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PVC

2009 Senior Student-Athlete Awards Banquet

The 2009 PVC Senior Student-Athlete Awards Banquet

Upcoming PVC Events For more information on 2009-2010 PVC events, which will begin in September please visit the online home of the PVC:

www.PrincetonVarsityClub.org

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elcome to the final edition of the Princeton Varsity Club News for the 2008-09 academic year. This edition of the PVC News is devoted to recognizing and remembering the accomplishments of the Great Class of 2009; as well as highlighting the award winners from the 12th annual Princeton Varsity Club Senior Student-Athlete Awards Banquet, held May 28 at the Graduate College. This special edition begins with the Princeton Athletics Year in Review on page 3. Following that, beginning on page 4 we recap the PVC Senior Student-Athlete Awards Banquet, highlighting the 2009 award winners and the remarks from a pair of 2009 graduates; women’s lacrosse’s Katie Cox and football’s Adam Berry, as well as the remarks from Director of Athletics Gary Walters ’67. Finally on pages 13-15 we recognize those who have graciously supported the PVC during this academic year. As always, your support of the Princeton Varsity Club and Princeton Athletics is greatly appreciated. We hope you enjoy this special issue of the PVC News and we look forward to seeing you in 2009-10! Go TIGERS!

2009 PVC Senior Student-Athlete Awards Banquet Winners Citizen-Athlete Award Robert Ehrlich Jr. ’79

Marvin Bressler Award Jeff Orleans

Class of 1916 Cup Cary Malkiewich

Art Lane ’34 Award Adam Berry ’09, Agatha Offorjebe ’09, Joelle Milov ’09, Kristin Schwab ’09

William Winston Roper Trophy

Lee Jubinville ’09, Mark Kovler ’09, Doug Lennox ’09, Michael Maag ’09, Mauricio Sanchez ’09

C. Otto von Kienbusch Award

Susannah Aboff ’09, Kathrine Giarra ’09, Parker Henritze ’09, Holly McGarvie ’09, Joleee VanLeuven ’09

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Princeton Varsity Club News published by Princeton’s Department of Athletics, Jadwin Gymnasium, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J., 08542-0071 Princeton Varsity Club 609-258-8393 www.PrincetonVarsityClub.org Director of Athletics Gary Walters ’67 Associate Director of Athletics for the Princeton Varsity Club Kellie Staples Assistant Director of the Princeton Varsity Club Marie Muhvic Assistant Director of the Princeton Varsity Club Steve Stoute Associate Director of Athletics Jerry Price Director of Athletic Media Relations Craig Sachson Director of Athletic Communications Yariv Amir Athletic Communications Assistants Andrew Borders, Kristy McNeil Staff Photographer Beverly Schaefer printing by Prism Color Corp. Moorestown, N.J.


PVC

2008-09 Athletics Year in Review

2008-09 Athletics Year in Review Tiger Dominance Once More • by Jerry Price

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he runners began to emerge from the woods and head down the long final push to the chute. The first one was, appropriately for this Halloween Day, dressed in Orange and Black. So was the next one. And the one after that. And five of the first six. And seven of the first nine. Princeton’s first Ivy League championship of the 2008-09 academic year was put up by the women’s cross country team at the Heptagonal championships on Halloween, and it came, prophetically enough, when the Tigers simply ran away from the pack. Before the final track races in June brought the athletic year to its official end, Princeton teams produce 11 Ivy League championship teams and two national championship teams, as well as another team that was the national runner-up and another that finished fifth out of the 350 Division I teams in that sport. The 2008-09 year marked the 17th time in school history that Princeton has reached double figures in Ivy titles; the rest of the league combined has done so three times. Princeton would win the Ivy League’s unofficial all-sports points championship for the 23rd straight year, reaching its highest overall point total since the 1998-99 school year. The national championships won by the women’s squash team and the men’s lightweight rowing team brought to 23 the number of consecutive years with at least one team or individual national champion. Of the 33 teams that competed in Ivy League sports, 18 finished first or second and 25 finished in the top three. No wonder it was impossible to pick just one outstanding senior male and female athlete for the end-of-year banquet. Instead, five senior men and five senior women were honored. Of course, the year wasn’t devoid of its tougher moments, including some of the most excruciating losses in the entire history of Princeton athletics. Princeton also saw two of its coaching legends leave the school after a combined 80 seasons. On balance, though, 2008-09 was an exceptional athletic year at Princeton

University. The women’s cross country team shattered the old record by winning Heps with 17 teams points with a 1-23-5-6 finish and then went on to win the Mid-Atlantic Regional on its home course and finish fifth in the NCAA finals – and Peter Farrell’s team wasn’t necessarily the best Princeton team of the year. Princeton teams won four Ivy League championships in the fall, including a sweep of the cross country races as the men edged Dartmouth for the team title shortly after the women won their race. The field hockey team went undefeated in the league to win the championship for the 13th time in 14 seasons. Princeton defeated Penn State in the opening round of the NCAA tournament and came within an overtime loss to Syracuse in the quarterfinals of reaching the Final Four. Princeton unveiled its brand-new Roberts Stadium soccer complex in the fall of 2008, and the facility immediately impressed everyone who visited in the inaugural season. The women’s team then went out and used Taylor Numann’s overtime goal against Penn to earn the program’s fifth Ivy League title in the last nine years. Princeton, who spent much of the year in the national Top 25, lost to West Virginia 2-1 in the NCAA tournament. The winter saw Princeton teams win three more Ivy championships, including men’s and women’s squash. The women then went on to win their third straight national championship at the Howe Cup. The men’s team continued arguably the best four-year run in the long history of the program with another dominant performance to win the league with a perfect record and reach the national finals. The men’s swimming and diving team recorded a perfect regular season and gave Florida a run in the annual Big Al Open, and then it capped the year with a brilliant wire-to-wire victory at the Ivy League championships. After winning a total of two events in the previous three years, Princeton won 12 events in the 2009 meet. Princeton finished 23rd at NCAAs with a handful of individual and relay All-America honors. Princeton ran off four more Ivy titles in the spring. The men’s lightweight rowing

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team was ranked No. 1 to start the year and went through all seven opponents, including defending champion Cornell. Princeton won by open water in both the Eastern Sprints and the IRA national championships to complete its first sweep of the two titles since 1998. The men’s lacrosse team went 13-3 and won two games in NFL stadiums, defeating Johns Hopkins at M&T Bank Stadium and eventual-NCAA champ Syracuse at Giants Stadium. Unfortunately for the Tigers, they couldn’t solve Cornell in two meetings, a pair of losses that cost Princeton an outright Ivy title and a berth in the Final Four. The women’s tennis team returned to the NCAA team tournament and won an Ivy League title for the first time since 2000 by defeating six of seven Ivy teams and watching Yale, its only loss, lose on the last day of Ivy competition to allow Princeton to seal the automatic berth. Princeton also had an individual participant in the NCAA tournament for the first time since 2002, sending a doubles team to the postseason. The women’s outdoor track and field team won its first Ivy League outdoor title since 1989, jumping ahead of five-time defending champion Cornell, 145-130, after a strong finish in the 3000-meter run with two events remaining. The team earned eight All-Ivy awards, qualified 15 athletes for the postseason and sent two to the NCAA championships. There were other strong performances by Princeton teams who did not win Ivy titles, including an 18th-place finish at the NCAA championships by the women’s swimming and diving team, a Southern Division championship in men’s water polo, a second-straight NCAA tournament appearance in men’s hockey, a Gehrig Division co-championship in baseball, a quarterfinal appearance in women’s lacrosse, a second-place finish in men’s basketball and a program-record 17 wins in men’s fencing. As for the disappointments, Princeton teams suffered two for the ages. The men’s hockey team spent the entire year in the national rankings, mostly in the Top 10, and earned an at-large NCAA tournament bid for the first time in program history. The Tigers then led

Minnesota-Duluth 4-2 in the final minute of regulation in the opening round of the NCAA tournament in Minneapolis, but the first NCAA win for the Tigers vanished when the Bulldogs scored twice in the final 40 seconds, including the tying goal with five seconds left, and then won it in OT. As excruciating as that loss was, the men’s squash final against Trinity might have stung more. Princeton and Trinity, winner of 202 straight matches, slugged it out for six hours at Jadwin Gym in the national final, only to see the visitors win 5-4 by the oh-so-closest of margins. If there was consolation for Princeton, it was the knowledge that the 2009 men’s squash final is one of the greatest championship events in the history of all of college athletics. Glenn Nelson, who coached the Princeton men’s and women’s volleyball teams to the NCAA tournament and took the men to the Final Four, retired after winning 1,110 matches in his 58 total seasons. Bill Tierney, who led Princeton men’s lacrosse to six NCAA championships and 14 Ivy championships in 22 seasons, left to become the head coach at the University of Denver. Golfer Susannah Aboff, diver Katie Giarra, volleyball player Parker Hentritze, field hockey/ lacrosse player Holly McGarvie and distance runner Jolee van Leuven were named winners of the von Kienbusch Award for the outstanding senior female athletes. Hockey player Lee Jubinville, men’s lacrosse player Mark Kovler, swimmer Doug Lennox, distance runner Michael Maag and men’s squash player Mauricio Sanchez were named winners of the Roper Trophy as the outstanding senior male athletes.

