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THE LOCAL LEGENDS COVERSHOOT PHOTOGRAPHY BY DUKE AND GYPSY, MAKE-UP BY MELINA DEE. CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES FROM MYER, CITY CHIC AND COLETTE BY COLETTE HAYMAN AT SUNSHINE PLAZA. SPECIAL THANKS TO PARTY MANIA, THE VINTAGE STOCKROOM AND BELLA FLORA FOR PROVIDING THE PROPS.

editor’s INGRID NELSON, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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e are lucky to have some pretty inspiring people to look up to here on the Sunshine Coast, we like to call them our local legends. Some of them may be well known to you, others not so much and this issue is all about giving them some well deserved limelight. The cover story this month is one that is very close to my heart and one I have wanted to share with you since meeting the very special man who inspired it and this edition of the magazine. David Dangerfield founded Compass Institute in 1992 to offer access to education, skills and vocational training for young people with intellectual and physical disabilities, in an effort to improve their quality of life. It started with just three young people to become the fastest growing service of its kind in Queensland. I was fortunate to visit the Compass farm in Hunchy and witnessed the life-changing impact he is having on these young people’s lives. We are delighted to share the story of one very special young lady, Sarah Fitzpatrick, who has thrived from the nurturing environment that Compass Institute provides. I think you will agree, Sarah shines like a bright star on our cover this month and she certainly stole the hearts of the Profile team, especially our Deputy Editor, Nicole Fuge who shares her beautiful story. This is just one of the many uplifting stories, focusing on those who are leading the way in our community, you will find inside this special issue. From the entire Profile family, we salute our local legends and we thank you for helping to make the Sunshine Coast such a wonderful place to call home.

SAVE THE DATE!

Don’t miss the launch of our Local Legends issue on Monday, 9 April at Maroochy Surf Club. HEAD OVER TO OUR FACEBOOK PAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO SECURE YOUR TICKETS.

x Ingrid x april 2018

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Introducing the local labels taking inspo from our natural landscape

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ingrid Nelson ingrid@profilemag.com.au

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EDITORIAL

Deputy editor Nicole Fuge Journalist Caitlyn Spanner editorial@profilemag.com.au

CREATIVE

Art director Tara Williams Senior graphic designer Chelsea Barnard Senior graphic designer Ellen Parker design@profilemag.com.au

SALES

Account manager Lee McCarthy Account manager Vicky Sheridan sales@profilemag.com.au

DISTRIBUTION

Distribution manager Joey Fabrizio joe@profilemag.com.au

CONTRIBUTORS

Editorial Lauren Grounsell Photography Giselle Peters, Phill Jackson, Leah Blissett, Paul Fletcher, Lani Carter

CONNECT WITH US

Phone (07) 5451 0669 Beach on Sixth, 102 / 65 Sixth Ave, Maroochydore PO Box 1065, Cotton Tree, QLD 4558

EDITORIAL CONTENT KEY

Profile aims to only bring you content we think is relevant and interesting to our audience. : Profile editorial : Sponsored content written on behalf of an advertising business.

DISTRIBUTION

Up to 35,000 free copies are delivered to high traffic areas across the Sunshine Coast, Brisbane, Toowoomba and Gympie monthly.

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DIGITAL

Our email magazine is sent to 14,000 inboxes monthly. We have an average social media reach of up to 150,000 per month across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Profile is available to read and share on issuu.com, attracting up to 60,000 impressions per month. Our overall local digital reach is up to 315,000 per month.

Profile Magazine is a free publication (subscriptions available) published monthly by The Design and Publications Trust. All rights are reserved and the contents are copyright and may not be reproduced without the written consent of The Publisher, The Design and Publications Trust (“The Publisher”). Their related companies and officers hereby disclaim, to the full extent permitted by law, all liability, damages, costs and expenses whatsoever arising from or in connection with copy information or other material in this magazine, any negligence of The Publisher, or any persons actions in reliance thereon. Any dispute or complaint regarding placed advertisements must be made within seven days of publication. Inclusion of any copy must not be taken as any endorsement by The Publisher. Views expressed by contributors are personal views and they are not necessarily endorsed by The Publisher.

editor’s note letters to the editor let’s chat

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cover story sarah fitzpatrick compass institute

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homegrown boyd family

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future kaylene langford

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leading ladies elizabeth fairon

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competitions

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the last word bruce and denise morcombe

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Support local artisans while remaining your fashionable self

LIFESTYLE 47 49 51 52 57

the style edit jacinta emms fashion beauty health column home

GOURMET + CULTURE 58

the gourmet edit nicole fuge

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gourmet feature alesha gooderham table talk foodie trail recipe

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travel feature jacinta blundell culture feature hiba elchikhe culture events


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Connect with us: LETTER OF THE MONTH

WIN!

My normal day-to-day life on the Sunny Coast is busily filled with full time work, wife and mum duties, as well as care for two active “fur babies”, so being able to recently spend two weeks on the gorgeous Hawaiian island of Oahu, was blissful. Traveling light, I packed the February copy of Profile and was lucky enough to find plenty of “me time” to catch up on the latest of what’s happening at home and beyond. Being in some of Oahu’s most amazing locations helped too.

Allan and Barbara Pease, RRP $29.95. For more

What I found and love about the magazine is that it is (always) filled with stories of people from all walks of life, that have lived, laughed (cried) and learnt. They are happy to share their views and achievements in a positive and honest way. I can’t help but feel motivated and inspired afterwards.

SHOW US YOUR PROFILE AND Show us how you enjoy your copy of Profile Magazine by tagging @profilemagazine and #profilemagazine on Instagram, for your chance to win a copy of The Answer by information see page 77.

WRITE TO US AND stribe @hannahplu

WIN!

Tell us what you love about this issue of Profile Magazine for your chance to win a copy of Supercharge Your Gut by Lee Holmes, RRP $35. Send your letter, along with your name and address, to editorial@profilemag.com.au, for the opportunity to win!

I also love love love the Foodie Trail pages – yummo! A fabulous excuse to “indulge and explore” our beautiful Coast. As well as What’s On, my diary gets a healthy social work out! Please keep up the amazing work PM team. Your efforts and hard work are very much appreciated … at home and away. “Mahalo” NINA DAVIES

Nina and Profile in Oa hu, Hawaii


LET’S CHAT

LET THE GAMES WORDS NICOLE FUGE

Whatever the opposite of a sports fanatic is, I’m it. I don’t have a football team, I loathe watching the tennis, and don’t get me started on cricket. But there is something alluring about Olympic and Commonwealth Games that releases my inner cheerleader.

begin

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t’s pretty remarkable how stumbling across an item from your childhood can transport you back to that moment, resurrecting old feelings and memories that you had long forgotten about. I was cleaning out some boxes under my house, that I hadn’t opened since moving out of my parents’ home about 10 years ago; when I found a smooth rock about the size of my palm and a rolled up strip of bright blue plastic with Sydney 2000 emblazoned on it.

History will also be made, with an EQUAL number of men’s and women’s medal events CONTESTED at a Commonwealth Games.”

I laughed as I reminisced about my dad and I pocketing a rock from the rowing canal at the end of the last race; and the spectators at the marathon, myself included, tearing off a piece of the branded blue banner tape lining the streets. I remember attending the swimming events, athletics and tennis, and watching the opening and closing ceremonies on television (who can forget Nikki Webster flying across the stadium?!) 6

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There is an insurmountable camaraderie at international sporting events, everyone brandishing their team’s colours, singing national anthems at the top of their lungs and of course the great Mexican wave. This month, the Gold Coast hosts the XXI Commonwealth Games, where 6600 athletes and team officials represent 70 nations and territories within the Commonwealth. History will also be made, with an equal number of men’s and women’s medal events contested at a Commonwealth Games – at a time when women’s rights are at the forefront, this is a hop, step and a jump forward in equality. GC2018 will also feature the largest integrated sports program in Games history, with 18 sports and seven parasports, including women’s rugby sevens, beach volleyball and para triathlon making their debuts. With these positive changes happening on such a large scale, the Games provide an optimistic influence for the men, women and children watching on; I just hope the athletes feel the same responsibility, afterall, they are the role models for our leaders of tomorrow.

AUSTRALIA HAS WON THE MOST COMMONWEALTH GAMES MEDALS: 852 GOLD, 716 SILVER AND 650 BRONZE

HISTORY OF THE COMMONWEALTH GAMES

• The first Commonwealth Games was held in 1930 in Hamilton, Canada, with 11 countries, 400 athletes, six sports and 59 events. • Bobby Robinson, a major influence within athletics in Canada at the time, implemented the event that had been talked about among Commonwealth nations for over 30 years. • Since then, the Games have been conducted every four years (except for 1942 and 1946 due to World War II). • From 1930 to 1950, the Games were known as the British Empire Games; from 1954 to 1966 they were the British Empire and Commonwealth Games; from 1970 to 1974 they were the British Commonwealth Games; and in 1978, changed to the Commonwealth Games.

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l u f i t bow life! A

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WORDS INGRID NELSON PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH

Glen and Anthea Anderson’s world was turned upside down when they discovered their precious daughter, Elise, had a life threatening liver condition. But thanks to the marvels of modern medical intervention and the ongoing support of the Maroochydore Child Development Centre, their pintsized princess has been given a second chance at life.

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n first impressions, little Elise Anderson looks like any other three-year-old girl. Dressed in her pretty pink party dress, the dainty tot pours me a fairy-sized cup of tea while busily attending to the teddy bear guests who are also joining us. But this brave little girl has had a rockier start to life than most of us. Diagnosed with a cyst on her liver at just six months of age, it was later discovered Elise would need a liver transplant and she underwent the life saving surgery last year. Taking it all in her stride, the courageous little lady is testament to the strength of the human spirit and the highly skilled health professionals who have helped her on her remarkable journey. “Elise was full term but she was only four pounds when she was born, and we didn’t really know what the issues were. But three weeks later we found she had a cleft palate and we thought, ‘Okay, we will have surgery to repair it and she will be fine’,” says mum, Anthea.

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ANTHEA AND ELISE ANDERSON

Her IMMUNE system was turned off for three months to ACCEPT the ORGAN and she is almost there now.”

Six months later and unfortunately, Elise still wasn’t thriving and after further tests, it was discovered she had a cyst on her liver. “We had a lot of feeding problems with her so she had a feeding tube put in for six months, which wasn’t fun but it allowed her to grow bigger and stronger for what was to be a one-off surgery to remove the cyst,” says Anthea. “However, just one hour into the surgery we got a call from the surgeon and we knew something was wrong. My poor husband just about fainted when they told us her entire liver was cirrhotic and she would need a transplant. It was worse than any of the doctors had anticipated.” profilemag.com.au


Elise was kept stable on various medications with a feeding tube or peg directly into her stomach for 12 months and was then actively on the donor waiting list for three months before a match was found. It was a life changing moment Anthea and her husband will never forget. “It was a very emotional time. You have to be prepared for the phone call but you don’t want to put your life on hold,” says Anthea. “Every phone call could be ‘the one’ and when it did happen at 9.30 one night, it was a rollercoaster mix of emotions. It’s exciting but you know there has to be more testing once they sight the organ and make sure it’s a match and then my thoughts immediately went to the donor family and what they were going through.” Thankfully, it was a match and Elise came through the operation with flying colours. “When they took the liver out it was the size of a dinner plate, and the cyst was about was the size of an orange,” says Anthea. “All we know is that it was a healthy adult organ. She got portions two and three and an adult got the other portions, so more than one life was saved. “It was very successful, often there are complications but Elise didn’t have any. She was out of bed after six days and was home after 11 days. “She had quite a lot of medication at the beginning as her immune system was turned off for three months to accept the organ. Now she only needs one antirejection tablet once a day.” april 2018

INSPIRE

Every phone call could be ‘THE ONE’ and when it did happen at 9.30 one night, it was a ROLLERCOASTER mix of emotions. It’s EXCITING but you know there has to be more testing once they sight the organ and make sure it’s a match and then my thoughts immediately went to the donor family and what they were GOING THROUGH.”

Question time

WITH WISHLIST CEO LISA ROWE PROFILE: WHAT IS THE MAROOCHYDORE CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTRE (CDS) AND HOW DO THEY HELP CHILDREN LIKE ELISE?

Growing stronger by the day and now reaching all of her milestones, Anthea says she is forever grateful to the surgeons and highly skilled health professionals who saved her daughter’s life, including the life changing support of the Maroochydore Child Development Centre (CDS), funded by Wishlist. “From a very young age Elise has had assessments through the CDS. At six months she was involved in a weekly group therapy session, which included a physiotherapist, speech pathologist and occupational therapist. The facilities on Wises Road are very good and all of the staff are excellent. Wishlist has played an immense part in providing equipment, facilities and services that would not have been available otherwise.” As I am leaving, Elise stands on her tippy toes, arms above her head like a prima ballerina and says goodbye with one of her favourite quotes from her idol, yellow Wiggle, Emma. “Have a bow-tiful day,” she says softly, her bright blue eyes dancing with mischief. After meeting you Elise, how could it be anything but.

The CDS really has changed lives for countless families across the Coast and was one of our largest financial commitments to relocate and extend the service to the tune of $1.4 million over three years. It was the Sunshine Coast community who rallied together to provide the service for children needing to access physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, social workers, dietitians and psychologists all under the one roof. PROFILE: HOW WERE THE FUNDS RAISED?

It was the generosity of local people who supported 92.7 MixFM’s Give Me 5 for Kids appeal each year and Run Sunshine Coast in 2014 and 2015. We were able to move the service from a small space at Nambour General Hospital to a much larger and refurbished area at Wises Road in Maroochydore. PROFILE: HOW MANY FAMILIES HAVE BENEFITTED FROM THE NEW CENTRE?

Wishlist committed to funding the rental of the new space for three years, as well as funding extra health staff – all completely with donations. In 2017 the CDS provided more than 3500 occasions of service to more than 439 children and their families. profilemagazine

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f g o n i K ne i s i u C

WORDS CAITLYN SPANNER PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH

With two new restaurants making waves at the newly updated Wharf in Mooloolaba, it’s quite clear that everything Tony Kelly touches turns to gold. We speak with Tony about Saltwater, Rice Boi, and his love for the Coast as he embarks on the next stage of his impressive career.

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oasting a list of highly regarded establishments next to his name including Junk, Hello Harry, Donut Boyz, Wine Bar and Stokehouse Brisbane (to name a few), Tony Kelly has made a significant mark on the hospitality industry both here and throughout Australia over the course of his career. Starting out as a chef working all around Australia in hatted restaurants before turning to the business side of hospitality, Tony now describes himself as a serial entrepreneur. We last featured him in our Foodie issue in June 2015 just as the artisan donut sensation Donut Boyz was taking off. “I remember the first day of Donut

Boyz, we sold 700 donuts in 15 minutes, the next day we sold 1000 donuts in half an hour. On the third day we went in at midnight and sold 1200 donuts in an hour,” he says. Within six months they had nine franchises between the Sunshine Coast and the Gold Coast and went from making 2000 donuts a week to 25,000. Meanwhile, Junk and Hello Harry were also gaining serious popularity and Tony decided it was time to sell Donut Boyz to focus on them. Fast forward another six months and Tony had half a dozen Hello Harry franchises, a new restaurant in Portside, Brisbane, several businesses in Toowoomba, and opened Junk in Melbourne and South Bank, Brisbane. With three young kids at home and what Tony describes as a ‘very understanding wife’, he decided it was time to focus on life and business on the Sunshine Coast. “I really did believe deep down that

the Sunshine Coast was where our brand was the strongest,” he says. In July 2017, Tony exited the business and took a month off, which proved to be quite difficult for someone with an entrepreneurial calling. “It got to the stage where I was mowing the lawn every third day,” he laughs. He knew there were changes in store for The Wharf in Mooloolaba and he had a very good feeling about the location. “Growing up on the Sunshine Coast, I knew what The Wharf was but it was just hard to envision it when it was dilapidated,” he says.

