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Providence Public Schools District Curriculum Framework Who can use these documents? The processes and strategies through which these documents were developed and the contents of Dana Center tools, protocols, and resources, such as A Guide for Collaborative Study and Research-Based Instructional Strategies, are the exclusive copyrighted property of the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin and may not be used or distributed outside Providence Public Schools without written permission from the Dana Center. The content of the Supplemental Unit Materials is the exclusive copyrighted property of the Dana Center or of the copyright holders named on the documents and may not be used or distributed outside Providence Public Schools without written permission from the copyright holder. It is understood that the copyrighted Supplemental Unit Materials have been purchased by the Providence Public Schools. The content of the District Curriculum Framework was developed by teams of teachers and leaders from the Providence Public Schools with process facilitation and production support from the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin. As such, this content can be used in perpetuity within the Providence Public Schools in any way the district sees fit. In addition, Providence Public Schools engaged in a collaborative partnership with the National Center for History in the Schools at the University of California, Los Angeles, World History for Us All, and Facing History and Ourselves to support the development of the District Social Studies/History Curriculum Framework and with the University of Connecticut’s Center for Behavioral Education and Research (CBER) to support the creation of the English Language Arts Curriculum Framework. The content of these District Curriculum Framework documents is not intended for use or sale outside Providence Public Schools without express written permission from the copyright holder, which shall not be unreasonably withheld. Please send questions or permission requests to the appropriate address below: Charles A. Dana Center The University of Texas at Austin 1616 Guadalupe Street, Suite 3.206 Austin, TX 78701

Providence Public Schools Office of the Chief Academic Officer 797 Westminster Street Providence, RI 02903

Fax: 512-232-1855 dana-txshop@utlists.utexas.edu

Fax: 401-456-9277 Tel.: 401-453-8676

The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and English Language Arts and the Rhode Island mathematics, science, reading, writing, oral communication, and government/civics and historical perspectives Grade-Level Expectations and Grade Span Expectations constitute the foundation of these curriculum documents. The district began its transition from the Rhode Island GLEs/GSEs to the ELA and Mathematics Common Core State Standards during the 2010–2011 academic year. The third edition of the mathematics frameworks and second edition of the secondary English language arts frameworks align to the Common Core State Standards adopted by Rhode Island in July 2010. The Rhode Island standards, as well as released items from the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) and additional resources for implementing the standards, are at www.ride.ri.gov/instruction/curriculum, a website of the Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (also known as RIDE—the Rhode Island Department of Education). The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and for English Language Arts are copyrighted by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and are available at www.corestandards.org/the-standards; these CCSS are being used under the NGA Center and CCSSO Terms of Use (also known as the Non-Commercial License), available at www.corestandards.org/terms-of-use. The district selected the National History Standards published by the National Center for History in the Schools to use in conjunction with the Rhode Island government/civics and historical perspectives Grade Span Expectations.


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About the development of this resource The mathematics and science curriculum documents were created through a collaboration between Providence Public Schools and the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin. This is the third version of the mathematics resources. The secondary English language arts curriculum documents were created through a collaborative partnership between Providence Public Schools, the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin, and staff from the Center for Behavioral Education and Research (CBER) at the University of Connecticut. This is the second version of the secondary English language arts resources. The secondary social studies/history documents were created through a collaborative partnership between Providence Public Schools, the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin, The National Center for History in the Schools at the University of California, Los Angeles, World History for Us All, and Facing History and Ourselves. This is the second version of the secondary social studies/history resources. It is understood that the materials cited in the Resources sections of these documents have been purchased by the Providence Public School District. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of The University of Texas at Austin. The Charles A. Dana Center and The University of Texas at Austin, as well as the authors and editors, assume no liability for any loss or damage resulting from the use of this resource. We have made extensive efforts to ensure the accuracy of the information in this resource, to provide proper acknowledgement of original sources, and to otherwise comply with copyright law. If you find an error or you believe we have failed to provide proper acknowledgment, please contact the Dana Center or Providence Public Schools at the contact information on the previous page, as appropriate.

Acknowledgments These curriculum documents were created collaboratively by professionals from the Providence Public Schools, the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin, the Center for Behavioral Education and Research at the University of Connecticut, the National Center for History in the Schools, World History for Us All, and Facing History and Ourselves.

Providence Public Schools Division of Teaching and Learning Staff Sharon L. Contreras, Chief Academic Officer Paula R. Shannon, Executive Director, Curriculum Development /Interim Chief Academic Officer Gary Moroch, Executive Director of Elementary Schools Marc Catone, Executive Director of Middle Schools Nkolika Etell Onye, Executive Director of High Schools Denise Carpenter, Director of Dropout Prevention Cynthia Scheller, Director of Professional Learning Soledad Catanzaro, Director of English Language Learning Karen Vessella, Director of Secondary Special Education Lisa Vargas-Sinapi, Director of Elementary Special Education Guy Alba, Supervisor, K-12 Guidance and Counseling Earnest Cox, Administrator, Advanced Academics, Fine Arts and World Languages Natalie Dunning, Supervisor, K–12 Science Kimberly Luca, Supervisor, K–12 Social Studies and Library Media Services Dennis McHugh, Supervisor K–12 Mathematics Sheryl Rabbitt, Supervisor, K–12 English Language Arts Deborah Almagno, Supervisor, Special Populations Helen Giorgio, Supervisor, Special Populations ii

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Mary Cullen, Supervisor, Special Populations Susan Hartson, Supervisor, Special Populations Kathleen Mastrobuono, Supervisor, Special Populations Gail DeRoy, Supervisor, Special Populations Mindy Mertz, Supervisor, Special Populations Dawn Pelino, Supervisor, Special Populations Karyn Rosenfield, District Assistance Team, Elementary Mathematics Intervention Specialist Judy Fried, District Assistance Team, Secondary Mathematics Intervention Specialist Beatrice Metts, District Assistance Team, Secondary Mathematics Intervention Specialist Jessica Lavallee, District Assistance Team, Elementary ELA Intervention Specialist Gail Desimone-Tella, District Assistance Team, Secondary ELA Intervention Specialist Arzinia Gill, District Assistance Team, Secondary ELA Intervention Specialist Secondary English Language Arts Denise Adams, Esek Hopkins Middle School Laura Almagno, Hope High School Ellen Anderson, Classical High School Polly Barnes, Providence Academy of International Studies Jillian Belanger, Providence Career and Technical Academy Felicia Byers, Mount Pleasant High School Nilda Caraballo, E-Cubed Academy Joy Cervone, Esek Hopkins Middle School Nancy D’Errico, Mount Pleasant High School Gail Desimone-Tella, Gilbert Stuart Middle School Christine Fitzgerald, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Theresa Fox, Nathanael Greene Middle School Jose Garcia, William B. Cooley, Sr. High School Gianina Gastelo, Roger Williams Middle School Jonathan Goodman, Hope High School Alvin Green, Roger Williams Middle School Richard Gurspan, Central High School Amy Harrington, Nathan Bishop Middle School Alyssa Healy, E-Cubed Academy Barbara Irons, Mount Pleasant High School Marisa Jackson (Vincent), Gilbert Stuart Middle School Michael Johnson, Feinstein High School Karleen Keefe-Polak, Samuel W. Bridgham Middle School Steven Kilsey DelSesto Middle School Francesca LeClerc, Classical High School Dan Lilley, Central High School Heather Longo, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Tarryn Maynard, Providence Career and Technical Academy Sherri Mooney, Governor Christopher DelSesto Middle School Stephanie Morrison, E-Cubed Academy Andrew Nassef Mount Pleasant High School Robert Nerney, William B. Cooley, Sr. High School Kaleen O’Leary, Governor Christopher DelSesto Middle School Alana Parenteau, Roger Williams Middle School Melissa Parkerson, Providence Academy for International Studies Donna Perrotta, Oliver H. Perry Middle School Annette Pesaturo, Roger Williams Middle School Debra Pilkington, Nathanael Greene Middle School Elgerine Roberts, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Melissa Sarro-Gadalla, Stuart Middle School Deb Spisso, Oliver H. Perry Middle School Jodi Timpani, Nathan Bishop Middle School Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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Lillian Turnipseed, Providence Academy of International Studies Kim Vuona, Governor Christopher DelSesto Middle School Elementary Mathematics Christen Ahern, Charles N. Fortes Academy Elementary School Lisa Airhart, George J. West Elementary School Annemarie Alberino, Pleasant View Elementary School/Robert F. Kennedy Elementary School Nancy Allen, Robert L. Bailey, IV Elementary School Heather Almagno, Charles N. Fortes Academy Elementary School Anne Andrade, Alan Shawn Feinstein Elementary at Broad Street Cara McHugh Avila, Carl G. Lauro Elementary School Lisa Bianco, Edmund W. Flynn Elementary School/Reservoir Avenue Elementary School Mari-Ellen Boisclair, Charles N. Fortes Academy, The Leviton Complex Alisha Borelli, Robert L. Bailey, IV Elementary School/Webster Avenue Elementary School Trisha Bowler, Anthony Carnevale Elementary School Maureen Bracewell, Edmund W. Flynn Elementary School Christine Brierly, Lillian Feinstein Elementary School at Sackett Street Carla Caliri, Charlotte Woods Elementary School/ Sgt. Cornel Young, Jr. Elementary School Janet Cambio, Webster Avenue Elementary School Linda Carnevale, Carl G. Lauro Elementary School/Asa Messer Elementary School Pamela Carter, West Broadway Elementary School Deborah Castelli, Pleasant View Elementary School Beth Chambers, George J. West Elementary School Cynthia Clark, Lillian Feinstein Elementary School at Sackett Street Roy Clements, Charlotte Woods Elementary School/ Sgt. Cornel Young, Jr. Elementary School Tonya Costa, Charles N. Fortes Academy Elementary School Kelli Courville, William D'Abate Elementary School Stacey Crofton, Harry Kizirian Elementary School Phyllis DeCesare, Frank D. Spaziano Elementary School/Anthony Carnevale Elementary School Melissa DeMatos, Pleasant View Elementary School Rachel DeNofio, Asa Messer Elementary School Cynthia Dursin, Windmill Street Elementary School Cindy Engelhardt, Windmill Street Elementary School/Alfred A. Lima, Sr. Elementary School Nelia Fontes, Windmill Street Elementary School Gail Frueh, Charlotte Woods Elementary School/ Sgt. Cornel Young, Jr. Elementary School Laurie Fuge, Charlotte Woods Elementary School/ Sgt. Cornel Young, Jr. Elementary School Kim Gibeau, Windmill Street Elementary School Kendra Haggerty, Robert F. Kennedy Elementary School Deborah Hamel, Veazie Street Elementary School Colleen Hanley, Frank D. Spaziano Elementary School Elizabeth Hefferman, Frank D. Spaziano Elementary School Tracy Howland, Pleasant View Elementary School Marie Iasimone, Harry Kizirian Elementary School Jennifer Johnson, Mary E. Fogarty Elementary School Cindy Jones, Carl G. Lauro Elementary School Jennifer Larkin, Harry Kizirian Elementary School Amy Lopes, William D'Abate Elementary School Maria Lourenzo, Robert F. Kennedy Elementary School Caroline Maggiacomo, Robert L. Bailey, IV Elementary School Gail Matthews, Pleasant View Elementary School Cheryl McElroy, West Broadway Elementary School/Alan Shawn Feinstein Elementary School at Broad Street Christine Mendonca, Vartan Gregorian Elementary School Colleen Moran, Veazie Street Elementary School Tom Nolan, Veazie Street Elementary School Michele Paris-Obrien, Veazie Street Elementary School Aracelis Pazmino, Frank D. Spaziano Elementary School iv

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Hlee Phul, Mary E. Fogarty Elementary School Robert Prignano, Alfred A. Lima, Sr. Elementary School Brian Purcell, Asa Messer Elementary School Jane Quirk, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School Pamela Resendes, George J. West Elementary School Sandy Rhee-Khowalik, Reservoir Avenue Elementary School Carla Ricci, George J. West Elementary School Bridget Richardson, Charlotte Woods Elementary School/Sgt. Cornel Young, Jr. Elementary School   Rachel Salvatore, Carl G. Lauro Elementary School Robin Sampson, Robert L. Bailey, IV Elementary School Jeff Scanapieco, Lillian Feinstein Elementary School at Sackett Street Jeanne Scarella, Charles N. Fortes Academy Elementary School Dawn Simonelli, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School / Harry Kizirian Elementary School Jenna Simpson, William D'Abate Elementary School Julie Slater, Charles N. Fortes Elementary School Michelle St Germaine, Mary E. Fogarty Elementary School Stacey Stravato, Charles N. Fortes Elementary School Margaret Szlosek, Veazie Street Elementary School Donna Tolppa, Webster Avenue Elementary School Rick Tramonti, Anthony Carnevale Elementary School Molly Trout, Edmund W. Flynn Elementary School Natasha White, Charles N. Fortes Elementary School April Williams, Alfred A. Lima, Sr. Elementary School Erin Winslow, Alan Shawn Feinstein Elementary School at Broad Street Julie Yang, Reservoir Avenue Elementary School Secondary Mathematics Santiago Almanzar, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Luis Alvarez, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Sabrina Antonelli, Oliver H. Perry Middle School Carol Armour, Central High School Rosy Ayala, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Edmund Bargblor, Mount Pleasant High School Mike Bilodeau, Providence Academy of International Studies Lillian Birch, Mount Pleasant High School Nicole Broadmeadow, Samuel W. Bridgham Middle School Paula Caron, Providence Career and Technical Academy Jenny Chan-Remka, Samuel W. Bridgham Middle School Bunthoeun Chem, Central High School Herminia Collado, Hope High School Complex Mike Comella, West Broadway Elementary School Michael Cote, William B. Cooley, Sr. High School Barbara Creati, Classical High School Shaila Cruz, Oliver H. Perry Middle School Janet Cuhna, Roger Williams Middle School Kerry Daley, Esek Hopkins Middle School Darlene DaSilva, Esek Hopkins Middle School Vivianne Desimone, Mount Pleasant High School Dominic DiDonato, Providence Career and Technical Academy Randall Dugan, Mount Pleasant High School Christine Dunbar, DelSesto Middle School Ernestine Edson, Mount Pleasant High School Cesar Elias, Hanley Career and Technology David Elkin, Providence Academy of International Studies Missy Englehard, Alan Shawn Feinstein High School Francesca Florio, Hope High School Complex Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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Frank Forster, William B. Cooley, Sr., High School Deb Fox, Nathanael Greene Middle School Sean Geoghegan, Hope High School Complex Stephanie George, Classical High School Christina Gibbons, Esek Hopkins Middle School Jeff Glantz, Roger Williams Middle School Fran Grabowski, West Broadway Elementary School Theron Green, Central High School Steve Hafey, Roger Williams Middle School Tacy Hellewell, Providence Academy of International Studies Ellen Holm, Classical High School Ellen House, Hope High School Complex Rose Johnson, Roger Williams Middle School Kevin Knoll, Nathan Bishop Middle School Kerri Little, Nathanael Greene Middle School Enneson Louis, Nathanael Greene Middle School Maria Lourenzo, Robert F. Kennedy Elementary School Kerri Luffborough, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School Victoria Konovalenko, Central High School Patricia Maia, Nathanael Greene Middle School Susan Macksoud, Providence Academy of International Studies Joy Martin, Oliver H. Perry Middle School Gina Masiello, Gilbert Stuart Middle School Jenn Mignanelli, Esek Hopkins Middle School Linda Moon, Providence Career and Technical Academy Gerome Muriel, Hope High School Complex Nolberto Pena, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Linette Perry, William B Cooley, Sr. High School Michelle Pistocco, Samuel W. Bridgham Middle School Umberto Prezioso, Classical High School Kevin Raponi, Central High School Mike Ras, Feinstein High School Ruben Reyes, Oliver H. Perry Middle School Juan Rodriguez, Roger Williams Middle School Sherrie Santos, E-Cubed Academy Richard Santurri, Classical High School Dawn Simonelli, Nathanael Greene Middle School Jeremy Spencer, West Broadway Elementary School Mary Thake, Providence Career and Technical Academy Donna Tolppa, Webster Avenue Elementary School Veronica Trek, Providence Career and Technical Academy Vivian Vargas, E-Cubed Academy Rudene Wilkins, Nathanael Greene Middle School Jamye Williams, Samuel W. Bridgham Middle School Elementary Science Kimberly Alves, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School Rachel Aramini-Clark, Vartan Gregorian Elementary School Nurys Audette, Mary E. Fogarty Elementary School Catherine Blish, Harry Kizirian Elementary School Rita Calabro, Asa Messer Elementary School Pamela Carter, West Broadway Elementary School Mary Ann Cauchon, Lillian Feinstein Elementary School at Sackett Street Cheri Cerio, Windmill Street Elementary School Thay Chuk, Alan Shawn Feinstein Elementary School at Broad Street Erin Cirello, West Broadway Elementary School vi

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Mary Clare, Lillian Feinstein Elementary School at Sackett Street Catherine Cowen, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School Daniel DeCesare, Anthony Carnevale Elementary School Cheryl Ferrara-Conti, Asa Messer Elementary School Michael Fioravanti, Veazie Street Elementary School Ruth Gil-Johnston, Robert L. Bailey, IV Elementary School Siobhan Giorgi, William D'Abate Elementary School Anne Grimes, Veazie Street Elementary School Deborah Hamel, Charlotte Woods Elementary School Tracy Hitchcock-Carcamo, Alfred A. Lima, Sr. Elementary School Lori Hoffman, Webster Avenue Elementary School Peter Kay, Mary E. Fogarty Elementary School Joanne Kearns, Reservoir Avenue Elementary School Linda Lefebvre, Charlotte Woods Elementary School Caroline LeStrange, Alan Shawn Feinstein Elementary School at Broad Street Cindy Matracia, Harry Kizirian Elementary School Laurie McKenna-Therrien, Alfred A. Lima, Sr. Elementary School Maureen Miranda, Windmill Street Elementary School Suzanne Mitchell, Carl G. Lauro Elementary School Christine Naylor, Robert F. Kennedy Elementary School Cynthia O’Brien, Carl G. Lauro Elementary School Paula O’Hara, Alan Shawn Feinstein Elementary School at Broad Street Mary Patalano, Robert F. Kennedy Elementary School Monica Paige, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School Mary Paolino, Veazie Street Elementary School Jennifer Partridge, Alan Shawn Feinstein Elementary School at Broad Street John Polinick, Robert F. Kennedy Elementary School Lisa Pucino, Lillian Feinstein Elementary School at Sackett Street Suzanne Quinn, George J. West Elementary School Karen Rasnick, Robert F. Kennedy Elementary School Pamela Resendes, George J. West Elementary School Tania Saguid, Frank D. Spaziano Elementary School Ligna Sanchez, William D’Abate Elementary School Ruiping Shen, Alan Shawn Feinstein Elementary School at Broad Street Agnes Summerly, Webster Avenue Elementary School Sara Tavares, Anthony Carnevale Elementary School Anna-Maria Urrutia, Robert L. Bailey, IV Elementary School Melissa Veilleux, Alan Shawn Feinstein Elementary School at Broad Street Rose Ann Warren, George J. West Elementary School Nancy Wasserman, Edmund W. Flynn Elementary School Quiping Xia, Pleasant View Elementary School Secondary Science Edgar Aguedo, Providence Academy of International Studies Adria Alfano, Oliver H. Perry Middle School Michael Baccari, Esek Hopkins Middle School Jane Bamberg, Mount Pleasant High School David Baxter, Oliver H. Perry Middle School Christine Beaubien, Samuel W. Bridgham Middle School Lisa Bucci, Hope High School Aja Butler, Classical High School Donna Casanova, Gilbert Stuart Middle School Moises Crisostomo, Central High School Ann Marie D’Ambrosio, Samuel W. Bridgham Middle School Catherine DiPietro, Nathanael Greene Middle School Christine Dunbar, Governor Christopher DelSesto Middle School Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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David Evans, Alan Shawn Feinstein High School John Fair, E-Cubed Academy Kelly Farrell, Nathanael Greene Middle School Anthony Fascia, Central High School Jose Fermin, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Helen Gannon, Roger Williams Middle School Rufina Garcia, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Renee Gasparri, Roger Williams Middle School Lenora Goodwin, Central High School Lori Hall, Governor Christopher DelSesto Middle School Helaine Hager, Mount Pleasant High School Megan Hollilbaugh-Baker, Providence Career and Technical Academy David Hurd, Central High School Barbara Irons, Mount Pleasant High School Kerri Krawczyk, Nathan Bishop Middle School Martha Lawson, Gilbert Stuart Middle School Donovan Lewis, Classical High School Julie Lombardi, Governor Christopher DelSesto Middle School Carlos Madera, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Alexander Major, E-Cubed Academy Steven Mancini, Oliver H. Perry Middle School Mary Markey, Providence Career and Technical Academy Paula Martinuzzi-DeSano, Esek Hopkins Middle School Charles McDonald, Mount Pleasant High School Kathleen McDonough, Nathanael Greene Middle School Judy McGowan, Mount Pleasant High School Gina Miller, Oliver H. Perry Middle School Rachel Moran, Hope High School Alain Morin, Central High School Christine Neligon, Governor Christopher Delsesto Middle School Eileen Nugent, Samuel W. Bridgham Middle School Ernest Pacheco, Roger Williams Middle School Margaret Paduano, William B. Cooley, Sr. High School Joseph Paliotti, Hope High School William Pare, Central High School Mudite Paux, Roger Williams Middle School Marc Pelagalli, E-Cubed Academy Jennifer Roe, Providence Career and Technical Academy Nina Rooks-Cast, William B. Cooley, Sr. High School Linda Rose, Central High School Nadine Rucker, E-Cubed Academy Anna Saccoccia, Nathanael Greene Middle School Sherrie Sharpe, Gilbert Stuart Middle School Dawn Smith, Governor Christopher DelSesto Middle School Richard Sweetman, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Babatunde Taiwo, Providence Academy of International Studies Alyssa Taylor, Charles N. Fortes Academy Dennis Votto, Mount Pleasant High School Joel Weintraub, Providence Academy of Service John Wemple, William B. Cooley, Sr. High School Mary Whittaker, Nathanael Greene Middle School Jefferson Wright, Samuel W. Bridgham Middle School Barbara Zanger, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School David Zoglio, Classical High School

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Secondary Social Studies Tim Ahern, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School John Alexion, Classical High School Chris Audette, Nathan Bishop Middle School Peter Bellisle, Providence Academy of International Studies Thumbelina Biah, Esek Hopkins Middle School Bryan Cerullo, Nathanael Greene Middle School Kali Coleman, Providence Career and Technical Academy Ryan Connole, Roger Williams Middle School Frank Cornachoine, Central High School Anthony Deltoro, Central High School Cassandra DeCaporale, DelSesto Middle School Beverly Deware, Governor Christopher DelSesto Middle School Alisa Diakite, Dr. Jorge Alvarez High School Jeff Doucette, Gilbert Stuart Middle School Patricia Geary, Gilbert Stuart Middle School Bill Glad, Oliver Hazard Perry Middle School Jenny Guertin, Hope High School John Healy, E-Cubed Academy David Kelly, Mount Pleasant High School Ed Lee, William B. Cooley, Sr. High School Todd Macmaster, Alan Shawn Feinstein High School Robin Maguire, Hope High School Matilda Mahama, Gilbert Stuart Middle School Mark Manzo, E-Cubed Academy John Mitrelis, Nathanael Greene Middle School Ana Montalbon, Central High School Rachel Moran, Hope High School Maria Morias, Gilbert Stuart Middle School Emily Nuri, Hope High School Sue Pangborn, Nathanael Greene Middle School Maria Perkins, Roger Williams Middle School Deborah Petrarca, Hope High School Debbie Podbros, Alan Shawn Feinstein High School Teddie Polak, Samuel Brigham Middle School Chris Pride, Roger Williams Middle School Gina Ranucci, Classical High School Flor Ribezzo, Gilbert Stuart Middle School Chandra Rodrigues, Samuel Brigham Middle School Arthur Rustigian, Classical High School David Salvas, Central High School Leanne Saravo, Mount Pleasant High School Martha Scott, Mount Pleasant High School Rick Taylor, Governor Christopher DelSesto Middle School Scott Turner, Providence Career and Technical Academy Dan Wall, Providence Academy of International Studies Kim White, Roger Williams Middle School Torie Zannini, Esek Hopkins Middle School

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Charles A. Dana Center Shannon Baker, ELA and history consultant Lisa Brown, senior program coordinator Jim Collins, program coordinator Amy Dolejs, lead editor and production manager Chris Dolejs, ELA and history consultant David Hill, program director Dauna Howerton, senior program coordinator

Carolyn Moore, mathematics consultant Tracey Ramirez, senior program coordinator Ann Roman, senior program coordinator Sarah Searcy, editor Karen Snow, mathematics consultant Barbara Taylor, senior program coordinator Pam Walker, senior program coordinator

Special thanks also to the following Dana Center staff writers, editors, and consultants: Omar Barnhart, Steve Engler, Jodie Flint, Joe Gallegos Phillip Hebert, Bill Hopkins, Cara Hopkins, Rachel Jenkins, Laura Maldonado, Tom McVey, Norma Salas, Mary Jane Schott, Phil Swann, and Emma Trevino.

Partnering organizations supporting the English language arts and social studies work Center for Behavioral Education and Research at the University of Connecticut Project Directors and Principal Investigators: Michael Faggella-Luby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Center for Behavioral Education & Research, University of Connecticut Natalie Olinghouse, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Center for Behavioral Education & Research, University of Connecticut Michael Coyne, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Center for Behavioral Education & Research, University of Connecticut Project Consultants: Louise Spear-Swerling, Ph.D., Professor, Southern Connecticut State University Susan Loftus, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island Research Assistants: Sally Drew, MA, Center for Behavioral Education & Research, University of Connecticut Ashley Capozzoli-Oldham, MA, Center for Behavioral Education & Research, University of Connecticut Kelly McNamara, MA, Center for Behavioral Education & Research, University of Connecticut Josh Wilson, MA, Center for Behavioral Education & Research, University of Connecticut Mona Teitelbaum, MA, Center for Behavioral Education & Research, University of Connecticut National Center for History in the Schools Gary B. Nash, Professor Emeritus of History and Director, National Center for History in the Schools, University of California, Los Angeles World History for Us All Ross E. Dunn, Professor Emeritus of History, San Diego State University, and Director of World History Projects at the NCHS Tim Keirn, Professor of History and Coordinator of the Social Science Credential Program, California State University, Long Beach; Associate Director of the World History for Us All Projects at the NCHS Facing History and Ourselves Jennifer Clark, Associate Program Director, New England Fran Colletti, Program Director, New England Elisabeth Kanner, Manager for Curriculum & Program Development Jeremy Nesoff, Program Associate, New England The Dana Center and Providence Public Schools note with gratitude the National Center for History in the School’s encouragement to excerpt selected expectations from their National Standards for History in the social studies district curriculum frameworks, which were developed for education purposes. For more information about the National Center for History in the Schools and its history standards, see nchs.ucla.edu/standards.

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About the Providence Public School District The Providence Public School District is the largest school district in Rhode Island, serving a culturally diverse population of 23,300 students. The racial and ethnic breakdown of the student population is as follows: 22 percent black, 60 percent Hispanic, 12 percent white, 6 percent Asian, and 1 percent Native American. Providence, like many urban school districts, faces challenges in educating our students, many of whom face significant barriers to learning, including poverty, limited language proficiency, and special education needs. Eighty-six percent of our students are eligible for free and reduced-price lunch; nearly 60 percent come from homes where English is not the primary language spoken; and 21 percent receive special education services to support their learning. The Providence Public School District is composed of 25 elementary schools, 7 middle schools, 13 high schools, 2 charter schools, and 1 school for students with significant disabilities. A nine-member School Board, appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by the City Council, oversees the school district. The School Board has the authority and responsibility for developing policy to guide the management and strategic direction of the school district.

About the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin The Dana Center works to raise student achievement in K–16 mathematics and science, especially for historically underserved populations. We do so by providing direct service to school districts and institutions of higher education; to local, state, and national education leaders; and to nonprofits, agencies, and professional organizations concerned with strengthening American mathematics and science education. We support high standards and build system capacity; collaborate with key state and national organizations to work on emerging issues; create and deliver professional supports for educators and education leaders; and write and publish education resources, including student supports. We are committed to ensuring that the accident of where a child attends school does not limit the academic opportunities he or she can pursue. For more information about the Dana Center and to access our resources (many of them free), please see our homepage at www.utdanacenter.org.

About the Center for Behavioral Education and Research In the Fall of 2005, the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut hired Dr. George Sugai to develop a signature organization that specialized in quality research and teaching in the areas of positive behavior support, behavior disorders, literacy, school psychology, and special education. More specifically, the intent was to establish an efficient and supportive work group that would enable highly capable new researchers to establish important and influential programs of research and highly productive and experienced veteran researchers to continue “leading edge” research that influences practice, policy, and educational science. The purpose of CBER is to conduct and disseminate rigorous research that improves educational and social outcomes for all children and youth in schools. Areas of interest include design of instruction, literacy, learning strategies, positive behavior support, applied behavior analysis, evidence-based practices, organizational and system change, and academic and behavioral assessment and evaluation.

About the National Center for History in the Schools The National Center for History in the Schools (NCHS) at the University of California, Los Angeles, founded in 1988 with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, is a nationally known organization that has engaged the talents of scores of classroom teachers and provided history educators across the nation with new historical resources and teaching strategies. NCHS’s double mission is (a) to aid the professional development of K–12 history teachers; and (b) to work with teachers to develop curricular materials that will engage students in exciting explorations of United States and World history.

About the World History for Us All Project World History for Us All is a national collaboration of K–12 teachers, collegiate instructors, and educational technology specialists. It is a project of San Diego State University in cooperation with the National Center for History in the Schools at UCLA. World History for Us All represents a powerful, innovative model curriculum for teaching world history in middle and high schools that presents the human past as a single story rather than unconnected stories of many civilizations; enables teachers to survey world history without excluding major peoples, regions, or time periods; helps students understand the past by connecting specific subject matter to larger historical patterns; and draws on up-to-date historical research. Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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About Facing History and Ourselves The work of Facing History and Ourselves over the past 30 years demonstrates that effective teaching can cultivate the sense of civic responsibility needed to protect human dignity and prevent violations of human rights. The flow of people, ideas, capital, and images across borders opens new possibilities for tolerance and also new risks of misunderstanding. Facing History, informed by leading thinkers from the fields of philosophy, religion, and education, is a leader in educating for tolerance and understanding. Facing History highlights education, often overlooked, as a crucial tool for strengthening civil societies. Facing History and Ourselves delivers classroom strategies, resources, and lessons that inspire young people to take responsibility for their world. Internationally recognized for its quality and effectiveness, Facing History harnesses the power of the Internet and partners with school systems, universities, and ministries of education worldwide. Each year the organization reaches more than 1.9 million students through its global network of more than 28,000 trained educators, staff, adjunct faculty, and international fellows, who facilitate hundreds of seminars and workshops annually, and it reaches the public through community events and extensive online resources. In 2008, the Facing History and Ourselves website received more than 700,000 visits from people in 215 countries.

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ANGEL TAVERAS

Mayor THOMAS M. BRADY

Superintendent

Providence Public School District Office of the Chief Academic Officer 797 Westminster Street Providence, RI 02903-4045 tel. 401.453.8676 fax 401.456.9252

July 1, 2011 Dear PPSD Educators, It is with great pride and enthusiasm that I present you with the newest versions of our District Curriculum Frameworks in mathematics, English language arts, and social studies/history. These frameworks are the result of a continued collaboration between PPSD educators and our partners at the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin, the Center for Behavioral Education and Research at the University of Connecticut, Pearson, the National Center for History in the Schools, World History for Us All, and Facing History and Ourselves. The ELA and mathematics frameworks represent our initial efforts to transition to the Common Core State Standards. These standards are internationally benchmarked, align to expectations for college and career readiness, and have been adopted by 46 states (including Rhode Island). But more importantly, they support our college- and career-ready mission. Aligning our frameworks to the Common Core State Standards is critically important and bolsters our current effort to dramatically improve student achievement. The District Curriculum Frameworks provide a “road map” and establish common expectations for instruction across the district. We must continue to engage in structured collaboration focused on instructional improvement. These maps do not replace the need to plan, but instead support the daily preparation that remains a critical part of teaching and learning. Purposeful unit and lesson planning must occur to meet the needs of our students and to ensure that actual instruction and student tasks align to the rigorous demands outlined in the standards and measured by quality assessment. To maintain our focus on teaching and learning, ongoing professional development has been planned to address expectations for the effective design and delivery of instruction. A new section has been added to the frameworks to provide a space to organize resources and materials received in these training sessions. “Section F—Guidance: Effective Instructional Design and Delivery” will help you organize your materials, which are based upon decades of research defining the characteristics of and criteria for rigorous, engaging instruction that results in high levels of student learning. As a result of the 2010–2011 framework development work, the following improvements are evident in the new editions: • K–12 ELA is aligned to the CCSS. • Secondary ELA unit structure has been reworked to improve flow and pacing, allowing for emphasis on particular areas of rigorous instruction. Learning objectives and summative assessments have been revised to improve alignment, clarity, and accuracy. An Equal Opportunity Employer. The Providence School Department does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, color, disability or veteran status. Vision: The Providence Public School District will be a national leader in educating urban youth. Mission: The Providence Public School District will prepare all students to succeed in the nation’s colleges and universities, and in their chosen professions.


In grades K and 1 mathematics, summative assessments and “common tasks” were reworked to align to the CCSS; collaborative lesson planning and analysis of student work using the “three stack protocol” will continue. The revised curriculum is supported by two resources: Investigations and enVision. These resources, often used simultaneously, support students in meeting the CCSS. In grade 8 and high school mathematics, the scope and sequence and units were aligned to the CCSS. We made the decision to begin an immediate transition to provide as much time as possible to prepare our students for the first administration of PARCC in 2014–2015. PARCC will assess students in grades 9 through 11. Additionally, the GLEs/GSEs were analyzed against the CCSS to identify potential instructional gaps so that adjustments could be made to support students in preparation for continued NECAP testing that will occur through 2014. Research-based instructional strategies and technology were strategically integrated into the revisions. Initial efforts were launched to embed the CCSS Literacy Standards into the secondary social studies/history curriculum. Learning objectives, teaching strategies, and assessments were revised to improve alignment, clarity, and accuracy. Additionally, the number of learning objectives and essential questions in each unit was streamlined and reduced.

In closing, I would like to thank the Providence School Board and Superintendent Thomas Brady for their commitment to this very important work. Additionally, I must recognize the leadership of a dedicated Division of Teaching and Learning staff; the tireless efforts of the content supervisors and District Assistance Team members drive this work forward. Most importantly, this incredible body of work exists as a result of the collaborative efforts of hundreds of Providence teachers. Thank you for the countless hours invested in the development process on Saturdays and after the school day, often late into the evening. I look forward to continuing to work with all of you to achieve our mission of preparing all our students for success in the nation’s colleges and universities and in their chosen professions. With great respect,

Paula R. Shannon Interim Chief Academic Officer

An Equal Opportunity Employer. The Providence School Department does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, color, disability or veteran status. Vision: The Providence Public School District will be a national leader in educating urban youth. Mission: The Providence Public School District will prepare all students to succeed in the nation’s colleges and universities, and in their chosen professions.


World History 1

Table of Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 1 Section A: Course/Grade-Level Assigned Standards ............................................................................. A-1 Section B: Yearly Overview .................................................................................................................... B-1 Section C: Scope and Sequence ............................................................................................................... C-1 Section D: Units ...................................................................................................................................... D-1 Understanding the Unit Template for Social Studies Inclusion and Accommodations Unit 1.1: Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE Unit 1.2: Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE Unit 1.3: Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE Unit 2.1: An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE Unit 2.2: New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE Unit 2.3: Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations Unit 3.1: The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350 Unit 3.2: Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450 Unit 3.3: The Great Global Convergence Unit 4.1: The Making of the Atlantic World Unit 4.2: Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750 Unit 4.3: Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750 Section E: A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit: Understanding the Curricular, Instructional, and Assessment Aspects .................................................................................. E-1 Section F: Guidance: Effective Instructional Design and Delivery ......................................................... F-1 Section G: Rhode Island Standards for Social Studies and Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies ...................................................................................................... G-1


Introduction The content of these district curriculum frameworks was developed through a collaboration between the Providence Public Schools and the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin, in support of the Providence School Board’s vision that “The Providence Public School District will be a national leader in educating urban youth.” Additional development and review of the English language arts and social studies resources was supported by the Center for Behavioral Education and Research at the University of Connecticut, the National Center for History in the Schools, World History For Us All, and Facing History and Ourselves. This introduction provides context for and a broad overview of the District Curriculum Framework documents and is broken into the following subsections. •

Providence Public School District Curriculum Development Initiative—This subsection provides a summary of the workplan and vision driving the development of these curriculum frameworks. It lays out the project’s broad purpose, goal, objectives, actions, and roles/responsibilities and summarizes the Providence School Board’s vision, mission, and core beliefs and commitments.

The Charge—This subsection lays out a more specific context for the District Curriculum Development Initiative, including information on the Providence School Board’s Strategic Direction Policy and framework for an Aligned Instruction System.

Development of the Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum—This subsection describes how the guaranteed and viable curriculum was developed and how the individual instructional units in the District Curriculum Frameworks help make this guaranteed and viable curriculum actionable.

Structure of the District Curriculum Framework—This subsection provides a brief description of the Framework booklet components, with special attention to the structure of Section D: Units.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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Introduction

2011

 

Providence Public School District Curriculum Development Initiative

Overview

Purpose: Increase student achievement in Providence Public School District by aligning curriculum, instruction, and assessments to the state standards. Goal: By the 2011–2012 (math and science) and 2012–2013 (reading and writing) academic year, a minimum of 70% of all students will attain achievement proficiency levels of 3 or 4 on NECAP. Objectives:

Actions:

Roles and Responsibilities:

1.

Teachers, leaders, and Charles A. Dana Center staff will:

Division of Teaching and Learning staff will…

Implement the guaranteed and viable curriculum in every school, every classroom, every day, for every student.

2.

Provide regular opportunities for teachers and leaders to collaboratively study and implement the curriculum.

3.

Implement routines and structures for monitoring implementation of the curriculum and providing feedback.

a. Collaboratively generate district-level curriculum documents that delineate which standards should be taught in each grade level, in what order, and for what duration. This work includes the development of a high school course-taking sequence. b. Engage in system-wide study of the state standards and district-developed curriculum documents. c. Develop and implement support structures and tools for leaders to increase their ability to support teachers in implementing the district curriculum. d. Refine and implement support structures and tools for teachers as they work collaboratively to plan and implement instruction that is aligned to the state standards and district curriculum.

2

Provide monitoring and support of curriculum development and implementation, collaborate with teacher writing team members and Dana Center staff, and ensure that the work of the initiative is aligned to the district’s overall plan for increasing student achievement. Building leaders will… Ensure teacher participation in professional development, provide regular opportunities for teachers to collaboratively plan and implement instruction aligned to the standards and curriculum, monitor implementation of the curriculum, and provide teachers with ongoing meaningful feedback. Teachers will… Attend and actively participate in professional development, implement the curriculum in every classroom for every child on every day, and regularly collaborate with grade level/department colleagues to plan and implement instruction aligned to the standards and curriculum documents. The Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin will… Provide technical expertise and on-site support for planning and implementing this work, facilitate the initial alignment work, and help Providence Public School District build capacity in its system throughout this project.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


2011

Introduction

   

Vision: The Providence Public School District will be a national leader in educating urban youth.

Mission: Providence Schools will prepare all students to succeed in the nationʼs colleges and universities and in their chosen professions. The Providence School Board has committed to focusing the comprehensive reform and restructuring of the Providence Public Schools on success for all students. The School Board has set forth an ambitious vision and mission to guide the work of the District. The Board’s core beliefs and commitments provide the foundation upon which the District will achieve its vision and mission.

Core Beliefs and Commitments of the Providence School Board 1. All Providence students can and must learn at high levels, reach their full potential, and succeed in school and in life. Therefore, we commit to creating the conditions for all students to learn at high levels and to their full potential; we commit to closing the achievement gap. 2. Providence teachers and Providence schools can and must have a positive influence and a profound effect on our students’ lives. Therefore, we commit to organizing our schools and all our resources to support the student–teacher relationship as the primary factor in student success. 3. Providence schools can and must be good places to teach and good places to learn. Therefore, we commit to creating schools that have positive cultures and are housed in high-quality facilities. 4. The Providence school district can and must be a high-performing organization. Therefore, we commit to organizing the Providence School Department around its core business—teaching and learning. 5. Providence families and the entire Providence community can and must support our students’ success. Therefore, we commit to partnering with family and community in shaping and supporting the education of our students.

The Charge Providence will create a high-performing school district that educates all students to high standards and eliminates the achievement gap. Creating a high-performing school district requires that we redesign all our systems to directly and effectively manage our core business of teaching and learning. We will make fundamental changes, moving from a school system in which schools work in isolation from each other to a school system working from common understandings and resources. This tightly integrated system will provide equity and access to all students. Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

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Introduction

2011

Strategic Direction Policy and Aligned Instruction System To bring about dramatic positive improvements in student outcomes and to enact the Providence School Board’s Core Beliefs and Commitments, the School Board adopted a Strategic Direction Policy that articulates an organized, coherent framework for an Aligned Instruction System. The Aligned Instruction System is a set of organized, coherent strategies designed to create dramatic positive improvements in student outcomes. The design is enhanced by collaboration and engagement with educators, community partners, parents, and students. An Aligned Instruction System clearly articulates how schools and departments are to implement a standards-based school design through alignment of curriculum and instruction, a comprehensive assessment framework, and professional development. Providence’s Aligned Instruction System addresses all three of these components for managing teaching and learning in our schools. The District Curriculum Frameworks Central support staff and Providence teachers worked collaboratively with consultants from partnering organizations to develop demanding, relevant curriculum frameworks that direct instruction in core subjects and all grade levels. These curriculum frameworks are driven by the critical factors established by the Providence School Board in addition to research in the field of curriculum design and implementation. Specifically, the curriculum framework documents encompass these critical factors: •

Alignment of curriculum to adopted standards that clearly define expectations for what students will learn and how well they have to learn it;

Identification of research-based instructional programs, strategies, and tools that support the delivery of instruction aligned to adopted standards; and

Articulation of instructional practices and strategies suggested to support teachers in purposeful unit and lesson planning and instructional delivery.

