Q Magazine Atlanta | August 29, 2019

Page 1

Q inform | inspire

Labor Gay Weekend in the LGBTQ ATL 19

0 August 29, 2

D U O L T I Y SA em Th o t s n a e eM d i r P y a G k lac B t a h W n o Q People

Black, Proud & More Work to Do 10 Queer Cures for Summertime Blues You Can’t & Won’t Be A Dating Mind Reader

Q News Q Voices Q Shots The Weekly Print Publication of Project Q Atlanta


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EDITOR’S NOTE Q Q MAGAZINE THE WEEKLY PUBLICATION OF PROJECT Q ATLANTA PUBLISHERS INITIAL MEDIA, LLC MIKE FLEMING PUBLISHER & EDITOR MIKE@THEQATL.COM MATT HENNIE PUBLISHER & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MATT@THEQATL.COM RICHARD CHERSKOV PUBLISHER & GENERAL MANAGER RICHARD@THEQATL.COM ART DIRECTOR JOHN NAIL JOHN@THEQATL.COM PROJECT Q ATLANTA PATRICK SAUNDERS EDITOR PSAUNDERS@THEQATL.COM CONTRIBUTORS IAN ABER LAURA BACCUS GABRIELLE CLAIBORNE BUCK COOKE CHARLES E. DAVIS JON DEAN BILL DICKINSON JIM FARMER BRAD GIBSON JAMES L. HICKS BENTLEY HUDGINS TAMEEKA L. HUNTER HEATHER MALONEY ERIC PAULK KYLE ROSE JAMES PARKER SHEFFIELD VINCE SHIFFLETT ALEXANDRA TYLER VAVA VROOM RUSS YOUNGBLOOD NATIONAL ADVERTISING RIVENDELL MEDIA SALES@RIVENDELLMEDIA.COM 212-242-6863 LOCAL ADVERTISING SALES@THEQATL.COM 404-949-7071

19 for 2019 BEING SOMETIMEY WASN’T going to cut it. Once-a-year lip service just wouldn’t do. On our long must-do for Q from the outset was our commitment to year-round queer diversity and intersectionality of civil justice movements. It’s ironic that the way in which we and a few other “for everyone” venues and outlets stand out becomes more obvious when everyone else jumps on the bandwagon. Take Atlanta’s Black Gay Pride over Labor Day Weekend, closing in on 25 years as the country’s premier event series of its kind.

MIKE FLEMING EDITOR & PUBLISHER

As celebrations and commemorations approach, more black faces and representation appear in places you rarely see them outside Labor Day Weekend. But here at Q, this issue marks the 15th of 35 issues in 2019 with an African American on the cover, and the 37th profile of at least one black LGBTQ-ATLien, not to mention regular columns and photos by contributors of African descent on our other pages.

Being all here for all of queer Atlanta all year made easy work of this week’s coverage at the intersection of black and LGBTQ. We asked 19 of our 2019 Q profiles what Black Gay Pride means to them. From the worlds of business, art, performance and activism, they are as inspiring as they are insightful. We supplement it with a call to action by Georgia Equality Deputy Director Eric Paulk.

Of course, Black Gay Pride isn’t the only queer thing to do in Atlanta this week, so find our list of even more events in the Queer Agenda. That’s followed by our ever-churning factory of Q Shots photos from recent gatherings, and the always popular Q advice column to closeout coverage.

In other weekly installments, 10 Queer Things helps cure the summertime blues with real-world solutions, Q News finds joys and concerns for every queer in the village from theQatl.com, and I invite your feedback directly to mike@theQatl.com. Have a great week, and happy Labor Gay, Atlanta.

theQatl.com

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

VOLUME 2 ISSUE 40 AUGUST 29, 2019

GET ‘ER DONE

Labor Gay Weekend in Atlanta

COVER

15 29

Black & Proud QATLiens on Black Gay Pride

VOICES

13 8

31 Total Nonsense

Work to Do

Moving past visibility toward liberation COMMUNITY

12

Eat Up

32 Chug Bugs

JenChan’s owners ready to feed Atlanta

FEATURES

Q Voices Q News The Queer Agenda Q Shots The Q 6

theQatl.com

8 12 29 31 38

38

36 Glamour Tic


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Q

VOICES

Black Pride=

BLACK LIBERATION

IT CAN BE EASY TO FORGET THAT BLACK LGBTQ LIVES are under attack, especially in this era of Pose, Lil Nas X and Lena Waithe.

system level that act as barriers to health care.

