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COCKTAIL COOL

www.thebeatsociety.com

PRUKBEAT

IN-HOUSE SYRUPS

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The world’s most famous party island certainly wasn’t always like this…

IBIZA: HOW IT ALL BEGAN

SPIRITS OF SUMMER

Everything you need to know about this emerging trend, including the best techniques for producing unique syrup flavours in-house.

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THE BEAT TOUR Find out which cities The BEAT Tour will be hitting up in 2018 and check out what’s on.

Up for a new challenge and a new way of looking at cognac cocktails? Take the Cordon Bleu Challenge!

18 THE CORDON BLEU CHALLENGE

ISSUE: 01 SPRING / SUMMER 2018

BAR__CULTURE__SPIRIT 21

T.F.P.O.T.W The Fantastic Proliferation of Tonic Waters! Eight of our favourites that make or break a G&T.


SINGLE ESTATE COPPER CRAFTED

LUXURY VODKA

@A BSO LUT E LYX


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BEAT____VOLUME 01

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BOLD FLAVOURS AND ELEGANCE IN SIMPLICITY… WHAT WE THINK YOU WILL BE DRINKING THIS SUMMER

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04 In-House Syrups How and Why

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BEAT Geek Interview with Jameson Ambassador Ronan Collins

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Ibiza How it all began

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Spirits of Summer Cocktails to keep you cool

16 BEAT on Tour

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The Cordon Bleu Challenge Are you ready to play?

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The Interview Meet Kaiko and Oliver 18

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16 04 WELCOME TO THE FIRST EDITION OF ‘VOLUME’…

DANIEL BRAND ENGAGEMENT & ADVOCACY MANAGER PERNOD RICARD UK @danpruk

glimpse into what we think you should be drinking in Summer 2018. Predicting the future is always tricky, but we have spent a long time making drinks (tough work) and even longer visiting bars (even tougher) to see what people are choosing to enjoy. We think bold flavours and elegance in simplicity are here to stay and that UK cocktail culture will continue to embrace its playful side. When the BEAT team get together there is always an aura of happiness, and the sound of laughter surrounding a cocktail, and our summer drinks collection will definitely bring this to life.

T.F.P.O.T.W Or, The Fantastic Proliferation of Tonic Waters

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Meet the Team

As well as suggesting some drinks you may like to try on your lists this summer, we have written a few words about some of our favourite things; Ibiza, Mexico and good tonic water to name but a few. We have also now released the dates of the BEAT tour – have a read and if you are keen to come along, register your interest on our Facebook page. All the details are on page 16. We hope you enjoy the paper, and would love to get your feedback. Drop me a line at daniel.ianson@pernod-ricard.com if you have comments or questions. Cheers!

www.thebeatsociety.com

PRUKBEAT

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longer process of infusion, or cook said ingredients in water in order to extract a stronger flavour, that can then be harnessed in a syrup.

BEAT____VOLUME 01

yrups are a useful addition to any bartender’s arsenal when making drinks. They provide a fantastic basis for adding flavour to a drink, whilst contributing towards the sweetness/balance required for a good mixed drink. This article will explore the pros and cons of making syrups in-house, as well as the best techniques to use to produce unique flavours.

MIKE FOSTER SENIOR BRAND AMBASSADOR @mikeafoster

What Are Syrups? In essence, syrup (as far as the bar industry is concerned) is a mixture of sugar and water, providing bartenders with a liquid sweetener that can be used in place of granulated sugars, which don’t tend to dissolve quite as well in cold drink preparations. Most of you will know this as gomme (a ratio of 2:1 sugar to water) or simple syrup (a ratio of 1:1 Sugar to Water). Aside from simply adding sweetness to a drink, syrups can also be infused with a variety of different ingredients to also add flavour to a drink. Although there are many commercially available syrups on the market, comprised of an almost endless list of flavours, a trend has emerged whereby bars are starting to look towards bringing syrup production in-house, for a variety of reasons. There are many advantages to making syrups within your venue.

Creating new, bespoke flavours hard to find commercially In an ever evolving bar industry, bartenders are often looking to break boundaries within the confines of flavours in drinks. By making your own syrups, this opens a world of possibilities far beyond what is commercially available for bars to purchase. This in turn allows for diversity of flavour on menus, gifting the customer the chance to try new and interesting drinks using lesser found ingredients. Harnessing perishable ingredients Frequently in bartending, there can often be a significant amount of wastage of fresh ingredients that get used in drinks, particularly if it is an ingredient that is specific only to one serve. If that drink underperforms compared to forecast, operators can end up throwing away an unnecessary amount of fresh produce. As sustainability in bars has risen to be such a hot topic in the last year, many operators have looked to find ways to reduce their wastage as much as possible. In concentrating the essence/flavour of a perishable ingredient into a syrup or modifier, this can improve the shelf life of said ingredient by a long amount. Concentration of Flavour There are certain ingredients that do not impart a great deal of flavour when added to cold liquids in their raw format (e.g. coriander seeds). In order to achieve a consistent and concentrated flavour that can then be added to mixed drinks, bartenders may carry out a

