Page 1

FEATURES: Chicken soup for the pet owner’s soul

SPORTS: Synchronized swimming star

PHOTO ESSAY: Healthy living

THE PROSPECTOR CUPERTINO HIGH SCHOOL’S

VOLUME 52 NO. 7

10100 FINCH AVENUE, CUPERTINO CA

MAY 27, 2011

Redesign of quad and cafeteria:

Students and staff collaborate with architects to develop plan for renovations

REGINA HONG news assistant

In addition to the ongoing track renovations, CHS plans to start rebuilding other parts of the campus, such as the front building and the quad, by the 2012-2013 school year. In the past, the district passed a construction bond that specifically stated that it could only be used for the construction of new buildings. Therefore, due to the increasing population, the current cafeteria at the front of the school will become a two-story building, which will house the library, cafeteria and guidance and administrative offices. By moving all of these areas into one building, the old library and office space will turn into new classrooms. This will create more flexibility with class space, larger conference areas for the staff and more bathrooms. The quad will also undergo several changes, such as the addition of a stage, new seating arrangements and a better sound system. In order to prepare for the renovation, CHS asked for input from those who are involved with the school, such as students, teachers and other staff members. On May 5, 2011, several members from the Quattrocchi Kwok Architects company came to CHS to ask selected students at a student committee meeting to ask for their

input regarding how the front building and quad should be rebuilt. “We hope for a more modernized, nicer and different campus, but at the same time, we also want to keep the familiarity of Tino,” said sophomore Julia Seaton. At the meeting, students asked for a big and open front building in which upperclassmen and lowerclassmen would not be separated. The structure of the building will resemble that of a student union on a college campus. According to Seaton, the architects respected all of the students’ opinions and tried their best to allow for everyone’s voices to be heard. According to assistant principal Andy Walczak, a student asked to showcase Dusty at the front of the school, so passers-by would be able to see the pride of CHS. The architects also met with the staff members. During this meeting, adults gave their opinions on how the school should be reconstructed. Said librarian Pat Accoriniti, “I’m just really excited about the process. We’ll [Teachers and students] be more accepting of the new building and quad because we were actu see QUAD AND CAFETERIA RESDESIGN, pg 3

SINDHU GNANASAMDANDAN

Students prepare for summer Latin American cultural immersion program HARINI JAGANATHAN editor-in-chief

This summer, juniors Delia Cannon, Noelle Foley and Allison Ness will be traveling to Latin America to work on community service projects through the AMIGOS program. AMIGOS is a nonprofit international organization that provides community service opportunities for young people in areas across Latin America. All three students have been training and preparing for their trip, practicing their Spanish conversational skills, learning about Latin American culture and raising funds to support their service projects. Cannon, Foley and Ness will be living with families in different Latin American communities, and completing projects with just one English speaking partner. They hope to immerse themselves in the culture as well as make a positive impact on the areas they will be traveling to. Foley will be going to Oaxaca, Mexico to build fuel efficient stoves and raise environmental awareness. She will be living in a community for eight weeks.

“I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn more about myself and the world,” Foley said. “We’re sheltered in Cupertino.” Ness will spend six weeks in La Paz, Honduras and her project will focus on teaching the youth about the environment and how to sustain resources. “I was into it because I’m interested in language immersion and community service,” Ness said. “I also want to become more outgoing.” Cannon will be in Cotapaxi, Ecuador for seven weeks teaching youth about health and children’s rights. While Cannon admits that her initial motivations for embarking on this endeavor were college applications and travel opportunity, she found that the issues she will be focusing on in Cotapaxi matter to her. Her motivations for completing her trip have changed. In addition to improving her Spanish listening and speaking skills, Cannon is excited to help the children in the community she will be living in. “I want to make life better for these kids, even if that’s just teaching them how to brush their teeth and clean their hands,” Cannon said. Although all three are excited to immerse themselves in an-

other culture, some aspects of living in another country make them nervous. Cannon is concerned about communicating with the locals as well as living without the comforts of home. “I’m worried that it’ll take me too long to be understood,” Cannon said. “I’m also worried about the lack of American fast food.” Foley is slightly worried about answering difficult questions asked by the locals. “I will be asked about I think about immigration policies there,” she said. “I’m a little nervous about that.” All three find that there are other aspects of the cultural immersion process that excite them. “They eat guinea pig in Cotapaxi,” Cannon said. “When will I ever get to try guinea pig if I don’t try that there?” Cannon, Foley and Ness are excited and nervous about immersing themselves in another culture and isolating themselves from the comforts that Cupertino offers. They anticipate that their trip will bring them a greater understanding of Latin American culture and will be a personal growth experience. They hope to share interesting stories of their journey upon their return.


FEATURES: Chicken soup for the pet owner’s soul

SPORTS: Synchronized swimming star

PHOTO ESSAY: Healthy living

THE PROSPECTOR CUPERTINO HIGH SCHOOL’S

VOLUME 52 NO. 7

10100 FINCH AVENUE, CUPERTINO CA

MAY 27, 2011

Redesign of quad and cafeteria:

Students and staff collaborate with architects to develop plan for renovations

REGINA HONG news assistant

In addition to the ongoing track renovations, CHS plans to start rebuilding other parts of the campus, such as the front building and the quad, by the 2012-2013 school year. In the past, the district passed a construction bond that specifically stated that it could only be used for the construction of new buildings. Therefore, due to the increasing population, the current cafeteria at the front of the school will become a two-story building, which will house the library, cafeteria and guidance and administrative offices. By moving all of these areas into one building, the old library and office space will turn into new classrooms. This will create more flexibility with class space, larger conference areas for the staff and more bathrooms. The quad will also undergo several changes, such as the addition of a stage, new seating arrangements and a better sound system. In order to prepare for the renovation, CHS asked for input from those who are involved with the school, such as students, teachers and other staff members. On May 5, 2011, several members from the Quattrocchi Kwok Architects company came to CHS to ask selected students at a student committee meeting to ask for their

input regarding how the front building and quad should be rebuilt. “We hope for a more modernized, nicer and different campus, but at the same time, we also want to keep the familiarity of Tino,” said sophomore Julia Seaton. At the meeting, students asked for a big and open front building in which upperclassmen and lowerclassmen would not be separated. The structure of the building will resemble that of a student union on a college campus. According to Seaton, the architects respected all of the students’ opinions and tried their best to allow for everyone’s voices to be heard. According to assistant principal Andy Walczak, a student asked to showcase Dusty at the front of the school, so passers-by would be able to see the pride of CHS. The architects also met with the staff members. During this meeting, adults gave their opinions on how the school should be reconstructed. Said librarian Pat Accoriniti, “I’m just really excited about the process. We’ll [Teachers and students] be more accepting of the new building and quad because we were actu see QUAD AND CAFETERIA RESDESIGN, pg 3

SINDHU GNANASAMDANDAN

Students prepare for summer Latin American cultural immersion program HARINI JAGANATHAN editor-in-chief

This summer, juniors Delia Cannon, Noelle Foley and Allison Ness will be traveling to Latin America to work on community service projects through the AMIGOS program. AMIGOS is a nonprofit international organization that provides community service opportunities for young people in areas across Latin America. All three students have been training and preparing for their trip, practicing their Spanish conversational skills, learning about Latin American culture and raising funds to support their service projects. Cannon, Foley and Ness will be living with families in different Latin American communities, and completing projects with just one English speaking partner. They hope to immerse themselves in the culture as well as make a positive impact on the areas they will be traveling to. Foley will be going to Oaxaca, Mexico to build fuel efficient stoves and raise environmental awareness. She will be living in a community for eight weeks.

“I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn more about myself and the world,” Foley said. “We’re sheltered in Cupertino.” Ness will spend six weeks in La Paz, Honduras and her project will focus on teaching the youth about the environment and how to sustain resources. “I was into it because I’m interested in language immersion and community service,” Ness said. “I also want to become more outgoing.” Cannon will be in Cotapaxi, Ecuador for seven weeks teaching youth about health and children’s rights. While Cannon admits that her initial motivations for embarking on this endeavor were college applications and travel opportunity, she found that the issues she will be focusing on in Cotapaxi matter to her. Her motivations for completing her trip have changed. In addition to improving her Spanish listening and speaking skills, Cannon is excited to help the children in the community she will be living in. “I want to make life better for these kids, even if that’s just teaching them how to brush their teeth and clean their hands,” Cannon said. Although all three are excited to immerse themselves in an-

other culture, some aspects of living in another country make them nervous. Cannon is concerned about communicating with the locals as well as living without the comforts of home. “I’m worried that it’ll take me too long to be understood,” Cannon said. “I’m also worried about the lack of American fast food.” Foley is slightly worried about answering difficult questions asked by the locals. “I will be asked about I think about immigration policies there,” she said. “I’m a little nervous about that.” All three find that there are other aspects of the cultural immersion process that excite them. “They eat guinea pig in Cotapaxi,” Cannon said. “When will I ever get to try guinea pig if I don’t try that there?” Cannon, Foley and Ness are excited and nervous about immersing themselves in another culture and isolating themselves from the comforts that Cupertino offers. They anticipate that their trip will bring them a greater understanding of Latin American culture and will be a personal growth experience. They hope to share interesting stories of their journey upon their return.


FEATURES: Chicken soup for the pet owner’s soul

SPORTS: Synchronized swimming star

PHOTO ESSAY: Healthy living

THE PROSPECTOR CUPERTINO HIGH SCHOOL’S

VOLUME 52 NO. 7

10100 FINCH AVENUE, CUPERTINO CA

MAY 27, 2011

Redesign of quad and cafeteria:

Students and staff collaborate with architects to develop plan for renovations

REGINA HONG news assistant

In addition to the ongoing track renovations, CHS plans to start rebuilding other parts of the campus, such as the front building and the quad, by the 2012-2013 school year. In the past, the district passed a construction bond that specifically stated that it could only be used for the construction of new buildings. Therefore, due to the increasing population, the current cafeteria at the front of the school will become a two-story building, which will house the library, cafeteria and guidance and administrative offices. By moving all of these areas into one building, the old library and office space will turn into new classrooms. This will create more flexibility with class space, larger conference areas for the staff and more bathrooms. The quad will also undergo several changes, such as the addition of a stage, new seating arrangements and a better sound system. In order to prepare for the renovation, CHS asked for input from those who are involved with the school, such as students, teachers and other staff members. On May 5, 2011, several members from the Quattrocchi Kwok Architects company came to CHS to ask selected students at a student committee meeting to ask for their

input regarding how the front building and quad should be rebuilt. “We hope for a more modernized, nicer and different campus, but at the same time, we also want to keep the familiarity of Tino,” said sophomore Julia Seaton. At the meeting, students asked for a big and open front building in which upperclassmen and lowerclassmen would not be separated. The structure of the building will resemble that of a student union on a college campus. According to Seaton, the architects respected all of the students’ opinions and tried their best to allow for everyone’s voices to be heard. According to assistant principal Andy Walczak, a student asked to showcase Dusty at the front of the school, so passers-by would be able to see the pride of CHS. The architects also met with the staff members. During this meeting, adults gave their opinions on how the school should be reconstructed. Said librarian Pat Accoriniti, “I’m just really excited about the process. We’ll [Teachers and students] be more accepting of the new building and quad because we were actu see QUAD AND CAFETERIA RESDESIGN, pg 3

SINDHU GNANASAMDANDAN

Students prepare for summer Latin American cultural immersion program HARINI JAGANATHAN editor-in-chief

This summer, juniors Delia Cannon, Noelle Foley and Allison Ness will be traveling to Latin America to work on community service projects through the AMIGOS program. AMIGOS is a nonprofit international organization that provides community service opportunities for young people in areas across Latin America. All three students have been training and preparing for their trip, practicing their Spanish conversational skills, learning about Latin American culture and raising funds to support their service projects. Cannon, Foley and Ness will be living with families in different Latin American communities, and completing projects with just one English speaking partner. They hope to immerse themselves in the culture as well as make a positive impact on the areas they will be traveling to. Foley will be going to Oaxaca, Mexico to build fuel efficient stoves and raise environmental awareness. She will be living in a community for eight weeks.

“I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn more about myself and the world,” Foley said. “We’re sheltered in Cupertino.” Ness will spend six weeks in La Paz, Honduras and her project will focus on teaching the youth about the environment and how to sustain resources. “I was into it because I’m interested in language immersion and community service,” Ness said. “I also want to become more outgoing.” Cannon will be in Cotapaxi, Ecuador for seven weeks teaching youth about health and children’s rights. While Cannon admits that her initial motivations for embarking on this endeavor were college applications and travel opportunity, she found that the issues she will be focusing on in Cotapaxi matter to her. Her motivations for completing her trip have changed. In addition to improving her Spanish listening and speaking skills, Cannon is excited to help the children in the community she will be living in. “I want to make life better for these kids, even if that’s just teaching them how to brush their teeth and clean their hands,” Cannon said. Although all three are excited to immerse themselves in an-

other culture, some aspects of living in another country make them nervous. Cannon is concerned about communicating with the locals as well as living without the comforts of home. “I’m worried that it’ll take me too long to be understood,” Cannon said. “I’m also worried about the lack of American fast food.” Foley is slightly worried about answering difficult questions asked by the locals. “I will be asked about I think about immigration policies there,” she said. “I’m a little nervous about that.” All three find that there are other aspects of the cultural immersion process that excite them. “They eat guinea pig in Cotapaxi,” Cannon said. “When will I ever get to try guinea pig if I don’t try that there?” Cannon, Foley and Ness are excited and nervous about immersing themselves in another culture and isolating themselves from the comforts that Cupertino offers. They anticipate that their trip will bring them a greater understanding of Latin American culture and will be a personal growth experience. They hope to share interesting stories of their journey upon their return.


FEATURES: Chicken soup for the pet owner’s soul

SPORTS: Synchronized swimming star

PHOTO ESSAY: Healthy living

THE PROSPECTOR CUPERTINO HIGH SCHOOL’S

VOLUME 52 NO. 7

10100 FINCH AVENUE, CUPERTINO CA

MAY 27, 2011

Redesign of quad and cafeteria:

Students and staff collaborate with architects to develop plan for renovations

REGINA HONG news assistant

In addition to the ongoing track renovations, CHS plans to start rebuilding other parts of the campus, such as the front building and the quad, by the 2012-2013 school year. In the past, the district passed a construction bond that specifically stated that it could only be used for the construction of new buildings. Therefore, due to the increasing population, the current cafeteria at the front of the school will become a two-story building, which will house the library, cafeteria and guidance and administrative offices. By moving all of these areas into one building, the old library and office space will turn into new classrooms. This will create more flexibility with class space, larger conference areas for the staff and more bathrooms. The quad will also undergo several changes, such as the addition of a stage, new seating arrangements and a better sound system. In order to prepare for the renovation, CHS asked for input from those who are involved with the school, such as students, teachers and other staff members. On May 5, 2011, several members from the Quattrocchi Kwok Architects company came to CHS to ask selected students at a student committee meeting to ask for their

input regarding how the front building and quad should be rebuilt. “We hope for a more modernized, nicer and different campus, but at the same time, we also want to keep the familiarity of Tino,” said sophomore Julia Seaton. At the meeting, students asked for a big and open front building in which upperclassmen and lowerclassmen would not be separated. The structure of the building will resemble that of a student union on a college campus. According to Seaton, the architects respected all of the students’ opinions and tried their best to allow for everyone’s voices to be heard. According to assistant principal Andy Walczak, a student asked to showcase Dusty at the front of the school, so passers-by would be able to see the pride of CHS. The architects also met with the staff members. During this meeting, adults gave their opinions on how the school should be reconstructed. Said librarian Pat Accoriniti, “I’m just really excited about the process. We’ll [Teachers and students] be more accepting of the new building and quad because we were actu see QUAD AND CAFETERIA RESDESIGN, pg 3

SINDHU GNANASAMDANDAN

Students prepare for summer Latin American cultural immersion program HARINI JAGANATHAN editor-in-chief

This summer, juniors Delia Cannon, Noelle Foley and Allison Ness will be traveling to Latin America to work on community service projects through the AMIGOS program. AMIGOS is a nonprofit international organization that provides community service opportunities for young people in areas across Latin America. All three students have been training and preparing for their trip, practicing their Spanish conversational skills, learning about Latin American culture and raising funds to support their service projects. Cannon, Foley and Ness will be living with families in different Latin American communities, and completing projects with just one English speaking partner. They hope to immerse themselves in the culture as well as make a positive impact on the areas they will be traveling to. Foley will be going to Oaxaca, Mexico to build fuel efficient stoves and raise environmental awareness. She will be living in a community for eight weeks.

“I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn more about myself and the world,” Foley said. “We’re sheltered in Cupertino.” Ness will spend six weeks in La Paz, Honduras and her project will focus on teaching the youth about the environment and how to sustain resources. “I was into it because I’m interested in language immersion and community service,” Ness said. “I also want to become more outgoing.” Cannon will be in Cotapaxi, Ecuador for seven weeks teaching youth about health and children’s rights. While Cannon admits that her initial motivations for embarking on this endeavor were college applications and travel opportunity, she found that the issues she will be focusing on in Cotapaxi matter to her. Her motivations for completing her trip have changed. In addition to improving her Spanish listening and speaking skills, Cannon is excited to help the children in the community she will be living in. “I want to make life better for these kids, even if that’s just teaching them how to brush their teeth and clean their hands,” Cannon said. Although all three are excited to immerse themselves in an-

other culture, some aspects of living in another country make them nervous. Cannon is concerned about communicating with the locals as well as living without the comforts of home. “I’m worried that it’ll take me too long to be understood,” Cannon said. “I’m also worried about the lack of American fast food.” Foley is slightly worried about answering difficult questions asked by the locals. “I will be asked about I think about immigration policies there,” she said. “I’m a little nervous about that.” All three find that there are other aspects of the cultural immersion process that excite them. “They eat guinea pig in Cotapaxi,” Cannon said. “When will I ever get to try guinea pig if I don’t try that there?” Cannon, Foley and Ness are excited and nervous about immersing themselves in another culture and isolating themselves from the comforts that Cupertino offers. They anticipate that their trip will bring them a greater understanding of Latin American culture and will be a personal growth experience. They hope to share interesting stories of their journey upon their return.


2

MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

the Prospector 2010-2011 STAFF

Cupertino High School Established 1958 Vol LII., No. 5 | 2011

editor-in-chief harini jaganathan news editor kevin chu opinions editor abhishek zaveri features editor jesse zhou in-depth editors michelle cheung sunwoo jeong lifestyles editor natasha sharma sports editor azadeh rongere photo editors sindhu gnanasambandan copy editors alya omar victoria duan business manager jackie breuer

Lawson reflects on 35 years of teaching, changes over the years VIRENA GALOTRA lifestyles assistant

This year marks history teacher Jay Lawson’s 35th year as a teacher in this district. To commemorate the occasion his students made him cards and presented him with gifts. Lawson is one of the longest employed teachers on campus and, as a result, notices changes in diversity, teacher collaboration and technology at school over the years. Ever since he was a young boy, Lawson wanted to be a teacher. Both his parents were teachers in the district and his father was a prominent administrator as well. In fact, Sam H. Lawson Middle School is named in honor of his father. Lawson began his career as a history teacher at Monta Vista High School and simultaneously worked as a wrestling coach at Homestead High School at the same time. After only three years of teaching, he was laid off from his job as a history teacher in 1979. Lawson then became an intern to a special education teacher at Monta Vista High School while getting his credentials at night school. After he graduated, he became a full time special education teacher at Monta Vista High School. He then transferred to CHS in 1985 as both the head wrestling coach and a special education teacher. Fourteen years later in 1999, he took up his current position as a history teacher on campus, which is his favorite class to teach. “I really enjoy... sharing the stories of history and the older I get the easier it gets because I’ve lived through a lot of the things I’m teaching,” Lawson said. After 35 years of teaching, Lawson plans to continue teaching for another three years before retiring. “It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more

students,” he said. Over the years, Lawson has observed many changes pertaining to both the school and his job as a teacher. One of the major changes on campus is its diversification, a process that occurred gradually. He mentions that there is less of an emphasis on the trades and students have less interest in taking classes like auto shop, metal shop and cooking. In addition, a smaller percentage of students choose to pursue these types of careers. Lawson also notes

It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more students. Jay Lawson

History Teacher

that both teachers and students now use technology in the classroom on a regular basis. Computers have now become a daily teaching tool as well as a regular learning resource for students. Another positive change is how teaching has become a collaborative job. “We as teachers share our ideas and materials and to me that’s what makes it special. Being old timer, I have [some] things to offer [but] it’s also challenging to learn some of the new things,” Lawson said. However, the one thing he says that has stayed consistent is the enthusiasm of the students. “I love my time in the classroom with students. They make me feel young,” Lawson said.

SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

35 YEARS AND COUNTING| History teacher Jay Lawson contemplates the rapidly changing school and fulfilling years of teaching

IDC Best Dance Crew debuts choreographical talent news anand hemmady assistants regina hong nikhil kanthi opinions amar kantipudi assistants anthony kao gun ho lee features emily cheng assistants alyssa williams tess wu

JOANNA LEE sports assistant

Launching the first ever Intra-District Council Best Dance Crew (IDCBDC), crews from Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, and Cupertino showcased their best dance moves in front of a screaming crowd at the Lynbrook gym on Friday, May 13. Weeks of practicing and stress for all parties involved led up to a

lifestyles virena galotra assistants natalie hoang madhuri sathish in-depth jackie breuer assistants vani mulkareddy jamin shih sports fred han assistants joanna lee eric jang willie wang adviser ann peck editorial policy “The Prospector” is an open forum of expression for student editors to inform and educate their readers. It will not be reviewed by or restrained by school officials prior to publication or distribution. Advisors may and should coach and discuss content during the writing process. The staff of “The Prospector” seeks to recognize individuals, events, ideasand bring news to the Cupertino community in an accurate, professional and unbiased manner. “The Prospector” will not avoid publishing a story solely on the basis of possible dissent or controversy. If you believe an error has been made, or wish to have your opinion expressed in “The Prospector”please contact us via mail or e-mail. Letters sent become the sole property of “The Prospector” and can be edited for length, clarity, or accuracy. “The Prospector” editorial board reserves the right to accept or reject any ad in accordance with its advertising policy. Contact Us The Prospector 10100 Finch Avenue Cupertino, CA 95014 prospector.chs@gmail.com

JOANNA LEE

DANCE CREW SHOWCASE | Seniors Vi Viet, Benjamin Du, Sheng Poon, Willie Wang and Brian Walsh display their talents at the first ever IDCBDC

successful turnout of the first ever IDCBDC. Cupertino’s IDC Commissioners, senior Mennen Kassa, 12, and junior Ashley Park, 11, gathered with the other schools to sort out the details and have been working for weeks planning the event. With the performance date having been changed multiple times due to various reasons, some were beginning to fear that the event may never actually take place. However, with positive attitudes, both Kassa and Park continued to push for the event to take place. Crews were selected based on a competitive audition process in which each crew demonstrated their choreography and were judged based on overall preparedness and enthusiasm. In the end, popular hip hop crew, GTFO, and newly formed all female crew, XI So Fly, were selected to represent Cupertino at the IDCBDC. Other schools, however, did not have as many competing teams as Cupertino did, thus leading to some additional conflicts. Though enduring another minor conflict, Kassa reassures the event will have the turnout it is hoping for. Said Kassa, “IDC has been able to work everything out and we are very excited for this upcoming event.” With the dance scene on the rise, participating schools thought it would be appropriate and fun to hold a showcase that would allow students to show off the their individual styles and ultimately reign supreme while holding the Best Dance Crew title. Said Kassa, “IDC was eager to plan an event that would give the chance for students in the district to bond and show off their talents. We noticed how popular the dance scene has become throughout the district and decided that a dance competition would be the perfect way to promote district unity.” On Friday afternoon, students from all participating schools filed into the Lynbrook gym and watched eagerly as each school performed their best. Though supportive of each competing crew, the crowd screamed passionately after their representing crews performed. Though Kassa and Park originally planned for qualified judges who are already familiar with the dance scene, qualified judges were unable to be recruited before the show took place. In the end, the audience took the role of the judges. Each group showcased a variety of creative and intricate routines, including a martial arts inspired dance, some instances of jazz and lyrical, and various popping and breaking moves. Even though IDCBDC was a dance show, each school perfected a dance number that was tailored to their own individual styles and personalities that really became a sight to see. After six talented and varying performances, it was time to finally announce the winner and holder of the IDCBDC title. The audience was able to vote for their favorite crew and the crew with the most votes would take home the title. Ultimately, it was Lynbrook who took away this year’s title. With a successful turnout for the first ever IDCBDC, it is likely this event will return in the upcoming school year as an even better dance spectacle.


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

Letter to the editor Editor, The recent staff editorial (“Affirmative Action: Out-dated and Out-weighted) in the May 6th edition of The Prospector, though well-written, and thoughtful, failed to address some key issues concerning affirmative action policies. First and foremost, the editorial fails to mention the 1996 California proposition (Proposition 209) that banned racial, gender, and ethnic preferences for the University of California and the Cal-State systems. The majority of Cupertino High School students entering four-year universities, attend either a UC or Cal-State school, so the “factors of admission that are simply out of our control” is a non-factor for most CHS students. In addition to the omission of Proposition 209, the article does not cite key data about family income in the United States. The thesis of the article is that because racial discrimination is no longer the issue it once was, affirmative action programs should shift focus to income, and not race. A simple look at the last US Census reveals the following yearly median family incomes broken down by race: Asian Americans $73, 578, White $65,000, Hispanic $40, 466, and African-Americans $39,879. In sum, if UC or Cal-State were to address income, rather than race, we would still be targeting the same group of underrepresented students. The final missing piece is the assumption that every California high school student competes at the same level. The Fremont Union High School District community is an amazing place to work (I have worked in the district for 14 years and would not want to work anywhere else), and go to school (I am a 1992 Fremont High School graduate); however, it is easy to forget about the inherent advantages we have at our disposal. Not all California students have access to numerous AP courses, award winning performing arts programs, amazing teachers, supportive parents, comprehensive sports programs, or the financial means for SAT prep courses. To go back to your original argument, access to these things are “factors of admission that are out of our control”. If I attend a high school without these luxuries, how in the world can a UC admission officer look at me in the same light, as say a student who attends Cupertino, Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, or Homestead High Schools? (To be honest, the college admissions process has always been a mystery to me. Every day I am surrounded by 1,800 amazing students, and think they should be able to attend any college of their choice! ) In sum, affirmative action programs are but one tool to help underrepresented students attend select universities. Is it the only tool? Not by any stretch of the imagination — I am not naïve enough to think just one tool can close the achievement gap. Any attempt to close the achievement gap is one that would require a great deal more than affirmative action. Andy Walczak Assistant Principal

Want to advertise with the Prospector? email prospector.chs@gmail.com

3

Quad and cafeteria redesign: (cont. pg. 1)

ally a part of the project since we were given the opportunity to voice our opinions.” After hearing from all types of people at the school, the architects feel the need to preserve several areas of CHS. Said architect Diane Rappold, “The quad is a well loved spot on campus that we will improve on and ‘celebrate’. We also recognize the significance of the Senior Lawn — which may be transformed in the new design, but the concept will remain.” Although CHS is only undergoing the first phase of the rebuilding process, many students and teachers are excited to see the project progress because they had the chance to voice their opinions.

Letter from the editor Dear Reader, You hold in your hands the last full issue of the Prospector for the 2010-2011 school year. As was the case in our last issue, junior editors worked hard to create and edit the content of these pages. In this issue, you will learn about having chickens as pets, find out how much to exercise to work of that chipotle burrito and become an expert in throwing Harry Potter themed parties. Finish strong as the year draws to a close. Summer is nearly here! Keep an eye out for senior issue, which comes out next week. Please recycle! Harini Jaganathan Editor-in-Chief


opinions

4

MAY 27, 2011

Mo’ money mo’ problems: Child investment woes FRED HAN sports assistant

T

oday’s opinionated article revolves around the issue of parents’ financial investment in children. Strictly speaking, an investment is spending money in order to gain profitable returns. There are two reasons why parents would spend money on behalf of their children. The first is from a biological perspective, in which parents invest money to ensure the survival of their offspring. The offspring will then breed, continuing the survival of those genes and the human race. The second is the less obvious: to ensure the prolonged survival of the parent. But that’s not the point. The key question is how much money should a parent invest in their children? Parents should provide only the bare minimal financial support for the child to live comfortably to prevent spoiling the child and to teach the child financial independence. Before any misunderstandings form, “bare minimal financial support” does not mean starving the child or forcing them to work in dirty coal mines. Instead, the child should be full fed, clothed and prepared to learn the art of survival: Cupertino’s art of survival is hunting for colleges and farming for GPA. Any luxury beyond the basic necessities and tools for enhanced education — which include, but is not limited to, overly luxurious eating style or incessant shopping trips — tends to spoil the child. Any form of spoiling will spoil the chances for the child to succeed and successfully reproduce or support the parent. Psychologically speaking, spoiling is a case of operant condition – a system of punishment and reward. For example, if a child learns to associate crying tantrums with getting whatever

he wants, then he will repeat the behavior. The parent needs to understand when to say “no” – or else it is like subprime lending. Continuation of inappropriate and excessive parental financial investment will soon lead to bursting the bubble of the inflated expectations and soon depression. Remember, parents in Cupertino should focus primarily about necessities for survival in life: working hard for happiness. The key step to help the child work hard for happiness is by preventing him or her from being spoiled. In other words, learning to say “no”. If a child truly wants to achieve or want something, then make him or her work for it — which leads to the next point: financial independence. Remember, the fastest route to corruption (spoiling in this case) is permission. Work is the fastest route to independence. If a child does not understand at least the core basics of money and economics, the chances are he or she will not understand how to deal with money later on in life. Then the children’s children — if the original children still survived by that point (a highly unlikely situation in Cupertino’s overly competitive environment) would not understand financial importance either. This results in continued financial dependence on the parents later in life — a counterproductive and non-profitable investment. The solution to this is to teach the children to work for what they want. Directing their desires and creative energies toward work for financial incentives will teach them the importance of money and give them a sense of dealing with different quantities of money. In conclusion, parents must learn to say no to any potential spoiling opportunities (although reward for hard work and excellent performance is mandatory) and spend only enough to guide the children’s creative energies. By freely giving money whenever a child demands so or not teaching them the importance of financial independence, those parents are setting themselves up for a potentially

spoiled child. Otherwise the “investment” of all the money and time put into improving the survival rate. However, do note that parents should never force a child into working so much that the child is greatly inclined to rebel. It is a delicate balance of the carrot and the whip.

EMILY CHENG

THE AGE OF INNOCENCE VS. MODERN-DAY TEENS

Anonymous questioning is unnecessary cowardice AMAR KANTIPUDI sports assistant EMILY CHENG news assistant

Ask me something, anything. Curious? It is an unsurprising feeling people get when they come across a chance to ask whatever they desire of their peers. When curiosity takes over, thoughts run free, and a new, undiscovered side of a person will be unleashed. This is even more evident when people hide behind a veil of anonymity because they ask anything and everything they can until they have satisfied their curiosity. It is these intentions, this sense of infallible curiosity and innate bigotry humans tend to demonstrate that often diminishes personal confidence. Just a simple question can induce the feeling of throwing out your entire life on the chopping block. The practice of attempting to fish out potential secrets without identification is a privileged feature provided to people by social networking sites. Services such as Tumblr and Formspring allow literally anyone to ask specific people questions — uncensored and unmonitored. It is through sites like these that the world has been introduced to concepts such as “trolling” and cyber bullying Anonymous questioning does comes with its fair share of reasons. After all, some people are just too afraid to ask something personal. It is almost always easier to talk to someone when away from the spotlight. That, by far, is the most appealing aspect of talking to friends online rather than in person or on the phone. Nonetheless unless a relationship is significantly strong, it is nearly impossible to separate sarcastic comments from serious ones. Furthermore, since people can say whatever they want online without having to admit who they are, they resort to a more crude language that can sometimes belittle the peer. Though, many still set up an anonymous question box expecting fun, light-hearted and interesting questions that can help them kill time, in the

long run, users run the risk of having their honesty tested, actions questioned, and image bashed, eventually damaging one’s self-esteem. If the user does not put a halt to anonymous questioning after they’ve already fallen victim to “anon bashing”, they suffer comment after comment of demeaning verbiage flooding their inbox. Soon, even strongly optimistic individuals will fall prey to the condescending harassment of their peers. It is all too common to see cheerful people turn into pessimists. Such an initially simple and harmless intention of exciting user life can morph into a lethal and emotionally degrading exchange of Q&A. Because of this, people may become very unhappy individuals who cannot control their own emotions properly, and oftentimes would end up lashing out at the resulting instability at others. These insecurities are then observed and questioned once again through that wretched anonymous button! Even if it is an attempt to poke fun into others’ lives, anonymous questioning can and most likely will lead to displeasing tension and shaky feelings. After all, once people put a mask on, they fail to take responsibility for their actions. To have a bright and confident spirit be torn down by anonymous comments is a excruciating sight. The few moments of entertainment gained on the asking end do not balance out the discomfort imposed on the receiving end. Online socializing does have its boundaries in this sense. Take a few precautions before entering a world full of anonymity, realize the consequences, and remember the saying that’s far too overheard but never entirely understood: curiosity killed the cat.

Why do you strut around campus like a know-it-all?

THE MASK OF ANONYMITY:

What students experience with online bashing “ I don’t have a formspring because I think it is another way for someone to bully you and bullying on formspring is inevitable.” Mahtab Danai, senior “I deleted my formspring because all that I got on there was stuff that I rather hear in person or didn’t want to hear at all. I didn’t want to give them an outlet when they deserved nothing from me.” Julia Seaton, sophomore “I have the curiosity of a reality check on whether people actually like me or not.” Varsha Prabhakar, sophomore

You think you’re cool? You’re just a poser.


THE PROSPECTOR

MAY 27, 2011

opinions

5

DEATH OF BIN LADEN Should the death of an enemy be celebrated?

Liberty for Free

Respect for Life

ALYA OMAR copy editor JACKIE BREUER in-depth assistant

SAMUEL LEE opinions assistant

On September 11, 2001, America watched in horror as a group of terrorists hijacked three planes, crashing them into the windows of the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and a field in Virginia. Family members watched as their loved ones’ lives were prematurely taken from them. Days later, leader of Al Qaeda Osama bin Laden vanished after taking responsibility for orchestrating the attacks, leaving behind an uncertain, tormented future. From that day, it has been one of the top priorities of the U.S. government to take down the man who instructed such heartbreak for thousands of its citizens. As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 loomed overhead, when President Barack Obama announced to the nation that an attack on bin Laden’s compound was successful, the spectrum of emotion was of massive contrast. While some recognized the magnitude that bin Laden’s death held as a weight lifted off of their grieving shoulders, others rebuked the celebrations, finding it inappropriate to disrespect the dead. However, it is not another person’s right to judge another person’s happiness and the expression of said emotion. People are affected differently by major events and define closure in a different way. 3,000 families continued with their lives forever changed, and though their losses were met with sympathy and pledges of remembrance, it was never combatted with justice because the man who orchestrated the events continued to lead his life, while their lost ones could not. From the perspective of the somewhat naive, bin Laden’s death signifies nothing but the end of a human life. To others, it was a monumental moment of closure, an assurance that the man that executed the execution was not pardoned for what he had done. This is not to say that the only proper reaction to bin Laden’s death is to galavant through the streets, chanting “U.S.A.” The death of bin Laden is simply a headline to some, while for others it is a sign of redemption for the lost loved ones. It is not in anyone’s capabilities to stand back and determine the value of such an event for someone else. Whether you feel compelled to run through the streets singing the national anthem or to simply hold a moment of silence, it is imperative to realize that the next best action is to move on and keep those that lost their lives on September 11 and during the war on terrorism in our hearts forever.

A DIVIDED

The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them.” -- Lois McMaster Bujold

AMERICA

I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” — Martin Luther King Jr.

Osama died, Americans cried… in happiness. Yes, you read that right! “Life, liberty and justice for all” except for certain Arab terrorists — they just get two out of the three. As soon as news of the al-Qaeda leader’s death reached the American public, thousands of Americans flooded Times Square and the White House to pop bottles of champagne, sing, chant “U-SA” and smile for the camera. Times like this throw doubts on whether Americans truly value the life of another human being. There should be no celebration for the death of Osama bin Laden. Admittedly, bin Laden’s is crucial to American security. The nation ought to thank President Bush for collecting the necessary intelligence throughout his presidency. It should also thank President Obama for capturing the terrorist when given the opportunity, unlike President Clinton; his stained presidency includes an incident in which he refused the Sudanese government’s offer to arrest and extradite bin Laden. Though the operation may have been necessary, bin Laden’s death is nothing to celebrate. Unless malice and vengeance form the bedrock of American principles (as opposed to, say, basic respect for human life), there is no justifiable reason for celebration: Terror attacks will not stop just because bin Laden descended to Hell. Just a few weeks after his death, suicide bombers murdered 51 Pakistanis in retaliation. Even worse, his death does not mean an end to outrageously invasive TSA procedures. Three year old boy: Wait, I thought bad terror man was gone! TSA “agent”: Quiet, I’m fondling your genitals. Americans running to the White House to celebrate bin Laden’s death with flags and drunkenness exhibited the same kind of euphoria that certain groups of Afghans displayed on 9/11. Chanting “U.S.A” just makes the entire circus more obscene. We must not lower our moral standards to those of the terrorists. Had people stayed home in quiet introspection and prayer, then that would have demonstrated true American exceptionalism. People are fully justified in feeling relief over the destruction of a mass murderer. But a sense of joy does not belong to a nation that considers itself a representative of everything that is good with the world.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Future homecoming court should be open to all classes, not just seniors Last month, we reported on ASB Executive Council’s new Homecoming Court nomination process for the 2011-2012 school year. This process involves several steps: nominating only senior candidates, having the top 20 male and top 20 female candidates complete a questionnaire about their school involvement, selecting the top 10 male and top 10 female candidates based on that questionnaire and having students from all classes choose their top six males or female Court candidates in an open vote. According to ASB, the new system is meant to ensure that the Homecoming Court accurately portrays our school’s values. However, there is considerable opposition to this policy across class lines. We completely agree with the new system’s purpose; screening candidates through a questionnaire on school involvement will be an effective way to ensure that only qualified, upstanding students make it on the Court. However, we believe that restricting the Court to only seniors goes against our school’s traditions and spirit of class unity. Homecoming has always been an event where the entire

school comes together for the sake of school pride and spirit. Students from freshmen to seniors flock to Homecoming because of the memories it creates and the kindred bonds they are able to forge with their friends. The event gives students a chance to garner happy memories and strengthen friendships with their peers — usually those in the same class. When there is not a freshman face to be found in the Homecoming Court, how delightful, inclusive or memorable will attending freshmen think Homecoming is? Supporters try to justify this massive exclusion of students by saying that all students will have the opportunity to be nominated to the court once they go through four years of high school. This assertion completely ignores the motivational and inspirational value the court can provide. If court members are meant to be shining examples of perfect Pioneers, these examples should be relatable and plentiful. Having a court from all classes will allow students who are not seniors to recognize that even one, two or three years at our school can make a difference. Having all classes represented on the Homecoming Court

will also maintain our school’s sense of community and unity. Homecoming is not meant to be an exclusive affair; with each class having an equal chance to compete in areas like skits and posters, it gives a level playing field for all classes to shine. If we deny freshmen, sophomores and juniors opportunities that seniors have in what is supposed to be a schoolwide event, they will feel excluded — which is exactly the opposite of what Homecoming is all about. In an April Prospector poll, 66% of students polled, including seniors, opposed the new seniors-only Homecoming Court nomination process. If anything, ASB Executive Council should listen to this supermajority of its constituency and work to revise this process instead of single-handedly implementing it. Homecoming is for all CHS students, and every part of Homecoming, the Court included, should be open to students regardless of class. We believe that unity and inclusiveness are core Pioneer values. It only makes sense that the Pioneers’ Homecoming Court embodies them.


features

MAY 27, 2011

6

TINO’S ANIMAL KI GDO Chicken Soup for the Asian Soul

Sophomore’s feathery pals help in many ways SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN photo editor

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She has chicken soup for the pet lover’s soul — and no, not the book. The fact is, sophomore Julie Chen’s pets are chickens and she has consumed them in soup form before. While Chen does love her fuzzy, egg-laying creatures, she shares an, lets just say, atypical bond with them. Through this bond though, she has learned a great deal about the nature of animals and the responsibility that comes along with caring for them. A year ago, at Chen’s request, her family drove two hours to a farm and picked up a handful of “female” (four out of the eight grew up to be male) chicks. They built a coop and everyday, fed them vegetables, checked their feed and refilled their water. With time “scooping up morning presents” was added to the to-do list; one egg per chicken a day, hard-boiled in the morning is not a bad deal at all. California state law, though, prohibits housing roosters in residential areas (a blessing for those who like to sleep in) so Chen’s family needed a way to dispose of their four not-so-female chickens. “We ate them. We are Asians so of course we know how to kill chickens,” said Chen, “It’s really just a quick throat cut.” This may sound brutal and Chen herself initially had much trouble with this idea. That being said, she eventually came to peace with eating her chickens under the circumstances. First of all, Chen was never excessively attached to her chickens as others may be with their more conventional pets. “They used to have names —

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Chrome, Chicovo, Phoenix, Chocolate and Turtle — but they grow up really fast. I went on a cruise for a week and they all changed colors so I couldn’t tell who was who anymore,” said Chen, “It’s not like killing a pet dog or anything.” She is comfortable with it from a moral standpoint as well. “The whole reason we have this garden is because my mom read this book called Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. It talks about this writer who starts a farm and raises her own animals. Her philosophy is that if one raises them naturally, it’s ethical to eat them. I feel better about eating these chickens rather than eating commercially grown ones, fattened

We are Asians, so of course we know how to kill chickens.

up in two months,” added Chen. Aside from, when occasion calls, eating them, Julie also spends a great deal of time babysitting her chickens. She has made some quite interesting observations. “Chickens are very vicious sometimes,” Chen said, “They actually have a pecking order. Sometimes I’ll feed them dandelion leaves and certain chickens are not allowed to come and eat. The little chickens were initially at the bottom of the order and the red chicken was at the very bottom but once she started laying, she gained social status. Now the once oldest, meanest black chicken is at the bottom because she stopped laying.” Overall, while owning chickens has taught Julie a thing or two, she admits that it is not for everyone. “It’s kind of a hassle. Whether you should own one or not depends on where you live, how your backyard is, and how committed you are to waking up at 6 am in the morning to angry c h i c k e n s ,” Chen warns, “If that doesn’t concern you, then two bucks a chick at Gilroy. Good luck!”

Owning a pet can help with stress KEVIN CHU news editor

While most people think of massage, meditation and yoga as natural, healthy stress relievers, there is another option that is fluffier and more loveable: getting a pet. Not only do pets help relieve stress, but they can also improve one’s mood, control one’s blood pressure, reduce loneliness and provide social support— all of which are important for health and well-being, and for avoiding stress and depression. Animals are relatively consistent in their behaviors — such as locations and times of eating, sleeping, and cuddling — which provide a stable, predictable and thus less stressful aspect in the owner’s life. Their unconditional love is also extremely comforting — pets greet their owners with excitement when they come home, they can usually tell when their owners are upset, and many pets will cuddle up next to their owners, providing soothing contact. A 2002 study by re-

searchers at the State University of New York showed that when performing a stressful ta felt less stressful in the presence of pets th presence of a spouse or close friend. Pet ow had significantly lower baseline heart rates a pressure than the participants who did not o Caring for a pet often results in a sense o tion and fulfillment. In addition, owning pet the likelihood of going outside and interac others, providing opportunities for mood-r cialization. “I spend up to an hour each day taking for walks,” said sophomore Abishek Kumar. A 1999 study found that male AIDS pat less likely to suffer from depression if they ow “Pet ownership among men who have A vides a certain level of companionship that h them cope better with the stresses of th lives,” said psychologist Judith Siegel, a UC professor of public health and lead aut of the report. “This is one more study demonstrates the health benefits that ing a pet can provide.” In addition, pets help decrea pressure, heart rate and muscl

She is her dogs’ best friend Junior goes home to take care of pets during lunch JAMIN SHIH features assistant

When the bell rings at 12:25 p.m. every day, students leave their classrooms, obligations and quite often campus to enjoy 40 minutes of leisure. One student, however, exits campus not to leave her responsibilities behind but to take on another set. While her classmates spend lunchtimes with their friends, junior Ashley Kan visits and takes care of her three pet dogs, a chore she says teaches her both responsibility and time management skills that will aid her throughout her life. Kan feeds her three dogs, two Chihuahuas named Missy and Teddy and a Pomeranian named Charlie, every day during lunch because no one else is available to do so at that time. This causes her to miss out on the social banter that occurs during lunchtime, and she admits that she sacrifices spending time with her friends because of her pets. Regardless, she is sure that her dogs are completely worth the sacrifice. “I’m really close to my dogs. They’re really my best friends sometimes, because they’re always there for me,” Kan said. Indeed, just as Kan gives to her dogs, they give equally back to her. The sacrifice does not seem nearly as significant when her

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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

features

7

GDOM: EVERYTHING ON PETS WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PET?

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both in reaction to stressful events over a period of time. Owning a pet requires daily walks and other opportunities for exercise (another proven stress reliever) are also increased. Recovering addicts who struggle with high levels of stress should research different pets to determine which types, breeds, personalities and ages seem like a good match for you. For instance, if having to potty train a puppy sounds stressful, look into getting a dog that’s already trained is an appropriate option. For people who are often away from home, a more selfsufficient animal like a cat might be a better choice. There is nothing quite like hav- ing a warm ball of fur curl up next to you or an excitedly thumping tail greeting you — and it’s even more satisfying to know that these furry friends are helping to improve our lives.

“My dream pet would be “F” the White Winged Horse. It’s name is F so that when it takes my last name, Lai, its full name will be F Lai. And then I can tell it: ‘F Lai, fly!’ And then I’ll go around raiding towns on my mount.” -Alan Lai, senior “Well, I kind of just want a ferret. Not really creative or anything... I just like them!” -Andrew Qu, junior “My dream pet is a rainbow-horned unicorn that can fly and take me places, but that can also understand what I’m saying and be cuddly.” -Jeong Eun Lee, freshman “I like white tigers because they look more unique than other types of tigers.” -Brian Nguyen, senior

COMPILED BY TESS WU

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57% 170 PEOPLE POLLED COMPILED BY FRED HAN

Passing of pets leaves student stronger

ANAND HEMMADY features assistant

Disclaimer: The Prospector strongly encourages owners to spay or neuter pets, and acknowledges that some of the behavior exhibited by the owners of the cats in the following article is irresponsible. The Prospector also would like to warn readers that some elements of the following article may be exaggerated. Everything must end. This is a rule of the universe. Unfortunately, relationships with pets are not exempt from this rule. No matter how well an owner takes care of a pet, it will eventually pass away, and the owner will have to move on without it. The unavoidable pain from having a pet die often turns many away from keeping pets, and often raises questions as to whether having pets is worth the pain. In the end, though, the benefits of having pets far outweigh the negatives. Sophomore Brent Knaack knows the pain of losing pets all too well. Having once had thirty cats, Knaack could only watch helplessly as cat after cat died, leaving him with only five. “Our family of cats started when my dad was looking through boxes in our backyard and he found three kittens in a box,” Knaack said. “They were born literally just an hour before we found them. We took care of them because their mom never did. They grew up, and then they had kittens. Eventually we had around thirty cats, all living in our backyard in makeshift shelters.” Later, though, Knaack’s beloved pets started dying. “There was one cat in particular with whom I had a close relationship,” said Knaack as he recounted the death of his favorite cat. “I called him Tiny, because he had growth problems, and he never grew any bigger than my hand. This led to internal organ failure, and he passed away. I respected him because even in his last few hours of pain, he was determined to stay alive, and he survived through a lot of pain and suffering. I rarely cry, but when Tiny died, I couldn’t stop crying for two hours.” U

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nothing. During her daily fifteen minute visits to her dogs, she does feed them. The time she spends with her dogs is rewarding and her er an unconditional love that mirrors her own. t always there. They’re always playful, they always make me happy… n a good mood,” said Kan. g care of her dogs does cost her some of her free time, the experience he responsibility and time management skills she earns for the future es up for it. Kan stresses that it is completely different from normal ent duties to care for another living being and that owning three dogs wed her to experience both responsibility and the joy of bringing hapss to someone or something else. These lessons can also be applied e world outside of high school and pets; Kan finds applications well beyond homework assignments or tests. “For the future, if you ever have kids, you’re going to have to take care of something. You’re going to have to take care of cleaning up after them. It’s just a huge responsibility,” said Kan. While many students have only one set of responsibilities to worry about at school, Kan’s pet duties begin where her school ones end. Despite seeming like a large hassle, however, her dogs bring her the kind of joy and teach her the kind of lessons that only COUR TESY OF AS HLEY pets can. KAN

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After Tiny’s death, Knaack witnessed the death of around 25 other cats. Knaack let his cats roam freely around the neighborhood, which annoyed the neighbors. The neighbors began leaving poisoned food out on their doorsteps. Knaack was forced to witness cat after cat dying from the food poisoning. He could do nothing to stop the death toll of cats from rising. In the end, only five cats remained. Despite all the grief that the deaths of his cats caused him, though, Knaack does not regret anything and is happy that he had the chance to know his cats. “One of the best times of my life was when I was playing around with the three original kittens,” Knaack said. “It was really cute when we let them into the house and watched them crawl around, pull out wires, and stumble and fall. In spite of all the pain I think it was worth it to have pets and I don’t regret it.” Clearly, the loss that pets bring will be painful. However, it would be foolish to refuse to entertain the thought of having pets simply because of the pain. After all, in life, happiness can only come with suffering. To discard things only because they will hurt us would ruin life entirely. Although pets die and losing them hurts, the overall relationship with pets brings more happiness than sorrow.


lifestyles

MAY 27, 2011

8

THE BOY WHO LIVES ON... THE LEGACY OF HARRY POTTER

NIKHIL KANTHI features assistant

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here are moments in our lives when the harshness of reality casts a shadow over our happiness, causing it to be short-lived. On July 15th, when Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 comes out, I will have to struggle between pangs of excitement and sorrow as I watch a part of my life end. When I pored over the books time and time again in my younger days, I wondered what attracted me to the adventures of a boy wizard. What set this story apart from the other books I had devoured in my youth? I often put this question on hold as I turned the last page in the last book and started anew with the first book. I spent days walking the corridors and grounds of Hogwarts. However, as the pages became more and more familiar, I realized that there would soon be a day when I would be bored by the tale that once meant the world to me. That day, I took the books out of my room and anticipated a day when I would open the books and be amazed once more. A few days ago, I turned the first page of the first book. The parchment-like scent of

the pages with which I was so familiar brought with them a painful comprehension. In less than two months, the journey would be over. I think I can answer my question today. I did not love Harry Potter because it was a friend or mentor. The reason I love these books is because I could see myself as Harry. Rowling erased the line between the reader and Harry somewhere in those pages. Readers empathized with Harry when he was in danger or depressed, and that empathy carried over to the moments when Harry was triumphant. We were united by the naive hope that things will get better. When the circumstances were not as happy and bright as they could have been, I knew that my time would come. Harry Potter taught me that victory was not impossible, and I think we all yearn for that certainty. It taught me the power of hope. I wish for a day when the corridors of Hogwarts will be as alien to me as they were to Harry on his first night there, and I wish that I could feel the loss of Sirius or Dumbledore without expecting it. I doubt that day will come before July 15th, but that’s fine. I think I will do just fine without reading the story I have read seventy times before as I wait outside the midnight premiere. Good job, my friend. Mischief managed.

POTTER PREMIERE PARTY

1. Buy midnight premiere tickets in advance, optimally three to four weeks before the movie.

Want to make your HP premiere night truly magical? Here are a few suggestions that will make your night less Dudley and a tad more Diggory.

2. First, decide on a menu for your party. For terrific Potter recipes, visit http://www.mugglenet.com/misc/rosmertas/index.shtml. Remember that Butterbeer and Golden Snitch cupcakes are absolute necessities! 3. Decorate! After you settle on a venue, plaster the walls with Harry Potter-themed posters. Make sure to include the official movie poster! 4. Costumes are mandatory — they should consist of robes, traditional Hogwarts uniforms, wands and scarves. Assign each guest a specific character in his or her customized Hogwarts-style invitation. 5. Finally, plan some activities! Some suggestions: i. Test your knowledge of the series with some trivia and use Bertie Botts’ Every Flavor Beans as the prize (or punishment!) ii. Reenact your favorite scenes from the series, and be creative. iii. Host a Dueling Club. iv. Watch Deathly Hallows, Part I in preparation for the finale! MADHURI SATHISH

Lady Gaga’s Born This Way contains darker and more serious overtones JESSE ZHOU features editor

The Mother Monster has done it again. Lady Gaga, the artist who has so far defined the voice of a new generation, has been inching toward far more radical themes in her music (believe it or not) with her new album Born This Way. While the widely acclaimed The Fame introduced Gaga as the queen of “Just Dance”, Born This Way instead puts her in the spotlight as a woman with the most independent spirit in the music industry. Many of Gaga’s songs indeed revolve around being proud and self-sufficient. “Hair” and “Bad Kids” promote the idea that being fiercely independent is essential to having true freedom. In addition, her songs call on people to respect those who choose to be independent. For example, one line from “Hair” states, “I just wanna be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.” Her words give the listener a window into a troubled soul who wants nothing more than for others to be accepted in today’s cruel society. The overall tone of Born This Way is darker and more disorderly than The Fame as well. However, Gaga uses this style in a unique way, and trust me, she uses it well. By utilizing the power

of static-shock beats, Gaga’s songs are a rather elegant synthesis of symphony and cacophony: a paradox pleasing to the ear. The fractured mix of piano, electro synthesizers, electric guitar and abnormal beats ends up finding its way into songs like “Judas” and “Marry the Night.” The atmosphere Gaga has created in Born This Way is terrifying and euphoric at the same time. By using theme and tone to their full potential, Lady Gaga’s new album, Born This Way, is bound to be one of the greatest albums of the decade. From songs about true love (“You and I”) to being who you are (“Born This Way”), the Mother Monster covers a full range of topics that will leave the listener surprised. By the time the last song finishes, something will be blown. It will either be your mind or your CD player from abusing the replay button too much.

