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Contents

o Who’s Wh ess 2017 go Busin d & Toba in Trinida -2018

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Automotive and Aviation Services

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Banking, Investment and Financial Services

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Construction, Engineering and Transportation

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Education and Training

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Energy and Energy-Related Industries

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Health, Safety, Security, Environment and Standards

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Human Resource and Management Consultancies

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Information and Communications Technology

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Insurance 94

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Manufacturing and Retail Distribution

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Professional Services, Public and Private Sector Organisations

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Real Estate, Property Development and Facilities Management 128 Shipping, Ports and Maritime Services

PRESTIGE BUSINESS PUBLICATIONS TEAM Richard Lewis Chairman Patricia Lewis Director Marie Gurley Director

Produced and Created by Prestige Business Publications Ltd. Advertising Patricia Lewis, Marie Gurley, Betti Gillezeau, Kathleen Maynard Edited by Lonsdale Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising Limited Cheryl-Ann Phillips-Gonzales

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Layout Laird Raymond, Patrice Letren

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Nichele West-Broome Vanessa Ramtahal Administrative Assistants Copyright Š 2017 Prestige Business Publications Ltd. All rights reserved. Prestige Business Publications Ltd. The Film Centre, 9 Humphrey Street St. James, Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 622-0738/9 Fax: (868) 622-0426 Email: info@whoswhotnt.com www.whoswhotnt.com

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Special Thanks to ANSA McAL Group of Companies, Ryan Lee Young, Satyakama Maharaj (Sacha Cosmetics), TSG Consulting Photography Edison Boodoosingh (Cover - bottom photo) Christopher Anderson, Abigail Hadeed, Gary Jordan Annual Distribution 12,000 copies


Contents Massy Motors................................................................................ Inside Front Cover Citibank Trinidad and Tobago Limited.................................... Inside Back Cover The National Insurance Board of Trinidad and Tobago (NIB)...........................1 ANSA Motors.................................................................................................................3 ANSA Rentals.................................................................................................................5 Prestige Business Publications Limited...................................................................7 Publisher’s Note.............................................................................................................8 Testimonial from TSG Consulting.............................................................................8 Messages........................................................................................................... 9 The Honourable Paula Gopee-Scoon, Minister Ministry of Trade and Industry..................................................................................9 The Honourable Kelvin Charles, Chief Secretary - The Tobago House of Assembly (THA) and Secretary of Education, Innovation and Energy........10 American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T).........................................................................................................11 The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago.....................................................11 Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA)............................11 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce ........................... 12 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce (Tobago Division)........................................................................................................ 12 The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce...................................... 12 Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobgao (ECA)........... 13 Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries Limited (TTCSI) ...... 13 Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association................................... 13 Informational Lists and Indices.................................................................... 143 Honorary Consuls Accredited to The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago.. 144 Diplomatic Missions and International Organisations................................... 145 The Government of Trinidad and Tobago......................................................... 146 Chambers of Commerce......................................................................................... 147 Fast Facts of Trinidad and Tobago....................................................................... 148 Map of Trinidad .........................................................................................................152 Map of Tobago...........................................................................................................153 Index by Surname..................................................................................................... 154 Index by Company.....................................................................................................158 Chambers American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T).............................................. 11, 126, 147 British Caribbean Chamber of Commerce......................................................... 147 Couva/Point Lisas Chamber of Commerce...................................................... 147 Greater Tunapuna Chamber of Industry and Commerce............................. 147 Penal/Debe Chamber of Commerce.................................................................. 147 Point Fortin South Western Chamber of Industry and Commerce............ 147 Sangre Grande Business Association.................................................................. 147 The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce............................. 12, 147 The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago......................................11, 61, 147 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce ..........12, 127, 147 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce (Tobago Division).......................................................................................12, 127, 147 Associations Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC).......104 Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT)..................................... 37 Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA).... 13, 77 Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF).................... 37 Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries Limited (TTCSI)....... 13 Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association (THRTA)................ 13 Trinidad and Tobago Contractors Association (TTCA).................................. 43 Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects (TTIA)........................................ 43 Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA)............................11 Tobago Hotel and Tourism Association (THTA).............................................127 Trinidad and Tobago Incoming Tour Operators Association (T&TITOA)...................................................................................................................127 Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA)....................................................... 130

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Special Features Derek Walcott............................................................................................................. 79 Ryan Lee Young........................................................................................................... 93 Dr. Anthony N. Sabga.............................................................................................. 105 Satyakama Maharaj...................................................................................................115 Understanding Property Tax..................................................................................135 Automotive and Aviation Services................................................................. 14 Airports Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (AATT).........................................16 National Helicopter Services Limited (NHSL).....................................................18 Sookhai’s Diesel Service Limited.............................................................................19 Banking, Investment and Financial Services.................................................20 First Citizens Bank...................................................................................................... 22 Republic Financial Holdings Limited......................................................................24 Scotiabank Trinidad and Tobago Limited............................................................ 26 CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank............................................................... 28 Gravitas Business Solutions Limited..................................................................... 29 Home Mortgage Bank...............................................................................................30 Island Finance Trinidad and Tobago ..................................................................... 31 JMMB Group Trinidad and Tobago....................................................................... 32 NCB Global Finance Limited.................................................................................... 33 RBC Royal Bank........................................................................................................... 34 Trinidad and Tobago Unit Trust Corporation (UTC)........................................ 35 Caribbean Information & Credit Rating Services Limited (CariCRIS).......... 36 Funds International Limited..................................................................................... 36 Trinidad and Tobago Securities and Exchange Commission (TTSEC)........ 37 Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT)..................................... 37 Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF).................... 37 Construction, Engineering and Transportation............................................38 Benca Process and Engineering Solutions Limited............................................40 The Paramount Transport & Trading Company Limited..................................41 TOSL Engineering Limited........................................................................................42 Kentz-OJ’s E&I Services JV...................................................................................... 43 Trinidad and Tobago Contractors Association (TTCA).................................. 43 Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects (TTIA)........................................ 43 Education and Training...................................................................................44 Arthur Lok Jack Graduate School of Business....................................................46 MIC Institute of Technology ...................................................................................49 UWI School of Business and Applied Studies Limited (UWI-ROYTEC).....50 The Professional Institute of Marketing & Business Studies Ltd. (PIMBS).......................................................................................................................... 51 The Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago (ACTT).......................... 51 Energy and Energy-Related Industries.......................................................... 52 Falck Safety Services..................................................................................................54 HHSL Safety Systems Limited................................................................................. 55 Lake Asphalt of Trinidad and Tobago (1978) Limited...................................... 56 The NGC Group of Companies ............................................................................. 57 Offshore Innovators .................................................................................................. 58 Trinidad & Tobago National Petroleum Marketing Company Limited (NP)............................................................................................. 59 ASCO Trinidad Ltd.....................................................................................................60 Lennox Petroleum Services Limited......................................................................60 Safety Pass Alliance Trinidad and Tobago Limited (SPATT)..........................61 The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago...............................................11, 61 Fircroft.............................................................................................................................61 Health, Safety, Security, Environment and Standards.................................62 Innovative Security Technologies Ltd................................................................... 65 Renew Star Serpentine Ltd.......................................................................................66 St. Clair Medical Centre............................................................................................ 67 Grand Bay Paper Products Ltd................................................................................68 Trinidad Tissues Limited...........................................................................................68