Authenticity In recent years, consumers have begun to change the way in which they imbibe, with many placing an emphasis on the importance of ‘craft’ in mixed drinks. Whilst we could debate for days as to the definition of ‘craft’ (or whether it exists at all!) one can safely draw the assumption that consumer seeking ‘craft cocktails’, would expect that the drinks they order contain some homemade ingredients. Although this may seem trivial, the addition of homemade ingredients such as syrups can increase the craft credentials of your bar, and in turn, attract a consumer base willing to increase your profits! When considering whether or not to make homemade syrups in your bar, although the prospect may seem appealing, there are certain considerations that need to be weighed up to evaluate the benefit of carrying out this process. Here are some common pitfalls: Time Although on the surface, the preparation of syrups may seem relatively easy, it can often be a time consuming process. With the exception of techniques such as producing syrups from juices (explained below) certain ingredients may require longer extraction times, or a greater degree of care when being prepared. As a result, you may find that the time spent creating the bespoke ingredients may well not be worth it in the long run, if it eats into setup time or overheads.

consistency of flavour and or quality when creating syrups. If you have an unreliable supplier, or are using an ingredient which is extremely seasonal, this can lead to complications down the line which would in turn lead to a poorer quality of drink. Quite often, bar operators may find that a product available commercially may do a better job in terms of providing a good quality supply of consistent flavour, which would negate the need to produce syrups in-house. Cost Effectiveness Linked somewhat to the first point concerning time, there may be occasions whereby creating syrups in-house may simply not be a cost effective process. The prep time for making syrups will need to be covered by wages, as well as the equipment required to prepare the ingredients. In addition, when using ingredients in a smaller quantity, this can lead to an increased cost of goods in the long run, which ultimately would lead your syrups to be very expensive in terms of production. If you compare this to a large scale producer who buys raw ingredients in bulk, they are likely to achieve a more cost effective economy of scale, and therefore offer a cheaper alternative to your homemade syrup.

Consistency When dealing with raw ingredients, it can often be hard to achieve a high

IN-HOUSE SYR 4


BEAT____VOLUME 01

THE BEST TECHNIQUES FOR PRODUCING UNIQUE SYRUP FLAVOURS HOW TO MAKE SYRUPS IN-HOUSE

E UPS

Cold Infusion/Warm Infusion of Raw Ingredients One of the most common ways to create a syrup is by adding flavour to water using a raw ingredient, then mixing said water with sugar until it reaches the required sweetness (or even making a syrup first and infusing ingredients afterwards!). If you don’t have access to a lot of equipment in order to do this, the infusion can simply be achieved by steeping your raw ingredients in water/syrup. Some ingredients with a lighter chemical structure may not require the application of heat in order to extract flavour. In this instance, ingredients can simply be soaked in cold water/syrup for a period of time until the water has adopted the required amount of flavour (for example vanilla). However, raw ingredients with a more robust chemical structure may require the water or syrup/ingredient mixture to be heated in order to extract the right amount of flavour. This can be done by using preheated water from a kettle, or by using a saucepan and hob. Sous Vide Linked to warm infusion of raw ingredients, the process of cooking Sous Vide has become increasingly popular in bartending in order to harness flavour. The process of cooking ingredients sous vide involves sealing your raw ingredients in a contained environment (ideally a vacuum pack bag), and immersing the bag or container into water which is maintained at a consistent temperature (i.e. a water bath). The benefit of preparing/infusing syrups sous vide as opposed to a simple warm infusion is that by sealing your ingredients in a contained environment when cooking, this can prevent a loss of flavour or aroma through evaporation. In addition, cooking sous vide can promote a higher level of consistency in homemade products, as it allows you to eliminate potential variables which may affect the way in which the ingredients cook (e.g. contamination in a saucepan, variance in temperature in the air). Once upon a time, the necessary equipment required to cook sous vide was relatively expensive. However, in recent years, a number of more affordable pieces of kit have appeared on the market, making the process more accessible to both bartenders and consumers alike.

Cold Compounding Cold compounding of syrups is where one would take a ready made syrup or gomme, and simply add a finite amount of a pre-made flavouring or essence and stir it in. Although this may seem like ‘cheating’, there are several advantages to cold compounding. Quite frequently, certain flavours that a bartender might want to use in order to make a drink may be extremely expensive in their raw format, or it may be very hard to extract the required taste/aroma. There are several reputable companies in the market that have the required equipment and/or funding in order to create concentrates or essences of a very high quality that harness these types of flavours. In adding these essences as opposed to creating a syrup from a raw ingredient, one can ensure both a high consistency and quality of flavour. From Juices Rather than complicated process such as cooking ingredients or infusing via sous vide, some syrups can simply be made by adding sugar to a juice that is already commercially available. The most common instance of this in bars is often Grenadine, which can be prepared by simply mixing two parts of sugar to one part of pure pomegranate juice. Preparing syrups from juices can have advantages where the required yield of juice can be hard to obtain cheaply on a small scale (such as cranberry). The process of making homemade syrups can be fun, as well as expanding a bartender’s knowledge and library of flavours in order to make drinks for the customer. However, one should take into consideration whether or not the process is actually required within the bar to achieve a certain objective, or whether or not it is a process for process’ sake! ◆

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BEAT____VOLUME 01

INTERVIEW WITH JAMESON AMBASSADOR RONAN COLLINS

BEAT GEEK onan Collins joins the BEAT to spread the good word of Irish Whiskey. To welcome him to the team, our Monkey 47 brand ambassador Mike Foster sat down with him for a chat and a Jameson to find out a little bit more about his journey from theatre school, to surf instructor, to working in Dandelyan @ The Mondrian Hotel – ‘The world’s best bar’ as voted by Tales of the Cocktail 2017.