The Strategic Direction Policy also provides specific expectations about instruction—that is, the way the curriculum is presented to students. Instruction will focus on the needs of students. The curriculum documents, therefore, identify instructional practices and strategies for teaching the curriculum that are grounded in current research. These practices and strategies provide guidance about the key elements of effective instructional design and delivery. In accordance with School Board policy, the district has identified high-quality, research-based instructional programs and tools. These programs and tools support schools in the consistent and timely delivery of the pre-kindergarten–12 curriculum. Curriculum documents clearly identify which instructional programs and tools will be used and how these programs and tools are aligned to stateadopted standards and/or national content standards.

Development of the Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum Research concludes that implementation of a guaranteed and viable curriculum plays a critical role in the improvement of student achievement. Guaranteed means that every child in every school receives essential instruction every day; viable means that the curriculum can be taught in the amount of time provided. The District Curriculum Frameworks outline the guaranteed and viable curriculum defining the essential knowledge that all students must learn at each grade level and in each course of study. Careful attention was given to the amount of time necessary to teach these essential knowledge and skills.

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


2011

Introduction

The guaranteed and viable curriculum was developed through careful study of—and alignment to—the state standards. This process of starting from state standards to identify essential student learning is referred to as backloading. The backloading process supported the development of the scope and sequence document for each grade level or course. Elements of the Understanding by Design1 approach supported the development of specific instructional units presented in the District Curriculum Framework documents. The use of these approaches ensures that the written curriculum directly aligns to the assessed curriculum. A tremendous amount of research, time, and discussion revolved around the design of the District Curriculum Framework documents to provide the necessary specificity to develop common understandings of standards, identify specific learning objectives, and recommend effective instructional practices and strategies. These documents provide the starting point for ongoing collaborative discussion focused upon effective instructional delivery aligned to standards and resulting student achievement. The District Curriculum Frameworks provide a “road map” and establish common expectations across the district. In order to meet the needs of students, teachers must continue to engage in purposeful unit and lesson planning. The frameworks or “maps” support planning but in no way should limit daily preparation. Purposeful unit and lesson planning must ensure that actual instruction and tasks align to the curriculum and assessment expectations.

Structure of the District Curriculum Framework The purpose of these district curriculum documents is to support quality implementation of the standards every day, in every classroom, for every student—to ensure grade-level and subject-area alignment and coherence across the district. In the District Curriculum Framework documents for mathematics, science, English language Arts, and social studies/history, we have tried to identify which standards are taught, when, and for how long. We have also tried to clarify standards and describe the implications of the standards for each grade level or course. We have described units of study and have articulated the alignment of lesson objectives and assessments to standards and instructional resources. The District Curriculum Framework documents do not provide daily lesson plans, eliminate the need for lesson planning, or recreate the teacher’s edition of textbooks. Rather, the curriculum framework provides a workplan that directs the instruction delivered in every classroom in every school in the district. The curriculum framework consists of the following sections. Section A: Course/Grade-Level Assigned Standards This section denotes which GSEs or Common Core standards are to be addressed in each grade level in the Providence Public Schools for the following: K–8 science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Precalculus, 6–8 social studies, 9–11 social studies, and 9–12 English language arts. This section also denotes which National History Standards are to be addressed in each secondary social studies course. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for mathematics and English language arts adopted by Rhode Island define what is to be addressed in the K–8 mathematics and English language arts programs.

                                                                                                                1

Grant P. Wiggins and Jay McTighe. (2005, second edition). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. See also the Understanding by Design idea exchange website at http://ubdexchange.ascd.org. Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

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2011

Section B: Yearly Overview This section lists unit titles for the grade or course along with the approximate number of days needed to conduct the unit and the Essential Questions students should be able to answer by the end of the unit. Section C: Scope and Sequence This section lists the relevant content standards (CCSS/GSEs) and/or national standards from each unit. Section D: Units These instructional units outline specific student outcomes aligned to the standards. These units lie at the heart of the District Curriculum Framework documents. Each unit provides detailed information to support daily instruction and is structured in five main sections: •

Overview: Each unit overview lists the overall days needed to teach the unit and defines expectations for student learning by articulating the content to be learned and processes to be used—that is, the standards-based expectations of which students will demonstrate understanding. The overview ends with a list of the Essential Questions that students should be able to answer by the end of the unit.

Written Curriculum: This section lists the specific parts of the relevant standards to be taught during the unit. The Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites subsection provides an analysis of the ideas taught in the grade level(s) before and after the grade level or course being taught. This section also reports important findings about the standards that support teachers in narrowing the ideas in the standards to the content taught in the grade level, and it provides additional specificity in those cases where state-adopted standards lack sufficient specificity.

Taught Curriculum: This section begins with specific learning objectives for what “students will be able to” do throughout the lessons within the unit, linked to recommended pacing for the teaching of each objective. The Resources subsection identifies the district instructional resources that are aligned to the learning objectives, and a Materials subsection alerts users to any additional materials needed for the unit. The Instructional Considerations subsection details key vocabulary and suggests planning and instructional strategies appropriate for the unit lessons.

Assessed Curriculum: This section lists Embedded/Formative Assessments and Summative/Unit Assessments. The unit documents sometimes also make recommendations to support the regular use of formative assessments to inform instruction. The Summative/Unit Assessments subsection identifies specific common assessment items and New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) released items. An optional Extra Practice subsection identifies additional NECAP items teachers can use if students need additional practice with the concepts.

Notes: This section is left blank so that teachers and leaders can write down important findings and thoughts regarding the curriculum.

Section E: A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit: Understanding the Curricular, Instructional, and Assessment Aspects This Dana Center tool, modified for use with the Providence Public Schools Curriculum Framework, provides step-by-step guidance for a process in which teacher and leader teams engage in focused dialogue about the relationship between standards and the units in these District Curriculum Framework documents. This tool supports collaborative study of individual units through a reflective process that engages educators in studying standards within a unit to arrive at common understandings and expectations for student learning. This process supports teachers in ensuring alignment between what is expected and what is actually taught. 6

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


2011

Introduction

Section F: Guidance: Effective Instructional Design and Delivery This section provides a space to organize resources and materials received during ongoing professional development sessions, which will address expectations for the effective design and delivery of instruction. Guidance provided in training sessions is based upon decades of research defining the characteristics of and criteria for rigorous, engaging instruction that results in high levels of student learning. Section G: Rhode Island Standards/Common Core State Standards These are complete copies of the state standards to aid in effective collaboration around the District Curriculum Framework documents. Each District Curriculum Framework booklet contains the full CCSS mathematics standards, the full science standards, the full CCSS ELA standards, or the full government/civics and historical perspectives standards. The CCSS for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and the Technical Subjects are also included in the social studies/history frameworks. Parts of the CCSS Mathematics Appendix A appear in the grade 8 and high school mathematics frameworks. The National History Standards are bound and will be provided separately. Additional information about the Common Core State Standards, including appendices, can be retrieved at the following website: www.corestandards.org/the-standards. Section H: Research-Based Instructional Strategies This section appears only in the second and third editions of the mathematics frameworks and second edition of the science frameworks. The section presents three categories of research-based instructional strategies that support high student achievement when implemented consistently and appropriately. For the District Curriculum Frameworks in mathematics and science, three categories of strategies from the work of Marzano, Pickering, and Pollock2 were determined to be easy to integrate into and especially beneficial for mathematics and science teaching and learning. In this section, each category of strategies is presented with a description of its purpose and intent, student learning results when it is used correctly, and specific examples of commonly used high-impact strategies and high-quality tools. Section I: K–12 Key Vocabulary This section appears only in the second and third editions of the mathematics frameworks and second edition of the science frameworks. The section lists the Key Vocabulary by grade level for mathematics and science. Section J: Blackline Masters for Released NECAP Items For grade levels with released NECAP items, this section collects the items that connect to content in specific units. (In the English language arts binders, this is Section H.) Section K: Supplemental Unit Materials This section is present only in District Curriculum Framework documents in mathematics for grades 6, 7, and 8, and for Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. These supplemental materials address standards that were not addressed in the selected grade-level instructional resource.

                                                                                                                2

Robert J. Marzano, Debra J. Pickering, and Jane E. Pollock. (2001). Classroom Instruction That Works: ResearchBased Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

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2011

Feedback Feedback from teachers who are implementing the curriculum on a daily basis remains a critical part of our ongoing revision and refinement of the curriculum units. Division of Teaching and Learning staff will continue to collect feedback in two major ways: 1. Online curriculum feedback survey 2. Implementation notes provided to instructional coaches (elementary) or teacher leaders (secondary) or emailed directly to the appropriate content supervisor The online survey is the best way to provide feedback, as it allows us to quickly collate suggestions by grade or course. Survey responses are anonymous. The survey can be accessed at the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/endofunitfeedback When preparing to provide feedback, make certain that you have available the curriculum unit for which you plan to provide feedback. You will need to provide specific references to this document. The survey will ask for the following information: •

Unit title

List 3 instructional strategies you used to address the learning objectives that worked well.

List 3 instructional strategies you used to address the learning objectives that did not work well.

Did you notice any alignment issues between the learning objectives and the identified standards? If yes, describe.

How many teaching days did it take to complete the unit?

Which specific learning objectives took more time to teach than suggested?

List specific reasons why objectives noted required additional time.

What concept, skill, or strategy posed a challenge to students in this unit?

Which identified resources and materials did you find most effective in developing student understanding of the learning objectives?

What modifications did you make in the identified instructional resources to ensure alignment to the identified standard and learning objectives?

What supports do you feel you still need to effectively teach the content of this unit?

 

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Section A: Course/Grade-Level Assigned Standards


World History 1

Course/Grade-Level Assigned Standards The standards below were selected from the larger set of the Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R. I. History: Grades 9-12; the National Standards for History (National Center for History in the Schools, www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs/standards); and the Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, Grades 6–12.

Rhode Island GSEs for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives: Grades 5-8 Civics and Government C&G 1: People create and change structures of power, authority, and governance in order to accomplish common goals. C&G 1 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by… a. describing or explaining competing ideas about the purposes and functions of politics and government b. comparing and contrasting different forms of government and their purposes

C&G 2: The Constitution of the United States establishes a government of limited powers that are shared among different levels and branches. C&G 4: People engage in political processes in a variety of ways. C&G 4 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by… b. interacting with, analyzing, and evaluating political institutions and political parties in an authentic context (using local, national, or international issues/events that are personally meaningful)

C&G 5: As members of an interconnected world community, the choices we make impact others locally, nationally, and globally. C&G 5 (9-12) – 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of the many ways Earth’s people are interconnected by… a. identifying the ways the world is organized: politically, socially, culturally, economically, environmentally (e.g. nation-state)

Historical Perspectives HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (5-6) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by… b. using sources to support the stories of history (How do we know what we know?)

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2

Section A

HP 1 (9-12) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by… a. formulating historical questions, obtaining, analyzing, evaluating historical primary and secondary print and non-print sources (e.g., RI Constitution, art, oral history, writings of Elizabeth Buffum Chace) c. identifying, describing, or analyzing multiple perspectives on an historical trend or event (e.g. mill worker v. mill owners during Industrial Revolution in RI; separation ofpowers in RI government) HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by… a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12)– 1 Students connect the past with the present by… a. explaining origins of major historical events (e.g., Industrial Revolution in Rhode Island) b. identifying and linking ideas and their enduring implications (e.g. separation of church and state in Rhode Island) HP 2 (9-12) – 2 Students chronicle events and conditions by… a. creating narratives based on a particular historical point of view (e.g., unemployed WWII vet, home front in WWII, oil refinery promoter, environmental activist in Rhode Island; slave or free black in Newport, slave holder, trader or investor) b. synthesizing information from multiple sources to formulate an historical interpretation (e.g., documentbased questions, quantitative data, material artifacts of RI) HP 2 (9-12)– 3 Students show understanding of change over time by… a. tracing patterns chronologically in history to describe changes on domestic, social, or economic life (e.g. immigration trends, land use patterns, naval military history)

HP 3: The study of history helps us understand the present and shape the future. HP 3 (9-12) – 2 Students make personal connections in an historical context (e.g., source-to-source, source-toself, source-to-world) by… b. analyzing how an historical development (e.g. cycle of poverty or prosperity, low educational attainment, “Independent Man”) has contributed to current social, economic, or political patterns

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 3: Classical Traditions, Major Religions, and Giant Empires, 1000 BCE-300 CE Standard 2: The emergence of Aegean civilization and how interrelations developed among peoples of the eastern Mediterranean and Southwest Asia, 600-200 BCE.

2A The student understands the achievements and limitations of the democratic institutions that developed in Athens and other Aegean city-states. Therefore, the student is able to Assess the importance of Greek ideas about democracy and citizenship for the development of Western political thought and institutions. [Hypothesize the influence of the past]

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Section A

World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2

Standard 3: How major religions and large-scale empires arose in the Mediterranean basin, China, and India, 500 BCE–300 CE.

3A The student understands the causes and consequences of the unification of the Mediterranean basin under Roman rule. Describe the political and social institutions of the Roman Republic and analyze why Rome was transformed from republic to empire. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Evaluate the major legal, artistic, architectural, technological, and literary achievements of the Romans and the influence of Hellenistic cultural traditions on Roman Europe. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

3C The student understands how China became unified under the early imperial dynasties. Analyze the political and ideological contributions of the Han to the development of the imperial bureaucratic state and the expansion of the empire. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Standard 5: Major global trends from 1000 BCE-300 CE.

5A The student understands major global trends from 1000 BCE to 300 CE. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze the significance of military power, state bureaucracy, legal codes, belief systems, written languages, and communications and trade networks in the development of large regional empires. [Interrogate historical data] Define the concept of “classical civilization� and assess the enduring importance of ideas, institutions, and art forms that emerged in the classical periods. [Analyze the importance of ideas] Analyze how new religious or ethical systems contributed to cultural integration of large regions of Afroeurasia. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain the significance of Greek or Hellenistic ideas and cultural styles in the history of the Mediterranean basin, Europe, Southwest Asia, and India. [Analyze the importance of ideas] Analyze ways in which trade networks, merchant communities, state power, tributary systems of production, and other factors contributed to the economic integration of large regions of Afroeurasia. [Employ quantitative analysis]

Era 4: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, 300-1000 CE Standard 1: Imperial crises and their aftermath, 300-700 CE.

1A The student understands the decline of the Roman and Han empires. Therefore, the student is able to Trace the migrations and military movements of major pastoral nomadic groups into both the Roman Empire and China. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Compare the consequences of these movements in China and the western part of the Roman Empire. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze comparatively the collapse of the western part of the classical Roman Empire and the survival of the eastern part. [Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas] Describe the consolidation of the Byzantine state after the breakup of the Roman Empire and assess how Byzantium transmitted ancient traditions and created a new Christian civilization. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Analyze various causes that historians have proposed to account for the decline of the Han and Roman empires. [Evaluate major debates among historians.]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2

Section A

1B The student understands the expansion of Christianity and Buddhism beyond the lands of their origins. Therefore, the student is able to Assess how Christianity and Buddhism won converts among culturally diverse peoples across wide areas of Afro-Eurasia. [Demonstrate and explain the influence of ideas] Analyze the spread of Christianity and Buddhism in the context of change and crisis in the Roman and Han empires. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze the importance of monasticism in the growth of Christianity and Buddhism and the participation of both men and women in monastic life and missionary activity. [Compare and contrast differing values, behaviors, and institutions]

1C The student understands the synthesis of Hindu civilization in India in the era of the Gupta empire. Therefore, the student is able to Describe fundamental features of the Hindu belief system as they emerged in the early first millennium CE. [Appreciate historical perspectives] Explain the rise of the Gupta Empire and analyze factors that contributed to the empire’s stability and economic prosperity. [Analyze multiple causation] Analyze how Hinduism responded to the challenges of Buddhism and prevailed as the dominant faith in India. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Evaluate Gupta achievements in art, literature, and mathematics. [Appreciate historical perspective] Standard 2: Causes and consequences of the rise of Islamic civilization in the 7th-10th centuries.

2A The student understands the emergence of Islam and how it spread in Southwest Asia, North Africa, and Europe. Therefore, the student is able to Describe the life of Muhammad, the development of the early Muslim community, and the basic teachings and practices of Islam. [Assess the importance of the individual] Explain how Muslim forces overthrew the Byzantines in Syria and Egypt and the Sassanids in Persia and Iraq. [Interrogate historical data] Analyze how Islam spread in Southwest Asia and the Mediterranean region. [Analyze the influence of ideas] Analyze how the Arab Caliphate became transformed into a Southwest Asian and Mediterranean empire under the Umayyad dynasty and explain how the Muslim community became divided into Sunnis and Shi’ites. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

2B The student understands the significance of the Abbasid Caliphate as a center of cultural innovation and hub of interregional trade in the 8th-10th centuries. Analyze the sources and development of Islamic law and the influence of law and religious practice on such areas as family life, moral behavior, marriage, inheritance, and slavery. [Examine the influence of ideas] Describe the cultural and social contributions of various ethnic and religious communities, particularly the Christian and Jewish, in the Abbasid lands and Iberia. [Appreciate historical perspectives] Evaluate Abbasid contributions to mathematics, science, medicine, literature, and the preservation of Greek learning. [Interrogate historical data] Standard 3: Major developments in East Asia and Southeast Asia in the era of the Tang dynasty, 600-900 CE.

3A The student understands China’s sustained political and cultural expansion in the Tang period. Describe political centralization and economic reforms that marked China’s reunification under the Sui and Tang dynasties. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] A-4

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Section A

World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2

Standard 4: The search for political, social, and cultural redefinition in Europe, 500-1000 CE.

4A The student understands the foundations of a new civilization in Western Christendom in the 500 years following the breakup of the western Roman Empire. Assess the importance of monasteries, convents, the Latin Church, and missionaries from Britain and Ireland in the Christianizing of western and central Europe. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain the development of the Merovingian and Carolingian states and assess their success at maintaining public order and local defense in western Europe. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Analyze how the preservation of Greco-Roman and early Christian learning in monasteries and convents and in Charlemagne’s royal court contributed to the emergence of European civilization. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

4B The student understands the coalescence of political and social order in Europe. Standard 6: The rise of centers of civilization in Mesoamerica and Andean South America in the first millennium CE.

6AThe student understands the origins, expansion, and achievements of Maya civilization. Describe the natural environment of southern Mesoamerica and its relationship to the development of Maya urban society. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze the Maya system of agricultural production and trade and its relationship to the rise of city-states. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Interpret the Maya cosmic world view as evidenced in art and architecture and evaluate Maya achievements in astronomy, mathematics, and the development of a calendar. [Appreciate historical perspectives] Analyze how monumental architecture and other evidence portrays the lives of elite men and women. [Draw upon visual sources]

6B The student understands the rise of the TeotihuacĂĄn, Zapotec/Mixtec, and Moche civilizations. Analyze how the diverse natural environment of the Andes region shaped systems of agriculture and animal herding. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Describe how archaeological discoveries have led to greater understanding of the character of Moche society. [Hold interpretations of history as tentative]

Era 5 Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000-1500 CE Standard 1: The maturing of an interregional system of communication, trade, and cultural exchange in an era of Chinese economic power and Islamic expansion

1A The student understands China’s extensive urbanization and commercial expansion between the 10th and 13th centuries. Analyze how improved agricultural production, population growth, urbanization, and commercialization were interconnected. [Analyze multiple causation] Identify major technological and scientific innovations and analyze their effects on Chinese life. [Examine the influence of ideas]

1D The student understands how interregional communication and trade led to intensified cultural exchanges among diverse peoples of Eurasia and Africa. Explain connections between trade and the spread of Islam in Central Asia, East Africa, West Africa, the coasts of India, and Southeast Asia. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain how camel caravan transport facilitated long-distance trade across Inner Eurasia and the Sahara Desert. [Interrogate historical data] Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

A-5


World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2

Section A

Standard 2: The redefining of European society and culture, 1000-1300 CE.

2A The student understands feudalism and the growth of centralized monarchies and city-states in Europe. Therefore, the student is able to Describe feudal lordship and explain how feudal relationships provided a foundation of political order in parts of Europe. [Interrogate historical data] Analyze how European monarchies expanded their power at the expense of feudal lords and assess the growth and limitations of representative institutions in these monarchies. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain the changing political relationship between the Catholic Church and secular states. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze how prosperous city-states arose in Italy and northern Europe and compare the political institutions of city-states with those of centralizing monarchies. [Formulate historical questions]

2B The student understands the expansion of Christian Europe after 1000. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze connections between population growth and increased agricultural production and technological innovation. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain urban growth in the Mediterranean region and northern Europe and analyze causes for the expansion of manufacturing, interregional trade, and a money economy in Europe. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships] Analyze the causes and consequences of the European Crusades against Syria and Palestine. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

2C The student understands the patterns of social change and cultural achievement in Europe’s emerging civilizations. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the rise of schools and universities in Italy, France, and England contributed to literacy, learning, and scientific advancement. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Evaluate major works of art, architecture, and literature and analyze how they shed light on values and attitudes in Christian society. [Draw upon visual sources] Standard 3: The rise of the Mongol empire and its consequences for Eurasian peoples, 1200-1350.

3A The student understands the world-historical significance of the Mongol empire. Assess the career of Chingis Khan as a conqueror and military innovator in the context of Mongol society. [Assess the importance of the individual] Describe the Mongol conquests of 1206-1279 and assess their effects on peoples of China, Southeast Asia, Russia, and Southwest Asia. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Describe the founding and political character of Mongol rule in China, Central Asia, Southwest Asia, and Russia and explain why the unified empire divided into four major successor kingdoms. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Assess the usefulness and limitations of the concept of the “Pax Mongolica” and analyze how long-distance communication and trade led to cultural and technological diffusion across Eurasia. [Interrogate historical data]

3B The student understands the significance of Mongol rule in China Analyze how Mongol rule affected economy, society, and culture in China and Korea. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

A-6

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Section A

World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2

Standard 4: The growth of states, towns, and trade in Sub-Saharan Africa between the 11th and 15th centuries.

4A The student understands the growth of imperial states in West Africa and Ethiopia. Analyze the importance of agriculture, gold production, and the trans-Saharan caravan trade in the growth of the Mali and Songhay empires. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain how Islam expanded in West Africa and assess its importance in the political and cultural life of Mali and Songhay. [Examine the influence of ideas] Standard 5: Patterns of crisis and recovery in Afro-Eurasia, 1300-1450

5A The student understands the consequences of the Black Death and recurring plague pandemic in the 14th century. Explain the origins and characteristics of the plague pandemic of the mid-14th century, and describe its spread across Eurasia and North Africa. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Analyze the demographic, economic, social, and political effects of the plague pandemic in Eurasia and North Africa in the second half of the 14th century. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

5B The student understands transformations in Europe following the economic and demographic crises of the 14th century. Analyze major changes in the agrarian and commercial economies of Europe in the context of drastic population decline. [Appreciate historical perspectives] Assess the effects of crises in the Catholic Church on its organization and prestige. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships] Analyze the resurgence of centralized monarchies and economically powerful city-states in western Europe in the 15th century. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Define humanism as it emerged in Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries and analyze how study of GrecoRoman antiquity and critical analysis of texts gave rise to new forms of literature, philosophy, and education. [Examine the influence of ideas.] Evaluate the aesthetic and cultural significance of major changes in the techniques of painting, sculpture, and architecture. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

5C The student understands major political developments in Asia in the aftermath of the collapse of Mongol rule and the plague pandemic. Analyze reasons for the collapse of Mongol rule in China and the reconstituting of the empire under the Chinese Ming dynasty. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Describe the Zheng He maritime expeditions of the early 15th century and analyze why the Ming state initiated, then terminated, these voyages. [Evaluate the implementation of a decision] Standard 6: The expansion of states and civilizations in the Americas, 1000-1500.

6A The student understands the development of complex societies and states in North America and Mesoamerica. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the Aztec empire arose in the 14th and 15th centuries and explain major aspects of Aztec government, society, religion, and culture. [Interrogate historical data]

6B The student understands the development of the Inca empire in Andean South America. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze Inca expansion and methods of imperial unification. [Appreciate historical perspectives] Explain Inca social, political, religious, and economic institutions. [Interrogate historical data]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

A-7


World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2

Section A

Compare the government, economy, religion, and social organization of the Aztec and Inca empires. [Compare and contrast differing values and institutions] Analyze how the diverse natural environment of the Andes region shaped systems of agriculture and animal herding. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Describe how archaeological discoveries have led to greater understanding of the character of Moche society. [Hold interpretations of history as tentative] Standard 7: Major Global Trends from 1000-1500 CE

7A The student understands major global trends from 1000 to 1500 CE. Therefore, the student is able to Compare Europe and China in relation to causes and consequences of productive growth, commercialization, urbanization, and technological or scientific innovation. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Account for the growth, decline, and recovery of the overall population of Afro-Eurasia and analyze ways in which large demographic swings might have affected economic, social, and cultural life in various regions. [Utilize mathematical and quantitative data]

Era 6: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 1450-1770 Standard 1: How the transoceanic interlinking of all major regions of the world from 1450 to 1600 led to global transformations.

1A The student understands the origins and consequences of European overseas expansion in the 15th and 16th centuries. Explain major characteristics of the interregional trading system that linked peoples of Africa, Asia, and Europe on the eve of the European overseas voyages. [Consider multiple perspectives] Analyze the major social, economic, political, and cultural features of European society, and in particular of Spain and Portugal, that stimulated exploration and conquest overseas. [Identify issues and problems in the past] Identify major technological developments in shipbuilding, navigation, and naval warfare and trace the cultural origins of various innovations. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze the motives, nature, and short-term significance of the major Iberian military and commercial expeditions to Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas. [Identify issues and problems in the past]

1B The student understands the encounters between Europeans and peoples of Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Analyze Portuguese maritime expansion to Africa, India, and Southeast Asia and interactions between the Portuguese and the peoples of these regions. [Formulate historical questions] Describe the political and military collision between the Spanish and the Aztec and Inca empires and analyze why these empires collapsed. [Identify issues and problems in the past]

1C The student understands the consequences of the worldwide exchange of flora, fauna, and pathogens. Assess ways in which the exchange of plants and animals around the world in the late 15th and the 16th centuries affected European, Asian, African, and American Indian societies and commerce. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze why the introduction of new disease microorganisms in the Americas after 1492 had such devastating demographic and social effects on American Indian populations. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

A-8

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Section A

World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2

Standard 2: How European society experienced political, economic, and cultural transformations in an age of global intercommunication 1450-1750.

2A The student understands demographic, economic, and social trends in Europe. Analyze the social and economic consequences of population growth and urbanization in Europe from the 15th to the 18th centuries. [Utilize visual and mathematical data] Describe major institutions of capitalism and analyze how the emerging capitalist economy transformed agricultural production, manufacturing, and ways in which women and men worked. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships]

2B The student understands the Renaissance, Reformation, and Catholic Reformation. Analyze the social and intellectual significance of the technological innovation of printing with movable type. [Demonstrate and explain the influence of ideas] Explain connections between the Italian Renaissance and the development of humanist ideas in Europe north of the Alps. [Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas and values] Evaluate major achievements in literature, music, painting, sculpture, and architecture in 16th-century Europe. [Draw upon visual data and literary sources] Explain discontent among Europeans with the late medieval Church and analyze the beliefs and ideas of the leading Protestant reformers. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances] Explain the aims and policies of the Catholic Reformation and assess the impact of religious reforms and divisions on European cultural values, family life, convent communities, and men’s and women’s education. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze causes of religious wars in 16th- and 17th-century Europe and account for the rise of religious pluralism. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances]

2C The student understands the rising military and bureaucratic power of European states between the 16th and 18th centuries. Therefore, the student is able to Account for the growth of bureaucratic monarchy in Russia and analyze the significance of Peter the Great’s westernizing reforms. [Interrogate historical data] Trace Russian expansion in the Caucasus, Central Asia, and Siberia and explain the success of the tsars in transforming the Duchy of Moscow in a Eurasian empire. [Draw comparisons across regions.] Analyze the character, development, and sources of wealth of strong bureaucratic monarchies in the 16th century. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

2D The student understands how the Scientific Revolution contributed to transformations in European society. Explain connections between the Scientific Revolution and its antecedents such as Greek rationalism, medieval theology, Muslim science, Renaissance humanism, and new global knowledge. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances] Explain the cultural, religious, and scientific impact of astronomical discoveries and innovations from Copernicus to Newton. [Examine the influence of ideas] Analyze the importance of discoveries in mathematics, physics, biology, and chemistry for European society. [Employ quantitative analysis] Explain the development and significance of the “scientific method.” [Examine the influence of ideas]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

A-9


World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2

Section A

Standard 3: How large territorial empires dominated much of Eurasia between the 16th and 18th centuries.

3A The student understands the extent and limits of Chinese regional power under the Ming dynasty. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze the power and limits of imperial absolutism under the Ming dynasty. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain China’s self-concept as the “middle kingdom” and the character of its political, commercial, and cultural relations with Korea, Vietnam, and other societies of East and Southeast Asia. [Interrogate historical data] Analyze China’s changing attitudes toward external political and commercial relations following the Zheng He voyages from 1405 to 1433. [Formulate historical questions]

3B The student understands how Southeast Europe and Southwest Asia became unified under the Ottoman Empire. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the capture of Constantinople and the destruction of the Byzantine empire contributed to the expansion of Ottoman power. [Hypothesize the influence of the past] Analyze reasons for Ottoman military successes against Persia, Egypt, North African states, and Christian European kingdoms. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze the political, institutional, and economic development of the empire in the context of its religious and ethnic diversity. [Analyze multiple causation]

3C The student understands the rise of the Safavid and Mughal empire. Therefore, the student is able to Explain the Mughal conquest of India and the success of the Turkic warrior class in uniting the diverse peoples of the Indian subcontinent. [Formulate a position or course of action on an issue] Analyze the relationship between Muslims and Hindus in the empire and compare Akbar’s governing methods and religious ideas with those of other Mughal emperors. [Examine the influence of ideas, human interests, and beliefs] Standard 4: Economic, political, and cultural interrelations among peoples of Africa, Europe, and the Americas, 1500-1750.

4A The student understands how states and peoples of European descent became dominant in the Americas between the 16th and 18th centuries. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the Netherlands, England, and France became naval, commercial and political powers in the Atlantic basin. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances]

4B The student understands the origins and consequences of the trans-Atlantic African slave trade. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze the ways in which entrepreneurs and colonial governments exploited American Indian labor and why commercial agriculture came to rely overwhelmingly on African slave labor. [Evidence historical perspectives] Compare ways in which slavery or other forms of social bondage were practiced in the Islamic lands, Christian Europe, and West Africa. [Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas] Explain how commercial sugar production spread from the Mediterranean to the Americas and analyze why sugar, tobacco, and other crops grown in the Americas became so important in the world economy. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain the organization of long-distance trade in West and Central Africa and analyze the circumstances under which African governments, elites, merchants, and other groups participated in the sale of slaves to Europeans. [Identify issues and problems in the past] A-10

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Section A

World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2 Explain how European governments and firms organized and financed the trans-Atlantic slave trade; and describe the conditions under which slaves made the “middle passage� from Africa to the Americas. [Appreciate historical perspectives] Describe conditions of slave life on plantations in the Caribbean, Brazil, and British North America and analyze ways in which slaves perpetuated aspects of African culture and resisted plantation servitude. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

4C The student understands patterns of change in Africa in the era of the slave trade. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the Atlantic slave trade affected population, economic life, polygynous marriage, family life, and the use of male and female slave labor in West and Central Africa. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Standard 6: Major global trends from 1450 to 1770.

6A The student understands major global trends from 1450 to 1770. Therefore, the student is able to Assess the impact of gunpowder weaponry and other innovations in military technology on empire-building and the world balance of naval power. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain major changes in world political boundaries between 1450 and 1770 and assess the extent and limitations of European political and military power in Africa, Asia, and the Americas as of the mid-18th century. [Clarify information on the geographic setting]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Key Ideas and Details RH.9-10.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

RH.9-10.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

Craft and Structure RH.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.

RH.9-10.5

Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.

RH.9-10.6

Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas RH.9-10.7

Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.

RH.9-10.9

Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

A-11


World History 1 Grade Span Expectations Version 2

Section A

Writing Text Types and Purposes WHST.9-10.1

Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content. a.

Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

b.

Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

c.

Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

d.

Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e.

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

Production and Distribution of Writing WHST.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

WHST.9-10.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. WHST.9-10.9

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Range of Writing WHST.9-10.10

A-12

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Section B: Yearly Overview


World History 1

Yearly Overview Quarter 1   Unit

Days

1.1

13  

1.2

1.3

10

14

Unit Title and Essential Questions

Notes  

Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE •

What was similar and what was different about the character and form of the state in 5th-century BCE Athens and the Roman and Han empires?

How did Rome become transformed from a republic to an empire?  

How did Confucianism and the Mandate of Heaven contribute to the formation of empire in China?  

Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE •

In what ways were the growth of long-distance trade and the development of a chain of large and prosperous states across Afroeurasia in the early centuries CE related?

What factors help explain why both Buddhism and Christianity spread widely beyond the lands of their birth in the early centuries CE?

In what ways might trade between different societies contribute to change in those societies, and what connections might there be between trade and the spread of ideas and technologies?

Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE •

Why did both the Western Roman and Han empires fall between the 3rd and 5th centuries after having ruled huge areas of Afroeurasia for several centuries?

Why did the pastoral nomadic peoples of Inner Eurasia exert so much power between the 3rd and 6th centuries CE, and to what extent might their migrations and invasions account for the fall of the Western Roman and Han empires?

What important contributions did the Gupta Empire make to mathematics in the 4th through 6th centuries CE?

Why did Buddhism decline in the land of its birth relative to the Hindu tradition, which became stronger?

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

 

 

 

B-1  


World History 1 Yearly Overview Version 2  

Section B

 

Quarter 2   Unit

Days

2.1

11

2.2

2.3

14

12

Unit Title and Essential Questions An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE •

How did Islam become established as an important new religion beginning in the 7th century CE?

What evidence shows that the Muslim Abbasid Empire became a center of scientific, technological, and philosophical innovation between 750 and 1000 CE?

What evidence argues that China had a powerful economy in the era of the Tang Dynasty?

What are the major indications that a new civilization was emerging in Western Europe in the 600–1000 CE period?

New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE •

How would you compare and contrast China and Europe in the 1000–1300 CE period in terms of population and economic growth, urbanization, commerce, and impact on Afroeurasia as a whole?

How would you explain the fact that relations between the Christian states of Europe and the Muslim states of Southwest Asia and North Africa involved both peaceful commercial and cultural exchange and prolonged war?

Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations •

What factors encouraged the rise of dense urban societies in certain parts of Mesoamerica and South America?

How were complex societies in the Americas similar to or different from civilizations in Afroeurasia, such as the Roman Empire?

How did peoples of the Americas build large empires and cities without the benefit of basic tools available to peoples of Afroeurasia—particularly, iron, the wheel, and a choice of large domesticated animals?

Notes  

 

 

 

B-2  

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the   Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Quarter 3   Unit

Days

3.1

10  

3.2

3.3

14

14

Unit Title and Essential Questions The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350 •

Should the Mongol conquerors of the 13th and 14th centuries be regarded mainly as barbarian destroyers or as builders of stronger economic and cultural exchange networks across Eurasia?

In what fundamental ways did civilization in China differ from that in Europe in the 13th and early 14th centuries?

Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450 •

How could an infectious disease spread nearly all the way across Eurasia in the 14th century and have such devastating social and economic effects?

What do the Ming voyages in the Indian Ocean (1405-1433) tell us about China’s government and economy in that era?

What historical relationship might there be between the Italian Renaissance and the economic prosperity and power of such places as Florence, Venice, and Rome?

The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 •

How might the character, extent, and limits of Portuguese and Spanish power in Africa and Asia in the 16th century be assessed?

How may 16th-century encounters between Europeans and Native Americans in the West and between Europeans and Asians in the East be compared and contrasted?

Why did the linking of Afroeurasia with the Americas lead to a loss of as much as 90 percent of the Native American population by the early 17th century?

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

Notes  

 

 

B-3  


World History 1 Yearly Overview Version 2  

Section B

 

Quarter 4   Unit

Days

4.1

14

4.2

4.3

14

11

Unit Title and Essential Questions The Making of the Atlantic World •

Why was the Columbian Exchange of plants, animals, and diseases in the 16th and 17th centuries such an important world event?

Why did Europeans seek slave laborers from Africa for economic activities in the Americas, and what major effects did the Atlantic slave trade have on African societies up to the 19th century?

Why did more Africans than Europeans populate the Americas between the 16th and 18th centuries?

Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750 •

How did the new and developing gunpowder technology of the 16th and 17th centuries contribute to transformations in both war and government power?

How would you compare Western European empires with those of other parts of Afroeurasia in the 16th and 17th centuries?

Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750 •

How did the religious and political makeup of Western Europe change between 1450 and 1750?

In what ways did the Scientific Revolution change humankind’s ideas about the human species, the natural world, and the cosmos?

Notes  

 

 

 

B-4  

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the   Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Section C: Scope and Sequence


World History 1

Scope and Sequence Quarter 1 Unit 1.1: Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE, 13 days Grade-Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (5-6) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by… b. using sources to support the stories of history (How do we know what we know?)

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 3: Classical Traditions, Major Religions, and Giant Empires, 1000 BCE–300 CE Standard 2: The emergence of Aegean civilization and how interrelations developed among peoples of the eastern Mediterranean and Southwest Asia, 600–200 BCE.

2A The student understands the achievements and limitations of the democratic institutions that developed in Athens and other Aegean city-states. •

Explain hierarchical relationships within Greek society and analyze the civic, economic, and social tasks that men and women of different classes performed. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

Describe changing political institutions of Athens in the 6th and 5th centuries BCE and analyze the influence of political thought on public life. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

Assess the important of Greek ideas about democracy and citizenship for the development of Western political thought and institutions. [Hypothesize the influence of the past]

Standard 3: How major religions and large-scale empires arose in the Mediterranean basin, China, and India, 500 BCE–300 CE.

3A The student understands the causes and consequences of the unification of the Mediterranean basin under Roman rule. •

Describe the political and social institutions of the Roman Republic and analyze why Rome was transformed from republic to empire. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Evaluate the major legal, artistic, architectural, technological, and literary achievements of the Romans and the influence of Hellenistic cultural traditions on Roman Europe. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

3C The student understands how China became unified under the early imperial dynasties. •

Analyze the political and ideological contributions of the Han to the development of the imperial bureaucratic state and the expansion of the empire. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

C-1  


World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2  

Section C

Standard 5: Major global trends from 1000 BCE to 400 CE

5 The student understands major global trends from 1000 BCE to 300 CE. •

Define the concept of “classical civilization” and assess the enduring importance of ideas, institutions, and art forms that emerged in the classical periods. [Analyze the importance of ideas]

Analyze the significance of military power, state bureaucracy, legal codes, belief systems, written language, and communications and trade networks in the development of large regional empires. [Interrogate historical data]

Explain the significance of Greek or Hellenistic ideas and cultural styles in the history of the Mediterranean basin, Europe, Southwest Asia, and India. [Analyze the importance of ideas]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Key Ideas and Details RH.9-10.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

RH.9-10.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

Writing Production and Distribution of Writing WHST.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Unit 1.2: Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE, 10 days Grade-Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (5-6) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by… b. using sources to support the stories of history (How do we know what we know?)

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the   Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Section C

World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 3: Classical Traditions, Major Religions, and Giant Empires, 1000 BCE–300 CE Standard 5: Major global trends from 1000 BCE–300 CE.

5A The student understands major global trends from 1000 BCE to 300 CE. Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze the significance of military power, state bureaucracy, legal codes, belief systems, written languages, and communications and trade networks in the development of large regional empires. [Interrogate historical data]

Analyze how new religious or ethical systems contributed to cultural integration of large regions of Afroeurasia. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Analyze ways in which trade networks, merchant communities, state power, tributary systems of production, and other factors contributed to the economic integration of large regions of Afroeurasia. [Employ quantitative analysis]

Era 4: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, 300–1000 CE Standard 1: Imperial crises and their aftermath, 300-700 CE

1B The student understands the expansion of Christianity and Buddhism beyond the lands of their origins. Therefore, the student is able to •

Assess how Christianity and Buddhism won converts among culturally diverse peoples across wide areas of Afro-Eurasia. [Demonstrate and explain the influence of ideas]

Analyze the spread of Christianity and Buddhism in the context of change and crisis in the Roman and Han empires. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas RH.9-10.7

Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.

