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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

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CO N T E N TS

Photography by Mike Braca

Providence Monthly • September 2019

Learn how sweet spots like Tricycle Ice Cream turned from simply mobile to a mainstay (pg. 32)

27 The Showman

32 From Truck to Table

The complicated life of Buddy Cianci goes onstage at Trinity Rep

How Providence’s mobile food businesses are putting down permanent roots in the city

DEPARTMENTS Pulse

13 A public installation along the

24 RHODY GEM:

High-end vintage

and customer service on North Main

48 FOOD NEWS: It’s tiki time

62 ON STAGE: Taylor Mac at First-

in Providence

Works, The Prince of Providence, and Mortified top this month’s

Providence River explores climate

Life & Style

change and community

15 This annual Central Falls soccer

39 SHOP: Sea-worthy accessories made in the Ocean State

50 EXPERIENCE: Bettola brings Rolfe Square

tournament is anything but little

16 Brianna Moon is a small store

40 HOME: A peek into the style of

52 RESTAURANT GUIDE: Loosen

a Hope Street shop owner’s home

your belt - there’s a lot of deliciousness to be had

kids grow into every aspect of

64 MUSIC: Melodic-meets-distortion on Plug’s Block Out the Sun

with big purpose

18 Project GOAL strives to help

hottest tickets

superlative pizza and hip dining to

42 INFLUENCER: A producer of

66 A stunning city snapshot

The Rhode Show shares what inspires her camera-ready look

Pic of PVD

from one of our readers

Art & Culture

57 THE MUST LIST: Events you

their identities

can’t miss this month

20 Doors Open RI Festival is back, this time in Pawtucket and Central Falls

22 YEAR OF THE CITY:

Food & Drink

45 SPOTLIGHT: This bakery gives

60 ART: The Olneyville-based artist

you something to celebrate

responsible for painting Cicilline’s portrait and so much more

Explore

PVD in a new way through special

46 IN THE KITCHEN: Julian’s re-

project programming

flects on 25 years on the West Side

ON THE COVER: Smoke and Squeal BBQ now mans a truck and brick-and-mortar. Photography by Nick DelGuidice


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Ann Gallagher Kristine Mangan Olf Elizabeth Riel Dan Schwartz Stephanie Oster Wilmarth For advertising information email: Marketing@ProvidenceOnline.com

Contributing Photographers Mike Braca

Wolf Matthewson

Grace Lentini

Kendall Pavan St. Laurent

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Jackie Ignall

Karen Greco

Julie Tremaine

Adam Hogue

Adam Toobin

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Olivia Hewitt

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019


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PULSE

LIVING ON THE EDGE A public installation along the Providence River explores climate change and community Walking along South Water Street, the last thing you’d expect to stumble upon is a tree-lined oasis. There’s a mulched pathway to a makeshift bench from a fallen log, surrounded by a young forest of birch, elm, and oak, plus a sea of sunflowers that nod to its creator: Adam E. Anderson, RISD lecturer and artistic mastermind behind the 10,000 Suns project. This “Living Edge” along the Providence River is Adam’s winning proposal chosen in a competition hosted by DownCity Design’s CityWorks Collective. The cohort sought ideas for a public installation that would reimagine an idle site beside the river as a gathering space. However, they wanted more than just a pretty park. After eight months of extensive research – consulting with neighbors and city agencies and everyone in between – the group decided they wanted the design to explore themes of “community, resilience, climate change, and place-

based history.” Adam’s design was the perfect fit. At first, Adam admits, he was reluctant to participate. “It called to address climate change, community resilience, and history. How can you address all of these in a relatively small budget?” he recalls. His design takes into consideration Providence’s past, from salt marsh to industrial port, and its present, as not-quite defined and unable to weather the effects of storm surges. The felled log pays homage to the native forest that once existed there. The woodc chip paths represent the forest floor. The location complements the kayak ramp and nearby terraced seating. In the middle of downtown, it’s a pocket of flowering meadowland and forest. “The project demonstrates the necessity of a coexistence of natural and cultural systems within our city and the importance of landscape as a critical component of our urban infrastructure.” DownCityDesign.org, DesignUnderSky.com -Megan Schmit

Photo by Lisa Su, courtesy of DownCity Design ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

13


PULSE • City

A Small World Cup Goes Big This annual Central Falls soccer tournament is anything but little

Photo courtesy of CFMundialito

Team from the 2017 Mundialito Tournament

Rhode Island fans need only wait a little longer to relive the glory of this summer’s Women’s World Cup. On September 14, veteran players from across the smallest state will converge in its smallest city for the fifth annual Central Falls Mundialito Soccer Tournament, a competition that every year does more to match the fever pitch of its namesake (Mundialito, in Spanish, literally means “little World Cup”). Fans and players who turn up to the Cowden Courts in Central Falls will quickly find themselves enjoying a bite to eat, listening to a local DJ, and cheering on their preferred team in the intense bouts of small-sided soccer on the newly renovated asphalt court. The participation of local elected officials like Central Falls Mayor

James Diossa does much to keep annual expectations high, but this year, excitement for the competition has reached a new level. “Every year, I have been able to grow it,” said Mundialito founder Tatiana Baena. Inspired by the success of previous iterations, Tatiana has expanded the one-day format to include a full six-week season of competition that will culminate with its traditional winner-take-all final. Providing teams an opportunity to build chemistry, and rivalries the chance to take root, Tatiana sees the extended season as just the next step in a process that has seen her vision evolve from an idea to a local institution. The tournament “has always been about a little more than just soccer,” says Tatiana. It is designed to highlight “the diversity of our

state and our city.” An idea originally hatched during Tatiana’s participation in the New Leaders Council fellowship, the tournament already raises enough money to provide two graduates of Central Falls High School, her alma mater, with a $500 college scholarship. But for Tatiana, the past few years have only been just the beginning: Looking forward, she hopes to add more opportunities for young people to get involved by hosting a one-day tournament just for them or even a youth summer league. The plans may seem ambitious for the selfstyled “little World Cup”, but Tatiana has already proven that the Mundialito intends to play in the big leagues. Central Falls, Facebook: CF Mundialito -Adam Toobin

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

15


PULSE • City

Reach for the Moon Brianna Moon runs a small store with big purpose

Hope Artiste Village is known for its interesting mix of businesses and just recently added another shop to its directory: Brianna Moon, a vintage clothing store named for its owner. While small, with just two racks and a selection of Brianna’s handmade jewelry, the shop has much to offer. Says Brianna, “What sets my store apart from others with a similar aesthetic is that I am hand-making and altering 95 percent of the items in my store. There are no wholesalers or vendors I fill it with.” Instead, you’ll find pieces she has hand-picked and altered herself: beaded tops and boho-

16

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

inspired necklaces alongside vintage ‘70s wedding gowns and bell-sleeved minidresses. She’s mindful of the elements she uses, both in terms of sustainability and cost, and sticks to leftover materials, especially for her jewelry. “In a world full of ‘stuff,’ I am trying to find ways to repurpose or make new items in a sustainable manner as well as give back to the community.” From a passion for repurposing to helping others, Brianna’s devotion to her community is evident throughout her store. It starts with styling – “I one hundred percent want customers to come into my store and get

the full treatment. Styling for me is a way to show a person’s personality and help them feel and look like their best self” – but it also goes beyond that. Brianna gives five percent of her sales to the Sojourner House, a local nonprofit supporting victims of domestic abuse. “I have people very close to me who have experienced domestic violence and I myself was a victim of cyber stalking for 14 years,” Brianna says, “so supporting a nonprofit that supports women who have been through trauma, domestic, and sexual violence is something very important to me.” Pawtucket, BriannaMoon.com -Rebecca Clark

Photo courtesy of Brianna Moon

Find Brianna’s handmade jewelry alongside her rack of curated clothing


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Fifteen years ago, Darius Shirzadi, Peter Whealton, and Javier Centeno started Project GOAL to help young children achieve their academic and athletic dreams. Today, the organization is still up and running, but this dedicated group of staff and volunteers has made it their mission to become more than just about school and sports. Coach Bryce DuBois says that Project GOAL is striving to become more socially aware and inclusive, and help kids grow into their gender and sexual identities. The acronym “GOAL” stands for “Greater Opportunity for Athletes to Learn.” And learn they do. The program is targeted towards children between fifth and tenth grade. Each

year, kids are bussed from the Central Falls and Providence area twice a week after their regular school day to Calcutt Middle School (fall/winter) and Moses Brown (spring) for an hour-and-a-half of tutoring. Most of the classrooms are supervised by trained teachers, and if a teacher is unavailable, volunteers from Providence College or Brown is available to step in. After their academic session, they play soccer for the remainder of their time, which Bryce says is a great way to incentivize learning. Recently, Project GOAL became aware of the need to create an LGBT-inclusive space on the soccer field. The program belongs to an international network (Street Football

