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thePyramid We A r e S a n p e t e . c o m

We A r e S a n p e t e . c o m Sixth District Court welcomes new senior judge An Edition of the

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RAY LAFOLLETTE

The Pyramid

MANTI—The Sixth District Court located in Sanpete County has a new judge. Darold “Dar” Butcher was sworn in Dec. 11 by Sanpete County Justice Court Judge John R. Cox at the Sanpete County Courthouse in Manti. Judge Butcher has been certified by the administrative office of the courts for appointment as an active senior judge. The Utah Supreme Court has also certified his appointment to serve Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2022. Judge Butcher was first appointed as a justice court judge in Feb. 2009 and served as Grantsville Third District Justice Court Judge for over five years. He was

Thursday, December 19, 2019  •  Vol. 128, No. 51  •  75 cents

then appointed as an active senior judge for two terms. He has presided over West Valley, Cottonwood Heights, Tooele, Stockton and Murray Justice Courts, filling if for the respective courts when judges were in conflict or absent. Judge Butcher was born and raised in Salt Lake City. He married his high school sweetheart, Francine Pollock, and they have four children, 14 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Butcher served four years in the U.S. Navy and graduated from Utah State University. In 1987, he was in- Sanpete County Sixth District Justice Court Judge John R. Cox, (on volved in an U.S. Army helicopter right), administers the oath of office to Judge Darold “Dar” Butcher Dec. 11, in Manti. (Photo by Ray LaFollette, The Pyramid) crash. Judge Butcher and his wife moved to Mt. Pleasant from Grantsville this last July. It has always been his dream to live in the Sanpete val-

MP Council recognizes Eagle Scout project ANGELA THOMPSON

MT. PLEASANT—Mt. Pleasant City Council took the time to recognize a completed Eagle Scout project during the Dec. 10 city council meeting. Tanner Sorensen of Boy Scouts of America Troop 507 recently completed his Eagle project at the Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery. According to Sorensen, The existing plot markers in lot B at the Tanner Sorensen’s Eagle project Mt. Pleasant cemetery consisted included adding cement around Mt. Pleasant City leaders recognize Tanner Sorensen for his completed grave markers in Lot B of the Mt. of aluminum spikes placed in the Pleasant Cemetery. (Photo courtesy Eagle Scout project in the Mt. Pleasant Cemetary. Shown (left to right) sod. Many of the markers were of Brian Sorensen) are: Councilmember Justin Atkinson, Councilmember Kevin Stallings, Mayor Dan Anderson, Councilmember Keith Collier, Troop 507 Scout overgrown with grass or buried Tanner Sorensen, Sandra Bigler and Councilmember Russel Keisel. two-three inches in the ground. For his Eagle project, Sorensen (Photo courtesy of Angela Thompson) This situation made it impossible and those helping him, dug one foot to find the markers without using a squares for each grave marker in the plot markers to make them more 100 total man-hours were spent tape measure. sod. Then added cement around the visible to cemetery patrons. Over working on the project.

Christmas Eve program set Dec. 24 SPRING CITY — A non-denominational Christmas Eve program will be held on Tuesday, Dec. 24, at 7 p.m., in the historic Spring City Second Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 164 South Main. All are encouraged to attend this family program. Admission is free. The program features a retelling of the story of the birth of Christ using scriptures accompanied by carols and solos that complement the scripture reading. The readers and musicians who will participate include Brian Stucki, Matt Harding, Lance Martin, David Rosier and other local volunteers. The evening’s service is short enough for families to attend and still have plenty of time for their own traditional Christmas Eve events.

SANPETE VALLEY SINGERS CONCERT SET DEC. 22 ROMAS_PH — STOCK.ADOBE.COM

Sanpete Valley Singers under the direction of Dr. Roy Ellefsen present the 18th Annual Sounds of Christmas community music concert Sunday, Dec. 22, at 7 p.m., at the Mt. Pleasant Stake Center, 300 South State Street, Mt. Pleasant. Everyone is encouraged to come enjoy an evening of beautiful music. mission is free.

Everyone is encouraged to attend a free non-denominational Christmas Eve program on Tuesday, Dec. 24, at 7 p.m., in the historic Spring City Second Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 164 South Main.

Mutton Bustin’ is just one of several fun rodeo events taking place during the New Year’s Fun Night Rodeo Tuesday, Dec. 31, at 7 p.m., at the ConToy Arena, Cleone Peterson Eccles Equestrian Center, 1000 South 955 West, Mt. Pleasant. (Photo courtesy of Gaylyn Widdison)

New Year’s rodeo returns to ConToy Dec. 31 MT. PLEASANT—For the past five years, New Years has been celebrated in Mt. Pleasant with a rodeo. The Sixth Annual New Year’s Fun Night Rodeo is set for more fun Tuesday, Dec. 31, at 7 p.m., at the ConToy Arena, Cleone Peterson Eccles Equestrian Center, 1000 South 955 West, Mt. Pleasant. Tickets available at the door, kids under age 10 get in free. Several activities and challenges await participants including mutton bustin’, barrel racing, team roping, musical horse chairs, calf ribbon pull, hide race, exhibition bull and bronc riding. There are limited entries for each event and required fees. Cash prizes will be awarded for first, second and third place in each event. Sign-ups to participate begin at the event at 6 p.m. For more information, call (435) 851-4645.

LIVE NATIVITY SET DEC. 20, 21

Adobestock.com The 15th annual Fountain Green Live Nativity will be held from 6 to 8 p.m., Friday and Saturday, Dec. 20 and 21. Meet at the Fountain Green Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 151 South 200 West, then take a hayride up to the live nativity at 800 West 400 South. Free admission, refreshments and a warm fire.

SAINT LUCIA CELEBRATION BROUGHT LIGHT Miss Ephraim Samantha Everett led this year’s procession during the Saint Lucia Celebration bringing light and food to participants in the event held Dec. 14 signaling the arrival of Christmastide and the Light of Christ on Christmas day. (Photo courtesy of Gloria Winters)

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Fairview family receives decorated Christmas tree FAIRVIEW — When Aubrei Remundo, single mother of two girls, opened her door a few days ago, she was shocked to see family friend, Daniel Madsen, along with his father, Blake, carry in a large, decorated Christmas tree. Magically, the tree was a gift from the Fairview Museum of History and Art to her little family that fit perfectly in her windowed alcove in the living room. A few little gifts for the family were also delivered. The museum’s annual Family Tree Festival was another great success, with the money paid for unsold trees going as a split between the Fairview Museum and the Food Bank in Mt. Pleasant.

This particular tree was donated by the Madsen family, with most of the gorgeous ornaments donated by Farmers Floral, a generous business in Mt. Pleasant, proving why it pays to shop locally.

roni by the Sanpete County Sheriff ’s Office on charges of assault and disorderly conduct. Loriann Smith, East Carbon, was arrested on Hwy 89 by the UHP on charges of possessions of heroin, methamphetamine, marijuana and paraphernalia; two Seventh District and a Carbon County Justice Court Warrant. Bail was set at $13,260. Dustin Miller, Arizona, was arrested on Hwy 89 by the UHP on charges of possessions of controlled substance and paraphernalia. Bail was set at $5,680. Ariana Whipple, Manti, was arrested by the Sanpete

County Sheriff ’s Office on the charge of surreptitious administration of a delirious substance. Booked and released for Sixth District Court. Dec. 14 Darin Mckay Allen, Mt. Pleasant, was arrested in Ephraim by the Sanpete County Sheriff ’s Office on the charge of enticing a minor. Bail was set at $10,000. Dec. 16 Caden Keith Edmunds, was arrested in Ephraim by the Sanpete County Sheriff ’s Office on charges of DUI, open container, lane travel provision and failure to stop at sign. Bail was set at $1,810.

1989; feeder steers: mostly higher; heifers: mostly higher. Holstein steers: few; slaughter bulls: lower. Prices for Salina Producers Feeder steers: 200-300 Livestock Auction held Dec. lbs scarce; 300-400 lbs 162.50-210.00; 400-500 lbs 10 are as follows: Receipts: 1603; last week: 150.00-172.00; 500-600 lbs

141.00-158.00; 600-700 lbs 130.00-143.25; 700-800 lbs 122.00-139.00; 800-900 lbs 115.00-133.00; 900-1000 lbs 107.50-122.00; 1000 lbs 87.75120.00. Holstein steers: 300-400 lbs 67.50-77.50.

Feeder heifers: medium and large frame 1-2: 200-300 lbs 145.00-172.50; 300-400 lbs 133.00-186.00; 400-500 lbs 127.50-165.00; 500-600 lbs 120.00-145.50; 600-700 lbs 115.00-132.00; 700-800 lbs 95.00-127.50; 800-900 lbs

Daniel Madsen, along with his three sisters, Julie, Sadie and Aleeya; with the help of their father, Blake; delivered a decorated tree to the Remundo family in Fairview. The Madsen kids often play with the Remundo girls, Addie, age 3, and Lilah, 16 months. Holding Lilah is mom, Aubrei, and behind her is neighbor and good friend, Anne-Marie Howard.

MELINDA MYERS

Gardening expert

MUKWONAGO, WI — The holidays are upon everyone and busy schedules often send people into a panic when looking for the perfect gift for those on a gift list. No matter the budget, there are affordable gift options available for friends and family with love. Tools are always a welcome gift. Most gardeners are reluctant to invest in that cool new hand trowel, shovel or rake. And that’s what makes them a great gift. Or create a starter kit from personal extra tools for a new homeowner or gardener. Clean them up, sharpen the blades and bundle them with a bow. Add a gift card from a nearby garden center if the budget allows. Help a favorite gardener avoid skin cancer and protect their hands when working in the garden by creating a garden basket with gloves, a hat and sunscreen. Clean up a corner of the basement or spare bedroom to create a seed starting station. Purchase the lights and fixtures or set a table in front of a sunny window. And if the budget is limited, scour the garage and shed or talk to gardening friends to secure items that can be cleaned and reused. Or give a favorite gardener all they need to start a windowsill herb garden or terrarium. Purchase or recycle the containers and take cuttings, make divisions or purchase the plants needed. A trip to the basement or thrift store may provide the perfect vessel for a terrarium. Convert an old aquarium into a tropical biodome. A large clear glass serving dish, salad bowl or vase may make a unique terrarium sure to intrigue the recipient and their guests. Help a favorite indoor gardener dress up

86 West Main Mt. Pleasant, UT 86447 An edition of The Daily Herald Subscriptions and Delivery Service ....801-375-5103 News and Advertising.............435-462-2134 Fax..........................435-462-2459 E-mail...pyramid@heraldextra.com The Pyramid Daily Herald Edition (USPS 365-580) a weekly newspaper published at 86 West Main Street, Mt. Pleasant, Utah 84647. Periodicals Postage Paid at Mt. Pleasant, Utah 84647 and at additional mailing offices POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Pyramid, 86 West Main Street, Mt. Pleasant, Utah 84647

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NEWS We welcome news tips. Call 435-462-2134 to report a news tip, or if you have a comment or a question. We welcome letters to the editor. All letters must include author’s name (printed AND signed) and a phone number. We reserve the right to edit letters for clarity, punctuation, taste and length. Letters are welcome on any topic.

