raised by a mom and dad.” And yet again, as with others of his bigoted ilk, Jackson makes this ridiculous statement with no real argument to support it. How exactly does the marriage of two homosexuals degrade the nuclear family? Jackson immediately follows this assertion with: “What will the landscape of America look like if same-sex marriage is legalized across the country? Social scientists report what most Americans have always known: Both boys and girls are deeply affected in biological and physical ways by the presence of their fathers.” Finally, something that makes sense — if you ignore the first sentence. Yes, social scientists agree that a good father figure provides an element of stability and support for children. But the question still remains: what does that have to do with gay marriage? Most gay and lesbian couples don’t have children, but if they do, a stable, married couple (even a same-sex one) is definitely a much better option than an unstable (even hetero) couple. How many hetero couples shouldn’t have children? You can’t read the news without seeing a story about neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse or even murder of children — by hetero parents, Bishop Jackson. Again, the assumption Jackson makes is that the purpose of marriage is children. Why is that? People who are unmarried have children all the time, so should this be prohibited? Should society remove children from single parents and place them with hetero couples? I don’t see Bishop Jackson arguing this point, but it’s the next “logical” step in his illogical path to a better society. The bottom line on this one is freedom of choice. While the Constitution doesn’t specifically protect choice, it is the most fundamental of freedoms. Without free choice, there is no other freedom. What is freedom of speech if you can’t choose what to say? What is freedom of religion if you can’t choose what to believe (or not to believe at all)? There is no logical or legal reason that all people should not be allowed to choose who to love and marry. Q

Bob Henline is a straight man. Don’t hold that against him — he was born that way. He is also a professional author and editor. His blog can be read at nonpart.org.

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 15


OUR VIEWS

I

guest editorial Mental Illness Stigmatized in Utah’s Gay Community by Kyle Foote

WAKE UP PARALYZED with anxiety and fear. I stare at the ceiling, willing myself to sleep a little longer so I won’t have to face the day just yet. I secretly wish that I had simply died in my sleep as I apprehensively ponder all the things that I need to get done today knowing I won’t be able to. I slept through class this morning and I’m already going to be late for work. I purposefully ignore the repeated calls and text messages from my family and friends, I’ll avoid their disappointment for a few more hours. I just want to die right now. But how should I do it? Razor blades? No, I don’t think I could cut myself. How about a rope? Nah, then I’d have to find a rope and I’d probably mess up the knot and just fall on my ass. Alcohol and pills? Hmm, that’s the way I’ll do it. But not today, I’m too tired to kill myself today. I’ll take a shower, have some coffee and see how I feel after that. The scenario above isn’t all that made up. It’s exactly how many people, gay or otherwise, wake up each morning. It’s a story I’ve heard from many different people with whom I have worked and befriended over the past two years as a volunteer with the National Alliance on Mental Illness and other Utah mental health organizations. Many of us may have had a morning like the one I describe above. The sad truth is that many people have mornings like this every day of their life. They are paralyzed by depression and anxiety. This type of paralysis, however, isn’t something that people can just get over or ignore or avoid. Fashion, shopping, boyfriends, drinking, sex and illicit drugs won’t make it go away. Major depression and anxiety are typical symptoms of a mental illness. People who suffer from

a mental illness have a real and palpable chemical imbalance in their brain. They need to seek out support from those around them. In many cases, they may also need medication and counseling to be able to cope with the realities of life. As we know, recently we have had a number of suicides in our community. The first

The primary reason for these suicides was that the young people were suffering from a mental illness reaction to them, by some, was to blame their families, their church, and the straight community in general. The truth is, however, they didn’t kill themselves because they may not have been accepted by their family or a church or by straights for being gay. The primary reason for these suicides was that the young people were suffering from a mental illness and either weren’t able to get or didn’t seek out the support they needed to deal with their disease. In the gay community we often stigmatize anything or anyone that’s different. We reject people based on their looks, physique,

clothes, job, income, education and anything else we deem as being substandard for some pseudo gay norm. We also tend to discard the reality of the pervasiveness of mental illness in our community. This appears to be especially true amongst the youth of our community. We ignore that our friends and loved ones may be suffering from major depression, or bi-polar or other forms of mental illness. By doing so, we fail to support them in their efforts to cope with life. When we avoid the tough conversations and judge those who are different than ourselves, in effect we are placing the blame for suicides within our population on everyone but our own community. As a community we need to embrace the truth that there are many people in our community, especially those who are under 25, who are suffering from mental illnesses and who lack the support or have not yet learned the tools to cope and/or to survive day to day. With the aim of creating resources for our community, NAMI is working together with the Utah Pride Center and other gay community organizations to eliminate the stigma of mental illness and providing our community with resources to support, nurture, and heal those among us who are suffering. In an effort to provide this support, NAMI is launching a support group called “Connection.” This mental health support group is offered at no charge and is organized specifically for those under 30 in the GLBTQ community. It is a place where people who are suffering from a mental illness or who know or love someone who is can gather together on a weekly basis to learn from and share with each other. By the end of the year NAMI will also launch a Connection group for those in the community who are 30 and older. A Facebook group called “Mind Games” has also been formed to provide information on all mental health resources and events available to the local GLBTQ Community. Q Starting September 21st Connection meetings will be held every Tuesday night at the Salt Lake City Main Library at 7pm. If you would like to find out more about how you can participate or help please contact NAMI Utah or join us on Facebook/Mind Games for regular updates.

snaps & slaps SNAP: Ben McAdams vs. Mel Nimer Utah’s State Senate District 2 has been boggling out-of-staters for nearly a year now. Last December, they were shocked to learn that the seat was not only in a Democratic district, but also respresented by an openly gay man, Scott McCoy. Then they were shocked that a straight but gay-friendly Mormon, Ben McAdams, took over. And now they’re shocked that a gay non-Mormon Republican, Mel Nimer, is seeking McAdams’ job (remember, most Americans think Utah is only good for polygamy and incoherent alcohol laws). While it’s always funny to watch people learn and re-learn that gay Utahns exist and that they sometimes do things other than be oppressed, the McAdams/Nimer race is interesting for a number of reasons. While it shows that Utah’s queer and allied community is diverse, it also shows that Democrats and Republicans can agree on fundamental questions about gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender equality. And that Utah’s Republican Party is willing to front an openly gay candidate — albeit in a heavily blue district. Still, if this signals a more gay-friendly turn in Utah’s GOP, we’re all for it.

SNAP: Turner Bitton At just 19, Turner Bitton has accomplished a lot for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community. Now, along with several friends, he’s started a chapter of Parents,

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10 TO 40 MEMBERS. GUESTS OF MEMBERS ARE WELCOME AT MOST EVENTS.

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1 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

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OUR VIEWS

I

lambda lore I Am Shocked! Shocked, I Tell You! by Ben Williams

LIKE TO TELL PEOPLE THAT I was clinically insane until I was 23 years old. I know some of you are saying that explains a lot. But really, so was every other homosexual born before April 9, 1974. In case you think I am exaggerating a tad, I assure you I am not. The American Psychiatric Association’s Bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders classified homosexuality as being “among the sociopathic personality disturbances” in its first edition in 1952, and there the definition it remained until 1974. The American Psychiatric Association’s board of trustees voted in December 1973 to remove homosexuality from the DSM lists of disorders. However, some conservative members of the APA called for a full vote by the group’s 17,905 eligible members to settle the matter. On April 9, 1974 the results were announced. With only 10,555 eligible APA members participating, 3,810 psychiatrists voted to keep “homosexuality” in the DSM as a mental disorder. However 5,854 voted to remove it. So, the next day, on my 23rd birthday, I was no longer considered a mental case. After the 1974 vote, the American Psychiatric Association dropped homosexuality as “a psychiatric disorder,” and even began to advocate for laws to protect lesbians and gay men from discrimination in employment, housing, transportation and licensing. They also encouraged “the repeal of all legislation making criminal offenses of sexual acts performed by consenting adults in private.” Prior to 1970, most trained psychiatrists generally considered desires for someone of the same sex to be a disorder. Karoly Maria Kertbeny’s 19th century term “homosexual” was the official moniker for those inflicted by this mental-physical disassociative disorder. In the early 20th century, thanks to Dr. Freud and Dr. Jung, psychiatry exercised an “authoritative voice” on public opinion. By mid-century, psychiatry’s “scientific opinion” and Alfred Kinsey’s sexology studies began to change the judicial view that homosexuality was a criminal deviancy to a mental illness. Believe it or not, this was a vast improvement. Homosexuals were now being ordered into treatment instead of prison. But in Utah, it would appear that treatment was as bad as prison. Cleon Skousen, while Chief of Police in Salt Lake City, was dismayed that some city judges were sending offending homosexuals to psychiatric treatment, rather than charging them with a felony and sending them to

the state pen for up to 20 years as state law mandated. To sidestep the judges, Skousen got the city fathers to adopt as code the 1952 state provision which ordered sex offenders to the Utah State Hospital. In this way, Skousen said, “a conviction would enable authorities to commit offenders for life if medical examinations showed them mentally ill.” Previously, persons charged with indecent exposure or lewdness were tried in police court in Salt Lake City. Records show that homosexuals were being sent to the state mental institution in Utah County through much of the 1950s. By the 1960s, aversion therapy or electroshock therapy was promoted as means to cure homosexuality. As early as 1935 the American Psychological Association was told of a doctor successfully treating homosexuality by using electro-shock therapy “delivered at intensities considerably higher than those usually employed on human subjects.” Dr. Frankenstein meets Dr. Freud. Electro-shock therapy was readily adopted in Utah to cure homosexuals, especially at LDS Church-owned college campuses. During the ’60s one man stood out as the premier proponent of this therapy: Dr. Robert D. Card, a Salt Lake psychologist. Dr. Card practiced the highly controversial bio-feedback therapy to cure homosexuality for nearly 20 years, explaining it simply as a “pairing of noxious stimulus with the stimulus trying to be reduced.” Dr. Card was judges’ and bishops’ go-to guy to fix queers, and he found no want of clients desperate to be heterosexual to fit in with the state’s dominant culture. Dr. Card’s credibility in the professional world was spotless. He published several academic and professional papers advocating aversion therapy to eliminate homosexuality from a patient’s personality. He worked out of offices in Salt Lake City and on the BYU campus with gay Mormons. His BYU clients were treated by having electrodes attached to their genitals and then shown homosexual pornography. If they got a stiffy they were zapped. A member of our community wrote an account of his therapy session with Dr. Card in his Salt Lake office. It goes like this: “The doctor would turn on a very graphic porno video of two or more men having sexual intercourse (and other activities). As I became excited and started to get an erection, the little ring around my penis would measure the slightest growth in circumference. This would then register on the device where the doctor sat, and he would hit me with a

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few seconds of volts. He would then sharply tell me to control my arousal. After a few minutes he would hit me with a few more seconds of electricity. This would go on for about five to 10 minutes. I would get aroused no matter how hard I tried not to, and I would be shocked again and again.” Dr. Card defended this acceptable medical practice by stating, “I have an ethical responsibility to help anyone who wants to change.” However, by 1985 Dr. Card stated that he had abandoned the electro-shock therapy. When asked if he was ever successful in introducing heterosexual feelings in his homosexual patients, he was silent. He may have abandoned electro-shock therapy but it is interesting to note that in 1998 Dr. Card patented a sexual arousal device with the US Patent Office. Today, reparative therapy, also known as conversion therapy, has generally replaced aversion therapy as a cure for homosexuality by those who have not accepted the APA’s 1974 decision. Reparative therapy states that homosexuality is a learned behavior, not truly an orientation. In 1998, the American Psychiatric Association passed a resolution rejecting this “treatment.” The resolution stated that attempts to change a person’s sexual orientation can cause “depression, anxiety and self-destructive behavior.” The APA feared that even the existence of reparative therapy spreads the idea that “homosexuality is a disease or is evil and has a dehumanizing effect resulting in an increase in discrimination, harassment, and violence against gays, lesbians and bisexuals.” And yet here in Utah, Evergreen International, which embraces reparative therapy has had an annual conference for nearly 25 years feeding off referrals from LDS Family Services and from Mormons who are taught to despise their nature. Dr. Allen E. Bergin, a psychology professor at BYU, sums up the LDS position on why homosexuals must become heterosexual: “Though a person may suffer from homosexual inclinations that are caused by some combination of biology and environment, the gospel requires that he or she develop firm self-discipline and make an energetic effort to change.” The American Psychiatric Association repeated in 2009 that reparative therapy is not “clinically sound.” However, LDS General Authority Elder Bruce C. Hafen, at that year’s Evergreen Conference, criticized the APA for claiming that sexual orientation is unchangeable. Hafen told attendees to “find a therapist who can help you identify the unmet emotional needs that you are tempted to satisfy in false sexual ways.” In 1990, Boyd K. Packer wrote this regarding the church’s stance on homosexuality: “We are sometimes told that leaders in the Church do not really understand these problems. Perhaps we don’t. There are many ‘whys’ for which we just do not have simple answers.” This is about the only thing Packer has ever said that I agree with. Q

Q on the strt Who is your favorite ❝ Utah artist and why?”

Dan Q. Tham Ruby Chacon — her art is vibrant and expansive and deeply personal.

Dave Bastian Trent Harris because he holds a magnifying glass up to all the wonderful weirdness that is Utah. Jonathan Krausert Harry Francis Sellers — he’s a great painter and nice to have a conversation with over a couple a beers on Saturdays at Juniors. Ann Clark Benjamin Wiemeyer ... I love that he is so diverse. He has such an incredible art talent, anywhere from his self portraits, to beautiful pieces on canvas to incredible graffiti art found on walls all over the city. Brandon Burt I’ll admit to a longtime fetish for Arnold Friberg’s heroic genre paintings of hunky Nephites and Lamanites. But Lee Deffebach’s abstract expressionist colorfields were truly revolutionary — and she was kind enough once to give me season tickets to the Utah Opera, so she’s got my vote! Maureen Duffy-Boose Trevor Southey. He has made Utah culture famous far, far beyond Utah.


bushauck Ken Mehlman, the Hypocrite by Ryan Shattuck

C

OMING OUT OF THE CLOSET as a gay man or women is not an easy process. There’s a lot of paperwork to fill out; a new state identification card has to be issued; there are separate gay tax forms to be filed; and the federally mandated homosexual agenda has to be memorized. So it makes sense why it took Ken Mehlman, former Chairman of the Republican National Committee as well as George W. Bush’s former campaign manager, many years to come out of the closet. The dust has mostly settled since Mehlman came out a few weeks ago in The Atlantic. In the article written by politics editor Marc Ambinder, Mehlman explains why it took him so long to publicly admit that he is a gay man: “It’s taken me 43 years to get comfortable with this part of my life ... Everybody has their own path to travel, their own journey, and for me, over the past few months, I’ve told my family, friends, former colleagues, and current colleagues, and they’ve been wonderful and supportive. The process has been something that’s made me a happier and better person. It’s something I wish I had done years ago.” Although opening up about his sexuality has made Ken Mehlman “a happier and better person,” many people are quite angry at the former RNC Chairman, for coming out years after leading the Republican Party through some of its most anti-gay years in recent history. Under Mehlman’s direction, several states passed legislation banning same-sex marriage in 2004, and promoted a political aura of intolerance and discrimination that has plagued the Republican Party for years to follow. Naturally, many gay and lesbian men and women have labeled Mehlman a “hypocrite,” have satirically awarded him the “Roy Cohen Award” for “managing the most anti-gay Presidential campaigns in history” and have even called Mehlman a “Quisling Homophobic scumbag.” Is Ken Mehlman a hypocrite for coming out as a gay man after leading anti-gay political party? Or does he deserve our sym-

pathy for being ‘brave’ and admitting his sexuality in the midst of an anti-gay political party? Mehlman is currently in the process of repenting for his past sins by working with the American Foundation for Equal Rights, which supports a legal challenge to California’s anti-same-sex marriage proposition, and is attempting to garner sympathy with statements such as the following: “I can’t change the fact that I wasn’t in this place personally when I was in politics, and I genuinely regret that. It was very hard, personally ... If they can’t offer support, at least offer understanding. “What I do regret, and think a lot about, is that one of the things I talked a lot about in politics was how I tried to expand the party into neighborhoods where the message wasn’t always heard. I didn’t do this in the gay community at all.” Although some members of the gay community, such as Oscar-winning screenwriter and gay activist Dustin Lance Black, believe that “Ken represents an incredible coup for the American Foundation for Equal Rights,” the aftermath of damage caused by Mehlman during his anti-gay reign of political terror is so deep and entrenched in society that any apology and action is too little, too late. Mehlman states that, in regard to his traitorous, self-internalized homophobia, “At least for me, it wasn’t like there was a light-bulb moment,” and “The reality is, it’s taken me 43 years to come to terms with this part of my life.” Yes, some people take a long time to come to terms with who and what they are. Some gay men and women come out of the closet when they are teenagers; others take several decades to deconstruct and determine their sexuality. Other excuses and justifications may also be applied to Mehlman’s situation, such as: Are Americans not allowed to have opinions and political beliefs that evolve and shift with time and experience? Haven’t we all belonged to a job, a political party or another organization that made a decision with which we disagreed?

Ken Mehlman is no ordinary American, because he changed history in ways that very few Americans have

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 19

Aren’t public figures allowed to maintain a semblance of privacy in regard to their personal lives? Aren’t Americans afforded the right to have private lives that are not dictated by their politics? Yes, Americans can change their minds; yes, most of us have belonged to an organization that may have made a decision with which we disagreed; yes, public figures deserve privacy; yes, Americans have the right to support politics that disagree with their private lives. Nevertheless, most Americans are not in positions of power to affect national policy that affects the lives of millions of fellow Americans. Although all Americans are afforded the right to be as public or as private about their lives as they desire, most Americans do not influence policy that prevents other Americans from marrying, from visiting their partners in the hospi-

tal, and do not help create a political atmosphere that leads to the potential suicides of closeted gay teenagers. Ken Mehlman is no ordinary American, because he changed history in ways that very few Americans have. He does not deserve the privacy or sympathy of the average citizen. He gave up those rights long ago, when he started receiving a regular paycheck from the Republican National Committee, encouraging him to strip as many rights away from gay men and women as possible. No, coming out of the closet is not easy for anyone, even Ken Mehlman. And I doubt he’s even started filling out his paperwork. Q

Ryan Shattuck is the author of “Revolutions for Fun and Profit,” at revolutionsforfunandprofit. com

Friday Nights on Monument Plaza in Sugar House!

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by Christopher Katis

I

REMEMBER WHEN MY COUSIN LAURA’S husband was transferred to Golden, Colo. After settling in, she e-mailed me their new address and gave me some details about the house: it was only a couple of years old, had been in the Parade of Homes and was located in a great school district. I asked her if it had any charm. That, I learned, wasn’t one of her priorities. When Kelly and I bought our first place a couple of years later, I e-mailed the address to Laura and mentioned that our new place was nearly 100 years old and sat square in the middle of one of the worst school districts in Northern California, but man did it have charm! Charm used to be a requirement for us in homes, but once we became dads, our priorities in houses evolved. Last month, Kelly and I closed on a new house. It wasn’t a pretty experience. Our realtor Yvonne, another one of my cousins, claimed that in her 30 years in real estate she’d never seen a couple disagree with one another so consistently. Everything he liked, I pretty much hated. And vice versa. When we started, I told Yvonne I had three criteria for any house: at least two bathrooms, a place for an office/spare room and driving distance from my parents. Being a mother herself, she knew that a nice, safe neighborhood with kids in it, a decent-sized back yard and a good school district were also on the list even if we never mentioned them. Kelly had his own criteria: a unique home that oozed charm and was close to the private school at the Greek Church the boys started this year. That proved to be a tough order to fill. We’ve lived in “not perfect for us” houses before, and we’ve always managed to turn them into show pieces. Okay, Kelly’s always been able to turn them into show pieces. He got the gay decorating gene, I got the Greek one ... you know, the gene that makes you think everything blue and white and covered in plastic works. Take, for example, the nondescript illegal garden apartment we rented when we lived in San Francisco. I hadn’t wanted to move into it, but Kelly persuaded me by promising “we can make it cute.”

Within a couple of years he had taken a dark, forgettable apartment and turned it into, well, PeeWee’s Playhouse. From the wisteria-purple and corrugated metal walls in the living room to the giant sun blazing down in the sea blue kitchen, the place was a freakin’ masterpiece! So I know he can do it. But this time we’ve headed to the suburbs. It’s a different world out there. Somehow I doubt our new neighbors will mirror those we’ve enjoyed during the past 16 months in the Avenues. Last week, while we were unloading the first of the seemingly never-ending boxes at the new house, one of the neighbors introduced himself. No matter how clearly we explained our relationship, he still walked away confused. Now that I think about it, this move to the suburbs could be a chance for us to be good gay ambassadors! I’m going to bet that for more than a few of our neighbors we may be the first honest-to-goodness homos they’ve ever met live and in-person. This move is making me venture outside of my comfort zone. Once again, the boys are forcing me to head in an unpredictable direction. And I think that’s a good thing. And even though the house isn’t the perfect place for the two men in our family, it is pretty close to perfect for the two boys. Even Kelly has to admit that to a certain degree. There’s something to be said about a neighborhood where ducks swim in the canal, and grazing horses come right up to people to bum a cube of sugar or bite of apple. The house does have a lot to offer as well, and I like it a whole lot more than Kelly does. In fact, I was the one who said we should pull the trigger and buy it. Partly because I was sick of looking at houses. But it also met all of my criteria. (Although, apparently, my parents live close enough to drop by unexpectedly. That’s a little scary.) As time goes by, and as we make that house work for us, as we get used to living in a suburban neighborhood and being the only gay family for miles around, I know we’ll love it. Even Kelly. Maybe even as much as the boys and I do. Q

Charm used to be a requirement for us in homes

2 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


L

crp of the wk Charlie Crist by D’Anne Witkowski

OOK, I DON’T KNOW IF Florida Gov. Charlie Crist is gay. And while it really should be a non-issue because being gay is not this scandalous thing that makes a person unfit for public office like some loonies on the far right believe, the fact is: it matters. It’s an issue because Crist is making it an issue by reiterating his support for a constitutional ban on same-sex couples getting married. Granted, this isn’t the first time Crist has said he supports such a thing. Apparently he mentioned it at some point while running for governor and governors don’t really have much power when it comes to the United States Constitution. But now he’s running for Senate as an Independent. The United States Senate. On Aug. 29 during an interview on CNN, Ed Henry brought up the issue of same-sex marriage and pointed out that Marco Rubio, one of Crist’s opponents in the Senate race, supports a constitutional ban. “The former Republican Party Chairman Ken Mehlman came out and said he’s gay and he called on conservatives to kind of move to the political center and be more tolerant on this issue,” Henry said. “Now that you’re trying to occupy the political center, are you still in favor of a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage?” “I feel the same way, yes, because I feel that marriage is a sacred institution, if you will,” Crist responded. “But I do believe in tolerance. I’m a live-and-let-live kind of guy, and while I feel that way about marriage, I think if partners want to have the opportunity to live together, I don’t have a problem with that.” So he’s a “live-and-let-live kind of guy” who believes in “tolerance,” eh? And while marriage is “sacred,” thereby rendering homos unfit for such an institution, he doesn’t mind partners living together. So long as their relationship isn’t in any way recognized or protected and the law treats them as legal strangers then Crist doesn’t “have a problem with that.” Oh, how very magnanimous of him. “I think that’s where most of America is,” Crist continues. “So I think that, you know, you have to speak from the heart about these issues. They are very personal. They have a significant impact on an awful lot of people and the less the government is telling people what to do, the better off we’re all going to be.” Since telling the government to stay out

of people’s personal lives and writing discrimination into the constitution seem to be contradictory, Henry accuses Crist of trying to have it both ways (no pun intend-

ed, I’m sure). But Crist doesn’t budge. “Well, everything is in a matter of degree, Ed, and when it comes to the institution of marriage, I believe that it is between a man and a woman; it’s just how I feel,” he says. Call me crazy, but “it’s just how I feel” is a pretty flimsy argument for amending the Constitution to keep gay people from marrying each other. Hell, it’s a flimsy reason to amend it for anything. By itself, Crist’s unabashed support of writing discrimination into one of our nation’s founding documents is alarming to say the least. But it’s even more alarming

if he is, indeed, gay. And he is widely rumored and believed to be just that. Yes, he’s married. To a lady. Since 2008. Which, of course, proves that he’s not gay because of how getting opposite-sex married automatically makes you not gay. So who knows? Maybe all of the gay rumors are wrong. Either way, Crist is still a creep. Q

D’Anne Witkowski has been gay for pay since 2003. She’s a freelance writer and poet (believe it!). When she’s not taking on the creeps of the world she reviews rock ‘n’ roll shows in Detroit with her twin sister.

The YWCA Salt Lake City is pleased to invite you to the 22nd annual celebration of women in our community!

YWCA LeaderLuncheon • September 17, 2010 Grand America Hotel • 555 S. Main Street, Salt Lake City Reception 11:30 a.m. • Luncheon 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Keynote speaker: Jeannette Walls, author of the New York Times best-seller The Glass Castle. The 2010 Outstanding Achievement Awards will be presented at LeaderLuncheon to: Lynne N. Ward - Government/Public Service Marian Ingham - Community Service Cynthia A. Bioteau - Education Deborah S. Bayle - Health/Human Services

Tickets: $60, $50 for YWCA members/associates Sponsorships are available. Visit www.ywca.com to register online or call 801.537.8619.

salt lake city

Celebrating the Accomplishments of Women...Supporting Women and Children Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 2 1


SALT L AKE CONSIGNMENT SHOPS

Coming Home with Home Again by Joselle Vanderhooft

M Abode Brightens Up Any Abode by Joselle Vanderhooft

I

T’S NOT EVERY CONSIGNMENT SHOP that combines vintage clothing, crystal chandeliers, flea markets and mannequin parts, but few consignment shops are like Abode, where “shabby chic” meets “subtle elegance.” That’s how owner Miriam Sabir Venkataramanan describes her store, which she opened in 2005, after a few years managing Simply Home, another consignment shop on 1300 S. 900 East. And a peek inside Abode’s brightly painted building shows just how apt the description. There, decorators and collectors can find any number of unusual and striking items to brighten up their abode, from vintage theater marquee letters and unusual step stools to bigger pieces like armoires and even sofas, on occasion. “If it’s funky and interesting and vintage, we’ll take it,” said Venkataramanan. “Our bottom line is fun, funky and functional. I think we like to focus on the unusual while still remaining utilitarian. [For example], right now we have a shocking turquoise massage chair.” For even more unusual fare, visitors are invited to check out the store’s vintage children and baby section and its salvage room where unusual doorknobs, drawer knobs, mirrors, and even doors and windows are waiting. There’s even a back section which Venkataramanan lovingly calls “the Paris Flea Market,” which she describes as consignment with “a little Victorian and Edwardian thrown in.” There, crystal chandeliers can be found alongside Audrey Hepburnstyle little black dresses. “We call it our well-behaved side. So you know what the rest of the shop is like,” Venkataramanan joked. Unlike many consignment shops which spe-

cialize solely in furniture and home accessories, Abode also accepts vintage clothing, which Venkataramanan describes as anything “pre1960.” Though, she says that she’s particular about what she accepts because “there are so many things that can be wrong with clothes, like tears or damage.” Even so, the store’s mannequins are well-clothed and ready to be sold or rented for any number of events. Venkataramanan admits that she’s partial to mannequins, which are ubiquitous throughout Abode, from displays using their hands to an unusual sculpture in the bathroom. “In our restroom we have the bottom half of a female mannequin. Essentially she’s naked, and that holds our toilet paper,” she said. For those who can’t get enough of Abode’s classy flea market ambiance, the store holds an outdoor flea market in its parking lot each year from April through September. In fair weather and foul, up to 30 vendors meet once a month to hawk their wares, which have included clothing, homemade lemonade, “truly vintage, antique religious relics” and dolls bearing the likeness of Mexican artist and feminist icon Frida Kahlo. Venkataramanan, who provides breakfast to the vendors, said that she hosts the monthly market to draw attention not only to Abode but to the creative artisans who populate the surrounding neighborhoods. “We love Sugar House and the Avenues neighborhoods,” she said. “We love the people. It’s really our niche.” The final Abode flea market for the season will be held Sept. 18 from 9 a.m.–4 p.m. in the store’s parking lot at 1720 S. 900 East. For more information about the store visit abodepfm.com or abode-abode.blogspot.com. Q

22 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

AKING A HOME’S INTERIOR truly unique and beautiful is often a challenge in this contemporary world of cheap, mass-produced furniture. Thankfully, consignment shops like Home Again are there to help add a touch of class and beauty to any home with unique furniture in a variety of styles — including some items that most people wouldn’t think of as decorative. “We’ve even had a reclining wheelchair made out of wood,” said Kathryn Blomquist, manager of the Sugar House store. “That was kind of interesting. And right now I have a tortoise shell with a net on it to hang on a wall.” A canoe, she added, has also found its way into the store to be snapped up, as have antique watering buckets and horse troughs. Typically, however, both Home Again locations specialize in what Blomquist calls “eclectic and fun” furnishings in styles ranging “from Asian to French and Italian to German,” and which include everything from armoires and kitchen hutches to headboards and benches crafted by local artisans. “They’re all very unique in their own way,” she said. The Sugar House store was opened in 2002 by Lisa Herbold, the owner of a consignment clothing store near the University of Utah’s lower campus. Herbold moved to Jackson Hole several years ago, and the store is now owned by Emily Larsen, as is the Midvale location, which opened in 2007. While many furniture consignment stores

(such as Now & Again, which is also featured in this issue) specialize in small items that fit well in downtown apartments, Home Again carries larger items like book cases, dressers and coffee tables. Most of these items, said Blomquist, are imported by consignors, but both shops also accept consignment items from locals. “We have to see pictures of large items before they’re brought in,” said Blomquist, noting that both locations are highly selective about what they take. Small items, on the other hand, can be brought in any time. “We get really great dishware, china, all different kinds of stemware,” said Blomquist. If the item does not sell in 90 days, consignors must pick it up. Although Home Again has some pricier pieces — the most expensive in the Sugar House store, said Blomquist, is valued at $10,000 — both locations have a wide selection for shoppers, decorators and bargain-hunters of all budgets. Some classy end tables, for example, start at just $30. “It all depends on the piece,” said Blomquist. And while some pieces are vintage, several are brand new, a fact which only adds to the eclectic charm of both stores, which Blomquist described as “very different” from each other. “We don’t just specialize in old furniture. It’s a mix of new and old,” she said. Home Again is located at 1019 E. 2100 South and 7490 Holden St. in Midvale. For hours call 801-487-4668 for the Sugar House location and 801-255-5457 for the Midvale store. Q


Now & Again’s Styles from Now & Then by Joselle Vanderhooft

S

TEP INTO NOW & AGAIN in search of a cute end table and you might just leave with a giant golden rooster that greeted you at the door. “It was posted [to the shop’s website] in the evening and it sold within the first 20 minutes of business the day after,” said Michael Sanders, owner of the downtown consignment store which regularly sees such unusual items as the rooster, which he described as a decorative object made in the 1960s by Syroco, a company famous for its “hard plastic and painted gold” objects including wall sconces and rococo-style mirrors. The memorable fowl is one of many unique furnishings from past times and present day rubbing shoulders at the store. And that’s just the way Sanders likes it. “To me, it’s all about the mix,” he said. “I think the modern home is not filled with dusty antiques nor is it a sterile environment filled with stark hardness. It’s a mix in the middle, and I love our store to reflect that mix. I like to say we’re not looking for folks to come in and furnish their entire house from the store. We provide the “wow pieces,” the fun accessories that give a room personality.” And how does the golden bird fit in? “We love to display things that are kind of kooky and whimsical,” he said. His customers agree. Since the shop’s opening in May 2009, people from downtown, the Avenues and Capitol Hill have scoured its two daily-changing floors for tables, chairs, bathroom and kitchenware from all decades. “Pretty much from the moment I opened I was busy,” said Sanders. And while he opened the shop with overflow items from his friends’ garages, today he takes in goods from 300

consignors. “The merchandise comes in a pretty steady clip every day,” he said. “One of the things many people mention — especially those who make the rounds in the secondhand stores in Salt Lake — is that our store seems different every time they come in.” Sanders credits this to his policy of leaving merchandise in the store for no longer than three months. If it doesn’t sell, he explained, the owners must pick it up. “I think I’ve earned a reputation as a fair businessperson,” he said. “We’re kind and considerate to our customers and we pay everyone on time.” Sanders and Now & Again’s consignors also regularly donate items to a number of charities including Big Brothers, Big Sisters Club and Our Store, the thrift shop run by the People With AIDS Coalition of Utah. “Through our consignors, we’ve donated through the course of the year to yard sales benefiting people in need throughout the valley,” Sanders added. “We love giving to those.” And Sanders has loved consignment ever since he discovered 1950s clothing as a teenager. After a grueling life on the East Coast opening and planning events for night clubs and restaurants, Sanders decided to turn his lifelong passion for collecting into his livelihood. Having fallen in love with Utah on visits to his sister, who lives in Park City, Sanders moved to Salt Lake City in 2008 to embrace “a simpler life.” “I’ve always found Salt Lake to be an interesting city and one of America’s great secrets,” he said. “I felt it would be a wonderful quality of life here. I’ve always been very impressed at not only the natural beauty and friendliness of people, but of the very large gay and lesbian community here, and the fact it’s such a politically active

and exciting community. Back east in New York you can be whoever you want to be and no one says anything, so you get a bit complacent about being politically active, where in Utah it really makes a difference. I love that.” Although Sanders loves his store on 501 E. 300 South, he would also love to open a second location in Sugar House, where he is currently looking for the perfect storefront. There he would like to sell larger furniture, which he cannot do for his uptown clients who tend to live in small apartments. He is also preparing to expand his downtown store to take in more “really fabulous” vintage clothing, for which he says there is a mostly unfulfilled demand in the city. When this happens, he also hopes to offer alterations on site, a service he said that many clothing consignment stores on the East Coast offer. In the meantime, visitors to the shop will be greeted by Jolie and Bijoux, Sanders’ toy poodles whom he calls “one of the main attractions.” And if they’re looking for more funky items like the golden rooster, they only need to wait awhile for something unusual. “Once someone brought in a poster that I thought was fabulous,” said Sanders. “To me, at first glance, it was this fabulous deco poster of this jazz musician playing a trumpet. I said,

“I love the poster of a jazz musician!” and the woman [who brought it in] replied, “That’s the Angel Moroni!” Visit Now & Again online at nowandagainslc. com. Q

Like a Gay Man with Amnesia — We Come Out Every Two Weeks

salt lake Utah’s gay and lesbian news & entertainment biweekly magazine

The 2010 edition of TheQPages is out! Get one! or go to TheQPages.com

801-649-6663 QSaltLake.com

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 23


TRE VOR SOUTHEY

Trevor Southey’s

Oxymoronic Life on Display

“ The p ur sui t of t r u t h in one ’s life and art of ten le ads to conflict

in

one’s

self

and

conf rontat ion w it h ot her s.” – Robe r t Fly nn Johnson , cur ator in ch a rge , Ache nb ach Foundat ion for Gr aphic Arts, Fine Arts Museums

of

San

Fr ancisco

MOM, 1970

2 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

T

by Michael Aaron

REVOR SOUTHEY is a man who has lived several lives in one lifetime. Born in Africa, studied in England, converted to the Mormon Church and served a mission, graduated from Brigham Young University, married a woman, sired four children, founded the Mormon Art and Belief Movement, developed an artists’ commune in Alpine, came out as a gay man, moved to San Francisco, and through all of it, expressed himself through his art. “My work reflects my life ... Sometimes to an embarrassing degree,” Southey said during a lunch at Café Trio with myself, friend and art collector Jim Dabakis, and Day Christensen, fellow artist and curator of Southey’s show at the University of Utah Museum of Fine Arts. Indeed, you can see transformations in Southey’s life as you look at his art. That will become eminently clear during his show at UMFA, which will run from Oct. 21 through Feb. 11. Titled “Reconciliation,” his show is a “retrospective of [his] life and work,” through “four life passages that have defined

DAD, 1970

Southey’s character and his art: his youth in Rhodesia and education in England; his life as a married, practicing Mormon and his desire for a utopian lifestyle created around family, farming and art; Southey’s decision to acknowledge his homosexuality in 1982, which coincided with the first major public awareness of the AIDS NANNY, 1969 epidemic; and the reconciliation of his life decisions as expressed in his revised artistic approach to the human form,” according to the UMFA website. “Reconciliation” is also the title of his book, a nearly 200page piece of art in itself. “I was shocked at how autobiographical the book was,” Southey said.

Africa Southey was born in Rhodesia, Africa (now Zimbabwe) in 1940 of European parents. As a child he was timid, skinny and plagued with bouts of rheumatic fever. He wrote of his childhood in his book: “There is a photograph of my mother and myself. It is very revealing, though the imperfect skills of the photographer may have contributed to the sense of uncertainty, as the figures lean on the tilted ground. My mother’s feet are placed together, her plain cotton dress buttoned from neck to knee. She smiles in frank confidence of her essential beauty, though her hair is thin and parted with casual style. She is a young woman, evidently of few means but firm conviction. “I am a skinny boy, perhaps age 7 or so. I lean in toward my mother as if regretting ever having left the safety of her womb. I stare out of sunken, dark eye sockets, serious, a deep sense of my peculiarity already clear in my bearing. From the outset I did not fit well into the larger world. My mother and family, especially the women, secured any sense of well being I had at all. My essential timidity and then my illness justified my


clinging to her and her powerful, protective certainty. She was a fierce, strong woman. “My father was off to war, and after that off in his difficult world of survival, a world always challenging to his kind and gentlemanly soul.” He was forbidden from taking art courses in secondary school, and therefore chose to abandon his schooling before he received a diploma. He was, however, able to take special afternoon classes offered by the school principal’s wife. He also was able to find a handful of art books at the school library. He was enthralled by classical statuary of male nudes. His parents then gave him two volumes of reproductions of Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks for his 16th birthday, which greatly inspired his later work.

BLESSING, 1974

Mormonism

INTERCESSION AT GETHSEMANE

abstract was lost on the general population.” He and a few other artists began creating artwork in a Mormon theme. As their work grew, Brigham Young University “caught wind” of them and began watching. In 1969, “We had an exhibition at the library at BYU,” he said. “And what came out of that was the Mormon Festival of Arts.” That led to what would soon be called the Mormon Art and Belief Movement. He became an instructor of art at BYU, but was frustrated by the regimented attitudes toward art there. He was commissioned to do a piece of art for a show. As he presented the painting, which included male full frontal nudity, he was told, “Trevor — this is magnificent work, but we can never exhibit it.” He was forced to cover the groin area with gouache. “You could lick a thumb and wash the gouache off,”

He went on to study art in Sussex, England at the age of 17 and then the Natal Technical College in South Africa, where he met two Mormon missionaries. Drawn to the structured environment and spiritual system that meshed with the utopian views of his youth, he began a tumultuous relationship with the church. At the time of his conversion in the early ’70s, the church denied the priesthood to black members — a fact that mirrored the racism of his home country, where blacks couldn’t vote. He was also aware of the church’s stand on homosexuality, but was suppressing those feelings in himself anyway. The form of his art had already taken shape before his conversion to Mormonism. He had already begin his life of oxymoron. He says at the time he entered the Mormon Church, “I was only beginning to sense the terrible paradox of the solitude of the soul in its eternal, excruciating, wonderful dance toward union with another.” He then moved to the United States, what he called the “promised land.” He landed in New York City in the heat and humidity of July and was presented at the feet of the Statue of Liberty. He had come to the States to “serve the [LDS] Church and serve the Lord,” he said. He took in the World’s Fair and came across the Catholic Pavilion with Michelangelo’s Pieta and the Mormon Pavilion full of “mediocre art” actually painted by Seventh Day Adventists. “I knew that greater art was possible in the spirit of the restored church,” he wrote in his book. “Perhaps I was to be one vehicle for that new Renaissance.” “Mormon art,” at the time, he said, was an “oxymoron. The EDEN FARM, 1971

Southey laughed. Eventually, Southey had to leave BYU. “I didn’t quit BYU,” he said. “They fired me.”

Eden Farm In 1967, he married his wife, Elaine Fish. “I knew I must find a companion,” he wrote. “Some fine woman who would be with me through all eternity.” He met Elaine through a woman he had dated while seeking his eternal companion. “She was earnest and learned and beautiful,” he wrote. “She has a wide and generous face, a smile of perfect teeth with large eyes, clear and certain. We immediately related in a most vital and extraordinary way, sharing ideals and hopes in an openness rare on a first date.” —Continued on page 28

—Continued on page 28

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 2 7


TRE VOR SOUTHEY Dabakis negotiated the four-month-long exhibit of Southey’s work and life at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. Starting with an Oct. 21 special event, his exhibition will last through Feb. 11. The exhibition will follow Southey’s work, and therefore his life, from his time in Africa to his latest project, Warriors, in five adjoining galleries. In the first gallery, his work during his time in Africa will be displayed. The second will show his Mormon art. Then Eden Farm, then art as he was coming out. In the final gallery will be his current work. The last gallery, Southey said, is very different than the previous four. “There is not as much cohesiveness in the final gallery,” he said. “Once removed from the dogma, you can go anywhere.” Southey was diagnosed with prostate cancer shortly before Christmas in 2002 and currently lives with his daughter in the San Francisco Bay area. He is still close to his wife and children and considers himself a family man. He is not a fan of the word gay, finding it frivolous.

SAMARITAN, 1978

Trevor Southey Continued from page 27

Their courtship was short and they decided to marry, even though Southey was “haunted by [his] reality.” They moved to Alpine, in what would eventually be called Eden Farm, and had several children. “My children were, as babies, and are now, as adults, a consuming passion for me,” he said. “I cannot imagine life without them.” Southey talks of his life in oxymorons. “My life is like black and white,” he says. “My time in Alpine [Utah] was the most spectacular/heartbreaking/ blissful situation. The property was beautiful, the art was transforming. Everything was beautiful on the outside. On the inside there was grief.” “It was the best of times and the worst of times, as they say,” he continued.

VLADIMIR, 2003

Coming Out By the time his last child was born, however, his capacity to “suppress his nature” had reached its end. Doubts of his religion and its condemnation of what he perceived was his “natural way” took its toll on his marriage and his faith. He and Emily divorced and he moved to Salt Lake City. “Coming out was huge to me,” Southey reflected. “I went from the beautiful, large estate in Alpine to a shack on 8th East.” “I remember sitting among boxes in the middle of the room in November and I started to howl like an animal,” he said. “At the same time it was pain and relief.” “A lot of people experience this,” he said. “At one time they are surrounded by family and friends ... then not.” He said those days were a tough and wonderful period. Southey then met Jim Dabakis when he was interviewed by him for KTALK Radio as his painting, “Flight Aspiration,” was removed from the Salt Lake City International Airport because a woman said it might inspire rape. Dabakis called the interview a failure because Southey wouldn’t rise to the bait of his art being risqué in any way. Their resulting friendship, however, was anything but a failure. Dabakis has since represented Southey’s work at his gallery in Park City, the Thomas Kearns McCarthy Gallery. “Jimmy has pushed and pushed my art work,” Southey said. “This [show at the University of Utah Museum of Fine Arts] would have never happened without him.”

2 8 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

VYACHESLAV, 2001

FARM EGGS, 1979

“You can’t deny the deep spiritual calling for love,” he explained. Q

Trevor Southey: Reconciliation will run from Oct. 21 through Feb. 11, 2011, at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. More information at umfa.utah.edu and at trevorsouthey.com


Illuminating risks to LGBTQ youth and providing strategies for keeping families united.

Honoring families with keynote speaker, John Cepek, National PFLAG President and presenting Volunteer of the Year Award, Organization of the Year Award, and the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award.

