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BAR__CULTURE__SPIRIT 04

K EEP IT LOCAL

Latest health and wellness craze

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N O AND LOW

Cultural shift towards mindful wellness

ISSUE: 03 16

S NACK PAIRING

The ultimate guide

20 F LAVOURED GIN Changing Tastes or Time to Change Minds?

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SPRING/SUMMER 2019

F ROZEN COCKTAILS

Two weeks of summer


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KEEP IT LOCAL Latest health and wellness craze

This newspaper is printed on Fedrigoni Arcoprint Milk 85gsm, which is carbon-balanced with the help of the World Land Trust. By using this paper, we have helped protect 544 square metres of forest. The best way to recycle it is to give it to another bartender to read and once they have finished, they can pass it on! If you want to send an online version of this newspaper to your friends and colleagues, please visit www.issuu.com/prukbeat where you can find all of our papers as downloadable pdfs.

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The bag we use to send out the paper is a biodegradable poly bag and can be composted through bio-waste collection.

ZANTHOXYLUM ARTMATUM a.k.a Timut Pepper

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NO AND LOW Cultural shift towards mindful wellness

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08

CITY LOVE The Liverpool bar scene, from late night party venues to chilled daytime laptop sessions

SPIRITS OF SUMMER

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SNACK PAIRING The ultimate guide

10 COMMANDMENTS How to write a cocktail book

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ABC OF FERMENTATION Ignite your future passion for fermentation

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NEW ORLEANS Deep South meets France, meets The Caribbean, meets Europe

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FLAVOURED GIN Changing tastes or time to change minds?

MEET THE TEAM

FROZEN COCKTAILS Two weeks of summer

elcome to the third edition of ‘Volume’ a glimpse into what we think you should be drinking in summer 2019. As usual, we have tasted, considered and discussed new drinks and trends from all around the UK, and over the next few pages we will summarise these for your enjoyment! We continue to champion sustainability as a key part of the contract that all responsible operators should have with the planet and yourself, and feature articles in this issue on using local ingredients to make shrubs for Plymouth Gimlets, and using drinks with a reduced alcohol content as part of your drinking repertoire. The no and low category continues to explode, and we have ensured that you have all the drink ideas you need from CEDER’S and Lillet. This summer will be a record breaking one for gin - an estimated 95 new gins have launched over the last 12 months, and flavoured gin has been a booming category.

The growth of diverse new flavours (fancy a ‘Unicorn Tears’ & Tonic anyone) has been a little controversial, so we have spent a little time discussing this and considering whether it has all gone too far? Finally, it wouldn’t be summer without thinking about the perfect drink for the hottest day - a Frozen Daiquiri - and if the UK weather doesn’t play ball, why not book a flight to somewhere with guaranteed heat, great music and a long long history of creating stone cold cocktail classics - New Orleans ... Enjoy! Drop me a line at daniel.ianson@pernod-ricard.com if you have comments or questions. Cheers!

DANIEL I’ANSON BRAND ENGAGEMENT & ADVOCACY TEAM MANAGER @thepapabeat


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he latest health and wellness craze has driven uptake in meditation, gym memberships and plastic-free bags, now it’s time to keep it local and turn to local ingredients. There are multiple reasons why there is a growing interest in the quality of produce; whether for a greater connection between the consumer and their food sources, to avoid industrialised and processed foods, or to support their local economy. Through our lifestyles, restaurant choices and now spreading increasingly into the cocktail world, people are looking for something that they can resonate with. By using local and seasonal ingredients, we are creating experiences in which the consumer can understand the responsible and sustainable method used in creating their drink. The most popular way of showcasing local ingredients is done through seasonal berries and herbs, providing a noticeably fresh aroma and taste for cocktails. From the vivid red strawberries that signal the approach of sunnier days and the duskyorange apricots that are rich-picking throughout the summer, through to early Autumn’s harvest of luscious figs and blackberries. It is safe to say that the opportunities we have with local produce here in the UK are endless.

When it comes to British fruits, don’t just go for the headline acts, there’s a huge array on offer, many of which are criminally underrated. Gooseberries, blackcurrants and redcurrants are abundant and should be celebrated in the drinks that we make. As a child, I loved the fresh, home grown fruit and vegetables my mum would grow in her garden, to me the first home grown peas would be the indicator that summer is coming. But with this tasty flavour, also comes the issue of shelf life. When fruits are softening and starting to go brown FEAR NOT – simply make a shrub. Shrub syrups are traditional English drinks that are enjoying a bit of a revival. Originally a way to preserve and enjoy ripe fruit, the standard recipe muddles together equal parts of fruit, sugar and vinegar to create a thick syrup that can be diluted with still or sparkling water or even better… as an addition to your cocktail. See my recipe for a twist on a Gimlet using a sugar snap pea shrub on page 11, a nod to my lovely mum’s allotment and to me the true taste of spring!

ANNIE INGRAM GRADUATE BRAND AMBASSADOR — PLYMOUTH GIN @plymouth_bauk

FEAR NOT SIMPLY MAKE A SHRUB 4


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ARTMATUM

THE VOTES ARE IN! They have been counted and recounted, the nation waits with baited breath. And the ingredient of 2019 according to the BEAT is – TIMUT PEPPER!

You may know it as Timur, Nepalese pepper, or perhaps its botanical name, Zanthoxylum Artmatum – it is a marvellously characterful spice bursting with grapefruit and citrus aromas. With Timut also possessing a distinct numbing effect on the tongue and lips, it is a highly sensory ingredient. As a cousin of the Szechuan, it still holds its cold, spicy nature well in drinks, boosting their appeal on multiple levels. Because of its bold and powerful qualities, it can work well being added into the mixture after crushing, extracting the aroma by maceration and using in an atomizer, or using it to create flavourful syrups or cordials. Below is one of Monkey Jack’s creations, but let us know how you’re giving your cocktails that Nepalese edge by tagging @PRUKBEAT ! SPECS: 8 Timut peppercorns 2 Dashes Absinthe 1 Spoon Agave syrup 2.5ml Pedro Ximinez 15ml Peach liqueur 20ml Lemon juice 40ml Beefeater 24 Muddle peppercorns in shaker, add remaining ingredients and shake thoroughly. Fine strain into a coupette and garnish with a grapefruit twist.

JACK TREWHELLA BRAND AMBASSADOR — MONKEY 47 @monkey_jack_47

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DEEP IN THE VALLEY

Ingredients 50ml CEDER’S Classic 40ml Red grape juice 15ml Orange juice 8 Droplets tonka bean Non-alcoholic bitters Method Build in glass over cubed ice and stir gently to chill. Garnish with a thick orange twist.

CULTURAL SHIFT TOWARDS MINDFUL WELLNESS

CEDERBERG BREW

Ingredients 50ml CEDER’S Crisp 25ml Jasmine tea (cold) 10ml Elderflower cordial 10ml Lime juice Method Shake all ingredients over cubed ice and fine strain into a chilled coupette. Garnish with a lemon twist.