Photo courtesy of Project GOAL

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World) of organizations that operate on the “soccer for good” mission. Through the coalition, Project GOAL was invited by Play Proud to participate in a year-long training fellowship that trains staff on how to create safe spaces for all of their athletes. Says Bryce, “The goal of our program is to be inclusive and support young people. They’re also developing their identities...we know that a percentage of our young people will have a different sexual orientation or not be cisgender.” He emphasizes that this training allows mentors to empower their athletes to accept their identities during crucial stages of development. ProjectGOAL.org -Lauren Vella

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PULSE • City

Backstage Pass

Doors Open RI returns, this time to reveal the secret nooks of Pawtucket and Central Falls

Most people were happy

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

to see the John E. Fogarty Building torn down. The structure was a concrete box on Fountain Street. But Caroline Stevens appreciated those rows of gray window frames, and so did more than 30 others – so they arranged a “funeral,” complete with an obituary, memorial poem, and a kazoo parade. “We’re trying to connect people to place,” says Caroline, who founded Doors Open RI in 2017. “We’re constantly trying to do new and interesting things.” As the Fogarty funeral proves, Doors Open RI isn’t your boilerplate city tour; it’s funky and experimental, and Caroline seems born for this role. A native of Washington, DC, Caroline lived for several years in Illinois, where she was hired to coordinate the first Open House Chicago. Caroline studied art history at Beloit College, and she has always loved scouting urban

spaces; today, Open House Chicago incorporates hundreds of venues and draws tens of thousands of people. “This model for citywide open house festivals is practiced around the world,” says Caroline. “You try to think of a city as a museum.” The first Doors Open RI Festival invited participants to poke around Providence, such as the 200-year-old dome of the Beneficent Congregational Church. The second edition will take place in Pawtucket and Central Falls. “I just wanted to explore a new place,” says Caroline. “I think radiating out from Providence is a good strategy. Our name is Doors Open Rhode Island. I want to make good on the Rhode Island part.” This one-day festival will take visitors through both towns, and the stops are diverse: There’s Slater Mill, of course, but

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Doors Open RI returns with an expanded focus

there’s also 238 Main Street, a longabandoned commercial building with a glass dome. The festival will return to Providence in 2020, but Caroline loves to celebrate less-famous sites across the state, and more regularly. “Usually these events are just the one annual festival,” she says. “But I’m trying to build something that has other programs throughout the year.” Caroline herself looks forward to Cogswell Tower, a stone clock that rises out of a Central Falls hilltop. Completed in 1904, Cogswell looks like a castle wreathed in an iron grille. “It’s a tower that sits atop a natural grotto,” says Caroline. “To me, this encapsulates what Doors Open is all about. It’s just too cool.” The Doors Open RI Festival takes place September 28 at various locations. DoorsOpenRI.org -Robert Isenberg

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

21


PULSE • Year of the City (branded partnership)

If These Streets Could Talk Explore PVD in a new way through special Year of the City project

Exhibitions Performances Storytelling Lectures Walks Conferences

events in Providence neighborhoods Visit YearOfTheCity.com for a full calendar of events @YOTCProvidence2019 22

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

Listen to this city. It has stories to tell, secrets to reveal. They are recorded in its streets, its buildings, its parks and squares, in the spaces in between, and in memory. Over the course of 2019, Year of the City: The Providence Project has catalyzed exhibitions, performances, walks, lectures, and conferences produced by more than 50 different curators about the history, life, and culture of Providence’s 25 neighborhoods. Some programs have been initiated by the city’s largest cultural and historical institutions; others have been created by individuals working with shoestring budgets in unexpected spaces. Together, these projects reveal the multitude of different “cities” within Providence and show us how much we didn’t know. The project’s curators are Marisa Angell Brown (John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, Brown University), Angela DiVeglia (Providence Public Library), and Jennifer Dalton Vincent (¡City Arts! For Youth). Says Angela, “It’s so exciting to see all the different approaches that partners are using to tell the city’s stories.” Marisa adds, “Over the course of the year, we are all learning how much we still don’t know about this small, post-industrial, arty and gutsy city.” Find events or submit an idea for a project online at YearOfTheCity.com.

SEPTEMBER EVENTS (more information available at YearOfTheCity.com) Fort Thunder & Lightning Bolt at Old Mill/New Music at Orwig Music Library, 1 Young Orchard Avenue (through November 3) Providence Unveiled: Stories from the Archive at the Providence Athenaeum (through September 10) The Prince of Providence at Trinity Repertory Theater (through October 20) Carla Ricci and Roberta Kauffman at the Gallery at City Hall (through October 14) Map It Out – Providence at the Carriage House Gallery, John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, 50 Williams Street (through November 8) Counter-mapping Providence, a panel discussion at Brown University (September 27 only) Year of the City: The Providence Project is an unprecedented year-long exploration of the history, life, and culture of Providence’s 25 neighborhoods through exhibitions, walks, lectures, and conferences produced by 50+ different curators. Together, these projects reveal new stories and new ways of thinking about the city we love. YearOfTheCity.com


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PULSE • Rhody Gem

LOLA

Fashion Boutique We’re on the hunt for Rhody Gems! Every neighborhood has that secret, hidden, cool and unusual, or hole-inthe-wall spot that locals love. Email or tag us on social media using #RhodyGem to suggest yours, and we might just feature it! What it is: A shop specializing in new, locally designed, and estate pieces, along with vintage high-end fashion at affordable prices. Find clothing, shoes, jewelry, and accessories, with helpful personal customer service.

What makes it a Rhody Gem? Nominator Antonia Soares says that owner Rachel Wills-Russell is an integral part of what makes this shop so special. “She takes an interest in everyone that walks into her shop and always has great suggestions for whatever you are shopping for in her boutique. Rachel carries a great collection of dresses for all occasions, as well as fun accessories. There are a lot of talented women running small businesses in this state, and Rachel is definitely one of them!

LOLA 120 North Main Street 383-0021 Facebook: LOLA

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

Photography by Savannah Barkley for Providence Monthly

Where to find it: That section past where South Main turns to North Main, just before Meeting Street. Look for the red hanging sign.

To submit your Rhody Gem, please email Elyse@ProvidenceOnline.com


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25


The Showman Trinity Repertory Theatre puts the complicated life of Buddy Cianci onstage for the first time By Robert Isenberg

On the day I took office I knew as much about being mayor as I knew about brain surgery. If I had known then what the job actually required, I wouldn’t have voted for myself. - BUDDY CIANCI, Politics and Pasta


O

Obviously, Buddy Cianci should star in a stage play. Why not? The man did everything else. He spent 21 years in office. He prosecuted gangsters. He hosted his own radio show. He sold marinara sauce. He attended Little League games. He kept multiple mistresses. He sometimes flew around in a helicopter. He rose to unprecedented heights of political power; he was convicted of racketeering; he spent more than four years in “a federally funded gated community.” And on and on. But you know all this – whether you live on the East Side or in Honolulu – because the posthumous Buddy Cianci is even more famous than the living Buddy Cianci. Crimetown, which is basically just a chronicle of Cianci’s breakneck life, has become one of the most successful podcasts of all time. David Mamet, the iconic tough-guy dramatist, allegedly wrote a screenplay about him. And even if you skip Cianci’s own autobiography, Politics and Pasta, you may enjoy Mike Stanton’s 2003 bestseller, The Prince of Providence: The True Story of Buddy Cianci, America’s Most Notorious Mayor, Some Wiseguys, and the Feds. This is the book that Trinity Repertory Theatre now adapted for stage, minus the cumbersome subtitle. This is the world premiere that Rhode Islanders have been clamoring for. This is the production that the Boston Globe dubbed “the new Hamilton.” By the time you read these words, the entire run may be sold out. “It’s such a fascinating, captivating story,”