Don’t get me wrong. Visibility is crucial, but we must resist the urge to confuse visibility with liberation. The fight for liberation is embedded in the LGBTQ rights movement, though in recent years that fight has focused primarily on advancing equality through the courts.

was an increase in coverage that significantly benefited people

As the courts become more hostile towards LGBTQ rights — the Trump administration has had 123 federal judges confirmed, including 41 to the federal courts of appeal as well as circuit courts to lifetime appointments on his recommendation — it is important for us to utilize our pride as a conduit for advancing issues that lead to expanding equity and supports our liberation. Black queer folks experience disparities in access to health care and health outcomes, suffer disproportionate violence and discrimination, are overrepresented in foster care system and the criminal legal system, and face broad socioeconomic inequality.

Medicaid via the Affordable Care Act. In states that did, there who are often uninsured or under-insured, including LGBTQ populations, PLWH and black and Latinx people.

As the state considers a tailored approach to Medicaid expan-

sion through a waiver, we must advocate for one

that is robust and significantly increases access to

care and improves health outcomes. We must also actively participate in the public comment period once the waiver is released.

SUPPORT LEGISLATION TO REFORM HIV CRIMINAL LAWS

ERIC PA U L K

We are the ones we have been waiting for, and right now, during Black Gay Pride Atlanta, is the time for us to begin articulating our vision of equity for our community. Here are three ways that we can start:

HIV criminal laws like the one in Georgia dis-

proportionately impact black gay and trans people

who are often perceived as dangerous and deviant.

Under the Georgia law, people living with HIV can be found criminally liable for up to 10 years in prison if they do not

disclose their HIV status to consensual partners before any type of sexual contact, even if transmission is impossible. These laws

work against public health policies, perpetuate HIV stigma and

ADVANCE STATEWIDE CIVIL RIGHTS PROTECTIONS

discourage people from knowing their HIV status.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of race and ethnicity, but it does not bar discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. Georgia is one of only three states with no civil rights bill protecting people from discrimination in the workplace, housing or public spaces.

Last legislative session, a bill was introduced to change the law

And you guessed it: Black LGBTQ individuals are more acutely impacted by these issues, as bias and prejudice based on race, sexual orientation and gender identity intersect and increase our likelihood of discrimination.

in Georgia. We should encourage our elected officials to support this bill during the next legislative session. We should also work with local prosecutors to educate them on HIV and to use their discretion to not bring charges under this statute.

Our progress shouldn’t be dictated by perceived assimilation

into mainstream media, but should be measured by our ability to move the needle towards equity and liberation. We owe that not only to ourselves and to the generation coming up behind us,

This year, we must support efforts to enact explicit nondiscrimination protections in Georgia.

but to all of those who created the space for us to stand strong,

INCREASE ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE

Eric Paulk is Deputy Director of Georgia Equality and an advocate

Black LGBTQ and people living with HIV (PLWH) experience a myriad of health disparities at the patient, provider and 8

Georgia was one of several states that chose not to expand

theQatl.com

black and proud.

working at the intersections of race, class and sexuality. Follow him on Twitter @EricPaulk.


FESTIVAL PROGRAMMING Yoga & Live Music, Car & Motorcyle Show - Lambda Car Club, Comedy Showcase, AIDS Memorial Quilt Sobriety Meetup, Bi + Pan March, Drag Queen Storytime, Burlesque Show, Trans March, Dyke March Shooting Stars Cabaret, Queer Your Gender Dance Party, Outworlders Gaymer Space 19th Annual Atlanta Pride Brunch, Gray Pride, Family Fun Zone SWEET TEA: A Queer Variety Show, Starlight Cabaret

ATLANTA PRIDE CELEBRATION OCT. 11-13, 2019 | ATLANTA PRIDE.ORG


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10 QUEER THINGS Q

Rethinking the Summertime Blues By Mike Fleming

T

he excitement of Memorial Day, the thrill of Stonewall Month, and the giddiness over weekly pool parties are long gone. Netflix and Pornhub are endless, but their entertainment value isn’t. You don’t care if you never see another daquiri, and it’s basically too damn hot to do anything but hole up near an air conditioner and pray for the sweet relief of fall. We’ve all been there, and there’s actually a reason for those

summer doldrums. For some people, the body has a tough time adjusting to earlier sunrises and later sunsets. Instead of waking and enjoying the extra daylight, you get the “sads.” Literally. SAD is an actual a thing ­— Seasonal Affective Disorder. It usually affects people in winter, but the Summer Onset variety is just as dangerous. Beyond that, maybe summer has just gone on too long, and it’s time for a change. Maybe you have vacation envy from your Facebook friends. Maybe your self- inflicted anxiety over tank tops has gone on long enough. Cruel summer? If being over the heat has turned into summer sads, try these tips that actually work.