Christmas anxiety Some of you people out there are all ready for Christmas and are just waiting for Tuesday night and Wednesday. Christmas Eve and Christmas Day hold no fear for you. You’ve done all of your shopping. You’ve done all of your baking. You’ve done all of your mailing and delivering. You people make me sick! You’re the kind of people who have already started making a list for your after-Christmas shopping. You’re going to buy stuff right after the holiday for what you intend to give people next year. You’ll buy gifts on deep discount when the clearance sales are going on and smugly stow away stuff for next year. There’s probably a few of you psychopaths out there who will even wrap it up in Christmas paper and tie bows on next year’s gifts before New Year’s Eve this year. I can just see it now – a dozen heated, wearable blankets (“electric snuggies?”) purchased for $9.99 each, all carefully wrapped and stacked in the back of a closet. They’re all ready for Christmas 2020. I guess you can see my Christmas anxiety manifesting itself as vindictiveness towards people who plan ahead and don’t procrastinate. It’s a common syndrome. Procrastinators tend to think of non-procrastinators as having defective personalities. Dumb guys like me like to categorize smart, non-procrastinator people, as being a little wacky and “too tightly wrapped.” (These people even wrap their Christmas gifts extra tight with the tape placed just exactly so, all prim and proper.) In truth, it all boils down to envy, I suppose. I wish I were more on the ball and not quite so derelict, when it comes to Christmas preparations. All is not lost. I do have a few precious days left to solve all my Christmas anxieties. I often say, “If it weren’t for the last minute, nothing would ever get done.” I think I just need to take a few deep breaths and pause. Perhaps I need to pat myself on the back for the things that I have gotten done so far this Christmas season. Some therapists say that we need to focus on the good things that we’ve done and not worry quite so much about all of the undone things. I have successfully put Christmas lights up on the outside of the house. Yay for me! That’s no small thing. I have helped someone who didn’t have a Christmas tree by cutting a real tree for them. And yes, I had a tag, and yes, it came from a legal

Affordable gift ideas for others on Christmas lists

The Pyramid

Thursday, December 19, 2019

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Create a tropical paradise in a terrarium as a unique gift for a loved one. (Photo courtesy of Melinda Myers, LLC) their favorite hanging plants. Macramé is back in vogue and adding flare to indoor gardens. Create a few plant hangers from jute and beads. Preserve a garden memory with a photo of a garden or favorite plants. A collection of photos can be made into a calendar for a gift that keeps giving all year long. Share a bit of a garden. Pass along some seeds saved or start a few cuttings from a favorite heirloom houseplant. Dress up the gift with a painted pot or basket. And don’t forget to share some dried herbs and flowers or preserves made from a garden harvest. Nothing tastes better or is more beautiful than when it’s homegrown. Don’t have extra this year? Make a note on next year’s calendar and plan ahead. Give the gift of time. Most of us can use an extra set of hands at certain times of the garden season. No dusting required and it’s a great way to ensure time together.

Put those artistic skills to work and create a garden journal. A simple notebook dressed up with some photos, artwork or stickers can provide an attractive and inviting place for a favorite gardener to record their gardening successes, failures and other useful garden information. As can be seen, the possibilities are endless and getting friends and family involved in creating these gifts is a great way to enjoy time together while preparing for the holidays. About Myers Melinda Myers has written numerous books, including Small Space Gardening. She hosts The Great Courses “How to Grow Anything” DVD series and the nationally-syndicated Melinda’s Garden Moment TV & radio program. Myers is a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine. For more information, visit www.MelindaMyers.com.

Sanpete County booking report MANTI — Activities on the Sanpete County booking report are as follows: Dec. 9 Tyler Tipton, Mt. Pleasant, was arrested in Mt. Pleasant by the Mt. Pleasant Police Department on charges of DUI and driving on suspension. Bail was set at $5,750. Dec. 10 Ever Canales, Moroni was arrested by the Utah Highway Patrol (UHP) on charges of false personal identification to police, reckless driving and expired license. Bail was set at $2,740. Dec. 11 Alexander Andreas Have, Lindon, was arrested in Mo-

area up on the mountain (as opposed to one cut illegally from the cemetery in the dead of night). I struggled getting that tree into an old stand we had laying around in the garage. When we delivered the tree, it was gratefully received. That tree looks good and is standing relatively straight – if you shut one eye and partially shut the other eye. I helped my wife deliver some neighborhood gifts up and down the street. That wasn’t easy. And, it took time. Everyone wants to visit. Sheesh! Don’t people know that the holiday season is a busy time? It isn’t a time to lollygag around and chat and tell each other how wonderful we are. That’s what time at Wal-Mart is for. Gee, I’m feeling a little better already. I really have done a few things for Christmas. I’m not quite as unprepared as I thought. I’m trying really hard right now not to think of the “undone things.” It’s not easy because it seems like there are so many. When am I going to find the time to watch the movie “It’s A Wonderful Life?” I haven’t made fudge yet. Will I finally learn the lyrics to Mele Kalikimaka this year? hen there is that little nagging Christmas item that can’t be put off forever. What do I give my wife for Christmas this year? I just have to remember my answer that I give to people when they ask, “Are you ready for Christmas?” My answer generally is, “I’ve found that Christmas happens regardless of whether I’m ready or not.” But never fear. I will be ready. One way or another, I will declare myself ready. And in all my preparations and lack of preparations, I am attempting to remember “the reason for the season.” It’s sometimes difficult, but it can be done. I am trying to be nice to people. I’m trying to keep “WWJD” (What Would Jesus Do?) in mind. When all else fails, I tune into the Hallmark Channel for a few minutes. That either makes me or breaks me. Enjoy the Christmas season. Have a great time with family and friends. And if you know someone who doesn’t have a friend or a family, include him or her somehow in your Christmas circle. I’ll sign off with a Christmas “smile” that I like. A group of chess enthusiasts checked into a hotel and were standing in the lobby discussing their recent tournament victories. After about an hour, the manager came out of the office and asked them to disperse. “But why,” they asked, as they moved off. “Because,” he said, “I can’t stand chess nuts boasting in an open foyer.”

90.00-125.50; 900-1300 lbs scarce; heiferettes: 51.50-85.25. Bred cows: scarce. Cows: 43.00-63.50. Cutting bulls: 700-1050 lbs 70.00-109.00. Slaughter bulls: 63.2570.75.


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Sanpete County Community Calendar Dec. 22 7  p.m., Sanpete Valley Singers under the direction of Dr. Roy Ellefsen present the 18th Annual Sounds of Christmas community music at Mt. Pleasant Stake Center, 300 South State Street, Mt. Pleasant. Everyone is encouraged to come enjoy an evening of beautiful music. Admission is free. Dec. 24 7 p.m., Everyone is encouraged to attend a free non-denominational Christmas Eve program retelling the story of the birth of Christ using scriptures accompanied by carols and solos that complement the scripture reading at the historic Spring City Second Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 164 South Main. Dec. 31 7 p.m., New Year’s Fun Night Rodeo with mutton bustin’, barrel racing, team roping, musical horse chairs, calf ribbon pull, hide race, exhibition bull and bronc riding at the ConToy Arena, Cleone Peterson Eccles Equestrian Center, 1000 South 955 West, Mt. Pleasant. Tickets available at the door. Sign-up for events at 6 p.m. For more information, call (435) 8514645. AA meetings Alcoholics Anonymous meet every week at the following locations and times: Sundays, 10 a.m., upstairs in Mt. Pleasant Recreation Center; 10 N. State, Mt. Pleasant (also Wednesdays at 8 p.m. at this location); Mondays, 8 p.m., Central Utah Counseling Center, 390 W. 100 N, Ephraim (also Thursdays at 8 p.m. at this location). Anyone interested in Alanon/Alateen fellowship for those whose lives have been affected by alcoholic behavior are encouraged to contact Sam at (435) 262-1188. American Veterans All eligible veterans are encouraged to join and attend the appropriate post meeting as follows: Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9276 of North Sanpete meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m., at 50 North 100 West, Mt. Pleasant. American Legion Post 4 of Mt. Pleasant meets the third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m., at the Utah National Guard Armory, 525 West 1000 South, Mt. Pleasant. Bereavement group Gunnison Valley Home Care sponsors a bereavement group meeting open to anyone interested on the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m., at Gunnison Home Health, 45 East 100 North. For more info, call Krista (435) 528-3955. Blood pressure clinic Free blood pressure clinics sponsored by Gunnison Valley Home Care are held monthly at the following locations: Manti Senior Center the second Wednesday of every month from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Gunnison Senior Center the second Thursday of every month from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Contact Krista at (435) 5283955. Disabled Veterans Disabled American Veterans provides free van transportation to the George E. Wahlen Medical Center in Salt Lake City for veterans with medical appointments from Richfield and Sanpete County. DAV is currently seeking more drivers. For more information, contact the DAV Hospital Coordi-