TOP 3 SINGLES 1. Born This Way 2. The Edge of Glory 3. Judas COMPILED BY NATASHA SHARMA COURTESY OF SpreePiX-Berlin


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

lifestyles

9

The beauty OFTHRIFTING

Looking for something trendy without breaking the bank? Thrift stores sell classic pieces at surprinsgly low prices. You don’t have to buy couture to be chic.

VICTORIA DUAN copy-editor

The outrageous prices offered at too many stores in the mall make it hard for frugal shoppers to pick out affordable items that complement them. Never mind purchasing an outfit, or a nice set of furniture — a single shirt will devastate one’s wallet. But sophomore Brittney Lundquist and junior Noa Rosenberg, both experienced in the ways of thrifting, know better than to blow their entire savings on just one item. Thrift stores are shops owned and run by charities or nonprofit organizations as fundraisers for their cause. Unlike conventional stores, thrift stores carry a multitude of different products. Each new shipment is always full of surprises, and the prices of the products are relatively low. “I have found a lot of name brands like Abercrombie, the North Face, J. Crew and Banana Republic [while thrifting]. It’s a nice feeling to say that you can own name brand clothing and only have to pay a fraction of the original price,” Lundquist said. Although the quality of the donations are often questionable, Lundquist has found that the overall value of a thrift store’s merchandise can be roughly predicted by the city the store is located in.

“I have found that the ‘richer’ cities have the fancier, nicer, name brand clothing options — for example, San Francisco, Santa Cruz and Los Angeles,” Lundquist said. However, nearby thrift stores, including Goodwill, Salvation Army and Savers can all be thoroughly scavenged for good deals and quality items. Contrary to Lundquist, Rosenberg approaches thrifting with a slightly different tactic. While Lundquist is more oriented towards browsing for clothes, Rosenberg thrifts with an open mind and warmly welcomes all possibilities that might come her way. “I may go shopping with the intent to find a new sweater and then I’ll leave the store with a new shelf for my room. The challenge of thrifting is not to find something that is the perfect fit, but finding things that have the potential to be cinched, hemmed, draped in a room or framed on a wall. When I do find something I like, it’s like finding a gem; that’s the beauty of thrifting!” Rosenberg said. With thrifting comes not only the thrill of hunting for the perfect item, but also the satisfaction of paying sensible prices for a purchase. Forget the unreasonable prices at the mall — go look for the cheaper counterpart at Goodwill.


sports

Have a healthy summer

Which is worse – resisting the urge to eat or mustering the willpower to exercise? Most people are reluctant to do either, as byproducts of animal evolution makes us inclined to eat as much as possible and save every last ounce of fat in case of famine. That’s right, those deliciously

dreadful, guilty calories that lurk in your In-NOut Cheeseburger with Onions are here to stay unless burned off by the exercise that we so despise. Here are some popular food items along with matching activities needed to part with those beloved calories.

VERDE

IN N’ OUT PEARL

CHEESE BURGER WITH ONIONS

306

480

Shop for one hour 14 minutes

MILK TEA (BUBBLE TEA)

Calories:

Calories:

Exercise:

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MAY 27, 2011

Exercise:

Garden for one hour and three minutes

CHIPOTLE

WING STOP

BARBACOA BURRITO

FRENCH FRIES

Calories:

Calories:

200

800

Exercise:

Exercise:

Run at nine mph for 11.5 minutes

Dance for three hours

Boosts that actually give you a boost NATALIE HOANG lifestyles assistant

A

fter ordering a cold smoothie to quench the thirst of a hot summer’s day, the Jamba Juice cashier asks you, “Would you like a boost with that?”. You will proceed to ask what types they offer and are met with a list of seemingly health nourishing choices. The options tackle different aspects of the body, from the Charger and Antioxidant boosts to the Immunity and Energy boosts. Sure, it sounds convincing, but what is it exactly that you are putting into your body? Do the benefits live up to the name? Let us break it down. A boost is a dietary supplement intended to add the vitamins, minerals, fiber, or amino acids a person may lack in his or her daily consumption. In a scroll through the Jamba Juice Booster nutritional facts, noted is the abundance of Maltodextrin and Inulin in the energy and vitamin boosts. Substitutes for sugar, Maltodextrin and Inulin give a sweet taste and the energy provided by sugar without the calories and fat. This makes the 3G Charger, Antioxidant Power, Daily Vitamin, Immunity and Energy Boosts all great options for those in need of a pick-me-up without the extra carbohydrates and sugar to bog them down. The last three boosters are crafted to regulate the body’s systems to maintain healthy levels. Flax & Fiber, a promising Boost, is made of Flaxseed. It is known for reducing blood sugar levels, bad cholesterol, triglycerides, and being the great source of fiber it is, constipation. As for the Whey Protein and Soybean Boosts, their benefit is in the name: protein. Protein’s importance lies in it’s ability to repair body cells, build and repair muscles and bones, and control metabolism. These boosts are promising in their nature, so why not add them into your smoothie? Though it is unlikely one would purchase a smoothie with a boost everyday, or enough to feel the benefits, their intentions are there. A simple overthe-counter supplemental pill directed to take once a day is perhaps the better solution for those concerned about their health. But if mixing in a boost takes the guilt off of your 300-calorie smoothie, go for it!

AZADEH RONGERE

3G Charger™ Boost Antioxidant Power™ Boost Daily Vitamin™ Boost Energy™ Boost Flax & Fiber Boost Immunity™ Boost Soy Protein™ Boost Whey Protein™ Boost

PHOTOS BY: AZADEH RONGERE COMPILED BY: ERIC JANG

get

1 TONED

for summer COMPILED BY: NIKHIL KANTHI

LEG RISES

Lie on your back with your hands holding onto something heavy (like a bookshelf side), and raise your legs without bending your knees. 20 minutes (counting breaks) of these and a four-pack will be a breeze.

2 3

COMPILED BY: AZADEH RONGERE

SHUFFLE PUSH-UPS Do pushups while moving side to side. Nothing strains your biceps, triceps, deltoids, and laterals like some serious pushup shuffling. Aim for three or four sets of 20 reps to get some toned arms.

RUNNING Put on a pair of shorts, plug in your favorite song on your MP3, and speed off on a strenuous but quick workout. Aim for anything under nine minutes (as long as you have warmed up), and you will have burned off a six-inch from Subway.

PHOTOS BY: SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

Badminton Team Dilemma: Winning does not always reap the rewards ERIC JANG sports assistant

There is no doubt that winning feels good — addicting even, if victories come frequently. However, even a winning streak has its disadvantages when the victories become too easy. The badminton team has dominated its matches in a less-competitive league but it has done so at the expense of the valuable lessons gained by losing matches. Players compete against members of the other team in singles or doubles matches, ranked by skill level. The entire game is won by a majority of match wins from the team members. Players who train in competitive badminton clubs outside of school, such as Bintang, are often on

par with other club players from upper league schools. Since the school team is composed of both club badminton players and players who only train at school practices, the latter players are presented with formidable challenges when they have to play in higher leagues against more experienced players. Conversely, higher league players do not have enough of a challenge when they have to play in the lower league and so neither league is apt for both types of players. As a result, the Varsity and Junior Varsity teams have lost most of their games in higherdivision leagues for the last two years. However, because they have been bumped down to a lower league this year, the badminton team has remained undefeated the entire season. Although practice alone contributes to the

success of team members during matches, ingame experience is also vital to the growth of the player. Team members do not improve as much when all of their matches are won easily and their mistakes go unnoticed. When the Central Coast Section (CCS) championships roll around, players that have become accustomed to their successes may find themselves unprepared to face opponents of higher skill level. “I’m scared that they all think they’re good enough at the level they are at now and have no desire to concentrate during practice,” said varsity player Peggy Chiang about her teammates. Chiang learns which footwork needs practice and which shots she can improve on from losing against tougher players. Playing against difficult opponents in

the higher league not only reveals areas for self-improvement, but also builds appreciation for the competitive aspect of the sport. According to varsity player Lawrence Luk, failures are vital to good sportsmanship. Modesty is difficult to come by for those who seldom experience defeat. “Losing teaches me humility, because I can’t expect to walk all over my opponents all the time,” Luk said. Despite the fact that the badminton team has enjoyed a winning streak this year, some players believe that excessive victories have slowed athletic growth. Luk and Chiang believe that losing to higher-league contenders is a necessary step in improving and taking the team to the next level.


11 11

sports sports

THE PROSPECTOR THE PROSPECTOR

MAY27, 27,2011 2011 MAY

Synchronized swimmer Ekaterina Frelikh pursues future Olympic dream AZADEH RONGERE sports editor

Above the surface, two artistic synchronized swimmers jump through the air in perfect harmony. The chemistry between the teammates allows their routines to be of sheer perfection. Their magical performance, a blend of gymnastics and dancing, requires flawless consistency. Below the surface is junior Ekaterina Frelikh an aspiring synchronized swimmer. Frelikh was born in Russia where she began her successful career as a synchronized swimmer at age nine. Before she became a talented performer, Frelikh explored speed swimming, but she quickly realized this sport bored her. She then turned to synchronized swimming deciding that it would provide her with more excitement. “I saw girls doing little leg things and I thought it was very cool and pretty, so I joined,” Frelikh said. When she joined a popular Russian team, she received a proper foundation for her synchronized swimming future through training. Ho w e v e r, when she emigrated from Russia four years ago, it seemed as if her aspirations could no longer become a reality. Once she moved to America, Frelikh lacked a synchronized swimming team so she reluctantly returned to speed swimming. After a year of break,

she was introduced to one of the best synchronizing swimming team in America in Santa Clara. After a successful try out, she joined the team. Despite a new addition, her team supported and welcomed Ferlikh and they built friendships only teammates could share. Although their occasional bonding activities do bring them closer, their natural chemistry already supports their undeniable bond. “We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable,” Frelikh said. However, to pursue her dream Frelikh had to compromise

We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable.

her academic schedule. Since her practices last from 4:00 to 8:30 p.m. every day, she found it hard to fit AP classes into her schedule. Even after these strenuous weekday practices she is unable to sleep in on weekends since she has practices from 7:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. Furthermore, during the summer, she practices ten hours each and every day. “I just have to make it work. I mean, I have to wake up early and sleep really late to balance out my workload with synchronized swimming,” Frelikh said. In addition, during the first semester of each school year, she and her team ruthlessly train and tirelessly practice. Throughout second semester there are multiple national and international

2010 West Side Junior Exibition

meets for which Frelikh must miss school in order to attend. Since she constantly takes “vacation” days, she treats tutorials and lunches like gold because she has to constantly make-up tests, in-class essays, class work and participation points. Nevertheless, she conveys that these tedious make-up sessions are a small price to pay to visit and compete in New York, Ohio, Texas, Florida and North Carolina. Despite her busy schedule, Frelikh still has to find time to design and make her own outfits. Although a tailor provides her with a handmade outfit, Frelikh has to manually decorate it with rhinestones, sparkles, beads and other embellishments. Despite the fact that synchronized swimming has its academic and time disadvantages, Frelikh’s future in swimming is more valuable, as she will soon conquer her next meet in Sw itzerland.

NEW

FLORIDA

YORK 2010 Junior Nationals

TEXAS

r e m m u S e h t it e k a M ! t e g r o F r e v e N ll ’ You

2010 Age Group Nationals Free offers and discounts from VTA partners:

• Unlimited rides on bus and light rail all summer • For youth 17 years & under • Enter to win one of ten $100 Westfield gift cards and other great prizes Like us on Facebook

www.vta.org/sbp • (408) 321-2300 • TTY (408) 321-2330

End of the year countdown Memorial Day- NO SCHOOL

Stress-less Cafe!!

Baccalaurette 4th and 5th @ West Val- Period Final ley Presbyterian Church 2nd and 3rd Period Final

1st Period Final

6th and 7th Period Final

Graduation Ceremony- @ De Anza College Football Field

Partying Partying YEAH! Partying Partying YEAH! Fun. Fun. Fun. Fun.

The Prospector wishes you a happy summer. Please Recycle


photoessay

12

MAY 27, 2011

Health is Wealth Next time you are at the front of the line debating between the fresh fruit cup and the gooey chocolate chip cookie, choose wisely, for the outcomes of these battles are what add up to form a lifestyle. And what better time than now to start anew on the path to good health? Sounds simple enough, but what most of us fall short on is willpower. With one good look around campus, though, it is easy to get this dose of inspiration; students are constantly pursuing healthy activities as seen on this page. Juniors Zhijiang Li, Andrew Qu and Eric Lee (upper left) share a hug in the quad, while sophomores Brittany Rodriguez and Katelyn Howard (upper right) share a laugh during their laps around the pool. Junior Paolo Barrenechea (left) shoots hoops with a handful of other students who form teams and battle it out on the asphalt during lunchtime. In addition to mental and physical health, eating habits also constitute a big part of balanced living. Junior Bhavisha Shukla (bottom left) takes a refreshing gulp of H2O, while senior Vandita Manyam chows down on a handful of tangerine slices. Other healthy choices include grabbing a milk carton on your way out of the cafeteria or choosing to ride your bike to school. It really is as simple as that, so join your peers in pursuing a healthy lifestyle today.


2

MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

the Prospector 2010-2011 STAFF

Cupertino High School Established 1958 Vol LII., No. 5 | 2011

editor-in-chief harini jaganathan news editor kevin chu opinions editor abhishek zaveri features editor jesse zhou in-depth editors michelle cheung sunwoo jeong lifestyles editor natasha sharma sports editor azadeh rongere photo editors sindhu gnanasambandan copy editors alya omar victoria duan business manager jackie breuer

Lawson reflects on 35 years of teaching, changes over the years VIRENA GALOTRA lifestyles assistant

This year marks history teacher Jay Lawson’s 35th year as a teacher in this district. To commemorate the occasion his students made him cards and presented him with gifts. Lawson is one of the longest employed teachers on campus and, as a result, notices changes in diversity, teacher collaboration and technology at school over the years. Ever since he was a young boy, Lawson wanted to be a teacher. Both his parents were teachers in the district and his father was a prominent administrator as well. In fact, Sam H. Lawson Middle School is named in honor of his father. Lawson began his career as a history teacher at Monta Vista High School and simultaneously worked as a wrestling coach at Homestead High School at the same time. After only three years of teaching, he was laid off from his job as a history teacher in 1979. Lawson then became an intern to a special education teacher at Monta Vista High School while getting his credentials at night school. After he graduated, he became a full time special education teacher at Monta Vista High School. He then transferred to CHS in 1985 as both the head wrestling coach and a special education teacher. Fourteen years later in 1999, he took up his current position as a history teacher on campus, which is his favorite class to teach. “I really enjoy... sharing the stories of history and the older I get the easier it gets because I’ve lived through a lot of the things I’m teaching,” Lawson said. After 35 years of teaching, Lawson plans to continue teaching for another three years before retiring. “It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more

students,” he said. Over the years, Lawson has observed many changes pertaining to both the school and his job as a teacher. One of the major changes on campus is its diversification, a process that occurred gradually. He mentions that there is less of an emphasis on the trades and students have less interest in taking classes like auto shop, metal shop and cooking. In addition, a smaller percentage of students choose to pursue these types of careers. Lawson also notes

It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more students. Jay Lawson

History Teacher

that both teachers and students now use technology in the classroom on a regular basis. Computers have now become a daily teaching tool as well as a regular learning resource for students. Another positive change is how teaching has become a collaborative job. “We as teachers share our ideas and materials and to me that’s what makes it special. Being old timer, I have [some] things to offer [but] it’s also challenging to learn some of the new things,” Lawson said. However, the one thing he says that has stayed consistent is the enthusiasm of the students. “I love my time in the classroom with students. They make me feel young,” Lawson said.

SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

35 YEARS AND COUNTING| History teacher Jay Lawson contemplates the rapidly changing school and fulfilling years of teaching

IDC Best Dance Crew debuts choreographical talent news anand hemmady assistants regina hong nikhil kanthi opinions amar kantipudi assistants anthony kao gun ho lee features emily cheng assistants alyssa williams tess wu

JOANNA LEE sports assistant

Launching the first ever Intra-District Council Best Dance Crew (IDCBDC), crews from Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, and Cupertino showcased their best dance moves in front of a screaming crowd at the Lynbrook gym on Friday, May 13. Weeks of practicing and stress for all parties involved led up to a

lifestyles virena galotra assistants natalie hoang madhuri sathish in-depth jackie breuer assistants vani mulkareddy jamin shih sports fred han assistants joanna lee eric jang willie wang adviser ann peck editorial policy “The Prospector” is an open forum of expression for student editors to inform and educate their readers. It will not be reviewed by or restrained by school officials prior to publication or distribution. Advisors may and should coach and discuss content during the writing process. The staff of “The Prospector” seeks to recognize individuals, events, ideasand bring news to the Cupertino community in an accurate, professional and unbiased manner. “The Prospector” will not avoid publishing a story solely on the basis of possible dissent or controversy. If you believe an error has been made, or wish to have your opinion expressed in “The Prospector”please contact us via mail or e-mail. Letters sent become the sole property of “The Prospector” and can be edited for length, clarity, or accuracy. “The Prospector” editorial board reserves the right to accept or reject any ad in accordance with its advertising policy. Contact Us The Prospector 10100 Finch Avenue Cupertino, CA 95014 prospector.chs@gmail.com

JOANNA LEE

DANCE CREW SHOWCASE | Seniors Vi Viet, Benjamin Du, Sheng Poon, Willie Wang and Brian Walsh display their talents at the first ever IDCBDC

successful turnout of the first ever IDCBDC. Cupertino’s IDC Commissioners, senior Mennen Kassa, 12, and junior Ashley Park, 11, gathered with the other schools to sort out the details and have been working for weeks planning the event. With the performance date having been changed multiple times due to various reasons, some were beginning to fear that the event may never actually take place. However, with positive attitudes, both Kassa and Park continued to push for the event to take place. Crews were selected based on a competitive audition process in which each crew demonstrated their choreography and were judged based on overall preparedness and enthusiasm. In the end, popular hip hop crew, GTFO, and newly formed all female crew, XI So Fly, were selected to represent Cupertino at the IDCBDC. Other schools, however, did not have as many competing teams as Cupertino did, thus leading to some additional conflicts. Though enduring another minor conflict, Kassa reassures the event will have the turnout it is hoping for. Said Kassa, “IDC has been able to work everything out and we are very excited for this upcoming event.” With the dance scene on the rise, participating schools thought it would be appropriate and fun to hold a showcase that would allow students to show off the their individual styles and ultimately reign supreme while holding the Best Dance Crew title. Said Kassa, “IDC was eager to plan an event that would give the chance for students in the district to bond and show off their talents. We noticed how popular the dance scene has become throughout the district and decided that a dance competition would be the perfect way to promote district unity.” On Friday afternoon, students from all participating schools filed into the Lynbrook gym and watched eagerly as each school performed their best. Though supportive of each competing crew, the crowd screamed passionately after their representing crews performed. Though Kassa and Park originally planned for qualified judges who are already familiar with the dance scene, qualified judges were unable to be recruited before the show took place. In the end, the audience took the role of the judges. Each group showcased a variety of creative and intricate routines, including a martial arts inspired dance, some instances of jazz and lyrical, and various popping and breaking moves. Even though IDCBDC was a dance show, each school perfected a dance number that was tailored to their own individual styles and personalities that really became a sight to see. After six talented and varying performances, it was time to finally announce the winner and holder of the IDCBDC title. The audience was able to vote for their favorite crew and the crew with the most votes would take home the title. Ultimately, it was Lynbrook who took away this year’s title. With a successful turnout for the first ever IDCBDC, it is likely this event will return in the upcoming school year as an even better dance spectacle.


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

Letter to the editor Editor, The recent staff editorial (“Affirmative Action: Out-dated and Out-weighted) in the May 6th edition of The Prospector, though well-written, and thoughtful, failed to address some key issues concerning affirmative action policies. First and foremost, the editorial fails to mention the 1996 California proposition (Proposition 209) that banned racial, gender, and ethnic preferences for the University of California and the Cal-State systems. The majority of Cupertino High School students entering four-year universities, attend either a UC or Cal-State school, so the “factors of admission that are simply out of our control” is a non-factor for most CHS students. In addition to the omission of Proposition 209, the article does not cite key data about family income in the United States. The thesis of the article is that because racial discrimination is no longer the issue it once was, affirmative action programs should shift focus to income, and not race. A simple look at the last US Census reveals the following yearly median family incomes broken down by race: Asian Americans $73, 578, White $65,000, Hispanic $40, 466, and African-Americans $39,879. In sum, if UC or Cal-State were to address income, rather than race, we would still be targeting the same group of underrepresented students. The final missing piece is the assumption that every California high school student competes at the same level. The Fremont Union High School District community is an amazing place to work (I have worked in the district for 14 years and would not want to work anywhere else), and go to school (I am a 1992 Fremont High School graduate); however, it is easy to forget about the inherent advantages we have at our disposal. Not all California students have access to numerous AP courses, award winning performing arts programs, amazing teachers, supportive parents, comprehensive sports programs, or the financial means for SAT prep courses. To go back to your original argument, access to these things are “factors of admission that are out of our control”. If I attend a high school without these luxuries, how in the world can a UC admission officer look at me in the same light, as say a student who attends Cupertino, Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, or Homestead High Schools? (To be honest, the college admissions process has always been a mystery to me. Every day I am surrounded by 1,800 amazing students, and think they should be able to attend any college of their choice! ) In sum, affirmative action programs are but one tool to help underrepresented students attend select universities. Is it the only tool? Not by any stretch of the imagination — I am not naïve enough to think just one tool can close the achievement gap. Any attempt to close the achievement gap is one that would require a great deal more than affirmative action. Andy Walczak Assistant Principal

Want to advertise with the Prospector? email prospector.chs@gmail.com

3

Quad and cafeteria redesign: (cont. pg. 1)

ally a part of the project since we were given the opportunity to voice our opinions.” After hearing from all types of people at the school, the architects feel the need to preserve several areas of CHS. Said architect Diane Rappold, “The quad is a well loved spot on campus that we will improve on and ‘celebrate’. We also recognize the significance of the Senior Lawn — which may be transformed in the new design, but the concept will remain.” Although CHS is only undergoing the first phase of the rebuilding process, many students and teachers are excited to see the project progress because they had the chance to voice their opinions.

Letter from the editor Dear Reader, You hold in your hands the last full issue of the Prospector for the 2010-2011 school year. As was the case in our last issue, junior editors worked hard to create and edit the content of these pages. In this issue, you will learn about having chickens as pets, find out how much to exercise to work of that chipotle burrito and become an expert in throwing Harry Potter themed parties. Finish strong as the year draws to a close. Summer is nearly here! Keep an eye out for senior issue, which comes out next week. Please recycle! Harini Jaganathan Editor-in-Chief


opinions

4

MAY 27, 2011

Mo’ money mo’ problems: Child investment woes FRED HAN sports assistant

T

oday’s opinionated article revolves around the issue of parents’ financial investment in children. Strictly speaking, an investment is spending money in order to gain profitable returns. There are two reasons why parents would spend money on behalf of their children. The first is from a biological perspective, in which parents invest money to ensure the survival of their offspring. The offspring will then breed, continuing the survival of those genes and the human race. The second is the less obvious: to ensure the prolonged survival of the parent. But that’s not the point. The key question is how much money should a parent invest in their children? Parents should provide only the bare minimal financial support for the child to live comfortably to prevent spoiling the child and to teach the child financial independence. Before any misunderstandings form, “bare minimal financial support” does not mean starving the child or forcing them to work in dirty coal mines. Instead, the child should be full fed, clothed and prepared to learn the art of survival: Cupertino’s art of survival is hunting for colleges and farming for GPA. Any luxury beyond the basic necessities and tools for enhanced education — which include, but is not limited to, overly luxurious eating style or incessant shopping trips — tends to spoil the child. Any form of spoiling will spoil the chances for the child to succeed and successfully reproduce or support the parent. Psychologically speaking, spoiling is a case of operant condition – a system of punishment and reward. For example, if a child learns to associate crying tantrums with getting whatever

he wants, then he will repeat the behavior. The parent needs to understand when to say “no” – or else it is like subprime lending. Continuation of inappropriate and excessive parental financial investment will soon lead to bursting the bubble of the inflated expectations and soon depression. Remember, parents in Cupertino should focus primarily about necessities for survival in life: working hard for happiness. The key step to help the child work hard for happiness is by preventing him or her from being spoiled. In other words, learning to say “no”. If a child truly wants to achieve or want something, then make him or her work for it — which leads to the next point: financial independence. Remember, the fastest route to corruption (spoiling in this case) is permission. Work is the fastest route to independence. If a child does not understand at least the core basics of money and economics, the chances are he or she will not understand how to deal with money later on in life. Then the children’s children — if the original children still survived by that point (a highly unlikely situation in Cupertino’s overly competitive environment) would not understand financial importance either. This results in continued financial dependence on the parents later in life — a counterproductive and non-profitable investment. The solution to this is to teach the children to work for what they want. Directing their desires and creative energies toward work for financial incentives will teach them the importance of money and give them a sense of dealing with different quantities of money. In conclusion, parents must learn to say no to any potential spoiling opportunities (although reward for hard work and excellent performance is mandatory) and spend only enough to guide the children’s creative energies. By freely giving money whenever a child demands so or not teaching them the importance of financial independence, those parents are setting themselves up for a potentially

spoiled child. Otherwise the “investment” of all the money and time put into improving the survival rate. However, do note that parents should never force a child into working so much that the child is greatly inclined to rebel. It is a delicate balance of the carrot and the whip.

EMILY CHENG

THE AGE OF INNOCENCE VS. MODERN-DAY TEENS

Anonymous questioning is unnecessary cowardice AMAR KANTIPUDI sports assistant EMILY CHENG news assistant

Ask me something, anything. Curious? It is an unsurprising feeling people get when they come across a chance to ask whatever they desire of their peers. When curiosity takes over, thoughts run free, and a new, undiscovered side of a person will be unleashed. This is even more evident when people hide behind a veil of anonymity because they ask anything and everything they can until they have satisfied their curiosity. It is these intentions, this sense of infallible curiosity and innate bigotry humans tend to demonstrate that often diminishes personal confidence. Just a simple question can induce the feeling of throwing out your entire life on the chopping block. The practice of attempting to fish out potential secrets without identification is a privileged feature provided to people by social networking sites. Services such as Tumblr and Formspring allow literally anyone to ask specific people questions — uncensored and unmonitored. It is through sites like these that the world has been introduced to concepts such as “trolling” and cyber bullying Anonymous questioning does comes with its fair share of reasons. After all, some people are just too afraid to ask something personal. It is almost always easier to talk to someone when away from the spotlight. That, by far, is the most appealing aspect of talking to friends online rather than in person or on the phone. Nonetheless unless a relationship is significantly strong, it is nearly impossible to separate sarcastic comments from serious ones. Furthermore, since people can say whatever they want online without having to admit who they are, they resort to a more crude language that can sometimes belittle the peer. Though, many still set up an anonymous question box expecting fun, light-hearted and interesting questions that can help them kill time, in the

long run, users run the risk of having their honesty tested, actions questioned, and image bashed, eventually damaging one’s self-esteem. If the user does not put a halt to anonymous questioning after they’ve already fallen victim to “anon bashing”, they suffer comment after comment of demeaning verbiage flooding their inbox. Soon, even strongly optimistic individuals will fall prey to the condescending harassment of their peers. It is all too common to see cheerful people turn into pessimists. Such an initially simple and harmless intention of exciting user life can morph into a lethal and emotionally degrading exchange of Q&A. Because of this, people may become very unhappy individuals who cannot control their own emotions properly, and oftentimes would end up lashing out at the resulting instability at others. These insecurities are then observed and questioned once again through that wretched anonymous button! Even if it is an attempt to poke fun into others’ lives, anonymous questioning can and most likely will lead to displeasing tension and shaky feelings. After all, once people put a mask on, they fail to take responsibility for their actions. To have a bright and confident spirit be torn down by anonymous comments is a excruciating sight. The few moments of entertainment gained on the asking end do not balance out the discomfort imposed on the receiving end. Online socializing does have its boundaries in this sense. Take a few precautions before entering a world full of anonymity, realize the consequences, and remember the saying that’s far too overheard but never entirely understood: curiosity killed the cat.

Why do you strut around campus like a know-it-all?

THE MASK OF ANONYMITY:

What students experience with online bashing “ I don’t have a formspring because I think it is another way for someone to bully you and bullying on formspring is inevitable.” Mahtab Danai, senior “I deleted my formspring because all that I got on there was stuff that I rather hear in person or didn’t want to hear at all. I didn’t want to give them an outlet when they deserved nothing from me.” Julia Seaton, sophomore “I have the curiosity of a reality check on whether people actually like me or not.” Varsha Prabhakar, sophomore

You think you’re cool? You’re just a poser.


THE PROSPECTOR

MAY 27, 2011

opinions

5

DEATH OF BIN LADEN Should the death of an enemy be celebrated?

Liberty for Free

Respect for Life

ALYA OMAR copy editor JACKIE BREUER in-depth assistant

SAMUEL LEE opinions assistant

On September 11, 2001, America watched in horror as a group of terrorists hijacked three planes, crashing them into the windows of the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and a field in Virginia. Family members watched as their loved ones’ lives were prematurely taken from them. Days later, leader of Al Qaeda Osama bin Laden vanished after taking responsibility for orchestrating the attacks, leaving behind an uncertain, tormented future. From that day, it has been one of the top priorities of the U.S. government to take down the man who instructed such heartbreak for thousands of its citizens. As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 loomed overhead, when President Barack Obama announced to the nation that an attack on bin Laden’s compound was successful, the spectrum of emotion was of massive contrast. While some recognized the magnitude that bin Laden’s death held as a weight lifted off of their grieving shoulders, others rebuked the celebrations, finding it inappropriate to disrespect the dead. However, it is not another person’s right to judge another person’s happiness and the expression of said emotion. People are affected differently by major events and define closure in a different way. 3,000 families continued with their lives forever changed, and though their losses were met with sympathy and pledges of remembrance, it was never combatted with justice because the man who orchestrated the events continued to lead his life, while their lost ones could not. From the perspective of the somewhat naive, bin Laden’s death signifies nothing but the end of a human life. To others, it was a monumental moment of closure, an assurance that the man that executed the execution was not pardoned for what he had done. This is not to say that the only proper reaction to bin Laden’s death is to galavant through the streets, chanting “U.S.A.” The death of bin Laden is simply a headline to some, while for others it is a sign of redemption for the lost loved ones. It is not in anyone’s capabilities to stand back and determine the value of such an event for someone else. Whether you feel compelled to run through the streets singing the national anthem or to simply hold a moment of silence, it is imperative to realize that the next best action is to move on and keep those that lost their lives on September 11 and during the war on terrorism in our hearts forever.

A DIVIDED

The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them.” -- Lois McMaster Bujold

AMERICA

I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” — Martin Luther King Jr.

Osama died, Americans cried… in happiness. Yes, you read that right! “Life, liberty and justice for all” except for certain Arab terrorists — they just get two out of the three. As soon as news of the al-Qaeda leader’s death reached the American public, thousands of Americans flooded Times Square and the White House to pop bottles of champagne, sing, chant “U-SA” and smile for the camera. Times like this throw doubts on whether Americans truly value the life of another human being. There should be no celebration for the death of Osama bin Laden. Admittedly, bin Laden’s is crucial to American security. The nation ought to thank President Bush for collecting the necessary intelligence throughout his presidency. It should also thank President Obama for capturing the terrorist when given the opportunity, unlike President Clinton; his stained presidency includes an incident in which he refused the Sudanese government’s offer to arrest and extradite bin Laden. Though the operation may have been necessary, bin Laden’s death is nothing to celebrate. Unless malice and vengeance form the bedrock of American principles (as opposed to, say, basic respect for human life), there is no justifiable reason for celebration: Terror attacks will not stop just because bin Laden descended to Hell. Just a few weeks after his death, suicide bombers murdered 51 Pakistanis in retaliation. Even worse, his death does not mean an end to outrageously invasive TSA procedures. Three year old boy: Wait, I thought bad terror man was gone! TSA “agent”: Quiet, I’m fondling your genitals. Americans running to the White House to celebrate bin Laden’s death with flags and drunkenness exhibited the same kind of euphoria that certain groups of Afghans displayed on 9/11. Chanting “U.S.A” just makes the entire circus more obscene. We must not lower our moral standards to those of the terrorists. Had people stayed home in quiet introspection and prayer, then that would have demonstrated true American exceptionalism. People are fully justified in feeling relief over the destruction of a mass murderer. But a sense of joy does not belong to a nation that considers itself a representative of everything that is good with the world.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Future homecoming court should be open to all classes, not just seniors Last month, we reported on ASB Executive Council’s new Homecoming Court nomination process for the 2011-2012 school year. This process involves several steps: nominating only senior candidates, having the top 20 male and top 20 female candidates complete a questionnaire about their school involvement, selecting the top 10 male and top 10 female candidates based on that questionnaire and having students from all classes choose their top six males or female Court candidates in an open vote. According to ASB, the new system is meant to ensure that the Homecoming Court accurately portrays our school’s values. However, there is considerable opposition to this policy across class lines. We completely agree with the new system’s purpose; screening candidates through a questionnaire on school involvement will be an effective way to ensure that only qualified, upstanding students make it on the Court. However, we believe that restricting the Court to only seniors goes against our school’s traditions and spirit of class unity. Homecoming has always been an event where the entire

school comes together for the sake of school pride and spirit. Students from freshmen to seniors flock to Homecoming because of the memories it creates and the kindred bonds they are able to forge with their friends. The event gives students a chance to garner happy memories and strengthen friendships with their peers — usually those in the same class. When there is not a freshman face to be found in the Homecoming Court, how delightful, inclusive or memorable will attending freshmen think Homecoming is? Supporters try to justify this massive exclusion of students by saying that all students will have the opportunity to be nominated to the court once they go through four years of high school. This assertion completely ignores the motivational and inspirational value the court can provide. If court members are meant to be shining examples of perfect Pioneers, these examples should be relatable and plentiful. Having a court from all classes will allow students who are not seniors to recognize that even one, two or three years at our school can make a difference. Having all classes represented on the Homecoming Court

will also maintain our school’s sense of community and unity. Homecoming is not meant to be an exclusive affair; with each class having an equal chance to compete in areas like skits and posters, it gives a level playing field for all classes to shine. If we deny freshmen, sophomores and juniors opportunities that seniors have in what is supposed to be a schoolwide event, they will feel excluded — which is exactly the opposite of what Homecoming is all about. In an April Prospector poll, 66% of students polled, including seniors, opposed the new seniors-only Homecoming Court nomination process. If anything, ASB Executive Council should listen to this supermajority of its constituency and work to revise this process instead of single-handedly implementing it. Homecoming is for all CHS students, and every part of Homecoming, the Court included, should be open to students regardless of class. We believe that unity and inclusiveness are core Pioneer values. It only makes sense that the Pioneers’ Homecoming Court embodies them.


features

MAY 27, 2011

6

TINO’S ANIMAL KI GDO CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE ASIAN SOUL

Sophomore’s feathery pals help in many ways SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN photo editor

She has chicken soup for the pet lover’s soul — and no, not the book. The fact is, sophomore Julie Chen’s pets are chickens and she has consumed them in soup form before. While Chen does love her fuzzy, egg-laying creatures, she shares an, lets just say, atypical bond with them. Through this bond though, she has learned a great deal about the nature of animals and the responsibility that comes along with caring for them. A year ago, at Chen’s request, her family drove two hours to a farm and picked up a handful of “female” (four out of the eight grew up to be male) chicks. They built a coop and everyday, fed them vegetables, checked their feed and refilled their water. With time “scooping up morning presents” was added to the to-do list; one egg per chicken a day, hard-boiled in the morning is not a bad deal at all. California state law, though, prohibits housing roosters in residential areas (a blessing for those who like to sleep in) so Chen’s family needed a way to dispose of their four not-so-female chickens. “We ate them. We are Asians so of course we know how to kill chickens,” said Chen, “It’s really just a quick throat cut.” This may sound brutal and Chen herself initially had much trouble with this idea. That being said, she eventually came to peace with eating her chickens under the circumstances. First of all, Chen was never excessively attached to her chickens as others may be with their more conventional pets.

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Chrome, Chicovo, Phoenix, Chocolate and Turtle — but they grow up really fast. I went on a cruise for a week and they all changed colors so I couldn’t tell who was who anymore,” said Chen, “It’s not like killing a pet dog or anything.” She is comfortable with it from a moral standpoint as well. “The whole reason we have this garden is because my mom read this book called Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. It talks about this writer who starts a farm and raises her own animals. Her philosophy is that if one raises them naturally, it’s ethical to eat them. I feel better about eating these chickens rather than eating commercially grown ones, fattened

We are Asians, so of course we know how to kill chickens.

up in two months,” added Chen. Aside from, when occasion calls, eating them, Julie also spends a great deal of time babysitting her chickens. She has made some quite interesting observations. “Chickens are very vicious actu sometimes,” Chen said, “They actually have a pecking order. Sometimes I’ll feed them dandelion leaves and certain chickens are not allowed chick to come and eat. The little chickens were initially at the bottom of the order and the red chicken was at the very bottom but once so she started laying, she gained social status. Now the once oldest, bot meanest black chicken is at the bottom because she stopped laying.” Overall, while owning chickens has taught Julie ad a thing or two, she admits that it is not for everyone. “It’s kind of a hassle. Whether you should own one or not depends on where you live, how your backyard com is, and how committed you are to waking up at 6 am morn in the morning to angry c h i c k e n s ,” Chen warns, “If that doesn’t concern you, then two bucks a chick at Gilroy. Good luck!”

OWNING A PET CAN HELP WITH STRES KEVIN CHU news editor

While most people think of massage, meditation and yoga as natural, healthy stress relievers, there is another option that is fluffier and more loveable: getting a pet. Not only do pets help relieve stress, but they can also improve one’s mood, control one’s blood pressure, reduce loneliness and provide social support— all of which are important for health and well-being, and for avoiding stress and depression. Animals are relatively consistent in their behaviors — such as locations and times of eating, sleeping, and cuddling — which provide a stable, predictable and thus less stressful aspect in the owner’s life. Their unconditional love is also extremely comforting — pets greet their owners with excitement when they come home, they can usually tell when their owners are upset, and many pets will cuddle up next to their owners, providing soothing contact. A 2002 study by re-

searchers at the State University of New York showed that when performing a stressful ta felt less stressful in the presence of pets th presence of a spouse or close friend. Pet ow had significantly lower baseline heart rates a pressure than the participants who did not o Caring for a pet often results in a sense o tion and fulfillment. In addition, owning pet the likelihood of going outside and interac others, providing opportunities for mood-r cialization. “I spend up to an hour each day taking for walks,” said sophomore Abishek Kumar. A 1999 study found that male AIDS pat less likely to suffer from depression if they ow “Pet ownership among men who have A vides a certain level of companionship that h them cope better with the stresses of th lives,” said psychologist Judith Siegel, a UC professor of public health and lead aut of the report. “This is one more study demonstrates the health benefits that ing a pet can provide.” In addition, pets help decrea pressure, heart rate and muscl

SHE IS HER DOGS’ BEST FRIEND Junior goes home to take care of pets during lunch JAMIN SHIH features assistant

When the bell rings at 12:25 p.m. every day, students leave their classrooms, obligations and quite often campus to enjoy 40 minutes of leisure. One student, however, exits campus not to leave her responsibilities behind but to take on another set. While her classmates spend lunchtimes with their friends, junior Ashley Kan visits and takes care of her three pet dogs, a chore she says teaches her both responsibility and time management skills that will aid her throughout her life. Kan feeds her three dogs, two Chihuahuas named Missy and Teddy and a Pomeranian named Charlie, every day during lunch because no one else is available to do so at that time. This causes her to miss out on the social banter that occurs during lunchtime, and she admits that she sacrifices spending time with her friends because of her pets. Regardless, she is sure that her dogs are completely worth the sacrifice. “I’m really close to my dogs. They’re really my best friends sometimes, because they’re always there for me,” Kan said. Indeed, just as Kan gives to her dogs, they give equally back to her. The sacrifice does not seem nearly as significant when her

WHAT KIND OF PET DO YOU HAVE?

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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

features

7

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both in reaction to stressful events over a period of time. Owning a pet requires daily walks and other opportunities for exercise (another proven stress reliever) are also increased. Recovering addicts who struggle with high levels of stress should research different pets to determine which types, breeds, personalities and ages seem like a good match for you. For instance, if having to potty train a puppy sounds stressful, look into getting a dog that’s already trained is an appropriate option. For people who are often away from home, a more selfsufficient animal like a cat might be a better choice. There is nothing quite like hav hav- ing a warm ball of fur curl up next to you or an excitedly thumping tail greeting you — and it’s even more satisfying to know that these furry friends are helping to improve our lives.

“My dream pet would be “F” the White Winged Horse. It’s name is F so that when it takes my last name, Lai, its full name will be F Lai. And then I can tell it: ‘F Lai, fly!’ And then I’ll go around raiding towns on my mount.” -Alan Lai, senior “Well, I kind of just want a ferret. Not really creative or anything... I just like them!” -Andrew Qu, junior “My dream pet is a rainbow-horned unicorn that can fly and take me places, but that can also understand what I’m saying and be cuddly.” -Jeong Eun Lee, freshman “I like white tigers because they look more unique than other types of tigers.” -Brian Nguyen, senior

COMPILED BY TESS WU

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N O N E

12%

57% 170 PEOPLE POLLED COMPILED BY FRED HAN

Passing of pets leaves student stronger

ANAND HEMMADY features assistant

Disclaimer: The Prospector strongly encourages owners to spay or neuter pets, and acknowledges that some of the behavior exhibited by the owners of the cats in the following article is irresponsible. The Prospector also would like to warn readers that some elements of the following article may be exaggerated. Everything must end. This is a rule of the universe. Unfortunately, relationships with pets are not exempt from this rule. No matter how well an owner takes care of a pet, it will eventually pass away, and the owner will have to move on without it. The unavoidable pain from having a pet die often turns many away from keeping pets, and often raises questions as to whether having pets is worth the pain. In the end, though, the benefits of having pets far outweigh the negatives. Sophomore Brent Knaack knows the pain of losing pets all too well. Having once had thirty cats, Knaack could only watch helplessly as cat after cat died, leaving him with only five. “Our family of cats started when my dad was looking through boxes in our backyard and he found three kittens in a box,” Knaack said. “They were born literally just an hour before we found them. We took care of them because their mom never did. They grew up, and then they had kittens. Eventually we had around thirty cats, all living in our backyard in makeshift shelters.” Later, though, Knaack’s beloved pets started dying. “There was one cat in particular with whom I had a close relationship,” said Knaack as he recounted the death of his favorite cat. “I called him Tiny, because he had growth problems, and he never grew any bigger than my hand. This led to internal organ failure, and he passed away. I respected him because even in his last few hours of pain, he was determined to stay alive, and he survived through a lot of pain and suffering. I rarely cry, but when Tiny died, I couldn’t stop crying for two hours.” U

O T H E R

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nothing. During her daily fifteen minute visits to her dogs, she does feed them. The time she spends with her dogs is rewarding and her er an unconditional love that mirrors her own. t always there. They’re always playful, they always make me happy… n a good mood,” said Kan. g care of her dogs does cost her some of her free time, the experience he responsibility and time management skills she earns for the future es up for it. Kan stresses that it is completely different from normal ent duties to care for another living being and that owning three dogs wed her to experience both responsibility and the joy of bringing hapss to someone or something else. These lessons can also be applied e world outside of high school and pets; Kan finds applications well beyond homework assignments or tests. “For the future, if you ever have kids, you’re going to have to take care of something. You’re going to have to take care of cleaning up after them. It’s just a huge responsibility,” said Kan. While many students have only one set of respon responsibilities to worry about at school, Kan’s pet duties begin where her school ones end. Despite seeming like a large hassle, however, her dogs bring her the kind of joy and teach her the kind of lessons that only COUR TESY OF AS HLEY pets can. KAN

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After Tiny’s death, Knaack witnessed the death of around 25 other cats. Knaack let his cats roam freely around the neighborhood, which annoyed the neighbors. The neighbors began leaving poisoned food out on their doorsteps. Knaack was forced to witness cat after cat dying from the food poisoning. He could do nothing to stop the death toll of cats from rising. In the end, only five cats remained. Despite all the grief that the deaths of his cats caused him, though, Knaack does not regret anything and is happy that he had the chance to know his cats. “One of the best times of my life was when I was playing around with the three original kittens,” Knaack said. “It was really cute when we let them into the house and watched them crawl around, pull out wires, and stumble and fall. In spite of all the pain I think it was worth it to have pets and I don’t regret it.” Clearly, the loss that pets bring will be painful. However, it would be foolish to refuse to entertain the thought of having pets simply because of the pain. After all, in life, happiness can only come with suffering. To discard things only because they will hurt us would ruin life entirely. Although pets die and losing them hurts, the overall relationship with pets brings more happi happiness than sorrow.


lifestyles

MAY 27, 2011

8

THE BOY WHO LIVES ON... THE LEGACY OF HARRY POTTER

NIKHIL KANTHI features assistant

T

here are moments in our lives when the harshness of reality casts a shadow over our happiness, causing it to be short-lived. On July 15th, when Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 comes out, I will have to struggle between pangs of excitement and sorrow as I watch a part of my life end. When I pored over the books time and time again in my younger days, I wondered what attracted me to the adventures of a boy wizard. What set this story apart from the other books I had devoured in my youth? I often put this question on hold as I turned the last page in the last book and started anew with the first book. I spent days walking the corridors and grounds of Hogwarts. However, as the pages became more and more familiar, I realized that there would soon be a day when I would be bored by the tale that once meant the world to me. That day, I took the books out of my room and anticipated a day when I would open the books and be amazed once more. A few days ago, I turned the first page of the first book. The parchment-like scent of

the pages with which I was so familiar brought with them a painful comprehension. In less than two months, the journey would be over. I think I can answer my question today. I did not love Harry Potter because it was a friend or mentor. The reason I love these books is because I could see myself as Harry. Rowling erased the line between the reader and Harry somewhere in those pages. Readers empathized with Harry when he was in danger or depressed, and that empathy carried over to the moments when Harry was triumphant. We were united by the naive hope that things will get better. When the circumstances were not as happy and bright as they could have been, I knew that my time would come. Harry Potter taught me that victory was not impossible, and I think we all yearn for that certainty. It taught me the power of hope. I wish for a day when the corridors of Hogwarts will be as alien to me as they were to Harry on his first night there, and I wish that I could feel the loss of Sirius or Dumbledore without expecting it. I doubt that day will come before July 15th, but that’s fine. I think I will do just fine without reading the story I have read seventy times before as I wait outside the midnight premiere. Good job, my friend. Mischief managed.

POTTER PREMIERE PARTY

1. Buy midnight premiere tickets in advance, optimally three to four weeks before the movie.

Want to make your HP premiere night truly magical? Here are a few suggestions that will make your night less Dudley and a tad more Diggory.

2. First, decide on a menu for your party. For terrific Potter recipes, visit http://www.mugglenet.com/misc/rosmertas/index.shtml. Remember that Butterbeer and Golden Snitch cupcakes are absolute necessities! 3. Decorate! After you settle on a venue, plaster the walls with Harry Potter-themed posters. Make sure to include the official movie poster! 4. Costumes are mandatory — they should consist of robes, traditional Hogwarts uniforms, wands and scarves. Assign each guest a specific character in his or her customized Hogwarts-style invitation. 5. Finally, plan some activities! Some suggestions: i. Test your knowledge of the series with some trivia and use Bertie Botts’ Every Flavor Beans as the prize (or punishment!) ii. Reenact your favorite scenes from the series, and be creative. iii. Host a Dueling Club. iv. Watch Deathly Hallows, Part I in preparation for the finale! MADHURI SATHISH

Lady Gaga’s Born This Way contains darker and more serious overtones JESSE ZHOU features editor

The Mother Monster has done it again. Lady Gaga, the artist who has so far defined the voice of a new generation, has been inching toward far more radical themes in her music (believe it or not) with her new album Born This Way. While the widely acclaimed The Fame introduced Gaga as the queen of “Just Dance”, Born This Way instead puts her in the spotlight as a woman with the most independent spirit in the music industry. Many of Gaga’s songs indeed revolve around being proud and self-sufficient. “Hair” and “Bad Kids” promote the idea that being fiercely independent is essential to having true freedom. In addition, her songs call on people to respect those who choose to be independent. For example, one line from “Hair” states, “I just wanna be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.” Her words give the listener a window into a troubled soul who wants nothing more than for others to be accepted in today’s cruel society. The overall tone of Born This Way is darker and more disorderly than The Fame as well. However, Gaga uses this style in a unique way, and trust me, she uses it well. By utilizing the power

of static-shock beats, Gaga’s songs are a rather elegant synthesis of symphony and cacophony: a paradox pleasing to the ear. The fractured mix of piano, electro synthesizers, electric guitar and abnormal beats ends up finding its way into songs like “Judas” and “Marry the Night.” The atmosphere Gaga has created in Born This Way is terrifying and euphoric at the same time. By using theme and tone to their full potential, Lady Gaga’s new album, Born This Way, is bound to be one of the greatest albums of the decade. From songs about true love (“You and I”) to being who you are (“Born This Way”), the Mother Monster covers a full range of topics that will leave the listener surprised. By the time the last song finishes, something will be blown. It will either be your mind or your CD player from abusing the replay button too much.

TOP 3 SINGLES 1. Born This Way 2. The Edge of Glory 3. Judas COMPILED BY NATASHA SHARMA COURTESY OF SpreePiX-Berlin


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

lifestyles

9

The beauty OFTHRIFTING

Looking for something trendy without breaking the bank? Thrift stores sell classic pieces at surprinsgly low prices. You don’t have to buy couture to be chic.

VICTORIA DUAN copy-editor

The outrageous prices offered at too many stores in the mall make it hard for frugal shoppers to pick out affordable items that complement them. Never mind purchasing an outfit, or a nice set of furniture — a single shirt will devastate one’s wallet. But sophomore Brittney Lundquist and junior Noa Rosenberg, both experienced in the ways of thrifting, know better than to blow their entire savings on just one item. Thrift stores are shops owned and run by charities or nonprofit organizations as fundraisers for their cause. Unlike conventional stores, thrift stores carry a multitude of different products. Each new shipment is always full of surprises, and the prices of the products are relatively low. “I have found a lot of name brands like Abercrombie, the North Face, J. Crew and Banana Republic [while thrifting]. It’s a nice feeling to say that you can own name brand clothing and only have to pay a fraction of the original price,” Lundquist said. Although the quality of the donations are often questionable, Lundquist has found that the overall value of a thrift store’s merchandise can be roughly predicted by the city the store is located in.

“I have found that the ‘richer’ cities have the fancier, nicer, name brand clothing options — for example, San Francisco, Santa Cruz and Los Angeles,” Lundquist said. However, nearby thrift stores, including Goodwill, Salvation Army and Savers can all be thoroughly scavenged for good deals and quality items. Contrary to Lundquist, Rosenberg approaches thrifting with a slightly different tactic. While Lundquist is more oriented towards browsing for clothes, Rosenberg thrifts with an open mind and warmly welcomes all possibilities that might come her way. “I may go shopping with the intent to find a new sweater and then I’ll leave the store with a new shelf for my room. The challenge of thrifting is not to find something that is the perfect fit, but finding things that have the potential to be cinched, hemmed, draped in a room or framed on a wall. When I do find something I like, it’s like finding a gem; that’s the beauty of thrifting!” Rosenberg said. With thrifting comes not only the thrill of hunting for the perfect item, but also the satisfaction of paying sensible prices for a purchase. Forget the unreasonable prices at the mall — go look for the cheaper counterpart at Goodwill.


sports

Have a healthy summer

Which is worse – resisting the urge to eat or mustering the willpower to exercise? Most people are reluctant to do either, as byproducts of animal evolution makes us inclined to eat as much as possible and save every last ounce of fat in case of famine. That’s right, those deliciously

dreadful, guilty calories that lurk in your In-NOut Cheeseburger with Onions are here to stay unless burned off by the exercise that we so despise. Here are some popular food items along with matching activities needed to part with those beloved calories.