Photo by David Jacobson

Marc Smerling and Zac Stuart-Pontier of Crimetown

says Tyler Dobrowsky, associate artistic director at Trinity Rep. “It’s almost Shakespearean.” “He was, and is, a very divisive figure,” says Taibi Magar, the show’s director. Like a mix of Hamlet and Lear, Cianci made choices that touched on bigger themes. “I hope the audience walks away pondering the larger questions underneath his story: What made him that way? Was he always that way, or is the system engineered for corruption? How did the leading prosecutor of corruption – in his time – become (arguably) the most corrupt politician we have ever had? Also, why did this story happen in Providence? What is the story of this city?” A play about Cianci might have been produced anytime in the past few years, but Trinity had to wait for the film rights to expire, because they were bundled with the theatrical rights. Indeed, Stanton has reportedly entertained several dramatic adaptations of his book, but none of them ever panned out. Once the rights ran out in 2016, the Trinity staff saw their chance. With Stanton’s blessing, Trinity could bring that story to life, beneath spotlights, in the heart of Cianci’s hometown. But how do you solve a problem like Vincent Cianci, Jr.? How do you turn such an epic life into a play? His career is outsized, too colorful to summarize in two hours. What moments do you pick? How do you paint such a controversial figure, such a prismatic personality? Do you include his military service? Do you mention

his last-minute engagement to a model half his age? How much time do you dedicate to the assault charges, and how much to the racketeering trial? Couldn’t his relationship with former mayor Joseph Paolino, both combative and fraternal, become its own miniseries? How do you put an entire urban facelift – the downtown mall and rerouted rivers that Cianci championed – on a single stage, if at all? The answer: very carefully. The first step is to hire a confident playwright. George Brant has penned dozens of scripts, and his last contribution to Trinity, Into the Breeches!, was also a historical drama. Before he settled in New York, Brant lived for a decade in Providence, and he knows the city intimately. Next, you build a story around Cianci’s life, showing major events in chronological order. The first act follows his first term in office, concluding with the brutal interrogation of Raymond DeLeo – by far his most infamous chapter. In the second act, we see Cianci’s return to power, the FBI investigation that brought him down, and the prosecution that (sort of) ended his political career. But you have to finesse the details. At least one character is a composite of two real-life people, and much of the dialogue is imagined. Unlike, say, The Laramie Project, The Prince of Providence is not documentary in nature; the play recreates real people, events, and one liners as dramatic scenes. Despite all the broadcasts, depositions,


An empty Trinity Rep stage – the

Photography by Mike Braca

calm before the Cianci storm

and hidden cameras, there’s a lot of history that no one recorded, and a playwright like Brant needs to connect the dots on his own. Finally, you anchor the production in a single place. The scenes unfold in several locations: in the mayor’s residence, in a radio booth, in a courthouse, even in a moving car. Yet the main set, designed by Sara Brown, found its inspiration in the Alderman Room, one of the chambers in City Hall. Here, the walls are adorned with portraits of past Providence mayors – perhaps symbolizing the legacy of office. Using “lights and other stage tricks,” the audience will be whisked from one place to the next, but the background is always the stately home of City government. A year ago, Brant brought his script to Trinity to be read aloud. This kind of play is tricky; its story is based on the exploits of an actual person, and it covers 30 years of local events. But the read-through was a smash. The Trinity staff loved it. “He’s an excellent, excellent writer who’s familiar with Providence,” says Dobrowsky. “Everyone in the room was so impressed with how George was able to tell the story. Everyone was like, ‘This is going to be amazing.’” Retelling these events isn’t easy, but the hardest part about the Cianci story is telling it the right way. Once he was released from prison, the former mayor was fairly open – even good-humored – about his foibles in office. Yet people still love him. To this day, supporters insist that

the ends justified the means. Cianci dedicated his life to lifting Providence out of the doldrums. Love him or hate him, there is no way to imagine our capital without his influence. As Judge Ernest Torres put it, at the end of the Operation Plunder Dome trial: “There appear to be two very different Buddy Ciancis. The first is a skilled and charismatic political figure, probably one of the most talented politicians Rhode Island has ever seen. [The other] presided over an administration that is rife with corruption at all levels.” Trinity has handled delicate topics before: Boots on the Ground told the story of Iraqi war veterans from Rhode Island; the script was based on actual interviews. The America Too series is similarly based on real conversations, dramatizing up-to-the-minute social issues like DACA, race relations, and police conduct. Yet Cianci is a special case. The common refrain is, “Everybody has a Buddy story.” Magar only spent three years in Providence, while a student at Brown, but even she has a story. “The only time I ever encountered him was at The Columbus Day Parade in 2014, as he was campaigning for the election that year,” Magar recalls. “I remember seeing a general hubbub about half a mile down Atwells, and then slowly a crowd gathered around and behind him. It was very cinematic. I remember mostly just finding him mysterious, how could someone be so loved and so hated?” Thanks to Crimetown, millions of people around the world know the intricacies of Cianci’s life, that strange imbalance. From a theatrical

standpoint, Brant has tried to humanize Cianci, to explore his many virtues and vices. “We’re not necessarily saying Buddy was a really good guy, but we’re not condemning him, either,” says Dobrowsky. “He was a pugnacious fighter, but also a charismatic person. There are people who consider him a criminal, but also really like him.” The Trinity staff is expecting a vocal response. The story is close to local hearts – and lest we forget, Cianci passed away only three years ago. As with all Trinity productions, the theater will host a semi-formal talk, Context and Conversation, before each show. Hosted by Christina Bevilacqua, Trinity’s “conversationalist in residence,” the series gives any ticket holder the chance to ask questions and hear more about the play. There’s only one downside to producing this play in 2019: Cianci himself isn’t around to see it. If you know the man, you can just picture him socializing in the lobby. You can imagine him waving from his seat on opening night, absorbing applause. What would he think of Scott Aielo, the New York-based actor who will portray him onstage? What would he say of Rebecca Gibel, the actress playing his wife Sheila? The man loved attention, and he knew himself well. When the curtain fell, what zinger would he have offered? “I have been called many things in my career,” Cianci once wrote. “I’ve been ‘America’s most innovative mayor,’ a ‘colorful character,’ and a convicted felon. But no one has ever called me shy.”


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from

Truck Tab to


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N a given day in Providence, you can find

any of the city’s nearly 60 food trucks rolling down the streets, serving everything from tacos to vegan ice cream to French food from a Michelin-starred chef. They can be anywhere from College Hill to the Jewelry District, usually for lunch, but in the warmer weather, for dinner, too. It seems like every time you turn around, there’s another food business popping up, feeding Providence’s insatiable appetite for the new. Over the last year or two, the food truck scene in the city morphed into something new. Mobile food businesses, whether they’re trucks, trailers, or pop-ups, have been transitioning into brick-and-mortar stores. Nitro Cart parlayed the popularity of their nitrogen-infused cold brew coffee into placing tanks at restaurants and cafes all over Rhode Island, and eventually opened The Nitro Bar inside Dash Bicycles on Broadway. Fully Rooted started their cold-pressed juices at farmers’ markets around the state, and now has a production facility/cafe in Pawtucket, and a juice counter in downtown Providence at Current State, the wellness center and fitness studio owned by Alex and Ani. This past winter, Tricycle Ice Cream took over the spot once owned by North Bakery on the West Side, and is now selling 4,500 frozen treats a week in peak season. Randy Diantuono and Tom Wright’s Friskie Fries opened a truck to feed hungry customers leaving Randy’s bars (The Dark Lady and The Alley Cat) at closing time. The business quickly went from a single mobile operation to standing locations in Johnston, Providence, Barrington, and Newport, with 50 employees and an expansion into Massachusetts, Colorado, and California in the works for later this year. The transition from food truck to restaurant seems like a natural progression, and in a way it is, but if you know anything about starting a business in Providence or trying to get it funded through traditional channels, you know the process is not nearly as easy as it seems.

Smoke and Squeal BBQ

Photography by Brandon Harmon

le

How Providence’s mobile food businesses are putting down permanent roots in the city • By Julie Tremaine


Photography by Kendall Pavan St. Laurent

Nitro Cart

mobile food service. “There are some food trucks that I saw and thought, we could really be doing this,” Adam says. “A lot of the reason restaurants fail is the massive overhead. A food truck has less overhead and more control over those costs.” Fast forward two years – two challenging years of long seven-day weeks – and he’s gone from being the only employee to having four other people working full-time for him, and operating a commissary and cafe in Pawtucket that serves lunch and is also a prep kitchen for the truck. During PVDFest this year, Smoke

Rebelle Artisan Bagels

Photography Mike Braca

T

rying to jump into a restaurant is such a high startup cost. It just wasn’t going to happen,” says Adam Batchelder, who launched his Smoke and Squeal BBQ truck in 2017, serving 17-hour smoked brisket and pulled pork right out of his mobile smoker. The Johnson & Wales grad came from a corporate culinary background, so he understood what it takes to run a food business, not just in terms of money, but in terms of manpower and sweat equity, too. He knew there was no way he’d be able to finance a brickand-mortar location – but saw possibility in

and Squeal served 500 pounds of its signature smokey mac & cheese, which was being churned out of the commissary and sent to the truck as fast as it could be made. A business that’s mobile, with its increased visibility and the ability to be present at different events, has its own kind of marketing. This is especially with food businesses, that create so much word-of-mouth and organic buzz from customers sharing photos on social media. A food truck is also proof of concept, a way to test whether your food works with customers’ palates.


