Page 1

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E Pä Tö Hau Patea Maori 1:15 He Waiata Tënei mo Parihaka J.C. Sturm 1:57 Volunteer Chris Orsman 2:44 The Charge at Parihaka Anthony Ritchie 5:55 from Parihaka Grieving Alistair Te Ariki Campbell 2:08 from The Sound of Places and Names Dinah Hawken 2:57 Ko Aotea Patea Maori 1:03 Moment of Truth Rore Hapipi 2:52 Taranaki Patere—Kahuri Patea Maori 2:52 To Taranaki (from Book 5 of Commonplace Odes) Ian Wedde 1:43 Parihaka—Te Whiti—Tohu—Täwhiao Patea Maori 4:36 Not by Wind Ravaged Hone Tuwhare 1:56 Rain Over Taranaki Roma Potiki 2:53 Parihaka Apirana Taylor 1:48 An Offering for Parihaka David Hamilton 13:34 from Twelve Little Poems About Parihaka Elizabeth Smither 3:00 from Poems From Another Century, for Parihaka Robert Sullivan Fuse Cilla McQueen 2:43 Gather Up the Earth William Dart—Mervyn Thompson 2:45 A Tricky Business J.C. Sturm 3:41 Parihaka Tim Finn & Herbs 4:11 Total Duration 68:59

2:22


o tënei mätou ngä kaihautü,

ngä ringaringa,

ngä waewae o Parihaka, e pöwhiri nei i ngä Maunga,

me te Whare Whakaari o Te Whanganui ä Tara,

ngä Tupua Kauri, ngä Tohunga tarai i te körero, i te räkau, i te waituhi,

kia haere ake ki te Kaupapa Whakaari—‘Parihaka’

o Te Whiti o Rongomai räua ko Tohu Käkahi.

E Pä Tö Hau Patea Maori He Waiata Tënei mo Parihaka J.C. Sturm Volunteer Chris Orsman The Charge at Parihaka Anthony Ritchie from Parihaka Grieving Alistair Te Ariki Campbell from The Sound of Places and Names Dinah Hawken Ko Aotea Patea Maori Moment of Truth Rore Hapipi Taranaki Patere—Kahuri Patea Maori To Taranaki (from Book 5 of Commonplace Odes) Ian Wedde Parihaka—Te Whiti—Tohu—Täwhiao Patea Maori Not by Wind Ravaged Hone Tuwhare Rain Over Taranaki Roma Potiki Parihaka Apirana Taylor An Offering for Parihaka David Hamilton from Twelve Little Poems About Parihaka Elizabeth Smither from Poems From Another Century, for Parihaka Robert Sullivan Fuse Cilla McQueen Gather Up the Earth William Dart—Mervyn Thompson A Tricky Business J.C. Sturm 21 Parihaka Tim Finn & Herbs

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20


o tënei mätou ngä kaihautü,

ngä ringaringa,

ngä waewae o Parihaka, e pöwhiri nei i ngä Maunga,

me te Whare Whakaari o Te Whanganui ä Tara,

ngä Tupua Kauri, ngä Tohunga tarai i te körero, i te räkau, i te waituhi,

kia haere ake ki te Kaupapa Whakaari—‘Parihaka’

o Te Whiti o Rongomai räua ko Tohu Käkahi.

E Pä Tö Hau Patea Maori He Waiata Tënei mo Parihaka J.C. Sturm Volunteer Chris Orsman The Charge at Parihaka Anthony Ritchie from Parihaka Grieving Alistair Te Ariki Campbell from The Sound of Places and Names Dinah Hawken Ko Aotea Patea Maori Moment of Truth Rore Hapipi Taranaki Patere—Kahuri Patea Maori To Taranaki (from Book 5 of Commonplace Odes) Ian Wedde Parihaka—Te Whiti—Tohu—Täwhiao Patea Maori Not by Wind Ravaged Hone Tuwhare Rain Over Taranaki Roma Potiki Parihaka Apirana Taylor An Offering for Parihaka David Hamilton from Twelve Little Poems About Parihaka Elizabeth Smither from Poems From Another Century, for Parihaka Robert Sullivan Fuse Cilla McQueen Gather Up the Earth William Dart—Mervyn Thompson A Tricky Business J.C. Sturm 21 Parihaka Tim Finn & Herbs

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20


Parihaka stands for one of the most shameful episodes and one of the most remarkable and enduring stories in New Zealand’s colonial history. The issues: Mäori land, rangatiratanga and mana. Under the charismatic leadership of Te Whiti and Tohu, Parihaka, a self-sufficient community, became a refuge and haven for thousands of Mäori dispossessed and made homeless by governmental land confiscations throughout New Zealand. In a world turned upside down by European colonisation,Te Whiti and Tohu sought to maintain

peace while upholding the land, cultural integrity and independent authority of iwi in Taranaki. Although Parihaka had not been involved in rebellion, government land confiscations in Taranaki included the Parihaka block. In a creative response to political and legal injustice and military oppression, Te Whiti and Tohu preached and practised an active form of non-violent resistance, advocating on philosophical and moral grounds—a generation before Gandhi’s parallel response to British imperialism—peace rather than violence. With strategic brilliance and political acumen, Te Whiti and Tohu employed their innovative tactics in a courageous bid to achieve justice through litigation to test the legality of government land confiscation. Their followers removed survey pegs, ploughed, planted and erected fences on the surveyed land, and undertook long silent marches around their coastal tribal boundaries in a symbolic assertion of ownership and eloquent protest against the alienation of their land. They consciously and voluntarily courted arrest and imprisonment, overfilling colonial gaols to the embarrassment of the government and the paranoia of the settlers. On 5 November 1881, the peaceful village of Parihaka was invaded by 1500 settlers, militia and volunteers, under the command of the Native Minister John Bryce. Meeting no resistance, Te Whiti, Tohu and hundreds of their followers were arrested. They faced with courage and dignity the prospect of transportation and imprisonment for years in the South Island. Many prisoners died from the harsh prison conditions, enforced hard labour in a