GET THAT D Your body gets most, if not all, of its Vitamin D3 from the sun, so if you’re avoiding the heat, you could be starving for sunlight. An astonishing 88 percent of Americans don’t get enough of D3, so consider a supplement if getting outside is not in the cards.

LOVE THAT BODY Warm-weather fashions send you running for cover-ups? Stressing about your body every time you get dressed makes for a long summer. Fit or not, love your body enough to pamper and celebrate it the way it is.

CRANK THE TUNES Create a playlist for the soundtrack of summer. Hint: Not Adele. It may look like a movie and sound like a song, but that shit is depressing.

LOWER EXPECTATIONS Building up summer in your mind can create a disconnect when compared with reality. If you’re prepared for the worst, you can be pleasantly surprised when everything goes just fine.

SOCIAL REALITY CHECK No, everyone on Facebook and Instagram does not have a better dog, beaux or summer celebration schedule than you. Stop comparing your movie to their highlight reel.

LIVE IN THE MOMENT New Year and spring feel like beginnings, but summer flying by can feel like time is fleeting. Take your best shots of summer and put them on your wall to celebrate – not what was, but the here and now.

SLEEP IN

BRIGHTEN UP TO LIGHTEN UP

That blinding light through the window at the buttcrack of dawn may make sleeping sound impossible, and endless weeks of getting up with the sun could be taking its toll. Consider blackout curtains or a sleep mask to get extra winks.

It sounds like pop psychology, but surrounding yourself with light and color really helps you feel better. Wear bright hues. Get out, use light therapy devices (Google it), or sit by a window.

BUILD IN RELAXATION TIME

WORK IT OUT Getting the blood pumping keeps your mind sharp and lifts your spirits. One study found that simply walking 35 minutes a day, three times a week, can stave off mild to moderate depression.

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed when you overdo, and burnout is even more possible during summer. Map out some downtime.

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Q

IN BRIEF

Lesbian restaurateurs opening new Cabbagetown spot By Patrick Saunders JEN AND EMILY CHAN ARE EXPANDING THEIR “MOSTLY Southern, mainly Asian” food delivery club to a full-service restaurant in Cabbagetown.

The couple aims for a mid-September opening of JenChan’s in the former Mouth of the South space at 186 Carroll Street.

“We already have our Department of Agriculture license, so

we’re currently cooking and we can open as a market,” Emily Chan (photo right) told Project Q Atlanta. “We’ve put in our application with the Department of Health, and we’re

Emily (right) and Jen Chan with their son Mik

hoping for the earlier end of that.”

include “Mik’s Pick,” courtesy of the Chan’s infant son.

The market area will be about 300 square feet, with 600 square

The couple started JenChan’s Supper Delivery Club in January. Emily has been a restaurant consultant, a GM for Flying Biscuit and she’s worked for Mellow Mushroom’s corporate office. Jen (left) is the beverage manager for Ford Fry Restaurants.

awaiting inspections that could take two to three weeks. We’re

feet of seating space plus a bar. The restaurant menu will remain similar to the supper club’s, which includes spareribs, chicken

wings, rice noodles, egg rolls and stuffed mushrooms. It will also

House candidate in Atlanta claims trans people ‘gender pretending’ A FAR-RIGHT CONSPIRACY

the assistant manager.

theorist with anti-transgender views

The Facebook posts that SPLC ref-

has joined the GOP primary for a

erences are not public.

U.S. House seat in metro Atlanta, one of a handful of anti-LGBTQ

Greene’s history of far-right con-

candidates in the same race.

servatism doesn’t stop there. She

accused U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar of

Construction company owner Mar-

marrying her brother to help him

jorie Taylor Greene’s Facebook posts

gain citizenship, and she insinuated

fighting a Drag Queen Story Time

event in north Fulton County were

uncovered by the Southern Poverty

Marjorie Taylor Greene

Law Center’s “Hatewatch” blog. Green hopes to win the

Republican primary to challenge U.S. Rep. Lucy McBath in the 6th Congressional District race next year.