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he rise of non-alcoholic spirits, cocktails, premium soft drinks and a number of alcoholfree fermented libations isn’t representative of a trend in the drinks world. This is a cultural movement people. And that’s not to mention the boom in lower-abv cocktails and spritzes being served over British bars by the bucket-load. You know when there is not only one, but a variety of non-alcoholic sparkling wines on the shelf of your local budget supermarket that something is up – or when your mother-in-law requests a bottle of Lillet Rose for the Christmas brunch tipple, a woman who thought cognac was a type of gin. Whether or not you’ve, personally, embraced this cultural shift towards mindful wellness – if you work in the drinks trade then you’ll need to embrace it in some shape or form. People in their late teens and twenties are not as interested in consuming copious amounts of alcohol like the generations before them. Swathes of regular drinkers are moderating themselves more often, and those that never partook in the water of life are demanding to be represented in the mainstream. Where does that leave the drinks industry? In the same position as always – evolve, innovate and create. At the root of everyone’s job in the drinks industry is to give the people what they want, however that manifests. When they wanted a tiny umbrella to shield their disco-drink from the blinding rays of the mid-afternoon sun in Wandsworth we gave it to them. When they started to prefer the heavily-iced and lightly perfumed Aperol-spritz as respite to the near-unbearable heat of the British Summer Time, we gave it to them. Last week I was asked to host a masterclass for a group of members at Hospital Club – an event for CEDER’S – a non-alcoholic distilled spirit. I have hosted masterclasses for nearly a decade, often involving the making of soft-cocktails as a way to moderate the event and save money by lowering the quantities of broken glassware. Never before had I run one where alcohol was not present at all. Naturally, I gave the people what they wanted.

The outcome was extremely interesting – not only was it fully booked, but if I’d walked in as an outsider I wouldn’t have noticed a difference. It bore all the hallmarks of a cocktailmaking masterclass for consumers: unacquainted couples made friends, the volume of the guests was difficult to control, I had an abundance of vocal help from my self-appointed assistant whose hobby was cocktails and spirits – someone even managed to slice their finger open on a peeler. Ultimately it was so similar because the people got what they wanted. They wanted good flavours, to experiment, and to have a positive and engaging experience – regardless of alcohol content. And so bartenders find themselves in an honoured role oncemore, because this can be translated to the buying of a non-alcoholic cocktail – because is this not what everyone wants when they visit a cocktail bar? Flavours, experimentation and an experience. Therefore, enthusiastic bartenders are being tasked with their favourite pastime: coming up with something that tastes great, and in this case with the fortunate addition of creating a neutral playing field for all guests – whether they want something strong, with a much lower alcohol content, or simply none at all. My experience has been extremely positive. When creating a menu for CEDER’S, I found that it required me to pull out all the stops when it came to my creativity. CEDER’S shares a few similarities with gin – it is produced using the same methods, macerating a neutral spirit with juniper and other botanicals and re-distilling it to capture flavours, but the abv is taken down to a negligible <0.5%. As such, it belongs with nuanced ingredients that won’t overpower, but will highlight or work in harmony. With bartenders relishing this opportunity to flex their skills with a new challenge we are finding an array of styles coming to the fore – with some drinks mimicking that of classic cocktails, others involving more artisanal techniques such as homemade flavoured waters, shrubs, cordials and fermented kombuchastyle additives; others choose to focus on premiumisation of their mixers and garnishes to deliver premium long mixed drinks.

So moving forward, let’s forget the word Mocktail. Let’s shed it from our collective and shady drinks vernacular. With more and more no and low products becoming available and more popular, we have even more at our disposal to create future classics. What’s more, the need to give more space on the back bar to them – and possibly the speed rail – will become more pertinent. But with more products comes more innovation and creativity. What a wonderful time to be alive. I’d love to hear about your CEDER’S creations and how you’ve been utilising it in drinks! Get in touch or tag me on Instagram on the addresses below. Happy experimenting!

JACK TREWHELLA BRAND AMBASSADOR — MONKEY 47 @monkey_jack_47


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he Liverpool bar scene in recent years has grown from strength to strength and has developed its own unique hospitality style. Liverpool has a mix of late night party venues for when you want to turn your night up to 11 but also has plenty of chilled venues during the day for those laptop sessions with a tasty coffee. I have selected a couple of bars and their cocktails to highlight the mixture of Liverpool must see institutions and new venues with their unique style.

JOE WILD BRAND AMBASSADOR — HOUSE OF TEQUILA @wild5507

BERRY & RYE With an entrance that suggests you might be doing something illegal, inside Berry & Rye fills the soul with a concoction of Whiskey, Blues, Gin, and Jazz. Berry & Rye has become a Liverpool institution with its focus on hospitality and incredible cocktails. The Merchant 30ml Martel VS 20ml El Dorado 15 10ml Ruby port 5ml Demerara syrup 2 Dashes of Angostura

FILTER + FOX Filter + Fox is a collaboration between long-time friends, inspired by years spent in the hospitality industry with an uncompromising dedication to coffee, wine and cocktails. Filter + Fox is a great hang-out spot during the day but changes up the vibe in the evenings to bring an awesome friendly destination spot. Eucalyptus Cordial 50ml Altos Tequila 25ml Eucalyptus cordial 2 Dashes of Cardamom bitters

Method Stirred down, double rocks, ice block, orange twist.

Method Shaken and strained in a Nick & Nora garnish with eucalyptus leaf.

FURNIVAL’S WELL This old Victorian jail which was established in the late 19th century is a venue that is steeped in history. A fun fact about this venue is that Charles Dickens stayed there to carry out research for his first published novel, The Uncommercial Traveller. Cosy, intriguing and immersive are words that come to mind for this spot. This is a must visit gem within the City of Liverpool.

SOME PLACE Some would say if you follow the hazy green light you will be rewarded, and this place doesn’t disappoint. This spot is famous for its Absinthe and possesses a seriously unique character. If you are looking for somewhere quirky, head to Some Place, it won’t disappoint.

De La Rue 40ml Beefeater Gin 10ml Giffard Apricot 10ml Orgeat 25ml Lemon 10ml Gomme 1 dash Peychands

DOCKLEAF Set in the filtration room of the Old Cains Brewery. Yes, I know, it already sounds cool! This place is steeped in history and without a doubt has one of the best Irish Whiskey collections in the entirety of Liverpool. Set over two floors with an amazing roof terrace, this place has a certain tranquillity to it. No matter what time of the day you enter, this place will offer a warm atmosphere to house yourself for an hour or evening. The Canary 15ml Beefeater 15ml Lillet Blanc 15ml Limoncello 15ml Lemon juice Top with Pineapple juice Method Highball glass, build, stir garnish with 1 lemon wheel, 1 sage leaf (clapped for aroma).

Watermelon Spritz 30ml Lillet Rose 20ml Pernod Absinthe 20ml Cranberry juice 50ml Watermelon juice 15ml Gomme 15ml Lime juice Method Build in wine glass, cubed ice, top with tonic garnish with mint and watermelon.

Method Shake and strain over cubed ice. Top with soda and garnish with a lemon slice and mint sprig.

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SPIRITS OF SUMMER FRUITY, FRESH, DAYTIME & CRISP OR LATE NIGHT & INDULGENTâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

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SWEDISH PALOMA

GALA PORNSTAR MARTINI

SUMMER FIELD TRIP

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Absolut Grapefruit

40ml Absolut

35ml Absolut Grapefruit

45ml Pink grapefruit juice

10ml Suze

15ml China Nardini

10ml Lime juice

10ml Passion fruit syrup

15ml Sugar syrup

2 Dashes black pepper tincture

2 drops Vanilla bitters

Fresh cucumber slices

Sugar rim

2 drops Saline solution

Grapefruit chunks

Top soda

Muddle fresh gala melon

Rosemary branch

METHOD:

Long lemon twist

METHOD:

Shake, strain into highball,

METHOD:

Build in kilner jar with cubed ice

top with soda.