Photography Mike Braca

Tricycle Ice Cream

Rebelle Artisan Bagels

Photography Mike Braca

T

he popularity of their Hawaiian-style poke bowls, which have a rice base and are traditionally made with raw tuna and salmon and toppings like tobiko and seaweed salad, proved to Hometown Poké owners Rebecca Brady and Tiffany Ting that their mobile trailer could transition into a business. “The cart really allowed us to test our market, since we weren’t sure if people would be receptive to this sort of food,” says Rebecca. She and Tiffany started serving poke in August 2017, and opened their permanent Mount Hope location last fall. “When we did open the store, we had a pretty loyal base of customers. That made opening easier.” The two used the profits from their year of only having a food truck to fund the store’s buildout, and used personal lines of credit to finance the rest. “No traditional bank would give us a loan because food businesses are considered risky,” says Rebecca. “If we could have opened a store right away, we probably would have, but we didn’t have that sort of capital. It’s okay though, because it allowed us to be scrappy.” The four months of bagel pop-up events that Milena Pagan held before opening Rebelle Artisan Bagels


in 2017 definitely also fall into that scrappy category. Successful businesses like Borealis Coffee Roasters, PVDonuts, and Revival Brewing hosted events and did early collaborations with her, and Milena eventually had enough critical mass to support a Kickstarter campaign to open her East Side bakery cafe. Even with a solid amount of money from the pop-ups and a Kickstarter that exceeded its goal by $2,500 (the total was over $27,000), she still only had a third of the capital she needed for buildout. Now, with the success of her shop and the help that got her to this place, Milena sees it as her role to support new food producers. “I definitely have a personal philosophy that part of my role is supporting other businesses,” she says. “You have to be really mindful of your costs up to a certain point, but past that point you have a little more wiggle room. This is the time to have fun and support other local producers, right?” The Burgundian Coffee and Waffles started as a popup serving sweet and savory liege waffles at different locations around Rhode Island, and now has a food truck and plans for a double decker British bus that will be a mobile cafe with enclosed seating for 26 up top. It’s one of the businesses that has gotten a foothold in the local food scene with support from people like Milena, Brian Dwiggins at Borealis, and Jan Faust-Dane at Stock Culinary Goods. “They understand that there are so many people who have helped them start up,” says Burgundian owner Shane Matlock. “All these businesses were just ready to help someone else like they were helped.” In other cities, Shane says, there isn’t that same level of support and collaboration. “Whenever I talk to popup food vendors in Boston, it’s not that way,” he says. “I don’t even think it’s necessarily the lack of desire, I think it’s just such a big city,” compared to Providence. “The community is really tight here,” Shane says. “We’re all trying to navigate everything that’s going on. From talking to other food vendors, it really is unique to Providence. It’s great to be a part of that.”

Friskie Fries

Photogrpahy by Brandon Harmon

Hometown Poké


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LIFE & STYLE Shop • Home • Influencer SHOP

by Elyse Major • photos courtesy of Lemon & Line 1

Ship Shape For as long as David Norton can remember, he’s loved sailing. His family would take their Pearson 36 Orion sailboat to Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket, Block Island, and beyond. A staple of the experience was always donning an old school turks head bracelet, also known as a knot bracelet. “The cotton ones that shrink to your wrist, they get funky by the end of summer… but that was the whole point,” David chuckles. However, as an adult, David thought there’s got to be a better – and cleaner way – to wear one’s passion for sailing and summertime. Brainstorming over Dark ‘n’ Stormy cocktails in the cockpit of his boat, a concept for marine-grade knotted bracelets was hatched. “Where better to drum up salty creativity than in your favorite harbor, drinking your favorite drink,” says David, who uttered “Lemon & Line” for a company name, and it stuck. Nearly a decade since debuting their version of the classic square knot, the range has expanded to include belts, dog leashes, and more. Bracelets and accessories are constructed from seaworthy materials like recycled plastic, with features like stainless steel hardware that won’t rust, corrode, or fade, making products suited for both land and sea. Products are handcrafted in Newport and available around the state.

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39


LIFE & STYLE • Home

by Elyse Major

Tip: Use large potted plants to soften hard lines and fill rooms with natural color

THE SHOP OWNER’S HOUSE Priya Himatsingka appreciates the serenity of white walls. Inside ph Factor, her gift and accessories shop on Hope Street, white walls create a gallery-like vibe and colorful wares are displayed along walls on shelves and hooks, resulting in a narrow space that feels twice its width. This anything-but-stark version of minimalism carries over to Priya’s private home as

well. In the Wayland Square Greek Revival she shares with her children, white walls are the perfect foil for motifs, textures, and orderly assemblages. “All my walls are white,” says Priya. “I prefer to introduce color and pattern through art and objects.” Born in Calcutta, India, from a family of textile designers, Priya moved to Providence from New York City in the late ‘90s to attend Want your home featured in Providence Monthly? Email Elyse@ProvidenceOnline.com to learn more

Photography by Grace Lentini

A peek inside the Wayland Square home of ph Factor’s Priya Himatsingka


RISD. Soon after graduating with a degree in Jewelry & Metalsmithing, she founded her Himatsingka jewelry studio and line. “At heart, I’m a big-city person. However, I’ve lived in Providence for 22 years and absolutely love it here,” says Priya. “The people in Rhode Island are warm and friendly. RISD and Brown offer so much to the cultural landscape of the city. And the restaurants here are amazing.” Describing her style as “fairly minimal; simple, uncomplicated, and fresh,” Priya generally begins decorating with white walls and wooden floors.

“Any color inside the house typically comes from objects – I can never seem to commit to brightly colored walls or upholstery.” she says. Over years of travel and recent buying trips for the store, Priya has amassed an interesting array of art and articles – everything from antiques to patinated machine parts to street kitsch – which infuse streamline spaces with personality. Oddly enough, Priya’s house was the first of over 30 properties she toured with a realtor. Initially out of her range, the price eventually dropped and she was able to make the purchase.

“I absolutely love the blueprint of the house – it feels so bright and spacious. The layout is open and every room has big windows,” says Priya, who enjoys cooking and entertaining. “I particularly like the eat-in kitchen with its French windows overlooking the back deck.” “Today, I’m a busybody,” Priya says with a laugh. “I split time between my home, the store, and the jewelry studio. Thankfully, all three are within a two-mile radius so I rarely have to drive far. In other words: I’m now a bona fide Rhode Islander.”

GET RHODY STYLE Retail or residential, Priya Himatsingka takes a simple approach to decorating. Take these cues to achieve her crisp yet layered look in your home.

STORAGE HACKS Open cabinetry, floating shelves, and rows of hooks are great ways to make wall space double as storage. LIGHTEN UP Make even small areas appear larger with white walls, minimal window treatments, and plenty of natural light. HOPE & MAIN Priya lists many of her retail neighbors (ph Factor, 780 Hope St.) as favorite small businesses, including Blooming Blossoms, Evolve, Kreatelier, and Seven Stars. “I also love Simple Pleasures and RISD Works,” she says. ON DISPLAY Arrange everyday items like books, stacks of magazines, even shoes, in a such a way that they function as decorative accents when not in use. PLANT CITY Use potted plants of all sizes to add organic shapes and colors to surfaces and corners.

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

41


LIFE & STYLE • The Influencer

by Jackie Ignall

Ashley Erling Director of Local Content & Executive Producer at The Rhode Show

would be a pair of statement earrings. I feel they complete an outfit. My go-to choice is a pair of hoops. Maybe I’m taking the J.Lo thing too far, but I feel they make you instantly cooler. When I dress for television, I wear more form-fitting clothes, which is not my comfort zone, but anything loose or baggy on TV can read as frumpy or make you look like you put on extra pounds. I recently wore a wicked cute jumpsuit, which is adorable in real life, but on camera I looked like a blob. Lesson learned. I can find a piece of clothing I like almost anywhere, but more often than not I am a bargain hunter. I love searching the racks at Wrentham Outlets and TJ Maxx because you can find high-end pieces for low-end prices. I splurge on occasion for classic pieces such as a great blazer or something fabulous. I try to shop locally when I can, as well as to find pieces that are special or know will be unique. Everyday is different at work and I’m constantly meeting new people and learning about places. I love that no matter where you are in Rhode Island, you are never far from the ocean. Being able to sit by the water with a little breeze and relax is my absolute favorite thing to do. I went to Roger Williams and have been obsessed with the state ever since. The dining scene is unparalleled and there are always up and coming shopping areas that I love to explore!

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

Photography by Wolf Matthewson

My style is classic with a trend forward edge. Think Jackie O. meets J.Lo – I think I’m trying to make that a thing. My look changes a bit depending on the season. A great pair of jeans is always the best, but in the warmer months I gravitate toward fun, brightly colored dresses. One item that I wear mostly everyday


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FOOD & DRINK In the Kitchen • Food News • Experience • Restaurant Guide

WORTH CELEBRATING A baker’s quest to provide vegan and gluten free treats For gluten eaters and gluten-free diners alike, the sound of a vegan cake made without flour just sounds, well…unappetizing – until you see one of Becky Morris’s cakes. One look at her Instagram and you’ll know what we’re talking about. Beautiful tablescapes are finished off with edible art. The cake centerpieces are adorned with edible flowers, molded into clean, crisp shapes, and decorated with colorful icing. It’s enough to make anyone become a vegan, full time. At Celebrated, Becky wants her customers to feel just that – special and celebrated by her creations. “Cakes are a universal symbol of celebration, joy, and togetherness. Every special occasion in my household was marked with a celebratory cake in the center of the table. Whether it’s blowing out the candles on your birthday, slicing that first piece on your wedding day, or just eating cake for the sake of eating cake,” says Becky.