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You’re based in London. What’s different about the bar scene, compared to the other places you’ve lived in? I have bartended in Cape Town, Belfast, Dublin, New York and Amsterdam. But London is the most complete city for drinks in the world. It has levels from gastro pubs & boozers, high volume high street cocktail bars (usually priced in an appealing way), a strong 8/10 level of every range of bar, the best hotel bars in the world and finally the most elite innovative cocktail bars in the world. Having that range is not something I have come across anywhere else. They usually have maybe 2 or 3 out of that list.  


K

BEAT____VOLUME 01

What’s your current favourite summer cocktail? Can anything really beat a mojito? Some banging crisp green fragrant mint, splash of fresh lime and sugar and a sexy white rum over crushed ice. Yummy! But to be honest I could drink stout and a whiskey on the side in a sauna, so that too. What’s one thing everyone should try at least once? Surfing. It will change your life.   What was it like working with Ryan Cheti and the guys at Dandelyan? The team is by far the best team I have ever come across! Every single person pulls their weight so that each of our personal qualities were allowed to shine through and that created a very special environment to be a part of and hopefully this impacted on guest experience. Ryan is one of the nicest guys I have ever met. I don’t know when he sleeps, he is constantly working and then at a moments notice will give anyone the time for a chat. It was a pleasure being a Lyan for 15 months. Words cannot describe how much I learnt and owe to every single person I met during it.    Who are your heroes? I don’t really have any. I more admire people. Mary McAleese, George Best, Cillian Murphy, CJ Stander and any play write, poet and artist. They really make the planet a much richer place than anyone.  

Which three words describe you? Committed. Caring. Spicy.   What is it about bartending that has you hooked? I love looking back at how history was formed through drinks and being a small part of trying to change the way people perceive drinking. It is also class craic and I love chatting to people.    What’s your one biggest pet peeve, in life or in bars? Anyone being condescending.    What’s the best advice you’ve been given? It’ll be grand.   What’s on your bucket list? Summit Mount Everest.    What is one thing you wish you knew when you were younger? How important knowing other languages would be in my life..   What makes you smile? Animals. They are just so strange just doing their own thing – all of them are class.   Where’s the best place to sip Jameson? After coming in from a surf.   Shaken or stirred? Blended.   What drinks trends should we be looking out for? Guests relating and ordering their spirit from the cask its been aged in rather than age statement – thus influencing their choice of garnish and serve. Oh and Irish Whiskey...obvs. 

I’VE BARTENDED IN CAPE TOWN, BELFAST, DUBLIN, NEW YORK AND AMSTERDAM… BARTENDING IS CLASS CRAIC. 7


BEAT____VOLUME 01

IBIZA HOW IT ALL BEGAN oday Ibiza is the worlds favourite party island. We all know about the famous clubs & hedonistic lifestyle (and more about that later), but it is much more than that. There are now numerous festivals, the cocktail bar scene has exploded with London stars such as Charles Vexenat and ECC setting up shop. The coastline off Salinas Beach seems to have more super yachts than Monaco, there are 5* boutique hotels dotted everywhere, and the drinks companies like ours are always entertaining guests there and promoting various brands. The whole island is buzzing! But how did we get here? It certainly wasn’t always like this. I guess we have to go back to 1936 for the first embryonic seeds to what it was to become. In that year General Franco came to power in the Spanish Civil War. He immediately imposed a very restrictive authoritarian regime. It became an outpost for many Spanish artists, painters, writers and other outcasts escaping the regime. This haven became a very welcoming culture, and an example of this was when all the hippies arrived in the 60s & early 70s. Thus Ibiza’s reputation as a hippy colony was born. With Franco passing away in 1976 the then package holiday boom really started to explode and Ibiza really benefited. With the arrival of the tourists, large disco nightclubs started to open. Amnesia was the first, followed by Privilige & then Pasha. These clubs were massive and very hedonistic. In the 70s they played disco but in the early 80s they became very fashionable with the New Romantics who would dress in quite outrageous costumes. Young celebrities, popstars, models & the jet-set soon embraced the ‘White Isle’ and this wild decadent party lifestyle. The pop band Wham famously filmed their ‘Club Tropicana’ video at Pikes Hotel in 1983. Ibiza was on the way up! The real catalyst for change and what really made Ibiza was yet to come though…. 8

PHIL HUCKLE SENIOR BRAND AMBASSADOR @chivasphil

In the mid 80s House Music had broken out of its Chicago underground scene and the sound was sweeping the world. It quickly took over the Ibiza clubs. However the DJs there gave it a different twist. It was more upbeat, sexy, sophisticated and fun. It became known as the Balearic Beat or Ibiza House. In 1986 four young English DJs decided to go there on holiday and check out this new scene. They included Paul Oakenfold and Danny Rampling. They couldn’t believe what they were hearing and seeing. They incorporated this sound into the London/Manchester scene. They called it “Acid House” and it absolutely exploded. Famous nights like Shoom and Spectrum became legendary. Very soon the UK club scene became the epicentre of everything that was happening with House Music. What happened next was just a natural progression. The British love their summer holidays in the Med. Let’s bring this Acid House Scene to Ibiza for the summer. The Club scene in Ibiza then also exploded and the UK & Ibiza were joined at the hip. This continues to this day.