Vegas was a conspiracy against the

Second Amendment, according to Georgia Pol.

Greene responded to SPLC by labeling the group a “radical progressive organization” and “the propaganda arm of the

Days before theDrag Queen Story Time event in April,

Democrat party.” She accused them of putting her in physi-

mean gender change, it just means a gender refusal and gen-

accounts of her behavior.

SPLC said Greene posted on Facebook, “Trans does not der pretending! Truth is truth, it is not a choice!!!”

cal danger with the characterization but did not dispute any The GOP primary race also includes former U.S. Rep. Karen

Greene reportedly confronted library staff later during the

Handel, state Sen. Brandon Beach and political newcomer

parently secretly recording audio of her confrontation with

an LGBTQ ally — in November 2020.

Drag Queen Story Time event, sitting through it before ap-

12

that the 2017 mass shooting in Las

theQatl.com

Nicole Rodden. The winner takes on incumbent McBath ­—


theQatl.com

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COVER Q

Janaya DAVIS

Owner, BoxFit Fitness Studio & Former Boxing Champion “Black Gay Pride is not only a celebration but a movement to help unify the black and white LGBT communities, to voice concerns, and gain support for issues that are unique to the black LGBT communities — such as homophobia, medicine and outreach groups. Black Gay Pride is a celebration of the work and advancements that have been made due to the tireless work and efforts of those that decided to fight for the rights and equality of the LGBT community.”

Photo by Russ Youngblood

SAY IT LOUD

Q Atlanta People welcome Black Gay Pride 2019

W

by Mike Fleming & Patrick Saunders ith a commitment to covering all of the LGBTQATL all year, Q builds an archive of noteworthy coverage and a stockpile of gorgeous photography worth a second look. The magazine staff prides itself on including the queer AfricanAmerican experience on our pages among the rich tapestry of sto-

ries we help tell as the weeks and months progress, not just during the nationally recognized Black Gay Pride Weekend.

When we put our heads together for this issue, we realized: What

better way for Q to cover Black Gay Pride Atlanta 2019 than with our own 2019 cover models and feature stories of the year so far?

So with the help of our photographers, we did. We circled back and touched base with nearly two-dozen of our 2019 subjects

to get their thoughts on the intersection of LGBTQ and black identities in Atlanta.

What does Black Gay Pride mean to them? Keep flipping pages. 

George “Say” DAIGLE

Taylor MCLENDON

“As a part of both the African American and the LGBTQ community, I have a unique perspective of what it means to only be allowed or reviled in a space where others are welcomed and respected. I’m excited about the advancement of freedoms that were once only dreamed of for both of my communities. Now I know, dually, what it to means fight to earn an equitable portion of the liberties others were simply given at birth. For me, Black Gay Pride month is a celebration of the diaspora under a rainbow sky.”

“Black Pride, in my personal scope, embodies the unapologetic celebration of the cultural resonance that queer blackness has had not only on the greater LGBT Community, but the world. Although race and queerness are not one and the same, their struggles for equality are interwoven and reminds us to affirm the stories, creativity and image of queer-folks of color in our society.”

Founder & Host WERU Radio

Photo by Russ Youngblood

Gymnastics Coach & National Flag Football League of Atlanta Member

Photo by James L. Hicks, jameshicksphotography.net theQatl.com

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Q

BLACK GAY PRIDE continued

Johnnie Ray KORNEGAY III

Photographer, Consultant, Activist

Melissa SCOTT

DJ, Event Promoter, Business Owner, Television Personality on Love & Hip Hop Atlanta “Black Pride to me is the celebration of my life, culture and people like me and people that love me, my culture and people like me. I love being a black lesbian that finds beauty, peace, love and happiness in every race, gender and orientation.”

Photo by Russ Youngblood

“My black and my gay identity are as intertwined as my blood and my veins. As long as there’s life, and even beyond it, there is no separation. Black Gay Pride offers me an opportunity to reflect on the contributions and influence of black LGBTQ+ folks to humanity. It provides an opportunity to gather with my people, and love on one another in a world that still, actively, attempts to systemically eradicate us. We are still here.”