rigorous climate and the trauma of captivity and exile. A special act of parliament, the Native Prisoners’ Trials Act, suspended habeas corpus to allow the Parihaka prisoners to be detained indefinitely without trial, in the most heinous abrogation of civil rights ever seen in this country. Over a couple of months, in a war of attrition and excess, the prosperous village of Parihaka was systematically razed, homes were looted and burnt, crops destroyed and livestock slaughtered. The people were forcibly driven out and left homeless, facing a bleak future of extreme hardship, and the settlement was virtually wiped out of existence; maps were redrawn and history was redefined in the attempt to obliterate the memory of Parihaka from the face of the earth. Te Whiti and Tohu did not achieve their vision of victory through peaceful negotiation; virtually the whole of the Taranaki province was confiscated. The undertaking to set aside reserve land for Mäori was never honoured. Instead, the promised reserves were leased to settlers in perpetuity. Land claims in Taranaki are still unresolved. Unlike Mahatma Gandhi and Nelson Mandela, Te Whiti and Tohu did not return from imprisonment and exile to lead their country. Their utopian dream of a new social order for Mäori and Päkehä based on respect, equity, peace and harmony was not realised in their lifetimes. Nonetheless, they guided their people through a traumatic and explosive period in history, avoiding full-scale war at a time when Mäori had almost no possibility of military victory. Theirs was a moral victory, in which they upheld Mäori honour and integrity against inconceivable odds. Although many issues in Mäori-Päkehä relations still remain unresolved, the influence of Te Whiti and Tohu is far from ended. They have bequeathed through their teaching and example a political, moral and spiritual legacy that transcends both time and tribal or national boundaries. Symbolised by the raukura or albatross’ white feather of peace, theirs is a philosophy and ideology that touches the deepest roots of human aspiration. Parihaka continues to have meaning and influence in the present as a source of inspiration for writers, artists, musicians, film-makers, political activists, social advocates, religious thinkers, philosophers and clergy in New Zealand and overseas. The teachings of Te Whiti and Tohu of mutual respect and understanding are important lessons for all New Zealanders.


Parihaka stands for one of the most shameful episodes and one of the most remarkable and enduring stories in New Zealand’s colonial history. The issues: Mäori land, rangatiratanga and mana. Under the charismatic leadership of Te Whiti and Tohu, Parihaka, a self-sufficient community, became a refuge and haven for thousands of Mäori dispossessed and made homeless by governmental land confiscations throughout New Zealand. In a world turned upside down by European colonisation,Te Whiti and Tohu sought to maintain

peace while upholding the land, cultural integrity and independent authority of iwi in Taranaki. Although Parihaka had not been involved in rebellion, government land confiscations in Taranaki included the Parihaka block. In a creative response to political and legal injustice and military oppression, Te Whiti and Tohu preached and practised an active form of non-violent resistance, advocating on philosophical and moral grounds—a generation before Gandhi’s parallel response to British imperialism—peace rather than violence. With strategic brilliance and political acumen, Te Whiti and Tohu employed their innovative tactics in a courageous bid to achieve justice through litigation to test the legality of government land confiscation. Their followers removed survey pegs, ploughed, planted and erected fences on the surveyed land, and undertook long silent marches around their coastal tribal boundaries in a symbolic assertion of ownership and eloquent protest against the alienation of their land. They consciously and voluntarily courted arrest and imprisonment, overfilling colonial gaols to the embarrassment of the government and the paranoia of the settlers. On 5 November 1881, the peaceful village of Parihaka was invaded by 1500 settlers, militia and volunteers, under the command of the Native Minister John Bryce. Meeting no resistance, Te Whiti, Tohu and hundreds of their followers were arrested. They faced with courage and dignity the prospect of transportation and imprisonment for years in the South Island. Many prisoners died from the harsh prison conditions, enforced hard labour in a

rigorous climate and the trauma of captivity and exile. A special act of parliament, the Native Prisoners’ Trials Act, suspended habeas corpus to allow the Parihaka prisoners to be detained indefinitely without trial, in the most heinous abrogation of civil rights ever seen in this country. Over a couple of months, in a war of attrition and excess, the prosperous village of Parihaka was systematically razed, homes were looted and burnt, crops destroyed and livestock slaughtered. The people were forcibly driven out and left homeless, facing a bleak future of extreme hardship, and the settlement was virtually wiped out of existence; maps were redrawn and history was redefined in the attempt to obliterate the memory of Parihaka from the face of the earth. Te Whiti and Tohu did not achieve their vision of victory through peaceful negotiation; virtually the whole of the Taranaki province was confiscated. The undertaking to set aside reserve land for Mäori was never honoured. Instead, the promised reserves were leased to settlers in perpetuity. Land claims in Taranaki are still unresolved. Unlike Mahatma Gandhi and Nelson Mandela, Te Whiti and Tohu did not return from imprisonment and exile to lead their country. Their utopian dream of a new social order for Mäori and Päkehä based on respect, equity, peace and harmony was not realised in their lifetimes. Nonetheless, they guided their people through a traumatic and explosive period in history, avoiding full-scale war at a time when Mäori had almost no possibility of military victory. Theirs was a moral victory, in which they upheld Mäori honour and integrity against inconceivable odds. Although many issues in Mäori-Päkehä relations still remain unresolved, the influence of Te Whiti and Tohu is far from ended. They have bequeathed through their teaching and example a political, moral and spiritual legacy that transcends both time and tribal or national boundaries. Symbolised by the raukura or albatross’ white feather of peace, theirs is a philosophy and ideology that touches the deepest roots of human aspiration. Parihaka continues to have meaning and influence in the present as a source of inspiration for writers, artists, musicians, film-makers, political activists, social advocates, religious thinkers, philosophers and clergy in New Zealand and overseas. The teachings of Te Whiti and Tohu of mutual respect and understanding are important lessons for all New Zealanders.


E Pä Tö Hau: Patea Maori

A traditional waiata, either sung or, as here, played on the köauau. The piece is a lament composed by Te Rangiämoa of Ngäti Apakura (Waikato) for her cousin Te Wano. Following the sacking of their Pä and the confiscation of their ancestral lands in the Waikato, the people of Ngäti Apakura fled south to Taupo, whereupon they climbed a hill to take a last look back at their lands. Te Wano looked back in the knowledge that he would never return, and died shortly thereafter. For all the members of the Patea Maori Club, Parihaka is part of Taranaki Whänui. We can all whakapapa to the prophets Te Whiti and Tohu. Although we are domiciled in south Taranaki, many of our tüpuna from Tangahoe and Pakakohi were enslaved with the Parihaka Whänau down in Otago. It is important that the Parihaka story is kept alive, but the true stories of Pakakohi and Tangahoe are yet to be told in their entirety. For all Taranaki tribes the raukura (the three feathers worn by Taranaki women) is the symbol of the prophets, and their edict of passive resistance still permeates the province to this very day. Our contribution to this CD is our karakia, a renewal of the vows taken by our forefathers. Nä Dalvanius

He Waiata Tënei mo Parihaka A Tricky Business J.C. Sturm (Taranaki)

Born in Opunake (near Parihaka) in 1927, Sturm has been publishing poetry since the 1940s. She graduated with a BA from the University of Otago in 1949, and she is believed to have been the first Mäori woman to obtain a university degree. In 1983 she published a collection of short stories, The House of the Talking Cat, and since then two collections of poetry have appeared: Dedications (1996) and Postscripts (2000). Sturm has family links with Parihaka Pä and one of her tüpuna was among the prisoners transported to Otago in the late 19th century.