nator at (800) 613-4012 ext. 2003. DUP Anyone interested in joining or visiting local camps of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers (DUP) is encouraged to contact any DUP member or visit www.isdup.org. Employment help Department of Workforce Services (DWS), Manti, is offering free resume writing and interview skills workshops. Resume writing workshops are held every Tuesday, and interview skills workshops are held on Wednesdays. Contact DWS office for times at (435) 835-0731. Fairview Museum Fairview Museum of History and Art is displayed in two buildings and grounds featuring many historical artifacts, sculptures, paintings, antique machinery and a locally found mammoth. Winter hours are 12 noon-4 p.m., Thursday thru Saturday or by appointment. Call the museum (435) 427-9216, or Claudia Fossum (801) 6734738, or send email to fvmuseum@cut.net. FG City Library Serving the communities of Fountain Green, Moroni, Wales and Chester. Internet, computer, printer and TV available. Tuesdays, Preschool story time at 1 p.m., Story hour for ages 4-12, from 3-4 p.m. Adult book club meets at 1 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month. For book club information, call Mary Smith (435) 445-3597. Library hours: Tuesdays thru Thursdays, 1-5 p.m., at Fountain Green City Hall, 260 West 100 North. Mental health services Sanpete Valley Hospital offers Mental Health Services for individuals who are under or uninsured, including outpatient counseling, medication assistance, and medication management. Call Sanpete Valley Hospital at (435) 462-2441 to see if you qualify. MatchingDonors.com 22 Americans die each day waiting for organ transplants, most of them for kidneys. MatchingDonors. com, a 501c3 nonprofit organization, is helping to change that by linking organ donors with people in desperate need of kidneys and other transplants. And now, it’s not necessary to donate a kidney to save a life. Donors can donate a boat, car or real estate, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to help save lives of people needing organ transplants. Visit matchingdonors. com or call (800) 385-0422. MP Public Library An original Carnegie library serving Mt. Pleasant City and surrounding areas. Preschool story time on Mondays at 11:15 a.m. Home School story time on Mondays at 1 p.m. Bedtime story time on third Thursday each month at 6 p.m., come in PJs and bring blanket if desired. Teen Advisory Council Of Students (TACOS) meets first Thursday of month at 4 p.m., TACOS book club meets second Thursday each month at 4 p.m. Book club for adults meets the fourth Friday of each month at 9 a.m., Adult writer’s club meets first Tuesday each month at 6 p.m.,

Teen writer’s club meets first Thursday each month at 4 p.m., Library hours: Mondays 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Tuesday-Thursday 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Friday 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday 11 a.m.-3 p.m. For more information, call (435) 4623240, or visit Mt. Pleasant City Library, 24 East Main, Mt. Pleasant. MP Senior Center Mt. Pleasant Senior Citizen Center, 101 East 100 North, offers rental space for events and social gatherings. For more information, call Paula Wright at (435) 262-9789 or Linda Jarman at (435) 2620380. NAMI National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) support groups are a free resource providing support for individuals with mental health issues and their family and loved ones. Find strength with others who understand. Family Support Group for family and friends of individuals with mental health issues meets on the first and third Thursdays of each month. Connections Support Group for individuals with mental health issues meets on the second and fourth Thursdays each month. All NAMI meetings are held from 7-8:30 p.m., at 1050 South Medical Drive, (Next to Therapy West) Mt. Pleasant. Narconon Narconon reminds those struggling with addiction that relationships that have been destroyed with an addiction can be repaired. Addicts and alcoholics must stop talking about it and stop making broken promises, and start making a change. This is where the saying, “Actions speak louder than words,” comes into play. Getting treatment and making a change that people can see is the start to mending those relationships. For more information on repairing relationships, go to https:// www.narconon-suncoast. org/blog/repairing-relationships-damaged-by-addiction.html. Call today for a no cost screening or referral: (877) 841-5509. Preparedness skills Community classes to promote the advancement of skills, preparedness and resilience, are being taught by Jim Phillips in Spring City, sponsored by Spring City Citizen Corps (SCCC). Classes are held at Old Spring City Hall, 150 East Center. Skills classes are held every Thursday at 7 p.m. All events are open to the public at no cost. Questions, call (435) 709-1474. Resource clothing bank Persons needing clothing are welcome to browse what is available, free, on Wednesdays from 1-7 p.m., or Saturdays, 3:30-6:30 p.m., at 50 South 100 West, Ephraim. Clothing and money donations are welcome. Volunteer help is always needed. For more information call Nancy (435) 851-0603 or Darcie (435) 851-1963. TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) is held every Thursday from 4:30-5:45 p.m., at Mt. Pleasant Elementary, 579 South 400 East. For more information, call Carolyn (435) 262-7759.

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NS DRILL TEAM TAKES FIRST PLACE FINISH

North Sanpete High School Drill Team participated in a competition event Dec. 14, at Juan Diego High School, Draper, and the girls walked away with a first place finish in military, second in dance, and first place in character. (Photo courtesy of Marcy Curtis)

Hospital Births

Dec. 8 A boy, Cash Randel Nielson, was born to Jake and GUNNISON—Babies born Bree Nielson, Centerfield. He at Gunnison Valley Hospital weighed seven pounds nine are as follows: ounces.

COUGA

COUGARBLUE Expert BYU Sports Coverage

Tidings of Comfort & Peace As we usher in the holiday season, we are moved to remember all the loved ones past and present who have brough so much joy and light to our lives. We cherish their presence and their memories, and all the blessings that touch our hearts and spirits. We hope that this Christmas and the New Year deliver much happiness, goodwill and good fortune to you and yours. Thank you for your trust in us and your friendship.

96 W 100 N • Mt. Pleasant 435-462-2427

RASMUSSEN MORTUARY


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Thursday, December 19, 2019

North Sanpete Sub4Santa successful

North Sanpete High School teachers Jori Turpin and Auralee Brooks answer Christmas trivia questions in hopes of avoiding North Sanpete teachers Ben Cox and Justin Morley have their heads shaved by student body officers during the successful getting doused with various holiday food items in the Sub4Santa fundraising event. (Photo courtesy of Jeff Ericksen) Sub4Santa event. (Photo courtesy of Jeff Ericksen)

During the Sub4Santa fundraising event, Bryan Strain volunteered to have the North Sanpete High School student body officers decorate his head. (Photo courtesy of Jeff Ericksen)

Here’s hoping your holiday season is a whole lot of merry and bright! May your Christmas and the New Year deliver an abundance of health, happiness and good fortune to you and the ones you love.

As we reflect on all we are grateful for this Christmas season, the support and friendship of customers and neighbors like you come to mind. We greatly appreciate your kindness and your patronage, and we look forward to serving you in the coming years. Thank you, and best wishes!

FOUNTAIN GREEN CITY

North Sanpete High School student body officers pose with hundreds of toys purchased at the local Walmart for families in need. The students were able to buy the toys as a result of their quite successful Sub4Santa fundraising event which raised the most money in school history. (Photo courtesy of Jeff Ericksen)

From our HOUSE to yours, we wish you a...

Season’s Readings! As we turn the page to another holiday season, we’d like to take a moment to thank you, our loyal readers, for your trust and support. We hope this Christmas delivers all the good news you’ve been hoping for and more. Happy Holidays!

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SecurityNational Mortgage Company 497 S. Main Street Suite E, Ephraim, UT 84627 | Branch NMLS #971470

This is not a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower and property qualifications. Contact one of our loan officers for an accurate, personalized quote. Interest rates and program guidelines are subject to change without notice. Equal Housing Lender | Co. NMLS# 3116


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North Sanpete Hawk wrestler Luis Rodriguez pinned his opponent during a duel meet with the Richfield Wildcats. Rodriguez has an undefeated record so far this season in the 182 weight class for the Hawks. (Photo courtesy of Marcy Curtis) North Sanpete Hawk senior Adrian Lemus attempts to pin his man during the wrestling match Dec. 10 against the Richfield Wildcats. Overall, the Hawks took the win over the Wildcats. (Photo courtesy of Cheryl Hadley)

Thinking of you at Christmastime.

During the wrestling tournament in Panguitch Dec. 6 and 7, North Sanpete Hawk wrestler Kasey Curtis (on right) beat a Union High School 113 pound wrestler who is currently ranked fifth in that weight class in the state. (Photo courtesy of Marcy Curtis)

Wishing you peace, joy and good fortune always! Farmers Floral 57 W. Main • Mt. Pleasant

Hawk wrestlers begin season well MARCY CURTIS

MT. PLEASANT — North Sanpete (NS) Hawk wrestlers have had a busy start to their season this past week. The team traveled to Panguitch for a tournament Dec. 6 and 7. The Hawk team is one of the smaller teams, but did exceptionally well against other teams from Utah, Arizona and Nevada. Wrestlers Luis Rodriguez and Jayden Kaibetony took first place at the tournament. Kasey Curtis, placed second. Adrian

Lemus, third and Kylan Taylor, fifth. On Dec. 10, the Hawks had a duel with the Richfield Wildcats in Richfield. The Hawk Wrestlers needed to come out strong because there were a couple weight classes on the Hawk team that were empty and those matches had to be forfeited. But the NS Hawk team wrestlers battled hard with pins and wins and defeated the Wildcats 45-36. The team then traveled to

American Leadership Academy on Dec. 12. The wrestlers did their best and fought a tough fight but came up just short in the end. The team had two matches this week, first on Dec. 17 against South Sevier and another on Thursday, Dec. 19, at 5:30 p.m., in Delta. (Results not available at press time) The Hawks have a tough schedule coming back after the Christmas break but are looking forward to bringing home more hardware for the team.

Men’s basketball league

MT. PLEASANT — In men’s basketball action this week, Anderson’s defeated Team Chaun 68-60. Olsen’s beat Douglas Dentistry 61-58 and

Bucket Central over Wasatch 73-31. 1. Bucket Central ..........4-0 2. Anderson’s ................3-1 3. Wasatch ................... 2-2

4. Team Chaun ............. 5. Douglas Dentistry ...... 6. Olsen’s .................... 7. Backwood Ballers.......

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A Note of Thanks at the Holidays We're more thankful than words can express, As we send you glad tidings for a Merry Christmas; For your goodwill and friendship, too… We're deeply indebted to each one of you!

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DEADLINE CHANGE Due to the Christmas holiday, the deadline for the Dec. 25 and 26 Pyramid Shopper and Pyramid, has been changed to Thursday, Dec. 19 at 3 p.m. All advertising and article submissions are due at that time. Our office will be closed Wednesday, Dec. 25.

Happy Holidays!