Photo courtesy Johnnie Ray Kornegay III, johnnieraykornegay.com

Iv FISCHER

YouTuber, Writer, Performer “Society continues to add weight onto the already-broken backs of women like me. Furthermore, it’s been extremely sad to realize that a lot of the flack I get for being transgender comes from the Black community. There needs to be more conversations regarding visibility and representation for trans women of color. There needs to be more opportunities for us to find work, to comfortably transition, and to exist openly in public spaces. I hope we see more and more progress in the future.”

Photo by Jon Dean, jondeanphotography.com

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RIPPARACHIE Rapper

“To be seen and heard is how we thrive. To be respected and cared about like other races is what matters. Being black isn’t all that safe and being gay makes it even worse. It is powerful to be black and openly gay. Everyone isn’t built like us. I feel like we are the strength behind the community, even if we aren’t in the mainstream light. I’m proud to be me.”

Photo by Russ Youngblood




BLACK GAY PRIDE continued Q

Jennifer Barnes BALENCIAGA

Legislative Liaison, Activist, House of Balenciaga “Being black and trans is one of my proudest realities. I am very proud of both of those identities, specifically for the fact that my existence is resistant to stereotypes and negative narratives.”

Bruno ROSE

Actor & Co-owner, PackLeadersATL Pet Services “Black Gay Pride is in the intersection of two cultural identities that represent resilience, strength, courage, love and family. Black culture and LGBTQIA culture are both experiencing a new wave of cultural influence. I’m proud to be a part of this intersection as an actor/singer, and a local Atlanta business owner. As I see it, there is nothing we cannot do or achieve. The world is ours.”

Photo by Russ Youngblood

Photo by Russ Youngblood

Taylor BROWN

Staff Attorney, Lambda Legal “W.E.B DuBois beautifully described the concept of double-consciousness. It has remained with me for years. It is the ever-present self-awareness of the interplay of being black and simultaneously being an ‘American.’ Two souls in one body. The idea being that being black made you different from the ‘majority,’ and not just understanding that but living and coping with that at every moment. It is very much the same for me regarding my identity as a transgender person. A triple-consciousness if you will. I am always conscious of my identity as a person, a transgender person, and a transgender person of color. The intersections and layers of my identity has given me profound empathy, compassion and strength.” Photo by Russ Youngblood

Miss HE

Drag Performer “Black Gay Pride is embracing the intersectionality of being both black and queer, understanding you are seen as an ‘other’ in society, and taking charge of the beauty that’s in that. I have chosen to live fully in both and embrace all that both cultures have to offer. We have always been here leading revolutions, being the tastemakers of popular culture, and living loudly in our truth despite the guarantee of bigotry and hate. As a black, non-binary femme, I live my life with black gay pride by being my blackest and queerest self and doing it unapologetically.” Photo by Jon Dean, jondeanphotography.com

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BLACK GAY PRIDE continued Q

Coco ROSE

Burlesque Performer, Glitter Goddess Productions Owner, Pink Diva Cupcakery “Being a black and queer woman that lives in the South is a battle within itself. There are so many different fights that affect each of my identities and being told to focus on just one side of my identity when the viewpoints sometimes contradict each other is frustrating to say the least. I am not just a black woman, but also a queer woman as well as a person that lives in the South. All of these things shape my fights as well as choices on what issue to take a stand on, which is why my biggest fight is for diversity and inclusive because no matter what space I am in, this is the area that is always lacking.” Photo by James L. Hicks, jameshicksphotography.net

Royce HALL

Daddy ROD

Musician, Performer

Onyx Southeast

“When I think of Black Gay Pride, I think of the resilience, resistance and revolutionary movement of my ancestors and elders. As a black trans man, I am able to stand strong and affirm myself in the reflection of their strength and sacrifices in order for me to even proclaim my identities. I think of Baldwin, Rustin, Johnson, Lorde and many, many others who survived and fought for their very existence, by any means necessary, so that I could learn their methods and carry the torch. I stand on their shoulders — the shoulders of giants — fueled by their diligence and in reverence of their mission so that I may continue fighting for justice and actually have the ability to do so. I stand firm in my black LGBTQIA Pride. I am a direct descendant of my ancestors and elders’ determination beyond measure so that the safety, security, affirmation and liberation of black LGBTQIA people may become a true manifestation, bit by bit.”