Muddle melon, add all other ingredients

and add splash of tonic.

and shake hard. Serve in a coupette with a shot of champagne on the side.

STRAWBERRY BANANA RAMOS INGREDIENTS: 50ml Absolut Juice Strawberry 10ml Giffard Banane du Bresil  25ml Lemon juice  25ml Double cream 10ml Sugar syrup

WHITE HARBOUR INGREDIENTS: 30ml Absolut Pear 25ml White port 2 Mint leaves 2 Verbena leaves 5ml Sugar syrup

Egg white

STRAWBERRY DOG

METHOD:

INGREDIENTS:

with soda in a highball.

50ml Pink grapefruit juice 35ml Cranberry juice

Top tonic

5ml Strawberry syrup

METHOD:

1/2 Strawberry

Build over cubed ice.

Dry shake and then top

50ml Absolut Juice Strawberry

Salt rim

METHOD: Shake and strain into a chilled coupette.

LILLET FROSÉ

FLEUR DE LILLET

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Lillet Rosé

50ml Lillet Rosé

100ml Jacobs Creek Le Petit Rosé

10ml Elderflower cordial,

35ml Sugar syrup

75ml Premium tonic water

7.5ml Suze 5 Raspberries METHOD:

METHOD: Garnish with a lime wheel or any seasonal fruit of your choice.

THE SCOTCHMO

Pour all your ingredients into a blender,

INGREDIENTS:

add 8 cubed ice, blend for 15 seconds

40ml The Glenlivet Founder’s Reserve

Pour in a large wine glass. Garnish

20ml Grand Marnier

with a sprig of mint and a raspberry.

15ml Lime juice 10ml Cranberry juice 5ml Sugar syrup METHOD: Shake and double strain into a martini glass and garnish with a lime wedge slàinte mhath!

LILLET SUMMER SPRITZ INGREDIENTS: 50ml Passion fruit infused Lillet Blanc 5ml Peach liqueur 5ml Suze 50ml Royal Flush Kombucha METHOD: Build the first 3 ingredients with cubed ice in a wine glass and stir. Top up with 50ml of Royal Flush Kombucha, garnish with a slice of canteloupe melon. Passion fruit infused Lillet Blanc: Infuse the flesh of 3 passion fruits in one bottle of Lillet blanc for 8 hours then strain

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with a coffee filter, store in the fridge.

JOSIE COLLINS INGREDIENTS: 50ml The Glenlivet Founder’s Reserve 20ml Lemon juice 10ml Sugar syrup 15ml Peach puree Soda water METHOD: Shake and strain into a highball glass filled with ice and top with soda water and garnish with a lemon twist and two raspberries slàinte mhath!


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RHUBARB GIMLET INGREDIENTS:

RASPBERRY & ELDERFLOWER COLLINS

50ml Plymouth Gin

INGREDIENTS:

20ml Lime juice

50ml Plymouth Gin

BOTANICAL SPRITZ

CEDER’S COLLINS

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

60ml CEDER’S Classic

50ml CEDER’S Crisp

15ml Citric acid syrup

10ml Lime juice

Fever Tree Elderflower tonic

Tonic water

10ml Elderfower cordial

Mint

METHOD:

METHOD:

Build in a elegant glass with cubed

25ml Rhubarb cordial

20ml Lemon juice

METHOD:

10ml Sugar syrup

Add all ingredients in to a shaker. Shake with ice and fine strain into a chilled glass.

4 Fresh raspberries

Muddle the raspberries and sugar syrup together in the bottom of a shaker.

5 Drops Rosemary Non-Alcoholic Bitters Top with Soda water

ice. Garnish with a lemon wheel

METHOD:

and rosemary sprig.

Build in high-ball glass with cubed ice stirring gently to combine. Garnish

Add Plymouth Gin and lemon juice,

with rosemary and mint sprigs.

shake with ice. Fine strain into a high ball glass, fill with ice and top with elderflower tonic. Garnish with mint sprig and fresh raspberry.

PEAS CAN I HAVE SOME MORE INGREDIENTS: 50ml Plymouth Gin 20ml Fresh lime juice 20ml Sugar snap pea shrub Dash Celery bitters 3 Mint leaves

PASSION FRUIT CUP SPRITZ INGREDIENTS: 50ml Fruit Cup 25ml Fresh lemon juice 12.5ml Monin passionfruit syrup Soda Prosecco METHOD: Add the Fruit Cup, passionfruit syrup and lemon juice to a shaker and shake with ice. Strain over ice into a wine/spritz glass and top with half soda and half prosecco. Garnish with a mint sprig and a lemon twist.

SLOE BEES KNEES

VALLEY CUPPA

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

15ml Plymouth Gin

60ml CEDER’S Wild

15ml Plymouth Sloe

15ml Cold jasmine tea

15ml Lemon

10ml Earl grey tea syrup

20ml Honey syrup

10ml Lemon juice

250g sugar

METHOD:

METHOD:

250ml Apple cider vinegar

Shake with ice and

Shake briefly and fine strain into a small,

top with champagne.

chilled coupette. Garnish by floating

METHOD: Add all ingredients to a shaker. Shake with ice and fine strain into a chilled glass. Garnish with sugar snap. SUGAR SNAP PEA SHRUB: 250g sugar snap peas,

METHOD:

an edible flower on the surface of the drink.

Finely slice sugar snap peas and combine in mason jar with other ingredients. Tightly seal and leave for 24 hours. Strain and bottle (keep in fridge for two weeks).

HOTEL NACIONAL INGREDIENTS:

FROZEN DAIQUIRI (SLUSHIE MACHINE)

50ml Havana Club 3YO

INGREDIENTS:

CANCHA

25ml Pineapple juice

5ltr Havana 3YO

10ml Fresh lime juice

5ltr Water

INGREDIENTS:

15ml Apricot liqueur

3ltr Rich sugar syrup (2:1 sugar:water)

50ml Havana Club 7YO

Barspoon sugar syrup (2:1 sugar:hot water)

2ltr Fresh lime juice

50ml Chilled soda water

Angostura bitters

10ml Fresh lime juice

METHOD:

20ml Honey syrup (1:1 hot water:clear honey)

METHOD: Allow enough time (usually 3 hours) before

Add all the ingredients (except the bitters)

you need to serve this. Obviously the water

METHOD:

to the shaker and shake with ice. Strain into

freezes and provides suitable dilution.

Build rum, juice and syrup in the serving glass,

a chilled martini glass, dash of angostura.

stir add large fresh cubed ice and top with chilled soda. Garnish with fresh sliced wheel of lime inside the drink on top of the ice.

GRIND MASTER FLASH

AIRMAIL

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

25ml Havana Club 7YO

25ml Havana 3YO

30ml Kahlua

15ml Fresh lime juice

30ml Porter Beer

15ml Honey syrup (1:1 honey:hot water)

30ml Espresso

GH Mumm Champagne

10ml Sugar syrup

METHOD:

METHOD:

Shake the first 3 ingredients, strain

Shake all the ingredients and serve

into a Champagne flute, top with

straight up in a martini glass.

chilled Champagne.

RUM & COLA INGREDIENTS: 25ml Havana 7YO 100ml Chilled GH Mumm Champagne 20ml Cola syrup 5ml Fernet Branca Dash of Angostura METHOD: Build the Rum, syrup, Fernet Branca & bitters in a glass. Add a large clear block of ice, top with Champagne. Twist of lemon garnish.