VERDE

IN N’ OUT PEARL

CHEESE BURGER WITH ONIONS

306

480

Shop for one hour 14 minutes

MILK TEA (BUBBLE TEA)

Calories:

Calories alories:

Exercise:

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MAY 27, 2011

Exercise:

Garden for one hour and three minutes

CHIPOTLE

WING STOP

BARBACOA BURRITO

FRENCH FRIES

Calories:

Calories:

200

800

Exercise:

Exercise:

Run at nine mph for 11.5 minutes

Dance for three hours

Boosts that actually give you a boost NATALIE HOANG lifestyles assistant

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fter ordering a cold smoothie to quench the thirst of a hot summer’s day, the Jamba Juice cashier asks you, “Would you like a boost with that?”. You will proceed to ask what types they offer and are met with a list of seemingly health nourishing choices. The options tackle different aspects of the body, from the Charger and Antioxidant boosts to the Immunity and Energy boosts. Sure, it sounds convincing, but what is it exactly that you are putting into your body? Do the benefits live up to the name? Let us break it down. A boost is a dietary supplement intended to add the vitamins, minerals, fiber, or amino acids a person may lack in his or her daily consumption. In a scroll through the Jamba Juice Booster nutritional facts, noted is the abundance of Maltodextrin and Inulin in the energy and vitamin boosts. Substitutes for sugar, Maltodextrin and Inulin give a sweet taste and the energy provided by sugar without the calories and fat. This makes the 3G Charger, Antioxidant Power, Daily Vitamin, Immunity and Energy Boosts all great options for those in need of a pick-me-up without the extra carbohydrates and sugar to bog them down. The last three boosters are crafted to regulate the body’s systems to maintain healthy levels. Flax & Fiber, a promising Boost, is made of Flaxseed. It is known for reducing blood sugar levels, bad cholesterol, triglycerides, and being the great source of fiber it is, constipation. As for the Whey Protein and Soybean Boosts, their benefit is in the name: protein. Protein’s importance lies in it’s ability to repair body cells, build and repair muscles and bones, and control metabolism. These boosts are promising in their nature, so why not add them into your smoothie? Though it is unlikely one would purchase a smoothie with a boost everyday, or enough to feel the benefits, their intentions are there. A simple overthe-counter supplemental pill directed to take once a day is perhaps the better solution for those concerned about their health. But if mixing in a boost takes the guilt off of your 300-calorie smoothie, go for it!

AZADEH RONGERE

3G Charger™ Boost Antioxidant Power™ Boost Daily Vitamin™ Boost Energy™ Boost Flax & Fiber Boost Immunity™ Boost Soy Protein™ Boost Whey Protein™ Boost

PHOTOS BY: AZADEH RONGERE COMPILED BY: ERIC JANG

get

1 TONED

for summer COMPILED BY: NIKHIL KANTHI

LEG RISES

Lie on your back with your hands holding onto something heavy (like a bookshelf side), and raise your legs without bending your knees. 20 minutes (counting breaks) of these and a four-pack will be a breeze.

2 3

COMPILED BY: AZADEH RONGERE

SHUFFLE PUSH-UPS Do pushups while moving side to side. Nothing strains your biceps, triceps, deltoids, and laterals like some serious pushup shuffling. Aim for three or four sets of 20 reps to get some toned arms.

RUNNING Put on a pair of shorts, plug in your favorite song on your MP3, and speed off on a strenuous but quick workout. Aim for anything under nine minutes (as long as you have warmed up), and you will have burned off a six-inch from Subway.

PHOTOS BY: SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

Badminton Team Dilemma: Winning does not always reap the rewards ERIC JANG sports assistant

There is no doubt that winning feels good — addicting even, if victories come frequently. However, even a winning streak has its disadvantages when the victories become too easy. The badminton team has dominated its matches in a less-competitive league but it has done so at the expense of the valuable lessons gained by losing matches. Players compete against members of the other team in singles or doubles matches, ranked by skill level. The entire game is won by a majority of match wins from the team members. Players who train in competitive badminton clubs outside of school, such as Bintang, are often on

par with other club players from upper league schools. Since the school team is composed of both club badminton players and players who only train at school practices, the latter players are presented with formidable challenges when they have to play in higher leagues against more experienced players. Conversely, higher league players do not have enough of a challenge when they have to play in the lower league and so neither league is apt for both types of players. As a result, the Varsity and Junior Varsity teams have lost most of their games in higherdivision leagues for the last two years. However, because they have been bumped down to a lower league this year, the badminton team has remained undefeated the entire season. Although practice alone contributes to the

success of team members during matches, ingame experience is also vital to the growth of the player. Team members do not improve as much when all of their matches are won easily and their mistakes go unnoticed. When the Central Coast Section (CCS) championships roll around, players that have become accustomed to their successes may find themselves unprepared to face opponents of higher skill level. “I’m scared that they all think they’re good enough at the level they are at now and have no desire to concentrate during practice,” said varsity player Peggy Chiang about her teammates. Chiang learns which footwork needs practice and which shots she can improve on from losing against tougher players. Playing against difficult opponents in

the higher league not only reveals areas for self-improvement, but also builds appreciation for the competitive aspect of the sport. According to varsity player Lawrence Luk, failures are vital to good sportsmanship. Modesty is difficult to come by for those who seldom experience defeat. “Losing teaches me humility, because I can’t expect to walk all over my opponents all the time,” Luk said. Despite the fact that the badminton team has enjoyed a winning streak this year, some players believe that excessive victories have slowed athletic growth. Luk and Chiang believe that losing to higher-league contenders is a necessary step in improving and taking the team to the next level.


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sports sports

THE PROSPECTOR THE PROSPECTOR

MAY27, 27,2011 2011 MAY

Synchronized swimmer Ekaterina Frelikh pursues future Olympic dream AZADEH RONGERE sports editor

Above the surface, two artistic synchronized swimmers jump through the air in perfect harmony. The chemistry between the teammates allows their routines to be of sheer perfection. Their magical performance, a blend of gymnastics and dancing, requires flawless consistency. Below the surface is junior Ekaterina Frelikh an aspiring synchronized swimmer. Frelikh was born in Russia where she began her successful career as a synchronized swimmer at age nine. Before she became talented performer, Frelikh explored speed swimming, a quick but she quickly realized this sport bored her. She then turned to synchronized swimming deciding that it would provide her with more excitement. “I saw girls doing little leg things and I thought it was very cool and pretty, so I joined,” Frelikh said. When she joined a popular Russian team, she received a proper foundation for her synchronized swimming future through training. Ho w e v e r, when she emigrated from Russia four years ago, it seemed as if lon her aspirations could no longer become a reality. Once she moved to America, Frelikh lacked a synchronized swimming team so she reluctantly returned to speed swimming. After a year of break,

she was introduced to one of the best synchronizing swimming team in America in Santa Clara. After a successful try out, she joined the team. Despite a new addition, her team supported and welcomed Ferlikh and they built friendships only teammates could share. Although their occasional bonding activities do bring them closer, their natural chemistry already supports their undeniable bond. “We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable,” Frelikh said. However, to pursue her dream Frelikh had to compromise

We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable.

her academic schedule. Since her practices last from 4:00 to 8:30 p.m. every day, she found it hard to fit AP classes into her schedule. Even after these strenuous weekday practices she is unable to sleep in on weekends since she has practices from 7:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. Furthermore, during the summer, she practices ten hours each and every day. “I just have to make it work. I mean, I have to wake up early and sleep really late to balance out my workload with synchronized swimming,” Frelikh said. In addition, during the first semester of each school year, she and her team ruthlessly train and tirelessly practice. Throughout second semester there are multiple national and international

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meets for which Frelikh must miss school in order to attend. Since she constantly takes “vacation” days, she treats tutorials and lunches like gold because she has to constantly make-up tests, in-class essays, class work and participation points. Nevertheless, she conveys that these tedious make-up sessions are a small price to pay to visit and compete in New York, Ohio, Texas, Florida and North Carolina. Despite her busy schedule, Frelikh still has to find time to design and make her own outfits. Although a tailor provides her with a handmade outfit, Frelikh has to manually decorate it with rhinestones, sparkles, beads and other embellishments. Despite the fact that synchronized swimming has its academic and time disadvantages, Frelikh’s future in swimming is more valuable, as she will soon conquer her next meet in Sw itzerland.

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MAY 27, 2011

Health is Wealth Next time you are at the front of the line debating between the fresh fruit cup and the gooey chocolate chip cookie, choose wisely, for the outcomes of these battles are what add up to form a lifestyle. And what better time than now to start anew on the path to good health? Sounds simple enough, but what most of us fall short on is willpower. With one good look around campus, though, it is easy to get this dose of inspiration; students are constantly pursuing healthy activities as seen on this page. Juniors Zhijiang Li, Andrew Qu and Eric Lee (upper left) share a hug in the quad, while sophomores Brittany Rodriguez and Katelyn Howard (upper right) share a laugh during their laps around the pool. Junior Paolo Barrenechea (left) shoots hoops with a handful of other students who form teams and battle it out on the asphalt during lunchtime. In addition to mental and physical health, eating habits also constitute a big part of balanced living. Junior Bhavisha Shukla (bottom left) takes a refreshing gulp of H2O, while senior Vandita Manyam chows down on a handful of tangerine slices. Other healthy choices include grabbing a milk carton on your way out of the cafeteria or choosing to ride your bike to school. It really is as simple as that, so join your peers in pursuing a healthy lifestyle today.


FEATURES: Chicken soup for the pet owner’s soul

SPORTS: Synchronized swimming star

PHOTO ESSAY: Healthy living

THE PROSPECTOR CUPERTINO HIGH SCHOOL’S

VOLUME 52 NO. 7

10100 FINCH AVENUE, CUPERTINO CA

MAY 27, 2011

Redesign of quad and cafeteria:

Students and staff collaborate with architects to develop plan for renovations

REGINA HONG news assistant

In addition to the ongoing track renovations, CHS plans to start rebuilding other parts of the campus, such as the front building and the quad, by the 2012-2013 school year. In the past, the district passed a construction bond that specifically stated that it could only be used for the construction of new buildings. Therefore, due to the increasing population, the current cafeteria at the front of the school will become a two-story building, which will house the library, cafeteria and guidance and administrative offices. By moving all of these areas into one building, the old library and office space will turn into new classrooms. This will create more flexibility with class space, larger conference areas for the staff and more bathrooms. The quad will also undergo several changes, such as the addition of a stage, new seating arrangements and a better sound system. In order to prepare for the renovation, CHS asked for input from those who are involved with the school, such as students, teachers and other staff members. On May 5, 2011, several members from the Quattrocchi Kwok Architects company came to CHS to ask selected students at a student committee meeting to ask for their

input regarding how the front building and quad should be rebuilt. “We hope for a more modernized, nicer and different campus, but at the same time, we also want to keep the familiarity of Tino,” said sophomore Julia Seaton. At the meeting, students asked for a big and open front building in which upperclassmen and lowerclassmen would not be separated. The structure of the building will resemble that of a student union on a college campus. According to Seaton, the architects respected all of the students’ opinions and tried their best to allow for everyone’s voices to be heard. According to assistant principal Andy Walczak, a student asked to showcase Dusty at the front of the school, so passers-by would be able to see the pride of CHS. The architects also met with the staff members. During this meeting, adults gave their opinions on how the school should be reconstructed. Said librarian Pat Accoriniti, “I’m just really excited about the process. We’ll [Teachers and students] be more accepting of the new building and quad because we were actu see QUAD AND CAFETERIA RESDESIGN, pg 3

SINDHU GNANASAMDANDAN

Students prepare for summer Latin American cultural immersion program HARINI JAGANATHAN editor-in-chief

This summer, juniors Delia Cannon, Noelle Foley and Allison Ness will be traveling to Latin America to work on community service projects through the AMIGOS program. AMIGOS is a nonprofit international organization that provides community service opportunities for young people in areas across Latin America. All three students have been training and preparing for their trip, practicing their Spanish conversational skills, learning about Latin American culture and raising funds to support their service projects. Cannon, Foley and Ness will be living with families in different Latin American communities, and completing projects with just one English speaking partner. They hope to immerse themselves in the culture as well as make a positive impact on the areas they will be traveling to. Foley will be going to Oaxaca, Mexico to build fuel efficient stoves and raise environmental awareness. She will be living in a community for eight weeks.

“I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn more about myself and the world,” Foley said. “We’re sheltered in Cupertino.” Ness will spend six weeks in La Paz, Honduras and her project will focus on teaching the youth about the environment and how to sustain resources. “I was into it because I’m interested in language immersion and community service,” Ness said. “I also want to become more outgoing.” Cannon will be in Cotapaxi, Ecuador for seven weeks teaching youth about health and children’s rights. While Cannon admits that her initial motivations for embarking on this endeavor were college applications and travel opportunity, she found that the issues she will be focusing on in Cotapaxi matter to her. Her motivations for completing her trip have changed. In addition to improving her Spanish listening and speaking skills, Cannon is excited to help the children in the community she will be living in. “I want to make life better for these kids, even if that’s just teaching them how to brush their teeth and clean their hands,” Cannon said. Although all three are excited to immerse themselves in an-

other culture, some aspects of living in another country make them nervous. Cannon is concerned about communicating with the locals as well as living without the comforts of home. “I’m worried that it’ll take me too long to be understood,” Cannon said. “I’m also worried about the lack of American fast food.” Foley is slightly worried about answering difficult questions asked by the locals. “I will be asked about I think about immigration policies there,” she said. “I’m a little nervous about that.” All three find that there are other aspects of the cultural immersion process that excite them. “They eat guinea pig in Cotapaxi,” Cannon said. “When will I ever get to try guinea pig if I don’t try that there?” Cannon, Foley and Ness are excited and nervous about immersing themselves in another culture and isolating themselves from the comforts that Cupertino offers. They anticipate that their trip will bring them a greater understanding of Latin American culture and will be a personal growth experience. They hope to share interesting stories of their journey upon their return.


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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

the Prospector 2010-2011 STAFF

Cupertino High School Established 1958 Vol LII., No. 5 | 2011

editor-in-chief harini jaganathan news editor kevin chu opinions editor abhishek zaveri features editor jesse zhou in-depth editors michelle cheung sunwoo jeong lifestyles editor natasha sharma sports editor azadeh rongere photo editors sindhu gnanasambandan copy editors alya omar victoria duan business manager jackie breuer

Lawson reflects on 35 years of teaching, changes over the years VIRENA GALOTRA lifestyles assistant

This year marks history teacher Jay Lawson’s 35th year as a teacher in this district. To commemorate the occasion his students made him cards and presented him with gifts. Lawson is one of the longest employed teachers on campus and, as a result, notices changes in diversity, teacher collaboration and technology at school over the years. Ever since he was a young boy, Lawson wanted to be a teacher. Both his parents were teachers in the district and his father was a prominent administrator as well. In fact, Sam H. Lawson Middle School is named in honor of his father. Lawson began his career as a history teacher at Monta Vista High School and simultaneously worked as a wrestling coach at Homestead High School at the same time. After only three years of teaching, he was laid off from his job as a history teacher in 1979. Lawson then became an intern to a special education teacher at Monta Vista High School while getting his credentials at night school. After he graduated, he became a full time special education teacher at Monta Vista High School. He then transferred to CHS in 1985 as both the head wrestling coach and a special education teacher. Fourteen years later in 1999, he took up his current position as a history teacher on campus, which is his favorite class to teach. “I really enjoy... sharing the stories of history and the older I get the easier it gets because I’ve lived through a lot of the things I’m teaching,” Lawson said. After 35 years of teaching, Lawson plans to continue teaching for another three years before retiring. “It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more

students,” he said. Over the years, Lawson has observed many changes pertaining to both the school and his job as a teacher. One of the major changes on campus is its diversification, a process that occurred gradually. He mentions that there is less of an emphasis on the trades and students have less interest in taking classes like auto shop, metal shop and cooking. In addition, a smaller percentage of students choose to pursue these types of careers. Lawson also notes

It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more students. Jay Lawson

History Teacher

that both teachers and students now use technology in the classroom on a regular basis. Computers have now become a daily teaching tool as well as a regular learning resource for students. Another positive change is how teaching has become a collaborative job. “We as teachers share our ideas and materials and to me that’s what makes it special. Being old timer, I have [some] things to offer [but] it’s also challenging to learn some of the new things,” Lawson said. However, the one thing he says that has stayed consistent is the enthusiasm of the students. “I love my time in the classroom with students. They make me feel young,” Lawson said.

SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

35 YEARS AND COUNTING| History teacher Jay Lawson contemplates the rapidly changing school and fulfilling years of teaching

IDC Best Dance Crew debuts choreographical talent news anand hemmady assistants regina hong nikhil kanthi opinions amar kantipudi assistants anthony kao gun ho lee features emily cheng assistants alyssa williams tess wu

JOANNA LEE sports assistant

Launching the first ever Intra-District Council Best Dance Crew (IDCBDC), crews from Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, and Cupertino showcased their best dance moves in front of a screaming crowd at the Lynbrook gym on Friday, May 13. Weeks of practicing and stress for all parties involved led up to a

lifestyles virena galotra assistants natalie hoang madhuri sathish in-depth jackie breuer assistants vani mulkareddy jamin shih sports fred han assistants joanna lee eric jang willie wang adviser ann peck editorial policy “The Prospector” is an open forum of expression for student editors to inform and educate their readers. It will not be reviewed by or restrained by school officials prior to publication or distribution. Advisors may and should coach and discuss content during the writing process. The staff of “The Prospector” seeks to recognize individuals, events, ideasand bring news to the Cupertino community in an accurate, professional and unbiased manner. “The Prospector” will not avoid publishing a story solely on the basis of possible dissent or controversy. If you believe an error has been made, or wish to have your opinion expressed in “The Prospector”please contact us via mail or e-mail. Letters sent become the sole property of “The Prospector” and can be edited for length, clarity, or accuracy. “The Prospector” editorial board reserves the right to accept or reject any ad in accordance with its advertising policy. Contact Us The Prospector 10100 Finch Avenue Cupertino, CA 95014 prospector.chs@gmail.com

JOANNA LEE

DANCE CREW SHOWCASE | Seniors Vi Viet, Benjamin Du, Sheng Poon, Willie Wang and Brian Walsh display their talents at the first ever IDCBDC

successful turnout of the first ever IDCBDC. Cupertino’s IDC Commissioners, senior Mennen Kassa, 12, and junior Ashley Park, 11, gathered with the other schools to sort out the details and have been working for weeks planning the event. With the performance date having been changed multiple times due to various reasons, some were beginning to fear that the event may never actually take place. However, with positive attitudes, both Kassa and Park continued to push for the event to take place. Crews were selected based on a competitive audition process in which each crew demonstrated their choreography and were judged based on overall preparedness and enthusiasm. In the end, popular hip hop crew, GTFO, and newly formed all female crew, XI So Fly, were selected to represent Cupertino at the IDCBDC. Other schools, however, did not have as many competing teams as Cupertino did, thus leading to some additional conflicts. Though enduring another minor conflict, Kassa reassures the event will have the turnout it is hoping for. Said Kassa, “IDC has been able to work everything out and we are very excited for this upcoming event.” With the dance scene on the rise, participating schools thought it would be appropriate and fun to hold a showcase that would allow students to show off the their individual styles and ultimately reign supreme while holding the Best Dance Crew title. Said Kassa, “IDC was eager to plan an event that would give the chance for students in the district to bond and show off their talents. We noticed how popular the dance scene has become throughout the district and decided that a dance competition would be the perfect way to promote district unity.” On Friday afternoon, students from all participating schools filed into the Lynbrook gym and watched eagerly as each school performed their best. Though supportive of each competing crew, the crowd screamed passionately after their representing crews performed. Though Kassa and Park originally planned for qualified judges who are already familiar with the dance scene, qualified judges were unable to be recruited before the show took place. In the end, the audience took the role of the judges. Each group showcased a variety of creative and intricate routines, including a martial arts inspired dance, some instances of jazz and lyrical, and various popping and breaking moves. Even though IDCBDC was a dance show, each school perfected a dance number that was tailored to their own individual styles and personalities that really became a sight to see. After six talented and varying performances, it was time to finally announce the winner and holder of the IDCBDC title. The audience was able to vote for their favorite crew and the crew with the most votes would take home the title. Ultimately, it was Lynbrook who took away this year’s title. With a successful turnout for the first ever IDCBDC, it is likely this event will return in the upcoming school year as an even better dance spectacle.


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

Letter to the editor Editor, The recent staff editorial (“Affirmative Action: Out-dated and Out-weighted) in the May 6th edition of The Prospector, though well-written, and thoughtful, failed to address some key issues concerning affirmative action policies. First and foremost, the editorial fails to mention the 1996 California proposition (Proposition 209) that banned racial, gender, and ethnic preferences for the University of California and the Cal-State systems. The majority of Cupertino High School students entering four-year universities, attend either a UC or Cal-State school, so the “factors of admission that are simply out of our control” is a non-factor for most CHS students. In addition to the omission of Proposition 209, the article does not cite key data about family income in the United States. The thesis of the article is that because racial discrimination is no longer the issue it once was, affirmative action programs should shift focus to income, and not race. A simple look at the last US Census reveals the following yearly median family incomes broken down by race: Asian Americans $73, 578, White $65,000, Hispanic $40, 466, and African-Americans $39,879. In sum, if UC or Cal-State were to address income, rather than race, we would still be targeting the same group of underrepresented students. The final missing piece is the assumption that every California high school student competes at the same level. The Fremont Union High School District community is an amazing place to work (I have worked in the district for 14 years and would not want to work anywhere else), and go to school (I am a 1992 Fremont High School graduate); however, it is easy to forget about the inherent advantages we have at our disposal. Not all California students have access to numerous AP courses, award winning performing arts programs, amazing teachers, supportive parents, comprehensive sports programs, or the financial means for SAT prep courses. To go back to your original argument, access to these things are “factors of admission that are out of our control”. If I attend a high school without these luxuries, how in the world can a UC admission officer look at me in the same light, as say a student who attends Cupertino, Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, or Homestead High Schools? (To be honest, the college admissions process has always been a mystery to me. Every day I am surrounded by 1,800 amazing students, and think they should be able to attend any college of their choice! ) In sum, affirmative action programs are but one tool to help underrepresented students attend select universities. Is it the only tool? Not by any stretch of the imagination — I am not naïve enough to think just one tool can close the achievement gap. Any attempt to close the achievement gap is one that would require a great deal more than affirmative action. Andy Walczak Assistant Principal

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3

Quad and cafeteria redesign: (cont. pg. 1)

ally a part of the project since we were given the opportunity to voice our opinions.” After hearing from all types of people at the school, the architects feel the need to preserve several areas of CHS. Said architect Diane Rappold, “The quad is a well loved spot on campus that we will improve on and ‘celebrate’. We also recognize the significance of the Senior Lawn — which may be transformed in the new design, but the concept will remain.” Although CHS is only undergoing the first phase of the rebuilding process, many students and teachers are excited to see the project progress because they had the chance to voice their opinions.

Letter from the editor Dear Reader, You hold in your hands the last full issue of the Prospector for the 2010-2011 school year. As was the case in our last issue, junior editors worked hard to create and edit the content of these pages. In this issue, you will learn about having chickens as pets, find out how much to exercise to work of that chipotle burrito and become an expert in throwing Harry Potter themed parties. Finish strong as the year draws to a close. Summer is nearly here! Keep an eye out for senior issue, which comes out next week. Please recycle! Harini Jaganathan Editor-in-Chief


opinions

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MAY 27, 2011

Mo’ money mo’ problems: Child investment woes FRED HAN sports assistant

T

oday’s opinionated article revolves around the issue of parents’ financial investment in children. Strictly speaking, an investment is spending money in order to gain profitable returns. There are two reasons why parents would spend money on behalf of their children. The first is from a biological perspective, in which parents invest money to ensure the survival of their offspring. The offspring will then breed, continuing the survival of those genes and the human race. The second is the less obvious: to ensure the prolonged survival of the parent. But that’s not the point. The key question is how much money should a parent invest in their children? Parents should provide only the bare minimal financial support for the child to live comfortably to prevent spoiling the child and to teach the child financial independence. Before any misunderstandings form, “bare minimal financial support” does not mean starving the child or forcing them to work in dirty coal mines. Instead, the child should be full fed, clothed and prepared to learn the art of survival: Cupertino’s art of survival is hunting for colleges and farming for GPA. Any luxury beyond the basic necessities and tools for enhanced education — which include, but is not limited to, overly luxurious eating style or incessant shopping trips — tends to spoil the child. Any form of spoiling will spoil the chances for the child to succeed and successfully reproduce or support the parent. Psychologically speaking, spoiling is a case of operant condition – a system of punishment and reward. For example, if a child learns to associate crying tantrums with getting whatever

he wants, then he will repeat the behavior. The parent needs to understand when to say “no” – or else it is like subprime lending. Continuation of inappropriate and excessive parental financial investment will soon lead to bursting the bubble of the inflated expectations and soon depression. Remember, parents in Cupertino should focus primarily about necessities for survival in life: working hard for happiness. The key step to help the child work hard for happiness is by preventing him or her from being spoiled. In other words, learning to say “no”. If a child truly wants to achieve or want something, then make him or her work for it — which leads to the next point: financial independence. Remember, the fastest route to corruption (spoiling in this case) is permission. Work is the fastest route to independence. If a child does not understand at least the core basics of money and economics, the chances are he or she will not understand how to deal with money later on in life. Then the children’s children — if the original children still survived by that point (a highly unlikely situation in Cupertino’s overly competitive environment) would not understand financial importance either. This results in continued financial dependence on the parents later in life — a counterproductive and non-profitable investment. The solution to this is to teach the children to work for what they want. Directing their desires and creative energies toward work for financial incentives will teach them the importance of money and give them a sense of dealing with different quantities of money. In conclusion, parents must learn to say no to any potential spoiling opportunities (although reward for hard work and excellent performance is mandatory) and spend only enough to guide the children’s creative energies. By freely giving money whenever a child demands so or not teaching them the importance of financial independence, those parents are setting themselves up for a potentially

spoiled child. Otherwise the “investment” of all the money and time put into improving the survival rate. However, do note that parents should never force a child into working so much that the child is greatly inclined to rebel. It is a delicate balance of the carrot and the whip.

EMILY CHENG

THE AGE OF INNOCENCE VS. MODERN-DAY TEENS

Anonymous questioning is unnecessary cowardice AMAR KANTIPUDI sports assistant EMILY CHENG news assistant

Ask me something, anything. Curious? It is an unsurprising feeling people get when they come across a chance to ask whatever they desire of their peers. When curiosity takes over, thoughts run free, and a new, undiscovered side of a person will be unleashed. This is even more evident when people hide behind a veil of anonymity because they ask anything and everything they can until they have satisfied their curiosity. It is these intentions, this sense of infallible curiosity and innate bigotry humans tend to demonstrate that often diminishes personal confidence. Just a simple question can induce the feeling of throwing out your entire life on the chopping block. The practice of attempting to fish out potential secrets without identification is a privileged feature provided to people by social networking sites. Services such as Tumblr and Formspring allow literally anyone to ask specific people questions — uncensored and unmonitored. It is through sites like these that the world has been introduced to concepts such as “trolling” and cyber bullying Anonymous questioning does comes with its fair share of reasons. After all, some people are just too afraid to ask something personal. It is almost always easier to talk to someone when away from the spotlight. That, by far, is the most appealing aspect of talking to friends online rather than in person or on the phone. Nonetheless unless a relationship is significantly strong, it is nearly impossible to separate sarcastic comments from serious ones. Furthermore, since people can say whatever they want online without having to admit who they are, they resort to a more crude language that can sometimes belittle the peer. Though, many still set up an anonymous question box expecting fun, light-hearted and interesting questions that can help them kill time, in the

long run, users run the risk of having their honesty tested, actions questioned, and image bashed, eventually damaging one’s self-esteem. If the user does not put a halt to anonymous questioning after they’ve already fallen victim to “anon bashing”, they suffer comment after comment of demeaning verbiage flooding their inbox. Soon, even strongly optimistic individuals will fall prey to the condescending harassment of their peers. It is all too common to see cheerful people turn into pessimists. Such an initially simple and harmless intention of exciting user life can morph into a lethal and emotionally degrading exchange of Q&A. Because of this, people may become very unhappy individuals who cannot control their own emotions properly, and oftentimes would end up lashing out at the resulting instability at others. These insecurities are then observed and questioned once again through that wretched anonymous button! Even if it is an attempt to poke fun into others’ lives, anonymous questioning can and most likely will lead to displeasing tension and shaky feelings. After all, once people put a mask on, they fail to take responsibility for their actions. To have a bright and confident spirit be torn down by anonymous comments is a excruciating sight. The few moments of entertainment gained on the asking end do not balance out the discomfort imposed on the receiving end. Online socializing does have its boundaries in this sense. Take a few precautions before entering a world full of anonymity, realize the consequences, and remember the saying that’s far too overheard but never entirely understood: curiosity killed the cat.

Why do you strut around campus like a know-it-all?

THE MASK OF ANONYMITY:

What students experience with online bashing “ I don’t have a formspring because I think it is another way for someone to bully you and bullying on formspring is inevitable.” Mahtab Danai, senior “I deleted my formspring because all that I got on there was stuff that I rather hear in person or didn’t want to hear at all. I didn’t want to give them an outlet when they deserved nothing from me.” Julia Seaton, sophomore “I have the curiosity of a reality check on whether people actually like me or not.” Varsha Prabhakar, sophomore

You think you’re cool? You’re just a poser.


THE PROSPECTOR

MAY 27, 2011

opinions

5

DEATH OF BIN LADEN Should the death of an enemy be celebrated?

Liberty for Free

Respect for Life

ALYA OMAR copy editor JACKIE BREUER in-depth assistant

SAMUEL LEE opinions assistant

On September 11, 2001, America watched in horror as a group of terrorists hijacked three planes, crashing them into the windows of the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and a field in Virginia. Family members watched as their loved ones’ lives were prematurely taken from them. Days later, leader of Al Qaeda Osama bin Laden vanished after taking responsibility for orchestrating the attacks, leaving behind an uncertain, tormented future. From that day, it has been one of the top priorities of the U.S. government to take down the man who instructed such heartbreak for thousands of its citizens. As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 loomed overhead, when President Barack Obama announced to the nation that an attack on bin Laden’s compound was successful, the spectrum of emotion was of massive contrast. While some recognized the magnitude that bin Laden’s death held as a weight lifted off of their grieving shoulders, others rebuked the celebrations, finding it inappropriate to disrespect the dead. However, it is not another person’s right to judge another person’s happiness and the expression of said emotion. People are affected differently by major events and define closure in a different way. 3,000 families continued with their lives forever changed, and though their losses were met with sympathy and pledges of remembrance, it was never combatted with justice because the man who orchestrated the events continued to lead his life, while their lost ones could not. From the perspective of the somewhat naive, bin Laden’s death signifies nothing but the end of a human life. To others, it was a monumental moment of closure, an assurance that the man that executed the execution was not pardoned for what he had done. This is not to say that the only proper reaction to bin Laden’s death is to galavant through the streets, chanting “U.S.A.” The death of bin Laden is simply a headline to some, while for others it is a sign of redemption for the lost loved ones. It is not in anyone’s capabilities to stand back and determine the value of such an event for someone else. Whether you feel compelled to run through the streets singing the national anthem or to simply hold a moment of silence, it is imperative to realize that the next best action is to move on and keep those that lost their lives on September 11 and during the war on terrorism in our hearts forever.

A DIVIDED

The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them.” -- Lois McMaster Bujold

AMERICA

I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” — Martin Luther King Jr.

Osama died, Americans cried… in happiness. Yes, you read that right! “Life, liberty and justice for all” except for certain Arab terrorists — they just get two out of the three. As soon as news of the al-Qaeda leader’s death reached the American public, thousands of Americans flooded Times Square and the White House to pop bottles of champagne, sing, chant “U-SA” and smile for the camera. Times like this throw doubts on whether Americans truly value the life of another human being. There should be no celebration for the death of Osama bin Laden. Admittedly, bin Laden’s is crucial to American security. The nation ought to thank President Bush for collecting the necessary intelligence throughout his presidency. It should also thank President Obama for capturing the terrorist when given the opportunity, unlike President Clinton; his stained presidency includes an incident in which he refused the Sudanese government’s offer to arrest and extradite bin Laden. Though the operation may have been necessary, bin Laden’s death is nothing to celebrate. Unless malice and vengeance form the bedrock of American principles (as opposed to, say, basic respect for human life), there is no justifiable reason for celebration: Terror attacks will not stop just because bin Laden descended to Hell. Just a few weeks after his death, suicide bombers murdered 51 Pakistanis in retaliation. Even worse, his death does not mean an end to outrageously invasive TSA procedures. Three year old boy: Wait, I thought bad terror man was gone! TSA “agent”: Quiet, I’m fondling your genitals. Americans running to the White House to celebrate bin Laden’s death with flags and drunkenness exhibited the same kind of euphoria that certain groups of Afghans displayed on 9/11. Chanting “U.S.A” just makes the entire circus more obscene. We must not lower our moral standards to those of the terrorists. Had people stayed home in quiet introspection and prayer, then that would have demonstrated true American exceptionalism. People are fully justified in feeling relief over the destruction of a mass murderer. But a sense of joy does not belong to a nation that considers itself a representative of everything that is good with the world.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Future homecoming court should be open to all classes, not just seniors Last month, we reported on ASB Executive Council’s new Homecoming Court nomination process for the 2011-2012 school year. This process involves several steps: nominating only senior candidates, having the top 20 male and top 20 female candidates complete a questionnaire about their school involvement, selecting the top 10 male and top 10 female candidates based on that questionnaire and having students from all classes choose their top six males or female Court candidates in an open vote. According to ASB, the new system is meant to ensure that the Homecoming Court accurately portrays our school’s values. However, there is considerable opposition to this policy across class lines. We completely agree with the new system’s purpose; screening candidates through a questionnaire on school involvement will be an effective way to ensure that only qualified, upstanding students make it on the Court. However, we believe that restricting the Court to only seniors goes against our school’s traditions and spirit of class unity. Homecoming has always been an event where the entire

school comes together for the sake of school pride and spirit. Students from freshmen to seniors flock to Homecoming because of the memories it creates and the kindred bonds they are able to forge with their friends. The event gives students a chance to garner happy memories and strengthen friendships with their peers — usually those in the same class. When there is not a freshman face to be found in the Homecoming Court, how delightful, inclusive or memorable will attending freshmen think Homecoming is? Supporters try to justify this massive exclusion of students by saying that all students will have the opportunity to be nominated to the court once they go through four years of high school. This assertion completely ignores the motivational and inspirational value the court can provide. If court members are meant to be shining examples of perfect Pioneers, these examples should be relatable and plentiful. Having a court from all classes will allow students who are not seniors to recognize that even one, two or three years at our school can make a difference. Having all classes represented on the Homecoming Court

will also maintain our school’s sense of community and unity. Homecoming is not meant to be an exclusive affair; with each class having an equal chance to compete in areas like skits and posters, it gives a level playing field for all classes to shine. If we deny freshmen, sophomores and juniors opportunities that seniors have in what is supposed to be a schoolwide event, they will feel excluded — which is exactly the opposite of what Homecoming is all about. In an April Prospector poll, 66% of students polled, including seniors, opposed the new seniors-only Homecoming Court nomination process. If anything, ASB Executive Council should listen to this supermajority of its constituency and work to revise this process instead of single-handedly implementing it. Homecoming is for all CHS students, and every part of Homecoming, the Court included, should be open to students regardless of class. We believe that unity and inclusiveness are core Pioneer values. It only makes sense that the Pioneers’ Homecoming Court embodies them.


features

MAY 27, 2011

6

TINO’S ANIMAL KI GDO CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE ASIAN SOUL

Sophomore’s feathery pals help in many ways SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN photo editor

She has chicken soup for the pet lover’s soul — and no, not the book. The fact is, sophomore Julie Chen’s pets are chickens and she has consumed them in soup form before. While Chen does love her fuzzy, egg-laying creatures, she shares an, lets just say, atypical bond with them. Through this bond though, she has learned a great deal about the nature of animals and the responsibility that comes along with caring for them. A year ago, at Chen’s request, her family drove two hours to a farm and picked up a handful of “female” (four out of the eight grew up to be male) chicks. They built a coop and everyday, fed them vegetables, checked their feed and refilled their water. With time “scooping up morning presents” was added to the to-do list; one egg per chicken a day, hard-boiled in the morning is not a bad deal at all. California state law, though, prohibits housing roosters in residential areas (a blessing for those who like to sleep in) so Chen’s family needed a way to dispose of their four not-so-female chickens. “We ate them. We are Asians so of course we know how to kill chickens,” said Chen, “It’s really just a quick throat cut.” This may sound brutal and Chen herself initially had much trouble with this idea. That being said, she eventually came to peace with eating her chickens under the circumstances. First of all, Chen was never excessively attached to her chickens as others may be with their more conventional pets.

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Chrome, Chicovo, Phoenix, Chocolate and Turtle — but they grow up really fast. I went on a cruise for a week and they all changed colors so I couldn’t tell who was who anymore,” said Chen, “It’s not like killing a pet dog or anything.” She is comfortable with it from a moral standpoint as well. “The whole reason we have this garden is because my mom read this book called Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. It talks about this writer who starts a farm and raises her own animals. Her philosophy is that if one raises them naturally, it’s ethical to eat them. I feel better about eating these chickens rather than eating commercially grown ones, fattened

We are Asians, so of course we know how to kill chickens.

up in two months,” added Chen. Aside from, when occasion calls, eating them, Julie also spends a great deal of time babysitting her chickens. She has made some quite interesting observations. “Chickens are very vicious actu sometimes,” Chen said, “They actually have a pecking order. Sometimes I’ll feed them dandelion leaves and certain chickens are not allowed chick to come and eat. The little chickens were initially at the bottom of the order and the red chicken was at the very bottom but once so she started laying, she gained social status. Now the once oldest, bot meanest black chicken is at the bottom because she stopped laying.” Overall, while owning chickens has taught Julie ad a thing or two, she admits that it is not for everyone. “It’s kind of a hassle. Whether you should own one or not depends on where you live, how your backyard com is, and how committed you are to waking up at 6 am morn in the morning to angry c h i c k e n s ,” Chen warns, “If that doesn’t concern you, then two bucks a chick at Gilroy. Good luck!”

OWNING A PET CAN HELP WITH STRES KEVIN CHU news editor

While most people think of massage, meditation and yoga as natural, healthy stress relievers, there is another option that is fluffier and more loveable: getting a pet. Not only do pets help relieve stress, but they can also improve one’s mood, control one’s blood pressure, reduce loneliness and provide social support— all of which are important for health and well-being, and for avoiding stress and depression. Animals are relatively consistent in their behaviors — such as locations and times of eating, sleeping, and cuddling — which provide a stable, predictable and thus less stressful aspect in the owner’s life. Their unconditional love is also extremely comforting — pets greet their owners with excitement when they come home, they can usually tell when their owners are upset, and many pets will cuddle up next to their owners, providing soothing contact. A 2002 study by re-

searchers at the State University of New York showed that when performing a stressful ta felt less stressful in the presence of pets th presence of a spouse or close friend. Pet ow had significantly lower baseline heart rates a pressure than the participants who did not o Caring for a pet often results in a sense o tion and fulfillment. In addition, owning pet the likelihood of going outside and interac others, providing opportunities for mood-r cialization. “I spend up to an hour each day taking for walks,” said sophomore Abishek Kumar. A 1999 study found that male AIDS pat less likely to suffer from depression if they ow “Pet ownership among men who have A vides a certain level of companionship that h them cope better with the stresses of th lives,” said psychologist Judith Siegel, a UC professor of public health and lead aut of the report. “This is one more study demonstrates the health benefits that ing a pet can provide.” In addition, pets help decrea pressure, heart rate and muscl

SHE IS HER DOGS’ BEST FRIEND Junior goes home to take care of pets during lunch JAMIN SHIH features assistant

When the bell rings at 12:25 p.m. every day, students leave their classrooms, obligations and quite often campus to enjoy 40 minutes of leisure. One student, however, exits campus not to leave her responsibilities behind but to take on another set. While her classmates spend lunchtimes with their friends, junior Ashley Kan visits and takes care of her three pet dogs, a chore she says teaches her both responsibility and time management skills that will aid her throughout her life. Kan feeds her three dogs, two Chihuahuas named Missy and Teddy and a Pomeranian named Charlie, every day during lunch because no one else is available to do so at that time. This causes her to miss out on the social banter that occurs during lunchtime, and she admits that she sacrifices spending time with her friends because of her pets. Regardless, she is sure that her dogs are completely worth the sacrifice. “I’m really close to my dogs. They’re really my best friends sometimes, because they’re always there for me,” Kan said. Indeed, just as Kan gives to her dogs, they give equally back to her. The sacrifice does not seem nearly as significant when her

WHAT KIND OF PET DO YOU HAVE?

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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

features

7

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both in reaction to stressful events over a period of time. Owning a pet requires daily walks and other opportunities for exercise (another proven stress reliever) are also increased. Recovering addicts who struggle with high levels of stress should research different pets to determine which types, breeds, personalities and ages seem like a good match for you. For instance, if having to potty train a puppy sounds stressful, look into getting a dog that’s already trained is an appropriate option. For people who are often away from home, a more selfsufficient animal like a cat might be a better choice. There is nothing quite like hav hav- ing a warm ball of fur curl up next to you or an excitedly thumping tail greeting you — and it’s even more satisfying to know that these furry friends are helping to improve our lives.

“My dream pet would be “F” the White Winged Horse. It’s name is F so that when it takes my last name, Lai, its full name will be F Lai. And then I can tell it: ‘F Lai, fly!’ And then I’ll go around raiding towns on my mount.” -Alan Lai, senior “Well, I kind of just want a ferret. Not really creative or anything... I just like them!” -Andrew Qu, junior “My dream pet is a rainbow-horned unicorn that can fly and take me places, but that can also understand what I’m saying and be cuddly.” -Jeong Eun Lee, freshman “I like white tigers because they look more unique than other types of tigers.” -Brian Nguyen, senior

COMPILED BY TESS WU

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N O N E

12%

57% 170 PEOPLE POLLED COMPILED BY FRED HAN

Passing of pets leaves student stronger

ANAND HEMMADY features assistant

Disclaimer: The Prospector strongly encourages owners to spay or neuter pets, and acknowledges that some of the behavior exhibited by the owners of the cats in the following article is irresponsible. The Prospector also would like to warn readers that some elements of the following article may be exaggerated. Everything must end. This is a rule of the universe. Unfortunately, relationships with pets are not exempt from this rule. No matter how well an owner takes care of a pet, it will eventually pass away, and the owner will have to move on without it. The unavoidable pain from having a pet die often turns many away from keeping pets, and often raises questions as to whether having pets is worth the pain. In the end, though, the benefits of having pets far outweigh the negatives. Sophomore Brent Knaack knows the pain of losing pets all too well. Having once had thirty cats, Knaack could only watch helplessly as cat after cat died, leaving him with only five. “Our family of cats started when my dad was looking through boxes in our backyard and he found three kittens in a box,” Knaack said. “They were born literally just an hour before we found them. We took care of them because their mom never did. They grew up, and then they had kittens. Eventually we had around thirty cats, all living in our backyard in makeshift shelters.” Later, though, Knaack’s beloved pets started dying. “There was one cat in particular with whom I had a close relationship,” said Knaack as he recounted the death of his favorite cat. “I called him Tiny, because he had growth problems, and he never grew any bigger than my hand. This led to internal organ failure, and he passed away. I respected him because even in his last few hours of pain, he was determined to stay alive, and he survived through a lot of pain and suffering. I rarely cry, but when Tiny died, I couldn’t stop crying for two hours.” U

O T H E R

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nothing. During her daily fifteen minute visits to her dogs, she does feed them. The time she spends with her dogs is rewarding and her er an unconditional love that mirrors her own. t always there. They’re always playful, they always make me happy… n a good mood,” said Kan. g care of her dogs does cost her some of her free time, the experience he responsibility and time management skills she earns for the future es up for it. Kan stresses that it is completely different from normal ent duties to care for another living being and that owning three dogs wed her to experience both responsibility and the joy of bringing hapss to someone or something else. These lessons can also be applied e world outside of high school and pets; Kan finds applications well beyond homework assignments or tests. “For the future, if you ever have kids, you’re going to have to take care of something. You’re going to have to take care of cleaning up after them. It’s just a huge responsibility,” said Kan. While many students have only one set of respon responsibilities to worry about at school, Kan’s pet duties begin where her school ones end. Despite seeming like a large hassle, however, her dogs bring her the kind of joy and teach her the kind of lessons that only COUR TESY OF AS HLEY pets can. KAN

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After Tiny’s death, Knaack witnessed the death of around 25 other cats. Knaack let his cats roam freely around the neighborhood, which annoyed the neighbors. The neighbors began leaving poisoned food out on their doorsteps. Knaack was forced to witness cat after cat dying from the food poisoning. He could do nothing to stop the death toll of cats from rising. In the end, only five cats remained. Despite all the grief that the deaths of his cats caused him, though, Knaack does not regret anything and is happy that he had the chance to know his cats. “One of the best times of my life was when I was playing around with the three original kittens,” Knaack said. “It was really cute when we let them into the house and watched them crawl around, pull out wires, and stumble and fall. In spite of all the pain I think it was worth it to have pets and I don’t regret it.” Clearly, the loss that pets bring will be painful. However, it would be foolish to refuse to entertain the thought of having pets simply because of the pain. After all, in life, happiness can only come with suffering. To discard things only because they will hurt us would ruin life entirely. Although pets die and losing them hurts, the overall relationship with pets brings more happi happiness than sorrow.


lifestyles

MAY 27, 2011

8

THE BOY WHO LIVES ON... THE LEGACY OF HARRY POTTER

NIKHIL KANTHI features assistant

T

here are moments in our lives when the harshness of reality casts a shadow over our happiness, causing it to be short-lived. On July 15th, when Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 comes out, I will have to struggle between pangs of excitement and sorrow as I watch a part of my life end. When I pored over the books time and time again in my younger days, I wondered what attracted me to the adventures of a boy wizard. What set this story apart from the other books I had devoured in my youth? I often put this question on hold as I turned the last page in the last book and started anew with the first book. I spent days walking the corridors and grounds of Hogwarts. However, as the pages became more and more familiar, I realized that there would soon be a day when I would be bored by the tale that once meant the world to me. That day, I took the books out of my room and anticipated a day when I would open the books and be amazed once more. A few days ago, I turned the first page of the first book. The parchment-like scent of

the pages with which I was so familiar brought with them a painful comprehension. In less than two months, the journey would be over. I think I can answer my question today. I did not love Harry Potter because it was a friend or mentor. The reason I love these books is because I could see myself as Harry. Rowling erased the line between the reader and Harry somewhere in those pages. Readers empathized with Harry when he was in danger or depressed, and that empathy carried over to the moments when Harry was triumphant. We were united by the naive hope that things will get better. When the circumstances were not as happy and bright as they could have been, I knew that my time would come. Harry Potter taught me that victory was not impossible, and I think we all yearn for that certainty. It taught me the power of hope. I wish for a day when the corridors of Hogwarts will be as alien to me as they were to Harry on his first night there, and I wish that I could feel the loss of Sirius or Dumbledore without expecting it. I doubt that day will come before July 15th, but that’s fine. I think I will do just fine without reading the story I have read seventy times before as I wait outside the midnight premiere. Good job, my friend. Mischief managed.

POTTER PREMIERE PARTY

1. Buy midnight premiere tickets in advance, optimally three to four weeks before the movie.

Want to make your HP premiere night truly magical? Here are a few suggestions that will make your night less Dudley and a tad more Diggory.

2. First, decide on a menu for your party. For terrific Potter recipes, visit http://www.mugglenet.com/misc/rosmertas/index.shtml. Remember that Butterbeer and Golden Snitch cupcakes are absolute necessities! 3. Decorate! After you settle on a venue, plaster the walls with Harry Potter-themed posters. Make sure to include the official movie poster! 4. Costumes are mandatory — they should consist of robes, traditional Hogwarts uniforms, wands and scarves. Assign each guest a specific character in his or her customized Hogwarts-style invitation. 5. Finally, plan some activities! Some suggestions: i. Test your knowledge of the series with some trivia and use Bertie Botts’ Every Flavor Beans as the prize (or punishment!) ii. Reenact your favorite scenes from the series, and be creative. iii. Host a Dueling Club. iv. Watch Deathly Hallows, Part I in preparation for the finale! MADHURI SATHISH

Lady Gaga’s Born This Way contains darker and more serious overtones JESSE ZHOU features editor

The Mother Monster has done it again. Lady Gaga, the artist who has so far defined the voice of a new generation, has been inching toward far more radical themes in her music (believe it or not) with her new album Born This Way. While the widely acclaimed The Fame introduced Gaga as the queen of “Just Dance”, Born This Way instead puts her in the spotlight as a woman with the most independent spirit in the music industry. Many of Gaga’s songs indeed revolve around being proud and self-sufficient. “Hair” and “Bad Kids” promote the idea that being fiercely independent is essential to having true freedom. In addition, her songs call on people to respect those who choose to be independent. For example, one line from “Hair” states, “I just wanna be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.” Her words give the listener a window into a troubled soul who wants nothing more than for others to be accepted in today’s cruel society. The overall tone of Born This Way is darker and more disorderly than The Fame as well. However, Gaga uses this style in a unique way, and trust me, she uses it well. By utilizing the power

of static-shock beats, Gaga’s songs are a rather elegant synthesis of symphony and cacophony: a paradox pleasing to the ear. The fractured mix of piano, electro synthesizers, electric guitar and abnormal beats ends up finding its way into songs like “Judas” and “Marry the Night.” The atmosphere Gaga has created in Born This Way is terrifying and euphoric at the same time. By using theme and tone to their full potential, Lady Gaga’s new album, Born This Way, is bound to be one of the greatest albums of the decade. From songs about true love (“You and I”) to being who you are (“Born This Way”), the Mother Monster covers a full range of topics that will leave the listener surprised. By the time the last song finishes, something will be blown. It will either be your mind or your CD player from abusing the replay button too much.

TOP 3 SINGLES 1. Born This Way 2. The Edge of Glory 3. Judas COMPILED BY NATASHA SHARMA COURTESY OF SpreePiX-Berlin


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

lifestyles

9

The beauty OFTHRIFTING

Looking for something trendy without breaking the bank? Thrift stores sell classic pieces at surprinsgly low prices. You don’t have to buy couture to be chic.

VICTORIA DUAN copy-editor

The outrageous prices offered at too many stores in the mall make it hard for frugal shoppers to pick out affordable items that complement them. Never mind purchasing an outfit, or a nice set of furniture — a single shirt will devastate one’s wallet. But sophomore Brittney Lundquist and junior Noa Rosenberg, both experienced in the ways of thrifting, know better than to blow their entire savings on just one item. Thrift stores are shops owned and run by charities or nonprofit organizations as fundraisers for their cause. Unlike conventional stores, thrift stores carry a multitude of different products. Each new shipment is always full of surprises, and the prices of the products are relatively low. “I have found a lot of name brands like Abercrombie, the North Face, J. Crew and Banana Republic [while thrifting]. It’s a nice feeling to say that you can own name brand clothing and only have to pay a fraction of the original price,” Lundquist said. Although the quality of the donations are often questionable, Lundquist has found that the overall value of a thrift store’s merchandise can be roughly predicted by the city the store is located in.

“I have found that the ‘richer’ cities have the fancier, nicer, name brand clothing options — for example, San Francisco, Santa Cruz and Los Angeles,” Lundquist said. However, nearby thrift stores, including Goodwill, Salvation Army and Savers can all be thoroughly scavenged for good deals and quality items. Contrary to Lundquist, Rosenberg approaches thrifting with a slightly different tactic. While Lundquist is more oriented towards browsing for clothes, Rosenberg thrifts with an open mind and warmly welcomes all possibilities that might come her way. “I may go shopping with the intent to find a new sweater and then I’ll leave the store with a new shelf for my room. The challenge of thrifting is not to find something that is the perfect fit, but finding things that have the potential to be cinched, hemmed, draped in a room or framed on a wall. When I do find something I like, it’s like finding a gem; that’s the beauty of thrifting!” Rosenberg said. With thrifting comes not only the thrill of hunting for the perfect item, but also the satisfaction of paying sensible prices for a purchase. Forget the unreasonable prices at the mall — go look for the cheaper counterpart at Goodwill.


sports

Have a healthy summer

Which is worse – resisting the urge to eat or mustering the willpower to exercise? Most people are reluctant to do either, as byproducts of animal evolution makes us inclined to eat as much as possible and save every last ounce of fat in case of famine. That’s right, those deliciously

dreadful, guilty calories that lurk in your In-NOut Cheeseburger with Onions are here to stay unless burned off by the exercise that we so despise. Here are some popular food items along with matching activities needed to part with those beloved calories.