Changing Lives, Together! cvmed.net | 48 West 1500 North, Nephi, UT 84648 | 435-623-3000


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Thursday, December 19, 2019

New online reporting form ready for SS imposter scam calls DENVER — Andrew Saul, Commissioner of Social Security (SS), and Gail S. Ennis, the Inspector General for the Social Security Administration, recently announced the launch of a dedicated online form to receive reports from the public of Social Security-related scams. The new online reporting form can be found at https:// oig.ssa.gov. These scams—in which fraudulent callers mislead victims into making cash or gift card payments to avoid arrest for purported Social Security number problems— skyrocketed over the past year to become the #1 type of fraud reported to the Federal Trade Commission and the Social Security Administration. To combat these scams, Social Security and the OIG will use the new online form to cap-

ture data that will be analyzed for trends and commonalities. The OIG will use the data to identify investigative leads, which could help identify criminal entities or individuals participating in or facilitating the scams. Ultimately, these efforts are expected to disrupt the scammers, help reduce this type of fraud, and reduce the number of victims. “We are taking action to raise awareness and prevent scammers from harming Americans,” Commissioner Saul said. “I am deeply troubled that our country has not been able to stop these crooks from deceiving some of the most vulnerable members of our society.” Commissioner Saul and Inspector General Ennis encourage the public to use the new online form to report Social

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Those who receive Social Security related scam phone calls are encouraged to report them via a new reporting form found online at https://oig.ssa.gov. Security phone scams including robocalls and live callers, as well as email, text, and in-person scams. The form allows people to create a unique Personal Identification Number (PIN), so if OIG contacts a person about their report, they will know the call is legitimate.

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“Awareness is our best hope to thwart the scammers,” said Inspector General Ennis. “Tell your friends and family about them and report them to us when you receive them, but most importantly, just hang up and ignore the calls.” Social Security employees do occasionally contact people--generally those who have ongoing business with the agency--by telephone for business purposes. However, Social Security employees will never threaten a person, or promise a Social Security benefit approval, or increase, in exchange for information or money. In those cases, the call is fraudulent and people should just hang up. Generally, the agency mainly calls people who have recently applied for a Social Security benefit, someone who is al-

ready receiving payments and requires an update to their record, or a person who has requested a phone call from the agency. If a person is not in one of these situations, they normally would not receive a call from the agency. People need to know that Social Security will not: 1.) Tell anyone that their Social Security number has been suspended. 2.) Contact, and demand an immediate payment. 3.) Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone. 4.) Require a specific means of debt repayment, like a prepaid debit card, a retail gift card, or cash. 5.) Demand that a Social Security debt is paid without the ability to appeal the amount owed. 6.) Promise a Social Security

benefit approval, or increase, in exchange for information or money. If there is a problem with a person’s Social Security number or record, in most cases Social Security will mail a letter. If a person needs to submit payments to Social Security, the agency will send a letter with instructions and payment options. People should never provide information or payment over the phone or Internet unless they are certain of who is receiving it. The Social Security OIG will also continue to take reports of fraud, waste, and abuse in Social Security’s programs and operations. A separate online form for those reports remains available at www. ssa.gov/fraudreport/oig/public_fraud_reporting/form.htm.


Thursday, December 19, 2019

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SBA lending reflects strong economic trends DENVER — U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) lending, both nationally and in Utah, continues to reflect strong economic trends during fiscal year 2019 — the period Oct. 1, 2018 — Sept. 30, 2019. Nationally, the agency approved 63,539 7(a), 504, and microloans loans worth $28.2 billion. In Utah, SBA approved 1,022 guaranteed loans worth $509.6 million, which created or retained more than 10,200 jobs in the state. Zions First National Bank is the top SBA 7(a) lender in the state based on the number of loans approved (120 loans worth $23.3 million), and Mountain West Small Business Finance is the top 504 lender (182 loans worth $131.3 million). “SBA’s loan programs continue to show strong performance in 2019, and this strength should only continue given the President’s pro-business agenda that will help more small businesses prosper in the coming year,” said SBA Regional Administrator Dan Nordberg. “The SBA is building a more favorable environment for entrepreneurship and innovation in Utah, and is helping entrepreneurs with the tools they need to start, grow, and expand their businesses. I’m particularly proud of the work we’ve done to better assist underserved areas in both rural and urban communities,” said Nordberg. A strong economy is powering America’s 30 million small businesses, and the SBA’s FY19 numbers bear that out. When the economy is doing well, 7(a)

lenders are more willing to provide capital without the need for a federal loan guarantee. SBA’s 504 and Microloan programs continued to grow from last year, as all of these loans are designed to create jobs and grow all small businesses in communities across the country. “Utah’s economy remains one of the strongest in the nation, and the SBA’s small business lending programs continue to be a critical economic development driver in the state creating or retaining more than 10,000 jobs,” said SBA Utah District Director Marla Trollan. “The SBA’s Utah District office worked hard to increase its collaboration with local community partners across the state to better serve rural communities. As a result, we significantly increased our rural 504 lending by over 70 percent in number of loans, and over 100 percent in total dollars.” For more information about SBA’s loan programs, financial assistance and other services, visit www.sba.gov<http:// www.sba.gov. About 7(a), 504 loans The 7(a) loan program is the SBA’s primary program for providing financial assistance to small businesses and offers guarantees on loans to small businesses of up to $5 million on reasonable terms and conditions. 7(a) loans are commonly used for acquiring land, purchasing equipment, or working capital. The CDC/504 loan program helps small businesses acquire fixed assets to promote eco-

nomic development in the form Under this program, the SBA nesses with the help of thirdof long-term fixed rate financ- authorizes CDCs (Certified party lenders (typically banks). ing for fixed assets on reason- Development Companies) to The maximum loan amount able terms. provide financing to small busi- is generally $5 million; however,

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certain eligible energy-efficient or manufacturing projects may qualify for more than one 504 loan up to $5.5 million each.

MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM A TO Z WINDOWS & DOORS

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48 West Main • Mt. Pleasant (435) 462-3333


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Thursday, December 19, 2019

NS basketball wins, but drops one JORI TURPIN

Pyramid Sports

MT. PLEASANT—North Sanpete High School basketball is underway. Last week the boys’ basketball team played two games, first against Millard Eagles on the Hawks home court and then against the Richfield Wildcats in Richfield. Millard Eagles North Sanpete (NS) boys’ basketball team hosted the Millard High School Eagles Dec. 11 and were able to walk away with a commanding victory. The game quickly started off with high intensity as both teams were blocking shots and making several hustle plays in the first quarter. The Hawks were able to edge out the Eagles in the first quarter with a 11-7 lead, with NS junior Trevyn Morley leading the pack with multiple completed shots. The Hawks were able to continue dominating the Eagles in the second quarter. Although, they had several

North Sanpete coaches Bill Pollock and Cris Hoopes try to rally their team against the Richfield Wildcats Dec. 13. The Hawks were unable to defeat the Wildcats, but did defeat Millard High School earlier in the week. (Photo courtesy of Cheryl Hadley)

turnovers, the Hawks were able to move the ball and find open players resulting in several buckets for North Sanpete. At the end of the first half, the

Hawks lead Millard 21-16. After the half, North Sanpete continued to play with the same intensity as they continued to bury the Eagles. Millard, finding themselves in foul

trouble, continued to provide the Hawks with scoring opportunities as North Sanpete had several offensive changes from the line. In the end, the Hawks walked away with a 5441 victory. Richfield Wildcats The Hawks traveled to Richfield to play the top ranked Wildcats Dec. 13. North Sanpete knew this would be a tough game and hoped to make some noise in Richfield, but were unable to do so as they fell to the Wildcats. At first, the Hawks battled with Richfield and were able to keep the score close, however, Richfield’s exceptional three-point shooting allowed the Wildcats to quickly race past North Sanpete. The first quarter ended with a 19-7 lead for Richfield. Although the Hawks continued to fight, they couldn’t quite keep up as the Hawks had difficulty getting a basket to fall. Mid-second quarter, North Sanpete was able to cut the point deficit to 10. Although the Hawks were

getting good looks at the hoop, they were having difficulty getting their offensive attempts to fall. The second quarter ended with Richfield leading 24-12. After the half, both teams were able to put points on the board. Richfield added 12 and North Sanpete added eight, bringing the score to a 36 -20 Wildcat lead. In the fourth quarter the Wildcats began to pull away as their team broke down the Hawks full court press and were successful in making hoops time after time. The Hawks began to take several three-point shots to try and close the lead, but were unable to find the target. Richfield took the victory with a score of 58-36. This week the Hawks began region play games and took on Maeser Prep Dec. 18, at home and are set to play American Leadership Academy on Friday, Dec. 20, at 3:30 p.m., in Spanish Fork. (Scores not available at press time).

DWR stocks over 10 million fish throughout Utah in 2019 SALT LAKE CITY— In an effort to enhance fishing throughout the state, as well as boost native fish populations, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (DWR) stocks a variety of fish species throughout Utah each year. In 2019, the division stocked more than 10 million fish into 603 local waterbodies, a total of more than 1.1 million pounds of fish. The practice of stocking fish in the Beehive State goes back more than a century, as fish were first formally stocked in Utah in 1871. At that time, fish were transported from other states by train and were stocked into lakes along the train route. In 1898, Utah

opened its first hatcheries for raising trout locally. “These original hatcheries were really impounded streams where we put fry that we got from the federal government,” DWR sportfish coordinator Randy Oplinger said. “We opened our first traditional fish hatchery in 1899, in Murray, with raceways like we have today where we produced our own eggs.” Over time, the DWR expanded its fish hatchery operations, and there are now 13 facilities across Utah. The bulk of the fish stocked in 2019 came from these hatcheries, which produced 9.4 million of the total 10,081,077 fish stocked

throughout the state. The other almost 680,000 were transported from various states across the U.S., including Arkansas and Wyoming, as well as from two federal fish hatcheries in Utah. “Our hatcheries are important because they provide the majority of the fish that we stock in Utah,” Oplinger said. “Stocking is a crucial management tool that we use to provide Utahns with the numbers and species of fish that they desire — it helps ensure that the public has a great fishing experience.” There were 20 different fish species stocked in 2019. The DWR produces multiple strains of some species, and

some of the fish are sterile (meaning they can’t reproduce) — a management tool to help control various populations in different waterbodies. This includes eight different cutthroat trout groups and five separate strains of rainbow trout, as well as channel catfish, largemouth bass and bluegill from Arkansas, and Arctic grayling eggs from Wyoming that are then raised in our local hatcheries. Several native species were also stocked this year, including over 28,000 bonytail chub, almost 4,700 Virgin River chub, and more than 30,000 June suckers, a species only found in Utah Lake.

In recent years, June suckers have made an impressive recovery due to conservation efforts and were recently proposed for a down listing — from endangered to threatened — under the Endangered Species Act. In 2018, the DWR stocked more than 12 million fish, a total of 1.1 million pounds. The division decided to stock fewer, but larger fish this year. The DWR increased its stocking of 12-inch rainbow trout in 2019 because research has shown that these 12-inch fish are more readily caught by anglers than the eightto-10-inch rainbow trout the division has traditionally stocked.