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HOMEMADE DESPARADO

FIELD NOTES

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

25ml Altos Blanco

35ml Altos Plata

15ml Lime juice

15ml Kamm & Sons

10ml Agave

25ml Grapefruit juice

300ml Top with Pilsner

20ml Lime juice 10ml Agave

METHOD:

2 Slices cucumber

Shake & strain into coupette.

1 Pinch rocket METHOD: Build in tin, fine strain into double rocks, garnish with cucumber ribbon.

BRAZILIAN BROWN COUPETTE INGREDIENTS: 30ml Altos Tequila 20ml Lime juice 15ml Hibiscus syrup Top with prosecco Garnish with hibiscus flower METHOD: Shake and fine strain into coupe, top with Prosecco.

THE HERNANDEZ

SAO PAULO SUN RISER

MEXICAN SUMMER PUNCH

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

45ml Altos Plata

35ml Altos Plata

40ml Altos Plata

10ml Maraschino Liquer

25ml Aperol

40ml Pineapple

40ml Pineapple juice

50ml Pineapple

50ml Ginger ale

20ml Lime juice

25ml Lime

20ml Lillet Rosé

10ml Agave

15ml Sugar

6 Mint leaves

1 Dash of rose water

1/2 Passion fruit

2 Raspberry

METHOD:

METHOD:

Shake and fine strain into coupette,

Shake and strain into highball -

garnish with raspberry dust.

garnish with half a passionfruit.

2 Whole strawberrys halved Strawberry syrup 2 Orange slices METHOD: Build in glass, add cubed ice, churn with bar spoon.

CLASSIC SYMPHONY INGREDIENTS: 50ml Martell Blue Swift 5ml Sugar syrup 1 Dash orange bitters 3 Dashes Peychaud’s bitters 1 Lemon zest 3 to 4 Mint leaves 2 Dashes Pernod Absinthe METHOD: In a mixing glass, stir first 6 ingredients together with ice cubes and strain into chilled Absinthe rinsed rocks glass.

PUNCH O’CLOCK

SWIFT SIDECAR

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

35ml Martell Blue Swift

50ml Martell Blue Swift

15ml Lillet Blanc

20ml Lemon juice

25ml Lemon juice

15ml Sugar syrup

10ml Sugar syrup

Egg white

50ml Thé vert du Hammam

METHOD:

METHOD:

Blend with cubed ice and pour into a chilled

Stir with ice and strain into chilled

coupette. Garnish with a lemon zest.

Nick & Nora. Garnish with an orange slice and a cherry.

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GENTLEMEN’S COMPANION

SUMMER IN COGNAC

FLYING CHAPMAN

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

35ml Martell Blue Swift

50ml Martell Blue Swift

50ml Blue Swift

15ml LBV Port

15ml Lime juice

25ml Blackcurrant Ribena

20ml Lemon juice

25ml Mango puree

15ml Sugar syrup

15ml Sugar syrup

5ml Sugar syrup

50ml Orangina

75ml Earl Grey tea

Ginger ale top

Optional: 2 dashes Angostura bitters

METHOD:

METHOD:

Stir and strain over ice in a wine glass.

Build up first 4 ingredients with cubed ice

METHOD:

Garnish with a slice of orange.

in a highball glass. Top up with soda water

Build up first 5 ingredients with cubed ice

and garnish with a lime wedge.

in a highball and stir. Top up with soda water

Top up Soda water

and garnish with seasonal fruits.


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BIG STONE

CLOVER

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

40ml Jameson Caskmates Stout Edition

50ml Jameson Original

10ml Crème de cacao

25ml Apple juice

5ml Orgeat syrup

15ml 2:1 Honey syrup 3 Basil leaves

METHOD:

SELLSWORD

Build on the rocks, can be stirred or

METHOD:

batch made. Garnish with lemon zest.

Build on the rocks, shaken and fine strained.

INGREDIENTS:

Garnish with a basil leaf.

25ml Jameson Caskmates IPA Edition 10ml Dry curacao 5ml Grapefruit Oleo Saccharum Top four pure easy peeler METHOD: Build in a tankard glass, blended over crushed ice with a grapefruit zest garnish.

BATTALION INGREDIENTS: 40ml Jameson Caskmates IPA Edition 10ml Dry curacao 5ml Ancho Reyes Verde 20ml Lime juice 5ml Gomme METHOD: Build in a coupette, shake and fine strained. Garnish with a dehydrated lime wheel.

COOPERS HANDLE

PHOENIX PARK

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

60ml Jameson Black Barrel

50ml Jameson Black Barrel

10ml 7 second syrup

10ml Maraschino

3 Dashes Saline solution

2 Dash Orange bitters 2 Dash Peychaud’s bitters

METHOD: Build on the rocks with a dehydrated orange

METHOD:

wheel garnish. Can be stirred or batch made.

Build in a Nick & Nora, can be stirred or batch made. Garnish with orange zest.

SOLERA-NARA

PATIO IN JULY

THE VOILIER

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Chivas Regal Mizunara

35ml Chivas Mizunara

35ml Chivas Extra

10ml Fino sherry

70ml Peach & chamomile tea

20ml Campari

5ml Simple syrup

40ml Soda water

10ml Lime juice

METHOD:

METHOD:

Stir down ingredients in a mixing glass.

Build in glass with tall ice block.

Serve in a chilled martini glass.

Garnish with peach wedge.

25ml Simple syrup 50ml Cranberry juice METHOD: Shake over ice and double strain into a chilled coupette. Garnish with a lemon peel then discard.

CHERRY BLOOM INGREDIENTS: 40ml Chivas Mizunara 3 Dashes cherry bitters 100ml Soda water top METHOD: Build in glass with ice. Stir. Garnish with grapefruit slice and rosemary sprig.

INTO THE WILD LE BON TEMP ROULE

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

5ml Martini Rosso Vermouth

30ml Chivas 18

5ml Oloroso sherry

20ml Martell Cordon Bleu

10ml Water

20ml Antica Formula 5ml Benedictine 2 Dashes Peychaud bitters 2 Dashes Angostura bitters

50ml Chivas Regal Extra

METHOD: Pour all ingredients into a hipflask. Serve at room temperature or stir down with ice if preferred chilled.

METHOD: Shake and strain into cocktail glass.

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KING LOUIE INGREDIENTS: 50ml Monkey 47 Sloe Gin 15ml Pink grapefruit liqueur 60ml Freshly-squeezed orange juice 15ml Fresh lime juice 5ml Gomme METHOD: Shake and strain into a high-ball glass filled with cubed ice. Garnish with an orange halfmoon sprinkled with spices and demerara sugar - lightly caramelise with a chef’s torch.

FOOLISH MONKEY

BIJOU COCKTAIL

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Monkey 47 Sloe Gin

25ml Monkey 47 Dry Gin

20ml Velvet Falernum

20ml Green Chartreuse

20ml Noilly Prat

20ml Rosso vermouth

15ml Fresh lemon juice

1 Dash Orange bitters

3 Fresh gooseberries

METHOD:

METHOD:

Stir thoroughly in a mixing glass

Muddle the gooseberries in the base

and strain into a chilled coupette.

of shaker - add remaining ingredients

Garnish with an orange twist.

and shake thoroughly. Fine strain into a large, chilled coupette. Garnish with gooseberries and a lemon twist.