VERDE

IN N’ OUT PEARL

CHEESE BURGER WITH ONIONS

306

480

Shop for one hour 14 minutes

MILK TEA (BUBBLE TEA)

Calories:

Calories alories:

Exercise:

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MAY 27, 2011

Exercise:

Garden for one hour and three minutes

CHIPOTLE

WING STOP

BARBACOA BURRITO

FRENCH FRIES

Calories:

Calories:

200

800

Exercise:

Exercise:

Run at nine mph for 11.5 minutes

Dance for three hours

Boosts that actually give you a boost NATALIE HOANG lifestyles assistant

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fter ordering a cold smoothie to quench the thirst of a hot summer’s day, the Jamba Juice cashier asks you, “Would you like a boost with that?”. You will proceed to ask what types they offer and are met with a list of seemingly health nourishing choices. The options tackle different aspects of the body, from the Charger and Antioxidant boosts to the Immunity and Energy boosts. Sure, it sounds convincing, but what is it exactly that you are putting into your body? Do the benefits live up to the name? Let us break it down. A boost is a dietary supplement intended to add the vitamins, minerals, fiber, or amino acids a person may lack in his or her daily consumption. In a scroll through the Jamba Juice Booster nutritional facts, noted is the abundance of Maltodextrin and Inulin in the energy and vitamin boosts. Substitutes for sugar, Maltodextrin and Inulin give a sweet taste and the energy provided by sugar without the calories and fat. This makes the 3G Charger, Antioxidant Power, Daily Vitamin, Immunity and Energy Boosts all great options for those in need of a pick-me-up without the extra carbohydrates and sugar to bog them down. The last three boosters are crafted to regulate the body’s systems to maintain healthy levels. Flax & Fiber, a promising Boost, is made of Flaxseed. It is known for reducing blood sugar levels, bad cholesterol, triglycerides, and being the great source of fiber it is, constipation. As for the Whey Protein and Soybean Boosts, their benefit is in the name: protein. Protein’s importance lies in it’s ability to repair body cells, build and repair muscles and bones, and control metabolism. These boosts are promising in their nature, so why not add them into your smoothie? Though it is unlikely one would purchase a smoothie with a boost everyday, or enough to feel the benefits, their intentions are there. A simple overthe-counter supplemental pill directed to take once a day is perhaps the better solution for those concerned about their health. But if mixing in a boost takes the guilt off of your 300-calorie smoothie, go for it!

AZADEH RONGERE

3G Charger™ Boost Antioxidant Power™ Boost Daily Vitamin™ Boost Energy™ Boost Flax & Fiber Boost Immunity™ Boost Soy Protein™ Boost Whey Protein™ Boost

PHOTOS BY: AZADEH RONGERE COMPILED BY: ERIC JANG

get

1 TONED

for summer COMPILED BY: NIKHIL KANTHI

LEG RISES

Lie on your back with your hands holding onto something heavy (like a bookshelf side), and raise your legs without bending your knees. 20 minutes (counting breaks) of these and a four-pack will be a breeze.

2 3

COMPILED BY: AZADEH RONGERE

SHUFFLE PUSH-UPS Do pushups while moving side to side. Nothing strains your biceps, triceps, deltoids, and laterals like some serious pushup shuffling. Aim for three or four sets of 20 reps to get some toned arms.

RUNNING Put on a pair of shorts, plug in your favorite song on your MP3, and speed off on a strenuous but quick workout. Aim for anything under nine minutes (as long as you have warmed up), and you will have burned off a six-inch from Subway.

PHOTOS BY: SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

Badminton Team Dilemma: Winning does not always reap the rewards ERIC JANG sports assistant

There is no doubt that winning feels good — addicting even, if victories come frequently. However, even a winning streak has its disadvantages when the victories become too easy. The badminton team has dominated its matches in a less-competitive league but it has done so at the expense of the valuable lessons gained by losing matches. Players compete against members of the other team in singles or doubles matches, ranked by skill level. The entire game is won by a majority of match wins from the team members. Players who train in competitive badminton clubs outside of school, such as Bintang, are often on

par with other club players from upper league schools. Since the school team is composed of both club badminton players and players who only train at school practices, the latter players are presented with formidable challenges when they have to play in higher leagues against more experienced players. Conversely, higher league players do not have enough of a challenge when they have to play in the lower league and so neither league is apt for both types of players. As a result, the Varsity and Junior Varsity teams have lost most of their games in higherdivision leagues for the last two years. However, because they have been bumped down to a lower league this year, the badminton team has remained undefeated the entire season. Although practice alone contributes to the

success of team members during matches, ingame experience is also vital to the growth of the player. Team members do not improve as much when all of their matches are won easily and their mistakes go unnoticed. When the Central Coast Section (CCS) championships roll around, players that have become accustomed to their successes may find themselves unprepared to face opponents of higher skill level. “I’m scared that they all think they’re good enough at the level they are at now and have no desire to concentrate during practice,” said varsity player Peggy Chiang about her teammates. Chiang learns which footwork needs practice and which shots she can improve on from losing against tougher players. Playing against difficult opponents in

the higher league not only reveals areas for self-improvement, but also builds appreciation for the competitive aspect of the sport. According to varsity player Lawrence Luk, failures are vital to good sportsmanship. Modesty is difficult to come by for those who seldom experience defeat. “Losing teaches me humility, because I can’t expect to walk all over my opponents all the time,” Luk said. Despite the fact that the badminton team has enjoyed a winning streak this year, some players believe that excessive victories have slowed athletic growth. Luk and Chiang believe that losing to higher-league contenders is a necessary step in improving and taking the team to the next level.


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sports sports

THE PROSPECTOR THE PROSPECTOR

MAY27, 27,2011 2011 MAY

Synchronized swimmer Ekaterina Frelikh pursues future Olympic dream AZADEH RONGERE sports editor

Above the surface, two artistic synchronized swimmers jump through the air in perfect harmony. The chemistry between the teammates allows their routines to be of sheer perfection. Their magical performance, a blend of gymnastics and dancing, requires flawless consistency. Below the surface is junior Ekaterina Frelikh an aspiring synchronized swimmer. Frelikh was born in Russia where she began her successful career as a synchronized swimmer at age nine. Before she became talented performer, Frelikh explored speed swimming, a quick but she quickly realized this sport bored her. She then turned to synchronized swimming deciding that it would provide her with more excitement. “I saw girls doing little leg things and I thought it was very cool and pretty, so I joined,” Frelikh said. When she joined a popular Russian team, she received a proper foundation for her synchronized swimming future through training. Ho w e v e r, when she emigrated from Russia four years ago, it seemed as if lon her aspirations could no longer become a reality. Once she moved to America, Frelikh lacked a synchronized swimming team so she reluctantly returned to speed swimming. After a year of break,

she was introduced to one of the best synchronizing swimming team in America in Santa Clara. After a successful try out, she joined the team. Despite a new addition, her team supported and welcomed Ferlikh and they built friendships only teammates could share. Although their occasional bonding activities do bring them closer, their natural chemistry already supports their undeniable bond. “We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable,” Frelikh said. However, to pursue her dream Frelikh had to compromise

We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable.

her academic schedule. Since her practices last from 4:00 to 8:30 p.m. every day, she found it hard to fit AP classes into her schedule. Even after these strenuous weekday practices she is unable to sleep in on weekends since she has practices from 7:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. Furthermore, during the summer, she practices ten hours each and every day. “I just have to make it work. I mean, I have to wake up early and sleep really late to balance out my workload with synchronized swimming,” Frelikh said. In addition, during the first semester of each school year, she and her team ruthlessly train and tirelessly practice. Throughout second semester there are multiple national and international

2010 West Side Junior Exibition

meets for which Frelikh must miss school in order to attend. Since she constantly takes “vacation” days, she treats tutorials and lunches like gold because she has to constantly make-up tests, in-class essays, class work and participation points. Nevertheless, she conveys that these tedious make-up sessions are a small price to pay to visit and compete in New York, Ohio, Texas, Florida and North Carolina. Despite her busy schedule, Frelikh still has to find time to design and make her own outfits. Although a tailor provides her with a handmade outfit, Frelikh has to manually decorate it with rhinestones, sparkles, beads and other embellishments. Despite the fact that synchronized swimming has its academic and time disadvantages, Frelikh’s future in swimming is more valuable, as she will soon conquer her next meet in Sw itzerland.

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Partying Partying YEAH! Partying Partying YEAH! Fun. Fun. Fun. Fun.

The Prospector wishes you a happy summer. Please Recycle


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MAY 27, 2011

Health is Wealth Next time you are at the front of the line debating between the fresh fruit cup and the gooey chocolate chip cookie, choose wisely, for the outcomes of these battles are what add up to form a lifestyle. And what better time than now to start anew on the path to good health? Sounds simple enough, but what most of us fall short on is willpower. With one good look around campus, though, it is easy to get this dose of inspiration; students are constantly pursuing healthy activities as seen on this page. Juniors Zhijiang Li, Andrew Qu and Eric Lee (upper left) share a hug in the quad, while sophomores Brittany Rodriguez and Katelyn Howard (upper right) share a laugh during their laps around the pool. Junior Paolo Barrenechea (left) shoots hoops with a handful of other students who form teams and battle it out on the asphalt during lunchtime. In addition to mental and physical health, eating habits also constitute a big part of balanced living. Junior Bhavisha Shukla (bottom left) takes a refreshing gulp of H2O, while senior Vandita Manyam chows down on a handful of tangerine slices. Other healthy choices include grabbing a milk carton on your way out of the cafeteria or choosing to ride your bike to school. It really is as simple as that, so join your peers in pursuing a healthy lifestyle today.


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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

the Prospector 2010-2011 STAFF

Cupertino High School Established 1958 Vol LII., No. 5 | 2011

editor-in-chief harini jaganathan news editor kevin chu opinions editor abhishek zaveri features editor jesse zhou in-depth editors michelle cheung sunwoo jeong lifestyles editor natasha sharma sports editor azadeh rongere photo editors sindhu gnanasambandan copy editors alya omar victoria duan business manager jackie breuer

Lawson reflects on 35 years of teaching, changes over the years VIRENA GALOTRA lifestyles assistant

This year marks history teacher Jay Lawson’s 35th year as a teacher in this district. To commemorate the occasion his students made him cards and presented him with gifts. Lawson is one of the longest employed teachers on campus and, as a result, notices changes in diversity, teacher collaboration and technology at school over the years. Ever since he was a young boy, Lawson wanted to be a teacher. Both his parents were teachers in the district and his father was a prominent administrator as well. In fact, Sam H. Lawson Middle School is named in honor of his father. Lawson began his career as a history teacher at Monta Vista High School and simultaneously worked as a wrestling coach at Homestead High School at the same time. After only three years of teaching, he was laid off from his job as a history teacher in 1979. Lawson then became an intern to a special education teacher at Monta Vista High School while getting his credentials at night school. After he graduated, he became a full time special education teacher at Monta Vista High School. He then transferred to CHS in 1985 as both the head wrestling coach and a special education teacher. Fourteen years later in 1999, he took up his current position as a history teacher on campus, which is his favorite class to teach. “I really enjoy... sharing the stories of history and the older I get the easier it gets because I’ve lived through a lot of the things I’m teaching,” Lawson said. After 35 years of teaching, Lawson plans to continue teaching for another three years before retiring. “It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more

students,” he said. Over the years, Lawson has observed many changes pertaining to both the school and his job as a teacher. One of the major changes on campus is its diversification, a process that occurred gradually. He mentions that there is less of an emphasis on the trades and students have less interest in taking classes like auto shop, metal shop and cooking. In addition, a smaller percentage of students choose to pursue these types of careers. Lawson also notes

It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more students. Jay Lawson

History Teacher

that both teachers and students now use technology in the classroom on a regular basis. Computers have now become a daily teaching tool as well as a regular learning resource for students. Another positive change is how teaching has become a collaborative job. “We as teachers share our ideas and materials and to me that’s what makes it special. Being old timer, I have [some] things to offer [but] it’s also challenging to learn some of the new things,” Lawson said. However, the one thing he says that has stayed consistent is the enthusiasm of the students. “I love my time in the classroom with students. They make me feel young,” Lawson said.

SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

35 YEARS AND COUNTING| History teacher Jay Lawson contemplates the rapidly changing school and fulfilling years of teaching

IDC Best Dance Crew debuts choreographical talent news anand hemmady assistants regina hong nikhil kanthi opinions amar kantipudi assistants anthony kao gun ho lee features emily cheng assistants alyssa williams tess wu

JOANNA LEE sports assistant

Launching the first ever Intra-District Council Best Dance Crew (IDCBDC), crews from Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, and Cupertino showcased their best dance moves in front of a screaming crowd at the Lynbrook gym on Friday, May 13. Weeks of practicing and stress for all parties involved led up to a

lifestyles virena galotra assistants natalie hoang madhuri sathish in-depth jackie breuer assistants vani mulkareddy jamin shih sports fred han assistants joanna lee eric jang willie wang adviser ann peck editorial policy “The Prospector” is an open forum of expression for student editors to inform and educate their readers. It will not be reviewed by or restrained by school officials prior to publication or distribution. Advisors may and should coach and discuss content during the writing process. The staff of “The Prospector” seeks to recognize individuals, events, ideasand bring news to the Cupertino community in an accurate, professional and unbiased manner. “The Prospector” will not avoid publishing a story solely on the basis of possible dissent or controversy. If you believe an error has been made, or wish to have your opinion expressed in “The Prospector”please contact us via mail or e-mail. Letters sent become the sole property of “The Prospector” and can be edited for length, clarity, or accuracy. “The Prospector” editorial board reserves the right to accept or reject any ad in accordance with its advertising policy. Contact Us The Prospector 10100 Finch Avenue Cupertino, CA 95014 prospector.chs@gmail.com

JOANNA LEE

DANCE CREW SHOWCASE | Seniors Vi Viet, Benjamin Du, Sheng Poon, Willie Wang and Brian Walsh display their talents at the first ever IDCBDC

successful turnout of the first ever IDCBDC. Cupertino’s IDC Commissioners, senior Mennen Kassa, 12, and junior Ashley Park, 11, gathered with the other schools to sort out the details and have been working for weeks planning the event. With the performance date having been changed multiple times due to various reasons, some were beginning to fear that the event may never actually take place. However, with positive attitudes, both Kassa and Park continued to push for the event to take place. Crews were selected based on a competitive audition process in which each crew demonstrated their choreography and were judged based on overall preparedness and enthusiasm. In the end, popular hip hop crew, GTFO, and newly formed all female crew, XI So Fly, were selected to represent Cupertino at the IDCBDC. Other schools, however, did not have as many competing teams as Cupertino did, thus leading to some additional conflicts. Though enduring another minor conflict, Kassa reassures the event will have the turnout it is hoping for. Said Kassa, “IDC has been able to work everything out and we are very excited for this upcoming event.” With the dance scene on the rise, participating schools thought it would be appropriate and fun to hold a showcase that would allow students to show off the their individual styles and ultimately reign supreme while holding the Best Dance Crew title. Said Kassa, “IDC was eager to plan an event that would give the chance for students in the district to bond and show off their talents. We noticed how popular the dance scene has become throughout the district and decided that a dance competition would be the perfect way to promote district unity.” On Friday afternoon, students from all participating schools filed into the Lynbrook gym and watched eagerly as each school performed their best. Though supportive of each competing crew, the crowd screamed passionately after their representing crews performed. Though Kassa and Park originally planned for qualified judges who are already familiar with the dance scene, qualified judges were unable to be recruited before the show took place. In the end, the audience took the role of the judges. Each group showcased a variety of creative and intricate routines, including a martial arts inspired dance, some instances of jazz and lyrical, and various popping and breaking moves. Even though IDCBDC was a dance show, each school perfected a dance number that was tailored to their own individual styles and personalities that really became a sight to see. After six talented and varying performances, it was time to finally announce the winner and holder of the IDCBDC title. The audience was able to vote for their favorite crew and the crew with the most votes would take home the title. Ultimately, it was Lynbrook who took away this year’s title. With a successful turnout for the first ever IDCBDC, it is likely this event will return in the upcoming school year as an even better dance spectacle.


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

Letter to the editor Editor, The recent staff editorial (“Affirmative Action: Out-dated and Out-weighted) in the May 6th edition of The Prospector, though well-written, and thoughtful, failed to address some key issues concerning affirmative action policies. First and foremost, the editorial fails to mention the 1996 California proposition (Proposition 209) that banned racial, gender, and ethnic preferences for the University of California and the Cal-State systems. The majority of Cupertino High School students entering four-year universities, attend either a UC or Cal-State school, so the “factors of admission that are simply out of our control” is a non-factor for most CHS students. In addition to the omission of Proposition 209, the article does not cite key data about family income in the United States. The thesis of the article is that because racial discrimination is no longer the issue it once was, affirmative action programs should shift focus to income, and not race. A simple look at the last US Census reveals the following yearly median family incomes broken down by race: Asian Americans $73, 578, White $65,000, Hispanic $40, 466, and African-Americans $39,879. In sum, if UC or Cal-State were to address income, rather than race, we would still be targeting the same group of underrepresented students. The final missing piece is the assumption that every California high school student competes at the same level. The Fremont Union High School District community is an amazing place to work (I have worked in the district for 14 years and would not want to work anywhere else), and go to school (I am a 1992 Fremont High School graduate); however, it is easy to forget about the inherent advantages we have at our disposal. Not all California students have access to numerous AP courses, award winning performing arts programs, amazing teachers, supportive parents, comprehensive sports programs, or the financial means for SAT prep courses. To go back to your original argument, access to these things are “factors of admission that are out of our control”. If I attend a high school without these luxuries, how in the world can a UC admission officer look at me in the same light, as say a student who attends Cupertino, Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, or Homestead High Schools? (To be honest, the college admissions process has always been a mystery to me. Every day I am surrounded by 1,800 amazing students, and think they should be able to attend any college of their choice! ) In sum, affirmative action programs are but one tool to help underrepresented students attend select universities. Is it the only tool? Not by any stretch of the imagination — I am not naïve enough to think just one tool can close the achievement gap. Any attempt to close the achievement gap is one that would require a great deal more than affirmative action. Andy Walczak Assistant Principal

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Quad and cafeteria redesign: (cont. pg. 1)

ally a part of the project since we were given the opportunity to voice our opinions.” After hearing from all types of people at the school, the architects feel the need to preserve several areas of CHS. Said architect Diane Rappold, “The quad is a well loved spot on campus that we will improve on and ‘celebrate’. We also recognize the significance of the Senior Lawn — which may be transformed in the new design, but the concept will remain.” Although CHS is only undergoing the first phase of the rebuilding process, many students and teachers are excited to see the project progress because they had the chance to voice their opinions.

Letter from the editor Dear Reader, You hold in your hands the last full issue of the Prospector for the 2010-2011 school year. As was the case in our last issue, junior editors worked hard to create and edit the content of these pages. In this issue, you will learn about having chickens as pets, find out how much to exercise to work of that chipotle burrito and become an expert in throwing Harry Potter themed parties. Finish strong as the year draws to a close. Summer is nearly here! Keep an eye out for senior issue, which comes out next week. Please recycle! Harini Jaganathan Editor-in-Chief


opinions

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MAY 27, 2011

Mo’ money mo’ problems: Child investment woes FRED HAN sports assistant

T

oday’s opinionated article revolves around the issue of parents’ financial investment in children. Strictly speaking, an investment is spending money in order to gain profitable returns. There are two reasons why parents would spend money on behalf of their children. The first is from a biological perspective, in which parents invest money to ensure the survival of their offspring. The offspring will then breed, continuing the survival of those genes and the human race. The second is the less obvious: to ensure the prolonged survival of the parent. But that’s not the point. The key question is how much money should a parent invest in their children? Parents should provide only the bare minimal financial support for the child to live comfortably to prevent spoiling the child and to teach the child financial independence. Before any misunderstandings form, “bare minimal financial support” does not mean starving the child or forcing them to work in dirty coal mines. Instead, the child should be full fed, clothed and prepared to learn the art of survival: Cupertino’s art of survival is hunting for colleges and farming for GPA. Any luxury beyond the basic necessities and tools for enhanced education — which include, but is not limited to, overly luxurious eating style or incessant shopping trips — tends to spoil the child. Any form of spoiling will spoil the chances for the child to succeed and successfully reproduce or support the parent. Psychologically speaking, spoiling is a case of operant condition – a system of punishment and reward. For example, if a child learns to associate crying tantrums with getting whatever

he wants, then he will repeat the behavior. The parent needs to understand when to say “no” – or else it is like subprime lending. Continuation of inappropriate and excessive parental financial investment will soon lead to bursting the bubble of the inflated expectations and soon depression. Remember, parents in Cupertino should focus primarily about necessities for survival in life: working hard for happiness. The key step to help the child work hard for happiness is by preventing him or her from being spoiled. In other words, learning to say “no”. If a child truly wants to achieve or want something, then make him or her work for it — which leads to the next point: financial independence. Remember, the fastest route to corruption (spoiling in this case) is permission. Work is the fastest route to independence. If a child does not understand at least the core basics of money and economics, the chances are he or she will not understand how to deal with money later on in life. Then the children’s children — if the original children still survived by that point (a highly unlikely situation in Cupertino’s overly competitive environment) would not understand financial importance either. This results in continued financial dependence on the parents later in life — a counterproductive and non-profitable investment. The solution to this is to teach the children to work for what they want. Directing their desires and creative energies toward work for financial incentives will teach them the importance of money and give them a sense of dealing with different quantities of money. In conclusion, parents must learn to say no to any potential spoiling opportunities (although reward for hard work and excellent performance is mandatory) and spend only enough to guide the children’s creative energies. By freely giving money whenever a child demands so or not teaching them the importance of financial independence, those parents are setting themselves up for a potentially

spoiled child. Otherwise the “investment” of all the money and time put into improving the survival rate. However, do note that parents should never force a child into working so much that the child is greatly inclined to rebel. It is a delicate balance of the carrot and the whip.

EMILY CHENG

THE AGE OF INNOCENCE VS. MODERN-DAY TEENS

Anonymous questioning is unnecessary cowardice AMAR KANTIPUDI sports assistant EMILY CHENG news assistant

Ask me something, anything. Curious? It is an unsurprising feeling people get when they come across a chance to ask whatever they desire of their peers. When curiosity takes over, thoughts run free, and a new, undiscovered side of a person will be unleashed. This is even more evident when people hide behind a veil of anonymity because they ask anything and everything they can until they have satisfied their curiosity. It is these intentions, this sense of infallible curiosity and innate bigotry humans tend to demonstrate that often diminishes personal confidence. Just a simple question can induce the feeling of throwing out your entire life on the chopping block. The practice of attempting to fish out potential secrets without identification is a privileged feature provided to people by social networking sites. Services such as Tumblr and Formspring allow literally anyone to ask specific people questions — uncensored and unmonitored. It is through sites like these that the world has been introduced to concepts such as “trolling” and cyber bullying Anonymous questioning does comes with its fair share of reasons. After all, some people are just too afraid to ask something personal. It is almost always easier to talk to someone when away from the spotlight. That, by far, is the most appealing aspect of talking to friends online rather than in person or on the phone. Nonetheless unless a relationship is significantly strong, it is nearly impossible to separate sarcastic comments from serious ones. Furthermore, since people can say whatever they want online without having to admit who they are, they resort to a more crude language that can sometimes belittle the peer. Though, many still set up an anonymous question box expecting fun, light-hearted and interesting questions that can help them kill time, in the

long run, users run the risk of having their honesty tested, actions questioned, and image bashed, eventually damaging one’s self-esteem. If the user does not put a halt to anonymous questioning after they’ve already fallen victim to “anon bashing”, they suffer comment after comment of demeaning verbiage flooding their inbox. Soon, even strongly optimistic individuals will fall prey to the condescending harassment of their peers. It is all too common to see cheerful people turn into pessimists. Such an initially simple and harmless intention of exciting user life can morph into a lethal and emotionally degrading exchange of Q&A. Because of this, people may become very unhappy individuals who cannot control their own emotions properly, and oftentimes would end up lashing out at the resulting instability at others. These insecurities are then observed and questioned once again through that wretched anonymous button! Even if it is an attempt to poke fun into others’ lives, anonymous questioning can and most likely will lead to displeasing tension and shaky feelings. After all, once people put a mask on, they fail to take responsibility for their actions. To have a bright and confident spirit be torn down by anonymous comments is a excruciating sight. The few moments of entertainment gained on the asking end do not balance out the discomfort imposed on the receiving end. Online socializing does have its boundaries in this sense. Take a few precautions before entering a world full of anonymity, realize the consequences, and remember the saying that’s far too overheard but never entirely understood: curiosity killed the cat.

Why do you strut around campus like a know-it-all?

THE MASK OF ANONYMITY:

What students experience with online bashing “ I don’t have a formspring because I think it is another way for someone to bully you and bullying on formspring is inevitable.” Mahtab Danai, senior “I deleted my formspring because all that I got on there was stuff that I rather hear in person or didn’t want to hear at all. I didn’t want to give them an outlet when they deserved nothing from me.” Julia Seaton, sophomore “I have the curiosity of a reality check on whether people actually like me or not.” Varsha Prabhakar, sophomore

You think you’re cool? You’re just a poser.


THE PROSPECTOR

MAY 27, 2011

opinions

5

DEATH OF BIN LADEN Should the death of an enemy be celebrated?

Liberty for Free

Respect for Life

ALYA OMAR copy editor JACKIE BREUER in-depth assistant

SAMUEL LEE opinions assistant

On September 11, 2001, America watched in horror as a group of terrorists hijacked three planes, crashing them into the windows of the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and a field in Virginia. Family members watched as their loved ones’ lives were prematurely taken from them. Days later, leader of Al Qaeda Osama bin Laden vanished after taking responsibility for orchestrating the attacks, leaving behind an uncertain, tormented future. From that day, it has been one of the top priorities of the U.S. government to take down the man who instructed such heartbreak for thousands of its citizens. As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 loomed overhead, when President Barack Obama announced to the nation that an attack on bin Laden’s compound was successful, the spectrum of emotion was of massive contrast. While some recognized the magnitude that bin Laden’s death held as a weight lifted off of their grieving shoulders, others rebuked the celebrations, finding it inappropriate to disrespect the dead. However, it is not another person’s right to judge another person’s happiness and the expression of said emotion. People are affected differently by major events and define closure in a different way. 3,000 families continued with their lives forever changed, and though their losses were met with sympathy and pledges of remembrance, it was never combatted with justice because the man who orchestrated the events continued to lead his life, while their lost ones could not. From the perspective of the somewhat naive, bin Laden’s death signifies nothing but the end of a human life. To others, it was a monumental moment of closure, an assurance that the man that executed the execution was not pardoned for what he had done. This is not to say that the only proper reaction to bin Laden’s death is to galavant through the streets, chanting “U.S.A.” The death of bin Laden is simply a headline to some, while for others it is a sign of redemption for the lost loved ones. It is not in anyone’s capabilities to stand back and determine the value of such an event for someone else. Whether you feel compelled to run through the streets singing the national anthem or to simply hold a moment of silence, it is imperative to realize that the next best action is to move on and keep those that lost their lives on September 11 and during the war on terrorism in our hearts forever.

A DIVIDED

The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them.” -- Lois McMaster Bujold

AMERICA

I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” — Martin Luther King Jr.

Osama died, Americans cried… in happiness. Yes, you read that right! “Life, liberty and justice for all” except for certain Arab terrorists — they just get two out of the three. As soon as news of the al-Qaeda leader’s death reached the American public, thousands of Americans flooded Times Square and the White House to pop bottles of champagne, sing, chant “U-SA” and smile for the camera. Times like this throw doubts on whether Americans truly value the life of another human being. There should be no celebration for the death of Osama bin Laden. Admittedly, bin Laden’s is crucial to American security. The nation ought to thank President Bush for collecting the necessary intelligence throughout his presidency. It should also thank President Obama for capturing the terrorist when given the opportunity, unlike President Clinton; his stained presidency includes an incident in which he refused the Sudanese government’s offer to arrest and extradite bin Laden. Though the operation may have been necessary, bin Laden’s death is nothing to celebrate. Unless malice and vengeance form the bedrock of American principles (as opposed to, say, basic respect for human life), there is no justifiable reason for celebration: Terror attacks will not stop just because bin Laden descended to Hell. Just a few weeks after his death, suicide bombers murdered 51 Pakistanis in retaliation. Even worse, his death does not mean an end to outrageously invasive TSA procedures. Three year old boy: Wait, I thought bad terror man was gone! TSA “agent”: Quiet, I’m fondling your genitals. Americans running to the White House to celebrate bin Laden’s death with flags and drunkenness exhibited the same kind of euphoria that certain groups of Afghans displayed on 9/11. Chanting “U.S.A” just makes the entire circus more obscene. We must not lower our moral standards to those of the terrorists. Had people stayed home in quiet introspection and prayer, then that would have demonstrated true American exceptionalism. People are fully justified in feeling relief over the destruction of a mass murderer. But a sense of joy does not belong to a nation that considers itself a representative of everything that is good with the world.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Future homecoming court should be open to all classes, not just seniors Last month, we reported on ASB Executive Council’s new Homecoming Court nomination process for the 2011-2012 school year. This process involves several steps: nominating only senior candidates, having the top 20 male and top 20 female candidates complete a questionnaire about their school involvement, selecting the top 10 male and top 10 female candidates based on that questionnaire and having students from all classes choose their top six males or female Court candidates in an open vote. According to ASB, the new system is meant to ensure that the Homecoming Court accurately portrays our school’s values. However, there is considerable opposition to this policy across class lines. We completely agree with the new system’s purpose; screening candidates through a questionnaire on school involvement will be an effective way to ensure that only qualified, upstanding students make it on the Court. However, we believe that restricting the Court to only seniors goes against our school’s traditions and spirit of class unity. Homecoming has always been an event where the entire

school comes together for the sake of school pride and spirit. Students from freshmen to seniors flock to Homecoming because of the memories it creates and the kindred bonds they are able to forge with their friends. The event gives students a chance to garner happy memories and strengthen friendships with their peers — usually those in the same class. When there is not a freshman face to be found in the Homecoming Court, how delightful, inclusive or memorable will attending freshmen think Homecoming is? Supporters try to justify this massive exclusion of students by saying that all students will have the opportunity to be nominated to the court once they go through four years of high school. This assertion completely ignores the motivational and inspirational value the court can provide. If court members are meant to be shining examples of perfect Pioneers, these examples should be relatable and plentiful. Having a court from all classes will allow students who are not seniors to recognize that even one, two or three years at our school can make a difference. Having all classes represented on the Homecoming Court

will also maintain our school’s sense of community and unity. Homecoming is not meant to be an exclusive affair; with each class having an equal chance to compete in areas like skits and posters, it gives a level playing field for all classes to shine. If we deny freshmen, sophomores and juniors opportunities that seniors have in what is supposed to be a schoolwide event, they will feel excluded — which is exactly the opposite of what Homecoming is all about. In an April Prospector poll, 66% of students polled, including seniors, opposed the new seniors-only Homecoming Court nomination process. If anything, ASB Executive Council should listen to this supermajority of its constituency and work to revise this process instead of single-handedly implementing it. Homecoming is for all CHS students, and every part of Homecoming, the Court included, should be open to students regardless of class. We believe that unity and inclusiveness are core Pioneer values. It only makes sense that the Pioneers’ Homecoming Court embodies them.


features

MAY 27, 2011

6

TINO’S ANIMAL KI GDO CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE ASIAN SOUL

Sophomore’s feathery pals help in many ways SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN photo editor

She has chicken soup for the pet lover’s soul — and no, not the book. The fact is, sophomore Julie Chen’s pets are chickens and she has consumed them in soup form before. While Chen does love her fuzzy, egg-laying creatures, she shares an, lets just say, atypical bond with them. Through this bond though, she has learned a great deal about the nature of animals and the responsibility that comes along with caring for them. A year ago, at Chen’s request, her family drove two hours to a farm and picked up a handful of “female” (four out of the eight grew up to be male) chicks. They built a coop and everyday, fed them vegetables, checked their feed and refilled their water. With time “scooping up morning presents” was added to the to-do list; one egg per chicken a day, hard-boiled in the morning is not a bad deal at all. California state law, though, prohibits housing roosters in residential areas (a blessing for those who like to sleep in) so Chen’s family needed a way to dispose of their four not-so-female chickens. “We ate them. We are Asians so of course we know how to kill chickens,” said Chen, “It’s really just a quick throat cut.” This may sound brutal and Chen herself initially had much trouble with this idea. That being said, she eventually came to peace with eating her chickens under the circumstances. First of all, Chen was never excessively attached to her chickens as others may be with their more conventional pets.

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Chrome, Chicovo, Phoenix, Chocolate and Turtle — but they grow up really fast. I went on a cruise for a week and they all changed colors so I couldn’t tell who was who anymore,” said Chen, “It’s not like killing a pet dog or anything.” She is comfortable with it from a moral standpoint as well. “The whole reason we have this garden is because my mom read this book called Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. It talks about this writer who starts a farm and raises her own animals. Her philosophy is that if one raises them naturally, it’s ethical to eat them. I feel better about eating these chickens rather than eating commercially grown ones, fattened

We are Asians, so of course we know how to kill chickens.

up in two months,” added Chen. Aside from, when occasion calls, eating them, Julie also spends a great deal of time babysitting her chickens. She has made some quite interesting observations. “Chickens are very vicious actu sometimes,” Chen said, “They actually have a pecking order. Sometimes I’ll feed them dandelion leaves and certain chickens are not allowed chick to come and eat. The little chickens were initially at the bottom of the order and the red chicken was at the very bottom but once so she started laying, she gained social status. Now the once oldest, bot meanest black chicken is at the bottom because she stopped laying.” Overall, while owning chickens has taught Julie ad a thing or two, she admits that it is not for everyone. “It’s kind of a hassle. Whether you should own one or not depends on where you live, how your backyard com is, and how committed you are to waking up at 6 am morn in the morning to angry c h i c k e n s ,” Chen warns, “If that doesn’t concern you, then two bucks a chick at Gilroy. Good luck!”

OWNING A PET CAN HELP WITH STRES KEVIN CHU news editor

While most people think of massage, meditation and yoga as natural, healthy stress relievers, there is another option that is fluffier and more loveable: getting a pet. Not only do pets help relieve stress, but they can also improve one’s mood, control one’s blood pressure, reduce loneliness and provide social support— all of which are important for health and well-being, and for avoiding stress and depression. Animals are relatively consistent in their behaviors — such as locations and times of eating, sleeping, and cuddling — which provide a stable, predictable and thus less stressful aspect in the owner’s life. Their unconditional love is also extremely comforting — pets greet their owners with excitement when they come home, they can usually tell when their owners are upset, and many pets will cuddle up next to their owners, providing soothing contact. A 2002 study by re-

searchers at the State University of New York showed that when performing a stressful ta felt less stressful in the presence of pets th presence of a spouse or close friend. Pet ow had significantly lower baseline heart rates a pressure than the participants who did not o Caring for a pet often results in a sense o tion and fulfillment. In addition, owning pet the likelihood of going outside and interac others, providing opportunities for mood-r cialization. “I spend up to an hour each day taking for walks,” said sophomore Abishek Kumar. A 1999 study found that male AIDS pat less likely to suffer from depression if they ow “Pet ownership among men who have A vides a certain level of companionship that h them cope better with the stresses of th lives,” said psychologist Judith Siegel, a UC professor of public health and lead aut of the report. “This is one more study demonstrates the health benefits that ing a pet can provide.” In addition, pets help decrea pressure, heart rate and muscl

SHE IS HER DOGS’ BEST FRIEND Junior goes home to take care of pets during lunch JAMIN SHIH features assistant

When the bell rings at 12:25 p.m. every day, students leave their classrooms, obligations and quite often campus to enjoy 40 minutes of leisure. One student, however, exits campus not to leave her responsibilities behind but to take on another set. While her classmates spend lunchtimes with their friends, junior Ashley Kan visits and takes care of her three pet dogs, a chore she says teaches her both responsibility and time management skills that will aid her throughout her life. Kan feeds her three dogs, two Chihuahuas named Missy and Teddy and a Pomeranian named Charlie, every day during lunch because no one else is available to do so at that time. This causes her to miss out on the social banter that occurs during lunchtime, and she admits that she sacrifices spending time with her friends because of her pets. Regardless, she is sure that her dogs are completely worth the sacrifice. “I’m really close to my dogs. They’re really my best friends sometimes, because they’re always there for me,” Kan said. Indeed, just as Kan gives to her dogs, they give equally back to her. The sacrifice does not seem nearly as significant when her

WHAT KIND OF PET DO YOU HAVE?

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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

features

7

OM: EVERYTHING ON PETS WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PET?

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both in reaction to stressful events over a period of time. Owning a pet requires daily walks and other opportunities for exercise (another proven stress reliever) are also increased. Recovering addicts who struggle with high levels of stress should research different pets to determine which types, breeds, personalities and ages seem like a good match for you. For instance, if having to potty train a puppy sounds stressful, look into getting a dog that’s already trained is an appropriate option. For people who are often away from home, a more selfsufficient animal like a cat might be a better choice. There is nothing quite like hav hav- ing a warm ball of fur curl up next to you or an excitedly thumping tail greeting you — and it’s even more satisfying to know that these furry friends are helping to improve our lives.

“My dream pet would be “F” the White Winged Horse. It’s name is F so that when it takes my last name, Lai, its full name will be F Lai. And then I can tell it: ‘F Lai, fly!’ And then I’ll go around raiding towns on my mount.” -Alan Lai, senior “Well, I kind of just want a ferret. Not really creative or anything... I just like them!” -Andrew Qu, junior “My dream pet is a rainbow-horned unicorn that can fly and take me places, but that can also understand what I’m saying and be cuddly.” -Jeong Eun Lee, freshman “I like white tigers because they look more unique than other types of tigers.” -Brian Nguyen, senior

COMPILED BY TESS WU

ease blood le tension,

N O N E

12%

57% 170 PEOPLE POLLED COMPILED BY FRED HAN

Passing of pets leaves student stronger

ANAND HEMMADY features assistant

Disclaimer: The Prospector strongly encourages owners to spay or neuter pets, and acknowledges that some of the behavior exhibited by the owners of the cats in the following article is irresponsible. The Prospector also would like to warn readers that some elements of the following article may be exaggerated. Everything must end. This is a rule of the universe. Unfortunately, relationships with pets are not exempt from this rule. No matter how well an owner takes care of a pet, it will eventually pass away, and the owner will have to move on without it. The unavoidable pain from having a pet die often turns many away from keeping pets, and often raises questions as to whether having pets is worth the pain. In the end, though, the benefits of having pets far outweigh the negatives. Sophomore Brent Knaack knows the pain of losing pets all too well. Having once had thirty cats, Knaack could only watch helplessly as cat after cat died, leaving him with only five. “Our family of cats started when my dad was looking through boxes in our backyard and he found three kittens in a box,” Knaack said. “They were born literally just an hour before we found them. We took care of them because their mom never did. They grew up, and then they had kittens. Eventually we had around thirty cats, all living in our backyard in makeshift shelters.” Later, though, Knaack’s beloved pets started dying. “There was one cat in particular with whom I had a close relationship,” said Knaack as he recounted the death of his favorite cat. “I called him Tiny, because he had growth problems, and he never grew any bigger than my hand. This led to internal organ failure, and he passed away. I respected him because even in his last few hours of pain, he was determined to stay alive, and he survived through a lot of pain and suffering. I rarely cry, but when Tiny died, I couldn’t stop crying for two hours.” U

O T H E R

NOT FORGOTTEN

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nothing. During her daily fifteen minute visits to her dogs, she does feed them. The time she spends with her dogs is rewarding and her er an unconditional love that mirrors her own. t always there. They’re always playful, they always make me happy… n a good mood,” said Kan. g care of her dogs does cost her some of her free time, the experience he responsibility and time management skills she earns for the future es up for it. Kan stresses that it is completely different from normal ent duties to care for another living being and that owning three dogs wed her to experience both responsibility and the joy of bringing hapss to someone or something else. These lessons can also be applied e world outside of high school and pets; Kan finds applications well beyond homework assignments or tests. “For the future, if you ever have kids, you’re going to have to take care of something. You’re going to have to take care of cleaning up after them. It’s just a huge responsibility,” said Kan. While many students have only one set of respon responsibilities to worry about at school, Kan’s pet duties begin where her school ones end. Despite seeming like a large hassle, however, her dogs bring her the kind of joy and teach her the kind of lessons that only COUR TESY OF AS HLEY pets can. KAN

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After Tiny’s death, Knaack witnessed the death of around 25 other cats. Knaack let his cats roam freely around the neighborhood, which annoyed the neighbors. The neighbors began leaving poisoned food out on their doorsteps. Knaack was forced to witness cat after cat dying from the food poisoning. He could do nothing to stop the death toll of cats from rising. In the end, only five cats remained. Despite all the grief that the deaths of his cats caused him, though, Knaack does not regret anything and is happy that he had the chance to know his cats. “One of the best times of my life was when I was playing around with the three original kittens,” Knaack said. “It was really cute when we let them into the house and watched them crawl around, pull out wires, and stumble and fall. In spite of all the pain I think it was worth it to have pets and I don’t regret it.” Clearly, the loss that pets bring will be painful. However, it would be foolish to refuse to entertain the thought of having pets simply because of the pain. After all, in life, happiness can only come with suffering. To discard things only because they will hurt us would ruin life entirely. Although pets die and losing them hurts, the overall relationship with pets brings more happi happiness than sorrow.


lifestyles

MAY 27, 2011

8

THE BOY WHO LIVES ON... THE LEGACY OF HARRY POTTER

NIKHIL KANTHI features assistant

T

here are moments in our lives when the harshness of reality casts a shadow over our happiness, causing it to be short-lived. On July 15th, when Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 comes out, I will have to struggle between pangs of excitement and sorrow as I watch a part of my life end. When I pored over the books time and time again in my younger days, I wondered what attracted me to the adventures of a boy wizard. What set this story apart from the other books I had devoured in my youth? I often put this question on hold as I turned the last page in the last book and started anew with the first book. I spent days walking the corridors and grounds of Hogwarts. However, as the pages became more and more familiar, I realized that there would soon be a day when I would be bored by the tale that once meant the world to me. That day, I took the books out of my room and anticipated a day when I would open the books and be amazed once more. A few days ago, I turned the first page of the first book. The parchment-like scent of

the pages with which I was so familiar brought with them a painful comprehension. In less than two months, the journey would be over. I think I can answer my question today. I did not love Harry Potter because it was a friend or mentor. The reason I love these books is because I could see myself as Harry. Rowling erased the line between the reader and Harry somewhere in those pages. Readers empathized with Harry when he was in danger or depressed, and that empathy carried over to the moments when Harry was triumphant. We were united by the naive hope that things will get better. When the circumstances were not as happy and bright as they could have been, I knew that my time would come. Harry Potter taught me that victory was not impossible, and I think we all yearn for that certainty. It taught me the power of hope. I wish for a day when the corridors of Hogwarts will be as alien to me as they were to Harry on his first night there, and I wish that I could feel the loss of Sirius or Dumbledore without expecting it. I doubt that day will come before July 15th, but that’s fine. I think I will do just fine without reading the story I have read seventy times before as I wait outside the midnight premiere. Good job, my friend. Mischief managed.

POTTER PREMIERE PARTY

1. Buy midnight premiere tickets in advance, optimally three to four weeks before the movie.

Want to make your HP premiere night truly magical? Here are a few suggestions that will make your night less Dudley and a tad more Diggory.

2. First, decide on a menu for your party. For terrific Potter recipes, visit http://www.mugglenet.com/misc/rosmertas/index.shtml. Remember that Butterbeer and Golden Snitch cupcakes are absolute necessities! 3. Decorate! After you settle on a venue, plaster the walls with Harry Potter-themed posters. Make sure to include the official movie poster! 4. Costumes are mandatory — they should consist of robes, traditional Hogwarts uniforms, wands and scarves. Assign each guest a specific character in his or her customized Hogwarts-style invitation. 5. Finally, plan some activities! Some suggestions: i. Test your knowledge of the series with some trivia and use Bertie Botts’ Every Flavor Beans as the prize (or punishment!) ii. Reenact your favorite scenes from the series, and be creative. iii. Host a Dueling Club. iv. Watch Deathly Hallows, Part I in preparation for the finale! MADHURI SATHISH

Lady Gaga’s Born This Way contains darker and more serious overtones JESSE ZHOU features editor

The Mother Monster has done it again. Lady Gaga, the artist who has so far defined the voice of a new generation, has been inching toward far more radical themes in her music (believe it or not) with her new album Born This Way. While the widely acclaimed The Fame introduced Gaga as the queen of “Just Dance”, Born This Way instead puts her in the spotlight as a woman with the most independent spirit in the music industry. Many of Gaga’s songs indeed revolve around being proud and self-sufficient. “Hair” and “Bad Kids” promote the idea that being fiercely independent is essential to having true freedom. In addition, her songs call on people to respect those who choose to be independent. For example, one line from “Hair” states, “I just wanna be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.” Her words give the listener a window into a troubled soul who wants nothing more than for others to be accepted in today’s cruel society. The overall tone of Born This Way is darker and more disorderly than The Fame as well. However, Gaga uses this style in a unique way, and trust me, she uses it well. By utilizing the power

of static-shock beats, Gaga’s songs are a rather elegant synthesis of symphony and cacophony: a paradox pleasing to the ear. The fractured mix of piano, electro synthesizers, electric guitar and abnormal beats ends up finding its way into songs like “Judas” and “Marry the Night.” The atmosphere Gaga has created in Born This Way is terrifying and euphoric at the same time. By using theme and tone to their full potential, Lady Gaga’s new album, Born This Way, is bound to be one of the greatest albums of the decade. From songs about true love (“You and I”) to being who you are (“Born This Way”), the Mother Monster covers a full range of topics that will leave the listener surprised. By the time the last song finishes, something will be blown. It will either be your mind or your CD player from abusing the replay button too much.

TOP 3 SINGLES 1. Born This Way 2. The Edge of Glory 3. Judas COMPILED BY NATASHA SHARMA COURTESY OF SpreePiX-Berlin


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

lifestyles

9

The beauty OFTHRIFTING

Looking for something trendy without breaking the bank? Thrift stores sell classic pieces at surprinsgly low prices. You don’t have to buy couture to be chic.

VICTORIA DUAN copy-editor

The outrageous prices offered at too many stores in the mall make it hard for frugal shoppers to pick out affordable items that complement them. Never mind purchasing an outfit, or a nice set of furniture — a single shirt will devastate one’s wallet. But sophomore Brittney Lundquist and junior Noa Rosenberg, both experienced in the ways of thrifting, know better than to blow their entire savings on just one item. Thrift stores are shops owned and run by charities or nonprofit organizations as fundraisers for their cause. Unlike conventional stores, thrift stores carry a multitude of different products. Each new shipment is always full of surprises, and the prices of the products are relatively low. “I have found a lot of name brands like Abercrombie, the North Face, J. Crew and Banana Republic [while thrifting]. It’s a nice feeling to say that you can own name brand clothing and only have to pay a fraction of the original price,” Lundquist said. Although the quality of the donations are often questionable, Lundquist has found that the overall value of a thrift store’s merchandise can be roughly predicted by the city the store is located in.

“I have found that the ‘richer’ cities have the fancier, nicer, name brand clothing options — for example, San Francisco, Santa Cruz and Los Angeles,” Lundquist said. However, nearby thrift stores, including Goodwill, Salvation Army and Savers can all be thoroughly scavenged for good deals and quality items. Contrary to Lundquist, Rosenberg approaches thrifting with a slightly different tactic. While Lundquist is more oriented towards browsing for clothes, Rosenberg thrifts with an open mind and warmly welcomes all possibilities that might come her way. “I may go shopping with the intent to find a new sweater and then I’ll leave the store with a new shelf for my room. The challenge of thrifting is not to find something that is the perfect fit, but finding things that have the potential to be cinched, hemmed, draped in a room or framed on a wall. When I do find something I like, it’s like finding a gem; that’s the beauty of thrifting!” Rosenberg said. With thrifting comes not only the thrill of hunting for the perfect item, but also the satisfaction of paying sensible prices for a purchase. Forget the unreasonable prices at the mall — go look for the cheaper counterpart at Goodwill.


sports

Have a healthy summer

Which is worse – resisting the urge to eat or mustering the willpower to exercise? Most people are reluctant to do either, as byproducts of animal evolution makes us inclined to eat as much as possible and save every last ounce of fat in case of famine. That’s right, those deliciously

dreadful, guilty calories that lurk in your In-NOut Cheeseburger with Onions are here to stay unless burned off by the exercise that we so despise. Here are some popular food items along with matching activities needed to part with those beloved calories.

VERDE

IN N’ OUT PEARL

CHEESE BURGER WITH ONIONS

306

480

Shop for one hour 14 minutes

MILK TEA (BUBBLE TEA)

Calories:

Calories alories:

Exercise:

10

MAY 27, 2011

Exercise:

Garden for one hour and three minutes

CHIPOTLE

WING STOP

BARBACOA BURRITO

FRENCH FRIES

Calories:

Calories:

200

800

Exercise:

Exercise:

Run at nine mph for 11.5 minutes

Dance for three hours

Boosts that actually give you a boost NATALIE HOANG lifestyles assistant

A

fter ordering a cold smoothie to quench the thirst of a hot summer’s day, the Jamba Juice cashier asks you, “Would you like a boost with that?”. You will proceed to ask what types they offer and are met with a list of seemingly health nourishing choices. The options tackle different aspects of the body, from the Charger and Antioxidant boosts to the Immunity and Energy boosts. Sure, it sounds convincing, but what is it exactly that you are putting into your body? Do the benefits live up to the name? Let us break it down. A boost is a dietary supplement intended to add the vitamins, minerals, fiber, or amino acids a person may lack in his or her daily consumption. In a scroll through the Jamba Juice Booster nutritional facts, noted is the abundance of Maltodextrin and Inulin in the energy and vitamin boosts. Substitutes for sugar, Maltodextrin and Inulin give a sweet taste and the energy provided by sugar without the calories and fat. This makes the 3G Charger, Antioxidant Power, Daily Vitamin, Immunity and Energy Boosts all great options for those in need of a pick-me-up without the extra carbohydrates and sugar to bog them down. The last three boosters are crafted to regulate the body’s systems to maintain healthy levels. Flax & Fiber, a promising Boost, is made of Flaxseed. It is known for reducing blood sugar levels, bad cholesterol, triglycerides, and being the great source of fiber it is, constipation. As for the Whey Protein and Soybean Boosts, their benefit is in the name: protein. Protein’s importance lies in it’s ability to repair body cells, build and repair muscles and bones, and control metabolism. These boosts are promising in their nature, so why not add them into your smoothie? Though it is unlikely one would purchase a smoothie with a boost everyday, or enough to feel the benefits, their intentions are there. A simple overthe-counter supplemental pill directed to take once a day is perhaps the better solution for those concerned about their health. But if mixing in a boost takes the guilt off of your 300-calorie smoothie, go for it!

AZADEH RONGERE

3G Charger™ Boost Antioxidant Power™ Boost Daily Vitamin™ Boost Energy™ Boost Flax & Fiber Boost Immunity™ Boost Soy Protein™ Boost Whey Protein™ Boost

PHOTOS BY: AZADEH RONGERE COMPILED BY: ERIC JANG

get

1 TONED

for summer COMPILED BY: NIKHIL KANTHI

LEG RISES

Lie on your back with your hands holding onto something heavy (like a bookshelf side), and raise your legs without bending your knees. 20 minutes (counting breaks) of these and a four-pack will be a breeze.

2 3

COMPILED BY: AZADEH RONGERE

SHUFFLE PUSH-UPS Do pushups while moving side to side. Nothing strains your biceps, triceps, deltoids, and laterals like some serious pushup shuffling. Aim for three or four sets of 20 reps to get some toned arms.

RUNNING Put on a pair of shorts, plug in your favorite song on your MP3, and speed off on a strenuous but quick workout. Aim for anything under nine minutes (as long as you have warmed up), and you will have burned off a six-inch from Subway.

PHOTOS BY: SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

Badminton Team Dilemma: Winning does not always reap the rewards ERIC JANG sports assistant

There is no doubt that winning feels good — addicting even, if victories come frequently. However, even a winning streak has its disadvantages when the victories become too easy. The badminton team has dominated its matches in a less-competitive league but it has done so at the expense of the valuable lessons gained by losing matches. Players compete against members of the other team in singles or doubles matches, ranked by skill level. The entire game is won by a majority of match wins from the team members. Players who train in competitive badminton clubs outside of school, such as Bintang, are often on

par with other club players from upper league schools. Since the school team is composed of both club badminton players and players who only train at school practices, the latter players are presented with formidable challenges when they have to play in higher leagues against more experienced players. Conversely, higher league players do not have enough of a challenge when they have to play in the lower league and so neither league is apt for both types of players. As a result, the Varsity and Junior Varsity teams have lost most of their games in higherdivision leagues for the last two years. However, because they have been bumped down to a lower league this year, the badminton team has remained undefeated the entire season. Although practice alone contributes to the

success of team members during matches, ingame experience is also vital to the growth of the player. Team members do not improve as much when all of their matches are won easily and their mistakes go unnoticed. When the Central Coast Section (CCS) championships roll around, players that have become accustomed to their successes may find themselves unprepared to face opponents of higher skill level. “I’m scared that they all think they’re good enough at the level they are at now and have no desire to concentrate during practice,” said varsity player Peggy Chiang about her teammates. Chiang learns which footwork needs practice and which shots she can improve on from losing against tougher players. Playing against difficult opponents in

the higher league not only reveals areas for self-improvement, but also builds appreciation for the competitive aspect of the sport. According to varsity player Lawrence Luk, failures are vital to good sportsmanship. Modesty is difficult to come by for those who seldom experience defeat. “Losing teaches me humility, because I can’t expect to walk all over my opponents all the time,” Luk said. Despite the fact that the badminton team has enjoyed a winning streak this year, some players believe that excessive victories have slowed athletic growth. Luk and Chiang believe that losing to higher-league contenders is a necessary step in improving and taking the team to the next level.