During the past year over 10 million fish have been placed in Utah waterbodies to enhance fishing for Utah anglers. (Photo courtesy of Utah DWR)

With best wishes to you and yours, Merry Christmas!

Goodness & Light May the joyous spirit and blessings of Christmastime resound in your heart and home all year.

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Thursday, December 19, 2019

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Looking for perfect Christmas gift? Consider fishing, hunting license SALT LAKE CITY— While some people may not be thinking about hunting or fishing during December, there are still plenty of opportunities to do both, and its easy to surprise friends or family with a Utah fishing or hunting license for Christmas. They make thoughtful presents and are easy to buy. Along with a great ice fishing season, Utah also offers several hunts during the winter months. The hunts for cottontail rabbit, chukar partridge and snowshoe hare run through most of the winter. Buying a hunting or fishing license online on the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources website is the easiest way to get one. Just visit https:// wildlife.utah.gov/licenses/ licenses-permits.html. However, interested persons can also buy a license at one of the six DWR offices or from any fishing and hunting license agent across Utah. Combination licenses, which allow the license holder to fish and hunt small game, are also available at the same locations and on the website. To buy a license for someone, all that is needed is the person’s name, their approximate height and weight, their eye color, hair color, date of birth, address and phone number. If the license is purchased on the DWR website, it can be mailed to the purchaser so it can be wrapped to give as a gift, or the license can be

mailed directly to the person it was purchased for. It usually takes about seven days for a license to arrive in the mail, so order one early to arrive in time for Christmas. In addition to providing an opportunity for someone to enjoy the outdoors next year, the person to receive the license will get an added bonus: Annual Utah fishing and hunting licenses are 365day licenses, so the license is valid starting the day it is purchased. If the person to receive the license is 18 years of age or older, instead of buying a one-year license, purchasers also have the option of buying a license that’s valid for two, three, four or even five years. If the person to receive the license already has a one, a purchaser can extend the period of time when their current license is valid. For example, if the person has a license that will expire next April, a purchaser can buy a license extension for them now. The purchased extension will keep their license valid for one, two, three, four or five years from the day the license was supposed to expire. Be aware, however, that a license extension may be bought only for a license that will expire within six months from the day the extension is to be purchased. For example, if a license doesn’t expire until Nov. 2020, the soonest an extension can be purchased is in June 2020, six months before

Hunting and fishing licenses may be used as Christmas gifts for those who currently don’t have a license or have a license that will expire soon. (Photo courtesy of Utah DWR) it expires. Utah resident license and permit costs range from $5 to $38, depending on what type of license is wanted. Gift givers should also note that hunting and combination licenses do not include a deer or elk permit and do not allow someone to hunt deer or elk. Hunters may apply for a

2020 general buck deer permit, starting Jan. 30, 2020. General elk permits will be available, on a first-come, first-served basis, starting July 16, 2020. Another great gift idea for a special angler is to pay their registration fee for the Utah Cutthroat Slam. The goal of the Slam is for anglers to catch

each of the four native Utah cutthroat trout, Bonneville, Colorado River, Bear River and Yellowstone in their historic ranges. Registration costs range from $10 to $20 depending on who the fee is being paid for, and those registration fees may be paid on the DWR website. All but $1 of the registra-

Mt. Pleasant Mayor, City Council, Employees & Staff

tion cost is dedicated to conservation projects throughout the state that help native cutthroat trout. The Slam can provide a fun challenge and a great way to get outdoors. So anyone having a hard time finding stocking stuffers this holiday need not worry — the DWR has anglers and hunters covered.


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Thursday, December 19, 2019

Virtual Christmas exists for over 1/3 of Utah families, survey reveals PORTLAND, OR — Leading tech and gifts review site, GearHungry. com, conducted a survey of 3,000 people to find out how they are planning to spend Christmas in 2019, and an increasing trend, it seems, is to have a ‘virtual’ one. This is where people don’t actually go and visit their family, but link up with them at Christmas using video software, such as Skype, or FaceTime, instead. In fact, a significant 36 percent of Utahns are planning on having a virtual Christmas this year. Possible reasons? Well perhaps people are fed up with overpriced plane tickets, or not being able to face the traffic on the roads. Here are a few of the details revealed: • Of those Beehive state residents who do travel to see their families this Christmas, the average time they’re willing to spend getting there is 2.7 hours; • Christmas voted as the worst time of year to be alone; • 83 percent would invite a neighbor over for Christmas if they were alone; • And ¼ of couples have argued as to which side of the family to spend Christmas with.

MAKSYM ZAITSEV

Due to improving technology and the Internet, there will be many who celebrate with family this holiday season via video software. A survey has determined that 1/3 of Utahns will celebrate with a virtual Christmas. Deck the halls and check the WiFi connection! Perhaps there are little kids who are not the biggest fans of long journeys or maybe the time or money is not available to spend on costly airfare during the holiday season. Whatever the reason, living a long distance away from loved ones means it’s not always possible to spend time with them… in person at

least. Thanks to the magic of technology, now people can connect with their friends and families in faraway places on a virtual level via apps like Skype, Facetime and WeChat, which allow users to make real time video calls. There’s still a stigma around spending Christmas alone, without any family around. 65 percent of respondents voted it the worst time

of year to be alone. It trumped even birthdays (24 percent), New Year’s (six percent) and Thanksgiving (five percent). But it’s also a contentious holiday — a quarter of couples admit to having argued with each other about whose side of the family to spend Christmas with. So why are some people choosing to stay at home for Christmas, instead of being with our family? 27 percent of respondents said it was because their family they live too far away, which, considering the size of the U.S., seems a genuine consideration. For 19 percent, cost is a huge factor; people simply don’t have the money to spend on air, bus or train fares. 18 percent are just happy to have some time to themselves and enjoy their own company, while 12 percent say they can’t get the time off work. The survey revealed that a quarter of people say Christmas is the only time of year they speak with or see family members. In true holiday spirit, Christmas brings people together! One-in-five admit that they see family less in person because of video

technology. Taking into consideration the high quality of technology these days, it’s no wonder this is the case, as a video call somewhat simulates the presence of a person. For those who don’t know what technology is available, GearHungry. com has compiled a rundown of the eight best video call apps for keeping in touch with family. To see the list, visit https://www. gearhungry.com/best-video-callapps-on-christmas/. In the meantime, if the solitude gets too much just knock next door. 83 percent of big-hearted Utahns say they would invite a neighbor to spend Christmas with them if they found they would be spending it alone. “Merry Christmas everyone! Technology is advancing at a quicker rate that we ever could have imagined. Today, there are tons of gadgets, gizmos and apps that help you virtually connect with the people you love without even having to be in the same country!” says a spokesperson for GearHungry.com. “Having access to video calling apps takes the stress out of travelling long distances to visit your loved ones, allowing for a more laid-back holiday season.”

HELP WANTED Mt. Pleasant City seeks a Temporary Public Works Employee Minimum Qualifications--High School graduation or GED; Ability to pass background check and drug test. This job involves replacing of water meters, or partially replacing to restore meter to working order, and possibly other Public Works related projects as assigned. Pay will vary based on experience with water meters. ($12-15hr) This is a temporary position not to exceed 40 hours per week. Deadline for applications: open until filled.

May Your Holiday

Spread the Joy!

GlowWith Happiness We hope the spirit of the season surrounds you with enough warmth, love and light to last the whole year through.

In the air and on the ground it feels like Christmas all around. People laugh and children play counting down to Christmas Day. And as we deck the halls and tree we send a wish to all of thee who’ve helped to make our year so bright: Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good night!

Friends like you make us so grateful to be a part of this wonderful community. Your visits have made our year extra special, and we thank you for your loyal support. With gratitude in our hearts, we wish you and yours a very merry Christmas and a happy New Year.

CENTRAL UTAH TITLE Member FDIC

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MT PLEASANT BRANCH

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Thursday, December 19, 2019

DAILY HERALD

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Outstanding grad credits ASU program for becoming a fire captain at 24 PHOENIX, AZ — At age 24, Utah Air National Guard Staff Sgt. Oliver Silva — make that Fire Captain Oliver Silva — credits his graduate studies at Arizona State University as what set him apart from his colleagues. Silva is captain in the fire department at the 801,505 acre U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground in the northwestern Utah desert, about 50 miles southwest of Salt Lake City. For a firefighter to attain the rank of captain usually takes several years, often a decade or two, of dedicated service. Silva is receiving his master’s degree in emergency management and homeland security from the School of Public Affairs at ASU’s Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions in Phoenix, AZ; and is SPA’s fall 2019 Outstanding Graduate. “I heard from fire chiefs and had a lot of mentors who made it clear that the way the fire world is going, they want educated people. It was one of

those things they highly recommend to set you apart from other individuals, and that is what I wanted to do,” said Silva. In regards to his becoming captain he said, “I consider it one of my greatest achievements. Most career firefighters take at least 20 years to get to that level.” Oliver Silva, from Mt. Pleasant, said he realized he wanted to study emergency management after people he respected in the field informed him that employers were increasingly seeking applicants with college credits. “I heard from fire chiefs and had a lot of mentors who made it clear that the way the fire world is going, they want educated people,” Silva said. “It was one of those things they highly recommend to set you apart from other individuals, and that is what I wanted to do.” He said he was pleasantly surprised to find many of his ASU courses were directly related to his career, from learn-

Oliver Silva

Happy Holidays from

ing how to write policies to directing programs. Today at Dugway, he’s in charge of all department preparedness and response to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosives, or CBNRE for short. Silva said he chose ASU because of its renowned program for emergency management and homeland security, ranked No. 1 in the nation by U.S. News

& World Report. “It’s also one of the best military-friendly schools — also a plus,” he said. The online program he undertook was easy to fit into Silva’s complicated firefighter schedule: 72 hours on, 96 hours off. He also has time to volunteer at his community’s local fire department and ambulance service. He said one of the best aspects of online study was in-

teracting with other students with different preparations. “Everyone had different knowledge and experience from different organizations and different parts of the world,” he said. “Someone would be focused on earthquakes and hurricanes, others on snow, depending on the different parts of the nation they were from.” Silva said his post-graduation plans are much the same as

they are now. “I’m going to stay where I am, and keep working on improving myself as a captain and leader,” he said. If offered $40 million to solve one problem in the world, Silva’s answer was clear and straightforward, the kind that might be expected from a dedicated fire captain: “I’d help improve my community emergency response services to keep our community safe.”