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Contents Trinidad and Tobago Bureau of Standards (TTBS)...........................................69 AMS Biotech Security Concepts Limited.............................................................70 AmSure Trinidad and Tobago Limited..................................................................70 AMS Technologies.....................................................................................................70 AST Security International Distribution LLC.......................................................70 Ecosol Services Limited.............................................................................................70 The Environmental Management Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (EMA)............................................................................................................. 71 Gulf View Medical Centre......................................................................................... 71 Piranha International Limited.................................................................................. 72 Almawi Limited, The Holistic Clinic...................................................................... 72 Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI)............................................ 72 Robust Security Network Ltd................................................................................... 73 El Cid Day Spa.............................................................................................................. 73 Sygma Environmental................................................................................................ 73 Human Resource and Management Consultancies...................................... 74 Aegis............................................................................................................................... 76 Eve Anderson Recruitment Limited....................................................................... 76 Caribbean Resourcing Solutions............................................................................. 76 CaribbeanJobs.com ................................................................................................... 77 DRA Consulting .......................................................................................................... 77 Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobgao (ECA).... 13, 77 Regency Recruitment and Resources Limited.................................................... 78 NEM Leadership Consultants.................................................................................. 78 TSG Consulting........................................................................................................... 78 Information and Communications Technology.............................................80 Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (TATT)................ 82 Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (TSTT)....84 bmobile..........................................................................................................................84 C&W Business.............................................................................................................86 DIRECTV Caribbean Limited................................................................................... 87 National Information and Communication Technology Company Limited (iGovTT).....................................................................................88 Massy Technologies Applied Imaging..................................................................89 Massy Technologies InfoCom................................................................................90 SI Media .........................................................................................................................91 Streamline Systems ................................................................................................... 92 Digital Broadcast Technology Limited.................................................................. 92 Insurance..........................................................................................................94 Agostini Insurance Brokers Limited.......................................................................96 Beacon........................................................................................................................... 97 Cardea Health Solutions Ltd....................................................................................98 CUNA Caribbean Insurance....................................................................................99 Massy United Insurance.........................................................................................100 NAGICO Insurance (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited....................................... 101 New India Assurance Company (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited............... 102 The Maritime Financial Group.............................................................................. 103 Pan American Life Insurance Group....................................................................104 Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC).......104 Farah Insurance Brokers Ltd..................................................................................104 Manufacturing and Retail Distribution........................................................106 Angostura Limited.................................................................................................... 108 Engineering Associates Limited............................................................................ 109 MDC-UM..................................................................................................................... 110 Nescafé Dolce Gusto................................................................................................. 111 Tricon.............................................................................................................................112 CEEJAY Engineering Limited...................................................................................113 Happi Products Ltd.....................................................................................................113 Scrip-J............................................................................................................................ 114 Trade and Investment Convention (TIC)............................................................ 114

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Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA)................... 11, 114 Professional Services, Public and Private Sector Organisations...............116 Label House Group Limited (LH Group)............................................................. 118 Debt Recovery and Administrative Services Limited (DR&ASL)................ 120 KPMG.............................................................................................................................121 Access Trinidad..........................................................................................................122 BDO Trinidad and Tobago......................................................................................122 ODYSSEY CONSULTinc Limited...........................................................................123 Personnel Management Services Limited (PMSL)...........................................123 The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Trinidad and Tobago (ICATT)....................................................................................................................... 124 Brison........................................................................................................................... 124 Caribbean Discovery Tours Limited.................................................................... 124 SWF&Co.......................................................................................................................125 Anthony P. Pierre & Co. Chartered Accountants ............................................125 American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T)............................................................................................... 12, 126 EPL Properties Limited.............................................................................................126 Lennox H. Sealy & Associates Limited.................................................................126 Sacoda Serv Limited..................................................................................................126 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce ...................12, 127 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce (Tobago Division)................................................................................................12, 127 Tobago Hotel and Tourism Association (THTA).............................................127 Trinidad and Tobago Incoming Tour Operators Association (T&TITOA)..........................................................................................127 Real Estate, Property Development and Facilities Management.............. 128 Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA)....................................................... 130 Sea Jade Investments.............................................................................................. 130 Arnella Gomez Real Estate Agent........................................................................ 130 S2 Real Estate Services........................................................................................... 130 Ric’s Real Estate Services....................................................................................... 130 Realty Broker Services............................................................................................. 130 Cevara Realty............................................................................................................. 130 CPRC Realty............................................................................................................... 130 Key West Real Estate.............................................................................................. 130 Kanhai Real Estate.................................................................................................... 130 UWI School of Business and Applied Studies Limited (UWI-ROYTEC)........................................................................................................ 130 Regus..............................................................................................................................131 RGM Limited...............................................................................................................132 Servus Limited............................................................................................................132 Terra Caribbean.........................................................................................................133 1 On 1 Realty................................................................................................................133 Clean Image Carpet and Janitorial Services Limited........................................133 Dynamic Real Estate Consultancy Ltd................................................................ 134 Intrarealty.................................................................................................................... 134 J & G Supplies Just Clean Janitorial Services.................................................... 134 RE/MAX Nexus Realty Trinidad & Tobago....................................................... 134 Shipping, Ports and Maritime Services....................................................... 136 Point Lisas Industrial Port Development Corporation Limited (PLIPDECO)................................................................................................................138 SeaBox..........................................................................................................................138 Caribbean Dockyard and Engineering Services Limited (CDESL)...............139 CL Marine Ltd (CLM)...............................................................................................139 Trinidad and Tobago Postal Corporation (TTPOST)......................................140 Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Limited...................................................140 Foxx Logistics Limited ............................................................................................140 Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago (SATT)................................... 141 Shipping Solutions & Services Ltd. (SSSL).......................................................... 141 Tropical Express Couriers Limited........................................................................ 141


For 17 years, Prestige Business Publications Ltd. has produced popular, high quality, annual periodicals which spotlight a variety of industries in Trinidad and Tobago. Our three signature books are known for comprehensive coverage of diverse topics. Flip through Business Trinidad & Tobago for insight into local trends and nancial opportunities for investors both locally and abroad. Peruse Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business for a valuable directory of local businesses, investments and partnerships. Grab a copy of Ins & Outs of Trinidad & Tobago for a colourful, detailed guide to local tourism options which features cultural events, entertainment, accommodations and cuisine. Book a space for your business today and reach hundreds of potential clients.


Publisher’s Note This year’s edition of the Who’s Who in Business Trinidad & Tobago is certainly a tribute to the serious-minded people in our private and public sectors who continue to be optimistic and consider pursuing the many opportunities that exist in their mission to turn around an economy that needs good, realistic and positive actions implemented through PEOPLE.

RICHARD LEWIS PUBLISHER

This publication has always focused on the core resource of any company, its PEOPLE, more popularly referred to as human resources. When I read the messages from these very important positive thinkers in private and public sector organisations and the glowing tributes to our own citizens who have impacted the business and cultural sectors of this country, it brought me back to the conversation that success is all about the PEOPLE. For 2018/2019, we will be focusing on the concept of extending the brand beyond this printed

publication and moving towards the establishment of a regional presence to give our customers and readers more value added and cement ourselves as a Caribbean-wide brand with many channels of digital distribution and new revenue lines in the digital marketing space. We are excited about the possibilities and hope that you, advertisers, readers and users alike, will join us on the journey. Most importantly, I feel that this is the time to really acknowledge the team behind the publication, particularly its Directors, Marie Gurley and the actual life force of Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business, my wife, Patricia Lewis. In all the years of this successful venture, she has been the one who has made the dream come true for our advertisers, dedicated employees, co-owners and other stakeholders. Congrats, Madame Publisher, on a job well done.