Volunteer: Chris Orsman

Born in Lower Hutt in 1955, Chris Orsman has worked as an architect, ambulance driver and, more recently, a parliamentary chauffeur. His first collection of poems, Ornamental Gorse, appeared in 1994 and his most recent book South was published by Faber and Faber in England in 1999. Orsman’s poems explore not only his family history but larger narratives of exploration and colonialism. G. C. Beale, Parihaka 1881, watercolour on paper, 295x420mm, Collection of Taranaki Museum


E Pä Tö Hau: Patea Maori

A traditional waiata, either sung or, as here, played on the köauau. The piece is a lament composed by Te Rangiämoa of Ngäti Apakura (Waikato) for her cousin Te Wano. Following the sacking of their Pä and the confiscation of their ancestral lands in the Waikato, the people of Ngäti Apakura fled south to Taupo, whereupon they climbed a hill to take a last look back at their lands. Te Wano looked back in the knowledge that he would never return, and died shortly thereafter. For all the members of the Patea Maori Club, Parihaka is part of Taranaki Whänui. We can all whakapapa to the prophets Te Whiti and Tohu. Although we are domiciled in south Taranaki, many of our tüpuna from Tangahoe and Pakakohi were enslaved with the Parihaka Whänau down in Otago. It is important that the Parihaka story is kept alive, but the true stories of Pakakohi and Tangahoe are yet to be told in their entirety. For all Taranaki tribes the raukura (the three feathers worn by Taranaki women) is the symbol of the prophets, and their edict of passive resistance still permeates the province to this very day. Our contribution to this CD is our karakia, a renewal of the vows taken by our forefathers. Nä Dalvanius

He Waiata Tënei mo Parihaka A Tricky Business J.C. Sturm (Taranaki)

Born in Opunake (near Parihaka) in 1927, Sturm has been publishing poetry since the 1940s. She graduated with a BA from the University of Otago in 1949, and she is believed to have been the first Mäori woman to obtain a university degree. In 1983 she published a collection of short stories, The House of the Talking Cat, and since then two collections of poetry have appeared: Dedications (1996) and Postscripts (2000). Sturm has family links with Parihaka Pä and one of her tüpuna was among the prisoners transported to Otago in the late 19th century.

Volunteer: Chris Orsman

Born in Lower Hutt in 1955, Chris Orsman has worked as an architect, ambulance driver and, more recently, a parliamentary chauffeur. His first collection of poems, Ornamental Gorse, appeared in 1994 and his most recent book South was published by Faber and Faber in England in 1999. Orsman’s poems explore not only his family history but larger narratives of exploration and colonialism. G. C. Beale, Parihaka 1881, watercolour on paper, 295x420mm, Collection of Taranaki Museum


The Charge at Parihaka: Anthony Ritchie

This work for vocal sextet or 6-part choir (SSATBB) was commissioned by the Australian Song Company for inclusion in their programme at the 1994 Conference of Voice Teaching in Auckland. It is a setting of a poem by Jessie Mackay (1864–1938), the daughter of a high-country Can-terbury shepherd, which gives a satirical account of the tragic events of 1881 in the form of a parody of Tennyson’s The Charge of the Light Brigade. Anthony Ritchie (1960–) has worked as a freelance composer since 1994, and has written for a wide variety of performers including the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, the Auckland Philharmonia, Michael Houstoun and Wilma Smith, and also for choreographers such as Shona Dunlop and Dan Belton. As well as having composed a large variety of vocal and instrumental works he has also written music for the theatre. Many of his works have been performed overseas, and a growing number are being recorded and published commercially. Ritchie’s curiosity about Parihaka was first aroused when he became aware of prison cells dug into cliffs around Anderson’s Bay in Dunedin. These primitive holes housed prisoners working on land reclamations in the 19th century, including Mäori brought down from Parihaka. After reading Dick Scott’s book Ask that Mountain: The Story of Parihaka, Ritchie was moved by this tragic history to compose an orchestral piece for the Dunedin Sinfonia, Remember Parihaka, and the song The Charge at Parihaka. The Charge at Parihaka

Yet a league, yet a league, Yet a league onward, Straight to the Maori pah Marched the Twelve Hundred. “Forward the Volunteers! Is there a man who fears?” Over the ferny plain Marched the Twelve Hundred. “Forward!” the Colonel said Was there a man dismayed? No, for the heroes knew There was no danger. Theirs not to reason why, Theirs not to bleed or die, Theirs but to trample by, Each dauntless ranger.

Photographer unknown, Armed constabulary and militia prepare to move against Parihaka, 1881, black & white photograph, 235x280mm, W. A. Price Collection, Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington

Pressmen to the right of them, Pressmen to the left of them, Pressmen in front of them, Chuckled and wondered. Dreading their country’s eyes, Long was the search and wise; Vain, for the pressmen five Had, by a slight device, Foiled the Twelve Hundred. Gleamed all their muskets bare, Fright’ning the children there; Heroes to do and dare, Charging a village, while Maoridom wondered Plunged in potato fields, Honour to hunger yields, Te Whiti and Tohu, Bearing not swords and shields, Questioned nor wondered, Calmly before them sat, Faced the Twelve Hundred.

Children to right of them, Children to left of them, Women in front of them, Saw them and wondered. Stormed at with jeer and groan, Foiled by the five alone, Never was trumpet blown O’er such a deed of arms. Back with their captives three, Taken so gallantly, Rode the Twelve Hundred. When can their glory fade? Oh! the wild charge they made! New Zealand wondered Whether each doughty soul Paid for the pigs he stole, Noble Twelve Hundred! Jessie Mackay


The Charge at Parihaka: Anthony Ritchie

This work for vocal sextet or 6-part choir (SSATBB) was commissioned by the Australian Song Company for inclusion in their programme at the 1994 Conference of Voice Teaching in Auckland. It is a setting of a poem by Jessie Mackay (1864–1938), the daughter of a high-country Can-terbury shepherd, which gives a satirical account of the tragic events of 1881 in the form of a parody of Tennyson’s The Charge of the Light Brigade. Anthony Ritchie (1960–) has worked as a freelance composer since 1994, and has written for a wide variety of performers including the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, the Auckland Philharmonia, Michael Houstoun and Wilma Smith, and also for choreographers such as Shona Dunlop and Dan Belton. As well as having composed a large variety of vocal and instrumental works he has also written music for the theatre. Many of his works have been performed overseas, and a growing number are being recorded and published commercially. Ritchie’s curiosity about Parihaka was first aroused when he became aware of prison cells dug into cliffs around Anderson’s Bay in Dunedin. These primitive holes housed prisoners working on land reclamations in the 19th century, including Mäori brought down from Parihaka. After reading Dick Scott’s book Ask that Mountain: The Story of Parihaka, Ritchie was moved by this tragic history to compose an orchestral piece for the Dunedin Sinfonia, Remember Parihaka, and the song The Charge at Parihaka. The Charge at Parihaka

Yet a league, yet a league, Yet a league onward, Straight to the Maori pah Marched the Twelve Hundred. “Forward the Volunteers! Is there a man who fears?” Over the ferny plain Marched the Twelve Hundred. “Forward!” the Colonel said Was there a man dismayed? No, for the heroes knew There was no danger. Theirs not to reason why, Theirs not to bleed or die, Theirs but to trample by, Each dauntless ranger.