Varsity Club News

July 2009


PVC

William Winston Roper Trophy

Princeton Varsity Club

Senior Stud

William Winston Roper Trophy Awarded annually to the a Princeton senior man of high scholastic rank and outstanding qualities of sportsmanship and general proficiency in athletics. Presented by Mrs. William W. Roper and the Class of 1902.

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he William Winston Roper Trophy is the highest male student-athlete award at Princeton. The award was originally given by Mrs. William Winston Roper and the Class of 1902 in honor of Princeton’s famed football coach. It goes annually to “a Princeton senior male of high scholastic rank and outstanding qualities of sportsmanship and general proficiency in athletics.” It has been awarded annually since 1936. This year we had five winners, they were: Lee Jubinville (hockey), Mark Kovler (lacrosse), Doug Lennox (swimming), Michael Maag (cross country and track & field) and Mauricio Sanchez (squash). Lee Jubinville graduates as one of the most decorated players ever to play for the Princeton men’s hockey team. He led the team in scoring in two of his four seasons, including a magical junior year in which he helped lead Princeton to the Ivy League and ECAC championships and its first NCAA tournament appearance in 10 years. His performance led to his being named the ECAC and Ivy League Player of the Year, becoming the first Princeton player ever to win the ECAC year-end award. He was also named a first-team All-America, becoming one of four Princeton hockey players ever to achieve the honor, and was Princeton’s first candidate for the Hobey Baker Award, college hockey’s equivalent of the Heisman Trophy. Lee completed his career with 99 career points, leaving him 14th all-time at Princeton in scoring. Mark Kovler of the men’s lacrosse team became the first Princeton midfielder since 2000 to be named a first-team All-America and the third player in school history to earn All-America honors four times. Mark scored 34 goals as a senior for the second-highest single-season ever total by a Princeton midfielder, two off the record. Kovler finished his career with 91 career goals, third all-time by Princeton middies. Mark, whose junior year ended with a broken ankle, started his senior season slowly, with six goals in the first five games, but he would finish with 28 in the final 10. He also earned first-team All-Ivy League honors for the second time in his career and was a three-time All-Ivy League selection. He was recently the 12th draft pick for Major League Lacrosse. Prior to the arrival of Doug Lennox, Princeton had won three Ivy League men’ swimming and diving titles in the previous 10 years. During his four-year career, Doug guided the Tigers to three more titles and earned a multitude of individual honors. He led

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Varsity Club News

the Tigers to the team championship in 2006 and 2007, and after falling short last year, he came back as a senior tri-captain and pushed Princeton to the 2009 title and a Top 20 national ranking. Doug won four Ivy League individual championships during his career in his top stroke, the butterfly. He swept the 100 and 200 in 2009 and helped Princeton to four relay titles, including all three freestyle relays. He earned first-team All-America honors after reaching an NCAA final in each of the last two years. He was also part of a trio of All-America relays. Michael Maag is one of the premiere distance runners in Princeton history. Michael has been an individual Heps cross country champion and runner-up, and he helped Princeton to three team cross country championships, including this past fall when he also served as captain. He has been an All-America, a two-time NCAA championships participant and a three-time first-team All-Ivy League selection, but his season did not end in the fall. Michael was also a double champion at the 2009 Ivy League Outdoor Heps, winning both the 1,500 and the 5,000. In previous seasons, he has won the 3,000 and been part of the distance medley-relay championship team. He has earned four first-team and two second-team All-Ivy awards in track and field and helped the team to the indoor track and field championship in 2007. He is the schoolrecord-holder for the indoor 3,000, and he owns the second-best time in program history in the indoor mile. Mauricio Sanchez guided the Princeton men’s squash team to arguably its greatest four-year era in program history. The 2006 Ivy League Rookie of the Year and 2007, 2008 and 2009 Ivy League Player of the Year, Mauricio never played below the No. 2 spot in his career and never lost an Ivy League match after his freshman season. He was a four-time first-team All-Ivy and fourtime first-team All-America honoree. He also led Princeton to four straight Ivy League men’s squash championships, an unprecedented feat for the program, and he led the Tigers to four straight national team finals. He reached the national individual semifinals in all four years of his career and was a national finalist in both 2007 and 2009.

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Lee Jubinville

Michael Maag

Doug Lennox

Roper Trophy Winners Mark Kovler

Mauricio Sanchez


PVC C. Otto von Kienbusch Award

dent-Athlete

Awards Banquet 2009 C. Otto von Kienbusch Award

Susannah Aboff

Awarded annually to the a Princeton senior woman of high scholastic rank who has demonstrated general proficiency in athletics and the qualities of a true sportswoman. Presented in memory of C. Otto von Kienbusch ’06, friend and benefactor of women’s athletics at Princeton.

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Katie Giarra

Holly McGarvie

von Kienbusch Award Winners

Parker Hentrize

Jolee Van Leuven

he C. Otto von Kienbusch Award is the highest female student-athlete award at Princeton. C. Otto von Kienbusch was a staunch opponent of the addition of women to Princeton University in the late ’60s. Once women were admitted to the school, several early women athletes made a trip to his home in upstate New York to try to win him over. They were so successful that he became an instant convert and supporter of women’s athletics at Princeton, subsequently endowing this award. This year the award will be shared by five winners; Susannah Aboff (golf), Kathrine Giarra (diving), Parker Henritze (volleyball), Holly McGarvie (field hockey and lacrosse) and Jolee VanLeuven (cross country and track & field). Susannah Aboff completed the rare feat of back-to-back individual championships at the Ivy League golf tournament. Her second Ivy title helped her earn an individual bid to the NCAA East Regional, making her the first Tiger since 2005 to appear in the NCAA postseason. Susannah’s Ivy championship also led her to the league’s inaugural Player of the Year honor and completed a four-year run of being on the All-Ivy team, making her the fifth Ivy golfer and second Tiger to earn an All-Ivy spot all four seasons. In Princeton’s last 23 tournaments, Susannah finished as the top Tiger 20 times. That run included eight individual championships at various events. Katie Giarra has been the Ivy League’s best and most consistent diver throughout her four-year career, and she was a leading force for Princeton in winning three Ivy League team swimming and diving titles during the last four years. Katie won both the one- and three-meter diving competitions in both 2007 and 2009 and earned Ivy League Championships Diver of the Meet honors in both years. Her performance scored big points for Princeton in winning the 2006, 2007 and 2008 Ivy League championships. Katie reached an individual career milestone in 2009 by qualifying for her first NCAA championship meet. She earned All-America honorable mention by placing 12th overall in the three-meter. Her finish helped Princeton to 18th place at the NCAA championships.

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Parker Henritze graduates as one of the most decorated volleyball players in Ivy League history. The lone Princeton woman to earn both Ivy League Rookie of the Year and Player of the Year honors in her career, Parker is a four-time All-Ivy selection and a three-time first-team selection. She was named to the team unanimously in each of the last two years, including during her Player of the Year performance in 2007. A starting outside hitter since the beginning of her freshman year, Parker guided Princeton to a 45-11 Ivy League record in her four years. In 2007, she led the Tigers to the first 14-0 record in the Ivy League and the program’s first Ivy title since 2004 and the first NCAA tournament appearance since 2001. She has been among the Ivy League leaders in kills and aces throughout her career. During her autumns, Holly McGarvie was an integral part of four Ivy League championships and two NCAA quarterfinal appearances in field hockey. She was a three-time All-Ivy selection in field hockey, twice earning first-team honors. Holly, who played in every game for four years, finished with 69 points for her career, including a 29 as a senior. In the spring she led the Tigers to four NCAA women’s lacrosse tournament appearances. She was named the 2009 Ivy League co-Player of the Year, and is just the third player in the Princeton history to earn Rookie and Player of the Year honors during a career. McGarvie has been an All-Ivy honoree all four years and was named firstteam All-America last year. Holly has started in every game during her career, with 116 goals and 52 assists for 168 points. She ranks in the Top 10 in the program in points, assists and ground balls in a career. Jolee VanLeuven has been captain of both the cross country and the track and field teams. She is a five-time NCAA participant and multiple AllAmerica honoree and she has earned four All-Ivy League honors while being a three-time Academic All-Ivy honoree. Jolee has helped her teams to four Ivy League team titles in the two sports. As one of the leaders of the 2008 cross country team, that had the best team score in Ivy League Heptagonal history and then won the regional championship and went on to a fifth place finish in the NCAA championship, the best finish in Princeton history.