BEAT____VOLUME 01

What I haven’t mentioned is how beautiful the island is, the rolling hills, long white sandy beaches, the dramatic coast line and hidden coves make this a truly special place. It does feel quite spiritual as well (maybe those hippies were onto something!). It’s not hard to see why so many people love this island. In the last few years everything has gone so much more upmarket and prices have gone up. However for the most part this is a positive. The Club scene is still there but many people complain that the vibe is very different then it was in its heyday. However the island feels like it’s still on the way up, but this time for different reasons. Next summer if you can’t decide where to go to escape the British weather then I suggest Ibiza.

IT WASN’T ALWAYS LIKE THIS…

My love affair with the island started in 2000 when I gained employment as the Bar Manager of the AKA Bar in London. AKA was London’s first late night DJ bar. The idea was to match the quality of drinks/service of the best cocktail bars and combine it with great late night entertainment. It gets better… underneath us in the same building was our sister venue and the best dance music club in London – The End! Even better our two principal owners were famous DJs Layo Paskin (Layo & Bushwacka) & Richard West (aka Mr C from The Shamen). They were always off to Ibiza and so I decided to go. Being connected from my workplace, I knew where to go and was guest listed everywhere. I think my two favourite places at the time were The Terrace at Space & the beach bar Bora Bora at Playa D’en Bossa. It truly was an incredible time.

www.thebeatsociety.com

PRUKBEAT

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BEAT____VOLUME 01

SPIRITS OF CRISP, FRESH AND FULL OF FLAVOUR – THE BEAT SUMMER COLLECTION

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BEAT____VOLUME 01

OF SUMMER www.thebeatsociety.com

PRUKBEAT

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BEAT____VOLUME 01

HOLLYWOOD HILLS

APEARITIV

PINKLET

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

40ml Absolut Elyx

40ml Absolut Pear

50ml Absolut Lime

10ml Montenegro

10ml Strega

12.5ml Lillet Rose

10ml Crème de peche

25ml Lemon juice

12.5ml Belvoir raspberry lemon cordial

5ml Demerara sugar syrup

15ml Sugar syrup

2 Drops Bob’s Grapefruit Bitters

2 Drops peach bitters

Top up with soda

Mint leaves METHOD: Build and churn. copper mug, mint sprig and peach slice.

METHOD: Shaken and strained. Highball, lemon wheel.

METHOD: Shaken and double strained. Martini glass, lime peel.

KOKORO INGREDIENTS: 45ml Absolut Original

GREYER HOUND

PETER RABBIT

50ml *Coconut cordial

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

45ml Absolut Elyx

35ml Absolut Original

10ml Benedictine

5ml Kummel

10ml Italicus

15ml Chilli honey syrup

20ml Pink grapefruit juice

10ml Lemon juice

METHOD: Shake and double strain. Nick and nora glass *Coconut cordial recipe 300ml Coconut water 30g Dry coconut flakes 70g Caster sugar

10ml Lime juice

METHOD: Shaken and double strained. Martini glass, star anise.

10ml Simple syrup 2 Drops Bob’s Liquorice Bitters

Mix and heat until simmering. Strain Add 1g malic acid. Stir until dissolved.

METHOD: Shaken and strained, rocks, grapefruit slice.

NEGRONI LUNGO

B&T

ARMY AND NAVY

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

15ml Beefeater Dry

50ml Beefeater Dry

50ml Beefeater Dry

15ml Sweet Vermouth

Top up with tonic water

25ml Lemon juice

15ml Campari Top up with tonic water METHOD: Build all ingredients in hi-ball glass over cubed ice and stir gently to combine. Garnish with orange slice.

METHOD: Build in hi-ball glass over cubed ice and garnish with lemon and orange slice.

15ml Orgeat METHOD: Shake and fine strain into large coupette.

ASCOT PUNCH INGREDIENTS: 3 Parts Beefeater 24

FRENCH 24

3 Parts Earl Grey tea (cold)

INGREDIENTS:

2 Parts Mumm Champagne

BRAMBLE

25ml Beefeater 24

1 Part Crème de Cassis

INGREDIENTS:

2.5ml Fernet Branca

1 Part lemon juice

50ml Beefeater Gin

15ml Lemon juice

1 Part Gomme

25ml Lemon juice

5ml Gomme

15ml Gomme

Top up with Perrier Jouet NV

1 Part Lillet Blanc 1 Part Antica Formula

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METHOD: Use cold water infusion to ensure tannins are not over extracted when making the tea. Add all of the ingredients together in a large punch bowl with a large block of ice and gently stir. Garnish with summer berries citrus slices.

12.5ml Crème de Mure METHOD: Add first three ingredients to cocktail shaker and shake over cubed ice. Strain into rocks glass over crushed ice and drizzle Mure across the top. Garnish with a blackberry.

15ml Lillet Blanc

METHOD: Shake first five ingredients in cocktail shaker and fine strain into flute glass. Top with champagne and stir gently to combine. Lemon twist to garnish.


BEAT____VOLUME 01

PENNANT PUNCH INGREDIENTS: 3 1/2 Parts Plymouth Gin 1 1/2 Parts Plymouth Sloe 1 1/2 Part Sweet Vermouth 1/2 Part Apricot Liqueur 1 Part Lemon juice 1 Part Orange juice 1/2 Part Gomme Top up with soda water METHOD: Build all ingredients in vessel and churn with crushed ice. Top with more crushed ice and top with soda water. Garnish with mint, orange and lemon slice.

BALLROOM SPRITZ

PINK G&T

FROOT BEER

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

25ml Plymouth

50ml Plymouth Gin

35ml Plymouth Sloe

25ml Poire William

Top up with Fever Tree Aromatic Tonic

15ml Crème de Peche

12.5ml Lime juice 5ml Gomme Top up with Mumm NV METHOD: Shake first four ingredients in shaker and strain into wine glass over cubed ice. Top with champagne and stir to combine. Garnish with rosemary sprig.