October 8-10, 2010 Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel $125

October 10, 2010 Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel $35/ticket, $350/table sponsorships available

Pricing, registration, agenda, and presenter bios can be found at www.utahpridecenter.org space is limited

Registration, sponsorships, and more information can be found at www.utahpridecenter.org

PRESENTERS Dr. Caitlin Ryan, Family Acceptance Project Trevor Project Massachusetts Commission on GLBT Youth National Youth Advocacy Coalition Legal Services for Children Gender Spectrum Planned Parenthood of Utah ACLU of Utah and more!

John Cepek National PFLAG President

WWW.UTAHPRIDECENTER.ORG


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

gay agenda Happy Bir... by Tony Hobday

OK, so I didn’t say “Screw you Labor Day weekend!” Instead, I said, “I want to have your babies, Labor Day Weekend!” I ventured to the Gorge with my lil sister, Jake. When we arrived, it became Flaming Gorge. We went wake boarding, cliff-jumping and jellyfish hunting (we didn’t see any, dammit!). I even scratched a park ranger’s kitty. Alright, I can’t lie to you, we actually only played Gin, drank iced tea and took afternoon naps (rubbed down with Ben-gay and wearing pink ‘Sleeping Beauty’ sleep masks); it was like heaven in a vodka bottle.

17

FRIDAY — There’s a new tenant at Armadillo Acres and she’s wreaking havoc all over Florida’s most exclusive trailer park in Dark Horse Company Theatre’s production of THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER PARK MUSICAL. Pippi is a stripper on the run (the tassels are just a spinnin’), and when she comes between an agoraphobic (that’s the fear of wool) housewife and her less-than-affluent husband, she causes a mighty hurricane. This campy, caustic musical fable has everything from spray cheese to road kill to (or at) Costco. 8pm, Thurs.–Sat., 6pm, Sun., through Oct. 3, Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main St., Park City. Tickets $18–25, 435-649-9371 or parkcityshows.com. Q It has been called the greatest play produced in the English language in 400 years, and now Pioneer Theatre is proud to present a production of William Shakespeare’s HAMLET. It’s part ghost story, part murder mystery, part psychological thriller and part hard-to-understand. Tehehe! 7:30pm, through Oct. 2, Pioneer Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, UofU. Tickets $24–42, 801-581-6961 or pioneertheatre.org. Q In 1988, one of the greatest rock bands formed — THE SMASHING PUMPKINS. Though the band has led a tumultuous career, they are one of the most diverse, densely layered, and guitar-heavy groups. Their music contains elements of gothic rock, heavy metal, dream pop, psychedelic rock, arena rock, electronica and a shoegazer-style production. My favorite is “1979” ... yes, I am gay! 7pm, In The Venue at Club Sound, 219 S. 600 West. Tickets $40, 801-467-8499 or smithstix.com.

18

SATURDAY — Happy Birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy bir .... oh lord, I’m getting as old as Gene Gieber because I don’t remember the rest. Anyhoo, the old fart is celebrating his birthday tonight with an UNDERWEAR PARTY. And the old perv loves Baskits. Love ya long time, Gene! 8pm, Club Try-Angles, 251 W. 900 South. For more info, call 801-364-3203 or visit clubtry-angles.com. Q Happy Birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy bir ... shit, I did it again! Anyhoo, The Trapp is celebrating 20 years of supporting alcohol abusers — just kidding ... well, sort of, because Jabe serves a drink called the Drunken Tony — I wonder who that’s named after? Double anyhoo, join Joe Redburn and his clan at their 20TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY, it’ll be a freakin’ hoot! 7pm, The Trapp, 102 S. 600 West. 801-531-8727. 3 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

19

SUNDAY — Equality Utah’s monthly sociopolitical event, PILSNERS AND POLITICS, is held on the third Sunday of each month at Squatters. The restaurant has a butt-load of beer to choose from: staples to seasonal brews to limited releases, like Provo Girl, Nitro Cream, Monkey’s Dunkle and Hell’s Keep. EU also has a butt-load of Utah politics to discuss, so be there, get your butt loaded (but don’t drive!) and hear from candidates about their races. 4pm, Squatters Brewery, 147 W. Broadway. Cost $5, 801-355-5020 or equalityutah.org.

22

WEDNESDAY — Direct from the Las Vegas Strip comes drag sensation EDIE. She will perform her solo cabaret show, a fastpaced hour — and then some — of the leggy showgirl singing her favorites, all with her signature ’60s gogo flair. Look out for high-kicking choreography and witty off-the-cuff banter. 8pm, Black Box Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. Broadway. Tickets $25, 801-355-ARTS or arttix.org.

23

THURSDAY — Sugar Space’s 2010 Artist in Residence (recipients receive 40 hours of free space, approximately $500 allotted to staff, marketing materials, etc., and artists receive a percentage of the door) recipient, INFLUX DANCE, from SLC/Charlottesville, Va., perform an original dance theatre piece exploring women throughout history based on writing by Margaret Atwood. 8pm, through Saturday, Sugar Space, 616 Wilmington Ave. Tickets $10/adv.–12/door, 888-300-7898 or thesugarspace. com. Q Become absorbed in the CONFIGURATIONS of contemporary dance as Ririe-Woodbury explores the depths of the human experience with four cutting-edge choreographers. The performance will feature a newly commissioned work entitled “Duet” by Tony Award-winning choreographer, Bill T. Jones. The uncompromising and unapologetic political and social views of Jones have always laid the foundation for his dances. He has taken considerable strides in merging art with social commentary on topics such as being African American, homosexual, and HIV positive in today’s society. 7:30pm, through Saturday, Jeanne Wagner Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. Broadway. Tickets $30, 801-355-ARTS or arttix.org.

Q This event sounds like more fun than a night with Ryan Kwanten (Jason Stackhouse) ... OK, not really! The first annual POWELLAPALOOZA is packed with tons of music, games and beach parties. Taking place on the Arizona side of Lake Powell, the four-day festival includes over 50 bands, a golf tournament, poker run, hot air balloon rides and more. Through Sept. 26 in Page, Az. Tickets $35–105, VIP tix $290. For more information, powellapalooza.com.

24

FRIDAY — Nestled in the majestic Zion Canyon is an adorable little town named Springdale, and this weekend the adorable little town is host to the ZION CANYON MUSIC FESTIVAL. Performers include Thriftstore Cowboys, Sputnik, Mother Hips and Crippled Stripper. And may I recommend that you stay at Under the Eaves Bed & breakfast — the gay couple that owns it are fantabulous! 5pm tonight & 11am Saturday, Springdale Town Park, Springdale. Tickets $15/Friday, $20/Saturday or $30 for both days, zioncanyonmusicfestival.com.

25

SUNDAY — “Women fake orgasms because they have excellent time management skills.” That’s a Dottie Dixon quote ... I mean WANDA SYKES. Anyhoo, the ultra-hip gay comedian will be bringing down the house in Wendover. Don’t miss it. “Drinking will make you feel like a sexy 26-year-old.” That’s what Michael Aaron believes! 7pm, Peppermill Concert Hall, 680 Wendover Blvd., Wendover, Nev. Tickets $40–70, 800-217-0049 or wendoverfun. com.

UPCOMING EVENTS OCT 16 NOV 26-29 APR 11

Spencer Day, Rose Wagner The Rockettes, Maverick Ctr Lily Tomlin, Kingsbury Hall


save the date

hear me out By Chris Azzopardi

Robyn Body Talk, Pt. 2

September 18 sWerve’s Oktoberfest swerveutah.com September 18 Walk for Life, Bike for Life utahaids.org September 25 ROTC Military Ball rotcslc.com September 25 Wanda Sykes, Wendover, Nev. wendoverfun.com September 28 Equality Utah Allies Dinner equalityutah.org October 9 National Coming Out Day Breakfast utahpridecenter.org October 16 sWerve’s Halloween Bash swerveutah.com October 16–20 Living With AIDS Conference pwacu.org October 18–22 UofU Pride Week emanzanares@sa.utah.edu November 25 Thanksgiving Dinners at the Utah Pride Center, Club Try-Angles and The Trapp December 1 World AIDS Day worldaidsday.org December 10–11 Salt Lake Men’s Choir Christmas Concert saltlakemenschoir.org January 5–9 Utah Gay & Lesbian Ski Week, Park City communityvisions.org January 20–30 Sundance Film Festival, Park City sundance.org

On “Hang with Me,” Robyn’s lead single from part two in her Body Talk series, the every-girl of (smart) pop is hesitant to fall in love. We, though, hardly had a choice. Just coming off the June release of the first installment, she’s adorably irresistible, emotionally exposed like the BFF you never had, but in Robyn’s wonderfully up-front way, almost do. That single from this edition — slightly beginning-to-end better than the first — is too good for words; a slice of bursting dream-pop that’s so honest and innocent that it reads like a diary entry and feels more real than anything on the radio, right where this particular charmer belongs. It’s heartily inviting, just like the two addictive openers before it, “In My Eyes” and “Include Me Out” — the latter featuring the silliest and sweetest of Left Eyelike breakdowns. Both songs are the consoling friends she needed when a lover broke her heart on the first disc’s “Dancing on My Own.” Sadness mostly sits out this time around, while Robyn warns that “Love Kills” and then shakes out some sass on “Criminal Intent” and the hardcore toughie “U Should Know Better,” alternating boasts with Snoop Dogg like a tag-team fierce enough to take down Osama bin Laden. She closes with “Indestructible,” and like the acoustic version of “Hang with Me” from Body Talk Pt. 1, it’s string-powered and sweetly melancholy. When the song is, as her cycle suggests, cut for the clubs on the third and final chapter, we’ll be right there — hanging with her.

how truly atrocious they really are. Otherwise, she’s stuck with slapped-together songwriting that even Mary J. Blige couldn’t salvage: “Bittersweet,” the first single, is one big, crying Hallmark card that Fantasia bellows like she means every trite line she’s emoting; so is “Even Angels,” a trendy R&B jam with a walk-then-run motto that at least corks a singable melody within its glimmering synth groove. Old-school soul sweeps through “The Thrill is Gone” and “Trust Him,” calling up Lauryn Hill, and it’s invigorating to hear Fantasia sing something that suits her ragged, old-soul voice. Her shining coup, though, isn’t even studio produced; it’s her live version of “I’m Here” from her role in The Color Purple musical. From the gut, it’s a reminder that Fantasia can be great when the music allows her to be.

Zayra Baby Likes to Bang Now that Gaga’s set the precedence for dancepop, wannabes want a piece of her disco ball. A chunk of it goes to this Puerto Rican vixen, who gives glam a go with songs on her debut disc, which includes six originals and five remixes. She goes M.I.A. with “Feel Good,” and on the fierce “V.I.P.,” a top-10 dance single, she’s too cool for you. If Zayra wasn’t so much like everyone else, that just might be true.

Reach Chris Azzopardi at chris@pridesource.com.

Grade: C+

Also Out Kristine W Straight Up with a Twist Dance divas shifting outside the box sounds so Cyndi Lauper, but another big voice is going for beyond-her-roots glory. Kristine W’s doing it over two discs: a laid-back, Latin-seasoned mix of covers and dance-songs-turned-ballads paired with a livelier, Sade-sounding second disc. Ms. W sounds divine, her silky pipes rising high above some pedestrian production, but scene queens will be looking for less chill, more kill.

Grade: A-

Fantasia, Back to Me Fantasia Barrino has never reached the heights of American Idolwinning peers Kelly Clarkson or Carrie Underwood, but she has just as much talent wringing from her. Talent that, again on her third album Back to Me, is squandered on songs that reek of regurgitation, forcing Fantasia into the simplest of R&B conventions that almost completely ignore her instinctual passion. She has a better backstory — single mom, reality show champ and, now, suicide-attempt survivor — than hit-making catalog, which has left nary a blip on the radio and turned some horribly embarrassing jams. But at least she’s consistent; both “I’m Doin’ Me” and “Collard Greens & Cornbread” are almost funny enough to forget Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 1


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Girls Just Want to Have Big, Gay Fun

Over 50 people joined QSaltLake on the Big Gay Fun Bus to West Wendover to watch Cyndi Lauper croon her new and old songs to a rambunctious (sometimes too) crowd. A pool party the next day and back home. Bingo, Jello shots, prizes and Sin Delopper, not to mention a rowdy crowd, made the trip memorable and fun. Watch for the next Big Gay Fun Bus to Wendover and make sure you’re on it!

Did we mention the pool party? 

32 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Don R. Austin, LCSW

Quries By Steven Petrow

I’m not stalking him, but ...

Q

I connected with this really nice guy on Facebook and have been perusing his profile ever since. We are actually going to meet for coffee , as our first date. So am I allowed to “know” as much as I do about him? I don’t want to creep him out.

A

Unless your new friend has signed up for an app that reveals who’s been reading his page, ignorance is bliss. But your instincts are good: People don’t always like the idea of new friends or beaus knowing all about them. In fact, when the two of you get together, try to pretend you don’t know what you do. Don’t bring up out of the blue his entire work history (yes, that’s creepy) and avoid comments like “So, I saw you and Mike broke up on Facebook...” But if you

both love Lady Gaga or volunteer at the local LGBT center, it’s fine — and actually very helpful — to talk about what you have in common to break the ice and discover what else you may share. Online relationships are just like offline ones. Peeling back the layers of someone’s life and personality should happen in a gradual way, as you build up trust. And hearing someone describe his life in his own words is a great way to get to know someone. It’s entirely possible that your new friend would rather tell you himself about his beloved pets and what he wore for Halloween last year.

Dressing for success or myself

Q

Usually when I’m applying for a job I set aside the real me—the butch dyke, if you will—and dress up a little feminine (different hair, different suit, everything). As I get older, this makes me feel less and less comfortable, as though I’m not being the real me. How do you suggest I dress for interviews?

A

That’s a tough question. Ideally, it’s essential not to disguise yourself or to appear other than who you are. Still, there’s something to be said for having your “interview suit” — and doing some extra grooming — especially because we all know how others’ prejudices can work against us. Think of it this way: The idea is to take appearances completely out of the equation so that you can explain your qualifications and sell yourself without distraction. Once you land the job, you can be freer in how you dress. You’re not selling out to adopt a more mainstream look for the interviews; this is just another step to get you in the door. In my experience, most people try to pick up a company’s dress code once they start work. But if you don’t think you can do that — or want to dress butch all the time — then go ahead and do it for the interview. If the company can’t take it then, you’re wasting your time considering this particular employer.

Gay male Psychotherapy group forming. Limited to 6 – 8 members.

801-485-9225

Tickets for Hamlet On Sale Now! 2010-11 Season tickets now available! Hamlet Sept. 17 – Oct. 2, 2010 Bram Stoker’s

Dracula

Oct. 22 – Nov. 6, 2010 Irving Berlin’s

White Christmas Dec. 3 – Dec. 24, 2010

Black Comedy Jan. 14 – Jan. 29, 2011

In Feb. 18 – Mar. 5, 2011

Hamlet

Sept. 17 – Oct. 2, 2010

The Diary of Anne Frank Mar. 18 – Apr. 2, 2011 Andrew Lloyd Webber’s

Sunset Boulevard

Apr. 29 – May 14, 2011 Special Event!

Rent

Jun. 10 – Jun. 25, 2011

Exploring the Breadth of Human Experience 801.581.6961 | www.PioneerTheatre.or g A professional theatre in residence at the University of Utah

Major Season Suppor t Provided By:


FOOD&DRINK

restaurant review Basque Supper at La Caille by Chef Drew Ellsworth

O

N A SUNDAY NIGHT TWO weeks ago, I went, unannounced, to La Caille for their Basque family-style supper. I was very pleased. Let me tell you about it. I haven’t been to La Caille for years, so I had been looking forward to this visit for days with great anticipation. I went with friends from work and we all brought great wine. Some of the younger guys don’t drive, so I picked them up and we drove south to the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon. The epic grounds of La Caille are secluded and overgrown on the sides of the old gate — far

more than I remembered. I actually drove past a couple of times before realizing what it was! The beautiful, filigreed gate which screams France, is taller and narrower than I had it in my mind, and the red brick lane leading up to the château is now older, bumpier and even more old world than ever before. My young friends thought we had been transported to another place and time. The lane, by design, meanders and serpents its way toward the restaurant, through a beautiful park of lawns and mature trees. There were families of black rabbits dining on the grasses and many peacocks strolling around as though they owned the place. The magic is still there!

We used the valet parking at the entrance where the red brick becomes a circular plaza. The Art Nouveau glass work around the gables of the château is so authentically reminiscent of France at the turn of the last century, it is almost breathtaking to a Francophile like me. Old neighborhoods in Paris, like Montmartre and Montparnasse, still display this beautiful architectural style. You can say what you want about the French, but secretly we all admire their art. What’s cool about La Caille is the attention to detail in everything. When you enter, there are high ceilings and cracked stone walls with gorgeous, old antique armoires on each side of the vestibule. As you proceed upstairs, you pass the seemingly ancient wine cellar which is stocked by my friend Joe Wright, who has been the sommelier at La Caille for a decade. The bottles are placed in handmade ceramic pipes that have been set in concrete. Other bottles are crammed into old world wrought iron racks so you read the impressive lables: Château Mouton Rochchilde, Château Margaux, Echezeau and Clos de Beze, Caymus and Silver Oak from California, and Brunellos from Italy. We were led by our hostess, a pretty blond woman dressed in the famous La Caille bustier, to a small, semi-private dining room. We had a view of the eves of the château and the park with the ever-present peacocks. A cool breeze was blowing and the French doors throughout the dining rooms were open to the outdoors. Our dining room had a coffered ceiling of botanical relief sculptures depicting roses and bay leaves. By now, the boys from the Wine Store were enthralled! For newcomers, La Caille is truly amazing and a little overwhelming. It was fun for me to introduce young people to Europe via Little Cottonwood Canyon. We were, as it should be in a French restaurant, brought baskets of bread with hand-piped, butter roses. The bread was the best French bread I’ve had in Salt Lake, which says a lot because I make a lot of French bread myself: crispy, crusty, golden on the outside and spongy, chewy and full of holes on the inside. Our first course was a flavorful black bean country soup in a rich broth with a lot of vegetables. We had cracked open a bottle of Silverbirch New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc and a beautiful ’03 Grand Cru

Chablis which was showing a little age and was fragrant, honeyed and delicious. Next, we were served a Caprese salad on a long, rectangular plate — a simple dish with large slices of fresh mozzarella, tomatoes and basil. The salad was drizzled with very good olive oil and tangy balsamic vinegar — classically done and perfect! The entrée was just so beautifully homemade, I almost couldn’t believe I was in a restaurant. Sometimes La Caille gets bad reviews for its food, but on this night I felt like I was at the home of a French friend. There were crisp, braised short ribs on one end of a huge platter and baked halibut on the other end. In the center was a bouquetiere of vegetables: steamed asparagus, new potatoes and broccoli. The fish was served on a bed of creamed spinach which I thought was just delicious. The veggies were perfectly cooked and the melt-in-your-mouth short ribs were laced with a flavorful Bordelaise sauce which I wanted to drink! This night, the food at La Caille was fully matched to the beautiful surroundings. Our wine servers poured us a Premier Cru Mercurey red Burgundy and I brought a Nicolas Cole “Camille” Bordeaux-blend. The wines were awesome with our entrees. We had our choice of three desserts: crepes, Bananas Flambé and crème brulee. How very, very French! We tried all three and although the desserts were quite predictable, they were nicely done and presented with a lot of show. My visit to La Caille was random and they didn’t know I was writing an article so there is no prejudice here or any connection. I can freely say I just love the total experience. If I made any little comments at all, it would be that the bean soup, to my taste, was a little salty — something which no one else mentioned. I also thought the fish, although nicely cooked, had very little flavor or seasoning, something which was only noticed by one other person. But the delicious sauces and vegetables made up for any misgivings or criticisms. I rate my visit at La Caille at 90+. The plus is for the grounds and building which are incomparable to anywhere in Utah. Sadly, La Caille has just gone up for sale and has an iffy future as a time-honored restaurant in Salt Lake City, so please go again soon. The Sunday brunch and Basque Supper are, indeed, memorable. Q

3 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


BIG Chimichangas!

2 TUESDAY

$

ALL BEERS JUST $2

• 25 WINGS FLAVORS • PATIO OPEN • FREE PARKING AT TROLLEY SQUARE • OPEN AT NOON EVERY DAY • OPEN SUNDAY FUN DAY

myspace.com/ trolleywing

Make Love to our Food Experience sophisticated Mexican gastronomy, wines and spirits in a hip, relaxed atmosphere. Fresh, flavorful, festive and sexy… As Frida would have desired.

For Reservations: 801-983-6692 545 West 700 South, Salt Lake City

WEEKLY SPECIALS

www.fridabistro.com

Sunday • Fajitas $11.99

Try our wild coconut, curried wild rice

Monday • 1/2 Off Select Apps Pitchers of Bud Light $8.00 Taco Tuesday • Tacos $2.00 Tecate Beer $2.50 Wednesday • Beef Barbacoa $14.99

2148 Highland Drive

Thursday • Chipotle BBQ Ribs $11.99 Bucket of 5 “Coronitas” $10

801-486-0332

www.omarsrawtopia.com

Food Specials Start at 4 pm till items run out.

noW oPen

tueSdayS g eve4npmin – dusk

Park City at Kimball Junction I-80 & Hwy. 224 (Behind Wells Fargo Bank)

from uce-only for a prod ring the market du tiful most boun ar! e ye time of th

435-645-7000 Weekly Specials are available for Dine In only and may not be used with any other offers. Offer expires June 30th, 2010.

Saturday MorningS

at HiStoric Pioneer Park (300 South, 300 West)

September

18 Cooking Demos Viking Cooking School 25 Art and Culture Day Eve

october

2 Cooking Demos Viking Cooking School 9 Dutch Oven Cook Off City Weekly

Super-sized sunflowers are a sure sign of a bountiful harvest.

QSaltLake Tweets @qsaltlake

Visit slcfarmersmarket.org for market updates Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 35


FOOD&DRINK

cocktail chaer Drag Not a Drag with Brass Monkeys By Ed Sikov

Visit 41 of Salt Lake City’s finest restaurants between September 17 – October 2 and choose a three-course dinner for either $15 or $30. Some participating restaurants offer a delicious two-item lunch special for only $5 or $10. 15

$15 Dinner

Acme Burger Company 30 10 Bambara 30 Bayleaf Café 15 10 Biaggi’s Ristorante Italiano 15 Buca di Beppo 15 10 Caffe Molise 30 10 Cannella’s 15 10 Caputo’s by Night 15 Cedars of Lebanon 15 10 Christopher’s Seafood & Prime Steakhouse 30 10 Copper Canyon Grill House & Tavern 15 10 Copper Onion 30 10 Donovan’s Steak & Chop House 30 Eva Restaurant 30 10

30

$30 Dinner

5

$5 Lunch

Faustina 30 10 Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse and Wine Bar 30 Garden Restaurant 15 Gracie’s 5 Green Pig Pub 15 5 Iggy’s Sports Grill Downtown 15 10 J. Wong’s Asian Bistro 15 5 Lamb’s Grill Café 15 10 Market Street Grill 30 10 Market Street Oyster Bar 30 10 Martine 30 10 Melting Pot 30 Metropolitan 30 10 Naked Fish Japanese Bistro 30 10

10

$10 Lunch

New Yorker 30 10 Oasis Café 15 Olive Bistro 15 10 Red Rock Brewing Company 15 10 Robin’s Nest 5 Ruth’s Chris Steak House Sage’s Café 15 10 Sandbar Mexican Grill 15 10 Settebello Pizzeria Napoletana 15 10 Squatters Pub Brewery 15 10 Star of India 30 10 Takashi 30 Tin Angel Café 30 10 Vienna Bistro 30 10 Wild Grape Bistro 30 10

Presented by:

Supported by:

For information visit www.dineoround.com

30

T

HE LABOR DAY DRAG PARTY in Fire Island Pines is either a hilarious gender circus or a reason to blow some queen’s brains out. Drag is fabulous. It’s the sweating, stinking, drunken guys in wigs who brazenly stick their tongue in your ears that’s either a kick or a nightmare. It’s a party for Pines boys who have discovered the glamour girl within. I wasn’t about to reveal mine in public. I’d make an incredibly ugly Nancy Sinatra. (I’d call to mind a blonde Cynthia Ozick in white leather boots.) Dan wouldn’t do it, either. He’d just look like Dan in a dress. But our housemates all brought suitcases stuffed with secrets; nobody named their inner woman until the big reveal. Jack Fogg came downstairs first. Sammy had put him up to doing it. Jack was clearly miserable — he was wearing a burqa. (His eyes said it all.) Sammy followed in a luxurious purple sari and a bhindi on her forehead. “So what drink are you sending us off with, dude?” Sammy asked. “Miss Jackie-Anne Taliban here needs a drink.” Jackie-Anne was fussing with her crotch. “There’s a pitcher of Brass Monkeys in the fridge,” I said. “What’s a Brass Monkey?” Ms. Taliban asked through the slit in her headpiece. “Rum, vodka and orange juice. The color resembles buffed old brass.” “Make mine a double,” the Islamic fundamentalist begged her Hindu girlfriend. Frankie and Ian then made their entrance. I’d expected more, but all they did was put on long blonde wigs and matching white tennis outfits. Ian immediately sensed my disappointment. “Don’t you know who we are?” He asked in disbelief. I shook my head no. “We’re the Doublemint Twins,” they sang out in unison. “Brava, divas!” Dan said, applauding. “It’s delicious and really strong!” The non

sequitur came out of the burqa’s mouth slit. Sari Sammy agreed. “Seriously, dude!” She said. “I’ll be on my ass before we get to the party.” Then Sal and Sean came down, reminiscent of grizzled, gray Old Year and adorable Baby New Year. Sal went for distinctly middle-aged laughs; he was “Edie Gourmet.” With his face framed by Edie’s signature hairdo, Sal actually looked like her in a most disturbing way. Of course this Edie was carrying a copy of M.F.K. Fisher’s The Art of Eating and had a can of duck confit serving as a hat. Being brilliant himself, Sal persistently overestimates the average gay man’s wit. My unspoken prediction: nobody at the party would get the joke. I was right. It was Sean who stole the show, not only at our place but at the party, too. With his actor’s make up skills, a copper-colored wig and naturally voluptuous body, he was an eerily perfect Beyoncé. When he grabbed the burqa woman by the waist, yanked her close and began singing “We’re your dream girls” in precisely the voice of Ms. Knowles, it was way too much, and I shot some of my Brass Monkey out my nose.

The words ‘rum,’ ‘juice,’ and ‘you’re such an asshole’ formed the foundation of our debate

The Brass Monkey 1 part dark rum 1 part Absolut 2 parts orange juice Pour the ingredients into a shaker filled with ice, and after shaking it just enough to chill it, pour the contents into the prechilled glass of your choice. This drink shouldn’t be served on the rocks. Note: the original (some might call it real) recipe contains much more OJ. It’s boring. My version is a lot more fun. Q Ed Sikov is the author of Dark Victory; The Life of Bette Davis and other books about films and filmmakers.

3 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


BIG Chimichanga!

dining guide Frida Bistro Sophisticated Mexican cuisine, wine and spirits 545 W. 700 South 801-983-6692 Loco Lizard Cantina Serious mexican food since 1999 at Kimball Junction. 1612 Ute Blvd., Park City 435-645-7000 Meditrina Small Plates & Wine Bar Encouraging gastronomic exploring in tapas tradition 1394 S. West Temple 801-485-2055 Metropolitan Handcrafted new American cooking 173 W Broadway 801-364-3472 Off Trax Internet Café Coffee, wi-fi and pool 259 W 900 South 801-364-4307

For people of all ages to hang out, play pool, get on the internet, play music COFFEE BURGERS SANDWICHES SOUPS SALADS APPETIZERS BREAKFAST BRUNCH POOL TABLE VIDEO GAMES JUKE BOX FREE WIFI OPEN Mon-Thur 7a–7p Friday 7a-3p AND After Bar Closing Fridays and Saturdays

259 W 900 S 801 364-4307

Next to Club Try-Angles, Half Block from TRAX in the NEW Gayborhood!

Home of the Happy Hangover Sunday Brunch 11am–2pm Q PON

Free Soda or Coffee with food purchase

www.offtraxslc.com

Omar’s Rawtopia Restaurant Organic live food 2148 S. Highland Dr. 801-486-0332 Sage’s Cafe The freshest and healthiest cuisine possible 473 E 300 South 801-322-3790

Monday • 1/2 Off Select Apps Pitchers of Bud Light $8.00 Taco Tuesday • Tacos $2.00 Tecate Beer $2.50 Wednesday • Beef Barbacoa $14.99 Thursday • Chipotle BBQ Ribs $11.99 Bucket of 5 “Coronitas” $10

Park City at Kimball Junction I-80 & Hwy. 224 (Behind Wells Fargo Bank)

10 AM Gardeners, bring your produce to sell or trade!

FROM

SUNDAYS

Trolley Wing Company We’re Back! Open daily noon to 11pm 550 S 700 East 801-538-0745

The Wild Grape Bistro Eat where the locals eat 481 E South Temple 801-746-5565

Sunday • Fajitas $11.99

Food Specials Start at 4 pm till items run out.

Tin Angel Cafe Local food, music, art. Serving lunch, dinner and Saturday brunch 365 W 400 South 801-328-4155

Vertical Diner Vegetarian restaurant open seven days a week 10 a.m.–9 p.m. 2280 S West Temple 801-484-8378

WEEKLY SPECIALS

435-645-7000 Weekly Specials are available for Dine In only and may not be used with any other offers. Offer expires June 30th, 2010.

JUNE 13 THRU OCTOBER 24

INT’L PEACE GARDEN 1060 SOUTH 900 WEST www.slcpeoplesmarket.org

OUR 2010 SPONSORS

To get listed in this section, please call 801-649-6663 and ask for Brad or e-mail brad@qsaltlake.com Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 7


NIGHT LIFE

bar map

Q

J

Salt Lake City

E 600 N.

by Hunter Richardson

Temple Square

Gateway Mall

200 S

Salt Palace

300 W

S R

Trax Line

Arena

100 S. 200 S.

Intermodal Hub

400 S MAIN ST

500 S

STATE ST

900 W

600 W

V 300 S. City Hall

300 W

600 S

Trax Station

900 S

900 E

1300 S STATE ST

South Salt Lake City

Sugar House

Trax Station

Trax Line

T 3300 S

300 W

nonetheless. Additionally there is The Trapp which has been alive and well for years, serving great drinks in big jars — it reminds me of a cabin filled with booze and games (what could be better than that on a cold evening?). Moving on, there is Club Try-Angles with a pool table and my personal favorite thing: text messages that you can send to the TV for everyone to see (childish, yet completely satisfying). Edge and Fusion are where to go on a night where you find yourself wanting the environment of an old, classic New York City gay bar with lasers and smoke — and to me, that’s a lot better than snow and cold. Ultimately, I feel as winter comes closer and the layers get thicker, the place to be will be anywhere that has the closest parking and best atmosphere. Bar hopping doesn’t become an issue as most people park and stay because wiping snow off the car just isn’t that appealing more than twice a night. Actually, I would bet that the first club to have covered parking would be the most popular during the cold months strictly because no one (gay, lesbian, bisexual or straight) likes cleaning off a snow-covered automobile. So bid farewell to the skimpy clothing. Let’s see the style the Salt Lake City gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community can bring to the table. This winter I challenge you all to be more sophisticated than trendy. More classy than sassy. Refine yourselves in the fact you can outwardly project the great character within, rather than defining yourself through the façade of “individual expression.” You are all beautiful, so show it with your style, not your skin this winter. See you this weekend. Q

Trax Line

F

IRST THINGS FIRST: I REFUSE to get involved in the drama of a situation which I am not directly a part of or cannot single-handedly solve within a reasonable period of time. That said: bars, clubs and lounges, play nice or your “customer” may start to feel uncomfortable. Just saying. OK, to the point now. I am happy to announce that tank top season is over. For all of you who love them: knock it off. That time has passed and the rest of the world can live without being subjected to open armpits, budging necklines and people who should just never wear a tank top in the first place. This is Salt Lake City, not the Jersey Shore. That said, this means fall (and soon winter) is around the corner. So grab your layers because patios will be chilled, the glasses cooled and, of course, the air will be slightly below comfortable. Of course, I understand that this is Utah and guessing the weather is like throwing darts at a board, but still, one can hope. Still, I see a few spots becoming “hot spots” even in the cold weather. Namely, JAM. This well-known and well-loved place may not have the heated rock seat bench anymore, but needless to say they understand how to market in a cold climate (one has to love the many heaters). Also, Püre. On a Friday night, who doesn’t want to park close to an arena filled with warm bodies drinking and having a good time? I think no more explanation is needed. There’s also Babylon. Same-same-but-different to the reasoning above. So, where else is there to go? As I’ve mentioned, Studio 27. It is having a slow start, but it’s been steadily rising in popularity

200 EAST

Q scene No More Tank Tops!

K 2100 S

P 3900 S

Q bar guide WEEKLY BAR EVENTS E CLUB EDGE ●

615 N 400 W • D M K X tinyurl.com/clubedgeslc

T CLUB TRY-ANGLES ●

251 W 900 S • D M N 801-364-3203 • clubtry-angles.com

SUNDAYS

MONDAYS

LATIN GAY NIGHT

KAROAKE W/KADE STEEL

KARAOKE $1 DRAFTS BBQS AT 4PM

BEER-SOAKED WEENIES

●J JAM

BEER BUST BBQ AT 4PM BLOODY MARYS

K KARAMBA ●

LATIN GAY NIGHT DJ FRANK GO-GO DANCERS

751 N 300 W • D F M N 801-891-1162 • jamslc.com 1051 E 2100 S • D M X 801-696-0639 • klubkaramba.com

P PAPER MOON ●

3737 S State St • J K L 801-713-0648 • thepapermoon.info

S STUDIO 27 ●

615 W 100 South • D M 801-363-2200 • studio27slc.com

V TAVERNACLE ●

201 E 300 South • K X 801-519-8800 • tavernacle.com

R THE TRAPP ●

102 S 600 West • B N D K M 801-531-8727 • tinyurl.com/trappslc

FREE POOL $1 DRAFTS $1 MIMOSAS

FREE TEXAS HOLD-EM $4 PAPER MOON STEINS

TUESDAYS

PIANO KARAOKE WITH ERIC 8–11PM

BBQ at 4PM

KARAOKE WITH JAMIE 9PM

THURSDAYS

HIP HOP NIGHT DJ WONDERBOY

DANCE EVOLUTION W/DJ DC

$1 DRAFTS BACKROOM BLUES

SATURDAYS FUSION W/ROBBIE ROB & TIM

KARAOKE

$1 DRAFTS DJ D / DJ BOYTOY

DANCE! DANCE! DANCE!

SUPERSTAR KARAOKE WITH BRIAN G

BLACK OUT DEEP HOUSE W/ DJ MIKE BABBITT

FRIDAY FIX WITH DJ \V/

BOOM BOOM ROOM WITH DJ MIKE BABBITT

KARAOKE W/ MR. SCOTT 8PM $1 CORONAS, RED STRIPE

WHITE TRASH BINGO FREE POOL $2 WELLS, $3 BIG BUD CANS

COUNTRY LINE DANCING 7–9PM WILD WEE KARAOKE 9PM

POLES, CAGES, SEXY WOMEN BEST FEMALE DJs

WOMEN! WOMEN! WOMEN!

SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE

DJ BRENT VINCENT $3 JAGER SHOTS $4 JAGER BOMBS

DJ NAOMI $5 LONG ISLANDS

DJ TONY MARINOS SUMMER MARTINI LUGE

DUELING PIANOS 9PM $3 BIG BUD LIGHT

DUELING PIANOS 9PM $3 BIG BUD LIGHT

DUELING PIANOS 9PM

DUELING PIANOS 9PM

DART TOURNAMENT 7PM DJ DENNIS

DJ DENNIS

POWERBALL KARAOKE W/ TROY 9PM

B = BEAR/LEATHER | D = DANCE FLOOR | F = FOOD | K = KARAOKE NIGHTS | L = MOSTLY LESBIAN | M = MOSTLY GAY MEN | N = NEGHBORHOOD BAR | T = 18+ AREA | X = MIXED GAY/STRAIGHT OR GAY CERTAIN NIGHTS

3 8 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

FRIDAYS

JAM U GAY COLLEGE NIGHT

LATIN NIGHT

$1 DRAFTS KARAOKE W/KEVAN 9PM

WEDNESDAYS


CLUB MILITARY ID ID S L R A E V B H M E IT M W S O ER REE T SERVICEMEMB IVILEGES - EFR R R U P O S R IT O S F A H V IP MEMBERSH TELL — NO CO ’T N O D , K S A DON’T

8 1 R E B M E T P E SATURDAY, S askits) b s e v o l e H ( y a d birth ’s e n e G e t a r b e l Come ce R 20 E B M E T P E S , Y MONDA INALE

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! R E V O N E Z O R HELL HAS F E R E H S I E K ys a d s r u h T KARAoO & s y a n Sund MONDAYS

ERTS C N O C O E D I V TUESDAYS

S E U L B M O O R BACnK t 7pm a in g e b s n o s s le ce

, After the boar nues ti n the party c next door at

ers Da e u q y r lt u s r fo Dancing

WEDNESDAYS

NTS E M A N R U O T POOL eturning October 6 R

AYS $1 DRAFTS D S E U T ▼ S IE N ONDAYS WEE J BOY TO M ▼ TOY, $1 DRAFTS TS F A R D 1 D $ S • Y m A p 4 RAOKE, BBQ at HURSDAYS KARAOKE ▼ FRID A K S Y A D N U S T OPEN DAILY 2PM LY O PEN D AIL Y AT AT 2 PM $1 DRAFTS ▼ S Y A L NIGHT L D A S E E U C T N A ▼ -D E 801-364-3203 251 W 900 S C R S DANCE-DAN GHOUT THE BA 1/2 BLOCK FROM 9th S TRAX STATION U O R ▼ SATURDAY TH S N E E R C

m • offtraxslc.co 259 w 900 s

ON SHY? TEXT HIM

OUR S

WWW.CLUBTRY-ANGLES.COM

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 9


FUN&GAMES

Turn of Phrase Across

1 Pitcher’s rubber 5 Whitman’s dooryard bloomers 11 Get ready for action 15 Succotash bean 16 Tennis star Mauresmo 17 Little Caesar gangster 18 Crude cartel 19 Scent of a Woman Oscar winner 20 Point of view intro, at Gay.com 21 Start of a quip 24 Sault ___ Marie 25 Start of a footnote abbr. 26 Threesome 28 Doesn’t feel up 32 Buster Brown’s bulldog 35 End of the quip 39 Victor/Victoria actor Peter 40 Verdi opera 41 ___ Gay Hamilton 42 Liam of Kinsey 44 Straw hat 46 Beginning to whiz 47 k.d. lang’s “___ Gal” 52 Barrie’s precipitation 53 Source of the quip 55 No note for a butch 58 “The Mod Squad” character

59 Edmund to Colette? 63 Saying 64 “Village Voice” honor 65 Three Tall Women writer 66 Material on a drag queen’s legs 67 Tony-winning musical 68 Defamation in print 69 Forest opening 70 Like Izzard’s comedy 71 Rock Hudson roles, usually Down

1 Lagging behind 2 Prefix with suction 3 Nat. counterpart in MLB 4 Bottoms 5 Memory gap 6 “___ my wit’s end!” (cry of a bottom comic’s lover?) 7 One who says, “Let us prey” 8 You could get caught in this 9 Armed Forces VIP 10 Capital of Margaret Cho’s ancestral home 11 Adventurous desert queen 12 Hoar 13 Alpine feedback 14 Billy Elliot epithet 22 “Believe ___ not!”

23 Mil. student body 26 Number of sides to a gay symbol 27 Transsexual Richards 28 Queen of the hill 29 Dick’s running mate 30 Like Abner, before Viagra? 31 NBC sketch source 33 Stud’s strides 34 To eat, to Ulrichs 35 Tart taste 36 Kind of column 37 Old TV comedian George 38 Poet Teasdale 43 Like antigay language 45 Third testacle? 48 Pussy’s last name, in Goldfinger 49 Greased the palm of 50 With title to 51 Fine point 53 George Burns film 54 Gay porn director Francis 55 Dangle like a package 56 Pastoral poem 57 The Oscars, e.g. 60 “Dancing Queen” band 61 Have-not’s condition 62 Disney pictures PUZZLE ANSWERS ON PAGE 47

Cryptogram

A cryptogram is a puzzle where one letter in the puzzle is substituted with another. For example: ECOLVGNCYXW YCR EQYIIRZNBZN YZU PSZ! Has the solution: CRYPTOGRAMS ARE CHALLENGING AND FUN! In the above example Es are all replaced by Cs. The puzzle is solved by recognizing letter patterns in words and successively substituting letters until the solution is reached. This week’s hint: S = W Theme: A quote by Eliza Byard of GLSEN on the correlation between anti-gay bullying and religious views.

VZY SFIR ‘LECCFV’ WX AFV OEIV FL EAB IYPWCWFQX KIYYR.

___ ____ ‘______’ __ ___ ____ __ ___ _________ _____. 4 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Team Avalanche Fund-raiser for Gay Bowl The Mountain West Flag Football League will host a fundraiser pool party for Salt Lake City Avalanche at Rick and Kyle’s pool at 259 N. State Street from 2–7 p.m. on Sept. 18. The league will send players from the four teams that participated in this past summer’s league play to the national championship, Gay Bowl X, in Phoenix, Oct. 8–10. Each year, the National Gay Flag Football

League hosts a national championship in the city of a participating team that ran a summer flag football league and tournament. For 2010, Phoenix was previously chosen to host over 16 teams from all over the United States and Canada. Twenty dollars will get you entrance, two free drinks, a free BBQ, music and a chance to meet this year’s flag football players. Jump in the pool and play water badminton or volleyball, and relax in the last days of summer in Salt Lake City.

Q les

Saturday, Sept 18 Come Celebrate the Trapp’s

20 ANNIVERSARY TH

Q doku Q doku

Each Sudoku puzzle has a unique solution which can be reached

logically without Enterwhich digitscan 1 through 9 into the Each Sudoku puzzle has a guessing. unique solution be reached logically withoutblank guessing. EnterEvery digitsrow 1 through into theone blank Everyasrow spaces. must 9contain of spaces. each digit, must must contain one of each digit, as must each column and each 3x3 square. column each but 3x3connected, square. Qdoku is puzzles. actually five Qdoku each is actually five and separate, Sudoku

Level: Medium

separate, but connected, Sudoku puzzles.