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sports sports

THE PROSPECTOR THE PROSPECTOR

MAY27, 27,2011 2011 MAY

Synchronized swimmer Ekaterina Frelikh pursues future Olympic dream AZADEH RONGERE sports editor

Above the surface, two artistic synchronized swimmers jump through the air in perfect harmony. The chemistry between the teammates allows their routines to be of sheer perfection. Their magical performance, a blend of gymnastics and dancing, requires flawless consistency. Below the surface is junior Ekaterina Frelikh an aspiring synchronized swimmer. Frelikh was born in Russia where she began her successful career as a synchronized swimmer at age nine. Before she became talented performer, Frelikh explored speed swimming, a quick but she quickly realized this sport bored her. She then turned to synchronized swimming deciding that it would provide her with more excitement. “I saw girls doing little leg things and I thought it was very cool and pretty, so I joined,” Frelikh said. When she joined a popular Russian team, she received a proper foundation for her synchronized swimming future through training. Ho w e v e r, when she emigrated from Russia four years ago, it seemed as if lon her aspirations could no longer become a reality. Once she moved to America, Frelikh lacked a synchronized swimming team so she reluctantly returned to speed swimming. After a year of break,

she was introduced to one of the best synchronizing swimming team in America in Santa Clara. After a successful try out, she joined the team. Despite a new addition, her team supported and welcomed Ferlikh and they built friendships only teammates could share. Although their occasional bonding activities do bring them closer, their natural chemistry already supports their undeniable bond. “We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable,” Frelikh said. However, to pursue her dream Frelikh had to compromise

We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable.

her academic schedule. Since her practices last from 4:00 to 8:30 p.m. every day, she found it hard to fit AP classes into her schedule. Even after these strenuous weekday practices she is unable to sleep in on weekends since she has practices from 7:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. Furthermore, during the summer, she practices ten hours each and every day. “I just have to make it work. I mean, I have to wake up early and sleep really late to balance out my workload with synchronized swimming,” Frelikh said. In addition, during the first semester of each school year, she and her team ruthlessly train and tirelessly practice. Throughout second semester there are multiple national and international

2010 West Side Junior Exibition

meets for which Frelikh must miss school in order to attend. Since she constantly takes “vacation” days, she treats tutorials and lunches like gold because she has to constantly make-up tests, in-class essays, class work and participation points. Nevertheless, she conveys that these tedious make-up sessions are a small price to pay to visit and compete in New York, Ohio, Texas, Florida and North Carolina. Despite her busy schedule, Frelikh still has to find time to design and make her own outfits. Although a tailor provides her with a handmade outfit, Frelikh has to manually decorate it with rhinestones, sparkles, beads and other embellishments. Despite the fact that synchronized swimming has its academic and time disadvantages, Frelikh’s future in swimming is more valuable, as she will soon conquer her next meet in Sw itzerland.

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• Unlimited rides on bus and light rail all summer • For youth 17 years & under • Enter to win one of ten $100 Westfield gift cards and other great prizes Like us on Facebook

www.vta.org/sbp • (408) 321-2300 • TTY (408) 321-2330

End of the year countdown Memorial Day- NO SCHOOL

Stress-less Cafe!!

Baccalaurette 4th and 5th @ West Val- Period Final ley Presbyterian Church 2nd and 3rd Period Final

1st Period Final

6th and 7th Period Final

Graduation Ceremony@ De Anza College Football Field

Partying Partying YEAH! Partying Partying YEAH! Fun. Fun. Fun. Fun.

The Prospector wishes you a happy summer. Please Recycle


photoessay

12

MAY 27, 2011

Health is Wealth Next time you are at the front of the line debating between the fresh fruit cup and the gooey chocolate chip cookie, choose wisely, for the outcomes of these battles are what add up to form a lifestyle. And what better time than now to start anew on the path to good health? Sounds simple enough, but what most of us fall short on is willpower. With one good look around campus, though, it is easy to get this dose of inspiration; students are constantly pursuing healthy activities as seen on this page. Juniors Zhijiang Li, Andrew Qu and Eric Lee (upper left) share a hug in the quad, while sophomores Brittany Rodriguez and Katelyn Howard (upper right) share a laugh during their laps around the pool. Junior Paolo Barrenechea (left) shoots hoops with a handful of other students who form teams and battle it out on the asphalt during lunchtime. In addition to mental and physical health, eating habits also constitute a big part of balanced living. Junior Bhavisha Shukla (bottom left) takes a refreshing gulp of H2O, while senior Vandita Manyam chows down on a handful of tangerine slices. Other healthy choices include grabbing a milk carton on your way out of the cafeteria or choosing to ride your bike to school. It really is as simple as that, so join your peers in pursuing a healthy lifestyle today.


FEATURES: Chicken soup for the pet owner’s soul

SPORTS: Synchronized swimming star

PHOTO ESSAY: Healthy living

THE PROSPECTOR CUPERTINO HIGH SCHOOL’S

VOLUME 52 NO. 7

10100 FINCH AVENUE, CUPERTINO CA

MAY 27, 2011

Redesign of quad and cafeteria:

Students and staff collaborate with architects to develop plan for renovations

REGINA HONG news assistant

In addition to the ongoing track renovations, CHS plans to start rebuilding other parts of the campus, such as the front building and the quad, by the 2012-2013 school year. In the past, the district passed a construction bond that specifically stated that it could only be used for the construction of new buildings. Therefore, due to the increasing population, the current cafeteria at the front of the school will become a two-story building, which will house the library, cafeteria and guidance and administrative offices. By moving all of these areas into one building, the old library and office space will turn into new classrooms. This will create more flexibility with class space, larger conference areas for the staff and more bathrooms. The quad will also undergo several changes, such as the addition of a stage, new seating arrangements and a better sound system. In order to prepare for the renovation, CHS asked for input from those who are involved with the school, such as students, teachers and other staff members. On May 5, 2011, several members from the Quattrocchi Kwok Architects company came to CHS to ask selected students at a student committee meeting to ask for their

input regarding how the front building and quad should be rebuilt. “We hope for a more modernized, nicer and different campus, but at the same time, we also want to keep the familiarity of Tino,” said sophomore Julia Seaton. At the meeting, students asked for a big and open front building in which upperclassmen and lowerclassmen would not be separated. The structure of the building will resemble that of a student union on a college campus. According to Seaton, the architects respected all of the students’ opinions and tried their best to allow for everyone’s voices to be heard. According to assistant principal Andy Walczak, a student asked to showcase Dusty at the front of the school, so passers-by would be able to see the pride of CHS. The architects also met with the staff members. During this meeting, adults gave their opinions on how the school should be reconstructed. Said librarian Pat Accoriniti, “I’m just really excited about the process. We’ll [Teachers and students] be more accepting of the new building and quad because we were actu see QUAD AND CAFETERIA RESDESIGN, pg 3

SINDHU GNANASAMDANDAN

Students prepare for summer Latin American cultural immersion program HARINI JAGANATHAN editor-in-chief

This summer, juniors Delia Cannon, Noelle Foley and Allison Ness will be traveling to Latin America to work on community service projects through the AMIGOS program. AMIGOS is a nonprofit international organization that provides community service opportunities for young people in areas across Latin America. All three students have been training and preparing for their trip, practicing their Spanish conversational skills, learning about Latin American culture and raising funds to support their service projects. Cannon, Foley and Ness will be living with families in different Latin American communities, and completing projects with just one English speaking partner. They hope to immerse themselves in the culture as well as make a positive impact on the areas they will be traveling to. Foley will be going to Oaxaca, Mexico to build fuel efficient stoves and raise environmental awareness. She will be living in a community for eight weeks.

“I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn more about myself and the world,” Foley said. “We’re sheltered in Cupertino.” Ness will spend six weeks in La Paz, Honduras and her project will focus on teaching the youth about the environment and how to sustain resources. “I was into it because I’m interested in language immersion and community service,” Ness said. “I also want to become more outgoing.” Cannon will be in Cotapaxi, Ecuador for seven weeks teaching youth about health and children’s rights. While Cannon admits that her initial motivations for embarking on this endeavor were college applications and travel opportunity, she found that the issues she will be focusing on in Cotapaxi matter to her. Her motivations for completing her trip have changed. In addition to improving her Spanish listening and speaking skills, Cannon is excited to help the children in the community she will be living in. “I want to make life better for these kids, even if that’s just teaching them how to brush their teeth and clean their hands,” Cannon said. Although all three are excited to immerse themselves in an-

other culture, some aspects of living in another country make them nervous. Cannon is concerned about communicating with the locals as well as living without the comforts of home. “I’m worried that it’ll take me too long to be understood,” Cannon said. “I’m also worried about the lack of American fast food.” Foley is slightly worried about answering difficult questions asked by the locals. “I will be asked about I think about immigration policies there,” she said. “I’m a little nervous about that.” All three find that there are other aspects of the cultural immersion process that excite them. “They eat guinea pig in Cotapaxi,” Cannon said. “When will I ever get to try guinea pig if I don’t try that there?” Cannon, Foley and Ness are excited and nervous about immersing themselves in another culture and isolating themselves from the comforts that Cupertino offers. They anticipate that their trip will bring them a greater understanding of Latin American culture and will be a personal growth experience. They hope to share interesting stories of their journey upon their return.


FEATURES: Chicken soup for the pet owner’s soul

SPORTS: Synchronized swimming star

PHOTO ESSAY: Healthy living

THE PROSPECTOR CUPERTINO HIGH SCHOOL’S

VOLUME 52 NO. 7

10100 FINCH AVENUE, CUPERTINO CA

MAY 27, 2011

Redesign of quad and cafeteria:

Students and staff collaborate with architects to develop plan for renovations

REGINA HONG news assistant

In addition to the ongoing track renovations, CHS plans to start rebuilding other parts of the campus, such as the front building and the quad, by the 2012-2013 school year. In the past, the district passed a construction bond that specifically stated that it could only be used for the construction of new buildings. Therefore, due to the increasing population, the current cafeteria at the front of the school will become a two-story building, which will house the library, cafeteria and guidance and administrative offices. By moving all of these areas into one building, the old library and office space will turn into new classrooms. This will create more flexibility with class space, larger conference areas for the staff and more bathrooms. The quad will also undergo several changes, such as the addition of a stage, new seating arrangements and a better sound system. In order to prepare for the renovation, CHS asked for input from those who are involved with the school, such as students, teachers and other staff members. On May 5, 2011, several members from the Quattrocchi Kwok Architects company came to CHS to ask selected students at a student committee meeting to ask for their

input regarding how the front building and quad should be rebuilt. “We hope for a more modernized, nicer and different campus, but at the same time, we also want to keep the familiarity of Tino,” said sophomore Julia Seaton. At the meeting, students asked for a big and open front building in which upperclassmen and lowerclassmen would not be separated. The structure of the building will resemble that of a student union on a college campus. According to Seaton, the architects respected all of the students’ opinions and tried their best to allow for everyone’s voices to be heard. According to assistant principal Andy Walczak, a student asked to showcase Dusty at the front of the school, so passers-by would be able to see the pride of CHS. The architects also met with the staff members. During this meeting, adults gave their opinions on how the school should be reconstructed. Said librarian Pat Accoriniti, “I’m just really excited about the process. We’ll [Teachers and students] be more accepting of the new building and quad because we were actu see QUAD AND CAFETERIA RESDESIGN, pg 3

SINDHU GNANASAMDANDAN

Students prepare for summer Latin American cultural immersion program HARINI JAGANATHAN editor-in-chief

This summer, juniors Delia Cannon, Noelle Foley and Allison Ness will be traveling to Latin America to work on community service projects through the AMIGOS program. AMIGOS is a nonprofit international organization that provides community service opportunities for young people in areas across Latin America. All three students have been training and preparing for their trip, practicing their Spanish conversational skills, learning about Latin American culture and raising funds to support their service projects. Cannon, Foley and Ness will be living with families in different Latin American communities, and completing projects with just one English speaking partner. They hope to immerse themselves in the culture as well as make a positive impact on the areas they will be traveling to. Foley will be going to Oaxaca, Mexico to build fuel efficient stoves and raise environmental awareness. She will be living in a community for eight weeks.

“I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn more about myself and the world,” Foley said. “We’re sheltered in Cupertino.” Ness will spend six weeks in La Paz, Honduras and her project will focus on teaching the youth about the environment and how to sustain resources. “I was into it because I’m interested in language immersion and community service,” Ness said. “I also want to become more outgoing.” Cannon will be in Cotapaxi, Ecuador for seven weeks teaching youth about health and children’s rights. While Cannon admits that her initial motivations for embarking on this endeavor were college applications and travel opportunity, she found that the issues she will be focusing on in Cotapaxi matter to her. Her motivations for completing her trip have changed. In addition to improving her Spanish listening and speaking skills, Cannon is excited to help the children in the community she will be living in. “I want to make life better for these kids, even if that’s just teaching them how to brush their teeth and clean their hands,” Cannon said. Although all three are excited to immerse themselves in an-

other culture, some aspects of living in another country make them nervous. Cannon is concerned about communicating with the locals as well as living without the comforts of home. “I’m worried that it’ll take me too long to be understood,” Cannon said. “I’m also worried about the lack of American fast food.” Foley is slightly worried about answering difficult questions asked by the locals. “I will be asked about I think about immigration policies there,” she said. “I’m a little nervous about that.” All three find that there are other aspects of the cultural immersion process that excite them. “They eat guinea pig in Cotapaxi,” Cannon said. “When will I ever get to try guinea pig if I don’t try that there?” Cannon, Foley and Ness are excited and nervous about immersing themselves in another culture and isolating themselves from the comforts that Cupertino offers. They anticipate that their trip will bring them a greater understanding of Latin American culture and will be a personal growth experience. They hope to share interesting stories of their journey upon their return.


2

MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

the Prospector 2010-2011 STAFF

Cupertino High School Established 1958 Vol LII., No. 5 | 2011

editor-in-chief harini jaganathan news editor kevin chu opinions editor abhishek zaveri features editor jesse zhou in-depth editors michelle cheung sunwoo jeong lifestyles editor natasha sharma sports editor azadeh rongere photo editors sindhu gnanasambandan copy editors alya omar victoria duan business manager jackie breuer

Lawson reflects on 35 years of teaching, changes over the years VIRENA GALOTRA lifestyles assistant

This year marks history teacher Jay Lawson’s 35th year as a teacher in this district. To commemorate the occasion his students made him cards and presented him with gifts. Lawson is one of the longest employed teachers on campus and, as a result, notices changes in diversity, teacher collaboration and technology at school over the years. Ever since he was a young boy, Lawson wanted to be a teacher. Both his parents were teachers in the district and his father was a prominent administrator as well. In fact, Sam H. Lawson Middle School is named in honor of his father. Lawson began his career as a history teacher at Monta Vista High School and simultaneously worked as a wrestling coach at Homestead High School at the same time. After only three years of teaching, he was laid off from his job as a history teacher in 1979. Lawson then became an intern to a special education teacher at Monta Vista High School while getting his credentials at night school. After he graduated, he became a full time special education teacher at Monta Vista High School. He then transferred to CHS in 1985 as both the head wrestling coach and a special education teacher. Fourteen years later in 1999, he took up his current position as a history teacher on campus, which is his favorite class to teach. “I really enjoy... sharing the stories of history and the older I get the easier it gets because I’ve lived through a lot of the things I’m teaching,” Lawson said. After 35 years of teaching, Lawson plans to continue teaching for another three years before retiring. “It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more

students,” he said. Over the years, Lawson has observed many changes pertaining to both the school and his job as a teacher. One of the major changes on campus is its diversification, a process that occurred gradually. He mentions that there is less of an emphasis on the trades and students have less interest in taking classes like auto shop, metal shop and cooking. In addition, a smaller percentage of students choose to pursue these types of careers. Lawson also notes

It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more students. Jay Lawson

History Teacher

that both teachers and students now use technology in the classroom on a regular basis. Computers have now become a daily teaching tool as well as a regular learning resource for students. Another positive change is how teaching has become a collaborative job. “We as teachers share our ideas and materials and to me that’s what makes it special. Being old timer, I have [some] things to offer [but] it’s also challenging to learn some of the new things,” Lawson said. However, the one thing he says that has stayed consistent is the enthusiasm of the students. “I love my time in the classroom with students. They make me feel young,” Lawson said.

SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

35 YEARS AND COUNTING| History teacher Jay Lawson contemplates the rapidly changing school and fulfilling years of teaching

IDC Best Dance Crew debuts choreographical talent news anand hemmady assistants regina hong nikhil kanthi opinions amar kantipudi assistants anthony kao gun ho lee features emily cheng assistants alyssa williams tess wu

JOANNA LEE sports assistant

Launching the first ever Intra-District Council Best Dance Crew (IDCBDC), crews from Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, and Cupertino showcased their best dance moves in front of a screaming crowd at the Lynbrook gym on Friday, May 13. Weeks of practicing and stress for all parties involved led up to a

lifestyles virena galotra assistants natalie hoang madhuri sathish in-depth jackie breuer assistants vani mulkareddy jamin shih sports fred han assistants joanna lee eric jang willie wang adviser ann peck editorial policy “The Prospector” is an open forum of expression for student editors to inform and educate their readers. It will not be reviewed by or restrained by school officials prior to publication or distribution. Advisors may and should coach and discuss content during the writing process. The staff of “The Prospector” seeks to recognize individuals, events, ideasand bring news to the Cupertino community in an accurate, professional and unbiased manner. “The Prospector” will not avoid publishing a story solely on the basis of possible dissent or controversy. If you believe an error has been made, or wish to have your opinion expressed in “The Prospector”please contact us via mail or e-mail. Letters sent become the sole property of “The Prospector” and can be edited for length, clarity, or accuracy. “The Prospector” editorial board reserves the right to accept or reject any ad in accordance with its advertising policy. Contact Us The Prospector 10100 Finch Avenue Cupertino, CA 95014 prospector.chs@gmail.com

JOANNA LEE

DANCE CREW SHOWCASE | Seniors Vi Viet, Benjamin Du, Sheng Poon, Willie Wang and Brian Walsh display their talents at the first ever IDCBDC

successful turnout of the first ever IDCBDC. Cupertino’s IDC Commissioners, senior Mennen Kassa, 12, and junior Ashley Park, 11, gathered with the other schools to sort out the details and have been working for weeks planning the event. With the performance date having been changed multiple times due to various reasons, some were beginning to fear that the event may never actually take place. However, with positive attitudes, both Kassa and Park continued to push for the event to take place. Crews were selected based on a competitive audition process in which each crew demonstrated their choreography and were judged based on overall preparedness and enthusiasm. In the end, popular hip hop crew, GTFO, and newly formed all female crew, XI So Fly, were selected to represent Cupertino at the IDCBDC. Other schools, however, did not have as many competing teams as Cupertino did, thus leading to some additional conflicts. Though enduring another minor conflict, Kassa reassures the event will have the turnout it is hoping for. Said Kassa, “IDC has been able to work everything out and we are very excited for this upcoming event.” With the dance scene on the rise, participating schools thought it would be appropriate and fun to hold a showcase that would allow students to show off the their individual styles and ultimately reign supreme while holding the Best Dance Crew title. Said Kassa, “IDC was eager to plan an event that would give the chance for students in the district to bond and show off their talents. We noticed how popular the dance scene has become throughout the district and decided that a dance competition would be the perfect way to promote district unity.” On Friday afternoon, students from all participating schools filed into the Lynbrook gym and watched eagerly as each school performed their best. Though supportive of each competing crew, the crowd screamed passionately after their representing crews performed. Though Kassa and Park originally planned for qualified judges who are already familiar with the dance scene, qualified judges were unable to be recruited before the show took place. In the end, the audience took the role of the judges. Each group showcased a variety of creative and intricate routines, including a martial arts inspired dance, some instances of jazz and lyrical, and various popping and breaking moves. Even though IDCBDC was a dance show, each school perfected a dance number that was tailored to their own individual styles and personalities that really became a sight to see. After six talented and varying performances, it was time to finally announce the winner and holder of the IDCBDC title. The audience was able to vote for their favorite crew and the crew with the most votes would take home the title. Ultimately, it was Lynbrook who took away this year’s title. With a successful turnout for the first ever IDCBDC, it is likely this event will return in the upcoming school year as an even better dance spectacle.


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

Letter to the editor Editor, The recent staff editorial (“Affirmative Action: Out-dated and Out-weighted) in the May 6th edition of The Prospector, though well-written, and thoughtful, failed to address some key issues concerning affirmative action policies. First and foremost, the editorial fails to mention the 1996 California proposition (Proposition 209) that banned racial, gender, and ethnic preferences for the University of California and the Cal-State systems. The majority of Cupertino High School students entering four-year universities, attend either a UC or Cal-State school, so the “factors of admission that are simply out of our control” is a non-factor for most CHS students. In addition to the omission of Proposition 209, the article does not cite key data about family income in the United States. The thesis of the article is that because racial discrimination is no longer the issue it once was, affirmative action programs should shift focus to income, and not race. A simple look at the last US Census reveals the following yearly median family incomes broken down by race: Asian Americans $73, 578, White $65,000, Hispanic $40, 466, and African-Americans $39,879. In sum, if UC or Cal-State were to address income, rather than race, we would still be targeting the same group of underrepresented students. The final missing piece is the assumption that every California high school student competes at the same level. The Fremont Union High School District community is an amazing place to work (I have worked in the district for 14 years and would not want to work anywhere else), and go to school (I am a 1992 Fremont High School graduate); however, it is easy to forget about the inherent advantages we have at our disposal. Not all California students have access to numerous AP courses, award winning performing arts programs, amazing teachers, supportive parents, comprehensive sports programs, or the financial means for SAT prep courses. To go back to your original argument, access to these things are “factors of admission that are out of our control”. If I attend a high school without these luxuries, how in the world can a UC admission officer look at me in the same light, as say a student who attends Cupertino, Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, or Homestead High Schools? (To be honest, the college admissions process has always been a mystery to me. Every day I am surrounded by 1,800 amazing students, and think they should be able to attend any college of their choice! ) In sum, affirmative action programs are but one tool to help underrepresented students attend select universities. Is it the only tool? Not by any stretch of the imagination — I am not naïve enough to think just one tool can close the achievement gap. Any attempt to close the achievement gap is one that would require a great deal more than affirmative action. Andy Walczak Assistant Principal

Want to advertise with the Prospector? email prospector.chs@gmail.com

3

Quad and cafeteria redesign: (cont. pg. 1)

ally a part of the project since we were given the opportunity to voice our opinions.” After hearing from all types of people at the school, the architects feel the need to preserve several areas of CHS. Said architect Diane Rappold, “The quad is a well loved spot on campus that we will improve on and ‘celebrate’. We also recognize the significance of the Senior Lawn — which may be transformed in the new design, but the concept will remain.” Although CHS is only undergoing the first phase of the rebuilding process, many students and teachers are excited to see the project progress because they had the chance to voice their opinions.

Letter from the editor Dear Reader, You hold in your hands the last full issue of the Prospector for the 2010-2011 school year. As was the case in our last issue, junior editors worked hard to create and edit the content of these pages. In this issue, you will learn about having chickens as pets, find out how much to exercise to work of that chipotle burrito and become an expert in throwing Harry Potter themed parties. Finish strong as the year draws to a close. Summer is nearly here! Keep an eye out for senior issue, which comes out next week. Please recycle! Harini Jaganathan Editor-in-Chief


opinions

4

MAY 27, 2011

Mo’ money mo’ problems: Child investment woes FRED HAN sports assistant

T

oday’s opinionated article revolves around the issue of parents’ financial investment in children. Strictly speaking, an investment is spending money in order to gain profitable returns. There are two reasons why parents would spend money on behalf of their children. The first is from a biological perspective, in which parents invest money to ensure the survival of their offspring. The offspring will then breed, continuing the survival of those genes and the human race. The second is the less obvious: to ensure the prolonged survival of the parent. But that’s not the point. The key question is how much money should a parent invest in their children? Parents should provide only the bare minimal financial support for the child to live comfortably to prevent spoiling the child and to teach the child financial independence. Before any misunderstandings form, “bare minimal financial support” does not mean starving the child or forcing them to work in dirty coal mines. Instead, the child should be full fed, clothed and prepared to learn the art of survival: Cupertino’s art of survival is hunting for colleges and farming for GPA. Any luxury beyond the basic necessities and tools for enhanced education — which include, but is not limited to, overly luxurious eating style or incessant shopping trips — tends to spoil the child. Any form of spoiling will spoil the chances for the child to succeed and successfully reproduce or support the parent. Psychologically speaking, spoiling is a case of operant condition – a system of punishment and reward. For example, if a child learns to associate crying tantrums with getting whatever

he wants, then he will repeat the behavior. The parent needs to understand when to say “no” – or else it is like subprime lending. Continuation of inappropriate and excessive parental financial investment will soon lead to bursting the bubble of the inflated expectations and soon depression. Remember, parents in Cupertino should focus primarily about necessities for survival in life: working hard for happiness. The key step to help the child work hard for happiness is by preventing him or her from being spoiled. In other words, learning to say “no”. If a child truly wants to achieve or want something, then make him or her work for it — which leads to the next point: financial independence. Remember, the fastest route to corruption (spoiling in this case) is permission. Work is the fastest route to independence. If a child does not understand at least the core basics of money and economics, the chances are he or she will not understand how to deal with money later on in life. Then the children’s children — if the original children still survived by that point (a highly unlikely situation in Cupertino’s overly competitive environment) would not understand financial importance either. This results in continued financial dependence on the parents later in life — a counterproductive and non-profitable investment. The solution to this is to teach the children to work for what they want. Directing their desires and creative energies toward work for financial incentives will teach them the importance of money and give them a sense of dealing with different quantities of money. In conclusion, parents must learn to say no to any potential spoiling opportunities (although reward for hard work and excellent performance is mandatory) and spend only enough to guide the children’s creative energies. By freely giving money whenever a child demands so or not teaching them the importance of financial independence, those parents are setting themselves up for a potentially

spoiled child. Otherwise the “investment” of all the money and time put into improving the survival rate. However, do note that parents should never force a child into working so much that the child is greatly inclined to rebel. It is a delicate balance of the carrot and the whip.

EMILY CHENG

THE AGE OF INNOCENCE VS. MODERN-DAY TEENS

Anonymous questioning is unnecessary cowardice AMAR KANTIPUDI sports assistant EMILY CHENG news assistant

Ask me something, anything. Curious? It is an unsurprising feeling people get when they come across a chance to ask whatever they desire of their peers. When curiosity takes over, thoughts run free, and a new, undiscovered side of a person will be unleashed. This is even more evident when people hide behind a veil of anonymity because they ask anything and everything they can until they have satisfied their curiosity. It is these intentions, this sense of infallible curiosity and innate bigotry humans tend to demonstrate that often diminishes personal confidence. Just a simple question can induce the feeling of throwing out your entire life on the chopping block. The practice of attempting to fish out potential secrets without identification is a privileged feature provided to people by social networking sites. Services such as Tumblr and Formspring allow literally anyone to ask specific people questions — uncensored and unmonitored. It is through sites like these that the world has been introduced to concepts such as “trolling” and cyber bullying Anonymous questioning does comes with its fair share of reasons. After all, some people are just too afraid to ask something personal. It is almost always easier to talk to someone when away from the spotlight. That, by far, is the most appealing aspect of talking to friends online rather than in person or on the phone. Nonetheless unless a relationship is significantly strong, it is nearly impossible to separate sarcastic comments from serious ones. Furthermore, since people can say whatever they want online without having to admit who they are, they resort to a more crude language that can sometimes belittle the peer. Though, many still set up an anonymous question box expecting fun, light-hearted and interesting questions that can help them kill time, in the

long run, users run the risk of having their honesty tested, actions questioned, and image bashed, eventually damaging one’s self-esteem. If the user does not put a halt to anonymous questioning after they’ve already fallen victim to “anon bashing”, they suffer comment after comment of demeaning verbiage flooding their inbox. Soon, even strongly optimistic individuals will fall prey to the condescending harassment of their peers. It is all too common to see cheerful people turn into pessimists. Such an initially simple and harmless intention of exciting user life can morph into a lethal and emotionally degrading exchange of Q&A. Because of this, people may become very unhappy individuals who cannot control their own emotions properly, and oftentimes would end up lashing out at the resulting instability at others. These insecurities are then observed and questioned once again through that wretched anonymous button! Even if it is an attempt to poke fun into others’ lives, anonymous questioning can and most likely will lead to displeasing tension and shaky feelings. After all, once people put a mask on, they fail to take responsibility for their actions. To have a bright and confident spirit be torn down by anonymous comments is a excruciating sight. The few moments of entertainment gained on the asking end do not balance out the discomfort imposed on the receiving end. Online socializing does have its boundaries in this sense. Take a few precautions before entering a world full of anonymity, realize the consequences, and remember the saying that’s far too overheard but never entirely understood: curiosity killed the cat.

Why do you strut around campus like a know-it-all?

THE MASK OF ANONYMITY:

What students experience with online bashing “ I don’t have a formspring because I think it is another way for someone to bully you and bullying on formspring is inevitable.” Mahtab Danai, senior “I deleted my formspring because all that I got on there was stuff that I rather hear in person or didn’t want to hear at all. I didn’t want to give them an outlet when they deserved nothing from me.” Julia Seaton, sophomore “I have the curiosity of a reality check on whether people actually like me or not.” Varsha Prabhakar, sophomore

You think you’re cool? You’re just a poser.


THE PROSPECTOR

MAY 27, 2011

opinions

5

DEATH OF BIN LADEN Should the death of an enemy be celebrated?

Liberty for Free

Respect for Life

ALYA OMAR copy editor JACKIE BREUER in-depth assistant

SAMUEL LEE opinions assistant

On September 11, 2001, America watched in horror as a group of terrorists hijacked three planes, crashing them into the windows of the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and a field in Virginia. Family members watched as their loved ones’ lives were prematurely taken from them. Days later, leader of Al Qaeda Osama bin Laden vanished after taking responsibility for orchestrating the attacks, leaving behind an uncertain, tormented future. From that day, it has been one of the top priorities of the U.S. government to take down the man who instructed such heartbreak for thousands of its citizens. As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 loomed overhead, when President Barack Obama announced to the nation that an attack on bin Laden’s compound was successful, the spectrum of emotion was of massive contrast. While some recognized the magnitude that bin Laden’s death held as a weight lifted off of their grieving shoulders, others rebuked the celebrations, finding it inappropriate to disrespect the dead. However, it is not another person’s right to judge another person’s happiness and the expression of said emotion. People are affected differently by major events and define closure in a different way. 3,000 families continued with their lives forever changed, and though their losses were met with sympathy and pledges of remembrance, it was never combatted with justice because the man who orchestrated the events continued to lead his life, while their lost ones could not. From the perspective of the somewhat naive, bin Laden’s death signifies nothing but the end of a human life. To others, it was a monumental moment of closure, an assurance that the man that executed the execution was not pardoned for what he had done. This is not to say that the only proper reaction to bin Laden’s death is to galavant through the streets, chanting “U.S.A.” The death of bin Laden is simply a headline to some, while for others it is a sign of redemption for the lost loved ones. It is not in anyone’s capabilities to stand back and determine the value of such an event for someone else. Whether you feel compelled to run through the streets singing the national anthem or to simply hold a moment of silence, it is imperative to realize that the next best action is to move on and keep those that lost their lives on September 11 and during the war on terrorism in our hearts forever.

A DIVIDED

The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them.” -- Lois McMaster Bujold

AMERICA

I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” — Martin Luther King Jr.

Osama died, Americans cried… in happiness. Yes, you read that right! “Life, liberty and justice for all” except for certain Arab terrorists — they just get two out of the three. As soon as news of the al-Qaeda leader’s death reached the American public, thousands of Americans flooded Times Square and the White House to pop bottles of champagne, sing, chant “U-SA” and smile for the camera. Times like this throw doubts on whether Americans truly value the life of another human being. There should be no celebration for the death of Osama bin Laden. Admittedly, bin Laden’s is crucial to American security. The nation ought to thank President Bush for collecting the necessary intelligence throughout his presidency. It should also thank President Obama for capturing the terrorist when given the opportunity, unlike President Clinton; his stained presidency includes an incident in which he refused the Sudanese government’s offer to arrest and extradite bin Laden. Though the operation may have been necessary, bin Laden’s death is nothing to celebrate. Unless malice and vengeance form the bedrock of American principles (as opposed to, say, basic respect for human life), there is no justifiable reason for celebration: Terror attacks will not stop just because bin Laden descended to Hell. Just a few weeks after his death, suicide bombers murdered 51 Pakistanis in retaliation. Even worse, his death does not mean an end to outrageously invasive TSA procedures. Three year old boy: Wait, I thought bad terror man was gone! TSA “agent”: Quiet, I’m fondling your genitals. Americans running to the White House to celebrate bin Laden’s death with flags and drunkenness exhibited the same kind of euphoria that certain groups of Afghans displayed on 9/11. Chanting “U.S.A” just makes the entire circus more obscene. We must not lower our moral standards to those of the terrorists. Had people stayed home in quiet introspection and prayer, then that would have demonstrated true American exceptionalism. People are fully justified in feeling relief over the destruction of a mass murderer. But a sense of joy does not belong to a nation that considers itself a representative of everything that is good with the world.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Future homecoming court should be open to all classes, not just seniors Last month, we reported on ASB Executive Council’s new Homecoming Court nomination process for the 2011-2012 school year. This process involves several steps: nominating only senior candidates, having the top 20 male and top 20 female candidates complete a questionnaire about their school involvement, selecting the top 10 male and top 10 female candidates based on that questionnaire and having students from all classes choose their top six males or female Court candidates in an open vote. According to ASB, the new system is meant to ensure that the Homecoming Court accurately portrays our school’s values. However, there is considerable opposition to this policy across class lines. We completely agree with the new system’s purpose; screening candidates through a questionnaire on school involvement will be an effective way to ensure that only qualified, upstanding students make it on the Court. However, we believe that restricting the Court to only seniors goes against our school’s traditions and spirit of class unity. Homecoming has always been an event where the entire

school comes together for the sake of school pride and spirit. Students from freshmen to seniors flock to Homecoming because of the memories it creates and the kindred bonds they are able to forge with their friends. The event gives students a chance to garner happy memories and strengthen friendships with their peers — usually those in the same class. When there is not a freshman face to be found in the Homecoming Court, how delightful, inclusive or memorable will attending freshmen think Homecoming is? Supporters try to justify this massive exclusion of students by saying that all students will have the opportunity to be nominated to the court once they go through four years of high school. This assertion completely ignores the motivational and inspirational value the court can provide. If court members are meant to be shining examples of perfect Pioneers, these examples should be relatable and plentiful. Having a court from all classes will allow students who are not seniors to recognize that even one, two or three years at our school can make a difference. Having all classes represented on the Homecoming Court

will also maintain our school’s sense of community and unity. Homecoming is not meant to be an exclusive affair; with each class having an equal chance to compete in areas like skits and posters, it gives a level playing field for all classes to shine. If we deny freshmen, sophomores and juniors opportunities that seniors have in what is supposed to be a schoolwide event, they will feel excluded — which is exactly the opposite of what Homecoming is all about. In an April Prospector poll, 66% of students polled, including seniors, opposed the new seniors-only Homecoming Court nomination process. If anything, ASB Executive Council should listen to this supermajority of its constituency and work to revise this process instead of single-handedly implementing it. Homecoming is for all CHS students, and every part of Homecoming, the Court included, should be open to students regardless of class. We believe that unity and inclusiveness are core Pioneer values. It only makes sense that the Pioneers’ Homecoming Court embodies them.


features

MAY 27, 2011

6

TINO’S ANIMAL KI GDO CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE ASIAN SOUL

Sophomore’s feathery pals help in many ways SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN photo editor

She has chicken soup for the pet lover’s soul — and no, not the book. The fact is, sophomore Julie Chen’s pets are chickens and she has consumed them in soup form before. While Chen does love her fuzzy, egg-laying creatures, she shares an, lets just say, atypical bond with them. Through this bond though, she has learned a great deal about the nature of animals and the responsibility that comes along with caring for them. A year ago, at Chen’s request, her family drove two hours to a farm and picked up a handful of “female” (four out of the eight grew up to be male) chicks. They built a coop and everyday, fed them vegetables, checked their feed and refilled their water. With time “scooping up morning presents” was added to the to-do list; one egg per chicken a day, hard-boiled in the morning is not a bad deal at all. California state law, though, prohibits housing roosters in residential areas (a blessing for those who like to sleep in) so Chen’s family needed a way to dispose of their four not-so-female chickens. “We ate them. We are Asians so of course we know how to kill chickens,” said Chen, “It’s really just a quick throat cut.” This may sound brutal and Chen herself initially had much trouble with this idea. That being said, she eventually came to peace with eating her chickens under the circumstances. First of all, Chen was never excessively attached to her chickens as others may be with their more conventional pets.

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Chrome, Chicovo, Phoenix, Chocolate and Turtle — but they grow up really fast. I went on a cruise for a week and they all changed colors so I couldn’t tell who was who anymore,” said Chen, “It’s not like killing a pet dog or anything.” She is comfortable with it from a moral standpoint as well. “The whole reason we have this garden is because my mom read this book called Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. It talks about this writer who starts a farm and raises her own animals. Her philosophy is that if one raises them naturally, it’s ethical to eat them. I feel better about eating these chickens rather than eating commercially grown ones, fattened

We are Asians, so of course we know how to kill chickens.

up in two months,” added Chen. Aside from, when occasion calls, eating them, Julie also spends a great deal of time babysitting her chickens. She has made some quite interesting observations. “Chickens are very vicious actu sometimes,” Chen said, “They actually have a pecking order. Sometimes I’ll feed them dandelion leaves and certain chickens are not allowed chick to come and eat. The little chickens were initially at the bottom of the order and the red chicken was at the very bottom but once so she started laying, she gained social status. Now the once oldest, bot meanest black chicken is at the bottom because she stopped laying.” Overall, while owning chickens has taught Julie ad a thing or two, she admits that it is not for everyone. “It’s kind of a hassle. Whether you should own one or not depends on where you live, how your backyard com is, and how committed you are to waking up at 6 am morn in the morning to angry c h i c k e n s ,” Chen warns, “If that doesn’t concern you, then two bucks a chick at Gilroy. Good luck!”

OWNING A PET CAN HELP WITH STRES KEVIN CHU news editor

While most people think of massage, meditation and yoga as natural, healthy stress relievers, there is another option that is fluffier and more loveable: getting a pet. Not only do pets help relieve stress, but they can also improve one’s mood, control one’s blood pressure, reduce loneliness and provide social support— all of which are important for health and well-being, and for avoiding stress and depression. Animals are relatively consistent in their behaviors — such as locations and times of eating, sleeping, and cuddling — which provide a stable, predictable and thus less stressful aspect in the owner’s life. Their unconditional love is also extremely comforting — pets greet their owners with excitement when they come home, they can usually tell when their owners are upset, and many pets will cuddle up next to their owners, providing soothing contact. A 2002 study by re-

searchers at the State University of New York showed that when performing a stressful ta felt less stressful in the presence of pets th presence of a spouse or close friend. Pet ow had significantly lower baseline heart rates a pressure than the participants who did not o Caring for a pet often results in a sense o tion and fulfillment. In addition, owning pet the likelihood of going outside and interac others, providing opportunities for mood-r cialization. “I spend up to an hour each day taking for walks,” said sophomore Abishek Kumar. A 1999 study found that male AIDS pat less likely to suffer from depression if they ow “Pet ownership among men who have A vides a certain level of companionship that h them cope better with the stresses of th lives,” said psychologist Judith Siegel, a UC professor of public health and lead aut of the report. “This is one more study demonstrates the health benefits that ing a pet can provide.” In addition, pets help decrea pressure, heart rate and muscl

SHE IS HER DOGS’ BEST FRIEND Junior goes home to take care of pets during lunch JAMIN SHIH features assistant

When the bell rings at 12:25 p.m. every day, students leave their classrooms, obligations and quite often campus to enjoy 40 minutes of leisure. One student, however, exits campus not to leave her responsibilities behind but to take on another set. While her classmates spend lunchtimes with their friends, junior Ashley Kan visits and takes care of her three pet dogs, a chore she says teaches her both responsibility and time management skills that will aid her throughout her life. Kan feeds her three dogs, two Chihuahuas named Missy and Teddy and a Pomeranian named Charlie, every day during lunch because no one else is available to do so at that time. This causes her to miss out on the social banter that occurs during lunchtime, and she admits that she sacrifices spending time with her friends because of her pets. Regardless, she is sure that her dogs are completely worth the sacrifice. “I’m really close to my dogs. They’re really my best friends sometimes, because they’re always there for me,” Kan said. Indeed, just as Kan gives to her dogs, they give equally back to her. The sacrifice does not seem nearly as significant when her

WHAT KIND OF PET DO YOU HAVE?

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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

features

7

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both in reaction to stressful events over a period of time. Owning a pet requires daily walks and other opportunities for exercise (another proven stress reliever) are also increased. Recovering addicts who struggle with high levels of stress should research different pets to determine which types, breeds, personalities and ages seem like a good match for you. For instance, if having to potty train a puppy sounds stressful, look into getting a dog that’s already trained is an appropriate option. For people who are often away from home, a more selfsufficient animal like a cat might be a better choice. There is nothing quite like hav hav- ing a warm ball of fur curl up next to you or an excitedly thumping tail greeting you — and it’s even more satisfying to know that these furry friends are helping to improve our lives.

“My dream pet would be “F” the White Winged Horse. It’s name is F so that when it takes my last name, Lai, its full name will be F Lai. And then I can tell it: ‘F Lai, fly!’ And then I’ll go around raiding towns on my mount.” -Alan Lai, senior “Well, I kind of just want a ferret. Not really creative or anything... I just like them!” -Andrew Qu, junior “My dream pet is a rainbow-horned unicorn that can fly and take me places, but that can also understand what I’m saying and be cuddly.” -Jeong Eun Lee, freshman “I like white tigers because they look more unique than other types of tigers.” -Brian Nguyen, senior

COMPILED BY TESS WU

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N O N E

12%

57% 170 PEOPLE POLLED COMPILED BY FRED HAN

Passing of pets leaves student stronger

ANAND HEMMADY features assistant

Disclaimer: The Prospector strongly encourages owners to spay or neuter pets, and acknowledges that some of the behavior exhibited by the owners of the cats in the following article is irresponsible. The Prospector also would like to warn readers that some elements of the following article may be exaggerated. Everything must end. This is a rule of the universe. Unfortunately, relationships with pets are not exempt from this rule. No matter how well an owner takes care of a pet, it will eventually pass away, and the owner will have to move on without it. The unavoidable pain from having a pet die often turns many away from keeping pets, and often raises questions as to whether having pets is worth the pain. In the end, though, the benefits of having pets far outweigh the negatives. Sophomore Brent Knaack knows the pain of losing pets all too well. Having once had thirty cats, Knaack could only watch helplessly as cat after cat died, leaving him with only five. “Our family of cats started when my dad was looking through boxes in our backyard and he found three kittens in a box,” Knaack said. “They were born literally just an hour before we found them. We took care of them because their mom never did. They grew up, and then they had kittens. Eventually we had around thirty cats, all living in our backyard in makeshift shelters.” Later, though, Knaack’s beloved pets started dying. “There was one cat in particular with whom I had a close relationship,” said Knaack as he recounted the death of his favorite cat. “I called him Tiny, because he had growth problems, and he never grew any bigger than my hand. This led to internal organ failure, and he passed away. I respected him because even in his last few hours of pain, he was determined to stay alive, and he survived through a lot of pain and suffering. I rarely cry, but when Tiny died, I couldn’t stop crying for two hours.” U

O T H E R

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nothing. During her daily fifteen minute visits to her dogs, she does feed them. The time she spends with her dogs is rewarding and her er an unconditional love that mirrors her own. t always there. They’re always playful, they always make me happy… n a good mood,” said Kan. g care of her dogs does cost her some of her free time, the experience he responsibility and time management skills she earns for the future es up for it. Kan stresses that it is completely different from normal ent duties to care for another living being and that owning three dogs wed her to experience both responsibility and the joy of bringing hapss to someone or something else. These lessons can also be applied e world outside of high school and pets; Kan finds applications well beyond homework assignments or tests. “For the future, if you ever have kids, you’re going to have to take care of something. You’re going to have to take care of cleaning up after them. It’s just a huge responsibility,” said Kan. While many students have only one set of respon responsibilities to worry about at school, Kan’s pet duties begin where her school ones end. Despite seeming like a large hassle, however, her dogs bring her the kind of joy and teach her the kind of lessons that only COUR TESY OF AS HLEY pets can. KAN

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After Tiny’s death, Knaack witnessed the death of around 25 other cats. Knaack let his cats roam freely around the neighborhood, which annoyed the neighbors. The neighbors began leaving poisoned food out on their doorsteps. Knaack was forced to witness cat after cat dying from the food poisoning. He could do nothing to stop the death toll of cats from rising. In the end, only five cats remained. Despite all the grief that the deaths of his cats caused him, though, Knaack does not regret anything and is happy that he had the chance to know his cats. “One of the best times of my life was when I was playing around with the three original kittens,” Knaack said. “It was really cute when we let them into the house and watched them crawl around, pull out wires, and stumble and fall. In spite of all the pain I think it was worth it to have pets and I don’t regret it.” Clearly, the loss that pets bring will be painful. However, it would be foolish to refuse to entertain the thought of having pets simply because of the pain. After all, in life, happiness can only come with suffering. To discard things only because they will hurt us would ruin life entirely. Although pets die and losing them hurts, the overall relationship with pets brings more happi happiness than sorrow.


lifestyles

MAY 27, 2011

8

THE BOY WHO LIVES ON... THE LEGACY OF HARRY POTTER

NIKHIL KANTHI features assistant

T

here are moments in our lives when the harshness of reality casts a shadow over our happiness, causing it to be short-lived. On July 15th, when Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 comes out, I will have to struggle between pangs of excitement and sorrow as I watch a part of my life end. When I pored over the books time and time again in my younger days, I wondered what attracted me to the adventures of a boy wizard. What set this story apart from the other books I had devoured in my youth? I often put this question on hold as I turned the last page in the last book and started anew with the first book. I spent days walking the corridors and grounds of Hogwarts. However, as the pages became more and more familiar, I realized that there would soon be a day when I would be bored by the tale that once meant the world to me. That day, I took the books out of my room and anticipated a day when I would open the books and be amazed once more. A few days ago, I turned the first page of the first book. The parchment-like scent of

the pages with which I was so familiar brought with them a painful comprehension. In less than two months, the journey would be over. I think I can answer my question today. I did not love Harry Potter because it was a friend or mentor. The reason I love these books is because I could see myself as Harry. Rowling erased the line between the reader and Harry somewhere in those pages. Readers empathized with Harry when he was in danger or depressed, and that empathy carried over to the moments when Harry was triumphant. We were united by the naive hope that things will get better. When the circumstances were not as happy and bright as they could have been, I knew that my time would come. Harry Potter taught me that victory was not impossible, and I think we all yearn for that certainty. It taught me the power of hope. I wish for a day when the corridors of Hogwarts will be as alien to me as they were to Harry on his first night there, and I wish that I could feel the loss of Sirius or Dumbledore without expecting it. I doubt that day will come before July 15th, but that’s fine. I think I will do just fine without reading the story I have read seventy times before as I wait outside the midnight premiere. Good job, my friend. Mischief managed.

POTTER PREMIERE PARTY

1. Buy midnight premiere tickets in advance, optimally three to four weeks before the movie.

Want to make your HP premiere night truly magical? Here are a few suggestions that will make your night less Dudley and a tad more Diggory.

2. First, decide on a menu for your party. For terrific Potter recipes, visit http://www.mugglenet.com/misc/rosmertas/index.shtml. Remember that Butterbeer and Golden Snitch cupcakes are absolute necessities! 3. Decorate! After you settle on a venue, plaster the walls with Harry Potter-themed posters. Make sure to include the official movie poster! 4. Costumes are mandatory — they should consist of robes, traditional Hogwarts uniforms, wands and scarves. Assign each guest a specific character in his or her customized Hogwarts-style invitation. 5. Finally, plan some activities! Some suggestions: i. Test your knowledge of the series with some trivia and use Bertie Botts’ Every Flavor Beans as the prize (or punishment!) ii. Reenact your favorite scenes from the series, and be creative. iii. Host a Dueling Club. iv. Watch Deathly Hallows, Part I in preparation for the finale! MADHURI SATHISH

Lady Gaga’s Born This Way contains darker and more serious overtones JESSE ZHOU features editor

The Mother Monster has done it again. Lady Gaga, the artist who has so far defined the voice of a new generation, has been inching toward far more radical themes in her music (believe it or not) with her new album Born This Way. While the widely acclaimed The Fame introduced Gaga as the queen of “Just Dance”, Born This Way instead puts her in the spotlight as a woman with the most independent spirit in the music industry. Many of Gaga’s songs indeed revolve around being proud and self-sufficient. “Hair” and “Bad Kids” promote the idea that being fiercely independent is essential to having true freedom. In addition, her songs call on people to respect those who choose to be independent. For example, one line from “Hair” states, “I just wanna be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.” Her words give the listener a window into a troubled soul who wants nothing more than for others to be accepted in today’s cruel society. The overall tone of Born This Way is darker and more disorderly than The Fame as well. However, Gaga uses this style in a unique way, and trust me, she uses it well. By utilizing the power

of static-shock beats, Gaga’s songs are a rather elegant synthesis of symphony and cacophony: a paradox pleasing to the ear. The fractured mix of piano, electro synthesizers, electric guitar and abnormal beats ends up finding its way into songs like “Judas” and “Marry the Night.” The atmosphere Gaga has created in Born This Way is terrifying and euphoric at the same time. By using theme and tone to their full potential, Lady Gaga’s new album, Born This Way, is bound to be one of the greatest albums of the decade. From songs about true love (“You and I”) to being who you are (“Born This Way”), the Mother Monster covers a full range of topics that will leave the listener surprised. By the time the last song finishes, something will be blown. It will either be your mind or your CD player from abusing the replay button too much.

TOP 3 SINGLES 1. Born This Way 2. The Edge of Glory 3. Judas COMPILED BY NATASHA SHARMA COURTESY OF SpreePiX-Berlin


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

lifestyles

9

The beauty OFTHRIFTING

Looking for something trendy without breaking the bank? Thrift stores sell classic pieces at surprinsgly low prices. You don’t have to buy couture to be chic.

VICTORIA DUAN copy-editor

The outrageous prices offered at too many stores in the mall make it hard for frugal shoppers to pick out affordable items that complement them. Never mind purchasing an outfit, or a nice set of furniture — a single shirt will devastate one’s wallet. But sophomore Brittney Lundquist and junior Noa Rosenberg, both experienced in the ways of thrifting, know better than to blow their entire savings on just one item. Thrift stores are shops owned and run by charities or nonprofit organizations as fundraisers for their cause. Unlike conventional stores, thrift stores carry a multitude of different products. Each new shipment is always full of surprises, and the prices of the products are relatively low. “I have found a lot of name brands like Abercrombie, the North Face, J. Crew and Banana Republic [while thrifting]. It’s a nice feeling to say that you can own name brand clothing and only have to pay a fraction of the original price,” Lundquist said. Although the quality of the donations are often questionable, Lundquist has found that the overall value of a thrift store’s merchandise can be roughly predicted by the city the store is located in.

“I have found that the ‘richer’ cities have the fancier, nicer, name brand clothing options — for example, San Francisco, Santa Cruz and Los Angeles,” Lundquist said. However, nearby thrift stores, including Goodwill, Salvation Army and Savers can all be thoroughly scavenged for good deals and quality items. Contrary to Lundquist, Rosenberg approaches thrifting with a slightly different tactic. While Lundquist is more oriented towards browsing for clothes, Rosenberg thrifts with an open mind and warmly welcomes all possibilities that might come her way. “I may go shopping with the intent to find a new sweater and then I’ll leave the store with a new shelf for my room. The challenge of thrifting is not to find something that is the perfect fit, but finding things that have the potential to be cinched, hemmed, draped in a room or framed on a wall. When I do find something I like, it’s like finding a gem; that’s the beauty of thrifting!” Rosenberg said. With thrifting comes not only the thrill of hunting for the perfect item, but also the satisfaction of paying sensible prices for a purchase. Forget the unreasonable prices at the mall — go look for the cheaper counterpart at Goodwill.


sports

Have a healthy summer

Which is worse – resisting the urge to eat or mustering the willpower to exercise? Most people are reluctant to do either, as byproducts of animal evolution makes us inclined to eat as much as possible and save every last ounce of fat in case of famine. That’s right, those deliciously

dreadful, guilty calories that lurk in your In-NOut Cheeseburger with Onions are here to stay unless burned off by the exercise that we so despise. Here are some popular food items along with matching activities needed to part with those beloved calories.