“As an African American, SGL (Same Gender Loving), Leather/BDSM Man, it’s important to me to be visible and give a voice for not only myself, but for other LGBTQ of African descent who are at a point of reflection and self-discovery in their lives. Pride is acknowledging the fact that God created me and I am as worthy of love as every other human. Black Pride is a time to celebrate and find deep pride in my community’s historic commitment to justice. I am proud to honor our stories and the experiences of LGBTQ of African descent.” Photo by James L. Hicks, jameshicksphotography.net

Photo by Russ Youngblood theQatl.com

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Q

BLACK GAY PRIDE continued

State Rep. Renitta SHANNON “James Baldwin said, ‘A black gay person who is a sexual conundrum to society is already, long before the question of sexuality comes into it, menaced and marked because he’s black or she’s black. The sexual question comes after the question of color; it’s simply one more aspect of the danger in which all black people live.’ “What he said about living as both queer and black is still true today and will likely always be true because racism continues to survive in America. It is for this reason we will always need Black Gay Pride to highlight and make progress on what it is like to live at the intersection of both identities.”

Photo by Russ Youngblood

Emmy MARSHALL Artist

“To be black and a part of the LGBTQ+ community is a triumphant feeling. I am a part of two cultural groups that have been marginalized throughout history. Both black and gay people have overcome many injustices and we remain resilient through change. Pride is a time to celebrate, inspire and have fun!”

Photo by Russ Youngblood

Charles STEPHENS

Brandon ELLIS

“As a black gay man, for me, Black Gay Pride means power. This is something I have never taken for granted, because I can still remember what it’s like to not feel powerful. I also know what it’s like to be silenced and to be erased. Visibility is critical for our collective resistance. Being an Atlanta native, someone that grew up here, came out here, and found my voice in the movement here, I am never prouder of my city than when our people come together to celebrate and affirm who we are as black LGBTQ folk. Black Gay Pride is one of our most sacred collective rituals, one that continues to restore and empower our community.”

“We were shamed, hidden and made to feel guilty for who we were for so long! Now we can let our freedom ring on so many levels due to acceptance and honoring our humanitarian spirits for our services throughout America as contributing tax paying citizen.”

Poet & Community Organizer

Dancer, Choreographer

Photo by Johnnie Ray Korneygay III, johnnieraykornegay.com

Photo by James L. Hicks, jameshicksphotography.net

For a preview of Black Gay Pride Atlanta 2019, see the Queer Agenda calendar in this issue, and visit theQatl.com for more extended coverage. Look for more outstanding black LGBTQ Atlantans every week in every edition of Q magazine. 24

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Richard Cherskov

Michael Birnholz

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michael.birnholz@cruiseplanners.com

888-402-0004 richardandmichael.travel PHOTOS BY RUSS YOUNGBLOOD theQatl.com

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Q

THE QUEER AGENDA The Best Queer Things To Do in Atlanta This Week

August 29 – September 4 THURSDAY, AUG. 29 – MONDAY, SEPT. 2 Black Gay Pride Atlanta

Official events include a NOH8 photo shoot and Respect the Legacy

Fashion Show among a full slate of In The Life Atlanta events @ Georgia Tech Hotel & Conference Center. Special events include the Trans Men of Excellence Gala @ Bio Bio, the Working Cross Differences

Symposium at ArtsXchange and the Pure Heat Festival in Piedmont Park on Sunday. Visit inthelifeatlanta.org, atlantaprideweekend.com

More parties with celebrity guests than you can possibly ever attend

are set every day and night through Labor Day Monday. In addition to the organizers above, visit rockstarsproduction.com, wassupnatl.com, mysistersroom.com, atlantaeagle.com, mysistersroom.com, facebook.com/ bulldogsbaratlanta, facebook.com/midtownmoon

Decatur Book Festival TransMilitary Screening

This year’s LGBTQ Track includes

more than a dozen events like Real Talk About LGBTQIAP, as well as authors like presidential poet

Richard Blanco, Real Queer America

author Samantha Allen (photo), Nicole

Dennis-Benn, Ross Gay, Jacob Tobia, Fariha Roisin, E Patrick Johnson and Mecca Jamilah Sullivan @ Decatur Square and surrounding areas, all weekend. Dragon*Con