“I really did BELIEVE deep down that the SUNSHINE COAST was where our brand was the strongest.” “The vision Dirk Long had for The Wharf was exactly the reason I stayed on the Coast. I never thought about having a restaurant in Mooloolaba, I thought it was so tourist driven. I was a bit nervous about that.” But the nerves didn’t stick around for long. Tony had the idea to open an affordable fish and chippery and approached renowned chef Wayd Bailey to join the venture. “He’s one of the best chefs in Noosa. I wanted to work with him. He’s a family

MITCH SMITH AND TONY KELLY


PROFILE man, he’s passionate and a great chef.” Tony admits it’s a big transition to go from formal food to fish and chips, but he knew the market was there. “Whether you’re cooking a beautiful souffle, or you’re frying fish and chips, what you want is to create food that people put in their mouths and go, ‘Oh my God how did you do that?’,” he says. With Wayd by his side, Tony opened Saltwater on the new and improved Wharf. With its stunning Hamptons interior and clear vision for affordable fish and chips for families, Saltwater has quickly gained traction. Rice Boi came into the picture shortly after and Tony approached Mitch Smith and Elyza Molloy, two former staff from Junk and Hello Harry. Tony suggested that they create something with longevity, something they could be proud of. He put it to them, ‘Why don’t we create something that we can have forever and it will be just ours? And it will be all about the food, not about the space, not about the service. It will be about taking photos of food with an iPhone. Let’s make it really raw and gritty and make it about food again’.

Mitch and Elyza came on board as business partners and helped Tony bring his vision to life. The two restaurants, with their contrasting interiors , delicious food and wide market appeal, began receiving line-ups out the door. They’ve since added more seating and the next step is to open a dive bar upstairs where punters can go for a drink while they wait for a table. We asked Tony how he always stays ahead of the game and gets it oh-so-right every single time. He was unsure of the exact reason, but he believes it comes down to a mix of luck, staying ahead of food trends and creating a value for money experience. We personally think it has a lot to do with Tony’s skills and knowledge gained over the years in the industry. Whatever it is, we can’t wait to see what the community-focused Rice Boi and Saltwater have in store for the Coast and its hungry residents. “I feel really fortunate. We want to cement ourselves into the community here, and make sure we can help where we can, we can educate where we can and we want to feed all the people who’ve supported us for many years.”

THE WHARF MOOLOOLABA 123 Parkyn Parade Saltwater ph: 5444 1190 Rice Boi ph: 5444 1297

TONY KELLY AND WAYD BAILEY


PEOPLE

voice arts FOR THE

WORDS INGRID NELSON PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

As the excitement builds for the opening of the 20th Queensland Music Festival in July, Profile caught up with its most recently appointed artistic director, revered Australian singer, songwriter, producer, pianist and fierce advocate of the arts, Katie Noonan.

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he first came to our attention as the angel-voiced vocalist behind george, the legendary Australian band which broke through in 2002. Almost two decades on and Katie Noonan is now regarded as one of Australia’s most versatile and successful artists. Her illustrious career has seen her win five ARIA awards, go seven times platinum and release over a dozen studio albums so far. Born and bred in Queensland, and deeply proud of her home state, Katie resides in the eclectic Sunshine Coast suburb of Eumundi. A mother of two boys, she is passionate about showcasing the incredible talent we have right here on our doorstep, and her appointment to artistic director of the Queensland Music Festival in 2016 has given her the perfect platform to do just that. “Our basic reason for being is to transform lives and communities throughout Queensland through music,” says Katie. “We do that in a multitude of ways, but the main thing I think we do better than anyone else is genuine community engagement outside of metropolitan and major city areas.

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“We aim to empower Queenslanders from all walks of life with the power of music and I believe everyone deserves music. Music is the maker of friends and a great equaliser and I really do genuinely believe it’s a very powerful tool for healing and communication and reconciliation.” Not only is Katie the first Queensland artistic director, she is also the youngest and only the second female in the position in the 20 years it has been running. “Being the first Queenslander is awesome but it’s a bit of a depressing fact too, really. And I think it is actually a reflection of the cultural cringe we have felt – the perception that if you are from Sydney or Melbourne you are better,” says Katie. “I vehemently don’t believe that is true. I have been lucky enough to tour the country and the world and I know we make world class art here. Whether that be dance, circus, ballet, music, visual arts, photography or sculpture – it can stand next to any art in the world.” Fundamentally, Katie’s role involves designing a program that responds to community needs and she has certainly achieved that in spades since she has been at the helm. “I work with the team to come up with a program that is a combination of artistic excellence and accessibility,” says Katie. “Last year on the Sunshine Coast we did the Currie Street music crawl, which was a free event in a town that is going through change and a lot of young people with maybe not enough for them to do. profilemag.com.au


PEOPLE

Our basic reason for being is to TRANSFORM lives and COMMUNITIES throughout Queensland through music.”

“We had 25 bands over five venues for free and it was a smash hit, it couldn’t have gone better. It focused on local talent, indigenous musicians, female musicians – something Nambour has never seen before.” Passionate about creating programs that offer reflection and celebrate our cultural diversity and cultural legacy, Katie says music is a powerful way to express emotions. “The biggest program last year involved a 2500-strong choir performing a concert called You’re the Voice designed to raise awareness about domestic and family violence,” says Katie. “This is a prevalent issue in Queensland homes. We worked with Rosie Batty, Quentin Bryce and the Allison Baden-Clay Foundation. Allison’s children and parents were singing alongside survivors, it was very powerful.” Aside from the biannual program, there are also a number of annual programs. “This year we have Score IT!, which is a film scoring competition open to every single high school student in Queensland. We also have the Carol Lloyd Award, where we give $15,000 to an emerging singer/ songwriter who identifies as a female to either make an album or EP and tour regional Queensland,” she says. “We are a very unusual model in that we are not a traditional festival model in any way because we do really serious long term community engagements. Our big project during the last festival was in Moranbah in the Isaac Region, which brought together five disparate towns of Moranbah, Glen Eden, Middlemount and Dysart for the world premiere of a musical that was free for the community. It had a cast of 300 locals, some of whom had never been on a stage before in their life. april 2018

KATIE NOONAN

“Another annual event is the Yaraba Festival in Cairns, that’s pretty amazing and another series is Twilight at the Red Box, a free classical music chamber program at the State Library of Queensland and we are co-presenting Songs That Made Me for the Women in Voice Festival at QPAC later this month.” Remarkably, not only is Katie juggling her busy role with the Queensland Music Festival with being a mum to sons Dexter, 13 and Jonah, 11, she is also the current musical director for the opening and closing ceremony for the Commonwealth Games. How on earth does she manage it all I ask incredulously? “With great difficulty sometimes,” says Katie. “It’s an extraordinarily busy time, but I have an amazing partner who is mainly a stay-athome dad. I also have amazing kids who have always known that this is what Mum does. But the great thing about what I do is when I’m home, I’m really home and actually compared to a nine-to-five job, I certainly see my kids more than if I was in that situation.” Something tells me this is far from the end of Katie’s story and if her success so far is anything to go by, it will be one hell of a ride. profilemagazine

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Global Mindset, LOCAL APPROACH WORDS CAITLYN SPANNER PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

Nikki Fogden-Moore has spent the last 20 years coaching global leaders all around the world. This year, the author, business coach and keynote speaker is planning to dedicate time to the change-makers of the Coast with workshops that tackle the work-life blend.

If YOU do not ask for what you WANT, you’ll get what you’re given.”

NIKKIFOGDENMOORE.COM THEVITALITYCOACH.COM.AU

“I

f you do not ask for what you want, you’ll get what you’re given.” This is a saying Nikki Fogden-Moore AKA The Mojo Maker regularly shares with audiences and clients during her keynote talks and coaching sessions. The business coach is known for working with the highest achievers to help them become the CEO of not only their businesses but their lives. And while being an international entrepreneur comes with a unique type of stress, there’s no denying that most of us are struggling to juggle family, work, health, study and the list goes on. Nikki believes the difference between those who do something about it and those who suffer through it is simply asking for what you want. “I think everybody has this within them. The difference is recognising that we don’t all have to be alone. There is a defining commonality in all my clients. That is humility, intelligence and self awareness,” she says. That’s why Nikki is launching a series of workshops right here in her home town, which include a special section on unleashing creativity for entrepreneurs with musician Tobias. Anyone who wants to be in the driver’s seat of their career and life can be a part of it, whether they’re growing their business or scaling it. “These workshops are for people who wouldn’t really be able to coach with me one-on-one; anyone who wants to learn how to integrate their personal and commercial success without throwing life upside down,” she says. Nikki is extremely passionate about giving back to the Sunshine Coast community and wants to help build sustainable businesses here for a global city of the future. “I really wish I had someone like me when I was starting! The workshops for me are a way to provide an affordable, no-nonsense, high level of coaching that everybody can get into,” she says. “The more people we empower to run successful, sustainable businesses that are a true reflection of their own values and brand, the better the Coast is going to be.” Nikki practices what she preaches, and regularly seeks out coaching from her mentors and high-achieving friends.


The more people we EMPOWER to run successful, sustainable businesses that are a true REFLECTION of their own values and brand, the better the Coast is going to be.”

NIKKI’S TIPS ON WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A BUSINESS COACH: CREDIBILITY – Great coaching means sharing and trust. I regularly

meet with clients face to face, I share my network and business challenges. Ensure your coach really has credibility before you take any advice. Ask around. EXPERIENCE – Research their LinkedIn and check the media to ensure their level of expertise will best suit you. CHEMISTRY – Ensure you feel trust and a professional connection. Chemistry means you know that this person understands you and can add value. CONFIDENTIALITY – The coach is confidential and has your best interest at heart. NIKKI AND TOBIAS

“I get my vibe from the people I have on my show, my friends, and from a few select mentors. I invest in this really amazing American strategy coach every now and then. You continually have to evolve and I’m continually curious. I’m always asking questions because I replace fear with curiosity,” she says. Nikki’s commitment to high performance ensures her coaching can be accessible to anyone who wants to elevate their life to their next level, and you can tell just by being in her presence how passionate she is about helping those who need it,

especially those on the Sunshine Coast. “The workshops enable me to show people what good advice looks like. “I’m the navigator, I don’t tell them what they need, or put words into their mouth, my expertise is to really cut straight through the clutter, making people feel understood, with an enormous amount of empathy and compassion.” Keep an eye out for Nikki’s new book The Mojo Maker, coming out this year.

WHAT YOU’LL TACKLE IN A MOJO MAKER WORKSHOP WITH NIKKI:

• Elevating your business for sustainable success • Where you sit now and where you really want to be personally and commercially • Core challenges and roadblocks • How to master the art of winning weeks • Your own 90-day game plan • What remarkable looks like

NIKKIFOGDENMOORE.COM THEVITALITYCOACH.COM.AU


VIEW

RUSSELL STITZ

GIVING CLOSE

TO HOME

WORDS LAUREN GROUNSELL PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH

They encourage simply to give where you live, and when it comes to community philanthropy, the Buderim Foundation is leading the charge. With a goal to reach $2 million by the end of 2018, they are proving when it comes to charity, every dollar counts.

O

n the books of the Buderim Foundation charity is a donation for $23.50. The amount was gifted by two young boys, Charlie and Jack, who, armed with a basket of hand-picked limes set out to raise funds for the community group on Australia Day. “You could say that’s just as valuable as $10,000, every bit helps,” says Buderim Foundation chair Russell Stitz. “No amount is small if you’re giving it to someone else.”

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And that’s exactly what the Buderim Foundation does. Since its launch in 2004, the organisation has donated a staggering $383,000 to 66 different charity organisations and not-for-profits that benefit the people of Buderim and surrounding 4556 postcode. This year the foundation aims to raise $600,000 in 12 months through the 2018 Community Challenge, and with $30,000 donated in one week alone, that goal is well within reach. Russell says what sets the foundation

apart is how they manage their finances. Every donation is placed in a fund, with these funds then invested to generate income which is given as grants. With the administration costs covered by sponsors, all donated funds are never actually spent and the charity can continue to give forever. “At the moment, the corpus stands at $1.46 million, and the Community Challenge is about trying to increase that over $2 million so we can give out more grants,” Russell explains. “The whole concept is to promote the 4556 community and its wellbeing.” Russell, who started his role as chair of the foundation in September 2017, explains the concept as “money in, money managed and money out”. profilemag.com.au


“We have money in as part of donations or bequests; then we have money managed, which is our investment committee doing their best to create revenue as a result of investing that money; then we have money out, which is obviously the grants process and distribution,” he says. The benefit these grants have on the community is widespread. For example, children at the Buderim kindergarten are learning about edible gardening through their own vegetable patch, while eagle-eyed visitors of the Buderim War Memorial Community Association hall would notice a newly renovated floor. But just as important are the less obvious differences – the smile on a child’s face who was able to go to school in a new uniform, or the sense of belonging people get from attending the Alzheimer’s Australia support group. In 2017, the foundation distributed more than $64,000 in community grants to the Suncoast Youth Orchestra, Buderim Horse and Pony Club, Fusion Sunshine Coast and Team Adem, to name a few. “Although it’s called the Buderim Foundation, it’s actually the whole 4556 postcode,” Russell explains. “And from a philanthropic point of view, that doesn’t mean somebody can’t be given a grant from outside that, it’s just got to benefit the people in that postcode.” An example is the Hear and Say Centre, while having headquarters in Brisbane and centres in Nambour, it still benefits the people from Buderim and surrounds. Another key initiative of the foundation is their Back to School Program, which sees money donated by the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR) put in to vouchers for families. april 2018

“They’re for people struggling to get school uniforms and books, and we either let the school itself or the chaplins identify the people in need,” says Russell. While the foundation works tirelessly for the community, just as much effort is put in behind the scenes. Foundation members, including 12 members of the board, give their time voluntarily to better their local community. “We have a number of different committees to achieve what the foundation does,” he says. “In addition to that we appoint working groups, for example the 2018 Community Challenge has a working group chaired by Simon Little, a long-standing identity in Buderim.” Russell himself is a relatively new face to the foundation, having recently relocated to Buderim from Brisbane, where he worked as a leading colorectal surgeon.

Throughout his career, Russell has held a number of esteemed roles including president of the Colorectal Surgical Society of Australia and New Zealand, president of the Australian Medical Association in Queensland and he served on the board of the Wesley Hospital in Brisbane and Wesley Research Institute. These positions, Russell says, helped equip him with the skills needed to spearhead the foundation’s projects. “I don’t think the concept of philanthropy is as well developed in this country, but a lot of ordinary people give money which nobody hears about,” he says. “I think here, philanthropy is more in the community, and we want to make that culture permeate the whole of society. If you donate one dollar a week, that’s $50 a year, and if every family on the Sunshine Coast donated that amount a year, imagine how much you’d have.”

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At the moment, the corpus stands at $1.46 million, and the COMMUNITY CHALLENGE is about trying to increase that over $2 million so we can give out more grants.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT BUDERIMFOUNDATION.ORG.AU

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COVER STORY

hero be your own

WORDS NICOLE FUGE PHOTOS DUKE AND GYPSY

Having a disability, doesn’t mean you can’t squeeze the best out of life – just ask 27-year-old Sarah Fitzpatrick, who is a shining example that all you need is to find your bearings. Enter Compass Institute, the local charity empowering young people to live the life they’re not only capable of, but one they deserve.