Level: Medium

5 7 1 8 2 5 9 1

8 9 5 1 1 6

2

9 7

3

6 4 7 5

3 9 1

9 3 5

3

3

4 5 5 4 8 7

4

7 9

6 4 6 5 9 4 9 3 1 6 3 8 4 5 3 7 9 9 6 3 7 1 9 3 5 8 2 7 6 2 1 9

5 6

1

8

5 2 8

4

1 3 5

2 1 8

4 5

3

2

5 4

3 5

6

4

Sundays 1

5 9 7 4 1 5 1 9 4 7 1 6 4 1 3

All day, all night Showtime at 7pm

3 7 6

BBQ, 4pm

Fridays

Dart Tournament, 7pm

8 7 2 4 3 8 2 6 102 SOUTH 600 WEST 1 5

801–531–8727

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 1


QMMUNIT Y

Quni groups

Utah has a vibrant gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community with many organizations for nearly any activity or interest you may have. Try these organizations out. For corrections or additions, please email editor@qsaltlake.com

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL Aetna ANGLE * HuntR@Aetna.com . . 801-256-7137 Armed Forces Support . 801-581-7890 LGBTQ-AFFIRMATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPISTS GUILD OF UTAH A professional group for mental-health providers. We meet monthly to network, educate ourselves, and improve the counseling services of LGBTQ individuals. www.lgbtqtherapists.com

Disability Law Center. . . . . . 801-(800) 662-9080 * info@disabilitylawcenter.org EQUALITY UTAH  equalityutah.org * info@equalityutah.org Working for a fair & just Utah 175 W 200 S, Ste 3001 . 801-355-3479 Human Rights Campaign, Utah  hrcutah.org * HRCSaltLakeUT@aol.com

National Organization for Women PO Box 57816, Murray . . . . . 801-268-0363

LOG CABIN REPUBLICANS, UTAH  logcabinutah.org * ut@logcabin.org

Pride at Work, Utah . . . . 801-531-6137

UTAH STONEWALL DEMOCRATS  utahstonewalldemocrats.org 455 S 300 E, Ste 301 . . . . . . . 801-328-1212 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-532-5330

Q BUSINESS ALLIANCE A guild of business owners, professionals, entrepreneurs and non-profit organizations that holds social events on the first Friday of the month and business breakfasts on the third Friday of the month. qsaltlake.com/qba . . . . . . . . 801-649-6663 Salt Lake County Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Employees * jdonchess@slco.org. . . . 801-273-6280

HEALTH & HIV Hermanos de Luna y Sol * arman@utahAIDS.org 1408 S 1100 E . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-487-2323 MEDICRUISER  medicruiser.com Gay, lesbian, transgender friendly staff and providers. Low cost, high quality Medical Care. Testosterone & hormone therapy, HIV/STD, weight management, addiction treatment 1850 S 300 W, Ste A . . . 801-484-5504 No. Utah HIV/AIDS Project Walk-Ins Welcome. Every other Monday 5–7pm 536 24th St, Ste 2B, Ogden . . . . 801-393-4153 PEOPLE WITH AIDS COALITION OF UTAH  pwacu.org 358 S 300 E . . . . . . . . . . 801-484-2205 PLANNED PARENTHOOD 654 S 900 E . . . . . . . . . . 800-230-PLAN SALT LAKE VALLEY HEALTH DEPT. — HIV/STD CLINIC  slvhealth.org/hiv/ 610 S 200 E . . . . . . . . . . 801-534-4666 University of Utah Department of Family and Preventative Medicine  uuhsc.utah.edu/dfpm 375 Chipeta Way, Ste A . . . . . 801-581-7234 UTAH AIDS FOUNDATION  utahaids.org * mail@utahaids. org 1408 S 1100 E . . . . . . . . 801-487-2323

HOMELESS SERVICES Center for Women and Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-261-9177 Homeless Youth Resource Center Youth ages 15-21. 655 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-364-0744 The Road Home  theroadhome.org 210 Rio Grande St . . . . . . . . . 801-359-4142 YWCA 322 E 300 S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-537-8600

POLITICAL American Civil Liberties Union  acluutah.org * aclu@acluutah.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-521-9862

RELIGIOUS & SPIRITUAL AFFIRMATION SALT LAKE  affirmation.org/saltlake Affirmation: Gay & Lesbian Mormons serves the needs of gay Mormon women and men, as well as bisexual and transgender LDS and their supportive family and friends, through social and educational activities. . . . . . 801-486-6977 BOUNTIFUL COMMUNITY CHURCH  bountifulucc.org * regal66@ yahoo.com 150 N 400 E, Btfl . . . . . . 801-295-9439 Cache Valley Unitarian Universalists 596 E 900 N, Logan . . . . . . . . 435-755-2888 CHRIST UNITED METHODIST  christumcutah.net Regular Sunday Worship Schedule: 8am, 9am, 10:30am Fellowship Time: 10am Childcare available 8:45am-11:45am Sunday mornings 2375 E 3300 S . . . . . . . . 801-486-5473 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF SLC  firstbaptist-slc.org * office@firstbaptist-slc.org Jesus didn’t discriminate and neither do we. Please join us. 777 S 1300 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-582-4921 First Unitarian Church * slcuu.org 569 S 1300 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-582-8687 Gay Latter-day Saints  gaylds.net Glory to God Community Church 375 Harrison Blvd, Ogden . . 801-394-0204 Holladay United Church of Christ 2631 E Murray-Holladay Rd . 801-277-2631 Inner Light Center . . . . . 801-268-1137 * innerlightcenter.net Integrity/Utah St. James Church . . . . . . . . . 801-566-1311

QUEER SPIRIT * info@queerspirit.org Men loving men, gathering together in loving and intimate ways to explore, dialog, enjoy, dream and celebrate the “who” and “what” we are in the broader community through weekend retreats, vision quests, monthly gatherings . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-557-9203 Restoration Church of Jesus Christ 2900 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . 801-359-1151 Sacred Light of Christ 823 S 600 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-595-0052 Salt Lake Center for Spiritual Living 870 E North Union Ave, Midvale . . . . . . . . . 801-307-0481 St. Paul’s Episcopal Church 261 S 900 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-322-5869 SOUTH VALLEY UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST SOCIETY  www.svuus.org * svuus@xmission. com An intentionally diverse religious community. You are welcome here, no matter your age, race, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity. South Valley is the place where U can be U. 6876 S Highland Dr (2000 E). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-944-9723 Unitarian Universalist Church Ogden 705 23rd St, Ogden . . . . . . . . 801-394-3338 WASATCH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  www.wpcslc.org No matter who or where you are on your journey of faith, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ – you are welcome at Wasatch Presbyterian Church. Ours is a community committed to the nurture of Christian faith through worship, learning and service – and we hope to share our enthusiasm and care with you. 1626 S 1700 E . . . . . . . . 801-487-7576

SOCIAL ALTERNATIVE GARDEN CLUB  altgardenclub.org Meets 1st Weds at 7:30PM in Sugar House Park Garden Club Building Bisexual Community Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 ext 14 Meets the 2nd Thurs each month at 7pm in the Multi-purpose room at the Center. Engendered Species  es-transgender.com * deborahthai@yahoo.com801-320-0551 Gamofites  gamofites.org . . . . . . . 801-444-3602 Gay and Lesbian Parents of Utah * glpu@hotmail.com

LDS Reconciliation  ldsreconciliation.org Activity Info Line . . . . . . . . . . 801-296-4797

Imperial Rainbow Court of Northern Utah  irconu.org, PO Box 3131, Ogden, UT 84409

Lifebreath Center/Interfaith Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-363-9229

Kindly Gifts by Stitch & Bitch . . . . . . 801-487-7008

Provo Community United Church of Christ 175 N University Ave, Provo . 801-375-9115

Ogden OUTreach Resource Center  ogdenoutreach.org 705 23rd Street . . . . . . . . . . . 801-686-4528

4 2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

PARENTS, FAMILIES AND FRIENDS OF LESBIANS & GAYS  pflag.org Ogden: 3rd Thursday, 705 E 23rd St * ogdenpflag@q.com Salt Lake City: 1233 S 1000 E 801-244-6423 * slcpflag@gmail.com St. George: 823 Harrison * pflagsaintgeorge@gmail.com

UTAH PRIDE CENTER  utahpridecenter.org * thecenter@utahpridecenter.org Community Events • Lending Library • Assembly Room • Support Groups • Resource & Referral • Utah Pride Organizers • Youth Activity Center 361 N 300 W . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Toll-free . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-874-2743

University of Utah Women’s

QUEER VILLAGE  queervillage.blogspot.com

UTAH QUEER EVENTS  groups.yahoo.com/group/ UtahQueerEvents

Utah State University Gay and

Western Transsexual Support Group . . . . . . . . . 435-882-8136

(GLSRC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435-797-4297

SPORTS

* usuglsrc@yahoo.com

QUEEREADS  twitter.com/queereads Book club hosted by Sam Weller’s Bookstore and co-sponsored by the Utah Pride Center that discusses queer literature. 254 S Main St . . . . . . . . 801-328-2586 QVINUM GAY & LESBIAN WINE TASTING GROUP  www.qvinum.com Fun and fabulous wine tasting club for gay and lesbian and other fabulous wine lovers. Monthly wine tastings at members’ homes. Join us – bring the wine of the month or some delicious yummy. Mix, mingle, slurp – but don’t spit. We’re not that kind of group. RAINBOW CLASSIC CAR CLUB Don R. Austin. . . . . . . . . 801-485-9225 ROTC-SLC  rotcslc.com * rotcslc@yahoo.com ROTC-Salt Lake City is a performancebased organization, centered in the lesbian and gay community. Men and women, straight and gay, we come together to form a modern-day color guard. . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-261-3694 Royal Court of the Golden Spike Empire  rcgse.org * chairman@rcgse.org SimplySocial  simply-social.org A group of gay men dedicated to building a vibrant community through friendship. SOUTHERN UTAH GLBT COMMUNITY CENTER * suglbtcc@yahoo.com . . . . . . 801-(435) 313-GLBT  groups.yahoo.com/groups/suglbtcc SOUTHERN UTAH PRIDE  southernutahpride.org Strength In Numbers(Sin) SL  groups.yahoo.com/group/ SINSaltLake A social network for gay men living with HIV and AIDS. sWerve  swerveutah.com

Resource Center  sa.utah.edu/women 200 S Central Campus Dr, Rm 411 . 801-581-8030 Utah State University Pride Alliance  groups.yahoo.com/group/usupride/

Lesbian Student Resource Center  usu.edu/glsrc

Frontrunners Utah . . . . . 801-519-8889

Utah Valley State College Gay

Lambda Hiking Club  gayhike.org

Straight Alliance

Mountain West Basketball League angst2008@gmail.com . . . . 801-598-3844

 uvsc.edu/clubs/club.cfm?clubID=251

Mountain West Flag Football League  mwffl.org . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-359-2544 Mountain West Volleyball League  slcgaa.org . . . . . . . . . 773-301-5343 Northern Utah Women ROC  groups.yahoo.com/group/ OgdenOutdoorWomen Social organization of lesbian and straight women interested in walking, camping, festivals, cook outs, shows, skiing and creative workshops.

 groups.yahoo.com/group/uvscgsa Weber State University Gay Straight Alliance  organizations.weber.edu/dlsu/  groups.yahoo.com/group/WeberDLSU * WeberDLSU@yahoo.com

YOUTH Homeless Youth Resource Center Youth ages 15-21.

Pride Community Softball League  prideleague.com * pcsl@prideleague.com . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Ext 21

655 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-364-0744

Salt Lake City Gay Athletic Association  slcgaa.org

TINT (TOLERANT INTELLIGENT

QUAC – QUEER UTAH AQUATIC  quacquac.org * questions@ quacquac.org Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and straight swimming team. All swimmers of any skill level welcome. See web site for swim schedule . . . . . . . 801-232-7961 Salt Lake Goodtimes Bowling League  saltlakegoodtimes.com Sundays starting in August . . 801-832-9745 Ski Out Utah  skioututah.com STONEWALL SHOOTING SPORTS OF UTAH  stonewallshootingsportsutah.org Utah Gay and Lesbian Ski Week communityvisions.org . . . . . . 877-429-6368 Utah Gay Men’s Tennis Group groups.yahoo.com/group/ utahgaymenstennis Utah Gay Mountain Bike Riders groups.yahoo.com/group/ utahgaymtnbike

Gay LDS Young Adults  glya.com

NETWORK OF TEENS) The Utah Pride Center’s youth activity center provides a safe place for people ages 14-20 regardless of race, ethnicity, physical ability, religion, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation or identity. It provides social and support groups for GLBTQ youth and offers food, a big screen TV, video games, computers, a library, a pool table, and much more! Drop-in hours: Tuesday thru Friday 3pm-9pm, Saturday 5pm-9pm 355 N 300 W . . . . . . 801-539-8800 x14

Not Listed?

UTAH BEAR ALLIANCE  utahbears.com * info@utahbears.com Social/service group for Bears, Cubs and their admirers. Check the web site for a calendar of our activities

UNIVERSITY & COLLEGE

Utah Families Coalition * admin@utahfamilies.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Ext. 23

Gay and at BYU  groups.yahoo.com/group/ gayandatBYU/

UTAH MALE NATURISTS  www.umen.org A social group for gay, bisexual and gaypositive men that holds nonsexual naked social and recreational events, including pool/hottub parties, cocktail parties, potlucks, movie nights and overnight campouts throughout the year. Guests are welcome at most events.

Gay-Straight Alliance Network  gsanetwork.org/

with your organization

Salt Lake Community College Coloring Outside the Lines . . . . . . . . 801-957-4562 * coloring_outside_lines@yahoo.com

name, url, address

Southern Utah University Pride  suu.edu/orgs/pride/

and a short paragraph

Utah Polyamory Society 801-309-7240  groups.yahoo.com/group/ UtahPolyamorySociety 1st Friday of the month, 6:30pm, Utah Pride Center, 4th Sunday of the month at Grounds for Coffee/Clrfld

University of Utah Lesbian & Gay Student Union  utah.edu/lgsu/

on what your group

University of Utah LGBT Resource Center  sa.utah.edu/lgbt 200 S Central Campus Dr, Rm 409 801-587-7973

does and when and

Delta Lambda Sappho Union Weber State Univ. . . . . . . . . . 801-627-1639

email editor@qsaltlake.com

and/or phone number

where it meets.


Q Scopes You are as beautiful as you feel, Scorpio! by Jack Fertig

Venus is in Scorpio, tempting deep, dark passions, both erotic and aesthetic. Mercury in Virgo sextile Venus brings in critical insight and shrewd vision. Saturn is right in the middle, adding focus and structure. Put up that sling and/or take that art history class.

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ARIES (March 20 – April 19) Working out, tight-fitting clothes and chit-chat in the bar can get you lots of places, but never very far. Superficial charm will work, but more mature and darker will help you find a solid match. Try quoting Dorothy Parker.

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TAURUS (April 20 – May 20) Want to please your sweetie? His or her secret desire could be a naughty, nude maid. It’s one way to get the housework done. No sweetie? Someone at work wants to put some sugar in your bowl.

Better yet, make a very serious and practical plan about how you’re going to increase your earnings. It will take hard work, but you can do it!

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LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Worries may be exaggerated, but still point to real problems. You have strength and value you don’t realize, and those buried talents can get you through. Critical self-analysis should always include the positive.

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SCORPIO (October 23 – Nov. 21) You are as beautiful as you feel, and however you feel about yourself is how the world will see you. If you need support and convincing, let a friend help you create a new look.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 – Dec. 20) Trust your instincts – but only so far – for inspiration to get through the maze of politics and hierarchies that stands between you and success. Run those notions past a good friend who can improve your ideas.

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GEMINI (May 21- June 20) Staying home and doing housework can be more fun than you expect. Take it as a creative challenge. You could also expand that creativity to some efforts in the community, or share an adventure with some nephews and/or nieces. CANCER (June 21- July 22) Write a letter to – or draw a picture of – the parents you always wanted. Then write a letter telling your real parents of all your disappointments, how they failed you and you them. Don’t mail it! Just get it off your chest and forgive everyone involved.

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LEO (July 23 – August 22) A serious talk about bills, accounting and fairness can save you and your housemates some decent money. Live alone? At least go over the bills and consider how your parents or grandparents got through the depression. Those pennies add up!

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VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Sit down and have a serious discussion about how you can economize.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 21 – January 19) While you’re at the top of your game, new ideas and self-criticism to hone your skills will help you to rise even higher. Suggestions and praise from admiring friends should be happily accepted, although with a grain of salt. AQUARIUS (January 20 – Feb. 18) Wise as you are, are you smart enough to keep ego and pride out of your own way? The more you try to look good, the less you will. Let your facts and figures do the talking and you’ll sizzle.

Free Cover All Night Don’t Miss Out on this !!! Over 300 People Every Sunday

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PISCES (February 19 – March 19) Acting as (or actively seeking) the wise and well-traveled voice of mature experience can help you find passion, if not actual love. What does your partner say? New adventures are good; they don’t necessarily require a new playmate.

Jack Fertig, a professional astrologer since 1977, is available for personal and business consultations in person in San Francisco, or online everywhere. He can be reached at 415-864-8302, starjack.com or qscopes@qsaltlake.com.

anagram An anagram is a word or phrase that can be made using the letters from another word or phrase. Rearrange the letters below to answer:

Name the out comedian who plays Wendover on Sept. 25.

DYKE WAN ASS _____ _____ PUZZLE SOLUTIONS ARE ON PAGE 47

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 3

THE BEST LATINO GAY NIGHT WITH THE BEST MUSIC BY DJ FRANK THE HOTTEST GO- GO DANCERS SHOWS & ENTERTAINMENT AND THE BEST CROWD IN UTAH...


BE AR ACUDA

JAM Welcomes Bearracuda and Blue Alley Fair by Brad Di Iorio

The Marmalade District’s only gay bar, Club JAM, will pay tribute to Salt Lake’s leather, fetish and Levis crowd with the revival of the Blue Alley Fair, welcoming San Francisco’s Bearracuda, and presenting an alternative tattoo and spit-shine Sunday event. Seen as Salt Lake’s prelude to San Francisco’s ultimate leather fest, the Folsom Street Fair, the Blue Alley Fair is a tamer version, celebrating leather, kink and fetish accoutrements and self-expression. On Sept. 18, Bearracuda promoter, Matt Mikesell will bring his successful bear party to Salt Lake City for the first time. “We basically go to our favorite cities that we have a connection in,” said Mikesell. “Our connection in Salt Lake City was my old, old friend, Princess Kennedy. She hooked us up with the great guys at JAM.” Bearracuda started at a small club in San Francisco as an alternative to other bear hangouts, featuring great music, dancing, and a focus on making friends and connections. “I’m a 34-year-old guy who has lived in San Francisco off and on for 15 years. I started Bearracuda in 2006, because I thought that bears really deserved more in San Francisco,” explained Mikesell. “All that was offered back then were bars that never changed their décor and didn’t really make much of an effort to draw people in. If you wanted to dance, then the parties were few and far between as well as being pretty expensive.” Two years ago, the first satellite party was held

in Seattle — adding Portland and New Orleans, the following year. This year, 12 cities are included in the tour, including Atlanta, Sydney, Vancouver, and, of course, Salt Lake City. “We’re a bear event, but we get every type of guy coming to the club … with the majority of them having facial hair,” said Mikesell. “We were voted ‘Best Club for Queer Men’ in San Francisco’s weekly paper in 2008, 2009 and 2010.” Mikesell creates and promotes the events on his own and has worked with other promoters, deejays and event coordinators to make the Bearracuda event a large and fun party. Attending to the tunes at Bearracuda SLC is famed circuit party DJ Matt Consola, who is now considered a Bearracuda mainstay. DJ Consola began spinning when he was 15 years old, and for the last 20 years has performed as resident DJ at Metropolis (San Francisco), Crobar (Miami and Chicago) and Pure/Amsterdam (Denver). Consola has also spun at raves and circuit parties for both San Francisco and Los Angeles Pride Festivals, and at both Black and White Parties in Palm Springs. He has also recently opened for The Pet Shop Boys for their sold out Pandemonium World Tour when they played in San Francisco for two nights at the historic Warfield Theater in 2009. Consola also co-owns record label Redzone Records that produces and promotes dance music and dance artists. “You can expect a very busy night full of beef and fur with fantastic tunes from Mike Babbit

and Matt Consola,” said Mikesell. “We’ve had sexy video visuals done for this event and there will be a snack table for our guys at the club. [Consola] is putting a very special set for this evening with many of the songs he’s remixed himself.” For Saturday night’s Bearracuda at JAM, there will be a $5 cover charge before 10 p.m. and $7 after. “We’re hoping that people are going to enjoy the friendly atmosphere and the great tunes,” added Mkesell. On Sunday, beginning at 4 p.m., JAM will present the Blue Alley Fair with vendors as diverse as tattoo artists and leather and costume clothing makers. In years past, the Blue Alley Fair was presented as an alternative, fetish-styled street fair in Salt Lake City, but a promoter has not

taken the reigns to organize the event on a continuing yearly basis. Brian Morris of JAM would like the event to continue as a prelude and nod to the West Coast’s larger leather and fetish celebration, the Folsom Street Fair, which attracts over 600,000 visitors to San Francisco during the last weekend of September each year. JAM will feature drink specials and a BBQ, along with various local and national vendors who will provide attendees with opportunities to explore their kinky side. Attendees can get a military haircut, get their army boots shined, or add to their personal collection of toys. Q

Bike For Life 2010

the Walk For Life. “Last year we had about 60 riders who raised more than $5000,” said Measom. “We’d love to exceed those numbers — so far we’re at about half that, so hopefully we can get the word out and get people registered.” Cyclists set their own fund-raising goals, and there is no minimum in fund raising required. Participants create their own fund-raising pages from UAF’s website through the First Giving link that collects and documents online donations. The pages can be sent out in an e-mail or be directed to a Facebook page, where contributors can pledge by mile, for the whole ride, or in any way cyclists have chosen for their donations to be collected. “We will have a van trailing the route to watch for any kind of emergency situations, as well as crossing guards along the route to report anything that may happen,” stressed Measom. “There will be two water stations along the route — one near Hogle Zoo, which is the turn around point for the low intensity course, and another at the top of Emigration Canyon, which is the turn around point for the full intensity course.” Funds from the Bike For Life event will support the UAF HIV/STD test site, fund the purchase of condoms and safe-sex devices, and go to prevention programs for those at risk of getting HIV. They will also contribute to services for people living with AIDS, including case management,

health-related workshops and the on-site food bank at the UAF office. “Helmets and bikes are mandatory; [a] raincoat is optional depending on the weather, and we highly recommend bikers bring a water bottle,” added Measom. Bike For Life will end at the 9th and 9th Street Festival which will be in full swing at 10 a.m. and will end at 6 p.m. in the very gay-friendly neighborhood of 900 E. 900 South. Fund-raising incentives include a Bike For Life T-shirt for raising $40 or more, a T-shirt and a special UAF water bottle for those raising $150 or more, a T-shirt, UAF water bottle and a special UAF hat for $250 or more, and a T-shirt, water bottle, hat, and a specially designed 500 Club hooded sweatshirt as well as an invitation to the UAF’s 500 Club party, for those cyclists raising over $500. Adam Frost, who was a founding member of Cycle Out, Utah’s gay and lesbian cycling club, will be participating in Bike For Life again this year. “The event is fun and at the same time helps people in the local community. Plus, I get to see some friends that I wouldn’t otherwise run into,” Frost said. “I have ridden this year’s course up Emigration Canyon a couple of times in the past months and have really enjoyed it. The scenery is amazing.” Last year, Frost said he did have a slight run-in with a motorist as the course wound through

downtown Salt Lake City. “Being the first year, there weren’t as many riders as other events I’ve attended, but that comes with being a new event,” he added. And Larry Lee, silver team medalist in bowling at this year’s Gay Games in Cologne, Germany is participating again. “My commitment to my sponsors last year was that I would ride 90 miles for the Bike For Life,” he said. “At that time, I lived in Layton. As to the course changes, I hate hills, so I am not excited about the change to Emigration Canyon. Still, it will be different and certainly a challenge.” Lee’s children have participated in Walk For Life events for years and will support him in this year’s Bike For Life efforts. “My goal this year is $1,200 and so far I am at $700. Anything I raise will be matched up to $1,000,” said Lee. “Most importantly, I get to help a wonderful organization that is working hard to help people impacted by HIV and to reduce the rate of HIV infection.” For more information about Walk For Life or Bike For Life, go to the Utah AIDS Foundation’s website at uaf.org and click on either event. If you would like to contribute to a specific cyclist, go to Facebook and type in Walk For Life or look up specific names of participating cyclists. Bike For Life will begin at 8 a.m. on the north end of Liberty Park, located between 600 and 700 East and 900 South. Q

by Brad Di Iorio

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HE SECOND ANNUAL BIKE FOR Life will take place Sept. 18, marking 25 years of fund raising by the Utah AIDS Foundation for Utahns living with HIV and AIDS. Accompanying the popular (and older) Walk For Life event at Liberty Park on Saturday morning, interested cyclists can register the day of the event at 8 a.m., but many cyclists have already registered and are raising money on their sponsorship pages which they created on UAF’s website. “Bike For Life is a powerful public awareness event and one of our most exciting new fund-raisers,” said Nathan Measom, UAF’s development director and Bike For Life program coordinator. “The route has changed from a city course to a challenging canyon course.” There are two ride options for cyclists this year: a high-intensity 22-mile from Liberty Park to the top of Emigration Canyon and back, and a low-intensity ride, or about 11 miles. Both rides will take place on the same route where there will be hills. “The low intensity ride is about half of the regular ride,” added Measom. “Theoretically, riders can turn around on the route and head back whenever they feel like they need to.” Registration is free for both Ride For Life and

4 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Club JAM is at 751 N. 300 West. For more information on Bearracuda visit bearracuda.com, or look for the party on Facebook, where several parties are also scheduled for Folsom Street Festival.


spinning Top 40 remix on Fridays

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 5


Come get Hunky Every Sunday night at The Tav

KARAOKE

SUNDAYS AND TUESDAYS DOLLAR DRAFTS Sundays, Mondays and Wednesdays OLDIES Mondays DUELING PIANOS Wednesdays through Saturdays

Non-Smoking

Corner of 3rd South and 2nd East for 7 years 801-519-8900 www.tavernacle.com A Private Club for Members

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QTALES

the perils of petunia pap-smear A Tale of a Job Called Blow by Petunia Pap-Smear

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HE ROAD TO CHOIR PRACTICE is fraught with danger and excitement. It is very easy as a drag queen to imagine that, when dressed to the nines in my finest polyester, I assume the identity of a drag queen super hero. Petunia Pap-Smear! Protector of Prissy Princesses, and defender of all things sparkly. I see myself just like Captain James T. Kirk commanding the Starship Enterprise, commanding my own personal starship — my large land yacht Queer-Tanic — maneuvering about the Intermountain West in an ongoing mission to “Go where no man has gone before,� while dispensing etiquette lessons, beauty tips and makeovers to biker gangs and Relief Society sisters. Sadly, in reality, I’m much less like Captain Kirk and more like Barbarella, the intergalactic slut. But a super hero must go with her strengths. Nevertheless, I do, on occasion, remove the fake boobs, take off the tiara and use an industrial paint stripper to remove my makeup. Then, my jewelry safely under lock and key and my hair consigned to the shelf, I slide into some Fruit of the Looms. A pair of Dockers and a polo shirt later, I begin my once weekly pilgrimage to sing with the Salt Lake Men’s Choir. This rather plain and unadulterated appearance is my civilian disguise which I don in order to be able to move about the community with anonymity. One typical Thursday during evening rush hour, I was at the helm of Queer-Tanic proceeding at maximum warp speed to choir practice. Having safely negotiated the treacherous Spaghetti Bowl Nebula, I was going east

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through the Interstate 80 worm hole, nearing the Foothill System. Suddenly, Queer-Tanic’s engine coughed and died, ceasing all forward propulsion. Luckily, I was able to coast in to the very, very narrow emergency lane and turn on my emergency beacons. No problem, the drag queen motto (which has been plagiarized by a para-military youth organization which shall remain nameless) is “Be prepared.� As a 10-year Car Talk listener, I prepared to exit the craft to diagnose and perhaps even fix the problem. But as I cracked open the hatch, a huge triple trailer truck more ominous than a Klingon Bird of Prey, zoomed by at Warp 9, within about 18 inches of the side of QueerTanic’s port side. Because Commander Scott has gone to that great engine room in the sky and is not available to make it go, and there was not a single lesbian with a tool box within sight, I flipped open my communicator (styled cell phone) and issued a distress call to Starfleet (Triple A) command. The operator asked if I was in a safe location. I looked out the window at the continuing maelstrom of speeding traffic and replied, “No.� She immediately contacted the Highway Patrol to send protective escort. Very shortly, a most handsome Utah Highway Patrolman looking ever-so-stunning in his tight fitting uniform (economic stimulus money well spent, if you ask me) arrived and began flashing his lights. I thought to myself: please don’t let this be like an episode of Star Trek where the gorgeous unnamed crewman accompanying the landing party is the first one killed. Before long, a Federation tow

Cryptogram: The word ‘faggot’ is not part of any religious creed.

Anagram: Wanda Sykes

honor ro These businesses brought you this issue of QSaltLake. Make sure to thank them with your patronage. vessel arrived and captured Queer-Tanic in its tractor beam and brought me safely to choir practice a little flustered, but no worse for the wear. Except, that is, for a nasty case of cotton mouth (usually when faced with a handsome man in uniform, I tend to drool, but the extreme heat of the day left me parched instead). Once again, I followed our motto and popped a Ricola throat lozenge to help keep things lubricated. (Cue the alpenhorn and yodeler.) Well, as it just so happened, that was the night a brand new, hot looking guy joined the choir and came and sat right beside me. Since hospitality is a queen’s greatest virtue, I engaged the new stud in friendly conversation between songs to make him feel welcome. He asked if I could smell licorice and I told him that it was probably the Ricola and pursed my lips in order to produce a gentle blow job of air to confirm my theory. During my high school and college years, I spent about 10 years playing trombone in the marching band. Did you know that tromboners “do itâ€? in seven positions? Anyway, all that boner blowing must have left me with a very strong diaphragm, because the resulting flow of air created a vortex into which the Ricola was sucked, and subsequently launched from between my lips like a slippery wet Photon Torpedo. To my great dismay, I could not close my lips around it quickly enough and it took flight. I watched in horror as it arched into the air, as if in slow motion, and landed right on the new hottie’s arm. I learned as a little princess that it’s not nice manners to spit on new acquaintances. It just isn’t a good way to win friends and influence people. Not knowing exactly the best course of action at this juncture, after staring at the offending lozenge for a moment, I quickly retrieved it from his arm and returned it from whence it flew. He graciously excused my blow job faux pas. Being highly embarrassed, I turned and paid extra attention to the director so as to pretend that the unfortunate blow job never occurred. To my amazement, the stud returned the next week, undaunted and ready to sing. What a guy! Like always these events leave us with many eternal questions: 1. According to the hanky code, what color kerchief is spit? 2. Must I wear Lederhosen to suck on Ricola? 3. Must I learn to yodel and play the alpenhorn? 4. Would a Certs breath mint be as aerodynamic as Ricola? 5. Is there a blow job mishap support group? These and other important questions to be answered in future chapters of “The Perils of Petunia Pap-Smear.â€? Q

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 7

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NATIONAL NEWS

BY REX WOCKNER

Federal Judge Strikes Down Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips in Riverside, Calif., struck down the military’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell ban on open gays in the military Sept. 9. Phillips found that the ban violates the U.S. Constitution’s guarantees of free speech and due process under the First and Fifth Amendments. “The Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Act infringes the fundamental rights of United States servicemembers in many ways,” Phillips wrote in her 86-page opinion. “The Act denies homosexuals serving in the Armed Forces the right to enjoy ‘intimate conduct’ in their personal relationships. The Act denies them the right to speak about their loved ones while serving their country in uniform; it punishes them with discharge for writing a personal letter, in a foreign language, to a person of the same sex with whom they shared an intimate relationship before entering military service; it discharges them for including information in a personal communication from which an unauthorized reader might discern their homosexuality. In order to justify the encroachment on these rights, defendants faced the burden at trial of showing the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Act was necessary to significantly further the government’s important interests in military readiness and unit cohesion. Defendants failed to meet that burden.” Phillips said the government’s contention that letting gays be open in the military harms its functioning is fully undermined by the fact that the military delays discharge of gays and lesbians who violate DADT until they return from combat deployment. The six-year-old case, brought by the gay group Log Cabin Republicans, was heard without a jury in July. Phillips said she will issue a permanent injunction prohibiting the military from enforcing Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. She gave LCR until Sept. 16 to submit proposed language for the injunction and gave the U.S. government until Sept. 23 to respond to LCR’s submission. “She could at that point stay the injunction pending an appeal or, as Judge (Vaughn) Walker did (in the federal Prop 8 case), she could deny such a stay but grant a temporary stay to allow the government to seek a stay pending an appeal from the 9th Circuit,” said Jon Davidson, legal director of Lambda Legal. If no stay is issued, it is unclear whether Phillips’ ruling would take effect nationwide or just in California’s Central District of the federal courts. “This is an historic moment and an historic ruling for the gay military community,” said Servicemembers United Executive Director Alexander Nicholson, who was kicked out of the Army under DADT. “As the only named injured party in this case, I am

exceedingly proud to have been able to represent all who have been impacted and had their lives ruined by this blatantly unconstitutional policy. We are finally on our way to vindication.” Gay activists responded to the ruling by calling on President Barack Obama to cease enforcement of DADT immediately and demanding that the U.S. Justice Department decline to appeal Phillips’ decision.

tantamount to a daily dose of torture,” commented National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Executive Director Rea Carey. “In too many cases, harassment, taunting and abuse are allowed to go on unabated in our nation’s schools. We have repeatedly seen the tragic consequences of this pervasive problem: Young people are left emotionally damaged, physically hurt, or feel they have no other option than to take their own lives out of hopelessness and despair. Youth who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender — or simply perceived to be — are often the targets of this abuse. Today, New York said enough is enough.” Fifteen states and the District of Columbia have enacted similar laws to protect gay/lesbian and, in some cases, transgender students.

California Supremes Rebuff Prop 8 Proponents

New York Governor David Paterson

N.Y. Governor Signs Law Protecting LGBT students New York Gov. David Paterson signed a bill Sept. 7 protecting students in New York public schools from bias-based bullying and discrimination. He signed the legislation in a ceremony at the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center in New York City. “The Dignity for All Students Act will provide important new safeguards to ensure that schools are places where students can concentrate on learning and personal growth, not on avoiding taunting or violence,” said Ross Levi, executive director of the Empire State Pride Agenda. The new law targets harassment based on race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity and expression. It requires teacher training on discouraging bias-based harassment, inclusion in coursework of discrimination and harassment awareness, and reporting of bias incidents to the state Education Department. The law marks the first time New York state has legislated explicit protections for transgender people. A 2007 study by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network found that 33 percent of LGBT students skip school in any given month because they fear for their safety, compared with only 4.5 percent of the general student population. “For some young people, going to school is

6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

The forces that want to keep Proposition 8, the voter-passed constitutional amendment that re-banned same-sex marriage in California, can’t catch a break. The state Supreme Court on Sept. 7 slapped down an effort by conservative activists to force Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Attorney General Jerry Brown to defend Prop 8 in the federal case that was appealed to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals after U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker found in August that Prop 8 violates the U.S. Constitution. None of the governmental entities that were sued in the federal case is interested in defending Prop 8, so the appeal to the 9th Circuit was filed by the activists who put Prop 8 on the ballot. It is unlikely, however, that the activists have “standing” to mount an appeal, since it’s not their job to defend California’s constitution. Worried about such a determination, conservative forces have been trying to find some other route to assure that the 9th Circuit hears the appeal, including pressuring defendants Brown and Schwarzenegger and pushing to add Imperial County, located in the southeast California desert, as an official defendant. The 9th Circuit will make the call on the county’s long-shot effort, probably in December, when it also will take up the question of whether the pro-Prop 8 activists have standing. If they do, the 9th Circuit will then move on to hear the appeal of Walker’s actual ruling. If the activists do not have standing and Imperial County can’t become a defendant, the case is over and same-sex marriage is legal again in California, unless the activists attempt to appeal the standing question to the U.S. Supreme Court. That, too, would be a long shot, many legal experts believe. They say the Supreme Court would be unlikely to conclude that displeased citizens can step into a state government’s shoes to defend a state law that the state government itself refuses to defend and, indeed, believes violates the U.S. Constitution. In rejecting the activists’ latest move, the California Supreme Court denied review without comment.

Quips & Quotes ❝

More than anything else, what I’m doing is giving the Republicans and independents an alternative to vote for.” —Melvin Nimer, telling The Salt Lake Tribune about his run for Utah Senate District 2

So, if McAdams [a gay-friendly Mormon who replaced openly gay Sen. Scott McCoy] weren’t interesting enough all on his own, now he’s being challenged by a gay man, a gay Republican, no less, and they’re always interesting.” —Jesse Fruhwirth on City Weekly’s news blog

Personally, I think this is a simple way for the Republican Party to throw Mel Nimer and the Utah Log Cabin Republicans under the bus. With two months until the election, and with all of the qualified candidates they could have picked from, the Repub’s decided to throw the gay head of a gay political group into a race against the biggest ally the State has in the Senate? With virtually no time to raise funds or to get a campaign off the ground. Sounds very….. Republican to me.” —Eric Ethington of Pride in Utah

The fact that the Utah Republican Party nominated an openly gay man is amazing no matter how you slice it. We’re talking about the reddest of red states here kids.” —Commenter “Michael M.” on the same post

I want to bring awareness to Tooele, especially since it’s a smaller city. I know there could be youth out there struggling with issues and I want people to know that there are other people out there.” —Robin Sheehy, founder of Come Out Tooele, in the Tooele Transcript Bulletin


Pro-gay Mayor Daley Will Not Seek Re-election Strongly pro-gay Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, who has led the city for 21 years, announced Sept. 7 that he will not run for a seventh term. Apart from a series of run-ins with ACT UP/Chicago in the late ’80s and early ’90s, Daley has been nothing short of a hero to most of the city’s LGBT community. In 1989, he became the first mayor to ride in the Chicago gay pride parade while in office. Two years later, Daley set up the nation’s first municipally sponsored Gay and Lesbian Hall of Fame and proceeded to personally hand out the awards nearly every year since. In 1998, he redecorated the city’s gay business strip, North Halsted Street, with a series of giant Flash-Gordon-esque retrofuturistic rainbow pylons. When some residents objected to the official gayification of the street, fearing for their property values, Daley thundered, “I won’t let the homophobes run this city!” He has been a supporter of same-sex marriage since 2004. Daley went on to serve as honorary cochair of Gay Games VII in 2006 and, in 2007, was honorary chair of the capital campaign to get the city’s new LGBT center built. At the Games’ opening ceremonies, Daley said: “Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community have contributed to Chicago in every imaginable way — in business, education, the arts and neighborhood development. They deserve to have the city of Chicago standing on their side, and it will continue to do so, as long as I am mayor of this great city.” Daley was pro-gay before it was cool. He decided long ago that gays make neighborhoods better, and that seemed to be that for him. He never wavered. His spoken defenses of the city’s gays were straightforward and from the gut. The mayor’s conflicts with ACT UP/Chicago came to a head on Feb. 12, 1992, when he and six members of the group engaged in a shouting match at a meeting of the gay business group Chicago Professional Networking Association. ACT UP members were angry that the city’s AIDS budget allegedly had been stagnant for several years and that, due to a then-new policy of not working on Sundays, Daley had missed AIDS Walk and the gay pride parade, among other issues. “I have been in the forefront as a public official dealing with the gay and lesbian community,” Daley told the hecklers. “You don’t see the governor, you don’t see any other elected official. I’m right here! And I don’t hide! I don’t hide from the gay and lesbian community as mayor of the city of Chicago! The gay and lesbian community has a (yearly) reception not at a Hilton hotel but at the mayor’s City Hall on the

fifth floor (where my office is). ... And the AIDS budget each year goes up in the city of Chicago.” “That’s a lie!” the protesters yelled back. “It hasn’t gone up in three years! It’s a million dollars. It’s the same as it was! ... You’re lying!” “I’m just as concerned as anybody else,” Daley said. “Don’t make me one who’s insincere and not concerned about the AIDS issue.” The protesters then lambasted Daley for having attended the wake of Danny Sotomayor, who had been ACT UP/Chicago’s spiritual leader and perhaps Daley’s fiercest critic ever. “Liar!” they shouted. “Why did you go to Danny Sotomayor’s funeral? Why. Did. You. Go. To. Danny. Sotomayor’s. Funeral?!” At that point, pandemonium ensued and CPNA ejected ACT UP from the gathering. Daley then said: “I always remember Danny Sotomayor. I went to his wake. ... I went there out of respect for him and his family. Now, he’s a strong advocate. I used to see him all the time. He’d, you know, scream and yell in my face. I said: ‘Danny, why you yelling at me? I’m here. This is a reception we’re having. This is what we’re doing. I’m not perfect. But don’t try to make me the one, like, insensitive or not concerned. There’s a lot of other people who won’t even talk to you, won’t even shake your hand, listen to you, won’t understand what you’re saying.’” As for ACT UP’s tactics, Daley said: “To get up and say anything, that’s their right to do anything, but after a time you have to say: ‘Hey, let’s move on. I’ve heard. I’ve listened. We are trying to do it. It’s not fast enough. You’re right, it’s not fast enough.’” “You know why it’s not fast enough?” he continued. “When one person dies, you’re right, it’s not fast enough. It’s not fast enough for you or me or anybody else when you see one person die. And one thing I found out — that we’re all in this together. We’re not separate, we’re not higher or lower, we’re all together. And these issues that confront any community confront the city of Chicago. And what we’re trying to do here in our city is to truly work together.” A little more than three months after the showdown — and an even worse blowup seven weeks later, when 40 furious AIDS activists torpedoed the mayor with vicious insults for 90 minutes as he and more than 500 gays and lesbians marched through gay neighborhoods in response to an anti-gay shooting — Daley relented on AIDS spending, and the City Council voted 46-0 to boost funding to $3.57 million. “This is a very serious health and emotional problem and we have to recommit ourselves,” Daley said. According to Windy City Times and the Chicago Tribune, one of the people who may run to replace Daley is Alderman Tom Tunney, who is openly gay.