Varsity Club News

July 2009


PVC Awards & Honors

Art Lane ’34 Award

Berry, Offorjebe, Milov, Schwab honored The Art Lane Award has been given to honor selfless contribution to sport and society by an undergraduate. Art Lane, the very embodiment of the award that now bears his name, won the Pyne Prize and captained the 1933 Princeton football team to the national championship as an undergraduate before going on to a career as a Naval officer, a federal judge and a corporate general counsel. Adam Berry has been actively involved in the Princeton community as a leader in many areas. He has served as a University Big Siblings Mentor; the social chair of the Impact Christian Fellowship Group, sat on the INGNITE Student panel aimed at motivating inner city youth in the Bronx and was selected to be a featured speaker at the “Reflections on Diversity” seminar during the 2008 Freshman Orientation. Adam’s contributions to football program and the Department of Athletics have also been significant, most notably through a recruiting plan that he developed aimed at attracting African-American student-athletes to Princeton. Adam’s plan was originally built for football, but was so impressive that it was soon adopted throughout the athletic department. He was recognized by his coaching staff as the recipient of the Hank Towns Award for mentoring freshman and the Richard Colman Award for academic achievement and was selected by his peers to serve on the team Leadership Council. Most recently, Adam was selected as a 2009 Spirit of Princeton award winner. Agatha Offorjebe, in the words of women’s track and field coach Pete Farrell, “works hard at making Princeton a better place for all.” Her many contributions to Princeton during the past four years include serving as a peer mentor and a residential college advisor, as the vice-president of the Varsity Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, as a founding member of the student-athlete wellness leaders, as the alcohol collation committee co-chair and as a master at Butler College. In recognition of her tremendous achievements, Agatha was awarded with the prestigious Sprit of Princeton award in 2008 as a junior. As a walk-on to the track & field team, Agatha quickly demonstrated her leadership ability among her peers and went on to achieve school records in the 400 meters (indoor and outdoor) as well as earning All-America and All-Ivy distinctions. Following graduation, Agatha will be traveling to Botswana as part of the Princeton in Africa program working in a medical clinic for the next year. Joelle Milov has been described as a hard-working and determined leader. Her commitment to philanthropic work is unwavering, including serving as a Co-Project Coordinator with Special Olympics Swimming, a leader in the “Learn to Swim” program that offers free lessons to the Princeton community and the “Bowl for Life” program that raises money and awareness for organ donation. She has also traveled to Veracruz, Mexico, on a service trip to build schools for the needy. Most recently, Joelle co-founded the “Collegians for the Cure Cancer Walk” program in coordination with the Susan G. Komen Foundation. The first event was held in the fall of 2008 and is a program that will continue on at Princeton following her graduation. She was honored by her teammates with the Friends of Princeton Swimming award – presented to a team member whose perseverance in practice and effort in competition have led to the greatest overall improvement. Joelle will be attending law school this fall. Kristin Schwab has distinguished herself over her career as a scholar, athlete and tireless volunteer. With a passion for medicine, she has dedicated her time to serve as a legal advocate and hotline counselor at the House of Ruth domestic violence center, volunteered at the Princeton Medical Center Emergency Room and in the Neurosurgery Department at Johns Hopkins Hospital. To conduct research for her senior thesis, Kristin traveled to Ghana, where she worked in hospitals, immunization clinics and laboratories across four different regions. She has also served as a Wilson College fellow, a Wellness Leader for the field hockey team and as an Academic Success Today Tutor for local high school students. As a stand-out athlete and four-year starter on two nationally-ranked sports, she has maintained exceptional grades in a challenging pre-med curriculum. After Princeton, Kristin will be attending medical school at Penn as the recipient of an NCAA Post-Graduate Scholarship.

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Pictured from top to bottom: Joelle Milov, Adam Berry, Kristin Schwab, Agatha Offorjebe.


Marvin Bressler Award Awarded to that member of the Princeton family who, through heartfelt support of the University’s student-athletes and coaches, best embodies a belief in the lifelong lessons taught by competition and athletics as a complement to the overall educational mission.

PVC Awards & Honors

Class of 1916 Cup The Class of 1916 Cup is awarded to the varsity letterwinner who, continuing in competition in his or her senior year, achieved at graduation the highest academic standing. It was given by the Class of 1916 on the occasion of its 50th reunion. Carey Malkiewich of the men’s heavyweight crew team won the Class of 1916 Cup this year. Carey is a Math major from Worcester, Massachusetts, whose thesis is entitled, “Riemann Surfaces.”

Bressler Award winner Jeff Orleans. Jeff Orleans has spent 25 years on the Princeton campus as the only Executive Director the Ivy League office has ever had. He took over the newly formed position in 1984, and the league he leaves now has prospered on his watch. Ivy League teams and athletes have been able to compete and earn regional and national success while maintaining the integrity of the league’s commitment to having its athletes reflect and be integrated with the overall undergraduate population of each school. Jeff has been an ardent supporter of the Ivy League ideal of broad-based athletic participation on the eight different campuses. He has worked tirelessly behind the scenes, often acting as a mediator between University Presidents, Directors of Athletics and Coaches, always working on behalf of the student-athletes and doing so while demanding the highest levels of professionalism from himself and his staff.

Citizen-Athlete Award Presented by the Princeton Varsity Club, for selfless and noble contributions to sport and society. Our winner for 2009 is Robert Ehrlich, the captain of the 1978 Princeton football team who went on to Wake Forest University Law School and then to a career as a four-term United States congressman and finally the first Republican Governor of the state of Maryland in 36 years when he was elected in 2002. He is currently a partner in the law firm of Womble, Carlyle, Sandridge and Rice in Baltimore. While Governor, Robert Ehrlich made important strides in a wide-range of non-partisan issues for the state, including education, technology and the environment. As Governor, he signed the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Act, which led to a reduction in pollution in the Bay that was described by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation as “the best thing for the Bay in a generation.” He was at the forefront of reform movements that led to an overhaul of the funding of the state’s poorest school districts and record state contributions to its Historically Black Colleges. He also devoted a great deal of energy while a Congressman and Governor to the needs of the disabled, especially in the area of employment. A dynamic and charismatic voice in the Republican Party, his name has been frequently mentioned for future political races, possibly on the national level. In addition to his legal career, he also lends his voice to several political radio shows. He also once appeared in an episode of the HBO show “The Wire,” playing a Maryland state trooper assigned to guard the Governor.

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Varsity Club News

July 2009


PVC Banquet Testimonial

Katie Cox ’09

For more student-athlete alumni testimonials, visit the PVC’s official website at PrincetonVarsityClub.org

A PVC Banquet Testimonial I want to start by expressing my gratitude for the opportunity to speak here tonight. I will begin tonight by telling you a little bit about my journey to Princeton. I grew up in Long Island, a hot bed of lacrosse and develop a passion for the sport at an early age. In my Middle School yearbook, I wrote about how I aspired to come to Princeton and by my freshman year of high school, it looked like lacrosse would the ticket into my dream school. I hit a minor bump my sophomore year when I went down with an ACL tear. I took to the field again 5 months later ready to pick up right where I left off. Unfortunately only two weeks after my return, I went down again. I remember sitting on field, fully believing that infamous pop noise not only signaled another ACL tear but also the bursting of any hope I had of playing lacrosse as a tiger. To my surprise, a phone call soon came from head coach Chris Sailer offering a spot on her team. Unbeknownst to her, or even me at the time, that one phone call has changed the trajectory of my life. Playing lacrosse here these past four years has been an incredibly rewarding experience. Under the tutelage of our talented coaching staff and surrounded by an amazing group of young women, I have transformed as a player and person. Being a student-athlete has defined my experience at Princeton. My time here has been split between the classroom and 1952 stadium, between early mornings in the Jadwin pit and late nights in the depths of Firestone. The rigorous academic demands of Princeton made it clear that to be a successful student, I had to translate the qualities I utilize on the field—to apply the same discipline, work-ethic, and attitude toward improving to my work in the classroom. As a politics major, I have been able to enroll in courses taught by renowned political scholars and listen to guest speakers such as Kofi Annan and Condoleezza Rice. As a lacrosse player, I traveled to Australia to play the defending World Champions and I have found myself marked up against the best players in the country. That is what is amazing about our experience as Princeton athletes: although it certainly has not been easy, we have been able to achieve great success, both on the field and in the classroom. We have all been able to be students and athletes, without having to chose one or the other. Of course, there have been moments when I was jealous of those students who don’t play a sport. Times when the last thing I want to do is sit on a bus for 7 hours after a devastating loss or during midterm week when there is just not enough time

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Varsity Club News

in the day to get everything done. Times when I dreaded trekking down to the weight room at 7 am on a snowy winter morning and times when I watched everyone gear up for a post-Dean’s Date celebration in Dod Courtyard as I headed down for practice. It was in those moments that I envied the average student; I envied their freedom and their extra hours of sleep. But then there are those times when I wouldn’t trade being an athlete here for anything in the world. Moments that only other athletes can relate to and appreciate. Moments that may seem trivial to anyone else, but to a competitor, they are the times you’ve spent all year working for. Those precious moments of athletic triumph and complete exhilaration. All of us have gathered a collection of these moments. I can close my eyes and I remember exactly how I felt when my team knocked off the number 2 ranked UVA in the first round of the NCAA tournament or our Dartmouth game this year when everything just seemed to click and our team looked unstoppable. Over the past four years, I have witnessed some of your greatest moments. I remember the electrifying feeling of watching the women’s squash team win their National Championships, and when the football team’s win over Yale earned the entire school a bonfire. I remember watching the men’s hockey team defeat Harvard last year on ESPN and when the women’s volleyball team brought home the Ivy league title. Those are the moments that athletes crave, and its our dedication to create moments like this that unites us together. It’s the feeling that gets you out to practice everyday, the one that pushes you to stay late and do extra sprints and the voice in your head that tells you to keep going even when you want to give up. It is in these moments that we learn about ourselves as individuals. And in the moments of triumph and failure that the greatest lessons of athletics are taught. Because I am an athlete, I know how to succeed under intense pressure and scrutiny. Because I am an athlete, I know when to place my personal ambitions on the shelf for the betterment of the group. Because I am an athlete, I have differentiated myself from peers as a person who knows what it means to work-hard,