“L

SARAH WEARS HER OWN DRESS AND COLETTE BY COLETTE HAYMAN BRACELET, AVAILABLE AT SUNSHINE PLAZA. MAKE-UP BY MELINA DEE AND FLOWERS PROVIDED BY BELLA FLORA IN SIPPY DOWNS (BELLAFLORA.COM.AU)

april 2018

ife’s problems are put into perspective when you see their smiles, the joy they have, gratitude and appreciation of the small things life brings, being present and being okay with being in that moment. “Spending too much time rethinking the past makes people sad and too much time trying to predict or control the future makes them anxious, so the idea of being in the now is actually something we can all learn – there are some aspects of living with a disability we can actually learn from as individuals, families, groups and communities, if we are open to looking at those things.” Having spent quite a bit of time with Sarah Fitzpatrick and her family throughout the writing of this very special feature, I couldn’t agree more with those sentiments of Compass Institute founder and CEO David Dangerfield. You see, Sarah unequivocally stole my heart. Born and bred in Sydney, Sarah moved to the Sunshine Coast with her dad, John, and mum, Libby, in 2003, where she attended Currimundi Special School for six years. Not knowing what postschool providers were available, they were staring down the barrel of Libby needing to give up work to become a full time carer. Their saving grace was the Compass Institute, an awardwinning Sunshine Coast charity providing support for people with intellectual and/or physical disabilities. David Dangerfield founded Compass in 1992 to provide alternative education programs to at-risk youth through local schools and in 2003, opened a post-secondary service aimed at changing the philosophy behind this type of service from one of passive recreation to a pathway of lifelong learning, skills-based training and vocational opportunities. profilemagazine

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“We didn’t know what to expect and with some trepidation we went and I know that I became quite relaxed with what Sarah was exposed to and what they were doing at Compass and it’s been absolutely fabulous,” says John. “I admire what David and his staff do because as a parent you know how hard it is and we’re looking after our own child, they’re teachers looking after all of the other children.” Since joining Compass in 2010, Sarah has continued to learn the basics of personal grooming, cookery, numeracy and literacy, as well as workplace health and safety, civic rights and responsibilities, and personal safety. Sarah also has a creative flair and thrives in the arts through pottery, tie dye and woodwork. She also practices aikido, a form of martial arts, and gives me a demonstration, flexing her arms to the side and exclaiming, ‘Don’t mess with me’. 22

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SARAH WEARS CITY CHIC AKIKO DRESS, $149.95, REVIEW BELT $29.99 AND SANDLER AIKEN SHOES FROM MYER, $149.95, AND COLETTE BY COLETTE HAYMAN NECKLACE AND BRACELET, ALL AVAILABLE AT SUNSHINE PLAZA. COLOURFUL PAPER FANS PROVIDED BY PARTY MANIA (STORES. EBAY.COM.AU/PARTYMANIA-PARTY-SUPPLIES) AND CHAIR PROVIDED BY THE VINTAGE STOCKROOM (THEVINTAGESTOCKROOM.COM.AU)

“Originally Sarah would talk like this (bowing her head), she wouldn’t look people in the eye, she would mumble, was very quietly spoken and it’s a credit to Compass that they’ve got her to speak more clearly and have eye contact,” says Libby, prompting Sarah to hold her gaze with mine and we both share a laugh. “Even something as simple as going to the deli and ordering a couple of slices of Devon, having to speak to that person and having them understand what they were asking for. She’s grown in her confidence to speak to people that she will now look at people and you can understand her and understand what she’s saying.” As Rose Rimmer, from Caloundra Compass says, they create an expectation and understanding that if Sarah acts like

Spending too much time rethinking the past makes people sad and too much time trying to predict or control the future makes them anxious, so the idea of being IN THE NOW is actually something we can all learn – there are some aspects of living with a disability we can actually LEARN from.”

an adult then she’ll be treated like an adult; it becomes about respect. “I have two daughters in their 20s and I’d want my daughters to be treated with respect and Sarah has the right to that as well,” she says. For the past five years, Sarah has also worked at Pelican Waters Bowls Club, where she picked up food preparation and waitressing skills. “She started with basic kitchen handling skills and making salads and one day they saw her taking plates left at a table back to the kitchen and they realised she can do that. Then over a period of 12 months, she had to learn how to carry someone’s dinner to the table without sticking her thumb in their mashed potato, just little things like that,” says Libby. “It’s taken four years to get to that point, it’s all those little increments you need to achieve.” As Compass CEO, David says there are hundreds of microsteps behind every task we do, regardless of how trivial or small it may seem. Think about making a cup of tea; which has over 15 steps to complete such a simple task. “It’s about pointing out what we take for granted in any process we have unconscious competence in and also the language we use. For example you might say you put the jug on, you put the jug on what? Did you put water in it? Of course I put water in. Did you turn it on at the wall? Of course I turned it on at the wall. There is no of course,” he says. “In the back end of all of those things are hundreds of microsteps and they have to be plotted for someone with an intellectual disability, not taken for granted and then they have to be trained and repeated until that person also has an unconscious competence in that skill. profilemag.com.au


COVER STORY SARAH WITH HER FAMILY – SISTER AND BROTHER-IN-LAW LAUREN AND STEVEN, WITH MADISON AND LEO, SISTER AND BROTHER-IN-LAW KAITLYN AND ANTHONY, AND HER PARENTS JOHN AND LIBBY

“There is an enormous amount of paperwork, planning and dedication from the staff, so Sarah can be unconsciously competent in doing those things. What worries me is this assumption it just happens, but it doesn’t, it takes thought, planning, repetition and process.” John and Libby concur, saying Sarah started early intervention in Sydney at six weeks of age to learn to crawl. “From six weeks to seven months she was learning to crawl and everything is repetitive, repetitive, repetitive and you get very sick of it but you keep persevering and eventually they get it and it becomes a normal, natural thing for them to do; be it crawling or making a cup of tea, every little step takes this much longer for them,” says Libby. As John explains, it is a collaborative effort, with their family and Compass working to help Sarah thrive. Her two sisters, Lauren, now aged 32 and Kaitlyn, 30, played a huge role in her early development, as all Sarah wanted was to keep up with them. “We, as parents, and Sarah, as a person, have a role to play. Sarah doesn’t have any special favours from us, where we live now, Sarah is fortunate to have her own bedroom with her own ensuite, so that’s her responsibility to keep that clean. Sarah has to make SARAH WEARS REVIEW SHANGHAI DRESS, $319.99 AND REVIEW BELT, $29.99 FROM MYER AND NECKLACE AND BRACELET FROM her bed every morning, COLETTE BY COLETTE HAYMAN, ALL AVAILABLE AT SUNSHINE change her sheets on the PLAZA. BALLOONS PROVIDED BY PARTY MANIA (STORES.EBAY.COM.AU/PARTYMANIA-PARTY-SUPPLIES) nominated day, set the

table, help with the cooking; it’s not like we sit back, but it was a process for us. Since she’s been at Compass she’s never wanted help making the bed,” says John. While it’s a life John and Libby never preconceived when going into the birth suite to deliver their third child, they wouldn’t have it any other way. “It all started when she was born, the obstetrician goes, ‘I think Sarah has Down syndrome, I’ll get the paediatrician’, who said, ‘Yes, Sarah has Down syndrome, what that means I don’t know; I can’t tell you what she can’t or can do, same as I can’t tell you what the other two can or can’t do. He suggested the early intervention clinic and that was the start of the long road for us and a longer road for Sarah, but now we get to this point and it has all been worth it,” says John. David says prior to the 1960s, there was an assumption that being born with an intellectual or physical disability was a medical issue, and therefore a welfare mentality was adopted, branding these young people as a liability. “What if that was wrong? What if the person wasn’t a liability, what if they were an asset? The next question is, ‘What unlocks assets?’ and the answer is education. You’re always learning, right from the time you’re a young child, at the hands of your parents, they’re teaching you and your family is helping you grow. “People with an intellectual disability or disability get that through to Year 12, then this welfare mentality kicks back in really hard. But there’s a developmental delay, peak learning is 18 to 25 for a person in that boat, you need to continue to unlock the asset post-secondary school, when they’re in that peak learning period, and that exactly coincides with when the government stops funding their education. profilemagazine

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COVER STORY

Having a DISABILITY is not a line in the sand, it’s a SPECTRUM and there are people from highly medicalised disabilities right through to people like Sarah, who have no limits to what they can ACHIEVE.”

“That’s exactly why Compass exists, we let them become their own hero, let them become their own asset and continue to help them reach their peak, the same as you or I did, which was through further education and training, that’s what’s missing in this sector, in this country.” Of the stigma surrounding people with a disability, both David and John believe the barriers are being broken down, but more often than not it is instigated by the person with the disability, not the general public. “You have to be deliberate about it, you can’t assume that just being in the community is enough. If you have half a dozen ‘Sarahs’ taken to the movies by Rose, that’s not going to create acceptance, but you have Sarah managing her money, going up and asking for her ticket, knowing how to behave socially in that environment and going over and getting something from the cafe, lining up like everyone else and communicating with the person behind them in the line, that’s what breeds acceptance and natural behaviour, it’s unnatural to have them herded around like a group of three-year-olds,” says David. Within Compass, they have Connections Cafe in Nambour, Wabi Sabi homewares and gift shop in Palmwoods, and the Compass Farm at Hunchy, where they run Rakes and Pains, and the Harvest Kitchen. All operations contribute some costs back, but David says none are commercially functioning because their primary purpose is to give a supportive workplace environment to a person with a disability. To cover the logistical operations and staff, Compass also holds fundraisers and events, applies for grants and accepts donations from generous locals who believe in the power of Compass. “You can have four or five young people per staff member, because their capacity is at that level, but if you have a young person who is non-verbal, non-mobile and requires personal care, we have some 24

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people who are palliative, they require the best possible care we can give them in a stimulating environment and they need one or two staff with them to support them and look after their needs,” says David. “Having a disability is not a line in the sand, it’s a spectrum and there are people from highly medicalised disabilities right through to people like Sarah, who have no limits to what they can achieve.” When Sarah was diagnosed with Down syndrome, doctors checked her heart, lungs and organs and she was given a clean bill of health, which Libby says she is fortunate to have. It wasn’t until she was three years old, that her hair started falling out and was diagnosed with alopecia, which has had no health implications. “We have met children along the way who have a medical condition that has meant they’ve had to spend time in hospital and haven’t been able to access services, so their development hasn’t been as strong,” she says. “Sarah is fortunate she’s healthy and it’s made such a difference to the quality of her life and what she can do.” Sarah has absolutely pushed the limits too, when she was in high school, she swam at the Special Olympics and represented Queensland in basketball. “The unsung heroes in all of this are the mums and dads, they can choose to back out of it and adopt the disempowering relationship with their child and John and Libby haven’t done that, they’ve put in the hundreds of thousands of hours in a developmental relationship with Sarah, not just a nurturing relationship and that’s different and it’s difficult,” says David. Wearing a pretty lace dress, Sarah stands on the set of our April cover shoot, staring down the barrel of the camera with photographer Giselle Peters from Duke and Gypsy on the other side. “Now, close your eyes and think of the person you love most in the world,” says Giselle, “Who is it?” “Me!” Sarah unabashedly exclaims, throwing her arms in the air and letting out a laugh.

While Sarah has overcome countless obstacles in her life, this is one lesson we can all learn from her, and it’s a message of self-love; pure and simple. Profile Magazine has proudly partnered with the Compass Institute, Cricks Sunshine Coast, WIN Network, 91.9 Sea FM, 92.7 Mix FM and the Sunshine Coast Daily to hold a Charity Gala Ball on 29 June at the Maroochy RSL. All proceeds from this very special event will go to Compass. TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

Contact Compass Institute on 5445 9116 for more information or to make a booking, $1500 for a table of 10.

profilemag.com.au


MEET SOME OF THE OTHER TEAM MEMBERS FROM COMPASS AUSTIN, aged 19, has been coming to Compass for almost a year and is a support worker at the Compass Farm at Hunchy. “I’m here to support others who need support. It’s good to learn about the animals, it’s really nice to know there are other people around us to support us, it’s been really good to come to Compass.”

EMMA-LEE, 23, is based at the Caboolture centre and comes to the Farm a few days a week. “I’ve been coming to Compass for two years and I walk Valerie (the horse) around. It’s fun and we walk and feed the animals.” Eighteen-year-old GRACE, has been at Compass for a month and works at the Compass Cafe in Nambour. “I serve the food here because everyone needs something to eat. I do it because I enjoy it and it’s my job now because I left school a long time ago and I wanted something to do so Mum said, ‘You can do this job, it’s your job right now”. I love that I get to serve people and be back of house sometimes, when everyone’s head is down enjoying the food.” Two years ago, JASMINE, now aged 20 was non-verbal and started talking after working with the animals at the Farm. She has been coming to Compass for four years. “I work with the animals and I make sure they are in good health and keep them healthy. It’s the best place to be, I love working with the animals and my boss and meeting new friends.” LACHLAN, aged 19, has been part of Compass for nine months. “Here at the cafe, I help make coffee, smoothies and milkshakes and help out with deliveries. I love making food and coffees.” RENEE, aged 26, has been working at the Compass Cafe for two years and part of compass for five years. “I was at the Harvest Kitchen at Compass Farm; I made jams, chutneys, sauces and used to make breaky wraps. Here at the cafe I cook with Madonna and do eftpos and the cash register and the coffee machine. The cafe is really good and I really love the staff here at the cafe.” april 2018

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HOMEGROWN

ALANA QUADE (NEE BOYD) PHOTO FROM GETTY IMAGES

good sports

WORDS NICOLE FUGE PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH

As the world tunes in to watch the sporting elite compete at the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, we meet the Sunshine Coast’s first family of sport. Recently inducted into the Sunshine Coast Hall of Fame, Ray and Denise Boyd and their eldest daughter Alana, have collectively competed at seven Olympics and eight Commonwealth Games, swagging an impressive 11 gold, silver and bronze medals.

A

n Olympic flag is mounted on the wall, with action shots of Ray and Denise Boyd bordering the colourful rings; to the left sits an Olympic torch and on the adjacent wall are gold, silver and bronze medals won at the most prestigious sporting events in the world. There is no denying Ray and Denise possess incredible sporting prowess, which they have passed onto their three children, Alana, Jacinta and Matthew; all of whom have competed at an international level. Their eldest daughter, Alana pushed her talents the furthest, competing in three Olympics and two Commonwealth Games, where she won gold in 2010 in Delhi and in 2014 in Glasgow. Her selection into the 2008 Beijing Olympics also marked the first time a child of two former Olympians competed on an Australian Olympic team. Growing up in Brisbane, Denise competed in athletics from the age of seven, often against children up to three years older, as the youngest competitive age group was Under 10s. “I won the Queensland state 50 yard title at the exhibition ground when I was nine years old, in 1962. I was just a bit

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quicker than most of the other kids at school and I really enjoyed it,” she says. “There were no junior or youth competitions when Ray and I were of that age, so my first representation was when I was 20 in the 1973 Pacific Conference Games in Canada.” It proved to be a sports meet in more ways than one, with Denise and Ray being introduced on their way to the airport. “Everyone was getting on the bus, the pole vaulter always gets on last, and I was shoved through the door and there was only one seat left at the back of the bus, next to Denise,” says Ray with a smile. Denise was 21 when she competed in her first Commonwealth Games in Christchurch in ‘74, where she won gold in the 4x100m relay and then backed it up with gold in the 200m dash at the ‘78 Games in Edmonton. Then in 1982, champion pole vaulter, Ray, won gold in Brisbane. As a child, Ray was an all-rounder; he loved sprints, cross country and high jump (he desperately wanted to trump his father’s high jump record at school, but says he never did), and was introduced to pole vault at a weekly meet in Melbourne. “I lived across the creek from

Collingwood Harriers Athletics Club in Melbourne and every Sunday morning they had a junior play thing. There was a guy standing there with the pole and a box and kids would line up. They were aluminium poles in those days and up over the bar you’d go and land in sawdust. You’d have to go with a shovel and turn the sawdust because it used to pack down after the rain,” he says. Alana’s introduction to pole vault was a little different, with Ray stumbling across some poles in the equipment shed at the University of the Sunshine Coast track in 2001. “I was 18 when I started pole vault, so pretty old in terms of starting an event,” says Alana. “I was hurdling at the time at a national level and didn’t quite make the world juniors that year. I had a lot of injuries and I didn’t have mum’s speed – I wasn’t going to be fast enough to be a world class hurdler and pole vault was something I took to quite well from the beginning, having done gymnastics and having enough speed to pole vault well.” Alana qualified for the 2006 Commonwealth Games, but her first Australian team as a pole vaulter was in 2007. She then competed at a world class level for the next 10 years, with Ray as her coach. “There is double the amount of pressure being a father and coach, I’m a lot more relaxed when it’s not my own. You need to make the right call or they’ll pull you up on it! I remember when we were in Monaco, Alana walked over at one stage after missing and I said, ‘I think you need profilemag.com.au


the next pole’, and she looked at me and said, ‘You think or you know?’ It was a fair question but it was just a turn of phrase and she took it literally. She changed the pole and jumped a PB – it was a great decision,” says Ray in jest. “We butted heads a lot but fortunately it stayed on the track, was never at home, I always thought she was a far better pole vaulter than she was showing at the time and I just couldn’t get her head and hold it above the water, it kept slipping beneath the surface.” From 2009 to 2012, Alana moved to Perth to train under Alex Parnov, who had also coached Australian champion Tatiana Grigorieva. Alana excelled, but after three years she reached a point where her decision was to retire or come home. “I didn’t want to retire because I’d had such a good year jumping previously, I jumped a PB and I didn’t have the Olympics I should have, I was 28 and thought I still have a few good years left in me yet and that’s what kept me going. I came back and started training with Dad again and it was way better, we still had our moments, that was to be expected,

DENISE COACHING AT USC STADIUM PHOTO BY REBECCA SMITH

If it’s not PERFECT I accepted that was the session I served up and tomorrow I’ll do it BETTER.”

but the last two years of my career were my best in terms of performance and not being injured and having that culminate at the Olympics,” she says. “My head was in a better place, I was confident and methodical in how I went about my training, I wasn’t so hard on myself – if it’s not perfect I accepted that was the session I served up and tomorrow I’ll do it better, but in the past I’d been so hard on myself and everything had to be perfect, but nothing is ever perfect.” Alana retired after the Rio Olympics in 2016, and a month later married her husband Ryan, who she now owns and runs a business with in Maroochydore. From 4 to 15 April, Ray, Denise and Alana will be on the Gold Coast, watching the 2018 Commonwealth Games, which is the first major competition since Alana’s retirement. “I miss competing when you’re in good shape, I don’t miss competing when you’re trying to pull a rabbit out of a hat! But as much as competing at the major is what you train for and it’s exciting, it’s bloody nerve wracking too, with the preparation and everything that goes into it, I’ll be happy just to sit in the stands,” says Alana. “So it will be different for me to watch the competition this year, given there are a few girls; Eliza McCartney from New Zealand who beat me in Rio, Holly Bleasdale from Britain and Alysha Newman from Canada; I competed against in the last five years who were around the same level as me – who do I cheer for? It will be a bit strange not being out there and competing against them.”