Photographer unknown, Armed constabulary and militia prepare to move against Parihaka, 1881, black & white photograph, 235x280mm, W. A. Price Collection, Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington

Pressmen to the right of them, Pressmen to the left of them, Pressmen in front of them, Chuckled and wondered. Dreading their country’s eyes, Long was the search and wise; Vain, for the pressmen five Had, by a slight device, Foiled the Twelve Hundred. Gleamed all their muskets bare, Fright’ning the children there; Heroes to do and dare, Charging a village, while Maoridom wondered Plunged in potato fields, Honour to hunger yields, Te Whiti and Tohu, Bearing not swords and shields, Questioned nor wondered, Calmly before them sat, Faced the Twelve Hundred.

Children to right of them, Children to left of them, Women in front of them, Saw them and wondered. Stormed at with jeer and groan, Foiled by the five alone, Never was trumpet blown O’er such a deed of arms. Back with their captives three, Taken so gallantly, Rode the Twelve Hundred. When can their glory fade? Oh! the wild charge they made! New Zealand wondered Whether each doughty soul Paid for the pigs he stole, Noble Twelve Hundred! Jessie Mackay


Michael Smither (born 1939), Parihaka, South Taranaki, 1973, oil on board, 595x965mm, Private collection


Michael Smither (born 1939), Parihaka, South Taranaki, 1973, oil on board, 595x965mm, Private collection


from

Parihaka Grieving: Alistair Te Ariki Campbell (Cook Island Mäori)

from

The Sound of Places and Names: Dinah Hawken

The son of a Cook Island Mäori mother and a Scots father, Campbell was born in the Cook Islands in 1926. He was educated in New Zealand and has been a vital force in this country’s literature since the early 1950s when, alongside James K. Baxter and Louis Johnson, he was a member of the Wellington Group. He has written three novels and an autobiography, as well as numerous collections of poetry. Campbell lives at Pukerua Bay on the Kapiti Coast. Born in Hawera in 1943, Hawken trained as a physiotherapist and social worker before publishing her first collection of poetry, It has no sound and is blue, in 1987. Her more recent books are Small Stories of Devotion (1991), Water, Leaves, Stones (1995) and the satirical A Little Book of Bitching (1998). She lives and works in Wellington.

Ko Aotea: Patea Maori

A traditional chant indigenous to Patea Maori, identifying the waka (canoe) in which their forebears sailed from the ancestral homeland of Hawaiiki to Aotearoa New Zealand.

Moment of Truth: Rore Hapipi (Ngäti Tuwharetoa)

Born in Oruanui in 1935, and currently based in Taupo, Rore Hapipi (Rowley Habib) has written poetry, plays, film scripts and short stories. In 1975, he took part in the Mäori Land March from Cape Reinga to Wellington. He was arrested during a land-related protest on the Raglan golf course in 1978 and jailed. His experiences as an activist inform ‘Moment of Truth’—a poem he chose to read at the City Gallery, Wellington, on the opening weekend of the Parihaka exhibition in August, 2000.

Taranaki Patere—Kahuri: Patea Maori

A traditional chant which lists the eight Taranaki Iwi (tribes) and states their whakapapa (genealogy).

To Taranaki (from Book Five of Commonplace Odes): Ian Wedde

A vital presence in New Zealand culture since the late 1960s, Ian Wedde (born Blenheim, 1946) has written numerous volumes of poetry, three novels, a collection of art and literary criticism and has also edited two important anthologies of New Zealand verse. In 1994 he curated the touring exhibition Fomison—what shall we tell them? and edited the accompanying catalogue. He is currently arts projects manager at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

Parihaka—Te Whiti—Tohu—Täwhiao: Patea Maori

The Waikato chief Matutaera (later King Täwhiao of King Movement fame) was approached by representatives of different religious denominations, each hoping that their particular faith might be chosen as the religion for the Tainui people. Matutaera conferred with Te Ua Haumëne of Taranaki, who suggested that he consult the prophets Tohu and Te Whiti. Following their meeting he decided that their Paimarire faith be adopted as the religion for Waikato. The introduction is an excerpt from a speech by Matutaera setting forth the way the Paimarire religion would be introduced in the King Country. The three subsequent items (a waiata, a haka and another waiata) relate to the religion and the connections between Waikato and Taranaki.

Not by Wind Ravaged: Hone Tuwhare (Ngapuhi)

Born in Kaikohe in 1922, Tuwhare published his first poems in the 1950s while working as a boilermaker. His debut collection, No Ordinary Sun, appeared in 1964 and was the first book of poems by a Mäori to be published. ‘Not by wind ravaged’ was included in that book and has been reprinted, anthologised and read publicly many times since. The poem was incorporated into an important painting in Ralph Hotere’s Te Whiti series in 1973 and since that time has often been associated specifically with Parihaka Pä.

Rain Over Taranaki: Roma Potiki

(Te Rarawa, Te Aupouri, Ngäti Rangitihi)

Born in Lower Hutt in 1958 and raised in Wainuiomata, Roma Potiki is one of the foremost poets of her generation. Her major publications are Stones in Her Mouth (1992), Shaking the Tree (1999) and a collaborative book with painter Robyn Kahukiwa, Oriori (1999). She also works as a visual artist and arts administrator. For the Parihaka exhibition at the City Gallery, Wellington, she was co-ordinator of public programmes.

Parihaka: Apirana Taylor

(Te Whanau-a-Apanui, Ngäti Porou, Ngäti Ruanui)

Born in 1955, Taylor has worked as a writer, actor, drama teacher and as a member of the Mäori theatre group Te Ohu Whakaari. He has published two short story collections—He Rau Aroha; A Hundred Leaves of Love (1986) and Ki Te Ao (1990)—and a novel, He Tangi Aroha (1993), as well as poetry. He now lives at Paekakariki, where he is a full-time writer, actor and painter.


from

Parihaka Grieving: Alistair Te Ariki Campbell (Cook Island Mäori)

from

The Sound of Places and Names: Dinah Hawken

The son of a Cook Island Mäori mother and a Scots father, Campbell was born in the Cook Islands in 1926. He was educated in New Zealand and has been a vital force in this country’s literature since the early 1950s when, alongside James K. Baxter and Louis Johnson, he was a member of the Wellington Group. He has written three novels and an autobiography, as well as numerous collections of poetry. Campbell lives at Pukerua Bay on the Kapiti Coast. Born in Hawera in 1943, Hawken trained as a physiotherapist and social worker before publishing her first collection of poetry, It has no sound and is blue, in 1987. Her more recent books are Small Stories of Devotion (1991), Water, Leaves, Stones (1995) and the satirical A Little Book of Bitching (1998). She lives and works in Wellington.

Ko Aotea: Patea Maori

A traditional chant indigenous to Patea Maori, identifying the waka (canoe) in which their forebears sailed from the ancestral homeland of Hawaiiki to Aotearoa New Zealand.