Writing Production and Distribution of Writing WHST.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

C-3  


World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2  

Section C

Unit 1.3: Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE, 14 days Grade-Span Expectations C&G 1: People create and change structures of power, authority, and governance in order to accomplish common goals. C&G 1 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by… a. describing or explaining competing ideas about the purposes and functions of politics and government

C&G 5: As members of an interconnected world community, the choices we make impact others locally, nationally, and globally. C&G 5 (9-12) – 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of the many ways Earth’s people are interconnected by… a. identifying the ways the world is organized: politically, socially, culturally, economically, environmentally (e.g. nation-state)

HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12) – 2 Students chronicle events and conditions by… a. creating narratives based on a particular historical point of view (e.g., unemployed WWII vet, home front in WWII, oil refinery promoter, environmental activist in Rhode Island; slave or free black in Newport, slave holder, trader or investor)

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 4: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, 300-1000 CE Standard 1: Imperial crises and their aftermath, 300-700 CE.

1A The student understands the decline of the Roman and Han empires. Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze various causes that historians have proposed to account for the decline of the Han and Roman empires. [Evaluate major debates among historians]

Trace the migrations and military movements of major pastoral nomadic groups into both the Roman Empire and China. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

Compare the consequences of these movements in China and the western part of the Roman Empire. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Analyze comparatively the collapse of the western part of the classical Roman Empire and the survival of the eastern part. [Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas]

Describe the consolidation of the Byzantine state after the breakup of the Roman Empire and assess how Byzantium transmitted ancient traditions and created a new Christian civilization. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

1B The student understands the expansion of Christianity and Buddhism beyond the lands of their origin. Therefore, the student is able to

C-4  

Assess how Christianity and Buddhism won converts among culturally diverse peoples across wide areas of Afro-Eurasia. [Demonstrate and explain the influence of ideas]

Analyze the spread of Christianity and Buddhism in the context of change and crisis in the Roman and Han empires. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the   Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Section C

World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2

Analyze the importance of monasticism in the growth of Christianity and Buddhism and the participation of both men and women in monastic life and missionary activity. [Compare and contrast differing values, behaviors, and institutions]

1C The student understands the synthesis of Hindu civilization in India in the era of the Gupta empire. Therefore, the student is able to •

Describe fundamental features of the Hindu belief system as they emerged in the early first millennium CE. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

Explain the rise of the Gupta Empire and analyze factors that contributed to the empire’s stability and economic prosperity. [Analyze multiple causation]

Analyze how Hinduism responded to the challenges of Buddhism and prevailed as the dominant faith in India. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

Evaluate Gupta achievements in art, literature, and mathematics. [Appreciate historical perspective]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Writing Production and Distribution of Writing WHST.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.9

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

   

Quarter 2 Unit 2.1: An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE, 11 days Grade-Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by… a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12) – 2 Students chronicle events and conditions by… a. creating narratives based on a particular historical point of view (e.g., unemployed WWII vet, home front in WWII, oil refinery promoter, environmental activist in Rhode Island; slave or free black in Newport, slave holder, trader or investor) b. synthesizing information from multiple sources to formulate an historical interpretation (e.g., documentbased questions, quantitative data, material artifacts of RI) Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

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World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2  

Section C

HP 3: The study of history helps us understand the present and shape the future. HP 3 (9-12) – 2 Students make personal connections in an historical context (e.g., source-to-source, source-toself, source-to-world) by… b. analyzing how an historical development (e.g. cycle of poverty or prosperity, low educational attainment, “Independent Man”) has contributed to current social, economic, or political patterns

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 4: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, 300-1000 CE Standard 2: Causes and consequences of the rise of Islamic civilization in the 7th-10th centuries.

2A The student understands the emergence of Islam and how it spread in Southwest Asia, North Africa, and Europe. Therefore, the student is able to •

Describe the life of Muhammad, the development of the early Muslim community, and the basic teachings and practices of Islam. [Assess the importance of the individual]

Explain how Muslim forces overthrew the Byzantines in Syria and Egypt and the Sassanids in Persia and Iraq. [Interrogate historical data]

Analyze how Islam spread in Southwest Asia and the Mediterranean region. [Analyze the influence of ideas]

Analyze how the Arab Caliphate became transformed into a Southwest Asian and Mediterranean empire under the Umayyad dynasty and explain how the Muslim community became divided into Sunnis and Shi’ites. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

2B The student understands the significance of the Abbasid Caliphate as a center of cultural innovation and hub of interregional trade in the 8th-10th centuries. •

Analyze why the Abbasid state became a cener of Afroeurasian commercial and cultural exchange. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Describe the cultural and social contributions of various ethnic and religious communities, particularly the Christian and Jewish, in the Abbasid lands and Iberia. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

Evaluate Abbasid contributions to mathematics, science, medicine, literature, and the preservation of Greek learning. [Interrogate historical data]

Standard 3: Major developments in East Asia and Southeast Asia in the era of the Tang dynasty, 600-900 CE.

3A The student understands China’s sustained political and cultural expansion in the Tang period. •

Describe political centralization and economic reforms that marked China’s reunification under the Sui and Tang dynasties. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Standard 4: The search for political, social, and cultural redefinition in Europe, 500-1000 CE.

4A The student understands the foundations of a new civilization in Western Christendom in the 500 years following the breakup of the western Roman Empire.

C-6  

Assess the importance of monasteries, convents, the Latin Church, and missionaries from Britain and Ireland in the Christianizing of western and central Europe. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Explain the development of the Merovingian and Carolingian states and assess their success at maintaining public order and local defense in western Europe. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

Analyze how the preservation of Greco-Roman and early Christian learning in monasteries and convents and in Charlemagne’s royal court contributed to the emergence of European civilization. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the   Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Section C

World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Writing Range of Writing WHST.9-10.10

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Unit 2.2: New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE, 14 days Grade-Span Expectations C&G 1: People create and change structures of power, authority, and governance in order to accomplish common goals. C&G 1 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by… b. comparing and contrasting different forms of government and their purposes

HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by… c. identifying, describing, or analyzing multiple perspectives on an historical trend or event (e.g. mill worker v. mill owners during Industrial Revolution in RI; separation ofpowers in RI government)

HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by… a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12)– 3 Students show understanding of change over time by… a. tracing patterns chronologically in history to describe changes on domestic, social, or economic life (e.g. immigration trends, land use patterns, naval military history)

HP 3: The study of history helps us understand the present and shape the future. HP 3 (9-12) – 2 Students make personal connections in an historical context (e.g., source-to-source, source-to-self, source-to-world) by… b. analyzing how an historical development (e.g. cycle of poverty or prosperity, low educational attainment, “Independent Man”) has contributed to current social, economic, or political patterns

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

C-7  


World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2  

Section C

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 5 Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000-1500 CE Standard 1: The maturing of an interregional system of communication, trade, and cultural exchange in an era of Chinese economic power and Islamic expansion

1A The student understands China’s extensive urbanization and commercial expansion between the 10th and 13th centuries. •

Analyze how improved agricultural production, population growth, urbanization, and commercialization were interconnected. [Analyze multiple causation]

Identify major technological and scientific innovations and analyze their effects on Chinese life. [Examine the influence of ideas]

1D The student understands how interregional communication and trade led to intensified cultural exchanges among diverse peoples of Eurasia and Africa. •

Explain connections between trade and the spread of Islam in Central Asia, East Africa, West Africa, the coasts of India, and Southeast Asia. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Standard 2: The redefining of European society and culture, 1000-1300 CE.

2A The student understands feudalism and the growth of centralized monarchies and city-states in Europe. Therefore, the student is able to •

Describe feudal lordship and explain how feudal relationships provided a foundation of political order in parts of Europe. [Interrogate historical data]

Analyze how European monarchies expanded their power at the expense of feudal lords and assess the growth and limitations of representative institutions in these monarchies. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Explain the changing political relationship between the Catholic Church and secular states. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

2B The student understands the expansion of Christian Europe after 1000. Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze connections between population growth and increased agricultural production and technological innovation. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Explain urban growth in the Mediterranean region and northern Europe and analyze causes for the expansion of manufacturing, interregional trade, and a money economy in Europe. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships]

Analyze the causes and consequences of the European Crusades against Syria and Palestine. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

2C The student understands the patterns of social change and cultural achievement in Europe’s emerging civilizations. Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze how the rise of schools and universities in Italy, France, and England contributed to literacy, learning, and scientific advancement. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Evaluate major works of art, architecture, and literature and analyze how they shed light on values and attitudes in Christian society. [Draw upon visual sources]

Standard 4: The growth of states, towns, and trade in Sub-Saharan Africa between the 11th and 15th centuries.

4A The student understands the growth of imperial states in West Africa and Ethiopia. C-8  

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the   Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Section C

World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2

Analyze the importance of agriculture, gold production, and the trans-Saharan caravan trade in the growth of the Mali and Songhay empires. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Explain how Islam expanded in West Africa and assess its importance in the political and cultural life of Mali and Songhay. [Examine the influence of ideas]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Writing Production and Distribution of Writing WHST.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Unit 2.3: Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations, 12 days Grade-Span Expectations C&G 4: People engage in political processes in a variety of ways. C&G 4 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by… b. interacting with, analyzing, and evaluating political institutions and political parties in an authentic context (using local, national, or international issues/events that are personally meaningful)

HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by… a. formulating historical questions, obtaining, analyzing, evaluating historical primary and secondary print and non-print sources (e.g., RI Constitution, art, oral history, writings of Elizabeth Buffum Chace)

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 4: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, 300-1000 CE Standard 6: The rise of centers of civilization in Mesoamerica and Andean South America in the first millennium CE.

6AThe student understands the origins, expansion, and achievements of Maya civilization. •

Describe the natural environment of southern Mesoamerica and its relationship to the development of Maya urban society. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Analyze the Maya system of agricultural production and trade and its relationship to the rise of city-states. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Interpret the Maya cosmic world view as evidenced in art and architecture and evaluate Maya achievements in astronomy, mathematics, and the development of a calendar. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

C-9  


World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2   •

Section C

Analyze how monumental architecture and other evidence portrays the lives of elite men and women. [Draw upon visual sources]

6B The student understands the rise of the Teotihuacán, Zapotec/Mixtec, and Moche civilizations. •

Analyze how the diverse natural environment of the Andes region shaped systems of agriculture and animal herding. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Describe how archaeological discoveries have led to greater understanding of the character of Moche society. [Hold interpretations of history as tentative]

Era 5 Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000-1500 CE Standard 6: The expansion of states and civilizations in the Americas, 1000-1500.

6A The student understands the development of complex societies and states in North America and Mesoamerica. Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze how the Aztec empire arose in the 14th and 15th centuries and explain major aspects of Aztec government, society, religion, and culture. [Interrogate historical data]

6B The student understands the development of the Inca empire in Andean South America. Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze Inca expansion and methods of imperial unification. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

Explain Inca social, political, religious, and economic institutions. [Interrogate historical data]

Compare the government, economy, religion, and social organization of the Aztec and Inca empires. [Compare and contrast differing values and institutions]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Key Ideas and Details RH.9-10.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

Craft and Structure RH.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.

Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

WHST.9-10.9

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

C-10  

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the   Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Section C

World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2

 

Quarter 3 Unit 3.1: The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350, 10 days Grade Span Expectations HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12)– 1 Students connect the past with the present by… a. explaining origins of major historical events

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 5: Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000-1500 CE. Standard 1: The maturing of an interregional system of communication, trade, and cultural exchange in an era of Chinese economic power and Islamic expansion.

1D The student understands how interregional communication and trade led to intensified cultural exchanges among diverse peoples of Eurasia and Africa. Explain how camel caravan transport facilitated long-distance trade across Inner Eurasia and the Sahara Desert. [Interrogate historical data] Standard 2: The redefining of European society and culture, 1000-1300 CE.

2A The student understands feudalism and the growth of centralized monarchies and city-states in Europe Analyze how European monarchies expanded their power at the expense of feudal lords and assess the growth and limitations of representative institutions in these monarchies. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain the changing political relationship between the Catholic Church and secular states. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze how prosperous city-states arose in Italy and northern Europe and compare the political institutions of city-states with those of centralizing monarchies. [Formulate historical questions] 2C The student understands the patterns of social change and cultural achievement in Europe’s emerging civilizations. Analyze how the rise of schools and universities in Italy, France, and England contributed to literacy, learning, and scientific advancement. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Standard 3: The rise of the Mongol empire and its consequences for Eurasian peoples, 1200-1350.

3A The student understands the world-historical significance of the Mongol empire. Assess the career of Chingis Khan as a conqueror and military innovator in the context of Mongol society. [Assess the importance of the individual] Describe the Mongol conquests of 1206-1279 and assess their effects on peoples of China, Southeast Asia, Russia, and Southwest Asia. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

C-11  


World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2  

Section C

Describe the founding and political character of Mongol rule in China, Central Asia, Southwest Asia, and Russia and explain why the unified empire divided into four major successor kingdoms. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Assess the usefulness and limitations of the concept of the “Pax Mongolica” and analyze how long-distance communication and trade led to cultural and technological diffusion across Eurasia. [Interrogate historical data] 3B The student understands the significance of Mongol rule in China Analyze how Mongol rule affected economy, society, and culture in China and Korea. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Standard 7: Major global trends from 1000 to 1500 CE.

7A The student understands major global trends from 1000 to 1500 CE. Compare Europe and China in relation to causes and consequences of productive growth, commercialization, urbanization, and technological or scientific innovation. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Craft and Structure RH.9-10.6

Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Unit 3.2: Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450, 14 days Grade Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by… a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

C-12  

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the   Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Section C

World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 5: Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000-1500 CE Standard 5: Patterns of crisis and recovery in Afro-Eurasia, 1300-1450

5A The student understands the consequences of the Black Death and recurring plague pandemic in the 14th century. Explain the origins and characteristics of the plague pandemic of the mid-14th century, and describe its spread across Eurasia and North Africa. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Analyze the demographic, economic, social, and political effects of the plague pandemic in Eurasia and North Africa in the second half of the 14th century. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

5B The student understands transformations in Europe following the economic and demographic crises of the 14th century. Analyze major changes in the agrarian and commercial economies of Europe in the context of drastic population decline. [Appreciate historical perspectives] Assess the effects of crises in the Catholic Church on its organization and prestige. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships] Analyze the resurgence of centralized monarchies and economically powerful city-states in western Europe in the 15th century. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Define humanism as it emerged in Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries and analyze how study of GrecoRoman antiquity and critical analysis of texts gave rise to new forms of literature, philosophy, and education. [Examine the influence of ideas.] Evaluate the aesthetic and cultural significance of major changes in the techniques of painting, sculpture, and architecture. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

5C The student understands major political developments in Asia in the aftermath of the collapse of Mongol rule and the plague pandemic. Analyze reasons for the collapse of Mongol rule in China and the reconstituting of the empire under the Chinese Ming dynasty. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Describe the Zheng He maritime expeditions of the early 15th century and analyze why the Ming state initiated, then terminated, these voyages. [Evaluate the implementation of a decision] Standard 7: Major Global Trends from 1000-1500 CE

7A The student understands major global trends from 1000 to 1500 CE. Therefore, the student is able to Account for the growth, decline, and recovery of the overall population of Afro-Eurasia and analyze ways in which large demographic swings might have affected economic, social, and cultural life in various regions. [Utilize mathematical and quantitative data]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Key Ideas and Details RH.9-10.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

C-13  


World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2  

Section C

Craft and Structure RH.9-10.6

Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. WHST.9-10.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Unit 3.3: The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600, 14 days Grade Span Expectations HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12)– 1 Students connect the past with the present by…

b. identifying and linking key ideas and concepts and their enduring implications (e.g., separation of church and state in Rhode Island)

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 6: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 1450-1770 Standard 1: How the transoceanic interlinking of all major regions of the world from 1450 to 1600 led to global transformations.

1A The student understands the origins and consequences of European overseas expansion in the 15th and 16th centuries. Explain major characteristics of the interregional trading system that linked peoples of Africa, Asia, and Europe on the eve of the European overseas voyages. [Consider multiple perspectives] Analyze the major social, economic, political, and cultural features of European society, and in particular of Spain and Portugal, that stimulated exploration and conquest overseas. [Identify issues and problems in the past] Identify major technological developments in shipbuilding, navigation, and naval warfare and trace the cultural origins of various innovations. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze the motives, nature, and short-term significance of the major Iberian military and commercial expeditions to Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas. [Identify issues and problems in the past] 1B The student understands the encounters between Europeans and peoples of Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Analyze Portuguese maritime expansion to Africa, India, and Southeast Asia and interactions between the Portuguese and the peoples of these regions. [Formulate historical questions] C-14  

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the   Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Section C

World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2

Describe the political and military collision between the Spanish and the Aztec and Inca empires and analyze why these empires collapsed. [Identify issues and problems in the past] 1C The student understands the consequences of the worldwide exchange of flora, fauna, and pathogens. Assess ways in which the exchange of plants and animals around the world in the late 15th and the 16th centuries affected European, Asian, African, and American Indian societies and commerce. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze why the introduction of new disease microorganisms in the Americas after 1492 had such devastating demographic and social effects on American Indian populations. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas RH.9-10.7

Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.

Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.8

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

 

Quarter 4 Unit 4.1: The Making of the Atlantic World, 14 days Grade Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by…

a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 6: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 1450-1770 Standard 1: How the transoceanic interlinking of all major regions of the world from 1450 to 1600 led to global transformations.

1C The student understands the consequences of the worldwide exchange of flora, fauna, and pathogens. Therefore, the student is able to Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

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World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2  

Section C

Assess ways in which the exchange of plants and animals around the world in the late 15th and the 16th centuries affected European, Asian, African, and American Indian societies and commerce. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze why the introduction of new disease microorganisms in the Americas after 1492 had such devastating demographic and social effects on American Indian populations. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Standard 4: Economic, political, and cultural interrelations among peoples of Africa, Europe, and the Americas, 1500-1750.

4A The student understands how states and peoples of European descent became dominant in the Americas between the 16th and 18th centuries. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the Netherlands, England, and France became naval, commercial and political powers in the Atlantic basin. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances]

4B The student understands the origins and consequences of the trans-Atlantic African slave trade. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze the ways in which entrepreneurs and colonial governments exploited American Indian labor and why commercial agriculture came to rely overwhelmingly on African slave labor. [Evidence historical perspectives] Compare ways in which slavery or other forms of social bondage were practiced in the Islamic lands, Christian Europe, and West Africa. [Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas] Explain how commercial sugar production spread from the Mediterranean to the Americas and analyze why sugar, tobacco, and other crops grown in the Americas became so important in the world economy. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain the organization of long-distance trade in West and Central Africa and analyze the circumstances under which African governments, elites, merchants, and other groups participated in the sale of slaves to Europeans. [Identify issues and problems in the past] Explain how European governments and firms organized and financed the trans-Atlantic slave trade; and describe the conditions under which slaves made the “middle passage” from Africa to the Americas. [Appreciate historical perspectives] Describe conditions of slave life on plantations in the Caribbean, Brazil, and British North America and analyze ways in which slaves perpetuated aspects of African culture and resisted plantation servitude. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

4C The student understands patterns of change in Africa in the era of the slave trade. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the Atlantic slave trade affected population, economic life, polygynous marriage, family life, and the use of male and female slave labor in West and Central Africa. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Key Ideas and Details RH.9-10.2

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Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

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Section C

World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2

Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.8

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

Unit 4.2: Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750, 14 days Grade Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by…

a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 6: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 1450-1770 Standard 2: How European society experienced political, economic, and cultural transformations in an age of global intercommunication, 1450-1750.

2C The student understands the rising military and bureaucratic power of European states between the 16th and 18th centuries. Therefore, the student is able to Account for the growth of bureaucratic monarchy in Russia and analyze the significance of Peter the Great’s westernizing reforms. [Interrogate historical data] Trace Russian expansion in the Caucasus, Central Asia, and Siberia and explain the success of the tsars in transforming the Duchy of Moscow in a Eurasian empire. [Draw comparisons across regions.] Standard 3: How large territorial empires dominated much of Eurasia between the 16th and 18th centuries.

3A The student understands the extent and limits of Chinese regional power under the Ming dynasty. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze the power and limits of imperial absolutism under the Ming dynasty. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain China’s self-concept as the “middle kingdom” and the character of its political, commercial, and cultural relations with Korea, Vietnam, and other societies of East and Southeast Asia. [Interrogate historical data] Analyze China’s changing attitudes toward external political and commercial relations following the Zheng He voyages from 1405 to 1433. [Formulate historical questions]

3B The student understands how Southeast Europe and Southwest Asia became unified under the Ottoman Empire. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the capture of Constantinople and the destruction of the Byzantine empire contributed to the expansion of Ottoman power. [Hypothesize the influence of the past] Analyze reasons for Ottoman military successes against Persia, Egypt, North African states, and Christian European kingdoms. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

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World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2  

Section C

Analyze the political, institutional, and economic development of the empire in the context of its religious and ethnic diversity. [Analyze multiple causation]

3C The student understands the rise of the Safavid and Mughal empire. Therefore, the student is able to Explain the Mughal conquest of India and the success of the Turkic warrior class in uniting the diverse peoples of the Indian subcontinent. [Formulate a position or course of action on an issue] Analyze the relationship between Muslims and Hindus in the empire and compare Akbar’s governing methods and religious ideas with those of other Mughal emperors. [Examine the influence of ideas, human interests, and beliefs] Standard 6: Major global trends from 1450-1770.

6A The student understands major global trends from 1450 to 1770. Therefore, the student is able to Assess the impact of gunpowder weaponry and other innovations in military technology on empire-building and the world balance of naval power. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain major changes in world political boundaries between 1450 and 1770 and assess the extent and limitations of European political and military power in Africa, Asia, and the Americas as of the mid-18th century. [Clarify information on the geographic setting]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Craft and Structure RH.9-10.5

Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.

Writing Text Types and Purposes WHST.9-10.1

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Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content. a.

Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

b.

Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

c.

Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

d.

Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e.

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

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Section C

World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2

Unit 4.3: Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750, 11 days National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 6: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 1450-1770 Standard 2: How European society experienced political, economic, and cultural transformations in an age of global intercommunication 1450-1750.

2A The student understands demographic, economic, and social trends in Europe. Analyze the social and economic consequences of population growth and urbanization in Europe from the 15th to the 18th centuries. [Utilize visual and mathematical data] Describe major institutions of capitalism and analyze how the emerging capitalist economy transformed agricultural production, manufacturing, and ways in which women and men worked. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships]

2B The student understands the Renaissance, Reformation, and Catholic Reformation. Analyze the social and intellectual significance of the technological innovation of printing with movable type. [Demonstrate and explain the influence of ideas] Explain connections between the Italian Renaissance and the development of humanist ideas in Europe north of the Alps. [Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas and values] Evaluate major achievements in literature, music, painting, sculpture, and architecture in 16th-century Europe. [Draw upon visual data and literary sources] Explain discontent among Europeans with the late medieval Church and analyze the beliefs and ideas of the leading Protestant reformers. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances] Explain the aims and policies of the Catholic Reformation and assess the impact of religious reforms and divisions on European cultural values, family life, convent communities, and men’s and women’s education. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze causes of religious wars in 16th- and 17th-century Europe and account for the rise of religious pluralism. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances]

2C The student understands the rising military and bureaucratic power of European states between the 16th and 18th centuries. Analyze the character, development, and sources of wealth of strong bureaucratic monarchies in the 16th century. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

2D The student understands how the Scientific Revolution contributed to transformations in European society. Explain connections between the Scientific Revolution and its antecedents such as Greek rationalism, medieval theology, Muslim science, Renaissance humanism, and new global knowledge. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances] Explain the cultural, religious, and scientific impact of astronomical discoveries and innovations from Copernicus to Newton. [Examine the influence of ideas] Analyze the importance of discoveries in mathematics, physics, biology, and chemistry for European society. [Employ quantitative analysis] Explain the development and significance of the “scientific method.” [Examine the influence of ideas]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

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World History 1 Scope and Sequence Version 2  

Section C

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas RH.9-10.9

Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

Writing Text Types and Purposes WHST.9-10.1

Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content. a.

Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

b.

Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

c.

Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

d.

Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e.

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.9

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

 

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Section D: Units


Understanding the Unit Template for Social Studies Overview The one-page Overview summarizes the important ideas and processes and the general focus of the unit.

Overall days:

X

(1 day = Y minutes)

The number of days is a guide for pacing to ensure that all the curriculum units for the year are implemented.

Purpose This section outlines the overall content focus for the unit.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Specific content and concepts students will learn in this unit. Statements describe, in broad terms, what students will be able to do related to the content and concepts. The content to be learned is typically drawn from the National Standards for History.

Specific processes students will use in learning the content and responding to the Essential Questions. These statements are drawn from the standards.

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit Key questions students should be able to answer upon completion of the unit. These questions are intended to be relatively broad and open-ended, relate directly to the unit, and represent the big ideas of the unit. These questions are intended for use as an advance organizer and to guide and assess student understanding of the content throughout the unit.

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Understanding the Unit Template for Social Studies

Version 2

Written Curriculum This section provides in-depth information about alignment of this unit to the standards. These units include new Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies that align to the Historical Perspectives/Rhode Island History Strand Statements of Enduring Knowledge and the Standards in Historical Thinking from the National History Standards. Reading historical texts and writing in the content area of social studies will require support of the content expert—the teacher—to model and support disciplinary literacy. The Standards in Historical Thinking best define the lens that readers and writers of historical texts should use to access, illustrate, and comprehend information. The Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations section in this unit, whether focused on learning about a historic era or figure or reviewing artifacts defined in the standards, will be structured around the five Standards of Historical Thinking: 1.

Chronological thinking

2.

Historical comprehension

3.

Historical analysis and interpretation

4.

Historical research capabilities

5.

Historical issues analysis and decision-making

Refer to Chapter 2 in the National Standards for History text for details of these standards. These standards are also infused into the teaching strategies used in the Facing History and Ourselves resources and all Pearson resources.

Grade-Level/Course Standards This section contains the National Standards for History, Rhode Island GLEs/GSEs, and the Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies. The Rhode Island GLEs/GSEs serve as the process standards to support students’ attainment of the content. The standards have been copied in their complete form, including all numbering and strand information, exactly as they appear in their original form.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites The content in each unit is a bridge between what students have learned before and what they will learn later. This section provides a brief analysis of the standards at the grade levels before and after this one. It will help teachers focus the ideas for the identified grade level and the specific unit. This section may also describe levels of specificity not illustrated in some standards.

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Version 2

Understanding the Unit Template for Social Studies

Taught Curriculum This section provides information about the portions of the common district resources that are aligned with and should be used for teaching the core ideas in the unit. This section also includes an Instructional Considerations subsection that provides further clarification and recommendations about instructional approaches and the use of the common district resources.

Learning Objectives

Resources

The learning objectives that make up the core of the unit. This section also provides guidance about pacing.

List of chapters or sections of the common district resources and ancillary resources that support this unit.

Materials Instructional materials and supplies needed to conduct the activities in the unit.

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary A list of the most critical vocabulary words introduced and developed within the unit. This section does not contain every word that could be encountered in a unit or all the vocabulary and/or language that might need to be developed; rather, it attempts to identify the vocabulary that requires special attention and thoughtful development in the classroom.

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations Guidance for how to optimize student understanding of the material in the unit. The information in this section •

aligns instruction, resources, and pacing to the Learning Objectives;

outlines the important unit context and flow of the unit;

describes useful and generalizable content-focused strategies;

specifies where additional instructional strategies can be located in the common district resources;

identifies which portions of the common resources should be used to address the standards and the learning objectives and provides recommendations on how to use those portions of the common resources;

clarifies which portions of the resources are and are not directly aligned to the standards and learning objectives outlined in the unit; and/or

provides insights and suggestions regarding the resources, classroom management, and materials management for activities within the unit.

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Understanding the Unit Template for Social Studies

Version 2

Assessed Curriculum This section provides expectations regarding which concepts, skills, and processes are to be assessed and how they are to be assessed.

Formative Assessments This section is aligned to the Learning Objectives and lists specific places in the unit activities and common district resources where embedded/formative assessment occurs, plus explanations and detail to support understanding of (1) the knowledge students should demonstrate, (2) how students should perform, and (3) where in-class interventions may be necessary.

Summative Assessment The required, specific common assessment items or assessments within the resources to be used in a summative way for the unit.

Notes This section is provided for teachers to use to make notes about planning, implementing, and revising the unit.

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Social Studies

Inclusion and Accommodations Providence Public Schools is dedicated to implementing the guaranteed and viable curriculum for all students. To ensure an inclusive educational setting for special populations, we are using the following five models for inclusion: •

Cohort teaching: One exclusive group of students for the entire year.

Co-teaching: Two teachers teach the same lesson together.

Parallel teaching: Two teachers teach separately, to different areas of the classroom.

Station teaching: Special educators form different groups within the classroom.

Alternative teaching: Special educators teach individual students at random.

Instructional Accommodations To support students from special populations, choose an instructional accommodation strategy that fits each student’s needs and the content and processes you are teaching. Some instructional accommodations strategies are: •

Frequent checks for understanding: Comprehension measurement to judge level of understanding.

One-on-one instruction: A teacher or an assistant to the student teaches an individual student.

Feedback/question: Reflect and identify the level of understanding.

Peer-conferencing: Students teach students.

Sharing/accountable talk: Students are accountable for their learning, such as in Think-Pair-Share.

Apply prior knowledge: Students implement and apply what they know.

Show what you know: Presentation/demonstration.

Workshop model (I, we, you): The teacher models, teacher and students work together, and then students work independently.

Reciprocal strategies poster (question, clarify, summarize, and predict): Dissect elements of a text.

Visuals for referencing: Word trees, word walls, vocabulary, and examples.

Essential problems/questions: Probing questions/barriers.

Vocabulary before concept: Comprehension of key words.

Timelines of events: Important historic events.

Recognizing contextual clues: Use information to define unfamiliar words/concepts.

Reciting major events: Focus on the key situations/issues.

Addressing the learning modalities: Creating a hands-on activity (kinesthetic/tactile). Collecting materials, food, etc. from historical periods (kinesthetic/tactile).

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Social Studies Inclusion and Accommodations

2010–2011

Music or text recordings (auditory). Drawings and videos (visuals).

Functional Accommodations and Modifications To support students from special populations, choose functional accommodations and modifications that fit each student’s needs and the content and processes you are teaching. Some functional accommodations and modifications are: •

Preferential seating: Appropriate placement in the classroom.

Extended time: Giving the student a window of time based on their needs and strengths.

Directions read and clarified: Verifying what needs to be done.

Concrete examples: Notes, vocabulary, and reference material.

Functional/behavior plans: Documented daily report to keep student on track.

Technology: Computers, calculators, and tools to assist students.

Use of Braille: For the visually impaired.

Respect/compliancy: Accepting directives and following rules and policies.

Positive social skills: Appropriate code of conduct.

Organizational skills: An efficient system for sorting information.

Environmental access/mobility: Easy and convenient accessibility.

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 1 of 3

Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE Overview Overall days: 13

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose This unit reviews developments in world history in late ancient times and prepares students for study of the human past from 500 BCE to 300 CE. The unit focuses on review of Classical Greek, Roman, and Han Chinese societies, alerting students to the key historical concepts of the state, democracy, republican government, empire, bureaucracy, and law. Students will analyze distinctions among the democratic, republican, and imperial types of government as they applied to 5th-century BCE Athens and other Greek city-states, the Roman Republic, the Roman Empire, and the Han Chinese Empire, which emphasized bureaucracy and the moral and civic values of Confucianism. Students will consider the sources of authority from which governments have historically claimed to be legitimate (rightful)—especially the idea of the sovereignty of the citizens as compared with the idea of the sovereignty of the monarch or emperor based on divine power.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Define the “state” as a type of organization and distinguish among city-states, territorial states, empires, monarchies, and republics as political concepts.

Demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by comparing different types of states and governments known in world history.

Describe major political and social institutions of 5th-century BCE Athens and other Greek city-states.

Explain the conditions under which Rome became transformed from a republic to an empire headed by a ruler claiming divine and absolute authority.

Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas, values, and institutions in relation to social class differences in Athens, Sparta, or other Greek city-states.

Describe the unification of large areas of East Asia under the Qin and Han dynasties in the 3rd century BCE, and explain the Mandate of Heaven as an institution that both made the emperor legitimate and potentially limited his power.

Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration in which historical developments have unfolded to analyze major changes in the Roman Empire.

Define “bureaucracy” as a specific way of organizing government, and explain basic features of the Han Chinese bureaucracy, especially as it was informed by Confucianism as an ethical and moral system.

Draw upon historical maps to trace the unification of a large part of East Asia under the Qin and Han dynasties, and demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by explaining the Chinese idea of the Mandate of Heaven.

Connect the past with the present by identifying key ideas and concepts related to political bureaucracy as a type of governing institution.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 1 Version 2

Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE (13 days)

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit •

What was similar and what was different about the character and form of the state in 5thcentury BCE Athens and the Roman and Han empires?

How did Rome become transformed from a republic to an empire?

How did Confucianism and the Mandate of Heaven contribute to the formation of empire in China?

Written Curriculum Grade-Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (5-6) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by… b. using sources to support the stories of history (How do we know what we know?)

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 3: Classical Traditions, Major Religions, and Giant Empires, 1000 BCE–300 CE Standard 2: The emergence of Aegean civilization and how interrelations developed among peoples of the eastern Mediterranean and Southwest Asia, 600–200 BCE.

2A The student understands the achievements and limitations of the democratic institutions that developed in Athens and other Aegean city-states. •

Explain hierarchical relationships within Greek society and analyze the civic, economic, and social tasks that men and women of different classes performed. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

Describe changing political institutions of Athens in the 6th and 5th centuries BCE and analyze the influence of political thought on public life. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

Assess the important of Greek ideas about democracy and citizenship for the development of Western political thought and institutions. [Hypothesize the influence of the past]

Standard 3: How major religions and large-scale empires arose in the Mediterranean basin, China, and India, 500 BCE–300 CE.

3A The student understands the causes and consequences of the unification of the Mediterranean basin under Roman rule. •

Describe the political and social institutions of the Roman Republic and analyze why Rome was transformed from republic to empire. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Evaluate the major legal, artistic, architectural, technological, and literary achievements of the Romans and the influence of Hellenistic cultural traditions on Roman Europe. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

3C The student understands how China became unified under the early imperial dynasties. •

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Analyze the political and ideological contributions of the Han to the development of the imperial bureaucratic state and the expansion of the empire. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE (13 days)

World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 1 Version 2

Standard 5: Major global trends from 1000 BCE to 400 CE

5 The student understands major global trends from 1000 BCE to 300 CE. •

Define the concept of “classical civilization” and assess the enduring importance of ideas, institutions, and art forms that emerged in the classical periods. [Analyze the importance of ideas]

Analyze the significance of military power, state bureaucracy, legal codes, belief systems, written language, and communications and trade networks in the development of large regional empires. [Interrogate historical data]

Explain the significance of Greek or Hellenistic ideas and cultural styles in the history of the Mediterranean basin, Europe, Southwest Asia, and India. [Analyze the importance of ideas]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Key Ideas and Details RH.9-10.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

RH.9-10.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

Writing Production and Distribution of Writing WHST.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites This unit is a review of key trends and concepts taught in grade 6 World History. This review is required owing to the two-year gap in world history study from grade 6 to grade 9. New to the grade span is students’ use of sources to support their knowledge of an era. Instruction should include both primary and secondary sources for examination.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 1 Version 2

Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE (13 days)

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson, 2011

Define the “state” as a form of human social organization and distinguish among city-state, territorial state, and empire as different types of states. (2 days)

Compare and contrast republic and monarchy as different types of government. (1 day)

Compare and contrast the principal features of the daily life and government of Sparta and Athens in the 5th century BCE, highlighting aspects of authoritarian monarchy, republican institutions, democracy, slavery, and citizenship. (4 days)

Teacher’s Edition (pp. 30-56)

Assessment Rubrics, Pearson, 2001 World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu •

Big Era 3, Panorama Teaching Unit

Big Era 3, Landscape Teaching Unit 3.3

Facing History and Ourselves Jigsaw, http://www.facinghistory.org/resources/ strategies/jigsaw-developing-community-d

Explain how the Roman Republic was transformed into an authoritarian empire during the 1st century CE. (2 days)

Explain the development and territorial expansion of the Qin and Han empires, including the basic characteristics of the Han Empire in the 1st century CE and the concepts of the Mandate of Heaven and bureaucracy. (4 days)

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary authoritarianism

Mandate of Heaven

bureaucracy

monarchy

city-state

republic

democracy

state

direct democracy

territorial state

empire

warlord

hierarchy

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE (13 days)

World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 1 Version 2

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations This unit is intended for review of a number of political concepts and the form of government in ancient Athens, Rome, and Qin/Han China. As an intended outcome, it is expected that students will be able to utilize data presented in charts and historical maps, analyze cause-and-effect relationships, engage in comparative analysis, and identify relevant historical antecedents. The strategies listed below represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective. For background and extra teaching strategies, see World History for Us All, Big Era 3 units. The following teaching strategies are aligned to the order of the learning objectives. •

To ensure that students will be able to define the “state” as a form of human social organization and distinguish among city-state, territorial state, and empire as different types of states (2 days): Have students in small groups create a chart comparing city-states, territorial states, and empires by defining each type, listing advantages and disadvantages for ordinary people, and including a visual representation. Have a class discussion comparing the charts the different groups have made. Ask group members to state which they would rather live in, and have them explain their choices. Standard 4: Historical research

To ensure that students will be able to compare and contrast republic and monarchy as different types of government (1 day): Using a T-chart with the headings “Republic” and “Monarchy,” have students brainstorm the advantages each form of government offers ordinary people. Perform another T-chart activity with the same headings, but list the disadvantages. When both charts are complete, have students pick an advantage of monarchies that is not also an advantage of republics. Have students write a journal entry about how that advantage could be incorporated into the U.S. political system without violating the Bill of Rights.

To ensure that students will be able to compare and contrast the principal features of the daily life and government of Sparta and Athens in the 5th century BCE, highlighting aspects of authoritarian monarchy, republican institutions, democracy, slavery, and citizenship (4 days): Jigsaw Activity: This strategy asks a group of students to become experts on a specific text or body of knowledge and then share that material with another group of students. Split the students into four research groups: “Daily Life in Sparta,” “Daily Life in Athens,” “Government in Sparta,” and “Government in Athens.” Have the students within each research group draw information from the text and teacher-provided source documents about Greece in the 5th century BCE. Students should be able to define key words and unfamiliar words and summarize what their topic is all about. Then regroup the students into two teams, “Sparta” and “Athens,” ensuring that all of the Sparta experts are together and all of the Athens experts are together. Each team will then synthesize their findings into a single product (e.g., graphic organizer, outline, etc.). Teams can orally report their findings to the class to share what they have learned. (See the Facing History website’s Jigsaw page for more information about this strategy.) Standard 4: Historical research Ask students in small groups to refer to the product from the Jigsaw activity. Have students create charts comparing the lives of men, women, and children in Athens and Sparta in the 5th century BCE. Ask students to discuss in class how and to what extent the ideal of political equality was fulfilled in Athens and Sparta in the 5th century BCE. Would they rather have been Athenians or Spartans? Why?

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 1 Version 2

Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE (13 days)

To ensure that students will be able to explain how the Roman Republic was transformed into an authoritarian empire during the 1st century CE (2 days): Ask students to define the composition and purpose of the Roman Senate and explain why they think the Senate had more power in the republic than it had in the empire beginning in the 1st century CE. Also have students respond to the following question: “Had you been a leader in 1st-century Rome, what strategy would you have used to try to save the republic?” Students may answer the question in written, visual, or oral formats. Standard 5: Historical issues-analysis and decision-making

To ensure that students will be able to explain the development and territorial expansion of the Qin and Han empires, including the basic characteristics of the Han Empire in the 1st century CE and the concepts of the Mandate of Heaven and bureaucracy (4 days): Using a basic physical map of Eurasia, have students locate in color the territories of the Qin/Han and Roman empires during the 1st century CE. In a quick write, ask students to interpret and compare how waterways may have played a role in the growth and wealth of these two empires. In a general class discussion, ask students to look up in a dictionary and then explain, in their own words, the meaning of “bureaucracy” as a feature of government. Ask students to give examples of how they or families members have had experiences with government or business bureaucracies. Referring to information in the textbook, lead a discussion with students assessing to what extent the Han Empire was bureaucratic. How did Confucianism contribute to the nature of bureaucracy in Han China? Standard 2: Historical comprehension

Additional Teaching Strategies Have each student create a poster that illustrates political life in either Athens or Sparta. Have students create Venn diagrams comparing and contrasting the composition and purpose of the Roman Senate under the republican government and the United States Senate today. Discuss in class the similarities and differences between the two institutions.

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the Spartan way of life, ask students to respond to the following prompt: “What do you think your teachers mean when they say a person leads a Spartan existence?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to define the “state” as a form of human social organization and distinguish among citystate, territorial state, and empire as different types of states, have students rank republics, monarchies, and empires from strongest to weakest. Have them explain their rankings.

how to compare and contrast republic and monarchy as different types of government, have students create a Venn diagram with “Republic” on one side and “Monarchy” on the other, writing words and phrases associated with each in the appropriate rings. Words and phrases associated with both types of government should be written in the overlap between the rings. Have students write the

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE (13 days)

World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 1 Version 2

names of republics and monarchies from throughout all of human history outside the appropriate rings of the diagram. Standard 2: Historical comprehension •

how to compare and contrast principal features of the daily life and government of Sparta and Athens in the 5th century BCE, highlighting aspects of authoritarian monarchy, republican institutions, democracy, slavery, and citizenship, have students write a letter to the editor of a Spartan newspaper from a male shopkeeper criticizing the absence of political equality in Sparta. In the letter, the shopkeeper should point out how shopkeepers in Athens have more specified political rights.

how to explain how the Roman Republic was transformed into an authoritarian empire during the 1st century CE, have students respond to the following prompt in a journal entry or short writing assignment: “By the 1st century BCE, the Roman Empire could no longer expand under a republic form of government. Agree or disagree? Support your answer with historical evidence from the textbook.”

how to explain the development and territorial expansion of the Qin and Han empires, including the basic characteristics of the Han Empire in the 1st century CE and the concepts of the Mandate of Heaven and bureaucracy, ask students in groups to give brief oral presentations explaining the meaning of the Mandate of Heaven as a political concept that developed in China in the 1st millennium BCE. As independent practice, ask each student to write a journal entry or short written response that assesses how the Mandate of Heaven might have both strengthened and weakened the authority of the Han emperor.