As we tie up another year, we’re reminded of just how fortunate we are to do business in this warm and welcoming community. Thank you for your year-round support and friendship. We wish you and yours a most merry and beautiful Christmas.

Terry R. Brotherson Excavating, Inc. & TRB Rock Products

Thank you for choosing us to help improve your health and happiness

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NOTICE TO WATER USERS

The applications below were filed with the Division of Water Rights in Sanpete County. These are informal proceedings per Rule 655-6-2. Protests concerning an application must be legibly written or typed, contain the name and mailing address of the protesting party, STATE THE APPLICATION NUMBER PROTESTED, CITE REASONS FOR THE PROTEST, and REQUEST A HEARING, if desired. Also, A $15 FEE MUST BE INCLUDED FOR EACH APPLICATION PROTESTED. Protests must be filed with the Division of Water Rights on or before January 8, 2020 either electronically using the Division s on-line Protest of Application form, by hand delivery to a Division office, or by mail at PO Box 146300, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6300. Please visit waterrights.utah.gov or call (801) 5387240 for additional information. NONUSE APPLICATION(S) 51-8460 (A33501): Smith Hartvigsen, PLLC is/are seeking a nonuse period for 5.5 ac-ft. from groundwater (Indianola) for IRRIGATION. 51-8476 (A33501): Smokey Ridge Ranch, LLC is/are seeking a nonuse period for 15 ac-ft. from groundwater (Indianola) for IRRIGATION. 51-8576 (A33501): Kristin Nicole Boothe and Jason Boothe is/are seeking a nonuse period for 0.25 ac-ft. from groundwater (Indianola) for IRRIGATION. Boyd P. Clayton, P.E. INTERIM STATE ENGINEER Legal Notice 47565 Published in The Pyramid December 12 and 19, 2019.

Help Wanted

Health

Sales & Service

Sales & Service

Barnes Bullets - 4-Day Work Week! Now hiring for an Ammunition Loading Operator. To download an application please visit http://www.barnesbullets.co m/careers/. Applications need to be sent to hr@barnesbullets.com or faxed to 435-856-1040. EEO/AA/F/M/Vet/Disabled.

Wheelchairs available. Persons with mobility issues have the opportunity to use wheelchairs at no charge for temporary or long time needs. For details, call Roy (435) 8519244.

Handyman Ministry. Jesus can fix anything. So can we, with his help. Pray then call Jesus' helpers at (435) 262-0467 and say to us the following words, "Jesus told me to call you for help."

Merchandise

Housekeeping, Weekly, Bi-weekly, Monthly. Specializing in top to bottom work. Ceiling fans, cabinets, light fixtures, blinds, wood work, windows, baseboards. North Sanpete area. References. Call Teresa (435) 2621355.

Specialized mobile welding and repairs. Aluminum, steel, stainless steel, no job to small. Professional quality and service. Call Mark Robbins Welding Repair (801) 473-6077. www.mobileweldingrepair. com.

Premium Quality AlfalfaGrass Hay for sale. Great for horses. $6 per small For only $68 give the gift bale. 72 available. Call of a business with resid- Larry Seely, Fairview, at ual income. Get paid on (435) 469-2052. daily swipes of Revv Sales & Service Smart Card, free debit card & concierge services. Receive bank ownership, A REMODEL or home reg e t d i s c o u n t s a t o v e r pair at a great price. Just 500,000 locations. Call one call, I do it all. Signa(435) 650-6379 or visit ture Remodel. Don't pay www.rnetwork.io/7891515 contractor prices. Over 20 yearsʼ experience. No job 7. too small. You name it, I do it. Please call Brad Hansen for a Free EstimReal Estate ate at (435) 851-0540. Building Lot in Fairview City, Great view location, Blackhawk Mtn. Handy.6 acre, utility ready, low man, 30 yrs experience. price. Call (435) 427-3879 Drywall, custom textures, painting (roll only), or cell# (435) 680-3757. caulking, some framing (doors and trim) and small jobs. Call Dave (435) 314Water Shares 9139. Water Shares, Class A, Cottonwood Gooseberry, $1,750 each, O.B.O. Call Charlie cell#(435) 6803757 or (435) 427-3879.

Make your memories safe. Digitize them. Photos, slides, scrapbook pages $.15 each; home movies from VHS & camcorder tapes, $7.50 per video hour. Call Linda in Moroni (385) 626-2969. On The Side Paint - Painting inside or out. Any kind of remodeling. Call Juan Vazquez at (435) 4690095. Signature Tile & Floor Coverings. Custom Tile, Vinyl, Carpet, Laminate and Remodeling. Over 20 years experience. Don't Pay Contractor Prices! Let me know. For a Free Estimate, call Brad (435) 851-0540.

T Wa pro P writ of t NU PRO A APP with 8, 2 Pro sion City P 724

Two drop off locations to serve all your Dry Cleani ng & La u nd ry nee d s. Jensenʼs Department Store, 29 North Main, Manti, (435) 835-3131; and Niche Apparel, 74 West Main, Mt. Pleasant, (435) 462-4200. Items 5 must be dropped off by 6 see p.m., Tuesdays and will be available for pick-up the ter 5 following week on Wedsee nesday. (Ind 5 Miscellaneous Boo Old newspapers for wrap- from ping or fire building available at The Pyramid office, 86 W. Main, Mt. Pleasant. Leg Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 3 ber p.m.


A12 DAILY HERALD

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P Y R A M I D

Thursday, December 2019 | B3 XXXX, XXXX,19, 2019 Public Notice

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE

The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, on the steps of the main entrance or in the foyer of the Sixth Judicial District Courthouse – Sanpete County, 160 North Main, Manti, Utah 84642 on January 27, 2020, at the hour of 11:00 A.M. of that day, for the purpose of foreclosing a Deed of Trust dated April 7, 2014, executed by MOWER RANCH, LTD., a Utah Limited Partnership, as Trustor ("Trustor"), in which WESTERN AGCREDIT, PCA was named as Trustee and Beneficiary, and recorded on April 22, 2014, as Entry No. 197241 in Book 661 at Pages 1509 et. seq., in the official records of Sanpete County, State of Utah. The real property affected thereby is described as follows: See Exhibit “A” for legal description of property, together with all buildings, fixtures and other improvements, leases and other rights and all rights, title and interests to water and water rights. The Real Property tax identification numbers are purported to be: 21871; 21875; 22068X; 22074; and 22076. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed is Western AgCredit, PCA. A Substitution of Trustee has been filed naming David H. Leigh, Esq. as Successor Trustee and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default was Mower Ranch, LTD. The Trusteeʼs sale of the real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, identification numbers or encumbrances. The successful bidder, other than the Beneficiary, must make a $5,000.00 down payment, at the time of sale, by bank cashierʼs check made payable to WesternAg Credit PCA, with the remaining balance of the successful bid payable, in certified funds, within 24 business hours following the sale. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trusteeʼs sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. EXHIBIT A Parcel l: Beginning at the Northeast Corner of Section 6, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South 5280 feet to the Southeast Corner of Section 6, thence West 3960 feet, thence North 2640 feet, thence East 1320 feet, thence North 2640 feet to the section line, thence East 2640 feet to the point of beginning. (Parcel No. 21871) Parcel 2: Beginning at the Northeast Corner of Section 7, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence Southerly along the center line of a Wash 1980 feet to a point on the East line of Section 7, thence South 3300 feet to the Southeast Corner of Section 7, thence West 5280 feet to the Southwest Corner of Section 7, thence North 2640 feet to the Northwest Corner of Lot 3, Section 7, thence East 1320 feet, thence North 2640 feet to the section line, thence East 3960 feet to the point of beginning. (Parcel No. 21875) Parcel 3: Beginning at the Northeast Corner of Section 16, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence West 3960 feet, thence South 660 feet, thence West 1320 feet to the West Line of Section 16, thence South 41.58 feet, thence East 2640 feet, thence South 948.75 feet, thence East 1320 feet, thence North 948.75 feet, thence East 1320 feet, thence North 701.58 feet to the point of beginning. (Parcel No. 2206SX) Parcel 4: Beginning at the Northwest Corner of Section 17, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South 3960 feet, thence East 2640 feet, thence North 3258.42 feet, thence East 2640 feet, thence North 41.58 feet, thence West 2640 feet, thence North 660 feet, thence West 2640 feet to the point of beginning. (Parcel No. 22074) Parcel 5: Beginning at the Northeast Corner of Section 18, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South 3960 feet, thence West 1320 feet, thence North 1320 feet, thence West 1046 feet, thence Northwesterly along fence 3200 feet, more or less, to the Section line at a point 1200 feet North of the Southwest Corner of the Northwest Quarter·of Section 18, thence North along Section line to the Northwest Corner of Lot 1, Section 18, thence East along the Section line 5280 feet more or less to the point of beginning. (Parcel No. 22076) DATED this 13th day December, 2019. Successor Trustee: /s/ David H. Leigh David H. Leigh, Esq. Ray Quinney & Nebeker P.C. 36 South State Street, Suite 1400 Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Telephone: (801) 532-1500 Generally available during normal business hours (8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.) Monday through Friday. 1513514 Legal Notice 47747 Published in The Pyramid December 19 and 26, 2019, and January 2, 2020. PUBLIC NOTICE FAIRVIEW CITY 2020 MEETING SCHEDULES City Council Fairview City Council Meetings for 2020 will be held the third Thursday of each month (unless otherwise noticed) at 7:30 p.m., in the Fairview City Council Room located at 85 South State, Fairview, Utah. Planning & Zoning Fairview City Planning Commission Meetings for 2020 will be held the first Thursday of each month (unless otherwise noticed) at 7:30 p.m., in the Fairview City Council Room located at 85 South State, Fairview, Utah. Municipal Building Authority The Municipal Building Authority of Fairview City will be held on the third Thursday at 7:30 p.m., at the Fairview City Hall, 85 South State, Fairview, Utah, as deemed necessary by the Board of Trustees of the Municipal Building Authority of Fairview City. Individuals with disabilities needing special accommodations during the meeting(s) should contact the city office at least three working days prior to the meeting. Jan Anderson Fairview City Recorder Legal notice 47786 Published in The Pyramid December 19, 2019.