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 7


LOC AL NEWS

McAdams: Not Taking Election for Granted Just before Christmas 2009, Democratic delegates from Utah’s Senate District 2 came together to perform a difficult task: pick a replacement to finish outgoing — and out — Sen. Scott McCoy’s term. Following McCoy’s resignation in order to devote needed time to his law practice, a number of candidates contacted delegates for consideration. These included Arlyn Bradshaw who, like McCoy, is openly gay — and who is now the favorite in a race for Salt Lake County Council’s District 1 seat. In the end, however, the delegates chose Ben McAdams, an aide to Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker and a straight ally, to take over for McCoy. Less than a year later, it’s time for McAdams to run on his own terms. This time, he’ll be doing so against Mel Nimer, an openly gay candidate from across the aisle who entered the race after McAdam’s original challenger failed to file her paperwork in time to run. “This is my first time introducing myself to the voters,” said McAdams, taking QSaltLake’s interview while canvassing the neighborhoods in his heavily Democratic district. “I was disappointed when my previous opponent dropped out because I think I owe it to the district, and we deserve a race.” McAdams comes to voters after a session where he had little time to debate gay- and transgender-rights issues. A compromise between pro-gay Democrats and Republi-

can leadership tabled all such bills in order to save Salt Lake City’s gay and transgender-inclusive employment and housing nondiscrimination ordinances from bills seeking their cancellation. Still, he has been a strong advocate for this part of his constituency, having promised to take up McCoy’s bill that would give same-sex couples rights to sue in cases of a partner’s wrongful death. In this sense, both he and Nimer are of the same mind. “It’s refreshing to have a Republican candidate who agrees with me on LGBT issues,” said McAdams who, like Nimer, promised to run a clean campaign that focused on the areas in which both men differ, rather than in attacking one another. “This was the first time I’ve met him, but he seems like a great guy,” he said of his opponent. “We have a lot of mutual friends so I’d heard of him, and I look forward to getting to know him better as we go through the campaign. We agreed for the sake of the LGBT issues that we both care about that we’d keep it clean and make sure we’d finish the election with the good reputation we each had going in.” “We shouldn’t’ cannibalize our own and we agreed not to do that,” he added. Like Nimer, McAdams noted that budgeting, education and immigration would top his list of concerns during the race. “It is an incredibly difficult year for the state budget,” he said, referring to the sluggish economy that has plagued every state

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in the Union. “My perspective is before we raise taxes, we need to understand this economy is no easier on tax payers than it is on government.” When making state budget cuts, McAdams said that lawmakers need to ensure that “necessary social services for those who have been hit by the economic downturn” remain, such as the Meals on Wheels program for elderly residents as well as insurance coverage for children. “Utah has ranked 50th in Medicaid access for kids, and that’s not good enough,” he said. ‘I don’t like tax increases and I want to stay away from that, but I think it’s important for the government to keep performing its essential functions. It’s going to depend on what we’re cutting. This is s a scale and you’ve got to balance both sides of the sale.” Like Nimer, McAdams is also concerned about Utah’s education system and particularly in what he calls its decline in quality over the last two decades. “It used to be that we could stack ‘em deep and teach ‘em cheap,” said the senator. But Utah’s increasingly diverse population — which includes several students for whom English is a second language — means that these days are over, he added. “The state’s financial commitment to education has gone down significantly. We’re last in per-pupil spending, and that’s not good enough,” he said. “I feel strongly that we need to provide equal opportunity to anyone who needs to reach out and grab it.” McAdams also said he feels Utah may go in the wrong direction on immigration issues. He is opposed to a bill proposed by Sen. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, that closely mirrors Arizona’s controversial SB 1070, which critics accused of encouraging racial profiling. “He’s called it Arizona-light, but I’ve read the bill. There’s nothing light about it,” said McAdams. “Make no mistake: It’s unconstitutional and un-American.” McAdams’ biggest objection to Sandstrom’s bill, he said, was that it would take away police and prosecutors’ right to “express discretion” in which illegal immigrants to pursue — such as those who are responsible for violent crime and drug trafficking rather than those who are abiding by the law. In that vein, McAdams also said he would not support any resolutions in the Utah State Senate or the House in support of overturning a clause in the 14th Amendment that grants citizenship to children born within U.S. borders to immigrants who are here illegally. “If we deny children who are born in the

United States the right to citizenship that dates back to the Civil War and the abolition of slavery, that would, in my mind, create a permanent under class in the United States — people with no citizenship in any country” who government would then deny “the opportunity to become contributing members of our society.” “For me, it’s a consistent message: looking out for our minority community whether they’re sexual or ethnic minorities,” he continued. “We need to send a message and be a welcoming society. That’s what America was founded on, and that’s who we need to be.” While Nimer and his supporters have argued that a gay and transgender-friendly Republican would get more done in the state’s conservative government than would a Democrat, McAdams countered that his ability to work with Republican lawmakers “being critical on some issues and working collaboratively on different issues” was more important. “My distinct point of view is reflective of the district,” he said. “The district wants a counterpoint on many issues and in my short time in the Legislature, I believe I’ve offered that counterpoint.” And although his district has wanted that counterpoint for decades (McAdams noted that it hadn’t been represented by a Republican in at least 35 years), the senator said he’s still not taking the election for granted. “It means I’ll have to continue to work hard, and I should,” he said. “We should expect that of our elected officials.” Q


Mel Nimer: Red Candidate in a Blue District Mel Nimer is no stranger to Utah politics. As the President of the Utah Log Cabin Republicans, a gay and transgender-friendly GOP caucus, he has worked to give gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Utah Republicans a voice in Utah’s ruling party. As a Precinct Chair and former state delegate, he has worked to get Republicans sympathetic to gay and transgender issues into office. And as of this month, Nimer is now a candidate for political office. When Nancy Davis, the Republican challenger to Sen. Ben McAdams’ District 2 Senate seat failed to file all her paperwork by the registration deadline, the Utah Elections Office disqualified her, leaving the party just one day to find a replacement. “The county [party] called and asked me to fill in the spot that got vacated,” said Nimer. “They said, ‘We can’t think of anybody better than you to fill in that spot. Will you run?’” Nimer’s response catapulted him fairly late into the race in this heavily Democratic district. Nonetheless, he said that he and his campaign volunteers are working quickly to put up a website, print fliers and hit the streets for canvassing. Although the election is still in its early stages, one thing at this point is certain: gay and transgender rights will not be a wedge issue. Perhaps for the first time in Utah political history, both the Republican and Democratic candidate agree on practically everything from the importance of job and employment protections to the need for same-sex partners to be able to sue in cases of wrongful death. “Senator McAdams has done a great job representing our community and filling Sen. Scott McCoy’s shoes,” said Nimer, who like the senator that McAdams replaced is also openly gay. The real contention in the election, he said, will thus be about both candidates’ different approaches to several issues affecting not only their district, but the state at large. “The only other big advantage I offer everyone in the district is that they’ll have a seat at the Republican table, so they’ll have a seat at the super majority table, which may be good, may be bad. But for our community, for the first time ever, they’ll have someone they can count on to try and swing the Republican majority more clearly in our favor.” Some of the main issues that Nimer and McAdams consider to be highly important are state budget cuts, education and immigration. Like many people from all party affiliations, Nimer said that the state’s budget has been on his mind a lot lately. While Nimer said that programs such as the state’s AIDS Drug Assistance Program

“need to be funded, totally,” he said that his main concern about the state’s economy is the complex interplay between job creation and a strong education system. “They’re not separate topics,” he said. “They’re all combined and interlinked and there is no one answer for each problem. We have to look at the much bigger picture in order to solve all these little problems.” To solve the state’s budget crisis, Nimer said that Utah must support small businesses, which are the state’s economic backbone. To this effect, he said that the state should lessen government controls on business creation. As an example, he cited Utah’s heavy regulation of liquor licenses, which he said prevent many would-be restaurateurs from going into business and therefore costs the state jobs and revenue. “We don’t need a whole bunch of rules and micromanaging what everyone does with all their time in building businesses,” he said. While both candidates agree that the state is not adequately serving its pupils, their ideas for improving the system — and especially getting it more money — differ considerably. In order to better fund the system, Nimer said he would support changing how the state handles taxation. Currently, he said, 70 percent of Utah is owned by the federal government, meaning that the state government has only 30 percent of the state to draw upon when crafting its budget. “One way to finance education is through property taxes,” he said. “In New Jersey, where only 7 percent of the land is federally controlled, they fund their education system the same way we do. And where we spend just $5,000 per student they can spend $13,000 per student because they have control of the land and we don’t. We need to change that and work things out with the federal government where we can use [this land].” In order for Utah to get the most out of its acreage, Nimer proposed coming to terms with the federal government on issues such as mining in federal monuments like the controversial Grand StaircaseEscalante National Monument, which sits atop a vast coal reserve. He said that the monument could be treated much the same way as are ski resorts in Utah’s national forests, which he calls “a good use of federally-owned land that the state gets money from.” “Mining that could easily be done [at Grand Staircase] without any harm to the environment or to the monument,” he said. “It won’t affect anything anyone’s going to enjoy and we’d be able to get thousands of tons of some of the cleanest burning coal

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 9

available.” A plan such as this, he said, would also boost the state’s sluggish economy, creating jobs and putting more money in the hands of citizens. But one thing Nimer said should not be in the hands of Utah residents is immigration, which he called the purview of the federal government. To that effect, he said he opposed a bill by Rep. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, that mirrors a controversial Arizona law. “[Bills like Sandstrom’s are] a simplistic answer to a really complex problem. It’s trying to take on a federal issue at a state level and that’s not appropriate,” he said. However, Nimer said that Utah could set up a system to help employers understand how to verify the resident status of their employees and to get illegal immigrants “help to become legal rather than deporting them.” The United States, he said, has historically depended upon a migrant workforce of foreigners from a number of nations, so taking a hard-line stance against illegal immigrants would be counterproductive. “We have to respect the fact that those people are human beings and we need to develop a system [that treats them with dignity], he said.

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Another person that Nimer said he will be treating with dignity is his opponent, who he has met and who has also promised to stick strictly to the issues facing the district and the state. And while he acknowledges that a Republican win in a heavily blue district will be “an uphill battle,” he said that it’s one in which he will engage wholeheartedly. “This is not a game,” he said. “We are in this as a serious campaign.” Q

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Treat yourself or a loved one to cooking classes with Chef Drew Ellsworth, 34-year chef, wine manager of the Third West Wine Store, QSaltLake’s Restaurant reviewer. With small groups of no more than 8 students, Ecole Dijon gives you the opportunity to watch and interact with a professional chef preparing foods in an exciting and expeditious way. The atmosphere is very casual and warm and students can freely move around to see what the chef is doing. “Hands on” training is available when possible.

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LOC AL NEWS

Allies To Be Honored at Annual Equality Utah Dinner board hired Mike Thompson. “I did a lot of legal work to help them grow Equality Utah’s annual Allies Dinner is one from being just Equality Utah to the three of the highlights of the year for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer organizations it is today: Equality Utah, community. Sponsored by Jane and Tami Equality Utah PAC and Equality Utah FounMarquardt and philanthropist Bruce Bastian, dation,” she said. “I realized that was a good the dinner is one of the gay and transgender structure, to combine a political action comrights organization’s biggest fund-raisers, as mittee, a lobbying arm and a political founwell as a day for it to honor individuals and dation. I think I followed the lead of the Huorganizations that have provided exemplary man Rights Campaign, which is set up in a similar way.” service to Utah’s queer community. Marquardt is legally married to her partNamed “Gaining Ground,” in honor of the spread of job and employment protections ner, Tami, in Canada and in a number of for gay and transgender people, this year’s U.S. states that have legalized same-sex mardinner will feature Dustin Lance Black as riage. Tami Marquardt served as the Utah its keynote speaker. A writer for the televi- Pride Center’s interim director in 2004 before the hiring of Valsion show Big Love, Black has won numererie Larabee and is a ous Writers Guild of America awards for his member of the Center’s work on the HBO drama about polygamy in board today. Utah. In 2009, he won an Academy Award for “Tami had a real Best Original Screenplay for Milk, a dramainterest in youth,” tization of the life and assassination of gayMarquardt explained. rights activist and public official Harvey “She has a real passion Milk. He also narrated 8: The Mormon Propofor talking to young sition, Reed Cowan’s controversial documenpeople, so when she tary about the LDS Church’s involvement in was at the Center she the passage of California’s Proposition 8. Tami Marquardt helped to run programs During the dinner, Equality Utah will also for youth. In life now she’s always willing give its Allies for Equality Award to five reto talk to people having issues coming out. cipients: Jane and Tami Marquardt, Gary and She’s so good at it people come to find her.” Millie Watts and the Salt Lake City Human Like Tami Marquardt, Gary and Millie Rights Commission. Watts have also helped gay, lesbian, bisexual Once a practicing and transgender youth, as well as their famiattorney from 1979 to lies as the leaders of LDS Family Fellowship. 2007, Jane Marquardt Although the two did not found the organizahas served Utah’s gay, tion, they joined soon after its formation in lesbian, bisexual and 1993; two of their six children are gay, and transgender citizens one of them, Craig, has been excommunicatsince 1982, when she ed from the LDS Church. started offering semi“Our love for Craig lead to a family comnars on establishing mitment to do all we can to help people underpowers of attorney, stand more about same-sex orientation,” the wills and other direc- two wrote in a 1994 letter viewable on their Jane Marquardt tives to same-sex cou- website, ldsfamilyfellowship.org, shortly beples. In 1996, she also helped organize training fore they began holding Family Fellowship sessions for Utah judges about “the cutting- meetings in their Utah County home. “Not edge issues of the day like employment non- only do we share the scientific research that is discrimination” affecting gay, lesbian, bi- coming forth, we also try to help people realize sexual and transgender people. During those how much discrimination hurts, not only the sessions, she faced off against psychologists homosexual person, but family and friends as and BYU professors who presented what she well. It [Craig’s coming out] has opened our called “the other side” of the debate. eyes to the world of “justified” discrimination “It was a chance to be a competent gay per- that exists in many aspects of society.” son standing up in front of a group of judges As leaders of the support group, the Wattwho may have thought they didn’t know gay ses not only provide council and support for people,” she said. “That was a fun thing to be parents struggling to come to terms with involved in. It was a landmark that the Utah their child’s sexual orientations, but tireSupreme Court even wanted to be educated less advocacy for gay, lesbian, bisexual and on these issues in the middle of the ’90s.” transgender people. Marquardt also served as a board member “Education is one of our major goals, and for Equality Utah from 2001–2007, starting to just try to get the parents and siblings to when the organization was known as Unity love their gay child and keep their gay child Utah, and is still a member of the group’s under their wing, not kick them out of the advisory council. In 2004, she served as the house like happens so many times with gay chair for the Don’t Amend campaign, Equal- children,” said Millie Watts in an interview ity Utah’s effort to stop a state constitutional with KUED for Friends and Neighbors: A ban on same-sex marriage. When founder Community Divided, a 1999 documentary Michael Mitchell departed the organization, about the families and friends of gay and lesshe also acted as interim director until the bian Utahns. by JoSelle Vanderhooft

1 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Throughout the ’90s and 2000s, the Wattses have spoken to journalists and organizations alike about their work, and have spoken out against anti-gay pronouncements made by LDS officials. A number of organizations have recognized them for these efforts, including Affirmation: Gay and Lesbian Mormons, a support group for former and current gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender members of the LDS Church. “Gary and Millie possess a genuinely charitable spirit,” said Family Fellowship supporter Marge Bradshaw in a 2006 ceremony where Affirmation honored the couple with an award for outstanding leadership. “They give. They give time; they give money; they give love. We spend four nights or so each year, with several other couples, at the dining room table in their home stuffing and addressing envelopes Millie and Gary Watts that contain a flyer announcing the upcoming Family Fellowship gathering. They provide the home, the pizza and root beer, and contribute to the spirit of friendship. There are no aides or secretaries; there is only Watts’ generosity.” The eight-member Salt Lake City Human Rights Commission has been an invaluable part of making the capital city a safer and more just place for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender residents. In 2009, its report on discrimination within the city’s boundaries revealed that discrimination based on race, sexual orientation and gender identity were significant problems. The report was the cornerstone upon which Mayor Ralph Becker based two ordinances prohibiting housing and employment discrimination against gay and transgender residents. The Salt Lake City Council ultimately passed the ordinances near the end of last year, and seven other municipalities have adopted them since. Lisa Harrison Smith, Becker’s deputy director of communications, said that the commission was “honored and excited” to receive the recognition. “We’re really thrilled that we’re recognized by Equality Utah. They’re a big part of many, if not all, of the initiatives that come out in the city. It means a lot to us.” Upon entering office, said Smith, Becker created the commission with Coordinator Yolanda Francisco-Nez at the helm “with the charge to make some very big changes” in how the city handled matters relating to diversity. “I think that set the tone for a pretty progressive agenda when it comes to LGBT rights,” she said, adding that the mayor’s office appreciated EU’s recognition of Francisco-Nez’s efforts. Francisco-Nez was out of town and could not be reached for comment. Q “Gaining Ground” will be held Sept. 28 at the Salt Palace. Tickets are $100 per person or $900 for a table of 10. Proceeds will go to Equality Utah Political Action Committee, to help elect fair-minded candidates who support equal rights for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender citizens. Vegetarian options are available. For more information visit alliesdinner.com.

Shades of Queer In October, the University of Utah’s LGBT Resource Center will present its annual Gay-la Dinner and Silent Auction, the theme of which will be “Shades of Queer: Connecting Through Difference.” The evening’s keynote speaker will be Reed Cowan, the director, writer and producer of 8: The Mormon Proposition, a popular documentary about the LDS Church’s involvement in California’s Proposition 8. The evening will also include performances by Keila Michiko Cone-Uemura and Baron Daniel Cureton. Dress is business casual and vegetarian and vegan options are available. WHEN: Oct. 22, 6 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. dinner WHERE: IJ and Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center, 2 North Medical Drive COST: $65 per person, $650 per table of 10, $45 per student (available upon request) INFO: To purchase tickets contact Cathy Martinez at cmartinez@ sa.utah.edu or Kathleen Boyd at kboyd@sa.utah.edu or 801-5877973

Fashion Stroll #10 Salt Lake City’s Fashion Stroll will celebrate its 10th incarnation by turning its outdoor market into a Halloween party. Attendees and merchants are encouraged to dress in costume, and prizes will be awarded to the most creative. Likewise, the event’s runway show and entertainment — including dancers, local bands and street performers — will all have a Halloween flair. Sponsorship opportunities are available. WHEN: Oct. 29, 6–10 p.m., East Broadway (300 South between State Street and 300 East) COST: Free to the public INFO: SLCFashionStroll.com or contact organizer Matt Monson at 801-671-4304 or slcfashionstroll@ gmail.com.

Family Conference The Utah Pride Center will host “Bringing Families Back Into the Room,” a regional conference, Oct. 8-10, for families with gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer youth. The keynote speaker will be Dr. Caitlin Ryan, head of the Family Acceptance Project at San Francisco State University, which is studying ways to help families support queer children. For more details, check utahpridecenter.org.


Will Cedar City Be Next to Pass Gay/Transgender Ordinance? So far, seven Utah municipalities have passed ordinances protecting residents from job discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. With less than four months of 2010 left, Equality Utah is hoping that at least three more will join their ranks. Currently, the gay and transgender rights group has approached mayors and city councils around the state about the ordinances, which Salt Lake City first approved in 2009. The discussion is especially developing in Holladay, Ogden and Cedar City, said Executive Director Brandie Balken. Although Equality Utah’s staff discussed the ordinances with the Ogden City Council earlier this year, the body voted to put off considering them until they had dealt with pressing budgeting concerns. Balken said that she hopes to meet with Mayor Matthew R. Godfrey in mid-September. Meanwhile, Holladay’s city council discussed whether or not to move forward on the ordinances during a Sept. 2 work meeting. Here, Councilman Barry Topham touched off controversy by saying that he didn’t know why the council was discussing this “can of worms” issue. “I think you should be able to discriminate if you don’t want a cross-dresser living in your house,” he said in the meeting. His remarks prompted Councilman Jim Palmer to call Topham’s position discriminatory and in violation of “the equalprotection clause of the Constitution that

we’ve all sworn to uphold.” Balken said that Equality Utah is encouraging Holladay residents to contact their councilmembers and let them know they support passing these ordinances. “I think in some cases it’s good for people to express their deeply held opinion. It gives us an opportunity to discuss what those concerns are,” said Balken of Topham’s remarks. “We’ve got some outreach to do.” Out of all three cities, progress is happening the fastest in Cedar City, where Equality Utah has been working closely with Southern Utah University’s QueerStraight Alliance to educate residents about the protections the ordinances offer. Along with speaking to Mayor Joe Burgess and the six-member city council, the organization held a series of three public meetings about the proposed measures at the mayor’s request. “We got on the radio, we got fliers out, we papered the town in an attempt to get as many people from as many backgrounds as possible to come and talk about the ordinances because no one wants to pass something they don’t understand,” said Benjamin King Smith, QSA president. “We’ve had a lot of people who have come to them wanting to know if they’ll be protected. It’s nice to have these conversations.” The council and mayor, said Smith, gave QSA positive feedback about the meetings and are planning to discuss the ordinances

throughout October. On Oct. 6, QSA members will ask the council to meet with the mayor about drafting the ordinances during the body’s weekly meeting. On the following week, Smith said the council will vote on whether or not to accept the ordinances. “There will be another vote after that, but if they pass the first vote, it’s pretty much guaranteed,” he said. Following this meeting, said Balken, Cedar City residents will be able to weigh in on the ordinances, and then the council will vote on whether or not to pass them.

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contestants and the audience. Rox is a retired police officer and law enforcement educator who now works full time as a BDSM and leather lifestyle educator. He is a graduate of the Journeyman III Academy, a BDSM school which closed in 2009. He also is the key organizer of Utah Rebellion, Head Master of Salt Lake’s BDSM201 Intermediate educational series, and is an administrator of and presenter coach for the Path 101 BDSM Group. He has taught at several clubs as well as major events such as Thunder in the Mountains, Maui Kink in Hawaii, DomCon Los Angeles, and DomCon Atlanta. Rox won the title of Mr. Rocky Mountain Olympus Leather in April at the first annual Rocky Mountain Olympus Leather Competition held in Salt Lake City, making him eligible to compete in the international competition. RMOL is a regional leather group which covers Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. Sythen of Salt Lake City was named runner-up for the International Ms. Olympus Leather 2010 at the event.

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Utah Rox Wins Int’l Mr. Olympus Leather Utah Rebellion organizer Utah Rox earned the title of International Mr. Olympus Leather 2010 at the International Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather contest held in Los Angeles. The contest was created to “promote a positive image of the Leather lifestyle,” according to its statement of purpose. “It is our belief that the leather community is comprised of an extremely diverse group of people ranging from the motorcycle and leather/Levi clubs to the heaviest SM edge player and all of the leatherfolk in between. The Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather title seeks to make all leatherfolk feel good about themselves regardless of race, religion, political beliefs, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, age, size, handicap, or health condition. It is the goal of Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather to make all those who wish to be a part of the leather community feel welcome in doing so.” Contestants competed in four categories — interview, fantasy, fetish image and stage presence. During the fantasy category, contestants staged a 5- to 7-minute erotic production, involving judges, other

“We think it’s likely we’ll have a vote in Cedar City before the end of October,” she said. The meetings will take place on Oct. 6, 13, 20 and 27. To date, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Park City, Summit County, West Valley City, Logan and Taylorsville have passed the measures, which impose fines against businesses with 15 or more employees and landlords renting at least four units who discriminate against gay and transgender people. Religious organizations are exempt.

Saturday, Sept 18th, 10am – 6pm Hosted by ELPCO – The East Liberty Park Organization and the East Centrsl Community Council

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 1 1


LOC ALNEWS

Layton PFLAG Launched Layton has become the latest of several Utah cities to start a chapter of the political, social and support group Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. “I’ve decided to make a goal of starting more PFLAGs in more cities,” said activist Turner Bitton, who recently held a Rally for Equality this summer to address the suicides of several Layton PFLAG President young gay Utahns. Cynthia Stevens “There’s really nothing for people up north,” he continued. “Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County have so much support for people, but Davis and Ogden have no support.” Bitton announced his intentions to several friends in Layton and the fledgling group met for the first time on Sept. 9 on

Weber State University’s campus. Here, the 25 attendees voted to make Cynthia Stevens president and Barb D’Arco vice president of Layton’s PFLAG chapter. Bitton will serve as vice president of public relations, a title he also holds in Ogden’s group. “I figure since the chapters are so close in proximity I’ll be able to do both at the same time,’ he said. The group will now focus on filing paperwork with PFLAG’s national body to become an official chapter. They expect to hold their first official meeting in October. For now, the group is meeting at 6:30 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month in the main building of Weber State University’s Davis campus, room 306. The first meeting is scheduled for Oct. 14. A support group will meet in the same room an hour before official business begins.

For more information about Layton PFLAG contact Turner Bitton at Bitton.politico@gmail.com or 801- 814-3660.

National Coming Out Brunch to Reveal Big PFLAG News For the sixth year in a row, the Utah Pride Center will celebrate National Coming Out Day, held nationally on October 11, with a brunch and awards ceremony. This year’s celebration in honor of the coming out process and the individuals and organizations that have served gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer Utahns will take place on Oct. 10 at the Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel. John Cepek, president of the national Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, will be the day’s keynote speaker at the brunch. The Center will also honor the 2010 recipients of its Lifetime Achievement Award, Community Organization of the Year Award and Volunteer of the Year Award. Marina Gomberg, the Utah Pride Center’s director of development and marketing, said that the Center is pleased to have Cepek visit — especially because “he will be delivering some very big news to us on that day.” “We’re very excited to have him and to be able to have that announcement made because it impacts us here in Utah,” she said. Although past recipients Nikki Boyer, Joe Redburn and Becky Moss are still deliberating over the winner of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award, the Center has announced the other two winners. Volunteer Chris Coon will receive this year’s Volunteer of the Year award for his three years of service at the Utah Pride Center as an administrative assistant.

“He has been incredible,” said Gomberg. “Day after day, week after week, month after month, and year after year, he remains as happy and dedicated as the first day he started. We’ve been extremely lucky to have Chris as part of our staff not only because of his dedication but because of his spirit.” The award for Community Organization of the Year will go to Salt Lake City’s PFLAG chapter, which Gomberg praised for its support in a number of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights causes. “We’ve seen the impact of their work under the leadership of [President] Kathy Godwin, and the impact has been very positive,” she said. “We’re really glad to be able to award them for their great work this year.” This year’s National Coming Out Day celebration will also be held on the last day of the Center’s inaugural Family Acceptance Regional Conference (Oct. 8-10). Geared toward making families safe and affirming environments for queer youth and toward keeping families with queer youth together, the conference is a perfect match for National Coming Out Day. Because of overlap with the conference, Gomberg said that the Center hopes “this will be one of our largest NCOD celebrations.”

Registration for both the NCOD brunch and conference are open on the Utah Pride Center’s website, utahpridecenter.org. Sponsorship and table captain opportunities for the brunch are available.

12 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Creative Minds Shine on Homeless Youth by JoSelle Vanderhooft

In 2009, Utahns Chloe Noble and Jill Hartman walked across the United States to raise awareness of the challenges facing homeless youth — over 40 percent of whom identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning or “nonstraight.” Their journey took them from Seattle to Washington, D.C., where they participated in and helped organize October’s March for Equality. Nearly one year later, the foundation the two women created, Operation Shine America, has announced the launch of a new campaign. Kicked off this August, Creative Minds 2010 is a national campaign offering homeless youth and their allies what Noble calls “a platform to be seen and heard.” It will work in tandem with a number of local organizations such as the Homeless Youth Resource Center, Volunteers of America, Urban Village Cooperative, the Inclusion Center, Community In-Roads Alliance, the Utah Pride Center and the Utah chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. These organizations, said Noble, who is OSA’s founding director, will work together to sponsor community awareness training about homeless youth in which participants will learn how to help these youth and how to work toward solving social problems that lead to youth homelessness. “This is about extending core family values like acceptance, patience, compassion, generosity, protection and love, beyond ourselves and our personal family unit,” said Noble. “This epidemic [of homelessness facing youth] can not be solved simply by donations, emergency services, or even emergency over night shelters; although all of these things are essential in keeping these children safe and alive long enough for them to enter into recovery. What is needed to end youth homelessness is a complete transformation of our systems of care, a rebuilding of our local communities, and a strong awareness of the trauma

that these homeless youth experience on a daily basis.” During last year’s Homeless Youth Pride Walk, Noble said that she and Hartman interviewed the youth they met about what brought them to the streets. They found, she said, that although the causes were numerous, they all tied back into communityrelated problems such as familial rejection and a lack of access to services. Overall, Noble said that there are two million homeless youth in the United States. And given that queer youth are disproportionately represented in that number, Noble said that gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights were inseparable from the homeless youth epidemic. “This means that huge causal factors in youth homelessness are homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia,” said Noble. “If we are going to eradicate youth homelessness, we are going to have to come to terms with the negative and oppressive belief systems that teach us to treat LGBTQ citizens with anything less than dignity, respect, love and acceptance. This certainly includes our amazing youth, especially those who are now homeless.” “This diverse group of homeless youth, whether LGBTQ or heterosexual, has a profound and powerful voice,” agreed OSA director of administration Ginger Phillips. “We want to support them in their progress and give them many creative ways to be seen and heard. Studies show that many homeless LGBTQ youth who receive appropriate guidance, support, protection and resources, eventually become successful members of the community.” In order to help provide youth with this help, OSA will also participate in a number of events throughout autumn and winter. These include NAMI’s annual walk to raise awareness of mental illness, which will begin at Mobile Ballpark at 9 a.m. on Sept. 18. In Oct., OSA will take part in Utah Pride Center’s Family Acceptance Regional Conference (Oct. 8–10), which is targeted

toward creating safe and affirming family environments for queer youth. Throughout the month Creative Minds 2010 will also host Creative Freak Boutique, a shop selling arts and crafts created by homeless youth and where homeless youth will be able to express themselves through open mic and music. From Oct. 14 through Nov. 6 Creative

Minds 2010 will also be a part of the NAMI Art Project at the Patrick Moore Gallery, 2233 S. 700 East. Homeless youth will also participate in NAMI’s Holiday Boutique from Dec. 3–5 at Pioneer Craft House, 3271 S. 500 East. Q

For more information about OSA visit operationshineamerica.blogspot.com.

Pro-Prop 8 Lawyer Lectures at BYU The attorney who represented proponents of California’s Proposition 8 in U.S. District Court lectured Brigham Young University law students at a J. Reuben Clark Law School forum sponsored by the BYU chapter of the Federalist Society. Charles J. Cooper’s argument for upholding Prop 8 was that marriage is, by definition, a union between a man and a woman. “A marriage between a man and a woman is not the core of the institution, it defines the institution,” he said. Cooper’s testimony before U.S. Judge Vaughn Walker mirrored his talk at BYU. Walker decided against Prop 8 proponents, saying that it infringes on gay and lesbian couples’ 14th amendment rights under the U.S. Constitution. Cooper said that marriage benefits society because the union produces children. “Child-rearing and procreation is important in matrimony,” Cooper said. “but also to nature and society.” Cooper said same-sex marriage could harm heterosexual couples in the long run. “The question is not can a same-sex couple raise a child as well as a heterosexual couple,” Cooper said. “It is about the longterm effects, including contributions to society.” In a question-and-answer period following his presentation, Cooper was asked how same-sex marriage would harm heterosexual marriage. According to BYU student Marshall Thompson, his reply was, “Recognizing homosexual marriage would not harm heterosexual marriage at

Prop 8 attorney Charles J. Cooper

all,” and that it was never a point he felt he needed to prove in court. In a document written to the District Court, Cooper cited statistics from the Netherlands, which instituted same-sex marriage in 2001, showing trends of fewer marriages, more single-parent families, more unmarried parents raising children and more opposite-sex couples choosing an alternative status over marriage. He also argued in the memorandum that same-sex marriage deinstitutionalizes marriage. Allowing same-sex marriage weakens the social norms with respect to marriage and shifts the focus from fulfilling socially valuable roles such as parent and spouse to “personal choice and selfdevelopment,” his legal team wrote.

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 13


OUR VIEWS

guest editorial HIV/AIDS: The Best of Times and the Worst of Times by David Mixner

I

N RECENT MONTHS, THE MEDIA has been filled with encouraging news about progress in treating HIV/AIDS. At the very same time, we have been dealt some real setbacks. The lesson is the same as it always has been: embrace and celebrate the progress, and don’t let up the pressure until there is a cure. The good news is indeed reason to celebrate. From the International AIDS Conference in Vienna came word that promising new gels have been developed that could dramatically lower the infection rate among at-risk women. The Wall Street Journal recently published a story indicating that scientists have discovered three powerful antibodies that can neutralize 91 percent of HIV strains. The bad news is that the economic situation is wrecking havoc with HIV/AIDS budgets — both here and abroad. Many states are freezing the ability of people with HIV/AIDS to receive treatment. AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) funds have either been cut way back or frozen, making it impossible for new clients to access them. Unless this is corrected, it could mean a death sentence for some people. It’s crucial for every American that cares about this horrendous epidemic to keep up the pressure, seek new funds and hold lawmakers accountable for their actions. Given the uncertainty with the economy and ADAP, it makes Medicare funds for treating HIV/AIDS even more critical in assisting people with the disease. Medicare provides a vital source of health coverage for around 100,000 people with the disease. In 2006, Medicare became the single largest source of federal financing for HIV

care. The number of people with HIV receiving Medicare benefits has grown over time, reflecting growth in the size of the of the HIV-positive population and an increased lifespan for people with the virus. As thrilled as I was with the new health care law, there is one part that is extremely disturbing. Especially since my journey over the years has taught me the urgent need to hold public officials accountable for their actions in this battle for a cure. Quite simply, with the creation of an entity called the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), we could lose our ability to pressure lawmakers for change. This new board is simply not accountable to anyone. While the IPAB is tasked with cutting Medicare spending, it is exempt from any judicial or administrative review of its decisions, and is barred from probing the government’s spending patterns on specific health care providers, such as hospitals. Shackled by such restraints and yet dangerously unaccountable to Congress, the people or the courts, this board could turn its attention to successful programs in Medicare to carry out its cost cutting mission. The mere existence of an unchecked,

powerful agency making life-determining decisions should be worrisome to everyone. Draconian decisions by IPAB to limit access to medicines to treat HIV will be free from judicial review, the need for advance public notice, or even appeals from patients. The fact of the matter is that the IPAB, like any other agency of government, can make bad decisions. And if they do, we have absolutely no recourse to change them. Personally, I can’t think of a worse scenario than for our research leaders to be on the cusp of a cure, only to be denied the necessary resources because a government panel has blown research and development into the Stone Age. We must not be shortsighted in our zeal to bring down health care costs by thwarting future research and reversing already achieved progress. Stated simply, if we go this route, we would only blunt the more laudable and courageous goal of saving lives and one day eliminating this horrific disease once and for all. Q David Mixner has been involved in public life creating policy and as an activist and writer for over 40 years. He has had two bestselling books, Stranger Among Friends and Brave Journeys, both published by Bantam Books.

leers

Editor, I just wanted to say that Issue 160, August 5, 2010, was the best you have ever put out. I normally don’t respond to such incredible insight and eloquent writing because I generally think it’s too late for words, but you have impressed me with your ‘first person’ insight and articles “Utah’s Gay Community Reel from Recent Suicides” and especially “Full Spectrum Social Justice.” I will eventually read the entire issue and will cut it out and journal it. The cover story, “My Last Shot,” intrigued me initially because it seems to be such a taboo subject that really needs to be addressed. I have been that gay man who turned to drugs and got judged, so I appreciate the compassion in your article. For the first time in my history with Salt Lake City I feel there is hope. Please continue to spread ‘happy’ pleasure as much as you can, but thank fucking god you are not afraid to bring up the real issues. I truly hope your publication can make a difference here in this coping state.

Darren Carlson Salt Lake City

QSaltLake welcomes your feedback Please send your letters to the editor to letters@qsaltlake.com 1 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


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by Bob Henline

NN RECENTLY POSTED an opinion piece by Bishop Harry R. Jackson, Jr. entitled “Same-sex Marriage Will Hurt Families, Society.” In this lovely bit of drivel, Jackson first goes after the validity of “openly gay” (although that has yet to be confirmed) Judge Vaughn Walker’s ruling in the matter of California’s Proposition 8. After that, he attempts to explain why samesex marriage represents the end of civilization as we know it. Let’s take a look at Bishop Jackson’s bullshit. First and foremost, I think it’s important to note that Jackson does what all ignorant “Christians” do in this situation: rely on selected biblical passages. According to Jackson, “All the scriptures in the Bible concerning marriage presuppose heterosexual marriage.” While this is certainly true, who decided that this outdated bit of fiction should determine the laws of our nation? Also, if we determine that we are to follow biblical law, why is it that we should only follow the parts of biblical law that serve the interests of bigots like Jackson? Should we go back to stoning adulterers? People the world over have been up in arms for months over the sentencing of an Iranian woman to death by stoning, yet this is also a biblical punishment for adultery. All one need do is read Leviticus to find all kinds of interesting “rules” that modern Christians don’t follow. This book mentions the legitimacy of slavery, as long as the slaves are from a “neighboring nation.” It references putting to death any who work on the Sabbath, and decrees that eating shellfish is an “abomination.” Not only are these rules not incorporated into our legal system, I’d be willing to bet that Pastor Jackson doesn’t follow them all, either. As a full-time pastor, he certainly “works” on the Sabbath, right? “A marriage requires a husband and wife, because these unions are necessary to make new life and connect children to their mother and father.” While Jackson goes so far as to later declare in his statement that our society should place a greater emphasis on preserving marriages, he doesn’t go so far as to advocate a ban on divorce, separation or abandonment. Why is that? If the sole purpose of marriage is to produce children, shouldn’t we then ban marriage for people who are unable to reproduce? Should we force married couples without children to breed? What about people who choose not to marry at all? If procreation is the point of life, should we not arrange and enforce marriages for all, complete with impregnation?

Of course, Jackson also has to resort to the traditional fear tactic: “These kinds of ill-advised social experiments may produce a host of unintended consequences. If gay marriage is allowed, the nation will soon begin to experience an increased degradation of the nuclear family — resulting in fewer kids being raised by a mom and dad.” And yet again, as with others of his bigoted ilk, Jackson makes this ridiculous statement with no real argument to support it. How exactly does the marriage of two homosexuals degrade the nuclear family? Jackson immediately follows this assertion with: “What will the landscape of America look like if same-sex marriage is legalized across the country? Social scientists report what most Americans have always known: Both boys and girls are deeply affected in biological and physical ways by the presence of their fathers.” Finally, something that makes sense — if you ignore the first sentence. Yes, social scientists agree that a good father figure provides an element of stability and support for children. But the question still remains: what does that have to do with gay marriage? Most gay and lesbian couples don’t have children, but if they do, a stable, married couple (even a same-sex one) is definitely a much better option than an unstable (even hetero) couple. How many hetero couples shouldn’t have children? You can’t read the news without seeing a story about neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse or even murder of children — by hetero parents, Bishop Jackson. Again, the assumption Jackson makes is that the purpose of marriage is children. Why is that? People who are unmarried have children all the time, so should this be prohibited? Should society remove children from single parents and place them with hetero couples? I don’t see Bishop Jackson arguing this point, but it’s the next “logical” step in his illogical path to a better society. The bottom line on this one is freedom of choice. While the Constitution doesn’t specifically protect choice, it is the most fundamental of freedoms. Without free choice, there is no other freedom. What is freedom of speech if you can’t choose what to say? What is freedom of religion if you can’t choose what to believe (or not to believe at all)? There is no logical or legal reason that all people should not be allowed to choose who to love and marry. Q

Bob Henline is a straight man. Don’t hold that against him — he was born that way. He is also a professional author and editor. His blog can be read at nonpart.org.

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 15


OUR VIEWS

I

guest editorial Mental Illness Stigmatized in Utah’s Gay Community by Kyle Foote

WAKE UP PARALYZED with anxiety and fear. I stare at the ceiling, willing myself to sleep a little longer so I won’t have to face the day just yet. I secretly wish that I had simply died in my sleep as I apprehensively ponder all the things that I need to get done today knowing I won’t be able to. I slept through class this morning and I’m already going to be late for work. I purposefully ignore the repeated calls and text messages from my family and friends, I’ll avoid their disappointment for a few more hours. I just want to die right now. But how should I do it? Razor blades? No, I don’t think I could cut myself. How about a rope? Nah, then I’d have to find a rope and I’d probably mess up the knot and just fall on my ass. Alcohol and pills? Hmm, that’s the way I’ll do it. But not today, I’m too tired to kill myself today. I’ll take a shower, have some coffee and see how I feel after that. The scenario above isn’t all that made up. It’s exactly how many people, gay or otherwise, wake up each morning. It’s a story I’ve heard from many different people with whom I have worked and befriended over the past two years as a volunteer with the National Alliance on Mental Illness and other Utah mental health organizations. Many of us may have had a morning like the one I describe above. The sad truth is that many people have mornings like this every day of their life. They are paralyzed by depression and anxiety. This type of paralysis, however, isn’t something that people can just get over or ignore or avoid. Fashion, shopping, boyfriends, drinking, sex and illicit drugs won’t make it go away. Major depression and anxiety are typical symptoms of a mental illness. People who suffer from

a mental illness have a real and palpable chemical imbalance in their brain. They need to seek out support from those around them. In many cases, they may also need medication and counseling to be able to cope with the realities of life. As we know, recently we have had a number of suicides in our community. The first

The primary reason for these suicides was that the young people were suffering from a mental illness reaction to them, by some, was to blame their families, their church, and the straight community in general. The truth is, however, they didn’t kill themselves because they may not have been accepted by their family or a church or by straights for being gay. The primary reason for these suicides was that the young people were suffering from a mental illness and either weren’t able to get or didn’t seek out the support they needed to deal with their disease. In the gay community we often stigmatize anything or anyone that’s different. We reject people based on their looks, physique,

clothes, job, income, education and anything else we deem as being substandard for some pseudo gay norm. We also tend to discard the reality of the pervasiveness of mental illness in our community. This appears to be especially true amongst the youth of our community. We ignore that our friends and loved ones may be suffering from major depression, or bi-polar or other forms of mental illness. By doing so, we fail to support them in their efforts to cope with life. When we avoid the tough conversations and judge those who are different than ourselves, in effect we are placing the blame for suicides within our population on everyone but our own community. As a community we need to embrace the truth that there are many people in our community, especially those who are under 25, who are suffering from mental illnesses and who lack the support or have not yet learned the tools to cope and/or to survive day to day. With the aim of creating resources for our community, NAMI is working together with the Utah Pride Center and other gay community organizations to eliminate the stigma of mental illness and providing our community with resources to support, nurture, and heal those among us who are suffering. In an effort to provide this support, NAMI is launching a support group called “Connection.” This mental health support group is offered at no charge and is organized specifically for those under 30 in the GLBTQ community. It is a place where people who are suffering from a mental illness or who know or love someone who is can gather together on a weekly basis to learn from and share with each other. By the end of the year NAMI will also launch a Connection group for those in the community who are 30 and older. A Facebook group called “Mind Games” has also been formed to provide information on all mental health resources and events available to the local GLBTQ Community. Q Starting September 21st Connection meetings will be held every Tuesday night at the Salt Lake City Main Library at 7pm. If you would like to find out more about how you can participate or help please contact NAMI Utah or join us on Facebook/Mind Games for regular updates.

snaps & slaps SNAP: Ben McAdams vs. Mel Nimer Utah’s State Senate District 2 has been boggling out-of-staters for nearly a year now. Last December, they were shocked to learn that the seat was not only in a Democratic district, but also respresented by an openly gay man, Scott McCoy. Then they were shocked that a straight but gay-friendly Mormon, Ben McAdams, took over. And now they’re shocked that a gay non-Mormon Republican, Mel Nimer, is seeking McAdams’ job (remember, most Americans think Utah is only good for polygamy and incoherent alcohol laws). While it’s always funny to watch people learn and re-learn that gay Utahns exist and that they sometimes do things other than be oppressed, the McAdams/Nimer race is interesting for a number of reasons. While it shows that Utah’s queer and allied community is diverse, it also shows that Democrats and Republicans can agree on fundamental questions about gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender equality. And that Utah’s Republican Party is willing to front an openly gay candidate — albeit in a heavily blue district. Still, if this signals a more gay-friendly turn in Utah’s GOP, we’re all for it.