Moment of Truth: Rore Hapipi (Ngäti Tuwharetoa)

Born in Oruanui in 1935, and currently based in Taupo, Rore Hapipi (Rowley Habib) has written poetry, plays, film scripts and short stories. In 1975, he took part in the Mäori Land March from Cape Reinga to Wellington. He was arrested during a land-related protest on the Raglan golf course in 1978 and jailed. His experiences as an activist inform ‘Moment of Truth’—a poem he chose to read at the City Gallery, Wellington, on the opening weekend of the Parihaka exhibition in August, 2000.

Taranaki Patere—Kahuri: Patea Maori

A traditional chant which lists the eight Taranaki Iwi (tribes) and states their whakapapa (genealogy).

To Taranaki (from Book Five of Commonplace Odes): Ian Wedde

A vital presence in New Zealand culture since the late 1960s, Ian Wedde (born Blenheim, 1946) has written numerous volumes of poetry, three novels, a collection of art and literary criticism and has also edited two important anthologies of New Zealand verse. In 1994 he curated the touring exhibition Fomison—what shall we tell them? and edited the accompanying catalogue. He is currently arts projects manager at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

Parihaka—Te Whiti—Tohu—Täwhiao: Patea Maori

The Waikato chief Matutaera (later King Täwhiao of King Movement fame) was approached by representatives of different religious denominations, each hoping that their particular faith might be chosen as the religion for the Tainui people. Matutaera conferred with Te Ua Haumëne of Taranaki, who suggested that he consult the prophets Tohu and Te Whiti. Following their meeting he decided that their Paimarire faith be adopted as the religion for Waikato. The introduction is an excerpt from a speech by Matutaera setting forth the way the Paimarire religion would be introduced in the King Country. The three subsequent items (a waiata, a haka and another waiata) relate to the religion and the connections between Waikato and Taranaki.

Not by Wind Ravaged: Hone Tuwhare (Ngapuhi)

Born in Kaikohe in 1922, Tuwhare published his first poems in the 1950s while working as a boilermaker. His debut collection, No Ordinary Sun, appeared in 1964 and was the first book of poems by a Mäori to be published. ‘Not by wind ravaged’ was included in that book and has been reprinted, anthologised and read publicly many times since. The poem was incorporated into an important painting in Ralph Hotere’s Te Whiti series in 1973 and since that time has often been associated specifically with Parihaka Pä.

Rain Over Taranaki: Roma Potiki

(Te Rarawa, Te Aupouri, Ngäti Rangitihi)

Born in Lower Hutt in 1958 and raised in Wainuiomata, Roma Potiki is one of the foremost poets of her generation. Her major publications are Stones in Her Mouth (1992), Shaking the Tree (1999) and a collaborative book with painter Robyn Kahukiwa, Oriori (1999). She also works as a visual artist and arts administrator. For the Parihaka exhibition at the City Gallery, Wellington, she was co-ordinator of public programmes.

Parihaka: Apirana Taylor

(Te Whanau-a-Apanui, Ngäti Porou, Ngäti Ruanui)

Born in 1955, Taylor has worked as a writer, actor, drama teacher and as a member of the Mäori theatre group Te Ohu Whakaari. He has published two short story collections—He Rau Aroha; A Hundred Leaves of Love (1986) and Ki Te Ao (1990)—and a novel, He Tangi Aroha (1993), as well as poetry. He now lives at Paekakariki, where he is a full-time writer, actor and painter.


An Offering for Parihaka: David Hamilton

This work, for traditional Mäori instruments and string orchestra, is based upon the composer’s A Song of Tamatea which he wrote in 1988 for the Schola Musica. It has been revised and retitled for this recording. In it are heard the sounds of the köauau (the most widely used of Mäori instruments, a straight hollow tube about 10-15cm in length possessing three finger-holes, and with an effective range of only three or four notes), the nguru (a similar instrument which has a curved end) and the pukaea (a long hollow tube, often slightly tapered, which is used to produce a single note as a signal call). The composer writes: “Before composing this piece I made two decisions—one was to avoid producing a catalogue of effects and instruments, and the other was not to base the piece on traditional Mäori waiata melodies.” David Hamilton (1955–) was born in Napier, New Zealand and studied at Auckland University with Douglas Mews and John Rimmer. His works have been commissioned by a variety of New Zealand groups including the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, the New Zealand National Youth Choir and the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra, and his music is increasingly being performed outside of New Zealand. He has a particular affinity for choral music, having written over sixty works in this medium.

from

Twelve Little Poems About Parihaka: Elizabeth Smither

Elizabeth Smither was born in 1941 in New Plymouth, where she still lives. One of New Zealand’s senior writers, she has published 13 collections of poetry—most recently The Lark Quartet (2000)—as well as two novels, three short story collections and a book of journals. She works at New Plymouth Library and continues to write prolifically.

from Poems

From Another Century, for Parihaka Robert Sullivan (Ngapuhi)

Born in 1967 in Auckland, where he still lives, Sullivan has published three collections of poetry—most recently Star Waka (1999), a poem of 2001 lines which brings together the past, present and future of Mäori. He currently works at Auckland University Library.

Fuse: Cilla McQueen William Andrew Collis (1853-1920), Children at Parihaka Pä, undated, black & white photograph, 210x280mm, W. A. Collis Collection, Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington

Born in England in 1949, McQueen has spent most of her life in Dunedin, although she now lives at Bluff. She has published seven collections of poetry including Crikey: Selected Poems (1994) and a collection of verse and drawings, Markings (2000). For some years she lived on Otago Peninsula and would drive to and from Dunedin along a road built by Taranaki prisoners back in the 1870s and 1880s.


An Offering for Parihaka: David Hamilton

This work, for traditional Mäori instruments and string orchestra, is based upon the composer’s A Song of Tamatea which he wrote in 1988 for the Schola Musica. It has been revised and retitled for this recording. In it are heard the sounds of the köauau (the most widely used of Mäori instruments, a straight hollow tube about 10-15cm in length possessing three finger-holes, and with an effective range of only three or four notes), the nguru (a similar instrument which has a curved end) and the pukaea (a long hollow tube, often slightly tapered, which is used to produce a single note as a signal call). The composer writes: “Before composing this piece I made two decisions—one was to avoid producing a catalogue of effects and instruments, and the other was not to base the piece on traditional Mäori waiata melodies.” David Hamilton (1955–) was born in Napier, New Zealand and studied at Auckland University with Douglas Mews and John Rimmer. His works have been commissioned by a variety of New Zealand groups including the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, the New Zealand National Youth Choir and the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra, and his music is increasingly being performed outside of New Zealand. He has a particular affinity for choral music, having written over sixty works in this medium.

from

Twelve Little Poems About Parihaka: Elizabeth Smither

Elizabeth Smither was born in 1941 in New Plymouth, where she still lives. One of New Zealand’s senior writers, she has published 13 collections of poetry—most recently The Lark Quartet (2000)—as well as two novels, three short story collections and a book of journals. She works at New Plymouth Library and continues to write prolifically.

from Poems

From Another Century, for Parihaka Robert Sullivan (Ngapuhi)

Born in 1967 in Auckland, where he still lives, Sullivan has published three collections of poetry—most recently Star Waka (1999), a poem of 2001 lines which brings together the past, present and future of Mäori. He currently works at Auckland University Library.