25ml Lemon juice METHOD: Build in hi-ball glass over cubed ice and garnish. Garnish with orange zest.

METHOD: Build all ingredients in hi-ball glass over cubed ice and stir gently to combine. Garnish with lemon wedge.

MARTINI

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Plymouth

50ml Plymouth

25ml Lime juice

15ml Dry Vermouth METHOD: Add ingredients to mixing glass over cubed ice and stir for 15-20 seconds. Fine strain into coupette and garnish as appropriate.

METHOD: Add first three ingredients to cocktail shaker and shake over cubed ice. Strain into rocks glass over crushed ice and drizzle Mure across the top. Garnish with lime.

STRASBOURG DAISY

ROSE COLLINS

WHAT IS GOOD?

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Monkey 47

40ml Monkey 47

35ml Monkey 47

20ml Lime juice

10ml Crème de Violette

15ml Apricot Liqueur

10ml Gomme

25ml Lemon juice

25ml Lime juice

10ml Yellow chartreuese

15ml Rose syrup

10ml Gomme

Top up with soda

1 Egg white

METHOD: Build all ingredients in hi-ball glass over cubed ice and stir gently to combine. Garnish with lemon slice/flower.

METHOD: Dry shake/wet shake and single strain into large coupette. Garnish with dried mango.

BLACK FOREST SPRITZ

RIGHT TURN CLYDE

MONKEY PEDDLAR

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Monkey 47 Sloe

35ml Monkey 47

50ml Monkey 47 Sloe

3 Blackberries

15ml Peach liqueur

Top up with bitter lemon

2 Raspberries

25ml Lemon juice

Splash soda

25ml White wine

Top up with Mumm NV

20ml Gomme

METHOD: Add all ingredients to wine glass over cubed ice and stir to combine. Garnish with a mint sprig.

Top up with root beer

GIMLET

15ml Gomme

METHOD: Add first three ingredients to cocktail shaker and shake over cubed ice. Strain into vessel over crushed ice and drizzle Mure across the top. Garnish with Mint Sprig/Lime Wedge/ Icing Sugar.

10ml Gomme

METHOD: Build in hi-ball glass over cubed ice and garnish with lemon slice.

70ml Milk METHOD: Combine all ingredients in bottle and store in fridge overnight. Strain through coffee filter and chill down before serving. Garnish with a lemon slice.

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BEAT____VOLUME 01

AQUA DE PINA

TEQUILA SUNSET

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

*Beetroot grenadine

50ml Altos Plata

35ml Altos Reposado

75ml Biona pressed

15ml Raw honey

50ml Fresh orange juice Beetroot juice

25ml Carton pineapple juice

12.5ml Beetroot

25ml Raw honey

15ml Fresh lime juice

Grenadine*

Stir until honey is

3 Chunks muddled pineapple

5ml Lemon juice

fully dissolved

METHOD: Shake & fine strain over fresh ice into a rocks glass. Garnish with pineapple leaf/wedge.

METHOD: Combine Altos, orange & lemon juice in a wine glass. Add ice and beetroot grenadine.

AGAVEYONCE

JALISCO HIGHBALL

HOLIDAY REVIVER

ALTOS RAMOS

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS: 50ml Altos Plata

50ml Altos Reposado

37.5ml Altos Anejo

25ml Altos Plata

20ml Fresh lemon juice

15ml Lillet Blanc

25ml Malibu

25ml Lime juice

20ml Real maple syrup

20ml Pineapple juice

25ml Lillet Rose

25ml Bean water

Pinch cayenne pepper

5ml Agave syrup

25ml Fresh lemon juice

1/4 Avocado

Pinch sea salt

5ml Lime juice

5ml Sugar syrup

15ml Agave syrup

METHOD: Shake and strain into a coupette.

1 Dash orange bitters Top up with soda METHOD: Shake & strain into highball. Garnish with cherry on a skewer.

VERY FRENCH MARTINI

GALLIENNE HIGHBALL

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

45ml Martell VSSD

50ml Martell VSSD

15ml Chambord

25ml Fresh lemon juice

45ml Fresh pineapple juice

15ml Creme d’Abricot (Briottet recommended)

METHOD: Shake and double strain into chilled coupette, garnish with three raspberries.

METHOD: Absinthe rinse. Shake & fine strain into a large coupette.

METHOD: Stir and strain over cubed ice into highball, garnish with lemon slice.

MARTELL TONIC

WHITE MAGIC

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

15ml Martell VSSD

50ml Martell VSSD

50ml Martell VSSD

INGREDIENTS:

15ml Pear liqueur (Merlet recommended)

125ml Tonic water

5ml Sugar syrup 1:1

35ml Martell VSSD

5ml Pear Eau-de-vie

25ml Cocci di Torino

3 Dashes Peychaud’s bitters

25ml Campari

1 Lemon zest

Top up withsoda

METHOD: Build up and top up in flute glass, top up Champagne, garnish with orange zest.

METHOD: Build up over cubed ice in Martell rocks glass, garnish with lemon slice.

5ml Absinthe METHOD: Stir first 5 ingredients together and strain into chilled Absinthe rinsed Martell Sazerac glass.

CHANTELOUP SPRITZ

METHOD: Stir and strain over cubed ice in a wine glass. Top up soda. Garnish with orange wheel and mint sprig.