SUNSHINE COAST SPORTS HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES RAY BOYD

Ray won 11 Australian championships in pole vault, ending his career on a high by winning a gold medal at the 1982 Commonwealth Games in Brisbane. He competed in two Olympics (Munich 1972 and Montreal 1976) and three Commonwealth Games (Edinburgh 1970, Christchurch 1974 and Brisbane 1982). Boyd’s best vault of 5.30 metres was achieved in Melbourne in March 1976. DENISE BOYD (NEE ROBERTSON)

Denise was one of the greatest sprinters throughout the 1970s and ’80s. She represented Australia at the 1976 Montreal Olympic Games and was the Australian team’s joint flag-bearer at the 1980 Moscow Games. At the Commonwealth Games in Christchurch in 1974, she won bronze in the 100m, silver in the 200m and gold in the 4x100m relay. In Edmonton in 1978, she won bronze in the 100m and 4x100 relay, silver in the 4x400m relay and gold in the 200m. In her final Commonwealth Games appearance in Brisbane in 1982, she won a silver medal in the 4x400m relay. ALANA QUADE (NEE BOYD)

Alana won her maiden national pole vault crown in 2008, before achieving a 4.30m clearance on Olympic debut at Beijing 2008. She has since won the Australian Athletics Championships gold medal on three occasions (2009, 2013 and 2015). Alana won gold at the 2010 Delhi and 2014 Glasgow Commonwealth Games, a bronze medal at the IAAF Continental Cup in Marrakech and a personal best of 4.81m in 2016 to become Australia’s best female pole vaulter. She was an Olympic finalist in London in 2012 and closed out her career with a 4.80m jump and fourth place at the Rio Olympic Games in 2016. RAY AND DENISE BOYD WITH THEIR ELDEST DAUGHTER ALANA

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MAY 16 - 18 2018 Royal International Convention Centre, Fortitude Valley Once a year, the world’s most influential thinkers and tinkerers, entrepreneurs and experts, rebels and renegades get together in beautiful Brisbane to push the world forward, one essential question at a time. Myriad is as much an inclusive cultural experiment, as it is an inspiring technological festival. It is a celebration of the human beings who find themselves at the uncertain intersections of culture and industry and choose to make a difference. We’re calling Sunshine Coast innovators and entrepreneurs to join SCRIPT in representing our thriving region at this world-class event. TO SECURE A TICKET VISIT WWW.MYRIAD.LIVE/TICKETS

BIGGER AND BETTER After a sold-out debut event, Myriad returns to beautiful Queensland, Australia in 2018. Featuring founders, investors, thought leaders and senior executives from some of the most influential brands on the planet, Myriad 2018 is where Australia meets the future. Our program is designed to engage curious minds in a variety of unique formats, including; • KEYNOTE PRESENTATIONS • FIRESIDE CONVERSATIONS • PANEL DISCUSSIONS • INTIMATE WORKSHOPS • POWERFUL MASTERCLASSES • NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES • LIVE PERFORMANCES & EPIC PARTIES

ARE YOU A SUNSHINE COAST INNOVATOR OR ENTREPRENEUR? Don’t miss out on the opportunity to gain exposure amongst influential investors and network with like-minded entrepreneurs. TO SECURE A TICKET VISIT WWW.MYRIAD.LIVE/TICKETS


THE 2018 LINEUP

Don’t miss your chance to hear from these unique local and international speakers, who are inspiring investment, innovation and impact around the world.

ANNIE PARKER

Former CEO - Fishburners

DR. LARRY MARSHALL CEO - CSIRO

ARI EISENSTAT

Founder & CEO - Dræm Ventures Global

DR. RAGHAV MURALI-GANESH

Co-Founder & COO - Canceraid

ATLANTA DANIEL

Venture Capitalist - Blue Sky Capital

GLENN COOPER

Co-Founder and Chairman Coopers Brewery

BORIS SILVER

Co-Founder - Funders Club

JACQUELINE GARAVENTE Venture Capitalist - Union Square Ventures

Brought to you by:

#SCRIPT The Sunshine Coast Regional Innovation Program is a collaboration of local entrepreneurs, business owners, government stakeholders and community members dedicated to fueling a culture of innovation on the Sunshine Coast. Our purpose is to invest in innovative programs which make a difference to our community. Our areas of focus are:

JEREMY BLOOM

World Champion & Entrepreneur - Integrate

JODIE FOX

Chief Creative Officer and Co-Founder - Shoes of Prey

JODY MEDICH

Design Director Singularity U Labs

JONATHAN TRENT

Project Lead Scientist OMEGA - NASA

• Smart Cities • Food and Agribusiness • Sustainability and Environment • Health and Wellbeing and; • Creative Industries If you have an innovative project idea or would like to find out more, visit: sunshinecoastinnovation.com.au

ROD DRURY

KELLY WATKINS

MATT ROCKMAN

NAVEEN JAIN

KARLA BALLARD WILLIAMS

ZEPHANII SMITH

National Council - UN Association

TARYN WILLIAMS

TONY CONRAD

Co-Founder & CEO - Ying

YAEL EISENSTAT

STEVE JURVETSON

Founder & CEO - Xero

Former CIA Officer

VP, Global Marketing - Slack

Co-Founder - Seek

Founder & CEO - The Right Fit

Founder - DFJ

WWW.MYRIAD.LIVE

Founder - Moon Express

Founder & Partner - True Ventures


FUTURE

dream,

hust l e, repeat. WORDS CAITLYN SPANNER PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH

Kaylene Langford is a young entrepreneur who used the skills she developed in a soul-sucking corporate job to create the life of her dreams and in turn help others do the same. We sit down with the globe-trotting founder of StartUp Creative to hear her inspiring story.

I

n April of 2014, Kaylene Langford stuck a handwritten note on her bedroom wall that read, ‘By 30 August, I will have left my job’. What started as a passionate career in youth work, turned into a hamster-wheel corporate job, ridden with red tape, unnecessary meetings and a several-hour commute from the Gold Coast to Brisbane every day. Growing up on the Sunshine Coast and being surrounded by a family dedicated to charity work, Kaylene developed a passion for helping kids and got into youth work shortly after leaving school. “My passion is mentoring. I really liked working with kids at-risk and helping disadvantaged kids. There’s so much power in just being mates with them, helping them be kids,” she says. In the beginning of her career, Kaylene kicked a lot of goals and created programs for St Vincent De Paul and schools across Queensland and was awarded Young Volunteer of the Year for her efforts. The award gained Kaylene a lot of attention and she was able to move into a corporate role writing similar programs for the

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Queensland Government. What seemed like a dream job on paper became the catalyst for a serious health scare. “I was fed up in my job and waking up with really bad headaches. I went to the doctor, got sent for scans on my brain – I thought I was dying!” she says. Kaylene found out the headaches weren’t linked to a life threatening illness, but stress. And while the diagnosis wasn’t critical, it meant she had to take a good hard look at her situation. Seeking answers, she picked up a book titled Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill and was inspired to make a massive change.

My PASSION is mentoring. I really liked working with kids at-risk and helping disadvantaged kids. There’s so much POWER in just being mates with them, helping them be kids.”

“The first thing that came to mind was the award that I won. Setting up a program, branding it, funding it, scaling it, recruiting for it – that’s how you run a business. What I’m good at is having a concept and an idea and figuring out how to bring it to life,” she says.

“So I literally sat down and wrote a course called How to Turn Your Passion into a Business.” On 22 August, eight days before her deadline, Kaylene left her corporate job to begin her business, StartUp Creative, using the skills she had developed writing programs to help other young people start their own businesses. She began pitching a six-week course which was picked up by big institutions like Brisbane City Council and USQ. But she still found herself jumping through hoops profilemag.com.au


FUTURE

A lot of the SUCCESSFUL people are the ones that are doing it for a deeper purpose. Yes, I deliver business coaching and workshops and a magazine, but what I’m really on this planet to do is free people from jobs that they hate. That’s my PURPOSE.”

in a corporate environment, when all she wanted to do was help people. One day when having dinner at a pizza restaurant, she had a lightbulb moment. “I was in this restaurant and I thought the owner was so lucky, he was going straight to his customer and showing them his great pizza. And I realised I could do that too,” she says. So she immediately stopped pitching to third parties and went directly to the people she wanted to help. StartUp Creative gained momentum and is now a platform for young entrepreneurs who want to get their ideas off the ground. Through a magazine, e-courses, one-onone coaching, an e-book and workshops, Kaylene has developed a successful business april 2018

with a fundamental goal to help others. Moving from the corporate world to self-employment is never easy and Kaylene admits she’s still ‘hustling’ to make it work. “I’m a startup, I’m still in the trenches. I’ll always try to relate to other people starting out,” she says. There have been days when it was tricky to get $3.50 together to pay for a coffee, but she’s happier than ever and is designing the life of her dreams. “A lot of the successful people are the ones that are doing it for a deeper purpose. Yes, I deliver business coaching and workshops and a magazine, but what I’m really on this planet to do is free people from jobs that they hate. That’s my purpose.” Kaylene is now living the life of her dreams and has since taken StartUp Creative to New York. She plans to take it to new corners of the globe in 2018, but still calls the Sunshine Coast home and regularly returns to see family and friends. “There’s definitely a changing vibe on the Sunshine Coast. There is opportunity for young families and new businesses,” she says. Kaylene hopes to see more people like her pursuing their dreams right here on the Coast. “Councils need to develop initiatives to help people get in the game. But it’s also up to you to persist and hustle. You should also go to events and support other creatives and young business owners.” With a weekly podcast and the fifth issue of her magazine now on shelves, Kaylene continues to be the source of so much inspiration for young entrepreneurs wanting to live the life they’ve always dreamt of.

KAYLENE LANGFORD


“The only way you find what your limits are is by pushing them.” – TERRI IRWIN

LEADING LADIES OF THE SUNSHINE COAST

ELIZABETH FAIRON WORDS CAITLYN SPANNER PHOTOS FLETCHER PHOTOGRAPHY

Dedication and passion are the keys to Elizabeth Fairon’s success. After 13 years of providing family law solutions on the Sunshine Coast, she has rebranded her firm and launched a new book, Trust Yourself. We catch up with the leading lady to hear all about it.

W

ith Australians spending less and less time in each job, (3.3 years on average according to mccrindle. com.au) it’s rare to come across a business owner in any industry who’s spent 10 or more years in a role. Elizabeth Fairon of Life Law Solutions is breaking that mould after dedicating 13 years to her practice. In 2005 she joined what was then called Frank Carroll Solicitor for practical legal training during the final year of her law degree. “I went there for work experience, was offered a job on the second day and I haven’t looked back,” she says. She became a partner alongside Frank Carroll in 2009, after she tackled family law, estates, property and whatever was thrown at her for four years (the average amount of time someone of her generation stays in a position). Then, in 2015, she acquired the firm from her mentor and partner to become the sole owner of Carroll Fairon Solicitors. Elizabeth is now the owner and principal lawyer of the firm, which just re-launched under the name Life Law Solutions. Surprisingly, she never planned to be a lawyer. The inherently curious Elizabeth changed her degree from education to law purely because a friend was studying it and it seemed interesting.

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“At the time, I didn’t have this overwhelming sense of justice driving me to study law. I’ve learnt since that I have a natural sense of curiosity so it probably explains why I studied law because it was interesting,” she says. This inquisitive nature led Elizabeth to finish two more degrees; a Masters of Law and a Masters of Applied Family Law. As a book-lover, life-long learner and business owner, it’s no surprise that Elizabeth is planning to start a Masters of Business Administration in the next 12 months. To top it all off, 2018 marks the 20th year of her firm, which inspired Elizabeth to not only rebrand the practice but launch her own book. “We’re now called Life Law Solutions because we help people find solutions for legal problems they have in their life.” “Moving into this year we wanted a fresh start. We moved away from that traditional surname/surname practice. We asked, what is it that we really do? Life Law is what we do. We focus on family law, estates and property and they’re mainly the transactions that normal people have to deal with,” she says. Elizabeth is tremendously passionate about family law and dedicates her life to helping everyday people resolve their legal matters. With her calming presence, passion for helping others and years of

ELIZABETH FAIRON MAKE-UP BY BRIDAL MAKEUP BY TIHANNA HAIR BY UPTOWN HAIR STUDIO

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LEADING LADIES

experience and commitment, she takes the stress out of what can otherwise be a daunting and intimidating experience. Her book titled, Trust Yourself: How Empowered Decision Making Can Help You Resolve Your Family Law Matter, was written by Elizabeth to provide the same sort of relatable help to families with a legal matter. “It’s based on my thoughts over my years of experience about how people can make the most out of the family law system for what it is. It’s not a perfect system, there are huge delays and if you can work out a way that you can get out of the system and try to resolve your matter that’s far better than waiting two to three years for a judge,” she says. Elizabeth N T H FA IR O says the book is E L IZ A B E for prospective clients, people who are separating, or those who are already in the system and need more information about the family wered How empo

We LOVE our Sunshine Coast clients and we love HELPING people on the Coast.”

ELIZABETH’S BUSINESS TIPS:

• Understanding your limits is key • Seek advice always and often • Having a mentor and advisor is of tremendous value

law system. She provides tips on what to do, what not to do, how you can make the most out of the system for what it is, and different ways of resolving your matter. “My practice is very much about making sure you work out what you want to achieve regardless of what the law says; working on what your goals are and putting them in place,” she says. Her home city is another passion of Elizabeth’s, who resides in Peregian Beach with her husband and their two dogs. “We love our Sunshine Coast clients and we love helping people on the Coast. I know that Sunshine Coast clients want to deal with local people and we are local people. All the team who work here live here. We’re very much locals supporting locals,” she smiles. With a career driven by passion and commitment, this leading lady is a true inspiration to many young women looking to start a career in law, or any industry for that matter.