Summative Assessment Address the Essential Question “What was similar and what was different about the character and form of the state in 5th-century BCE Athens and the Roman and Han empires?” Have students write a fiveparagraph essay that compares and contrasts the origins and political characteristics of the Roman and Han empires. Use the Rubric for Assessing Writing (Assessment Rubrics, p. 6) to provide a common means for scoring the essays. When students are working on this summative assessment, this is an opportunity to implement reading standards RH.9-10.1 and RH.9-10.2 in preparation for addressing writing standards for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.4 and WHST.9-10.7.

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 1 Version 2

Review of Ancient Civilizations and Empires, 500 BCE to 300 CE (13 days)

Notes

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 2 of 3

Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE Overview Overall days: 10

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose This unit focuses on two key developments of the early centuries CE that prepare students for study of world history in the centuries from 500 to 1750 CE. Students will first explore the basic characteristics of large states and empires that stretched across Afroeurasia from Rome in the west to the Han Chinese Empire in the east. Second, they will investigate the basic teachings and practices of Buddhism and Christianity, universalist religions that spread widely in the first five centuries CE. This unit also requires students to investigate large-scale developments in world history that cut across the boundaries of particular states and civilizations.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Draw upon data in historical maps to identify major states and empires of the early centuries CE, and compare their political and economic characteristics.

Map key routes of exchange and major trade centers in which large states participated in the early centuries CE.

Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas, values, behaviors, and institutions in relation to Buddhism and Christianity in the early centuries CE.

Consider multiple perspectives of various peoples in the past by demonstrating the differing motives, beliefs, interests, hopes, and fears of people who were attracted to Buddhism or Christianity.

Gather, classify, and compare knowledge about major states and empires that existed in Afroeurasia in the early centuries CE, focusing on the Roman Empire, the kingdom of Kush on the upper Nile River, Axum in Ethiopia, the Parthian Empire in Iran and Mesopotamia, and the Han Chinese Empire.

Analyze the ways by which large states facilitated long-distance trade.

Compare the basic teachings and practices of Buddhism and Christianity in the early centuries CE.

Analyze why both Buddhism and Christianity began to spread widely in several directions in Afroeurasia in the early centuries CE.

Essential question students should be able to answer by end of unit •

In what ways were the growth of long-distance trade and the development of a chain of large and prosperous states across Afroeurasia in the early centuries CE related?

What factors help explain why both Buddhism and Christianity spread widely beyond the lands of their birth in the early centuries CE?

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

In what ways might trade between different societies contribute to change in those societies, and what connections might there be between trade and the spread of ideas and technologies?

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 2 Version 2

Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE (10 days)

Written Curriculum Grade-Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (5-6) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by… b. using sources to support the stories of history (How do we know what we know?)

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 3: Classical Traditions, Major Religions, and Giant Empires, 1000 BCE–300 CE Standard 5: Major global trends from 1000 BCE–300 CE.

5A The student understands major global trends from 1000 BCE to 300 CE. Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze the significance of military power, state bureaucracy, legal codes, belief systems, written languages, and communications and trade networks in the development of large regional empires. [Interrogate historical data]

Analyze how new religious or ethical systems contributed to cultural integration of large regions of Afroeurasia. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Analyze ways in which trade networks, merchant communities, state power, tributary systems of production, and other factors contributed to the economic integration of large regions of Afroeurasia. [Employ quantitative analysis]

Era 4: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, 300–1000 CE Standard 1: Imperial crises and their aftermath, 300-700 CE

1B The student understands the expansion of Christianity and Buddhism beyond the lands of their origins. Therefore, the student is able to •

Assess how Christianity and Buddhism won converts among culturally diverse peoples across wide areas of Afro-Eurasia. [Demonstrate and explain the influence of ideas]

Analyze the spread of Christianity and Buddhism in the context of change and crisis in the Roman and Han empires. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas RH.9-10.7

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Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.

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Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE (10 days)

World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 2 Version 2

Writing Production and Distribution of Writing WHST.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites Students are entering grade 9 with a foundation in ancient history. This unit is intended to be used as a review of four major cornerstones from ancient history: empires/states, trade, universalist religion, and Hellenistic tradition. Historical thinking skills are being refined and further developed. The purpose of this unit is to bridge the content from sixth grade to ninth grade by surveying large-scale developments in the early centuries CE before introducing students to the major topics of the 500–1750 CE era. Since this unit considers very large-scale developments in world history in the early centuries CE, teachers should introduce students to the concept of Afroeurasia as a geographical tool—that is, the idea of Africa, Asia, and Europe together as a “place” within which historical developments that cut across the borders of particular civilizations, states, or empires occurred. (For more background information, see Ross E. Dunn, “Big Geography and World History,” Social Studies Review, Spring/Summer 2010, pp. 1418.) New to the grade span is the student use of sources to support their knowledge of an era. Instruction should include primary sources for examination.

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 2 Version 2

Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE (10 days)

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu

Identify major states and empires that existed in Afroeurasia in the early centuries CE (Rome, Kush, Axum, the Parthian Empire, and Han China) and analyze the distinctions among these states in terms of their geographical location, size, economic importance, and type of government. (4 days) Trace major land and sea trade routes that connected important trade centers throughout Rome, Kush, Axum, the Parthian Empire, and Han China in the early centuries CE. (2 days) Compare the basic teachings of Buddhism and Christianity, considering similarities and differences between their respective beliefs and practices. (2 days)

Big Era Four PowerPoint Overview Presentation (Expanding Networks of Exchange and Encounter, 1200 BCE–500 CE)

Big Era Four Panorama Teaching Unit, Lessons 1-4

Big Era Four Landscape Teaching Unit 4.5 (Giant Empires of Afroeurasia, 300 BCE–200 CE)

Big Era Four Closeup Teaching Unit 4.4.1 (The Budding of Buddhism, 563 BCE–150 CE)

World History, Pearson, 2011 •

Teacher Edition Chapter 3, Sections 2, 3, 5 (pp. 76-91, 101-111)

Trace the early spread of Buddhism and Christianity in Afroeurasia up to 500 CE, and analyze why these two religions spread in the directions they did. (2 days)

Chapter 4, Sections 4 and 5 (pp. 130-147) Chapter 5, Sections 3 and 4 (pp. 161-172, 178183) Assessment Rubrics (p. 6) The Sermon on the Mount excerpt, http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/csj/csj019.htm The Sermon at Benares, http://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/btg/btg17.htm Facing History and Ourselves •

Socratic Seminar, http://www.facinghistory.org/ resources/strategies/socratic-seminar

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary church

missionary

cosmopolitanism

monotheism

four noble truths

polytheism

messiah

Silk Road

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Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE (10 days)

World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 2 Version 2

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations This unit is intended to be used as a review of three major concepts from ancient history: major empires and states, long-distance trade, and universalist religions. Students will be able to compare and contrast differing sets of ideas, draw comparisons across regions, obtain historical data from a variety of sources, draw upon data in historical maps, and analyze cause-and-effect relationships. The strategies listed below represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective. The following teaching strategies are aligned to the order of the learning objectives. •

To ensure that students will be able to identify major states and empires that existed in Afroeurasia in the early centuries CE (Rome, Kush, Axum, the Parthian Empire, and Han China) and analyze the distinctions among these states in terms of their geographical location, size, economic importance, and type of government (4 days): Show the PowerPoint presentation from World History for Us All, Big Era 4, for the Panorama Unit (Expanding Networks of Exchange and Encounter, 1200 BCE–500 CE). Discuss the following questions with the class: (1) Why do you think the PowerPoint presentation focuses on two particular developments? (2) How does the presentation break those developments down into different aspects of large-scale change? (3) How does the concept of “Afroeurasia” as a geographical entity help us to understand those developments and their importance? From World History for Us All, Big Era Four, teach Lesson 3 (An Age of Empires) from the Panorama Teaching Unit, and Lesson 1 (Giant Empires of Afroeurasia: Gathering/Classifying Data) from the Landscape Teaching Unit 4.5 (Giant Empires of Afroeurasia). In presenting these lessons, focus on the basic histories and characteristics of the empires of Rome, Kush, Axum, the Parthian Empire, and Han China.

To ensure that students will be able to trace major land and sea trade routes that connected important trade centers throughout Rome, Kush, Axum, the Parthian Empire, and Han China in the early centuries CE (2 days): Teach Lesson 2 (Networks of Exchange) from World History for Us All, Big Era Four, Panorama Teaching Unit. In discussion, focus student learning on the Essential Question “In what ways were the growth of long-distance trade and the development of a chain of large and prosperous states across Afroeurasia in the early centuries CE related?” Standard 2: Historical comprehension

To ensure that students will be able to compare the basic teachings of Buddhism and Christianity, considering similarities and differences between their respective beliefs and practices (1 day): Have pairs of students use information from the textbook to construct a Venn diagram that compares and contrasts the practices and beliefs of early Christianity and Buddhism. Have students refer to their Venn diagrams and the textbook as you lead a class discussion that addresses the following: What is distinctive to one religion but not the other? What is similar? Why have historians categorized both Christianity and Buddhism as religions of salvation? Why have both been characterized as “universalist” religions?

To ensure that students will be able to trace the early spread of Buddhism and Christianity in Afroeurasia up to 500 CE, and analyze why these two religions spread in the directions they did (2 days): Show students the map on slide number 41 in the Panorama (Expanding Networks of Exchange and Encounter, 1200 BCE–500 CE) PowerPoint overview in Big Era 4 in World History for Us All. Have

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 2 Version 2

Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE (10 days)

students read the selections in the Pearson textbook that pertain to the spread of Buddhism and Christianity. In discussion, ask students why they think Buddhism and Christianity spread in the directions that they did. Ask students why both Buddhism and Christianity later became minority religions in the lands where they started. Ask students to analyze possible connections between the spread of these religions and the existence of the Roman and Han empires. Ask students to make connections between the spread of these religions and the location of major trade routes in Afroeurasia. Standard 3: Historical analysis and interpretation Additional Teaching Strategies Socratic Seminar: Have students read the appropriate sections in the textbook concerning the Roman, Parthian, and Han empires and the kingdoms of Kush and Axum. Ask students to identify, define, and give their opinions about what caused the rise and decline of the major empires in Afroeurasia. The goal of a Socratic Seminar is for students to help one another understand the ideas, issues, and values reflected in a specific text. A Socratic seminar is not used for the purpose of debate, persuasion, or personal reflection, as the focus is on developing shared meaning of a text (see the Facing History website for more information). Use the various activities and selections in the Pearson textbook to have students understand the key teachings of the Buddha, to understand how Han rulers strengthened the economy and government of China, and to analyze why many Chinese people accepted Buddhist ideas. Teach Lesson 1 (The Life of the Buddha) from the Closeup Teaching Unit 4.4.1 (The Budding of Buddhism, 563 BCE–150 CE) in World History for Us All, Big Era Four. Have students write an article for an investigative journal explaining the ways in which Buddhism and Christianity spread to new areas and new peoples. In the article, students must address the role that monks played. Have students working in groups use readings in the textbook to investigate the relationship between the growth of long-distance trade and the early spread of Christianity and Buddhism. Have them answer the following questions in presentations: Did commercial enterprise follow or precede the expansion of these new religions? What were the possible relationships between religious preachers and merchants?

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the trade routes across Afroeurasia, ask students to respond to the following prompt: “Why didn’t the Silk Road cross Asia in a straight line?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

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how to identify major states and empires that existed in Afroeurasia in the early centuries CE (Rome, Kush, Axum, the Parthian Empire, and Han China) and analyze the distinctions among these states in terms of their geographical location, size, economic importance, and type of government, divide the class into five groups, with each assigned to a specific empire. Have each group create a “recipe” that explains the success and duration of the assigned empire. Have each Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE (10 days)

World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 2 Version 2

group present their recipe to the class. Have each student create a “cookbook” with the recipes for each empire. As independent practice, have each student write a one-paragraph comparison of the ingredients that appear in more than one of the recipes for imperial success. Standard 3: Historical analysis and interpretation •

how to trace major land and sea trade routes that connected important trade centers throughout Rome, Kush, Axum, the Parthian Empire, and Han China in the early centuries CE, have students prepare a map showing the main trade routes in Afroeurasia at several periods during the 300 BCE–300 CE time span. Use symbols placed next to the routes to indicate the main items traded. Show and label the location of important centers of trade, both ports and inland cities. Indicate the location and extent of the major states and empires that traded. Standard 1: Chronological thinking

how to compare the basic teachings of Buddhism and Christianity, considering similarities and differences between their respective beliefs and practices, have students read Buddha’s Sermon at Benares (Varanasi) and Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount. In a short writing assignment, have students compare and contrast the sermons, and instruct them to substantiate their claims with internal evidence from within the documents. (The primary documents are available online; see the Resources list.)

how to trace the early spread of Buddhism and Christianity in Afroeurasia up to 500 CE, and analyze why these two religions spread in the directions they did, have students write a journal entry or short essay comparing the role of government and trade in explaining the spread of Buddhism and Christianity in the empires of Han China and Rome.

Summative Assessment To address the Essential Questions, have groups of students create a travel brochure for the Silk Road that (1) provides an analysis of the political and religious characteristics of the empires that are encountered during travel and (2) reflects upon the origins of the people found traveling and the types of commodities and technologies that are traded and diffused along it. The brochure should include a map. When students are working on this summative assessment, this is an opportunity to implement reading standard RH.9-10.7 and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.4 and 9-10.7. Use Assessment Rubrics (p. 6) to evaluate this product.

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 2 Version 2

Large Empires and Expanding Religions, 1–400 CE (10 days)

Notes

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 3 of 3

Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE Overview Overall days: 14

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose This unit introduces the period of disruption and change that much of Eurasia and northern Africa experienced between 300 and 700 CE. Population declined, cities and trade shrank, large empires fell, and armies of pastoral nomads attacked settled peoples. Focusing on the examples of the Mediterranean region and China, students investigate how and why the Roman and Han empires shrank in one case and collapsed in the other. Students consider why the eastern part of the Roman Empire, known later as the Byzantine Empire, managed to survive. Students also investigate the major elements and growth of the Brahmanic, or Hindu tradition in the context of the culturally lively Gupta Empire, which rose in India in the 4th century CE.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Describe and evaluate the major factors historians have identified to explain the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century CE.

Analyze cause-and-effect relationships— bearing in mind multiple causations—to analyze the fall of the Western Roman Empire.

Analyze why the eastern provinces of the Roman Empire survived, and describe basic characteristics of Byzantine civilization as it emerged in the 4th century CE.

Obtain historical data from a variety of sources to construct an explanation for the survival of the Eastern Roman Empire and the emergence of Byzantine civilization.

Describe and evaluate the major factors historians have identified to explain the collapse of the Han Empire in China.

Identify and discuss factors that led to the breakdown of order among societies and resulting consequences in relation to the collapse of the Han Empire.

Map the major migrations and invasions of pastoral nomadic peoples of Inner Eurasia between the 4th and 6th centuries, and analyze the differences in the effects they had on the Western Roman Empire, the Eastern Roman (Byzantine Empire), and the Han Empire.

Draw comparisons across regions in order to define the large-scale movements of pastoral nomadic peoples in Eurasia between the 4th and 6th centuries and the consequences of their migrations and invasions.

Describe the rise of the Gupta Empire in India in the 4th century, and assess its contributions to mathematics.

Utilize visual, mathematical, and qualitative data to evaluate the contributions of scholars of the Gupta Empire to mathematics.

Explain basic teachings and practices of the Brahmanic (Hindu) tradition in India, and analyze why this tradition gained strength in India in the Gupta era, while Buddhism declined there.

Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas, values, and institutions in relation to the success of the Brahmanic belief system in India and the relative decline of Buddhism.

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 3 Version 2

Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE (14 days)

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit •

Why did both the Western Roman and Han empires fall between the 3rd and 5th centuries after having ruled huge areas of Afroeurasia for several centuries?

Why did the pastoral nomadic peoples of Inner Eurasia exert so much power between the 3rd and 6th centuries CE, and to what extent might their migrations and invasions account for the fall of the Western Roman and Han empires?

What important contributions did the Gupta Empire make to mathematics in the 4th through 6th centuries CE?

Why did Buddhism decline in the land of its birth relative to the Hindu tradition, which became stronger?

Written Curriculum Grade-Span Expectations C&G 1: People create and change structures of power, authority, and governance in order to accomplish common goals. C&G 1 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by… a. describing or explaining competing ideas about the purposes and functions of politics and government

C&G 5: As members of an interconnected world community, the choices we make impact others locally, nationally, and globally. C&G 5 (9-12) – 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of the many ways Earth’s people are interconnected by… a. identifying the ways the world is organized: politically, socially, culturally, economically, environmentally (e.g. nation-state)

HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12) – 2 Students chronicle events and conditions by… a. creating narratives based on a particular historical point of view (e.g., unemployed WWII vet, home front in WWII, oil refinery promoter, environmental activist in Rhode Island; slave or free black in Newport, slave holder, trader or investor)

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 4: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, 300-1000 CE Standard 1: Imperial crises and their aftermath, 300-700 CE.

1A The student understands the decline of the Roman and Han empires. Therefore, the student is able to

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Analyze various causes that historians have proposed to account for the decline of the Han and Roman empires. [Evaluate major debates among historians]

Trace the migrations and military movements of major pastoral nomadic groups into both the Roman Empire and China. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 3 Version 2

Compare the consequences of these movements in China and the western part of the Roman Empire. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Analyze comparatively the collapse of the western part of the classical Roman Empire and the survival of the eastern part. [Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas]

Describe the consolidation of the Byzantine state after the breakup of the Roman Empire and assess how Byzantium transmitted ancient traditions and created a new Christian civilization. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

1B The student understands the expansion of Christianity and Buddhism beyond the lands of their origin. Therefore, the student is able to •

Assess how Christianity and Buddhism won converts among culturally diverse peoples across wide areas of Afro-Eurasia. [Demonstrate and explain the influence of ideas]

Analyze the spread of Christianity and Buddhism in the context of change and crisis in the Roman and Han empires. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Analyze the importance of monasticism in the growth of Christianity and Buddhism and the participation of both men and women in monastic life and missionary activity. [Compare and contrast differing values, behaviors, and institutions]

1C The student understands the synthesis of Hindu civilization in India in the era of the Gupta empire. Therefore, the student is able to •

Describe fundamental features of the Hindu belief system as they emerged in the early first millennium CE. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

Explain the rise of the Gupta Empire and analyze factors that contributed to the empire’s stability and economic prosperity. [Analyze multiple causation]

Analyze how Hinduism responded to the challenges of Buddhism and prevailed as the dominant faith in India. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

Evaluate Gupta achievements in art, literature, and mathematics. [Appreciate historical perspective]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Writing Production and Distribution of Writing WHST.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.9

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites This unit is a review of key definitions and concepts taught in sixth-grade world history. Students are entering ninth grade with a foundation in ancient civilizations. Historical thinking skills are being refined and further developed.

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 3 Version 2

Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE (14 days)

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson, 2011

Analyze the problems that led to the fall of the Han Empire. (3 days) Explain how and why the Western Roman Empire collapsed but the Eastern (Byzantine) Empire survived. (3 days)

Assess the impact of pastoral nomadic peoples of Inner Eurasia on the Western Roman, Eastern Roman, and Han empires. (3 days)

Describe the origins and fall of the Gupta Empire in India, and evaluate Gupta contributions to mathematics. (3 days)

Interpret why Buddhism declined in India in the early first millennium CE in favor of the Hindu tradition. (2 days)

Teacher’s Edition (pp. 105-106, 166-177)

World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu •

Big Era 5, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.1

Assessment Rubrics (p. 6) Facing History and Ourselves •

Reader’s Theatre, www.facinghistory.org/ resources/strategies/readers-theatre-exploringemo

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary assassination

mercenary

civil war

migration

concept of zero

pastoral nomads

imperialism

warlord

inflation

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations This unit is intended to investigate in comparative perspective the decline of the Roman and Han empires, the role of pastoral nomads in history, and the era of the Gupta Empire in India. Students will be able to construct patterns of historical succession and duration, interpret evidence, develop historical perspectives, draw comparisons across regions, formulate historical questions, and obtain historical data from a variety of sources. The strategies listed below represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective.

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 3 Version 2

The following teaching strategies are aligned to the order of the learning objectives. •

To ensure that students will be able to analyze the problems that led to the fall of the Han Empire (3 days): Teach Lesson 2 (A Concatenation of Miseries, or CSI Han China) in Landscape Teaching Unit 5.1 (Centuries of Upheaval in Afroeurasia, 300–600 CE) in Big Era 5 in World History for Us All. Have students in groups construct a chart that identifies key trends or events in the weakening and decline of the Han Empire, such as internal corruption, massive use of slave labor, inflation, overextension of political capacity to rule, generals setting themselves up as rulers, the settlement of previously hostile nomads within the borders, or aggression of nomads against the empire. Construct a second chart with one column headed “long-term causes” and the other “immediate causes.” From the first chart, have students select causes that they believe were long-term and those that were immediate. In a class discussion, analyze how both long-term and immediate causes of decline might be related to each other. Standard 2: Historical comprehension

To ensure that students will be able to explain how and why the Western Roman Empire collapsed but the Eastern (Byzantine) Empire survived (3 days): Teach Lesson 3 (Rome Didn’t Fall in a Day) in Landscape Teaching Unit 5.1 (Centuries of Upheaval in Afroeurasia, 300–600 CE) in Big Era 5 in World History for Us All. Have students in groups construct a chart that identifies key trends or events in the weakening and decline of the Roman Empire, such as internal corruption, massive use of slave labor, inflation, overextension of political capacity to rule, generals setting themselves up as rulers, the settlement of previously hostile nomads within the borders, or aggression of nomads against the empire. Construct a second chart with one column headed “long-term causes” and the other “immediate causes.” From the first chart, have students select causes that they believe were long-term and those that were immediate. In a class discussion, analyze how both long-term and immediate causes of decline might be related to each other. In addition, have students construct a “balance sheet” delineating the differences between the Western and Eastern Roman empires in the 4th century CE. Show the strengths and weaknesses of each part of the empire and hypothesize why the empire broke up in one region but not in the other. Standard 3: Historical analysis and interpretation

To ensure that students will be able to assess the impact of pastoral nomadic peoples of Inner Eurasia on the Western Roman, Eastern Roman, and Han empires (3 days): Based upon reading in the textbook, have students fill in a T-chart that compares the distinctive characteristics of pastoral nomadic societies with settled agrarian societies. Discuss the ideas that students have generated. Then, using outline maps of Afroeurasia (or of the Eastern Hemisphere), have students identify the original homelands and trace the migrations or invasions of the following peoples: Germanic tribes, Huns, and Xiongnu. Discuss the impact that these groups had on the settled agrarian peoples of Eurasia.

To ensure that students will be able to describe the origins and fall of the Gupta Empire in India, and evaluate Gupta contributions to mathematics (3 days): Teach Lesson 4 (Gupta Kaputa) in Landscape Teaching Unit 5.1 (Centuries of Upheaval in Afroeurasia, 300–600 CE) in Big Era 5 in World History for Us All.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 3 Version 2

Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE (14 days)

To ensure that students will be able to interpret why Buddhism declined in India in the early first millennium CE in favor of the Hindu tradition (2 days): First, have a short class discussion listing the fundamental differences and similarities between the Buddhist and Hindu religious traditions. Have students fill in a Venn diagram that represents the similarities and differences between the two religious traditions. From the textbook, have the students gather information about the ebb and flow of Hinduism and Buddhism under the Gupta. Frame the class discussion around the question, “Was the revival of Hinduism in Gupta times a consequence of Buddhist failings or of Hindu strengths?” Standard 4: Historical research

Additional Teaching Strategies Construct a grid indicating on one axis the Western Roman Empire, the Eastern Roman Empire, and the Han Empire. List on the other axis possible causes of crisis in these empires, such as nomadic invasions, failings of rulers, and social and economic conditions. Discuss whether the causes of crisis in these places were more similar or more different. Draw on historical evidence to write a “state of the empire” speech as a Roman emperor might have given in the early 4th century CE, outlining the strengths and weaknesses of the empire during that emperor’s reign. In groups of three or four, have students solve a small set of multiplication and long-division problems using both the Roman numeral system and modern “Arabic” numerals (which were invented in Gupta India). Discuss the relative difficulties of solving these problems using the two systems. Ask, “Which system do you think is superior?” The following pages contain strategies for the concepts being studied and are listed in the order of the learning objectives: •

Explain the complex and interrelated problems that led to the fall of the Han Empire. (Pearson, pp. 105-106)

Outline the development of early Christianity. (Pearson, pp. 166-171)

Explain how and why the Roman Empire divided. (Pearson, pp. 173-174)

Have students create timelines to track the events leading to the decline of the Han and Roman empires. Standard 1: Historical thinking Have students identify key trends or events in the weakening and decline of the Han and Roman empires, such as internal corruption, overextension of political capacity to rule, generals setting themselves up as rulers, or the invasion or settlement of previously hostile nomads within the borders. Students can analyze the relative significance of these factors using graphic organizers, such as four-way charts.

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 3 Version 2

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the impact of nomadic invaders on the Western Roman Empire, ask students to respond to the following prompt: “Why were the Huns such successful invaders?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to analyze the problems that led to the fall of the Han Empire, have students write a letter as an advisor to the Han Emperor in the 2nd century CE that provides advice for keeping the empire intact. Standard 5: Historical issues-analysis and decision-making

how to explain how and why the Western Roman Empire collapsed but the Eastern (Byzantine) empire survived, have students write a letter as an advisor to the Roman Emperor in the 4th century CE that provides advice for keeping the empire intact. Standard 5: Historical issues-analysis and decision-making

how to assess the impact of pastoral nomadic peoples of Inner Eurasia on the Western Roman, Eastern Roman, and Han empires, have students fill in a graphic organizer that identifies the economic, social, and political characteristics of pastoral nomadic life. From the graphic organizer, have students write two paragraphs that associate the specifics of a pastoral lifestyle to the military and trading impact of pastoral nomads on sedentary agrarian Eurasian societies.

how to describe the origins and fall of the Gupta Empire in India, and evaluate Gupta contributions to mathematics, have each group of students construct a poster that illustrates the major contributions of Gupta scholars to mathematics. Standard 2: Historical comprehension

how to interpret why Buddhism declined in India in the early first millennium CE in favor of the Hindu tradition, divide the class into groups and hold a graded class debate in which one team represents a group of Buddhist monks and the other a group of Hindu Brahmins. Have the teams debate the statement: “The people of India have little need of Buddhist religious ideas or practices.”

Summative Assessment To address the Essential Questions, have students write a five-paragraph essay that compares and contrasts the fall of the Gupta, Han, and Roman empires. Use the Rubric for Assessing Writing (Assessment Rubrics, p. 6) to provide a common means to score the essay. When students are working on this summative assessment, take the opportunity to implement writing standards for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.4 and WHST.9-10.9.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 1, Unit 3 Version 2

Great Empires in Crisis, 300–700 CE (14 days)

Notes

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 1 of 3

An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE Overview Overall days: 11

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose This unit asks students to investigate large-scale developments that took place in Afroeurasia in the period from approximately 600 to 1000 CE. In these 400 years, societies experienced a period of increasingly complex commercial and cultural interchange after three centuries of upheaval and breakdown. The first part of the unit introduces students to the rise of Islam, the youngest of the major world religions to appear on the world stage, and to the forging of an empire led by Arabic-speaking peoples. For a time, this empire spanned the entire region from Spain to northwest India. Students will consider how the Muslim empire of the Abbasid dynasty became the main intermediary for the exchange of goods, ideas, and technologies across the hemisphere. Students then look east to China, which in the sixth century became politically reunified after several centuries of fragmentation. From this period, China emerged under the Sui and Tang dynasties as an economic powerhouse, sending out manufactured goods like silk and porcelain across the hemisphere and importing commodities from the Middle East, India, and Southeast Asia. Paralleling China and the Muslim world, Europe at the western end of Afroeurasia recovered from several centuries of trouble to lay the foundations for political and social order and greater economic prosperity.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Analyze factors leading to the appearance of Islam as a new monotheistic religion and the rise of the Arab-led empire in the 7th and 8th centuries.

Analyze cause–effect relationships to hypothesize how and why Islam emerged as a religious and political force in the 7th and 8th centuries.

Describe the basic teachings of Islam in comparative perspective with Christianity and Judaism.

Consider multiple perspectives of peoples in the past to compare the basic beliefs and practices of Islam, Christianity, and Judaism.

Explain the importance of the Muslim Abbasid Empire as a center of intellectual and cultural innovation.

Investigate the relationship between Chinese political unification under the Sui and Tang dynasties and China’s growing economic power.

Obtain historical data from records of historic sites, museums, and primary source texts to elucidate cultural innovations and advances in the Abbasid empire between the 8th and 10th centuries.

Formulate historical questions related to the emergence of China as an economic powerhouse beginning in the 7th century.

Identify and explain the origins and basic functions of the Christian church and feudalism in Europe from the 6th century.

Explain how Europeans reestablished political and social order after 500 CE on the foundations of the Christian church, feudalism, and new agricultural technology.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 1 Version 2

An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE (11 days)

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit •

How did Islam become established as an important new religion beginning in the 7th century CE?

What evidence argues that China had a powerful economy in the era of the Tang Dynasty?

What evidence shows that the Muslim Abbasid Empire became a center of scientific, technological, and philosophical innovation between 750 and 1000 CE?

What are the major indications that a new civilization was emerging in Western Europe in the 600–1000 CE period?

Written Curriculum Grade-Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by… a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12) – 2 Students chronicle events and conditions by… a. creating narratives based on a particular historical point of view (e.g., unemployed WWII vet, home front in WWII, oil refinery promoter, environmental activist in Rhode Island; slave or free black in Newport, slave holder, trader or investor) b. synthesizing information from multiple sources to formulate an historical interpretation (e.g., documentbased questions, quantitative data, material artifacts of RI)

HP 3: The study of history helps us understand the present and shape the future. HP 3 (9-12) – 2 Students make personal connections in an historical context (e.g., source-to-source, source-toself, source-to-world) by… b. analyzing how an historical development (e.g. cycle of poverty or prosperity, low educational attainment, “Independent Man”) has contributed to current social, economic, or political patterns

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 4: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, 300-1000 CE Standard 2: Causes and consequences of the rise of Islamic civilization in the 7th-10th centuries.

2A The student understands the emergence of Islam and how it spread in Southwest Asia, North Africa, and Europe. Therefore, the student is able to

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Describe the life of Muhammad, the development of the early Muslim community, and the basic teachings and practices of Islam. [Assess the importance of the individual]

Explain how Muslim forces overthrew the Byzantines in Syria and Egypt and the Sassanids in Persia and Iraq. [Interrogate historical data]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE (11 days)

World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 1 Version 2

Analyze how Islam spread in Southwest Asia and the Mediterranean region. [Analyze the influence of ideas]

Analyze how the Arab Caliphate became transformed into a Southwest Asian and Mediterranean empire under the Umayyad dynasty and explain how the Muslim community became divided into Sunnis and Shi’ites. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

2B The student understands the significance of the Abbasid Caliphate as a center of cultural innovation and hub of interregional trade in the 8th-10th centuries. •

Analyze why the Abbasid state became a cener of Afroeurasian commercial and cultural exchange. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Describe the cultural and social contributions of various ethnic and religious communities, particularly the Christian and Jewish, in the Abbasid lands and Iberia. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

Evaluate Abbasid contributions to mathematics, science, medicine, literature, and the preservation of Greek learning. [Interrogate historical data]

Standard 3: Major developments in East Asia and Southeast Asia in the era of the Tang dynasty, 600-900 CE.

3A The student understands China’s sustained political and cultural expansion in the Tang period. •

Describe political centralization and economic reforms that marked China’s reunification under the Sui and Tang dynasties. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Standard 4: The search for political, social, and cultural redefinition in Europe, 500-1000 CE.

4A The student understands the foundations of a new civilization in Western Christendom in the 500 years following the breakup of the western Roman Empire. •

Assess the importance of monasteries, convents, the Latin Church, and missionaries from Britain and Ireland in the Christianizing of western and central Europe. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Explain the development of the Merovingian and Carolingian states and assess their success at maintaining public order and local defense in western Europe. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

Analyze how the preservation of Greco-Roman and early Christian learning in monasteries and convents and in Charlemagne’s royal court contributed to the emergence of European civilization. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Writing Range of Writing WHST.9-10.10

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites New to this content may be the practice of creating a narrative to better understand historical point of view. Instruction should model how to create a story from a particular point of view. These units include Common Core Literacy standards in reading and literacy and Historical Thinking Standards. The impact on instruction of these new and additional standards is noted in the Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations and Assessment sections. Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 1 Version 2

An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE (11 days)

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2011, Teacher’s Edition (pp. 55-60, 168-170, 214-218, 302-330, 336-337, 368-374)

Analyze factors leading to the emergence of Islam as a new monotheistic religion and the creation of the Arab-led empire extending from Spain and North Africa to India. (3 days)

World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu

Describe the basic teachings and practices of Islam and put them in comparative perspective with Christianity and Judaism. (2 days)

Big Era 5, Introductory Essay

Big Era 5, Panorama Teaching Unit

Evaluate major scientific, technological, and artistic achievements of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian scholars and artists in the age of the Abbasid Empire. (1 day)

Big Era 5, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.2, Afroeurasia and the Rise of Islam

Describe the rise of China as an economic powerhouse in the era of the Tang dynasty. (2 days)

Assessment Rubrics (p. 10) Facing History and Ourselves •

Chunking, http://www.facinghistory.org/ resources/strategies/chunking

Investigate the influence of the Christian church and feudal kingship on the formation of a new civilization in Europe between 600 and 1000 CE. (3 days)

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary Bedouin

mosque

feudalism

prophet

hajj

Qur’an

medieval

scholar

kingship

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations Teaching activities in this unit invite students to investigate large-scale developments in Afroeurasia from 600 to 1000 CE, emphasizing the origins and spread of Islam, the economic dynamism of Tang China, and formation of a new Christian civilization in Europe. Emphasis is also placed on developing students’ analysis of cause and effect and change over time. The strategies listed below represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective. The following teaching strategies are aligned to the order of the learning objectives. Select from the activities and readings in the Pearson text and from World History for Us All Big Era 5 to

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE (11 days)

World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 1 Version 2

provide students with background information and critical thinking opportunities that align to the learning objectives. •

To ensure that students will be able to analyze factors leading to the emergence of Islam as a new monotheistic religion and the creation of the Arab-led empire extending from Spain and North Africa to India (3 days): Have students, working in groups and using information from class discussion and the textbook, create a map with a corresponding timeline that charts the spread of Islam and an Arab-led empire from the Arabian Peninsula westward to Spain and North Africa and eastward to India. With a graphic organizer, have students list the main reasons why Islam was so attractive to those living in the Arabian Peninsula. On the same organizer, have them identify the main reasons why the Ummayid Empire stretched from Spain and North Africa to India. Have a reporter from each group share one of his or her group’s findings. Historical Thinking Standard 1: Chronological thinking

To ensure that students will be able to describe the basic teachings and practices of Islam and put them in comparative perspective with Christianity and Judaism (2 days): Have students refer to the following pages from the textbook as they work through the activities: Judaism (pp. 58-60), Christianity (pp. 168-170), and Islam (pp. 306-309). Students will fill in a graphic organizer that compares the basic tenets of Islam with those of Judaism and Christianity. After volunteers share the comparisons they made, discuss any differences among their comparisons.

To ensure that students will be able to evaluate major scientific, technological, and artistic achievements of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian scholars and artists in the age of the Abbasid Empire (1 day): Divide the class into groups. Have the students refer to readings in the textbook and information from class discussion as they fill in a graphic organizer designed as a matrix that charts science, technology, and art among the three communities.

To ensure that students will be able to describe the rise of China as an economic powerhouse in the era of the Tang dynasty (2 days): Divide the class into groups. Have students refer to information in the textbook and from class discussion as they work in groups to create posters that demonstrate the economic and technological achievements of the Tang dynasty. Have members from each group present the posters, while others from the group answer any questions you or the class may have.

To ensure that students will be able to investigate the influence of the Christian church and feudal kingship on the formation of a new civilization in Europe between 600 and 1000 CE (3 days): Have students refer to the textbook as they identify on a graphic organizer the structures of the Christian church and feudal kingship by 1000 CE. Lead a class discussion around the Essential Question: What are the major indications that a new civilization was emerging in Western Europe in the 600–1000 CE period?

Additional Teaching Strategies The following pages contain strategies for the concepts being studied and are listed in the order of the learning objectives: Factors leading to the emergence of Islam and the creation of the Arab-led empire (pp. 302-305) The basic teachings and practices of Islam in comparative perspective with Christianity and Judaism (pp. 306-309) Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 1 Version 2

An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE (11 days)

Scientific, technological, and artistic achievements of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian scholars and artists (pp. 317-323) The Abbasid’s role in commercial and cultural interchange among peoples of Afroeurasia (pp. 310-315) The rise of China as an economic power in the era of the Tang dynasty (pp. 368-373) The rise of the empire of Charlemagne in Western and Central Europe (pp. 214-218) The effects of the migrations and conquests of Vikings and Magyars on European society in the 9th and 10th centuries (p. 218) The influence of the Christian church and of Christian monasteries on the formation of a new civilization in Europe after 500 CE (pp. 325-330) Questions for students to answer in class based on the reading in the textbook can be found at: Section 1 Assessment, Comprehension and Critical Thinking, Questions 3–6 (Pearson, p. 305) Section 2 Assessment, Comprehension and Critical Thinking, Questions 3–6 (Pearson, p. 316) Section 1 Assessment, Comprehension and Critical Thinking, Questions 3–6 (Pearson, p. 374) Section 1 Assessment, Comprehension and Critical Thinking, Questions 3–6 (Pearson, p. 218) Teaching strategies to support deeper understanding of the multiple religions studied in this unit include: Use a map from the World History for Us All, Big Era 5 Panorama unit and graphic organizer on religions to help students better understand the dominant world religions. Have students answer the four questions at the top of the map on page 315 in the textbook to discuss trade implications. When reading about the spread of Islam, it is helpful to have a reading strategy. A chunking strategy helps students access difficult text to better understand details and complex information. (See the Facing History and Ourselves website’s page on Chunking for more information.) Students can also answer the following questions and assignments: Students complete Writing About History in the Section Assessment (Pearson, pp. 374, 218). Scoring suggestions for each activity are given in the Teacher’s Edition on the pages listed. Students complete Chapter Assessment, questions 11–16 and 23–24, and Document-Based Assessment, questions 1–4 (Pearson, pp. 336-337). Answers or references to rubrics for scoring are given in the Teacher’s Edition on the pages listed.

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the Spanish Muslims’ tolerance of other religions, ask students to respond to the following question: “What was one way that the early Muslim rulers of Córdoba showed tolerance toward Christians?”

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE (11 days)

World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 1 Version 2

To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to analyze factors leading to the emergence of Islam as a new monotheistic religion and the creation of the Arab-led empire extending from Spain and North Africa to India, have students write a diary entry from an Arab Bedouin explaining why he or she is attracted to Islam.

how to describe the basic teachings and practices of Islam and put them in comparative perspective with Christianity and Judaism, in a short writing assignment, have students use their graphic organizers to write about a similarity and a difference between Islamic and Judeo-Christian traditions. Also, students should account for these similarities and differences. Historical Thinking Standard 3: Historical analysis and interpretation  

how to evaluate major scientific, technological, and artistic achievements of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian scholars and artists in the age of the Abbasid Empire, using their graphic organizers, have students in groups create a dialogue among a Muslim, a Jewish, and a Christian scholar explaining the achievements of their particular community.

how to describe the rise of China as an economic powerhouse in the era of the Tang dynasty, in a short journal entry, have students identify the two most important reasons why Tang China had such strong economy. Have them justify their claims with evidence. Historical Thinking Standard 2: Historical comprehension  

how to investigate the influence of the Christian church and feudal kingship on the formation of a new civilization in Europe between 600 and 1000 CE, have students write a letter from the Pope to a medieval king in 1000 CE addressing why the Church was the most important institution in European life.

In this unit, these short writing assessments are an opportunity to employ writing routinely in a single setting using WHST.9-10.10.

Summative Assessment Put students in groups and have them create posters to be scored and presented where they rank the civilizations of Europe, Islam, and China in terms of their importance in Afroeurasia in 1000. Each group must explain their ranking. Use Assessment Rubrics (p. 10) to assess. Students complete Writing About History in the Section Assessment (Pearson, pp. 374, 218). Scoring suggestions for each activity are given in the Teacher’s Edition on listed pages. These short writing assessments are an opportunity to employ writing routinely in a single setting using WHST.9-10.10. Students complete Chapter Assessment, questions 11–16 and 23–24, and Document-Based Assessment, questions 1–4 (Pearson, pp. 336-337). Answers or references to rubrics for scoring are given in the Teacher’s Edition on the pages listed.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 1 Version 2

An Era of Expansion: Islam, China, and Europe, 600–1000 CE (11 days)

Notes

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 2 of 3

New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE Overview Overall days: 14

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose This unit encompasses major developments in Afroeurasia from about 1000 to 1300 CE. In these centuries, peoples of Eurasia and Africa became more firmly interconnected than at any earlier time in history. In the first part of the unit, students orient themselves to Afroeurasia during these three centuries by locating and discussing major centers of population, cities, states, empires, religions, and trade routes. Students will then follow threads from the preceding unit to compare developments in East Asia and Europe, two regions that witnessed remarkable growth. China experienced a burst of technological innovation, commercialization, and urbanization, emerging as, by far, the largest economy in the world. At the opposite end of the hemisphere, Europeans built a new center of Christian civilization. Agricultural production, population, commerce, and military might all expanded, and powerful new kingdoms and city-states emerged. In the second part of the unit, students explore interrelations between European Christian and Muslim societies of Southwest Asia and North Africa, including the Crusades. Finally, students investigate the Ghana and Mali empires in West Africa and the role that trans-Saharan trade played in their development.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Describe a “big picture” of historical developments in Afroeurasia between 1000 and 1300 CE in terms of population, cities, states, empires, religions, and trade routes.