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sacrifice, preserve, and succeed. I’ve also come to realize that by being a Princeton tiger, I am apart of a tradition much larger than myself. With the simple action of putting on a uniform, we were all instantly accepted into the Princeton community of devoted alumni and avid fans. In being an athlete at Princeton, we became apart or something bigger than ourselves. Whether it be in the pool in DeNunzio the courts in Jadwin or on the ice at Baker rink, each one of has contributed to the legacy of success at Princeton. When we look back upon our time as a Princeton athlete, our memory will be a collection of these moments. Because as time passes, we will forget how many sprints we ran, what our overall record was, or how many points we scored. What we will remember however, are the times when you turn to your teammates and relish in the glory of the moment, whether it be a major success or a minor triumph, it is the people we shared those moments with and the feeling in our hearts that will stay with us forever. We will close our eyes and picture ourselves in our respective venues and what we looked like with the “P” on our jerseys. I do not leave here without athletic regrets, after all I wanted a couple National Championship rings, but what I have learned however, is that the rewards of being an athlete at Princeton are not measured like this. Instead I leave here with a bundle of priceless memories. I think I speak for all of us when I say, I am most grateful for the moments when there was nothing else in the world I wanted more than a Princeton tiger. Thank you for those moments and thank you for letting me speak here tonight.


PVC Banquet Testimonial

Adam Berry ’09

For more student-athlete alumni testimonials, visit the PVC’s official website at PrincetonVarsityClub.org

A PVC Banquet Testimonial Good evening and welcome to all the studentathletes, coaches, administrators, parents, and alumni. I would like to thank the Princeton Varsity Club for giving me the opportunity to speak tonight. My name is Adam Berry and I am a (retired) WR on the football team. It is an incredible honor to be given the opportunity to speak in front of so many people who I deeply respect and who have positively affected my life. I am a strong believer in the value of athletics. I often tell people that I have learned more on the athletic field, the weight room, and the track than I have in any classroom. This is a significant statement given the amount I’ve learned academically in Princeton, but sport can be more difficult than any precept, problem set, or final paper. It is always more memorable and often times more practical in life. Keeping this in mind, I want to share with you three lessons sport has demonstrated to me during my time here which I believe are applicable to just about everyone in this room as well. The first lesson began with an incident in the weight room my freshmen year. We were in the middle of an offseason lift and moving through a leg circuit. The whistle had just blown and as I moved to the next station I saw Coach Jackson, our defensive backs coach. He was about to move to another station but made eye contact with me and decided to stay right at the station he was already at. As I did the exercise, already tired, and fatiguing more he started saying “faster” and “is that all you’ve got.” Somehow this didn’t give my legs any extra strength, so he moved on to saying “your brother is kicking your butt.” Now my brother plays football at Harvard and we are twins. He also plays the opposite position and incidentally, had just had a much better freshmen football season than me. Coach J had gotten to know both of us fairly well during the recruiting process and knew how competitive we were against one another. So of course he knew this got under my skin. He continued to chant those words or some variation of it to the rhythm of the reps I completed during the exercise. As I fatigued and got slower he spoke slower. As I got mad and snuck in a faster rep, he spoke faster. All the while I kept angrily thinking how bringing up my brother had little to do with an offseason workout. After my turn at the station was done, I made some smart alec comment to him between pants, but he laughed and simply said “Always compete.” That quote has always stuck with me, and my

coach’s way of getting that point across was actually quite a good bit of coaching for both football and life. Coach Jackson was and is completely right. Choosing to compete, even in something that doesn’t seem to matter is always half the battle. There are a lot of times when we are behind the 8 ball, could have plenty of excuses for not achieving a goal, or are at some disadvantage relative to our peers. But being a student-athlete at Princeton has prepared us to be successful despite long odds. We have had to compete against the best collegiate athletes by playing at the Division I level and against the best collegiate minds by attending such a prestigious institution. We have had to earn every grade, every minute of playing time, and every championship by choosing to always compete. Very few student-athletes can say they played against the best athletes while handling some of the most difficult classes and earning grades curved against some of the brightest minds. But the people in this room can which puts you in a position to fight for a win whether it’s in a tough job market, a difficult grad school application, or simply a tough position in life by always competing. The next thing we’ve learned is to handle adversity with poise. Whether it is playing in front of thousands of people, getting “corrected” by a coach, or playing from behind on the road the ability to be poised in an uncomfortable or difficult situation is probably the most underestimated trait of the Princeton student-athlete. I realized this particularly in my internship last summer. The company I worked at had meetings where it was the goal of senior management to basically publicly embarrass interns as they tried to present on their knowledge of the industry and see how the interns responded. You’d be surprised the amount of people who literally froze or could not speak in an environment like this. There were several other Princeton student-athletes in this room who were in the same program as myself, and many of us got put in this situation. Yet despite some of senior management’s best attempts, none of the Princetonians showed any panic or fluster. I’m sure many of us felt flustered, but outward appearances and the ability to proceed calmly and rationally were clearly traits which marked us. I have no doubt anyone else in this room would have been just as successful. After all, being late to a

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workout or getting chewed out by coach is far more frightening than someone trying to throw you off with a couple of questions or brainteasers. Believe it or not this trait which bonds all of us, will be significant in the next phases of our lives. The final( and probably most important) lesson I will leave with all of you tonight is one that I am sure many of you have discovered without my need to point it out, and that is: If you need to count on someone, count on someone you have done something difficult with. There is no one on this campus that will have your back like a teammate. Whether you are from different states, countries, socioeconomic backgrounds, ethnicities, political viewpoints, or anything else, there is nothing like playing a 4 years of a varsity sport with someone. It is not easy to be successful athletically and academically here. There is a lot of sacrifice and, at times, disappointment. But success is extremely attainable with the support of your closest peers. The tough times are always made better by your teammates and families because they have been there for you since day 1 and been by your side during this 4 year odyssey. And this is something that will not end tonight or on June 2. The relationships we have forged will no doubt serve us down the road because of the love, respect, blood, sweat, and tears that we have shared. So tonight celebrate all the trials and triumphs, the disappointments and surprises, the failures and successes because they have contributed so much to the people we are, and the people we will become. Congratulations to everyone and thank you for listening.

Varsity Club News

July 2009


PVC Athletics Director’s Remarks

PVC Senior Student-Athlete Banquet

Remarks from Director of Athletics Gary Walters ’67 Tonight is one of the highlights of the year for Princeton Athletics. It gives us an opportunity to salute the efforts of the many people who allow Princeton to continue to be a model of intercollegiate athletics, and it does so under the festive eye of Reunions and the impending graduation. We began this event as a way to gather here one last time before graduation to look back at the last four years and honor the student-athletes of the graduating class, in this case the Class of 2009, and the role they have played in preserving and advancing the great tradition that is Princeton athletics. Princeton athletics, as we all know, predates all of us by many decades. In fact, the first intercollegiate athletic event in school history was actually a baseball game played between Princeton and Williams in 1864, 145 years ago. Princeton played in the first intercollegiate football game, 140 years ago against Rutgers. Women’s athletics followed co-education in the early 1970s, and there are dozens of pioneers who fought for equality in athletic opportunity to whom our current women athletes and coaches owe a collective debt. As a result of their efforts, Princeton has long been a national leader in women’s athletics, some of whom are with us here tonight. Princeton through the years has been the premier athletic program in the Ivy League. Our teams have now won the league’s unofficial allsports points standings for the last 23 years in a row, and Princeton has won 370 Ivy League championships since the league was formalized in 1956, easily the most in league history and in fact nearly one quarter of all league championships won. Princeton won 42 Ivy League championships in your four years, 12 more than the next highest total by a league school. As an aside, your 42 Ivy titles are nearly double the combined total of a certain school in West Philadelphia and a certain school in New Haven. Of the 33 teams that compete in an Ivy League sport, no fewer than 25 won at least one Ivy League championship in your four years, including no fewer than 11 this year. Two teams, the field hockey team and the men’s squash team, won the Ivy League title all four years. Of the 38 varsity teams at Princeton, 28 competed in the national championships for their sport at least once. Your class combined for 23 All-America selections and 107 All-Ivy League selections.