Trust

king decision ma u will help yo ur family resolve yo law matter

ELIZABETH’S TIPS FOR ANYONE GOING THROUGH A SEPARATION:

• Seek out knowledge about all of the variables at play in the family law system • Looking after yourself is a priority • Seeking advice early on will set you on the right path

LIFE LAW SOLUTIONS 5446 1745 LIFELAW.COM.AU

april 2018

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Brenda Konig

YOUR FRIENDLY LOCAL TRAVEL EXPERT with world wide experience

The team at Barrett, Rogers & Turner Travel Associates in Maroochydore have all travelled extensively & have a true passion for sharing the wonders & benefits of travel with their clients Dutch born Brenda Konig, a Senior Travel Consultant is an exceptional travel advisor. As a child growing up in the Netherlands, Brenda found herself regularly staring at the globe dreaming about the many beautiful places in this world. Instead of seeing them in books she was determined to explore them herself. So it was no wonder after studying tourism, Brenda packed up her things and started travelling the world, before settling down in Australia to do what she loves - creating amazing holiday experiences for others! Having worked for more than 20 years in the travel industry Brenda knows there is different advice for every client and every destination. With a vast array of countries under her belt, she can recommend everything from a river cruise through Europe, trekking the Himalaya to must-dos in the Red Centre. “My passion is to make dream holidays come true. I love getting to know my clients and helping them find those elusive travel moments they are chasing. The best feeling there is, is when you speak to your clients when they return home and their holiday was even better than they had imagined. When they can’t stop talking about their experiences and keep thanking you for the carefree trip they had – those are the moments that I live for”. Brenda would love to discuss your travel needs

FREE CALL 1800 102 331 Mobile 0434 788 922

brenda_konig@travel-associates.com.au travel-associates.com.au/barrettrogers 34

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THINK MONEY | W E A LT H Y ' N ' W I S E

leading the way TO WEALTH Learn the secrets about money to create the wealth you desire.

Creating enough money for your lifestyle

The 7 things (about money) you wish you had learned at school

How do you get control of debt?

thinkmoney.com.au thinkmoney.com.au


PIPPA COLMAN & ASSOCIATES LAW PRACTICE PTY LTD

SPOUSAL MAINTENANCE SARAH QUILLIAM | DIRECTOR OF PIPPA COLMAN & ASSOCIATES

Spousal maintenance is a payment by one spouse (including de facto spouse) to another for their day-to-day expenses. The payment may be voluntary or pursuant to a court order.

T

he Family Law Act says that, “A party to a marriage is liable to maintain the other party, to the extent that the firstmentioned party is able to do so, if, and only if, that other party is unable to support herself or himself adequately”. An adequate reason for a spouse not being able to support themselves might be because they have care of young children, because of their age/health, or some other reason that impacts their earning capacity. The nature of spousal maintenance payments is that they are usually a temporary fix, so that one party is not suffering unnecessary hardship pending the finalisation of their property settlement. Often, maintenance payments will cease once the property settlement has concluded, but in some circumstances it is appropriate that maintenance continue to be paid for a period of time. When assessing how much (if any) maintenance should be paid, there is an assessment of the parties’ income (including capacity to earn an income), capital, financial resources and expenditure. There might be a dispute as to what is considered “reasonable” expenditure.

Spousal maintenance can be paid in many ways, e.g. a lump sum, a periodic payment (weekly, fortnightly, monthly) or by way of paying a mortgage, phone bill, private health insurance, rent or the like. Spousal maintenance should not be confused with child support, which is for children only. Therefore, when there is a claim for spousal maintenance, the claim will be scrutinised to identify what expenses relate only to a spouse, what is shared with the children and what relates only to the children. Financial statements, tax returns, receipts, bank statements and pay slips are all important evidence in spousal maintenance matters. Those who claim spousal maintenance must prove their expenses and needs, and the income and property available to them. Both parties must give full and frank disclosure of their financial positions. Luxuries may or may not be considered – in general they are not. Spousal maintenance is now regarded as a stop gap measure, giving time to a spouse to get a job or acquire skills to support themselves, and not a right to be supported for the rest of their life. We can assist people who think they may be entitled to spousal maintenance after their separation.

FREE

eBook on separation is available at

pippacolman.com

DIVORCE & SEPARATION PROPERTY SETTLEMENT CHILDREN & PARENTING RELATIONSHIP AGREEMENTS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE WILLS & ESTATES

working together P. 07 5458 9000 E. reception@pippacolman.com A. 19 First Avenue, Maroochydore

WE CONDUCT FREE INFORMATION SEMINARS ON FAMILY LAW TOPICS. DETAILS CAN BE FOUND AT PIPPACOLMAN.COM

www.pippacolman.com


Anything is Possible Children learn at their best when their education is enriched by memorable experiences. At Immanuel Lutheran College, we give students the ability to explore and discover not only in the classroom, but also with nature.

OPEN MORNING immanuel.qld.edu.au

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10 MAY

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ACCESSORISE GET REDDY Strong lines and bold colours will be sure to pack a punch. The colour red, which is always a colour associated with power, is having a moment right now, so stock up while it’s in stores.

STYLE

Use accessories to tell the story, your favourite timber carved bangle, gorgeous silk scarf, perhaps a pair of statement earrings or shoes. Whatever it is, it needs to be a piece of YOU, because when you feel like you, you will be confident, and confidence is power. SEPARATE WORK FROM PLAY There are still some things that should be kept for the weekend, so when shaking up your work wardrobe it’s best to avoid platform shoes, sandals and summer dresses and always pay attention to your skirt length – as a general rule, your business skirts should be at shortest just above the knee.

1980S INSPO

THE style EDIT

POWER

If you are feeling brave, you can always don a pair of shoulder pads, or invest in a sharp suit in pastel or all white, ‘80s fashion is still in the limelight so make the most of it.

WITH JACINTA EMMS

dressing

Power dressing has no power if you don’t feel powerful. Let us show you how to put your best foot forward, after all, first impressions last! Let’s get down to business, how do you take a little bit of confidence and put it into what you’re wearing? Something that shows you are a professional but still makes you feel in control and ready to rumble, what does that look like? Let’s start with your style super power, YOU! In the age of social media, asserting yourself and your personal trademark has never been more important and if what you wear is making the first announcement, you need to leave a mark with your smarts and your style.

april 2018

ALL ABOUT THAT BASE Be open to different styles of pants, skirts and dresses. Try a pair of culottes or a midi skirt and experiment with different waistlines, hemlines and cuts. Use your simplest piece as a base, work from there and add your showstopper – it doesn’t have to be over the top, so if you’re not feeling too adventurous, keep it simple and subtle, choose charcoal or navy over black, or add some spots, florals or your favourite colour. INJECT PERSONALITY Gone are the days of the black slacks and beige blouses, these days it is all about injecting your personality into your ensemble. Start styling your workwear with substance and mix it up – add femininity with a ruffle, or splash of pink, purple or paisley, and set your wild side free with animal prints and texture. Mixed prints will always make a statement.

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PROFILE

giving back

Want to work with Icons of the Industry? Only ONE franchise left on the Sunshine Coast

v

recently named

Enjoy our NEWEST franchise in PELICAN WATERS

Icons of the Industry

• NON SURGICAL FACE LIFT • REVERSE AGEING TREATMENTS • SKIN RESURFACING • NON SURGICAL BODY TREATMENTS & SKIN TIGHTENING • PRE & POST PREGNANCY TREATMENT • CELLULITE REDUCTION • BODY MASSAGE

laclinique.com.au Ph 07 5373 7576

Brightwater Retail Centre Pelican Waters Shopping Village

VITALITY TIPS WITH NIKKI FOGDEN-MOORE

B

eing a local legend starts with you, it starts at home and it has nothing to do with how much money you may have. Legends stem from a place of talent, kindness and the ability to give back on a daily basis.

HERE ARE FIVE TIPS TO LEVEL UP YOUR LOCAL LEGEND STATUS BY GIVING BACK (NO FUNDS REQUIRED). START WITH YOU – are you consciously living with purpose

daily? Look up instead of down at your phone and use your time wisely and with intent.

START AT HOME – are you spending quality time with those you

love? Take those extra few minutes to answer inquisitive minds, recognise the needs of others in your home and be supportive when your family members may be going through change or challenges in life.

r u o y o t n i GIVING back is not just about money. Di v e “ It’s your time, your experience and your . . . l o o p m a presence that COUNTS.” d re

LEAD BY EXAMPLE AT WORK – are you creating positive acts that reflect well on you? Can you create time in your agenda to mentor or support someone, or even ask your boss how else you could support them as they strive to build a sustainable business? Are you putting yourself in other people’s shoes and not just thinking of yourself?

CHOOSE CHARITIES THAT RESONATE WITH YOU – if you are going to contribute time and money to a not-for-profit, choose one or two that really connect with you and put more concentrated care and attention into those rather than spreading yourself too thin. Support is about what you do behind the scenes when no one is watching. GIVE BACK WITHIN YOUR MEANS – be inspired by others who

Call today! M. A . P 48

SERVICES

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M. A . P

are legends but ensure you do what is right for you at any given time. Giving back is not just about money. It’s your time, your experience and your presence that counts.

THEVITALITYCOACH.COM.AU

P. 0400 082 858 www.mapservices.com.au QBCC #15018195

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chic and comfy

FASHION

RUBY AND RAVEN LONG KAFTAN RRP $78, AVAILABLE AT RUBYANDRAVEN.COM.AU

planet friendly ECO BLING ASSORTED PRODUCTS, FROM $39.95, AVAILABLE AT ECOBLING.COM.AU

fashion

wrap it up LILYA MILITARY WRAP SKIRT, RRP $199, AVAILABLE AT ILOVELILYA.COM

all over it LILYA KARLIE OVERALL, RRP $249, AVAILABLE AT ILOVELILYA.COM

LOCALS ONLY:

These local labels have made a name for themselves, not only on the Coast but all throughout Australia and in some cases, around the world. Support local artisans while remaining your fashionable self.

fashionable folk LILYA CINTA DRESS IN PAPRIKA, RRP $249, AVAILABLE AT ILOVELILYA.COM

know your roots TRAVELLING KIMONO CHARLIE DRESS, RRP $89.95, AVAILABLE AT GRASSROOTSBOUTIQUE.COM.AU

glitter bug HOLSTER SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL ENLIGHTEN SNEAKER IN ROSE BRONZE, RRP $250, AVAILABLE AT HOLSTER NOOSA BOUTIQUE

april 2018

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20 MINUTE LED TREATMENT FOR JUST $40 normally valued at $60* *Offer valid until 30th April 2018.

20 Minute LED Treatment

LED light therapy treatment is a pain-free, non-invasive and rejuvenating skin treatment. It has the ability to help with all skin types and skin conditions. It can help to boost collagen production, acne breakouts, pigmentation, fine lines and wrinkles and redness.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE GREAT OFFERS

www.heidisbodyandskincare.com

Phone 07 5474 4522 • Suite 13, Level 1, Cooloola Centre, 97 Poinciana Ave Tewantin 4565 50

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lust-worthy make-up

BEAUTY

LUST MINERAL COSMETICS BB CREAM, FROM $35, AVAILABLE AT LUSTMINERALS.COM.AU

scent from heaven ORGANIC DEODORANT PASTE WITH ESSENTIAL OILS, RRP $18.95, AVAILABLE AT GETNAYKI.COM

LOCALS ONLY:

Beauty Call us biased, but we think the Sunshine Coast is nailing it when it comes to beauty. Here are a few of our favourite beauty brands calling the Coast home (and keeping us looking fresh).

free from nasties SAYA ARGAN SHAMPOO AND CONDITIONER, RRP $24.95 EACH, AVAILABLE SAYASKIN.COM

kissable lips ORGANIC LIP BALM VANILLA AND HONEY BALM, RRP $20, AVAILABLE AT ORGANICLIPBALM.COM.AU

nutty for coconuts COCONUT TREE ASSORTED PRODUCTS, FROM $18.50, AVAILABLE AT COCONUTTREE.COM.AU

daily essentials TWENTY8 ROMANCE & INTIMACY SYNERGY BLEND, RRP $41.95, AVAILABLE AT TWENTY8.COM

april 2018

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HEALTH

I feel like I’m so busy all the time, I never get time to relax. Help! HOLIDAY RELAXATION with Rhonda Billett-Haire

through the We’re already a quarter of the way time to catch up t grea a is k brea year, so the Easter treating yourself. and off days few a g takin – you on too often that As a hairdresser I see and hear all k about when Thin . busy g bein people are so busy h up with catc or BBQ a , party er dinn a to you go “I’ve say, eone som hear friends, how often you ”. busy been so h more from While it feels like life demands so muc 365 have we fact a us each and every year, it’s to time the take you sure e mak so days in a year, indulge and pamper you.

or indulge in • Get a massage, try acupuncture relaxed you get really to ogy some reflexol least for a • Visit your hairdresser, at the very of the salon door haircut. You will walk out the g for yourself ethin som done g havin feeling great up on a facial • Go to the beauty salon and catch it. Put on a • Spend a day at home and enjoy some k, face mask, then add a hair mas pop self your per pam and eyes your cucumber on and relax • Run the bath and fill it with bath salts nce, it’s great A successful, fulfilling life needs bala need to make all we for our inner and outer health, . right nce bala sure we keep the UPTOWN HAIR STUDIO uptownhair.com.au Phone: 5441 2420

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Invest in COLOURCORRECTING concealers, which EVEN your skin tone prior to applying your foundation.”

ASK OUR

HEALTH & BEAUTY EXPERTS

How do I achieve flawless ‘porcelain' doll-looking skin through make-up application? FLAWLESS MAKE-UP with Emily Jane

There is not a one-size fits all answer for this. Creating a flawless looking base with your make-up comes down to many factors. First of all, you need to recognise your skin type and find what cosmetics are going to work best for you, forget about what the trend is, the most important factor is understanding what is going to work for you and your skin type. If you have blemishes, acne, scarring and/or pigmentation on your face, the biggest tip I can provide is to invest in colourcorrecting concealers, which even your skin tone prior to applying your foundation. This will make a world of difference – as daunting as orange concealer looks, it will pay off once you know how to use it!

It’s also worth doing what you can to ensure you’re taking the best care of your skin – afterall, it is the canvas upon which the make-up is applied! Make sure you drink plenty of water and invest in a good skin care routine. Lastly, with make-up tutorials and selfies dominating the social media landscape, I’ll let you in on a little secret; majority of the photos you see on social media are taken using studio LED lighting and posed in our best angle, some may even smooth out those blemishes. Lighting plays a huge role and if you could walk around with a ring light in front of your face all day, you’d be half way to achieving flawless looking skin! PURE NAVA purenava.com Phone: 0432 552 533

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CHERMSIDE WEST L U X U R I O U S LY A P P O I N T E D 3 & 4 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSES W I T H M U LT I C A R P A R K I N G Set against the stunning backdrop of Chermside Hills Reserve with a combined 129 hectares of lush native bushland.

NOW IS THE TIME!

CO N S T R U C T I O N N O W CO M P L E T E S E T T L E P R I O R TO E N D O F F I N A N C I A L Y E A R - M AX I M I S E YO U R TAX C L A I M S

For your free information pack CALL 07 5451 1080 www.thinkinvestmentrealty.com.au


OVERLOOKING 5,000m2 OF OPEN RESERVE

S PAC I O U S L I V I N G AND QUALIT Y FINISHES

Outlook Chermside is set against the stunning backdrop of Chermside Hills Reserve with a combined 129 hectares of lush native bushland, over 100 bird species and kilometres of tracks for walking and riding.

Brisbane’s newest concept in contemporary modern living. Outlook Chermside has been carefully designed to complement its natural surroundings.

This exclusive development offers exclusive options overlooking 5,000m2 of protected open reserve.

This boutique townhouse project will provide spacious living and quality finishes.

O N LY 9KM TO BRISBANE CBD

FOR YOUR FREE INFORMATION PACK CALL 07 5451 1080 www.thinkinvestmentrealty.com.au


SUBURB PROFILE

CHERMSIDE WEST

Situated next to 129ha of the Chermside Hills Reserve

Chermside is a highly regarded, vibrant and progressive suburb in Brisbane’s inner north. Just 9kms north of the CBD, home to the North Brisbane Bus Interchange, adjoining the main arterial road and close to the entrance of the M7 Airport Link tunnel, Chermside is an extremely well connected suburb.