BRANDISH YOUR WEAPON

GLEN MASTER SMASH

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

30ml Glenlivet

Glen Master Smash

10ml Somerset apple brandy

4 Lemon wedges

20ml Creme de apricot

5 Mint leaves

15ml Lemon

20ml Apricot

5ml Orgeat

40ml Glenlivet

METHOD: Shake & strain into a rocks glass. Garnish – orange rind, rolled.

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METHOD: Blend (w/o ice) & then shake hard with ice. Highball and spray of orange blossom water.

Top up with soda water

MARTINET ROYAL

Top up Champagne

50ml Rice milk

Barspoon sugar syrup 2:1 METHOD: Shake all ingredients – do not strain!


BEAT____VOLUME 01

SMOKY JOE

CANCHANCHARRA

CUBAN HIGHBALL

APPLE COLLINS

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Havana Club 7yr

50ml Havana Club 3yr

35ml Havana Club 7yr

25ml Lime juice

2 dashes orange bitters

15ml Calvados

20ml Honey water (1:1)

Top up with soda

50ml Clear apple juice

METHOD: Shake hard. Pour into a rocks glass with ice and garnish with lime wedge.

METHOD: Build in a hi-ball glass with ice and top with soda. Garnish with orange wheel.

SHAQIRI

MARY PICKFORD

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

37.5ml Havana Club 3yr

50ml Havana Club 3yr

12.5ml Apple liqueur

20ml Lime juice

25ml Lime juice

35ml Pineapple juice

15ml Gomme

5ml Grenadine

Top up with beer

5ml Maraschino

METHOD: Add first four ingredients to blender and blend with two scoops of crushed ice. Add beer to bottom of hurricane and pour mixture in.

METHOD: Add all ingredients to cocktail shaker over cubed ice. Shake and fine strain into large coupette and garnish with a pineapple wedge.

ERIN ROSE

JGL

IRISH COFFEE MARTINI

IRISH MAID

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Jameson Caskmates

50ml Jameson Original

50ml Jameson Original or Caskmates

50ml Jameson Black Barrel

50ml Strong espresso coffee

1/2 lime

60ml Espresso coffee

10ml Elderfower cordial

15ml Sugar syrup

Ginger ale

15ml Demerara sugar syrup

15ml Sugar syrup

30ml Single cream

25ml Lemon juice

35ml Havana Club 7yr 15ml Kahlua 10ml Lime juice Top up with Madagascan Fevertree Cola METHOD: Build first three ingredients in shaker, decant into bottle and top with cola and add a lime wedge.

25ml Cream Big scoop of good quality vanilla icecream

METHOD: Build and squeeze limes!

METHOD: Blend until stiff.

METHOD: Shake first 3 ingredients and pour into a martini glass. Whip cream and float on top.

MORNING GLORY FIZZ

SCOTTISH POM POM

CHIVAS ZEST

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

50ml Chivas Regal 12

35ml Chivas Regal 12

35ml Chivas Regal 12

5ml Lime Juice

35ml Pomegrnate juice

30ml Lemon juice

25ml Lemon Juice

10ml Sugar syrup

10ml Honey syrup

1 Part egg white

15ml Lime juice

25ml Egg white

1 Dash soda

Part top with soda water

Orange zest garnish

Part lemon twist

Part lime wedge garnish

METHOD: Shake & strain.

METHOD: Shake first 4 ingredients and top with soda.

Top up with soda METHOD: Add all ingredients to a hi-ball glass over cubed ice and stir gently to combine. Garnish with apple slice.

Cucumber garnish METHOD: Shake and strain into a rocks glass.

METHOD: Shake & strain.

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BEAT____VOLUME 01

THE BEAT TOUR, 8 CITIES 250 BARTENDERS e are heading out on tour and want to meet you! We have planned a series of sessions in cities around the UK where we will bring members of the BEAT team and a whole load of toys to spend some time playing around with drinks. We are not into big presentations, but we are definitely into showing you a few tricks and techniques we have picked up and developed through our time behind the stick. To tell you too much more would spoil the surprise, but if you think you might like to spend a day with us, visit Facebook and search PRUKBEAT, then register your interest for one of the sessions. We will be in touch!

prukbeat

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BEAT____VOLUME BEAT____VOLUME0101

THE BEAT TOUR DATES NOVEMBER 20th BEAT TOUR 1 Liverpool

JANUARY 15th BEAT TOUR 2 Leeds

FEBRUARY 12th BEAT TOUR 3 Brighton

MARCH 12th BEAT TOUR 4 Birmingham

April 9th BEAT TOUR 5 Edinburgh

APRIL 30th BEAT TOUR 6 Manchester

MAY 21st BEAT TOUR 7 Newcastle

JUNE 18th BEAT TOUR 8 London

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BEAT____VOLUME 01

POST YOUR CLASSIC COGNAC COCKTAILS USING MARTELL CORDON BLEU WITH THE HASHTAG #CORDONBLEUCHALLENGE

THE CORDON BLEU CHALLENGE hat were you doing in February 2001? Myself, I was a 19 year-old teenager attending law school benches with the prospect of becoming an IP lawyer. Some others, I hear, were playing games behind the London bars. Turns out that 16 odd years down the line I am far from being an IP lawyer, though I am fully embracing the idea of a ‘new challenge’. Let’s play!