July 2009

Varsity Club News

Princeton Athletics won the Ivy League’s unofficial All-Sports points championship each of your four years. Princeton also had at least one team or individual national championship each of your four years, accomplishing that feat for 23 straight years. At the same time, many teams sitting out here tonight were also on the short end of some great athletic events. Hopefully, as time goes on, the sting of those days will fade into the realization of how blessed you’ve all been to be able to compete in your chosen sport through four years of college. Hopefully, you realize that many of your teammates and classmates who went through those same experiences the last four years are now your friends forever, and that the lessons you’ve learned on our playing fields as students and athletes will likewise be with you forever. The fall has featured some extraordinary moments in recent Princeton athletic history, such as four Ivy field hockey championships, unprecedented success in cross country, the first 14-0 Ivy League women’s volleyball season ever and the christening of perhaps the country’s finest college soccer facility, Roberts Stadium, which played home to an Ivy title by the women’s team. The winter season saw exceptional performances by Princeton teams, including multiple Ivy League championships in both men’s and women’s swimming and diving and men’s and women’s squash, the first NCAA tournament appearance for the women’s hockey program, Ivy titles in women’s basketball and

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men’s indoor track and a burst onto the national scene by the men’s hockey team, which won an ECAC title and made two NCAA tournament appearances. Princeton’s Class of 2009 has been a part of many great moments in the spring. A total of 10 different Princeton teams won Ivy League titles in the spring alone. In closing, let me share with you poignant and nostalgic words spoken by statesman Adlai Stevenson ’22 in addressing the Class of 1954, 55 years ago: “Your days are short here. This is the last of your springs. And now, in the serenity and quiet of this lovely place, touch the depths of truth, feel the hem of heaven. You will go away with old, good friends. Don’t forget when you leave why it is you came.”


PVC Table Sponsors

Table Sponsors The Princeton Varsity Club would like to extend a special thank you to those who sponsored tables at the 2009 PVC Senior Student-Athlete Awards Banquet – this event would not be possible without your generous support! All-American Sponsors Art Lane ’34 Family Berger Family Wayne Paglieri ’78 Susan & Jim Blair ’61 P87 William C. Powers ’79 Edward R. Burka ’52 - Track & Field Richard O. Prentke ’67 P03 Pete Carril h81 Princeton Varsity Club Class of 1981 Reilly, Peyser, Kolkin Families P09 Don & Betsy Dixon P09 Anthony J. Riposta ’74 Marty Franks ’72 P07 Frank & Margo Walter P09 Friends of Princeton Wrestling William H. Walton, III ’74 Emily Goodfellow ’76 Dr. Paul Harris ’54 Richard W. Kazmaier, Jr. ’52 P77 P81 P86 g07

All-Ivy Sponsors Hewes D. Agnew ’58 P87 P92 Robert H.B. Baldwin ’42 P76 P79 g05 g06 g07 Youngsuk “YS” Chi ’83 P11 Ralph D. DeNunzio ’53 P78 P81 P84 Judy & Peter Kovler P09 Michael G. McCaffery ’75 Polly & Terry O’Toole P09

Charles Plohn, Jr. ’66 Princeton Football Association Anthony P. DiTommaso, Jr. Kimberly Ritrievi ’80 Caroline Buck Rogers ’77 Margie Gengler Smith ’73 P03 Paul M. Wythes ’55 P86

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Varsity Club News

July 2009


PVC Message to Alumni

Support the Princeton Varsity Club Membership in the PVC is open to all letterwinners, alumni, parents and friends of Princeton Athletics and is based on the University fiscal year (July 1-June30). PVC membership dues and additional contributions help support an annual athletic fund that benefits ALL Princeton varsity student-athletes, regardless of sport.

The mission of the Princeton Varsity Club is “To implement and support programs that perpetuate and enhance the Performance, Values and Community of Princeton Athletics and the University.”

PVC Annual Dues Class Year

Annual Dues

2005-2009

$25

Enhancing the educational, athletic and postgraduate experiences of our current student-athletes.

1999-2004

$75

1992-1998

$100

Values

1958-1991

$150

1957 & earlier

$100

Non-alumni & friends

$150

Performance

Acting as stewards who encourage, perpetuate and demonstrate the educational values inherent in intercollegiate athletic competition.

Community

building a spirited collegiality among current and former Princeton varsity athletes and other supporters as part of the long tradition of athletic excellence at Princeton.

The Princeton Varsity Club acts in concert with the greater University community that supports the values and ideals of Princeton athletics. While PVC membership is open to all alumni letterwinners and members of Princeton Athletics Friends’ Groups, it is also open to any and all alumni and friends who are interested in supporting the mission of the Princeton Varsity Club. Membership dues are based on a sliding scale tied to year of graduation.

For more information, visit our Website at:

www.PrincetonVarsityClub.org

A Message to Alumni From the Department of Athletics The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) clearly defines permissible recruiting activities involving enrolled and prospective student-athletes. Under NCAA guidelines, alumni may not provide “extra benefits” to ENROLLED STUDENT-ATHLETES that are not available to all other students at the University. Some examples of “extra benefits” are: • • • • • • •

Arranging, providing or co-signing a loan. Providing any financial support to cover educational and/or general expenses for Princeton. Providing any gifts or transportation. Providing a ticket to any entertainment event. Providing parents, family or friends of a student-athlete free admission to a banquet, dinner, or other function. Providing a meal to a student-athlete (except in your home on an occasional basis). Providing a meal to the parent(s) of a student-athlete.

As a general rule, the NCAA prohibits involvement by alumni (and other “boosters” or “representatives of an institution’s athletics interests”) in the recruitment of PROSPECTIVE STUDENT-ATHLETES. Because of the Ivy League’s extensive and valued use of alumni in recruiting ALL students, however, the NCAA has granted a limited exception to some of its contact rules. Only members of the local SCHOOLS COMMITTEES are covered under this exception. If you are not a local Schools Committee member, you are prohibited from any contact with prospective student-athletes, including correspondence and telephone calls. If you are a local schools committee member, the following applies to your off-campus contact with prospective student-athletes: • All off-campus interviewing and recruiting activity must be carried out within Princeton’s regular admissions (i.e., local Schools Committee) structure and normal program for prospective local students. Again, if you are not a local Schools Committee member, you are prohibited from any contact with prospective student-athletes. • Any individual involved in interviewing prospective student-athletes through the local Schools Committee structure must also perform this function with non-athletic prospects. • Whenever you are in contact with prospects, or their parents or friends, it is a violation of NCAA and Ivy rules to pay for any meals, snacks or entertainment, except during Schools Committee or bona fide alumni group gatherings that involve both athletic and nonathletic prospects. • No on-campus contact by alumni with prospective student-athletes may take place. • It is an NCAA violation for alumni to engage in certain evaluation activities, such as picking up game films and transcripts, or contacting high school coaches, athletic directors or other employees regarding prospects. REMEMBER ... IMPROPER CONTACT OR ACTIVITY BY ALUMNI CAN RENDER A STUDENT, AND IN SOME CASES AN ENTIRE TEAM, INELIGIBLE FOR INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION. If you have any questions, contact the Compliance Office at (609) 258-5312 or kw2@princeton.edu.

July 2009

Varsity Club News

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The PVC would like to thank those donors listed below whose generous support of the Princeton Varsity Club helps to execute our mission to enhance the Performance, Values and Community of Princeton Athletics and the University.

The Rev. James H. Adams, III ‘61 Mr. Geoffrey P.M. Adamson ‘99 Enid and Stanley Adelson F Mr. Allen R. Adler ‘67 Hewes D. Agnew, M.D. ‘58 Mr. Stephen J. Agrista F Charles T. Albert, Esq. ‘51 Mr. Philip S. Allen ‘62 Mr. Robert J. Allen SF Clyde and Joan Anderson P10 Mr. Alan J. Andreini ‘68 Mr. Archie M. Andrews, Jr. ‘41 Mrs. Tanya Andrien ‘99 Mr. Dean W. Apy ‘90 Mr. Americo Arcamone F Paul H. Arkema, M.D. ‘62 Mr. Kevin R. Armbruster ‘77 The Rev. Richard S. Armstrong ‘46 David E. Attarian, M.D. ‘76 Mr. Nathan Dulaney Bachman, IV ‘57 Richard Baldwin, Jr., M.D. ‘62 Mr. Robert H.B. Baldwin ‘42 Mr. John F. Bales ‘62 Mr. John F. Bales ‘34 Mr. Lewis C. Bancroft ‘50 Thomas P. Barnett, M.D. ‘83 Mrs. Sarah Morrison Barpoulis ‘87 Mr. Clifford Barr ‘52 Mr. Richard C. Bartholomae ‘46 Mr. Paul B. Bartle ‘65 Mr. C. Scott Bartlett, Jr. ‘55 Mr. Michael E. Baumann ‘76 Mr. Gordon T. Beaham, III ‘53 Mr. Russel H. Beatie ‘59 Mr. William S. Beaver Jr. ‘03 Mr. John C. Beck ‘53 Gary and Susan Becker P03 Lee D. Bellmer, J.D. ‘50 Jean and Louis Belmonte P99 Mr. John R. Berger ‘74 John M. Bergland, III, M.D. ‘54 Mr. John F. Bernard ‘49 Mr. Jonathan N. Beyer ‘05 Ms. Priya M. Bhupathi ‘02 Mr. Mark C. Biderman ‘67 Mr. Chester Billings, Jr. ‘46 Mr. Scott S. Binder ‘76 Mr. Frank J. Biondi, Jr. ‘66 Ms. Jane O. Biondi ‘00 C. Robert Biondino, M.D. ‘65 Timothy and Susan Bishop P06 Mr. David H. Blair ‘67 Mr. James C. Blair ‘61 Mr. Alexander Blane, Jr. ‘72 Ms. Maura J. Bolger ‘03 William and Diane Bologna P10 Mr. KasemSante G. Boonswang ’96 Robert E. Booth, Jr., M.D. ‘67 Mr. Sebastian Borza ‘06 Mr. William J. Bostian ‘71 Mr. Henry E. Bothfeld ‘53 Lt. Col. John W. Bowman, Jr., USMC, Ret. ‘66 Amb. Thomas D. Boyatt ‘55