CITY CONVENIENCE M E E T S N AT U R A L R E T R E AT 800M

SU PERMARK E T

1.8KM

S TATE SCHOOL

1.8KM

STATE HI GH SCHOOL

3 KM S

P RI NCE CHARLES HOSPITA L

3.5KM S

HOLY SPI RI T NOR THSI DE

3.5KMS

WESTFI ELD CHERMSI DE

5.5KM

TR AI N STATI ON

6.9KM

K EPERR A GOLF CLU B

9 KM S

BRI SB ANE CB D

16 KMS

B RI SB ANE AI RPOR T

Officially recognised by the State Government as a key hub in Brisbane’s burgeoning sprawl, it’s not surprising that the Chermside area has been afforded the title “Principle Activity Centre” with the government’s vision to create an alternative central location outside the existing CBD. With this important designation comes a focused approach from the government, which equals more infrastructure spending, job creation and public amenity to be prioritised to further enhance the area. Chermside has some impressive statistics that make it a standout for long term property investors. One outstanding fact is that there are more jobs within the suburb of Chermside than the current resident population and the government estimates a further 5,000 jobs to come. Well known as the largest retail shopping centre in Queensland, which has just completed a further expansion boasting an enormous 400-plus retailers and over 14 million customer visits per year, Chermside also provides in excess of 4,000 medical jobs across The Holy Spirit Northside and The Prince Charles hospitals. In addition to these obvious employment nodes are the raft of government services including the ATO regional office based in the Chermside centre. As well as being a major employment hub, Chermside excels for its livability; it is well serviced by schools and educational centers along with endless parks, reserves and recreational facilities, which all contribute to attracting and retaining a growing community of astute urban dwellers.

FOR YOUR FREE INFORMATION PACK CALL 07 5451 1080 www.thinkinvestmentrealty.com.au


EVERYTHING ON YOUR DOORSTEP

INCLUSIONS & F E AT U R E S

Chermside West is a well-established, sought after residential area offering residents easy access to schools, childcare, parks, shopping, transport and public and private hospitals whilst being only 9km from Brisbane’s thriving CBD.

• Resident’s recreation hut and gymnasium

Extensive infrastructure, facilities and everything you need is right on your doorstep.

“ A L I F E S T Y L E T H AT L E T S YOU ENJOY THE BEAUT Y O F N AT U R E A N D T H E C R E AT U R E C O M F O R T S O F M O D E R N L I V I N G .”

• Views of the reserve • Generous outdoor living areas • 3 & 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, 2 car garages, ensuite and mirror sliding wardrobes • Air conditioned Fujitsu ducted 7kw • 2550mm high ceilings • Porcelain tiles • Delonghi 60cm stainless steel dishwasher • Stone benchtops in kitchens and bathrooms

H I G H LY DESIRED 2 CAR PA R K I N G

• Roller blinds • Landscaping • Low maintenance courtyard • Under cover alfresco with fan and downlights

For your free information pack CALL 07 5451 1080 www.thinkinvestmentrealty.com.au


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THE

gourmet EDIT NICOLE FUGE PROFILE GOURMET EDITOR

Grow Coastal is the Sunshine Coast’s first food accelerator and after a successful inaugural year in 2017, the next program kicks off once again on 17 April. So on that note, I’d like to introduce you to the 2018 Grow Coastal cohort – 12 local startups chosen for their product innovation, investment readiness, scalability and entrepreneurial tenacity.

EMBASSY XO

Since Embassy XO’s famous duck buns made their first appearance at the Noosa Farmers Market in 2013, Megan Dean and the XO team have handmade and sold over 200,000 duck buns. Also available at Maroochydore’s Ocean Street markets, the Noosa Junction Twilight markets and Embassy XO restaurant in Sunshine Beach.

Good Harvest Organic Farm BARENUTS

Gourmet macadamia nut products and gluten-free treats developed from a love of using totally bare ingredients to create delicious wholefoods that everyone can enjoy. All products are handmade at the Barenuts Macadamia Nut Farm on the Fraser Coast.

Black Lemonade

Specialising in unique vegan and gluten free decadent chocolate cookies (and other tasty morsels like brownie sandwiches, naked cakes, slices and loaves), Zoe Wombwell uses only the best real-food ingredients that not only taste epic, but are friendly for vegan and gluten intolerant tummies.

With a passion for growing organic food, they are feeding their community each week with organic farm boxes delivered straight to your door. When you join Good Harvest, you become part of a revolution that takes care of the Earth, the farmer, and the consumer – you and your family.

Hive Haven

Hive Haven is building a commercial future for the Australian stingless bee with their Native Gold stingless native honey. The native honey is sometimes called Sugarbag and its sweet but tangy flavour is in high demand locally and throughout Asia. Stingless native bees boost our ecosystem and pollinate our plants – they were our first pollinators and shared this planet with the dinosaurs.

LuvaBerry Boneafide Broth Co

Focused on using premium ingredients to produce nutritionally dense organic chicken bone broth bombs and other gut healing pantry staples. They are bringing back old school cooking methods and ingredients to turn a healthy culinary tradition into a convenient, crispy delight for the modern world.

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A fusion strawberry farm with a waste initiative, using the fruit to make freeze dried strawberry snacks and strawberry powder. The process enables all nutrients to be locked in and double as a convenient snack, and as nothing is added to the powder, it can be used as a natural flavour and colour in recipes.

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KOKOPOD CHOCOLATE

Using locally sourced products where possible, complemented by quality Swiss chocolate, Kokopod’s premium products are bold, fresh and handcrafted to perfection, and have been decorated with multiple gold and silver medals from renowned Australian fine food awards.

Mighty Bean Over three decades, master tempeh makers Michael and Julie Ann Joyce, have produced the highest quality fermented food, soy tempeh, using Australian grown certified organic whole soya beans.

SUNSHINE COAST CIDER

Following old fashioned techniques and using only the sweetest, juiciest and freshest apples from the Granite Belt, Martin Rellstab (a fifth generation cider maker from Switzerland) and his wife, Regine, only add yeast and a lot of time to turn 100 per cent apple juice into a delicious, dry cider.

The Whole Food Artisan

Born out of 10 years of granola alchemy, chef Nick Grivas created this trio of granolas that pack a flavour punch and are bursting with whole food nutrition.

Ugly Duck Preserves

Award-winning preserves made using surplus bumper-crops from Australian farms, as well as fresh fruit and vegetables that have been rejected by shops and supermarkets because of their nonstandard size, shape or colour.

april 2018

It’s counting moments, not years.

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*T&Cs apply. Ask in-store or visit laserclinics.com.au

VISIT US: Sunshine Plaza (07) 5370 2003 Kawana Shopping World (07) 5306 1904

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WORDS NICOLE FUGE PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

ON A

Having become a delicious drawcard for tourists and a highlight on the national events calendar, Alesha Gooderham has quite a task on her hands; curating the 15th annual Noosa Food and Wine Festival.

is good for all of Noosa, not just about their restaurant. “The idea is to link the right chefs and the right restaurants together, so it challenges our restaurants and it allows them to enrich the experience for their lesha Gooderham talks about guests. It’s also for the young chefs, food and wine with exuberance who have the opportunity to work with and a deep-seeded passion; not someone they have looked up to and only does she have a profound admired from afar and now they are in appreciation for the abundance of produce their kitchen. here on the Sunshine Coast, but she also “It’s not just about the meal to the understands the importance of fostering customer, it’s also about the skillset they homegrown talent and keeping it local. bring to that This year, the restaurant and Noosa Food and Wine I want everyone who making those Festival marks 15 comes to feel like they connections. Instead years of supporting of us losing great and showcasing learnt something new, to the capital local restaurants to TASTED something they chefs cities, we’re showing Australia. loved or tried something that you can have “The festival has amazing lifestyle very deep grassroots and it’s fun, it’s got to be an and achieve culinary and a strong success in Noosa or an ENJOYABLE time foundation; it’s on Sunshine Coast the national calendar with friends and family.” the and it’s only a hop, and it’s important for skip and a jump to Tourism Noosa, who own the festival, that it producers in the Hinterland.” stays on the national calendar because it has Alesha fervently believes in the industry all the essence to be the leading food and and has seen global success, having wine festival in Queensland,” she says. launched the Aldeburgh Food and Drink “In curating the program, we had a bit Festival in Suffolk, England with three of fun; we know we have great restaurants, other business owners, which has become and all of those restaurants and chefs have one of the top 10 food festivals in the UK. contacts, so it’s about collaborating with Originally from Brisbane, Alesha went them, ‘Who would you like to work with? backpacking in Europe in 1995 before Who do you know?’ They’re working landing a job in London with hotel group together with us to create a program which

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Intercontinental and later moved to Suffolk where she met and married her husband Johnny, who owned and operated the iconic Snape Maltings Estate. “Snape Maltings is a unique collection of Victorian malthouses, all heritage listed, which malted barley in the 1800,” she says. As the owners and operators of the site, the Gooderhams converted the malthouses into independent shops, galleries, restaurants, a café, public house and a 600-seater concert hall, which presented the BBC Proms.” It was the perfect destination for a food and drink festival. “Our festival was so small when we started, some chefs would stay in my house. On the Friday night before the festival

SAILS EXECUTIVE CHEF PAUL LEETE AND ALESHA GOODERHAM PHOTO BY KATIE TAKES A PICTURE

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long lunches in Australia where restaurants do the food; they all come out of their restaurants while they’re still running their restaurant service, so it’s a huge logistical challenge for them but it’s fun and it’s beautiful, 530 people all having lunch together.” Over the weekend, Festival Village in Lions Park also comes alive with wine tastings, a craft beer and cider corner, cooking demonstrations, and the addition of the Chef ’s Skills Table. “Visualise you’re going to an Italian grandmother’s home and she’s teaching you how to make gnocchi; we’ve put a table in the Producers Pavilion, it’s free and you can stand around, as you would a kitchen table, where a chef will teach you how to fold dumplings, fillet a fish – skills you think, ‘How do you do that?’ Each hour is a different skill.” There will also be $20 masterclasses throughout the day, starting with speciality coffee in the morning and finishing with cocktail making in the evening. “We’re also having restaurant food stalls, so if you try an Embassy XO duck bun, you then want to go to their restaurant. It’s another opportunity to say, ‘This is what’s on offer in Noosa all year round’,” says Alesha. “I want everyone who comes to feel like they learnt something new, tasted something they loved or tried something and it’s fun, it’s got to be an enjoyable time with friends and family.” It’s no surprise we love delicious food, beer and wine, but where this year’s festival really shines is its focus on tipping a hat to the people behind the plate of food placed in front of you. “The Hinterland tours have been the fastest to sell, because of the experience, people want to discover where the food is coming from, walk around the farms and

GOURMET

weekend, all the chefs would arrive at our house and would have dinner around my kitchen table. Upon reflection, I appreciate the calibre of chefs even more, such as Fergus Henderson and Brett Graham, and how fortunate we were to work with such talented chefs.” she says. “We had nearly 100 food producers in our region, so our focus was food producers and cooking demonstrations. In our first year we had 2000 people attend and I was so excited. I ended up on car parking duty and then I helped do the washing up for the stage – it was all hands to the deck; we ran it ourselves and therefore I know every job in running a festival because I’ve had to do every job.” After running the Aldeburgh festival for 10 years, Alesha and her family moved back to Queensland in 2016, where she was hired to run the Noosa International Food and Wine Festival, which was in the midst of a changeover, having been operated by local restaurateur Jim Berado. “We had four months to pull off the festival – I got to know Noosa very quickly!” Alesha says with a laugh. “We didn’t run the 2017 festival, but Tourism Noosa has taken in house the operations because we feel it’s the right thing for Noosa. The festival is a joy to run and operate; I have a large team because I have 30 restaurateurs, chefs and operators and together we’ve built the program. Without all of them, there is no festival.” Alesha looks back on planning the festival in 2016 and remembers thinking, “We have this great location, where else in Australia in May can you take your shoes off and stand in the sand and watch the sunset? It’s about those magical moments and treating people to that magic and celebrating the location. “On the Saturday we have the Long Lunch. It’s the only time we close one lane of Hastings Street and is one of the only

meet the producers,” says Alesha, going on to explain the lengths some chefs are going to, to create truly authentic experiences. “We’ve had to organise a special shipment for Miguel Maestro’s giant paella dish, fly it up by consignment because he’s going to do a giant paella and it will be so engaging and enjoyable – it’s not just a guest chef in the kitchen who you don’t see, they come out and share time with you. “That’s what makes it special, you have those moments where you have that engagement with a chef. It’s more than just the menu, it’s about that person as well.” Among the new events this year is the sold-out Gen X dinner with some of Australia’s leading up and coming young chefs; the WoHo (women in hospitality) lunch, where female chefs, sommeliers and front of house staff will take over Wasabi restaurant; and the Women in Food lunches at Pitchfork in Peregian Beach, also showcasing some of the best female talent of our time. “It’s not that they’re better than the male talent but they have an equal standing, they are also great at what they do and have something extremely valuable to contribute,” she says. With a whole gamut of tasty experiences to wrap your taste buds around, stunning scenery to admire and talented chefs and producers to shake the hands of, this year’s festival really will be a feast for the senses. For more information on events, and to buy tickets to the Noosa Food and Wine Festival, visit noosafoodandwine.com.au


GOURMET

Table talk

LOCAL LEADERS WORDS INGRID NELSON PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH VENUE SPIRIT HOUSE, YANDINA

Are leaders born or made? It’s the age old question that always strikes a hearty debate. I recently caught up with some of the leaders of the Sunshine Coast over a delicious lunch at Spirit House, Yandina, to discover their take on the subject.

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ou only have to observe a bunch of school kids to determine pretty quickly who is the “natural born” leader of the pack. They’re the one giving the orders in the playground, organising the games and basically running the show. But will these personality types go on to become successful leaders of a firm or run their own business? And does the country in which they grow up in determine how their natural strengths and abilities are nurtured and channeled? Being a leader doesn’t necessarily mean being the loudest or the most charismatic, in fact, often it has little to do with seniority or titles but more about the ability to inspire and motivate others by leading by example. Speaking of which, I got up close and personal with a group of local legends who have proven themselves to be successful leaders in their respective fields to share their thoughts on leadership with Profile.

Joining me for lunch was revered chef, entrepreneur and owner of Rice Boi and Saltwater Mooloolaba, Tony Kelly; founder of Think Money Group, Chris Childs; owner of White’s IGA group, Roz White and philanthropy manager with Wishlist, Hans de Koning.

HERVEY BAY (SCALLOPS)

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CHRIS: Between nature or nurture, I think it’s 95 per cent nurture. We don’t realise how much we influence our children. Children who are raised in not the best environment really have to struggle to change what nurture has given them. I think you can be blessed with a healthy, resilient gene pool but it all comes down to what you are taught. I also think good schooling is important, whether it’s private or public doesn’t matter. I think having the right ethos in the school is important. It’s not up to the teachers to raise the children but it is beneficial if they are supporting what you are teaching them at home. You really have to shape your children, it makes a huge difference towards who they become.

I like to think I am an example of a LEADER being made and I think that anyone who puts in the HARD WORK, perseverance and has a good work ethic can become a good leader.” leader.

THAI CARROT CAKE

ROZ: I believe leaders are born to be made. The reason I think of it in that light is because leaders don’t have to be charismatic or dynamic, you can be a leader with your own conviction and your own set of values and strength of character. I was not always necessarily a leader. I was actually quite meek and mild. I grew up thinking a woman’s role was a subservient role and that was due to my traditional upbringing. So for me, life has been quite a surprise. Igniting what you are passionate about brings out a good leader but you have to find that passion and conviction, find your values and lead with them. You don’t have to stand and shout it from the rooftops you just live your life in a way that people go, ‘Wow’, and respect you for it.

GOURMET

PROFILE: ARE LEADERS BORN OR MADE? HANS: I think it’s half and half really. There are people, like me, who have made an opportunity out of an opportunity, but I wouldn’t say that I was a born leader as such. I met kids in Year Three who were marching me around the playground and telling me exactly what they wanted me to do and they have gone on to do incredible things, so there are definitely those who are born leaders. I like to think I am an example of a leader being made and I think that anyone who puts in the hard work, perseverance and has a good work ethic can become a good leader.

TONY: I think leaders are born but they don’t know they are going to be leaders until they are. In my industry when someone can confidently lead a team, I don’t know if you can teach that. In a kitchen, it can be very hostile, there is so much pressure and sometimes you have to bluff your way through it but if you say it confidently and in a clear voice people will stand behind you. You can teach recipes and you can teach how to write a roster but sometimes when it all goes pear-shaped, if someone can stand up and say, ‘We will be okay, let’s just do this’, that is a leader. Some people don’t want to lead either. I know some people who could have their own business or be a head chef and they just want to work six hours a day and go home. Part of me is really envious of them because I have this burning entrepreneurial part of me that would never allow me to do that.