Fuse: Cilla McQueen William Andrew Collis (1853-1920), Children at Parihaka Pä, undated, black & white photograph, 210x280mm, W. A. Collis Collection, Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington

Born in England in 1949, McQueen has spent most of her life in Dunedin, although she now lives at Bluff. She has published seven collections of poetry including Crikey: Selected Poems (1994) and a collection of verse and drawings, Markings (2000). For some years she lived on Otago Peninsula and would drive to and from Dunedin along a road built by Taranaki prisoners back in the 1870s and 1880s.


Gather Up the Earth from Songs to the Judges: Mervyn Thompson—William Dart

Songs to the Judges was premiered as part of the Maidment Summer Theatre programme in 1980, in a double bill with a revival of Songs to Uncle Scrim. Judges was toured nationally by the NZ Students’ Arts Council in April 1981 and recorded the following year. The work is Thompson’s vision of the often troubled relationship between Mäori and Päkehä in Aotearoa New Zealand. Opening with an affirmation that the land is the very soul of a tribal people (‘Ahi Kä’) and ending with a gospel-styled vision of justice and unity (‘On That Day’), the nineteen songs draw on both historical and contemporary perspectives. We are reminded of the various Land Acts from 1841 to 1967 in one number; another takes satirical issue with the travesty of justice that was the Raglan Golf Course Trial. Parihaka is central to two songs, “We Got it All Together Just for You”, which lampoons the Government’s treatment of the Parihaka protesters and “Gather Up the Earth”, a deeply spiritual song, which draws much of its lyrical power from Te Whiti’s own sayings. Mervyn Thompson (1936-1992) was one of New Zealand theatre’s most charismatic figures. Born on the West Coast to a mining family, he was eventually drawn to the University of Canterbury where he worked with the inspirational Ngaio Marsh. His later career included stints as Director of Christchurch’s Court Theatre and Wellington’s Downstage, as well as a period lecturing in Drama at the University of Auckland. One of his special contributions was the “song-play”, a theatre piece which made its point through a series of songs. William Dart (1947– ) combines a career as an academic and a journalist. Currently a lecturer at the University of Waikato, he has been editing Art New Zealand since 1982 and Music in New Zealand since he founded it in 1988. In 1996 he was awarded an MNZM for services to arts and music. Gather Up the Earth And the tribesman asked “What shall We do if a ploughman is shot dead?” And Te Whiti replied: (chorus) Gather up the earth On which the blood is spilt And bring it to Parihaka. Gather up the earth On which the blood is spilt And bring it to the hallowed land.

Under the mountain Look on the land In the places where the blood has flowed Let the holes not be filled. Let the wounds not be healed Let the land remember.

[This is from Ann Salmond’s book Hui, and can be translated as “Bring the song of pain and lay it down so my dead may gather around me”]

(chorus)

They will spring out of the ground For their spirits have not flown. Like the Greeks in the living legends When the dragon's teeth were sown, They will rise from the soil Of Whakamaharatanga! There will be a human harvest On the day of Aranga!

Ei whakataukia Mai rä te rangi O te mamae e Kia tütaki Mai ngä mate Kua pä ki ahau!

(chorus)

Mervyn Thompson

Parihaka: Tim Finn & Herbs

In the late 1980s, Tim’s older sister Carolyn gave him Dick Scott’s book Ask That Mountain, which she had just read, and told him to write a song about it. Not one to disobey a directive from a sibling, Tim came through with the song ‘Parihaka’. Originally appearing on his eponymous third album, recorded in the USA, the song was re-recorded with Herbs as a single on his return to New Zealand. Tim Finn (1952–) is an icon in New Zealand, a legend in Australia, and has cult status throughout the Northern Hemisphere. He was a founding member of Split Enz in 1972, and he was with the band for their debut album Mental Notes in 1975 right through to the hugely successful True Colours and Time and Tide. His last studio album with the band was 1983’s Conflicting Emotions. The list of Split Enz classic songs include Tim’s ‘I See Red’, ‘Poor Boy’, ‘I Hope I Never’, ‘Six Months In A Leaky Boat’ and ‘Dirty Creature’. Since leaving Split Enz he has roamed the world, releasing five solo albums (Escapade, Big Canoe, Tim Finn, Before and After and most recently Say It Is So), writing and singing his way into the hearts and minds of those gathered along the highway. Parihaka

My friend, my friend, I hate to see you suffer Events conspire to bring us to our knees My friend, my friend, you’ve taken this the wrong way Rise up, defend yourself, never give in Look to the sky—the spirit of Te Whiti The endless tide is murmuring his name

One day you’ll know the truth They can’t pull out the roots So come and take me home (To weep) for my lost brother They gather still, the clouds of Taranaki His children’s children wearing the white plume So take me for the sins of these sad islands The wave still breaks on the rock of Rahotu

(chorus) Tohu, Te Whiti, they’ll never be defeated And even at the darkest hour their presence will remain Oh I’ll sing for you the song of Parihaka

And when you taste the pepper on your pudding Think when you taste the sugar in your soup

Te Whiti, he used the language of the Spirit Then stood accused, a madman and his dream They saw the train go roaring through the tunnel They heard the voice travel on the magic wire

Come to Parihaka—weep for my lost brother Come to Parihaka—the spirit of non-violence Has come to fill the silence Come to Parihaka—we’ll never be defeated

But they loved the silence of the river They dreamed the dog pissed on the cannon’s wheel

Tim Finn

(chorus)

(chorus)


Gather Up the Earth from Songs to the Judges: Mervyn Thompson—William Dart

Songs to the Judges was premiered as part of the Maidment Summer Theatre programme in 1980, in a double bill with a revival of Songs to Uncle Scrim. Judges was toured nationally by the NZ Students’ Arts Council in April 1981 and recorded the following year. The work is Thompson’s vision of the often troubled relationship between Mäori and Päkehä in Aotearoa New Zealand. Opening with an affirmation that the land is the very soul of a tribal people (‘Ahi Kä’) and ending with a gospel-styled vision of justice and unity (‘On That Day’), the nineteen songs draw on both historical and contemporary perspectives. We are reminded of the various Land Acts from 1841 to 1967 in one number; another takes satirical issue with the travesty of justice that was the Raglan Golf Course Trial. Parihaka is central to two songs, “We Got it All Together Just for You”, which lampoons the Government’s treatment of the Parihaka protesters and “Gather Up the Earth”, a deeply spiritual song, which draws much of its lyrical power from Te Whiti’s own sayings. Mervyn Thompson (1936-1992) was one of New Zealand theatre’s most charismatic figures. Born on the West Coast to a mining family, he was eventually drawn to the University of Canterbury where he worked with the inspirational Ngaio Marsh. His later career included stints as Director of Christchurch’s Court Theatre and Wellington’s Downstage, as well as a period lecturing in Drama at the University of Auckland. One of his special contributions was the “song-play”, a theatre piece which made its point through a series of songs. William Dart (1947– ) combines a career as an academic and a journalist. Currently a lecturer at the University of Waikato, he has been editing Art New Zealand since 1982 and Music in New Zealand since he founded it in 1988. In 1996 he was awarded an MNZM for services to arts and music. Gather Up the Earth And the tribesman asked “What shall We do if a ploughman is shot dead?” And Te Whiti replied: (chorus) Gather up the earth On which the blood is spilt And bring it to Parihaka. Gather up the earth On which the blood is spilt And bring it to the hallowed land.