VERDE

IN N’ OUT PEARL

CHEESE BURGER WITH ONIONS

306

480

Shop for one hour 14 minutes

MILK TEA (BUBBLE TEA)

Calories:

Calories alories:

Exercise:

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MAY 27, 2011

Exercise:

Garden for one hour and three minutes

CHIPOTLE

WING STOP

BARBACOA BURRITO

FRENCH FRIES

Calories:

Calories:

200

800

Exercise:

Exercise:

Run at nine mph for 11.5 minutes

Dance for three hours

Boosts that actually give you a boost NATALIE HOANG lifestyles assistant

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fter ordering a cold smoothie to quench the thirst of a hot summer’s day, the Jamba Juice cashier asks you, “Would you like a boost with that?”. You will proceed to ask what types they offer and are met with a list of seemingly health nourishing choices. The options tackle different aspects of the body, from the Charger and Antioxidant boosts to the Immunity and Energy boosts. Sure, it sounds convincing, but what is it exactly that you are putting into your body? Do the benefits live up to the name? Let us break it down. A boost is a dietary supplement intended to add the vitamins, minerals, fiber, or amino acids a person may lack in his or her daily consumption. In a scroll through the Jamba Juice Booster nutritional facts, noted is the abundance of Maltodextrin and Inulin in the energy and vitamin boosts. Substitutes for sugar, Maltodextrin and Inulin give a sweet taste and the energy provided by sugar without the calories and fat. This makes the 3G Charger, Antioxidant Power, Daily Vitamin, Immunity and Energy Boosts all great options for those in need of a pick-me-up without the extra carbohydrates and sugar to bog them down. The last three boosters are crafted to regulate the body’s systems to maintain healthy levels. Flax & Fiber, a promising Boost, is made of Flaxseed. It is known for reducing blood sugar levels, bad cholesterol, triglycerides, and being the great source of fiber it is, constipation. As for the Whey Protein and Soybean Boosts, their benefit is in the name: protein. Protein’s importance lies in it’s ability to repair body cells, build and repair muscles and bones, and control metabolism. These boosts are promising in their nature, so why not add them into your smoothie? Though it is unlikely one would purchase a smoothie with a boost everyday, or enough to feel the benefits, their intentions are there. A simple overthe-counter supplemental pill directed to take once a day is perhaps the better solution for those concerned about their health. But if mixing in a boost takes the guilt off of your 300-calorie smoothie, go for it!

AZADEH RONGERE

3G Charger™ Boost Antioxidant Power™ Boost Daily Vitamin™ Boost Energy™ Boost Flax & Fiber Boost Immunity™ Boost Soy Protein™ Boost Whey Protein™ Boost

PHOTOS BY: AZADEH RONGERE COMPILED BY: ERIC JANG

get

1 TONED

for summer COMPILED BY: NIKHIL KANTHI

LEG RISES

Lie on your back with your hands holding onto something heavy (like a bookshelf side), and raise your legs without bending your knees. 20 minutes (counting breaks) of these and a four-pack will be a breeze.

2 3

COMPILED BY: AZADEH RONGERE

SHUFFLE PUSH-UPS Do pushups while moving side to side. Nothing strains your biceps, triceps, deltoids, and laterals like some serious pushup shuffling. Aim for three or four sets of 20 reps to get some toned arms.

RUNNING Put on a pair of shorts, plug in your favorite song on your MP3, and speed off on a strenuous but quick workout. Aim for anything under nine minutes (as long as you have warmed up), and you will have burned off a six-inch from Subway.

PHOTOS BY: SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

Badminton Team Dilemma: Winning does not always reap the rewards ERIC JANG sports assistant

There is no doubt that winning feels good — addicting even, if victories come frequently. However, even a winning streak has its disadvantages when the victories become too easy. The badminton team has dominated its matches in a less-competitive league but it has done so at the expense of the valuable lessons gained by losing matches. Players compete against members of the other team in singles or doubles matches, ranked by skill level. The entire game is won by a majority of match wins from the team members. Players who train in competitive badminton clubs outside of school, such as Bintang, are often on

par with other club players from upper league schools. Since the school team is composed of both club badminton players and players who only train at school practices, the latter players are presented with formidable challenges when they have to play in higher leagues against more experienced players. Conversely, higher league players do not have enough of a challenge when they have to play in the lower league and so neither league is apt for both types of players. As a result, the Varsity and Junior Varsity teams have lost most of their games in higherdivision leagues for the last two years. However, because they have been bumped down to a lower league this year, the badminton team has remained undefeated the entire season. Although practice alone contributes to the

success of team members during matches, ingame experience is also vital to the growth of the player. Team members do not improve as much when all of their matches are won easily and their mistakes go unnoticed. When the Central Coast Section (CCS) championships roll around, players that have become accustomed to their successes may find themselves unprepared to face opponents of higher skill level. “I’m scared that they all think they’re good enough at the level they are at now and have no desire to concentrate during practice,” said varsity player Peggy Chiang about her teammates. Chiang learns which footwork needs practice and which shots she can improve on from losing against tougher players. Playing against difficult opponents in

the higher league not only reveals areas for self-improvement, but also builds appreciation for the competitive aspect of the sport. According to varsity player Lawrence Luk, failures are vital to good sportsmanship. Modesty is difficult to come by for those who seldom experience defeat. “Losing teaches me humility, because I can’t expect to walk all over my opponents all the time,” Luk said. Despite the fact that the badminton team has enjoyed a winning streak this year, some players believe that excessive victories have slowed athletic growth. Luk and Chiang believe that losing to higher-league contenders is a necessary step in improving and taking the team to the next level.


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sports sports

THE PROSPECTOR THE PROSPECTOR

MAY27, 27,2011 2011 MAY

Synchronized swimmer Ekaterina Frelikh pursues future Olympic dream AZADEH RONGERE sports editor

Above the surface, two artistic synchronized swimmers jump through the air in perfect harmony. The chemistry between the teammates allows their routines to be of sheer perfection. Their magical performance, a blend of gymnastics and dancing, requires flawless consistency. Below the surface is junior Ekaterina Frelikh an aspiring synchronized swimmer. Frelikh was born in Russia where she began her successful career as a synchronized swimmer at age nine. Before she became talented performer, Frelikh explored speed swimming, a quick but she quickly realized this sport bored her. She then turned to synchronized swimming deciding that it would provide her with more excitement. “I saw girls doing little leg things and I thought it was very cool and pretty, so I joined,” Frelikh said. When she joined a popular Russian team, she received a proper foundation for her synchronized swimming future through training. Ho w e v e r, when she emigrated from Russia four years ago, it seemed as if lon her aspirations could no longer become a reality. Once she moved to America, Frelikh lacked a synchronized swimming team so she reluctantly returned to speed swimming. After a year of break,

she was introduced to one of the best synchronizing swimming team in America in Santa Clara. After a successful try out, she joined the team. Despite a new addition, her team supported and welcomed Ferlikh and they built friendships only teammates could share. Although their occasional bonding activities do bring them closer, their natural chemistry already supports their undeniable bond. “We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable,” Frelikh said. However, to pursue her dream Frelikh had to compromise

We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable.

her academic schedule. Since her practices last from 4:00 to 8:30 p.m. every day, she found it hard to fit AP classes into her schedule. Even after these strenuous weekday practices she is unable to sleep in on weekends since she has practices from 7:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. Furthermore, during the summer, she practices ten hours each and every day. “I just have to make it work. I mean, I have to wake up early and sleep really late to balance out my workload with synchronized swimming,” Frelikh said. In addition, during the first semester of each school year, she and her team ruthlessly train and tirelessly practice. Throughout second semester there are multiple national and international

2010 West Side Junior Exibition

meets for which Frelikh must miss school in order to attend. Since she constantly takes “vacation” days, she treats tutorials and lunches like gold because she has to constantly make-up tests, in-class essays, class work and participation points. Nevertheless, she conveys that these tedious make-up sessions are a small price to pay to visit and compete in New York, Ohio, Texas, Florida and North Carolina. Despite her busy schedule, Frelikh still has to find time to design and make her own outfits. Although a tailor provides her with a handmade outfit, Frelikh has to manually decorate it with rhinestones, sparkles, beads and other embellishments. Despite the fact that synchronized swimming has its academic and time disadvantages, Frelikh’s future in swimming is more valuable, as she will soon conquer her next meet in Sw itzerland.

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Partying Partying YEAH! Partying Partying YEAH! Fun. Fun. Fun. Fun.

The Prospector wishes you a happy summer. Please Recycle


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MAY 27, 2011

Health is Wealth Next time you are at the front of the line debating between the fresh fruit cup and the gooey chocolate chip cookie, choose wisely, for the outcomes of these battles are what add up to form a lifestyle. And what better time than now to start anew on the path to good health? Sounds simple enough, but what most of us fall short on is willpower. With one good look around campus, though, it is easy to get this dose of inspiration; students are constantly pursuing healthy activities as seen on this page. Juniors Zhijiang Li, Andrew Qu and Eric Lee (upper left) share a hug in the quad, while sophomores Brittany Rodriguez and Katelyn Howard (upper right) share a laugh during their laps around the pool. Junior Paolo Barrenechea (left) shoots hoops with a handful of other students who form teams and battle it out on the asphalt during lunchtime. In addition to mental and physical health, eating habits also constitute a big part of balanced living. Junior Bhavisha Shukla (bottom left) takes a refreshing gulp of H2O, while senior Vandita Manyam chows down on a handful of tangerine slices. Other healthy choices include grabbing a milk carton on your way out of the cafeteria or choosing to ride your bike to school. It really is as simple as that, so join your peers in pursuing a healthy lifestyle today.


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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

the Prospector 2010-2011 STAFF

Cupertino High School Established 1958 Vol LII., No. 5 | 2011

editor-in-chief harini jaganathan news editor kevin chu opinions editor abhishek zaveri features editor jesse zhou in-depth editors michelle cheung sunwoo jeong lifestyles editor natasha sharma sports editor azadeh rongere photo editors sindhu gnanasambandan copy editors alya omar victoria duan business manager jackie breuer

Lawson reflects on 35 years of teaching, changes over the years VIRENA GALOTRA lifestyles assistant

This year marks history teacher Jay Lawson’s 35th year as a teacher in this district. To commemorate the occasion his students made him cards and presented him with gifts. Lawson is one of the longest employed teachers on campus and, as a result, notices changes in diversity, teacher collaboration and technology at school over the years. Ever since he was a young boy, Lawson wanted to be a teacher. Both his parents were teachers in the district and his father was a prominent administrator as well. In fact, Sam H. Lawson Middle School is named in honor of his father. Lawson began his career as a history teacher at Monta Vista High School and simultaneously worked as a wrestling coach at Homestead High School at the same time. After only three years of teaching, he was laid off from his job as a history teacher in 1979. Lawson then became an intern to a special education teacher at Monta Vista High School while getting his credentials at night school. After he graduated, he became a full time special education teacher at Monta Vista High School. He then transferred to CHS in 1985 as both the head wrestling coach and a special education teacher. Fourteen years later in 1999, he took up his current position as a history teacher on campus, which is his favorite class to teach. “I really enjoy... sharing the stories of history and the older I get the easier it gets because I’ve lived through a lot of the things I’m teaching,” Lawson said. After 35 years of teaching, Lawson plans to continue teaching for another three years before retiring. “It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more

students,” he said. Over the years, Lawson has observed many changes pertaining to both the school and his job as a teacher. One of the major changes on campus is its diversification, a process that occurred gradually. He mentions that there is less of an emphasis on the trades and students have less interest in taking classes like auto shop, metal shop and cooking. In addition, a smaller percentage of students choose to pursue these types of careers. Lawson also notes

It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more students. Jay Lawson

History Teacher

that both teachers and students now use technology in the classroom on a regular basis. Computers have now become a daily teaching tool as well as a regular learning resource for students. Another positive change is how teaching has become a collaborative job. “We as teachers share our ideas and materials and to me that’s what makes it special. Being old timer, I have [some] things to offer [but] it’s also challenging to learn some of the new things,” Lawson said. However, the one thing he says that has stayed consistent is the enthusiasm of the students. “I love my time in the classroom with students. They make me feel young,” Lawson said.

SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

35 YEARS AND COUNTING| History teacher Jay Lawson contemplates the rapidly changing school and fulfilling years of teaching

IDC Best Dance Crew debuts choreographical talent news anand hemmady assistants regina hong nikhil kanthi opinions amar kantipudi assistants anthony kao gun ho lee features emily cheng assistants alyssa williams tess wu

JOANNA LEE sports assistant

Launching the first ever Intra-District Council Best Dance Crew (IDCBDC), crews from Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, and Cupertino showcased their best dance moves in front of a screaming crowd at the Lynbrook gym on Friday, May 13. Weeks of practicing and stress for all parties involved led up to a

lifestyles virena galotra assistants natalie hoang madhuri sathish in-depth jackie breuer assistants vani mulkareddy jamin shih sports fred han assistants joanna lee eric jang willie wang adviser ann peck editorial policy “The Prospector” is an open forum of expression for student editors to inform and educate their readers. It will not be reviewed by or restrained by school officials prior to publication or distribution. Advisors may and should coach and discuss content during the writing process. The staff of “The Prospector” seeks to recognize individuals, events, ideasand bring news to the Cupertino community in an accurate, professional and unbiased manner. “The Prospector” will not avoid publishing a story solely on the basis of possible dissent or controversy. If you believe an error has been made, or wish to have your opinion expressed in “The Prospector”please contact us via mail or e-mail. Letters sent become the sole property of “The Prospector” and can be edited for length, clarity, or accuracy. “The Prospector” editorial board reserves the right to accept or reject any ad in accordance with its advertising policy. Contact Us The Prospector 10100 Finch Avenue Cupertino, CA 95014 prospector.chs@gmail.com

JOANNA LEE

DANCE CREW SHOWCASE | Seniors Vi Viet, Benjamin Du, Sheng Poon, Willie Wang and Brian Walsh display their talents at the first ever IDCBDC

successful turnout of the first ever IDCBDC. Cupertino’s IDC Commissioners, senior Mennen Kassa, 12, and junior Ashley Park, 11, gathered with the other schools to sort out the details and have been working for weeks planning the event. With the performance date having been changed multiple times due to various reasons, some were beginning to fear that the event may never actually take place. However, with positive attitudes, both Kassa and Park continued to push for the event to take place. Crews were selected based on a competitive audition process in which each crew demonstrated their choreography and were judged based on overall preparedness and enthusiasm. In the end, popular hip hop crew, GTFO, and newly formed all female crew, XI So Fly, were selected to represent Cupertino at the IDCBDC. Other schools, however, did not have as many competing teams as Cupertino did, thus leading to some additional conflicts. Though enduring another minor conflict, Kassa reassures the event will have the turnout it is hoping for. Said Kassa, “IDC has been able to work everything out and we are very excited for this upcoming event.” With the dance scene on the rise, participating schools thought it would be appropriate and fun to hold a showcase that would allow students to show off the their individual styles and ultimately reign supreme while holding the Best Dance Crew title. Said Kassa, “IDC was eager to plan an event that would give the chance for students in the district to bond and show off their talents. We noticed how popular the dance scene has become throughout the district and decided that a dance competition would be the perfect way to promote district unity.” On Friday afternoon, students from all participating schools filed into the Lynbrook gym and watched eagerly as each school performed their best. Though supportive of each competing crew, the crowd screamed passionately after their representing crews performed. Though Kassa and Park originally planned for qualified judges who are already familiar with the dance scene, qualified judges were unable to be recruited before the show took place. In the end, the audience took the role of the judges. Each group showcased a variety of creative and intricate routines, including a martial arts inspired dance, some instances of jazz and lyrical, and various popping and breaking moves. Even though IDCBDC was a dance show, each school perfected a dance number that was tailored to their own individual styles and personalities that really became a sight to see. After six talented and varying performances, it was time to finally announce the winner and holder of the IDCBDC title. The audience was able to vote for their favorite crew and the crew with the most votes would take home the title. Ultimately, it was Lynbrook who took away this year’s title. With a successful turnout for the first ever IDCBDC, it is likely this event will return in the upcoming school year as an even better dance spectacle.


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

Letter to the editor Editor, The recent staff editorial (“Affirmative Action: Out-dated and Out-weighted) in the May 6th edition of The Prospector, though well-written, and thoughtful, failed to address some key issues concerning affirmative action policies. First and foremost, the editorial fails to mention the 1996 California proposition (Proposition 209) that banned racial, gender, and ethnic preferences for the University of California and the Cal-State systems. The majority of Cupertino High School students entering four-year universities, attend either a UC or Cal-State school, so the “factors of admission that are simply out of our control” is a non-factor for most CHS students. In addition to the omission of Proposition 209, the article does not cite key data about family income in the United States. The thesis of the article is that because racial discrimination is no longer the issue it once was, affirmative action programs should shift focus to income, and not race. A simple look at the last US Census reveals the following yearly median family incomes broken down by race: Asian Americans $73, 578, White $65,000, Hispanic $40, 466, and African-Americans $39,879. In sum, if UC or Cal-State were to address income, rather than race, we would still be targeting the same group of underrepresented students. The final missing piece is the assumption that every California high school student competes at the same level. The Fremont Union High School District community is an amazing place to work (I have worked in the district for 14 years and would not want to work anywhere else), and go to school (I am a 1992 Fremont High School graduate); however, it is easy to forget about the inherent advantages we have at our disposal. Not all California students have access to numerous AP courses, award winning performing arts programs, amazing teachers, supportive parents, comprehensive sports programs, or the financial means for SAT prep courses. To go back to your original argument, access to these things are “factors of admission that are out of our control”. If I attend a high school without these luxuries, how in the world can a UC admission officer look at me in the same light, as say a student who attends Cupertino, Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, or Homestead High Schools? (To be honest, the college admissions process has always been a mystery to me. Every day I am surrounded by 1,800 amazing students, and think they should be able to attend any college of their choice! ) In sum, affirmative action programs are but one tool to help underrepresented students attend select universities. Is it the only tool? Not by any stretch of the imagination — I am not naïve enough to think just one tool can close the achievement gap. Any attempt to close the achievement gap is one that would require a great deal more than affirmative action. Andy Walczak Assistant Principal

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Quad and cafeteria redesign: (cont. pg. 1)

ally a part of the project since we were given the opportunity to voice our opinions.” After hearing from all types of people at the school, the architects feel the need to preserve several areas of CHS. Said architect Diane Rappold, “The quad is a well loved spot on campus that we will improve on and ‘celebrate’. We also recognize the significance of the Senior Lawn — which may be transformed in the new design, but the concept will remain.” Although CHS is only undergoing the first phase of the rebuilding process, many students and teachers are excited to see the project progress because they had the chance to voice their opinions.

Letter from the editor Dear Reader, You hold in your hands the last full issue of the Prospector for the 2010-2011 school year. As was the case in our last issue, junior editors worked hard to create and edit the content of these pages. In this issue, you will learn about having chickens as pets, find out how much to exercise to work of that chipotle burrito and become an expert in throwing Harry Potter themed parties. Finish strong as the year draws to a close. Summer is nearly here! Keep an eye out for senior issue, which comes out next week. Please recycle! Harini Jaganathan Editor-in-Chief


opinions

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MAY 27, 2011

Mo’ money mo’ problems: Child investment woes FRED HAN sports assistant

T

oday’s opinionated article revolves around the issue of parents’ financial investment in children. Strictly speaking, an investment is spending money in order to gain profitable returns. There are two reasons why parents would spend money on behalf of their children. The first is from a biological perspective, in which parents invest money to ensure the survival of their offspring. The offspring will then breed, continuing the survival of those genes and the human race. The second is the less obvious: to ensure the prolonged survival of the parent. But that’s not the point. The key question is how much money should a parent invest in their children? Parents should provide only the bare minimal financial support for the child to live comfortably to prevent spoiling the child and to teach the child financial independence. Before any misunderstandings form, “bare minimal financial support” does not mean starving the child or forcing them to work in dirty coal mines. Instead, the child should be full fed, clothed and prepared to learn the art of survival: Cupertino’s art of survival is hunting for colleges and farming for GPA. Any luxury beyond the basic necessities and tools for enhanced education — which include, but is not limited to, overly luxurious eating style or incessant shopping trips — tends to spoil the child. Any form of spoiling will spoil the chances for the child to succeed and successfully reproduce or support the parent. Psychologically speaking, spoiling is a case of operant condition – a system of punishment and reward. For example, if a child learns to associate crying tantrums with getting whatever

he wants, then he will repeat the behavior. The parent needs to understand when to say “no” – or else it is like subprime lending. Continuation of inappropriate and excessive parental financial investment will soon lead to bursting the bubble of the inflated expectations and soon depression. Remember, parents in Cupertino should focus primarily about necessities for survival in life: working hard for happiness. The key step to help the child work hard for happiness is by preventing him or her from being spoiled. In other words, learning to say “no”. If a child truly wants to achieve or want something, then make him or her work for it — which leads to the next point: financial independence. Remember, the fastest route to corruption (spoiling in this case) is permission. Work is the fastest route to independence. If a child does not understand at least the core basics of money and economics, the chances are he or she will not understand how to deal with money later on in life. Then the children’s children — if the original children still survived by that point (a highly unlikely situation in Cupertino’s overly competitive environment) would not understand financial importance either. This results in continued financial dependence on the parents later in life — a counterproductive and non-profitable investment. The solution to this is to teach the children to work for what they want. Directing their desires and creative energies toward work for financial incentives will teach them the importance of money and give them a sense of dealing with different quantities of money. In conclusion, parents must learn to say no to any potential spoiling opportunities (although reward for hard work and excellent performance is mandatory) and spend only enough to guide the children’s creative energies. By freely giving money whenever a child demands so or not teaching them the importance of financial independence, those parents are setting themselves up for a potentially

spoiled child. Otherwise the “investment” of all the money and time put into improving the survival rate. However, do note that parents should never force a child into working so much that the child is greatly inclined to rebel. It is a delicate balance of the carrot and the whip.

EMILY CHENG

THE AGE OF INNOCENCE VS. MODERN-DAY TEENS

Anonymous questioning is unnecessary cowardice AMAR KANTIPUDI sports assistant EMILY CHENG news assistant

Ask me something, anything. Curious? It is an unsurprising feeling people get when they come across a chance to ask whatever they desire of their peers. When curiosity takes over, thoughts run free, and a new, undiscovered side of a person will be unleashed. This is even more evident when people hide behind a veil of anonymity because they ask anything and everything they can until they have satisfied their curiosity. It is these intentions, this sense of infallible curiosity and innate bigotry humans tend to demonstrate that often diminishes personal confidence. Just a simple question can induce the feeling of throwing out your entire life on the chopping block. The practice of attempting to fish out potential secrets without identification is a privileged feature provided to people by social networking sites. Services such as Tumblr and Formspring allow literally anyone to ask specific people questions — uncensored and unmonitored. It is through sites like these that the world has been introduced to concepts such as “trolling” and cyber bullying Anonymous questioning does comes with its fair share of reasons. After all, some people are just too afraid to ask something personal. It is almost always easier to talk to someone when away from the spotlight. That, by far, is the most appealing aspect of talking to friends online rather than in person or on the phone. Nonetheless unless a relationship is significantly strong, it is nearly impossible to separate sarcastic comments from serious ones. Furthermore, since people can say whatever they want online without having to admit who they are, they resort to a more crude language that can sometimes belittle the peer. Though, many still set up an anonymous question box expecting fun, light-hearted and interesting questions that can help them kill time, in the

long run, users run the risk of having their honesty tested, actions questioned, and image bashed, eventually damaging one’s self-esteem. If the user does not put a halt to anonymous questioning after they’ve already fallen victim to “anon bashing”, they suffer comment after comment of demeaning verbiage flooding their inbox. Soon, even strongly optimistic individuals will fall prey to the condescending harassment of their peers. It is all too common to see cheerful people turn into pessimists. Such an initially simple and harmless intention of exciting user life can morph into a lethal and emotionally degrading exchange of Q&A. Because of this, people may become very unhappy individuals who cannot control their own emotions properly, and oftentimes would end up lashing out at the resulting instability at others. These insecurities are then observed and questioned once again through that wretched anonymous button! Even if it is an attempt to poke fun into others’ lives, anonymous questioning can and most likely will lead to displeasing tension and shaky feelings. After all, once people put a mask on, they fail to take responsibility for their actions. To have a bright and confident spirit be torn down by anonymous comments is a excruciating sight. The few moments of entertainment gained on the asking end do not balance out the discomfort imposed on the receiving end. Online socializing does have its boundaries in this sense. Take a few precautions before entering a world full of anonymity, realize the consequences, and remember the saying that’s far too overheard but never entirely understood: curiosity killed the cat.

Why do you strut around campus like a know-it-all?

THE MASK OF ANONYMITY:

What students experience with online bashing “ I don’t have a formspring because I think it is another way for someone to bully you and bullying on formspring is inevitable.” Mahtab Danai, senior “I deleted my formspring because all that I got on there was stuff that I rather hear in person or didn’t want to hear at all. I didn’t want to give them an outlet when they deserved nothing from me.” Julia Seaton, sophomore “I have the curiosity of a reality check on whether people actually like me or not.” Varsha Prabhakar, sophomore

You think you’re cool? You’re just a poser.


THE PROSPECTOR

MAY 27, 2011

opinions

5

DEATH OF BIN LADEN Should the death of an enemy be celebrated?

Liberty for Free

Respect for Life

ALYA OMAR copy editor JACKIE BREUER in-depth assistant

SAMUEL LEE opinions assistant

On September 11, 2001, America watched in horror as a group of terrorists hijacked three planes, crashing them into the windows of the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and a field in Virginia. Family members watched as their loved ones’ lives were prematurely taken from them. Days later, leader of Al Qaeda Osama bin Laden vanished after taking responsibility for orchestrating the attacks, leaving behind an uncertain, tormented future. From that day, it has been one of the top priorities of the U.S. government to take down the man who instructed such heartbreak for thousands of its citizens. As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 loomed overhead, when President Barack Obama announced to the nation that an attack on bin Laden’s compound was successful, the spectrum of emotion was of massive contrast. While some recognized the magnitude that bin Laden’s death held as a weight lifted off of their grieving shoulders, others rebuked the celebrations, finding it inappropriate to disrespect the dead. However, it is not another person’s right to judge another person’s happiness and the expression of said emotion. People are affected differently by major events and define closure in a different way. 3,000 families continued with their lives forever changed, and though their losses were met with sympathy and pledges of remembrance, it was never combatted with justice because the man who orchestrated the events continued to lead his life, while their lost ones could not. From the perspective of the somewhat naive, bin Laden’s death signifies nothing but the end of a human life. To others, it was a monumental moment of closure, an assurance that the man that executed the execution was not pardoned for what he had done. This is not to say that the only proper reaction to bin Laden’s death is to galavant through the streets, chanting “U.S.A.” The death of bin Laden is simply a headline to some, while for others it is a sign of redemption for the lost loved ones. It is not in anyone’s capabilities to stand back and determine the value of such an event for someone else. Whether you feel compelled to run through the streets singing the national anthem or to simply hold a moment of silence, it is imperative to realize that the next best action is to move on and keep those that lost their lives on September 11 and during the war on terrorism in our hearts forever.

A DIVIDED

The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them.” -- Lois McMaster Bujold

AMERICA

I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” — Martin Luther King Jr.

Osama died, Americans cried… in happiness. Yes, you read that right! “Life, liberty and justice for all” except for certain Arab terrorists — they just get two out of the three. As soon as news of the al-Qaeda leader’s death reached the American public, thousands of Americans flooded Times Square and the White House to pop bottles of champagne, sing, chant “U-SA” and smile for the camera. Times like this throw doubts on whether Americans truly value the life of another human being. There should be no celebration for the death of Osama bin Laden. Admittedly, bin Laden’s is crucial to American security. The nation ought to thank President Bush for collecting the necessary intelligence throughout his presidency. It should also thank President Obama for capturing the terrorist when given the opportunity, unlike President Clinton; his stained presidency includes an incident in which he refused the Sudanese government’s offer to arrest and extradite bin Laden. Though the operation may have been necessary, bin Laden’s death is nothing to celebrate. Unless malice and vengeance form the bedrock of American principles (as opposed to, say, basic respect for human life), there is no justifiable reason for celebration: Terror attacks will not stop just because bin Laden descended to Hell. Just a few weeks after his death, suicide bombers murdered 51 Pakistanis in retaliation. Even worse, his death does not mean an end to outrageously invasive TSA procedures. Three year old boy: Wait, I thought bad terror man was gone! TSA “agent”: Quiet, I’m fondling your genitals. Americans running to the White House to celebrate bin Laden’s death with flags and drunkenness exhibited the same kind of euphoria that certain groups of Afghans displayed on 9/11. Chanting “U.S.A” just makes the entire circus more obscene. We must not lower our moral standards to those of the terrorists. Had people stayed home in quiet introspection and prayer, then that would have demonstrated true American exceptionalism. People are fully justified in feeling relief over the destruction of a mass murderer. But a sense of joy does not belong to a nation that considers itself a representative of everything that is good with the world.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Future homecoming court should be open to all classes, not just seniors Last month, we reported on ASB Executive Council’s new Homecoming Court nomination process for the 2011-2012 school year. This process involves several steps: nominating only senior candidates, having the top 20 male and top 20 female candidates complete a questionnaire about their school involvement, selecting the top 10 male and top 10 female candidates based on that questionnaire and having students from all classes choose their top six males or female Court candidates in an open vote. According to ASB, the new system is meant to ensure that the Homecoming Court accurately portrays our school’s values. However, there is considerable opposition to this policy across class lines. We completely agree with the new system’s purpose; screening candidates through a questionnaire on school involvement will be an effective way to ensure that only qualified, upstanding students make it on the Court. However, we believe that restricting the Court to only seniors goes against our school’s traditions and spirit of class unity. Homecoming has always been an event where the entire

school comes together for the sake of school pride and spirit. Students from freshmen to seniors flock to Homecoming because of the memories it creates and the kindred bonds they are able to forge with their friends. The event gives students a chance to garner happy memories and strengthen friendships with their peers — usually those in the same class. When there is not a freshman face to be found in the Homecoming Court, how delightful, inclusive or memorable will attending freshmen think Homecoming is? Supporters try to justify this massive exclusion of students by saying that all students will have the opportunity to be nominated to the court once they go through four years of high school. This assertion completely ignores the motivational and inspirational value the court can provide. If court members are meant to be shining examples of perfect Pioneers, these examples should be relatable and plentiful. Having a court from all classes will allow students who are not seniors to recognize that even one, two or three years at our school can make a difference. Having all classes represented on the Homecoming Court

will also maintain our school’s sense of community and unity. Homecoming is not meant to be an exclusive affair; with each class having an equal chance to compete in areas like skits and posters, it gives a level playing field for all classes to shine. If we deny freshmen, sophomores and juniors opportunities that seniors have in what is supposed to be a schoolwide event, they will feel excluded — which is exactly the opposite of what Homecoming is all about. In an April Prospector poll, 66% of students polled, including seniors, opposed the new seniors-only Homecoming Court nomination process. If anything, ASB Executive Council should listen to this supermajority of its constituency and work to revise this process instead of single-handedly implementing it. Homecoming is for all CHS students, and every part of Homecoming, the Court included, should be open to students regardless of class. We believe that unity and inclusiveness are core Pioneer values. It only makes sense that the Pioneers’ Homecoming Court embodies them.


features

MAY 27, 2011

6

TINO’S ANIMAL KI GDO CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE ASIAN SOUL

Sophomore’s feathery pals help in many ways SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN photo editor

She has chicken soup for the pet lover’s soul — and no, not the book. The fact is, sophomore Julie Chen’s pets are chickens and she has consumed them in soup form before. While Chen does love her fuzzy, egg-laying creatures, she shares an, lets just say, atypical bond with them. Through this bond though, she has learned a great deal about the nature of animals and the responsibility that comes along with caring for them. A year ago, at Chen’s request, her family drove two hours to a farm and picked up a handful of “female” (four out of the eight grew up to be male) chicks. They built a coop and everyday, fed them vegetables, checked their feed and refilled their water. With time “scooping up morning presents” was added to the to-do list; one egg per chicken a day, hard-boiled in the morning is not a bad deal at all. California state law, though, prohibits housing roosters in residential areas (a blessing for those who like to sleep in) so Chen’s family needed a way to dispose of their four not-so-female chickens. “We ate them. We are Asians so of course we know how to kill chickens,” said Chen, “It’s really just a quick throat cut.” This may sound brutal and Chen herself initially had much trouble with this idea. That being said, she eventually came to peace with eating her chickens under the circumstances. First of all, Chen was never excessively attached to her chickens as others may be with their more conventional pets.

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Chrome, Chicovo, Phoenix, Chocolate and Turtle — but they grow up really fast. I went on a cruise for a week and they all changed colors so I couldn’t tell who was who anymore,” said Chen, “It’s not like killing a pet dog or anything.” She is comfortable with it from a moral standpoint as well. “The whole reason we have this garden is because my mom read this book called Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. It talks about this writer who starts a farm and raises her own animals. Her philosophy is that if one raises them naturally, it’s ethical to eat them. I feel better about eating these chickens rather than eating commercially grown ones, fattened

We are Asians, so of course we know how to kill chickens.

up in two months,” added Chen. Aside from, when occasion calls, eating them, Julie also spends a great deal of time babysitting her chickens. She has made some quite interesting observations. “Chickens are very vicious actu sometimes,” Chen said, “They actually have a pecking order. Sometimes I’ll feed them dandelion leaves and certain chickens are not allowed chick to come and eat. The little chickens were initially at the bottom of the order and the red chicken was at the very bottom but once so she started laying, she gained social status. Now the once oldest, bot meanest black chicken is at the bottom because she stopped laying.” Overall, while owning chickens has taught Julie ad a thing or two, she admits that it is not for everyone. “It’s kind of a hassle. Whether you should own one or not depends on where you live, how your backyard com is, and how committed you are to waking up at 6 am morn in the morning to angry c h i c k e n s ,” Chen warns, “If that doesn’t concern you, then two bucks a chick at Gilroy. Good luck!”

OWNING A PET CAN HELP WITH STRES KEVIN CHU news editor

While most people think of massage, meditation and yoga as natural, healthy stress relievers, there is another option that is fluffier and more loveable: getting a pet. Not only do pets help relieve stress, but they can also improve one’s mood, control one’s blood pressure, reduce loneliness and provide social support— all of which are important for health and well-being, and for avoiding stress and depression. Animals are relatively consistent in their behaviors — such as locations and times of eating, sleeping, and cuddling — which provide a stable, predictable and thus less stressful aspect in the owner’s life. Their unconditional love is also extremely comforting — pets greet their owners with excitement when they come home, they can usually tell when their owners are upset, and many pets will cuddle up next to their owners, providing soothing contact. A 2002 study by re-

searchers at the State University of New York showed that when performing a stressful ta felt less stressful in the presence of pets th presence of a spouse or close friend. Pet ow had significantly lower baseline heart rates a pressure than the participants who did not o Caring for a pet often results in a sense o tion and fulfillment. In addition, owning pet the likelihood of going outside and interac others, providing opportunities for mood-r cialization. “I spend up to an hour each day taking for walks,” said sophomore Abishek Kumar. A 1999 study found that male AIDS pat less likely to suffer from depression if they ow “Pet ownership among men who have A vides a certain level of companionship that h them cope better with the stresses of th lives,” said psychologist Judith Siegel, a UC professor of public health and lead aut of the report. “This is one more study demonstrates the health benefits that ing a pet can provide.” In addition, pets help decrea pressure, heart rate and muscl

SHE IS HER DOGS’ BEST FRIEND Junior goes home to take care of pets during lunch JAMIN SHIH features assistant

When the bell rings at 12:25 p.m. every day, students leave their classrooms, obligations and quite often campus to enjoy 40 minutes of leisure. One student, however, exits campus not to leave her responsibilities behind but to take on another set. While her classmates spend lunchtimes with their friends, junior Ashley Kan visits and takes care of her three pet dogs, a chore she says teaches her both responsibility and time management skills that will aid her throughout her life. Kan feeds her three dogs, two Chihuahuas named Missy and Teddy and a Pomeranian named Charlie, every day during lunch because no one else is available to do so at that time. This causes her to miss out on the social banter that occurs during lunchtime, and she admits that she sacrifices spending time with her friends because of her pets. Regardless, she is sure that her dogs are completely worth the sacrifice. “I’m really close to my dogs. They’re really my best friends sometimes, because they’re always there for me,” Kan said. Indeed, just as Kan gives to her dogs, they give equally back to her. The sacrifice does not seem nearly as significant when her

WHAT KIND OF PET DO YOU HAVE?

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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

features

7

OM: EVERYTHING ON PETS WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PET?

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both in reaction to stressful events over a period of time. Owning a pet requires daily walks and other opportunities for exercise (another proven stress reliever) are also increased. Recovering addicts who struggle with high levels of stress should research different pets to determine which types, breeds, personalities and ages seem like a good match for you. For instance, if having to potty train a puppy sounds stressful, look into getting a dog that’s already trained is an appropriate option. For people who are often away from home, a more selfsufficient animal like a cat might be a better choice. There is nothing quite like hav hav- ing a warm ball of fur curl up next to you or an excitedly thumping tail greeting you — and it’s even more satisfying to know that these furry friends are helping to improve our lives.

“My dream pet would be “F” the White Winged Horse. It’s name is F so that when it takes my last name, Lai, its full name will be F Lai. And then I can tell it: ‘F Lai, fly!’ And then I’ll go around raiding towns on my mount.” -Alan Lai, senior “Well, I kind of just want a ferret. Not really creative or anything... I just like them!” -Andrew Qu, junior “My dream pet is a rainbow-horned unicorn that can fly and take me places, but that can also understand what I’m saying and be cuddly.” -Jeong Eun Lee, freshman “I like white tigers because they look more unique than other types of tigers.” -Brian Nguyen, senior

COMPILED BY TESS WU

ease blood le tension,

N O N E

12%

57% 170 PEOPLE POLLED COMPILED BY FRED HAN

Passing of pets leaves student stronger

ANAND HEMMADY features assistant

Disclaimer: The Prospector strongly encourages owners to spay or neuter pets, and acknowledges that some of the behavior exhibited by the owners of the cats in the following article is irresponsible. The Prospector also would like to warn readers that some elements of the following article may be exaggerated. Everything must end. This is a rule of the universe. Unfortunately, relationships with pets are not exempt from this rule. No matter how well an owner takes care of a pet, it will eventually pass away, and the owner will have to move on without it. The unavoidable pain from having a pet die often turns many away from keeping pets, and often raises questions as to whether having pets is worth the pain. In the end, though, the benefits of having pets far outweigh the negatives. Sophomore Brent Knaack knows the pain of losing pets all too well. Having once had thirty cats, Knaack could only watch helplessly as cat after cat died, leaving him with only five. “Our family of cats started when my dad was looking through boxes in our backyard and he found three kittens in a box,” Knaack said. “They were born literally just an hour before we found them. We took care of them because their mom never did. They grew up, and then they had kittens. Eventually we had around thirty cats, all living in our backyard in makeshift shelters.” Later, though, Knaack’s beloved pets started dying. “There was one cat in particular with whom I had a close relationship,” said Knaack as he recounted the death of his favorite cat. “I called him Tiny, because he had growth problems, and he never grew any bigger than my hand. This led to internal organ failure, and he passed away. I respected him because even in his last few hours of pain, he was determined to stay alive, and he survived through a lot of pain and suffering. I rarely cry, but when Tiny died, I couldn’t stop crying for two hours.” U

O T H E R

NOT FORGOTTEN

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nothing. During her daily fifteen minute visits to her dogs, she does feed them. The time she spends with her dogs is rewarding and her er an unconditional love that mirrors her own. t always there. They’re always playful, they always make me happy… n a good mood,” said Kan. g care of her dogs does cost her some of her free time, the experience he responsibility and time management skills she earns for the future es up for it. Kan stresses that it is completely different from normal ent duties to care for another living being and that owning three dogs wed her to experience both responsibility and the joy of bringing hapss to someone or something else. These lessons can also be applied e world outside of high school and pets; Kan finds applications well beyond homework assignments or tests. “For the future, if you ever have kids, you’re going to have to take care of something. You’re going to have to take care of cleaning up after them. It’s just a huge responsibility,” said Kan. While many students have only one set of respon responsibilities to worry about at school, Kan’s pet duties begin where her school ones end. Despite seeming like a large hassle, however, her dogs bring her the kind of joy and teach her the kind of lessons that only COUR TESY OF AS HLEY pets can. KAN

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After Tiny’s death, Knaack witnessed the death of around 25 other cats. Knaack let his cats roam freely around the neighborhood, which annoyed the neighbors. The neighbors began leaving poisoned food out on their doorsteps. Knaack was forced to witness cat after cat dying from the food poisoning. He could do nothing to stop the death toll of cats from rising. In the end, only five cats remained. Despite all the grief that the deaths of his cats caused him, though, Knaack does not regret anything and is happy that he had the chance to know his cats. “One of the best times of my life was when I was playing around with the three original kittens,” Knaack said. “It was really cute when we let them into the house and watched them crawl around, pull out wires, and stumble and fall. In spite of all the pain I think it was worth it to have pets and I don’t regret it.” Clearly, the loss that pets bring will be painful. However, it would be foolish to refuse to entertain the thought of having pets simply because of the pain. After all, in life, happiness can only come with suffering. To discard things only because they will hurt us would ruin life entirely. Although pets die and losing them hurts, the overall relationship with pets brings more happi happiness than sorrow.


lifestyles

MAY 27, 2011

8

THE BOY WHO LIVES ON... THE LEGACY OF HARRY POTTER

NIKHIL KANTHI features assistant

T

here are moments in our lives when the harshness of reality casts a shadow over our happiness, causing it to be short-lived. On July 15th, when Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 comes out, I will have to struggle between pangs of excitement and sorrow as I watch a part of my life end. When I pored over the books time and time again in my younger days, I wondered what attracted me to the adventures of a boy wizard. What set this story apart from the other books I had devoured in my youth? I often put this question on hold as I turned the last page in the last book and started anew with the first book. I spent days walking the corridors and grounds of Hogwarts. However, as the pages became more and more familiar, I realized that there would soon be a day when I would be bored by the tale that once meant the world to me. That day, I took the books out of my room and anticipated a day when I would open the books and be amazed once more. A few days ago, I turned the first page of the first book. The parchment-like scent of

the pages with which I was so familiar brought with them a painful comprehension. In less than two months, the journey would be over. I think I can answer my question today. I did not love Harry Potter because it was a friend or mentor. The reason I love these books is because I could see myself as Harry. Rowling erased the line between the reader and Harry somewhere in those pages. Readers empathized with Harry when he was in danger or depressed, and that empathy carried over to the moments when Harry was triumphant. We were united by the naive hope that things will get better. When the circumstances were not as happy and bright as they could have been, I knew that my time would come. Harry Potter taught me that victory was not impossible, and I think we all yearn for that certainty. It taught me the power of hope. I wish for a day when the corridors of Hogwarts will be as alien to me as they were to Harry on his first night there, and I wish that I could feel the loss of Sirius or Dumbledore without expecting it. I doubt that day will come before July 15th, but that’s fine. I think I will do just fine without reading the story I have read seventy times before as I wait outside the midnight premiere. Good job, my friend. Mischief managed.

POTTER PREMIERE PARTY

1. Buy midnight premiere tickets in advance, optimally three to four weeks before the movie.

Want to make your HP premiere night truly magical? Here are a few suggestions that will make your night less Dudley and a tad more Diggory.

2. First, decide on a menu for your party. For terrific Potter recipes, visit http://www.mugglenet.com/misc/rosmertas/index.shtml. Remember that Butterbeer and Golden Snitch cupcakes are absolute necessities! 3. Decorate! After you settle on a venue, plaster the walls with Harry Potter-themed posters. Make sure to include the official movie poster! 4. Costumes are mandatory — they should consist of robes, traditional Hogwarts uniforms, wands and scarves. Assign each guest a specific character in his or her customized Hogwarts-style invitation. 5. Finally, plan some activities! Some suggestions: i. Test your knowledge of the series with some trivia and use Bertie Botts’ Every Flavor Beans as the prize (or punishment!) ii. Reenact your favorite scenes from the series, and be creative. iii. Host a Dueling Club. iv. Watch Deathly Hallows, Part I in preparation for the finale! MADHURI SATHISH

Lady Gaga’s Born This Way contains darker and more serious overtones JESSE ZHOU features editor

The Mother Monster has done it again. Lady Gaga, the artist who has so far defined the voice of a new generation, has been inching toward far more radical themes in her music (believe it or not) with her new album Born This Way. While the widely acclaimed The Fame introduced Gaga as the queen of “Just Dance”, Born This Way instead puts her in the spotlight as a woman with the most independent spirit in the music industry. Many of Gaga’s songs indeed revolve around being proud and self-sufficient. “Hair” and “Bad Kids” promote the idea that being fiercely independent is essential to having true freedom. In addition, her songs call on people to respect those who choose to be independent. For example, one line from “Hair” states, “I just wanna be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.” Her words give the listener a window into a troubled soul who wants nothing more than for others to be accepted in today’s cruel society. The overall tone of Born This Way is darker and more disorderly than The Fame as well. However, Gaga uses this style in a unique way, and trust me, she uses it well. By utilizing the power

of static-shock beats, Gaga’s songs are a rather elegant synthesis of symphony and cacophony: a paradox pleasing to the ear. The fractured mix of piano, electro synthesizers, electric guitar and abnormal beats ends up finding its way into songs like “Judas” and “Marry the Night.” The atmosphere Gaga has created in Born This Way is terrifying and euphoric at the same time. By using theme and tone to their full potential, Lady Gaga’s new album, Born This Way, is bound to be one of the greatest albums of the decade. From songs about true love (“You and I”) to being who you are (“Born This Way”), the Mother Monster covers a full range of topics that will leave the listener surprised. By the time the last song finishes, something will be blown. It will either be your mind or your CD player from abusing the replay button too much.

TOP 3 SINGLES 1. Born This Way 2. The Edge of Glory 3. Judas COMPILED BY NATASHA SHARMA COURTESY OF SpreePiX-Berlin


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

lifestyles

9

The beauty OFTHRIFTING

Looking for something trendy without breaking the bank? Thrift stores sell classic pieces at surprinsgly low prices. You don’t have to buy couture to be chic.

VICTORIA DUAN copy-editor

The outrageous prices offered at too many stores in the mall make it hard for frugal shoppers to pick out affordable items that complement them. Never mind purchasing an outfit, or a nice set of furniture — a single shirt will devastate one’s wallet. But sophomore Brittney Lundquist and junior Noa Rosenberg, both experienced in the ways of thrifting, know better than to blow their entire savings on just one item. Thrift stores are shops owned and run by charities or nonprofit organizations as fundraisers for their cause. Unlike conventional stores, thrift stores carry a multitude of different products. Each new shipment is always full of surprises, and the prices of the products are relatively low. “I have found a lot of name brands like Abercrombie, the North Face, J. Crew and Banana Republic [while thrifting]. It’s a nice feeling to say that you can own name brand clothing and only have to pay a fraction of the original price,” Lundquist said. Although the quality of the donations are often questionable, Lundquist has found that the overall value of a thrift store’s merchandise can be roughly predicted by the city the store is located in.

“I have found that the ‘richer’ cities have the fancier, nicer, name brand clothing options — for example, San Francisco, Santa Cruz and Los Angeles,” Lundquist said. However, nearby thrift stores, including Goodwill, Salvation Army and Savers can all be thoroughly scavenged for good deals and quality items. Contrary to Lundquist, Rosenberg approaches thrifting with a slightly different tactic. While Lundquist is more oriented towards browsing for clothes, Rosenberg thrifts with an open mind and warmly welcomes all possibilities that might come her way. “I may go shopping with the intent to find a new sweater and then I’ll leave the store with a new shelf for my room. The challenge of thrifting is not to find something that is the perfect fit, but finding things that have the potential to be cinched, hemmed, draped in a room or framed on a wall. When I do find something I like, it’s like finding a gem; that’s the beauty of thrifting!” Rosenberg said. With thrifting comes not only the thrill of hunting for the perfect item, but also the satisfaction of paying sensible prices for a purchase. Forget the unreasonable prices at the mall — go look for the cheaper counterpart at Goodwill.


sports

Have a healthy summer

Which is worse – resisting the urge to eat or mustering the willpower to exercise? Most people are reluctant to do either, as byproducts of animal evolution makes us inclined to eat as much as possible and save every last ounce of fat in case of famine. That’s right, those deliciously

dreadful, guilty calories that lurk in your In-NOut Cheeseburger with Onions are here to stay unless burned off by the exercise that we so despise. Here are some popular food items along with matching activities needed to part with those beloved calories.

VERDE

IN N’ OUT PEARL

CHEESE BURGER WITH ONIONS

306

480

Shop for one hour 14 minutes

MILK TEA (BUBBLE TEA)

Calories:

Calories alories:

Exercise:

10

MAY 27, 2011

Exercise:

Garden for one hour and three minutes

CHIPOTLE

WING STOP

BARBACOA BURRITO

FRENCH FRIES

Calories:

Calories:

200

800

Exercise:

Exercise:

Run at nine mph for 11.5 minutes

Dance for three hours

Boosts that actually give you a boost NATALIE HOANG lifestyles assistant

A

fter ordering a cold smoothie to quench the thirst of a hot summer’s day, the Jamba Juice cashier asks you, “Would you like a boost with that?”. You will proceed to ask what types they offer and are met with a list of seemingly health nourishing choices. The options tackle different aspects of the body, from the Charger and Antioxidant boosts to the Immunity and Energy boosts. Sure, it sounds convincing, but what is it exactly that you are putting into your body? Do the benefits live up to the name? Let us break it down. A boost is a dietary supplement intended to add the vitamins, minerals, fiber, or amino acids a person may lack in his or her daily consumption. In a scroll through the Jamba Juice Booster nutritional facts, noted is the abundance of Maltodextrin and Inulin in the energy and vitamin boosts. Substitutes for sugar, Maltodextrin and Inulin give a sweet taste and the energy provided by sugar without the calories and fat. This makes the 3G Charger, Antioxidant Power, Daily Vitamin, Immunity and Energy Boosts all great options for those in need of a pick-me-up without the extra carbohydrates and sugar to bog them down. The last three boosters are crafted to regulate the body’s systems to maintain healthy levels. Flax & Fiber, a promising Boost, is made of Flaxseed. It is known for reducing blood sugar levels, bad cholesterol, triglycerides, and being the great source of fiber it is, constipation. As for the Whey Protein and Soybean Boosts, their benefit is in the name: protein. Protein’s importance lies in it’s ability to repair body cells, build and repair muscles and bones, and control metabolism. These boosts are promising in their nature, so why not add them into your smoothie? Though it is unlikely one would purchase a smoothie with a boost everyday, or enough to feel the benefits, their intentions are there. A simple overthe-counter supplemental pill directed to take once a day is perhaps the better solution for those concerned about their health. But if mixing in a boost takes the guilt off of your 300-calorie smoothie, go for it!

AZADEH RONGERE

3G Charger™ Boost Antioxidant Power™ Boost Daily Vitamin™ Boost Energy™ Boost Flax & Fiber Boost Immunity™ Boost Soy Protein™ Boost Whey Protein™ Boost

PHOTOS BY: AZADEH RONGERE COMPILED BY: ERIC JANG

get

1 TONED

for summer COMPILED BY: NIKHIL KANTHI

LEG RISES

Lie on your back with your hands holding onto something heavy (like a bookshelf side), and raise your legs without bending your knees. 20 minutes (counting breaks) of these and a four-pack will be a breeze.

2 3

COMPILED BY: AZADEH RONGERE

SHUFFLE PUSH-UPS Do pushups while moving side to side. Nothing strains your biceps, triceps, deltoids, and laterals like some serious pushup shuffling. Aim for three or four sets of 20 reps to get some toned arms.

RUNNING Put on a pair of shorts, plug in your favorite song on your MP3, and speed off on a strenuous but quick workout. Aim for anything under nine minutes (as long as you have warmed up), and you will have burned off a six-inch from Subway.

PHOTOS BY: SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

Badminton Team Dilemma: Winning does not always reap the rewards ERIC JANG sports assistant

There is no doubt that winning feels good — addicting even, if victories come frequently. However, even a winning streak has its disadvantages when the victories become too easy. The badminton team has dominated its matches in a less-competitive league but it has done so at the expense of the valuable lessons gained by losing matches. Players compete against members of the other team in singles or doubles matches, ranked by skill level. The entire game is won by a majority of match wins from the team members. Players who train in competitive badminton clubs outside of school, such as Bintang, are often on

par with other club players from upper league schools. Since the school team is composed of both club badminton players and players who only train at school practices, the latter players are presented with formidable challenges when they have to play in higher leagues against more experienced players. Conversely, higher league players do not have enough of a challenge when they have to play in the lower league and so neither league is apt for both types of players. As a result, the Varsity and Junior Varsity teams have lost most of their games in higherdivision leagues for the last two years. However, because they have been bumped down to a lower league this year, the badminton team has remained undefeated the entire season. Although practice alone contributes to the

success of team members during matches, ingame experience is also vital to the growth of the player. Team members do not improve as much when all of their matches are won easily and their mistakes go unnoticed. When the Central Coast Section (CCS) championships roll around, players that have become accustomed to their successes may find themselves unprepared to face opponents of higher skill level. “I’m scared that they all think they’re good enough at the level they are at now and have no desire to concentrate during practice,” said varsity player Peggy Chiang about her teammates. Chiang learns which footwork needs practice and which shots she can improve on from losing against tougher players. Playing against difficult opponents in

the higher league not only reveals areas for self-improvement, but also builds appreciation for the competitive aspect of the sport. According to varsity player Lawrence Luk, failures are vital to good sportsmanship. Modesty is difficult to come by for those who seldom experience defeat. “Losing teaches me humility, because I can’t expect to walk all over my opponents all the time,” Luk said. Despite the fact that the badminton team has enjoyed a winning streak this year, some players believe that excessive victories have slowed athletic growth. Luk and Chiang believe that losing to higher-league contenders is a necessary step in improving and taking the team to the next level.