GREEN CURRY OF DUCK

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GOURMET

CHOCOLATE COCONUT MARQUISE WITH MANGO SORBET AND PASSIONFRUIT GEL

CRISPY BANGALOW PORK BELLY

Table talk review

CRISPY REEF FISH

The Spirit House at Yandina has a reputation that precedes itself. Regarded as one of the best Asian restaurants on the Sunshine Coast, the award-winning venue is revered for serving up exquisite contemporary Asian food in an environment that’s just as delicious. Surrounded by lush tropical gardens nestled around a tranquil pond, the Spirit House really is a delight for all the senses. From the aromatic smells wafting from the kitchen and cooking school, to the bubbling waterfalls and tinkling wind chimes, it feels like you could be a million miles from civilisation. On the day of our recent visit, the heavy rainfall only added to the magical atmosphere. My guests and I enjoyed the fourcourse banquet menu, which was a wonderful way to sample a range of signature dishes that really showcase what sets the Spirit House apart.

COCONUT SOUP OF SALMON

Asian flavours infused with a modern contemporary twist translates to a creative and varied menu. Beautifully presented, each course was simply sublime. We started with the coconut soup of salmon with lemongrass and chilli oil. Served at the perfect temperature and exploding with flavour, it set the standard for what was to follow. Next was crispy Bangalow pork belly with citrus caramel sauce and Hervey Bay scallops with red curried corn and salted coconut, both dishes tasted even better than they sound. The trio of dishes served for main course offered something to suit all tastes. The crispy reef fish with chilli tamarind sauce was an absolute standout and a dish I would highly recommend. Equally as popular was the green curry of duck with oven roasted beetroot, wild ginger and Thai basil. The fresh watermelon salad with green apple, ginger and hot mint was the perfect complement to both dishes. It was hard to choose from the two delectable desserts on offer. I finally decided on the Thai carrot cake with kaffir lime sugar and Thai tea ice cream and it didn’t disappoint. The chocolate coconut marquise with mango sorbet and passionfruit gel looked just as devine. For a truly special experience, the Spirit House has recently added a new private dining room that seats up to 24 guests, complete with its own kitchen, private chef and waiter. The Spirit House is not just a restaurant it’s an experience and one you have to put on your to do list soon!

HEAD CHEF TOM SWAPP

SPIRIT HOUSE 20 NINDERRY ROAD, YANDINA PHONE: 5446 8994 SPIRITHOUSE.COM.AU

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‘big queenslander’ burger

A BURST OF FLAVOUR MADE WITH SUN-RIPENED RASPBERRIES INSIDE A CHOC-SPRINKLE WAFFLE CONE. GELATISSIMO, 5444 6023

frutti waffle WAFFLE WITH STRAWBERRIES, BANANA AND ICE CREAM SERVED WITH PREMIUM BELGIAN CHOCOLATE. OLIVER BROWN, 5478 2380

chicken nu bowl LEMON HERB CHICKEN BREAST, BROWN RICE, TURMERIC ROASTED CAULIFLOWER, BABY KALE, TOMATO AND ONION AND ORGANIC COFFEE. NU HEALTHY CAFÉ, 5444 1231

Sink your teeth into these mouthwatering delights at Kawana Shoppingworld.

kawanashoppingworld.com.au

nachos HOUSE-MADE CORN CHIPS LOADED WITH CHICKEN, BLACK BEANS, AUSTRALIAN JACK CHEESE, TOPPED OFF WITH DELICIOUS GUACAMOLE AND PICO DE GALLO. GUZMAN Y GOMEZ, 5444 6866

sushi CHICKEN, AVOCADO AND CREAM CHEESE, SALMON NIGIRI, TUNA, AVOCADO AND CREAM CHEESE. SUSHI CHAIN, 5444 2009

prawn chorizo linguini PRAWN, CHORIZO, BROCCOLI, GARLIC, CHILLI AND EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL. THE GROOVE TRAIN, 5477 5685

PROFILE

raspberry sorbet

GRASS FED LEAN BEEF, TASTY CHEESE, CRISPY BACON, FREE RANGE EGG, A COUPLE OF SLICES OF BEETROOT WITH SALAD, RELISH AND HERBED MAYO. GRILL’D, 5444 0455


Smashed avo

Agnello lamb pizza

2018 WINNER OF AUSTRALIA GOOD FOOD GUIDE BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT SUNSHINE COAST

Slow roasted Victorian pulled lamb shoulder, Greek feta, oven roasted capsicum, Spanish onion and finished with fresh roquette and house made tzatziki

Smashed avocado with house marinated feta, local herbs and radish Winnie is a wee eathouse in the heart of Woombye serving Vintage Black coffee and a range of locally made artisanal baked goods. Open for breakfast and lunch Wednesday to Friday 6.30am to 2.30pm and on weekends from 6.30am to 1.30pm. WINNIE 13A BLACKALL ST, WOOMBYE PHONE: 0435 445 185

The fully licensed All’ Antica offers traditional dishes, all created from the best local produce and imported ingredients from Italy. With over 25 years at the forefront of the hospitality industry, this restaurant offers some of the best Italian cuisine on the Sunshine Coast. ALL’ ANTICA ITALIAN RESTAURANT 3/115 POINT CARTWRIGHT DRIVE, BUDDINA PHONE: 5444 0988 ALLANTICA.COM.AU

TANTALISE YOUR TASTE BUDS WITH A DELICIOUS DISH OF THE DAY

Sunday breakfast Poached organic free range eggs, thick cut smoked speck with chef’s relish on Turkish bread Every fortnight on Sunday from 8am to 11am, Something For Catering serves up a select menu of their best sellers including brulee brioche French toast, healthy puffed rice bircher or the ultimate Saturday night recovery brekky, the spiced pork and egg brekkie burger. If you're looking for an amazing breakfast on the Noosa River, or just somewhere to take a break during your busy Sunday morning schedule, you can’t go past Catalina's Sunday Breakfast. M.V CATALINA NOOSA 172 GYMPIE TERRACE, NOOSAVILLE PHONE: 0484 598 993 CATALINANOOSA.COM.AU

Gnocchi entree Gnocchi of pea, orange and taleggio with porcini crumb The Loose Goose offers European influenced, Australian cuisine prepared using fresh local produce. Boasting generous-sized meals bursting with flavour, which are all prepared daily on the premises, including their breads and pastries. Providing a comfortable and relaxed atmosphere with both indoor and outdoor dining available, they are open for lunch and dinner Wednesday to Sunday. THE LOOSE GOOSE 3/175 OCEAN DRIVE, TWIN WATERS PHONE: 5457 0887 THELOOSEGOOSE.COM.AU 66

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Mussel Mondays GOURMET

Steamed black mussels served with grilled ciabatta, fries and your choice of sauce, plus a glass of selected wine Mussel Mondays at Padstows is available from 11am for lunch and dinner and is only $25. Open seven days a week for breakfast, lunch and dinner, pop in for something light, something hearty or just a casual drink. Located in Noosa Junction, it is the perfect location to escape the hustle and bustle and watch the world go by – with a bevy in hand of course. PADSTOWS NOOSA 1 SUNSHINE BEACH ROAD, NOOSA PHONE: 5447 5413 PADSTOWS.COM.AU

Ferrero Rocher dessert Hazelnut parfait, macadamia crumble, chocolate covered puffed rice, chocolate ganache and a crisp chocolate dome Whisky Boy is a modern Australian kitchen and bar with over 55 whiskies on offer from all over the world and with a fully stocked bar, beer on tap, a large cocktail and wine list, they cater for everyone no matter what your poison. With a funky, modern atmosphere and a real emphasis on quality value for money food Whisky Boy aims to bring something different to Noosa, a high calibre offering with a casual laid back approach. WHISKY BOY 10/203 GYMPIE TERRACE NOOSAVILLE PHONE: 0403 600 406 WHISKYBOY.COM.AU

Mother's Day high tea A selection of finger sandwiches, roasted pumpkin and feta quiche, freshly baked scones with jam and cream, lemon curd tartlet, mini chocolate cupcake with buttercream frosting and French macarons with tea and coffee Spoil your mum this Mother’s Day with an indulgent high tea with decadent sweet treats made by Chocolate2Chilli. Held on Sunday, 13 May at 2pm at Sunshine Sunshine Espresso, cost is $48 per person, bookings are essential. SUNSHINE SUNSHINE ESPRESSO 23/9 LOMANDRA DR, CURRIMUNDI PHONE: 0473 594 447

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RECIPE LEE HOLMES PHOTOS STEVE BROWN

smoothie bowl People will be wondering what has you so chirpy early in the day! Made with coffee, raw cacao, chia seeds and hazelnuts, with fruity hums of banana, this delectably thick, chocolatey smoothie bowl will give you a natural hit of dopamine - the ‘happy’ hormone. Think about all the good fats and complex carbohydrates found in banana and nuts, then times them by two, and you’ll find yourself powering through your day like a Russian gymnast, performing effortless backflips, half turns and triple twists.

GOURMET

MOCHA AND BANANA • 30ml shot of espresso coffee or dandelion tea • 1 tablespoon chia seeds • 2 tablespoons raw cacao powder • 1 tablespoon food-grade diatomaceous earth, such as my Love Your Gut Powder (optional) • 1 frozen banana, sliced • 40g hazelnuts (or any nuts of your choice), soaked and roasted • 125ml coconut milk • 125ml almond milk, or other non-dairy milk of your choice • Toppings of your choice, to serve Pour the coffee or dandelion tea into a small bowl, add the chia seeds and let them sit for a few minutes. Transfer to a high-speed blender. Add the cacao powder, diatomaceous earth (if using), banana and hazelnuts. Pour in the coconut milk and almond milk and whiz until there are no lumps; the mixture can be quite thick. If your blender is struggling, add extra almond milk or water in small amounts to help it along. Pour the smoothie into a bowl or serving vessel; we’ve used half a coconut shell. Garnish with your choice of toppings – fresh banana slices, a sprinkling of mixed nuts and seeds, shaved fresh coconut, micro herbs – and dig in!

Supercharged tip

IMAGES AND RECIPES FROM SUPERCHARGE YOUR GUT BY LEE HOLMES, MURDOCH BOOKS, RRP $35.

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The great thing about a smoothie bowl is that you can add any type of sneaky green, and never taste the difference. Try a handful of baby English spinach, kale, avocado or even frozen peas, to get a headstart on your veggie intake for the day. PS: You don’t need to add the coffee if you don’t want to – or you can use a decaffeinated version instead.

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TRAVEL

Uluru holds tremendous SPIRITUAL significance for the local Anangu people, and the 10km Base Walk is full of WONDER as you follow in the footsteps of the land’s ancestral beings and absorb the stories and LEGENDS sacred to the Aboriginal people.”

Legend WORDS JACINTA BLUNDELL PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

HAS IT

Jacinta Blundell PROFILE TRAVEL EDITOR

When one wanders the world there are opportunities to immerse yourself in the culture of a destination and become engaged with the local legends. Learning why a destination is unique and the stories behind the local landscapes and people can enrich any holiday experience. ULURU, AUSTRALIA

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ll over the world there are extraordinary stories that have been passed down through generations by word alone, from our early ancestors. Many of these stories have evolved into amazing myths and legends, some that may even have a level of truth! I have been fascinated and intrigued by some of the local legends that have enlightened my travels over time, including my latest adventure to Iceland. A land rich in its own colourful legends where a majority of the population believe in the huldufólk. While taking photos of the dramatic south coast with its black sand beaches and volcanic sea stacks in the distance, I was told of the legend known as Reynisdrangar. The stacks were formed from three mischievous trolls as they attempted to pull a ship ashore and ended up being caught by the light of dawn, to become frozen in time. All of a sudden, a local legend can change your perspective of a landscape, and the imagination runs wild. There are many Icelandic landscapes that have equally intriguing legends and myths that surround them, and can fill many a long winter night of storytelling, and days of island exploring.

RAPA NUI MAOI, EASTER ISLAND PHOTO BY GLENDA DUNBIER

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A little less fanciful is the legend of Puente del Inca on the border of Chile and Argentina, high in the Andes Mountains. The Inca King’s son was very unwell, and with nothing left to do, the wise men advised the king to take the long trek to allow his son to drink from the healing waters in the remote southern Andes Mountains. However, on arrival, the healing springs were on the other side of a deep ravine, and to help their king, the warriors linked together and formed a human bridge to allow the king to carry his son across and partake in the waters, which healed him immediately. However when the king turned to give thanks to his warriors, they had turned into a stone bridge, calcified by the sulphuric waters. Hence the name The Inca Bridge. A legend closer to home is based around Australia’s own Uluru, or Ayers Rock as it’s still known by many. Uluru holds tremendous spiritual significance for the local Anangu people, and the 10km Base Walk is full of wonder as you follow in the footsteps of the land’s ancestral beings and absorb the stories and legends sacred to the Aboriginal people. As you listen to your local guide imparting stories at every natural feature, you too begin to see the images in the rock. Then the natural beauty of Uluru reveals itself as you explore the base which is home to waterholes, unique desert flora, caves and ancient rock paintings. There are always two sides to every coin of course, take the Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland for example. Legend has it that an Irish giant built a causeway to get to Scotland to fight another, then needed to make a hasty retreat, bringing down his bridge as he went. The more scientific explanation is that they are formed from volcanic activity – an epic 60-million-year-old legacy to lava, with over 40,000 interlocking basalt columns. Mind blowing and seriously photogenic, whichever way you look at them.


ALL EXCLUSIVE LUXURY CRUISING ADVENTURES

JACINTA’S DAUGHTER, CHLOE, AT GIANT’S CAUSEWAY IN NORTHERN IRELAND

INCA BRIDGE ARGENTINA

11 NIGHTS

BRITISH ISLES LEGACY

LONDON TO REYKJAVIK

10 JUNE 2019

Aboard Crystal Serenity * from USD $7,145 pp twin share including port charges Based on a deluxe stateroom with verandah (Cat. B2) *Conditions apply

16 NIGHTS

NORTH CAPE PANORAMA

REYKJAVIK TO COPENHAGEN

21 JUNE 2019

The most intriguing legend still to be explained comes from one of the most remote islands in the world and is set around the Rapa Nui Maoi. Why would the inhabitants carve nearly 900 giant stone statues, up to 10m high, decorate with markings and bury them until only their heads remain above ground? The significance of these giant Moai, that punctuate Easter Island’s barren landscape, is not for me to analyse however, but for you to explore and make your own interpretation. Small Group Journeys is a collection of bespoke worldwide adventures, cruises and tours designed and escorted by Jacinta Blundell. Follow Jacinta in Profile each month as she takes you beyond the tourist trail. MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE ONE OF HELLOWORLD TRAVEL’S SPECIALISTS TODAY OR VISIT SMALLGROUPJOURNEYS.COM

The stacks were formed from three MISCHIEVOUS TROLLS as they attempted to pull a ship ashore and ended up being caught by the light of dawn, to become frozen in time.”

from

Aboard Crystal Serenity USD $10,750* pp twin share including port charges Based on a deluxe stateroom with verandah (Cat. B1) *Conditions apply

16 NIGHTS

STORIED ISLES OF THE PACIFIC

VALPARAISO TO PAPEETE

19 FEBRUARY 2019

Aboard Crystal Symphony * from USD $6,674 pp twin share including port charges Based on a deluxe stateroom with large picture window (Cat. E1) *Conditions apply

Contact Jacinta to craft your luxury cruising experience

jacinta.buderim@helloworld.com.au (0438) 95 1766 5445 4022

5495 1766

58 Burnett St

75 King St

Buderim

Caboolture

Independently owned & operated by Blunbell Pty Ltd as Trustee for the GSJ Trust, trading as Helloworld Travel Buderim and GR & SJ Bell & JH Blundell, trading as Helloworld Travel Caboolture King Street and Small Group Journeys by Jacinta

ICELANDIC TROLLS

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Terms & Conditions: *Your Exclusive Fares are cruise-only, per person, in U.S. dollars, based on double occupancy, apply to new bookings only, and include taxes, fees and port charges. Solo Traveller Fares available on request. Cruise-only fare does not include land programs. All offers may not be combinable with other promotions, apply to first two full-fare guests in stateroom or suite, are capacity-controlled, subject to availability and may be withdrawn or changed at any time without notice. All fares, itineraries, programs, policies and shore excursions are subject to change and correct at time of printing | Credit Card fees may apply. International air travel ex Australia not included. For full Terms & Conditions see Helloworld Travel Buderim & Caboolture King St | Correct @ 01Mar18. E & O.E

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CULTURE

e l o h w A new world WORDS INGRID NELSON PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

Sparkle, romance, nostalgia, laughter and a truly fun night out is how principal cast member of Disney’s Aladdin, Hiba Elchikhe, describes the bold new musical wowing Brisbane audiences. Playing the iconic role of Jasmine, Hiba has been singing and dancing since the age of three and says playing a Disney princess is like a dream come true. Profile catches up with the talented performer for a sneak peak into what audiences can expect from the show. PROFILE: HOW DID YOU BECOME INVOLVED IN THE WORLD OF MUSICAL THEATRE? HIBA: I think if you asked my mum she

PROFILE: WHAT WAS THE AUDITION PROCESS LIKE AND HOW DIFFICULT IS IT TO LAND SUCH A ROLE? HIBA: I think I had about seven rounds of

would tell you I was singing from the age of three, putting on shows for everyone at home and thinking that I was a Disney princess. But my love for musical theatre definitely started when I went to The Brit School of Performing Arts. After leaving there at 18 I went to drama school for three years.

auditions. I had to sing some songs from the show and read the Jasmine scenes. I auditioned for the Australian production from London. I recorded and sent my final audition to Disney and the original Aladdin creatives in America and then about five weeks later I found out I got the job.