MATTHIAS LATAILLE SENIOR BRAND AMBASSADOR @sanmatthias

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Following a life changing trip to Cognac (that’s a little town in the South West of France) and a new-found love for the terroir of Borderies (that’s the smallest cru of the Cognac region, dearly cherished by the Martell House), the infamous Cordon Bleu Challenge was born.

What is this Cordon Bleu Challenge I’m going on about, you may ask? Well, rumour has it that every Classic Cocktail in the book tastes better with Martell Cordon Bleu (that is the iconic Extra Old Cognac from the Martell House) and some London bartenders took it upon themselves to find out if this urban legend is true. Margarita, Mojito, Daiquiri, Martini, Manhattan, Cosmopolitan, Bleumble, Corpse Reviver #Bleu, you name it. Even the ‘Bleudy Mary’ has passed the test with high distinction…! Fun, right!? Challenging perceptions & pushing boundaries, redefining the rules & shaping new drinking experiences…. Not quite a cocktail competition, yet a bit more than just a game.

THE HARVARD

Follow my quest for the best Classic Cocktail made with Cordon Bleu on Instagram @SanMatthias and feel free to get involved using #CordonBleuChallenge. My current favourite is the Manhattan cocktail (also known as the Harvard when made with Cognac).

Stirred and served straight up with a twist.

50ml Martell Cordon Bleu 25ml Cocci Vermouth di Torino 2 Dashes Angostura bitters 1 Dash orange bitters

Recipe by Matt Ottley of the Salt Room in Brighton. Santé!


BEAT____VOLUME 01

THE INTERVIEW

KAIKO TULLOCH A.K.A ‘MAMACITA BLANCO’

MEGS DEMEULENAERE UK HOUSE OF TEQUILA AMBASSADOR @megsmiller

House of Tequila Ambassador Megs DeMeulenaere recently went to Mexico for the Altos Tahona Society Final. She took a few moments to catch up with the two UK finalists.

Favourite food TORTAS AHOGADAS AAF

Favourite bar / bartender / cocktail (anywhere in the world) Bar – La Capilla / El Bandito, Bartender – Alan Mulvihill (Whisky or Death, Edinburgh) Cocktail – Mezcal Tommy’s or a BATANGA (though they just don’t taste nearly as good in the UK, just have to go back to Mexico!)

Most embarrassing moment? (This week or whenever) Getting a needle in the bum cheek under a tree while Megs took photos. (Bugs didn’t like me in Mexico)

What did you see or learn in Mexico that you will be taking back to London? Batangas! I’d never had one before getting to Mexico but I’ve been making them for everyone in Edinburgh.

Celebrity crush? Matthew Gray Gubler

What flavours from Mexico could be used in summer cocktails in the UK? Chillis are so versatile and can be suited to any season, especially as there are so many different types and different ways of preparing them.

Favourite moment or activity of the past week at the Tahona Society? The whole thing was amazing, but getting to the distillery and seeing all the things I’d read about, in the flesh was incredible. The red soil blew my mind.

OLIVER CUSH A.K.A ‘CABALLERO SUPREMO’ Favourite moment or activity of the past week at the Tahona Society? Definitely the trip at the Altos Distillery looking into the ovens smelling the roasted Agave. It was thick in the air and it all made sense at that moment. It was the excitement I get when looking into the oven on Christmas Day. Favourite Food? It’s very hard to decide as it’s all so delicious! Tortas ahogadas was my guilty pleasure of the week. For restaurants, Hueso and Los Barcos blew my mind but all of my experience with Mexican cuisine was accompanied with a warm, welcoming atmosphere that really embodies that sense of ‘La Familia’. Most embarrassing moment? (In Mexico or in general) Sleep walking into my living room naked with all of my family there. My sister immediately threw a towel over me in a panic. I have worse, for sure, but I’m sure anyone who knows me well can tell more. Celebrity crush Charlize Theron.

Favourite bar / bartender / cocktail (anywhere in the world) Bar – 69 Colebrooke Row, or for a pint after work my guilty pleasure is Translate. Bartender – Jack Savage is one of my favourite bartenders, being one of my oldest friends I can really relax in front of him. Cocktail – My go to cocktail is a Manhattan or a Wet Tequila Martini. What did you see or learn in Mexico that you will be taking back to London? I will be taking back to London the use of fresh and local ingredients. We get used to ingredients that aren’t necessarily natural. Connecting with your local community and fresh ingredients creates a stronger bond with flavours and appreciation for them. What flavours from Mexico could be used in summer cocktails in the UK? The flavours I would use from Mexico for the UK’s summer would be agua frescas. I found them in nearly every direction in Mexico and they are incredibly refreshing and delightful. Also, the use of the cactus family have some very interesting flavours I’ve not come across before that seem to be an upcoming trend.

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BEAT____VOLUME 01


BEAT____VOLUME BEAT____VOLUME0101

THE FANTASTIC PROLIFERATION OF TONIC WATERS (OR T.F.P.T.W FOR BREVITY) DANIELE UMOETTE SENIOR BRAND AMBASSADOR

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Along with the incredible resurgence of gin that has been going on for a couple of years now, the market has seen an explosion of different tonic waters. Long gone are the days when tonic water was just a medicine! What used to be a very limited choice between perhaps two products now requires a tonic sommelier just to start! Here are my favourite tonic waters and how to use them.

1. FEVER TREE MEDITERRANEAN TONIC  Delicate and herbal, slightly less bitter

than the regular tonic water. Mix it with your favourite vodka, sherry and a rosemary sprig for the best summer spritz there is.