In 2017, Becky began her endeavor shortly after getting engaged in Italy. The idea came when she and her fiance couldn’t find a New England bakery that would cater to vegan customers. Becky recalls, it was a “lightbulb moment.” From there, that gap in the market became a full-blown business. The entrepreneur says that her cakes are made to the specifications of her customers. No two cakes are made the same. Celebrated’s menu was designed to give clients the flexibility to make their own choices without restrictions. However, Becky recommends customers try her lemon layer cake filled with fresh raspberries and lemon curd. You can find Celebrated creations at Plant City in Providence, and Becky services all of Rhode Island and parts of Massachusetts for your vegan confectioner needs. Woonsocket, Celebrated.co. -Lauren Vella

Photo courtesty of Celebrated ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

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Food & Drink • In The Kitchen

by Lauren Vella

West Side Story Julian’s reflects on 25 years

Edward Pontarelli Jr., CRPC® Financial Advisor Managing Director Beacon Point Wealth Advisors A financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. 401.824.2532 1 Citizens Plaza, Ste 610 Providence, RI 02903 ed.pontarelli@ampf.com ameripriseadvisors.com/team/ beacon-point-wealth-advisors

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WALLPAPER? VISIT KREATELIER!

In the mid-1990s, Federal Hill was different – drastically different – from the blossoming West Side we know today. Buddy Cianci was mayor, and his administration was determined to “clean-up” the state’s capital and enstate a renaissance. During this time, Julian Forgue moved back from California to open a restaurant in his hometown and take care of his ailing father. After 25 years, Julian’s remains a local favorite and a pioneer in the West Side rehabilitation. Julian’s had humble beginnings. Originally,

kreatelier.com 46

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

the restaurant was supposed to be a coffee shop where people could sit, have a chat, and maybe even eat a muffin or some other baked good. The initial business plan made sense because Julian had little-to-no culinary experience, and a cafe with simple sweets seemed doable. But over time, the owner grew his clientele, and with it, the menu. With a nostalgic chuckle, Julian recalls some of his regulars asking for cooked eggs, and egg sandwiches on bagels. Eventually, he was serving fullblown meals and business was good.

Photography by Brandon Harmon

Pictured here: Co-Owner Brian Oakley


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What might be more interesting than Julian’s path to success though is the part the restaurant has played in the revitalization of the area. Co-owner Brian Oakley recalls when he began working there, he and Julian would do the best they could to clean their space and their section of the street, hoping the rest of the area would follow suit. In one case, their “fixer-upper” mentality saved lives. “They used to have dog fights in the lot across from us opposite the old Depasquale Pharmacy. The hedges were so overgrown that folks passing by couldn’t tell what was going on in there. So one day Julian, myself, and one of the chefs went across the street and cut back all the overgrowth and cleaned it up” says Brian, proudly. The good deed was followed by stoppage of the dog fights and gratitude from the community. Since the 1990s, Julian’s has come a long way, and so has the West Side. The menu and the interior decor of the restaurant reflects the group it serves: a community of diverse, quirky, vibrant people. The menu has expanded to include items that made the eclectic joint famous: from their inventive benedicts and falafel to their meat-free shakshuka. Part of this variety is due to Julian’s own travels and dabblings around the world. But another part is due to his knowledgeable staff. Says Julian, “I was never scared to hire people that knew more than me. I couldn’t go to school because I was running a business. School had to come to me.” Recently, a space beside the main restaurant has been plastered with a little Kool Aid man and a “J” design, intimating that the business is going to expand. Both Brian and Julian would not divulge what’s coming into this small storefront. However, Brian made sure to mention that, contrary to what the sign says, it will not be a drivethrough. To Brian, Julian, and their staff: Cheers to another 25 years!

Julian’s 318 Broadway, Providence • 861-1770 JuliansProvidence.com

Celebrating 85 years | Family Owned and Operated 100 SABRA STREET, CRANSTON • 781-9693 • TWINOAKSREST.COM

Green Space Makes Cities Great

FREE ARTS + CULTURAL EVENTS IN BURNSIDE PARK CONTINUE THROUGH SEPTEMBER! Tuesdays 3:00 – 6:00 | Kidoinfo Play in the Park Wednesdays 11:00 – 2:00 | Art Days at the Imagination Center Wednesdays 12:30 – 1:30 | Noon Tunes, sponsored by The Dean For directions & complete schedule of events, visit: www.provparksconservancy.org | @KennedyPlazaPVD

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

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BREAKFAST IS SERVED!

FOOD & DRINK • Food News

Tiki Time Keep summer fun going into September with these fun cocktails! Summer isn’t endless in Rhode Island, but you can keep fall at bay for a few weeks longer by soaking up some island vibes with tropical drinks at a local tiki bar. Here are two to quench your fundrink thirst.

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Most authentic tropical drink: The Navy Grog – a mix of Pusser’s, Gosling’s, and Naked Turtle rums blended with honey syrup, lime and grapefruit juice. Most interesting cocktail: Mount Gay Rum Punch – which you can order by the glass or in a copper punch bowl to share with friends. 373 Richmond Street, Providence. 441-6070, High-Tides.com. OGIE’S TRAILER PARK Prior to the current revival, tiki culture had its heyday in the 1950s, reflecting a postwar fascination with the South Pacific in the era of bigfinned cars, Elvis, and above-ground nuclear testing. No restaurant in Rhode Island captures that mid-century spirit like Ogie’s Trailer Park, so grab a seat at the grass-covered tiki bar in Providence’s hippest courtyard eatery and channel the Space Age vibe with some West Side hipsters and hepcats.

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

Most authentic tropical drink: The frozen piña

colada can be found at beach bars all over the world; now try the original tiki version with rich coconut and cream flavor, served on the rocks. Most interesting drink: The Coping Mechanism – a smoky tiki cocktail made with Gosling’s Black Seal rum, falernum, Fernet amaro, maple syrup, lime, and pineapple juice, and garnished with a smoldering cinnamon stick. This item isn’t on the menu, but ask for it at the bar! 1155 Westminster Street, Providence. 383-8200, OgiesTrailerPark.com.

Photo courtesy of High Tides Tiki Bar

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HIGH TIDES ISLAND GRILLE & TIKI BAR This new gem in the Jewelry District takes its tiki seriously, with a list of more than a dozen classic and nouveau tiki drinks, along with flights of fine aged rum. Prints of mid-century beach scenes adorn the bright and welcoming dining room, but you should take your drinks onto the patio while it’s still warm enough to pretend you’re on a beach somewhere.


Photography by Savannah Barkley for Providence Monthly

Classic Comfort The American diner is famous for its egalitarian nature, where laborers sit elbow-to-elbow with CEOs. No place is that more evident than Providence’s Seaplane Diner. Located on an industrial stretch of Allens Avenue, the Seaplane is a foodie oasis among the rugged landscape. Truckers and National Grid linemen sit beside doctors and nurses from the nearby Rhode Island Hospital. Judges and lawyers make their way from the downtown courthouse. Attorney Mike Bottaro (you’ve seen his ads) is a regular.