PROFILE: WHAT WAS IT LIKE TO LAND THE LEAD ROLE IN SUCH AN ICONIC MUSICAL? HIBA: It’s a cliche, but such a dream come

PROFILE: HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE LIVING EVERY LITTLE GIRL’S DREAM OF DRESSING UP LIKE A DISNEY PRINCESS EVERY DAY? HIBA: It’s crazy. I honestly don’t believe

true. I cried so much when I got that phone call and I honestly pinch myself everyday! 72

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representation of Jasmine for a whole new generation that didn’t grow up with the movie is such an amazing honour, opportunity and responsibility. PROFILE: HOW LONG DID YOU TRAIN FOR THIS ROLE AND WHAT WAS THAT PROCESS LIKE? HIBA: My whole life! No, I’m joking. I had

three weeks of rehearsals and it was so much fun. I learnt all of the music first and then did the staging. I mainly worked with Ainsley, who plays Aladdin, and worked on our Jasmine and Aladdin relationship and trying to do the characters justice (it’s great that we get on so well outside of the show too).

it! Jasmine was the first princess that looked like me, so knowing I’m the first profilemag.com.au


PROFILE: YOU SHARE THE STAGE WITH AN AUSTRALIAN CAST, HOW HAVE YOU FOUND THAT EXPERIENCE? HIBA: Wonderful! Everyone has made PROFILE: TAKE US THROUGH A TYPICAL DAY WHEN YOU ARE ON TOUR WITH THE SHOW? HIBA: It’s different in every city, but so

far in Brisbane, I’ll wake up, go to the gym or for a swim, have breakfast, if it’s a one-show day I’ll do some touristy things/ explore the sights or if it’s two I’ll head straight to the theatre. PROFILE: WHAT IS YOUR YOUR FAVOURITE SONG IN THE MUSICAL? HIBA: Oooh that’s tricky! It changes all

the time. My favourite one that I get to sing has to be A whole new world. It’s such a magical moment in the show! But my favourite song in the show that I don’t sing has to be High Adventure, which is a new song written for the musical. It’s sung by Aladdin’s three friends (Babkak, Omar and Kassim) and it’s an epic number where they storm the place to save Aladdin and it’s so funny! PROFILE: WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FONDEST MEMORY ON TOUR SO FAR? HIBA: There honestly have been so

many. But my favourite moment has to be performing the show for Alan Menken (the show’s composer) in Melbourne and basically having a jam session with him after the show where he played some of his iconic Disney songs for the cast and we got to sing along! I was literally living out all my Disney dreams.

me feel so welcome and the whole cast is incredible. It’s awesome working with an Aussie cast! The ensemble works so hard in the show doing multiple quick changes and dancing insanely well and every single person in the cast and crew is truly world class. PROFILE: I HAVE HEARD THE COSTUMES ARE AMAZING. WHAT WE CAN EXPECT TO SEE? HIBA: The costumes are so amazing! There

are over 500 beads on my Jasmine wedding skirt and over 500,000 Swarovski crystals used on the show’s costumes. If you want to see endless amounts of sparkle then prepare to be dazzled! Every single costume is beautifully designed for the person wearing it. There aren’t enough words to describe how epic the costumes are.

Jasmine was the first princess that looked like me, so knowing I’m the first REPRESENTATION of Jasmine for a whole new GENERATION that didn’t grow up with the movie is such an amazing honour, opportunity and responsibility.”

PROFILE: HOW DOES THE STAGE ADAPTATION COMPARE WITH THE MOVIE? HIBA: The story is the same that everyone

knows and loves but there are a couple of new additions, for example Aladdin has three best friends instead of his monkey side-kick Abu, and Jasmine has her attendants instead of her tiger! People who love the film will leave the musical feeling nostalgic and want to go home and put the soundtrack on to listen to the new songs and people who have never watched the film will leave singing all the songs all the way home. PROFILE: WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOU ARE NOT PERFORMING? HIBA: I love going to the cinema or

watching new movies. I also love teaching workshops and seeing new talent. As well as going to museums and exploring each new city I visit.

HIBA ELCHIKHE


CULTURE

FILM: ISLE OF DOGS Wes Anderson has done it again with his dystopian tale (or should we say tail), Isle of Dogs. In cinemas 12 April, the stop-motion animation will wow dog-lovers and film buffs of all ages. Set in near-future Japan, Isle of Dogs tells the story of Atari Kobayashi, a 12-year-old ward to the corrupt Mayor Kobayashi. When all canine pets of Megasaki City are exiled to a vast garbage dump called Trash Island, Atari flies across the river in search of his bodyguard dog, Spots. There, with the assistance of a pack of newly-found mongrel friends, he begins an epic journey that will decide the fate and future of the entire prefecture. Featuring the voices of Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson and Tilda Swinton, Isle of Dogs promises laughs from start to finish. DIRECTOR: Wes Anderson CAST: F. Murray Abraham, Bob Balaban, Bryan Cranston, Greta Gerwig, Jeff Goldblum, Akira Ito, Scarlett Johansson, Harvey Keitel, Frances McDormand, Bill Murray, Mari Natsuki, Yojiro Noda, Kunichi Nomura, Edward Norton, YokoOno, Koyu Rankin, Liev Schreiber, Fisher Stevens, Tilda Swinton, Akira Takayama, Courtney B. Vance, Frank Wood

COMEDY: MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL COMEDY FESTIVAL ROADSHOW Get ready for a night of laughs when the world-renowned Melbourne International Comedy Festival Roadshow hits the Sunshine Coast. For one night only you can chuckle, guffaw, howl and cry with laughter alongside some of the best in international comedy. Buckle up Australia, the Melbourne International Comedy Festival Roadshow is coming back and hitting the road to home deliver the freshest and funniest from Australia’s largest comedy festival. Each year the festival hand picks some of the hottest artists to venture across Australia bringing the funnies to you. With an all-killer, no-filler cast of Australian stars, talented newcomers and international performers, they have all of your comedy bases covered. This roving tour-de-comedy showcases everything from stand-up and sketch to satire and song in one side-splitting show. There’s nowhere our exceptional entertainers fear to tread, so they’re heading your way. Come on Sunshine Coast – pack your laughing gear and get on board. WHEN 15 May WHERE The Events Centre Caloundra BOOKINGS theeventscentre.com.au 74

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Grab your team, lace up your shoes and get ready to trek 25km from Coolum to Mooloolaba to raise money for STEPS Autism Treehouse. Celebrate Autism Awareness Month while enjoying some of the best coastal views and help STEPS make a difference in the lives of Sunshine Coast families living with autism. Participants are asked to support STEPS Autism Treehouse by helping to fundraise a minimum of $250 per person. mycause.com.au/events/ trekforautism

EVENTS

8 APRIL TREK FOR AUTISM

21 APRIL NOOSA VEGAN FESTIVAL

The Noosa Vegan Festival showcases the diverse vegan community of the Sunshine Coast with a wide variety of stalls, speakers, celebrity guests, and of course an abundant selection of delicious vegan foods. This unique event will showcase the latest vegan products, particularly highlighting the number of plant-based companies in our area, while creating a community atmosphere through music, entertainment and kids’ activities. noosaveganfestival.com.au

april may

WHAT’S ON IN

AND

5-6 MAY SUNSHINE COAST RELAY FOR LIFE

Relay For Life is one of Cancer Council Queensland’s biggest fundraising events, celebrating cancer survivors, remembering loved ones lost to cancer and fighting back against a disease that takes too much. It is a fun overnight event, with the challenge of completing a relay-style walk or run within a festival atmosphere. Held at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Sippy Downs, all funds raised support Cancer Council Queensland’s vital work in cancer research, education and patient support programs. Event registration is $20 per person and can be done online. relayforlife.org.au, cancerqld.org.au

17-20 MAY NOOSA FOOD AND WINE FESTIVAL 26 MAY BIG PINEAPPLE MUSIC FESTIVAL

In May, the Big Pineapple Music Festival will transform the lush hills of Woombye into the ultimate party playground, playing host to some of the biggest and best names in Australian music. Stay in touch with the Big Pineapple crew on Facebook for the latest updates. bigpineapplemusicfestival.com

Celebrate great Australian food, wine and lifestyle in one of Australia's leading food destinations, Noosa. With a range of events on offer, from intimate dining experiences with renowned local and national chefs, to other great events including tipis on Noosa Main Beach, the Long Lunch on Hastings Street and Hinterland Food Trails, there is something to suit all budgets and tastes. noosafoodandwine.com.au profilemagazine

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COMPETITIONS

win

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nown as the Mojo Maker for high achievers, VALUED AT Nikki Fogden-Moore specialises in working $2000 with driven individuals and companies to find the ultimate blend of healthy, wealthy and wise for success. She divides her time between private coaching, speaking, corporate vitality programs, boardroom and bespoke retreats, workshops and her Vitality Coach podcast and VitalityCoachTV. Author of two books, Vitality and Fitpreneur (with her third book Work Life Blend out in May) Nikki’s impressive career spans two decades in brand strategy, production, wellbeing and high performance. She’s the ultimate coach if you’re looking to get your life and your business back on track. Profile has teamed up with the Mojo Maker to give away a Power Hour lunch and strategy session to get you or your company on the right path to success. Nikki’s global coaching Power Hour sessions are a fantastic way to assess your goals, move roadblocks fast and create a 30-day game plan to put you back in the driver’s EACH PRIZE INCLUDES: seat. Enter online to win this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to • A Power Hour coaching call with Vitality Coach Nikki Fogden-Moore turn your life and business around. • Pre and post call prep NIKKI FOGDEN-MOORE THEVITALITYCOACH.COM.AU

• Creation of your overall 90 days with a 30-day plan focus

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COMPETITIONS

EVENT STATIONERY Style, class and a sense of timelessness is the key to Event Stationery’s (eventstationeryau.com) stunning collections. Their expertise goes far beyond wedding invitations, including corporate event invitations, favour cards, menus, wedding programs, bridal shower invitations, enclosure cards, place cards, RSVP cards, wishing well cards, seating plans and welcome signs. To win one of two $150 vouchers to use on your next stationery purchase, head to our website.

NATURA SKINCAREI

With three kids suffering from eczema and asthma, Monica Solinas of Natura Skincare (naturaskincare.com.au) was always conscious of the products she was using on their skin. She began making her own products that became so popular with family and friends that she decided to start her own business. Her products are made in small batches, scented with essential oils, are cruelty and chemical free and contain organic and natural ingredients. To get your hands on your very own pack of Natura Skincare worth $150, enter online.

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WIN CUFFLINKS FOR WOMEN Miss Links (misslinks.com) was born after Chartered Accountant, Dianna Butterworth, experienced the frustration of looking for feminine cufflinks. The ones on the market were either low quality with clichéd designs, or were very expensive masculine designer brands, so she took matters into her own hands. Miss Links’ cufflink range now includes Swarovski crystals, pearls, crystal clusters, bows, and many more stunning details. Each piece is made of high quality materials, is rhodium plated, will not tarnish and comes in a beautiful custom made box. Enter to win one of two $150 Miss Links vouchers.

SHOW US YOUR PROFILE AND WIN! Show us how you enjoy your copy of Profile Magazine by tagging @profilemagazine and #profilemagazine on Instagram, for your chance to win a copy of The Answer by Allan and Barbara Pease, RRP $29.95. WRITE TO US AND WIN!

WIN SUSTAINABLEI SWIMWEARI Elysian Swim (elysianswim.com) is an exclusive Australian lifestyle brand that specialises in beautiful, reversible and sustainable swimwear made out of abandoned fishing nets from the ocean. The fabric used is made from 100 per cent recycled fibers that have been engineered to be ultra-resistant to chlorine, suntan oils and creams. Get your hands on a pair of these babies just by entering our comp online. We have two $150 vouchers to give away. april 2018

Tell us what you love about this issue of Profile Magazine for your chance to win a copy of Supercharge Your Gut by Lee Holmes, RRP $35. Send your letter, along with your name and address, to editorial@ profilemag. com.au, for the opportunity to win!


THE LAST WORD

Bruce & Denise Morcombe Dedicated and passionate child safety advocates, Bruce and Denise Morcombe were named the 2018 Sunshine Coast Australia Day Awards Citizens of the Year. Bruce and Denise suffered every parent’s worst nightmare in 2003 when they lost their son, Daniel, in devastating circumstances and have worked tirelessly since then to help prevent other families from ever having to endure what they went through. As a legacy to Daniel and in honour of his memory, Bruce and Denise founded the Daniel Morcombe Foundation to assist educators and parents in the education of children about their personal safety, assist young victims of crime and empower people to make their local communities safer for children. PROFILE: WHERE WERE YOU BORN? DENISE: Melbourne, Victoria. BRUCE: Adelaide, South Australia. PROFILE: WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE SUNSHINE COAST? BRUCE: We relocated from Melbourne

in May 1994, seeking a more relaxed family lifestyle. We wanted to bring up our three young children in a place where people holidayed. PROFILE: WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT THE SUNSHINE COAST? DENISE: Friendly people, great

bushwalks and beaches. Fantastic weather in the winter months. BRUCE: It is compact, friendly, with the opportunity to succeed if you are prepared to work hard. Of course the weather and beaches and hinterland countryside are its recognised strong suit. PROFILE: WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY READING? DENISE: I don’t have much time to

read but my last book was, Spot visits his grandparents (with our young grandson, Winston). PROFILE: WHAT IS THE FIRST YOU DO IN THE MORNING? DENISE: Read the paper then go for a

BRUCE: Coffee, check

emails, diary, newspapers. PROFILE: WHAT IS YOUR SPECIAL TALENT? DENISE: I am very

trustworthy and loyal. I would do anything to assist my family and I am also very determined, if I have a plan I will make sure I stick to it until I achieve it. BRUCE: Able to stay calm yet focused, being creative and looking beyond the obvious. Fighting for what I believe in, staying strong to the cause and never giving up. PROFILE: WHAT IS THE QUALITY YOU ADMIRE MOST IN PEOPLE? DENISE: Someone who can delegate,

get the job done on time without raising a sweat, that is a real talent. BRUCE: Remembering people’s names and some people are naturally gifted public speakers. PROFILE: IF YOU COULD HAVE A SUPERPOWER WHAT WOULD IT BE? DENISE: Twitch my nose and

magically appear in my next location, as travelling is very time consuming. BRUCE: Go back in time.

5km walk.

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T O P OPEN MORNING WEDNESDAY 2 MAY

9-11AM

www.suncoastcc.qld.edu.au/open-morning

L A I T EN


Profile Magazine April 2018  

April 2018: The Local Legends Issue. Featuring Compass Institute, the Boyd family, Katie Noonan, Bruce and Denise Morcombe

Profile Magazine April 2018  

April 2018: The Local Legends Issue. Featuring Compass Institute, the Boyd family, Katie Noonan, Bruce and Denise Morcombe