Testimonial

CAMILLE WOODING

ERNEST KING

When TSG Consulting started its corporate journey 15 years ago, it was with a belief in the power of values-based leadership to change people and the businesses they led. That belief has informed our selection of clients, business partners and advertisers. It is the reason why we seized the opportunity from the earliest publication to today, to list in the Who’s Who in Trinidad and Tobago Business magazine. From our first interactions with the professional team Who’s at Prestige Business Publications, we recognised how closely aligned our two very different organisations were when it came to commitment to the highest standards of excellence. The attention paid to print quality and the editorial care given in showcasing each sector stands out in the advertising space. Much like TSG, the magazine’s commitment to innovation and development has stood the test of time, constantly evolving to reflect the evershifting dynamics of Trinidad and Tobago’s business landscape. Our partnership with Prestige Business Publications has worked well for TSG, allowing our local and international clients to not just find out about our company, but to also discover the context in which

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we operate. It helps that the magazine always includes informative pieces and interesting snippets about Trinidad and Tobago’s economy, culture and society. Our clients and prospects gain a better understanding of who we are through our ad, and, importantly, a clearer sight of the diversity and depth of our business environment, through the magazine. This makes our listing in Who’s Who more than an advertisement. With Who’s Who we know we can keep the TSG Consulting brand in front of readers, potential clients and partners. It is a key aspect of our business networking. We reach readers not just in Trinidad and Tobago, but in the wider Caribbean and even beyond through this consistently high quality magazine. We like to think there are not many companies like TSG Consulting, and we know for certain, there are not many magazines that offer us the value Who’s Who can. We look forward to working with the Who’s Who in Trinidad and Tobago Business team at Prestige Business Publications as we move to the next phase of our corporate journey. Congratulations and best wishes. Team TSG


Messages

T THE HONOURABLE PAULA GOPEE-SCOON MINISTER MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY REPUBLIC OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

he ever-changing global economic landscape has forced many resourcedependent economies to rethink their economic strategies and refocus their development agendas to promote inclusive growth through diversification - Trinidad and Tobago being no exception. Diversification efforts, however, can only be successful if the macroeconomic environment is conducive to competitive business practices and can attract quality domestic and foreign investments. The Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI) is acutely aware of this and is well positioned to lead the government’s diversification efforts through export expansion – particularly in the non-energy sector – investment growth and facilitation, and a more attractive business climate. The ministry is working closely with the business community to undertake several initiatives, in support of existing and potential exporters, that will ultimately expand the country’s export base, while also increasing market penetration. These initiatives include the development of a National Export Strategy, the implementation of several strategic trade agreements and the execution of a trade support and facilitation programme. Furthermore, the MTI has targeted the maritime sector and the creative industries as key areas for future growth and investment. After all, the development of our existing port infrastructure and harnessing our unique local talent are essential to Trinidad and Tobago effectively competing on the regional and international stages. To enhance our investment climate, the MTI has established a framework and inter-ministerial committee to improve the processing times involved in approving and facilitating investments in the non-energy sector. The MTI has also developed a policy that will revamp the current Special Economic Zone (SEZ) Regime and guide the growth and expansion of SEZs across Trinidad and Tobago. This initiative will ensure quality investments while bolstering export-ready entities. The government has already made significant strides in creating an enabling business environment through the creation of a Single Electronic Window for trade and business facilitation – TTBizLink. This online platform has revolutionised the way business is conducted in Trinidad and Tobago, with over 47 e-services that allow for real-time decisions, greater transparency and lower costs to the public and private sectors. To further advance the impact of TTBizLink, the MTI is strengthening the existing platform into a world-class solution that will enable electronic payments to government, automate additional e-government services, and improve the system’s interoperability with numerous trade agencies. Further to this, the MTI is coordinating with several ministries and government agencies to implement a robust package of administrative and legislative reforms that strategically target key aspects of government service delivery. The implementation of these reforms has already commenced, with far-reaching implications for the years and decades ahead. These initiatives reinforce the MTI’s commitment to facilitating economic diversification, growth and innovation. Additionally, as we strive to make Trinidad and Tobago a premier destination for business and investment, the MTI will continue to partner with the private sector as it is ultimately the engine of our economy and the key to our future prosperity.

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Messages

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THE HONOURABLE KELVIN CHARLES CHIEF SECRETARY OF THE TOBAGO HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY (THA) AND SECRETARY OF EDUCATION, INNOVATION AND ENERGY

ome of the most notable business and economic successes have been forged in the midst of significant challenges. And as the country works to navigate an uncertain economic climate, success in this regard will be determined by the ability of everyone — whether private or public sector, organisation or individual — to be creative, innovative and flexible. Having strong moral values and principles, as well as determination, will also keep us on a true course to sustainable development. To this end, the Tobago House of Assembly is accelerating its community development thrust, by implementing programmes that encourage and support a wide range of entrepreneurial activities within Tobago’s communities, and allocating more financial resources for this purpose. A decision has also been taken to expand the role of the Business Development Unit, which will provide support and training for community-based businesses, and promote youth participation in agriculture. Also key to revitalising our economy is ensuring that we are productive as we embark on a process to build Tobago, community by community. The vision to decentralise various governmental and THA services throughout Tobago must be met with the right passion to transform our communities; only then can we achieve our true potential for social and economic growth. As an Assembly, our priority is the welfare of the people of Tobago, and an enhanced quality of life for them. Our strategy is to achieve this by providing good governance, by enhancing public service delivery, and by creating a sustainable economy. This will require the input of the private sector, community-based organisations, NGOs and Central Government. Collaboration with all stakeholders is needed to enable an environment that is conducive to the growth of the private sector, and by extension, the economy. This must also be complemented by boosting our major sectors, such as agriculture, business and tourism, and seeking new opportunities in areas such as light manufacturing and technology. A sound strategy for building Tobago’s communities, as well as focused implementation and strong core values, will show that Tobago is ready and able to contribute to the national economy. Victor E. Bruce Financial Complex, 14 -16 Wilson Road, Scarborough, Tobago. • Tel: (868) 635-1203 • Fax: (868) 639-4927

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Messages

AMERICAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (AMCHAM T&T) Mitchell De Silva President

THE ENERGY CHAMBER OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (THE ENERGY CHAMBER) Vincent Pereira Chairman

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION (TTMA)

More than two years have passed since Trinidad and Tobago began to experience the pains of economic readjustment. The initial shocks, musings and finger pointing has tapered off, and what remains is a citizenry that is more knowledgeable, displays a willingness to partner with other, and possesses a strong spirit of resilience. While our economic conditions may change, there are some things about Trinidad and Tobago that will not. These include our location which offers advantages in our proximity to both North and South America, and places us below the hurricane belt. Other advantages include: having deepwater harbours on both islands, our strong diplomatic relations with the United States, our Caribbean neighbours and increased relations with Latin America, among others. While no country is without its challenges, these factors all add to the virility and

The Energy Chamber seeks to continuously improve and update our advocacy agenda to better represent our membership’s needs as well as ensure the sector’s sustainable development. We remain committed to positioning Trinidad and Tobago as the energy services hub of the region. As such, our major advocacy initiatives revolve around fiscal reform, gas value chain realignment, promoting local content, increasing energy efficiency, reforming industrial relations and exporting energy services. From these initiatives, it is clear our strategic mandates are both inward and outward looking and focus on attracting investment and exporting services sector expertise. Trinidad and Tobago’s place in the new energy order will depend on both how well we promote our country as a preferred energy investment destination and export our energy sector expertise globally. The Energy Chamber constantly reiterates the need for an efficient business sector and through our awardwinning STOW initiative we focus on helping local