Marsala are served along with burgers, fries, and meatloaf dinners. Fridays feature fresh seafood. Very few items on the menu are priced over 10 dollars. For David, the Seaplane Diner is a second act. He retired from an engineering job with the State and was introduced to the business by his friend Michael Arena. They coown several eateries, including the Westside Diner, Amanda’s Kitchen, the Lighthouse Restaurant, and the Broadway Diner. “I like diner hours,” he says, only half jok-

The 1950’s eatery is one of only two O’Mahoney diners still in operation in the state (the second is in Newport). Originally in the lot across the street, on the water side of Allens Avenue, it’s name pays homage to the seaplanes that landed in that stretch of Narragansett Bay. Gregarious owner David Penta, who greets customers with a boisterous hello behind the Formica counter, credits the success of the Seaplane to three things: its food, its prices, and its people. The menu offers the standard diner comforts like eggs, pancakes, and waffles. But at 11am, the lunch specials roll out. Lobster ravioli, shrimp tortellini Alfredo, and chicken

ing. They had a go at fine dining in the early aughts with Opia on the East Side. But the late-night hours and the economy took its toll, so their focus returned to the diners. Serving quality food at a low price point helps make the diner “recession proof.” “People come from all over,” he says. “We’ve had diner groupies who go from state to state visiting vintage diners. I’m sure it’s partly nostalgia that brings them out. But it’s the food and the people that keep them coming back.” For example, no one on his wait staff has worked at the Seaplane for less than 10 years. “I need my staff,” he says, adding, “I don’t know how to cook!” -Karen Greco

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

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FOOD & DRINK • Experience

by Robert Isenberg

Lunch in the Square Bettola brings superlative pizza and hip dining to a quaint corner of Cranston Bettola opened last December in Cranston, and it’s already famous for its pizzas. By all means – try the pizza. The oven is an enormous dome coated in decorative tile. The dough is fermented an extra day, and the crust emerges puffy and scorched in all the right places. The flavor of sourdough bread smacks you in the face. You can build your own pizza, using toppings like chorizo, crispy eggplant, and lemon aioli. Recently, Bettola’s pizza was named the

best in the state; this is a bold claim for such a young restaurant, but merited. Still, precocious pizza-making wasn’t the reason I first walked into Bettola. The draw was Rolfe Square, that picturesque little street in the Auburn neighborhood. Rolfe Square is only a few blocks long, but the sidewalks are lined with trees and specialty shops. In other words, it’s the perfect place for a hip pizza joint, especially when you live nearby, and

you’re looking for a great lunch deal. The fact is, Bettola is a handsome place, and it fits cozily into its environs. The owners cut their teeth on Basta, the upscale Italian restaurant, and they know how to make an eatery inviting. Yet Bettola is jauntier, with playful names and fonts. The decor is simple: exposed white brick, wooden pizza peels attached to the wall, and a floor-toceiling mural of Sofia Loren. Printed across

Photography by Brandon Harmon

San Gennaro Pizza, Marilyn Monroe Pizza, Gin Frizzante cocktail, and Red Moon Marjarita

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019


Bettola Wings

Experience. Integrity. Results.

CALL Gerri Schiffman (401) 474-3733 one surface is the maxim, “Wine is the only artwork you can drink.” I ate lunch at the bar, where I could yuk it up with the bartender. The lunch special is a steal at $9, and it comes with a cup of rich bean soup. If you have a standard appetite, the half-sandwich should satisfy you long into evening. I tried the Truffle Shuffle, made of crispy chicken, mozzarella, and prosciutto. The name is a cheeky reference to the 1985 cult film The Goonies, but it also alludes to the drizzle of white truffle sauce. The tower of meat was unwieldy, and I had to attack its vertical build from multiple angles. The bartender laughed. Then I laughed. And then she said, “You just have to dive in.” Bettola means “tavern” in Italian, and it’s exactly the addition Rolfe Square needed. You can drop in before catching a

CUISINE: Pizza and Italian PRICES: Appetizers $6-$11, Entrees $9-$16 ATMOSPHERE: Hip pizzeria and pub

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show at Theatre 82, or after a shopping trip at Durfee Hardware. You can visit late, when all the neighbors are closed, and try one of the many cocktails – the Mules, in particular.

Bettola 44 Rolfe Square, Cranston • 522-5222 Bettola.com

gerrischiffman.com

residentialproperties.com gerri@residentialproperties.com ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

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PARKSIDE ROSTISSERIE & BAR 76 South Main Street, Providence / (401)331-0003 www.ParksideProvidence.com


RESTAURANT GUIDE For full restaurant profiles, go to ProvidenceOnline.com

F E AT U R E D R E S TA U R A N T

LaMei Hot Pot

256 Broadway, Providence 831-7555, LaMeiHotPot.com

SEA FOOD

SEA FRIENDS PROVIDENCE AREA 10 Prime Steak & Sushi Fashionable prime steakhouse with award-winning sushi. 55 Pine St, Providence, 453-2333. LD $$$ Caserta Pizzeria Casual kid-friendly pizza spot offering traditional Italian crisp-cut pizza and calzones. 121 Spruce St, Providence, 621-3818. LD $-$$ CAV Eclectic cuisine and art in a historic setting. 14 Imperial Place, Providence, 751-9164. BrLD $$-$$$ Chapel Grille Gourmet food overlooking the Providence skyline. 3000 Chapel View Blvd, Cranston, 944-4900. BrLD $$$ Character’s Cafe & Theatre Hybrid art space with all-day breakfast, coffee, and theaterinspired entrees. 82 Rolfe Sq, Cranston, 4909475. BL $ Don Jose Tequilas Restaurant Homestyle Mexican fare plus beer, wine, and cocktails in

a colorful setting. 351 Atwells Ave, Providence, 454-8951. LD $-$$ Harry’s Bar & Burger Called the “Best Burger in America” by CNN. Over 50 craft beers. 121 N Main St, Providence, 228-7437; 301 Atwells Ave, 228-3336. LD $-$$ Haruki Japanese cuisine and a la carte selections with casual ambience. Locations in Cranston and Providence, HarukiSushi.com. LD $-$$

SEA VIEW

Joe Marzelli’s Old Canteen Italian Restaurant High-end Italian restaurant serving up specialty dishes and drinks. 120 Atwells Ave, Providence. 751-5544. LD $$$ Julian’s A must-taste Providence staple celebrating more than 20 years. 318 Broadway, Providence, 861-1770. BBrLD $$ Luigi’s Restaurant & Gourmet Express Handmade Italian classics and prepared foods to go. 1457 Hartford Ave, Johnston, 455-0045. LD $$

40 Ocean Road Narragansett 401.789.0700 thecoastguardhouse.com ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

53


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RESTAURANT GUIDE Luxe Burger Bar Build Your Own Burger: You dream it, we build it! 5 Memorial Blvd, Providence, 621-5893. LD $

The Salted Slate An agri-driven American restaurant with global influences. 186 Wayland Ave, Providence, 270-3737. BrLD $$-$$$

Parkside Rotisserie & Bar American bistro specializing in rotisserie meats. 76 South Main St, Providence, 331-0003. LD $-$$

Tortilla Flats Fresh Mexican, Cajun, and Southwestern fare, cocktails, and over 70 tequilas. 355 Hope St, Providence, 751-6777. LD $-$$

Pizza J Fun, upbeat atmosphere with thin-crust pizza, pub fare, and gluten-free options. 967 Westminster St, Providence, 632-0555. LD $-$$ Red Stripe Casual French-American bistro. 465 Angell St, Providence, 437-6950; 455 Main St, East Greenwich, 398-2900. BrLD $$ Siena Impeccable Italian cuisine. Locations in Providence, East Greenwich, and Smithfield, 5213311. D $$-$$$ Sydney Providence Australian-inspired cafe and coffee shop featuring breakfast and light lunch options. 400 Exchange St, Providence, 648-4994. BL $-$$

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

Twin Oaks Family restaurant serving an extensive selection of Italian and American staples. 100 Sabra St, Cranston, 781-9693. LD $-$$$

Coast Guard House A new American menu with a seafood emphasis and extensive wine list, open seven days a week. 40 Ocean Rd, Narragansett, 789-0700. BrLD $$$ Colvitto’s Pizza & Bakery Pizza Calzones and baked goods made fresh daily. 91 Point Judith Rd, Narragansett, 783-8086. BrLD $ Eleven Forty Nine City sophistication in the suburbs. 1149 Division St, Warwick, 884-1149. LD $$$

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George’s of Galilee Fresh-caught seafood in an upscale pub atmosphere. 250 Sand Hill Cove Rd, Narragansett, 783-2306. LD $-$$

Breachway Grill Classic New England fare, plus NY-style pizza. 1 Charlestown Beach Rd, Charlestown, 213-6615. LD $$

Mariner Grille Seafood, steaks, and pasta in a fun setting, with live entertainment. 40 Point Judith Rd, Narragansett, 284-3282. LD $$

Champlin’s Seafood Dockside fresh seafood serving easy breezy cocktails. 256 Great Island Rd, Narragansett, 783-3152. LD $-$$

Pasquale’s Pizzeria Napoletana Authentic Neapolitan wood-fired pizza with exclusive ingredients imported from Naples. 60 S County


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RESTAURANT GUIDE Commons Way, South Kingstown, 783-2900. LD $-$$ Red Stripe Casual French-American bistro. 465 Angell St, Providence, 437-6950; 455 Main St, East Greenwich, 398-2900. BrLD $$ Siena Impeccable Italian cuisine. Locations in Providence, East Greenwich, and Smithfield, 5213311. D $$-$$$ Sophie’s Brewhouse Espresso drinks and sandwiches with an emphasis on fresh, local ingredients. 699 S County Trail, Exeter, 2954273. BL $$ Tavern by the Sea Waterfront European/ American bistro. 16 West Main St, Wickford, 2945771. LD $$ The Cove Traditional bar and grill serving burgers, sandwiches, and classic New England seafood favorites. 3963 Old Post Rd, Charlestown, 364-