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sports sports

THE PROSPECTOR THE PROSPECTOR

MAY27, 27,2011 2011 MAY

Synchronized swimmer Ekaterina Frelikh pursues future Olympic dream AZADEH RONGERE sports editor

Above the surface, two artistic synchronized swimmers jump through the air in perfect harmony. The chemistry between the teammates allows their routines to be of sheer perfection. Their magical performance, a blend of gymnastics and dancing, requires flawless consistency. Below the surface is junior Ekaterina Frelikh an aspiring synchronized swimmer. Frelikh was born in Russia where she began her successful career as a synchronized swimmer at age nine. Before she became talented performer, Frelikh explored speed swimming, a quick but she quickly realized this sport bored her. She then turned to synchronized swimming deciding that it would provide her with more excitement. “I saw girls doing little leg things and I thought it was very cool and pretty, so I joined,” Frelikh said. When she joined a popular Russian team, she received a proper foundation for her synchronized swimming future through training. Ho w e v e r, when she emigrated from Russia four years ago, it seemed as if lon her aspirations could no longer become a reality. Once she moved to America, Frelikh lacked a synchronized swimming team so she reluctantly returned to speed swimming. After a year of break,

she was introduced to one of the best synchronizing swimming team in America in Santa Clara. After a successful try out, she joined the team. Despite a new addition, her team supported and welcomed Ferlikh and they built friendships only teammates could share. Although their occasional bonding activities do bring them closer, their natural chemistry already supports their undeniable bond. “We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable,” Frelikh said. However, to pursue her dream Frelikh had to compromise

We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable.

her academic schedule. Since her practices last from 4:00 to 8:30 p.m. every day, she found it hard to fit AP classes into her schedule. Even after these strenuous weekday practices she is unable to sleep in on weekends since she has practices from 7:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. Furthermore, during the summer, she practices ten hours each and every day. “I just have to make it work. I mean, I have to wake up early and sleep really late to balance out my workload with synchronized swimming,” Frelikh said. In addition, during the first semester of each school year, she and her team ruthlessly train and tirelessly practice. Throughout second semester there are multiple national and international

2010 West Side Junior Exibition

meets for which Frelikh must miss school in order to attend. Since she constantly takes “vacation” days, she treats tutorials and lunches like gold because she has to constantly make-up tests, in-class essays, class work and participation points. Nevertheless, she conveys that these tedious make-up sessions are a small price to pay to visit and compete in New York, Ohio, Texas, Florida and North Carolina. Despite her busy schedule, Frelikh still has to find time to design and make her own outfits. Although a tailor provides her with a handmade outfit, Frelikh has to manually decorate it with rhinestones, sparkles, beads and other embellishments. Despite the fact that synchronized swimming has its academic and time disadvantages, Frelikh’s future in swimming is more valuable, as she will soon conquer her next meet in Sw itzerland.

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End of the year countdown Memorial Day- NO SCHOOL

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Partying Partying YEAH! Partying Partying YEAH! Fun. Fun. Fun. Fun.

The Prospector wishes you a happy summer. Please Recycle


photoessay

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MAY 27, 2011

Health is Wealth Next time you are at the front of the line debating between the fresh fruit cup and the gooey chocolate chip cookie, choose wisely, for the outcomes of these battles are what add up to form a lifestyle. And what better time than now to start anew on the path to good health? Sounds simple enough, but what most of us fall short on is willpower. With one good look around campus, though, it is easy to get this dose of inspiration; students are constantly pursuing healthy activities as seen on this page. Juniors Zhijiang Li, Andrew Qu and Eric Lee (upper left) share a hug in the quad, while sophomores Brittany Rodriguez and Katelyn Howard (upper right) share a laugh during their laps around the pool. Junior Paolo Barrenechea (left) shoots hoops with a handful of other students who form teams and battle it out on the asphalt during lunchtime. In addition to mental and physical health, eating habits also constitute a big part of balanced living. Junior Bhavisha Shukla (bottom left) takes a refreshing gulp of H2O, while senior Vandita Manyam chows down on a handful of tangerine slices. Other healthy choices include grabbing a milk carton on your way out of the cafeteria or choosing to ride your bike to school. It really is as simple as that, so join your peers in pursuing a healthy lifestyle today.


FEATURES: Chicken soup for the pet owner’s soul

SPORTS: Synchronized swimming star

PHOTO ESSAY: Healthy living

THE PROSPECTOR CUPERTINO HIGH SCHOOL’S

VOLUME 52 NO. 7

10100 FINCH AVENUE, CUPERTINO CA

MAY 27, 2011

Redesign of quad and cafeteria:

Students and staff collaborate with architects to develop plan for renovations

REGINA HONG news assistant

In addition to the ongoing track renovations, CHS plans to start rebuilding other parts of the campus, such as the front building and the quad, by the 2012-2013 school year. In the past, the district passed a construction bond that specifically stated that it could only be used for the construction of new buildings. Therefore, due to the increasing population, the current cafeteria at the front of the school will become a two-story building, which will house the library, cafeteria and guidance and administrative offices. By moving all of these areas into one building, the old library and office space will turn into new classrooms. This will create more flexibility with class space, larger conference areas for the staff and more bathrooms. The quad will also undergo several changes, such as the addition of a stage, new seating arrangements and a better sound system. In order to prepare for the renovation, CHS asked for input from those who are involved with the school, such as students, teachers and other staff members. On May 5, 2011, several members from the Quattrocchi Kwok Architects company came to CHS to ask selected students at a student committee meeting to ask for their

input regarding how the front building and quad should be rebuilt. “We hope for a more modernized, nicer and different campus, but at the same time, we also want to keep the familiarity of Tino,” said sophomore Julia Seaton. At the meeting, students asked for a big and open front building in which upperclassmen and lowerclassmen would not be separated. The structure of the building will resemble that of a student union on a college campus. According to Seaton, the architects respected all of the students’ opinions and tried their best to allow for everyone’s voices to be heard. According to assistant principal Andy Walczak, a student asked to showcase Dusty at the front of the school, so passers-by would be able to see the pride of CHS. The architects also met with the staff members. During this meeting, adults gave their opinions on how the school should be reconstructed. Said librarian Pat Accoriniti, “I’m just really excited about the process. We’ll [Teachers and students] be more accepting of the new building and quad because we were actu see QUAD AND CAFETERIA RESDESIGN, pg 3

SINDHU GNANASAMDANDAN

Students prepare for summer Latin American cultural immersion program HARINI JAGANATHAN editor-in-chief

This summer, juniors Delia Cannon, Noelle Foley and Allison Ness will be traveling to Latin America to work on community service projects through the AMIGOS program. AMIGOS is a nonprofit international organization that provides community service opportunities for young people in areas across Latin America. All three students have been training and preparing for their trip, practicing their Spanish conversational skills, learning about Latin American culture and raising funds to support their service projects. Cannon, Foley and Ness will be living with families in different Latin American communities, and completing projects with just one English speaking partner. They hope to immerse themselves in the culture as well as make a positive impact on the areas they will be traveling to. Foley will be going to Oaxaca, Mexico to build fuel efficient stoves and raise environmental awareness. She will be living in a community for eight weeks.

“I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn more about myself and the world,” Foley said. “We’re sheltered in Cupertino.” Ness will spend six weeks in La Paz, Honduras and her project will focus on teaching the youth about the environment and how to sustain resources. “I was into it because I’m interested in language immersion and community service,” Ness said. “I also want to become more outgoing.” Cannon will be in Cotapaxi, Ecuador for seven weeks teaching youth about health and children’s rights. While Cannon admits that her initial motivations for embarking on this endeavor were college applications and travel opportunity, she found that the issues she will be focusing on in Cotapaxi matter to her. Her motivations for completing her trip have changed. In addition to improving her Spanish listening and speaking skills, Cannon is excited to help the children in the community she will be living in. “I want to make life better for these kids, even if that’s just teaching them how to brush their teeth and clean their hands,” Cannon said. Although all three are excited to immerse themselves in an-

other culture, some aspects of living in another country make them nervous. Cannon is concerned about communicating with the locals as well as living without the comforts of home. “I’m worried that it’ll take me too long to be understood,” Cannon said. “I’m also worried about the lack of American fast food.” Foley is slightly worried about answering difficult questions asked by the locals. “I will be asked about I think about immigration policies there,” she said. “I’m a little nervous about that.” All three find that there are other aspects of the cultural immersion process that excite them. “They eat guinea pig in Cotapaxi,” Cannon said. “When will I ever get to try guinea pig if I don’t try that there?” Cannon, Foley and Ness are excited and nervous about immersing themselves in another culture and isolating themselves from the comforts that Cupertino offers. They anticipate that their trip will bring them a greater understanding of Latin American culture and will be a personal growth experience. They hope to share interesting stories of their journey upon their return.


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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

the Prospector 2010-2011 STAFF

Cupertino High School Established 1958 Vol LII., No. 5 | 2011

editor-in-chief harini jaganathan news editor kevin chu opinions editor abhishek zaveri features editor jesse zhou in-depth editors michelle cheung sunwoo jeong lifestyles editor natasha sharma sports editor azadeh rongere photo editors sindhu gnanasambandan copy editors alya omar victoria duan business manager jackie breuer

Lawson reflects on 35 years of teaching, changes over the years VIRENA GALOTRA lifestyles assistant

This year marks history teacher Jay Lawson’s 35th year as a teacher in this district. To commemorate the occasion his students made him cards and presented him with gifts. Lawson is one of the longest employed teachers on campus and, as a result, notices changes in diversity, teacher collaboration and technology at school over the years. Ever since he was a young boy, Lawson wanted to be a teacher. Both his parents were teachers in the district and his father was a prominent administrator as well. In fact, Sam H. Lawson Middle School is named in honor of his father. Lawson began his career as a history teacher at Monta Vista High School and simultaneously worked as a wrestling coach at Homestead High School at the same time. After only three years of teaching, he was laid off from his job as a history teacher in 1979. Lawson then became an intern to a special education teacher at Monta Vista High School while getting his credentials at night school. After he graduated, he became a full time special education teacher at Monta Vista High School. He then transferred to CHS in 1985 as both the head wrestling coach and a special education teacher. Fourteen years later in 1999, he took up his current position as a history teacher on campus, which is his favorite class to teach. “I really enjoy... sharing the stories of history and the older I get the easier it gets because I’ve lived through a lot of the things I’m teaching,” Lawson said. After 35 years of teaching, Lawson plans to continue teaching for another three years before retiring. “It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more

students,” he said. Over the years, Lawson has observed many changes pertaining to both the school and his job as a teacher. One of the major changes on campus is its diversification, a process that occurred gradually. He mentions that there is less of an emphasis on the trades and students have less interest in taking classes like auto shop, metal shop and cooking. In addition, a smaller percentage of students choose to pursue these types of careers. Lawson also notes

It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more students. Jay Lawson

History Teacher

that both teachers and students now use technology in the classroom on a regular basis. Computers have now become a daily teaching tool as well as a regular learning resource for students. Another positive change is how teaching has become a collaborative job. “We as teachers share our ideas and materials and to me that’s what makes it special. Being old timer, I have [some] things to offer [but] it’s also challenging to learn some of the new things,” Lawson said. However, the one thing he says that has stayed consistent is the enthusiasm of the students. “I love my time in the classroom with students. They make me feel young,” Lawson said.

SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

35 YEARS AND COUNTING| History teacher Jay Lawson contemplates the rapidly changing school and fulfilling years of teaching

IDC Best Dance Crew debuts choreographical talent news anand hemmady assistants regina hong nikhil kanthi opinions amar kantipudi assistants anthony kao gun ho lee features emily cheng assistants alyssa williams tess wu

JOANNA LEE sports assistant

Launching the first ever Intra-District Council Best Dance Crew (IDCBDC), crews from Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, and Cupertino showcased their best dance moves in front of a screaming crowd at the Lynbrook gym on Friday, May 13. Weeks of practicing and stress for all parties involved led up to a

lifestyles virena galotra assistants natalie hoang madhuri sathish in-depth jackie breuer assistants vani mulkareddy jamin shih sports fred han assistants joanna lee eric jang willie wang adviser ann peck editorial policy “The Prospector” is an open forum of expression for student editors to inform and educate their readers. It will not be reviewed by or restrained by school officials prior to publication or distribution. Advisors may and should coach and discuss content during the writing process. The staff of “The Prospector” seeks to recognize individuals, events, ideasand bring news to the Cupertino community in an accurate, professional and unbiased manner. “The Prospector” will not avoid publishing a story solely on the basis of possible dissent or controversy. If you believe an error has been made, or wish to have your opinion expressed in “The Prospector”please contact us via mail or e-mail. Letters sent become the sole property of “The Prospector” and can be edited for length, clarity, or accuracy. “The Prospector” editorial board reserves the right to accept or reject any ad in accordance with its advertising policy. Contact Us The Prospector 10100 Finch Avenue Cupertino, CA 95014 prospector.chs@gmail.com

JOANNA LEE

DANCE CREW SHOWCASE | Seniors Vi Viet, Benjamin Du, Sheng Poon, Willie Wang and Brian Walsh display their talents at the first ever IDCBDC

successful turnout of the first ever IDCBDC. Cupertino’s IDC Commissioners, senior Mennen Kassa, 12, and junior Ashley Park, 11, gathered with the other schools to sort out the details and have been working for weeks planning the event. With the performance date having been changed multiple times due to various reasons, some were beginning to fear that the event may never actually take place. However, with positive attitudes, both Kassa and Park continued to push for the event to take place. Crews were selected based on a competitive audition process in which each crew demonstrated their choreography and were judged based on overall preparedness and enthusiasm. In the end, popular hip hop crew, GTFO, and newly formed all female crew, XI So Fly, were selected to represent Cupertino at the IDCBDC. Other schools, however, did not have as many competing teams as Cupertino did, thus leading to some additional conflicts. Though enduring another minor conflict, Kassa reassures the event will have the turnout it is hoping for. Said Kassa, “IDC has been able to work everything out and we are very excited for this upcoming event.” With the dance scene on the rise, participating schools thought it would be appropriate and fun to hold a showcase that would allow students to show off the their individual styles and ultimately reign supreme while holding the Best Dance Crew title. Said Kassa, “IDC was eager to plan an event that would give the chance for students in the district to bond and show off their talents. We noticed how popular the dance scene has become throughout the district and decided that a dance competition would be the perfect way to promote district unity.” On Friday afternoon, students from all participating schools filed into the Lynbrook gym and watched eagerly as each school performed their best. Though supportive of each competing crew, the crowd screamed passionately after their representing crews performed. Though Kassa and Park originally planned for qualified judges who are already familiar with the dance scene, qualified judges were unable to be recruited before the show took place. In the end, the audience took the role of the judges. Each group showcased a variety of creative and intricate routines, including a martial arts inspired dance, some instances of jazz and lyrical, and various popping and breaking moves. Even though IDCBDC was a dance show, each school perfected a dance number that was tailored to their own individual styles and personalities that really became a sight to see. After six talented and varying performances, it was time to finally announce the winner and holder of the IDCBDC title. The audience was able to vote for their favorite crew and the crew with the most votes would take home the title. Ultimately, it was Lynbrook who took away this year’s title. With a successful turnout for the first ever IDCBDC, it is likely this event will return in the upcoming school year as an even better dance spectacle.


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

Letter to the editor Editor, The recent staff editorial (“Affirmative Action: Out-dated and Out-weighted) in the May 6th edition of The Prospector, though well-written, and thoughtful, failed to address some key issues concerning affirmative action policies. First and foremost, the editorial fails to mention the 1996 California proposition (Proposition 209) that banned racial, gender, and ethnic preferences for the University of California and the Cal-State systems. The majority of Cupertino High School students entering four-year universities, attend either a UC or Cal-State school, so the “factors of admission that are simply out of our control” is a non-factor for most CHS students. In addition to the omission of Proposition 209, the article does not cite key data about family income in the United States. The thesis of the article is that because racial discrimination is no longer the issue it once was, affirmative action programs should shift focus to income, and not race. A simple look at the last US Census reveals the following yearly median family incomes broken down by race: Asian Americans $73, 578, White $65,000, Hispanic $40, 466, and African-Americans $39,879. In sum, if UC or Cal-State were to address income, rather than race, we would still be targeting the same group of underrepresented students. The final missing piece is the assumption that every California high school student competes at the same level. The Fremont Union High School District community is an amazing place to work (I have worked in the district for 14 years and would not want to work anywhere else), and go to school (I am a 1992 Fremont High School graduate); however, it is easy to forget about the inherent advantages we have at our disposal. Not all California students have access to numerous AP courses, award winning performing arts programs, amazing teachers, supportive parents, comprehensive sports programs, or the financial means for SAT prep courses. To go back to your original argument, access to these things are “factors of admission that are out of our control”. If I attend a high school without these luxuries, how in the world can a UC admission officer look at me in the same light, as say a student who attends Cupertino, Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, or Homestead High Schools? (To be honest, the college admissions process has always been a mystery to me. Every day I am surrounded by 1,800 amazing students, and think they should be able to attend any college of their choice! ) In sum, affirmative action programs are but one tool to help underrepresented students attend select universities. Is it the only tool? Not by any stretch of the imagination — I am not naïve enough to think just one tool can close the achievement gap. Any attempt to close the achievement gap is one that would require a great deal more than affirmative action. Andy Walczak Assistant Principal

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3

Quad and cafeteria redesign: (cont. pg. 1)

ally a part of the project since we were given the opportunity to voice our opinions.” After hearing from all types of people at the school, the architects feel the need to preserve several areas of CHS. Said architect Diane Rappold, “The quad is a well loved spot on campus that we will improve on and ‘celebrate’. We also recognize the significance of the Senior Lawn — which may be transformed in the new design, but the concept will remain.” Although CHS is only undergoing the first phase of the rebuilding process, many students and teachers are excited to see the project progress because they had the chance to voice their opinions.

Letter from the editor Dear Reader, You hold in your hands the last full issue of the Prospector for the 2010-2011 school year. As was the case in our last issue, junior editors worked hard to create and edit the content of these pages. In this issue, you will learn about having chickens as pets, find out how much to exercise to work of that chipotle burrito and become an expert in throwing Harry Potter themed parties. Finish strong as the year draws to a close. Summer is nearly here! Keep an eye out for senior issue, which comes out next week. Please recycle! Harini Jaganathan Editor-in-Chief


opinions

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MAY 27, 2011

Mo’ money mo’ problems: Child investment woes FRED HAN sports assistant

T

oday’s opinionated article revolves around the issue of parents’ financial investment in children. Strictly speaking, an investment is spending money in order to gain profitable returns. There are two reasons why parents would spend money on behalf of their children. The first is from a biological perspective, in which parents invest money to ensure the survival of their offspring. The offspring will then breed, continuing the survival of those genes and the human race. The second is the less obvious: to ensure the prolonged survival of the parent. But that’s not the point. The key question is how much money should a parent invest in their children? Parents should provide only the bare minimal financial support for the child to live comfortably to prevent spoiling the child and to teach the child financial independence. Before any misunderstandings form, “bare minimal financial support” does not mean starving the child or forcing them to work in dirty coal mines. Instead, the child should be full fed, clothed and prepared to learn the art of survival: Cupertino’s art of survival is hunting for colleges and farming for GPA. Any luxury beyond the basic necessities and tools for enhanced education — which include, but is not limited to, overly luxurious eating style or incessant shopping trips — tends to spoil the child. Any form of spoiling will spoil the chances for the child to succeed and successfully reproduce or support the parent. Psychologically speaking, spoiling is a case of operant condition – a system of punishment and reward. For example, if a child learns to associate crying tantrums with getting whatever

he wants, then he will repeat the behavior. The parent needs to understand when to say “no” – or else it is like subprime lending. Continuation of inappropriate and excessive parental financial investment will soon lead to bursting the bubble of the inflated expectations and soon depression. Remember, parents in Cupertino should focus primarily about necessities for survival in life: working hard for happiness. The key step to help the child work hard for happiness is by preventing him or her from being spoiled. In other words, learning to say “no”. If a child truly wants to achieve or want something, then make him or her work for it — which leads to the next point: financial independence. Remember, the fastest route to corruption (spoiling in this case) is permission. Work is the fastest route to independence. If a child does not understand at least the core basics of money and economics, the chances are he or she will not understand how to deal with money later on in life. Then the children’s children — if the original children still survived by that point (a highly unlikely situation in Cupertino’s overly competitive environment) would not understand financial importance either. This results in continued financial dependence on the parents later in life — a counterproductive and non-profitable investment. The solution to this is to teach the children to work for what they want. Directing their desires and creative energies toward work for financial incentives will teach them the importance of money and give them a sense of dealing with different quantities of money. In conclusion, parents must learn to say no to any potential spoiling opportunities (although reward for hard work and excellent performance is mandatory) and spend only enough to guide the children’s creative energies. By freely giving money whenever a child demands so or not teaching them the importance of financial independence, those parents are setting themselves up for a potentially

spoiled child. Otherwise the “investment” of all the money and time put into improving the survival rate. However, do note that parents should never force a child into working so much that the child is greatly inclined to rebel. It is a delicate balance of the carrot and the whip.

EMILY CHENG

THE AGE OF INNOCENCE VS. MODERN-DAY TEENS

Anonymous questioning is unnecessary cowardice AMAR KANTIPUDI sports assistant EMILY CHENG news assistant

Ask me something, anything. Curious? It is an unsurprising feeling people get when they come across a chance to ask whatever they desire of their peers. When curiosity takes over, thoughts run free, and a new, undiscovered side of a person will be unleashed. This is even more evident when people hide behind a veil of anonymity because they ask anything and everything they can until they have satisfied their curiosity. It is these intentions, this sense of infallible curiosity and innate bigotry humans tend to demonstrate that often diminishes personal confidence. Just a simple question can induce the feeling of throwing out your entire life on the chopping block. The practice of attempting to fish out potential secrets without identification is a privileged feature provided to people by social networking sites. Services such as Tumblr and Formspring allow literally anyone to ask specific people questions — uncensored and unmonitored. It is through sites like these that the world has been introduced to concepts such as “trolling” and cyber bullying Anonymous questioning does comes with its fair share of reasons. After all, some people are just too afraid to ask something personal. It is almost always easier to talk to someone when away from the spotlight. That, by far, is the most appealing aspect of talking to friends online rather than in person or on the phone. Nonetheless unless a relationship is significantly strong, it is nearly impossible to separate sarcastic comments from serious ones. Furthermore, since people can say whatever they want online without having to admit who they are, they resort to a more crude language that can sometimes belittle the peer. Though, many still set up an anonymous question box expecting fun, light-hearted and interesting questions that can help them kill time, in the

long run, users run the risk of having their honesty tested, actions questioned, and image bashed, eventually damaging one’s self-esteem. If the user does not put a halt to anonymous questioning after they’ve already fallen victim to “anon bashing”, they suffer comment after comment of demeaning verbiage flooding their inbox. Soon, even strongly optimistic individuals will fall prey to the condescending harassment of their peers. It is all too common to see cheerful people turn into pessimists. Such an initially simple and harmless intention of exciting user life can morph into a lethal and emotionally degrading exchange of Q&A. Because of this, people may become very unhappy individuals who cannot control their own emotions properly, and oftentimes would end up lashing out at the resulting instability at others. These insecurities are then observed and questioned once again through that wretched anonymous button! Even if it is an attempt to poke fun into others’ lives, anonymous questioning can and most likely will lead to displeasing tension and shaky feelings. After all, once people put a mask on, they fail to take responsibility for their actions. To have a bright and confident spirit be torn down by anonymous comments is a excruciating sight. The few moments of entertainment gained on the asking end do not balance out the discomfort imposed on the receiving end. Online socializing does have its boundaries in this sense. Take a few precautions before entering a world full of anonymity, realize the consequences, and remember the saying that’s far too overheard but never entirely understood: curiosity killed the cat.

Why do you strut around campus like a know-it-all?

THE MASK OF ANONYMITY:

What students experience with online bashing “ I don’t have a formspring because I think it is another way for someone to bully you and bullying on formspring is inevitable.” Mahtab Danai, senior “I deleted my formspring because all that I got on there was stuff that I rather hear in person or didn’t want to hear at all. I didn’t want to give them an outlet when they deserved nothing from me.” Julia Seaton, sophomore “I have the curiosity of a reality check on whether people actually like me or not.” Varsha Prabhakar, sophomore

You think you’re cool? You’re just a poser.


THE PROSPECTOR

MAY 27, 2011

opinions

5

DEATH OF BIN LADEN Should the death of an enemy be celebrated?

Liberty for Free

Respect for Life

ALYA OMAR copy editor JACKIE BREUER in-depth assistant

SAMUEL LEE opinions assistant

On September 11, 2001, America watched in horror as a group of terrorists hijacked three planes, crashing them into the windows of the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and a field in Virginia. Family members watched as their loved ones’ lives were prematurely taken from them. Days later, leader of Al Qaeda Osama bin Laden vanished after taking responsibility for orchestrating the attacks, leaving behind an uncertain, tormented future. From that day, it has been one of the top priorities of the U.S. government to take down the man who instructed such heartbreak for thousands of its citizens. As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 loomed overhead, when President Barack Obama announced to the nation that an attack on bin Laden’s compound was successful, the spectrum of emotion was of massive contrast. While some recognized the magnitude that bin Laden’s death held as a weight lifted off of their grieving shoulders, others rebuked the celebrations, finding it inappropriate to disrespect the dead. However, it is not another person’s right to judge another person’s happiness and the expression of said emotion. People are affected differently by major events and define closure in a different way. 3,000 families continued with their lives forever changed, and though their losses were met with sympathy and pledges of remembrance, it was never combatted with justice because the man who orchestrated the events continued to lead his life, while their lost ones could not. From the perspective of the somewhat naive, bin Laden’s death signifies nothing but the end of a human life. To others, it was a monumental moment of closure, an assurance that the man that executed the execution was not pardoned for what he had done. This is not to say that the only proper reaction to bin Laden’s death is to galavant through the streets, chanting “U.S.A.” The death of bin Laden is simply a headline to some, while for others it is a sign of redemption for the lost loved ones. It is not in anyone’s capabilities to stand back and determine the value of such an event for someone else. Whether you feel compelled to run through the streets singing the national anthem or to simply hold a moment of silence, it is imperative to realize that the next best action is to move on and keep those that lost their lives on September 11 and during the war on terrorism in our hearts forever.

A DIVIDED

The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them.” -- Lois McMaster Bujold

AMERICA

I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” — Martin Luther King Jr.

Osama died, Americans cried… in happiness. Yes, you read that right! “Life, liberty and justice for all” except for certain Arab terrorists — they just get two out of the three. As soon as news of the al-Qaeda leader’s death reached the American public, thousands of Americans flooded Times Square and the White House to pop bottles of champagne, sing, chant “U-SA” and smile for the camera. Times like this throw doubts on whether Americans truly value the life of another human being. There should be no celebration for the death of Osama bin Laden. Admittedly, bin Laden’s is crucial to American security. The nation ought to thank President Bush for collecting the necessary intelligence throughout his presidency. It should also thank President Obama for capturing the terrorist when given the opportunity, unlike President Clinton; his stained presidency includes an incident in which he refused the Sudanese government’s offer to arrest and extradite bin Laden. Though the operation may have been necessary, bin Laden’s death is nothing to celebrate. Unless malice and vengeance form the bedrock of American principles (as opposed to, say, basic respect for human life), there is no justifiable reason for celebration: Terror attacks will not stop just because bin Laden descended to Hell. Just a few weeks after his death, suicide bombers murdered 51 Pakistanis in retaliation. Even worse, his death does not mean an end to outrageously invasive TSA procedures. Three year old boy: Wait, I thought bad terror man was gone! TSA “agent”: Quiet, I’m fondling your genitals. Americans running to the White House to celebrate bin Laden’s death with flags and drunkenness exhibited the same kind of euphoria that certain groups of Afghans displayed on 9/11. Chanting “U.S.A” just makes the entire circus more obscene. We must not lower our moral standards to those of the terrorists. Had people stayed home in quiet introspection and prayer, then that would have demonstrated true American exceptionalism. People are fully justified in feeling relief over the destruction of a mass murderer. But a sense of joy does not belong to a nation that considers itself a representative of everything that is good with the world.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Future homecoming court should be open to all classes, not just seniors Last month, we reported on ASB Executive Council’s new Homecoming Court nomination process for the 2011-2012 school year. This process involves several steps: nominating only senior candidates, having the top 20 male and top 20 female candidates complete a questionnaire about their school involvement, selecting the top 10 male and top 10 female candidates based on that questionnaire and having students from all classes choose their top six males or female Court candidates in an open vote. According to ASB, the new system is meant to ensure that the Homecoming Court accurately portrays our school’s values. However, there is considerable opposition to this policy across class lines. We completely agree with the new system’s purpose; screening candidates through a questionnaire on school involvement will be an effective way to ensure that only qualified, upstanding students make it on the Court. However, we believe that restricting the Court to only seniors goes against our school’s traditions and spirit of class unity. Homecoming has always been an event where the entire

school comes together for the sake of school pride and spirit. Students from freshmen to seniors flock to Homecoming because of the memories it creates and the kindred bonds they are able to forge with their friends. The event gives students a chance to garner happy memories and strengthen friendships with their peers — usually those in the same class. When there is not a freshman face to be found in the Homecoming Court, how delightful, inclusive or memorable will attending freshmen think Homecoming is? Supporters try to justify this massive exclusion of students by saying that all students will have the opportunity to be nominated to the court once they go through four years of high school. This assertion completely ignores the motivational and inspirational value the court can provide. If court members are meant to be shining examples of perfect Pioneers, these examples should be relatable and plentiful. Having a court from all classes will allow students who are not seniors to recognize that even one, two or three years at our school can make a difference. Having all classes represented on the Homecoming Court

will also maintain our school’s sense of community and unity. Homecoming is not meant to be an exclusive affair; with each class having an equal chance to compete in areas like skits and posters, it gives a level playing field for all classes to shine. If we deny freshmen, sophomores and juniors opportunities that seniors have in what is supposed to be a schoolwide event, they will feel excluded — which is exactly the opposite of what Homecoming is all about. In an April Prospector poll, 66% of students polled, including seniors, opposed the new seniors-only Homecoming Court nomination process. If anything, ASB Executive Council should listen to this supermajority of its constituency and work to revise this process instead of single-handedly implementing it. Homecoming is for all CHS students, and every part of Homecoming, the Court included, should be open to students regardless of class. We believe that unity and inclusiveness are core Pioneer values. It only makes sense that the Pioneers’ Homecoming Court embodies them.


features

MAY 27, 2011

6

TINO’S ANIMAL KI GDO CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE ASIAN SOUL

Sophomore’s feathery pals help in many ways SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN photo editor

She has chicken soup for the pet lover’s soul — and no, not the book. The fact is, sophomore Julie Chen’s pets are chickens and she has consumed them in soup form before. While Chen does love her fuzzy, egg-laying creatures, she shares an, lets just say, atypical bond with them. Through this bond though, she has learned a great deal about the nature of animals and the responsibility that comes along with caring for them. A year ago, at Chen’s request, her family drove two hours to a farm and picked up a handful of “female” (four out of the eight grew up to be male) chicks. They built a coop and everyday, fed them vegetables, checked their feed and refilled their water. With time “scooping up morning presents” was added to the to-do list; one egg per chicken a day, hard-boiled in the morning is not a bad deal at all. California state law, though, prohibits housing roosters in residential areas (a blessing for those who like to sleep in) so Chen’s family needed a way to dispose of their four not-so-female chickens. “We ate them. We are Asians so of course we know how to kill chickens,” said Chen, “It’s really just a quick throat cut.” This may sound brutal and Chen herself initially had much trouble with this idea. That being said, she eventually came to peace with eating her chickens under the circumstances. First of all, Chen was never excessively attached to her chickens as others may be with their more conventional pets.

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Chrome, Chicovo, Phoenix, Chocolate and Turtle — but they grow up really fast. I went on a cruise for a week and they all changed colors so I couldn’t tell who was who anymore,” said Chen, “It’s not like killing a pet dog or anything.” She is comfortable with it from a moral standpoint as well. “The whole reason we have this garden is because my mom read this book called Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. It talks about this writer who starts a farm and raises her own animals. Her philosophy is that if one raises them naturally, it’s ethical to eat them. I feel better about eating these chickens rather than eating commercially grown ones, fattened

We are Asians, so of course we know how to kill chickens.

up in two months,” added Chen. Aside from, when occasion calls, eating them, Julie also spends a great deal of time babysitting her chickens. She has made some quite interesting observations. “Chickens are very vicious actu sometimes,” Chen said, “They actually have a pecking order. Sometimes I’ll feed them dandelion leaves and certain chickens are not allowed chick to come and eat. The little chickens were initially at the bottom of the order and the red chicken was at the very bottom but once so she started laying, she gained social status. Now the once oldest, bot meanest black chicken is at the bottom because she stopped laying.” Overall, while owning chickens has taught Julie ad a thing or two, she admits that it is not for everyone. “It’s kind of a hassle. Whether you should own one or not depends on where you live, how your backyard com is, and how committed you are to waking up at 6 am morn in the morning to angry c h i c k e n s ,” Chen warns, “If that doesn’t concern you, then two bucks a chick at Gilroy. Good luck!”

OWNING A PET CAN HELP WITH STRES KEVIN CHU news editor

While most people think of massage, meditation and yoga as natural, healthy stress relievers, there is another option that is fluffier and more loveable: getting a pet. Not only do pets help relieve stress, but they can also improve one’s mood, control one’s blood pressure, reduce loneliness and provide social support— all of which are important for health and well-being, and for avoiding stress and depression. Animals are relatively consistent in their behaviors — such as locations and times of eating, sleeping, and cuddling — which provide a stable, predictable and thus less stressful aspect in the owner’s life. Their unconditional love is also extremely comforting — pets greet their owners with excitement when they come home, they can usually tell when their owners are upset, and many pets will cuddle up next to their owners, providing soothing contact. A 2002 study by re-

searchers at the State University of New York showed that when performing a stressful ta felt less stressful in the presence of pets th presence of a spouse or close friend. Pet ow had significantly lower baseline heart rates a pressure than the participants who did not o Caring for a pet often results in a sense o tion and fulfillment. In addition, owning pet the likelihood of going outside and interac others, providing opportunities for mood-r cialization. “I spend up to an hour each day taking for walks,” said sophomore Abishek Kumar. A 1999 study found that male AIDS pat less likely to suffer from depression if they ow “Pet ownership among men who have A vides a certain level of companionship that h them cope better with the stresses of th lives,” said psychologist Judith Siegel, a UC professor of public health and lead aut of the report. “This is one more study demonstrates the health benefits that ing a pet can provide.” In addition, pets help decrea pressure, heart rate and muscl

SHE IS HER DOGS’ BEST FRIEND Junior goes home to take care of pets during lunch JAMIN SHIH features assistant

When the bell rings at 12:25 p.m. every day, students leave their classrooms, obligations and quite often campus to enjoy 40 minutes of leisure. One student, however, exits campus not to leave her responsibilities behind but to take on another set. While her classmates spend lunchtimes with their friends, junior Ashley Kan visits and takes care of her three pet dogs, a chore she says teaches her both responsibility and time management skills that will aid her throughout her life. Kan feeds her three dogs, two Chihuahuas named Missy and Teddy and a Pomeranian named Charlie, every day during lunch because no one else is available to do so at that time. This causes her to miss out on the social banter that occurs during lunchtime, and she admits that she sacrifices spending time with her friends because of her pets. Regardless, she is sure that her dogs are completely worth the sacrifice. “I’m really close to my dogs. They’re really my best friends sometimes, because they’re always there for me,” Kan said. Indeed, just as Kan gives to her dogs, they give equally back to her. The sacrifice does not seem nearly as significant when her

WHAT KIND OF PET DO YOU HAVE?

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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

features

7

OM: EVERYTHING ON PETS WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PET?

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both in reaction to stressful events over a period of time. Owning a pet requires daily walks and other opportunities for exercise (another proven stress reliever) are also increased. Recovering addicts who struggle with high levels of stress should research different pets to determine which types, breeds, personalities and ages seem like a good match for you. For instance, if having to potty train a puppy sounds stressful, look into getting a dog that’s already trained is an appropriate option. For people who are often away from home, a more selfsufficient animal like a cat might be a better choice. There is nothing quite like hav hav- ing a warm ball of fur curl up next to you or an excitedly thumping tail greeting you — and it’s even more satisfying to know that these furry friends are helping to improve our lives.

“My dream pet would be “F” the White Winged Horse. It’s name is F so that when it takes my last name, Lai, its full name will be F Lai. And then I can tell it: ‘F Lai, fly!’ And then I’ll go around raiding towns on my mount.” -Alan Lai, senior “Well, I kind of just want a ferret. Not really creative or anything... I just like them!” -Andrew Qu, junior “My dream pet is a rainbow-horned unicorn that can fly and take me places, but that can also understand what I’m saying and be cuddly.” -Jeong Eun Lee, freshman “I like white tigers because they look more unique than other types of tigers.” -Brian Nguyen, senior

COMPILED BY TESS WU

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N O N E

12%

57% 170 PEOPLE POLLED COMPILED BY FRED HAN

Passing of pets leaves student stronger

ANAND HEMMADY features assistant

Disclaimer: The Prospector strongly encourages owners to spay or neuter pets, and acknowledges that some of the behavior exhibited by the owners of the cats in the following article is irresponsible. The Prospector also would like to warn readers that some elements of the following article may be exaggerated. Everything must end. This is a rule of the universe. Unfortunately, relationships with pets are not exempt from this rule. No matter how well an owner takes care of a pet, it will eventually pass away, and the owner will have to move on without it. The unavoidable pain from having a pet die often turns many away from keeping pets, and often raises questions as to whether having pets is worth the pain. In the end, though, the benefits of having pets far outweigh the negatives. Sophomore Brent Knaack knows the pain of losing pets all too well. Having once had thirty cats, Knaack could only watch helplessly as cat after cat died, leaving him with only five. “Our family of cats started when my dad was looking through boxes in our backyard and he found three kittens in a box,” Knaack said. “They were born literally just an hour before we found them. We took care of them because their mom never did. They grew up, and then they had kittens. Eventually we had around thirty cats, all living in our backyard in makeshift shelters.” Later, though, Knaack’s beloved pets started dying. “There was one cat in particular with whom I had a close relationship,” said Knaack as he recounted the death of his favorite cat. “I called him Tiny, because he had growth problems, and he never grew any bigger than my hand. This led to internal organ failure, and he passed away. I respected him because even in his last few hours of pain, he was determined to stay alive, and he survived through a lot of pain and suffering. I rarely cry, but when Tiny died, I couldn’t stop crying for two hours.” U

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nothing. During her daily fifteen minute visits to her dogs, she does feed them. The time she spends with her dogs is rewarding and her er an unconditional love that mirrors her own. t always there. They’re always playful, they always make me happy… n a good mood,” said Kan. g care of her dogs does cost her some of her free time, the experience he responsibility and time management skills she earns for the future es up for it. Kan stresses that it is completely different from normal ent duties to care for another living being and that owning three dogs wed her to experience both responsibility and the joy of bringing hapss to someone or something else. These lessons can also be applied e world outside of high school and pets; Kan finds applications well beyond homework assignments or tests. “For the future, if you ever have kids, you’re going to have to take care of something. You’re going to have to take care of cleaning up after them. It’s just a huge responsibility,” said Kan. While many students have only one set of respon responsibilities to worry about at school, Kan’s pet duties begin where her school ones end. Despite seeming like a large hassle, however, her dogs bring her the kind of joy and teach her the kind of lessons that only COUR TESY OF AS HLEY pets can. KAN

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After Tiny’s death, Knaack witnessed the death of around 25 other cats. Knaack let his cats roam freely around the neighborhood, which annoyed the neighbors. The neighbors began leaving poisoned food out on their doorsteps. Knaack was forced to witness cat after cat dying from the food poisoning. He could do nothing to stop the death toll of cats from rising. In the end, only five cats remained. Despite all the grief that the deaths of his cats caused him, though, Knaack does not regret anything and is happy that he had the chance to know his cats. “One of the best times of my life was when I was playing around with the three original kittens,” Knaack said. “It was really cute when we let them into the house and watched them crawl around, pull out wires, and stumble and fall. In spite of all the pain I think it was worth it to have pets and I don’t regret it.” Clearly, the loss that pets bring will be painful. However, it would be foolish to refuse to entertain the thought of having pets simply because of the pain. After all, in life, happiness can only come with suffering. To discard things only because they will hurt us would ruin life entirely. Although pets die and losing them hurts, the overall relationship with pets brings more happi happiness than sorrow.


lifestyles

MAY 27, 2011

8

THE BOY WHO LIVES ON... THE LEGACY OF HARRY POTTER

NIKHIL KANTHI features assistant

T

here are moments in our lives when the harshness of reality casts a shadow over our happiness, causing it to be short-lived. On July 15th, when Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 comes out, I will have to struggle between pangs of excitement and sorrow as I watch a part of my life end. When I pored over the books time and time again in my younger days, I wondered what attracted me to the adventures of a boy wizard. What set this story apart from the other books I had devoured in my youth? I often put this question on hold as I turned the last page in the last book and started anew with the first book. I spent days walking the corridors and grounds of Hogwarts. However, as the pages became more and more familiar, I realized that there would soon be a day when I would be bored by the tale that once meant the world to me. That day, I took the books out of my room and anticipated a day when I would open the books and be amazed once more. A few days ago, I turned the first page of the first book. The parchment-like scent of

the pages with which I was so familiar brought with them a painful comprehension. In less than two months, the journey would be over. I think I can answer my question today. I did not love Harry Potter because it was a friend or mentor. The reason I love these books is because I could see myself as Harry. Rowling erased the line between the reader and Harry somewhere in those pages. Readers empathized with Harry when he was in danger or depressed, and that empathy carried over to the moments when Harry was triumphant. We were united by the naive hope that things will get better. When the circumstances were not as happy and bright as they could have been, I knew that my time would come. Harry Potter taught me that victory was not impossible, and I think we all yearn for that certainty. It taught me the power of hope. I wish for a day when the corridors of Hogwarts will be as alien to me as they were to Harry on his first night there, and I wish that I could feel the loss of Sirius or Dumbledore without expecting it. I doubt that day will come before July 15th, but that’s fine. I think I will do just fine without reading the story I have read seventy times before as I wait outside the midnight premiere. Good job, my friend. Mischief managed.

POTTER PREMIERE PARTY

1. Buy midnight premiere tickets in advance, optimally three to four weeks before the movie.

Want to make your HP premiere night truly magical? Here are a few suggestions that will make your night less Dudley and a tad more Diggory.

2. First, decide on a menu for your party. For terrific Potter recipes, visit http://www.mugglenet.com/misc/rosmertas/index.shtml. Remember that Butterbeer and Golden Snitch cupcakes are absolute necessities! 3. Decorate! After you settle on a venue, plaster the walls with Harry Potter-themed posters. Make sure to include the official movie poster! 4. Costumes are mandatory — they should consist of robes, traditional Hogwarts uniforms, wands and scarves. Assign each guest a specific character in his or her customized Hogwarts-style invitation. 5. Finally, plan some activities! Some suggestions: i. Test your knowledge of the series with some trivia and use Bertie Botts’ Every Flavor Beans as the prize (or punishment!) ii. Reenact your favorite scenes from the series, and be creative. iii. Host a Dueling Club. iv. Watch Deathly Hallows, Part I in preparation for the finale! MADHURI SATHISH

Lady Gaga’s Born This Way contains darker and more serious overtones JESSE ZHOU features editor

The Mother Monster has done it again. Lady Gaga, the artist who has so far defined the voice of a new generation, has been inching toward far more radical themes in her music (believe it or not) with her new album Born This Way. While the widely acclaimed The Fame introduced Gaga as the queen of “Just Dance”, Born This Way instead puts her in the spotlight as a woman with the most independent spirit in the music industry. Many of Gaga’s songs indeed revolve around being proud and self-sufficient. “Hair” and “Bad Kids” promote the idea that being fiercely independent is essential to having true freedom. In addition, her songs call on people to respect those who choose to be independent. For example, one line from “Hair” states, “I just wanna be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.” Her words give the listener a window into a troubled soul who wants nothing more than for others to be accepted in today’s cruel society. The overall tone of Born This Way is darker and more disorderly than The Fame as well. However, Gaga uses this style in a unique way, and trust me, she uses it well. By utilizing the power

of static-shock beats, Gaga’s songs are a rather elegant synthesis of symphony and cacophony: a paradox pleasing to the ear. The fractured mix of piano, electro synthesizers, electric guitar and abnormal beats ends up finding its way into songs like “Judas” and “Marry the Night.” The atmosphere Gaga has created in Born This Way is terrifying and euphoric at the same time. By using theme and tone to their full potential, Lady Gaga’s new album, Born This Way, is bound to be one of the greatest albums of the decade. From songs about true love (“You and I”) to being who you are (“Born This Way”), the Mother Monster covers a full range of topics that will leave the listener surprised. By the time the last song finishes, something will be blown. It will either be your mind or your CD player from abusing the replay button too much.

TOP 3 SINGLES 1. Born This Way 2. The Edge of Glory 3. Judas COMPILED BY NATASHA SHARMA COURTESY OF SpreePiX-Berlin


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

lifestyles

9

The beauty OFTHRIFTING

Looking for something trendy without breaking the bank? Thrift stores sell classic pieces at surprinsgly low prices. You don’t have to buy couture to be chic.

VICTORIA DUAN copy-editor

The outrageous prices offered at too many stores in the mall make it hard for frugal shoppers to pick out affordable items that complement them. Never mind purchasing an outfit, or a nice set of furniture — a single shirt will devastate one’s wallet. But sophomore Brittney Lundquist and junior Noa Rosenberg, both experienced in the ways of thrifting, know better than to blow their entire savings on just one item. Thrift stores are shops owned and run by charities or nonprofit organizations as fundraisers for their cause. Unlike conventional stores, thrift stores carry a multitude of different products. Each new shipment is always full of surprises, and the prices of the products are relatively low. “I have found a lot of name brands like Abercrombie, the North Face, J. Crew and Banana Republic [while thrifting]. It’s a nice feeling to say that you can own name brand clothing and only have to pay a fraction of the original price,” Lundquist said. Although the quality of the donations are often questionable, Lundquist has found that the overall value of a thrift store’s merchandise can be roughly predicted by the city the store is located in.

“I have found that the ‘richer’ cities have the fancier, nicer, name brand clothing options — for example, San Francisco, Santa Cruz and Los Angeles,” Lundquist said. However, nearby thrift stores, including Goodwill, Salvation Army and Savers can all be thoroughly scavenged for good deals and quality items. Contrary to Lundquist, Rosenberg approaches thrifting with a slightly different tactic. While Lundquist is more oriented towards browsing for clothes, Rosenberg thrifts with an open mind and warmly welcomes all possibilities that might come her way. “I may go shopping with the intent to find a new sweater and then I’ll leave the store with a new shelf for my room. The challenge of thrifting is not to find something that is the perfect fit, but finding things that have the potential to be cinched, hemmed, draped in a room or framed on a wall. When I do find something I like, it’s like finding a gem; that’s the beauty of thrifting!” Rosenberg said. With thrifting comes not only the thrill of hunting for the perfect item, but also the satisfaction of paying sensible prices for a purchase. Forget the unreasonable prices at the mall — go look for the cheaper counterpart at Goodwill.


sports

Have a healthy summer

Which is worse – resisting the urge to eat or mustering the willpower to exercise? Most people are reluctant to do either, as byproducts of animal evolution makes us inclined to eat as much as possible and save every last ounce of fat in case of famine. That’s right, those deliciously

dreadful, guilty calories that lurk in your In-NOut Cheeseburger with Onions are here to stay unless burned off by the exercise that we so despise. Here are some popular food items along with matching activities needed to part with those beloved calories.

VERDE

IN N’ OUT PEARL

CHEESE BURGER WITH ONIONS

306

480

Shop for one hour 14 minutes

MILK TEA (BUBBLE TEA)

Calories:

Calories alories:

Exercise:

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MAY 27, 2011

Exercise:

Garden for one hour and three minutes

CHIPOTLE

WING STOP

BARBACOA BURRITO

FRENCH FRIES

Calories:

Calories:

200

800

Exercise:

Exercise:

Run at nine mph for 11.5 minutes

Dance for three hours

Boosts that actually give you a boost NATALIE HOANG lifestyles assistant

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fter ordering a cold smoothie to quench the thirst of a hot summer’s day, the Jamba Juice cashier asks you, “Would you like a boost with that?”. You will proceed to ask what types they offer and are met with a list of seemingly health nourishing choices. The options tackle different aspects of the body, from the Charger and Antioxidant boosts to the Immunity and Energy boosts. Sure, it sounds convincing, but what is it exactly that you are putting into your body? Do the benefits live up to the name? Let us break it down. A boost is a dietary supplement intended to add the vitamins, minerals, fiber, or amino acids a person may lack in his or her daily consumption. In a scroll through the Jamba Juice Booster nutritional facts, noted is the abundance of Maltodextrin and Inulin in the energy and vitamin boosts. Substitutes for sugar, Maltodextrin and Inulin give a sweet taste and the energy provided by sugar without the calories and fat. This makes the 3G Charger, Antioxidant Power, Daily Vitamin, Immunity and Energy Boosts all great options for those in need of a pick-me-up without the extra carbohydrates and sugar to bog them down. The last three boosters are crafted to regulate the body’s systems to maintain healthy levels. Flax & Fiber, a promising Boost, is made of Flaxseed. It is known for reducing blood sugar levels, bad cholesterol, triglycerides, and being the great source of fiber it is, constipation. As for the Whey Protein and Soybean Boosts, their benefit is in the name: protein. Protein’s importance lies in it’s ability to repair body cells, build and repair muscles and bones, and control metabolism. These boosts are promising in their nature, so why not add them into your smoothie? Though it is unlikely one would purchase a smoothie with a boost everyday, or enough to feel the benefits, their intentions are there. A simple overthe-counter supplemental pill directed to take once a day is perhaps the better solution for those concerned about their health. But if mixing in a boost takes the guilt off of your 300-calorie smoothie, go for it!

AZADEH RONGERE

3G Charger™ Boost Antioxidant Power™ Boost Daily Vitamin™ Boost Energy™ Boost Flax & Fiber Boost Immunity™ Boost Soy Protein™ Boost Whey Protein™ Boost

PHOTOS BY: AZADEH RONGERE COMPILED BY: ERIC JANG

get

1 TONED

for summer COMPILED BY: NIKHIL KANTHI

LEG RISES

Lie on your back with your hands holding onto something heavy (like a bookshelf side), and raise your legs without bending your knees. 20 minutes (counting breaks) of these and a four-pack will be a breeze.

2 3

COMPILED BY: AZADEH RONGERE

SHUFFLE PUSH-UPS Do pushups while moving side to side. Nothing strains your biceps, triceps, deltoids, and laterals like some serious pushup shuffling. Aim for three or four sets of 20 reps to get some toned arms.

RUNNING Put on a pair of shorts, plug in your favorite song on your MP3, and speed off on a strenuous but quick workout. Aim for anything under nine minutes (as long as you have warmed up), and you will have burned off a six-inch from Subway.

PHOTOS BY: SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

Badminton Team Dilemma: Winning does not always reap the rewards ERIC JANG sports assistant

There is no doubt that winning feels good — addicting even, if victories come frequently. However, even a winning streak has its disadvantages when the victories become too easy. The badminton team has dominated its matches in a less-competitive league but it has done so at the expense of the valuable lessons gained by losing matches. Players compete against members of the other team in singles or doubles matches, ranked by skill level. The entire game is won by a majority of match wins from the team members. Players who train in competitive badminton clubs outside of school, such as Bintang, are often on

par with other club players from upper league schools. Since the school team is composed of both club badminton players and players who only train at school practices, the latter players are presented with formidable challenges when they have to play in higher leagues against more experienced players. Conversely, higher league players do not have enough of a challenge when they have to play in the lower league and so neither league is apt for both types of players. As a result, the Varsity and Junior Varsity teams have lost most of their games in higherdivision leagues for the last two years. However, because they have been bumped down to a lower league this year, the badminton team has remained undefeated the entire season. Although practice alone contributes to the

success of team members during matches, ingame experience is also vital to the growth of the player. Team members do not improve as much when all of their matches are won easily and their mistakes go unnoticed. When the Central Coast Section (CCS) championships roll around, players that have become accustomed to their successes may find themselves unprepared to face opponents of higher skill level. “I’m scared that they all think they’re good enough at the level they are at now and have no desire to concentrate during practice,” said varsity player Peggy Chiang about her teammates. Chiang learns which footwork needs practice and which shots she can improve on from losing against tougher players. Playing against difficult opponents in

the higher league not only reveals areas for self-improvement, but also builds appreciation for the competitive aspect of the sport. According to varsity player Lawrence Luk, failures are vital to good sportsmanship. Modesty is difficult to come by for those who seldom experience defeat. “Losing teaches me humility, because I can’t expect to walk all over my opponents all the time,” Luk said. Despite the fact that the badminton team has enjoyed a winning streak this year, some players believe that excessive victories have slowed athletic growth. Luk and Chiang believe that losing to higher-league contenders is a necessary step in improving and taking the team to the next level.