Under the mountain Look on the land In the places where the blood has flowed Let the holes not be filled. Let the wounds not be healed Let the land remember.

[This is from Ann Salmond’s book Hui, and can be translated as “Bring the song of pain and lay it down so my dead may gather around me”]

(chorus)

They will spring out of the ground For their spirits have not flown. Like the Greeks in the living legends When the dragon's teeth were sown, They will rise from the soil Of Whakamaharatanga! There will be a human harvest On the day of Aranga!

Ei whakataukia Mai rä te rangi O te mamae e Kia tütaki Mai ngä mate Kua pä ki ahau!

(chorus)

Mervyn Thompson

Parihaka: Tim Finn & Herbs

In the late 1980s, Tim’s older sister Carolyn gave him Dick Scott’s book Ask That Mountain, which she had just read, and told him to write a song about it. Not one to disobey a directive from a sibling, Tim came through with the song ‘Parihaka’. Originally appearing on his eponymous third album, recorded in the USA, the song was re-recorded with Herbs as a single on his return to New Zealand. Tim Finn (1952–) is an icon in New Zealand, a legend in Australia, and has cult status throughout the Northern Hemisphere. He was a founding member of Split Enz in 1972, and he was with the band for their debut album Mental Notes in 1975 right through to the hugely successful True Colours and Time and Tide. His last studio album with the band was 1983’s Conflicting Emotions. The list of Split Enz classic songs include Tim’s ‘I See Red’, ‘Poor Boy’, ‘I Hope I Never’, ‘Six Months In A Leaky Boat’ and ‘Dirty Creature’. Since leaving Split Enz he has roamed the world, releasing five solo albums (Escapade, Big Canoe, Tim Finn, Before and After and most recently Say It Is So), writing and singing his way into the hearts and minds of those gathered along the highway. Parihaka

My friend, my friend, I hate to see you suffer Events conspire to bring us to our knees My friend, my friend, you’ve taken this the wrong way Rise up, defend yourself, never give in Look to the sky—the spirit of Te Whiti The endless tide is murmuring his name

One day you’ll know the truth They can’t pull out the roots So come and take me home (To weep) for my lost brother They gather still, the clouds of Taranaki His children’s children wearing the white plume So take me for the sins of these sad islands The wave still breaks on the rock of Rahotu

(chorus) Tohu, Te Whiti, they’ll never be defeated And even at the darkest hour their presence will remain Oh I’ll sing for you the song of Parihaka

And when you taste the pepper on your pudding Think when you taste the sugar in your soup

Te Whiti, he used the language of the Spirit Then stood accused, a madman and his dream They saw the train go roaring through the tunnel They heard the voice travel on the magic wire

Come to Parihaka—weep for my lost brother Come to Parihaka—the spirit of non-violence Has come to fill the silence Come to Parihaka—we’ll never be defeated

But they loved the silence of the river They dreamed the dog pissed on the cannon’s wheel

Tim Finn

(chorus)

(chorus)


E Pa To Hau (Patea Maori) Köauau: Hohepa Malcolm Arranged and produced by Dalvanius Prime and Henare Te Ua Recorded April 1987 at Mascot Recording Studios, Auckland Ko Aotea / Taranaki Patere (Patea Maori) Kaea: Maggie Kahu Narrator: Don Selwyn Adaptation by Sonny Waru and Dalvanius Prime Arranged and produced by Dalvanius Prime and Dave Hurley Recorded and mixed April 1987 at Mascot Recording Studios, Auckland Parihaka – Te Whiti – Tohu – Tawhiao (Patea Maori) Köauau: Clarence Smith Keyboards: Ropata Smith Emulator II: Wiremu Karaitiana Körero (Patere): Ruka Broughton Snr Haka: Patea Maori Körero: Hoani Heremaia Arranged and produced by Dalvanius Prime and Henare Te Ua Recorded December 1987 at Mascot Recording Studios, Auckland From the album ‘Poi E’ P & © 1996 WARNER MUSIC NZ LTD The Charge at Parihaka (J. Mackay / A. Ritchie) The Australian Song Company: Penelope Sharpe Jeannie VandeVelde Jo Burton Richard Black David McKenzie Clive Birch Director: Roland Peelman Recorded (live) July 1994 at the 3rd International Convention of Voice Teachers, Auckland

Pauline Thompson (born 1943), Albatross, Taranaki, Crescent Moon, 2000, oil on canvas, 605x760mm, Courtesy of the artist

Further information about the Australian Song Company can be found at www.songcompany.com.au

Gather Up The Earth (M. Thompson / W. Dart) Mervyn Thompson Sharron Da Silva Hemi Rapata Margaret Blay Arthur Ranford Piano: William Dart Recorded in 1982 by Kiwi Pacific Records From the album ‘Songs to the Judges’ (KIWI SLD-69) P & © 1982 KIWI MUSIC Further information regarding the complete recording is available from Kiwi Pacific Records International Ltd., PO Box 826, Wellington, Ph 04 389 6394, Fx 04 389 6521 Offering for Parihaka (D. Hamilton) The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra Püoro Mäori: Richard Nunns Conductor: Kenneth Young Recorded 22 July 2000, at the Michael Fowler Centre, Wellington Parihaka (T. Finn) Tim Finn and Herbs Producer: Tim Finn Co-producer and engineer: Nick Morga Recorded in 1989 at Airforce Studios, Auckland From the single ‘Parihaka’ P & © 1989 EMI Music New Zealand Ltd The poets were recorded by Robbie Duncan and Chris Price at Braeburn Recording Studio, Wellington, between 21 August and 6 October, 2000 Digital editing and mastering by Richard Hulse, Radio New Zealand Executive Producer: Thomas Liggett Notes on the poets by Gregory O’Brien Booklet compiled and edited by Thomas Liggett Cover: Tony Fomison Untitled (Te Whiti), Private Collection, Wellington