9222. LD $$ Twin Willows Fresh seafood and water views in a family-friendly atmosphere. 865 Boston Neck Rd, Narragansett, 789-8153. LD $-$$

EAST BAY / NEWPORT Aviary Creative, locally sourced menu featuring rotating craft beers and from-scratch cocktails. 2229 GAR Highway, Swansea, MA, 508-3796007. BrLD $$ Blount Market & Kitchen Traditional New England seafood summer favorites offered yearround for dine-in and takeout. 406 Water St, Warren, 245-1800. LD $$ Bluewater Bar and Grill Casual restaurant with modern seafood dishes, patio seating, and live music. 32 Barton Ave, Barrington, 247-0017. LD $$-$$$

Chomp Upscale comfort food featuring awardwinning burgers and sandwiches. 440 Child St, Warren, 289-2324. D $$ East Bay Oyster Bar Local seafood meets innovative preparation in a rustic setting. 308 County Rd, Barrington, 247-0303. LD $$ Ichigo Ichie Traditional Japanese cuisine, creative sushi, and hibachi. 5 Catamore Blvd, East Providence, 435-5511. LD $-$$$ KC’s Burger Bar Burgers, hot dogs, and sides enjoyed in a retro car-themed diner. 1379 Fall River Ave, Seekonk, MA. 508-557-1723. BLD $$ Tav Vino Waterfront dining with an Italian and seafood focus. 267 Water St, Warren, 245-0231. D $$ The Old Grist Mill Tavern Fine dining located over the Runnins River. 390 Fall River Ave, Seekonk, MA, 508-336-8460. LD $-$$$

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

55


the Wolf School

Think differently|Learn differently

BACK to SCHOOL

Learn to Play Squash in Providence at Nicol Squash Club Clinics for all ages and abilities

Jump Start: 4-8 yr olds Rising Stars: Beginners - one year of experience Junior Performance/Tournament Players Fall session begins September 16th Join us for our Junior Open House Events September 6th and 13th, 3:45-5pm

K-8 Special Education School Fall Open House - October 20th

Nicolsquashclub.com for complete details and to register info@nicolsquashclub.com • 401-831-7350 ext: 764

Learn more at thewolfschool.org

Join us for Moses Brown’s annual Open House and Homecoming Extravaganza! A fun fall festival of performances, classroom demos, and community events, come and see Quaker values in action. Tour our historic campus, Robotics lab, and state-of-the-art Woodman Family Community and Performance Arts Center. rsvp today:

mosesbrown.org/admission

Oct. 19, 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.

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Providence, RI Mosesbrown.org Nursery-Grade 12, Co-Ed 56

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

See how a Quaker education can make a difference.


A R T & C U LT U R E Calendar • On Stage • Art • Music

India Point Park transforms for the most iconic Ocean State foodie festival

WE SEAFOOD AND EAT IT September 7-8: It doesn’t get more Rhody than a festival dedicated to the bounty of the sea. The annual Rhode Island Seafood Festival is a can’t-miss if you’re a fan of good food and great company. Indulge in local fare – don’t worry, there’s plenty for landlubbers and

seafarers alike – and spirits, plus a full schedule of live music. Last but not least: You can’t beat the breathtaking view of the city skyline over the water at India Point Park. 263 India Street, Providence, RISeafoodFest.com

Photo courtesy of RI Seafood Festival ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

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ART & CULTURE • Calendar

by Megan Schmit

THE MUST LIST 10 essential events happening this month

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

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September 6-15: The Pawtucket Arts Festival reflects the city’s diverse communities and history through presentations in song, dance, film, theater, and visuals. It’s a celebration of the arts, Pawtucket style. Various locations, Pawtucket, PawtucketArtsFestival.org

September 14: The poster says it all: Little State, Big Music. The Rhode Island Music & Arts Festival features local food, beverages, artists, and of course, tons of music, including The Felice Brothers, Kung Fu, and Bumpin Uglies. India Point Park, Providence, LittleStateBigMusic.com

2

4

September 12-21: Ten days. Multiple events. One mission. Design Week Rhode Island showcases the innovation and economic impact of the design sector in the state through a series of curated events featuring RI talent. Various locations in Providence, DesignXRI.com

September 14-15: Nothing signals the start of fall quite like the apple. To celebrate, Johnston hosts its Annual Apple Festival, where thousands flock to Memorial Park for apple pies, contests, and artisan row. 1583 Hartford Avenue, Johnston, Web.NRIChamber.com

Photography by Brandon Harmon

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We Make Sandwishes Come True

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September 18-21: Fashionistas, it’s the week you’ve been waiting for: New England’s premier STYLEWEEK Northeast brings local, national, and international designers together on the Rhody runway. One Sabin Street, Providence, StyleWeekNortheast.com

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LET US CATER YOUR NEXT EVENT

September 21: Grab your favorite furry friend for the Providence Animal Rescue League’s Pet Walk 2019. Raise money for shelter animals while spending time with your own roaming through Roger Williams Park. Temple to Music, 1000 Elmwood Avenue, Providence, PARL.org

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September 27-April 19: Some of us might shudder at the thought of spiders...but spider silk? RISD Museum presents an exhibit entirely dedicated to the mystifying beauty of the spider web. The Art and Design of Spider Silk features shawls, menswear, and photography. 20 North Main Street, Providence, RISDMuseum.org September 29-October 5: If you’re a fan of “Cheeseburger in Paradise”, you’ll be happy to hear about PPAC’s latest musical. Jimmy Buffett’s Escape to Margaritaville combines famous tunes with a dose of comedy, resulting in a show that’ll “knock your flip flops off!” 220 Weybosset Street, Providence, PPACRI.org

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September 22-28: Flavor comes first during Pawtucket & Central Falls Restaurant Week, a seven-day celebration of all things food. Featuring Latin American, Asian, Cape Verdean, Irish, Italian, and Indian cuisine. Various locations in Pawtucket and Central Falls, RestaurantWeekPCF.com

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“David’s knowledge, connections and welcoming personality were a real plus in selling our home.”

September 21: For the first time, the Rhode Island Heritage Day Festival will take place in Pawtucket, bringing back all the usual fanfare – multicultural fashion show, traditional music and dance, arts and crafts, kid’s area and face painting, and food trucks. 172 Exchange Street, Pawtucket, Preservation.RI.gov

“David is very responsive, knowledgeable, kind, generous and all around a wonderful agent and person.”

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

59


(same good times & happy vibes)

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Bridging People and Places Official Cicilline portrait artist Agustín Patiño paints an interconnected world In 2006, Agustín Patiño painted the mural Plaza of Art and Cultures on the corner of Broad and Ontario Streets. Over the course of two years, the artist rendered a visual bridge between South Providence and the far reaches of our interconnected, “small” earth and to nature itself. A newcomer to Providence at the time, the Ecuadorian native could barely speak English, but passersby would stop and ask him questions, curious about what he was doing there day after day; some even made their way into the painting. Over the course of his career, Agustín has painted countless portraits of influential people – Carlos Fuentes, Fernando Botero – even a billionaire or two. Earlier this year, he painted a commission of David Cicilline standing on a city street; the congressperson first admired Agustín’s work while officiating the unveiling of the Plaza mural as then-mayor. Many people recognize him as a street artist, “but no one knows my real career,” Agustín says. “Even in my country, no one knows because I’m super underground.” He prefers to “be myself,” a self-described “iconoclast” with an “obsessive” technique, while his murals often contain extensive symbolism and conceptual meaning. He sometimes Fishing

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incorporates the tops of real trees into his paintings, or uses trompe l’oeil, such as the faux escalator appearing in his 160’ x 25’ mural at Wheeler School’s Air Museum. Themes of global interconnectivity and nature appear throughout Agustín’s work – even his portraiture. If you look with a magnifying glass, in Cicilline’s portrait you can find tiny animals in the background: cows, dogs, and horses. The artist has exhibited in some of the world’s most cosmopolitan art cities, like New York and Miami, yet chooses to live in Providence with his family, painting out of a small basement studio in Olneyville. He grew up surrounded by rivers, lakes, and national parkland in the towns of Giron and Cuenca, studying architecture for three years before completing a bachelor of arts in Quito, where he trained in painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and ceramics. The beauty of the Amazon continues to inspire him and will be featured extensively in two major upcoming

Photos courtesy of Agustín Patiño

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Dwares Rhode Island

presents

exhibits at Casa de la Cultura in Ecuador. A world traveler, Agustín sees Earth and its cultures as “super small” and “singular,” with cities and nature irrevocably interconnected, especially given the current impacts of climate change. He teaches painting classes regularly at the Providence Art Club, but for four years he has also taught painting to smaller groups of people experiencing poverty, homelessness, mental illness, and other challenges, including immigrants and veterans. He describes them as “my teachers – my philosophers. They teach me a lot every second.” Agustín feels he has witnessed art’s transformative power firsthand. “Art is the only way to help this planet,” he says. “There is no other way. But it’s not easy to change the world with art.”