Investigate China’s technological advancement, commercialization, and urbanization in the era of the Song Dynasty (1000–1300 CE).

Construct maps of Afroeurasia for the approximate periods of 1000 and 1300 CE, identifying major changes in population centers, cities, states, empires, religions, and trade routes.

Compare and contrast factors leading to economic and population growth in Europe and China in the 1000–1300 CE period.

Analyze and account for the growth of economic production, population, and towns and for the expansion of manorialism and serfdom in Western Europe before 1300 CE.

Obtain historical data from a variety of source to explain how geography and economics influenced the changing forms of government in Europe in the 1000–1300 CE period.

Analyze relations between European Christian and neighboring Muslim societies, including both commercial exchange and warfare linked to the Christian Crusades.

Draw comparisons across regions in order to describe relations between European Christian and Muslim states, including both trade and warfare.

Explain the development of the Ghana and Mali empires in West Africa, including the role of Islam and trans-Saharan trade.

Use a variety of tools to ask and answer historical questions regarding the rise of the Ghana and Mali empires in West Africa.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 2 Version 2

New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE (14 days)

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit •

How would you compare and contrast China and Europe in the 1000–1300 CE period in terms of population and economic growth, urbanization, commerce, and impact on Afroeurasia as a whole?

How would you explain the fact that relations between the Christian states of Europe and the Muslim states of Southwest Asia and North Africa involved both peaceful commercial and cultural exchange and prolonged war?

Written Curriculum Grade-Span Expectations C&G 1: People create and change structures of power, authority, and governance in order to accomplish common goals. C&G 1 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by… b. comparing and contrasting different forms of government and their purposes

HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by… c. identifying, describing, or analyzing multiple perspectives on an historical trend or event (e.g. mill worker v. mill owners during Industrial Revolution in RI; separation ofpowers in RI government)

HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by… a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12)– 3 Students show understanding of change over time by… a. tracing patterns chronologically in history to describe changes on domestic, social, or economic life (e.g. immigration trends, land use patterns, naval military history)

HP 3: The study of history helps us understand the present and shape the future. HP 3 (9-12) – 2 Students make personal connections in an historical context (e.g., source-to-source, source-to-self, source-to-world) by… b. analyzing how an historical development (e.g. cycle of poverty or prosperity, low educational attainment, “Independent Man”) has contributed to current social, economic, or political patterns

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 5 Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000-1500 CE Standard 1: The maturing of an interregional system of communication, trade, and cultural exchange in an era of Chinese economic power and Islamic expansion D-34

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 2 Version 2

1A The student understands China’s extensive urbanization and commercial expansion between the 10th and 13th centuries. •

Analyze how improved agricultural production, population growth, urbanization, and commercialization were interconnected. [Analyze multiple causation]

Identify major technological and scientific innovations and analyze their effects on Chinese life. [Examine the influence of ideas]

1D The student understands how interregional communication and trade led to intensified cultural exchanges among diverse peoples of Eurasia and Africa. •

Explain connections between trade and the spread of Islam in Central Asia, East Africa, West Africa, the coasts of India, and Southeast Asia. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Standard 2: The redefining of European society and culture, 1000-1300 CE.

2A The student understands feudalism and the growth of centralized monarchies and city-states in Europe. Therefore, the student is able to •

Describe feudal lordship and explain how feudal relationships provided a foundation of political order in parts of Europe. [Interrogate historical data]

Analyze how European monarchies expanded their power at the expense of feudal lords and assess the growth and limitations of representative institutions in these monarchies. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Explain the changing political relationship between the Catholic Church and secular states. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

2B The student understands the expansion of Christian Europe after 1000. Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze connections between population growth and increased agricultural production and technological innovation. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Explain urban growth in the Mediterranean region and northern Europe and analyze causes for the expansion of manufacturing, interregional trade, and a money economy in Europe. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships]

Analyze the causes and consequences of the European Crusades against Syria and Palestine. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

2C The student understands the patterns of social change and cultural achievement in Europe’s emerging civilizations. Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze how the rise of schools and universities in Italy, France, and England contributed to literacy, learning, and scientific advancement. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Evaluate major works of art, architecture, and literature and analyze how they shed light on values and attitudes in Christian society. [Draw upon visual sources]

Standard 4: The growth of states, towns, and trade in Sub-Saharan Africa between the 11th and 15th centuries.

4A The student understands the growth of imperial states in West Africa and Ethiopia. •

Analyze the importance of agriculture, gold production, and the trans-Saharan caravan trade in the growth of the Mali and Songhay empires. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Explain how Islam expanded in West Africa and assess its importance in the political and cultural life of Mali and Songhay. [Examine the influence of ideas]

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 2 Version 2

New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE (14 days)

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Writing Production and Distribution of Writing WHST.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites New to the grade span is the idea of establishing a purpose for comparing and contrasting forms of government. Students could easily apply this idea to the conflicts between church and state and between European and Middle Eastern powers. Also new to the grade level is for students to trace patterns in order to show changes in three areas. Instruction should include the patterns of change. Of particular use with this unit is the idea of interpreting history through the connection of a series of events. The explosive economic growth of both China and Europe apply this idea. Using the tool of multiple perspectives to act as a historian is new to the grade span. Instruction should model the use of multiple perspectives in teaching about the rise of new states in Europe, the Crusades, or the expansion of Islam. These units include Common Core Literacy standards in reading and literacy and Historical Thinking Standards. The impact on instruction of these new and additional standards is noted in the Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations and Assessment sections.

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 2 Version 2

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson Prentice Hall, Teacher’s Edition, 2011 (pp. 219-224, 231-237, 240-241, 244-260, 274, 278, 282-288, 324-333, 336, 346351, 364, 370-374, 387-396, 404-405)

Identify on two maps of Afroeurasia major historical changes between the 7th and 11th centuries in the following subject areas: major centers of population and city growth, major states and empires, areas where major religions were practiced, and principal trade routes. (2 days) Analyze the relationships between technological developments in agriculture, industry, and transport and the growth of China’s populations, economy, and impact on the trade of Afroeurasia. (3 days) Analyze how changes in European agriculture, industry, and political organization between 1000 and 1300 CE contributed to the growth of populations, urbanization, and commerce. (3 days) Describe the changing relationship between Christian Europe and Muslim Southwest Asia/North Africa, including the Crusades between the 11th and 13th centuries. (3 days) Assess the relative importance of agriculture, gold, and trans-Saharan trade in explaining the rise of the Ghana and Mali empires in West Africa. (3 days)

World History for Us All •

Big Era 5, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.3, Consolidation of the Trans-Hemispheric Network

Big Era 5, Closeup Teaching Unit 5.3.1, West African Geography, Climate, and History

Internet Islamic History Sourcebook, http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/islam/ islamsbook.html •

Interaction with the West, Crusades (Scroll a little more than halfway down the page.)

Internet African History Sourcebook, http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/africa/ africasbook.html •

Africa and Islam, Culture (Scroll about halfway down the page.)

Ibn Battuta on the Web, http://www.isidore-ofseville.com/ibn-battuta

Materials Maps of Europe and the Middle East, colored pencils

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary apprentice

manor

capital

monarchy

charter

serf

commodity

surplus

feudalism

vassal

gentry

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 2 Version 2

New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE (14 days)

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations Teaching activities in this unit invite students to investigate large-scale developments in Afroeurasia from about 1000 to 1300 CE, emphasizing development of prosperous urban societies in China and Europe, relations between Christian Europeans and Muslim states, and developments in West Africa related to the expansion of Islam and trans-Saharan trade. The strategies listed below represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective. The following teaching strategies are aligned to the order of the learning objectives. Select from the activities and readings in the Pearson text to provide students with background information and critical thinking opportunities that align to the learning objectives. •

To ensure that students will be able to identify on two maps of Afroeurasia major historical changes between the 7th and 11th centuries in the following subject areas: major centers of population and city growth, major states and empires, areas where major religions were practiced, and principal trade routes (2 days): Have students in groups use a map template of Afroeurasia to identify the major historical changes between the 7th and 11th centuries in the areas of the major centers of population and city growth for the major states and empires. Examples would include Song China, Ghana, Mali, Seljuk Turks, England, France, Holy Roman Empire, Muslim Caliphate (Spain), Genoa, Rome, Paris, Hangzhou, Constantinople, Bagdad, Córdoba, Axum (Africa), Jenne (West Africa). Have students prepare a similar map dated to about 1300. Historical Thinking Standard 2: Historical comprehension Teach Lesson 1 (Local Markets, Regional Trade, and Trans-Hemispheric Networks) in World History for Us All, Big Era 5, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.3 (Consolidation of the Trans-Hemispheric Network). In class discussion, compare and contrast the population growth, economic growth, and urbanization in Europe, Abbasid Southwest Asia, Song China, and West Africa after 1000 CE. What similarities and differences do you think there may have been in the causes of these developments?

To ensure that students will be able to analyze the relationships between technological developments in agriculture, industry, and transport and the growth of China’s populations, economy, and impact on the trade of Afroeurasia (3 days): Using reading in the textbook and class discussion, have students in groups fill out a graphic organizer that addresses the Chinese technological developments in agriculture, industry, and transport. Have students fill in a map showing China’s trading connections, including labels for the types of traded goods and resources.

To ensure that students will be able to analyze how changes in European agriculture, industry, and political organization between 1000 and 1300 CE contributed to the growth of populations, urbanization, and commerce (3 days): In class, explain how the development of agricultural technologies such as the iron plowshare, the wheeled plow, and crop rotation stimulated greater agricultural production in Europe. Lead a class discussion around the question: How do you think increases in agricultural production were related to the growth of populations and cities? Lead a class discussion about those common features or activities that allowed city-states (such as Genoa, Venice, and Bruges) to become commercial and economic leaders of Europe. How did they maintain their independence as city-states? In what ways did their political structure differ from that of centralized monarchies?

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 2 Version 2

To ensure that students will be able to describe the changing relationship between Christian Europe and Muslim Southwest Asia/North African, including the Crusades between the 11th and 13th centuries (3 days): In groups, have students draw a recruiting poster for the Crusades for either Christian or Muslim armies. Lead a discussion around the following questions: How do you think the Christian and Muslim leaders enticed common soldiers and knights to commit so much of their lives to the Crusades? What benefits might have been gained from such service? How does the concept of Muslim jihad compare to the concept of crusade in the context of the 11th and 12th centuries? Lead a class discussion analyzing why European Christian states and maritime city-states achieved commercial and naval dominance over Muslim power in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea basins between the 11th and 13th centuries. What caused these European states to develop naval power? Have students interpret selections from Muslim chronicles and literary works regarding Muslim military, political, and cultural response to the Christian crusades in the Eastern Mediterranean. A selection of sources is available in the Internet Islamic History Sourcebook. Historical Thinking Standard 3: Historical analysis and interpretation  

To ensure that students will be able to assess the relative importance of agriculture, gold, and trans-Saharan trade in explaining the rise of the Ghana and Mali empires in West Africa (3 days): Teach Closeup Teaching Unit 5.3.1 (West African Geography, Climate, and History) in World History for Us All, Big Era 5. Have students view slides or pictures in class that portray the physical and cultural diversity of West Africa and write a few words describing each. Compile the descriptions into a poem beginning with, “West Africa is . . . ” This is a good opportunity to implement writing standards for literacy in history/social studies (WHST.9-10.2d). In class, read and discuss the Moroccan traveler Ibn Battuta’s account of Mali in the 14th century. What did Ibn Battuta admire about Mali, and why? What did he criticize, and why? Why did Ibn Battuta disapprove of the social relations between men and women in Mali society? For Ibn Battuta’s account, see the following resources: World History for Us All, Big Era 5, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.3, Lesson 1, page 19 Internet African History Sourcebook, Africa and Islam, Culture: Travels in Asia and Africa 1325–1354, and Malian Women Ibn Battuta on the Web, http://www.isidore-of-seville.com/ibn-battuta

Additional Teaching Strategies Using the textbook, students can read and answer the questions that follow: Section 4 Assessment, Note Taking, questions 1 and 2, and Writing About History (Pearson, p. 395) Section 2 Assessment, Note Taking, questions 1 and 2, and Writing About History (Pearson, p. 224) Section 4 Assessment, Note Taking, questions 1 and 2 (Pearson, p. 236) Section 1 Assessment, Note Taking, questions 1 and 2, and Writing About History (Pearson, p. 249) Section 2 Assessment, Note Taking, questions 1 and 2, and Writing About History (Pearson, p. 254) Section 1 Assessment, Note Taking, questions 1 and 2, and Comprehension and Critical Thinking, questions 3–5 (Pearson, p. 288) Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 2 Version 2

New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE (14 days)

Section 5 Assessment, Note Taking, questions 1 and 2, and Comprehension and Critical Thinking, questions 3–6 (Pearson, p. 333) Section 4 Assessment, Note Taking, questions 1 and 2, and Writing about History (Pearson, p. 328) Section 2 Assessment, Note Taking, questions 1 and 2, and Writing about History (Pearson, p. 351) Chapter Assessment, questions 12, 13, and 18 (Pearson, p. 404), and Document-Based Assessment, questions 1–4 (Pearson, p. 405) with short answer responses. Sample answers are given in the textbook for scoring. Chapter Assessment, questions 9, 11, 16, and 19 (Pearson, p. 278). Sample answers are given in the textbook for scoring. Writing about History (Pearson, p. 274). Answers for scoring or a scoring guide are found in the Teacher’s Edition on the same page. Chapter Assessment, questions 17–20, 26–27 (Pearson, p. 336). Sample answers are given in the textbook for scoring. Chapter Assessment, questions 11–12, 15–17, 20–21 (Pearson, p. 240), and Document-Based Assessment, questions 1–4 (Pearson, p. 241) with short answer responses. Sample answers are given in the textbook for scoring. Chapter Assessment, questions 11–14 (Pearson, p. 364). Sample answers are given in the textbook for scoring.

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the Crusades, ask students to respond to the following question: “What was the primary purpose of the Crusades?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to identify on two maps of Afroeurasia major historical changes between the 7th and 11th centuries in the following subject areas: major centers of population and city growth, major states and empires, areas where major religions were practiced, and principal trade routes, in a short writing assignment or journal entry, have each student compare what is different about the two maps.

how to analyze the relationships between technological developments in agriculture, industry, and transport and the growth of China’s populations, economy, and impact on the trade of Afroeurasia, have students write a letter from a European merchant describing and comparing life in urban China with that in London.

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New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 2 Version 2

how to analyze how changes in European agriculture, industry, and political organization between 1000 and 1300 CE contributed to the growth of populations, urbanization, and commerce, have students create an accordion book telling the story of the life of a serf living on a manor in feudal England. Have students choose at least one of the following focuses: daily activities, your rights, obligations, legal and economic position. Take this opportunity to implement writing standards for literacy in history/social studies (WHST.9-10.4).

how to describe the changing relationship between Christian Europe and Muslim Southwest Asia/North African, including the Crusades between the 11th and 13th centuries, have students write a letter from a European Crusader to his brother back in Europe describing and explaining what aspects of Muslim culture and technology would be useful to take back home.

how to assess the relative importance of agriculture, gold, and trans-Saharan trade in explaining the rise of the Ghana and Mali empires in West Africa, have students in groups design a room for an exhibit in an archaeological museum for West African artifacts. They should choose the items they would display and label them in a way that would contribute to understanding of reasons for the development of Ghana into a large-scale empire.

Summative Assessment In groups, have students create a travel brochure for a Venetian merchant traveling to cities in West Africa, Southwest Asia, and China in the 13th century. What would they expect to see? What would be similar to Venice? What would be different? This is an opportunity to use writing standards for literacy in history/social studies (WHST.9-10.4 and WHST.9-10.7). Provide the following rubric for student use and to assess the brochures. 4

3

2

1

Descriptions of what they saw

Descriptions are complete and accurate.

Descriptions are incomplete, but they are accurate.

Descriptions are complete, but they are not accurate.

Descriptions are neither complete nor accurate.

Descriptions of all three areas (West Africa, Southwest Asia, China)

All three.

Only two.

Only one.

Any attempt at all that still does not describe any one of the areas.

Similarity to/difference from Venice

Both the similarity and difference are supported by accurate and relevant facts.

Similarity and difference are supported by accurate but irrelevant facts.

Similarity and difference are supported by inaccurate but relevant facts.

Either a similarity or a difference is missing altogether.

Grammar and spelling

All accurate.

Mostly accurate.

Somewhat accurate.

Mostly inaccurate.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 2 Version 2

New Developments Across Afroeurasia, 1000–1300 CE (14 days)

Notes

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 3 of 3

Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations Overview Overall days: 12

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose In this unit, students cross the oceans to the Americas to investigate the development of complex agrarian societies in Mesoamerica (Middle America) and South America. Students will consider connections between the rise of large-scale urbanized societies—specifically, the Maya, Moche, Aztec, and Inca—and the physical and natural environment. Students will explore how goods and ideas spread across large areas, particularly in Mesoamerica and the Andean mountain spine of South America. Students will discuss how these societies organized city-states and empires and built on a monumental scale despite the absence of iron technology, wheeled transport, or more than a few large domesticated animals.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Understand the main characteristics of Maya civilization in Mesoamerica.

Understand the main characteristics of Moche civilization in South America in the context of its arid environment.

Analyze cause-and-effect relationships between the environment of Mesoamerica and the distinct characteristics of Maya economy and government.

Formulate historical questions to examine reasons why the Moche built an urban civilization in the extremely arid environment of South America’s Pacific coast.

Draw comparisons across regions to analyze how geography and ecology influenced the rise of the Aztec and Inca empires.

Evaluate historical data for evidence of longdistance trade and cultural exchange in both Mesoamerica and Andean South America.

Understand in comparative perspective the rise of the Aztec and Inca empires.

Explain how goods and ideas spread widely within Mesoamerica and along the Andean mountain spine of South America in the 200– 1500 CE period.

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit •

What factors encouraged the rise of dense urban societies in certain parts of Mesoamerica and South America?

How were complex societies in the Americas similar to or different from civilizations in Afroeurasia, such as the Roman Empire?

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

How did peoples of the Americas build large empires and cities without the benefit of basic tools available to peoples of Afroeurasia— particularly, iron, the wheel, and a choice of large domesticated animals?

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 3 Version 2

Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations (12 days)

Written Curriculum Grade-Span Expectations C&G 4: People engage in political processes in a variety of ways. C&G 4 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by… b. interacting with, analyzing, and evaluating political institutions and political parties in an authentic context (using local, national, or international issues/events that are personally meaningful)

HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by… a. formulating historical questions, obtaining, analyzing, evaluating historical primary and secondary print and non-print sources (e.g., RI Constitution, art, oral history, writings of Elizabeth Buffum Chace)

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 4: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, 300-1000 CE Standard 6: The rise of centers of civilization in Mesoamerica and Andean South America in the first millennium CE.

6AThe student understands the origins, expansion, and achievements of Maya civilization. •

Describe the natural environment of southern Mesoamerica and its relationship to the development of Maya urban society. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Analyze the Maya system of agricultural production and trade and its relationship to the rise of city-states. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Interpret the Maya cosmic world view as evidenced in art and architecture and evaluate Maya achievements in astronomy, mathematics, and the development of a calendar. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

Analyze how monumental architecture and other evidence portrays the lives of elite men and women. [Draw upon visual sources]

6B The student understands the rise of the Teotihuacán, Zapotec/Mixtec, and Moche civilizations. •

Analyze how the diverse natural environment of the Andes region shaped systems of agriculture and animal herding. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Describe how archaeological discoveries have led to greater understanding of the character of Moche society. [Hold interpretations of history as tentative]

Era 5 Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000-1500 CE Standard 6: The expansion of states and civilizations in the Americas, 1000-1500.

6A The student understands the development of complex societies and states in North America and Mesoamerica. Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze how the Aztec empire arose in the 14th and 15th centuries and explain major aspects of Aztec government, society, religion, and culture. [Interrogate historical data]

6B The student understands the development of the Inca empire in Andean South America. D-44

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations (12 days)

World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 3 Version 2

Therefore, the student is able to •

Analyze Inca expansion and methods of imperial unification. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

Explain Inca social, political, religious, and economic institutions. [Interrogate historical data]

Compare the government, economy, religion, and social organization of the Aztec and Inca empires. [Compare and contrast differing values and institutions]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Key Ideas and Details RH.9-10.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

Craft and Structure RH.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.

Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

WHST.9-10.9

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites New to the grade span is the skill to analyze and evaluate both primary and secondary sources in print or non-print form. Instruction should include modeling the use of both kinds of sources so students can learn to analyze and evaluate them. Also new to the grade span is the analysis of political institutions. This should be applied to the established hierarchy among the peoples of Mesoamerica and South America. These units include Common Core Literacy standards in reading and literacy and Historical Thinking Standards. The impact on instruction of these new and additional standards is noted in the Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations and Assessment sections.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 3 Version 2

Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations (12 days)

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson Prentice Hall, Teacher’s Edition, 2011 (pp. 184a-209)

Identify on a map of the Western Hemisphere the major north–south mountain chains, the South American coastal deserts, the Maya environmental and cultural region, the Basin of Mexico (Valley of Mexico), and the Aztec and Inca empires. (2 days) Characterize the distinctive ecological, political, religious, and artistic characteristics of Maya civilization. (3 days)

Compare the development and political character of the Aztec and Inca empires. (4 days)

Identify patterns of long-distance trade in Mesoamerica and Andean South America. (3 days)

Assessment Rubrics (p. 8) World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu •

Big Era 4, Landscape Teaching Unit 4.6: Empires and City-States of the Americas, Lessons 1, 2, and 3

Big Era 5, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.6: Spheres of Interaction in the Americas

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary adobe

kiva

allyu

maize

chinampa

quipu

city-state

stela

irrigation agriculture

tribute

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations The classroom strategies in this unit ask students to investigate, in comparative perspective, connections between the rise of large-scale urbanized societies—specifically, the Maya, Moche, Aztec, and Inca—and the physical and natural environment. They will also explore how goods and ideas spread across large areas. The strategies listed below represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective. The following teaching strategies are aligned to the order of the learning objectives. Select from the activities and readings in the Pearson text to provide students with background information and critical thinking opportunities that align to the learning objectives.

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations (12 days)

World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 3 Version 2

To ensure that students will be able to identify on a map of the Western Hemisphere the major north–south mountain chains, the South American coastal deserts, the Maya environmental and cultural region, the Basin of Mexico (Valley of Mexico), and the Aztec and Inca empires (2 days): Have students use a map template of the Americas to locate and identify the major north–south mountain chains, the South American coastal deserts, the Maya environmental and cultural region, the Basin of Mexico (Valley of Mexico), and the Aztec and Inca empires. Examining a climatic map of the Americas, have students hypothesize where large centers of population and city building were likely to be in the 1–1500 CE period. In what regions would population likely have been low? Teach with appropriate modifications World History for Us All, Big Era 4, Landscape Teaching Unit 4.6 (Empires and City-States of the Americas), Lesson 1 (Characteristics of Empires and City-States in the Americas) and Lesson 2 (Compare Characteristics of Empires and City-States of the Americas with Empires and City-States in Afroeurasia).

To ensure that students will be able to characterize the distinctive ecological, political, religious, and artistic characteristics of Maya civilization (3 days): Have students list the major achievements of Maya civilization and explain their relationship to everyday life. How did achievements in astronomy affect Maya society? How valuable to farmers were mathematical innovations and the calendar? This is a good opportunity to implement writing standards for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.2b Have students create an accordion book using glyphs integrated into the design, illustrating social organization and ritual practices, such as bloodletting warfare. Discuss the book, relating it to historical evidence of Mayan society and religious beliefs. Historical Thinking Standard 3: Historical analysis and interpretation Teach with appropriate modifications World History for Us All, Big Era 4, Landscape Teaching Unit 4.6 (Empires and City-States of the Americas), Lesson 3 (Compare Calendars).

To ensure that students will be able to compare the development and political character of the Aztec and Incan empires (4 days): Using a T-chart, have students compare the major achievements of Aztec and Inca civilizations. Historical Thinking Standard 2: Historical comprehension Lead a class discussion analyzing why the Aztecs practiced human sacrifice on a large scale. How might human sacrifice have been linked to religious beliefs, warfare, and the power of the state? In what other societies, premodern or modern, has human sacrifice been practiced? Historical Thinking Standard 3: Historical analysis and interpretation Construct a three-dimensional map of the Inca Empire, using different colors to show the expansion of the empire over time (about 1230–1525). Lead a class discussion around the following questions: What problems did the geography of the empire present? How did altitude and terrain affect Inca agriculture? Using readings in the textbook and classroom discussion, have students complete graphic organizers comparing the structure of Inca and Aztec societies, indicating the roles of groups such as priests, warriors, and farmers.

To ensure that students will be able to identify patters of long-distance trade in Mesoamerica and Andean South America (3 days): Teach with appropriate modifications World History for Us All, Big Era 5, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.6 (Spheres of Interaction in the Americas).

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 3 Version 2

Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations (12 days)

Additional Teaching Strategies Have students read the textbook and have them answer the following questions: Section 1 Assessment, Comprehension and Critical Thinking, questions 3–5 (Pearson, p. 194). Sample answers are given in the textbook for scoring. Section 2 Assessment, Comprehension and Critical Thinking, questions 3–5 (Pearson, p. 199). Sample answers are given in the textbook for scoring.

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the power structure in the Incan empire, ask students to respond to the following question: “What was the role of the ayllu?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to identify on a map of the Western Hemisphere the major north–south mountain chains, the South American coastal deserts, the Maya environmental and cultural region, the Basin of Mexico (Valley of Mexico), and the Aztec and Inca empires, have students respond in a short writing assignment to the following question: What environmental factors explain how people could have built cities in the extremely arid Pacific coastal deserts of South America?

how to characterize the distinctive ecological, political, religious, and artistic characteristics of Maya civilization, have students locate Maya city-states on a map of Mesoamerica using symbols to indicate roads and sea routes. Have students write a paragraph in which they hypothesize reasons for the development of urban societies in these locations (Pearson, p. 189). Take the opportunity to implement the reading standard for literacy in history/social studies (RH.9-10.4).

how to compare the development and political character of the Aztec and Incan empires, have students refer to the graphic organizer to write a short essay comparing the Aztec and Inca rulers.

how to identify patterns of long-distance trade in Mesoamerica and Andean South America, have students draw a map illustrating the exchange trade routes, commodities, and luxury goods, such as cacao, salt, feathers, jade, and obsidian. Have students write short responses to the following question: What conclusions may be drawn from the extent of Maya trade? How important was trade to the Mayan economy? This assessment provides an opportunity to practice both reading and writing skills using RH.9-10.1, WHST.9-10.7, and WHST.9-10.9

Other Formative Assessments Students complete questions 10–13, 18–19, 21–22 (Pearson, p. 208) and Document-Based Assessment questions 1–4 (Pearson, p. 209). Sample answers are given in the textbook for scoring short answer responses.

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Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations (12 days)

World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 3 Version 2

Summative Assessment Have students refer to their notes and class artifacts to write an essay that addresses the following: Why was there so little trade within the Inca Empire? In your opinion, how does this reflect either the strength or the weakness of the Inca rulers? If not for trade, then what were the primary uses for the massive network of roads in the Inca Empire? If you were the Inca ruler, how might you have managed the economy of the empire differently? Provide Assessment Rubrics, “Rubric for Assessing a Writing Assignment� (p. 8) to students to help them plan their essays. Use the same rubric to assess.

Notes

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 2, Unit 3 Version 2

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Mesoamerican and Andean Civilizations (12 days)

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 1 of 3

The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350 Overview Overall days:

10

(1 day = 50 minutes)

Purpose In this unit, students investigate a number of big changes in world history centered on the 13th and 14th centuries, a time during which peoples of Afroeurasia became more firmly interconnected. The first topic is the rise of the Mongol Empire, the largest land empire the world had ever seen. Students also consider the political, economic, and cultural consequences of Mongol conquests and rule on peoples of Eurasia. Students focus in comparative perspective on two regions: China, which came under Mongol rule, and Europe, most of which did not. The second section of the unit focuses on the trans-Saharan trade networks and the rise of Mali as a West African empire.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Describe a “big picture” of human and physical geographical features of Afroeurasia in the 1200–1350 period.

Draw upon historical maps to illustrate human and physical geographical features of Afroeurasia in the 13th and 14th centuries.

Explain the historical significance of Genghis (Chingis) Khan, and analyze how Mongol destructiveness and brutality were followed by a surge of trans-hemispheric commercial and cultural exchange.

Draw comparisons across regions in order to analyze the significance of the Mongol conquests and of the subsequent Mongol Peace for the history of peoples of Eurasia.

Assess the impact of Mongol conquests on Chinese society and economy, notably under the long reign of Kublai Khan.

Formulate historical questions regarding the extent to which Mongol rule changed China’s government and economy.

Appreciate economic, religious, and intellectual developments in Western Europe in the context of a region of many states and languages.

Obtain historical data from a variety of sources to analyze how Western Europe flourished as an urban civilization in the 13th and early 14th centuries.

Essential questions that students should be able to answer by end of unit •

Should the Mongol conquerors of the 13th and 14th centuries be regarded mainly as barbarian destroyers or as builders of stronger economic and cultural exchange networks across Eurasia?

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

In what fundamental ways did civilization in China differ from that in Europe in the 13th and early 14th centuries?

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 1 Version 2

The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350 (10 days)

Written Curriculum Grade Span Expectations HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12)– 1 Students connect the past with the present by… a. explaining origins of major historical events

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 5: Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000-1500 CE. Standard 1: The maturing of an interregional system of communication, trade, and cultural exchange in an era of Chinese economic power and Islamic expansion.

1D The student understands how interregional communication and trade led to intensified cultural exchanges among diverse peoples of Eurasia and Africa. Explain how camel caravan transport facilitated long-distance trade across Inner Eurasia and the Sahara Desert. [Interrogate historical data] Standard 2: The redefining of European society and culture, 1000-1300 CE.

2A The student understands feudalism and the growth of centralized monarchies and city-states in Europe Analyze how European monarchies expanded their power at the expense of feudal lords and assess the growth and limitations of representative institutions in these monarchies. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain the changing political relationship between the Catholic Church and secular states. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze how prosperous city-states arose in Italy and northern Europe and compare the political institutions of city-states with those of centralizing monarchies. [Formulate historical questions] 2C The student understands the patterns of social change and cultural achievement in Europe’s emerging civilizations. Analyze how the rise of schools and universities in Italy, France, and England contributed to literacy, learning, and scientific advancement. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Standard 3: The rise of the Mongol empire and its consequences for Eurasian peoples, 1200-1350.

3A The student understands the world-historical significance of the Mongol empire. Assess the career of Chingis Khan as a conqueror and military innovator in the context of Mongol society. [Assess the importance of the individual] Describe the Mongol conquests of 1206-1279 and assess their effects on peoples of China, Southeast Asia, Russia, and Southwest Asia. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Describe the founding and political character of Mongol rule in China, Central Asia, Southwest Asia, and Russia and explain why the unified empire divided into four major successor kingdoms. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] D-52

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350 (10 days)

World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 1 Version 2

Assess the usefulness and limitations of the concept of the “Pax Mongolica” and analyze how long-distance communication and trade led to cultural and technological diffusion across Eurasia. [Interrogate historical data] 3B The student understands the significance of Mongol rule in China Analyze how Mongol rule affected economy, society, and culture in China and Korea. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Standard 7: Major global trends from 1000 to 1500 CE.

7A The student understands major global trends from 1000 to 1500 CE. Compare Europe and China in relation to causes and consequences of productive growth, commercialization, urbanization, and technological or scientific innovation. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Craft and Structure RH.9-10.6

Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites These units include Common Core literacy standards in reading and literacy and Historical Thinking Standards. The impact on instruction of these new and additional standards is noted in the Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations section and the assessment sections of this unit.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 1 Version 2

The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350 (10 days)

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson, 2011 (pp. 376-379, 397401, 410-417)

Identify on a map of Afroeurasia for the approximate period 1250–1350 the principal geographical features of Inner Eurasia, the location of the Great Arid Zone, major empires and states, major cities, and principal trade routes. (2 days) Describe the career of Genghis (Chingis) Khan and identify the major Mongol conquests and the division of the Mongol Empire after 1260. (3 days)

Assess the effects of Mongol rule in China on both the economy and government. (2 days)

Analyze why monarchies and city-states of Western Europe enjoyed prosperity during the 13th and early 14th centuries. (3 days)

Assessment Rubrics for High School (p. 6) All in One Teaching Resources, Unit 2, p. 97 Facing History and Ourselves •

Big Paper, http://facing.org/resources/strategies/big-paperbuilding-a-silent-c

Human Timeline, http://www.facinghistory.org/ resources/strategies/human timeline

Jigsaw, http://www.facinghistory.org/resources/ strategies/jigsaw-developing-community-d

World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu •

History, Geography and Time PowerPoint Overview Presentation

Big Era 5 PowerPoint Overview Presentation

Big Era 5, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.4

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary commodity

steppes

matrilineal

surplus

network

trans-hemispheric

patrilineal

vernacular

savanna

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350 (10 days)

World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 1 Version 2

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations In this unit, students examine large-scale connections in Afroeurasia between 1200 and 1350, with special focus on the role of the Mongols and of the impact of trade. Students are asked to evaluate individual agency in history in this unit. Select from the activities and readings in the Pearson text to provide students with background information and critical thinking opportunities that align to the learning objectives. The strategies listed represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective. •

To ensure that students will be able to identify on a map of Afroeurasia for the approximate period 1250–1350 the principal geographical features of Inner Eurasia, the location of the Great Arid Zone, major empires and states, major cities, and principal trade routes (2 days): Have students in groups create a map that illustrates the following elements: (1) Empires and states: Mongol, Mali, Vietnam, Pagan, Khmer, Ethiopia, Great Zimbabwe, Mamluk (Egypt), Delhi Sultanate (North India), Russian states, Holy Roman Empire, and Byzantine Empire; (2) the Great Arid Zone; (3) major geographical features of Inner Eurasia: steppes, mountain ranges, and deserts; (4) cities: Beijing, Hanzhou (Hanchou), Kara Korum, Samarkand, Delhi, Tabriz, Cairo, Tunis, Timbuktu, Moscow, Vienna, Paris, and Venice; (5) land and sea trade routes: silk roads, Trans-Saharan, Indian Ocean, and Mediterranean. Standard 2: Historical Comprehension. For this map activity, refer to World History for Us All, History, Geography and Time, PowerPoint Overview Presentation (Big Geography), slides 29-36; Big Era 5 PowerPoint Overview Presentation (Patterns of Interregional Unity), slide 22; and maps in the Pearson textbook.

To ensure that students will be able to describe the career of Genghis (Chingis) Khan and identify the major Mongol conquests and the division of the Mongol Empire after 1260 (3 days): Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.4 (The Mongol Moment: 1200-1400). Have students write an account by someone their age about the conquest of his or her hometown by a Mongol army. Write a second account from the point of view of a Mongol warrior. How would these two accounts be different? Standard 5: Historical issues-analysis and decision-making. Human Timeline: Have students create a timeline. The strategy uses movement to help students understand and remember the chronology of events. Place each event on an index card or sheet of paper, along with the date or date range in which it occurred. Assign each student one event from the period that you are highlighting. Invite students to line up in the order of their events. Then, students present their events. After an event is presented, students can suggest possible causes of the event and can pose questions about what happened and why. These questions can be posted on the board for students to answer later. After all students have presented their events, sometimes teachers give students a timeline with relevant dates but no descriptions. Based on what they recall from the human timeline activity, students complete this timeline. This can be done individually or in small groups, and images can be added to the timelines. For more information, see the Facing History web page on Human Timelines. Standard 1: Chronological Thinking Big Paper: A discussion that takes place entirely in writing causes students to slow down, gives shy students an equal voice, and results in a written product for later reference. Divide the class into groups of two or three students. Ensure that every student has a pen or marker. Using differentcolored markers makes it easier to see the back-and-forth of a conversation. Each group also needs a “big paper” (e.g., butcher paper, newsprint, sheet from a chart tablet) that will accommodate a written conversation and added comments.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 1 Version 2

The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350 (10 days)

Read or post the following steps and discuss before beginning the activity in order to prevent students’ questions from breaking the silence. 1.

There is to be no talking whatsoever; students will write what they want to contribute/ask.

2.

In the center of the page, students will write the stimulus—Genghis Khan as History Maker— around which this silent discussion will take place.

3.

Referring to their notes from classroom activities, the text, and any other resources you choose to provide, students respond to the stimulus by writing their comments and questions and engaging in silent conversations with the others in their group. Students can write at the same time, and their discussions can run off into tangents according to where the students’ minds lead them. Allow 15 minutes or more for this phase.

4.

To clarify relationships among the comments and questions, students may find it helpful to draw lines or arrows connecting related entries.

5.

Allow the students to take their markers with them as they split up and examine other groups’ big papers, as in a gallery walk. While maintaining the silence, students may comment in writing directly on others’ big papers.

6.

Once students return to their own papers, they are free to speak with their group about their big papers, discussing their own thoughts as well as the comments/questions posed by their classmates.

7.

Lead the class in a discussion about their observations and unanswered questions. Identify and have students write the emerging themes and persistent questions in their journals. Encourage students to respond to their classmates’ questions.

8.

Call on volunteers to offer statements about what they learned.

(See the Facing History and Ourselves website’s Big Paper page for an image of a big paper and for more information.) •

To ensure that students will be able to assess the effects of Mongol rule in China on both the economy and government (2 days): Jigsaw—Developing Community and Disseminating Knowledge: To address the impact of Mongol rule upon China, this strategy asks a group of students to become “experts” on a specific section in the pages describing Yuan China under the Mongols and then share that material with another group of students. These “teaching” groups contain one student from each of the “expert” groups. Take the opportunity to implement writing standard for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.7.

To ensure that students will be able to analyze why monarchies and city-states of Western Europe enjoyed prosperity during the 13th and early 14th centuries (3 days): Based on reading in the textbook, have students in groups fill in a graphic organizer identifying evidence of prosperity and stability, and poverty and instability in Western Europe before the mid14th century. Standard 3: Historical Analysis and Interpretation

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350 (10 days)

World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 1 Version 2

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the Pax Mongolica (Mongol Peace), ask students to respond to the following question: “In what way(s) was daily life under Mongol rule probably better than under self-rule?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to identify on a map of Afroeurasia for the approximate period 1250–1350 the principal geographical features of Inner Eurasia, the location of the Great Arid Zone, major empires and states, major cities, and principal trade routes, based on the map created in class, as individual practice, have students write a journal entry that compares the advantages and disadvantages of landbased and maritime long-distance trade between 1250 and 1350.

how to describe the career of Genghis (Chingis) Khan and identify the major Mongol conquests and the division of the Mongol Empire after 1260, have students in pairs construct an interview with Genghis Khan about his childhood, conquests, and life achievements. Have pairs of students create maps that illustrate the history of the Mongol Empire. The events and individual drawings on the map should be heavily captioned. When most groups are done, call on every student to share one caption.

how to assess the effects of Mongol rule in China on both the economy and government, have students refer to their notes from the jigsaw activity while a student leads the class in the creation of a T-chart that lists the Mongols’ effects on the Chinese economy and government. Upon completion of the T-chart, have pairs of students write two concluding statements that assess the historical significance of those effects. Call on students to share their statements. Encourage discussion about the differences among the statements.

how to analyze why monarchies and city-states of Western Europe enjoyed prosperity during the 13th and early 14th centuries, have groups report out and present an argument about whether Western Europe would best be described as “prosperous and stable” or “poor and unstable” in this period. Students must use evidence to support their claims. Standard 3: Historical Analysis and Interpretation

Summative Assessment Have students read the two views of the Mongols below: •

Matthew Paris, English historian, writing in the 13th century: They are inhuman and beastly, rather monsters than men, thirsting for and drinking blood, tearing and devouring the flesh of dogs and men, dressed in ox-hides, armed with plates of iron . . . thickset, strong, invincible, indefatigable . . . They are without human laws, know no comforts, are more ferocious than lions or bears.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 1 Version 2

The Age of the Mongols, 1200–1350 (10 days)

Ghazi, Muslim historian, writing in the 13th century: Under the reign of Chinggis Khan, all the countries . . . enjoyed such peace that a man might have journeyed from the land of the sunrise to the land of sunset with a golden platter upon his head without suffering the least violence from anyone.

Based on their study of the Mongol Empire, have students respond to the following prompts in a short writing assignment. •

Explain in what ways these two selections represent contrasting views of the Mongols in history.

Identify which of the selections represents a more convincing view of the Mongols in history.

Responses must contain full explanations, and students must cite evidence that supports their conclusions. The Rubric for Assessing a Writing Assignment (Assessment Rubrics for High School, p. 6) should be used for scoring. When students answer the essential questions, take the opportunity to implement writing standard for literacy in history/social studies RH.9-10.6.