Design: Eyework Design & Production This recording is a co-operative venture between the City Gallery, Wellington and Trust Records. We would like to thank all the people and organisations involved in the making of this album who have have given so freely and generously of their time, their words and their music. The album was made possible by the contributions of the NZSO, Radio NZ, Tim Finn and Herbs, Anthony Ritchie, Roland Peelman and the Australian Song Company, Dalvanius Prime and the Patea Maori Club, David Hamilton, William Dart and the twelve poets. Thanks also to Paula Savage, Gregory O’Brien, Chris Price, Keith McEwing (National Library Music Room), Karlene Bakalich (Warner Music), Murray Vincent (Kiwi Pacific Records), Mike Chunn, Kylie Brown, Ross Hendy and Julie Nevett. Other releases by HRL Morrison Music Trust can be found at the website

www.trustrecords.com

The HRL Morrison Music Trust was established in March 1995 as a charitable trust to support New Zealand musicians of international calibre. All funds received by the Trust are used to make recordings, present concerts, both in New Zealand and overseas, and assist artists to undertake projects to further develop their talents. The artists appearing on this recording have generously waived all royalties. All profits from the sale of the CD will be donated to the trustees of Parihaka Pä. © 2000 HRL Morrison Music Trust, PO Box 1395, Wellington, New Zealand ALL RIGHTS OF THE PRODUCER AND OF THE OWNERS OF THE WORKS RE-PRODUCED RESERVED. UNAUTHORISED COPYING, HIRING, LENDING, PUBLIC PERFORMANCE AND BROADCASTING OF THIS RECORD PROHIBITED.


E Pa To Hau (Patea Maori) Köauau: Hohepa Malcolm Arranged and produced by Dalvanius Prime and Henare Te Ua Recorded April 1987 at Mascot Recording Studios, Auckland Ko Aotea / Taranaki Patere (Patea Maori) Kaea: Maggie Kahu Narrator: Don Selwyn Adaptation by Sonny Waru and Dalvanius Prime Arranged and produced by Dalvanius Prime and Dave Hurley Recorded and mixed April 1987 at Mascot Recording Studios, Auckland Parihaka – Te Whiti – Tohu – Tawhiao (Patea Maori) Köauau: Clarence Smith Keyboards: Ropata Smith Emulator II: Wiremu Karaitiana Körero (Patere): Ruka Broughton Snr Haka: Patea Maori Körero: Hoani Heremaia Arranged and produced by Dalvanius Prime and Henare Te Ua Recorded December 1987 at Mascot Recording Studios, Auckland From the album ‘Poi E’ P & © 1996 WARNER MUSIC NZ LTD The Charge at Parihaka (J. Mackay / A. Ritchie) The Australian Song Company: Penelope Sharpe Jeannie VandeVelde Jo Burton Richard Black David McKenzie Clive Birch Director: Roland Peelman Recorded (live) July 1994 at the 3rd International Convention of Voice Teachers, Auckland

Pauline Thompson (born 1943), Albatross, Taranaki, Crescent Moon, 2000, oil on canvas, 605x760mm, Courtesy of the artist

Further information about the Australian Song Company can be found at www.songcompany.com.au

Gather Up The Earth (M. Thompson / W. Dart) Mervyn Thompson Sharron Da Silva Hemi Rapata Margaret Blay Arthur Ranford Piano: William Dart Recorded in 1982 by Kiwi Pacific Records From the album ‘Songs to the Judges’ (KIWI SLD-69) P & © 1982 KIWI MUSIC Further information regarding the complete recording is available from Kiwi Pacific Records International Ltd., PO Box 826, Wellington, Ph 04 389 6394, Fx 04 389 6521 Offering for Parihaka (D. Hamilton) The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra Püoro Mäori: Richard Nunns Conductor: Kenneth Young Recorded 22 July 2000, at the Michael Fowler Centre, Wellington Parihaka (T. Finn) Tim Finn and Herbs Producer: Tim Finn Co-producer and engineer: Nick Morga Recorded in 1989 at Airforce Studios, Auckland From the single ‘Parihaka’ P & © 1989 EMI Music New Zealand Ltd The poets were recorded by Robbie Duncan and Chris Price at Braeburn Recording Studio, Wellington, between 21 August and 6 October, 2000 Digital editing and mastering by Richard Hulse, Radio New Zealand Executive Producer: Thomas Liggett Notes on the poets by Gregory O’Brien Booklet compiled and edited by Thomas Liggett Cover: Tony Fomison Untitled (Te Whiti), Private Collection, Wellington

Design: Eyework Design & Production This recording is a co-operative venture between the City Gallery, Wellington and Trust Records. We would like to thank all the people and organisations involved in the making of this album who have have given so freely and generously of their time, their words and their music. The album was made possible by the contributions of the NZSO, Radio NZ, Tim Finn and Herbs, Anthony Ritchie, Roland Peelman and the Australian Song Company, Dalvanius Prime and the Patea Maori Club, David Hamilton, William Dart and the twelve poets. Thanks also to Paula Savage, Gregory O’Brien, Chris Price, Keith McEwing (National Library Music Room), Karlene Bakalich (Warner Music), Murray Vincent (Kiwi Pacific Records), Mike Chunn, Kylie Brown, Ross Hendy and Julie Nevett. Other releases by HRL Morrison Music Trust can be found at the website

www.trustrecords.com

The HRL Morrison Music Trust was established in March 1995 as a charitable trust to support New Zealand musicians of international calibre. All funds received by the Trust are used to make recordings, present concerts, both in New Zealand and overseas, and assist artists to undertake projects to further develop their talents. The artists appearing on this recording have generously waived all royalties. All profits from the sale of the CD will be donated to the trustees of Parihaka Pä. © 2000 HRL Morrison Music Trust, PO Box 1395, Wellington, New Zealand ALL RIGHTS OF THE PRODUCER AND OF THE OWNERS OF THE WORKS RE-PRODUCED RESERVED. UNAUTHORISED COPYING, HIRING, LENDING, PUBLIC PERFORMANCE AND BROADCASTING OF THIS RECORD PROHIBITED.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

E Pä Tö Hau Patea Maori 1:15 He Waiata Tënei mo Parihaka J.C. Sturm 1:57 Volunteer Chris Orsman 2:44 The Charge at Parihaka Anthony Ritchie 5:55 from Parihaka Grieving Alistair Te Ariki Campbell 2:08 from The Sound of Places and Names Dinah Hawken 2:57 Ko Aotea Patea Maori 1:03 Moment of Truth Rore Hapipi 2:52 Taranaki Patere—Kahuri Patea Maori 2:52 To Taranaki (from Book 5 of Commonplace Odes) Ian Wedde 1:43 Parihaka—Te Whiti—Tohu—Täwhiao Patea Maori 4:36 Not by Wind Ravaged Hone Tuwhare 1:56 Rain Over Taranaki Roma Potiki 2:53 Parihaka Apirana Taylor 1:48 An Offering for Parihaka David Hamilton 13:34 from Twelve Little Poems About Parihaka Elizabeth Smither 3:00 from Poems From Another Century, for Parihaka Robert Sullivan Fuse Cilla McQueen 2:43 Gather Up the Earth William Dart—Mervyn Thompson 2:45 A Tricky Business J.C. Sturm 3:41 Parihaka Tim Finn & Herbs 4:11 Total Duration 68:59

2:22

Parihaka  

The Art of Passive Resistance

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