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2. F EVER TREE PREMIUM INDIAN TONIC WATER Doesn’t come up as a surprise, Fever Tree Indian Tonic Water is served in restaurant and bars across the world. Crisp with a hint of bitter orange flavour its perfect carbonation works very well across with both gin and vodka.

3. PETER SPANTON  Unconventional times call for

unconventional flavours. Whilst I appreciate their n.9 cardamom flavoured and their n.5 lemongrass flavoured I think the most interesting of them all is the n.4 chocolate flavoured tonic, very interesting when mixed with dark spirits.

4. INDI TONIC WATER

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5. 1724 TONIC WATER  Coming all the way from Chile this

tonic water is exclusively made from natural ingredients with hand harvested Peruvian Cinchona bark as a base. Mixed with vodka its pleasant mandarin notes will shine right through. The name 1724 is no coincidence either, that being the altitude above sea level where this tonic water is made!

6. JACK RUDY CLASSIC TONIC SYRUP Sometimes tonic water simply isn’t

enough! This artisanal tonic water concentrate from South Carolina will win you standing ovations in your gin and tonic circles. Try it if you don’t believe me.

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7. THOMAS HENRY CHERRY BLOSSOM TONIC Berlin based brand Henry Thomas

drew inspiration with Japanese cherry blossom festivals when creating this tonic water. Aside from the signature quinin profile the brand is famous, for here the incredible cherry aroma comes through making it a favourite of mine from the first sip.

8. BTW TONIC WATER  Made in London following a traditional

Victorian recipe this tonic is amber in colour and has a smooth crisp taste that won’t overpower your gin with excessive bitterness.

 Made with a traditional maceration of

botanicals using ingredients from all over the world such as oranges from Seville, Kewra from India and Japanese yuzu this gem of a tonic water tastes incredibly well balanced.

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BEAT____VOLUME 01

DANIEL I’ANSON

Brand Engagement & Advocacy Team Manager daniel.ianson@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7920 786050 @danpruk

THE BEAT CONNECTION Callum Pates Drinkologist callum.pates@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7584 705431 @callumpates @drinkologistsuk

Mickey Harrison Drinkologist michael.harrison@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7584 705432 @prukbeat @drinkologistsuk

Harry Hall Drinkologist harry.hall@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7584 705434

Felicity Criddle Graduate Brand Ambassador, Beefeater felicity.criddle@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7768 827986 @beefeater_bauk

@prukbeat @drinkologistsuk

James Spencer

Annie Ingram

Drinkologist james.spencer@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7584 705433 @prukbeat @drinkologistsuk

Graduate Brand Ambassador, Plymouth annie.ingram@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7785 692747 @plymouth_bauk

MIKE FOSTER Senior Brand Ambassador, Monkey 47 michael.foster@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7768 592149 @mikeafoster 22


BEAT____VOLUME 01

Sinea Weintz

Georgina Legg

PHIL HUCKLE

Graduate Brand Ambassador, Chivas georgina.legg@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7770 544691 @chivas_ba_georgie

Graduate Brand Ambassador, The Glenlivet sinea.weintz@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7768 827979 @sineatheguardian

Tomos Brooks

Scott Lever Graduate Brand Ambassador, Chivas scott.lever@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7747 564373 @chivas_ba_scott

Graduate Brand Ambassador, Chivas tomos.brooks@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 07785 692524 @tomchivasregal

Senior Brand Ambassador, Chivas phil.huckle@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7769 915825 @chivasphil

Dylan Shirley

Conor Griffin

Graduate Brand Ambassador, Jameson dylan.shirley@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7785 345416 @jameson_ba_dylan

Graduate Brand Ambassador, Jameson conor.griffin@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7785 344134 @conorjamesonuk

RONAN COLLINS

Senior Brand Ambassador, Jameson ronan.collins@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7468 716484 @whiskey4breakfast

Eimear Deane

Hannah O’Shea

Graduate Brand Ambassador, Jameson eimear.deane@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7785 344266 @jamesonnewcastle

Graduate Brand Ambassador, Jameson hannah.oshea@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7785 345022 @jameson_ba_manchester

MATTHIAS LATAILLE

Senior Brand Ambassador, Martell matthias.lataille@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7769 915825 @sanmatthias

www.thebeatsociety.com

Daniele Umoette

Megs DeMeulenaere

UK Brand Ambassador, Absolut daniele.umoette@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7778 533873 @absolut_dani

UK House of Tequila Ambassador megs.demeulenaere@pernod-ricard.com +44 (0) 7760 221931 @megsmiller

PRUKBEAT

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BRAND ENGAGEMENT & ADVOCACY TEAM LET US INTRODUCE OURSELVES We are the Brand Engagement & Advocacy Team for Pernod Ricard UK. Your one stop shop for all things drinks related. Training, menu & drinks development, trade and consumer events and much much more. To find out more, speak to your commercial representative or email us directly. All contact details can be found on page 22.

OUR BRANDS

www.thebeatsociety.com

PRUKBEAT

'Volume' - by the BEAT. Pernod Ricard Brand Engagement & Advocacy team  

Volume is a twice annual paper with drinks, bar tips and articles from the Pernod Ricard Brand Engagement & Advocacy Team

'Volume' - by the BEAT. Pernod Ricard Brand Engagement & Advocacy team  

Volume is a twice annual paper with drinks, bar tips and articles from the Pernod Ricard Brand Engagement & Advocacy Team

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