The membership of the Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA) is well placed to lead the mandatory process of diversification. However, there is still much to do. Over 400 members strong, the TTMA represents manufacturers of all sizes and sectors. It is my vision that our increased efforts in foreign markets will accelerate our access to greater export opportunities within the short to medium term. In an effort to manage the challenge of limited forex availability, the TTMA welcomes dialogue with the key stakeholders. We, the manufacturers, recognise that we have a responsibility to use forex to generate growth for our economy. Such a shift in focus must be embraced by the government and manufacturers

diversity of our nation’s economy and make Trinidad and Tobago a good place to do business. As Pathway to the Americas, AMCHAM T&T will not only maintain the call for increased collaboration and engagement, but will lead by example. We will continue to educate, advocate and participate in all fora and seek solutions to bridge any divide that may exist between business, government, labour, and civil society, as they each contribute in a real and significant way to progress and overall prosperity and peace. As late American businessman, JC Penny, illustrated, “The five separate fingers are five independent units. Close them and the fist multiplies strength.” 62 Maraval Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad, W.I. • P.O. Bag 150, Newtown, Port of Spain • Tel: (868) 622-4466/0340, 628-2508 • Fax: (868) 628-9428 • Website: www.amchamtt.com

service companies continuously raise the bar. We also play a pivotal role in HSE certification and professional development training through our Learning Centre. Our local energy services companies have built their reputation as providers of world-class service, leveraging their knowledge to support operations along all links of the energy value chain from exploration, refining and transmission to downstream processing. With over a century’s worth of experience in commercial oil and gas production, Trinidad and Tobago’s energy sector has a rich history and the Energy Chamber wishes to ensure that the sector is sustainable over the next century and beyond. Suite B2.03, Atlantic Plaza, Atlantic Avenue, Point Lisas, Trinidad • P.O. Box 80, San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago • Tel: (868) 6-ENERGY, 679-6623/1398 • Fax: (868) 679-4242 • Email: execoffice@energy.tt • Website: www.energy.tt

alike to ensure that we impact our nation’s balance of payments position positively. These are difficult times, but we will become stronger as a nation because of these challenges. The TTMA is proud to work on behalf of manufacturers that drive diversification thereby securing the sustainable economic solution that we unequivocally need. TTMA Building, 42 Tenth Avenue, Barataria, Trinidad and Tobago • P.O. Box 971, Port of Spain • Tel: (868) 675-TTMA (8862) • Fax: (868) 675-9000 • Email: service@ttma.com or info@ttma.com • Website: www.ttma.com

Christopher Alcazar President

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Messages

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (THE TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CHAMBER) Ronald Hinds President

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (TOBAGO DIVISION) Demi John Cruickshank Chairman

THE CHAGUANAS CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (CCIC) Vishnu Charran President

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The Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce is delighted to once more be a part of Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business. We extend sincere greetings to the publishers on yet another excellent edition of a magazine which has evolved into a valuable resource for local businesses and those operating out of the wider region and beyond. As the recognised ‘Voice of Business’, the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber has newly embarked upon a series of enhanced services with a view to better serving our membership and the wider business community. We have stayed the course for some 138 years, founded upon the vision and hard work of generations of entrepreneurs and innovators. With a membership totalling approximately 600 companies and 2,000 representatives spanning the services, import, export, manufacturing and distribution sectors, the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber serves on several national governmental and non-governmental committees. Through its nine steering committees in Trinidad and eight in Tobago, members volunteer their time and expertise to provide input on a range of subjects – from crime and justice to trade and investment, corporate social responsibility, technology, and manufacturing.

For several years, the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber has maintained its membership of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), headquartered in Paris, France. Here at home, the Dispute Resolution Centre — the first private mediation agency certified by the Mediation Board of Trinidad and Tobago — emerged out of targeted committee activities and now stands as a viable business entity. Similarly, the Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission, Crime Stoppers Trinidad and Tobago and Junior Achievement have all evolved out of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber to their respective independent statuses. Our Tobago Division remains the sole business services organisation based in Tobago, specifically dedicated to serving the island’s business community. We at the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce stand committed to championing the many causes of business on both the micro and macro levels in the ongoing development toward a strong, sustainable national economy. Columbus Circle, Westmoorings, P.O. Box 499, Port of Spain, Trinidad • Tel: (868) 637-6966; • Fax: (868) 637-7425 • Email: chamber@chamber.org.tt; • Website: www.chamber.org.tt

The Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce extends warm greetings to the publishers of Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business on this, the latest edition of the magazine. The Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce is the only business association with a special Division in Tobago, dedicated to holistically serving the needs of Tobago-based businesses. A Tobago Chamber was first established in 1936, and some 37 years later, became the Tobago Division of the T&T Chamber, after some degree of structural change. The Division has been built on a foundation of active representation through the contributions of several outstanding members, including its past Honorary Secretaries and Chairmen. As membership grows and the Division expands, the Chairman and Management Committee continue to work assiduously towards

contributing to the critical areas of business and tourism development — among others — and maintain a vibrant national presence. The Division’s eight Standing Committees address the issues of Inter-Island Transport, Security, Environment and Business Development and members serve voluntarily. The Division collaborates closely with the Tobago House of Assembly (THA) and Central Government, preserving a critical link between the private and public sectors in developing initiatives and reducing obstacles to sustainable development in Tobago.

Trinidad and Tobago is greatly challenged by the economic downturn, due to the decline in revenue from oil and gas. The mission of the Chamber is “to be the champion of business towards the development of a strong and sustainable national economy.” As newly elected President of the Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce, I accept my duty to keep in line with our mission. The vision for not only the borough of Chaguanas but all of Trinidad and Tobago is to see the resurgence of our agricultural sector, the development of SMEs, and the steady development and implementation of ICTs. The CCIC views this as the opportune time to partner with our government to help diversify our economy. This year, the Chamber, in association with the Ministry of National Security, hosted the Safety, Security and Sustainability Expo (SSS Expo). This Expo showcased the latest technology for personal and business security, as well as energy saving devices.

2nd Floor, ANSA McAL Building, Milford Road, Scarborough, Tobago • Tel: (868) 639-2669 • Fax: (868) 639-3014 • Email: tobagochamber@chamber.org.tt • Website: www.chamber.org.tt

We would like to see Trinidad and Tobago become a self-sufficient nation, in food production and simultaneously developing export markets. With the vision and initiatives like this we anticipate positive outcomes for the country; employment opportunities, new export markets, increase in revenue, and foreign exchange. The Chamber is already in the planning stages for the largest technological expo in the Caribbean for the manufacturing, agricultural and agroprocessing industries, to be launched next year. 17-18 Biljah Road, IDC Industrial Estate, Charlieville, c/o Metal-X Engineering Limited, Chaguanas, Trinidad • Tel: (868) 671-2242 (CCIC)/779-8804 • Fax: (868) 671-2242 • Email: gccic@chaguanaschamber.org • Website: www.chaguanaschamber.org


Messages

EMPLOYERS CONSULTATIVE ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (ECA) Suzetta Ali Chairman

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO COALITION OF SERVICES INDUSTRIES LIMITED (TTCSI) Angela Lee Loy President

TRINIDAD HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND TOURISM ASSOCIATION (THRTA) Hassel Thom President

Greetings from the Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA). As the recognised ‘Voice of Employers’, and an advocate for best practice in business and industrial relations, the ECA commends the publishers of this important publication for their commitment to what has become a valuable source of information and the facilitation of important business partnerships. Having celebrated its 57th anniversary in 2017, the ECA remains resolute in pursuit of its mandate to provide employers with informed, innovative and transformational representation and quality services at the organisational, national and international levels. Such representation we believe will ultimately contribute to an improved socioeconomic environment with a robust and successful employer community. This role is especially significant given the current economic and social turbulence which our country is facing. Over the years, the ECA has established a number of strategic associations, which has strengthened its ability to serve and represent the employer community. These include the Caribbean Employers’ Confederation, International Organisation of Employers, and the International Labour and Employment Relations

Association. Furthermore, our exclusive affiliation with the International Labour Organisation (ILO) means that our employer community is represented at the annual International Labour Conference, and other global employer activities. This is a vital link given the impact that ILO conventions and recommendations have on our legislative agendas and policy frameworks. Locally, we continue to represent employers on a number of state boards and statutory bodies. The ECA’s membership covers a diverse range of organisations of varying sizes and industries from both the private and public sectors, and remains open for all employers to join. As a social partner, we remain committed to the tripartite mechanism and to advancing the development of Trinidad and Tobago through responsible representation, advocacy and meaningful social dialogue. 17 Samaroo Road, Aranguez Roundabout North, Aranguez, Trinidad • Tel: (868) 675-5873 • Fax: (868) 675-4866 • Email: communications@ecatt.org • Website: www.ecatt.org • Follow us: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn

The Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries (TTCSI) is pleased to be a part of the latest edition of the Who’s Who in Trinidad and Tobago Business. Established in 2006, the TTCSI continues to champion the services sector and remains the vanguard of the services industry in Trinidad and Tobago, comprising 50 member associations, which is representative of the robustness and dynamism of the sector. Our membership continues to grow with the recent addition of the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA). Over the last year, the TTCSI has collaborated with the Ministry of Trade and Industry to further assist the development of the services sector to become globally competitive. As such, we have played a significant role in the creation of Trinidad and Tobago’s first National Services Policy and also a critical role in the development of sector and export expansion plans for some highlighted priority subsectors. We have also

completed the first phase of the nation’s first Services Exporters’ Registry, which is to be completed by the end of next year. We continue to further assist the sector through lobbying and providing an enabling environment for services and played a crucial role in the lobbying for the passage of the FATCA legislation. As a coalition, the TTCSI continues to be the champion voice for the services sector, supporting Trinidad and Tobago’s diversification thrust as we believe that this sector should lead the way in making this a reality.

The Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association (THRTA) is honoured to be part of Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business. As the largest private sector tourism body in Trinidad, the THRTA has played a leadership role in the tourism industry in Trinidad and Tobago for the past 50 years. The Association’s membership comprises hotels/guesthouses, restaurants, transport and tour operators and several companies that provide goods and services to the industry. THRTA provides benefits and services to its members through the creation of a business environment conducive to tourism sector development by influencing government policies, programmes and legislation, which in turn stimulates investment, profitability and competitive rates of return to our member companies. In the upcoming period, the THRTA will be focusing on executing its mandate, supported by strategic pillars, including Advocacy and Industry Representation; Strategic Networking and Alliances; Revenue Generation and Financial Sustainability;

Human Capital Development; and Research and Data Acquisition. The THRTA will also be working closely with its training arm, the Trinidad and Tobago Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) to ensure that the human capital needs of the industry are adequately served. We continue to work towards creating an enabling environment for tourism in Trinidad, encouraging investment in the sector, creating additional demand, strengthening the visitor experience and fostering the coordination of the efforts amongst all stakeholders. We seek to bring about more awareness and recognition that tourism has the potential to be a major driver of the diversification plans for the economy of Trinidad and Tobago.

18 O’Connor Street, Woodbrook, Port of Spain, Trinidad • Tel: (868) 622-9229 • Fax: (868) 622-8985 • Email: info@ttcsi.org • Website: www.ttcsi.org

Corner Airways Road and Hilltop Lane, Chaguaramas • P.O. Box 243, Port of Spain, Trinidad • Tel: (868) 634-1174/5 • Fax: (868) 634-1176 • Email: info@tnthotels.com • Website: www.tnthotels.com

13


Automotive and Aviation Services Aviation Trinidad’s Piarco International Airport has been recognised in two categories in the Skytrax 2017 World Airports Awards.* The airport has achieved second place for Best Airport Staff in Central America, and among airports in the Caribbean, is on top of the list for 2017. In addition, it has placed fourth in the category of Best Airports in Central America and the Caribbean. The Airports Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (AATT) is committed to continued excellence in customer service and this is evident in the authority’s current plans and projects.

Trinidad’s Piarco

International Airport

has been recognised in two categories in the Skytrax

2017 World Airports Awards.* The airport

has achieved second place for Best Airport Staff

in Central America,

and among airports in the Caribbean, is on top of the list for 2017.

*The Skytrax World Airport Awards are the most prestigious accolades for the airport industry voted by customers in the largest, annual global airport customer satisfaction survey. The 2017 Awards are based on 13.82 million airport survey questionnaires completed by 105 different nationalities of airline customers during the survey period.

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The Tobago House of Assembly (THA) and AATT work closely in an attempt to bring airlines into the country. PAWA Dominicana has indicated its interest in starting services later this year between the Dominican Republic and Port of Spain. In September, a team from AATT will also attend the World Route Development Forum in Barcelona for meetings with airlines in an attempt to persuade some to come to Trinidad and Tobago. Talks with a number of other airlines, including a European one, have also been held and the feedback was positive. Improving the passenger experience is also high on its list. AATT is working with the Immigration Division in an attempt to introduce kiosks for arriving nationals next year. The technology is currently used in the US, UK and Jamaica. Last year, the number of self-service check-in kiosks for departures was increased and this year, the installation of some devices to help passengers through the process will be carried out.

A strong sense of place is also being created. Soon, the airport’s atrium will see static displays giving visitors an electronic experience. Huge video walls showing music videos and local attractions, showcasing the cuisine and festivals of Trinidad and Tobago and more will be shown. There will also be an interactive zone with kiosks where visitors can get a ‘selfie’ against local sites and attractions. Work stations will also be available for travellers to charge their mobile devices and watch international news while waiting. ‘The Ad Whisperer’ will also be out by August. These check-in kiosks for tourists will be located at different points to help with way-finding and destination information. Visitors will stand in marked spots and will hear a voice recording giving directions on how to use the checkin kiosk. There will be three different types of applications for this technology. One will be in the check-in area, another will be at the exit from Customs where persons can get information on hotels, taxis and things to do in Trinidad and Tobago, and the last will be in the duty-free area. Last year saw the introduction of a free cell phone waiting lot. This year, improvements will be done on the airport’s car park. The authority is working on an easy payment solution for users of the car park and a parking monitor system showing available spots.


Automotive The use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as a vehicular fuel is being encouraged in the country and financial incentives have been offered to some who make the switch to CNG. In April 2017, the CNG Vehicle Management System (CVMS) was launched. This system requires the installation of a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag close to the CNG filling port. The tag will cost between TT$250 and TT$300. On bringing the nozzle close to the filling port, electronic verification will

take place. If the system on the vehicle is valid and meets requirements, the individual will be allowed the CNG; if not, he/she will be denied. This system will enforce compliance for CNG kit installations and periodic reinspections. According to the Ministry of Energy and Energy Industries (MEEI), the major benefits of the development of CNG as a vehicular fuel in Trinidad and Tobago are as follows: - Reduction of the subsidy on liquid fuels sold in the domestic market; - Availability of the displaced liquid fuels for export; and - Increased usage of an environmentally friendlier fuel that offers reduced Green House Gas (GHGs) emissions.

Owners who took a small maxi taxi (15 seats or less) out of service would

receive TT$45,000

and those who took out a large maxi taxi (more than 15 seats) would receive $75,000 towards the purchase of a CNG-

powered maxi taxi

Several incentives are offered to those who make the switch to CNG. The Public Service Transport Corporation (PTSC) first supported the CNG mandate with the purchase of 35 new Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) CNG buses in late 2014. And in 2015, NGC CNG introduced a grant aimed at hundreds of dieselpowered maxi taxis in the country, which provide a valuable transport service to the public. According to the MEEI, “The grant was for maxi taxi owners to take out of service and scrap their dieselpowered vehicle and replace it with a CNG-powered alternative. Owners who took a small maxi taxi (15 seats or less) out of service would receive TT$45,000 and those who took out

a large maxi taxi (more than 15 seats) would receive $75,000 towards the purchase of a CNG-powered maxi taxi.” While many foreign car dealers are complaining of a stagnant field due to the lack of foreign exchange, they try to keep a positive outlook. Dealers are also quite happy with the opening of the Caroni Inspection Division since it has significantly reduced documentation time and has assisted in the reduction of illegal vehicles. In addition, an online vehicle registration database has been set up by the Ministry of Works and Transport. The database aims to regularise motor industry practices in the country. The Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC) said this will also enable transparency in the vehicle registration process, address the issue of unregistered vehicles, and provide greater assistance to the public, the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service (TTPS), and insurers in the instance of hit and run accidents. ATTIC said the database will also assist in the discovery of uninsured vehicles when reconciled with the insurance industry databases and will provide benefits to insurers and police to aid in enforcing motor insurance use. This will form the basis for a shared network with the TTPS and insurance industry, and will lay the foundation to combat incidents of counterfeit insurance certificates and motor vehicle larceny. While the used car dealers say that the decision made by the Ministry of Trade and Industry two years ago to change the permissible age of imported vehicles from six years to four years is crippling the industry, they are quite pleased that the hybrid vehicles are now tax free. Although the vehicles are more costly, with them being tax free, the final price is equivalent to that of a normal vehicle. Due to this, vehicles such as the Nissan X-Trail, Toyota Prius, Toyota Aqua and Hyundai Vezel (HR-V) are also in high demand in Trinidad and Tobago.

AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES

The south terminal will be developed as a hub for cargo in the southern Caribbean and the northern part of South America. In March 2017, Laparkan did its sod-turning for its new warehouse, representing the largest investment in the organisation’s history. The company is moving its Trinidad headquarters to Piarco and is building not just a cargo warehouse with its headquarters, but is also in negotiations with international companies to put a major cargo complex in Piarco which would generate numerous jobs. Additionally, AATT has brought in an international operator for its jet centre. Recently, Signature Flight Support, which has the largest network in the world for fixed-base operations, launched its service in Piarco. It offers facilitation services to corporate jets and other private jets, as well as a real VIP experience when people land. Not forgetting the sister isle, the Authority and THA are working on the new terminal for Tobago. A Cabinet Note has been drafted seeking approval to move ahead and engage services of a consultant to do airport master planning and start planning a world-class airport terminal.

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AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES


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AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES


Banking, Investment and Financial Services

I

n 2016, the financial sector represented 16.95% of real gross domestic product (GDP) or $15.59 billion, compared to 14.53% in 2012. According to data from the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago, total deposits held with commercial banks and non-bank financial intermediaries (NFIs) was $109.95 billion while total loans outstanding amounted to $68.41 billion of which real estate mortgage loans totalled $18.44 billion. Trustee funds under administration held with trust and mortgage finance companies amounted to $236.06 billion. The eight commercial banks in Trinidad and Tobago account for 97% of deposits held by banks and NFIs.

CONTRIBUTION OF BANKING SECTOR TO T&T

$4.6

Paid billion dollars in taxes in last decade

$11.8

Distributed billion in dividends to shareholders in last decade

$131

Contributed million to corporate social responsibility (CSR) programmes over last three years

Source: Bankers Association of Trinidad & Tobago Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago www.central-bank.org.tt Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago www.batt.org.tt

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In 2016, they held total assets amounting to $138.59 billion, $37.65 billion in investments and $4.81 billion in foreign currency assets. Between 2012 to 2016, return on assets remained steady at 2.5% while return on equity fluctuated over the five-year period, starting at 18.1% in 2012 and settling at 19.9% in 2016. Non-performing loans as a percentage of gross loans actually improved, falling to 3.1% in 2016 from 5.4% in 2012. Loans to business rose slightly from $24.8 billion in 2015 to $25.81 billion in 2016, while loans to consumers grew from $21.49 billion in 2012 to $27.5 billion in 2015 and $29 billion in 2016. Over the five-year period, loans to consumers for land and real estate fell from $721.8 million to $694.5 million, while real estate mortgage loans grew from $9.09 billion to $12.51 billion and home improvement loans increased from $1.34 billion to $1.77 billion.

Motor vehicle loans almost doubled over the period from $2.46 billion to $4.08 billion. Despite these increases, in its March 2017 Economic Bulletin, the Central Bank pointed to an overall slowing down in borrowing, noting that “business lending remained subdued” in the latter half of 2016, while “lending to consumers for the purchase of motor vehicles decelerated for the fourth consecutive quarter.” It also reported that “growth in loans for home improvement and renovation slowed to 3.7% — the eighth consecutive quarter of deceleration.” However, loans for other purposes remained robust, growing by 9.5% in December 2016 on account of rising credit card balances but the Central Bank added, “Future growth in the latter may be contained by the enforcement of tighter limits on credit cards by commercial banks.”

JSC Enquiry into Bank Fees While the banking sector remained strong, stable and profitable in 2016, those very profits drew criticism because of increased fees and charges. A formal enquiry into bank fees by the Joint Select Committee (JSC) of Parliament — Finance and Legal began in 2017 with the first public hearing on the issue held in February.


2) To determine the feasibility of state involvement in the regulation of commercial banking fees in Trinidad and Tobago; 3) To determine the possible effects of unregulated fees on consumer welfare; 4) To examine the possibility of anti-competitive behaviours in these financial institutions; 5) To ascertain the amount of profits made by commercial banks per year due to changes in fees, if any; and 6) To ascertain the trends in banking fees or charges in Trinidad and Tobago in the last year. Speaking at the hearing, Central Bank Governor, Alvin Hilaire, said the Bank has raised the issue of fees several times with the banks and relied on moral suasion. He noted that since 30th September 2016, the Central Bank has published the fees and charges of all commercial banks on its website. “This is a very novel situation. Most central banks do not do this,” he said. Asked whether he thought the banks were making supernormal profits, he responded, “I think that they are making profits. I do not think that it would be necessarily supernormal in our estimation in terms of the return on assets and so forth.” Concerning supervision of credit facilities offered by sellers other than banks, he said, “Whether it is by legislation or you have some watchdog, I think that is quite important.”

The Honourable Randall Mitchell, Minister of Housing and Urban Development, spoke of the difficulties unhappy bank customers faced in switching banks, saying, “There is a general barrier to shopping around, to moving, to going to another bank to open an account” or to move a loan. “We do not have the power to regulate these things but I think we do have some influence which we will try to use as much as possible … ,” Hilaire added.

BATT President on Fees and Charges In her opening statement at the May 5th hearing before the JSC, President of the Bankers Association of Trinidad & Tobago (BATT), Anya Schnoor, denied any collusion among the banks in setting fees and also stressed that fees had not increased in real terms. In preparation for the hearing, she said BATT had employed an international accounting firm to collect information in aggregate on

the industry and some of its findings were that over the last 10 years: • Fees and service charges were adjusted only three times, independently of each bank; • In many fee categories, when adjusted for inflation, fee increases were actually negative; • Online and mobile options have remained free and; • Compared to similar services provided by banks in the region, in almost all the categories, Trinidad and Tobago was lower than its regional counterparts. Schnoor also told the JSC that fees and charges represented 7-11% of a bank’s total revenue, and that the banking sector’s profitability per customer and per account had declined over the last 10 years. “There are many reasons for this, the primary being the tremendous increases in operating costs in all banks over the same period,” she said.

COMMERCIAL BANKS SELECTED DATA (TT$Mn) Year

Total Assets

Return on Net Foreign Assets (%) Assets

Loans to Businesses

Loans to Consumer

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

120,473.0

2.5

15,549.1

23,227.0

21,486.2

125,822.0

2.0

15,079.8

23,096.9

23,410.9

133,658.0

1.8

14,472.5

24,446.5

25,452.3

134,788.0

2.5

17,316.2

24,797.3

27,503.8

138,590.0

2.5

18,472.2

25,806.3

29,005.4

Source: Central Bank Data Centre

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES

The objectives of the enquiry are: 1) To determine the rationale for the fee structure observed by commercial banks in Trinidad and Tobago;

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BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


Republic House 9-17 Park Street Port of Spain Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies Telephone: (868) 625-4411 Email: email@republicfinancialholdings.com Website: www.republicfinancialholdings.com

For decades, Republic Financial Holdings Limited (formerly Republic Bank Limited) has held a resolute focus on its Vision to be the Caribbean Financial Institution of Choice for its Staff, Customers and Shareholders by setting the Standard of Excellence in Customer Satisfaction; Employee Engagement; Social Responsibility and Shareholder Value – while building successful societies.

The Organisation, over 180 years old, is a visionary one, with a history of continual financial growth, professional and personal development, and successful collaboration with communities to bring about positive change. It is one of the largest and most successful indigenous banks in the Caribbean, offering a diverse portfolio of products and services designed to satisfy the growing needs of its retail banking customers, corporate clients and governments, regionally and internationally.