Notes

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 2 of 3

Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450 Overview Overall days:

14

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose This unit focuses on understanding the calamities that befell large parts of Afroeurasia (Eurasia and Africa) in the 14th and 15th centuries and on the remarkable recoveries that followed. The unit introduces students to a key transitional period in world history, a time of crisis and tumult. The first part of the unit focuses on the pandemic (Black Death) that swept across Eurasia and North Africa. Students also explore the major economic, social, and political consequences of the pandemic from China to Europe. In the second part, students investigate China’s political and economic resurgence in the late 14th and early 15th century under the Ming dynasty. In the third part of the unit, students shift to Europe to consider its economic recovery and cultural flowering in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Understand scientific explanations of causes of the lethal pandemic (Black Death) of the mid14th century, and trace the spread of the pandemic (identified traditionally as plague) across Eurasia and North Africa.

Draw upon data in historical maps to trace the spread of the mid-14th-century pandemic, analyzing relationships between routes of transmission, physical geography, population density, and trade.

Analyze short-term and long-term demographic, economic, and social effects of the Black Death on Europe, Southwest Asia, and North Africa.

Identify evidence of Europe’s demographic and economic recovery in the 15th century, and explain the basic features of the Italian Renaissance.

Draw upon visual, literary, and quantitative sources to analyze the effects of the Black Death in Europe, Southwest Asia, and North Africa from the mid-14th to the mid-15th century.

Explain the significance of the fall of the Mongol regime and the rise of the Ming dynasty for the population of China.

Obtain historical data from a variety of sources to analyze Europe’s broad recovery in the 15th century and the cultural flowering that took place in Italy.

Analyze the significance of the Ming sea voyages under Admiral Zheng He (Cheng Ho) for the history of both China and the wider Afroeurasian region.

Formulate historical questions about the collapse of Mongol rule in China and the early success of the Ming rulers.

Use visual and map data to analyze the historical significance of the Ming voyages.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 2 Version 2

Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450 (14 days)

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit •

How could an infectious disease spread nearly all the way across Eurasia in the 14th century and have such devastating social and economic effects?

What do the Ming voyages in the Indian Ocean (1405-1433) tell us about China’s government and economy in that era?

What historical relationship might there be between the Italian Renaissance and the economic prosperity and power of such places as Florence, Venice, and Rome?

Written Curriculum Grade Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by… a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 5: Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000-1500 CE Standard 5: Patterns of crisis and recovery in Afro-Eurasia, 1300-1450

5A The student understands the consequences of the Black Death and recurring plague pandemic in the 14th century. Explain the origins and characteristics of the plague pandemic of the mid-14th century, and describe its spread across Eurasia and North Africa. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Analyze the demographic, economic, social, and political effects of the plague pandemic in Eurasia and North Africa in the second half of the 14th century. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

5B The student understands transformations in Europe following the economic and demographic crises of the 14th century. Analyze major changes in the agrarian and commercial economies of Europe in the context of drastic population decline. [Appreciate historical perspectives] Assess the effects of crises in the Catholic Church on its organization and prestige. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships] Analyze the resurgence of centralized monarchies and economically powerful city-states in western Europe in the 15th century. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Define humanism as it emerged in Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries and analyze how study of GrecoRoman antiquity and critical analysis of texts gave rise to new forms of literature, philosophy, and education. [Examine the influence of ideas.] Evaluate the aesthetic and cultural significance of major changes in the techniques of painting, sculpture, and architecture. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450 (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 2 Version 2

5C The student understands major political developments in Asia in the aftermath of the collapse of Mongol rule and the plague pandemic. Analyze reasons for the collapse of Mongol rule in China and the reconstituting of the empire under the Chinese Ming dynasty. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration] Describe the Zheng He maritime expeditions of the early 15th century and analyze why the Ming state initiated, then terminated, these voyages. [Evaluate the implementation of a decision] Standard 7: Major Global Trends from 1000-1500 CE

7A The student understands major global trends from 1000 to 1500 CE. Therefore, the student is able to Account for the growth, decline, and recovery of the overall population of Afro-Eurasia and analyze ways in which large demographic swings might have affected economic, social, and cultural life in various regions. [Utilize mathematical and quantitative data]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Key Ideas and Details RH.9-10.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

Craft and Structure RH.9-10.6

Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. WHST.9-10.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites New to the grade span is examining the connectedness of events by summarizing or comparing and contrasting. Instruction should include examples of connectedness using these tools. These units include Common Core literacy standards in reading and literacy and Historical Thinking Standards. The impact on instruction of these new and additional standards is noted in the Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations section and the assessment sections of this unit.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 2 Version 2

Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450 (14 days)

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson, 2011 (pp. 379-382, 410-417)

Account for the means by which plague spread in Eurasia and North Africa. (2 days)

Examine the effects of the Black Death in Europe, Southwest Asia, and North Africa. (3 days)

Facing History and Ourselves

Describe Europe’s population and economic recovery in the 14th century and analyze factors that led to the Italian Renaissance. (4 days)

World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu

Investigate the reasons for the fall of Mongol rule and the rise of the Ming dynasty in China in the later 14th century. (2 days)

Explain the Ming rulers’ decision to send fleets of ships on distant expeditions and then withdraw support for these expeditions. (3 days)

Assessment Rubrics for High School (p. 8) •

Identity Charts, http://www.facinghistory.org/ resources/strategies/identity-charts

Big Era 5, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.5

Big Era 5, Close-up Teaching Unit 5.5.1

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary epidemic

pandemic

humanism

patron

humanities

plague

inflation

renaissance

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations This unit examines the global spread of plague in the 14th century. Students compare the impact of this pandemic in different regions of Afroeurasia. Students also learn about the resurgence of China under the Ming and of Europe, with special focus on the Italian Renaissance. Students will further develop their skills in comparative historical analysis and in understanding and identifying cause and effect. Select from the activities and readings in the Pearson text to provide students with background information and critical thinking opportunities that align to the learning objectives. The strategies listed represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective.

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450 (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 2 Version 2

To ensure that students will be able to account for the means by which plague spread in Eurasia and North Africa (2 days): Have students map the origin and spread of the 14th century plague on a physical relief map of Afroeurasia . Have students explain why they think some regions were hit by the plague and some were not. Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.5 (Calamities and Recoveries 1300-1500), Lesson 2: Double Trouble. This lesson addresses both the causes and the effects of the Black Death. Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Closeup Teaching Unit 5.5.1 (Coping with Catastrophe), Lesson 1: No Escape from Death: The Catastrophic Plague Arrives. This lesson addresses the spread of the Black Death.

To ensure that students will be able to examine the effects of the Black Death in Europe, Southwest Asia, and North Africa (3 days): Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Closeup Teaching Unit 5.5.1 (Coping with Catastrophe) Lesson 2: Trying to Cope: Explanations and Counter-measures, and Lesson 3: The Impact on Society. These lessons address questions of how people coped with the plague and how societies changed as a result of it. Have students in groups create posters that represent the short-term and long-term effect of the Black Death in a specific region. Have them do a gallery walk with a graphic organizer to learn about the impact in the other regions. This is a good opportunity to implement reading standard for literacy in history/social studies RH.9-10.6.

To ensure that students will be able to describe Europe’s population and economic recovery in the 14th century and analyze factors that led to the Italian Renaissance (4 days): Discuss contributions of the key figures in the Italian Renaissance (pp. 412-417), using identity charts to help students consider the many factors that shape who we are as individuals and as communities. (See the Facing History website’s Identity Charts page for more information.) Take the opportunity to implement writing standard for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.8. Based on readings in the textbook and other course materials, have students draw a chain of causes and effects that begins with “The Plague” and ends with “Italian Renaissance.” Students may find it helpful to draw a horizontal series of boxes with right-facing arrows between the boxes. The event or condition described in any box must be a direct result of the condition or event described in the box that immediately precedes it. Call on volunteers to suggest causes and events as another student adds boxes on the board/screen/etc. Challenge students to add more details within and between the boxes on the board. Allow students to add rows of boxes above or below the main row when there are multiple causes or effects for that in a single box.

To ensure that students will be able to investigate the reasons for the fall of Mongol rule and the rise of the Ming dynasty in China in the later 14th century (2 days): Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.5 (Calamities and Recoveries 1300-1500), Lesson 1: A Brilliant Recovery. This lesson addresses the fall of the Yuan (Mongol) dynasty in China and the rise of the Ming dynasty. For the learning objective covering the fall of the Mongols and the rise of the Ming dynasty, see pages 379-382 of the Pearson text and lead a class discussion about the reasons for the rise of the Ming. This is a good opportunity to implement reading standard for literacy in history/social studies RH.9-10.2.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 2 Version 2

Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450 (14 days)

To ensure that students will be able to explain the Ming rulers’ decision to send fleets of ships on distant expeditions and then withdraw support for these expeditions (3 days): Have students in groups construct maps charting the voyages and trade items associated with the Ming voyages. Lead a class discussion based on readings in the textbook about why the Ming abandoned these voyages. Have groups of students construct posters about how the world might have looked in the future had the Chinese not abandoned these voyages. Standard 5. Historical IssuesAnalysis and Decision-Making

Other Teaching Strategies Using historical evidence, have students produce a survivor’s eyewitness account of the mid-14th century Black Death, assuming the role of a person living in Southwest Asia (the Middle East) or in Europe. Ask, “What were the short-term economic, social, and other consequences of the plague in your area?” Assign students the following activity: Draw evidence from primary source documents and visual materials to infer how villagers in Western Europe and Southwest Asia responded to the Black Death. Write an account describing how you would have reacted if you were a villager and a deadly mysterious disease was threatening your village. Record and explain why your reactions would have been the same as or different from those shown in the sources. (World History for Us All: Landscape Unit 5.5) Have students make a list of what they consider to be the likely social and cultural consequences of the high mortality, prolonged fear, and social dislocation that accompanied recurrent pandemics in the 14th and 15th centuries. Ask them to check their hypotheses against historical evidence. What impact did the Black Death have on economic, political, and religious life? Take the opportunity to implement writing standard for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.9.

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the Black Plague, ask students to respond to the following question: “What was one factor that allowed the Black Plague to spread so far and so quickly?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to account for the means by which plague spread in Eurasia and North Africa, have students refer to their maps, notes, the text, and any other resources you choose to provide as they respond to the following prompts in short journal responses: 1.

How did the plague spread from one area to another?

2.

How did the plague spread from person to person?

3.

If there were a plague today, and if you were the governor of Rhode Island, what types of things would you do to prevent the state from being infected by the plague?

Have students exchange papers. Call on students to share their classmates’ responses to the third prompt.

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Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450 (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 2 Version 2

how to examine the effects of the Black Death in Europe, Southwest Asia, and North Africa, have pairs of students refer to their posters, notes from the gallery walk, the text, and any other resources you choose to provide as they write letters of warning from an infected area to a friend in an uninfected area. The writer will warn his or her friend of the physical, social, and economic consequences of the plague in his or her own area—Europe, Southwest Asia, or North Africa. To help students plan their letters, provide Assessment Rubrics for High School, page 8. Use the same rubric to score the letters.

how to describe Europe’s population and economic recovery in the 14th century and analyze factors that led to the Italian Renaissance, have students write a letter from Florence in the 14th century that describes the evidence of economic recovery and cultural renaissance in the city.

how to investigate the reasons for the fall of Mongol rule and the rise of the Ming dynasty in China in the later 14th century, have students produce a European newspaper special edition dated at the beginning of Ming rule in China. Include interviews of several persons who speculate about what caused the downfall of the Mongols and the rise of the Ming. Standard 3. Historical Analysis and Interpretation

how to explain the Ming rulers’ decision to send fleets of ships on distant expeditions and then withdraw support of the decision, have each student write 1 or 2 paragraphs in which they explain the change in Ming attitudes that brought an end to exploration after Zheng He’s death. Use Assessment Rubrics for High School, page 8, to guide student work and to score the responses.

Other Formative Assessments For the assessments below, student handouts come from World History for Us All, Landscape Teaching Unit 5.5. Students will use or complete Student Handouts 1.1–1.4 (pp. 8-14). Students will receive Student Handouts 2.3–2.6 for reading (pp. 20-28). Then they will complete Student Handout 2.7 using the reading handouts to fill in the graphic organizer. Students will receive Student Handouts 5.1–5.4 (pp. 44-48). Follow the directions for filling out the graphic organizers on page 43.

Summative Assessment Have students create a comic strip set in the general period from 1300 to 1450 that represents the life experience and point of view of one of the following two types of individuals. •

An Italian traveler who makes a journey from Egypt across the Mediterranean to Italy during the period of the Black Death. This merchant survives the Black Death and witnesses changes during the crisis in the following years. Your comic strip should tell the story of this person’s experience and what he or she observes during and after the Black Death.

A young painter who lives in an Italian city in the late 14th and early 15th century. Your comic strip should tell the story of this person’s experience and what he or she observes during the period of the Italian Renaissance.

Whether students choose Person 1 or Person 2, the comic strip should combine illustrations with conversations and explanations.

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 2 Version 2

Calamities and Recoveries in Afroeurasia, 1300–1450 (14 days)

Notes

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 3 of 3

The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 Overview Overall days:

14

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose This unit introduces students to the Great Global Convergence, the moment when Afroeurasia and the Americas became permanently linked. This is the era when genuinely globe-girdling economic, cultural, and social exchange began to take place, transforming the human community in many ways. European voyagers of the later 15th and early 16th centuries aimed first of all to play a larger and more direct part in the Afroeurasian commercial system that already existed and had its economic center in Asia. In this unit, students explore how Western Europeans adopted and invented technology that enabled them to sail long distances on the high seas and, consequently, to reach America, the Indian Ocean, and East Asia by establishing new oceanic passages. The unit then investigates early encounters between Europeans and the peoples of Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Finally, the unit addresses the short-term consequences of those encounters.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Describe principal features of the sea and land exchange networks of Afroeurasia in the mid15th century.

Hypothesize why and how the kingdoms of Portugal and Spain undertook oceanic voyages in the 15th century, including the adoption of new sailing technology.

Draw upon data in historical maps to identify and explain the importance of major longdistance trade routes in Afroeurasia as of the mid-15th century.

Assess the effects of early encounters between Portuguese or Spanish merchants and soldiers and the states and merchant groups of SubSaharan Africa, the Indian Ocean, and the China Seas.

Analyze interests, values, perspectives, and points of view to hypothesize about the motives of Portuguese and Spanish voyagers in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Describe how Columbus, Vasco da Gama, Magellan, and the sailors who followed them established permanent oceanic passages across the Atlantic and Pacific.

Appreciate historical perspectives, considering the historical context in which events unfolded, in relation to encounters between Portuguese or Spanish newcomers and peoples of SubSaharan Africa, India, and Southeast Asia in the 16th century.

Read historical narratives imaginatively to investigate the successes of Columbus and other mariners in establishing Atlantic and Pacific sea passages.

Analyze cause-and-effect relationships to interpret the rapid fall of the Aztec and Inca empires to Spanish conquerors and the causes and consequences of the “Great Dying” of Native Americans in the 16th century.

Describe major features of the Aztec and Inca empires on the eve of their encounters with Europeans, and hypothesize why those empires quickly fell to Spanish overlords and why American populations dropped drastically.

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 3 Version 2

The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 (14 days)

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit •

How might the character, extent, and limits of Portuguese and Spanish power in Africa and Asia in the 16th century be assessed?

How may 16th-century encounters between Europeans and Native Americans in the West and between Europeans and Asians in the East be compared and contrasted?

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Why did the linking of Afroeurasia with the Americas lead to a loss of as much as 90 percent of the Native American population by the early 17th century?

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The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 3 Version 2

Written Curriculum Grade Span Expectations HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. HP 2 (9-12)– 1 Students connect the past with the present by…

b. identifying and linking key ideas and concepts and their enduring implications (e.g., separation of church and state in Rhode Island)

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 6: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 1450-1770 Standard 1: How the transoceanic interlinking of all major regions of the world from 1450 to 1600 led to global transformations.

1A The student understands the origins and consequences of European overseas expansion in the 15th and 16th centuries. Explain major characteristics of the interregional trading system that linked peoples of Africa, Asia, and Europe on the eve of the European overseas voyages. [Consider multiple perspectives] Analyze the major social, economic, political, and cultural features of European society, and in particular of Spain and Portugal, that stimulated exploration and conquest overseas. [Identify issues and problems in the past] Identify major technological developments in shipbuilding, navigation, and naval warfare and trace the cultural origins of various innovations. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze the motives, nature, and short-term significance of the major Iberian military and commercial expeditions to Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas. [Identify issues and problems in the past] 1B The student understands the encounters between Europeans and peoples of Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Analyze Portuguese maritime expansion to Africa, India, and Southeast Asia and interactions between the Portuguese and the peoples of these regions. [Formulate historical questions] Describe the political and military collision between the Spanish and the Aztec and Inca empires and analyze why these empires collapsed. [Identify issues and problems in the past] 1C The student understands the consequences of the worldwide exchange of flora, fauna, and pathogens. Assess ways in which the exchange of plants and animals around the world in the late 15th and the 16th centuries affected European, Asian, African, and American Indian societies and commerce. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze why the introduction of new disease microorganisms in the Americas after 1492 had such devastating demographic and social effects on American Indian populations. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 3 Version 2

The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 (14 days)

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas RH.9-10.7

Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.

Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.8

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites Connecting the past to the present with ideas of enduring implications is new to the grade span. Instruction should include examples of events that have enduring implications in this unit. These units include Common Core literacy standards in reading and literacy and Historical Thinking Standards. The impact on instruction of these new and additional standards is noted in the Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations section and the assessment sections of this unit.

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson, 2011, (pp. 446-460)

Trace the major trade routes of Afroeurasia in the mid-1400s, and analyze why the Iberian states wished to play a larger part in Afroeurasian commerce. (2 days) Explain the origins and development of the navigational and shipbuilding technology that enabled Europeans to make long oceanic voyages. (3 days)

Compare and contrast the nature and consequences of early encounters between the Iberian maritime powers and states of Africa and Asia in the 15th and 16th centuries. (3 days)

Trace the routes and relate the significance of the success of Vasco da Gama, Columbus, Balboa, Magellan, and other European mariners in establishing major oceanic passages. (2 days)

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Assessment Rubrics for High School (p. 8) World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu •

Big Era 6, Panorama Teaching Unit

Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.1

Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.2

Facing History and Ourselves •

Jigsaw Activity, http://facing.org/ resources/strategies/jigsaw-developingcommunity-d

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The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 (14 days)

Identify reasons that the Spanish quickly destroyed the Aztec and Incan empires and why the population of the Americas began to drop drastically in the 16th century. (4 days)

World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 3 Version 2

Other Resources National Geographic •

Gold Fever, http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/ ngexplorer/0901/articles/mainarticle.html

PBS •

Conquest of the Incas, http://www.pbs.org/ conquistadors/pizarro/pizarro_c00.html

The Fall of the Aztecs, http://www.pbs.org/ conquistadors/cortes/cortes_d00.html

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary caravel

immunity

carrack

missionary

cartographer

monopoly

circumnavigate

motivation

conquistadors

outpost

demography

sovereign

extent

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations This unit examines early Iberian maritime expansion in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans. Students are to investigate the global significance and connections established by this expansion with specific emphasis upon the Columbian Exchange and the consequences of Native American demographic collapse in the 16th century. Select from the activities and readings in the Pearson text to provide students with background information and critical thinking opportunities that align to the learning objectives. The strategies listed represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective. •

To ensure that students will be able to trace the major trade routes of Afroeurasia in the mid1400s, and analyze why the Iberian states wished to play a larger part in Afroeurasian commerce (2 days): Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Panorama Teaching Unit (The Great Global Convergence, 1400-1800), Lesson 1: Luxury Trade Before the European Oceanic Voyages; Lesson 2: Trade Before the European Networks were Established. Case Study of Malacca, Lesson 3: Hunger for Spices Have students refer to their notes, the text, and any other resources you choose to provide as they create a map illustrating the major trade routes of Afroeurasia prior to the discovery of the Americas. The map should take up the entire right-hand half of a large poster. Students will add copious

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 3 Version 2

The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 (14 days)

captions throughout the poster. Call on each student to share one of his or her captions. •

To ensure that students will be able to explain the origins and development of the navigational and shipbuilding technology that enabled Europeans to make long oceanic voyages (3 days): In groups, have students draw an Iberian sailing vessel of the early 16th century or label a blank drawing of an Iberian sailing vessel. Have students identify the various important technological features on the ship and label the cultural or civilizational origin of the specific technology on the vessel. Standard 2: Historical Comprehension Have pairs of students use the text, their notes, and any other resources you may choose to provide to research the astrolabe, compass, sextant, map improvements, GPS, and radio communications. Have students describe (1) how these instruments were improved versions of earlier technologies, (2) who made the improvements, and (3) how each instrument facilitated long oceanic voyages. Historical Thinking Skill 4: Historical research

To ensure that students will be able to compare and contrast the nature and consequences of early encounters between the Iberian maritime powers and states of Africa and Asia in the 15th and 16th centuries (3 days): Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Panorama Teaching Unit (The Great Global Convergence, 1400-1800), Lesson 4: Europeans in the Indian Ocean. Based on information from the textbook and other course materials, have student groups fill in a Venn diagram with one side labeled “Iberian Encounters with Africa” and the other “Iberian Encounters with Asia.”

To ensure that students will be able to trace the routes and relate the significance of the success of Vasco da Gama, Columbus, Balboa, Magellan, and other European mariners in establishing major oceanic passages (2 days): Teach strategies and activities in Landscape Teaching Unit 6.1 (Oceanic Ventures and the Joining of the Continents, 1400-1550). Using material from the textbook and other course materials, have students outline the routes of de Gama, Columbus, Balboa, Magellan, and other European mariners on a map.

To ensure that students will be able to identify reasons why the Spanish quickly destroyed the Aztec and Incan empires and why the population of the Americas began to drop drastically in the 16th century (4 days): Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Panorama Teaching Unit (The Great Global Convergence, 1400-1800), The Great Dying and Its Relationship to Slavery in the Americas and the Landscape Teaching Unit 6.2 (The Columbian Exchange and Its Consequences, 1400-1650). Construct a historical argument or debate on such questions as: (1) Were the voyages of Columbus a “discovery”? (2) How should Columbus be characterized: conqueror, explorer, missionary, merchant, or villain? Standard 5. Historical Issues-Analysis and Decision-Making Use the following Jigsaw Activity: Divide students into four research groups: (1) steel vs. stone; (2) cavalry vs. infantry; (3) introduction of new diseases; and (4) viewing the other through the lens of religion. Group 1 will compare the weapons used by both sides. Group 2 will address the tactics used, as well as the importance of horses and dogs in battle. Group 3 will describe the devastating effects of Old World diseases on Native American populations.

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The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 3 Version 2

Group 4 will address the missionary mindset of (some of) the Europeans and the Aztec’s belief that Cortés was the God from the Sea.

Students will use all available resources—including, if possible, the “Gold Fever” page, “Conquest of the Incas,” and “Fall of the Aztecs” (in the Other Resources list)—to research their assigned topic. If there are no supplemental resources available, the topics being researched may have to be adjusted. Then have the students form new groups, ensuring that each new group contains at least one expert from each of the research groups. Students will then synthesize their findings into a single product (e.g., graphic organizer, outline, essay, etc.). Have a student from each group share one fact from what his or her group produced from the synthesized information. Encourage students to discuss the differences in their products. See the Facing History and Ourselves website’s Jigsaw page http://facing.org/resources/ strategies/jigsaw-developing-community-d for more information about this strategy. Historical Thinking Standard 4: Historical research Take the opportunity to implement writing standard for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.8. Additional Teaching Strategies The following pages from the Pearson text contain strategies for the concepts being studied and are coordinated with the learning objectives: •

Spanish and Portuguese exploration (pp. 446-450)

Explorers, routes, and results of their search for a direct trade route (pp. 447-450)

Balboa’s discovery and Magellan’s journey (p. 451)

The growth of the African slave trade (pp. 453-454)

Growth of the African states during the 1600s (pp. 454-455)

European permanent settlements outside of Europe (p. 455)

European exploration in South and Southeast Asia (pp. 457-460)

The effects of European contacts in East Asia (pp. 461- 465)

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the Iberian desire to play a greater role in Afroeurasian commerce, ask students to respond to the following question: “What were two imported items for which Europeans especially wanted to ‘cut out the middleman’?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to trace the major trade routes of Afroeurasia in the mid-1400s, and analyze why the

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 3 Version 2

The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 (14 days)

Iberian states wished to play a larger part in Afroeurasian commerce, have students write a short journal entry in which they identify the motivations and reasons that the Iberian states sought to play a larger part in Afroeurasian commerce. •

how to explain the origins and development of the navigational and shipbuilding technology that enabled Europeans to make long oceanic voyages, have each student use his or her ship drawing and labels to write a brief journal entry about the advantages of the specific maritime technological features labeled on the ship.

how to compare and contrast the nature and consequences of early encounters between the Iberian maritime powers and states of Africa and Asia in the 15th and 16th centuries, have each student write two paragraphs that explain his or her Venn diagram. The first paragraph will address similarities, and the second will address differences in the Iberian encounters with Africa and Asia. Use the Writing Assignments Rubric (Assessment Rubrics for High School, p. 8) to score the work.

how to trace the routes and relate the significance of the success of Vasco da Gama, Columbus, Balboa, Magellan, and other European mariners in establishing major oceanic passages, have students add to their maps of Afroeurasian trade routes. Students will use all available resources to add the Americas on the left-hand side of the map, leaving enough room for the Atlantic Ocean to allow the addition of routes. Students will add captions to the new additions. Call on each student to share one of his or her captions. Have students refer to their maps to create a ranking of the ”top three” European mariners and explain their choices briefly in terms of their historical significance.

how to identify reasons the Spanish quickly destroyed the Aztec and Incan empires and why the population of the Americas began to drop drastically in the 16th century, have students refer to the text, their notes, and any other resources you choose to provide as they write a newspaper article that reports on and explains the Spanish conquest of either the Aztec Empire or the Incan Empire. This is a good opportunity to implement reading standard for literacy in history/social studies RH.9-10.7.

Summative Assessment Have students use the graphic organizer below to compare and contrast the nature and effects of encounters between Europeans (Spanish or Portuguese) and the peoples of (1) the Americas and (2) the Indian Ocean region in the 16th century. The response in each box should be limited to 1-3 sentences.

The Americas

Indian Ocean Region

Extent of European conquests Rise or fall of empires

Nature and extent of trade between Europeans and natives peoples Change in populations of native peoples

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The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 3 Version 2

Notes

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World History 1, Quarter 3, Unit 3 Version 2

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The Great Global Convergence, 1450–1600 (14 days)

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 1 of 3

The Making of the Atlantic World Overview Overall days:

14

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose In this unit, students investigate the development of the “Atlantic world,” the increasingly complex interrelations of peoples of Africa, the Americas, and Europe following the opening of regular maritime communications across the Atlantic Ocean. From the early 16th century, Europeans, whose states progressively subjected the Americas to colonial dependency, sought to develop commercial mines and plantations in order to sell silver, sugar, tobacco, indigo, and other commodities in the world market. Because of the Great Dying of Native Americans in the 16th and 17th centuries, European entrepreneurs lacked sufficient local labor for their enterprises, and few Europeans wished to migrate to America to perform plantation or mine labor. Consequently, Europeans brought in Africans as slave laborers, a policy that had far-reaching effects on African states and peoples. Between 1450 and 1810, perhaps 11 million Africans arrived in the Americas, far more than the number of free Europeans who migrated there in that same period. In the Atlantic economic system that developed, Europeans provided capital, technological skills, government, and management; the Americas provided boundless acreages of productive land; and Africans provided labor. Study of the making of the Atlantic world lays a foundation for understanding the modern history of the Americas, including the United States.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Assess ways the Columbian Exchange affected population, society, and economy among of peoples of the Atlantic rim.

Evaluate why European entrepreneurs and merchants sought to recruit African slave labor for American mines and plantations.

Explain cause-and-effect relationships between the exchange of flora and fauna across the Atlantic and its effects on peoples of the Americas, Africa, and Europe.

Investigate why the trans-Atlantic slave trade developed.

Assess the circumstances under which some African rulers and merchants participated in the sale of slaves to European traders.

Analyze why Africans took part in the Atlantic economic system in ways not beneficial to many of them.

Analyze why commodities produced in the Americas, especially sugar, became so important in the world economy.

Examine patterns in the trade of sugar and other commodities of the Americas in the world market.

Describe the “Middle Passage” of Africans to the Americas and conditions of slave life on plantations in the Caribbean, Brazil, and British North America.

Read historical narratives imaginatively to understand the experience of individuals and groups subjected to slavery.

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 1 Version 2

The Making of the Atlantic World (14 days)

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit •

Why was the Columbian Exchange of plants, animals, and diseases in the 16th and 17th centuries such an important world event?

Why did Europeans seek slave laborers from Africa for economic activities in the Americas, and what major effects did the Atlantic slave trade have on African societies up to the 19th century?

Why did more Africans than Europeans populate the Americas between the 16th and 18th centuries?

Written Curriculum Grade Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by…

a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 6: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 1450-1770 Standard 1: How the transoceanic interlinking of all major regions of the world from 1450 to 1600 led to global transformations.

1C The student understands the consequences of the worldwide exchange of flora, fauna, and pathogens. Therefore, the student is able to Assess ways in which the exchange of plants and animals around the world in the late 15th and the 16th centuries affected European, Asian, African, and American Indian societies and commerce. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze why the introduction of new disease microorganisms in the Americas after 1492 had such devastating demographic and social effects on American Indian populations. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Standard 4: Economic, political, and cultural interrelations among peoples of Africa, Europe, and the Americas, 1500-1750.

4A The student understands how states and peoples of European descent became dominant in the Americas between the 16th and 18th centuries. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the Netherlands, England, and France became naval, commercial and political powers in the Atlantic basin. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances]

4B The student understands the origins and consequences of the trans-Atlantic African slave trade. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze the ways in which entrepreneurs and colonial governments exploited American Indian labor and why commercial agriculture came to rely overwhelmingly on African slave labor. [Evidence historical perspectives] D-78

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The Making of the Atlantic World (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 1 Version 2

Compare ways in which slavery or other forms of social bondage were practiced in the Islamic lands, Christian Europe, and West Africa. [Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas] Explain how commercial sugar production spread from the Mediterranean to the Americas and analyze why sugar, tobacco, and other crops grown in the Americas became so important in the world economy. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain the organization of long-distance trade in West and Central Africa and analyze the circumstances under which African governments, elites, merchants, and other groups participated in the sale of slaves to Europeans. [Identify issues and problems in the past] Explain how European governments and firms organized and financed the trans-Atlantic slave trade; and describe the conditions under which slaves made the “middle passage” from Africa to the Americas. [Appreciate historical perspectives] Describe conditions of slave life on plantations in the Caribbean, Brazil, and British North America and analyze ways in which slaves perpetuated aspects of African culture and resisted plantation servitude. [Appreciate historical perspectives]

4C The student understands patterns of change in Africa in the era of the slave trade. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the Atlantic slave trade affected population, economic life, polygynous marriage, family life, and the use of male and female slave labor in West and Central Africa. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Key Ideas and Details RH.9-10.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.8

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites New to the grade span is distinguishing between historical fact and historical interpretation. Instruction should model the difference between fact and interpretation. When discussing the definition of “creole,” be sure to refer to additional sources to provide students a comprehensive definition that goes beyond the context of Latin America.

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 1 Version 2

The Making of the Atlantic World (14 days)

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson, 2011 (pp. 477-497)

Identify the origins and effects of the Columbian Exchange on the peoples of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. (3 days) Provide reasons for the development and continuation of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. (4 days)

Analyze the ways Africans participated in the slave trade. (3 days)

Identify and account for why American commodities such as sugar and silver became so important in the world economy. (2 days)

Understand the conditions of slavery and the cultural and economic contributions of Africans in the Americas prior to the early 19th century. (2 days)

Assessment Rubrics for High School (p. 13) All-in-One Teaching Resources, Unit 3 World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu •

Big Era 6, Panorama Teaching Unit

Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.2

Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.5

Equiano’s Narrative, www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/15399 Gronniosaw’s Narrative, http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbin/browse-mixednew?id=GroGron&tag=public&images=images/mod eng&data=/texts/english/modeng/parsed Smithsonian Institution, “History: Where Food Crops Originated,” www.mnh.si.edu/ archives/ garden/history/

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary chattel slavery

mercantilism

Columbian Exchange

mestizo

commodity

middle passage

creole

plantation

entrepreneur

slave

indentured servant

triangular trade

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations In this unit, students will trace the development of an Atlantic World in the early modern period, with specific emphasis on the Columbian Exchange, the formation of plantation economies, and the transAtlantic slave trade. Students will identify forms of historical agency and examine these Atlantic developments in global context.

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The Making of the Atlantic World (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 1 Version 2

Select from the activities and readings in the Pearson text to provide students with background information and critical thinking opportunities that align to the learning objectives. The strategies listed represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective. •

To ensure that students will be able to identify the origins and effects of the Columbian Exchange on the people of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas (3 days): Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.2 (The Columbian Exchange and Its Consequences, 1400-1650). Keep a journal of foods you eat for a day. Cross out those items that would not be available in North America had the worldwide exchange not taken place. Diagram on a map where the various foods you are eating were first grown. Teachers with access to the Internet may want to allow students to access the Smithsonian Institution’s “History: Where Food Crops Originated,” which can be found at www.mnh.si.edu/archives/garden/history. Standard 3: Historical Analysis and Interpretation.

To ensure that students will be able to provide reasons for the development and continuation of the trans-Atlantic slave trade (4 days): Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.5 (The Making of the Atlantic Rim, 1500-1800 CE). Create a checklist from the perspective of a plantation owner that identifies the pros and cons of using the following sources of labor to produce sugar cane: free white labor, indentured servants, European prisoners of war, enslaved Native Americans, enslaved Africans. Standard 5: Historical IssuesAnalysis and Decision-Making Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Panorama Teaching Unit (The Great Global Convergence, 1400-1800), Lesson 6: The Great Dying and Its Relationship to Slavery in the Americas.

To ensure that students will be able to analyze the ways Africans participated in the slave trade (3 days): Based on readings from the textbook and other sources, create a graphic organizer listing the reasons and ways Africans participated in the slave trade. This is a good opportunity to implement reading standard for literacy in history/social studies RH.9-10.2. Using excerpts from the first parts of either Equiano’s Interesting Narrative or Gronniosaw’s The Narrative of James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, An African Prince (published in Newport, Rhode Island, in 1774), have students identify the reasons that Africans participated in the slave trade. Take the opportunity to implement writing standard for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.8.

To ensure that students will be able to identify and account for why American commodities such as sugar and silver became so important in the world economy (2 days): Based on reading in the textbook, have students work in groups to identify the movement of American silver and other commodities on a global map. Captions will explain who the suppliers were, who the buyers were, and the relative importance of each import and export to the world economy.

To ensure that students will be able to understand the conditions of slavery and the cultural and economic contributions of Africans in the Americas prior to the early nineteenth century (2 days): Based on readings and images in the textbook and other classroom materials, have students participate in a gallery walk. Have small groups create heavily captioned posters that illustrate the conditions of African slavery in the Americas and indicate the cultural and economic contributions of

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 1 Version 2

The Making of the Atlantic World (14 days)

Africans to the colonial societies of the Americas. During the gallery walk, students will record at least one item of interest about each poster in their journals. Standard 2: Historical Comprehension Additional Teaching Strategies View and discuss with students World History for Us All, Big Era 6, PowerPoint Overview Presentation (The Great World Convergence 1400-1800), slides 14-19. In what ways do you think the Columbian Exchange of plants and animals could have been related to the forced migration of African slaves to the Americas?

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the reach of the Columbian Exchange, ask students to respond to the following question: “In what ways was the introduction of the potato into Ireland both a good thing and a bad thing?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to identify the origins and effects of the Columbian Exchange on the people of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, create a restaurant menu including three sections: one using foods exclusively from Afroeurasia, the second using foods exclusively from the Americas, and the third using a combination of foods from both.

how to provide reasons for the development and continuation of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, using the checklist students created, have them write a journal entry explaining why enslaved Africans were used for labor in the Americas.

how to analyze the ways Africans participated in the slave trade, based on evidence from their graphic organizers and their analysis of the primary sources, have students write a short essay that explains how and why Africans participated in the slave trade within Africa. Students should provide evidence from the documents to substantiate their claims.

how to identify and account for why American commodities such as sugar and silver became so important in the world economy, have each student write a paragraph that explains the significance of sugar in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and as a globally traded commodity.

how to understand the conditions of slavery and the cultural and economic contributions of Africans in the Americas prior to the early nineteenth century, have students write a conclusion statement based on their findings from the gallery walk. Invite students to orally present their conclusion statements or posters from the gallery walk.

Summative Assessment Give students the following assignment: •

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Using 11 x 17 copy paper, create the front page of a newspaper from the Americas. The front page must report on the Columbian Exchange, the slave trade, the conditions of slavery, and the contributions of Africans to local culture and events. The newspaper must include a masthead (title, Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


The Making of the Atlantic World (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 1 Version 2

date and location, price), at least one image, and two articles with headlines. Students should be encouraged to use charts, graphs, and maps. To aid students in the development of their front pages, provide the Rubric for Assessing a Newspaper Article from Assessment Rubrics for High School (p. 13). Use the same rubric for scoring.

Notes

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 1 Version 2

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The Making of the Atlantic World (14 days)

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 2 of 3

Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750 Overview Overall days:

14

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose In this unit, students probe the global significance of the rise of several centralized states. By taking advantage of gunpowder weaponry and new governing methods, these states were able to control extensive territories and regulate their own populations more efficiently than ever before. Most of these states were giant land empires, including Russia, China, and three great Muslim monarchies. Altogether, these states produced bigger, more powerful governments than the world had seen up to that point. They also stimulated a rapid acceleration of trade and cultural exchange around the globe.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Assess the importance of firearms technology in world history.

Compare and contrast the major imperial systems in the world in the 16th century in terms of location, size, and type of government.

Draw upon data in historical maps to illustrate the configuration of political power in Afroeurasia in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Assess the power of the Ming Dynasty in China and the continuing role of China in the global economy.

Examine the importance of the Chinese economy in the 16th century compared to its importance today.

Analyze the development of the Ottoman and Mughal empires in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Evaluate the transformation of Russia into a Eurasian empire between the 16th and 18th centuries.

Analyze the relationship between the development of gunpowder technology and the rise of giant states in the late 15th and 16th centuries.

Compare the origins and development of the Ottoman and Mughal states in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Analyze political and military factors contributing to Russian imperial expansion between the 16th and 18th centuries, evaluating the modernizing advances made by Peter the Great.

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit •

How did the new and developing gunpowder technology of the 16th and 17th centuries contribute to transformations in both war and government power?

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

How would you compare Western European empires with those of other parts of Afroeurasia in the 16th and 17th centuries?

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 2 Version 2

Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750 (14 days)

Written Curriculum Grade Span Expectations HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by…

a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 6: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 1450-1770 Standard 2: How European society experienced political, economic, and cultural transformations in an age of global intercommunication, 1450-1750.

2C The student understands the rising military and bureaucratic power of European states between the 16th and 18th centuries. Therefore, the student is able to Account for the growth of bureaucratic monarchy in Russia and analyze the significance of Peter the Great’s westernizing reforms. [Interrogate historical data] Trace Russian expansion in the Caucasus, Central Asia, and Siberia and explain the success of the tsars in transforming the Duchy of Moscow in a Eurasian empire. [Draw comparisons across regions.] Standard 3: How large territorial empires dominated much of Eurasia between the 16th and 18th centuries.

3A The student understands the extent and limits of Chinese regional power under the Ming dynasty. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze the power and limits of imperial absolutism under the Ming dynasty. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain China’s self-concept as the “middle kingdom” and the character of its political, commercial, and cultural relations with Korea, Vietnam, and other societies of East and Southeast Asia. [Interrogate historical data] Analyze China’s changing attitudes toward external political and commercial relations following the Zheng He voyages from 1405 to 1433. [Formulate historical questions]

3B The student understands how Southeast Europe and Southwest Asia became unified under the Ottoman Empire. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze how the capture of Constantinople and the destruction of the Byzantine empire contributed to the expansion of Ottoman power. [Hypothesize the influence of the past] Analyze reasons for Ottoman military successes against Persia, Egypt, North African states, and Christian European kingdoms. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze the political, institutional, and economic development of the empire in the context of its religious and ethnic diversity. [Analyze multiple causation]

3C The student understands the rise of the Safavid and Mughal empire. Therefore, the student is able to Explain the Mughal conquest of India and the success of the Turkic warrior class in uniting the diverse peoples of the Indian subcontinent. [Formulate a position or course of action on an issue] D-86

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Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750 (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 2 Version 2

Analyze the relationship between Muslims and Hindus in the empire and compare Akbar’s governing methods and religious ideas with those of other Mughal emperors. [Examine the influence of ideas, human interests, and beliefs] Standard 6: Major global trends from 1450-1770.

6A The student understands major global trends from 1450 to 1770. Therefore, the student is able to Assess the impact of gunpowder weaponry and other innovations in military technology on empire-building and the world balance of naval power. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Explain major changes in world political boundaries between 1450 and 1770 and assess the extent and limitations of European political and military power in Africa, Asia, and the Americas as of the mid-18th century. [Clarify information on the geographic setting]

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Craft and Structure RH.9-10.5

Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.

Writing Text Types and Purposes WHST.9-10.1

Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content. a.

Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

b.

Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

c.

Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

d.

Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e.

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites New to the grade span is for students to summarize information or compare/contrast information or make connections. Instruction should connect the pieces of information in this unit as a way of modeling the standard.