The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, on the steps of the main entrance or in the foyer of the Sixth Judicial District Courthouse – Sanpete County, 160 North Main, Manti, Utah 84642 on January 27, 2020, at the hour of 11:30 A.M. of that day, for the purpose of foreclosing a Deed of Trust, Assignment of Rents, Fixture Filing and Security Agreement, dated September 21, 2007, executed by MOWER RANCH, LTD., a Utah Limited Partnership, and FAIRVIEW ARA, INC., a Utah corporation, as Trustors (collectively, "Trustor"), in which WESTERN AGCREDIT, FLCA, was named as Trustee and Beneficiary, and recorded on October 8, 2007, as Entry No. 149945 in Book 559 at Pages 427 et. seq., in the official records of Sanpete County, State of Utah. ("Trust Deed"). The real property affected thereby is described as follows: See Exhibit “A” for legal description of property, together with all buildings, fixtures and other improvements, leases and other rights and all rights, title and interests to water and water rights. The Real Property tax identification numbers are purported to be: 21115, 21118, 21878, 21892, 22048, 22052, 22061, 22065, 22438, 20924X, 21863 and 22439. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed is Western AgCredit, FLCA. A Substitution of Trustee has been filed naming David H. Leigh, Esq. as Successor Trustee and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default was Fairview ARA, Inc. as to Parcels 1, 2, 9 and 12; and Mower Ranch, LTD as to Parcels 3-8, 10 and 11. The Trusteeʼs sale of the real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, identification numbers or encumbrances. The successful bidder, other than the Beneficiary, must make a $5,000.00 down payment, at the time of sale, by bank cashierʼs check made payable to WesternAg Credit FLCA, with the remaining balance of the successful bid payable, in certified funds, within 24 business hours following the sale. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trusteeʼs sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. EXHIBIT A Parcel 1: Beginning 71 feet South from the Northeast corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 31, Township 13 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South to the Southeast corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 31, thence West 20 chains, thence North 1950 feet to the Southeasterly line of the State Highway, thence following the Southeasterly line of the State Highway Northerly to a point 3.33 chains West of the beginning, thence South to the Creek, thence Northeasterly along the Creek to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 21115) EXCEPTING all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. Parcel 2: The West half of the Southeast quarter of Section 31, Township 13 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. (Serial No. 21118) EXCEPTING all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. Parcel 3: Beginning at the Northwest corner of Section 8, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South along the Section line 5280 feet, thence East 2640 feet, thence North 1320 feet, thence West 1320 feet, thence North 2640 feet, thence East 1320 feet, thence North 1320 feet to the Section line, thence West along the Section line 2640 feet to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 21878) Parcel 4: Beginning at the Southeast corner of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence North 4 chains, thence West 60 chains, thence South 4 chains, thence East 60 chains to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 21892) EXCEPTING one-half of all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. Parcel 5: Beginning at the Northwest corner of Section 14, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South along the Section line 2752.20 feet, thence South 89° 45' East 706.20 feet, thence North 213.84 feet, thence East 247.50 feet, thence North 5° East 132 feet, thence North 46° East 209.88 feet, thence North 50° West 103.62 feet, thence North 488.40 feet, thence North 27° East 95.70 feet to a point 16 chains North, East 6.05 chains and South 89° East 9.84 chains from the Southwest corner of the Northwest quarter of Section 14, thence North 89° West 649.44 feet, thence North 18° East 149.82 feet, thence North 42° East 645.48 feet, thence West 18.48 feet to the center of the Sanpitch River, thence North 13° East up the center of the river 643.50 feet, thence North 76° West 336.60 feet, thence North 148.50 feet to the Section line, thence West 792 feet to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 22048) Parcel 6: Beginning 18.65 chains West and North 7.30 chains from the Southeast corner of the Northwest quarter of Section 14, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence North 40' East 15.70 chains, thence West 2 chains, thence South 30' West 6.15 chains, thence South 27° West 3.57 chains, thence South 7.40 chains, thence East 5 chains to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 22052) Parcel 7: Beginning North 89° 30' West 8.25 chains and South 30' West 1.45 chains from the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of Section 14, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South 30' West 6.98 chains, thence South 89° 30' West 10.17 chains, thence South 40° 15' West 3.93 chains, thence South 89° West 1.80 chains, thence North 3.69 chains, thence North 68° 15' East 3.50 chains, thence North 1.75 chains, thence North 45° East 1.62 chains, thence North 17° East 1.22 chains to the South line of the land conveyed by deed recorded as Entry No. 37001 in Book 365 at page 106, thence North 82° East to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 22061) Parcel 8: The North half of Section 15, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. (Serial No. 22065) EXCEPTING one-half of all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. Parcel 9: Lot 1, of Section 6, Township 14 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; the Southeast quarter of the Southwest quarter, the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter, the East half of the Southeast quarter and the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter; ALSO beginning 2.27 chains South from the Southwest corner of Lot 6, of Section 6, Township 14 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence North 80° 15' East to a point 2 rods North from the Southeast corner of Lot 6 of Section 6, thence East 20 chains, thence South 2 rods, thence West 20 chains, thence South 80° 15' West to a point 2 rods South of the beginning, thence North 2 rods to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 22438) EXCEPTING all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE FOLLOWING: Beginning at a point located North 84° 27'38" East 2673.79 feet, more or less, from the Southwest corner of Section 6, Township 14 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence running North 61° 11'50" East 120.09 feet, thence North 11° 57'16" East 136.34 feet, thence North 33° 30'51" East 140.49 feet, thence North 29° 18'50" West 60.13 feet, thence South 69° 54'48" West 193.30 feet, thence South 50" West 294.42 feet, more or less to the point of beginning. (Part of Serial No. 22438) Parcel 10: Beginning at the Southeast corner of Section 32, Township 13 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence West 20 chains, thence North 13 chains, thence South 82° East 8 chains, thence South 64° 31' East 5.40 chains, thence South 49° East 9.97 chains, thence South 3 chains to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 20924X) Parcel 11: Beginning at the center of Section 5, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence North 1320 feet, thence South 81° 53' West 1166.88 feet, thence West 165 feet, thence North 1485 feet, thence West 1320 feet, more or less to the Northwest corner of Section 5, thence South 5280 feet to the Southwest corner of Section 5, thence East 2640 feet, thence North 1320 feet, thence East 2062.50 feet, thence North 1320 feet, thence East 60.06 feet, more or less, thence North 1°22· East 1538.46 feet, thence East 517.44 feet, thence North 1110.12 feet to the Northeast corner of Section 5, thence West 1452 feet, thence South 1155 feet, thence South 81° 53' West 1199.88 feet, thence South 1320 feet to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 21863) Parcel 12: Beginning 34 rods North from the Southwest corner of the Southeast quarter of Section 7, Township 14 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence North 11.50 chains, thence East 40 chains, thence South 11.50 chains, thence West 40 chains to the point of beginning. ALSO the Southeast quarter of the Northwest quarter, the Northeast quarter of the Southwest quarter, the Southwest quarter of the Northeast quarter, the North half of the Northeast quarter and the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 7, Township 14 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. (Serial No. 22439) EXCEPTING all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. TOGETHER WITH the following water rights registered with the State of Utah Division of Water Rights: Water User Claim Number(s): 65-3216, 65-2458, 65-2441 and a 38% ownership interest in 65-3200 (Miner-Turpin Ditch Company). DATED this 13th day December, 2019. Successor Trustee: /s/ David H. Leigh David H. Leigh, Esq. Ray Quinney & Nebeker P.C. 36 South State Street, Suite 1400 Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Telephone: (801) 532-1500 Generally available during normal business hours (8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.) Monday through Friday. 1513459 Legal Notice 47776 Published in The Pyramid December 19 and 26, 2019, and January 2, 2020.

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DAILY HERALDDecember 19, 2019 Thursday,