BLACK FOREST BREAKFAST INGREDIENTS: 50ml Monkey 47 Dry Gin 20ml Lillet Rose 25ml Cloudy apple juice

LANKY PANKY

THE FARMER’S APPROVAL

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

(20ml Egg white optional)

35ml Monkey 47 Dry

35ml Monkey 47 Dry Gin

35ml Extra-dry vermouth

20ml Extra-dry vermouth

METHOD:

30ml Cloudy apple juice

15ml Chambord

Shake and fine strain into a tumbler filled

2 Dashes Fernet Branca

5ml Suze

15ml Fresh lemon juice 10ml Lavender syrup 1 Barspoon Lingonberry jam

with cubed ice. Garnish with lavender.

METHOD:

5 Drops Lavender bitters

Stir down in a mixing glass and strain

METHOD:

into a large, chilled coupette glass.

Stir down and strain into a tumbler filled with

Garnish with an orange twist.

cubed ice. Garnish with grapes and berries.

RAVEN MASTER INGREDIENTS:

BLOOD ORANGE SPRITZ

50ml Beefeater 24

INGREDIENTS:

ROSY POSEY COLLINS

150ml Ginger ale

40ml Beefeater Blood Orange

10ml Campari

INGREDIENTS:

20ml Lillet Rosé

Garnish with grapefruit slice

5ml Maraschino liqueur

METHOD:

5ml Green olive brine

50ml Beefeater Pink 25ml Aperitivo of Flynn Rosato 20ml Lemon juice 5ml Belvoir elderflower and rose cordial

100ml Fever Tree Mediterranean Tonic Water

Build gin and ginger ale, float Campari on top (as with a bramble).

METHOD: Build in a wine glass over cubed ice.

Soda top

Garnish with a green olive.

METHOD: Either build in highball glass, and then add soda. Or combine ingredients in a shaker, strain into highball and then add soda top.

ORANGE BASIL SMASH

CAT’S WHISKERS

PINKY PANKY

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Beefeater Blood Orange

50ml Beefeater

40ml Beefeater Pink

10ml Suze

20ml Cointreau

2ml Fernet Branca

20ml Lemon juice

20ml Lemon sherbet syrup

15ml Sweet Vermouth

5ml Orange juice

5ml Lillet Blanc

20ml Sugar syrup

2 Drops Angostura Bitters

2 Basil leaves

Garnish with an orange twist.

METHOD:

METHOD:

Build in a rock glass over crushed ice and

To make Lemon Sherbet syrup, 1:1 ratio of

churn with a spoon. Garnish with an orange

sherbet and water; add the sherbet to boiling

slice and a basil sprig.

water, stir until dissolved and leave to cool. Once syrup is ready, combine all ingredients

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and shake over ice and fine strain.

METHOD: Add to mixing glass. Stir to required dilution and strain into Nick & Nora glass.


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YELLOW FOR BREAKFAST INGREDIENTS: 50ml Ungava 5ml Kahlua 25ml Lemon juice 25ml Egg white 1 Spoon of Maple syrup 1 Heaped barspoon Orange marmalade 2 Dashes Angostura bitters METHOD: Shake and double strain into rocks glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

BACK TO QUEBEC INGREDIENTS: 35ml Ungava

TRUDEAU’S LAST WORD

20ml Dry vermouth 15ml Yellow Chartreuese 7.5ml Lavender syrup

INGREDIENTS:

METHOD:

35ml Ungava

Build in tumbler with cubed ice.

15ml Green Chartreuse

Stir thoroughly in glass, topping up

15ml Maraschino liqueur

ice throughout. Garnish with a lemon

15ml Lime juice

wheel and a lavender stalk.

10ml Water METHOD: Shake and fine strain into a chilled coupette. Garnish with a lime twist.

YELLOW IS THE NEW ORANGE

CANADIAN VICE

CANADIAN RIVIERA

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Ungava

35ml Ungava

35ml Ungava

20ml Rosso vermouth

15ml Luxardo limoncello

15ml Crème de peche

5ml Orgeat

15ml Lemon juice

20ml Lemon juice

2 Dashes Orange bitters

3 Dashes Peach bitters

10ml Melon syrup

METHOD:

2 Dashes Orange bitters

Top with ginger ale

Stir thoroughly in mixing glass

METHOD:

METHOD:

and strain into a chilled coupette.

Build in high-ball with cubed

Shake and strain into a tumbler

Garnish with a pineapple wedge.

ice. Garnish with lemon wheel

filled with cubed ice. Garnish with

and a pineapple leaf.

an orange wheel.

SMOKEY SWEDE INGREDIENTS: 40ml Mezcal Del Maguey Vida 42% 10ml Fino sherry 10ml Suedois Dolin 1 Dash Peychaud’s bitters METHOD: Stir all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice, strain into cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange zest.

CASA AZUL INGREDIENTS: 50ml Mezcal Del Maguey Vida 42% 25ml Freshly squeezed lime juice 12.5ml Blue Curaçao 5ml Sugar syrup METHOD: Shaken with ice, strain into cocktail glass or over ice in a rocks glass. Garnish with an edible purple flower (or any colour flower).

MADAME MAYAHUEL INGREDIENTS: 40 ml Mezcal Del Maguey Vida 42% 15 ml Cynar 15 ml Amontillado Sherry 5ml Joseph Cartron Liqueur de Violette METHOD: Stir all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice, strain into cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon zest.

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THE ULTIMATE GUIDE

he art of food and drink matching goes well beyond the traditional wine with a meal combo at the dinner table. Having a well thought through bar snacks menu is equally important as your drinks list itself. Indeed, 21st century out-goers no longer visit a bar to simply enjoy a drink. They relish having an Experience with a capital E. And every little detail has its importance, from the lighting to the tunes, from the greetings to the smiles to… you guessed it, the tasty nibbles that will harmoniously accompany your well-crafted beverage. I have asked my social network what their favourite snack and cocktail pairing was, and the answers are very interesting, yet quite baffling at times. While one may have expected to read five different sorts of chips (crisps for Brexiteers!), crackers and olive varieties, oysters seem to be ranking top among spirit drinkers and cocktail lovers alike. I mean, whether you like Mezcal over Tequila, your Martini dry with an olive or wet with a twist, your Bloody Mary with Vodka or Gin, you can’t really say no to an oyster on the side…! Can you? There is something about that little ocean taste that activates your senses and makes for an orgasmic drinking moment. Sigh… Cheese tends to be well appreciated too and has the favour of those with a soft spot for dark spirit cocktails such as the Manhattan or the Old-Fashioned - except perhaps when Cuba is calling, a Havana Club Daiquiri and Cuban sandwich are unmissable! A personal favourite pairing of mine (which came out of our Food Glorious Food project) is a Havana Club 7 red grape Old-Fashioned and parmesan cheese. Such a delight!

Ultimately, the idea remains about food enhancing the drinks and vice versa. Here are a few examples of pairing from my Facebook study worth mentioning: Saltiness: Edamame and Penicillin; Frites (should you like ‘em extra salty) and Champagne; with an honorary mention to the good old Ricard and peanuts - I shall leave it out there. Fattiness/Oiliness: Saucisson and jalapeño Mezcal Sour; Cured meat and Negroni; Pork scratchings and Martini; Prawn tacos and Tequila Corpse Reviver #2; Salmon Maki and Sidecar. Acidity: Frites (should you like ’em with a touch of vinegar) and Champagne; Ceviche and Michelada. Sweetness: Macarons and Cognac, a.k.a. the infamous Martell Gourmand. Food for (drinking) thought… Santé now!

MATTHIAS LATALLE SENIOR BRAND AMBASSADOR — MARTELL @sanmatthias


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THE COMMANDMENTS OF WRITING A COCKTAIL BOOK Nurture the idea of being an author (not for too long though), get excited and get on with it.