NIGEL M. BAPTISTE

HILTON HYLAND

DAVID ROBINSON

FARID ANTAR

RIAH DASS-MUNGAL

ANNA-MARÍA GARCÍA-BROOKS

DERWIN M. HOWELL

CHARLES A. MOUTTET

President,

General Manager,

General Manager,

General Manager,

General Manager,

General Manager,

Executive Director,

General Manager,

Republic Financial

Commercial and

Wealth

Corporate Operations

Internal Audit

Group Human

Republic Bank

Treasury

Holdings Limited,

Retail Banking

Management

and Process

Resources

Limited

Managing Director,

Improvement

Republic Bank Limited

24

REPUBLIC FINANCIAL HOLDINGS LIMITED Who's Who 2017 revised 7.5" x 10.875".indd 2

7/3/17 3:57 PM


The Republic Group area of operations includes:

organic growth and acquisition, and the provision of locally-focused service.

Trinidad and Tobago Republic Bank Limited (Formerly Fincor) Republic Investments Limited Republic Securities Limited Republic Wealth Management Limited London Street Project Company Limited

Today, Republic Financial Holdings Limited employs over 5,590 persons in the Caribbean. As at September 30, 2016, the assets of the Republic Group stood at US$10.1 billion, with equity at US$1.4 billion and profits attributable to shareholders for the year ended September 30, 2016, of US$142.4 million. In addition to being a strong financial institution, the Group is a socially responsible one. Grounded by a strong belief that every human life has an invaluable contribution to make to his or her environment, The Republic Group introduced its flagship social investment programme, the Power to Make a Difference, in 2003. Through the Programme, the Bank champions the cause of the young, elderly and socially marginalised, all the while promoting and safeguarding the rights of the differently able. For the period 2013-2018, the Bank has committed another US$22 million. In Trinidad and Tobago, the Banking subsidiary, Republic Bank Limited has a branch network of 41 branches – the largest in the Nation – and the most extensive ABM network in the island, with 127 ABMs in 85 locations. The Bank is also the Nation’s largest credit card operator and has the most experienced Trust Services Division in the country, with responsibility for assets of over US$4,700 million.

Grenada Republic Bank (Grenada) Limited Guyana Republic Bank (Guyana) Limited Cayman Islands Republic Bank (Cayman) Bank Republic Insurance Company (Cayman) Limited Barbados Republic Bank Trinidad and Tobago (Barbados) Limited Republic Bank (Barbados) Limited Suriname Republic Bank (Suriname) N.V. St. Lucia Republic Caribbean Investments Limited Atlantic Financial Limited Republic Suriname Holdings Limited Ghana HFC Bank Ghana Limited

MICHELLE PALMER-KEIZER

VIJAI RAGOONANAN

ALDRIN RAMGOOLAM

ROOPNARINE OUMADE SINGH

PARASRAM SALICKRAM

ANTHONY C. SUBERO

ANTHONY WONG

KAREN YIP CHUCK

General Manager,

General Manager,

General Manager,

Executive Director,

General Manager,

General Manager,

General Manager,

General Manager,

Group Marketing

Risk Management

Information

Republic Bank Limited

Planning and

Enterprise Risk

ElectronicChannels

Corporate and

Financial Control

Management

and Payments

Investment Banking

and Communications

Technology Management

REPUBLIC FINANCIAL HOLDINGS LIMITED Who's Who 2017 revised 7.5" x 10.875".indd 3

7/3/17 3:57 PM

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES

com s.com

The Republic Group, subscribes to a philosophy of expansion through

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Y

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Y

Y

MY

K

26


BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

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BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


Mortgages Investments

30


31

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


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33

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


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35

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


36


Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago

16 Gray Street, St. Clair, Invader’s Bay, Port of Spain P.O. Box 1259, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 235-6049/235-6050 Tel: (868) 628-2944, Website: https://batt.org.tt/contact-us/ 622-0282, EXT 231, Fax: (868) 628-9718, Email: secretariat@batt.org.tt

16 Gray Street, St Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-2944/622-0282 Fax: (868) 628-9718 Email: marketing@ibf.org.tt Website: www.ibf.org.tt

Nigel Baptiste President

Anya Schnoor President

Kelly Bute-Seaton Kelly Bute-Seaton Executive Director Executive Director

The Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago isThe a non-profit among the Bankersorganisation Associationformed of Trinidad and commercial to promote collaboration on Tobago is banks a non-profit organization formed matters importance to the banking sector. amongof the commercial banks to promote Our Missiononismatters to playofa importance core role intothe collaboration the growth stability of the financial sector, bankingand sector. through advocacy Our Mission is to and play a representation, core role in the and to and facilitate theof the provision of sector, the growth stability financial most competitive banking products and andto through advocacy and representation; services customers, withcompetitive integrity facilitatetotheour provision of the most and transparency. banking products and services to our Our objectiveswith are: integrity and transparency. customers, • To foster aare: collaborative approach for Our objectives theconsideration banking sectoroninallTrinidad •positioning To promote matters and with and international thatTobago affect consistent the banking financial trends, standards, compliance and changing sector, both locally and abroad. markets and regulatory requirements. • To promote the discussion of all questions • Toaffecting play an active role in the the the banking andeducation financial of sector, public on various risk mitigation methods both locally and abroad. as well as to enlighten them on their •financial To watch options.over, protect, represent, express and give effect to the views of • Tothe work as a cohesive bodyininthe partnering with banks on matters banking and the Centralsector. Bank and other local regulatory financial and business agencies for the development of the banking sector, as well as to enhance their support for the productive sectors of the economy.

About Us: The Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF) is a non-profit organization established in 1984 to assist the advancement of banking and finance professionals through its offerings of professional educational programmes and corporate training services. We are the educational arm of the Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago. Our Council Members are representatives of participating commercial banks, the Trinidad and Tobago Unit Trust Corporation and the University of the West Indies. Ms. Marsha R. John Chief Executive Officer

Our Mission: To facilitate the continuous development of banking and finance professionals and to promote high standards of knowledge, skills and conduct to meet the high demands of a changing financial industry. Our Vision: To be the preferred learning institution for financial services professionals. Who We Serve: IBF serves banking and finance professionals seeking career advancement through selfdevelopment. We offer two educational programmes: 1) The Professional Certificate for Financial Advisors (Cert. FA), accredited by the Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago. 2) The Diploma in Banking (DIB) which allows matriculation into UWI upon completion.

Mr. Aleem Cassim President

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES

Bankers Association of ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD BANKERS Trinidad and Tobago AND TOBAGO (BATT) BATT Level 2, Invader’s Bay Tower,

IBF also serves the public with awareness-building workshops and initiatives.

37


Construction, Engineering and Transportation

T

he construction industry in Trinidad and Tobago has gone through boom and bust cycles over the last few decades, and has survived and prospered. The current era is no different and despite a downturn in the economy, there are opportunities for foreign and locals who are already involved in the sector, as well as for those who wish to invest therein. Mikey Joseph, President of the Trinidad and Tobago Contractors’ Association (TTCA) told Who’s Who that the construction industry can be a motor to help diversify the country’s economy once it regains momentum. “One of the best ways to move forward is to look for new markets so that the construction sector can

The construction industry in Trinidad and Tobago accounted for an estimated

6.5%

of GDP in 2015

15.6%

and of the labour force.

Urban Development Company of Trinidad and Tobago (UDECOTT) www.udecott.com National Infrastructure Development Company (NIDCO) www.nidco.co.tt Housing Development Corporation (HDC) www.hdc.gov.tt Trinidad and Tobago Contractors Association (TTCA) www.ttca.com

38

become part of the diversification plan of the government. That is why we need talks with the government so we can inform them of how they can assist us in getting into new markets.” He said there are local contractors who are doing an excellent job operating in CARICOM countries. “We need to break out of that and go even further. There is Africa, Central and South America that may represent opportunities. But there are trade conditions that exist and there must be bilateral arrangements so that local contractors can be welcomed in foreign markets. The energy industry is already doing this successfully. We see the construction sector being able to do it too,” he said. Trinidad Cement Ltd is one company in the local construction and manufacturing sector which has recently had a new window of opportunity opened in the Caribbean market. In April, the Jamaica government gave Caribbean Cement Company

(Carib Cement) the green light to import cement from Trinidad and Tobago in a bid to ease a shortage of the commodity there.