SNAP: Turner Bitton At just 19, Turner Bitton has accomplished a lot for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community. Now, along with several friends, he’s started a chapter of Parents,

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1 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

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OUR VIEWS

I

lambda lore I Am Shocked! Shocked, I Tell You! by Ben Williams

LIKE TO TELL PEOPLE THAT I was clinically insane until I was 23 years old. I know some of you are saying that explains a lot. But really, so was every other homosexual born before April 9, 1974. In case you think I am exaggerating a tad, I assure you I am not. The American Psychiatric Association’s Bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders classified homosexuality as being “among the sociopathic personality disturbances” in its first edition in 1952, and there the definition it remained until 1974. The American Psychiatric Association’s board of trustees voted in December 1973 to remove homosexuality from the DSM lists of disorders. However, some conservative members of the APA called for a full vote by the group’s 17,905 eligible members to settle the matter. On April 9, 1974 the results were announced. With only 10,555 eligible APA members participating, 3,810 psychiatrists voted to keep “homosexuality” in the DSM as a mental disorder. However 5,854 voted to remove it. So, the next day, on my 23rd birthday, I was no longer considered a mental case. After the 1974 vote, the American Psychiatric Association dropped homosexuality as “a psychiatric disorder,” and even began to advocate for laws to protect lesbians and gay men from discrimination in employment, housing, transportation and licensing. They also encouraged “the repeal of all legislation making criminal offenses of sexual acts performed by consenting adults in private.” Prior to 1970, most trained psychiatrists generally considered desires for someone of the same sex to be a disorder. Karoly Maria Kertbeny’s 19th century term “homosexual” was the official moniker for those inflicted by this mental-physical disassociative disorder. In the early 20th century, thanks to Dr. Freud and Dr. Jung, psychiatry exercised an “authoritative voice” on public opinion. By mid-century, psychiatry’s “scientific opinion” and Alfred Kinsey’s sexology studies began to change the judicial view that homosexuality was a criminal deviancy to a mental illness. Believe it or not, this was a vast improvement. Homosexuals were now being ordered into treatment instead of prison. But in Utah, it would appear that treatment was as bad as prison. Cleon Skousen, while Chief of Police in Salt Lake City, was dismayed that some city judges were sending offending homosexuals to psychiatric treatment, rather than charging them with a felony and sending them to

the state pen for up to 20 years as state law mandated. To sidestep the judges, Skousen got the city fathers to adopt as code the 1952 state provision which ordered sex offenders to the Utah State Hospital. In this way, Skousen said, “a conviction would enable authorities to commit offenders for life if medical examinations showed them mentally ill.” Previously, persons charged with indecent exposure or lewdness were tried in police court in Salt Lake City. Records show that homosexuals were being sent to the state mental institution in Utah County through much of the 1950s. By the 1960s, aversion therapy or electroshock therapy was promoted as means to cure homosexuality. As early as 1935 the American Psychological Association was told of a doctor successfully treating homosexuality by using electro-shock therapy “delivered at intensities considerably higher than those usually employed on human subjects.” Dr. Frankenstein meets Dr. Freud. Electro-shock therapy was readily adopted in Utah to cure homosexuals, especially at LDS Church-owned college campuses. During the ’60s one man stood out as the premier proponent of this therapy: Dr. Robert D. Card, a Salt Lake psychologist. Dr. Card practiced the highly controversial bio-feedback therapy to cure homosexuality for nearly 20 years, explaining it simply as a “pairing of noxious stimulus with the stimulus trying to be reduced.” Dr. Card was judges’ and bishops’ go-to guy to fix queers, and he found no want of clients desperate to be heterosexual to fit in with the state’s dominant culture. Dr. Card’s credibility in the professional world was spotless. He published several academic and professional papers advocating aversion therapy to eliminate homosexuality from a patient’s personality. He worked out of offices in Salt Lake City and on the BYU campus with gay Mormons. His BYU clients were treated by having electrodes attached to their genitals and then shown homosexual pornography. If they got a stiffy they were zapped. A member of our community wrote an account of his therapy session with Dr. Card in his Salt Lake office. It goes like this: “The doctor would turn on a very graphic porno video of two or more men having sexual intercourse (and other activities). As I became excited and started to get an erection, the little ring around my penis would measure the slightest growth in circumference. This would then register on the device where the doctor sat, and he would hit me with a

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few seconds of volts. He would then sharply tell me to control my arousal. After a few minutes he would hit me with a few more seconds of electricity. This would go on for about five to 10 minutes. I would get aroused no matter how hard I tried not to, and I would be shocked again and again.” Dr. Card defended this acceptable medical practice by stating, “I have an ethical responsibility to help anyone who wants to change.” However, by 1985 Dr. Card stated that he had abandoned the electro-shock therapy. When asked if he was ever successful in introducing heterosexual feelings in his homosexual patients, he was silent. He may have abandoned electro-shock therapy but it is interesting to note that in 1998 Dr. Card patented a sexual arousal device with the US Patent Office. Today, reparative therapy, also known as conversion therapy, has generally replaced aversion therapy as a cure for homosexuality by those who have not accepted the APA’s 1974 decision. Reparative therapy states that homosexuality is a learned behavior, not truly an orientation. In 1998, the American Psychiatric Association passed a resolution rejecting this “treatment.” The resolution stated that attempts to change a person’s sexual orientation can cause “depression, anxiety and self-destructive behavior.” The APA feared that even the existence of reparative therapy spreads the idea that “homosexuality is a disease or is evil and has a dehumanizing effect resulting in an increase in discrimination, harassment, and violence against gays, lesbians and bisexuals.” And yet here in Utah, Evergreen International, which embraces reparative therapy has had an annual conference for nearly 25 years feeding off referrals from LDS Family Services and from Mormons who are taught to despise their nature. Dr. Allen E. Bergin, a psychology professor at BYU, sums up the LDS position on why homosexuals must become heterosexual: “Though a person may suffer from homosexual inclinations that are caused by some combination of biology and environment, the gospel requires that he or she develop firm self-discipline and make an energetic effort to change.” The American Psychiatric Association repeated in 2009 that reparative therapy is not “clinically sound.” However, LDS General Authority Elder Bruce C. Hafen, at that year’s Evergreen Conference, criticized the APA for claiming that sexual orientation is unchangeable. Hafen told attendees to “find a therapist who can help you identify the unmet emotional needs that you are tempted to satisfy in false sexual ways.” In 1990, Boyd K. Packer wrote this regarding the church’s stance on homosexuality: “We are sometimes told that leaders in the Church do not really understand these problems. Perhaps we don’t. There are many ‘whys’ for which we just do not have simple answers.” This is about the only thing Packer has ever said that I agree with. Q

Q on the strt Who is your favorite ❝ Utah artist and why?”

Dan Q. Tham Ruby Chacon — her art is vibrant and expansive and deeply personal.

Dave Bastian Trent Harris because he holds a magnifying glass up to all the wonderful weirdness that is Utah. Jonathan Krausert Harry Francis Sellers — he’s a great painter and nice to have a conversation with over a couple a beers on Saturdays at Juniors. Ann Clark Benjamin Wiemeyer ... I love that he is so diverse. He has such an incredible art talent, anywhere from his self portraits, to beautiful pieces on canvas to incredible graffiti art found on walls all over the city. Brandon Burt I’ll admit to a longtime fetish for Arnold Friberg’s heroic genre paintings of hunky Nephites and Lamanites. But Lee Deffebach’s abstract expressionist colorfields were truly revolutionary — and she was kind enough once to give me season tickets to the Utah Opera, so she’s got my vote! Maureen Duffy-Boose Trevor Southey. He has made Utah culture famous far, far beyond Utah.


bushauck Ken Mehlman, the Hypocrite by Ryan Shattuck

C

OMING OUT OF THE CLOSET as a gay man or women is not an easy process. There’s a lot of paperwork to fill out; a new state identification card has to be issued; there are separate gay tax forms to be filed; and the federally mandated homosexual agenda has to be memorized. So it makes sense why it took Ken Mehlman, former Chairman of the Republican National Committee as well as George W. Bush’s former campaign manager, many years to come out of the closet. The dust has mostly settled since Mehlman came out a few weeks ago in The Atlantic. In the article written by politics editor Marc Ambinder, Mehlman explains why it took him so long to publicly admit that he is a gay man: “It’s taken me 43 years to get comfortable with this part of my life ... Everybody has their own path to travel, their own journey, and for me, over the past few months, I’ve told my family, friends, former colleagues, and current colleagues, and they’ve been wonderful and supportive. The process has been something that’s made me a happier and better person. It’s something I wish I had done years ago.” Although opening up about his sexuality has made Ken Mehlman “a happier and better person,” many people are quite angry at the former RNC Chairman, for coming out years after leading the Republican Party through some of its most anti-gay years in recent history. Under Mehlman’s direction, several states passed legislation banning same-sex marriage in 2004, and promoted a political aura of intolerance and discrimination that has plagued the Republican Party for years to follow. Naturally, many gay and lesbian men and women have labeled Mehlman a “hypocrite,” have satirically awarded him the “Roy Cohen Award” for “managing the most anti-gay Presidential campaigns in history” and have even called Mehlman a “Quisling Homophobic scumbag.” Is Ken Mehlman a hypocrite for coming out as a gay man after leading anti-gay political party? Or does he deserve our sym-

pathy for being ‘brave’ and admitting his sexuality in the midst of an anti-gay political party? Mehlman is currently in the process of repenting for his past sins by working with the American Foundation for Equal Rights, which supports a legal challenge to California’s anti-same-sex marriage proposition, and is attempting to garner sympathy with statements such as the following: “I can’t change the fact that I wasn’t in this place personally when I was in politics, and I genuinely regret that. It was very hard, personally ... If they can’t offer support, at least offer understanding. “What I do regret, and think a lot about, is that one of the things I talked a lot about in politics was how I tried to expand the party into neighborhoods where the message wasn’t always heard. I didn’t do this in the gay community at all.” Although some members of the gay community, such as Oscar-winning screenwriter and gay activist Dustin Lance Black, believe that “Ken represents an incredible coup for the American Foundation for Equal Rights,” the aftermath of damage caused by Mehlman during his anti-gay reign of political terror is so deep and entrenched in society that any apology and action is too little, too late. Mehlman states that, in regard to his traitorous, self-internalized homophobia, “At least for me, it wasn’t like there was a light-bulb moment,” and “The reality is, it’s taken me 43 years to come to terms with this part of my life.” Yes, some people take a long time to come to terms with who and what they are. Some gay men and women come out of the closet when they are teenagers; others take several decades to deconstruct and determine their sexuality. Other excuses and justifications may also be applied to Mehlman’s situation, such as: Are Americans not allowed to have opinions and political beliefs that evolve and shift with time and experience? Haven’t we all belonged to a job, a political party or another organization that made a decision with which we disagreed?

Ken Mehlman is no ordinary American, because he changed history in ways that very few Americans have

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 19

Aren’t public figures allowed to maintain a semblance of privacy in regard to their personal lives? Aren’t Americans afforded the right to have private lives that are not dictated by their politics? Yes, Americans can change their minds; yes, most of us have belonged to an organization that may have made a decision with which we disagreed; yes, public figures deserve privacy; yes, Americans have the right to support politics that disagree with their private lives. Nevertheless, most Americans are not in positions of power to affect national policy that affects the lives of millions of fellow Americans. Although all Americans are afforded the right to be as public or as private about their lives as they desire, most Americans do not influence policy that prevents other Americans from marrying, from visiting their partners in the hospi-

tal, and do not help create a political atmosphere that leads to the potential suicides of closeted gay teenagers. Ken Mehlman is no ordinary American, because he changed history in ways that very few Americans have. He does not deserve the privacy or sympathy of the average citizen. He gave up those rights long ago, when he started receiving a regular paycheck from the Republican National Committee, encouraging him to strip as many rights away from gay men and women as possible. No, coming out of the closet is not easy for anyone, even Ken Mehlman. And I doubt he’s even started filling out his paperwork. Q

Ryan Shattuck is the author of “Revolutions for Fun and Profit,” at revolutionsforfunandprofit. com

Friday Nights on Monument Plaza in Sugar House!

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by Christopher Katis

I

REMEMBER WHEN MY COUSIN LAURA’S husband was transferred to Golden, Colo. After settling in, she e-mailed me their new address and gave me some details about the house: it was only a couple of years old, had been in the Parade of Homes and was located in a great school district. I asked her if it had any charm. That, I learned, wasn’t one of her priorities. When Kelly and I bought our first place a couple of years later, I e-mailed the address to Laura and mentioned that our new place was nearly 100 years old and sat square in the middle of one of the worst school districts in Northern California, but man did it have charm! Charm used to be a requirement for us in homes, but once we became dads, our priorities in houses evolved. Last month, Kelly and I closed on a new house. It wasn’t a pretty experience. Our realtor Yvonne, another one of my cousins, claimed that in her 30 years in real estate she’d never seen a couple disagree with one another so consistently. Everything he liked, I pretty much hated. And vice versa. When we started, I told Yvonne I had three criteria for any house: at least two bathrooms, a place for an office/spare room and driving distance from my parents. Being a mother herself, she knew that a nice, safe neighborhood with kids in it, a decent-sized back yard and a good school district were also on the list even if we never mentioned them. Kelly had his own criteria: a unique home that oozed charm and was close to the private school at the Greek Church the boys started this year. That proved to be a tough order to fill. We’ve lived in “not perfect for us” houses before, and we’ve always managed to turn them into show pieces. Okay, Kelly’s always been able to turn them into show pieces. He got the gay decorating gene, I got the Greek one ... you know, the gene that makes you think everything blue and white and covered in plastic works. Take, for example, the nondescript illegal garden apartment we rented when we lived in San Francisco. I hadn’t wanted to move into it, but Kelly persuaded me by promising “we can make it cute.”

Within a couple of years he had taken a dark, forgettable apartment and turned it into, well, PeeWee’s Playhouse. From the wisteria-purple and corrugated metal walls in the living room to the giant sun blazing down in the sea blue kitchen, the place was a freakin’ masterpiece! So I know he can do it. But this time we’ve headed to the suburbs. It’s a different world out there. Somehow I doubt our new neighbors will mirror those we’ve enjoyed during the past 16 months in the Avenues. Last week, while we were unloading the first of the seemingly never-ending boxes at the new house, one of the neighbors introduced himself. No matter how clearly we explained our relationship, he still walked away confused. Now that I think about it, this move to the suburbs could be a chance for us to be good gay ambassadors! I’m going to bet that for more than a few of our neighbors we may be the first honest-to-goodness homos they’ve ever met live and in-person. This move is making me venture outside of my comfort zone. Once again, the boys are forcing me to head in an unpredictable direction. And I think that’s a good thing. And even though the house isn’t the perfect place for the two men in our family, it is pretty close to perfect for the two boys. Even Kelly has to admit that to a certain degree. There’s something to be said about a neighborhood where ducks swim in the canal, and grazing horses come right up to people to bum a cube of sugar or bite of apple. The house does have a lot to offer as well, and I like it a whole lot more than Kelly does. In fact, I was the one who said we should pull the trigger and buy it. Partly because I was sick of looking at houses. But it also met all of my criteria. (Although, apparently, my parents live close enough to drop by unexpectedly. That’s a little scary.) As time goes by, and as we make that house work for us, as we get used to living in a suburban neighborhood and being the only gay family for miles around, I know we’ll love it. Even Kelly. Maybe even as much as the boys and I do. Q

Charm used to be a requirement for us in homes

2 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


L

crp of the wk Charlie Crist by D’Anne Witkowski

OOK, I DON’T KNOW IF Florida Gov. Charlie Crist is gay. And while it really should be a non-issue because being gay is not this scandalous thing that makes a person unfit for public office like some loonies on the far right believe, the fact is: it matters. It’s an issue because Crist is making it an issue by reiterating his support for a constitutional ban on same-sex couples getting married. Granted, this isn’t the first time Crist has said he supports such a thing. Apparently he mentioned it at some point while running for governor and governors don’t really have much power when it comes to the United States Constitution. But now he’s running for Senate as an Independent. The United States Senate. On Aug. 29 during an interview on CNN, Ed Henry brought up the issue of same-sex marriage and pointed out that Marco Rubio, one of Crist’s opponents in the Senate race, supports a constitutional ban. “The former Republican Party Chairman Ken Mehlman came out and said he’s gay and he called on conservatives to kind of move to the political center and be more tolerant on this issue,” Henry said. “Now that you’re trying to occupy the political center, are you still in favor of a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage?” “I feel the same way, yes, because I feel that marriage is a sacred institution, if you will,” Crist responded. “But I do believe in tolerance. I’m a live-and-let-live kind of guy, and while I feel that way about marriage, I think if partners want to have the opportunity to live together, I don’t have a problem with that.” So he’s a “live-and-let-live kind of guy” who believes in “tolerance,” eh? And while marriage is “sacred,” thereby rendering homos unfit for such an institution, he doesn’t mind partners living together. So long as their relationship isn’t in any way recognized or protected and the law treats them as legal strangers then Crist doesn’t “have a problem with that.” Oh, how very magnanimous of him. “I think that’s where most of America is,” Crist continues. “So I think that, you know, you have to speak from the heart about these issues. They are very personal. They have a significant impact on an awful lot of people and the less the government is telling people what to do, the better off we’re all going to be.” Since telling the government to stay out

of people’s personal lives and writing discrimination into the constitution seem to be contradictory, Henry accuses Crist of trying to have it both ways (no pun intend-

ed, I’m sure). But Crist doesn’t budge. “Well, everything is in a matter of degree, Ed, and when it comes to the institution of marriage, I believe that it is between a man and a woman; it’s just how I feel,” he says. Call me crazy, but “it’s just how I feel” is a pretty flimsy argument for amending the Constitution to keep gay people from marrying each other. Hell, it’s a flimsy reason to amend it for anything. By itself, Crist’s unabashed support of writing discrimination into one of our nation’s founding documents is alarming to say the least. But it’s even more alarming

if he is, indeed, gay. And he is widely rumored and believed to be just that. Yes, he’s married. To a lady. Since 2008. Which, of course, proves that he’s not gay because of how getting opposite-sex married automatically makes you not gay. So who knows? Maybe all of the gay rumors are wrong. Either way, Crist is still a creep. Q

D’Anne Witkowski has been gay for pay since 2003. She’s a freelance writer and poet (believe it!). When she’s not taking on the creeps of the world she reviews rock ‘n’ roll shows in Detroit with her twin sister.

The YWCA Salt Lake City is pleased to invite you to the 22nd annual celebration of women in our community!

YWCA LeaderLuncheon • September 17, 2010 Grand America Hotel • 555 S. Main Street, Salt Lake City Reception 11:30 a.m. • Luncheon 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Keynote speaker: Jeannette Walls, author of the New York Times best-seller The Glass Castle. The 2010 Outstanding Achievement Awards will be presented at LeaderLuncheon to: Lynne N. Ward - Government/Public Service Marian Ingham - Community Service Cynthia A. Bioteau - Education Deborah S. Bayle - Health/Human Services

Tickets: $60, $50 for YWCA members/associates Sponsorships are available. Visit www.ywca.com to register online or call 801.537.8619.

salt lake city

Celebrating the Accomplishments of Women...Supporting Women and Children Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 2 1


SALT L AKE CONSIGNMENT SHOPS

Coming Home with Home Again by Joselle Vanderhooft

M Abode Brightens Up Any Abode by Joselle Vanderhooft

I

T’S NOT EVERY CONSIGNMENT SHOP that combines vintage clothing, crystal chandeliers, flea markets and mannequin parts, but few consignment shops are like Abode, where “shabby chic” meets “subtle elegance.” That’s how owner Miriam Sabir Venkataramanan describes her store, which she opened in 2005, after a few years managing Simply Home, another consignment shop on 1300 S. 900 East. And a peek inside Abode’s brightly painted building shows just how apt the description. There, decorators and collectors can find any number of unusual and striking items to brighten up their abode, from vintage theater marquee letters and unusual step stools to bigger pieces like armoires and even sofas, on occasion. “If it’s funky and interesting and vintage, we’ll take it,” said Venkataramanan. “Our bottom line is fun, funky and functional. I think we like to focus on the unusual while still remaining utilitarian. [For example], right now we have a shocking turquoise massage chair.” For even more unusual fare, visitors are invited to check out the store’s vintage children and baby section and its salvage room where unusual doorknobs, drawer knobs, mirrors, and even doors and windows are waiting. There’s even a back section which Venkataramanan lovingly calls “the Paris Flea Market,” which she describes as consignment with “a little Victorian and Edwardian thrown in.” There, crystal chandeliers can be found alongside Audrey Hepburnstyle little black dresses. “We call it our well-behaved side. So you know what the rest of the shop is like,” Venkataramanan joked. Unlike many consignment shops which spe-

cialize solely in furniture and home accessories, Abode also accepts vintage clothing, which Venkataramanan describes as anything “pre1960.” Though, she says that she’s particular about what she accepts because “there are so many things that can be wrong with clothes, like tears or damage.” Even so, the store’s mannequins are well-clothed and ready to be sold or rented for any number of events. Venkataramanan admits that she’s partial to mannequins, which are ubiquitous throughout Abode, from displays using their hands to an unusual sculpture in the bathroom. “In our restroom we have the bottom half of a female mannequin. Essentially she’s naked, and that holds our toilet paper,” she said. For those who can’t get enough of Abode’s classy flea market ambiance, the store holds an outdoor flea market in its parking lot each year from April through September. In fair weather and foul, up to 30 vendors meet once a month to hawk their wares, which have included clothing, homemade lemonade, “truly vintage, antique religious relics” and dolls bearing the likeness of Mexican artist and feminist icon Frida Kahlo. Venkataramanan, who provides breakfast to the vendors, said that she hosts the monthly market to draw attention not only to Abode but to the creative artisans who populate the surrounding neighborhoods. “We love Sugar House and the Avenues neighborhoods,” she said. “We love the people. It’s really our niche.” The final Abode flea market for the season will be held Sept. 18 from 9 a.m.–4 p.m. in the store’s parking lot at 1720 S. 900 East. For more information about the store visit abodepfm.com or abode-abode.blogspot.com. Q

22 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

AKING A HOME’S INTERIOR truly unique and beautiful is often a challenge in this contemporary world of cheap, mass-produced furniture. Thankfully, consignment shops like Home Again are there to help add a touch of class and beauty to any home with unique furniture in a variety of styles — including some items that most people wouldn’t think of as decorative. “We’ve even had a reclining wheelchair made out of wood,” said Kathryn Blomquist, manager of the Sugar House store. “That was kind of interesting. And right now I have a tortoise shell with a net on it to hang on a wall.” A canoe, she added, has also found its way into the store to be snapped up, as have antique watering buckets and horse troughs. Typically, however, both Home Again locations specialize in what Blomquist calls “eclectic and fun” furnishings in styles ranging “from Asian to French and Italian to German,” and which include everything from armoires and kitchen hutches to headboards and benches crafted by local artisans. “They’re all very unique in their own way,” she said. The Sugar House store was opened in 2002 by Lisa Herbold, the owner of a consignment clothing store near the University of Utah’s lower campus. Herbold moved to Jackson Hole several years ago, and the store is now owned by Emily Larsen, as is the Midvale location, which opened in 2007. While many furniture consignment stores

(such as Now & Again, which is also featured in this issue) specialize in small items that fit well in downtown apartments, Home Again carries larger items like book cases, dressers and coffee tables. Most of these items, said Blomquist, are imported by consignors, but both shops also accept consignment items from locals. “We have to see pictures of large items before they’re brought in,” said Blomquist, noting that both locations are highly selective about what they take. Small items, on the other hand, can be brought in any time. “We get really great dishware, china, all different kinds of stemware,” said Blomquist. If the item does not sell in 90 days, consignors must pick it up. Although Home Again has some pricier pieces — the most expensive in the Sugar House store, said Blomquist, is valued at $10,000 — both locations have a wide selection for shoppers, decorators and bargain-hunters of all budgets. Some classy end tables, for example, start at just $30. “It all depends on the piece,” said Blomquist. And while some pieces are vintage, several are brand new, a fact which only adds to the eclectic charm of both stores, which Blomquist described as “very different” from each other. “We don’t just specialize in old furniture. It’s a mix of new and old,” she said. Home Again is located at 1019 E. 2100 South and 7490 Holden St. in Midvale. For hours call 801-487-4668 for the Sugar House location and 801-255-5457 for the Midvale store. Q


Now & Again’s Styles from Now & Then by Joselle Vanderhooft

S

TEP INTO NOW & AGAIN in search of a cute end table and you might just leave with a giant golden rooster that greeted you at the door. “It was posted [to the shop’s website] in the evening and it sold within the first 20 minutes of business the day after,” said Michael Sanders, owner of the downtown consignment store which regularly sees such unusual items as the rooster, which he described as a decorative object made in the 1960s by Syroco, a company famous for its “hard plastic and painted gold” objects including wall sconces and rococo-style mirrors. The memorable fowl is one of many unique furnishings from past times and present day rubbing shoulders at the store. And that’s just the way Sanders likes it. “To me, it’s all about the mix,” he said. “I think the modern home is not filled with dusty antiques nor is it a sterile environment filled with stark hardness. It’s a mix in the middle, and I love our store to reflect that mix. I like to say we’re not looking for folks to come in and furnish their entire house from the store. We provide the “wow pieces,” the fun accessories that give a room personality.” And how does the golden bird fit in? “We love to display things that are kind of kooky and whimsical,” he said. His customers agree. Since the shop’s opening in May 2009, people from downtown, the Avenues and Capitol Hill have scoured its two daily-changing floors for tables, chairs, bathroom and kitchenware from all decades. “Pretty much from the moment I opened I was busy,” said Sanders. And while he opened the shop with overflow items from his friends’ garages, today he takes in goods from 300

consignors. “The merchandise comes in a pretty steady clip every day,” he said. “One of the things many people mention — especially those who make the rounds in the secondhand stores in Salt Lake — is that our store seems different every time they come in.” Sanders credits this to his policy of leaving merchandise in the store for no longer than three months. If it doesn’t sell, he explained, the owners must pick it up. “I think I’ve earned a reputation as a fair businessperson,” he said. “We’re kind and considerate to our customers and we pay everyone on time.” Sanders and Now & Again’s consignors also regularly donate items to a number of charities including Big Brothers, Big Sisters Club and Our Store, the thrift shop run by the People With AIDS Coalition of Utah. “Through our consignors, we’ve donated through the course of the year to yard sales benefiting people in need throughout the valley,” Sanders added. “We love giving to those.” And Sanders has loved consignment ever since he discovered 1950s clothing as a teenager. After a grueling life on the East Coast opening and planning events for night clubs and restaurants, Sanders decided to turn his lifelong passion for collecting into his livelihood. Having fallen in love with Utah on visits to his sister, who lives in Park City, Sanders moved to Salt Lake City in 2008 to embrace “a simpler life.” “I’ve always found Salt Lake to be an interesting city and one of America’s great secrets,” he said. “I felt it would be a wonderful quality of life here. I’ve always been very impressed at not only the natural beauty and friendliness of people, but of the very large gay and lesbian community here, and the fact it’s such a politically active

and exciting community. Back east in New York you can be whoever you want to be and no one says anything, so you get a bit complacent about being politically active, where in Utah it really makes a difference. I love that.” Although Sanders loves his store on 501 E. 300 South, he would also love to open a second location in Sugar House, where he is currently looking for the perfect storefront. There he would like to sell larger furniture, which he cannot do for his uptown clients who tend to live in small apartments. He is also preparing to expand his downtown store to take in more “really fabulous” vintage clothing, for which he says there is a mostly unfulfilled demand in the city. When this happens, he also hopes to offer alterations on site, a service he said that many clothing consignment stores on the East Coast offer. In the meantime, visitors to the shop will be greeted by Jolie and Bijoux, Sanders’ toy poodles whom he calls “one of the main attractions.” And if they’re looking for more funky items like the golden rooster, they only need to wait awhile for something unusual. “Once someone brought in a poster that I thought was fabulous,” said Sanders. “To me, at first glance, it was this fabulous deco poster of this jazz musician playing a trumpet. I said,

“I love the poster of a jazz musician!” and the woman [who brought it in] replied, “That’s the Angel Moroni!” Visit Now & Again online at nowandagainslc. com. Q

Like a Gay Man with Amnesia — We Come Out Every Two Weeks

salt lake Utah’s gay and lesbian news & entertainment biweekly magazine

The 2010 edition of TheQPages is out! Get one! or go to TheQPages.com

801-649-6663 QSaltLake.com

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 23


TRE VOR SOUTHEY

Trevor Southey’s

Oxymoronic Life on Display

“ The p ur sui t of t r u t h in one ’s life and art of ten le ads to conflict

in

one’s

self

and

conf rontat ion w it h ot her s.” – Robe r t Fly nn Johnson , cur ator in ch a rge , Ache nb ach Foundat ion for Gr aphic Arts, Fine Arts Museums

of

San

Fr ancisco

MOM, 1970

2 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

T

by Michael Aaron

REVOR SOUTHEY is a man who has lived several lives in one lifetime. Born in Africa, studied in England, converted to the Mormon Church and served a mission, graduated from Brigham Young University, married a woman, sired four children, founded the Mormon Art and Belief Movement, developed an artists’ commune in Alpine, came out as a gay man, moved to San Francisco, and through all of it, expressed himself through his art. “My work reflects my life ... Sometimes to an embarrassing degree,” Southey said during a lunch at Café Trio with myself, friend and art collector Jim Dabakis, and Day Christensen, fellow artist and curator of Southey’s show at the University of Utah Museum of Fine Arts. Indeed, you can see transformations in Southey’s life as you look at his art. That will become eminently clear during his show at UMFA, which will run from Oct. 21 through Feb. 11. Titled “Reconciliation,” his show is a “retrospective of [his] life and work,” through “four life passages that have defined

DAD, 1970

Southey’s character and his art: his youth in Rhodesia and education in England; his life as a married, practicing Mormon and his desire for a utopian lifestyle created around family, farming and art; Southey’s decision to acknowledge his homosexuality in 1982, which coincided with the first major public awareness of the AIDS NANNY, 1969 epidemic; and the reconciliation of his life decisions as expressed in his revised artistic approach to the human form,” according to the UMFA website. “Reconciliation” is also the title of his book, a nearly 200page piece of art in itself. “I was shocked at how autobiographical the book was,” Southey said.

Africa Southey was born in Rhodesia, Africa (now Zimbabwe) in 1940 of European parents. As a child he was timid, skinny and plagued with bouts of rheumatic fever. He wrote of his childhood in his book: “There is a photograph of my mother and myself. It is very revealing, though the imperfect skills of the photographer may have contributed to the sense of uncertainty, as the figures lean on the tilted ground. My mother’s feet are placed together, her plain cotton dress buttoned from neck to knee. She smiles in frank confidence of her essential beauty, though her hair is thin and parted with casual style. She is a young woman, evidently of few means but firm conviction. “I am a skinny boy, perhaps age 7 or so. I lean in toward my mother as if regretting ever having left the safety of her womb. I stare out of sunken, dark eye sockets, serious, a deep sense of my peculiarity already clear in my bearing. From the outset I did not fit well into the larger world. My mother and family, especially the women, secured any sense of well being I had at all. My essential timidity and then my illness justified my


clinging to her and her powerful, protective certainty. She was a fierce, strong woman. “My father was off to war, and after that off in his difficult world of survival, a world always challenging to his kind and gentlemanly soul.” He was forbidden from taking art courses in secondary school, and therefore chose to abandon his schooling before he received a diploma. He was, however, able to take special afternoon classes offered by the school principal’s wife. He also was able to find a handful of art books at the school library. He was enthralled by classical statuary of male nudes. His parents then gave him two volumes of reproductions of Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks for his 16th birthday, which greatly inspired his later work.

BLESSING, 1974

Mormonism

INTERCESSION AT GETHSEMANE

abstract was lost on the general population.” He and a few other artists began creating artwork in a Mormon theme. As their work grew, Brigham Young University “caught wind” of them and began watching. In 1969, “We had an exhibition at the library at BYU,” he said. “And what came out of that was the Mormon Festival of Arts.” That led to what would soon be called the Mormon Art and Belief Movement. He became an instructor of art at BYU, but was frustrated by the regimented attitudes toward art there. He was commissioned to do a piece of art for a show. As he presented the painting, which included male full frontal nudity, he was told, “Trevor — this is magnificent work, but we can never exhibit it.” He was forced to cover the groin area with gouache. “You could lick a thumb and wash the gouache off,”

He went on to study art in Sussex, England at the age of 17 and then the Natal Technical College in South Africa, where he met two Mormon missionaries. Drawn to the structured environment and spiritual system that meshed with the utopian views of his youth, he began a tumultuous relationship with the church. At the time of his conversion in the early ’70s, the church denied the priesthood to black members — a fact that mirrored the racism of his home country, where blacks couldn’t vote. He was also aware of the church’s stand on homosexuality, but was suppressing those feelings in himself anyway. The form of his art had already taken shape before his conversion to Mormonism. He had already begin his life of oxymoron. He says at the time he entered the Mormon Church, “I was only beginning to sense the terrible paradox of the solitude of the soul in its eternal, excruciating, wonderful dance toward union with another.” He then moved to the United States, what he called the “promised land.” He landed in New York City in the heat and humidity of July and was presented at the feet of the Statue of Liberty. He had come to the States to “serve the [LDS] Church and serve the Lord,” he said. He took in the World’s Fair and came across the Catholic Pavilion with Michelangelo’s Pieta and the Mormon Pavilion full of “mediocre art” actually painted by Seventh Day Adventists. “I knew that greater art was possible in the spirit of the restored church,” he wrote in his book. “Perhaps I was to be one vehicle for that new Renaissance.” “Mormon art,” at the time, he said, was an “oxymoron. The EDEN FARM, 1971

Southey laughed. Eventually, Southey had to leave BYU. “I didn’t quit BYU,” he said. “They fired me.”

Eden Farm In 1967, he married his wife, Elaine Fish. “I knew I must find a companion,” he wrote. “Some fine woman who would be with me through all eternity.” He met Elaine through a woman he had dated while seeking his eternal companion. “She was earnest and learned and beautiful,” he wrote. “She has a wide and generous face, a smile of perfect teeth with large eyes, clear and certain. We immediately related in a most vital and extraordinary way, sharing ideals and hopes in an openness rare on a first date.” —Continued on page 28

—Continued on page 28

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 2 7


TRE VOR SOUTHEY Dabakis negotiated the four-month-long exhibit of Southey’s work and life at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. Starting with an Oct. 21 special event, his exhibition will last through Feb. 11. The exhibition will follow Southey’s work, and therefore his life, from his time in Africa to his latest project, Warriors, in five adjoining galleries. In the first gallery, his work during his time in Africa will be displayed. The second will show his Mormon art. Then Eden Farm, then art as he was coming out. In the final gallery will be his current work. The last gallery, Southey said, is very different than the previous four. “There is not as much cohesiveness in the final gallery,” he said. “Once removed from the dogma, you can go anywhere.” Southey was diagnosed with prostate cancer shortly before Christmas in 2002 and currently lives with his daughter in the San Francisco Bay area. He is still close to his wife and children and considers himself a family man. He is not a fan of the word gay, finding it frivolous.

SAMARITAN, 1978

Trevor Southey Continued from page 27

Their courtship was short and they decided to marry, even though Southey was “haunted by [his] reality.” They moved to Alpine, in what would eventually be called Eden Farm, and had several children. “My children were, as babies, and are now, as adults, a consuming passion for me,” he said. “I cannot imagine life without them.” Southey talks of his life in oxymorons. “My life is like black and white,” he says. “My time in Alpine [Utah] was the most spectacular/heartbreaking/ blissful situation. The property was beautiful, the art was transforming. Everything was beautiful on the outside. On the inside there was grief.” “It was the best of times and the worst of times, as they say,” he continued.

VLADIMIR, 2003

Coming Out By the time his last child was born, however, his capacity to “suppress his nature” had reached its end. Doubts of his religion and its condemnation of what he perceived was his “natural way” took its toll on his marriage and his faith. He and Emily divorced and he moved to Salt Lake City. “Coming out was huge to me,” Southey reflected. “I went from the beautiful, large estate in Alpine to a shack on 8th East.” “I remember sitting among boxes in the middle of the room in November and I started to howl like an animal,” he said. “At the same time it was pain and relief.” “A lot of people experience this,” he said. “At one time they are surrounded by family and friends ... then not.” He said those days were a tough and wonderful period. Southey then met Jim Dabakis when he was interviewed by him for KTALK Radio as his painting, “Flight Aspiration,” was removed from the Salt Lake City International Airport because a woman said it might inspire rape. Dabakis called the interview a failure because Southey wouldn’t rise to the bait of his art being risqué in any way. Their resulting friendship, however, was anything but a failure. Dabakis has since represented Southey’s work at his gallery in Park City, the Thomas Kearns McCarthy Gallery. “Jimmy has pushed and pushed my art work,” Southey said. “This [show at the University of Utah Museum of Fine Arts] would have never happened without him.”

2 8 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

VYACHESLAV, 2001

FARM EGGS, 1979

“You can’t deny the deep spiritual calling for love,” he explained. Q

Trevor Southey: Reconciliation will run from Oct. 21 through Feb. 11, 2011, at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. More information at umfa.utah.edu and at trevorsouthey.com


Illuminating risks to LGBTQ youth and providing strategies for keeping families united.

Honoring families with keynote speaker, John Cepek, National PFLAG President and presenting Volunteer of the Year Award, Organization of the Year Award, and the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award.

October 8-10, 2010 Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel $125

October 10, 2010 Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel $35/ticket, $350/table sponsorships available

Pricing, registration, agenda, and presenter bios can be found at www.utahpridecenter.org space is limited

Registration, sponsorships, and more information can be found at www.utahpridecenter.org

PRESENTERS Dr. Caitlin Ryan, Family Acceptance Project Trevor Project Massachusetts Commission on GLBT Youth National Youth Advocacy Coalition Legal Services for Children Gender Spectrum Planned Parenthood of Utah ACLU of Utah and more!

John Cepek National PFLAG President

WWW.UTAHPRIDECENTER.ORG


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

gay agenda Happy Bir... by Tony Hobday

OK, so I didn’t say “Screw you Labor Day weekend!” Instead, I said, “I want to have your babies, Labor Day Weekend!” I ventured to the Gorge with my lil sister, Jake. When we arrived, it became Flaming Gorge. We went wake boarding, cliff-jumping and jellyfish hunting (we didn’t see any, dammit!). I even scratched a park ranger’s kitty. Alright, I can’t lie to you, we actually only played Gin, drank iced tea and took afternoon naps (rubbed down with Ben-gay and wearing pink ‘Sleeping Beauty’ sleep masks); it was like heaven in a vodka bottle.

17

FRIDAY — There’s a new tenant at Armadillo Acres and she’s wreaking havoc all over Florida’s most exclusive trailer park in Dark Horse Company Theatre’s production of THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER PARK MUSICAL. Pippi is a stripper on the run (the tassels are just a spinnin’), and when she comes between an agoraphobic (that’s the fear of wool) housewife and her less-than-affluent husband, she causes a mighty hurricane. This campy, caustic musical fable has everything from spray cheese to road kill to (or at) Costco. 8pm, Thurs.–Sat., 6pm, Sun., through Oct. 3, Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main St., Park City. Tickets $18–25, 435-649-9371 or parkcityshows.com. Q It has been called the greatest play produced in the English language in 400 years, and now Pioneer Theatre is proud to present a production of William Shakespeare’s HAMLET. It’s part ghost story, part murder mystery, part psychological thriller and part hard-to-understand. Tehehe! 7:30pm, through Oct. 2, Pioneer Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, UofU. Tickets $24–42, 801-581-6961 or pioneertheatre.org. Q In 1988, one of the greatest rock bands formed — THE SMASHING PUMPKINS. Though the band has led a tumultuous career, they are one of the most diverse, densely layered, and guitar-heavy groups. Their music contains elements of gothic rock, heavy metal, dream pop, psychedelic rock, arena rock, electronica and a shoegazer-style production. My favorite is “1979” ... yes, I am gay! 7pm, In The Venue at Club Sound, 219 S. 600 West. Tickets $40, 801-467-8499 or smithstix.com.

18

SATURDAY — Happy Birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy bir .... oh lord, I’m getting as old as Gene Gieber because I don’t remember the rest. Anyhoo, the old fart is celebrating his birthday tonight with an UNDERWEAR PARTY. And the old perv loves Baskits. Love ya long time, Gene! 8pm, Club Try-Angles, 251 W. 900 South. For more info, call 801-364-3203 or visit clubtry-angles.com. Q Happy Birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy bir ... shit, I did it again! Anyhoo, The Trapp is celebrating 20 years of supporting alcohol abusers — just kidding ... well, sort of, because Jabe serves a drink called the Drunken Tony — I wonder who that’s named after? Double anyhoo, join Joe Redburn and his clan at their 20TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY, it’ll be a freakin’ hoot! 7pm, The Trapp, 102 S. 600 West. 801-531-8727. 3 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

19

SUNDAY — Equality Utah’s monthly sociopolitical event, PILSNERS AND POLITICS, is held on the third Sunday of each month at Squatters. The restaurant has a butt-load of beer to choose from: staples to seasonal brews to limited releases, like Provo Girl, Nitro Cream, Monkey’s Dunkle and Hell’s Keep. EU also has a butt-load of Utah politics to discuss, so be there, get your butt loaded (but don’t drive!) and hear from candidates about their races. 4pm, Squatters Brewery, 147 W. Broadway. Cost $5, 801-355-5020 or equalityutah.org.

22

WEDNESDAY — Direct from the Las Vegas Strip comes drag sensation EDIE. She will perform her solo cabaret show, a fastpaced hour — and then some — of the leggy showgirl singing her favorites, all with her signature ’60s gogo flair. Look out for high-kicking choreography and witty off-the-cuff banter. 8pm, Black Box Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. Broadway. Tickets $25, 801-355-ARTS or arttix.org.

23

THURSDAY — Sugar Space’s 2010 Artist in Residence (recipients receive 40 hours of free space, approximately $500 allotted to staff, marketing materials, etc., and artists receive a percentage of the door) recipient, INFLUX DANCE, from SLC/Charlottesville, Va., perform an original dance theatre piece exploring women throughout history based on writing by Margaret Atwood. 8pm, through Saturday, Sugar Space, 616 Wilmington Ave. Tickets $10/adv.–12/door, 888-300-7898 or thesugarspace. com. Q Become absorbed in the CONFIGURATIONS of contemporary dance as Ririe-Woodbury explores the depths of the human experience with four cutting-edge choreographers. The performance will feature a newly commissioned work entitled “Duet” by Tony Award-winning choreographer, Bill T. Jones. The uncompromising and unapologetic political and social views of Jones have always laid the foundation for his dances. He has taken considerable strides in merging art with social commentary on topics such as being African American, homosexual, and HIV positive in today’s society. 7:30pm, through Saturday, Jeanne Wagner Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. Broadway. Tickets $30, 801-355-ARTS or arttix.org.

Q This event sounds like more fun than a night with Ryan Kwanten (Jason Stackhouse) ... OK, not really! The first annual POWELLAPALOOZA is packed with tons of music, games and beach parties. Taking place on the Arizona side of Lake Powell, the four-day festival includes over 50 bands, a golf tournament, poker run, hot air balloon rides and more. Through Sept. 26 in Page, Az. Tickets $35–105, VIP tix $290. For more information, powellapalooza.com.

24

FRIDAY — Nestled in the majestic Zion Canyon is an adorable little town named Springdale, and this weekend the adorable little town is host to the ZION CANYON MUSIC FESTIVAL. Performers include Thriftstore Cowboys, Sputnik, Mother Hips and Crippled Stripper. And may I recommend that you stay at Under the Eaves Bed & breakfast — the gay couple that owns it are fantabulous! 5pm tonight & 11am Saturday, Springdale Town Park, Springdale. Tickets $15/Friday, $20/Saturday or $30 for both days, zioncanyonmusicfestival.com.

25

SUNDAY — “Women fake orgasms because they have excellent time management skills.” That’s a Dottie Dixon quote ... I mean WANDA SYKES. Anyhoo, the ultra-hip gay comedian will be bringing down the house in Wendover. Don’t miss it. “Drinking will make you feel like a sexy 26-year-old.” That’s what Michael Aaron believes! 7pm, Peppermill Concert Hall, 680 Wendover Blvd., Wendover, Nev. Tickets $40–70, 800-217-0049 or wendoverfun. com.

UPCOMING EVENTS OCT 16 NOV 26-29 APR 11

Spencer Day, Rose Wagner The Rockettes, Maverick Ctr Lily Tomlin, Kingsbury Hall


save the date

hear me out By Chris Azzopardi

Robyn Body Talk, Pt. 2

September 18 sWerve’s Oktoberfest swerveutah.com September 18 Walk for Life, Bike for Life utahaids.org September 25 ROTC Military Ball rotcslc.com September 25 Wanda Sykes, Wendover, Nev. wendoverfun.com September 28 Equality Utah Allies Dinner equalityutah.org October 9 National Coming Out Day Breakfast utahpridecenter.org October 16 sWerve’s Halloween Bash swerveutah.com October 16–20 Living With AIDS Conference pwacu.org October 18–22 UofU Pride Week emanzanares@sa.utah.edu November 25 Thanksgiving Dinners at the Utah Pride Center, Club Try-Angles and The Trapp December 1 World AIDS Day worldaidsday.org December 10–11 Salt Lake Men’s Choir Christmas Concert saltlakemenschoir.org January 5–9 Utah Gay & Lesbian Ski Week, Park City communityvisions.org January 20–30 Sundance Film Festival, Park City sundance.org

On “Hang with Me,” Robyn’s lead single from part two in her Body Talk series, the every-girl of (smart) pop is hesitant to fall in love. We, though, hardly had a choice. Just coming off the June release of the first installment, she’s adorably irresistible, emotionally exposed like the BFF you never had, but in Robyn’s wonderfully up-front way, almost do. That single from this edition — slightly beginning-to-end better than the first — is too good for words; a slice of bursting dream-pop that’s so honest and innocent that it reads like a diary entry and feels more real than anything on the radio, right where this particular charmer belongs. It’s heartily inviting, just like the two addictive openers before it, “In My Eyes” and “Include Me Out” — the latter featuring the silliest and sweetest of Left Eyelike breakdowns. Both songs are the consoling friends she needed when a lover broke her heart on the first disc’s “Dancing on My Own.” Sadness mostly sits out this time around, while Robyn warns that “Love Kills” and then shakes out some sass on “Criminal Intent” and the hardcore toughie “U Should Know Better,” alternating boasts with Snoop Dogg like a tag-team fierce enough to take down Osama bin Laden. She closes with “Indestructible,” and like the acoustic version of “Hang with Me” from Body Talk Pt. 1, it’s string-powered and sweetly melancholy. When the song is, as her cycle suggests, cut for the clubs on the third and final chapter, we’ll be right there — hanging with her.

how truly atrocious they really are. Otherwise, she’s stuck with slapped-together songwriting that even Mary J. Blige couldn’t salvage: “Bittersweet,” the first single, is one big, crying Hallmark card that Fantasia bellows like she means every trite line she’s emoting; so is “Even Angels,” a trendy R&B jam with a walk-then-run motto that at least corks a singable melody within its glimmering synth groove. Old-school soul sweeps through “The Thrill is Gone” and “Trust Him,” calling up Lauryn Hill, and it’s invigorating to hear Fantasia sing something that suits her ragged, old-soul voice. Her shining coup, though, isn’t even studio produced; it’s her live version of “I’m Here” from her role in The Color Purple musical. From the gut, it’s a reminder that Fantasia can be great when the music allows her to be.