Miss Natalie M. Branagan ‘01 Ms. Kyrsten L. Brea ‘05 Mr. Richard E. Bremer ‘67 Mr. Thomas P. Brennan ‘07 Gary and Laurie Briggs P09 William H. Brockman, CLU, ChFC ‘72 Mr. Edward P. Bromley, Jr. ‘58 Mr. James H. Bromley ‘60 Mr. Tyler V. Bronson ‘97 Dr. Tor G. Brostrom ‘80 Mr. Howard J. Brown ‘46 Mr. Terry P. Brown ‘65 Mr. William E. Brown ‘51 Mr. James M. Buck, III ‘81 Mr. Albert J. Budney, Jr. ‘68 Edward R. Burka, M.D. ‘52 Dr. William P. Burks ‘55 Mr. John Wm. Butler, Jr. ‘77 John L. Butsch, M.D. ‘56 Mr. Jeffrey M. Byrne ‘07 Mr. Patrick A. Cairns ‘97 Charles W. Caldwell Scholarship Fund OT Mr. David J. Callard ‘59 Matthew H. Carabasi, M.D. ‘74 Mr. Daniel A. Carmichael, Jr. ‘41 Charles C.J. Carpenter, Jr., M.D. ‘52 Mr. Michael L. Carr ‘00 Mr. Peter J. Carril P81 Ms. Marky Hall Carter ‘78 Elizabeth Kornfield Chadwell, M.D. ‘89 Mr. David G. Chandler ‘80 Mr. James T. Chandler ‘84 Mr. Morris Cheston, Jr. ‘59 Mr. YoungSuk C. Chi ‘83 Robert M. Chilstrom, Esq. ‘67 Mr. James M. Chiusano ‘74 Mr. David B. Clapp, Jr. ‘43 Mrs. Janet Morrison Clarke ’75 Mr. John H. Claster ‘67 Mr. Raymond H. Close ‘51 Mr. Justin A. Cohen ‘06 Mr. Antoine T. Colaco ‘94 Mr. Francis I.G. Coleman ‘45 Dr. William H. Coleman ‘42 Mr. James M. Colman, Jr. ‘95 Mr. Douglas F. Colson ‘79 Ms. Kiersten Todt Coon ‘94 Ms. L. Charlene Cosman ‘76 Mr. Jesse W. Couch ‘44 Mr. David R. Covin ‘91 Mr. J. Andrew Cowherd ‘74 David and Stephanie Cowin P09 Mr. Bill Cox ‘58 Eileen A. Crawford, M.D. ‘03 Mr. and Mrs. John T. Cusma P84 Donald and Lauren Czehut P02 Armand J. D’Accordo, C.P.A. ‘79 Mr. Richard M. D’Angelo ‘83 J. Christopher Daniel, M.D. ‘80 Mr. Brian M. Danielewicz ‘02 Mr. Edward C. Darnall ‘65 Mr. Steven C. Davidson ‘70 Dr. Maria L. Davis-Franco ‘88

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PVC Donor Roll

PVC Donor Roll as of July 2, 2009

Mr. Jonathan T. Dawson ‘66 Mr. Ralph L. DeGroff, Jr. ‘58 Mr. Ralph D. DeNunzio ‘53 Stephen R. Depperman, M.D. ‘65 Mr. Melville P. Dickenson, Jr. ‘49 John D. Diekman, Ph.D. ‘65 Mr. Jonathan C. Dill ‘67 Mr. James J. DiOrio ‘73 Mr. Anthony P. DiTommaso ‘86 Mr. Donald R. Dixon ‘69 Mr. J. Gardiner Dodd ‘62 Abbey and Valerie Doneger P05 The Rev. James K. Donnell ‘53 Mr. John P. Doran ‘68 Richard K. Dortzbach, M.D. ‘59 Mr. Christopher W. Doyal ‘96 Mr. Ethan E. Doyle ‘01 Mr. Jonathan W. Dunlay ‘79 Mr. David C. Eagleson ‘94 Mr. Sidney L. Eaton, Jr. ‘54 Bruce and Story Ebersole P07 Mr. Stephen W. Edwards ‘01 Martin R. Eichelberger, M.D. ‘67 Mr. A. Wright Elliott ‘57 Leonard and Gail Elmore P12 Mr. Gordon C. Enderle ‘83 Mr. Harold B. Erdman ‘46 Mary C. Fahrenbach, M.D. ‘83 Joseph M. Farley, Esq. ‘49 Patrick and Patricia Farrell P07 Mr. James S. Farrin ‘58 Eric and Patricia Fast P08 Ms. Susan H. Faulkner ‘81 Alec and Jan Finley P11 Mr. Redmond C. S. Finney ‘51 Mr. Henry E. Fish ‘48 Mr. Curtis M. FitzGerald ‘70 Mr. Fredric A. Flaxman ‘07 Mr. Bruce W. Fleming ‘77 Mr. Douglas B. Fletcher ‘47 (D) Mr. Royce N. Flippin, Jr. ‘56 Mr. Martin D. Franks ‘72 Mr. John W. Frazier, IV ‘65 Mr. Michael B. French ‘76 John J. Friedewald, M.D. ‘93 Dr. Gia R. Fruscione ‘00 Mr. Mortimer B. Fuller, III ‘64 Steven G. Gabbe, M.D. ‘65 Mr. George Chilton Gaines ‘51 Mr. James C. Gaither ‘59 Mr. Charles S. Ganoe ‘51 Mr. Michael B. Gasch ‘65 Ms. Louise D. Gengler ‘75 Mr. Michael P. Gilbane ‘04 Ms. Joanne Gillens F Christopher and Yolanda Glaeser P12 Harold and Phyllis Glantz P90 Mr. Edward F. Glassmeyer ‘63 Mr. Edward M. Glassmeyer ‘89 Ms. Emily C. Goodfellow ‘76 Mr. Arthur W. Goodman ‘48 Mr. John K. Goodwin ‘82 Richard E. Gordet, Esq. ‘87

Varsity Club News

July 2009


PVC Donor Roll

PVC Donor Roll as of July 2, 2009

Mr. Robert H. Gould ‘06 Mr. David M. Gouldin ‘63 Mr. Robert N. Grant ‘67 Mr. Charles A. Greathouse, III ‘57 Mr. G. Jonathan Greenwald ‘64 Paul and Carolyn Grous P12 Mr. William E. Guedel, Jr. ‘64 Mr. James G. Guidera P05 Mrs. Kristin S. Gulland S69 Mr. Stuart R. Gunn ‘85 Gen. John R. Guthrie ‘42 (D) Mr. John B. Haarlow ‘68 Mr. James M. Hackett ‘65 Mr. Christopher P. Halpin ‘98 Mr. Sheffield J. Halsey ‘41 Mr. Oscar P. Hampton, III ‘55 Mr. Fred A. Hargadon h66 Eugene M. Haring, Esq. ‘48 (D) Michael F. Harrer, M.D. ‘87 Mr. Roby Harrington, III ‘51 Dr. Paul D. Harris ‘54 Mr. Robert P. Hauptfuhrer ‘53 Mr. W. Barnes Hauptfuhrer ‘76 Miss Wendy M. Herm ‘99 Ms. Katharine C. Hession ‘07 Mr. Robert B. Hiden, Jr. ‘55 Mr. Michael F. Higgins ‘01 Ms. Elizabeth H. Hillenbrand ‘04 J. Dixon Hills, M.D. ‘54 Mr. Herbert W. Hobler ‘44 Ms. Deborah L. Hodges ‘90 Daryl and Susan Hoffman P11 Mr. Robert S. Holcombe ‘64 Mr. Stephen L. Holland ‘88 Mr. Joseph S. Holman ‘50 Mr. John M. Holton, Jr. ‘38 Mr. Michael K. Hooks ‘84 Mr. John L. Hopkins ‘60 Mr. Jonathan P. Horner ‘96 Mr. Peter E. Hubbard ‘64 Mr. Nelson E. Hubbell, Jr. ‘45 Mr. N. Richard Hueber ‘55 Mr. Charles E. Huggins ‘83 Mr. William D. Humes F Mr. Ogden M. Hunnewell ‘74 Mr. William R. Hunter ‘64 Mr. James B. Hurlock ‘55 Mr. Frederick L. Hyer, Jr. ‘61 Mr. John R. Ingram ‘83 Mr. Steven G. Jameson ‘04 Mr. Derek L. Javarone ‘06 Mr. Otis Allen Jeffcoat, III ‘70 Mr. Prescott Jennings, Jr. ‘49 Mr. Jotham Johnson ‘64 Mr. Thomas R. Johnson ‘68 Mr. Morgan R. Jones ‘61 Sheila Considine Kailus, Esq. ‘94 Steven J. Kaiser, Esq. ‘92 Mr. Timothy A. Kane ‘81 Mr. Brian N. Kazan ‘94 Mr. Richard W. Kazmaier, Jr. ‘52 Mr. Dennis J. Keller ‘63 Kevin and Lucy Kelly P05