Set a deadline for yourself and work backward with a clear plan of actions. Otherwise it will take forever!

Visit book stores and pick a bunch of items you like for whatever reasons.

Finalise all recipes and content. This is the most daunting part of the work, you’ll find it very rewarding to do a little bit every day.

Visualise your finished product and create a mood board, it will come in handy.

If you are involving contributors, be prepared to chase them up.

NB -all of these lessons have been learnt first-hand by the author of this piece Matthias Lataille during the writing of his book, “The Cognac Lover’s Guide to Classic Cocktails” if you are keen to have a look at this book, as an online e-book, please visit his Instagram page and click on the link in bio @sanmatthias.

Define the format and the content (intro, number of cocktails/pages, images and photos, etc...) - Be as clear and precise as you possibly can as this will have a great impact on costs down the line.

Share your project with design agencies early, they can start working alongside you.

Proofread, proofread, proofread…

Well done, you are now an author. Celebrate accordingly! 17


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OF FERMENTATION t’s that time of the year again: I’m writing an article for the BEAT magazine. Whilst picking a subject, a daunting task at first, I happened to discuss fermentation with my flatmate. I soon decided there’d be no better topic to explore, thanks to the almost cultish obsession it’s attracted in the food and drink world of late (kombucha, we’re looking at you). With this small article I hope to ignite your future passion for fermentation. What is Fermentation? Fermentation is fundamentally a transformation that happens in food actuated by microorganisms, be they bacteria, yeasts or mould. If you are a scientist, you would say that it is the process by which a microorganism converts sugar into another substance in the absence of oxygen. Seems straightforward right? Well, there’s a bit of a distinction to be made: fermentation can be primary or secondary. The primary fermentation begins when the microorganisms are introduced into a cool aerated solution. The microorganism then quickly utilises the available oxygen to produce compounds vital to culture expansion. When the oxygen is gone, the microorganisms switch to the anaerobic phase where most of the sugars in the solution are reduced to ethanol and CO2. The secondary fermentation is a process that starts after the first one takes place and takes advantage of the enzymes produced during the primary fermentation process. Secondary fermentation can be used amongst other things to clarify or to add additional flavours.

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What is good about it? Let’s start from the very beginning: what makes us like certain things and dislike others? Taste. Our senses of smell and taste have been with us for millions of years, and allows us to sense when something is ripe and ready to eat or when something else is potentially dangerous for us. As human beings we possess an innate aversion to certain things such as rotting flesh (indicating the presence of pathogenic bacteria) whilst -the carnivores among us- would register the scent of roasting meat as delicious (our brain knows we are about to eat something rich in protein). Fermentation is the sum of lots of processes at work, but the ones that we care about the most with taste in mind are those that break down large molecules into their parts. Starch and proteins are formed into long chains that can be broken down into simple sugar (glucose) or amino acids. Of these amino acids, one is the rock star that excites our senses: Glutamic acid. Glutamic acid is responsible for what our taste buds register as umami. Yes, you heard me. The mystical umami flavour is what makes meat, soy sauce, mushroom and cheese so delicious. Here is why then fermentation is so good. Whilst still in their large chain shape, starch and protein molecules are too large to be registered as sweet or umami. Once broken-down through fermentation our body can readily accept and recognise how delicious they are. It’s that simple!

BIG PROTAGONISTS OF FERMENTATION Bacteria: Bacteria are single celled organisms, present everywhere. We don’t even know all of them! Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are present on the skins of fruits, vegetables and human beings. They convert sugar into lactic acid, giving fermented products their sourness. They thrive in an anaerobic environment. Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) also present on the surface of many foods and convert alcohol into acetic acid, giving the sharp sourness to vinegar for example. They survive in the presence of oxygen. Enzymes: Enzymes are not alive, they are more like a catalyst for other transformations. They are protein that serve a specific function: they act on specific organic molecules or break down long organic chains into shorter ones. Pro tip: most of them can be recognised as they end with the suffix -ase (e. g glucoamylase) Use this wisely! Fungi: Fungi are everything! They can be moulds, mushrooms and anything in between (including our good friends yeasts). Essentially, they survive by breaking down and digesting the food around them converting it into something else. If you have paid attention that sounds suspiciously like what happens during the initial phases of fermentation in alcohol making.


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THE ROCK STAR THAT EXCITES OUR SENSES:

A MICROORGANISM NOW YOU TRY! CONVERTS SUGAR INTO ANOTHER SUBSTANCE IN THE ABSENCE OF OX YGEN. SEEMS STRAIGHTFORWARD RIGHT ? TEPACHE Try this Tepache recipe, courtesy of the test kitchen of Bon Appetit NYC. Tepache is a fermented pineapple beverage, commonly sold in Mexico.

Ingredients: 1 Pineapple, with skin, top and bottom trimmed, cut into 1" pieces (Keep the skin on!) 1 Cup Turbinado sugar 1 Cup Palm sugar, chopped 3 Tablespoons Whole coriander seeds 1 Tablespoon Grains of paradise 6 Peppercorns 1 Tablespoon Cubeb pepper

Combine pineapple, turbinado sugar, palm sugar, coriander, grains of paradise, peppercorns, cubeb peppers, and 240ml of warm water in a container with a tight-fitting lid. Stir to combine, cover tightly, and set aside in a warm, draft-free area (about 24°C) until sugar is dissolved, mixture is slightly warmer than room temperature, and a little fizzy, 2-3 days. (Check after the

2nd day. If mixture isn’t ready, cover and let ferment another day). Using a slotted spoon, skim the solids from the top of the container and discard. Strain mixture through a cheese-cloth-lined fine-meshed sieve into a jar. Cover and let sit at room temperature overnight, then refrigerate. Pro tip: Always make sure that you sanitise the container you use for fermentation before filling it. Also use fermentation grade glassware, to avoid happy accidents when pressure builds up inside the vessel! For a very refreshing drink mix 50ml of Olmeca Altos Plata and 150ml of Tepache in a highball filled with cubed ice and top it with a splash of lager.

DANIELE UMOETTE SENIOR BRAND AMBASSADOR — ABSOLUT @absolut_dani

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GIN THE DEMONISATION OF “FLAVOURED” GINS, CHANGING TASTES OR TIME TO CHANGE MINDS? his Ginassaince has truly taken hold. Never before have we in the UK seen so many brands, expressions and such a thirst for the juniper tipple. This has issued a complete rebirth of our beloved category, more people are drinking gin than ever, as it passed the £1 billion sales mark last year (up 56%), yet despite all these positive developments, for our industry and for our palates, the grumbling continues... To some, our bursting backbars represent a bastardisation of gin, and what it stands for. To others, these new products, this new choice, is helping to reinvigorate the category, reinvent the classics (see Pinky Panky, page 14), and reduce the restriction the majority of consumers, with only two to three gin options available, faced in the past. There is quite clearly a new category of gin drinker now, but does their engagement, and the choice on offer really constitute a bastardisation, or just a changing landscape and should we be so resistant to change?

BLOOD ORANGE SPRITZ

20

Unlike Whisky, Gin isn’t as strictly regulated, the only definition we have is that it must be bottled at a minimum of 37.5% abv and be predominantly flavoured by juniper.