Zayra Baby Likes to Bang Now that Gaga’s set the precedence for dancepop, wannabes want a piece of her disco ball. A chunk of it goes to this Puerto Rican vixen, who gives glam a go with songs on her debut disc, which includes six originals and five remixes. She goes M.I.A. with “Feel Good,” and on the fierce “V.I.P.,” a top-10 dance single, she’s too cool for you. If Zayra wasn’t so much like everyone else, that just might be true.

Reach Chris Azzopardi at chris@pridesource.com.

Grade: C+

Also Out Kristine W Straight Up with a Twist Dance divas shifting outside the box sounds so Cyndi Lauper, but another big voice is going for beyond-her-roots glory. Kristine W’s doing it over two discs: a laid-back, Latin-seasoned mix of covers and dance-songs-turned-ballads paired with a livelier, Sade-sounding second disc. Ms. W sounds divine, her silky pipes rising high above some pedestrian production, but scene queens will be looking for less chill, more kill.

Grade: A-

Fantasia, Back to Me Fantasia Barrino has never reached the heights of American Idolwinning peers Kelly Clarkson or Carrie Underwood, but she has just as much talent wringing from her. Talent that, again on her third album Back to Me, is squandered on songs that reek of regurgitation, forcing Fantasia into the simplest of R&B conventions that almost completely ignore her instinctual passion. She has a better backstory — single mom, reality show champ and, now, suicide-attempt survivor — than hit-making catalog, which has left nary a blip on the radio and turned some horribly embarrassing jams. But at least she’s consistent; both “I’m Doin’ Me” and “Collard Greens & Cornbread” are almost funny enough to forget Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 1


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Girls Just Want to Have Big, Gay Fun

Over 50 people joined QSaltLake on the Big Gay Fun Bus to West Wendover to watch Cyndi Lauper croon her new and old songs to a rambunctious (sometimes too) crowd. A pool party the next day and back home. Bingo, Jello shots, prizes and Sin Delopper, not to mention a rowdy crowd, made the trip memorable and fun. Watch for the next Big Gay Fun Bus to Wendover and make sure you’re on it!

Did we mention the pool party? 

32 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Don R. Austin, LCSW

Quries By Steven Petrow

I’m not stalking him, but ...

Q

I connected with this really nice guy on Facebook and have been perusing his profile ever since. We are actually going to meet for coffee , as our first date. So am I allowed to “know” as much as I do about him? I don’t want to creep him out.

A

Unless your new friend has signed up for an app that reveals who’s been reading his page, ignorance is bliss. But your instincts are good: People don’t always like the idea of new friends or beaus knowing all about them. In fact, when the two of you get together, try to pretend you don’t know what you do. Don’t bring up out of the blue his entire work history (yes, that’s creepy) and avoid comments like “So, I saw you and Mike broke up on Facebook...” But if you

both love Lady Gaga or volunteer at the local LGBT center, it’s fine — and actually very helpful — to talk about what you have in common to break the ice and discover what else you may share. Online relationships are just like offline ones. Peeling back the layers of someone’s life and personality should happen in a gradual way, as you build up trust. And hearing someone describe his life in his own words is a great way to get to know someone. It’s entirely possible that your new friend would rather tell you himself about his beloved pets and what he wore for Halloween last year.

Dressing for success or myself

Q

Usually when I’m applying for a job I set aside the real me—the butch dyke, if you will—and dress up a little feminine (different hair, different suit, everything). As I get older, this makes me feel less and less comfortable, as though I’m not being the real me. How do you suggest I dress for interviews?

A

That’s a tough question. Ideally, it’s essential not to disguise yourself or to appear other than who you are. Still, there’s something to be said for having your “interview suit” — and doing some extra grooming — especially because we all know how others’ prejudices can work against us. Think of it this way: The idea is to take appearances completely out of the equation so that you can explain your qualifications and sell yourself without distraction. Once you land the job, you can be freer in how you dress. You’re not selling out to adopt a more mainstream look for the interviews; this is just another step to get you in the door. In my experience, most people try to pick up a company’s dress code once they start work. But if you don’t think you can do that — or want to dress butch all the time — then go ahead and do it for the interview. If the company can’t take it then, you’re wasting your time considering this particular employer.

Gay male Psychotherapy group forming. Limited to 6 – 8 members.

801-485-9225

Tickets for Hamlet On Sale Now! 2010-11 Season tickets now available! Hamlet Sept. 17 – Oct. 2, 2010 Bram Stoker’s

Dracula

Oct. 22 – Nov. 6, 2010 Irving Berlin’s

White Christmas Dec. 3 – Dec. 24, 2010

Black Comedy Jan. 14 – Jan. 29, 2011

In Feb. 18 – Mar. 5, 2011

Hamlet

Sept. 17 – Oct. 2, 2010

The Diary of Anne Frank Mar. 18 – Apr. 2, 2011 Andrew Lloyd Webber’s

Sunset Boulevard

Apr. 29 – May 14, 2011 Special Event!

Rent

Jun. 10 – Jun. 25, 2011

Exploring the Breadth of Human Experience 801.581.6961 | www.PioneerTheatre.or g A professional theatre in residence at the University of Utah

Major Season Suppor t Provided By:


FOOD&DRINK

restaurant review Basque Supper at La Caille by Chef Drew Ellsworth

O

N A SUNDAY NIGHT TWO weeks ago, I went, unannounced, to La Caille for their Basque family-style supper. I was very pleased. Let me tell you about it. I haven’t been to La Caille for years, so I had been looking forward to this visit for days with great anticipation. I went with friends from work and we all brought great wine. Some of the younger guys don’t drive, so I picked them up and we drove south to the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon. The epic grounds of La Caille are secluded and overgrown on the sides of the old gate — far

more than I remembered. I actually drove past a couple of times before realizing what it was! The beautiful, filigreed gate which screams France, is taller and narrower than I had it in my mind, and the red brick lane leading up to the château is now older, bumpier and even more old world than ever before. My young friends thought we had been transported to another place and time. The lane, by design, meanders and serpents its way toward the restaurant, through a beautiful park of lawns and mature trees. There were families of black rabbits dining on the grasses and many peacocks strolling around as though they owned the place. The magic is still there!

We used the valet parking at the entrance where the red brick becomes a circular plaza. The Art Nouveau glass work around the gables of the château is so authentically reminiscent of France at the turn of the last century, it is almost breathtaking to a Francophile like me. Old neighborhoods in Paris, like Montmartre and Montparnasse, still display this beautiful architectural style. You can say what you want about the French, but secretly we all admire their art. What’s cool about La Caille is the attention to detail in everything. When you enter, there are high ceilings and cracked stone walls with gorgeous, old antique armoires on each side of the vestibule. As you proceed upstairs, you pass the seemingly ancient wine cellar which is stocked by my friend Joe Wright, who has been the sommelier at La Caille for a decade. The bottles are placed in handmade ceramic pipes that have been set in concrete. Other bottles are crammed into old world wrought iron racks so you read the impressive lables: Château Mouton Rochchilde, Château Margaux, Echezeau and Clos de Beze, Caymus and Silver Oak from California, and Brunellos from Italy. We were led by our hostess, a pretty blond woman dressed in the famous La Caille bustier, to a small, semi-private dining room. We had a view of the eves of the château and the park with the ever-present peacocks. A cool breeze was blowing and the French doors throughout the dining rooms were open to the outdoors. Our dining room had a coffered ceiling of botanical relief sculptures depicting roses and bay leaves. By now, the boys from the Wine Store were enthralled! For newcomers, La Caille is truly amazing and a little overwhelming. It was fun for me to introduce young people to Europe via Little Cottonwood Canyon. We were, as it should be in a French restaurant, brought baskets of bread with hand-piped, butter roses. The bread was the best French bread I’ve had in Salt Lake, which says a lot because I make a lot of French bread myself: crispy, crusty, golden on the outside and spongy, chewy and full of holes on the inside. Our first course was a flavorful black bean country soup in a rich broth with a lot of vegetables. We had cracked open a bottle of Silverbirch New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc and a beautiful ’03 Grand Cru

Chablis which was showing a little age and was fragrant, honeyed and delicious. Next, we were served a Caprese salad on a long, rectangular plate — a simple dish with large slices of fresh mozzarella, tomatoes and basil. The salad was drizzled with very good olive oil and tangy balsamic vinegar — classically done and perfect! The entrée was just so beautifully homemade, I almost couldn’t believe I was in a restaurant. Sometimes La Caille gets bad reviews for its food, but on this night I felt like I was at the home of a French friend. There were crisp, braised short ribs on one end of a huge platter and baked halibut on the other end. In the center was a bouquetiere of vegetables: steamed asparagus, new potatoes and broccoli. The fish was served on a bed of creamed spinach which I thought was just delicious. The veggies were perfectly cooked and the melt-in-your-mouth short ribs were laced with a flavorful Bordelaise sauce which I wanted to drink! This night, the food at La Caille was fully matched to the beautiful surroundings. Our wine servers poured us a Premier Cru Mercurey red Burgundy and I brought a Nicolas Cole “Camille” Bordeaux-blend. The wines were awesome with our entrees. We had our choice of three desserts: crepes, Bananas Flambé and crème brulee. How very, very French! We tried all three and although the desserts were quite predictable, they were nicely done and presented with a lot of show. My visit to La Caille was random and they didn’t know I was writing an article so there is no prejudice here or any connection. I can freely say I just love the total experience. If I made any little comments at all, it would be that the bean soup, to my taste, was a little salty — something which no one else mentioned. I also thought the fish, although nicely cooked, had very little flavor or seasoning, something which was only noticed by one other person. But the delicious sauces and vegetables made up for any misgivings or criticisms. I rate my visit at La Caille at 90+. The plus is for the grounds and building which are incomparable to anywhere in Utah. Sadly, La Caille has just gone up for sale and has an iffy future as a time-honored restaurant in Salt Lake City, so please go again soon. The Sunday brunch and Basque Supper are, indeed, memorable. Q

3 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


BIG Chimichangas!

2 TUESDAY

$

ALL BEERS JUST $2

• 25 WINGS FLAVORS • PATIO OPEN • FREE PARKING AT TROLLEY SQUARE • OPEN AT NOON EVERY DAY • OPEN SUNDAY FUN DAY

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Make Love to our Food Experience sophisticated Mexican gastronomy, wines and spirits in a hip, relaxed atmosphere. Fresh, flavorful, festive and sexy… As Frida would have desired.

For Reservations: 801-983-6692 545 West 700 South, Salt Lake City

WEEKLY SPECIALS

www.fridabistro.com

Sunday • Fajitas $11.99

Try our wild coconut, curried wild rice

Monday • 1/2 Off Select Apps Pitchers of Bud Light $8.00 Taco Tuesday • Tacos $2.00 Tecate Beer $2.50 Wednesday • Beef Barbacoa $14.99

2148 Highland Drive

Thursday • Chipotle BBQ Ribs $11.99 Bucket of 5 “Coronitas” $10

801-486-0332

www.omarsrawtopia.com

Food Specials Start at 4 pm till items run out.

noW oPen

tueSdayS g eve4npmin – dusk

Park City at Kimball Junction I-80 & Hwy. 224 (Behind Wells Fargo Bank)

from uce-only for a prod ring the market du tiful most boun ar! e ye time of th

435-645-7000 Weekly Specials are available for Dine In only and may not be used with any other offers. Offer expires June 30th, 2010.

Saturday MorningS

at HiStoric Pioneer Park (300 South, 300 West)

September

18 Cooking Demos Viking Cooking School 25 Art and Culture Day Eve

october

2 Cooking Demos Viking Cooking School 9 Dutch Oven Cook Off City Weekly

Super-sized sunflowers are a sure sign of a bountiful harvest.

QSaltLake Tweets @qsaltlake

Visit slcfarmersmarket.org for market updates Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 35


FOOD&DRINK

cocktail chaer Drag Not a Drag with Brass Monkeys By Ed Sikov

Visit 41 of Salt Lake City’s finest restaurants between September 17 – October 2 and choose a three-course dinner for either $15 or $30. Some participating restaurants offer a delicious two-item lunch special for only $5 or $10. 15

$15 Dinner

Acme Burger Company 30 10 Bambara 30 Bayleaf Café 15 10 Biaggi’s Ristorante Italiano 15 Buca di Beppo 15 10 Caffe Molise 30 10 Cannella’s 15 10 Caputo’s by Night 15 Cedars of Lebanon 15 10 Christopher’s Seafood & Prime Steakhouse 30 10 Copper Canyon Grill House & Tavern 15 10 Copper Onion 30 10 Donovan’s Steak & Chop House 30 Eva Restaurant 30 10

30

$30 Dinner

5

$5 Lunch

Faustina 30 10 Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse and Wine Bar 30 Garden Restaurant 15 Gracie’s 5 Green Pig Pub 15 5 Iggy’s Sports Grill Downtown 15 10 J. Wong’s Asian Bistro 15 5 Lamb’s Grill Café 15 10 Market Street Grill 30 10 Market Street Oyster Bar 30 10 Martine 30 10 Melting Pot 30 Metropolitan 30 10 Naked Fish Japanese Bistro 30 10

10

$10 Lunch

New Yorker 30 10 Oasis Café 15 Olive Bistro 15 10 Red Rock Brewing Company 15 10 Robin’s Nest 5 Ruth’s Chris Steak House Sage’s Café 15 10 Sandbar Mexican Grill 15 10 Settebello Pizzeria Napoletana 15 10 Squatters Pub Brewery 15 10 Star of India 30 10 Takashi 30 Tin Angel Café 30 10 Vienna Bistro 30 10 Wild Grape Bistro 30 10

Presented by:

Supported by:

For information visit www.dineoround.com

30

T

HE LABOR DAY DRAG PARTY in Fire Island Pines is either a hilarious gender circus or a reason to blow some queen’s brains out. Drag is fabulous. It’s the sweating, stinking, drunken guys in wigs who brazenly stick their tongue in your ears that’s either a kick or a nightmare. It’s a party for Pines boys who have discovered the glamour girl within. I wasn’t about to reveal mine in public. I’d make an incredibly ugly Nancy Sinatra. (I’d call to mind a blonde Cynthia Ozick in white leather boots.) Dan wouldn’t do it, either. He’d just look like Dan in a dress. But our housemates all brought suitcases stuffed with secrets; nobody named their inner woman until the big reveal. Jack Fogg came downstairs first. Sammy had put him up to doing it. Jack was clearly miserable — he was wearing a burqa. (His eyes said it all.) Sammy followed in a luxurious purple sari and a bhindi on her forehead. “So what drink are you sending us off with, dude?” Sammy asked. “Miss Jackie-Anne Taliban here needs a drink.” Jackie-Anne was fussing with her crotch. “There’s a pitcher of Brass Monkeys in the fridge,” I said. “What’s a Brass Monkey?” Ms. Taliban asked through the slit in her headpiece. “Rum, vodka and orange juice. The color resembles buffed old brass.” “Make mine a double,” the Islamic fundamentalist begged her Hindu girlfriend. Frankie and Ian then made their entrance. I’d expected more, but all they did was put on long blonde wigs and matching white tennis outfits. Ian immediately sensed my disappointment. “Don’t you know who we are?” He asked in disbelief. I shook my head no. “We’re the Doublemint Twins,” they sang out in unison. “Brava, divas!” Dan said, applauding. “It’s delicious and really strong!” The non

sequitur came out of the burqa’s mouth slit. Sari Sammy agreed. “Seriously, dude!” She said. “I’ll be on my ass before we get to the party.” Then Sal and Sean came down, reminiscent of grizzled, gray Old Year and adorable Baby New Year. Sal went for distinctly middle-aged laughs; he was “Edie Gourmet.” With his face framed by Edie’s signature hairdo, Sal actually looked like her in a most disturbing way. Of course this Edie was carrying a copy of M.F.K. Fisher’s The Art of Eating and had a can of duck confit serving as a hat. Being brilliant himself, Sal persistently overestimates the average gay man’s wit. My unspoken prediction: nobody at the party would get the joke. I was right. It was Sean who stole the show, not only at our place but at the party, too. With his actor’s make up skills, a copper-colored wig and naturally voluptuous body, he was an eerily perfect Beyoncé. When he grabbed the burqa woman by the waist, yanked her close and began singing “We’re your dream girls” in precisely the voice of Ms. Knowles, it was way too much, and I shot some of my Brass Monkey out my nose.

The words ‘rum,’ ‘juice,’ and ‘you’re such an asshole’ formed the foundation of our debate

The Brass Monkey 1 part dark rum 1 part Absolut 2 parts orange juice Pour the ingredients into a shaker filled with ice, and after shaking it just enough to chill it, pour the contents into the prechilled glass of your choice. This drink shouldn’t be served on the rocks. Note: the original (some might call it real) recipe contains much more OJ. It’s boring. My version is a lot more fun. Q Ed Sikov is the author of Dark Victory; The Life of Bette Davis and other books about films and filmmakers.

3 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


BIG Chimichanga!

dining guide Frida Bistro Sophisticated Mexican cuisine, wine and spirits 545 W. 700 South 801-983-6692 Loco Lizard Cantina Serious mexican food since 1999 at Kimball Junction. 1612 Ute Blvd., Park City 435-645-7000 Meditrina Small Plates & Wine Bar Encouraging gastronomic exploring in tapas tradition 1394 S. West Temple 801-485-2055 Metropolitan Handcrafted new American cooking 173 W Broadway 801-364-3472 Off Trax Internet Café Coffee, wi-fi and pool 259 W 900 South 801-364-4307

For people of all ages to hang out, play pool, get on the internet, play music COFFEE BURGERS SANDWICHES SOUPS SALADS APPETIZERS BREAKFAST BRUNCH POOL TABLE VIDEO GAMES JUKE BOX FREE WIFI OPEN Mon-Thur 7a–7p Friday 7a-3p AND After Bar Closing Fridays and Saturdays

259 W 900 S 801 364-4307

Next to Club Try-Angles, Half Block from TRAX in the NEW Gayborhood!

Home of the Happy Hangover Sunday Brunch 11am–2pm Q PON

Free Soda or Coffee with food purchase

www.offtraxslc.com

Omar’s Rawtopia Restaurant Organic live food 2148 S. Highland Dr. 801-486-0332 Sage’s Cafe The freshest and healthiest cuisine possible 473 E 300 South 801-322-3790

Monday • 1/2 Off Select Apps Pitchers of Bud Light $8.00 Taco Tuesday • Tacos $2.00 Tecate Beer $2.50 Wednesday • Beef Barbacoa $14.99 Thursday • Chipotle BBQ Ribs $11.99 Bucket of 5 “Coronitas” $10

Park City at Kimball Junction I-80 & Hwy. 224 (Behind Wells Fargo Bank)

10 AM Gardeners, bring your produce to sell or trade!

FROM

SUNDAYS

Trolley Wing Company We’re Back! Open daily noon to 11pm 550 S 700 East 801-538-0745

The Wild Grape Bistro Eat where the locals eat 481 E South Temple 801-746-5565

Sunday • Fajitas $11.99

Food Specials Start at 4 pm till items run out.

Tin Angel Cafe Local food, music, art. Serving lunch, dinner and Saturday brunch 365 W 400 South 801-328-4155

Vertical Diner Vegetarian restaurant open seven days a week 10 a.m.–9 p.m. 2280 S West Temple 801-484-8378

WEEKLY SPECIALS

435-645-7000 Weekly Specials are available for Dine In only and may not be used with any other offers. Offer expires June 30th, 2010.

JUNE 13 THRU OCTOBER 24

INT’L PEACE GARDEN 1060 SOUTH 900 WEST www.slcpeoplesmarket.org

OUR 2010 SPONSORS

To get listed in this section, please call 801-649-6663 and ask for Brad or e-mail brad@qsaltlake.com Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 7


NIGHT LIFE

bar map

Q

J

Salt Lake City

E 600 N.

by Hunter Richardson

Temple Square

Gateway Mall

200 S

Salt Palace

300 W

S R

Trax Line

Arena

100 S. 200 S.

Intermodal Hub

400 S MAIN ST

500 S

STATE ST

900 W

600 W

V 300 S. City Hall

300 W

600 S

Trax Station

900 S

900 E

1300 S STATE ST

South Salt Lake City

Sugar House

Trax Station

Trax Line

T 3300 S

300 W

nonetheless. Additionally there is The Trapp which has been alive and well for years, serving great drinks in big jars — it reminds me of a cabin filled with booze and games (what could be better than that on a cold evening?). Moving on, there is Club Try-Angles with a pool table and my personal favorite thing: text messages that you can send to the TV for everyone to see (childish, yet completely satisfying). Edge and Fusion are where to go on a night where you find yourself wanting the environment of an old, classic New York City gay bar with lasers and smoke — and to me, that’s a lot better than snow and cold. Ultimately, I feel as winter comes closer and the layers get thicker, the place to be will be anywhere that has the closest parking and best atmosphere. Bar hopping doesn’t become an issue as most people park and stay because wiping snow off the car just isn’t that appealing more than twice a night. Actually, I would bet that the first club to have covered parking would be the most popular during the cold months strictly because no one (gay, lesbian, bisexual or straight) likes cleaning off a snow-covered automobile. So bid farewell to the skimpy clothing. Let’s see the style the Salt Lake City gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community can bring to the table. This winter I challenge you all to be more sophisticated than trendy. More classy than sassy. Refine yourselves in the fact you can outwardly project the great character within, rather than defining yourself through the façade of “individual expression.” You are all beautiful, so show it with your style, not your skin this winter. See you this weekend. Q

Trax Line

F

IRST THINGS FIRST: I REFUSE to get involved in the drama of a situation which I am not directly a part of or cannot single-handedly solve within a reasonable period of time. That said: bars, clubs and lounges, play nice or your “customer” may start to feel uncomfortable. Just saying. OK, to the point now. I am happy to announce that tank top season is over. For all of you who love them: knock it off. That time has passed and the rest of the world can live without being subjected to open armpits, budging necklines and people who should just never wear a tank top in the first place. This is Salt Lake City, not the Jersey Shore. That said, this means fall (and soon winter) is around the corner. So grab your layers because patios will be chilled, the glasses cooled and, of course, the air will be slightly below comfortable. Of course, I understand that this is Utah and guessing the weather is like throwing darts at a board, but still, one can hope. Still, I see a few spots becoming “hot spots” even in the cold weather. Namely, JAM. This well-known and well-loved place may not have the heated rock seat bench anymore, but needless to say they understand how to market in a cold climate (one has to love the many heaters). Also, Püre. On a Friday night, who doesn’t want to park close to an arena filled with warm bodies drinking and having a good time? I think no more explanation is needed. There’s also Babylon. Same-same-but-different to the reasoning above. So, where else is there to go? As I’ve mentioned, Studio 27. It is having a slow start, but it’s been steadily rising in popularity

200 EAST

Q scene No More Tank Tops!

K 2100 S

P 3900 S

Q bar guide WEEKLY BAR EVENTS E CLUB EDGE ●

615 N 400 W • D M K X tinyurl.com/clubedgeslc

T CLUB TRY-ANGLES ●

251 W 900 S • D M N 801-364-3203 • clubtry-angles.com

SUNDAYS

MONDAYS

LATIN GAY NIGHT

KAROAKE W/KADE STEEL

KARAOKE $1 DRAFTS BBQS AT 4PM

BEER-SOAKED WEENIES

●J JAM

BEER BUST BBQ AT 4PM BLOODY MARYS

K KARAMBA ●

LATIN GAY NIGHT DJ FRANK GO-GO DANCERS

751 N 300 W • D F M N 801-891-1162 • jamslc.com 1051 E 2100 S • D M X 801-696-0639 • klubkaramba.com

P PAPER MOON ●

3737 S State St • J K L 801-713-0648 • thepapermoon.info

S STUDIO 27 ●

615 W 100 South • D M 801-363-2200 • studio27slc.com

V TAVERNACLE ●

201 E 300 South • K X 801-519-8800 • tavernacle.com

R THE TRAPP ●

102 S 600 West • B N D K M 801-531-8727 • tinyurl.com/trappslc

FREE POOL $1 DRAFTS $1 MIMOSAS

FREE TEXAS HOLD-EM $4 PAPER MOON STEINS

TUESDAYS

PIANO KARAOKE WITH ERIC 8–11PM

BBQ at 4PM

KARAOKE WITH JAMIE 9PM

THURSDAYS

HIP HOP NIGHT DJ WONDERBOY

DANCE EVOLUTION W/DJ DC

$1 DRAFTS BACKROOM BLUES

SATURDAYS FUSION W/ROBBIE ROB & TIM

KARAOKE

$1 DRAFTS DJ D / DJ BOYTOY

DANCE! DANCE! DANCE!

SUPERSTAR KARAOKE WITH BRIAN G

BLACK OUT DEEP HOUSE W/ DJ MIKE BABBITT

FRIDAY FIX WITH DJ \V/

BOOM BOOM ROOM WITH DJ MIKE BABBITT

KARAOKE W/ MR. SCOTT 8PM $1 CORONAS, RED STRIPE

WHITE TRASH BINGO FREE POOL $2 WELLS, $3 BIG BUD CANS

COUNTRY LINE DANCING 7–9PM WILD WEE KARAOKE 9PM

POLES, CAGES, SEXY WOMEN BEST FEMALE DJs

WOMEN! WOMEN! WOMEN!

SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE

DJ BRENT VINCENT $3 JAGER SHOTS $4 JAGER BOMBS

DJ NAOMI $5 LONG ISLANDS

DJ TONY MARINOS SUMMER MARTINI LUGE

DUELING PIANOS 9PM $3 BIG BUD LIGHT

DUELING PIANOS 9PM $3 BIG BUD LIGHT

DUELING PIANOS 9PM

DUELING PIANOS 9PM

DART TOURNAMENT 7PM DJ DENNIS

DJ DENNIS

POWERBALL KARAOKE W/ TROY 9PM

B = BEAR/LEATHER | D = DANCE FLOOR | F = FOOD | K = KARAOKE NIGHTS | L = MOSTLY LESBIAN | M = MOSTLY GAY MEN | N = NEGHBORHOOD BAR | T = 18+ AREA | X = MIXED GAY/STRAIGHT OR GAY CERTAIN NIGHTS

3 8 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

FRIDAYS

JAM U GAY COLLEGE NIGHT

LATIN NIGHT

$1 DRAFTS KARAOKE W/KEVAN 9PM

WEDNESDAYS


CLUB MILITARY ID ID S L R A E V B H M E IT M W S O ER REE T SERVICEMEMB IVILEGES - EFR R R U P O S R IT O S F A H V IP MEMBERSH TELL — NO CO ’T N O D , K S A DON’T

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! R E V O N E Z O R HELL HAS F E R E H S I E K ys a d s r u h T KARAoO & s y a n Sund MONDAYS

ERTS C N O C O E D I V TUESDAYS

S E U L B M O O R BACnK t 7pm a in g e b s n o s s le ce

, After the boar nues ti n the party c next door at

ers Da e u q y r lt u s r fo Dancing

WEDNESDAYS

NTS E M A N R U O T POOL eturning October 6 R

AYS $1 DRAFTS D S E U T ▼ S IE N ONDAYS WEE J BOY TO M ▼ TOY, $1 DRAFTS TS F A R D 1 D $ S • Y m A p 4 RAOKE, BBQ at HURSDAYS KARAOKE ▼ FRID A K S Y A D N U S T OPEN DAILY 2PM LY O PEN D AIL Y AT AT 2 PM $1 DRAFTS ▼ S Y A L NIGHT L D A S E E U C T N A ▼ -D E 801-364-3203 251 W 900 S C R S DANCE-DAN GHOUT THE BA 1/2 BLOCK FROM 9th S TRAX STATION U O R ▼ SATURDAY TH S N E E R C

m • offtraxslc.co 259 w 900 s

ON SHY? TEXT HIM

OUR S

WWW.CLUBTRY-ANGLES.COM

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 3 9


FUN&GAMES

Turn of Phrase Across

1 Pitcher’s rubber 5 Whitman’s dooryard bloomers 11 Get ready for action 15 Succotash bean 16 Tennis star Mauresmo 17 Little Caesar gangster 18 Crude cartel 19 Scent of a Woman Oscar winner 20 Point of view intro, at Gay.com 21 Start of a quip 24 Sault ___ Marie 25 Start of a footnote abbr. 26 Threesome 28 Doesn’t feel up 32 Buster Brown’s bulldog 35 End of the quip 39 Victor/Victoria actor Peter 40 Verdi opera 41 ___ Gay Hamilton 42 Liam of Kinsey 44 Straw hat 46 Beginning to whiz 47 k.d. lang’s “___ Gal” 52 Barrie’s precipitation 53 Source of the quip 55 No note for a butch 58 “The Mod Squad” character

59 Edmund to Colette? 63 Saying 64 “Village Voice” honor 65 Three Tall Women writer 66 Material on a drag queen’s legs 67 Tony-winning musical 68 Defamation in print 69 Forest opening 70 Like Izzard’s comedy 71 Rock Hudson roles, usually Down

1 Lagging behind 2 Prefix with suction 3 Nat. counterpart in MLB 4 Bottoms 5 Memory gap 6 “___ my wit’s end!” (cry of a bottom comic’s lover?) 7 One who says, “Let us prey” 8 You could get caught in this 9 Armed Forces VIP 10 Capital of Margaret Cho’s ancestral home 11 Adventurous desert queen 12 Hoar 13 Alpine feedback 14 Billy Elliot epithet 22 “Believe ___ not!”

23 Mil. student body 26 Number of sides to a gay symbol 27 Transsexual Richards 28 Queen of the hill 29 Dick’s running mate 30 Like Abner, before Viagra? 31 NBC sketch source 33 Stud’s strides 34 To eat, to Ulrichs 35 Tart taste 36 Kind of column 37 Old TV comedian George 38 Poet Teasdale 43 Like antigay language 45 Third testacle? 48 Pussy’s last name, in Goldfinger 49 Greased the palm of 50 With title to 51 Fine point 53 George Burns film 54 Gay porn director Francis 55 Dangle like a package 56 Pastoral poem 57 The Oscars, e.g. 60 “Dancing Queen” band 61 Have-not’s condition 62 Disney pictures PUZZLE ANSWERS ON PAGE 47

Cryptogram

A cryptogram is a puzzle where one letter in the puzzle is substituted with another. For example: ECOLVGNCYXW YCR EQYIIRZNBZN YZU PSZ! Has the solution: CRYPTOGRAMS ARE CHALLENGING AND FUN! In the above example Es are all replaced by Cs. The puzzle is solved by recognizing letter patterns in words and successively substituting letters until the solution is reached. This week’s hint: S = W Theme: A quote by Eliza Byard of GLSEN on the correlation between anti-gay bullying and religious views.

VZY SFIR ‘LECCFV’ WX AFV OEIV FL EAB IYPWCWFQX KIYYR.

___ ____ ‘______’ __ ___ ____ __ ___ _________ _____. 4 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Team Avalanche Fund-raiser for Gay Bowl The Mountain West Flag Football League will host a fundraiser pool party for Salt Lake City Avalanche at Rick and Kyle’s pool at 259 N. State Street from 2–7 p.m. on Sept. 18. The league will send players from the four teams that participated in this past summer’s league play to the national championship, Gay Bowl X, in Phoenix, Oct. 8–10. Each year, the National Gay Flag Football

League hosts a national championship in the city of a participating team that ran a summer flag football league and tournament. For 2010, Phoenix was previously chosen to host over 16 teams from all over the United States and Canada. Twenty dollars will get you entrance, two free drinks, a free BBQ, music and a chance to meet this year’s flag football players. Jump in the pool and play water badminton or volleyball, and relax in the last days of summer in Salt Lake City.

Q les

Saturday, Sept 18 Come Celebrate the Trapp’s

20 ANNIVERSARY TH

Q doku Q doku

Each Sudoku puzzle has a unique solution which can be reached

logically without Enterwhich digitscan 1 through 9 into the Each Sudoku puzzle has a guessing. unique solution be reached logically withoutblank guessing. EnterEvery digitsrow 1 through into theone blank Everyasrow spaces. must 9contain of spaces. each digit, must must contain one of each digit, as must each column and each 3x3 square. column each but 3x3connected, square. Qdoku is puzzles. actually five Qdoku each is actually five and separate, Sudoku

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separate, but connected, Sudoku puzzles.

Level: Medium

5 7 1 8 2 5 9 1

8 9 5 1 1 6

2

9 7

3

6 4 7 5

3 9 1

9 3 5

3

3

4 5 5 4 8 7

4

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6 4 6 5 9 4 9 3 1 6 3 8 4 5 3 7 9 9 6 3 7 1 9 3 5 8 2 7 6 2 1 9

5 6

1

8

5 2 8

4

1 3 5

2 1 8

4 5

3

2

5 4

3 5

6

4

Sundays 1

5 9 7 4 1 5 1 9 4 7 1 6 4 1 3

All day, all night Showtime at 7pm

3 7 6

BBQ, 4pm

Fridays

Dart Tournament, 7pm

8 7 2 4 3 8 2 6 102 SOUTH 600 WEST 1 5

801–531–8727

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 1


QMMUNIT Y

Quni groups

Utah has a vibrant gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community with many organizations for nearly any activity or interest you may have. Try these organizations out. For corrections or additions, please email editor@qsaltlake.com

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL Aetna ANGLE * HuntR@Aetna.com . . 801-256-7137 Armed Forces Support . 801-581-7890 LGBTQ-AFFIRMATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPISTS GUILD OF UTAH A professional group for mental-health providers. We meet monthly to network, educate ourselves, and improve the counseling services of LGBTQ individuals. www.lgbtqtherapists.com

Disability Law Center. . . . . . 801-(800) 662-9080 * info@disabilitylawcenter.org EQUALITY UTAH  equalityutah.org * info@equalityutah.org Working for a fair & just Utah 175 W 200 S, Ste 3001 . 801-355-3479 Human Rights Campaign, Utah  hrcutah.org * HRCSaltLakeUT@aol.com

National Organization for Women PO Box 57816, Murray . . . . . 801-268-0363

LOG CABIN REPUBLICANS, UTAH  logcabinutah.org * ut@logcabin.org

Pride at Work, Utah . . . . 801-531-6137

UTAH STONEWALL DEMOCRATS  utahstonewalldemocrats.org 455 S 300 E, Ste 301 . . . . . . . 801-328-1212 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-532-5330

Q BUSINESS ALLIANCE A guild of business owners, professionals, entrepreneurs and non-profit organizations that holds social events on the first Friday of the month and business breakfasts on the third Friday of the month. qsaltlake.com/qba . . . . . . . . 801-649-6663 Salt Lake County Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Employees * jdonchess@slco.org. . . . 801-273-6280

HEALTH & HIV Hermanos de Luna y Sol * arman@utahAIDS.org 1408 S 1100 E . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-487-2323 MEDICRUISER  medicruiser.com Gay, lesbian, transgender friendly staff and providers. Low cost, high quality Medical Care. Testosterone & hormone therapy, HIV/STD, weight management, addiction treatment 1850 S 300 W, Ste A . . . 801-484-5504 No. Utah HIV/AIDS Project Walk-Ins Welcome. Every other Monday 5–7pm 536 24th St, Ste 2B, Ogden . . . . 801-393-4153 PEOPLE WITH AIDS COALITION OF UTAH  pwacu.org 358 S 300 E . . . . . . . . . . 801-484-2205 PLANNED PARENTHOOD 654 S 900 E . . . . . . . . . . 800-230-PLAN SALT LAKE VALLEY HEALTH DEPT. — HIV/STD CLINIC  slvhealth.org/hiv/ 610 S 200 E . . . . . . . . . . 801-534-4666 University of Utah Department of Family and Preventative Medicine  uuhsc.utah.edu/dfpm 375 Chipeta Way, Ste A . . . . . 801-581-7234 UTAH AIDS FOUNDATION  utahaids.org * mail@utahaids. org 1408 S 1100 E . . . . . . . . 801-487-2323

HOMELESS SERVICES Center for Women and Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-261-9177 Homeless Youth Resource Center Youth ages 15-21. 655 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-364-0744 The Road Home  theroadhome.org 210 Rio Grande St . . . . . . . . . 801-359-4142 YWCA 322 E 300 S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-537-8600

POLITICAL American Civil Liberties Union  acluutah.org * aclu@acluutah.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-521-9862

RELIGIOUS & SPIRITUAL AFFIRMATION SALT LAKE  affirmation.org/saltlake Affirmation: Gay & Lesbian Mormons serves the needs of gay Mormon women and men, as well as bisexual and transgender LDS and their supportive family and friends, through social and educational activities. . . . . . 801-486-6977 BOUNTIFUL COMMUNITY CHURCH  bountifulucc.org * regal66@ yahoo.com 150 N 400 E, Btfl . . . . . . 801-295-9439 Cache Valley Unitarian Universalists 596 E 900 N, Logan . . . . . . . . 435-755-2888 CHRIST UNITED METHODIST  christumcutah.net Regular Sunday Worship Schedule: 8am, 9am, 10:30am Fellowship Time: 10am Childcare available 8:45am-11:45am Sunday mornings 2375 E 3300 S . . . . . . . . 801-486-5473 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF SLC  firstbaptist-slc.org * office@firstbaptist-slc.org Jesus didn’t discriminate and neither do we. Please join us. 777 S 1300 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-582-4921 First Unitarian Church * slcuu.org 569 S 1300 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-582-8687 Gay Latter-day Saints  gaylds.net Glory to God Community Church 375 Harrison Blvd, Ogden . . 801-394-0204 Holladay United Church of Christ 2631 E Murray-Holladay Rd . 801-277-2631 Inner Light Center . . . . . 801-268-1137 * innerlightcenter.net Integrity/Utah St. James Church . . . . . . . . . 801-566-1311

QUEER SPIRIT * info@queerspirit.org Men loving men, gathering together in loving and intimate ways to explore, dialog, enjoy, dream and celebrate the “who” and “what” we are in the broader community through weekend retreats, vision quests, monthly gatherings . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-557-9203 Restoration Church of Jesus Christ 2900 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . 801-359-1151 Sacred Light of Christ 823 S 600 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-595-0052 Salt Lake Center for Spiritual Living 870 E North Union Ave, Midvale . . . . . . . . . 801-307-0481 St. Paul’s Episcopal Church 261 S 900 E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-322-5869 SOUTH VALLEY UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST SOCIETY  www.svuus.org * svuus@xmission. com An intentionally diverse religious community. You are welcome here, no matter your age, race, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity. South Valley is the place where U can be U. 6876 S Highland Dr (2000 E). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-944-9723 Unitarian Universalist Church Ogden 705 23rd St, Ogden . . . . . . . . 801-394-3338 WASATCH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  www.wpcslc.org No matter who or where you are on your journey of faith, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ – you are welcome at Wasatch Presbyterian Church. Ours is a community committed to the nurture of Christian faith through worship, learning and service – and we hope to share our enthusiasm and care with you. 1626 S 1700 E . . . . . . . . 801-487-7576

SOCIAL ALTERNATIVE GARDEN CLUB  altgardenclub.org Meets 1st Weds at 7:30PM in Sugar House Park Garden Club Building Bisexual Community Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 ext 14 Meets the 2nd Thurs each month at 7pm in the Multi-purpose room at the Center. Engendered Species  es-transgender.com * deborahthai@yahoo.com801-320-0551 Gamofites  gamofites.org . . . . . . . 801-444-3602 Gay and Lesbian Parents of Utah * glpu@hotmail.com

LDS Reconciliation  ldsreconciliation.org Activity Info Line . . . . . . . . . . 801-296-4797

Imperial Rainbow Court of Northern Utah  irconu.org, PO Box 3131, Ogden, UT 84409

Lifebreath Center/Interfaith Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-363-9229

Kindly Gifts by Stitch & Bitch . . . . . . 801-487-7008

Provo Community United Church of Christ 175 N University Ave, Provo . 801-375-9115

Ogden OUTreach Resource Center  ogdenoutreach.org 705 23rd Street . . . . . . . . . . . 801-686-4528

4 2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

PARENTS, FAMILIES AND FRIENDS OF LESBIANS & GAYS  pflag.org Ogden: 3rd Thursday, 705 E 23rd St * ogdenpflag@q.com Salt Lake City: 1233 S 1000 E 801-244-6423 * slcpflag@gmail.com St. George: 823 Harrison * pflagsaintgeorge@gmail.com

UTAH PRIDE CENTER  utahpridecenter.org * thecenter@utahpridecenter.org Community Events • Lending Library • Assembly Room • Support Groups • Resource & Referral • Utah Pride Organizers • Youth Activity Center 361 N 300 W . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Toll-free . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-874-2743

University of Utah Women’s

QUEER VILLAGE  queervillage.blogspot.com

UTAH QUEER EVENTS  groups.yahoo.com/group/ UtahQueerEvents

Utah State University Gay and

Western Transsexual Support Group . . . . . . . . . 435-882-8136

(GLSRC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435-797-4297

SPORTS

* usuglsrc@yahoo.com

QUEEREADS  twitter.com/queereads Book club hosted by Sam Weller’s Bookstore and co-sponsored by the Utah Pride Center that discusses queer literature. 254 S Main St . . . . . . . . 801-328-2586 QVINUM GAY & LESBIAN WINE TASTING GROUP  www.qvinum.com Fun and fabulous wine tasting club for gay and lesbian and other fabulous wine lovers. Monthly wine tastings at members’ homes. Join us – bring the wine of the month or some delicious yummy. Mix, mingle, slurp – but don’t spit. We’re not that kind of group. RAINBOW CLASSIC CAR CLUB Don R. Austin. . . . . . . . . 801-485-9225 ROTC-SLC  rotcslc.com * rotcslc@yahoo.com ROTC-Salt Lake City is a performancebased organization, centered in the lesbian and gay community. Men and women, straight and gay, we come together to form a modern-day color guard. . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-261-3694 Royal Court of the Golden Spike Empire  rcgse.org * chairman@rcgse.org SimplySocial  simply-social.org A group of gay men dedicated to building a vibrant community through friendship. SOUTHERN UTAH GLBT COMMUNITY CENTER * suglbtcc@yahoo.com . . . . . . 801-(435) 313-GLBT  groups.yahoo.com/groups/suglbtcc SOUTHERN UTAH PRIDE  southernutahpride.org Strength In Numbers(Sin) SL  groups.yahoo.com/group/ SINSaltLake A social network for gay men living with HIV and AIDS. sWerve  swerveutah.com

Resource Center  sa.utah.edu/women 200 S Central Campus Dr, Rm 411 . 801-581-8030 Utah State University Pride Alliance  groups.yahoo.com/group/usupride/

Lesbian Student Resource Center  usu.edu/glsrc

Frontrunners Utah . . . . . 801-519-8889

Utah Valley State College Gay

Lambda Hiking Club  gayhike.org

Straight Alliance

Mountain West Basketball League angst2008@gmail.com . . . . 801-598-3844

 uvsc.edu/clubs/club.cfm?clubID=251

Mountain West Flag Football League  mwffl.org . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-359-2544 Mountain West Volleyball League  slcgaa.org . . . . . . . . . 773-301-5343 Northern Utah Women ROC  groups.yahoo.com/group/ OgdenOutdoorWomen Social organization of lesbian and straight women interested in walking, camping, festivals, cook outs, shows, skiing and creative workshops.

 groups.yahoo.com/group/uvscgsa Weber State University Gay Straight Alliance  organizations.weber.edu/dlsu/  groups.yahoo.com/group/WeberDLSU * WeberDLSU@yahoo.com

YOUTH Homeless Youth Resource Center Youth ages 15-21.