T H E

| B1 XXXX, XXXX, 2019A13

P Y R A M I D

Public Notice

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE

The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, on the steps of the main entrance or in the foyer of the Sixth Judicial District Courthouse – Sanpete County, 160 North Main, Manti, Utah 84642 on January 27, 2020, at the hour of 11:15 A.M. of that day, for the purpose of foreclosing a Deed of Trust dated May 24, 2011, executed by FAIRVIEW ARA, INC., a Utah corporation and MOWER RANCH, LTD., a Utah Limited Partnership, as Trustors (collectively, "Trustor"), in which WESTERN AGCREDIT, PCA, was named as Trustee and Beneficiary, and recorded on June 3, 2011, as Entry No. 177256 in Book 617 at Page 50 et. seq., in the official records of Sanpete County, State of Utah. ("Trust Deed"). The real property affected thereby is described as follows: See Exhibit “A” for legal description of property, together with all buildings, fixtures and other improvements, leases and other rights and all rights, title and interests to water and water rights. The Real Property tax identification numbers are purported to be: 21115, 21118, 21878, 21892, 22048, 22052, 22061, 22065, 22438, 20924X, 21863 and 22439. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed is Western AgCredit, PCA. A Substitution of Trustee has been filed naming David H. Leigh, Esq. as Successor Trustee and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default was Fairview ARA, Inc. as to Parcels 1, 2, 9 and 12; and Mower Ranch, LTD as to Parcels 3-8, 10 and 11. The Trusteeʼs sale of the real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, identification numbers or encumbrances. The successful bidder, other than the Beneficiary, must make a $5,000.00 down payment, at the time of sale, by bank cashierʼs check made payable to WesternAg Credit PCA, with the remaining balance of the successful bid payable, in certified funds, within 24 business hours following the sale. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trusteeʼs sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. EXHIBIT A Parcel 1: Beginning 71 feet South from the Northeast corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 31, Township 13 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South to the Southeast corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 31, thence West 20 chains, thence North 1950 feet to the Southeasterly line of the State Highway, thence following the Southeasterly line of the State Highway Northerly to a point 3.33 chains West of the beginning, thence South to the Creek, thence Northeasterly along the Creek to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 21115) EXCEPTING all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. Parcel 2: The West half of the Southeast quarter of Section 31, Township 13 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. (Serial No. 21118) EXCEPTING all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. Parcel 3: Beginning at the Northwest corner of Section 8, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South along the Section line 5280 feet, thence East 2640 feet, thence North 1320 feet, thence West 1320 feet, thence North 2640 feet, thence East 1320 feet, thence North 1320 feet to the Section line, thence West along the Section line 2640 feet to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 21878) Parcel 4: Beginning at the Southeast corner of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence North 4 chains, thence West 60 chains, thence South 4 chains, thence East 60 chains to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 21892) EXCEPTING one-half of all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. Parcel 5: Beginning at the Northwest corner of Section 14, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South along the Section line 2752.20 feet, thence South 89° 45' East 706.20 feet, thence North 213.84 feet, thence East 247.50 feet, thence North 5° East 132 feet, thence North 46° East 209.88 feet, thence North 50° West 103.62 feet, thence North 488.40 feet, thence North 27° East 95.70 feet to a point 16 chains North, East 6.05 chains and South 89° East 9.84 chains from the Southwest corner of the Northwest quarter of Section 14, thence North 89° West 649.44 feet, thence North 18° East 149.82 feet, thence North 42° East 645.48 feet, thence West 18.48 feet to the center of the Sanpitch River, thence North 13° East up the center of the river 643.50 feet, thence North 76° West 336.60 feet, thence North 148.50 feet to the Section line, thence West 792 feet to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 22048) Parcel 6: Beginning 18.65 chains West and North 7.30 chains from the Southeast corner of the Northwest quarter of Section 14, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence North 40' East 15.70 chains, thence West 2 chains, thence South 30' West 6.15 chains, thence South 27° West 3.57 chains, thence South 7.40 chains, thence East 5 chains to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 22052) Parcel 7: Beginning North 89°30' West 8.25 chains and South 30' West 1.45 chains from the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of Section 14, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence South 30' West 6.98 chains, thence South 89° 30' West 10.17 chains, thence South 40°15' West 3.93 chains, thence South 89° West 1.80 chains, thence North 3.69 chains, thence North 68° 15' East 3.50 chains, thence North 1.75 chains, thence North 45° East 1.62 chains, thence North 17° East 1.22 chains to the South line of the land conveyed by deed recorded as Entry No. 37001 in Book 365 at page 106, thence North 82° East to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 22061) Parcel 8: The North half of Section 15, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. (Serial No. 22065) EXCEPTING one-half of all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. Parcel 9: Lot 1, of Section 6, Township 14 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; the Southeast quarter of the Southwest quarter, the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter, the East half of the Southeast quarter and the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter; ALSO beginning 2.27 chains South from the Southwest corner of Lot 6, of Section 6, Township 14 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence North 80° 15' East to a point 2 rods North from the Southeast corner of Lot 6 of Section 6, thence East 20 chains, thence South 2 rods, thence West 20 chains, thence South 80° 15' West to a point 2 rods South of the beginning, thence North 2 rods to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 22438) EXCEPTING all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE FOLLOWING: Beginning at a point located North 84° 27'38" East 2673.79 feet, more or less, from the Southwest corner of Section 6, Township 14 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence running North 61° 11'50" East 120.09 feet, thence North 11° 57'16" East 136.34 feet, thence North 33° 30'51" East 140.49 feet, thence North 29° 18'50" West 60.13 feet, thence South 69° 54'48" West 193.30 feet, thence South 50" West 294.42 feet, more or less to the point of beginning. (Part of Serial No. 22438) Parcel 10: Beginning at the Southeast corner of Section 32, Township 13 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence West 20 chains, thence North 13 chains, thence South 82° East 8 chains, thence South 64° 31' East 5.40 chains, thence South 49° East 9.97 chains, thence South 3 chains to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 20924X) Parcel 11: Beginning at the center of Section 5, Township 14 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence North 1320 feet, thence South 81° 53' West 1166.88 feet, thence West 165 feet, thence North 1485 feet, thence West 1320 feet, more or less to the Northwest corner of Section 5, thence South 5280 feet to the Southwest corner of Section 5, thence East 2640 feet, thence North 1320 feet, thence East 2062.50 feet, thence North 1320 feet, thence East 60.06 feet, more or less, thence North 1° 22· East 1538.46 feet, thence East 517.44 feet, thence North 1110.12 feet to the Northeast corner of Section 5, thence West 1452 feet, thence South 1155 feet, thence South 81° 53' West 1199.88 feet, thence South 1320 feet to the point of beginning. (Serial No. 21863) Parcel 12: Beginning 34 rods North from the Southwest corner of the Southeast quarter of Section 7, Township 14 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; thence North 11.50 chains, thence East 40 chains, thence South 11.50 chains, thence West 40 chains to the point of beginning. ALSO the Southeast quarter of the Northwest quarter, the Northeast quarter of the Southwest quarter, the Southwest quarter of the Northeast quarter, the North half of the Northeast quarter and the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 7, Township 14 South, Range 5 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. (Serial No. 22439) EXCEPTING all minerals in or under said land including, but not limited to metals, oil, gas, coal, stone and mineral rights, mining rights, and easements rights or other matters relating thereto, whether expressed or implied. TOGETHER WITH the following water rights registered with the State of Utah Division of Water Rights: Water User Claim Number(s): 65-3216, 65-2458, 65-2441 and a 38% ownership interest in 65-3200 (Miner-Turpin Ditch Company). DATED this 13th day December, 2019. Successor Trustee: /s/ David H. Leigh David H. Leigh, Esq. Ray Quinney & Nebeker P.C. 36 South State Street, Suite 1400 Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Telephone: (801) 532-1500 Generally available during normal business hours (8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.) Monday through Friday. 1513511 Legal Notice 47775 Published in The Pyramid December 19 and 26, 2019, and January 2, 2020.

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Merrill Daniels 1939 ~ 2019 EPHRAIM-- Our beloved husband, father, grandfather, and greatgrandfather, Merrill Daniels, peacefully passed away at his home in Ephraim, UT; on Dec.13, 2019. Merrill was born in a small adobe home, delivered by his motherʼs aunt on July 10, 1939, to Roger Hyrum and Erma Delora Paulsen Daniels in Ephraim. Merrill married Renon Jorgensen in Las Vegas, NV. Together, they have three children; Shaun Daniels, Highland, CA; Cynthia Salazar, Riverton, WY; Cory (Tara) Daniels, Ephraim; nine grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren. Merrill was born a twin, the ninth of 11 children. Merrill loved the outdoors. He enjoyed the mountains, farming, gardening, hunting, fishing, and riding horses. He loved riding around looking at wildlife. Spending time with his family was his greatest joy, Merrill always had a story to tell them. He was a friend to everyone, he didnʼt know a stranger. Everyone was always welcome in his home. Merrill always had a smile earning him the nickname, "Smir." Merrill lived all of his life in Ephraim. He was a member of the Utah National Guard. He worked for Ephraim City and Manti Telephone Company for 27 years. After he retired, he spent his time working with the Ephraim Irrigation Company, which he really enjoyed. Merrill was honored as the Grand Marshal of Ephraim Cityʼs Scandinavian Festival in 2017. Merrill is survived by his wife, Renon, his children, and two brothers, Roy and Alfred Daniels. He was preceded in death by his parents, siblings; Ethel Nielsen, Paul Daniels, LuDean Jones, Dorothy Allred, John Daniels, Rawlin Daniels, his twin brother, Ferrill Daniels; and Richard Daniels. Graveside services were held Dec. 17 in the Ephraim Park Cemetery. Funeral Directors are Magleby Mortuary, Richfield, Salina and Manti. Online guestbook at www.maglebymortuary.com.

Vera F. Lindbo MT. PLEASANT-- Vera F. Lindbo, 83, passed away Dec. 17, 2019. She was the wife of Myron T. Lindbo. She was born in Salt Lake City, UT; to Vernon and Ada Farnworth. She had nine brothers and sisters and she was their baby girl. She was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She enjoyed crocheting and wood working. She will be remembered for her kindness and love she had for others. She is survived by her older sister, Faye Bean; her seven children and their spouses , 42 grandchildren, 67 great-grandchildren, and six great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at Noon, Saturday, Dec. 21, at Rasmussen Mortuary, 96 North 100 West, Mt. Pleasant. A viewing will be held one hour prior to services at the mortuary. Interment in the Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery. Online condolences at rasmussenmortuary.com.

Diane Otteson 1939 ~ 2019 MT. PLEASANT-Nedra Diane Otteson gained her angel wings Dec. 14, 2019, at home in Mt. Pleasant, UT; surrounded by her loving family. Diane was born Nov. 13, 1939, to Ray Andrew and Nedra Barney Swensen in Mt. Pleasant. She married Donell Otteson Nov. 23, 1957, in Ely, NV. Together, they had nine children, LeeAnne and Glenn Danner; Mary and Lavern Reierson; Tamra Terry (deceased); Kevin and Michelle (deceased) Otteson; Katherine and George Green; Julie and Barney Dye; Lisa Hubbs (deceased); Cherie and Bob Rudy; Joseph and Amy Otteson; and Troy (Fred) Otteson. She had 24 grandchildren and 40 great-grandchildren. Mom was a homemaker, mother, and foster mother to many children. Everyone that knew her, called her Mom. She loved reading, doing her puzzles in the winter and playing Scrabble with her sisters. She is survived by her children, one brother, Monte and Mary Swensen; and, two sisters, Dorothy and James Ivory; Jennie and Floyd Madsen. She was preceded in death by her parents; children, Tamra and Lisa; siblings, Joyce and Terrell Vance; grandchildren, James Danner, Travis Terry, Brayden Otteson, Breezy Otteson, Preslee Nelson and Kayzlee Otteson. Funeral services will be held Friday, Dec. 20, at 11 a.m., in the Mt. Pleasant Third Ward (Yellow Church) of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 295 South State Street. Viewings will be held from 6-8 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 19, at Rasmussen Mortuary, 96 North 100 West, Mt. Pleasant and from 9:30 - 10:30 a.m., at the church prior to services. Interment will be in the Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery. Online condolences rasmussenmortuary.com.


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T H E

P Y R A M I D

Thursday, December 19, 2019

May Faith, Hope & Happiness

Light Your Way Straight Through the New Year!

To our neighbors, customers, friends and associates here in the community, thank you and best wishes for a happy and healthy holiday season. We hope you get everything on your wish list!

A Special Thank You to all our Employees and their families!

Johansen Construction Inc. • Mt. Pleasant Al & Marty Johansen • Steve & Tracy Johansen Justin & Josee Johansen

Profile for pyramidsanpetecounty

12-19-19 The Pyramid  

Weekly newspaper serving all of Sanpete County, UT

12-19-19 The Pyramid  

Weekly newspaper serving all of Sanpete County, UT

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