July 2009

Varsity Club News

Mr. Robert W. Kent ‘57 The Hon. John W. Kern, III ‘49 Mr. J. Regan Kerney ‘68 Mr. Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 John and Lisa Kiernan P10 Mrs. William B. King S67 Mr. William B. King, Jr. ‘67 Mr. William H. Kingston, III ‘65 Mrs. Tara Christie Kinsey ’97 Mr. Richard C.J. Kitto, Jr. ‘69 Mr. Robert A. Kleinert ‘78 Mrs. E. Penney Klingman ‘84 Mr. William J. Koch ‘67 Mr. C. Theodore Koehn ‘91 Dr. Susan E. Kohler ‘82 Mitchell Kolkin and Kathleen Pontone P09 Ms. Catherine M. Kopil ‘04 George Kovatch, Ph.D. ‘55 Judy Lansing Kovler and Peter Kovler P09 Richard D. Krugman, M.D. ‘63 Mr. Vaden M. Lackey, Jr. ‘50 Mr. Jeremiah D. Lambert ‘55 Mr. Ronald J. Landeck ‘66 Mr. William F. Landrigan ‘76 Mr. A. Stephen Lane, Jr. ‘72 Sally Kuser Lane W34 Mr. John T. Langford ‘05 Mr. George H. Largay ‘66 Mr. Jeffrey R. Larsen ‘97 Ms. Meredith Leahy P06 Mr. Christopher W. Lebeis ‘05 Dr. William J. Ledger ‘54 James R. Ledwith, Esq. ‘58 Mr. Rudy F. Lehnert ‘52 Mr. Lawrence W. Leighton ‘56 Douglas C. Lennox, CPA ‘74 James and Mary Lee Lesko P09 Richard Levandowski, M.D. ‘70 The Hon. Paul G. Levy ‘58 Mr. Barton T. Lewis ‘62 Ian and Harriet Lewis P93 Mr. Winslow Lewis, Jr. ‘59 Brent and Diane Liljestrom P04 Mr. Mark F. Lockenmeyer ‘81 Hank Lubin, M.D. ‘79 Mr. John H. Lumpkin, Jr. ‘66 Mr. Lawrence P. Lutz ‘78 Ms. Rose Peabody Lynch ‘71 Peter B. Lyon, M.D. ‘68 Brian and Kathryn Maag P09 Mr. Joseph W. Macaione ‘91 Mr. Joseph M.J. Machado ‘98 Mr. Hugh MacRae, II ‘46 Mr. J. Michael Mahoney ‘51 Mrs. Aila Winkler Main ‘92 Karen G. Malm, Esq. ‘88 Mr. Michael J. Manzo ‘70 Mr. Sami W. Mardam-Bey ‘06 Mr. Michael J. Mardy ‘70 Mr. Michael J. Mariano ‘92 Mr. Ralph K. Martinson F Mr. Edgar M. Masinter ‘52 Kent E. Mast, Esq. ‘65

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Mr. Edward E. Matthews ‘53 Mr. McKinley C. McAdoo ‘71 Mr. Michael P. McAndrews ‘83 Mr. Michael G. McCaffery ‘75 Ms. Jennifer Jordan McCall ‘78 Mr. John F. McCarthy, Jr. ‘43 Mr. John F. McCarthy, III ‘69 Ms. Madeline J. McCarthy ‘05 Mr. John F. McCartney P09 Mr. Robert D. McCutchan ‘92 Mr. Brian J. McDonald ‘83 Mr. Walter K. McDonough ‘84 H. Clay McEldowney, PE, LS ‘69 Mr. Robert McEldowney, Jr. ‘40 David A. McEwen, M.D. ‘61 Mr. Hugh E. McGee, III ‘81 Mr. John F. McGillicuddy ‘52 (D) Mr. James J. McKay, Jr. F Mr. Edward M. Mead ‘49 Mr. J. Kenneth Michaelchuck ‘68 Mr. Peter T. Milano ‘55 Mr. Christopher A. Mill ‘66 Ms. Mary C. Minshall ‘07 Mr. Richard A. Monaghan ‘76 Mr. Michael E. Morandi *83 Mr. M. Glenn Morris, III ‘72 Mr. Kent K. Motes ‘74 Mr. Christopher J. Mueller ‘91 Mr. Richard R. Muhl ‘54 Lt. Benjamin S. Mulinix ‘99 Mr. Matthew F. Mullin ‘01 Mr. Sandeep N. Murthy ‘06 Mr. Stephen C. Muther ‘71 George A. Nankervis, M.D. ‘52 Mr. Spencer G. Nauman, Jr. ‘55 Mr. Michael P. Neary ‘82 Mr. Cameron D. Neulen ‘50 Mr. Kenneth W. Nevarez ‘98 Mr. William P. Newhall, II ‘70 Mr. David R. Newman ‘96 Mr. Joshua C. Nichols ‘03 Ms. Sarah Nikiforow ‘93 Ms. Anina C. Nolan ‘07 Mrs. Rosalie Wedmid Norair ‘76 Mr. Michael E. Novogratz ‘87 Mr. Geoffrey Nunes ‘52 Mr. John A. O’Brien ‘65 Mr. Thomas P. O’Connell F Mr. C. Ross Ohlendorf ‘05 Mrs. Robin Dwyer Olsen ‘00 Dr. Ogbemi O. Omatete ‘64 Mr. S. William Omeltchenko ‘78 Mr. Paul J. Ondrasik, Jr. ‘72 Mr. William H. Osborne, III ‘50 Mr. Arthur Oschwald, Jr. ‘42 Terence and Paula O’Toole P09 H. Martyn Owen, Esq. ‘51 Mr. Mark P. Ozer ‘86 Mr. H. Winfield Padgett, Jr. ‘68 Mr. Wayne C. Paglieri ‘78 Dr. Michael R. Pagnotto ‘00 Mr. John S. Palmer ‘44 Nicholas and Christina Pappas P02


PVC Donor Roll

PVC Donor Roll as of July 2, 2009

Mr. Charles R. Parmele, III ‘47 Dr. Lynn A. Parry ‘53 Mr. Michael J. Patino ‘96 Mr. Roger W. Patterson ‘03 Ms. Arlene S. Pedovitch ‘80 Mr. G. Frederick Perkins, Jr. ‘58 Mr. Anthony J. Perna, III ‘03 Mr. R. Kenneth Perry ‘50 Dr. Charles A. Philips ‘62 Mr. Donald R. Phillips ‘86 Robert F. Pickels, M.D. ‘63 Harold Pilskaln, Jr., Esq. ‘53 Andrew Piskun, M.D. ‘73 Mr. Charles J. Plohn, Jr. ‘66 Capt. Thomas M. Pohl ‘00 Prof. Michael E. Porter ‘69 William C. Porter, Jr., M.D. ‘47 Ms. Nina B. Potsiadlo ‘94 Mr. David N. Powers ‘78 Mr. William C. Powers ‘79 Mr. Richard Ottesen Prentke ‘67 Mr. L. Richardson Preyer, Jr. ‘70 Mr. Jeffrey J. Pyros ‘80 Mr. Adeel A. Qalbani ‘98 Mr. John G. Quigley F Mr. Ryan K. Quillian ‘03 Kathryn Quirk and William Quirk P04 Mr. Clyde E. Rankin, III ‘72 Mr. Ernest L. Ransome, III ‘47 Mr. Karl A. Rauschert ‘51 Robert H. Rawson, Jr., Esq. ‘66 Dr. Carl E. Reichert, Jr. ‘54 Dennis and Denise Reilly P09 Mr. Mike Reilly F Mr. Denis T. Rice ‘54 Mr. Trumbull L. Richard ‘39 Mr. Daniel P. Riley ‘00 Mr. L. Randy Riley ‘74 Ronald N. Riner, M.D. ‘71 Peter and Martha Riola F Mr. Anthony J. Riposta ‘74 Kimberly E. Ritrievi, Ph.D. ‘80 Mr. Thomas S. Roberts ‘85 Mr. Narendra Alexis Rocherolle ‘91 Mr. Charles S. Rockey, Jr. ‘57 Mr. Robert B. Rodgers ‘56 Mrs. Caroline Buck Rogers ‘77 Mr. John Rogers ’80 Mr. Scott A. Rogers, III ‘71 Mr. Robert S. Roma ‘79 Mrs. Elizabeth Lippincott Rosen ‘82 Norton S. Rosensweig, M.D. ‘57 Dr. David A. Rothenberger ‘69 Mr. Robert H. Ruxin ‘76 Ms. Savannah L. Sachs ‘08 Mr. Sratha Saengsuwarn ‘07 John and Janice Saidla P93 Mr. Michael G. Salerno ‘90 Ms. Lisa J. Sansone Thorp ‘87 Dr. Harold H. Saunders ‘52 Mr. John G. Sawin ‘07 Mr. Brian M. Sax ‘94 Peter and Linda Schafer P07