Pride Community Softball League  prideleague.com * pcsl@prideleague.com . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Ext 21

655 S State St . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-364-0744

Salt Lake City Gay Athletic Association  slcgaa.org

TINT (TOLERANT INTELLIGENT

QUAC – QUEER UTAH AQUATIC  quacquac.org * questions@ quacquac.org Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and straight swimming team. All swimmers of any skill level welcome. See web site for swim schedule . . . . . . . 801-232-7961 Salt Lake Goodtimes Bowling League  saltlakegoodtimes.com Sundays starting in August . . 801-832-9745 Ski Out Utah  skioututah.com STONEWALL SHOOTING SPORTS OF UTAH  stonewallshootingsportsutah.org Utah Gay and Lesbian Ski Week communityvisions.org . . . . . . 877-429-6368 Utah Gay Men’s Tennis Group groups.yahoo.com/group/ utahgaymenstennis Utah Gay Mountain Bike Riders groups.yahoo.com/group/ utahgaymtnbike

Gay LDS Young Adults  glya.com

NETWORK OF TEENS) The Utah Pride Center’s youth activity center provides a safe place for people ages 14-20 regardless of race, ethnicity, physical ability, religion, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation or identity. It provides social and support groups for GLBTQ youth and offers food, a big screen TV, video games, computers, a library, a pool table, and much more! Drop-in hours: Tuesday thru Friday 3pm-9pm, Saturday 5pm-9pm 355 N 300 W . . . . . . 801-539-8800 x14

Not Listed?

UTAH BEAR ALLIANCE  utahbears.com * info@utahbears.com Social/service group for Bears, Cubs and their admirers. Check the web site for a calendar of our activities

UNIVERSITY & COLLEGE

Utah Families Coalition * admin@utahfamilies.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801-539-8800 Ext. 23

Gay and at BYU  groups.yahoo.com/group/ gayandatBYU/

UTAH MALE NATURISTS  www.umen.org A social group for gay, bisexual and gaypositive men that holds nonsexual naked social and recreational events, including pool/hottub parties, cocktail parties, potlucks, movie nights and overnight campouts throughout the year. Guests are welcome at most events.

Gay-Straight Alliance Network  gsanetwork.org/

with your organization

Salt Lake Community College Coloring Outside the Lines . . . . . . . . 801-957-4562 * coloring_outside_lines@yahoo.com

name, url, address

Southern Utah University Pride  suu.edu/orgs/pride/

and a short paragraph

Utah Polyamory Society 801-309-7240  groups.yahoo.com/group/ UtahPolyamorySociety 1st Friday of the month, 6:30pm, Utah Pride Center, 4th Sunday of the month at Grounds for Coffee/Clrfld

University of Utah Lesbian & Gay Student Union  utah.edu/lgsu/

on what your group

University of Utah LGBT Resource Center  sa.utah.edu/lgbt 200 S Central Campus Dr, Rm 409 801-587-7973

does and when and

Delta Lambda Sappho Union Weber State Univ. . . . . . . . . . 801-627-1639

email editor@qsaltlake.com

and/or phone number

where it meets.


Q Scopes You are as beautiful as you feel, Scorpio! by Jack Fertig

Venus is in Scorpio, tempting deep, dark passions, both erotic and aesthetic. Mercury in Virgo sextile Venus brings in critical insight and shrewd vision. Saturn is right in the middle, adding focus and structure. Put up that sling and/or take that art history class.

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ARIES (March 20 – April 19) Working out, tight-fitting clothes and chit-chat in the bar can get you lots of places, but never very far. Superficial charm will work, but more mature and darker will help you find a solid match. Try quoting Dorothy Parker.

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TAURUS (April 20 – May 20) Want to please your sweetie? His or her secret desire could be a naughty, nude maid. It’s one way to get the housework done. No sweetie? Someone at work wants to put some sugar in your bowl.

Better yet, make a very serious and practical plan about how you’re going to increase your earnings. It will take hard work, but you can do it!

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LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Worries may be exaggerated, but still point to real problems. You have strength and value you don’t realize, and those buried talents can get you through. Critical self-analysis should always include the positive.

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SCORPIO (October 23 – Nov. 21) You are as beautiful as you feel, and however you feel about yourself is how the world will see you. If you need support and convincing, let a friend help you create a new look.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 – Dec. 20) Trust your instincts – but only so far – for inspiration to get through the maze of politics and hierarchies that stands between you and success. Run those notions past a good friend who can improve your ideas.

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GEMINI (May 21- June 20) Staying home and doing housework can be more fun than you expect. Take it as a creative challenge. You could also expand that creativity to some efforts in the community, or share an adventure with some nephews and/or nieces. CANCER (June 21- July 22) Write a letter to – or draw a picture of – the parents you always wanted. Then write a letter telling your real parents of all your disappointments, how they failed you and you them. Don’t mail it! Just get it off your chest and forgive everyone involved.

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LEO (July 23 – August 22) A serious talk about bills, accounting and fairness can save you and your housemates some decent money. Live alone? At least go over the bills and consider how your parents or grandparents got through the depression. Those pennies add up!

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VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Sit down and have a serious discussion about how you can economize.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 21 – January 19) While you’re at the top of your game, new ideas and self-criticism to hone your skills will help you to rise even higher. Suggestions and praise from admiring friends should be happily accepted, although with a grain of salt. AQUARIUS (January 20 – Feb. 18) Wise as you are, are you smart enough to keep ego and pride out of your own way? The more you try to look good, the less you will. Let your facts and figures do the talking and you’ll sizzle.

Free Cover All Night Don’t Miss Out on this !!! Over 300 People Every Sunday

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PISCES (February 19 – March 19) Acting as (or actively seeking) the wise and well-traveled voice of mature experience can help you find passion, if not actual love. What does your partner say? New adventures are good; they don’t necessarily require a new playmate.

Jack Fertig, a professional astrologer since 1977, is available for personal and business consultations in person in San Francisco, or online everywhere. He can be reached at 415-864-8302, starjack.com or qscopes@qsaltlake.com.

anagram An anagram is a word or phrase that can be made using the letters from another word or phrase. Rearrange the letters below to answer:

Name the out comedian who plays Wendover on Sept. 25.

DYKE WAN ASS _____ _____ PUZZLE SOLUTIONS ARE ON PAGE 47

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 3

THE BEST LATINO GAY NIGHT WITH THE BEST MUSIC BY DJ FRANK THE HOTTEST GO- GO DANCERS SHOWS & ENTERTAINMENT AND THE BEST CROWD IN UTAH...


BE AR ACUDA

JAM Welcomes Bearracuda and Blue Alley Fair by Brad Di Iorio

The Marmalade District’s only gay bar, Club JAM, will pay tribute to Salt Lake’s leather, fetish and Levis crowd with the revival of the Blue Alley Fair, welcoming San Francisco’s Bearracuda, and presenting an alternative tattoo and spit-shine Sunday event. Seen as Salt Lake’s prelude to San Francisco’s ultimate leather fest, the Folsom Street Fair, the Blue Alley Fair is a tamer version, celebrating leather, kink and fetish accoutrements and self-expression. On Sept. 18, Bearracuda promoter, Matt Mikesell will bring his successful bear party to Salt Lake City for the first time. “We basically go to our favorite cities that we have a connection in,” said Mikesell. “Our connection in Salt Lake City was my old, old friend, Princess Kennedy. She hooked us up with the great guys at JAM.” Bearracuda started at a small club in San Francisco as an alternative to other bear hangouts, featuring great music, dancing, and a focus on making friends and connections. “I’m a 34-year-old guy who has lived in San Francisco off and on for 15 years. I started Bearracuda in 2006, because I thought that bears really deserved more in San Francisco,” explained Mikesell. “All that was offered back then were bars that never changed their décor and didn’t really make much of an effort to draw people in. If you wanted to dance, then the parties were few and far between as well as being pretty expensive.” Two years ago, the first satellite party was held

in Seattle — adding Portland and New Orleans, the following year. This year, 12 cities are included in the tour, including Atlanta, Sydney, Vancouver, and, of course, Salt Lake City. “We’re a bear event, but we get every type of guy coming to the club … with the majority of them having facial hair,” said Mikesell. “We were voted ‘Best Club for Queer Men’ in San Francisco’s weekly paper in 2008, 2009 and 2010.” Mikesell creates and promotes the events on his own and has worked with other promoters, deejays and event coordinators to make the Bearracuda event a large and fun party. Attending to the tunes at Bearracuda SLC is famed circuit party DJ Matt Consola, who is now considered a Bearracuda mainstay. DJ Consola began spinning when he was 15 years old, and for the last 20 years has performed as resident DJ at Metropolis (San Francisco), Crobar (Miami and Chicago) and Pure/Amsterdam (Denver). Consola has also spun at raves and circuit parties for both San Francisco and Los Angeles Pride Festivals, and at both Black and White Parties in Palm Springs. He has also recently opened for The Pet Shop Boys for their sold out Pandemonium World Tour when they played in San Francisco for two nights at the historic Warfield Theater in 2009. Consola also co-owns record label Redzone Records that produces and promotes dance music and dance artists. “You can expect a very busy night full of beef and fur with fantastic tunes from Mike Babbit

and Matt Consola,” said Mikesell. “We’ve had sexy video visuals done for this event and there will be a snack table for our guys at the club. [Consola] is putting a very special set for this evening with many of the songs he’s remixed himself.” For Saturday night’s Bearracuda at JAM, there will be a $5 cover charge before 10 p.m. and $7 after. “We’re hoping that people are going to enjoy the friendly atmosphere and the great tunes,” added Mkesell. On Sunday, beginning at 4 p.m., JAM will present the Blue Alley Fair with vendors as diverse as tattoo artists and leather and costume clothing makers. In years past, the Blue Alley Fair was presented as an alternative, fetish-styled street fair in Salt Lake City, but a promoter has not

taken the reigns to organize the event on a continuing yearly basis. Brian Morris of JAM would like the event to continue as a prelude and nod to the West Coast’s larger leather and fetish celebration, the Folsom Street Fair, which attracts over 600,000 visitors to San Francisco during the last weekend of September each year. JAM will feature drink specials and a BBQ, along with various local and national vendors who will provide attendees with opportunities to explore their kinky side. Attendees can get a military haircut, get their army boots shined, or add to their personal collection of toys. Q

Bike For Life 2010

the Walk For Life. “Last year we had about 60 riders who raised more than $5000,” said Measom. “We’d love to exceed those numbers — so far we’re at about half that, so hopefully we can get the word out and get people registered.” Cyclists set their own fund-raising goals, and there is no minimum in fund raising required. Participants create their own fund-raising pages from UAF’s website through the First Giving link that collects and documents online donations. The pages can be sent out in an e-mail or be directed to a Facebook page, where contributors can pledge by mile, for the whole ride, or in any way cyclists have chosen for their donations to be collected. “We will have a van trailing the route to watch for any kind of emergency situations, as well as crossing guards along the route to report anything that may happen,” stressed Measom. “There will be two water stations along the route — one near Hogle Zoo, which is the turn around point for the low intensity course, and another at the top of Emigration Canyon, which is the turn around point for the full intensity course.” Funds from the Bike For Life event will support the UAF HIV/STD test site, fund the purchase of condoms and safe-sex devices, and go to prevention programs for those at risk of getting HIV. They will also contribute to services for people living with AIDS, including case management,

health-related workshops and the on-site food bank at the UAF office. “Helmets and bikes are mandatory; [a] raincoat is optional depending on the weather, and we highly recommend bikers bring a water bottle,” added Measom. Bike For Life will end at the 9th and 9th Street Festival which will be in full swing at 10 a.m. and will end at 6 p.m. in the very gay-friendly neighborhood of 900 E. 900 South. Fund-raising incentives include a Bike For Life T-shirt for raising $40 or more, a T-shirt and a special UAF water bottle for those raising $150 or more, a T-shirt, UAF water bottle and a special UAF hat for $250 or more, and a T-shirt, water bottle, hat, and a specially designed 500 Club hooded sweatshirt as well as an invitation to the UAF’s 500 Club party, for those cyclists raising over $500. Adam Frost, who was a founding member of Cycle Out, Utah’s gay and lesbian cycling club, will be participating in Bike For Life again this year. “The event is fun and at the same time helps people in the local community. Plus, I get to see some friends that I wouldn’t otherwise run into,” Frost said. “I have ridden this year’s course up Emigration Canyon a couple of times in the past months and have really enjoyed it. The scenery is amazing.” Last year, Frost said he did have a slight run-in with a motorist as the course wound through

downtown Salt Lake City. “Being the first year, there weren’t as many riders as other events I’ve attended, but that comes with being a new event,” he added. And Larry Lee, silver team medalist in bowling at this year’s Gay Games in Cologne, Germany is participating again. “My commitment to my sponsors last year was that I would ride 90 miles for the Bike For Life,” he said. “At that time, I lived in Layton. As to the course changes, I hate hills, so I am not excited about the change to Emigration Canyon. Still, it will be different and certainly a challenge.” Lee’s children have participated in Walk For Life events for years and will support him in this year’s Bike For Life efforts. “My goal this year is $1,200 and so far I am at $700. Anything I raise will be matched up to $1,000,” said Lee. “Most importantly, I get to help a wonderful organization that is working hard to help people impacted by HIV and to reduce the rate of HIV infection.” For more information about Walk For Life or Bike For Life, go to the Utah AIDS Foundation’s website at uaf.org and click on either event. If you would like to contribute to a specific cyclist, go to Facebook and type in Walk For Life or look up specific names of participating cyclists. Bike For Life will begin at 8 a.m. on the north end of Liberty Park, located between 600 and 700 East and 900 South. Q

by Brad Di Iorio

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HE SECOND ANNUAL BIKE FOR Life will take place Sept. 18, marking 25 years of fund raising by the Utah AIDS Foundation for Utahns living with HIV and AIDS. Accompanying the popular (and older) Walk For Life event at Liberty Park on Saturday morning, interested cyclists can register the day of the event at 8 a.m., but many cyclists have already registered and are raising money on their sponsorship pages which they created on UAF’s website. “Bike For Life is a powerful public awareness event and one of our most exciting new fund-raisers,” said Nathan Measom, UAF’s development director and Bike For Life program coordinator. “The route has changed from a city course to a challenging canyon course.” There are two ride options for cyclists this year: a high-intensity 22-mile from Liberty Park to the top of Emigration Canyon and back, and a low-intensity ride, or about 11 miles. Both rides will take place on the same route where there will be hills. “The low intensity ride is about half of the regular ride,” added Measom. “Theoretically, riders can turn around on the route and head back whenever they feel like they need to.” Registration is free for both Ride For Life and

4 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Club JAM is at 751 N. 300 West. For more information on Bearracuda visit bearracuda.com, or look for the party on Facebook, where several parties are also scheduled for Folsom Street Festival.


spinning Top 40 remix on Fridays

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 4 5


Come get Hunky Every Sunday night at The Tav

KARAOKE

SUNDAYS AND TUESDAYS DOLLAR DRAFTS Sundays, Mondays and Wednesdays OLDIES Mondays DUELING PIANOS Wednesdays through Saturdays

Non-Smoking

Corner of 3rd South and 2nd East for 7 years 801-519-8900 www.tavernacle.com A Private Club for Members

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QTALES

the perils of petunia pap-smear A Tale of a Job Called Blow by Petunia Pap-Smear

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HE ROAD TO CHOIR PRACTICE is fraught with danger and excitement. It is very easy as a drag queen to imagine that, when dressed to the nines in my finest polyester, I assume the identity of a drag queen super hero. Petunia Pap-Smear! Protector of Prissy Princesses, and defender of all things sparkly. I see myself just like Captain James T. Kirk commanding the Starship Enterprise, commanding my own personal starship — my large land yacht Queer-Tanic — maneuvering about the Intermountain West in an ongoing mission to “Go where no man has gone before,� while dispensing etiquette lessons, beauty tips and makeovers to biker gangs and Relief Society sisters. Sadly, in reality, I’m much less like Captain Kirk and more like Barbarella, the intergalactic slut. But a super hero must go with her strengths. Nevertheless, I do, on occasion, remove the fake boobs, take off the tiara and use an industrial paint stripper to remove my makeup. Then, my jewelry safely under lock and key and my hair consigned to the shelf, I slide into some Fruit of the Looms. A pair of Dockers and a polo shirt later, I begin my once weekly pilgrimage to sing with the Salt Lake Men’s Choir. This rather plain and unadulterated appearance is my civilian disguise which I don in order to be able to move about the community with anonymity. One typical Thursday during evening rush hour, I was at the helm of Queer-Tanic proceeding at maximum warp speed to choir practice. Having safely negotiated the treacherous Spaghetti Bowl Nebula, I was going east

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through the Interstate 80 worm hole, nearing the Foothill System. Suddenly, Queer-Tanic’s engine coughed and died, ceasing all forward propulsion. Luckily, I was able to coast in to the very, very narrow emergency lane and turn on my emergency beacons. No problem, the drag queen motto (which has been plagiarized by a para-military youth organization which shall remain nameless) is “Be prepared.� As a 10-year Car Talk listener, I prepared to exit the craft to diagnose and perhaps even fix the problem. But as I cracked open the hatch, a huge triple trailer truck more ominous than a Klingon Bird of Prey, zoomed by at Warp 9, within about 18 inches of the side of QueerTanic’s port side. Because Commander Scott has gone to that great engine room in the sky and is not available to make it go, and there was not a single lesbian with a tool box within sight, I flipped open my communicator (styled cell phone) and issued a distress call to Starfleet (Triple A) command. The operator asked if I was in a safe location. I looked out the window at the continuing maelstrom of speeding traffic and replied, “No.� She immediately contacted the Highway Patrol to send protective escort. Very shortly, a most handsome Utah Highway Patrolman looking ever-so-stunning in his tight fitting uniform (economic stimulus money well spent, if you ask me) arrived and began flashing his lights. I thought to myself: please don’t let this be like an episode of Star Trek where the gorgeous unnamed crewman accompanying the landing party is the first one killed. Before long, a Federation tow

Cryptogram: The word ‘faggot’ is not part of any religious creed.

Anagram: Wanda Sykes

honor ro These businesses brought you this issue of QSaltLake. Make sure to thank them with your patronage. vessel arrived and captured Queer-Tanic in its tractor beam and brought me safely to choir practice a little flustered, but no worse for the wear. Except, that is, for a nasty case of cotton mouth (usually when faced with a handsome man in uniform, I tend to drool, but the extreme heat of the day left me parched instead). Once again, I followed our motto and popped a Ricola throat lozenge to help keep things lubricated. (Cue the alpenhorn and yodeler.) Well, as it just so happened, that was the night a brand new, hot looking guy joined the choir and came and sat right beside me. Since hospitality is a queen’s greatest virtue, I engaged the new stud in friendly conversation between songs to make him feel welcome. He asked if I could smell licorice and I told him that it was probably the Ricola and pursed my lips in order to produce a gentle blow job of air to confirm my theory. During my high school and college years, I spent about 10 years playing trombone in the marching band. Did you know that tromboners “do itâ€? in seven positions? Anyway, all that boner blowing must have left me with a very strong diaphragm, because the resulting flow of air created a vortex into which the Ricola was sucked, and subsequently launched from between my lips like a slippery wet Photon Torpedo. To my great dismay, I could not close my lips around it quickly enough and it took flight. I watched in horror as it arched into the air, as if in slow motion, and landed right on the new hottie’s arm. I learned as a little princess that it’s not nice manners to spit on new acquaintances. It just isn’t a good way to win friends and influence people. Not knowing exactly the best course of action at this juncture, after staring at the offending lozenge for a moment, I quickly retrieved it from his arm and returned it from whence it flew. He graciously excused my blow job faux pas. Being highly embarrassed, I turned and paid extra attention to the director so as to pretend that the unfortunate blow job never occurred. To my amazement, the stud returned the next week, undaunted and ready to sing. What a guy! Like always these events leave us with many eternal questions: 1. According to the hanky code, what color kerchief is spit? 2. Must I wear Lederhosen to suck on Ricola? 3. Must I learn to yodel and play the alpenhorn? 4. Would a Certs breath mint be as aerodynamic as Ricola? 5. Is there a blow job mishap support group? These and other important questions to be answered in future chapters of “The Perils of Petunia Pap-Smear.â€? Q

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Q staff

publisher/editor Michael Aaron

busine aiance

The Q Business Alliance is starting up next month and all gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and ally business owners are invited to join and network with us. Corporations, small businesses, sole proprietors and independent agents are welcome to join, regardless of sexual orientation.

JOIN US AT OUR

first social event AT

FRIDAY

september 17 FROM 5:30 TO 8PM

FOOD, DRINKS, DOOR PRIZES, DJ MATT FREE B-12 SHOTS FREE FIRST LASER HAIR REMOVAL TREATMENT (lip, underarm or neck) RAFFLE PRIZES ART EXHIBITION OF JOSHUA L. JOHNSTON FREE AND OPEN TO ALL QSALTLAKE READERS

assistant editor JoSelle Vanderhooft arts & entertainment editor Tony Hobday graphic designer Christian Allred contributors Chris Azzopardi, Lynn

Beltran, Turner Bitton, Dave Brousseau, Brad Di Iorio, Chef Drew Ellswroth, Greg Fox, H. Rachelle Graham, Bob Henline, Tony Hobday, Christopher Katis, Keith Orr, Petunia Pap-Smear, Anthony Paull, Steven Petrow, Hunter Richardson, Ruby Ridge, Ryan Shattuck, A.E. Storm, JoSelle Vanderhooft, Ben Williams, Troy Williams, D’Anne Witkowski, Rex Wockner contributing photographers Ted Berger, Eric Ethington, Honey Rachelle Graham, Chris Lemon, Brent Marrott, Carlos Navales, Scott Perry, Deb Rosenberg, Chuck Wilson sales manager Brad Di Iorio office manager Tony Hobday distribution Brad Di Iorio, Ryan Benson, Gary Horenkamp, Nancy Burkhart publisher

Salt Lick Publishing, LLC 1055 East 2100 South, ste 206 Salt Lake City, Utah 84106 tel: 801-649-6663 toll-free: 1-800-806-7357 for general information:

info@qsaltlake.com for editorial queries:

editor@qsaltlake.com QSaltLake is a trademark of Salt Lick Publishing, LLC. Copyright © 2010, Salt Lick Publishing LLC. All rights reserved. No material may be reprinted or reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Copies of

QSaltLake are distributed free of charge in 200 locations across Utah and in Idaho

QSaltLake.com/QBA

for more info and an online application to join.

and Nevada. Free copies are limited to one per person. For additional copies, contact us at 801-649-6663. It is a crime to destroy or dispose of current issues or otherwise interfere with the distribution of this newsmagazine. Publication of the name or

T H E

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Each third Friday of the month, a themed breakfast will be held at various restaurants in the Greater Wasatch Front with guest speakers and the ability to introduce your business and hand out company literature to other owners and professionals

O F

photograph of any individual or organiza-

J O I N I N G :

Monthly After-Work Socials

Meet and mingle with other entrepreneurs and professionals, as well as QSaltLake readers, at different businesses in the valley

Service Guide Ads

Expose your business to thousands of QSaltLake readers with a listing or display ad in the Service Guide on the first Friday of each month.

2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Online Exposure through QSaltLake.com QSaltLake readers turn to our web site for help finding services in the community. They can be referred to your web site in a click of a button.

Member Newsletter Promote your business, introduce new products and announce upcoming events to other Alliance members

Swag Bags Place marketing materials or samples in highly-sought “swag” bags or at tables at large community events through the year More We will be announcing more opportunities for members as the Alliance grows

tion in articles or advertising in QSaltLake is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of such persons. Printed in the U.S.A. QSALTLAKE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/QSALTLAKE MYSPACE.COM/QSALTLAKE


I

N

T

R

O

D

U

C

I

N

G

T

H

E

Q staff

publisher/editor Michael Aaron

busine aiance

The Q Business Alliance is starting up next month and all gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and ally business owners are invited to join and network with us. Corporations, small businesses, sole proprietors and independent agents are welcome to join, regardless of sexual orientation.

JOIN US AT OUR

first social event AT

FRIDAY

september 17 FROM 5:30 TO 8PM

FOOD, DRINKS, DOOR PRIZES, DJ MATT FREE B-12 SHOTS FREE FIRST LASER HAIR REMOVAL TREATMENT (lip, underarm or neck) RAFFLE PRIZES ART EXHIBITION OF JOSHUA L. JOHNSTON FREE AND OPEN TO ALL QSALTLAKE READERS

assistant editor JoSelle Vanderhooft arts & entertainment editor Tony Hobday graphic designer Christian Allred contributors Chris Azzopardi, Lynn

Beltran, Turner Bitton, Dave Brousseau, Brad Di Iorio, Chef Drew Ellswroth, Greg Fox, H. Rachelle Graham, Bob Henline, Tony Hobday, Christopher Katis, Keith Orr, Petunia Pap-Smear, Anthony Paull, Steven Petrow, Hunter Richardson, Ruby Ridge, Ryan Shattuck, A.E. Storm, JoSelle Vanderhooft, Ben Williams, Troy Williams, D’Anne Witkowski, Rex Wockner contributing photographers Ted Berger, Eric Ethington, Honey Rachelle Graham, Chris Lemon, Brent Marrott, Carlos Navales, Scott Perry, Deb Rosenberg, Chuck Wilson sales manager Brad Di Iorio office manager Tony Hobday distribution Brad Di Iorio, Ryan Benson, Gary Horenkamp, Nancy Burkhart publisher

Salt Lick Publishing, LLC 1055 East 2100 South, ste 206 Salt Lake City, Utah 84106 tel: 801-649-6663 toll-free: 1-800-806-7357 for general information:

info@qsaltlake.com for editorial queries:

editor@qsaltlake.com QSaltLake is a trademark of Salt Lick Publishing, LLC. Copyright © 2010, Salt Lick Publishing LLC. All rights reserved. No material may be reprinted or reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Copies of

QSaltLake are distributed free of charge in 200 locations across Utah and in Idaho

QSaltLake.com/QBA

for more info and an online application to join.

and Nevada. Free copies are limited to one per person. For additional copies, contact us at 801-649-6663. It is a crime to destroy or dispose of current issues or otherwise interfere with the distribution of this newsmagazine. Publication of the name or

T H E

B E N E F I T S

Monthly Business Breakfasts

Each third Friday of the month, a themed breakfast will be held at various restaurants in the Greater Wasatch Front with guest speakers and the ability to introduce your business and hand out company literature to other owners and professionals

O F

photograph of any individual or organiza-

J O I N I N G :

Monthly After-Work Socials

Meet and mingle with other entrepreneurs and professionals, as well as QSaltLake readers, at different businesses in the valley

Service Guide Ads

Expose your business to thousands of QSaltLake readers with a listing or display ad in the Service Guide on the first Friday of each month.

2 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Online Exposure through QSaltLake.com QSaltLake readers turn to our web site for help finding services in the community. They can be referred to your web site in a click of a button.

Member Newsletter Promote your business, introduce new products and announce upcoming events to other Alliance members

Swag Bags Place marketing materials or samples in highly-sought “swag” bags or at tables at large community events through the year More We will be announcing more opportunities for members as the Alliance grows

tion in articles or advertising in QSaltLake is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of such persons. Printed in the U.S.A. QSALTLAKE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/QSALTLAKE MYSPACE.COM/QSALTLAKE


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NATIONAL NEWS

BY REX WOCKNER

Federal Judge Strikes Down Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips in Riverside, Calif., struck down the military’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell ban on open gays in the military Sept. 9. Phillips found that the ban violates the U.S. Constitution’s guarantees of free speech and due process under the First and Fifth Amendments. “The Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Act infringes the fundamental rights of United States servicemembers in many ways,” Phillips wrote in her 86-page opinion. “The Act denies homosexuals serving in the Armed Forces the right to enjoy ‘intimate conduct’ in their personal relationships. The Act denies them the right to speak about their loved ones while serving their country in uniform; it punishes them with discharge for writing a personal letter, in a foreign language, to a person of the same sex with whom they shared an intimate relationship before entering military service; it discharges them for including information in a personal communication from which an unauthorized reader might discern their homosexuality. In order to justify the encroachment on these rights, defendants faced the burden at trial of showing the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Act was necessary to significantly further the government’s important interests in military readiness and unit cohesion. Defendants failed to meet that burden.” Phillips said the government’s contention that letting gays be open in the military harms its functioning is fully undermined by the fact that the military delays discharge of gays and lesbians who violate DADT until they return from combat deployment. The six-year-old case, brought by the gay group Log Cabin Republicans, was heard without a jury in July. Phillips said she will issue a permanent injunction prohibiting the military from enforcing Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. She gave LCR until Sept. 16 to submit proposed language for the injunction and gave the U.S. government until Sept. 23 to respond to LCR’s submission. “She could at that point stay the injunction pending an appeal or, as Judge (Vaughn) Walker did (in the federal Prop 8 case), she could deny such a stay but grant a temporary stay to allow the government to seek a stay pending an appeal from the 9th Circuit,” said Jon Davidson, legal director of Lambda Legal. If no stay is issued, it is unclear whether Phillips’ ruling would take effect nationwide or just in California’s Central District of the federal courts. “This is an historic moment and an historic ruling for the gay military community,” said Servicemembers United Executive Director Alexander Nicholson, who was kicked out of the Army under DADT. “As the only named injured party in this case, I am

exceedingly proud to have been able to represent all who have been impacted and had their lives ruined by this blatantly unconstitutional policy. We are finally on our way to vindication.” Gay activists responded to the ruling by calling on President Barack Obama to cease enforcement of DADT immediately and demanding that the U.S. Justice Department decline to appeal Phillips’ decision.

tantamount to a daily dose of torture,” commented National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Executive Director Rea Carey. “In too many cases, harassment, taunting and abuse are allowed to go on unabated in our nation’s schools. We have repeatedly seen the tragic consequences of this pervasive problem: Young people are left emotionally damaged, physically hurt, or feel they have no other option than to take their own lives out of hopelessness and despair. Youth who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender — or simply perceived to be — are often the targets of this abuse. Today, New York said enough is enough.” Fifteen states and the District of Columbia have enacted similar laws to protect gay/lesbian and, in some cases, transgender students.

California Supremes Rebuff Prop 8 Proponents

New York Governor David Paterson

N.Y. Governor Signs Law Protecting LGBT students New York Gov. David Paterson signed a bill Sept. 7 protecting students in New York public schools from bias-based bullying and discrimination. He signed the legislation in a ceremony at the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center in New York City. “The Dignity for All Students Act will provide important new safeguards to ensure that schools are places where students can concentrate on learning and personal growth, not on avoiding taunting or violence,” said Ross Levi, executive director of the Empire State Pride Agenda. The new law targets harassment based on race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity and expression. It requires teacher training on discouraging bias-based harassment, inclusion in coursework of discrimination and harassment awareness, and reporting of bias incidents to the state Education Department. The law marks the first time New York state has legislated explicit protections for transgender people. A 2007 study by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network found that 33 percent of LGBT students skip school in any given month because they fear for their safety, compared with only 4.5 percent of the general student population. “For some young people, going to school is

6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

The forces that want to keep Proposition 8, the voter-passed constitutional amendment that re-banned same-sex marriage in California, can’t catch a break. The state Supreme Court on Sept. 7 slapped down an effort by conservative activists to force Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Attorney General Jerry Brown to defend Prop 8 in the federal case that was appealed to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals after U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker found in August that Prop 8 violates the U.S. Constitution. None of the governmental entities that were sued in the federal case is interested in defending Prop 8, so the appeal to the 9th Circuit was filed by the activists who put Prop 8 on the ballot. It is unlikely, however, that the activists have “standing” to mount an appeal, since it’s not their job to defend California’s constitution. Worried about such a determination, conservative forces have been trying to find some other route to assure that the 9th Circuit hears the appeal, including pressuring defendants Brown and Schwarzenegger and pushing to add Imperial County, located in the southeast California desert, as an official defendant. The 9th Circuit will make the call on the county’s long-shot effort, probably in December, when it also will take up the question of whether the pro-Prop 8 activists have standing. If they do, the 9th Circuit will then move on to hear the appeal of Walker’s actual ruling. If the activists do not have standing and Imperial County can’t become a defendant, the case is over and same-sex marriage is legal again in California, unless the activists attempt to appeal the standing question to the U.S. Supreme Court. That, too, would be a long shot, many legal experts believe. They say the Supreme Court would be unlikely to conclude that displeased citizens can step into a state government’s shoes to defend a state law that the state government itself refuses to defend and, indeed, believes violates the U.S. Constitution. In rejecting the activists’ latest move, the California Supreme Court denied review without comment.

Quips & Quotes ❝

More than anything else, what I’m doing is giving the Republicans and independents an alternative to vote for.” —Melvin Nimer, telling The Salt Lake Tribune about his run for Utah Senate District 2

So, if McAdams [a gay-friendly Mormon who replaced openly gay Sen. Scott McCoy] weren’t interesting enough all on his own, now he’s being challenged by a gay man, a gay Republican, no less, and they’re always interesting.” —Jesse Fruhwirth on City Weekly’s news blog

Personally, I think this is a simple way for the Republican Party to throw Mel Nimer and the Utah Log Cabin Republicans under the bus. With two months until the election, and with all of the qualified candidates they could have picked from, the Repub’s decided to throw the gay head of a gay political group into a race against the biggest ally the State has in the Senate? With virtually no time to raise funds or to get a campaign off the ground. Sounds very….. Republican to me.” —Eric Ethington of Pride in Utah

The fact that the Utah Republican Party nominated an openly gay man is amazing no matter how you slice it. We’re talking about the reddest of red states here kids.” —Commenter “Michael M.” on the same post

I want to bring awareness to Tooele, especially since it’s a smaller city. I know there could be youth out there struggling with issues and I want people to know that there are other people out there.” —Robin Sheehy, founder of Come Out Tooele, in the Tooele Transcript Bulletin


Pro-gay Mayor Daley Will Not Seek Re-election Strongly pro-gay Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, who has led the city for 21 years, announced Sept. 7 that he will not run for a seventh term. Apart from a series of run-ins with ACT UP/Chicago in the late ’80s and early ’90s, Daley has been nothing short of a hero to most of the city’s LGBT community. In 1989, he became the first mayor to ride in the Chicago gay pride parade while in office. Two years later, Daley set up the nation’s first municipally sponsored Gay and Lesbian Hall of Fame and proceeded to personally hand out the awards nearly every year since. In 1998, he redecorated the city’s gay business strip, North Halsted Street, with a series of giant Flash-Gordon-esque retrofuturistic rainbow pylons. When some residents objected to the official gayification of the street, fearing for their property values, Daley thundered, “I won’t let the homophobes run this city!” He has been a supporter of same-sex marriage since 2004. Daley went on to serve as honorary cochair of Gay Games VII in 2006 and, in 2007, was honorary chair of the capital campaign to get the city’s new LGBT center built. At the Games’ opening ceremonies, Daley said: “Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community have contributed to Chicago in every imaginable way — in business, education, the arts and neighborhood development. They deserve to have the city of Chicago standing on their side, and it will continue to do so, as long as I am mayor of this great city.” Daley was pro-gay before it was cool. He decided long ago that gays make neighborhoods better, and that seemed to be that for him. He never wavered. His spoken defenses of the city’s gays were straightforward and from the gut. The mayor’s conflicts with ACT UP/Chicago came to a head on Feb. 12, 1992, when he and six members of the group engaged in a shouting match at a meeting of the gay business group Chicago Professional Networking Association. ACT UP members were angry that the city’s AIDS budget allegedly had been stagnant for several years and that, due to a then-new policy of not working on Sundays, Daley had missed AIDS Walk and the gay pride parade, among other issues. “I have been in the forefront as a public official dealing with the gay and lesbian community,” Daley told the hecklers. “You don’t see the governor, you don’t see any other elected official. I’m right here! And I don’t hide! I don’t hide from the gay and lesbian community as mayor of the city of Chicago! The gay and lesbian community has a (yearly) reception not at a Hilton hotel but at the mayor’s City Hall on the

fifth floor (where my office is). ... And the AIDS budget each year goes up in the city of Chicago.” “That’s a lie!” the protesters yelled back. “It hasn’t gone up in three years! It’s a million dollars. It’s the same as it was! ... You’re lying!” “I’m just as concerned as anybody else,” Daley said. “Don’t make me one who’s insincere and not concerned about the AIDS issue.” The protesters then lambasted Daley for having attended the wake of Danny Sotomayor, who had been ACT UP/Chicago’s spiritual leader and perhaps Daley’s fiercest critic ever. “Liar!” they shouted. “Why did you go to Danny Sotomayor’s funeral? Why. Did. You. Go. To. Danny. Sotomayor’s. Funeral?!” At that point, pandemonium ensued and CPNA ejected ACT UP from the gathering. Daley then said: “I always remember Danny Sotomayor. I went to his wake. ... I went there out of respect for him and his family. Now, he’s a strong advocate. I used to see him all the time. He’d, you know, scream and yell in my face. I said: ‘Danny, why you yelling at me? I’m here. This is a reception we’re having. This is what we’re doing. I’m not perfect. But don’t try to make me the one, like, insensitive or not concerned. There’s a lot of other people who won’t even talk to you, won’t even shake your hand, listen to you, won’t understand what you’re saying.’” As for ACT UP’s tactics, Daley said: “To get up and say anything, that’s their right to do anything, but after a time you have to say: ‘Hey, let’s move on. I’ve heard. I’ve listened. We are trying to do it. It’s not fast enough. You’re right, it’s not fast enough.’” “You know why it’s not fast enough?” he continued. “When one person dies, you’re right, it’s not fast enough. It’s not fast enough for you or me or anybody else when you see one person die. And one thing I found out — that we’re all in this together. We’re not separate, we’re not higher or lower, we’re all together. And these issues that confront any community confront the city of Chicago. And what we’re trying to do here in our city is to truly work together.” A little more than three months after the showdown — and an even worse blowup seven weeks later, when 40 furious AIDS activists torpedoed the mayor with vicious insults for 90 minutes as he and more than 500 gays and lesbians marched through gay neighborhoods in response to an anti-gay shooting — Daley relented on AIDS spending, and the City Council voted 46-0 to boost funding to $3.57 million. “This is a very serious health and emotional problem and we have to recommit ourselves,” Daley said. According to Windy City Times and the Chicago Tribune, one of the people who may run to replace Daley is Alderman Tom Tunney, who is openly gay.

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 7


LOC AL NEWS

McAdams: Not Taking Election for Granted Just before Christmas 2009, Democratic delegates from Utah’s Senate District 2 came together to perform a difficult task: pick a replacement to finish outgoing — and out — Sen. Scott McCoy’s term. Following McCoy’s resignation in order to devote needed time to his law practice, a number of candidates contacted delegates for consideration. These included Arlyn Bradshaw who, like McCoy, is openly gay — and who is now the favorite in a race for Salt Lake County Council’s District 1 seat. In the end, however, the delegates chose Ben McAdams, an aide to Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker and a straight ally, to take over for McCoy. Less than a year later, it’s time for McAdams to run on his own terms. This time, he’ll be doing so against Mel Nimer, an openly gay candidate from across the aisle who entered the race after McAdam’s original challenger failed to file her paperwork in time to run. “This is my first time introducing myself to the voters,” said McAdams, taking QSaltLake’s interview while canvassing the neighborhoods in his heavily Democratic district. “I was disappointed when my previous opponent dropped out because I think I owe it to the district, and we deserve a race.” McAdams comes to voters after a session where he had little time to debate gay- and transgender-rights issues. A compromise between pro-gay Democrats and Republi-

can leadership tabled all such bills in order to save Salt Lake City’s gay and transgender-inclusive employment and housing nondiscrimination ordinances from bills seeking their cancellation. Still, he has been a strong advocate for this part of his constituency, having promised to take up McCoy’s bill that would give same-sex couples rights to sue in cases of a partner’s wrongful death. In this sense, both he and Nimer are of the same mind. “It’s refreshing to have a Republican candidate who agrees with me on LGBT issues,” said McAdams who, like Nimer, promised to run a clean campaign that focused on the areas in which both men differ, rather than in attacking one another. “This was the first time I’ve met him, but he seems like a great guy,” he said of his opponent. “We have a lot of mutual friends so I’d heard of him, and I look forward to getting to know him better as we go through the campaign. We agreed for the sake of the LGBT issues that we both care about that we’d keep it clean and make sure we’d finish the election with the good reputation we each had going in.” “We shouldn’t’ cannibalize our own and we agreed not to do that,” he added. Like Nimer, McAdams noted that budgeting, education and immigration would top his list of concerns during the race. “It is an incredibly difficult year for the state budget,” he said, referring to the sluggish economy that has plagued every state

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8 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

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in the Union. “My perspective is before we raise taxes, we need to understand this economy is no easier on tax payers than it is on government.” When making state budget cuts, McAdams said that lawmakers need to ensure that “necessary social services for those who have been hit by the economic downturn” remain, such as the Meals on Wheels program for elderly residents as well as insurance coverage for children. “Utah has ranked 50th in Medicaid access for kids, and that’s not good enough,” he said. ‘I don’t like tax increases and I want to stay away from that, but I think it’s important for the government to keep performing its essential functions. It’s going to depend on what we’re cutting. This is s a scale and you’ve got to balance both sides of the sale.” Like Nimer, McAdams is also concerned about Utah’s education system and particularly in what he calls its decline in quality over the last two decades. “It used to be that we could stack ‘em deep and teach ‘em cheap,” said the senator. But Utah’s increasingly diverse population — which includes several students for whom English is a second language — means that these days are over, he added. “The state’s financial commitment to education has gone down significantly. We’re last in per-pupil spending, and that’s not good enough,” he said. “I feel strongly that we need to provide equal opportunity to anyone who needs to reach out and grab it.” McAdams also said he feels Utah may go in the wrong direction on immigration issues. He is opposed to a bill proposed by Sen. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, that closely mirrors Arizona’s controversial SB 1070, which critics accused of encouraging racial profiling. “He’s called it Arizona-light, but I’ve read the bill. There’s nothing light about it,” said McAdams. “Make no mistake: It’s unconstitutional and un-American.” McAdams’ biggest objection to Sandstrom’s bill, he said, was that it would take away police and prosecutors’ right to “express discretion” in which illegal immigrants to pursue — such as those who are responsible for violent crime and drug trafficking rather than those who are abiding by the law. In that vein, McAdams also said he would not support any resolutions in the Utah State Senate or the House in support of overturning a clause in the 14th Amendment that grants citizenship to children born within U.S. borders to immigrants who are here illegally. “If we deny children who are born in the

United States the right to citizenship that dates back to the Civil War and the abolition of slavery, that would, in my mind, create a permanent under class in the United States — people with no citizenship in any country” who government would then deny “the opportunity to become contributing members of our society.” “For me, it’s a consistent message: looking out for our minority community whether they’re sexual or ethnic minorities,” he continued. “We need to send a message and be a welcoming society. That’s what America was founded on, and that’s who we need to be.” While Nimer and his supporters have argued that a gay and transgender-friendly Republican would get more done in the state’s conservative government than would a Democrat, McAdams countered that his ability to work with Republican lawmakers “being critical on some issues and working collaboratively on different issues” was more important. “My distinct point of view is reflective of the district,” he said. “The district wants a counterpoint on many issues and in my short time in the Legislature, I believe I’ve offered that counterpoint.” And although his district has wanted that counterpoint for decades (McAdams noted that it hadn’t been represented by a Republican in at least 35 years), the senator said he’s still not taking the election for granted. “It means I’ll have to continue to work hard, and I should,” he said. “We should expect that of our elected officials.” Q


Mel Nimer: Red Candidate in a Blue District Mel Nimer is no stranger to Utah politics. As the President of the Utah Log Cabin Republicans, a gay and transgender-friendly GOP caucus, he has worked to give gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Utah Republicans a voice in Utah’s ruling party. As a Precinct Chair and former state delegate, he has worked to get Republicans sympathetic to gay and transgender issues into office. And as of this month, Nimer is now a candidate for political office. When Nancy Davis, the Republican challenger to Sen. Ben McAdams’ District 2 Senate seat failed to file all her paperwork by the registration deadline, the Utah Elections Office disqualified her, leaving the party just one day to find a replacement. “The county [party] called and asked me to fill in the spot that got vacated,” said Nimer. “They said, ‘We can’t think of anybody better than you to fill in that spot. Will you run?’” Nimer’s response catapulted him fairly late into the race in this heavily Democratic district. Nonetheless, he said that he and his campaign volunteers are working quickly to put up a website, print fliers and hit the streets for canvassing. Although the election is still in its early stages, one thing at this point is certain: gay and transgender rights will not be a wedge issue. Perhaps for the first time in Utah political history, both the Republican and Democratic candidate agree on practically everything from the importance of job and employment protections to the need for same-sex partners to be able to sue in cases of wrongful death. “Senator McAdams has done a great job representing our community and filling Sen. Scott McCoy’s shoes,” said Nimer, who like the senator that McAdams replaced is also openly gay. The real contention in the election, he said, will thus be about both candidates’ different approaches to several issues affecting not only their district, but the state at large. “The only other big advantage I offer everyone in the district is that they’ll have a seat at the Republican table, so they’ll have a seat at the super majority table, which may be good, may be bad. But for our community, for the first time ever, they’ll have someone they can count on to try and swing the Republican majority more clearly in our favor.” Some of the main issues that Nimer and McAdams consider to be highly important are state budget cuts, education and immigration. Like many people from all party affiliations, Nimer said that the state’s budget has been on his mind a lot lately. While Nimer said that programs such as the state’s AIDS Drug Assistance Program

“need to be funded, totally,” he said that his main concern about the state’s economy is the complex interplay between job creation and a strong education system. “They’re not separate topics,” he said. “They’re all combined and interlinked and there is no one answer for each problem. We have to look at the much bigger picture in order to solve all these little problems.” To solve the state’s budget crisis, Nimer said that Utah must support small businesses, which are the state’s economic backbone. To this effect, he said that the state should lessen government controls on business creation. As an example, he cited Utah’s heavy regulation of liquor licenses, which he said prevent many would-be restaurateurs from going into business and therefore costs the state jobs and revenue. “We don’t need a whole bunch of rules and micromanaging what everyone does with all their time in building businesses,” he said. While both candidates agree that the state is not adequately serving its pupils, their ideas for improving the system — and especially getting it more money — differ considerably. In order to better fund the system, Nimer said he would support changing how the state handles taxation. Currently, he said, 70 percent of Utah is owned by the federal government, meaning that the state government has only 30 percent of the state to draw upon when crafting its budget. “One way to finance education is through property taxes,” he said. “In New Jersey, where only 7 percent of the land is federally controlled, they fund their education system the same way we do. And where we spend just $5,000 per student they can spend $13,000 per student because they have control of the land and we don’t. We need to change that and work things out with the federal government where we can use [this land].” In order for Utah to get the most out of its acreage, Nimer proposed coming to terms with the federal government on issues such as mining in federal monuments like the controversial Grand StaircaseEscalante National Monument, which sits atop a vast coal reserve. He said that the monument could be treated much the same way as are ski resorts in Utah’s national forests, which he calls “a good use of federally-owned land that the state gets money from.” “Mining that could easily be done [at Grand Staircase] without any harm to the environment or to the monument,” he said. “It won’t affect anything anyone’s going to enjoy and we’d be able to get thousands of tons of some of the cleanest burning coal

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 9

available.” A plan such as this, he said, would also boost the state’s sluggish economy, creating jobs and putting more money in the hands of citizens. But one thing Nimer said should not be in the hands of Utah residents is immigration, which he called the purview of the federal government. To that effect, he said he opposed a bill by Rep. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, that mirrors a controversial Arizona law. “[Bills like Sandstrom’s are] a simplistic answer to a really complex problem. It’s trying to take on a federal issue at a state level and that’s not appropriate,” he said. However, Nimer said that Utah could set up a system to help employers understand how to verify the resident status of their employees and to get illegal immigrants “help to become legal rather than deporting them.” The United States, he said, has historically depended upon a migrant workforce of foreigners from a number of nations, so taking a hard-line stance against illegal immigrants would be counterproductive. “We have to respect the fact that those people are human beings and we need to develop a system [that treats them with dignity], he said.