Agus t í n Patiño

Wonderland L THROUGH A SEASONA TRAVE L

October 3 – November 3

Celebrate the wonders of New England and all its glory and magic at the nationally acclaimed Jack-O-Lantern Spectacular presented by Citizens Bank at Roger Williams Park Zoo. Feast your senses on autumn’s beauty, winter’s swirling snow, spring’s first blossoms and summer’s ocean breezes intricately carved on thousands of pumpkins displayed along the Zoo’s beautiful Wetlands Trail.

Facebook: AgustínPatiño

For more information visit rwpzoo.org/jols

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

61


ART & CULTURE • On Stage

by Robert Isenberg

Big Personalities An avant-garde history lesson, a larger-than-life mayor, and a tour of adolescent diaries light up Providence stages Taylor Mac

VIETNAMESE ENTRÉES & PHO FAVORITES!

MON-THUR 11AM-10PM FRI-SAT 11AM-11PM | SUN 11AM-9PM

50 Ann Mary Street, Pawtucket 401-365-6278 • PhoHorns.com On Providence/Pawtucket line behind LA Fitness

SUMMER

Twice Told Tales 2145 Broad Street, Cranston 785-9599 • TwiceToldTalesRI.com

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ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

FirstWorks Presents Taylor Mac Rest assured, there is no one on earth like Taylor Mac, and you will never see a stage performance like this. Taylor’s singular style is partly by design: The singer/actor/monologuist/drag/artist has enraptured audiences across the nation with his interactive multimedia shows, and he openly opposes the bland categorization of his work. Taylor

was a 2017 recipient of the MacArthur “Genius Grant,” and he has put that award to good use: He has presented a 24-hour stage production about the less-known history of the United States; collaborated with designer Machine Dazzle to create spectacular avant-garde costumes; and brought innumerable audience members onstage to help him create dramatic scenes.

Photo by Sarah Walker

SALE!


Candy Trays • Salt Water Taffy • Wide Assortment of Chocolate Assorted Chocolates • Buttercrunch • Turtles • Gourmet Truffles Sugar-free Chocolates & Non-Chocolate Novelties • Gift Baskets This is exactly the kind of rising talent that FirstWorks was made for. This month, Taylor will finally arrive at The Vets for a one-night performance. Catch this abridged version of his day-long masterpiece, A 24-Decade History of Popular Music. Be advised: Taylor may invite you to join him in the spotlight, and his shows are famous for their variability. But if you do get called up there, just remember: You’re becoming a part of history. September 14, First-Works.org

GARDEN CITY • 401.942.2720

|

WAKEFIELD • 401.783.4433

WWW.SWEENORSCHOCOLATES.COM

The Prince of Providence It was only a matter of time before Buddy Cianci got his own stage play. Based on the book by Mike Stanton, this world premiere chronicles Buddy’s controversial career as mayor of Providence – despite the incredible odds against him, as well as deep personal flaws. In the wake of the Crimetown podcast, Trinity Repertory Company kicks off its 2019-20 season by bringing the bombastic story to life, thanks to a new script by playwright George Brant. It’s hard to predict how this drama will play out, given that Buddy basically ran the city for two separate decades, and a play only lasts so long. But however they tell the story, you can expect tickets to sell out. September 12 - October 20, TrinityRep.com Mortified Suppose you dug out that old diary – the one stored in a deeply buried shoebox. Suppose you reread your sixth grade musings, about best friends and broken hearts and your private-est feelings. Now suppose you read these musings aloud, for a live audience. How would you feel? Mortified! Created by David Nagelberg and Neil Katcher, this storytelling series has entertained and enlightened audiences around the world, and it’s even sparked its own TV series. Mortified will receive its Providence premiere at the Columbus Theatre. With luck, there will be a lot more mortification to follow. September 7, ColumbusTheatre.com

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

63


ART & CULTURE • Music

Leaders in Eye Care since 1927

OFFICIAL EYE CARE PROVIDER OF THE PAWTUCKET RED SOX PROVIDENCE BRUINS

by Adam Hogue

Creative Outlet Plug’s EP Block Out the Sun is distorted rock rooted in AM Gold

Stu Powers, Mark Stone, and Fred Galpern

DR. JOHN D. CORROW DR. CARL D. CORROW DR. J. LAWRENCE NORTON DR. MATTHEW D. DOYLE DR. MICHAEL R. MARTINEZ DR. SCOTT SYLVIA

AdvancedEyeCareRI.com

PROVIDENCE ART GLASS & LIGHTING Custom Quality Lighting / Made in Rhode Island

www.providenceartglass.com 64

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

Within the droning, distorted tones and an angsty alt-rock exterior lies the soul of a pop song recorded among good friends. In many ways, this is the very center of Plug’s EP Block Out the Sun; with an overall rock sound, the band puts together an album of noisy, riff-filled, meaningful tunes that never strays too far from a good hook. “My dark secret is that I’m a sucker for a great pop song,” says singer/songwriter Fred Galpern. “My earliest experience of music was listening to ‘70s Top 40 radio, which my parents played all the time. The Bee Gees and doo-wop tunes were always present and at the time I wouldn’t have claimed them,

but time has shown that stuff to have sunk in deep.” Along with a collection of local players, Fred took many years worth of songs and finally brought them to sonic life. Block Out the Sun has a sound rooted in the late ‘80s/ early ‘90s rock of Fred’s youth, complete with Dinosaur Jr.-esque noise and grunge layered under melodic vocals. “Over several sessions we recorded the basic tracks and then fine-tuned until we had something that we were proud of. We were lucky to have some good friends contribute. Jeff Robbins, from 123 Astronaut and Orbit, played some really cool guitar on the song

Photo courtesy of Plug

780 North Main Street Providence • 401-331-2020


Drown; and Paul ‘Pip’ Everett contributed background vocals to ‘Don’t Be Strong.’” Fred recalls, “Finally, a kind of magical, dream come true thing happened for the song ‘Even Everything.’ I had become casual online friends with a guy named Shawn Smith, one of my favorite singers from Seattle bands Brad, Pigeonhed, and tons of solo records. Shawn was kind enough to contribute vocals to ‘Even Everything’. Sadly, Shawn passed away earlier this year, so it’s bittersweet.” The brief six songs on Block Out the Sun offer many different sides of Plug in a concise and honest way that only presents the true essence of the band without overloading songs just to fill space. The album is intentional and diverse, from slow burning, earnest ballads like “Sad” and “Even Everything” to energy filled rockers like “Dreaming” and “Don’t Be Strong”. What becomes apparent is that for Plug, the guitar solo is alive and well when it needs to be. Plug is on the local record label 75 or Less and the live band features Karen Orsi on guitar; Mark Stone on bass; drummer Stu Powers; and Fred Galpern on vocals and guitar.

SO MANY REASONS

to Visit • • • • •

DINING COFFEE & COCKTAILS BOOKS & ODDITIES JEWELRY & ANTIQUES VINTAGE CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES • SALON SERVICES • SPECIAL EVENTS 65 Weybosset Street / 130 Westminster Street 454-4568 • Downcity Providence • ArcadeProvidence.com

TOP TRACKS: Don’t Be Strong: Driving drums, noisy, layered guitar solos, and vocals on top of that! This song is a great starting point for Plug that offers the ‘90s grunge feel, the hooks and the angst are all in one place! Even Everything: With a slightly delayed effect on the picked arpeggios and tomdrum filled verse, this track offers a lighter, cleaner side of Plug that gives a fully rounded counterpoint to their heavier rockers. It also features Shawn Smith of the Seattle Sub Pop band Pigeonhed on vocals. Plug performs at Pour Farm Tavern, New Bedford; Friday, September 13.

Plug PlugPVD.com

Of Trinity Brewhouse With Us At Our New Downtown Beer Garden 2 Kennedy Plaza | Biltmore Park, Providence

trinitybrewhouse.com

ProvidenceOnline.com • September 2019

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A reflection of dancing flames Submitted by Matt Schmalenberger. Follow him on Instagram @schmallys_vision

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ENJOY AN UNPARALLELED DINING EXPERIENCE AT TEN PRIME STEAK & SUSHI. INDULGENT STEAKS & DESIGNER SUSHI, ACCOMPANIED BY CREATIVE COCKTAILS & AWARD-WINNING WINE SELECTION.

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Providence Monthly September 2019  

Providence Monthly; Truck to Table; Rolling eateries are trading wheels for roots in the city; Ciancis Story Continues Onstage; Doors Open R...

Providence Monthly September 2019  

Providence Monthly; Truck to Table; Rolling eateries are trading wheels for roots in the city; Ciancis Story Continues Onstage; Doors Open R...