Mr. Erich S. Schifter ‘77 Bruce D. Schirmer, M.D. ‘75 David and Susan Schneider P11 Mr. Peter O. Schundler ‘65 Mr. Scott P. Schundler ‘04 Mr. Adam J. Schwartz ‘03 Mr. Amory B. Schwartz ‘85 Mr. Keoni A. Schwartz ‘01 Gordon Francis Schwartz, M.D. ‘56 Mr. Warren B. Scott F John and Amy Scott P10 Mr. Richard O. Scribner ‘58 Mr. Nicholas C.E. Seaver ‘07 Ricardo and Glenita Segura P11 Mr. Frederic D. Selbie, Jr. ‘42 Mr. O. Griffith Sexton ‘65 George and Reni Seyfried F Mr. Mark A. Shapiro ‘89 Mr. William C. Sharpstone ‘72 Mrs. Joan L. Sachs Shaw W60 Mr. Roderick W. Shepard ‘80 Mr. Sean P. Sherman ‘82 Christopher and Marsha Shinkman P94 Mr. G. Leif Shiras ‘81 Eric Shults, Esq. ‘63 Mr. David C. Siegfried ‘64 Mr. Richard V. Simkus ‘83 Mr. Edward H. Sipe ‘48 Mrs. Marjory Gengler Smith ‘73 Mr. Trevor A. Smith ‘03 Mr. David K. Smith ‘52 Mr. David S. Sodbinow F Mr. Bruce G. Soden ‘60 Mr. J. Sedwick Sollers, III ‘77 Mr. Frank S. Sowinski ‘78 Mr. Anthony T. Spano ‘54 Ms. Jacquelyn Sparks P11 Dr. Richard R. Spies *72 Mr. Benjamin L. Spinelli ‘56 Clifford and Mary Stanley P09 Mr. Steven K. Stearns ‘84 Mr. Hans Steinbeis F Mr. Bernard J. Stiroh Jr. ‘88 Col. Hervey S. Stockman, USAF, Ret. ‘44 Mr. A. Gordon Stollery ‘70 Mr. W. Kenneth Stringer, IV ‘06 Mr. Rudolph W. Struse, III ‘65 Mr. Lawrence J. Stupski ‘67 Mr. Brock J. Sturdivant ‘93 Mr. John G. Sully ‘45 Simon and Margaret Sutcliffe P98 Ms. Mia E. Swenson ‘07 Mr. William G. Swigart ‘74 Ms. Kristin N. Tahler ‘98 Ms. Donna E. Tatro SF Mr. Doug Taylor F The Rev. Christopher M. Thomforde ‘69 Mr. R. Donald Thomson ‘44 Mr. James D. Thursby F Mr. John R. Towers ‘63 William C. Trimble, Jr., Esq. ‘58 Mr. Thomas N. Trkla ‘81 Mr. John van Zelm Trubee ‘54

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Mr. Stuart A. Tuffnell ‘61 Mr. Thomas C. Tufts, A.I.A. ‘53 Ms. Margaret Cist Ughetta ‘82 Mr. August O. Uribe ‘85 K. Morgan Varner, III, Esq. ‘63 Dr. Robert D. Varrin ‘56 Mr. William N. Vaughan ‘42 Mr. Jim P. Vincent, Jr. ‘83 Ms. Aditi Viswanathan ‘89 P. Brian Volpp, M.D., M.P.H. ‘97 Mr. Bruce D. Von Cannon ‘76 Mr. Henry Von Kohorn ‘66 Mr. Frank J. Vuono ‘78 Mr. James M. Wadsworth ‘61 Thomas and Mary Wakefield P07 Mr. Robert G. Walker, Jr. ‘61 Mr. William M. Walker, II ‘64 Mr. F. Irving Walsh, Jr. ‘41 Frank and Marguerite Walter P09 Mr. Gary D. Walters ‘67 Mr. John R. Waltman ‘45 Mr. William H. Walton, III ‘74 Mr. Henry C. Ward, Jr. ‘57 Mr. William B. Ward, Jr. ‘59 Ms. Leslie A. Warren ‘05 Ms. Laura E. Watt ‘07 Mr. Theodore E. Webber ‘69 Ms. Ashley L. Weber ‘05 Mr. Jerome P. Webster, Jr. ‘61 Mr. Donald C. Weeden ‘64 Mr. Thomas P. Weidner ‘69 Mr. Edwin A. Weihenmayer, III ‘62 Mr. Peter G. Weiland ‘55 Mr. John A. Welaj ‘88 Mr. Peter C. Wendell ‘72 Mr. William B. Whitney, IV ‘76 Mr. Alan M. Willemsen ‘55 Dr. G. Mennen Williams, Jr. ‘62 Mr. David M. Wilson ‘53 Mr. August L. Wolf ‘83 Edmund and Randi Woodbury P08 Mr. M. Cabell Woodward, Jr. ‘51 Mr. Victor H. Woolley ‘64 Mr. David P. Wright ‘91 Mr. Scott E. Wunsch ‘92 Mr. John O. Wynne ‘67 Mr. Paul M. Wythes ‘55 Ms. Natasha M. Yaeger ‘03 Mr. Jeffrey H. Yellin ‘04 Charles J. Yeo, M.D. ‘75 Mr. Stewart M. Young ‘00 Joseph P. Zawadsky, M.D. ‘51 Mr. Leroy S. Zider, III ‘64 Richard W. Ziegler, M.D. ‘75 Mr. Aaron S. Zimmerman ‘04 Charles and Laura Zimmerman P11 Mr. James W. Zug ‘62

Varsity Club News

July 2009


PVC Join the Club

Membership Information Membership in the Varsity Club is open to all letterwinners, alumni, parents and friends of Princeton Athletics and is based on the fiscal year (July 1-June 30). Membership benefits include the following: • Invitations to special events • Subscription to the PVC News • Varsity Club lapel pin • car decal

Membership Dues

PVC Endowment Fund

Levels of Support.......................Class Year $25................................................. 2005-2009 $75................................................. 1999-2004 $100............................................... 1992-1998 $150............................................... 1958-1991 $100......................................1957 and earlier $150...................................non-letterwinners

Please consider a gift, in addition to your annual membership, to this important initiative of the Princeton Varsity Club. This fund will be used to build a legacy for the future of Princeton Athletics and its student-athletes.

c Enclosed is my check payable to Princeton University.

CREDIT CARD TYPE: ___ American Express ___ MasterCard ___ Visa ___ Discover

c I would like to make my gift by credit card. Complete information at right. My gift will be matched by _________________________________________ If you are affiliated with a matching gift company, please enclose their form with your gift.

CREDIT CARD #

Gifts to Princeton University are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.

EXPIRATION

month/year

AMOUNT: $ __________________

NAME ON CARD __________________________________________________________ SIGNATURE _____________________________________________________

I would like to support Princeton Athletics! Please designate my gift to:

Address correction requested as noted below

Princeton Varsity Club Princeton University P.O. Box 71 Princeton, NJ 08542-0071

__ Princeton Varsity Club 76 $ _________

__ Sprint Football 42

$ _________

__ Baseball/Softball 82

$ _________

__ Squash 71

$ _________

__ Basketball 43

$ _________

__ Swimming & Diving 50 $ _________

__ Crew (PURA) 48

$ _________

__ Tennis 55

$ _________

__ Fencing 57

$ _________

__ Track & Field/CC 46

$ _________

__ Field Hockey 19

$ _________

__ W. Volleyball 95

$ _________

__ Football (PFA) 41

$ _________

__ W. Water Polo 66

$ _________

__ Golf 49

$ _________

__ Wrestling 54

$ _________

__ Ice Hockey 44

$ _________

Self-Funded Varsities:

__ Lacrosse 53

$ _________

__ M. Volleyball 96

$ _________

__ Soccer 77

$ _________

__ M. Water Polo 51

$ _________

I would like to contribute a total gift of: $ _________________

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Varsity Club News

July 2009

Ex Officio: Royce Flippin ’56, Gary Walters ’67

s ba pe c is nqu ial s u e et

Hewes Agnew ’58 Jim Blair ’61 Gog Boonswang ’96 Janet Morrison Clarke ’75 Ralph DeNunzio ’53 Ed Glassmeyer ’63 Emily Goodfellow ’76 Paul Harris ’54 Richard Kazmaier ’52 Bert Kerstetter ’66 Tara Christie Kinsey ’97 Michael Novogratz ’87 Richard Prentke ’67 John Rogers ’80 Marjory Gengler Smith ’73 Frank Sowinski ’78 The Princeton Varsity Club Board of Directors

First Class U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 579 Cinnaminson, N.J.

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

Varsity Club News

Department of Athletics Jadwin Gymnasium Princeton, NJ 08542

July 2009

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PVC News - July 2009  

Princeton Varsity Club News, July 2009