A

D I V I S I O N

O F

D R E W

Another person that Nimer said he will be treating with dignity is his opponent, who he has met and who has also promised to stick strictly to the issues facing the district and the state. And while he acknowledges that a Republican win in a heavily blue district will be “an uphill battle,” he said that it’s one in which he will engage wholeheartedly. “This is not a game,” he said. “We are in this as a serious campaign.” Q

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quni

LOC AL NEWS

Allies To Be Honored at Annual Equality Utah Dinner board hired Mike Thompson. “I did a lot of legal work to help them grow Equality Utah’s annual Allies Dinner is one from being just Equality Utah to the three of the highlights of the year for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer organizations it is today: Equality Utah, community. Sponsored by Jane and Tami Equality Utah PAC and Equality Utah FounMarquardt and philanthropist Bruce Bastian, dation,” she said. “I realized that was a good the dinner is one of the gay and transgender structure, to combine a political action comrights organization’s biggest fund-raisers, as mittee, a lobbying arm and a political founwell as a day for it to honor individuals and dation. I think I followed the lead of the Huorganizations that have provided exemplary man Rights Campaign, which is set up in a similar way.” service to Utah’s queer community. Marquardt is legally married to her partNamed “Gaining Ground,” in honor of the spread of job and employment protections ner, Tami, in Canada and in a number of for gay and transgender people, this year’s U.S. states that have legalized same-sex mardinner will feature Dustin Lance Black as riage. Tami Marquardt served as the Utah its keynote speaker. A writer for the televi- Pride Center’s interim director in 2004 before the hiring of Valsion show Big Love, Black has won numererie Larabee and is a ous Writers Guild of America awards for his member of the Center’s work on the HBO drama about polygamy in board today. Utah. In 2009, he won an Academy Award for “Tami had a real Best Original Screenplay for Milk, a dramainterest in youth,” tization of the life and assassination of gayMarquardt explained. rights activist and public official Harvey “She has a real passion Milk. He also narrated 8: The Mormon Propofor talking to young sition, Reed Cowan’s controversial documenpeople, so when she tary about the LDS Church’s involvement in was at the Center she the passage of California’s Proposition 8. Tami Marquardt helped to run programs During the dinner, Equality Utah will also for youth. In life now she’s always willing give its Allies for Equality Award to five reto talk to people having issues coming out. cipients: Jane and Tami Marquardt, Gary and She’s so good at it people come to find her.” Millie Watts and the Salt Lake City Human Like Tami Marquardt, Gary and Millie Rights Commission. Watts have also helped gay, lesbian, bisexual Once a practicing and transgender youth, as well as their famiattorney from 1979 to lies as the leaders of LDS Family Fellowship. 2007, Jane Marquardt Although the two did not found the organizahas served Utah’s gay, tion, they joined soon after its formation in lesbian, bisexual and 1993; two of their six children are gay, and transgender citizens one of them, Craig, has been excommunicatsince 1982, when she ed from the LDS Church. started offering semi“Our love for Craig lead to a family comnars on establishing mitment to do all we can to help people underpowers of attorney, stand more about same-sex orientation,” the wills and other direc- two wrote in a 1994 letter viewable on their Jane Marquardt tives to same-sex cou- website, ldsfamilyfellowship.org, shortly beples. In 1996, she also helped organize training fore they began holding Family Fellowship sessions for Utah judges about “the cutting- meetings in their Utah County home. “Not edge issues of the day like employment non- only do we share the scientific research that is discrimination” affecting gay, lesbian, bi- coming forth, we also try to help people realize sexual and transgender people. During those how much discrimination hurts, not only the sessions, she faced off against psychologists homosexual person, but family and friends as and BYU professors who presented what she well. It [Craig’s coming out] has opened our called “the other side” of the debate. eyes to the world of “justified” discrimination “It was a chance to be a competent gay per- that exists in many aspects of society.” son standing up in front of a group of judges As leaders of the support group, the Wattwho may have thought they didn’t know gay ses not only provide council and support for people,” she said. “That was a fun thing to be parents struggling to come to terms with involved in. It was a landmark that the Utah their child’s sexual orientations, but tireSupreme Court even wanted to be educated less advocacy for gay, lesbian, bisexual and on these issues in the middle of the ’90s.” transgender people. Marquardt also served as a board member “Education is one of our major goals, and for Equality Utah from 2001–2007, starting to just try to get the parents and siblings to when the organization was known as Unity love their gay child and keep their gay child Utah, and is still a member of the group’s under their wing, not kick them out of the advisory council. In 2004, she served as the house like happens so many times with gay chair for the Don’t Amend campaign, Equal- children,” said Millie Watts in an interview ity Utah’s effort to stop a state constitutional with KUED for Friends and Neighbors: A ban on same-sex marriage. When founder Community Divided, a 1999 documentary Michael Mitchell departed the organization, about the families and friends of gay and lesshe also acted as interim director until the bian Utahns. by JoSelle Vanderhooft

1 0 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

Throughout the ’90s and 2000s, the Wattses have spoken to journalists and organizations alike about their work, and have spoken out against anti-gay pronouncements made by LDS officials. A number of organizations have recognized them for these efforts, including Affirmation: Gay and Lesbian Mormons, a support group for former and current gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender members of the LDS Church. “Gary and Millie possess a genuinely charitable spirit,” said Family Fellowship supporter Marge Bradshaw in a 2006 ceremony where Affirmation honored the couple with an award for outstanding leadership. “They give. They give time; they give money; they give love. We spend four nights or so each year, with several other couples, at the dining room table in their home stuffing and addressing envelopes Millie and Gary Watts that contain a flyer announcing the upcoming Family Fellowship gathering. They provide the home, the pizza and root beer, and contribute to the spirit of friendship. There are no aides or secretaries; there is only Watts’ generosity.” The eight-member Salt Lake City Human Rights Commission has been an invaluable part of making the capital city a safer and more just place for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender residents. In 2009, its report on discrimination within the city’s boundaries revealed that discrimination based on race, sexual orientation and gender identity were significant problems. The report was the cornerstone upon which Mayor Ralph Becker based two ordinances prohibiting housing and employment discrimination against gay and transgender residents. The Salt Lake City Council ultimately passed the ordinances near the end of last year, and seven other municipalities have adopted them since. Lisa Harrison Smith, Becker’s deputy director of communications, said that the commission was “honored and excited” to receive the recognition. “We’re really thrilled that we’re recognized by Equality Utah. They’re a big part of many, if not all, of the initiatives that come out in the city. It means a lot to us.” Upon entering office, said Smith, Becker created the commission with Coordinator Yolanda Francisco-Nez at the helm “with the charge to make some very big changes” in how the city handled matters relating to diversity. “I think that set the tone for a pretty progressive agenda when it comes to LGBT rights,” she said, adding that the mayor’s office appreciated EU’s recognition of Francisco-Nez’s efforts. Francisco-Nez was out of town and could not be reached for comment. Q “Gaining Ground” will be held Sept. 28 at the Salt Palace. Tickets are $100 per person or $900 for a table of 10. Proceeds will go to Equality Utah Political Action Committee, to help elect fair-minded candidates who support equal rights for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender citizens. Vegetarian options are available. For more information visit alliesdinner.com.

Shades of Queer In October, the University of Utah’s LGBT Resource Center will present its annual Gay-la Dinner and Silent Auction, the theme of which will be “Shades of Queer: Connecting Through Difference.” The evening’s keynote speaker will be Reed Cowan, the director, writer and producer of 8: The Mormon Proposition, a popular documentary about the LDS Church’s involvement in California’s Proposition 8. The evening will also include performances by Keila Michiko Cone-Uemura and Baron Daniel Cureton. Dress is business casual and vegetarian and vegan options are available. WHEN: Oct. 22, 6 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. dinner WHERE: IJ and Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center, 2 North Medical Drive COST: $65 per person, $650 per table of 10, $45 per student (available upon request) INFO: To purchase tickets contact Cathy Martinez at cmartinez@ sa.utah.edu or Kathleen Boyd at kboyd@sa.utah.edu or 801-5877973

Fashion Stroll #10 Salt Lake City’s Fashion Stroll will celebrate its 10th incarnation by turning its outdoor market into a Halloween party. Attendees and merchants are encouraged to dress in costume, and prizes will be awarded to the most creative. Likewise, the event’s runway show and entertainment — including dancers, local bands and street performers — will all have a Halloween flair. Sponsorship opportunities are available. WHEN: Oct. 29, 6–10 p.m., East Broadway (300 South between State Street and 300 East) COST: Free to the public INFO: SLCFashionStroll.com or contact organizer Matt Monson at 801-671-4304 or slcfashionstroll@ gmail.com.

Family Conference The Utah Pride Center will host “Bringing Families Back Into the Room,” a regional conference, Oct. 8-10, for families with gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer youth. The keynote speaker will be Dr. Caitlin Ryan, head of the Family Acceptance Project at San Francisco State University, which is studying ways to help families support queer children. For more details, check utahpridecenter.org.


Will Cedar City Be Next to Pass Gay/Transgender Ordinance? So far, seven Utah municipalities have passed ordinances protecting residents from job discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. With less than four months of 2010 left, Equality Utah is hoping that at least three more will join their ranks. Currently, the gay and transgender rights group has approached mayors and city councils around the state about the ordinances, which Salt Lake City first approved in 2009. The discussion is especially developing in Holladay, Ogden and Cedar City, said Executive Director Brandie Balken. Although Equality Utah’s staff discussed the ordinances with the Ogden City Council earlier this year, the body voted to put off considering them until they had dealt with pressing budgeting concerns. Balken said that she hopes to meet with Mayor Matthew R. Godfrey in mid-September. Meanwhile, Holladay’s city council discussed whether or not to move forward on the ordinances during a Sept. 2 work meeting. Here, Councilman Barry Topham touched off controversy by saying that he didn’t know why the council was discussing this “can of worms” issue. “I think you should be able to discriminate if you don’t want a cross-dresser living in your house,” he said in the meeting. His remarks prompted Councilman Jim Palmer to call Topham’s position discriminatory and in violation of “the equalprotection clause of the Constitution that

we’ve all sworn to uphold.” Balken said that Equality Utah is encouraging Holladay residents to contact their councilmembers and let them know they support passing these ordinances. “I think in some cases it’s good for people to express their deeply held opinion. It gives us an opportunity to discuss what those concerns are,” said Balken of Topham’s remarks. “We’ve got some outreach to do.” Out of all three cities, progress is happening the fastest in Cedar City, where Equality Utah has been working closely with Southern Utah University’s QueerStraight Alliance to educate residents about the protections the ordinances offer. Along with speaking to Mayor Joe Burgess and the six-member city council, the organization held a series of three public meetings about the proposed measures at the mayor’s request. “We got on the radio, we got fliers out, we papered the town in an attempt to get as many people from as many backgrounds as possible to come and talk about the ordinances because no one wants to pass something they don’t understand,” said Benjamin King Smith, QSA president. “We’ve had a lot of people who have come to them wanting to know if they’ll be protected. It’s nice to have these conversations.” The council and mayor, said Smith, gave QSA positive feedback about the meetings and are planning to discuss the ordinances

throughout October. On Oct. 6, QSA members will ask the council to meet with the mayor about drafting the ordinances during the body’s weekly meeting. On the following week, Smith said the council will vote on whether or not to accept the ordinances. “There will be another vote after that, but if they pass the first vote, it’s pretty much guaranteed,” he said. Following this meeting, said Balken, Cedar City residents will be able to weigh in on the ordinances, and then the council will vote on whether or not to pass them.

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contestants and the audience. Rox is a retired police officer and law enforcement educator who now works full time as a BDSM and leather lifestyle educator. He is a graduate of the Journeyman III Academy, a BDSM school which closed in 2009. He also is the key organizer of Utah Rebellion, Head Master of Salt Lake’s BDSM201 Intermediate educational series, and is an administrator of and presenter coach for the Path 101 BDSM Group. He has taught at several clubs as well as major events such as Thunder in the Mountains, Maui Kink in Hawaii, DomCon Los Angeles, and DomCon Atlanta. Rox won the title of Mr. Rocky Mountain Olympus Leather in April at the first annual Rocky Mountain Olympus Leather Competition held in Salt Lake City, making him eligible to compete in the international competition. RMOL is a regional leather group which covers Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. Sythen of Salt Lake City was named runner-up for the International Ms. Olympus Leather 2010 at the event.

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9 th & 9th Street Festival

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Utah Rox Wins Int’l Mr. Olympus Leather Utah Rebellion organizer Utah Rox earned the title of International Mr. Olympus Leather 2010 at the International Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather contest held in Los Angeles. The contest was created to “promote a positive image of the Leather lifestyle,” according to its statement of purpose. “It is our belief that the leather community is comprised of an extremely diverse group of people ranging from the motorcycle and leather/Levi clubs to the heaviest SM edge player and all of the leatherfolk in between. The Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather title seeks to make all leatherfolk feel good about themselves regardless of race, religion, political beliefs, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, age, size, handicap, or health condition. It is the goal of Mr. and Ms. Olympus Leather to make all those who wish to be a part of the leather community feel welcome in doing so.” Contestants competed in four categories — interview, fantasy, fetish image and stage presence. During the fantasy category, contestants staged a 5- to 7-minute erotic production, involving judges, other

“We think it’s likely we’ll have a vote in Cedar City before the end of October,” she said. The meetings will take place on Oct. 6, 13, 20 and 27. To date, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Park City, Summit County, West Valley City, Logan and Taylorsville have passed the measures, which impose fines against businesses with 15 or more employees and landlords renting at least four units who discriminate against gay and transgender people. Religious organizations are exempt.

Saturday, Sept 18th, 10am – 6pm Hosted by ELPCO – The East Liberty Park Organization and the East Centrsl Community Council

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 1 1


LOC ALNEWS

Layton PFLAG Launched Layton has become the latest of several Utah cities to start a chapter of the political, social and support group Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. “I’ve decided to make a goal of starting more PFLAGs in more cities,” said activist Turner Bitton, who recently held a Rally for Equality this summer to address the suicides of several Layton PFLAG President young gay Utahns. Cynthia Stevens “There’s really nothing for people up north,” he continued. “Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County have so much support for people, but Davis and Ogden have no support.” Bitton announced his intentions to several friends in Layton and the fledgling group met for the first time on Sept. 9 on

Weber State University’s campus. Here, the 25 attendees voted to make Cynthia Stevens president and Barb D’Arco vice president of Layton’s PFLAG chapter. Bitton will serve as vice president of public relations, a title he also holds in Ogden’s group. “I figure since the chapters are so close in proximity I’ll be able to do both at the same time,’ he said. The group will now focus on filing paperwork with PFLAG’s national body to become an official chapter. They expect to hold their first official meeting in October. For now, the group is meeting at 6:30 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month in the main building of Weber State University’s Davis campus, room 306. The first meeting is scheduled for Oct. 14. A support group will meet in the same room an hour before official business begins.

For more information about Layton PFLAG contact Turner Bitton at Bitton.politico@gmail.com or 801- 814-3660.

National Coming Out Brunch to Reveal Big PFLAG News For the sixth year in a row, the Utah Pride Center will celebrate National Coming Out Day, held nationally on October 11, with a brunch and awards ceremony. This year’s celebration in honor of the coming out process and the individuals and organizations that have served gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer Utahns will take place on Oct. 10 at the Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel. John Cepek, president of the national Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, will be the day’s keynote speaker at the brunch. The Center will also honor the 2010 recipients of its Lifetime Achievement Award, Community Organization of the Year Award and Volunteer of the Year Award. Marina Gomberg, the Utah Pride Center’s director of development and marketing, said that the Center is pleased to have Cepek visit — especially because “he will be delivering some very big news to us on that day.” “We’re very excited to have him and to be able to have that announcement made because it impacts us here in Utah,” she said. Although past recipients Nikki Boyer, Joe Redburn and Becky Moss are still deliberating over the winner of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award, the Center has announced the other two winners. Volunteer Chris Coon will receive this year’s Volunteer of the Year award for his three years of service at the Utah Pride Center as an administrative assistant.

“He has been incredible,” said Gomberg. “Day after day, week after week, month after month, and year after year, he remains as happy and dedicated as the first day he started. We’ve been extremely lucky to have Chris as part of our staff not only because of his dedication but because of his spirit.” The award for Community Organization of the Year will go to Salt Lake City’s PFLAG chapter, which Gomberg praised for its support in a number of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights causes. “We’ve seen the impact of their work under the leadership of [President] Kathy Godwin, and the impact has been very positive,” she said. “We’re really glad to be able to award them for their great work this year.” This year’s National Coming Out Day celebration will also be held on the last day of the Center’s inaugural Family Acceptance Regional Conference (Oct. 8-10). Geared toward making families safe and affirming environments for queer youth and toward keeping families with queer youth together, the conference is a perfect match for National Coming Out Day. Because of overlap with the conference, Gomberg said that the Center hopes “this will be one of our largest NCOD celebrations.”

Registration for both the NCOD brunch and conference are open on the Utah Pride Center’s website, utahpridecenter.org. Sponsorship and table captain opportunities for the brunch are available.

12 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


Creative Minds Shine on Homeless Youth by JoSelle Vanderhooft

In 2009, Utahns Chloe Noble and Jill Hartman walked across the United States to raise awareness of the challenges facing homeless youth — over 40 percent of whom identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning or “nonstraight.” Their journey took them from Seattle to Washington, D.C., where they participated in and helped organize October’s March for Equality. Nearly one year later, the foundation the two women created, Operation Shine America, has announced the launch of a new campaign. Kicked off this August, Creative Minds 2010 is a national campaign offering homeless youth and their allies what Noble calls “a platform to be seen and heard.” It will work in tandem with a number of local organizations such as the Homeless Youth Resource Center, Volunteers of America, Urban Village Cooperative, the Inclusion Center, Community In-Roads Alliance, the Utah Pride Center and the Utah chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. These organizations, said Noble, who is OSA’s founding director, will work together to sponsor community awareness training about homeless youth in which participants will learn how to help these youth and how to work toward solving social problems that lead to youth homelessness. “This is about extending core family values like acceptance, patience, compassion, generosity, protection and love, beyond ourselves and our personal family unit,” said Noble. “This epidemic [of homelessness facing youth] can not be solved simply by donations, emergency services, or even emergency over night shelters; although all of these things are essential in keeping these children safe and alive long enough for them to enter into recovery. What is needed to end youth homelessness is a complete transformation of our systems of care, a rebuilding of our local communities, and a strong awareness of the trauma

that these homeless youth experience on a daily basis.” During last year’s Homeless Youth Pride Walk, Noble said that she and Hartman interviewed the youth they met about what brought them to the streets. They found, she said, that although the causes were numerous, they all tied back into communityrelated problems such as familial rejection and a lack of access to services. Overall, Noble said that there are two million homeless youth in the United States. And given that queer youth are disproportionately represented in that number, Noble said that gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights were inseparable from the homeless youth epidemic. “This means that huge causal factors in youth homelessness are homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia,” said Noble. “If we are going to eradicate youth homelessness, we are going to have to come to terms with the negative and oppressive belief systems that teach us to treat LGBTQ citizens with anything less than dignity, respect, love and acceptance. This certainly includes our amazing youth, especially those who are now homeless.” “This diverse group of homeless youth, whether LGBTQ or heterosexual, has a profound and powerful voice,” agreed OSA director of administration Ginger Phillips. “We want to support them in their progress and give them many creative ways to be seen and heard. Studies show that many homeless LGBTQ youth who receive appropriate guidance, support, protection and resources, eventually become successful members of the community.” In order to help provide youth with this help, OSA will also participate in a number of events throughout autumn and winter. These include NAMI’s annual walk to raise awareness of mental illness, which will begin at Mobile Ballpark at 9 a.m. on Sept. 18. In Oct., OSA will take part in Utah Pride Center’s Family Acceptance Regional Conference (Oct. 8–10), which is targeted

toward creating safe and affirming family environments for queer youth. Throughout the month Creative Minds 2010 will also host Creative Freak Boutique, a shop selling arts and crafts created by homeless youth and where homeless youth will be able to express themselves through open mic and music. From Oct. 14 through Nov. 6 Creative

Minds 2010 will also be a part of the NAMI Art Project at the Patrick Moore Gallery, 2233 S. 700 East. Homeless youth will also participate in NAMI’s Holiday Boutique from Dec. 3–5 at Pioneer Craft House, 3271 S. 500 East. Q

For more information about OSA visit operationshineamerica.blogspot.com.

Pro-Prop 8 Lawyer Lectures at BYU The attorney who represented proponents of California’s Proposition 8 in U.S. District Court lectured Brigham Young University law students at a J. Reuben Clark Law School forum sponsored by the BYU chapter of the Federalist Society. Charles J. Cooper’s argument for upholding Prop 8 was that marriage is, by definition, a union between a man and a woman. “A marriage between a man and a woman is not the core of the institution, it defines the institution,” he said. Cooper’s testimony before U.S. Judge Vaughn Walker mirrored his talk at BYU. Walker decided against Prop 8 proponents, saying that it infringes on gay and lesbian couples’ 14th amendment rights under the U.S. Constitution. Cooper said that marriage benefits society because the union produces children. “Child-rearing and procreation is important in matrimony,” Cooper said. “but also to nature and society.” Cooper said same-sex marriage could harm heterosexual couples in the long run. “The question is not can a same-sex couple raise a child as well as a heterosexual couple,” Cooper said. “It is about the longterm effects, including contributions to society.” In a question-and-answer period following his presentation, Cooper was asked how same-sex marriage would harm heterosexual marriage. According to BYU student Marshall Thompson, his reply was, “Recognizing homosexual marriage would not harm heterosexual marriage at

Prop 8 attorney Charles J. Cooper

all,” and that it was never a point he felt he needed to prove in court. In a document written to the District Court, Cooper cited statistics from the Netherlands, which instituted same-sex marriage in 2001, showing trends of fewer marriages, more single-parent families, more unmarried parents raising children and more opposite-sex couples choosing an alternative status over marriage. He also argued in the memorandum that same-sex marriage deinstitutionalizes marriage. Allowing same-sex marriage weakens the social norms with respect to marriage and shifts the focus from fulfilling socially valuable roles such as parent and spouse to “personal choice and selfdevelopment,” his legal team wrote.

Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 13


OUR VIEWS

guest editorial HIV/AIDS: The Best of Times and the Worst of Times by David Mixner

I

N RECENT MONTHS, THE MEDIA has been filled with encouraging news about progress in treating HIV/AIDS. At the very same time, we have been dealt some real setbacks. The lesson is the same as it always has been: embrace and celebrate the progress, and don’t let up the pressure until there is a cure. The good news is indeed reason to celebrate. From the International AIDS Conference in Vienna came word that promising new gels have been developed that could dramatically lower the infection rate among at-risk women. The Wall Street Journal recently published a story indicating that scientists have discovered three powerful antibodies that can neutralize 91 percent of HIV strains. The bad news is that the economic situation is wrecking havoc with HIV/AIDS budgets — both here and abroad. Many states are freezing the ability of people with HIV/AIDS to receive treatment. AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) funds have either been cut way back or frozen, making it impossible for new clients to access them. Unless this is corrected, it could mean a death sentence for some people. It’s crucial for every American that cares about this horrendous epidemic to keep up the pressure, seek new funds and hold lawmakers accountable for their actions. Given the uncertainty with the economy and ADAP, it makes Medicare funds for treating HIV/AIDS even more critical in assisting people with the disease. Medicare provides a vital source of health coverage for around 100,000 people with the disease. In 2006, Medicare became the single largest source of federal financing for HIV

care. The number of people with HIV receiving Medicare benefits has grown over time, reflecting growth in the size of the of the HIV-positive population and an increased lifespan for people with the virus. As thrilled as I was with the new health care law, there is one part that is extremely disturbing. Especially since my journey over the years has taught me the urgent need to hold public officials accountable for their actions in this battle for a cure. Quite simply, with the creation of an entity called the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), we could lose our ability to pressure lawmakers for change. This new board is simply not accountable to anyone. While the IPAB is tasked with cutting Medicare spending, it is exempt from any judicial or administrative review of its decisions, and is barred from probing the government’s spending patterns on specific health care providers, such as hospitals. Shackled by such restraints and yet dangerously unaccountable to Congress, the people or the courts, this board could turn its attention to successful programs in Medicare to carry out its cost cutting mission. The mere existence of an unchecked,

powerful agency making life-determining decisions should be worrisome to everyone. Draconian decisions by IPAB to limit access to medicines to treat HIV will be free from judicial review, the need for advance public notice, or even appeals from patients. The fact of the matter is that the IPAB, like any other agency of government, can make bad decisions. And if they do, we have absolutely no recourse to change them. Personally, I can’t think of a worse scenario than for our research leaders to be on the cusp of a cure, only to be denied the necessary resources because a government panel has blown research and development into the Stone Age. We must not be shortsighted in our zeal to bring down health care costs by thwarting future research and reversing already achieved progress. Stated simply, if we go this route, we would only blunt the more laudable and courageous goal of saving lives and one day eliminating this horrific disease once and for all. Q David Mixner has been involved in public life creating policy and as an activist and writer for over 40 years. He has had two bestselling books, Stranger Among Friends and Brave Journeys, both published by Bantam Books.

leers

Editor, I just wanted to say that Issue 160, August 5, 2010, was the best you have ever put out. I normally don’t respond to such incredible insight and eloquent writing because I generally think it’s too late for words, but you have impressed me with your ‘first person’ insight and articles “Utah’s Gay Community Reel from Recent Suicides” and especially “Full Spectrum Social Justice.” I will eventually read the entire issue and will cut it out and journal it. The cover story, “My Last Shot,” intrigued me initially because it seems to be such a taboo subject that really needs to be addressed. I have been that gay man who turned to drugs and got judged, so I appreciate the compassion in your article. For the first time in my history with Salt Lake City I feel there is hope. Please continue to spread ‘happy’ pleasure as much as you can, but thank fucking god you are not afraid to bring up the real issues. I truly hope your publication can make a difference here in this coping state.

Darren Carlson Salt Lake City

QSaltLake welcomes your feedback Please send your letters to the editor to letters@qsaltlake.com 1 4 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10


C

the straight line Leviticus, Stones and Same-Sex Marriage

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by Bob Henline

NN RECENTLY POSTED an opinion piece by Bishop Harry R. Jackson, Jr. entitled “Same-sex Marriage Will Hurt Families, Society.” In this lovely bit of drivel, Jackson first goes after the validity of “openly gay” (although that has yet to be confirmed) Judge Vaughn Walker’s ruling in the matter of California’s Proposition 8. After that, he attempts to explain why samesex marriage represents the end of civilization as we know it. Let’s take a look at Bishop Jackson’s bullshit. First and foremost, I think it’s important to note that Jackson does what all ignorant “Christians” do in this situation: rely on selected biblical passages. According to Jackson, “All the scriptures in the Bible concerning marriage presuppose heterosexual marriage.” While this is certainly true, who decided that this outdated bit of fiction should determine the laws of our nation? Also, if we determine that we are to follow biblical law, why is it that we should only follow the parts of biblical law that serve the interests of bigots like Jackson? Should we go back to stoning adulterers? People the world over have been up in arms for months over the sentencing of an Iranian woman to death by stoning, yet this is also a biblical punishment for adultery. All one need do is read Leviticus to find all kinds of interesting “rules” that modern Christians don’t follow. This book mentions the legitimacy of slavery, as long as the slaves are from a “neighboring nation.” It references putting to death any who work on the Sabbath, and decrees that eating shellfish is an “abomination.” Not only are these rules not incorporated into our legal system, I’d be willing to bet that Pastor Jackson doesn’t follow them all, either. As a full-time pastor, he certainly “works” on the Sabbath, right? “A marriage requires a husband and wife, because these unions are necessary to make new life and connect children to their mother and father.” While Jackson goes so far as to later declare in his statement that our society should place a greater emphasis on preserving marriages, he doesn’t go so far as to advocate a ban on divorce, separation or abandonment. Why is that? If the sole purpose of marriage is to produce children, shouldn’t we then ban marriage for people who are unable to reproduce? Should we force married couples without children to breed? What about people who choose not to marry at all? If procreation is the point of life, should we not arrange and enforce marriages for all, complete with impregnation?

Of course, Jackson also has to resort to the traditional fear tactic: “These kinds of ill-advised social experiments may produce a host of unintended consequences. If gay marriage is allowed, the nation will soon begin to experience an increased degradation of the nuclear family — resulting in fewer kids being raised by a mom and dad.” And yet again, as with others of his bigoted ilk, Jackson makes this ridiculous statement with no real argument to support it. How exactly does the marriage of two homosexuals degrade the nuclear family? Jackson immediately follows this assertion with: “What will the landscape of America look like if same-sex marriage is legalized across the country? Social scientists report what most Americans have always known: Both boys and girls are deeply affected in biological and physical ways by the presence of their fathers.” Finally, something that makes sense — if you ignore the first sentence. Yes, social scientists agree that a good father figure provides an element of stability and support for children. But the question still remains: what does that have to do with gay marriage? Most gay and lesbian couples don’t have children, but if they do, a stable, married couple (even a same-sex one) is definitely a much better option than an unstable (even hetero) couple. How many hetero couples shouldn’t have children? You can’t read the news without seeing a story about neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse or even murder of children — by hetero parents, Bishop Jackson. Again, the assumption Jackson makes is that the purpose of marriage is children. Why is that? People who are unmarried have children all the time, so should this be prohibited? Should society remove children from single parents and place them with hetero couples? I don’t see Bishop Jackson arguing this point, but it’s the next “logical” step in his illogical path to a better society. The bottom line on this one is freedom of choice. While the Constitution doesn’t specifically protect choice, it is the most fundamental of freedoms. Without free choice, there is no other freedom. What is freedom of speech if you can’t choose what to say? What is freedom of religion if you can’t choose what to believe (or not to believe at all)? There is no logical or legal reason that all people should not be allowed to choose who to love and marry. Q

Bob Henline is a straight man. Don’t hold that against him — he was born that way. He is also a professional author and editor. His blog can be read at nonpart.org.

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Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10 | issue 163 | QS a lt L a k e | 15


OUR VIEWS

I

guest editorial Mental Illness Stigmatized in Utah’s Gay Community by Kyle Foote

WAKE UP PARALYZED with anxiety and fear. I stare at the ceiling, willing myself to sleep a little longer so I won’t have to face the day just yet. I secretly wish that I had simply died in my sleep as I apprehensively ponder all the things that I need to get done today knowing I won’t be able to. I slept through class this morning and I’m already going to be late for work. I purposefully ignore the repeated calls and text messages from my family and friends, I’ll avoid their disappointment for a few more hours. I just want to die right now. But how should I do it? Razor blades? No, I don’t think I could cut myself. How about a rope? Nah, then I’d have to find a rope and I’d probably mess up the knot and just fall on my ass. Alcohol and pills? Hmm, that’s the way I’ll do it. But not today, I’m too tired to kill myself today. I’ll take a shower, have some coffee and see how I feel after that. The scenario above isn’t all that made up. It’s exactly how many people, gay or otherwise, wake up each morning. It’s a story I’ve heard from many different people with whom I have worked and befriended over the past two years as a volunteer with the National Alliance on Mental Illness and other Utah mental health organizations. Many of us may have had a morning like the one I describe above. The sad truth is that many people have mornings like this every day of their life. They are paralyzed by depression and anxiety. This type of paralysis, however, isn’t something that people can just get over or ignore or avoid. Fashion, shopping, boyfriends, drinking, sex and illicit drugs won’t make it go away. Major depression and anxiety are typical symptoms of a mental illness. People who suffer from

a mental illness have a real and palpable chemical imbalance in their brain. They need to seek out support from those around them. In many cases, they may also need medication and counseling to be able to cope with the realities of life. As we know, recently we have had a number of suicides in our community. The first

The primary reason for these suicides was that the young people were suffering from a mental illness reaction to them, by some, was to blame their families, their church, and the straight community in general. The truth is, however, they didn’t kill themselves because they may not have been accepted by their family or a church or by straights for being gay. The primary reason for these suicides was that the young people were suffering from a mental illness and either weren’t able to get or didn’t seek out the support they needed to deal with their disease. In the gay community we often stigmatize anything or anyone that’s different. We reject people based on their looks, physique,

clothes, job, income, education and anything else we deem as being substandard for some pseudo gay norm. We also tend to discard the reality of the pervasiveness of mental illness in our community. This appears to be especially true amongst the youth of our community. We ignore that our friends and loved ones may be suffering from major depression, or bi-polar or other forms of mental illness. By doing so, we fail to support them in their efforts to cope with life. When we avoid the tough conversations and judge those who are different than ourselves, in effect we are placing the blame for suicides within our population on everyone but our own community. As a community we need to embrace the truth that there are many people in our community, especially those who are under 25, who are suffering from mental illnesses and who lack the support or have not yet learned the tools to cope and/or to survive day to day. With the aim of creating resources for our community, NAMI is working together with the Utah Pride Center and other gay community organizations to eliminate the stigma of mental illness and providing our community with resources to support, nurture, and heal those among us who are suffering. In an effort to provide this support, NAMI is launching a support group called “Connection.” This mental health support group is offered at no charge and is organized specifically for those under 30 in the GLBTQ community. It is a place where people who are suffering from a mental illness or who know or love someone who is can gather together on a weekly basis to learn from and share with each other. By the end of the year NAMI will also launch a Connection group for those in the community who are 30 and older. A Facebook group called “Mind Games” has also been formed to provide information on all mental health resources and events available to the local GLBTQ Community. Q Starting September 21st Connection meetings will be held every Tuesday night at the Salt Lake City Main Library at 7pm. If you would like to find out more about how you can participate or help please contact NAMI Utah or join us on Facebook/Mind Games for regular updates.

snaps & slaps SNAP: Ben McAdams vs. Mel Nimer Utah’s State Senate District 2 has been boggling out-of-staters for nearly a year now. Last December, they were shocked to learn that the seat was not only in a Democratic district, but also respresented by an openly gay man, Scott McCoy. Then they were shocked that a straight but gay-friendly Mormon, Ben McAdams, took over. And now they’re shocked that a gay non-Mormon Republican, Mel Nimer, is seeking McAdams’ job (remember, most Americans think Utah is only good for polygamy and incoherent alcohol laws). While it’s always funny to watch people learn and re-learn that gay Utahns exist and that they sometimes do things other than be oppressed, the McAdams/Nimer race is interesting for a number of reasons. While it shows that Utah’s queer and allied community is diverse, it also shows that Democrats and Republicans can agree on fundamental questions about gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender equality. And that Utah’s Republican Party is willing to front an openly gay candidate — albeit in a heavily blue district. Still, if this signals a more gay-friendly turn in Utah’s GOP, we’re all for it.

SNAP: Turner Bitton At just 19, Turner Bitton has accomplished a lot for Utah’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community. Now, along with several friends, he’s started a chapter of Parents,

VISIT THE NEW WEB SITE FOR UTAH MALE NATURISTS AT UMeN.ORG UTAH MALE NATURISTS IS A SOCIAL GROUP FOR GAY, BISEXUAL AND GAY-FRIENDLY

Families, & Friends of Lesbians and Gays for Layton residents. Like many parts of the state, Northern Utah doesn’t have nearly enough resources for queer residents and their families, making the need for

STRAIGHT MEN THAT HOLDS A VARIETY OF NONSEXUAL NAKED SOCIAL AND

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10 TO 40 MEMBERS. GUESTS OF MEMBERS ARE WELCOME AT MOST EVENTS.

Northern Utah’s queer and allied

1 6 | QS a lt L a k e | issue 163 | Sep t e mber 16 , 20 10

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lambda lore I Am Shocked! Shocked, I Tell You! by Ben Williams

LIKE TO TELL PEOPLE THAT I was clinically insane until I was 23 years old. I know some of you are saying that explains a lot. But really, so was every other homosexual born before April 9, 1974. In case you think I am exaggerating a tad, I assure you I am not. The American Psychiatric Association’s Bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders classified homosexuality as being “among the sociopathic personality disturbances” in its first edition in 1952, and there the definition it remained until 1974. The American Psychiatric Association’s board of trustees voted in December 1973 to remove homosexuality from the DSM lists of disorders. However, some conservative members of the APA called for a full vote by the group’s 17,905 eligible members to settle the matter. On April 9, 1974 the results were announced. With only 10,555 eligible APA members participating, 3,810 psychiatrists voted to keep “homosexuality” in the DSM as a mental disorder. However 5,854 voted to remove it. So, the next day, on my 23rd birthday, I was no longer considered a mental case. After the 1974 vote, the American Psychiatric Association dropped homosexuality as “a psychiatric disorder,” and even began to advocate for laws to protect lesbians and gay men from discrimination in employment, housing, transportation and licensing. They also encouraged “the repeal of all legislation making criminal offenses of sexual acts performed by consenting adults in private.” Prior to 1970, most trained psychiatrists generally considered desires for someone of the same sex to be a disorder. Karoly Maria Kertbeny’s 19th century term “homosexual” was the official moniker for those inflicted by this mental-physical disassociative disorder. In the early 20th century, thanks to Dr. Freud and Dr. Jung, psychiatry exercised an “authoritative voice” on public opinion. By mid-century, psychiatry’s “scientific opinion” and Alfred Kinsey’s sexology studies began to change the judicial view that homosexuality was a criminal deviancy to a mental illness. Believe it or not, this was a vast improvement. Homosexuals were now being ordered into treatment instead of prison. But in Utah, it would appear that treatment was as bad as prison. Cleon Skousen, while Chief of Police in Salt Lake City, was dismayed that some city judges were sending offending homosexuals to psychiatric treatment, rather than charging them with a felony and sending them to

the state pen for up to 20 years as state law mandated. To sidestep the judges, Skousen got the city fathers to adopt as code the 1952 state provision which ordered sex offenders to the Utah State Hospital. In this way, Skousen said, “a conviction would enable authorities to commit offenders for life if medical examinations showed them mentally ill.” Previously, persons charged with indecent exposure or lewdness were tried in police court in Salt Lake City. Records show that homosexuals were being sent to the state mental institution in Utah County through much of the 1950s. By the 1960s, aversion therapy or electroshock therapy was promoted as means to cure homosexuality. As early as 1935 the American Psychological Association was told of a doctor successfully treating homosexuality by using electro-shock therapy “delivered at intensities considerably higher than those usually employed on human subjects.” Dr. Frankenstein meets Dr. Freud. Electro-shock therapy was readily adopted in Utah to cure homosexuals, especially at LDS Church-owned college campuses. During the ’60s one man stood out as the premier proponent of this therapy: Dr. Robert D. Card, a Salt Lake psychologist. Dr. Card practiced the highly controversial bio-feedback therapy to cure homosexuality for nearly 20 years, explaining it simply as a “pairing of noxious stimulus with the stimulus trying to be reduced.” Dr. Card was judges’ and bishops’ go-to guy to fix queers, and he found no want of clients desperate to be heterosexual to fit in with the state’s dominant culture. Dr. Card’s credibility in the professional world was spotless. He published several academic and professional papers advocating aversion therapy to eliminate homosexuality from a patient’s personality. He worked out of offices in Salt Lake City and on the BYU campus with gay Mormons. His BYU clients were treated by having electrodes attached to their genitals and then shown homosexual pornography. If they got a stiffy they were zapped. A member of our community wrote an account of his therapy session with Dr. Card in his Salt Lake office. It goes like this: “The doctor would turn on a very graphic porno video of two or more men having sexual interc