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 2 Version 2

Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750 (14 days)

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson, 2011 (pp. 327-335, 457467, 526-535)

Compare the technology of firearms to previous weaponry to show the advantages and significance of firearms. (2 days)

Map the spread of the major states and empires in the world from the 16th century to the 18th century. (2 days)

Analyze Ming China’s relationship with the rest of the world. (3 days)

Compare and contrast basic features of the Ottoman and Mughal empires in the 16th and 17th centuries. (4 days)

Analyze how Russia evolved from the Duchy of Moscow to a Eurasian empire, and explain the main modernizing reforms of Peter the Great. (3 days)

World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu •

Big Era 6, Panorama Teaching Unit

Big Era 6, PowerPoint Overview Presentation

Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.2

Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.3

Hermitage Amsterdam: “Peter the Great in Holland,” www.hermitage.nl/en/stpetersburg_en_rusland/nederland_rusland_en_stpetersburg/peter_de_grote_in_holland.htm.

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary artillery

reform

autocratic

sovereign

evolve

transformations

modernization

westernization

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations In this unit, students will examine the origins and expansion of some of the early modern gunpowder empires. Students will examine the relationship between military technologies and state formation and expansion. In this unit, comparative forms of historical analysis are emphasized. Select from the activities and readings in the Pearson text to provide students with background information and critical thinking opportunities that align to the learning objectives. The strategies listed represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective. •

To ensure that students will be able to compare the technology of firearms to previous weaponry to show the advantages and significance of firearms (2 days): Teach strategies and activities in Lessons 1-3 in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.3 (Rulers with Guns: The Rise of Powerful States, 1400-1700).

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Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750 (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 2 Version 2

Then have small groups of students create graphic organizers comparing weapons used by armies and navies before and after gunpowder. Standard 3: Historical Analysis and Interpretation •

To ensure that students will be able to map the spread of the major states and empires in the world from the 16th century to the 18th century (2 days): View with students the World History for Us All, Big Era 6, PowerPoint Overview Presentation (The Great Global Convergence, 1400-1800), slides 30-36. Lead a class discussion around the question: How did the global map of major states and empires change between the 16th and 18th centuries? Describe the role of firearms in the spread of these states. Using information in the textbook and other resources, identify the following empires on a world map: Ming, Spanish, British, Portuguese, Mughal, Russian, Ottoman, and Safavid.

To ensure that students will be able to analyze Ming China’s relationship with the rest of the world (3 days): Students will construct a graphic organizer comparing and contrasting the basic features of Ming China with those of Russia, Mughal India, and Ottoman Turkey. In groups of three, have students create posters that demonstrate China’s achievements under the Ming, as well as China’s connections with Korea, Europe, and the Indian Ocean. This is a good opportunity to implement reading standard for literacy in history/social studies RH.9-10.5.

To ensure that students will be able to compare and contrast basic features of the Ottoman and Mughal empires in the 16th and 17th centuries (2 days): Begin a graphic organizer that compares the origins and character of the Ottoman and Mughal empires. Using evidence from the textbook, have students in groups complete the graphic organizer. Take the opportunity to implement writing standard for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.1.

To ensure that students will be able to analyze how Russia evolved from the Duchy of Moscow to a Eurasian empire, and explain the main modernizing reforms of Peter the Great (3 days): Small groups of students will use the passages and maps in the textbook, as well as any other resources you choose to provide, to create a timeline that charts the territorial expansion of Russia in the early modern period. (Teachers with access to the Internet may want to provide excerpts or access to Hermitage Amsterdam’s “Peter the Great in Holland” web page at www.hermitage.nl/en/stpetersburg_en_rusland/nederland_rusland_en_st-petersburg/peter_de_grote_in_holland.htm.) Lead a class discussion about the role of the reforms of Peter the Great. The discussion should focus on the contributions of these reforms to expansion and also to what extent they were “modern.” Standard 1: Chronological Thinking

Additional Teaching Strategies For a comparative approach to early modern empires of Afroeurasia, teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Panorama Teaching Unit (The Great Global Convergence, 14001800), Lesson 7: The Military Revolution. Have students use evidence from the textbook and possibly other readings and materials to write a brief essay that points to both China’s isolation and global connection in the later 15th and 16th centuries. Have students report out and make claims, substantiated by evidence, for and against characterizing China as being isolated in this period.

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 2 Version 2

Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750 (14 days)

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of the cultural, naval, scientific, and architectural knowledge Peter the Great introduced to Russia, ask students to respond to the following question: “When Peter the Great returned to Russia from the Netherlands, what was one advancement he brought back with him?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to compare the technology of firearms to previous weaponry to show the advantages and significance of firearms, have students write a journal entry explaining why an army with firearms would require additional resources and how it would promote a larger government.

how to map the spread of the major states and empires in the world from the 16th century to the 18th century, have students use their maps and other resources to answer the following question: “What roles did firearms have in the expansion of the Ming, Ottoman, Mughal, and Russian empires?”

how to analyze Ming China’s relationship with the rest of the world, have students use their posters and additional resources to help them debate whether China was or was not isolated.

how to compare and contrast basic features of the Ottoman and Mughal empires in the 16th and 17th centuries, have each student write a short journal entry comparing and contrasting the two empires. Invite volunteers to share their entries.

how to analyze how Russia evolved from the Duchy of Moscow to a Eurasian empire, and explain the main modernizing reforms of Peter the Great, have students write a short persuasive argument to convince a skeptical friend that Peter the Great was a “modern” ruler.

Additional Formative Assessments Students should answer the four questions on page 8 of World History for Us All, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.2. They can use Student Handout 1 (pp. 5-8) to answer the questions. Have students complete the table given in the Note Taking activity in the textbook (Pearson, p. 329). Fill in the characteristics of the Ottoman Empire.

Summative Assessment For this assessment, students will refer to their notes and graphic organizers to compare and contrast the basic features of the following empires: Russia, Ming China, Mughal India, and Ottoman Turkey. In a writing assignment, students will identify at least one similarity and at least one difference between these four empires. Provide the following guidance to help students structure their responses. •

How Russia was alike and different from Ming China:

How Russia was alike and different from Mughal India:

How Russia was alike and different from Ottoman Turkey:

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Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750 (14 days)

World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 2 Version 2

How Ming China was alike and different from Mughal India:

How Ming China was alike and different from Ottoman Turkey:

How Mughal India was alike and different from Ottoman Turkey:

Provide the following rubric to students. Inform them that their grades will be determined by adding the individual scores together and dividing by 12. Use the same rubric to assess.

4

3

2

1

Number of empires addressed:

All four.

Three.

Two.

One.

Number of empires for which at least two basic features are described:

All four.

Three.

Two.

One.

Number of accurate and relevant similarities and differences (of a possible total of 12):

10, 11, or 12.

7, 8, or 9.

4, 5, or 6.

1, 2, or 3.

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 2 Version 2

Gunpowder Empires, 1500–1750 (14 days)

Notes

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 3 of 3

Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750 Overview Overall days:

11

(1 day = 50-55 minutes)

Purpose In the 16th century, Europe emerged as a center of economic, technological, and scientific advancements, a hotbed of ideas and inventions that contributed much to the building of a dense global network of human interaction. Explanations of these achievements must include the ability of Europeans to draw on the accumulated knowledge of all Afroeurasian civilizations and on the blizzard of new information about humankind and nature that poured into Europe from the Americas, Africa, and Asia. In this unit, students explore major political and cultural developments in Europe. These include the cultural innovations of the Renaissance, the rise of Protestantism as a vision of Christian faith and practice that challenged the Roman Catholic Church, and, finally, the Scientific Revolution, a searching examination of humankind’s place in nature and the cosmos.

Content to be learned

Processes to be used

Analyze principal aspects of Europe’s economic strength in the 16th century.

Research why Europe achieved strong economic growth in the 16th century.

Distinguish principal ideas, styles, and leading figures of the Renaissance in northern Europe.

Analyze the growth and spread of the Protestant Reformation, the ensuing Catholic Reformation, and the causes and consequences of religious conflict in the 16th and early 17th centuries.

Draw upon visual, literary, and musical sources to appreciate major elements of northern Europe’s Renaissance.

Hypothesize why the Protestant Reformation gained religious and political strength and why religious conflict dominated European affairs in the 16th and early 17th centuries.

Using maps, describe Europe’s major political characteristics in the 16th century.

Characterize the Scientific Revolution and its connections to Renaissance humanism, changes in European Christianity, Muslim science, and new global knowledge.

Compare and contrast different types of governments that existed in Europe in the 16th century.

Determine why new ideas about nature and the universe emerged in Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Essential questions students should be able to answer by end of unit •

How did the religious and political makeup of Western Europe change between 1450 and 1750?

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

In what ways did the Scientific Revolution change humankind’s ideas about the human species, the natural world, and the cosmos?

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 3 Version 2

Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750 (11 days)

Written Curriculum National Standards for History (World History, Grades 5–12) Era 6: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 1450-1770 Standard 2: How European society experienced political, economic, and cultural transformations in an age of global intercommunication 1450-1750.

2A The student understands demographic, economic, and social trends in Europe. Analyze the social and economic consequences of population growth and urbanization in Europe from the 15th to the 18th centuries. [Utilize visual and mathematical data] Describe major institutions of capitalism and analyze how the emerging capitalist economy transformed agricultural production, manufacturing, and ways in which women and men worked. [Analyze cause-andeffect relationships]

2B The student understands the Renaissance, Reformation, and Catholic Reformation. Analyze the social and intellectual significance of the technological innovation of printing with movable type. [Demonstrate and explain the influence of ideas] Explain connections between the Italian Renaissance and the development of humanist ideas in Europe north of the Alps. [Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas and values] Evaluate major achievements in literature, music, painting, sculpture, and architecture in 16th-century Europe. [Draw upon visual data and literary sources] Explain discontent among Europeans with the late medieval Church and analyze the beliefs and ideas of the leading Protestant reformers. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances] Explain the aims and policies of the Catholic Reformation and assess the impact of religious reforms and divisions on European cultural values, family life, convent communities, and men’s and women’s education. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships] Analyze causes of religious wars in 16th- and 17th-century Europe and account for the rise of religious pluralism. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances]

2C The student understands the rising military and bureaucratic power of European states between the 16th and 18th centuries. Analyze the character, development, and sources of wealth of strong bureaucratic monarchies in the 16th century. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

2D The student understands how the Scientific Revolution contributed to transformations in European society. Explain connections between the Scientific Revolution and its antecedents such as Greek rationalism, medieval theology, Muslim science, Renaissance humanism, and new global knowledge. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances] Explain the cultural, religious, and scientific impact of astronomical discoveries and innovations from Copernicus to Newton. [Examine the influence of ideas] Analyze the importance of discoveries in mathematics, physics, biology, and chemistry for European society. [Employ quantitative analysis] Explain the development and significance of the “scientific method.” [Examine the influence of ideas]

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Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750 (11 days)

World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 3 Version 2

Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas RH.9-10.9

Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

Writing Text Types and Purposes WHST.9-10.1

Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content. a.

Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

b.

Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

c.

Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

d.

Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e.

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge WHST.9-10.9

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites Students are being introduced to the Protestant Reformation and Scientific Revolution, as well as the economic and political development of early modern Europe. Students will analyze these historical developments in global context and pay close attention to issues of historical causation and significance. The developments described in this unit set the stage for discussions about the Age of Revolution, the starting point of their World History studies in the tenth grade.

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 3 Version 2

Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750 (11 days)

Taught Curriculum Learning Objectives

Resources

Students will be able to:

World History, Pearson, 2011 (pp. 418-439, 446451, 502-538)

Analyze reasons for Europe’s economic growth in the 16th century. (2 days)

Identify the achievements of the Northern European Renaissance in the 16th and early 17th centuries. (2 days)

Analyze the origins and major religious and political features of the Protestant Reformation and how the Catholic Church responded. (3 days)

Assessment Rubrics for High School (p. 8) World History for Us All, http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu

Analyze the fundamental features of Europe’s political systems in the 16th and 17th centuries. (2 days)

Identify how European ideas about nature and the universe changed between 1450 and 1750, and explain how these ideas challenged traditional views. (2 days)

Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Units 6.6 and 6.7

Big Era 6, Closeup Teaching Unit 6.7.1

Instructional Considerations Key Vocabulary absolute monarchy

limited monarchy

cosmos

oligarchy

dissenter

scientific method

divine right

sect

indulgences

theocracy

Planning and Instructional Delivery Considerations In this unit, students explore major political and cultural developments in Europe. These include the cultural innovations of the Renaissance, the rise of Protestantism as a vision of Christian faith and practice that challenged the Roman Catholic Church, and, finally, the Scientific Revolution, a searching examination of humankind’s place in nature and the cosmos. Select from the activities and readings in the Pearson text to provide students with background information and critical thinking opportunities that align to the learning objectives. The strategies listed represent a menu of choices and possibilities to support each learning objective.

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750 (11 days)

World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 3 Version 2

To ensure that students will be able to analyze reasons for Europe’s economic growth in the 16th century (2 days): Based on readings in the textbook and class materials, construct a graphic organizer that charts the evidence and reasons for economic growth in 16th-century Europe.

To ensure that students will be able to identify the achievements of the Northern European Renaissance in the 16th and early 17th centuries (2 days): Have small groups of students produce decks of flash cards about the Renaissance. Provide images of art and inventions for students to use on one side of their cards. On the other side, the group will research those creations (using the text and any other resources you choose to provide) and supply the following information, which will be written on the other side of the associated card: Name Date (of invention, painting, etc., or date range of the person’s life) Significance of the creation/invention

After students have made their cards and quizzed each other on them briefly, have students put the cards away. Display one of the images and call on volunteers to identify the creator and explain the importance and/or impact of these achievements. Take the opportunity to implement writing standard for literacy in history/social studies WHST.9-10.9. •

To ensure that students will be able to analyze the origins and major religious and political features of the Protestant Reformation and how the Catholic Church responded (3 days): Based on readings in the textbook, have students complete a Venn diagram that compares the different beliefs of the Catholic Church and the Protestant Reformation. This is a good opportunity to implement reading standard for literacy in history/social studies RH.9-10.9. Create a cause-and-effect chart identifying the causes and the effects of the Protestant Reformation. Be sure to include in the effects the Catholic Church’s responses. Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.7 (The Long Reach of the Major Religions, 1500-1800), Lesson 1: The Protestant Revolution and Lesson 2: The Counter Reformation and Religious Struggles in Europe.

To ensure that students will be able to analyze the fundamental features of Europe’s political systems in the 16th and 17th centuries (2 days): Have students identify three characteristics of an “absolute” monarch and explain the extent to which James I of England, Louis XIV of France, and Peter I of Russia were absolute monarchs. Have students compare the governments of these rulers with those of the Netherlands and England at the end of the 17th century. Standard 5. Historical Issues-Analysis and Decision-Making

To ensure that students will be able to identify how European ideas about nature and the universe changed between 1450 and 1750, and explain how these ideas challenged traditional views (2 days): Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Landscape Teaching Unit 6.6 (The Scientific Revolution, 1500-1800) Construct a timeline showing important events of the Scientific Revolution and the person or persons associated with each. Include fields such as astronomy, mathematics, biology, chemistry, and medicine.

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 3 Version 2

Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750 (11 days)

Additional Teaching Strategies Teach strategies and activities in World History for Us All, Big Era 6, Closeup Teaching Unit 6.7.1 (The Protestant Reformation). Have students work in small groups to examine the lives of leading European political figures such as Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, Philip II, James I, Oliver Cromwell, Louis XVI, or Peter the Great. Incorporate pictures and sketches with information regarding the life and accomplishments of the selected leader. Research the trial of Galileo. Assuming the roles of defense and prosecution, conduct a simulated trial presenting evidence of Galileo’s innocence or guilt. Evaluate the arguments presented in the context of 17th century thought and values. Standard 5. Historical Issues-Analysis and Decision-Making.

Assessed Curriculum Formative Assessments Provide feedback to students through daily monitoring of student understanding using a variety of methods. For example, use exit cards. Have students answer questions on paper before they leave the class. Keep the activity prompt specific and brief to check for understanding of the day’s concepts. For instance, to check students’ comprehension of Martin Luther’s beliefs, ask students to respond to the following question: “How did Martin Luther try to make the Bible more accessible to ordinary people?” To assess the progress of understanding: •

how to analyze reasons for Europe’s economic growth in the 16th century, referring to their graphic organizers, have each student write a brief statement from the point of view of a merchant trader trying to convince others to become merchants.

how to identify the achievements of the Northern European Renaissance in the 16th and early 17th centuries, ask students to refer to their notes and flash cards as they write a short statement in response to the following question: “What do you think was the most significant achievement of the Northern Renaissance, and why?” Call on volunteers to share their statements. Discuss why a student chose one achievement over one suggested by another student.

how to analyze the origins and major religious and political features of the Protestant Reformation and how the Catholic Church responded, have small groups of students create a propaganda handbill listing 5–10 reasons people should join the Protestant Reformation. Then have each student write a statement that counters one of those reasons. Call on volunteers to share their posters and/or their counterstatements.

how to analyze the fundamental features of Europe’s political systems in the 16th and 17th centuries, have students use their notes, textbooks, and any other resources you choose to provide as they create a cartoon representing one of the political systems in Europe.

how to identify how European ideas about nature and the universe changed between 1450 and 1750, and explain how these ideas challenged traditional views, have students respond in writing to the following question: “How did the new ideas about nature and the universe challenge Europe’s traditional views?”

Other Formative Assessments Create a brochure to persuade investors to donate money to your overseas Western European business in the 17th century. D-98

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750 (11 days)

World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 3 Version 2

Summative Assessment Students will use their notes to respond in writing to the following question: “In what ways did Europe transform between 1450 and 1750?” Provide the following guidelines: “You will address at least one major change in each of the following categories: (1) economics, (2) politics, (3) art/culture, (4) religion, and (5) science. You may use any combination of states/regions/individuals described in this unit. Your response will be in outline form, but it is OK to have only one fact in any given category. Write a single conclusion statement below your outline.” Use the Rubric for a Writing Assignment (Assessment Rubrics for High School, p. 8) to assess.

Notes

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin

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World History 1, Quarter 4, Unit 3 Version 2

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Cultural Transformations in Europe, 1450–1750 (11 days)

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin


Section E: A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit: Understanding the Curricular, Instructional, and Assessment Aspects


A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit: Understanding the Curricular, Instructional, and Assessment Aspects This guide provides a structure for professional collaborative conversations about the standards and the District Curriculum Framework documents. The five steps outlined below correspond to the five sections in the Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit Framework recording tool that follows the questions. This recording tool can help guide and focus teacher and leader teams as they discuss the standards and District Curriculum Framework documents, specifically the units themselves. The guiding questions listed for each step are designed to elicit insights and findings about the standards and the curriculum framework units and to surface their implications for teaching and learning related to the units. Use the recording tool to document those findings and implications so they can be used to strengthen teaching and learning. This guide also includes an overview of Three Levels of Instruction with Supporting Activities; the guide concludes with a form and process for a Grade Level/Team Meeting Debrief.

Step 1: Standards addressed in the unit Record the identified cluster of grade-level or course standards found in the unit, and then discuss and determine what is necessary for students to know and be able to do in order to meet the expectations in the standards. The purpose of this step is to develop a common understanding of what is actually contained in the standards for the unit, as well as the focus of the standards regarding content to be learned and processes to be learned and used. Consider: •

In our discussion, have we looked at all parts of the standard’s underlying structure?

When reading these specific standards, what do they mean to me? What do they mean to us?

To what extent have all group members reached a common understanding of the content and processes identified in the standards, as well as the relationship of the content and processes to Bloom’s Taxonomy and to the three levels of instruction—developmental, reinforcement, and drilland-practice? (See the summary of Three Levels of Instruction with Supporting Activities later in this guide.)

Step 2: Changes For the identified grade level or course, determine and document exactly how the content and processes in the standards change from adjacent grades, including the levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy called for. The purpose of this step is to develop a common understanding of how the standards change (in content and processes) across the three-year grade/course span—and to document these changes.

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A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit 2011

Section E

Consider: •

What changes between grade levels need to be noted? To what extent are the changes an accurate reflection of the stated standards and their component parts?

In what ways does the content in each grade or course build on the content from the previous year?

In this year’s standards, what are the connections to—and support for—the content and processes described in next year’s standards?

In what ways do the skills and processes change from year to year in terms of depth and complexity?

Step 3: Important findings (notes, clarifications, and prerequisites) For the identified grade-level or course standards, discuss and document important findings related to which of the ideas in the content and processes need to be approached from which level(s) of instruction and what are the critical changes in content and processes. The purpose of this step is to clarify the levels of instruction called for in this particular grade level or course given what came before—and what comes after—this grade level or course as specified in the standards. This step is also intended to clarify how this cluster of standards should be addressed in the context of this particular unit given its placement in the scope and sequence. Consider: •

Which of the ideas (content and process) need to be approached from which level(s) of instruction? (See the Three Levels of Instruction with Supporting Activities summary.)

Which of the ideas (content and process) need to be approached from which level(s) of Bloom’s Taxonomy?

To what extent are these important findings grounded in the changes from grade to grade (or course to course) that were noted in step 2?

How do these important findings compare to those provided in the District Curriculum Framework unit? What adjustments need to be made to the findings your group generated? To the findings in the District Curriculum Framework unit?

When studying these specific standards, what do they mean in context of other units or grade levels?

Step 4: Implications for instruction and assessment (learning objectives) Discuss and document the implications of what we have learned so far for instructional decisions, approaches, and considerations. The purpose of this step is to use the findings from steps 2 and 3 to develop and document a set of considerations for instruction and assessment of the ideas called for in this particular standard—or set of standards—in this particular grade or course. Consider: •

What specific content and processes must students know and be able to do?

How do this content and these processes compare to the Learning Objectives in the unit?

When studying these specific standards, what do they mean in context of other units or grade levels?

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Section E

A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit 2011  

Which of the standards are most critical to the unit at this time? Consider which are fundamental ideas. Where and how is this standard addressed in other units? How do these standards relate to each other?

What instructional approaches should we use to ensure that students acquire and integrate the content / processes?

What types of strategies will provide multiple opportunities for students to learn, practice, apply, and master the content / processes called for in the standards?

Step 5: Planning (connections to resources and materials) Examine and explore how the resources and materials identified in the District Curriculum Framework unit align with and support what has been learned in the first four steps of this collaborative study. The purpose of this fifth and final step is to analyze the instructional resources and plan how to use the resources to design the overall unit activities such that they fully engage all students and address a variety of learning needs. This section is also intended to ensure that the unit activities are aligned to the Learning Objectives in the unit. Consider: •

What do we need to consider when analyzing, selecting, and using instructional resources, materials, and activities?

How do we make appropriate modifications for English language learners and other special populations?

What types of instructional strategies should be implemented throughout this unit in order for students to learn, practice, apply, and master the content and processes called for in the standards?

What in the “overview” section should be considered in order to increase alignment to the cluster of standards in this unit?

What types of instructional activities align to and support our documented findings and implications for instruction and assessment (learning objectives) called for in the unit?

How will the aligned instructional activities be used or incorporated into lesson design and the daily lesson plan?

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

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A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit 2011

Section E

A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit: Understanding the Curricular, Instructional, and Assessment Aspects Standards for Grade/Course                        

Standards for Grade/Course    

Standards for Grade/Course    

  Changes                        

Changes    

Important Findings (Notes, Clarifications, and Prerequisites)  

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Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Section E

A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit 2011  

  Implications for Instruction and Assessment (Learning Objectives)

  Planning (Connections to Resources and Materials)

 

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

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A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit 2011

Section E

Three Levels of Instruction with Supporting Activities1 Level 1: Provide developmental activities •

Emphasize problem solving.

Use interesting problems to frame and motivate exploration.

Use problem situations that relate to the lives of your students.

Use questions to guide student thinking.

Do not answer your own questions. Give students time to answer.

Use models that can be manipulated and studied.

Emphasize concrete objects and pictures before introducing symbols.

Work along with students, observing their progress carefully.

Concentrate on preventing misconceptions instead of correcting them.

When misconceptions arise, give corrective feedback as quickly as possible.

Use observations and oral questions to evaluate, rather than just pencil-and-paper tasks.

Level 2: Provide reinforcement activities •

Create stimulating explorations that build upon previous developmental lessons in which students worked together.

Expand upon the activities that you started in the developmental lessons.

Use materials in a variety of ways to connect concrete models, pictures, and symbolic representations.

Emphasize problem solving.

Organize small cooperative groups in which students can share ideas and help each other learn.

Let students in small groups take responsibility for making presentations, explaining processes, and developing problems.

Let students work together, but also provide them with opportunities to work alone.

Prepare problem-solving bulletin boards and learning centers.

Level 3: Provide drill-and-practice activities •

Create stimulating games in which students work together.

Change the directions for worksheets to create interesting puzzles and explorations.

Emphasize problem solving.

Use problem situations to motivate practice.

Give short sets of exercises and evaluate student progress.

Do not give long and tedious assignments in which students might practice their own misconceptions.

Never introduce drill before proper concept development and reinforcement of concepts have taken place.

                                                                                                                1

Adapted from Gagné, R. M., Wager, W. W., Golas, K, & Keller, J. M. (2005). Principles of Instructional Design (5th edition), Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing. E-6

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Section E

A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit 2011  

Grade Level/Team Meeting Debrief

Meeting date: Grade level or course: Unit of focus for collaborative study: Attendees:

1. As a group, use the step-by-step collaborative study process to review the upcoming unit or segment of the unit. Use the recording tool to document your key discussions and findings. 2. After the group has completed the collaborative study process, as a group discuss and record your answers to the following questions: •

What ideas emerged from the group’s discussion about the standards?

What ideas emerged from the group’s discussion about the important findings and implications for instruction and assessment?

In what ways did the discussion of the above affect the planned instructional activities?

What are the benefits of having these types of discussions with your team or department?

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  

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A Guide for Collaborative Study of the Unit 2011

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Section E

Providence Public Schools, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin  


Section F: Guidance: Effective Instructional Design and Delivery


Guidance: Effective Instructional Design and Delivery This section will be added later by Providence Public Schools.

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Section G: Rhode Island Standards for Social Studies and Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies


• Rhode Island: Narragansett Bay central to a ring of communities, central waterway, central highway

What factors influence the structure of government?

c. explaining what happens when political structures do or do not meet the needs of people (e.g., democracy v. anarchy)

d. explaining how geography and economics influence the structure of government

c. citing examples of when major changes in governments have occurred (e.g., American Revolution, Hammurabi’s Code, Rhode Island Royal Charter/ RI Constitution)

c. defining and identifying the nature of authority and sources of power

Final Version – December 2008

What are authority and power, how are they alike and different?

b. explaining why the rule of law is necessary to the role of government (e.g., debate/ Robert’s Rules of Order, classroom procedures)

b. identifying and describing the role of individuals (e.g., Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Thomas Paine) as authority figures/ leaders in the creation of government

1

Why is the rule of law necessary to the role of government?

a. comparing and contrasting the key stages of development of the rule of law, as presented in various enduring/significant documents (e.g. Magna Carta, Preamble of U.S. Constitution, U.N. Rights of the Child, “I Have A Dream” speech)

a. identifying and summarizing the rule of law, using various enduring/ significant documents (e.g., Magna Carta, Preamble of U.S. Constitution, U.N. Rights of the Child, “I Have A Dream” speech)

What is the rule of law and how did it develop?

C&G 1 (7-8)–2 Students demonstrate an understanding of sources of authority and use of power, and how they are/can be changed by…

C&G 1 (5-6) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of sources of authority and use of power, and how they are/can be changed by…

• Military force as represented by Gaspee, British annexation and occupation

• Silas Downer – writer, Nathanael Greene, O.H. Perry, Stephen Hopkins – writer • Women printers – Anne Franklin, S. Goddard, E. Roosevelt

• The Articles of Confederation to the Constitution/ Hammurabi’s Code to the Magna Carta • Magna Carta to Constitution

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-14 Breadth of Reading R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

• Personalities of Coddington and William Harris • American Revolution • RI Royal Charter, RI Constitution

How and why do governments change over time?

b. comparing and contrasting different forms of government (e.g., dictatorship, democracy, theocracy, republic, monarchy)

b. listing and defining various forms of government (e.g., dictatorship, democracy, parliamentary, monarchy) What are the differences and similarities among various forms of government?

• Enduring documents: Magna Carta, Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights, Hammurabi’s Code • Functions of government, town meeting in a colony • Massachusetts theocracy • William Blackstone, Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, Mary Dyer, Samuel Gorton

a. identifying and explaining the origins and basic functions of government

a. identifying the basic functions of government

Is government necessary?

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-14 Breadth of Reading R-15 Reading for Research

C&G 1 (7-8) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by…

C&G 1 (5-6) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by…

C&G 1: People create and change structures of power, authority, and governance in order to accomplish common goals. Potential Topics/Resources GSEs for Grades 5-6 GSEs for Grades 7-8 Essential Questions

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R. I. History: Grades 5-8


c. tracing the process of how an idea transforms into a bill and then becomes a law

C&G 2 (7-8) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the democratic values and principles underlying the U.S. government by … a. explaining how democratic values are reflected in enduring documents, political speeches (discourse), and group actions

b. using a variety of sources to identify and defend a position on a democratic principle (e.g., self-government in Declaration of Independence, women’s rights in Seneca Falls Declaration, Habeas Corpus in Laws of 12 Tables, freedom of religion in Washington’s letter to the Touro Synagogue) c. exhibiting and explaining what it means to be a responsible citizen in the state and nation

c. explaining how a bill becomes a law

G&C 2 (5-6) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the democratic values and principles underlying the U.S. government by …

a. exploring democratic values such as: respect, property, compromise, liberty, self-government, and self-determination

b. identifying enduring documents (e.g., Bill of Rights, U.S. Constitution) that reflect the underlying principles of the United States

2

c. exhibiting and explaining what it means to be a responsible citizen in the community

• Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” Speech, • Kennedy’s Inaugural Address, Declaration of Independence

• Ebenezer Knight Dexter, John Clarke Trust, Providence Female Charitable Facility, Honest Wall – Children’s Friends Facility • Hall of Fame How do responsible citizens demonstrate democratic values and principles?

• Gettysburg Address, Washington’s Farewell Address • Separation of church and state • Native American rights, Smoke Shop case

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-14 Breadth of Reading R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

• Committee, Amendment, Veto, Override, • Compromise, Constitutionality

• Organizational structure of the Constitution • Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, Constitution, Mayflower Compact, Federalist Papers • Rhode Island and separation of powers • Separation of powers, states’ rights, impost • Articles of Confederation

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-14 Breadth of Reading R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

How have democratic principles been demonstrated (in documents, speeches, actions, etc.) throughout U.S./ R.I. history?

Are values derived from the governed or does the government dictate the values?

What are the connections between the branches in the legislative process?

Why is federalism important and how does it affect the balance of power in government?

Is the pen mightier than the sword? How can/does a written document (or speech) affect the structure and function of government?

How is the United States Constitution a living document?

Final Version – December 2008

a. identifying the functions of the three branches of government; and analyzing and describing the interrelationship among the branches (i.e., checks and balances/ cause and effect, separation of powers) b. explaining how and why power is divided and shared among the levels of government (federalism)

a. identifying and describing the function of the three branches (i.e., checks and balances, separation of powers)

b. identifying how power is divided and shared among the levels of the United States government

C&G 2 (7-8) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of United States government (local, state, national) by…

C&G 2 (5-6) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of United States government (local, state, national) by…

C&G 2: The Constitution of the United States establishes a government of limited powers that are shared among different levels and branches. Potential Topics/Resources GSEs for Grades 5-6 GSEs for Grades 7-8 Essential Questions

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R. I. History: Grades 5-8


c. analyzing and defending a position on an issue involving civic responsibilities (personal, economic, legal or political rights) d. providing examples that reflect conflicts between individual rights and the common good, within the context of civic responsibility C&G 3 (7-8) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of how individuals and groups exercise (or are denied) their rights and responsibilities by… a. identifying an issue, proposing solutions, and developing an action plan to resolve the issue

b. identifying and explaining how an action taken by an individual or a group impacts the rights of others

c. identifying the impact of an historic court case

c. identifying a citizen’s responsibilities in a democratic society (personal, economic, legal, and civic)

d. identifying conflicts between individual rights and the common good (e.g. Eminent domain, airport expansion, Scituate Reservoir, Coastal Access)

C&G 3 (5-6) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of how individuals and groups exercise (or are denied) their rights and responsibilities by… a. identifying and explaining specific ways rights may or may not be exercised (e.g., civil rights)

b. recognizing potential conflicts within or among groups, brainstorming possible solutions, and reaching compromises (e.g. discrimination, bullying)

c. explaining the judicial process - due process – local, state, and federal (e.g. school discipline policy, truancy court, appeals process)

How are individual/group rights and responsibilities expressed within the judicial process? How do court cases impact individual/group rights and responsibilities?

How can a person’s actions or a group’s actions create multiple reactions?

• • • • • •

• • • • What are the limits to individual/group rights? How may issues surrounding those limits be dealt with?

Persuasive Essay Project Citizen Service Learning Projects Environment of Narragansett Bay: industry v. recreation Martin Luther King Gandhi Nelson Mandela Rosa Parks Local, contemporary issues Gordon Trial – elimination of death penalty District, state, and federal courts

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

• “Grass-roots movement” • Eminent Domain • Civil liberties

• U.N. Declaration of Human Rights, Student Rights • School governance • Civil Rights Movement • International Rights of The Child • Implied vs. Written Rights • Duties vs. Obligations, Common Good vs. Individual Needs

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

Potential Topics/Resources

Can one (person/group) make a difference? (e.g., Farmers’ fishing rights on Blackstone River v. mill owners)

Whose rights are “more” right?

What is a “good” citizen? (e.g., Roger Williams ship metaphor)

What are human rights (e.g., Seth Luther)

Final Version – December 2008

b. evaluating and defending a position on issues involving individual rights (personal, economic, legal, or political rights reflected in the Bill of Rights)

b. identifying citizen’s rights in a democratic society (personal, economic, legal, and civic)

3

C&G 3 (7-8) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of citizens’ rights and responsibilities by… a. defining and applying the concepts: “civic”(adj.), “civics”(n), “civil,” “citizen,” and “rights”

C&G 3 (5-6) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of citizens’ rights and responsibilities by… a. defining the concepts: “civic”(adj.), “civics”(n), “civil,” and “citizen”

C&G 3: In a democratic society, all of the people have certain rights and responsibilities. GSEs for Grades 5-6 GSEs for Grades 7-8 Essential Questions

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R. I. History: Grades 5-8


• • • •

• Open-mindedness • Current political issues

How do the outcomes of elections influence the political system?

Why is it important to recognize multiple perspectives on controversial issues?

d. examining how elections are/can be vehicles of change

e. recognizing multiple perspectives on historical or current controversial issues

4

• Party System, Organized Labor • Ideologies (7-8) • Special Interest Groups (7-8)

How are various political systems alike and different?

c. evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of various political systems (e.g., dictatorship, oligarchy, monarchy, democracy, theocracy)

c. identifying, comparing, and contrasting different “political systems” (e.g., monarchy, democracy, feudal)

Final Version – December 2008

How does political identification of individuals strengthen or weaken a society? How does it affect the political process?

Unicameral, Bicameral Confederacy Protectorate Dictatorship, Theocracy, Oligarchy

• Nativests – Know Nollug v. Native Americans • Political parties, ideological identification • Rhode Island’s political culture (e.g., Republican government and Democratic majority)

Democrat, Republican Student Council Primary, Caucus, Referendum Electoral College, Town Meeting

b. describing how and why individuals identify themselves politically (e.g., Federalist, Anti-federalist, suffragette, pacifist, nationalists, socialists)

• • • •

b. listing the “labels” that individuals may give themselves within a political process (e.g., radical, liberal, conservative, environmentalist, Democrat, Republican)

Who runs for political office? Who wins and why? What is the role of communication in the political process?

a. explaining how various factors affect how leaders are selected or elected through an election process (e.g., election process, public agenda, special interest groups, and media)

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

Potential Topics/Resources

a. explaining how leaders are selected or elected (e.g., election process, appointment process, political parties, campaigns)

Essential Questions

C&G 4 (7-8) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by…

C&G 4 (5-6) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by…

C&G 4: People engage in political processes in a variety of ways. GSEs for Grades 5-6 GSEs for Grades 7-8

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R. I. History: Grades 5-8


What is a reliable source?

C&G 4 (7-8)-3 Students participate in a civil society by… a. demonstrating an understanding and empathy for the opinions of others (e.g., listening to and asking relevant questions, considering alternative perspectives, voicing alternative points of view, recognizing bias) b. demonstrating the ability to compromise (e.g., offering solutions, persisting to resolve issues) c. recognizing the cause(s) and effect(s) of taking a civil action

d. utilizing a variety of reliable sources to develop an informed opinion

C&G 4 (5-6) –3 Students participate in a civil society by… a. demonstrating respect for the opinions of others (e.g., listening to and asking relevant questions, taking turns, considering alternative perspectives)

b. demonstrating the ability to compromise (e.g., offering solutions, persisting to resolve issues)

c. taking responsibility for one’s own actions (anticipating and accepting consequences)

d. identifying and accessing reliable sources to answer questions about current important issues (e.g. news media, children’s news magazines)

5

How does understanding the cause(s) and effect(s) influence one’s actions (particularly civil actions)?

c. engaging in the political process (e.g., mock elections)

c. engaging in the political process (e.g., voting in school elections)

Final Version – December 2008

What is compromise and how is it important in civil society?

What is civic virtue?

Why is it important to engage in the political process?

• Critical mindedness

• Self-discipline • Self-governance

• Open mindedness, negotiations • Contracts/treaties

• Civility, honesty, and compassion

Related GLEs/GSEs: W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

• Mock elections • Surveys and polls • School elections

• Mock elections ��� Surveys and polls • School elections

Does my vote make a difference?

b. describing their role and impact in the voting process

b. describing the voting process for a local, state, or national election

• Public issues • Current events • Writing a letter, article, essay

a. expressing and defending an informed opinion and presenting their opinion to an audience beyond the classroom (e.g., political cartoon, letter, speech, emailing Congressional membership)

a. using a variety of sources to form, substantiate, and communicate an opinion and presenting their opinion to an audience beyond the classroom (e.g., letter to the editor, student exhibition, persuasive essay, article in school newspaper)

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

Potential Topics/Resources

Why is effective communication of an informed opinion an integral part of the political process?

Students demonstrate their participation in political processes by…

Students demonstrate their participation in political processes by…

C&G 4: People engage in political processes in a variety of ways. (continued) GSEs for Grades 5-6 GSEs for Grades 7-8 Essential Questions C&G 4 (5-6) -2 C&G 4 (7-8)-2 .

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R. I. History: Grades 5-8


C&G 5 (7-8)-2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the benefits and challenges of an interconnected world by… a. identifying and discussing factors that lead to the breakdown of order among societies and the resulting consequences (e.g., abolition of slavery, terrorism, Fall of Roman Empire, civil war) b. considering competing interests on issues that benefit some people and cause other people to suffer (e.g. slavery, whaling, oil exploration) C&G 5 (7-8) -3 Students demonstrate an understanding of how the choices we make impact and are impacted by an interconnected world by… a. making predictions as to the effects of personal consumer, environmental, communication, and eventual political choices (e.g., hybrid cars, local v. imported) b. summarizing a significant situation; proposing and defending actions to be taken or not taken (e.g., pollution, consumption, conservation)

C&G 5 (5-6) -2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the benefits and challenges of an interconnected world by… a. identifying and discussing factors that lead to the breakdown of order among societies (e.g., natural disasters, wars, plagues, population shifts, natural resources)

b. citing a social, technological, geographical, economical, or cultural issue that provides an example of both benefits and challenges

C&G 5 (5-6) -3 Students demonstrate an understanding of how the choices we make impact and are impacted by an interconnected world by… a. identifying and analyzing the effects of consumer choice (environmental, communication, political)

6

Model United Nations, NAFTA, NATO Internet, Red Cross Destruction of rainforest Legal and Illegal Trade (oil, drug, human trafficking) Irish and Portuguese relief programs Local units or chapters International organizations (e.g., World Bank, IMF, UN) European Union Treaties (e.g., NATO)

• • • • How does action (or a lack of it) in significant situations affect societies and impact the world?

Civil War, Rwanda Cherokee Removal Holocaust Contemporary Issues

• Alternative energies (e.g., wind farms) • The U.S. economy and supply/demand

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

• Slavery • NAFTA • Immigration policies

• Migration/Immigration • Cultural diffusion • Abolition of slavery

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

• •

• • •

• • • •

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research

How do our individual and national choices impact our world?

How are some issues (social, technological, geographical, economical, cultural) beneficial to some people and harmful to others?

What are positive and negative effects of actions?

How do geography and other factors (political, economic, environmental, military, diplomatic) connect people, and how does that connection impact the relationships between/among nations/ peoples? How are cultural identities maintained in a global society? (e.g., La Survivance, Italo pride in Mussolini)

Where in the world do consumer products come from? How are people in the world interconnected? Who am I in relation to the world?