Here the issue arises; flavour or taste is an inherently subjective and personal thing, it’s also formed through association and memory. If I ask you your favourite drink you’ll most likely end up describing the setting, the music, and your company at the time to bring it alive. Ultimately, we will probably never answer this question of whether berry is better, or citrus superior when it comes to gin flavouring. So why do we fight each other to assert our dominance over personal, individual choice? And what, realistically does that dominance achieve? Can’t we just be happy for the business and excited by the challenge these new expressions will supply us with when making new drinks? (For example, our new Beefeater Blood Orange makes a cracking Basil smash (page 14) because it retains that juniper note but also incorporates the bitter citrus and subtle slightly sweet note of raspberry which is characteristic of the crimson maroon fruit).


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GIN WITHOUT TONIC?

Gin without tonic? In fact, what is it that we really associate with Gin? Despite new flavours the way we drink gin hasn’t really changed. Name me the last time you asked for shot of gin, or sipped it over ice… ? Gin and tonic have been united in a steady marriage for hundreds of years. It’s simple, it’s traditional, it’s delicious, but it is not to everyone’s taste. If you can find me a gin brand whose signature serve isn’t a gin and tonic, then I’ll be very surprised at the divorce of this undeniable pairing. When I run bar trainings I always recommend adding a little water to the spirit, and I pass around juniper berries to show what that pine-y quality actually is. What this does is strip the association of bitter quinine from their minds and often the response is ‘wow I never used to like gin, but I love gin and water’. Gin is as Desmond Payne says, a very sociable drink, it mixes well, with many things, not just tonic. These “flavoured” gins open up the category to a group of people who don’t like the bitterness of quinine and who naturally pair their gin with something else. So surely these new products, which break the mould and challenge tradition actually make accessible a spirit to a palate and section of the market which has hitherto been ignored. Also, let’s not be short-sighted, over time these drinkers may develop their tastes and potentially convert to a drier, more traditional expression (Raven Master, Cat’s whiskers, page 14). Ultimately, as long as we as an industry commit to making “flavoured” gins which hold that all important juniper note, I think we have an exciting opportunity for consumer recruitment.

Like it or love it, if you don’t stock a “flavoured” gin, you’re driving away profit in the mainstream, and intrigue further up (Blood Orange Spritz spritz, page 14). Still unsure? Well why not pick up a bottle of Beefeater Pink, or Blood Orange and test my theory; make a cocktail, add it to your menus, take a photo and tag @prukbeat and @beefeaterkc on instagram. Volume, yes, taste, yes, but there might be a trip to our distillery in it for you if we choose your cocktail. Not a bad deal eh? Ultimately, we should be snobby about the quality of our products and drinks, but not resistant to trends which provide a resurgence to a category. Rather than complain about the choice, make that cocktail, come and visit us in Kennington at the distillery, judge for yourself and together, through a quality focus, let’s get smarter, and stop demonising the “flavoured” gin category.

KATE CAMPBELL GRADUATE BRAND AMBASSADOR — BEEFEATER GIN @beefeaterkc

RAVEN MASTER

LIKE IT OR LOVE IT, IF YOU DON’T STOCK A ‘FLAVOURED’ GIN, YOU ’RE DRIVING AWAY PROFIT IN THE MAINSTREAM, AND INTRIGUE FURTHER UP.

Calling an end to the term “flavoured” gin Lastly, why not question why we call them “flavoured” gins in the first place? Doesn’t this label imply that traditional gins have no flavour? Gin is after all, by its very nature flavoured... with botanicals… Here I think the need to define and categorise divides good examples of “flavoured” gins into one conglomerate of assumed sugary, juniper-lacking spirit; which Beefeater Pink, as Imbibe’s favourite pink gin, most certainly isn’t.

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sk anyone in the know which city is the world capital of cocktail culture/ bars. The answer you’ll get is London or New York. And they would be correct. These two great cities dominate the global landscape and the evidence is there at all the key award shows. Wealth and large populations have certainly contributed to this, plus other factors like history, immigration, tourism, cocktail history/ heritage and the English language. However there is one city which massively has punched above its weight without the key factors of wealth and population. A city which today hosts our greatest global industry gathering, a city which hosts the American Cocktail museum and a city which can boast a huge amount of classic cocktails. That city is New Orleans. Population 393,292.

DEEP SOUTH MEETS FRANCE, MEETS THE CARIBBEAN, MEETS EUROPE.

In this article I’m going to explain how this small Louisiana Port on the Mississippi River came to such prominence in our industry and the history behind some of its cocktails. The City A brief delve into the city’s history and its easy to see how it all evolved. A myriad of factors coming together. A French colony sold to America in 1801, a port city bringing in ingredients and influences from all over America and the world, a night life of equal measures of sophistication and seediness, the music, the restaurants, the 24hr licensing. It really was where the Deep South meets France, meets the Caribbean, meets Europe. Antoine Amede Pechaud – The Sazerac, circa 1830. Our first hat tip should go to this gentleman who created his famous bitters in his French Quarter apothecary in 1830. Legend has it that he mixed the first Sazerac sometime after by rinsing a glass with Absinthe and stirring in cognac, Pechaud bitters and sugar.

22

The history is a bit murky here and maybe it was another French Quarter proprietor Aaron Handy who should get the credit. Either way this great cocktail was born. In the late 1800s the switch was made to rye whiskey, due to the rarity of cognac, thanks to the phylloxera epidemic which devastated the French vineyards. The Vieux Carre – Monteleone Hotel 1938 At this point I’m going to bring another cocktail into the equation, as I think this is one of the great ‘forgotten classics’ which is presently making a big comeback today. It’s a close cousin of the Sazerac and combines both cognac, rye, sweet vermouth, Benedictine, Angostura bitters and Pechaud Bitters. Now look at the influences where France, The American South & the Caribbean have all come together to create this incredible drink. The Ramos Gin Fizz 1888 Created by Henry C Ramos at his French Quarter bar this drink calls for vigorous shaking for 15 minutes to give it the right frothy texture. The drink made with gin, orange flower water, lemon juice, lime juice, egg white, powdered sugar and milk became so popular that Ramos had to employ up to 30 ‘shaker boys’ to keep up with demand for the drink. One famous imbiber was the notorious Louisiana Governor Huey Long, who loved the drink so much that he brought his favourite New Orleans bartender with him on business trips (at taxpayers expense of-course) so he could enjoy it on demand. Legend has it that he built the main highway from the State Capital of Baton Rouge to New Orleans so he could get to his favourite French Quarter bar 40 minutes faster. If you know Louisiana politics then this story is highly believable!

The Hurricane 1940 Possibly the most famous French Quarter bar today is Pat O’Briens. Located on Bourbon Street I highly recommend going there if you’re in town as its great fun with excellent service. It is of-course where the famous Hurricane cocktail was created. However today Pat O’Briens make it with powdered mix and its way too sweet and unbalanced. It was created in 1940 when Pat O’Brien couldn’t get hold of Scotch whisky due to WWII and was forced to buy in large quantities of rum. Stuck with a large excess of this spirit he created this cocktail to shift the stock. If you can find a bartender who knows how to make it properly it really is a great drink. Ironically, even though I lived in New Orleans for 4 years, the best one I’ve ever tried was made at NOLA bar in …London! Don the Beachcomber – Tiki Drinks circa 1930s A little known fact is that the father of Tiki drinks is from New Orleans. The Caribbean / rum influence in the city inspired Don (real name – Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt) to create the Tiki drinks which became world famous. Today New Orleans bartenders are starting to acknowledge their home towns major role in these famous drinks. Check out Latitude 29, Cane & Table and Tiki Tolteca which all pay homage to Don and the New Orleans influence in his life. Brandy Milk Punch When I lived in the city I used to bartend in the Uptown neighbourhood on St Charles Avenue, finishing at 3am I then used to go out and would find myself in all sorts of late night dives like Snake & Jakes and F&Ms. There are many bars that are open 24hrs so hangover cures were very much part of your weekly routine. Some people swear by a Bloody Mary but for me the Brandy Milk Punch was the ultimate. Go to Brennans in the French Quarter, they have perfected this famous drink of cognac, milk, nutmeg, cream and sugar. This combined with their famous Eggs Benedict and you’re suddenly alive again! A little Tales of the Cocktail tip there!