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sports sports

THE PROSPECTOR THE PROSPECTOR

MAY27, 27,2011 2011 MAY

Synchronized swimmer Ekaterina Frelikh pursues future Olympic dream AZADEH RONGERE sports editor

Above the surface, two artistic synchronized swimmers jump through the air in perfect harmony. The chemistry between the teammates allows their routines to be of sheer perfection. Their magical performance, a blend of gymnastics and dancing, requires flawless consistency. Below the surface is junior Ekaterina Frelikh an aspiring synchronized swimmer. Frelikh was born in Russia where she began her successful career as a synchronized swimmer at age nine. Before she became talented performer, Frelikh explored speed swimming, a quick but she quickly realized this sport bored her. She then turned to synchronized swimming deciding that it would provide her with more excitement. “I saw girls doing little leg things and I thought it was very cool and pretty, so I joined,” Frelikh said. When she joined a popular Russian team, she received a proper foundation for her synchronized swimming future through training. Ho w e v e r, when she emigrated from Russia four years ago, it seemed as if lon her aspirations could no longer become a reality. Once she moved to America, Frelikh lacked a synchronized swimming team so she reluctantly returned to speed swimming. After a year of break,

she was introduced to one of the best synchronizing swimming team in America in Santa Clara. After a successful try out, she joined the team. Despite a new addition, her team supported and welcomed Ferlikh and they built friendships only teammates could share. Although their occasional bonding activities do bring them closer, their natural chemistry already supports their undeniable bond. “We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable,” Frelikh said. However, to pursue her dream Frelikh had to compromise

We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable.

her academic schedule. Since her practices last from 4:00 to 8:30 p.m. every day, she found it hard to fit AP classes into her schedule. Even after these strenuous weekday practices she is unable to sleep in on weekends since she has practices from 7:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. Furthermore, during the summer, she practices ten hours each and every day. “I just have to make it work. I mean, I have to wake up early and sleep really late to balance out my workload with synchronized swimming,” Frelikh said. In addition, during the first semester of each school year, she and her team ruthlessly train and tirelessly practice. Throughout second semester there are multiple national and international

2010 West Side Junior Exibition

meets for which Frelikh must miss school in order to attend. Since she constantly takes “vacation” days, she treats tutorials and lunches like gold because she has to constantly make-up tests, in-class essays, class work and participation points. Nevertheless, she conveys that these tedious make-up sessions are a small price to pay to visit and compete in New York, Ohio, Texas, Florida and North Carolina. Despite her busy schedule, Frelikh still has to find time to design and make her own outfits. Although a tailor provides her with a handmade outfit, Frelikh has to manually decorate it with rhinestones, sparkles, beads and other embellishments. Despite the fact that synchronized swimming has its academic and time disadvantages, Frelikh’s future in swimming is more valuable, as she will soon conquer her next meet in Sw itzerland.

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End of the year countdown Memorial Day- NO SCHOOL

Stress-less Cafe!!

Baccalaurette 4th and 5th @ West Val- Period Final ley Presbyterian Church 2nd and 3rd Period Final

1st Period Final

6th and 7th Period Final

Graduation Ceremony@ De Anza College Football Field

Partying Partying YEAH! Partying Partying YEAH! Fun. Fun. Fun. Fun.

The Prospector wishes you a happy summer. Please Recycle


photoessay

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MAY 27, 2011

Health is Wealth Next time you are at the front of the line debating between the fresh fruit cup and the gooey chocolate chip cookie, choose wisely, for the outcomes of these battles are what add up to form a lifestyle. And what better time than now to start anew on the path to good health? Sounds simple enough, but what most of us fall short on is willpower. With one good look around campus, though, it is easy to get this dose of inspiration; students are constantly pursuing healthy activities as seen on this page. Juniors Zhijiang Li, Andrew Qu and Eric Lee (upper left) share a hug in the quad, while sophomores Brittany Rodriguez and Katelyn Howard (upper right) share a laugh during their laps around the pool. Junior Paolo Barrenechea (left) shoots hoops with a handful of other students who form teams and battle it out on the asphalt during lunchtime. In addition to mental and physical health, eating habits also constitute a big part of balanced living. Junior Bhavisha Shukla (bottom left) takes a refreshing gulp of H2O, while senior Vandita Manyam chows down on a handful of tangerine slices. Other healthy choices include grabbing a milk carton on your way out of the cafeteria or choosing to ride your bike to school. It really is as simple as that, so join your peers in pursuing a healthy lifestyle today.


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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

the Prospector 2010-2011 STAFF

Cupertino High School Established 1958 Vol LII., No. 5 | 2011

editor-in-chief harini jaganathan news editor kevin chu opinions editor abhishek zaveri features editor jesse zhou in-depth editors michelle cheung sunwoo jeong lifestyles editor natasha sharma sports editor azadeh rongere photo editors sindhu gnanasambandan copy editors alya omar victoria duan business manager jackie breuer

Lawson reflects on 35 years of teaching, changes over the years VIRENA GALOTRA lifestyles assistant

This year marks history teacher Jay Lawson’s 35th year as a teacher in this district. To commemorate the occasion his students made him cards and presented him with gifts. Lawson is one of the longest employed teachers on campus and, as a result, notices changes in diversity, teacher collaboration and technology at school over the years. Ever since he was a young boy, Lawson wanted to be a teacher. Both his parents were teachers in the district and his father was a prominent administrator as well. In fact, Sam H. Lawson Middle School is named in honor of his father. Lawson began his career as a history teacher at Monta Vista High School and simultaneously worked as a wrestling coach at Homestead High School at the same time. After only three years of teaching, he was laid off from his job as a history teacher in 1979. Lawson then became an intern to a special education teacher at Monta Vista High School while getting his credentials at night school. After he graduated, he became a full time special education teacher at Monta Vista High School. He then transferred to CHS in 1985 as both the head wrestling coach and a special education teacher. Fourteen years later in 1999, he took up his current position as a history teacher on campus, which is his favorite class to teach. “I really enjoy... sharing the stories of history and the older I get the easier it gets because I’ve lived through a lot of the things I’m teaching,” Lawson said. After 35 years of teaching, Lawson plans to continue teaching for another three years before retiring. “It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more

students,” he said. Over the years, Lawson has observed many changes pertaining to both the school and his job as a teacher. One of the major changes on campus is its diversification, a process that occurred gradually. He mentions that there is less of an emphasis on the trades and students have less interest in taking classes like auto shop, metal shop and cooking. In addition, a smaller percentage of students choose to pursue these types of careers. Lawson also notes

It’s so rewarding that…every year I’ve been able to make a difference in the lives of more and more students. Jay Lawson

History Teacher

that both teachers and students now use technology in the classroom on a regular basis. Computers have now become a daily teaching tool as well as a regular learning resource for students. Another positive change is how teaching has become a collaborative job. “We as teachers share our ideas and materials and to me that’s what makes it special. Being old timer, I have [some] things to offer [but] it’s also challenging to learn some of the new things,” Lawson said. However, the one thing he says that has stayed consistent is the enthusiasm of the students. “I love my time in the classroom with students. They make me feel young,” Lawson said.

SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

35 YEARS AND COUNTING| History teacher Jay Lawson contemplates the rapidly changing school and fulfilling years of teaching

IDC Best Dance Crew debuts choreographical talent news anand hemmady assistants regina hong nikhil kanthi opinions amar kantipudi assistants anthony kao gun ho lee features emily cheng assistants alyssa williams tess wu

JOANNA LEE sports assistant

Launching the first ever Intra-District Council Best Dance Crew (IDCBDC), crews from Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, and Cupertino showcased their best dance moves in front of a screaming crowd at the Lynbrook gym on Friday, May 13. Weeks of practicing and stress for all parties involved led up to a

lifestyles virena galotra assistants natalie hoang madhuri sathish in-depth jackie breuer assistants vani mulkareddy jamin shih sports fred han assistants joanna lee eric jang willie wang adviser ann peck editorial policy “The Prospector” is an open forum of expression for student editors to inform and educate their readers. It will not be reviewed by or restrained by school officials prior to publication or distribution. Advisors may and should coach and discuss content during the writing process. The staff of “The Prospector” seeks to recognize individuals, events, ideasand bring news to the Cupertino community in an accurate, professional and unbiased manner. “The Prospector” will not avoid publishing a story solely on the basis of possible dissent or controversy. If you believe an error has been made, or wish to have your opinion expressed in “The Prospector”please contact us via mail or e-mail. Letters sent become the sole property of “The Prospector” and can be edited for length, clarity, or accuracy. “The Prospector” editorial board reserves the right to accept or reject any ad in accordance with its advertising policy. Contact Us The Prospector 10100 Finch Avenue Cupertino, CA 95014 prospector.chs@gmail.com

JOANNA LEE

DANCE CREW SHOWCASE | Seniors Vi Viet, Benjamin Du, Sheng Poon, Willie Wang and Brian Walsh display their talents at the first ever IDCBDC

successful turnout of the first ever IDCBDC. Cupertino’s IDC Commissioners, senior Mennen Kassa, 12, and junior Ashley Park, 11, gathered with the other schools to sort out the details and have been working for weeks planning the event. With the performance date having been changed multiple times due to various reasons, some were beginning to fear that the event may never actually take place. However, with positive attitudes, both Kassa and Park continued to push for the event to take place. Crews were selected based on a competitive audition process in which each crew demonstrated their choreography and were judged based on overall preparedness and enthusiasm. In the end, popular hip hop crew, GTFO, and newly formed all female crew, XI So Fly, were selected to represent Cupertino at the IDCBDC. Other schools, however, did not have as many competing teams as Cupertino did, thus leading to some additional conflicts. Though enduring another minor conflict, Kassa reassures the event will have the turnout it is hoping for. Said Kassa, “IDC has been able to work everything out and we are very excited for this upcoming event.” With the dance scene on the rise, participating schools thought it would be appropriate and fun to hold a showcase that would allow students to show off the their individual styles and ultimately reign supreme while holding the Best Dance Crew title. Said Kassa, “IDC was eager to plan an event that would give the chance for students in the district to bond and show off their talents. We noticed how popular the dance scene has become throughout the district and decided that a dance competition would be the perfect way to promote district unity.” On Friday afternoon, students from all participating schools filed into the Lynbrook gym and watched eagerly as each school performed their best. Though supportive of each competing crew, the crowd screamed passionately after their representing crews performed. Though Kassa and Park originally planned for qualified judges who are already familiar with the dance scene, qualified judges were unable to be recruited before the show took place. In the end, the audience took the role of the judges. Each group showcased a variety of creative and intricate routines, including a martial arts inspired dance, some instances of jazz and lyrical, and various popping and breaking moves. Even though IDCBDC was a dance show, each school perfected a dance number that was tailored to their own individual styles and personalities that really became a sight to see. After six talented and varying performances, it was time to finally announce the winner and holder of the IDCBDC title. The audience was able to vote for their favorite crew and the crew with the most votes would take home the title. Ultimately, it was Lynbrook who took away this year’s title. With a successful turnout for the first ever IDCBDC, it is likely this event will return in the upcoming school year as an even better dance spectacle.


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

Letter to the editor Editor, The recent staff editorial (“Affirmative Action: Out-dated and Out-weighted) in the May 6th edition of The Prospector, though well-written, and thoughtful, failed to address some key issues concerning affirmative action policies. First and foremost, the editorial fails to mention the 1996 California proposition (Proposition 209) that banned racial, gender, and ethnic preferences for the University of California and the Cal-State systems. The majority of Cupertino High School students entering four-year universities, attend either a UC or Cal-State school, so the “factors of admission that are simply out of our control” is a non-factor for most CHS students. In addition to the omission of Proposition 209, the article does not cite key data about family income in the United States. The thesis of the article is that because racial discrimination is no longer the issue it once was, affirmative action programs should shift focus to income, and not race. A simple look at the last US Census reveals the following yearly median family incomes broken down by race: Asian Americans $73, 578, White $65,000, Hispanic $40, 466, and African-Americans $39,879. In sum, if UC or Cal-State were to address income, rather than race, we would still be targeting the same group of underrepresented students. The final missing piece is the assumption that every California high school student competes at the same level. The Fremont Union High School District community is an amazing place to work (I have worked in the district for 14 years and would not want to work anywhere else), and go to school (I am a 1992 Fremont High School graduate); however, it is easy to forget about the inherent advantages we have at our disposal. Not all California students have access to numerous AP courses, award winning performing arts programs, amazing teachers, supportive parents, comprehensive sports programs, or the financial means for SAT prep courses. To go back to your original argument, access to these things are “factors of admission that are out of our control”. If I attend a high school without these luxuries, how in the world can a UC admission officer look at me in the same light, as say a student who attends Cupertino, Lynbrook, Monta Vista, Fremont, or Homestead High Schools? (To be honest, the college admissions process has always been a mystery to me. Every day I am surrounded by 1,800 amazing students, and think they should be able to attend any college of their choice! ) In sum, affirmative action programs are but one tool to help underrepresented students attend select universities. Is it the only tool? Not by any stretch of the imagination — I am not naïve enough to think just one tool can close the achievement gap. Any attempt to close the achievement gap is one that would require a great deal more than affirmative action. Andy Walczak Assistant Principal

Want to advertise with the Prospector? email prospector.chs@gmail.com

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Quad and cafeteria redesign: (cont. pg. 1)

ally a part of the project since we were given the opportunity to voice our opinions.” After hearing from all types of people at the school, the architects feel the need to preserve several areas of CHS. Said architect Diane Rappold, “The quad is a well loved spot on campus that we will improve on and ‘celebrate’. We also recognize the significance of the Senior Lawn — which may be transformed in the new design, but the concept will remain.” Although CHS is only undergoing the first phase of the rebuilding process, many students and teachers are excited to see the project progress because they had the chance to voice their opinions.

Letter from the editor Dear Reader, You hold in your hands the last full issue of the Prospector for the 2010-2011 school year. As was the case in our last issue, junior editors worked hard to create and edit the content of these pages. In this issue, you will learn about having chickens as pets, find out how much to exercise to work of that chipotle burrito and become an expert in throwing Harry Potter themed parties. Finish strong as the year draws to a close. Summer is nearly here! Keep an eye out for senior issue, which comes out next week. Please recycle! Harini Jaganathan Editor-in-Chief


opinions

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MAY 27, 2011

Mo’ money mo’ problems: Child investment woes FRED HAN sports assistant

T

oday’s opinionated article revolves around the issue of parents’ financial investment in children. Strictly speaking, an investment is spending money in order to gain profitable returns. There are two reasons why parents would spend money on behalf of their children. The first is from a biological perspective, in which parents invest money to ensure the survival of their offspring. The offspring will then breed, continuing the survival of those genes and the human race. The second is the less obvious: to ensure the prolonged survival of the parent. But that’s not the point. The key question is how much money should a parent invest in their children? Parents should provide only the bare minimal financial support for the child to live comfortably to prevent spoiling the child and to teach the child financial independence. Before any misunderstandings form, “bare minimal financial support” does not mean starving the child or forcing them to work in dirty coal mines. Instead, the child should be full fed, clothed and prepared to learn the art of survival: Cupertino’s art of survival is hunting for colleges and farming for GPA. Any luxury beyond the basic necessities and tools for enhanced education — which include, but is not limited to, overly luxurious eating style or incessant shopping trips — tends to spoil the child. Any form of spoiling will spoil the chances for the child to succeed and successfully reproduce or support the parent. Psychologically speaking, spoiling is a case of operant condition – a system of punishment and reward. For example, if a child learns to associate crying tantrums with getting whatever

he wants, then he will repeat the behavior. The parent needs to understand when to say “no” – or else it is like subprime lending. Continuation of inappropriate and excessive parental financial investment will soon lead to bursting the bubble of the inflated expectations and soon depression. Remember, parents in Cupertino should focus primarily about necessities for survival in life: working hard for happiness. The key step to help the child work hard for happiness is by preventing him or her from being spoiled. In other words, learning to say “no”. If a child truly wants to achieve or want something, then make him or her work for it — which leads to the next point: financial independence. Remember, the fastest route to corruption (spoiling in this case) is permission. Work is the fastest route to independence. If a child does not understand at least the core basics of money and economics, the chances are he or she will not understand how to deal with money later on in life. Then the children’s children — if the original children still survived by that point (a highly unlikely situation in Cupertino’s overly competitive environment) would not understand financial importance either. This results in continued financial dependence on the parents later in life — a counterproductive and non-profitable investment. The solution to this is to teach the children to work for what they want. Directing their desires and creative energies toward work for financial incentives will teach them the importance of money and give them a sense of dealing with different quantities of money. In conclusion, parents must learn to say no to any potential spoiling opportunities (although reward for hard work and excellent performance is mandatory) and spend only enough to guide the children’s creative energies. By freely giving money whenever a child demands so or not teaching them the importance of financial independence, those parents are setting themselves up for a potentially

spoiled child. Otherwise the “investment” of all the money and time put into improving the survival rate. However, do note that parents should never force a child into working so much that the child is greatly inclined to rebel. It is a delicate balance of the carrot and the whip.

EMILY CHENG

THE AGE OF INNOCENCE VS. MODERN-DAY TEENS

Anonymous questioning is unnecessary cowardice AMAR KANTIPUDI sports assistant EMILY CHENG news assistant

Ask me something, anything. Curious? It is an unsurprising feeling people get when they come across a chance to ask whatever they desire of their peers. When curiosity takes over, thoughts run free, and a new, undiscovered side of a person will be unleashed. This is even more evident when people hide behind a veil of anonymity because they ask anything and everything they can until they have satisfied their curiosity. It is these intentions, this sense of infallible curiosity and innate bigotry humans tend to demonstrate that often diminishes personal confidence. Just a simple question can induce the feeling of throwing out your entire life on the chopping block. The practice of attempting to fish out potential secrets without identification is a privileged feature provided to people by social networking sites. Services such as Tumblr and Formspring allow literally anyone to ask specific people questions — uncensored and unmonitored. It is through sites like these that the world has been introduced to concepts such as “trolling” and cyber bullying Anonymous questioning does comes with its fair share of reasons. After all, some people are just too afraid to ask something personal. It is almost always easier to talk to someone when away from the spotlight. That, by far, is the most appealing aspect of talking to friends online rather than in person or on the phone. Nonetheless unless a relationship is significantly strong, it is nearly impossible to separate sarcastic comments from serious ones. Furthermore, since people can say whatever they want online without having to admit who they are, they resort to a more crude language that can sometimes belittle the peer. Though, many still set up an anonymous question box expecting fun, light-hearted and interesting questions that can help them kill time, in the

long run, users run the risk of having their honesty tested, actions questioned, and image bashed, eventually damaging one’s self-esteem. If the user does not put a halt to anonymous questioning after they’ve already fallen victim to “anon bashing”, they suffer comment after comment of demeaning verbiage flooding their inbox. Soon, even strongly optimistic individuals will fall prey to the condescending harassment of their peers. It is all too common to see cheerful people turn into pessimists. Such an initially simple and harmless intention of exciting user life can morph into a lethal and emotionally degrading exchange of Q&A. Because of this, people may become very unhappy individuals who cannot control their own emotions properly, and oftentimes would end up lashing out at the resulting instability at others. These insecurities are then observed and questioned once again through that wretched anonymous button! Even if it is an attempt to poke fun into others’ lives, anonymous questioning can and most likely will lead to displeasing tension and shaky feelings. After all, once people put a mask on, they fail to take responsibility for their actions. To have a bright and confident spirit be torn down by anonymous comments is a excruciating sight. The few moments of entertainment gained on the asking end do not balance out the discomfort imposed on the receiving end. Online socializing does have its boundaries in this sense. Take a few precautions before entering a world full of anonymity, realize the consequences, and remember the saying that’s far too overheard but never entirely understood: curiosity killed the cat.

Why do you strut around campus like a know-it-all?

THE MASK OF ANONYMITY:

What students experience with online bashing “ I don’t have a formspring because I think it is another way for someone to bully you and bullying on formspring is inevitable.” Mahtab Danai, senior “I deleted my formspring because all that I got on there was stuff that I rather hear in person or didn’t want to hear at all. I didn’t want to give them an outlet when they deserved nothing from me.” Julia Seaton, sophomore “I have the curiosity of a reality check on whether people actually like me or not.” Varsha Prabhakar, sophomore

You think you’re cool? You’re just a poser.


THE PROSPECTOR

MAY 27, 2011

opinions

5

DEATH OF BIN LADEN Should the death of an enemy be celebrated?

Liberty for Free

Respect for Life

ALYA OMAR copy editor JACKIE BREUER in-depth assistant

SAMUEL LEE opinions assistant

On September 11, 2001, America watched in horror as a group of terrorists hijacked three planes, crashing them into the windows of the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and a field in Virginia. Family members watched as their loved ones’ lives were prematurely taken from them. Days later, leader of Al Qaeda Osama bin Laden vanished after taking responsibility for orchestrating the attacks, leaving behind an uncertain, tormented future. From that day, it has been one of the top priorities of the U.S. government to take down the man who instructed such heartbreak for thousands of its citizens. As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 loomed overhead, when President Barack Obama announced to the nation that an attack on bin Laden’s compound was successful, the spectrum of emotion was of massive contrast. While some recognized the magnitude that bin Laden’s death held as a weight lifted off of their grieving shoulders, others rebuked the celebrations, finding it inappropriate to disrespect the dead. However, it is not another person’s right to judge another person’s happiness and the expression of said emotion. People are affected differently by major events and define closure in a different way. 3,000 families continued with their lives forever changed, and though their losses were met with sympathy and pledges of remembrance, it was never combatted with justice because the man who orchestrated the events continued to lead his life, while their lost ones could not. From the perspective of the somewhat naive, bin Laden’s death signifies nothing but the end of a human life. To others, it was a monumental moment of closure, an assurance that the man that executed the execution was not pardoned for what he had done. This is not to say that the only proper reaction to bin Laden’s death is to galavant through the streets, chanting “U.S.A.” The death of bin Laden is simply a headline to some, while for others it is a sign of redemption for the lost loved ones. It is not in anyone’s capabilities to stand back and determine the value of such an event for someone else. Whether you feel compelled to run through the streets singing the national anthem or to simply hold a moment of silence, it is imperative to realize that the next best action is to move on and keep those that lost their lives on September 11 and during the war on terrorism in our hearts forever.

A DIVIDED

The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them.” -- Lois McMaster Bujold

AMERICA

I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” — Martin Luther King Jr.

Osama died, Americans cried… in happiness. Yes, you read that right! “Life, liberty and justice for all” except for certain Arab terrorists — they just get two out of the three. As soon as news of the al-Qaeda leader’s death reached the American public, thousands of Americans flooded Times Square and the White House to pop bottles of champagne, sing, chant “U-SA” and smile for the camera. Times like this throw doubts on whether Americans truly value the life of another human being. There should be no celebration for the death of Osama bin Laden. Admittedly, bin Laden’s is crucial to American security. The nation ought to thank President Bush for collecting the necessary intelligence throughout his presidency. It should also thank President Obama for capturing the terrorist when given the opportunity, unlike President Clinton; his stained presidency includes an incident in which he refused the Sudanese government’s offer to arrest and extradite bin Laden. Though the operation may have been necessary, bin Laden’s death is nothing to celebrate. Unless malice and vengeance form the bedrock of American principles (as opposed to, say, basic respect for human life), there is no justifiable reason for celebration: Terror attacks will not stop just because bin Laden descended to Hell. Just a few weeks after his death, suicide bombers murdered 51 Pakistanis in retaliation. Even worse, his death does not mean an end to outrageously invasive TSA procedures. Three year old boy: Wait, I thought bad terror man was gone! TSA “agent”: Quiet, I’m fondling your genitals. Americans running to the White House to celebrate bin Laden’s death with flags and drunkenness exhibited the same kind of euphoria that certain groups of Afghans displayed on 9/11. Chanting “U.S.A” just makes the entire circus more obscene. We must not lower our moral standards to those of the terrorists. Had people stayed home in quiet introspection and prayer, then that would have demonstrated true American exceptionalism. People are fully justified in feeling relief over the destruction of a mass murderer. But a sense of joy does not belong to a nation that considers itself a representative of everything that is good with the world.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Future homecoming court should be open to all classes, not just seniors Last month, we reported on ASB Executive Council’s new Homecoming Court nomination process for the 2011-2012 school year. This process involves several steps: nominating only senior candidates, having the top 20 male and top 20 female candidates complete a questionnaire about their school involvement, selecting the top 10 male and top 10 female candidates based on that questionnaire and having students from all classes choose their top six males or female Court candidates in an open vote. According to ASB, the new system is meant to ensure that the Homecoming Court accurately portrays our school’s values. However, there is considerable opposition to this policy across class lines. We completely agree with the new system’s purpose; screening candidates through a questionnaire on school involvement will be an effective way to ensure that only qualified, upstanding students make it on the Court. However, we believe that restricting the Court to only seniors goes against our school’s traditions and spirit of class unity. Homecoming has always been an event where the entire

school comes together for the sake of school pride and spirit. Students from freshmen to seniors flock to Homecoming because of the memories it creates and the kindred bonds they are able to forge with their friends. The event gives students a chance to garner happy memories and strengthen friendships with their peers — usually those in the same class. When there is not a freshman face to be found in the Homecoming Court, how delightful, inclusive or memorable will attending freshmen think Homecoming is? Supporters try to justify this massive exclusion of students by saying that all students will have the opportunity to be nominated to the court once they go through four years of high school. This assertion completely ignores the motivational and inspirational value the court can provide. If court members are meant to be shining examples of perfect Pioneers, these examples should be relatable and plentiful. Having a court from all classes will allow students who are not seniors to recognize that even one, two or three years at our school can make a difference. Having all classes represented on the Homecoming Court

will also maintain our school’s sense of community and unity. Homecoming is not meant to be an exclusive affair; with each class having an equal chance to compete in areas like skits and posters, it gives a level playing field for all classes to shine. If we deny freshmen, sophomores and juniors opportunities that seniors have in what is supposed to be a schoolwide event, they will feel excluded — which is exactly the opposite of what Homecoming is all about. In an April Prospector poll, 66% of students polled, including seniors, opposed the new seniors-only Homecoming Court nomination process. If anything, ASB Executive Council should listen to this supermajority of its constituency and work to revise this process instead of single-handedly implementing it. Homecoming is for all CHS students, and every part of Homecoming, the Court included, should be open to students regardless of class. We believe that unity and inclusiveness are core Pioneer values. It only makes sense that the Pioneers’ Homecoming Court embodies them.


features

MAY 27, 2011

6

TINO’S ANIMAL KI GDO CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE ASIAN SOUL

Sophomore’s feathery pals help in many ways SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN photo editor

She has chicken soup for the pet lover’s soul — and no, not the book. The fact is, sophomore Julie Chen’s pets are chickens and she has consumed them in soup form before. While Chen does love her fuzzy, egg-laying creatures, she shares an, lets just say, atypical bond with them. Through this bond though, she has learned a great deal about the nature of animals and the responsibility that comes along with caring for them. A year ago, at Chen’s request, her family drove two hours to a farm and picked up a handful of “female” (four out of the eight grew up to be male) chicks. They built a coop and everyday, fed them vegetables, checked their feed and refilled their water. With time “scooping up morning presents” was added to the to-do list; one egg per chicken a day, hard-boiled in the morning is not a bad deal at all. California state law, though, prohibits housing roosters in residential areas (a blessing for those who like to sleep in) so Chen’s family needed a way to dispose of their four not-so-female chickens. “We ate them. We are Asians so of course we know how to kill chickens,” said Chen, “It’s really just a quick throat cut.” This may sound brutal and Chen herself initially had much trouble with this idea. That being said, she eventually came to peace with eating her chickens under the circumstances. First of all, Chen was never excessively attached to her chickens as others may be with their more conventional pets.

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Chrome, Chicovo, Phoenix, Chocolate and Turtle — but they grow up really fast. I went on a cruise for a week and they all changed colors so I couldn’t tell who was who anymore,” said Chen, “It’s not like killing a pet dog or anything.” She is comfortable with it from a moral standpoint as well. “The whole reason we have this garden is because my mom read this book called Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. It talks about this writer who starts a farm and raises her own animals. Her philosophy is that if one raises them naturally, it’s ethical to eat them. I feel better about eating these chickens rather than eating commercially grown ones, fattened

We are Asians, so of course we know how to kill chickens.

up in two months,” added Chen. Aside from, when occasion calls, eating them, Julie also spends a great deal of time babysitting her chickens. She has made some quite interesting observations. “Chickens are very vicious actu sometimes,” Chen said, “They actually have a pecking order. Sometimes I’ll feed them dandelion leaves and certain chickens are not allowed chick to come and eat. The little chickens were initially at the bottom of the order and the red chicken was at the very bottom but once so she started laying, she gained social status. Now the once oldest, bot meanest black chicken is at the bottom because she stopped laying.” Overall, while owning chickens has taught Julie ad a thing or two, she admits that it is not for everyone. “It’s kind of a hassle. Whether you should own one or not depends on where you live, how your backyard com is, and how committed you are to waking up at 6 am morn in the morning to angry c h i c k e n s ,” Chen warns, “If that doesn’t concern you, then two bucks a chick at Gilroy. Good luck!”

OWNING A PET CAN HELP WITH STRES KEVIN CHU news editor

While most people think of massage, meditation and yoga as natural, healthy stress relievers, there is another option that is fluffier and more loveable: getting a pet. Not only do pets help relieve stress, but they can also improve one’s mood, control one’s blood pressure, reduce loneliness and provide social support— all of which are important for health and well-being, and for avoiding stress and depression. Animals are relatively consistent in their behaviors — such as locations and times of eating, sleeping, and cuddling — which provide a stable, predictable and thus less stressful aspect in the owner’s life. Their unconditional love is also extremely comforting — pets greet their owners with excitement when they come home, they can usually tell when their owners are upset, and many pets will cuddle up next to their owners, providing soothing contact. A 2002 study by re-

searchers at the State University of New York showed that when performing a stressful ta felt less stressful in the presence of pets th presence of a spouse or close friend. Pet ow had significantly lower baseline heart rates a pressure than the participants who did not o Caring for a pet often results in a sense o tion and fulfillment. In addition, owning pet the likelihood of going outside and interac others, providing opportunities for mood-r cialization. “I spend up to an hour each day taking for walks,” said sophomore Abishek Kumar. A 1999 study found that male AIDS pat less likely to suffer from depression if they ow “Pet ownership among men who have A vides a certain level of companionship that h them cope better with the stresses of th lives,” said psychologist Judith Siegel, a UC professor of public health and lead aut of the report. “This is one more study demonstrates the health benefits that ing a pet can provide.” In addition, pets help decrea pressure, heart rate and muscl

SHE IS HER DOGS’ BEST FRIEND Junior goes home to take care of pets during lunch JAMIN SHIH features assistant

When the bell rings at 12:25 p.m. every day, students leave their classrooms, obligations and quite often campus to enjoy 40 minutes of leisure. One student, however, exits campus not to leave her responsibilities behind but to take on another set. While her classmates spend lunchtimes with their friends, junior Ashley Kan visits and takes care of her three pet dogs, a chore she says teaches her both responsibility and time management skills that will aid her throughout her life. Kan feeds her three dogs, two Chihuahuas named Missy and Teddy and a Pomeranian named Charlie, every day during lunch because no one else is available to do so at that time. This causes her to miss out on the social banter that occurs during lunchtime, and she admits that she sacrifices spending time with her friends because of her pets. Regardless, she is sure that her dogs are completely worth the sacrifice. “I’m really close to my dogs. They’re really my best friends sometimes, because they’re always there for me,” Kan said. Indeed, just as Kan gives to her dogs, they give equally back to her. The sacrifice does not seem nearly as significant when her

WHAT KIND OF PET DO YOU HAVE?

D O G

C A T

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10%

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MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

features

7

OM: EVERYTHING ON PETS WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PET?

SS AND HEALTH

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both in reaction to stressful events over a period of time. Owning a pet requires daily walks and other opportunities for exercise (another proven stress reliever) are also increased. Recovering addicts who struggle with high levels of stress should research different pets to determine which types, breeds, personalities and ages seem like a good match for you. For instance, if having to potty train a puppy sounds stressful, look into getting a dog that’s already trained is an appropriate option. For people who are often away from home, a more selfsufficient animal like a cat might be a better choice. There is nothing quite like hav hav- ing a warm ball of fur curl up next to you or an excitedly thumping tail greeting you — and it’s even more satisfying to know that these furry friends are helping to improve our lives.

“My dream pet would be “F” the White Winged Horse. It’s name is F so that when it takes my last name, Lai, its full name will be F Lai. And then I can tell it: ‘F Lai, fly!’ And then I’ll go around raiding towns on my mount.” -Alan Lai, senior “Well, I kind of just want a ferret. Not really creative or anything... I just like them!” -Andrew Qu, junior “My dream pet is a rainbow-horned unicorn that can fly and take me places, but that can also understand what I’m saying and be cuddly.” -Jeong Eun Lee, freshman “I like white tigers because they look more unique than other types of tigers.” -Brian Nguyen, senior

COMPILED BY TESS WU

ease blood le tension,

N O N E

12%

57% 170 PEOPLE POLLED COMPILED BY FRED HAN

Passing of pets leaves student stronger

ANAND HEMMADY features assistant

Disclaimer: The Prospector strongly encourages owners to spay or neuter pets, and acknowledges that some of the behavior exhibited by the owners of the cats in the following article is irresponsible. The Prospector also would like to warn readers that some elements of the following article may be exaggerated. Everything must end. This is a rule of the universe. Unfortunately, relationships with pets are not exempt from this rule. No matter how well an owner takes care of a pet, it will eventually pass away, and the owner will have to move on without it. The unavoidable pain from having a pet die often turns many away from keeping pets, and often raises questions as to whether having pets is worth the pain. In the end, though, the benefits of having pets far outweigh the negatives. Sophomore Brent Knaack knows the pain of losing pets all too well. Having once had thirty cats, Knaack could only watch helplessly as cat after cat died, leaving him with only five. “Our family of cats started when my dad was looking through boxes in our backyard and he found three kittens in a box,” Knaack said. “They were born literally just an hour before we found them. We took care of them because their mom never did. They grew up, and then they had kittens. Eventually we had around thirty cats, all living in our backyard in makeshift shelters.” Later, though, Knaack’s beloved pets started dying. “There was one cat in particular with whom I had a close relationship,” said Knaack as he recounted the death of his favorite cat. “I called him Tiny, because he had growth problems, and he never grew any bigger than my hand. This led to internal organ failure, and he passed away. I respected him because even in his last few hours of pain, he was determined to stay alive, and he survived through a lot of pain and suffering. I rarely cry, but when Tiny died, I couldn’t stop crying for two hours.” U

O T H E R

NOT FORGOTTEN

HO

nothing. During her daily fifteen minute visits to her dogs, she does feed them. The time she spends with her dogs is rewarding and her er an unconditional love that mirrors her own. t always there. They’re always playful, they always make me happy… n a good mood,” said Kan. g care of her dogs does cost her some of her free time, the experience he responsibility and time management skills she earns for the future es up for it. Kan stresses that it is completely different from normal ent duties to care for another living being and that owning three dogs wed her to experience both responsibility and the joy of bringing hapss to someone or something else. These lessons can also be applied e world outside of high school and pets; Kan finds applications well beyond homework assignments or tests. “For the future, if you ever have kids, you’re going to have to take care of something. You’re going to have to take care of cleaning up after them. It’s just a huge responsibility,” said Kan. While many students have only one set of respon responsibilities to worry about at school, Kan’s pet duties begin where her school ones end. Despite seeming like a large hassle, however, her dogs bring her the kind of joy and teach her the kind of lessons that only COUR TESY OF AS HLEY pets can. KAN

JESSE

Z

After Tiny’s death, Knaack witnessed the death of around 25 other cats. Knaack let his cats roam freely around the neighborhood, which annoyed the neighbors. The neighbors began leaving poisoned food out on their doorsteps. Knaack was forced to witness cat after cat dying from the food poisoning. He could do nothing to stop the death toll of cats from rising. In the end, only five cats remained. Despite all the grief that the deaths of his cats caused him, though, Knaack does not regret anything and is happy that he had the chance to know his cats. “One of the best times of my life was when I was playing around with the three original kittens,” Knaack said. “It was really cute when we let them into the house and watched them crawl around, pull out wires, and stumble and fall. In spite of all the pain I think it was worth it to have pets and I don’t regret it.” Clearly, the loss that pets bring will be painful. However, it would be foolish to refuse to entertain the thought of having pets simply because of the pain. After all, in life, happiness can only come with suffering. To discard things only because they will hurt us would ruin life entirely. Although pets die and losing them hurts, the overall relationship with pets brings more happi happiness than sorrow.


lifestyles

MAY 27, 2011

8

THE BOY WHO LIVES ON... THE LEGACY OF HARRY POTTER

NIKHIL KANTHI features assistant

T

here are moments in our lives when the harshness of reality casts a shadow over our happiness, causing it to be short-lived. On July 15th, when Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 comes out, I will have to struggle between pangs of excitement and sorrow as I watch a part of my life end. When I pored over the books time and time again in my younger days, I wondered what attracted me to the adventures of a boy wizard. What set this story apart from the other books I had devoured in my youth? I often put this question on hold as I turned the last page in the last book and started anew with the first book. I spent days walking the corridors and grounds of Hogwarts. However, as the pages became more and more familiar, I realized that there would soon be a day when I would be bored by the tale that once meant the world to me. That day, I took the books out of my room and anticipated a day when I would open the books and be amazed once more. A few days ago, I turned the first page of the first book. The parchment-like scent of

the pages with which I was so familiar brought with them a painful comprehension. In less than two months, the journey would be over. I think I can answer my question today. I did not love Harry Potter because it was a friend or mentor. The reason I love these books is because I could see myself as Harry. Rowling erased the line between the reader and Harry somewhere in those pages. Readers empathized with Harry when he was in danger or depressed, and that empathy carried over to the moments when Harry was triumphant. We were united by the naive hope that things will get better. When the circumstances were not as happy and bright as they could have been, I knew that my time would come. Harry Potter taught me that victory was not impossible, and I think we all yearn for that certainty. It taught me the power of hope. I wish for a day when the corridors of Hogwarts will be as alien to me as they were to Harry on his first night there, and I wish that I could feel the loss of Sirius or Dumbledore without expecting it. I doubt that day will come before July 15th, but that’s fine. I think I will do just fine without reading the story I have read seventy times before as I wait outside the midnight premiere. Good job, my friend. Mischief managed.

POTTER PREMIERE PARTY

1. Buy midnight premiere tickets in advance, optimally three to four weeks before the movie.

Want to make your HP premiere night truly magical? Here are a few suggestions that will make your night less Dudley and a tad more Diggory.

2. First, decide on a menu for your party. For terrific Potter recipes, visit http://www.mugglenet.com/misc/rosmertas/index.shtml. Remember that Butterbeer and Golden Snitch cupcakes are absolute necessities! 3. Decorate! After you settle on a venue, plaster the walls with Harry Potter-themed posters. Make sure to include the official movie poster! 4. Costumes are mandatory — they should consist of robes, traditional Hogwarts uniforms, wands and scarves. Assign each guest a specific character in his or her customized Hogwarts-style invitation. 5. Finally, plan some activities! Some suggestions: i. Test your knowledge of the series with some trivia and use Bertie Botts’ Every Flavor Beans as the prize (or punishment!) ii. Reenact your favorite scenes from the series, and be creative. iii. Host a Dueling Club. iv. Watch Deathly Hallows, Part I in preparation for the finale! MADHURI SATHISH

Lady Gaga’s Born This Way contains darker and more serious overtones JESSE ZHOU features editor

The Mother Monster has done it again. Lady Gaga, the artist who has so far defined the voice of a new generation, has been inching toward far more radical themes in her music (believe it or not) with her new album Born This Way. While the widely acclaimed The Fame introduced Gaga as the queen of “Just Dance”, Born This Way instead puts her in the spotlight as a woman with the most independent spirit in the music industry. Many of Gaga’s songs indeed revolve around being proud and self-sufficient. “Hair” and “Bad Kids” promote the idea that being fiercely independent is essential to having true freedom. In addition, her songs call on people to respect those who choose to be independent. For example, one line from “Hair” states, “I just wanna be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.” Her words give the listener a window into a troubled soul who wants nothing more than for others to be accepted in today’s cruel society. The overall tone of Born This Way is darker and more disorderly than The Fame as well. However, Gaga uses this style in a unique way, and trust me, she uses it well. By utilizing the power

of static-shock beats, Gaga’s songs are a rather elegant synthesis of symphony and cacophony: a paradox pleasing to the ear. The fractured mix of piano, electro synthesizers, electric guitar and abnormal beats ends up finding its way into songs like “Judas” and “Marry the Night.” The atmosphere Gaga has created in Born This Way is terrifying and euphoric at the same time. By using theme and tone to their full potential, Lady Gaga’s new album, Born This Way, is bound to be one of the greatest albums of the decade. From songs about true love (“You and I”) to being who you are (“Born This Way”), the Mother Monster covers a full range of topics that will leave the listener surprised. By the time the last song finishes, something will be blown. It will either be your mind or your CD player from abusing the replay button too much.

TOP 3 SINGLES 1. Born This Way 2. The Edge of Glory 3. Judas COMPILED BY NATASHA SHARMA COURTESY OF SpreePiX-Berlin


MAY 27, 2011

THE PROSPECTOR

lifestyles

9

The beauty OFTHRIFTING

Looking for something trendy without breaking the bank? Thrift stores sell classic pieces at surprinsgly low prices. You don’t have to buy couture to be chic.

VICTORIA DUAN copy-editor

The outrageous prices offered at too many stores in the mall make it hard for frugal shoppers to pick out affordable items that complement them. Never mind purchasing an outfit, or a nice set of furniture — a single shirt will devastate one’s wallet. But sophomore Brittney Lundquist and junior Noa Rosenberg, both experienced in the ways of thrifting, know better than to blow their entire savings on just one item. Thrift stores are shops owned and run by charities or nonprofit organizations as fundraisers for their cause. Unlike conventional stores, thrift stores carry a multitude of different products. Each new shipment is always full of surprises, and the prices of the products are relatively low. “I have found a lot of name brands like Abercrombie, the North Face, J. Crew and Banana Republic [while thrifting]. It’s a nice feeling to say that you can own name brand clothing and only have to pay a fraction of the original price,” Lundquist said. Although the quality of the donations are often questionable, Lundquist has found that the overall value of a thrift store’s merchandise can be roughly predicted by the city the store is located in.

“I have found that the ‘richer’ cities have the fancier, nicer, name brand clothing options — for example, San Francisco, Santa Cruz and Los Angeles,” Lundquist said. However, nearby thrift stores, including Goodwill, Salvation Army and Savers can all be thoroughly scavenged for good deals and quality items. Contrary to Lundquist, Rosenberg approaches thrifting with a slightly different tactic. While Lundquist is more oriented towards browsing for clothes, Rosenberg thrifts with an open mind and warmly welcomes all possibilities that might come her way. “I may go shopping with the intent to find a new sweater and then I’ll leave the store with a new shelf for my room. The challenge of thrifting is not to find something that is the perfect fit, but finding things that have the potential to be cinched, hemmed, draped in a room or framed on a wall. When I do find something I like, it’s like finding a gem; that’s the beauty of thrifting!” Rosenberg said. With thrifting comes not only the thrill of hunting for the perfect item, but also the satisfaction of paying sensible prices for a purchase. Forget the unreasonable prices at the mall — go look for the cheaper counterpart at Goodwill.


sports

Have a healthy summer

Which is worse – resisting the urge to eat or mustering the willpower to exercise? Most people are reluctant to do either, as byproducts of animal evolution makes us inclined to eat as much as possible and save every last ounce of fat in case of famine. That’s right, those deliciously

dreadful, guilty calories that lurk in your In-NOut Cheeseburger with Onions are here to stay unless burned off by the exercise that we so despise. Here are some popular food items along with matching activities needed to part with those beloved calories.

VERDE

IN N’ OUT PEARL

CHEESE BURGER WITH ONIONS

306

480

Shop for one hour 14 minutes

MILK TEA (BUBBLE TEA)

Calories:

Calories alories:

Exercise:

10

MAY 27, 2011

Exercise:

Garden for one hour and three minutes

CHIPOTLE

WING STOP

BARBACOA BURRITO

FRENCH FRIES

Calories:

Calories:

200

800

Exercise:

Exercise:

Run at nine mph for 11.5 minutes

Dance for three hours

Boosts that actually give you a boost NATALIE HOANG lifestyles assistant

A

fter ordering a cold smoothie to quench the thirst of a hot summer’s day, the Jamba Juice cashier asks you, “Would you like a boost with that?”. You will proceed to ask what types they offer and are met with a list of seemingly health nourishing choices. The options tackle different aspects of the body, from the Charger and Antioxidant boosts to the Immunity and Energy boosts. Sure, it sounds convincing, but what is it exactly that you are putting into your body? Do the benefits live up to the name? Let us break it down. A boost is a dietary supplement intended to add the vitamins, minerals, fiber, or amino acids a person may lack in his or her daily consumption. In a scroll through the Jamba Juice Booster nutritional facts, noted is the abundance of Maltodextrin and Inulin in the energy and vitamin boosts. Substitutes for sugar, Maltodextrin and Inulin give a sweet taste and the energy provided by sugar without the calories and fat. This makes the 3G Charger, Antioxidant Power, Daily Vitamin, Immunity and Energy Boosts all great options for those in need of a pick-me-up without the extra carbohydrates and sugar to bog them down. The last three boosters are crafted to regulate the body’s systems to maintain healthy levels. Flax & Fiber, a promising Boost, is made of Flaxseed. It is known for reducing blood sugar levels, bad cholesterol, triglycerides, and being the great source of fiber it is, constipation. As for the Whey Protein and Soybean Boosts, their benefit is in the name: protein. Protein’s importance lies in it’s ability to repair body cells, build and repair muscles and bones, and control metabolism. These boosts are promising in their nature, so why not add them into your smoothie? Though it is unlikely one would purchase a smoothie with a boost everyday, or enough to feel the benefits, their intentions are there. A simple overthe-counter supplemental pill directed to take once a day is perhaps the better solution for those concerned about their health. But if mixing in a boost takes the guilt off of your 300-calorie smoothie, go for it!

AZADEH RONGERE

3G Charger™ Boost Antioxidant Power™ Boost Daily Vitamin™ Boost Energy™ Boost Flax & Fiber Boost Immunity™ Boost Soy Protein™ Boost Whey Protein™ Boost

PHOTOS BY: AZADEH RONGERE COMPILED BY: ERIC JANG

get

1 TONED

for summer COMPILED BY: NIKHIL KANTHI

LEG RISES

Lie on your back with your hands holding onto something heavy (like a bookshelf side), and raise your legs without bending your knees. 20 minutes (counting breaks) of these and a four-pack will be a breeze.

2 3

COMPILED BY: AZADEH RONGERE

SHUFFLE PUSH-UPS Do pushups while moving side to side. Nothing strains your biceps, triceps, deltoids, and laterals like some serious pushup shuffling. Aim for three or four sets of 20 reps to get some toned arms.

RUNNING Put on a pair of shorts, plug in your favorite song on your MP3, and speed off on a strenuous but quick workout. Aim for anything under nine minutes (as long as you have warmed up), and you will have burned off a six-inch from Subway.

PHOTOS BY: SINDHU GNANASAMBANDAN

Badminton Team Dilemma: Winning does not always reap the rewards ERIC JANG sports assistant

There is no doubt that winning feels good — addicting even, if victories come frequently. However, even a winning streak has its disadvantages when the victories become too easy. The badminton team has dominated its matches in a less-competitive league but it has done so at the expense of the valuable lessons gained by losing matches. Players compete against members of the other team in singles or doubles matches, ranked by skill level. The entire game is won by a majority of match wins from the team members. Players who train in competitive badminton clubs outside of school, such as Bintang, are often on

par with other club players from upper league schools. Since the school team is composed of both club badminton players and players who only train at school practices, the latter players are presented with formidable challenges when they have to play in higher leagues against more experienced players. Conversely, higher league players do not have enough of a challenge when they have to play in the lower league and so neither league is apt for both types of players. As a result, the Varsity and Junior Varsity teams have lost most of their games in higherdivision leagues for the last two years. However, because they have been bumped down to a lower league this year, the badminton team has remained undefeated the entire season. Although practice alone contributes to the

success of team members during matches, ingame experience is also vital to the growth of the player. Team members do not improve as much when all of their matches are won easily and their mistakes go unnoticed. When the Central Coast Section (CCS) championships roll around, players that have become accustomed to their successes may find themselves unprepared to face opponents of higher skill level. “I’m scared that they all think they’re good enough at the level they are at now and have no desire to concentrate during practice,” said varsity player Peggy Chiang about her teammates. Chiang learns which footwork needs practice and which shots she can improve on from losing against tougher players. Playing against difficult opponents in

the higher league not only reveals areas for self-improvement, but also builds appreciation for the competitive aspect of the sport. According to varsity player Lawrence Luk, failures are vital to good sportsmanship. Modesty is difficult to come by for those who seldom experience defeat. “Losing teaches me humility, because I can’t expect to walk all over my opponents all the time,” Luk said. Despite the fact that the badminton team has enjoyed a winning streak this year, some players believe that excessive victories have slowed athletic growth. Luk and Chiang believe that losing to higher-league contenders is a necessary step in improving and taking the team to the next level.


11 11

sports sports

THE PROSPECTOR THE PROSPECTOR

MAY27, 27,2011 2011 MAY

Synchronized swimmer Ekaterina Frelikh pursues future Olympic dream AZADEH RONGERE sports editor

Above the surface, two artistic synchronized swimmers jump through the air in perfect harmony. The chemistry between the teammates allows their routines to be of sheer perfection. Their magical performance, a blend of gymnastics and dancing, requires flawless consistency. Below the surface is junior Ekaterina Frelikh an aspiring synchronized swimmer. Frelikh was born in Russia where she began her successful career as a synchronized swimmer at age nine. Before she became talented performer, Frelikh explored speed swimming, a quick but she quickly realized this sport bored her. She then turned to synchronized swimming deciding that it would provide her with more excitement. “I saw girls doing little leg things and I thought it was very cool and pretty, so I joined,” Frelikh said. When she joined a popular Russian team, she received a proper foundation for her synchronized swimming future through training. Ho w e v e r, when she emigrated from Russia four years ago, it seemed as if lon her aspirations could no longer become a reality. Once she moved to America, Frelikh lacked a synchronized swimming team so she reluctantly returned to speed swimming. After a year of break,

she was introduced to one of the best synchronizing swimming team in America in Santa Clara. After a successful try out, she joined the team. Despite a new addition, her team supported and welcomed Ferlikh and they built friendships only teammates could share. Although their occasional bonding activities do bring them closer, their natural chemistry already supports their undeniable bond. “We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable,” Frelikh said. However, to pursue her dream Frelikh had to compromise

We mostly bond when we swim; it’s something that nobody else can understand. It’s indescribable.

her academic schedule. Since her practices last from 4:00 to 8:30 p.m. every day, she found it hard to fit AP classes into her schedule. Even after these strenuous weekday practices she is unable to sleep in on weekends since she has practices from 7:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. Furthermore, during the summer, she practices ten hours each and every day. “I just have to make it work. I mean, I have to wake up early and sleep really late to balance out my workload with synchronized swimming,” Frelikh said. In addition, during the first semester of each school year, she and her team ruthlessly train and tirelessly practice. Throughout second semester there are multiple national and international

2010 West Side Junior Exibition

meets for which Frelikh must miss school in order to attend. Since she constantly takes “vacation” days, she treats tutorials and lunches like gold because she has to constantly make-up tests, in-class essays, class work and participation points. Nevertheless, she conveys that these tedious make-up sessions are a small price to pay to visit and compete in New York, Ohio, Texas, Florida and North Carolina. Despite her busy schedule, Frelikh still has to find time to design and make her own outfits. Although a tailor provides her with a handmade outfit, Frelikh has to manually decorate it with rhinestones, sparkles, beads and other embellishments. Despite the fact that synchronized swimming has its academic and time disadvantages, Frelikh’s future in swimming is more valuable, as she will soon conquer her next meet in Sw itzerland.

NEW

FLORIDA

YORK 2010 Junior Nationals

TEXAS

r e m m u S e h t it e k a M ! t e g r o F r e v e N ll ’ You

2010 Age Group Nationals Free offers and discounts from VTA partners:

• Unlimited rides on bus and light rail all summer • For youth 17 years & under • Enter to win one of ten $100 Westfield gift cards and other great prizes Like us on Facebook

www.vta.org/sbp • (408) 321-2300 • TTY (408) 321-2330

End of the year countdown Memorial Day- NO SCHOOL

Stress-less Cafe!!

Baccalaurette 4th and 5th @ West Val- Period Final ley Presbyterian Church 2nd and 3rd Period Final

1st Period Final

6th and 7th Period Final

Graduation Ceremony@ De Anza College Football Field

Partying Partying YEAH! Partying Partying YEAH! Fun. Fun. Fun. Fun.

The Prospector wishes you a happy summer. Please Recycle


photoessay

12

MAY 27, 2011

Health is Wealth Next time you are at the front of the line debating between the fresh fruit cup and the gooey chocolate chip cookie, choose wisely, for the outcomes of these battles are what add up to form a lifestyle. And what better time than now to start anew on the path to good health? Sounds simple enough, but what most of us fall short on is willpower. With one good look around campus, though, it is easy to get this dose of inspiration; students are constantly pursuing healthy activities as seen on this page. Juniors Zhijiang Li, Andrew Qu and Eric Lee (upper left) share a hug in the quad, while sophomores Brittany Rodriguez and Katelyn Howard (upper right) share a laugh during their laps around the pool. Junior Paolo Barrenechea (left) shoots hoops with a handful of other students who form teams and battle it out on the asphalt during lunchtime. In addition to mental and physical health, eating habits also constitute a big part of balanced living. Junior Bhavisha Shukla (bottom left) takes a refreshing gulp of H2O, while senior Vandita Manyam chows down on a handful of tangerine slices. Other healthy choices include grabbing a milk carton on your way out of the cafeteria or choosing to ride your bike to school. It really is as simple as that, so join your peers in pursuing a healthy lifestyle today.

The Prospector Junior Issue 2 (May 27 2011)  
The Prospector Junior Issue 2 (May 27 2011)  

The Prospector's issue for May 27, 2011

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