Final Version – December 2008

b. identifying, describing, and explaining how people are politically, economically, environmentally, militarily, and (or) diplomatically connected (e.g., World Bank, UN, NATO, European Union)

b. locating where different nations are in the world in relation to the U.S.

b. explaining how actions taken or not taken impact societies (e.g., natural disasters, incidences of social injustice or genocide)

C&G 5 (7-8) – 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of the many ways Earth’s people are interconnected by… a. tracing and explaining social, technological, geographical, economical, and cultural connections for a given society of people (trade, transportation, communication)

C&G 5 (5-6)– 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of the many ways Earth’s people are interconnected by… a. identifying, describing, and explaining how people are socially, technologically, geographically, economically, or culturally connected to others

C&G 5: As members of an interconnected world community, the choices we make impact others locally, nationally, and globally. Potential Topics/Resources GSEs Grades 5-6 GSEs Grades 7-8 Essential Questions

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R. I. History: Grades 5-8


a. identifying appropriate sources and using evidence to substantiate specific accounts of human activity

b. drawing inferences from Rhode Island History about the larger context of history (e.g., Opening of Japan, Separation of Church and State, Industrialism) c. asking and answering historical questions, evaluating sources of information, organizing the information, and evaluating information in terms of relevance and comprehensiveness

a. identifying appropriate sources (e.g., historical maps, diaries, photographs) to answer historical questions

b. using sources to support the stories of history (How do we know what we know?)

Influence of geography on Rhode Island Child labor Attitudes about immigration Media

• • • •

How does the point of view influence the information presented?

b. developing, expanding, and supporting an historical thesis, based on a series of events

Final Version – December 2008

How are certain events interrelated and what is the significance of that connection?

a. investigating and analyzing historical and visual data in order to draw connections between a series of events

a. investigating and summarizing historical data in order to draw connections between two events and to answer related historical questions

7

How does what we know change over time?

HP 1 (7-8) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple causeeffect relationships, by…

W- 2, 3 Response to Text • Connecting the RI maritime trades to the development of insurance and banks. • Connecting King Phillip’s War with on-going Native American relations • Bristol Fountain – who owns it? “Great People” vs. Portuguese • Revolution: Newport’s decline, Providence’s rise • Slater & water power – key growth in the American Industrial Revolution

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-14 Breadth of Reading R-15 Reading for Research

Architecture: Suburban house vs. Mansions Rhode Island State Charter Portrait of Thomas Wilson Dorr Oral History

• • • •

What does this information tell me about the topic and how useful is it?

Where does our understanding of history come from?

th

17 Century Rhode Island town map Sullivan Ballou Letter- Civil War “Rhode Island Box” Gravestones - John Stevens Rhode Island toys/dolls Rhode Island’s role in world history

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-14 Breadth of Reading R-15 Reading for Research (15.2)

Potential Topics/Resources

• • • • • •

What different kinds of information can be found in different sources?

HP 1 (5-6) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple causeeffect relationships, by…

d. identifying the point of view of a historical source (e.g. media sources)

c. asking and answering historical questions, organizing information, and evaluating information in terms of relevance

HP 1 (7-8) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by…

HP 1 (5-6) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by…

HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature. GSEs for Grades 5-6 GSEs for Grades 7-8 Essential Questions

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R. I. History: Grades 5-8


c. analyzing and evaluating how national and world events have impacted RI and how RI has impacted world events

8

How do things change but still remain the same?

How is history chronicled?

Final Version – December 2008

a. establishing a chronological order by working backward from some issue, problem, or event to explain its origins and its development over time; and to construct an historical narrative

a. establishing a chronological order by working backward from some issue, problem, or event to explain its origins and its development over time

HP 2 (5-6) – 3 Students show understanding of change over time by…

b. correlating key events to develop an understanding of the historical perspective of the time period in which they occurred (e.g., Jacksonian Democracy and Dorr’s Rebellion, water power and steam power, WWII and women at work) HP 2 (7-8) – 3 Students show understanding of change over time by…

b. summarizing key events and explaining the historical contexts of those events

How do we identify various time periods or historical eras (e.g., calendar time, cultural trends, economic trends, etc.)?

How does RI reflect multiculturalism? How is RI connected to the world?

b. analyzing the impact of RI’s ethnic development on local, state, and national history

b. comparing and contrasting the development of RI ethnic history to the nation’s history (e.g., What historical factors makes RI unique?; immigration, settlement patterns, religion, resources, geography) c. identifying and describing how national and world events have impacted RI and how RI has impacted world events (e.g., China Trade, WWII, Industrial Revolution) HP 2 (5-6) – 2 Students chronicle events and conditions by… a. placing key events and people of a particular historical era in chronological sequence HP 2 (7-8) – 2 Students chronicle events and conditions by… a. identifying key events and people of a particular historical era or time period (e.g., centuries, BCE, “The Sixties”)

Why does what happened in the past matter to me today?

a. determining the cause(s) and effect(s) of specific historical events that impact RI today

a. identifying sequential events, people, and societies that have shaped RI today

How have various religious and ethnic groups shaped RI?

HP 2 (7-8) –1 Students connect the past with the present by…

HP 2 (5-6) – 1 Students connect the past with the present by…

HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form. GSEs for Grades 5-6 GSEs for Grades 7-8 Essential Questions

• Evolutionary processes: Narragansett Bay; Changes – industrial /recreational; Mills; • Agriculture to Industrial to Hospitality • Changing the face of neighborhoods • Technology

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-14 Breadth of Reading R-15 Reading for Research

• Personal oral histories • Dorr’s Rebellion • Use of newspapers and/or TV/video news in the Cold War and Vietnam

W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing W-2, 3 Response to Text • Timelines, calendar time, thematic maps • Turning points

Related GLEs/GSEs:

• Community today and its history • Rhode Island’s role in international events/trends

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-14 Breadth of Reading R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing • Immigration • RI Mills/Industrial Revolution • RI Fishing/Maritime Trades • Infrastructure-interstate/bridges • Various Ethnic and Religious Groups • Village/neighborhood community • Cross-pollenization of RI technology

Potential Topics/Resources

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R. I. History: Grades 5-8


a. analyzing and reporting on a social movement from its inception (including historical causes), its impacts on us today, and its implications for the future

b. evaluating alternative courses of action, (keeping in mind the context of the time), ethical considerations, and the interest of those affected by the decision, and determining the long- and short-term consequences (e.g., Post WWII use of Narragansett Bay - tourism vs. oil refinery) HP 3 (7-8) – 2 Students make personal connections in an historical context (e.g., source-tosource, source-to-self, source-to-world) by… a. recognizing and reflecting on how the similarities of human issues across time periods influence their own personal histories (e.g., so what? How does this relate to me?)

a. identifying historical conditions and events that relate to contemporary issues (e.g., separation of church state, treatment of Native Americans, immigration, gender issues)

b. answering “what if” questions and using evidence to explain how history might have been different (e.g., How might history be different if Anne Hutchinson hadn’t dissented?)

Final Version – December 2008

How am I influenced by my culture? (e.g., family traditions, peer values)

c. comparing and contrasting the cultural influences that shape individuals and historical events (e.g., Conversion of Quakers from slave holders to abolitionists, emergence of mill villages, Gordon Trial)

c. identifying the cultural influences that shape individuals and historical events

9

What is heritage?

b. recognizing and reflecting on how the differences of human issues across time periods influence their own personal histories (e.g., so what? How does this relate to me?)

Why is history important to me?

What if certain events had not happened? (e.g., the 1938 hurricane) What if certain events had happened? (e.g., Providence burned like Chicago)

How does looking at the past help us understand the present, and plan/predict the future?

How does our understanding of the past influence our actions in the present or future?

b. explaining how the differences of human issues across time periods influence their own personal histories (e.g., so what? How does this relate to me?)

HP 3 (5-6) – 2 Students make personal connections in an historical context (e.g., source-tosource, source-to-self, source-toworld) by… a. explaining how the similarities of human issues across time periods influence their own personal histories (e.g., so what? How does this relate to me?)

HP 3 (7-8) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of how the past frames the present by…

HP 3 (5-6) – 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of how the past frames the present by…

HP 3: The study of history helps us understand the present and shape the future. GSEs for Grades 5-6 GSEs for Grades 7-8 Essential Questions

• RI books on Towns • Church Groups • RI Ethnic Heritage Pamphlet Series by Patrick Conley

Life in the Mills RI Legacy Theater Slavery How do I define myself?: religion, ethnic group, neighborhood, house-style, economic level, relationship to immigration • Empathy and Compassion • Gender issues

• • • •

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-14 Breadth of Reading R-15 Reading for Research

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing W-2, 3 Response to Text • Separation of Powers • Casinos/Lotteries • Civil Rights • Labor Laws • Suffrage- Thomas Wilson Dorr • Abolition- Moses Brown • Roger Williams- Religious Tolerance • Cleaning up the Narragansett Bay • Women’s movement • “Roads not taken”

Potential Topics/Resources

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R. I. History: Grades 5-8


How is the rule of law different from the rule of individual men/women?

d. distinguishing between the rule of law and the “rule of men” (e.g., Korematsu v. U.S. and Japanese internment during WWII)

1

c. examining the historical origins of power and how that power has been exercised over time (e.g., divine right, popular sovereignty, social contract, “regime of truth”)

a. identifying how actions of a government affect relationships involving the individual, society and the government (e.g., Homeland Security) b. explaining how political authority is obtained and legitimized

C&G 1 (Ext) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of sources of authority and use of power, and how they are/can be changed by…

What purposes can be served by different forms of government?

c. explaining how a political ideology is reflected in the form and structure of a government (e.g., Democracy – Democratic republic)

C&G 1 (9-12) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of sources of authority and use of power, and how they are/can be changed, by…

Development of government in RI from various towns to charter to constitution • Providence, 1640 (http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/states/ri01.htm) • Portsmouth, 1641 (http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/states/ri02.htm) • Providence Plantations Patent 1643 (http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/states/ri03.htm) • Charter to Constitution (http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/Lawrevision/lawsumry.htm) • Royal Charter 1663 (http://www2.sec.state.ri.us/special_projects/0304_Owners_Manual/pdf/charter.pdf) • RI Constitution (http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/gen_assembly/RiConstitution/riconst.html) • The Royal Charter contrasted with the U.S. Constitution

How are government structures similar or different? Why do certain cultures have different governments?

b. comparing and contrasting different forms of government and their purposes

Examples of corruption v. clean-government reform

U.S. Declaration of Independence th May 4 1776 RI Renunciation of Allegiance Atherton Narragansett Mortgage Scituate Reservoir Rhode Island government American colonies Origins of government

• • • • • • • Who gets power and why? How do people attain power? How is power used and/or abused?

Final Version – December 2008

Joshua Verin (http://www.ricw.ri.gov/committees/comm_verin.php) Warning-out system Evolution of marriage laws, divorce, property, primogeniture, etc.

• • • How do the actions of a government affect individuals and society?

Related GLEs/GSEs: W- 2, 3 Response to Text W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

• • •

Why do people need government? Where does government come from?

a. analyzing competing ideas about the purposes and functions of politics and government

a. describing or explaining competing ideas about the purposes and functions of politics and government The Royal Charter Dorr Rebellion Bloodless Revolution

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-15 Reading for Research W- 2, 3 Response to Text

C&G 1 (Ext) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by…

Potential Topics/Resources

C&G 1 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by…

Essential Questions

GSEs for Extended Learning

GSEs for HS Proficiency

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R.I. History: Grades 9-12, Extended Learning C&G 1: People create and change structures of power, authority, and governance in order to accomplish common goals.


2

d. discussing different historical understandings/ perspectives of democracy

c. identifying and giving examples of the discrepancies between democratic ideals and the realities of American social and political life (e.g., equal protection under the law and the reality of discrimination)

a. interpreting and analyzing the sources of the U.S. democratic tradition in the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution, and other documents (e.g., RI Constitution, Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments & Resolutions, Supreme Court decisions, Pledge of Allegiance) b. analyzing the inherent challenges involved in balancing majority rule and minority rights

C&G 2 (9-12) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the democratic values and principles underlying the US government by…

d. critically examining the principles, traditions, and precedents of American constitutional government

What are the democratic principles/values that Americans hold in common? Where is there conflict between the democratic principles and values Americans hold?

Are there differences between what is and what should be in American democracy?

What are the challenges of majority rule?

How do the United States’ enduring documents reflect democratic values and principles?

What principles, traditions and precedents shaped American constitutional government and how?

Final Version – December 2008

c. analyzing the discrepancies between democratic ideals and the realities of American social and political life (e.g., equal protection under the law and the reality of discrimination)

C&G 2 (Ext) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the democratic values and principles underlying the U.S. government by…

c. analyzing how people gain or fail to gain access to the institutions of the U.S. government (local, state, national) or other political institutions (e.g., access to the U.S. political process)

Whose Constitution is this? How do people gain access, or fail to gain access, to the levers [levels?] of power in U.S. government, and how does that affect justice?

b. analyzing the basic structures of government in the U.S. (e.g., national, state, local; branches of federal government) through researching a current or historical issue or event

c. identifying and describing ways in which people gain or fail to gain access to the institutions of the U.S. government (local, state, national) or other political institutions (e.g., access to the U.S. political process)

Essential Questions

What is the purpose of judicial review? What are the traits of judicial review? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the practice of judicial review? How does judicial review enrich democratic values? Do the structures of government in the U.S. effectively serve the general welfare?

C&G 2 (Ext) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of United States government (local, state, national) by…

a. evaluating, taking, and defending positions on a current issue regarding the judicial protection of individual or state rights via judicial review

C&G 2 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of United States government (local, state, national) by…

are shared among different levels and branches. GSEs for HS Proficiency GSEs for Extended Learning

C&G 2: The Constitution of the United States establishes a government of limited powers that

Eminent domain: Scituate Reservoir Temperance movement Marriage rights/divorce Slavery Inequalities in voting and education Bristol Customs District – Jefferson and the DeWolfs • Americanization movements 19001925, cultural vs. political practices

• • • • • •

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-15 Reading for Research W- 2, 3 Response to Text W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing • Plantation Agreement at Providence (1640) • Stephen Hopkins’ Rights of the Colonies Examined (1764)

• Bill of Rights • U.S. Constitution

• Property ownership and poll taxes – effects of various classes, industrial workers, etc. • Open access to government records, meetings, etc.

• Separation of powers debate – Common Cause Rhode Island

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-15 Reading for Research W- 2, 3 Response to Text W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing • Separation of Church and State – freedom of conscience • Gordon Brothers trials 1844 • Jim Taricani

Potential Topics/Resources

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R.I. History: Grades 9-12, Extended Learning


Final Version – December 2008

Who should be a citizen?

d. analyzing the scope and limits of personal, cultural, economic, or political rights (e.g., freedom of expression vs. school dress codes, speaking one’s native language vs. Englishonly legislation; living wage vs. minimum wage; civil liberties vs. national security)

3

When are your rights limited for the general welfare? How do you resolve the sources of conflict that you personally have with the system?

c. evaluating, taking, and defending positions regarding the personal and civic responsibilities of individuals

Was the Bill of Rights necessary? Why do we need a Bill of Rights? How are rights defined differently in various contexts? To what extent are they protected?

What are an individual’s personal and civic responsibilities?

a. evaluating, taking, and defending positions on provisions found in the Bill of Rights

a. comparing and contrasting different perspective on provisions found in the Bill of Rights (e.g., flag burning and the first Amendment)

Essential Questions

b. comparing and contrasting human rights provided for in various seminal documents or materials (e.g., Declaration of the Rights of Man, Universal Declaration of Rights, International Convention on the Rights of the Child, and other international documents)

GSEs for Extended Learning C&G 3 (Ext) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of citizens’ rights and responsibilities by…

GSEs for HS Proficiency

C&G 3 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of citizens’ rights and responsibilities by…

C&G 3: In a democratic society, all people have certain rights and responsibilities.

• Native American voting rights – Narragansett “detribalization” – sovereignty and dual citizenship • Sentinelist controversy – French-Canadian & Irish Catholic struggle for power • 1922 Peck Act – English-only education and the impact on French and Italian parochial schools

• Taxation, care for the poor • Obedience to the law

• Rhode Island Royal Charter and access to waters of Narragansett Bay – Native rights to land and water

• Roger Williams’ letter to Providence with ship metaphor [remove] writings (http://college.hmco.com/english/heath/syllabuild /iguide/williamr.html) • Pawtucket crèche

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-15 Reading for Research W- 2, 3 Response to Text W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

Potential Topics/Resources

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R.I. History: Grades 9-12, Extended Learning


e. reflecting on participation in school governance and/or youth leadership development

e. participating in and reflecting on a decision-making experience as part of a group in your classroom, school, or community (e.g., developing classroom norms, School Improvement Team member, response to community needs, such as a food drive)

4

d. critiquing and proposing alternatives to social, political, or economic injustices; using evidence to make predictions about how society might be transformed in the future

d. identifying and explaining ways individuals and groups have exercised their rights in order to transform society (e.g., Civil Rights Movement, women’s suffrage)

Final Version – December 2008

What responsibilities do I have in school governance?

How is American society transformed?

To what degree can access to justice and power be limited?

c. analyzing how access to institutions affects justice, reward, and power in the U.S.

c. describing and giving examples of how access to institutions can affect justice, reward, and power in the U.S.

How do public policies directly affect your life?

How do you access the political system?

a. evaluating, taking, and defending a position regarding a policy at the school, local, state, national, or international level that affects individual rights

a. identifying a policy at the school, local, state, national, or international level and describing how it affects individual rights

Essential Questions

b. accessing the political system (e.g., letter writing, researching an issue and communicating it to the public, organizing, petitioning, boycotting/buycotting)

GSEs for Extended Learning C&G 3 (Ext) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of how individuals and groups exercise (or are denied) their rights and responsibilities by…

GSEs for HS Proficiency

C&G 3 (9-12) –2 Students demonstrate an understanding of how individuals and groups exercise (or are denied) their rights and responsibilities by…

C&G 3: In a democratic society, all people have certain rights and responsibilities. (continued)

Bilingual Education Voting age & other requirements to vote Workers’ rights Qualifications for citizenship

• Student government/campaigns • Service learning projects

• Senators Anthony, Aldrich, Pastore • Irish power in government employ and church life • Labor movement • Civil Rights Movement • Women’s suffrage • Dorr Rebellion • Labor movements

• Open records and public meetings – Common Cause

• • • •

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-7, R-8 Informational texts R-15 Reading for Research W- 2, 3 Response to Text W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing

Potential Topics/Resources

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R.I. History: Grades 9-12, Extended Learning


c. critically analyzing a media piece (e.g., political advertisements, news broadcasts, talk radio shows) and assessing its impact on public opinion and behavior d. evaluating the significance of landmark campaigns and elections in the American political system

e. analyzing multiple perspectives on historical or current controversial issues to illustrate the complexity involved in obtaining political agreement on contested public issues (e.g., perspectives on immigration) C&G 4 (Ext) –2 Students demonstrate their participation in political processes by…

c. analyzing and interpreting sources (print and nonprint discourse/media), by distinguishing fact from opinion, and evaluating possible bias/propaganda or conflicting information within or across sources

d. selecting a landmark campaign or election in the American political system, explaining the historical context and its significance, and evaluating its impact

e. analyzing multiple perspectives on an historical or current controversial issue (e.g., immigration, environmental policy, escalation of the war in Vietnam, Brown v. Board of Education)

Final Version – December 2008

How is an effective civic project planned and carried out for lasting change? Why does my vote matter? How does the nature of a campaign influence the final result?

c. engaging in and reflecting upon an electoral process in a class, school, or community (e.g., become a candidate and carry out a campaign, participate in party/school nominations, work on a political campaign, volunteer to serve on a board, do polling)

5

How can people collaborate to solve the problems of the world? In what ways can I affect change in my own community?

Can there be more than one solution to a major problem in society? Can every problem be solved completely?

How do we avoid “present-mindedness” in exploring controversial historical issues? How does discourse reflect different points of view (e.g., political cartoons, speeches, written documents)?

Why are some elections “more important” than others?

How does the U.S. system of government differ from other governments? What is the effect of political parties and other political institutions on shaping the public agenda? How are political parties/institutions shaping the public agenda? What is the role and influence of a free press in the political process?

Essential Questions

b. working individually or with others to identify, propose, and carry out a community/civic engagement project/initiative (e.g., making the community aware of an issue, organizing a workshop)

C&G 4 (9-12) –2 Students demonstrate their participation in political processes by… a. using collaborative decision making/problem solving to consider multiple perspectives on a current political, social, or economic issue, evaluating the consequences of various options, and developing a plan of action (e.g., new school policy or local, national, or international public policy)

b. interacting with political institutions and/or political parties in order to evaluate how they shape the public agenda

b. interacting with, analyzing, and evaluating political institutions and political parties in an authentic context (using local, national, or international issues/events that are personally meaningful)

a. comparing and contrasting U.S. systems of government with others

GSEs for Extended Learning C&G 4 (Ext)–1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by…

GSEs for HS Proficiency

C&G 4 (9-12) –1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by…

C&G 4: People engage in political processes in a variety of ways.

• School, local, state, national elections • Community boards (e.g., zoning board, environmental commission)

• Service learning projects

• Current events/contemporary issues • Local/state/national/international public policy

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research

• 1824 – RI shift from Democratic states’ rights to Whig federal protections for manufactures • 1840 – Modern campaigning, popular movements • 1860 – North and South, slavery and secession • 1934 – RI’s shift from Republican to Democratic majorities • Policies: immigration, environment, education • Political cartoons, speeches

• (GSE R-10-8.4) • News media formats

• Current events/contemporary issues • Politics • Local/state government policy

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W- 2, 3 Response to Text W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing • U.S. government • World governments

Potential Topics/Resources

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R.I. History: Grades 9-12, Extended Learning


6

c. identifying and analyzing the conflicts that exist between public and private life (e.g., issues related to Homeland Security, Eminent Domain, civil liberties) Where does public and private life overlap? Where are they in conflict?

What exists in our community to help us live in a civil society?

What does it take to be a “good” citizen? What is required of each of us to live together in a civil society?

Essential Questions

Final Version – December 2008

b. understanding and analyzing the assets and needs of their communities and the interactions with various institutions (e.g., interest and advocacy groups, the not-forprofit sector)

b. identifying and describing the role that various institutions play in meeting the needs of the community

GSEs for Extended Learning C&G 4 (Ext) –3 Students participate in a civil society by…

C&G 4 (9-12) –3 Students participate in a civil society by… a. critically reflecting on their own civic dispositions (e.g., tolerance and respect, concern for the rights and welfare of others, social responsibility, and recognition of the capacity to make a difference)

GSEs for HS Proficiency

G&C 4: People engage in political processes in a variety of ways. (continued)

• Scituate Reservoir • Hillsgrove/ T.F. Green Airport

• Community organizations and services • Non-profits

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W- 6, 7, 8 Informational Writing • Ebenezer Knight Dexter

Potential Topics/Resources

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R.I. History: Grades 9-12, Extended Learning


Final Version – December 2008

How can solutions to global problems be constructed that support the general welfare? Is there such a thing as a “just solution” for all?

c. using deliberation, negotiation, and compromise to plan and develop just solutions to problems (e.g., immigration, limited energy resources, nuclear threat) created when nations or groups act

7

What are the potential consequences of conflict or a course of action?

b. identifying and summarizing the intended and unintended consequences of a conflict, event, or course of action

How can global issues affect people differently?

How are issues globally interconnected?

How do individuals, systems and structures relate to and interact with each other?

How is the world organized? In what ways is the world organized?

Do the benefits of living in an interconnected world outweigh the challenges? In what ways?

C&G 5 (Ext)-3 Students demonstrate an understanding of how the choices we make impact and are impacted by, an interconnected world by…

C&G 5-2 (Ext) Students demonstrate an understanding of the benefits and challenges of an interconnected world

C&G 5 (Ext) – 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of the many ways Earth’s people are interconnected by

C&G 5 (9-12) -3 Students demonstrate an understanding of how the choices we make impact and are impacted by, an interconnected world by… a. predicting outcomes and possible consequences of a conflict, event, or course of action

b. analyzing and evaluating a contemporary or historical issue (e.g. free trade versus fair trade, access to medical care and terrorism)

b. organizing information to show relationships between and among various individuals, systems, and structures (e.g. politically, socially, culturally, economically, environmentally) C&G 5 (9-12)-2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the benefits and challenges of an interconnected world by… a. describing the interconnected nature of a contemporary or historical issue

C&G 5 (9-12) – 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of the many ways Earth’s people are interconnected by… a. identifying the ways the world is organized: politically, socially, culturally, economically, environmentally (e.g. nationstate)

Free Trade vs. Fair Trade HIV/Aids Immigration vs. emigration Cultural diffusion Energy Environment vs. economic development Economics – price of oil (supply/demand) Environment vs. economic development Nation study (e.g., China’s views vs. U.S. views)

• • • •

Current events Economics – energy, trade, oil, food prices Immigration Cultural conflict

• Personal and collective actions: Consumer choices, human/environmental interaction, • Personal vs. Public Choices: Ride bike/Drive car (personal), Kyoto Protocol (Public) • Reduce, Re-use, recycle • Current events • U.S. history • Rhode Island history

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W-6,7,8 – Informational Writing

• • • • • • • • •

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W-6,7,8 Informational Writing

• Model UN • Capital Forum • Formal and informal organizations: ex: NationState, WTO, IMF, Transnational Corporations, United Nations, al Qaeda, Red Cross) • Merchants and Farmers • Raw materials and industrial production • Maritime culture and the Atlantic world

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research

C&G 5: As members of an interconnected world community, the choices we make impact others locally, nationally, and globally. GSEs for HS Proficiency GSEs for Extended Learning Essential Questions Potential Topics/Resources

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R.I. History: Grades 9-12, Extended Learning


8

How does what we know change over time? How are certain events interrelated and what is the significance of that connection? How have places, societies, people, etc. changed over time? How have they remained consistent? How does visual data aid understanding of historical continuity and change?

How does analyzing multiple perspectives enhance our understanding of history?

What sources have the most relevant, accurate information? How do various sources support or disprove historical theses or show new angles? Whose history is it? Why are accounts of the same historical events different?

Essential Questions

Final Version – December 2008

a. analyzing cause and effect relationships showing multiple causation (e.g., industrialization and immigration, King Philip’s War; detribalization and retribalization) b. analyzing visual data in order to explain historical continuity and change (e.g. timeline of Rhode Island’s path to Revolution) (How did architectural changes in RI mirror historical trends? – Mills transformed into living and work spaces)

a. explaining cause and effect relationships in order to sequence and summarize events, make connections between a series of events, or compare/contrast events

b. interpreting and constructing visual data (e.g., timelines, charts, graphs, flowchart, historical films, political cartoons) in order to explain historical continuity and change (e.g., timeline of Rhode Island’s path to Revolution; Why is Rhode Island first to declare independence, but last colony to ratify the Constitution?)

HP 1 (Ext) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by…

d. using a variety of technological tools in historical research and interpretation (e.g., master database of graveyards; census records, online school reports, online state tax records)

HP 1 (9-12) –2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships, by…

a. formulating historical questions, obtaining, analyzing, evaluating historical primary and secondary print and non-print sources (e.g., RI Constitution, art, oral history, writings of Elizabeth Buffum Chace) b. explaining how historical facts and historical interpretations may be different, but are related (e.g., slavery in RI v. economic benefit to RI) c. identifying, describing, or analyzing multiple perspectives on an historical trend or event (e.g. mill worker v. mill owners during Industrial Revolution in RI; separation of powers in RI government) d. using technological tools in historical research

GSEs for Extended Learning HP 1 (Ext) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by…

GSEs for HS Proficiency

HP 1 (9-12) –1 Students act as historians, using a variety of tools (e.g., artifacts and primary and secondary sources) by…

HP 1: History is an account of human activities that is interpretive in nature.

Slave trade in RI

Industrial Revolution in RI Gradual emancipation & Abolition RI government: separation of powers RI Libraries image databases (http://www.provlib.org.ri_image/Providence_Libr ary/index.html) Mapping with historic maps and contemporary satellite images

• • • •

• Chronological charting – stratigraphy, timelines, etc. • Turning points • Development of RI relationship with the U.S. Navy • Transforming RI Mills • Architecture and the built environment – map morphing, roadways, etc. • Census records and evolution of measurements • Dating objects based on visual characteristics – styles, materials, and tastes

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research R-7, R-8 Informational texts W-6,7,8 Informational Writing

RI Constitution, art, oral history Writings of Elizabeth Buffum Chace Providence Grays – finding Messer St. Grounds Origins of place names

• • • •

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research R-7, R-8 Informational texts W-6,7,8 Informational Writing

Potential Topics/Resources

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R.I. History: Grades 9-12, Extended Learning


9

b. documenting various groups (e.g., formal: nongovernment organizations, religious; informal: family, clan) and their traditions that have remained constant over time (e.g., religious denomination, fishing industry, formal and informal design, town financial meeting, lotteries)

b. synthesizing information from multiple sources to formulate an historical interpretation (e.g., document-based questions, quantitative data, material artifacts of RI) HP 2 (9-12)– 3 Students show understanding of change over time by… a. tracing patterns chronologically in history to describe changes on domestic, social, or economic life (e.g. immigration trends, land use patterns, naval military history)

a. creating narratives based on a particular historical point of view (e.g., unemployed WWII vet, home front in WWII, oil refinery promoter, environmental activist in Rhode Island; slave or free black in Newport, slave holder, trader or investor)

c. analyzing and evaluating how national and world events have impacted Rhode Island and how Rhode Island has impacted national and world events (e.g., women’s liberation movement; Commodore Matthew Perry of RI opens trade with Japan; Quonset Hut; slave trade) HP 2 (9-12) – 2 Students chronicle events and conditions by…

b. identifying and linking key ideas and concepts and their enduring implications (e.g., separation of church and state in Rhode Island)

How do patterns show change over time? What future events might be predicted based on those patterns? What are nongovernmental groups and what do they do?

How does the information gathered support an historical thesis?

How do the conditions of the time affect events?

What events/factors led up to major historical events or trends? How have those events or trends affected the present day? What are the enduring implications of key historical ideas and concepts? What was/is RI’s place in history?

Essential Questions

Final Version – December 2008

HP 2 (Ext)– 3 Students show understanding of change over time by… a. tracing patterns chronologically in history to describe changes on domestic, social, or economic life and predicting events that might occur in the future, based on those patterns b. documenting various groups and their ideas that have remained constant over time and analyzing why they have or have not endured

HP 2 (Ext) – 2 Students chronicle events and conditions by… a. critiquing historical narratives for historical accuracy or points of view

c. researching a current state, national or world issue and predicting future implications for RI or propose a course of action

a. tracing and analyzing how a present situation or problem has been constructed/affected by its historical roots (e.g., deindustrialization in Rhode Island)

a. explaining origins of major historical events (e.g., Industrial Revolution in Rhode Island)

GSEs for Extended Learning HP 2 (Ext)–1 Students connect the past with the present by…

HP 2 (9-12)– 1 Students connect the past with the present by…

GSEs for HS Proficiency

HP 2: History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form.

Industrial Revolution in Rhode Island Government regulation of Gaming Birth of the Navy Opening of Japan

Slave trade Commodore Matthew Perry & trade with Japan Ava Belmont and Newport Women’s Suffrage meetings RI in the Civil War – wartime industrial production

• Clubs and religious societies, mutual aid societies, sports teams (RI Reds, Providence Grays), street gangs

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W-6,7,8 Informational Writing • Great Trolley Car Strike of 1901-02 • A Forgotten History of the Slave Trade and Slavery in New England • Sons of Providence: the Brown Brothers, the Slave Trade and the American Revolution • Slavery and Justice Committee website • Black suffrage in the Dorr War – speeches by Frederick Douglas • Industry – imports and exports, census records, state tax records, etc. • RI Veterans experiences • RI Banking Crisis Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W-6,7,8 Informational Writing • Transformation of RI economy from industry to tourism • Farming/large estates to suburban developments

• • • •

• Narragansett Tribal recognition • Separation of church and state in RI • Localization (town-focus) rather than county-focus

• • • •

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research R-7, R-8 Informational texts W-6,7,8 Informational Writing

Potential Topics/Resources

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R.I. History: Grades 9-12, Extended Learning


10

b. formulating a position or course of action on a current issue from a choice of carefully evaluated options, taking into account the historical underpinnings (e.g., casino issue and American Indian sovereignty; current national border debate and RI historical perspective) HP 3 (9-12) – 2 Students make personal connections in an historical context (e.g., source-tosource, source-to-self, source-toworld) by… a. articulating an understanding of the meaning, implications, and impact of historical events on their lives today (e.g., closing of the Navy in Rhode Island at Quonset Point; volunteer army; ratification of RI Constitution; whaling industry, access to the shore, declining birth rates) b. analyzing how an historical development (e.g. cycle of poverty or prosperity, low educational attainment, “Independent Man”) has contributed to current social, economic, or political patterns

• Closing of the Navy in Rhode Island at Quonset Point • Volunteer army • Ratification of RI Constitution • Whaling industry • Institutional racism/sexism • Bill of Rights • Development of the electric system and conversion from coal gas th • 20 century urban decline and preservation of historic buildings

How are current problems related to historical developments? How much does an historical development contribute to current problems?

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W-6,7,8 Informational Writing W- 2, 3 Write in Response to text

• Gaming in the state constitution • Separation of powers • Environmental impacts of/on the fishing industry • Housing stock and affordable housing • Bridges and highways and their impacts on growing/declining communities • Education reform – Horace Mann and the Prussian system to NCLB • Zoning v. landowners rights • NAFTA

Related GLEs/GSEs: R-15 Reading for Research W-6,7,8 Informational Writing

Potential Topics/Resources

What are my personal values? What shaped them/How have they evolved? What impacts my life now?

How does the historical background of a current issue influence one’s position or course of action, and how one communicates that position or course of action?

How does our understanding of the past inform/instruct our actions in the future? What’s the point of studying history?

Essential Questions

Final Version – December 2008

b. presenting an analysis of an historical development to a public forum

HP 3 (Ext)– 2 Students make personal connections in an historical context (e.g., source-tosource, source-to-self, source-to-world) by… a. using knowledge of historical ideas and concepts and their enduring implications, to formulate a philosophy statement based on personal values

b. formulating and presenting a position or course of action on a current issue in a public forum

a. tracking implementation of a decision; analyzing the interests it served; estimating the position, power, and priority of each stakeholder; and predicting continuing costs and benefits from a variety of perspectives (e.g., public school funding in RI or U.S.)

GSEs for Extended Learning HP 3 (Ext) – 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of how the past frames the present by…

GSEs for HS Proficiency

HP 3 (9-12) – 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of how the past frames the present by… a. gathering evidence of circumstances and factors contributing to contemporary problems (e.g., civil rights movement, sexual revolution)

HP 3: The study of history helps us understand the present and shape the future.

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics & Government and Historical Perspectives/R.I. History: Grades 9-12, Extended Learning


Common Core State Standards

English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

for


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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2

9 10 11 13 15 18 19

Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/ Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects K–5

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

Reading Standards for Literature K–5

Reading Standards for Informational Text K–5

Reading Standards: Foundational Skills K–5

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

Writing Standards K–5

23 25 26 30 31 33

Speaking and Listening Standards K–5

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Language Standards K–5

Language Progressive Skills, by Grade

Standard 10: Range, Quality, and Complexity of Student Reading K–5

Staying on Topic Within a Grade and Across Grades

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening 22

3

Introduction

42

41

39

36

35

34

59 60 61 62 63

64

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6–12 Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects 6–12 College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects 6–12

57

56

52

51

49

Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

Standard 10: Range, Quality, and Complexity of Student Reading 6–12

Language Progressive Skills, by Grade

Language Standards 6–12

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Speaking and Listening Standards 6–12

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening 48

Writing Standards 6–12

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

Reading Standards for Informational Text 6–12

Reading Standards for Literature 6–12

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

Standards for English Language Arts 6–12

Table of Contents

Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects


6–12

Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

STANDARDS FOR

Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects


60 | 6-12 | History/Social Studies, science, and technical subjects | Reading

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

2.

3.

Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

5.

6.

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

8.

9.

* Please see “Research to Build and Present Knowledge” in Writing for additional standards relevant to gathering, assessing, and applying information from print and digital sources.

10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.*

7.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

4.

Craft and Structure

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

1.

Key Ideas and Details

The grades 6–12 standards on the following pages define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade span. They correspond to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards below by number. The CCR and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Reading is critical to building knowledge in history/social studies as well as in science and technical subjects. College and career ready reading in these fields requires an appreciation of the norms and conventions of each discipline, such as the kinds of evidence used in history and science; an understanding of domain-specific words and phrases; an attention to precise details; and the capacity to evaluate intricate arguments, synthesize complex information, and follow detailed descriptions of events and concepts. In history/social studies, for example, students need to be able to analyze, evaluate, and differentiate primary and secondary sources. When reading scientific and technical texts, students need to be able to gain knowledge from challenging texts that often make extensive use of elaborate diagrams and data to convey information and illustrate concepts. Students must be able to read complex informational texts in these fields with independence and confidence because the vast majority of reading in college and workforce training programs will be sophisticated nonfiction. It is important to note that these Reading standards are meant to complement the specific content demands of the disciplines, not replace them.

Note on range and content of student reading

Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects


6-12 | History/Social Studies | Reading

|

61

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).

2.

3.

Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).

Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

5.

6.

Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

8.

9.

Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.

3.

9.

8.

10. By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

10. By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claims.

Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.

Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

6.

7.

Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.

5.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

2.

4.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

Grades 9–10 students: 1.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

7.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.

4.

Craft and Structure

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.

1.

Key Ideas and Details

Grades 6–8 students:

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

3.

Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.

9.

8.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.

6.

7.

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

5.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

2.

4.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

RH

1.

Grades 11–12 students:

The standards below begin at grade 6; standards for K–5 reading in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects are integrated into the K–5 Reading standards. The CCR anchor standards and high school standards in literacy work in tandem to define college and career readiness expectations—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity.

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6–12

Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects


6-12 | science and technical subjects: reading

|

62

Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.

2.

3.

Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to an understanding of the topic.

Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text.

5.

6.

Distinguish among facts, reasoned judgment based on research findings, and speculation in a text.

Compare and contrast the information gained from experiments, simulations, video, or multimedia sources with that gained from reading a text on the same topic.

8.

9.

Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words. Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claim or a recommendation for solving a scientific or technical problem. Compare and contrast findings presented in a text to those from other sources (including their own experiments), noting when the findings support or contradict previous explanations or accounts.

8.

9.

Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, defining the question the author seeks to address.

6.

7.

Analyze the structure of the relationships among concepts in a text, including relationships among key terms (e.g., force, friction, reaction force, energy).

5.

Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks, attending to special cases or exceptions defined in the text.

3.

Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9–10 texts and topics.

Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; trace the text’s explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon, or concept; provide an accurate summary of the text.

2.

4.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions.

10. By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Grades 9–10 students: 1.

10. By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).

7.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

4.

Craft and Structure

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts.

1.

Key Ideas and Details

Grades 6–8 students:

Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information. Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.

8.

9.

10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, identifying important issues that remain unresolved.

6.

7.

Analyze how the text structures information or ideas into categories or hierarchies, demonstrating understanding of the information or ideas.

5.

Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on explanations in the text.

3.

Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.

Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.

2.

4.

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.

RST

1.

Grades 11–12 students:

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects 6–12

Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects


63 | 6-12 | History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects | Writing

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.

2.

3.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

5.

6.

Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

8.

9.

*These broad types of writing include many subgenres. See Appendix A for definitions of key writing types.

10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Range of Writing

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

7.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

4.

Production and Distribution of Writing

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

1.

Text Types and Purposes*

The grades 6–12 standards on the following pages define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade span. They correspond to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards below by number. The CCR and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought, and felt. To be college and career ready writers, students must take task, purpose, and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures, and formats deliberately. They need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining, and collaborating on writing. They have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources, and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and cogent manner. They must have the flexibility, concentration, and fluency to produce high-quality firstdraft text under a tight deadline and the capacity to revisit and make improvements to a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it. To meet these goals, students must devote significant time and effort to writing, producing numerous pieces over short and long time frames throughout the year.

Note on range and content of student writing

Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects


6-12 | History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects | Writing

|

64

1.

Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content. a. Introduce claim(s) about a topic or issue, acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically. b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant, accurate data and evidence that demonstrate an understanding of the topic or text, using credible sources. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. d. Establish and maintain a formal style. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

Text Types and Purposes

Grades 6–8 students: 1.

Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content. a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

Grades 9–10 students: 1.

whST

Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content. a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

Grades 11–12 students:

The standards below begin at grade 6; standards for K–5 writing in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects are integrated into the K–5 Writing standards. The CCR anchor standards and high school standards in literacy work in tandem to define college and career readiness expectations—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity.

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects 6–12

Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects


6-12 | History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects | Writing

|

65

3.

2.

(See note; not applicable as a separate requirement)

Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes. a. Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. c. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers. e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

Grades 9–10 students:

3.

2.

(See note; not applicable as a separate requirement)

Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes. a. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. c. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

Grades 11–12 students:

whST

Students’ narrative skills continue to grow in these grades. The Standards require that students be able to incorporate narrative elements effectively into arguments and informative/explanatory texts. In history/social studies, students must be able to incorporate narrative accounts into their analyses of individuals or events of historical import. In science and technical subjects, students must be able to write precise enough descriptions of the step-by-step procedures they use in their investigations or technical work that others can replicate them and (possibly) reach the same results.

(See note; not applicable as a separate requirement)

3.

Note:

Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes. a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories as appropriate to achieving purpose; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone. f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

2.

Text Types and Purposes (continued)

Grades 6–8 students:

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects 6–12

Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects


6-12 | History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects | Writing

|

66

With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently.

5.

6.

Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis reflection, and research.

8.

9.

10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Range of Writing

Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.

7.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

4.

Production and Distribution of Writing

Grades 6–8 students:

10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

8.

9.

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a selfgenerated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

6.

7.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

5.

4.

Grades 9–10 students:

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a selfgenerated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

whST

10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

9.

8.

7.

6.

5.

4.

Grades 11–12 students:

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects 6–12

Common Core State Standards for ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects


World History Curriculum