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DRIVE THROUGH DAIQUIRI BARS Absinthe Frappe 1874 The last cocktail I’m going to talk about in detail is the Absinthe Frappe. First created at The Absinthe House on Bourbon Street. This bar still exists today and is definitely worth visiting. Famous customers who loved to imbibe this drink were Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain and the Confederate General Robert E Lee. In 1912 the US Government banned Absinthe because they thought it drove you mad. However the ban was eventually lifted 95 years later and the New Orleans bars had their favourite cocktail ingredient back! The above is just a sample of some of the great drinks that have come out of the city. As you can see the influence its had on our industry. Now I didn’t even mention the Grasshopper, the French 75, The Pimms Cup, The Café Brulot (1890), The Brandy Crusta (1850), The Roffignac (1890), Cocktail a la Louisiane (1937). Some of these forgotten, some still famous but all created and influenced by the Crescent City.

New Orleans is my favourite city in the whole world. It truly is a special place and I highly recommend visiting. Tales of the Cocktail is under new management and I have full confidence this great drinks industry conference is going to go from strength to strength. Between the seminars and the parties try and visit the great historic bars, go on a ghost or voodoo tour, visit St Louis cemetery, take the Streetcar Uptown along St Charles Avenue, take in some jazz at Preservation Hall or go for a walk around The Garden District.

When you truly start to experience the city, then its historic and continuing influence in our imbibing lives just starts to make sense. P.S Did you know that if you gain a bar license in New Orleans it automatically means you can open 24hrs if you want. New Orleans is the only city in America that has drive through daiquiri bars! Yes you read that right, you can pull up in a drive through and order frozen daiquiris to drive away with!

PHIL HUCKLE SENIOR BRAND AMBASSADOR — CHIVAS @chivasphil

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WAIT, DID ANYONE MENTION ...

TWO WEEKS OF SHORTS, PICNICS AND SUNSHINE

othing says having fun with drinks more than perhaps neon signs, blue cocktails, flaring bottles, disco and anything to do with the ‘80’s. Wait, did anyone mention frozen cocktails? Evolving in the 1950’s when the Piña Colada led the way, through to the 1970’s with Margarita’s, now we embrace our modern take on classics. Roll on the summer! Shorts, picnics, sunshine… living in the UK we always look forward to those two weeks of the year when all the pubs are empty, yes empty… everyone is outside! All we want is instant cold refreshment which is delicious and fast! There are two different ways to do this – blend up your cocktail with crushed ice or alternatively batch and chill nicely in a slushy machine. Put simply, made simpler with fresh ingredients and balance – they are utterly delicious, helping to pave the way for a focus on technique, hopefully inspiring our future of classic cocktails. The Artesian bar, once helmed by Alex Kratena and a stellar crew used to escape from the perils of conformity when they served a delicious Piña Colada from a slushy machine, not an expectation from a five star hotel. Awarded the most delicious Cocktail in London at the CLASS Awards 2018, Coupette in East London defined the modern-day interpretation of the Piña Colada with the addition of Champagne. Fun, tasty, clever, elegant and most definitely worth it!

Frozen drinks can either be served churned in a blender with Sorbet/ Ice Cream, churned in a blender with crushed ice or served from a slushy machine. Place all the ingredients in a blender, pulse without ice to blend ingredients, add enough crushed ice to cover the liquid completely then blend until smooth consistency. Celebrating the 200th anniversary of the ‘cradle of the Daiquiri’ in Havana, El Floridita bar brought together the most recognised bartenders in October to enjoy this delicious, simply and perfectly balanced authentic Cuban cocktail. Alejandro Bolivar has been behind the stick for over 25 years and states that they churn out 1,000 Daiquiris 365 days a year. BlackTail bar in New York offers every one of its guests a welcome drink on arrival served from a slushy machine. BlackTail Daiquiri (Frozen) 4.5L Havana Club 3YO 4.5L Water 2.5L Rich sugar syrup (2:1) 2.3L Fresh lime juice Top tips for frozen drinks: Use the finest spirits / fresh ingredients. Clarify juices (extra fine strain).

MAX WARNER BRAND AMBASSADOR HAVANA CLUB ICÓNICA COLLECTION (AVAILABLE FOR HAVANA CLUB 7 ACTIVITY) @therumgentleman

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THE BEAT CONNECTION AMBASSADORS DANIEL I’ANSON Brand Engagement & Advocacy Team Manager daniel.ianson@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7920 786 050 @thepapabeat

PHIL HUCKLE Senior Brand Ambassador, Chivas and Single Malts phil.huckle@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7747 564 355 @chivasphil GEORGINA LEGG Graduate Brand Ambassador, Chivas. Edinburgh georgina.legg@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7770 544 691 @chivasgeorgie SCOTT LEVER Graduate Brand Ambassador, Chivas, London scott.lever@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7747 564 373 @chivasscott KIRSTY THOMSON Graduate Brand Ambassador, Chivas and Single Malts kirsty.g.thomson@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7789 945 863 @kirstytheguardian PAUL NEALON Graduate Brand Ambassador, Chivas and Single Malts. Manchester paul.nealon@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7500 608 098 @chivaspaul

BRANDS

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RONAN COLLINS Senior Brand Ambassador, Jameson ronan.collins@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7468 716 484 @whiskey4breakfast

MATTHIAS LATAILLE Senior Brand Ambassador, Martell matthias.lataille@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7769 915 825 @sanmatthias

DANIELE UMOETTE Senior Brand Ambassador, Absolut daniele.umoette@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7778 533 873 @absolut_dani

JAMIE DWYER Graduate Brand Ambassador, Jameson jamie.dwyer@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7799 648 971 @beat_manchester

JOE WILD Brand Ambassador, House of Tequila joe.wild@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7747 008 947 @wild5507

JACK TREWHELLA Brand Ambassador, Monkey 47 jack.trewhella@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7787 266 937 @monkey_jack_47

HELEN McALEER Graduate Brand Ambassador, Jameson helen.mcaleer@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7768 827 959 @beat_newcastle

MAX WARNER Brand Ambassador Havana Club Icónica Collection (available for Havana Club 7 Activity) max.warner@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7917 072 757 @therumgentleman

DAVID ROBINSON Brand Ambassador, Absolut (North) david.robinson@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7879 803 358 @twoshotsofabsolut

EIMEAR DEANE Graduate Brand Ambassador, Jameson eimear.deane@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7785 344 266 @beat_london ANNA McLAUGHLIN Graduate Brand Ambassador, Jameson anna.mclaughlin@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7825 453 216 @beat_midlands

KATE CAMPBELL Graduate Brand Ambassador, Beefeater kate.a.campbell@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7768 592 149 @beefeaterkc ANNIE INGRAM Graduate Brand Ambassador, Plymouth annie.ingram@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7785 692 747 @plymouthannie


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Volume 3 - Summer 2019 from The BEAT  

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