The sci-fi/fantasy/

cos-play event the city waits for all year is

super queer-inclusive and

specifically so during Saturday night’s Spectrum Rainbow Flag Party

@ Hyatt Regency, 10 p.m. dragoncon.org

THURSDAY, AUG. 29 #iammidtown

The social group committed to connecting intown residents networks @ Ten, 4 p.m. iammidtownatl.com

FRIDAY, AUG. 30 Country Night

Scoot your boots with lessons early then line

dancing and two-stepping all night @ Heretic, 8 p.m. hereticatlanta.com

Happy Birthday Summer

It’s a drag show and party with an eclectic cast @ Mother Bar + Kitchen, 9 p.m. mother.bar

SATURDAY AUG. 31 – SUNDAY, SEPT. 1 Heretic & Xion Labor Day Weekend

MONDAY, SEPT. 2 Rainbow Days

The 10th Anniversary of LGBT day at the park celebrates diversity while you ride and play @ Six Flags Over Georgia, all day.

facebook.com/pg/RainbowDaysATL Steven Universe The Movie

The TV show hits the big screen with Wussy queens helming the party

After country dancing on Friday, the gay dance

@ Plaza Theatre, 6 p.m.

urday night and DJ Alexander on Sunday night @

Find more queer things to do in

clubs keeps the heat with DJ Eric James on Sat-

Heretic, 10 p.m. both nights. Ed Wood hits town for

afterhours Saturday @ Xion at BJ Roosters, 3 a.m.

wussymag.com

the expanded edition of the Queer

Agenda at theQatl.com.

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BRENDAN MACLEAN & NONSENSE ATL AT THE BASEMENT

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Q

Q SHOTS

CHUG AT GEORGIA BEER GARDEN

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HSL SEASON CLOSING PARTY AT MIDTOWN MOON

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GLAMOROUS AT HERETIC

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Q

THEQ?! Mind READING WTF did they meant by that?

Q

After a long-term relationship, I’m back out meeting people, having fun and going on lots of dates. Some are

dudes, some are dames. And as you might imagine, some are duds, some are studs. I’ve been off the market long enough

that I forgot how many games are played and navigations are required. Did she

just pull a bait-and-switch question? Is

this presumptuous fucker “negging” me? What did they mean by this comment

or that? Is this a date or an interview? Is there such a thing as a wrong answer?

question. Cut through the crap and confusion with questions of your own. Not sure what they mean? Ask for clarification.

Maybe there actually is an ulterior motive in something they

said. Shut down and crack open passive-aggression with direct action: “I’m not sure how to respond. Tell me more.” You can even straight-up ask, “What do you mean exactly?”

Most people will be able to clarify, and when they do it’s fine. Schemers will reveal themselves pretty quickly as well when confronted.

Sexual politics can be complicated.

Hormones and attractions affect

emotions, our insecurities and confi-

dences collide, and the other person’s do

too. Fortunately, communication is at the ready again. Say how you feel and what

you want. Ask how they feel and what

they want. If you don’t match, it’s better

to know than wonder.

Afterward, how long should I wait before

The same goes for texts. Relax, be your-

texting a second time if there’s no re-

not on what they might or might not be

too long, or don’t wait long enough?

simple and light. Want a response and

texting or texting back? Should I bother

self and communicate based on that,

sponse? What will they think if I wait

thinking. Feel like texting? Text. Keep it

How much flirting is too much? When

didn’t get one after, say, a day? Send it

should I bring up sex?

Speaking of sex, I might be DTF on a first date, and I might not. Are they? How can I tell?

Even when a date seems to be working,

it’s work. How can I curb my over-analysis and just have fun?

Dear Psychic Friends Network: I’m not a mind reader, but I can predict frustration until you realize that you aren’t one either.

How can you tell what they mean, feel and want? You can’t

without asking. Communication is the key to easing your mind, learning more and paving the way to potentially getting closer. 38

Unlike a job interview, you’re not required to answer every

theQatl.com

(and drop it if you still don’t hear back). “Hey I’m still thinking of you. You

interested in getting together again or nah?”

They might say no. Good, you can

move on. They might also say yes. Good, you can move forward.

When taken logically, there is literally nothing to lose and everything to gain by being direct. Ask, listen intently, follow up, and nearly everyone will eventually show you who they really are.

The Q is for entertainment purposes and not professional counseling. Send your burning Qs to mike@theqatl.com.

ILLUSTRATION BY BRAD GIBSON