Immediate Outlook Joseph does not see any major increase in activity in the construction industry for the rest of the year. “The conditions are not showing signs that the stagnated state is going to improve by leaps and bounds. There is going to be some increased activity but not much.” The TTCA’s members include small, medium and large companies and make up a spectrum of general contractors, manufacturers and construction suppliers. Joseph said there are about 150 general members, with 96 being financial members in the TTCA. “Contractors are born every year. There are about 3,000 registered contractors in the country. However, many are dormant.” He believes that so far 2017 is not much different from 2016. “The Housing Development Corporation (HDC) may have tried to get small projects going and they are doing that, but in terms of work for the entire industry, most people are still operating at about 30% deficiency. Because of this,


Investment Opportunities Over the last 10 years, one of the big issues in the industry has been different governments awarding contracts to foreign contractors. Joseph said the work of local contractors stands up to the best worldwide. “Some of their work may happen faster but most times, it does not. Some things appear to be of better quality but over time, people recognise that it is worse. It is like a façade, there is paint and other finishings but in terms of durability, over time people realise that the quality is far worse than anything local contractors produce. Dollar for dollar, pound for pound, they are no better than local contractors.” Foreign contractors continue to show interest in the Trinidad and Tobago market. In April, there was the signing of a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between Canada-based Wylde Orchid Design and Management Ltd and local firm, Prime US International Ltd to construct 120,000 houses in Trinidad and Tobago. In April, the Indian High Commission in Trinidad asked reputed contractors

to offer tenders for the construction of the Mahatma Gandhi Institute for Cultural Co-operation in Mt. Hope. As for industry standards, the government and stakeholders have been working together to improve the efficiency of the sector, which will continue to attract local and foreign investors. According to a media release from the Ministry of Trade in February, the ministry is collaborating with Town and Country Planning Division to automate the construction permit process. This means that in the future, requests for construction approvals will be done online. The ministry stated that this will make investment in the local sector easier, as well as enhance Trinidad and Tobago’s standing in the international Ease of Doing Business Index. The automation of the construction permitting process will increase efficiency, reduce the logistical burden for the applicants, simplify processes and improve the management oversight. The World Bank has said that Trinidad and Tobago currently averages 273 days for a construction permit. According to the World Bank, automating the process will reduce that time frame and raise the country’s international ranking from position 149th for dealing with a construction permit.

Possible Projects Last November, Prime Minister, Dr. Keith Rowley, speaking at a meeting hosted by the Joint Consultative Council for the Construction Industry (JCC) promised more contracts for local contractors. He also urged local contractors to complete projects on time and within budget. Joseph said the government articulated several projects including infrastructure like bridges and roads that the country needs to build and reconstruct. “There is the San Fernando to Point Fortin Highway, there is the Sangre Grande to Manzanilla Highway and the Toco Ferry Port. There is a lot that the government wishes to achieve. In order to do all these things, there is one essential that is missing, which is money. While, we are glad to hear about these projects, having the ability to pay for them and build and operate them, is very important for the industry to get going,” he said. Joseph said there must be more discussion with the government and other stakeholders to improve the lot of the industry. “We have not been able to have any sort of meaningful meeting to discuss anything at all with government officials. We are hopeful that in the future we can all chart a path forward for the industry.” 11,458

22,664

120,042

656,399

2015 Billets

2015 DRI

266,486

130,064

2015 Wire Rods

129,530

901,086

Production of Billets (Tonnes) 266,486

Production of DRI (Tonnes) 901,086

Production of Wire Rods (Tonnes) 129,530

Local Sales of Billets (Tonnes) 22,664

Local Sales of of DRI (Tonnes) 0

Local Sales of Wire Rods (Tonnes) 11,458

Exports of Billets (Tonnes) 120,042

Exports of DRI (Tonnes) 656,399

Exports of Wire Rods (Tonnes) 130,064

CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION

businesses are being threatened by non-payment of work done in the past.”

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CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION


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TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION The Professional Centre Bldg., Ground Floor, Unit A 303 11–13 Fitzblackman Drive, Wrightson Road Ext., Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-1266 / 627-8020 • Fax: (868) 623-2949 Email: service@ttca.com • Website: www.ttca.com

Ramlogan Roopnarinesingh President

Glenn Mahabirsingh Vice President

Established in 1968, the Trinidad and Tobago Contractors Association (TTCA) is a non-governmental organisation that operates as a commentator and facilitator for the construction industry. TTCA promotes, supports and protects the interests of its members, clients and stakeholders, through the development and promotion of efficiency and equity in the field of construction. The TTCA facilitates dissemination and exchange of information among members, stakeholders and the public on matters relating to the construction industry via conferences, seminars, papers and discussions. The Association works to secure fair and equitable treatment, value for money and international competitiveness using international best practices for the benefit of all stakeholders.

Rm 305B, The Professional Centre, North Block 11–13 Fitzblackman Drive, Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 624-8842 Email: administration@ttia-architects.org Website: www.ttia-architects.org

The Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects (TTIA) is an organisation that promotes the ethical practice, art and science of architecture in Trinidad and Tobago. To date the TTIA has ninety-three full members who are fully qualified architects and nationals or permanent residents of CARICOM. The core objectives of the TTIA are as follows: • To advance the art and profession of architecture Mark Franco President

• To consider and safeguard matters of professional practice. • To promote and afford facilities for the study of architecture • To serve as a medium of friendly communication between members and others interested in the progress of architecture and its practice. The TTIA is associated with the following bodies: • International Union of Architects (UIA) • Commonwealth Association of Architects (CAA)

Ronald Ammon Vice President

• Federation of Caribbean Associations of Architects (FCAA)

CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION

Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects

• Association of Commonwealth Societies of Architects in the Caribbean (ACSAC)

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Education and Training

I

n keeping with previous years, education was given one of the highest priorities by the government. In the 2016/2017 budget, it was allocated $7.222 billion, the second highest allocation. It is important to note that this was the first full year of the tertiary education ministry being absorbed into the Ministry of Education (MoE).

Tertiary Education One of the most influential developments in government policy in the last decade was the introduction of the Government Assistance for Tuition Expenses (GATE) programme. GATE provided free tuition for nationals pursuing approved tertiary-level

programmes at public and private institutions, significantly increasing enrollment. In August 2016, a new policy was announced which changed the criteria for citizens who could access the programme. Some of the changes implemented from August 2016 included: • Students currently enrolled in various programmes being allowed to continue to receive their funding in accordance with the existing policy; • Students already registered for the 2016/2017 academic year to also receive funding according to the policy; and • Citizens over the age of 50 would no longer receive funding. Certain aspects of the policy were scheduled to come into effect in 2017. These include implementing a new means test. Government also has some longterm plans and support mechanisms

Catering to a student body that is more conscious that education is

an investment...

...in the future more and more students will require “their certification to be portable as they understand the global environment.” She also cited a demand for

“digital learning experiences”. Heather John, Manager, New Business Development, UWI-ROYTEC Ministry of Education www.moe.gov.tt

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to maintain GATE. These include the establishment of a National Education Savings Fund where the private sector will be encouraged by tax incentives to make fund contributions on behalf of the children of their employees or engage in other philanthropic initiatives to build the fund.

Students whose household income falls below $10,000.00 per month would be eligible for

100% funding. Those with incomes

above $10,000.00 would pay 25% of their tuition fees while households earning

above $30,000.00 would pay 50%. Within the sector, some significant changes include the opening of the newest College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAATT) campus in Chaguanas. The first-ever purpose built facility sits on 30 acres of land and will serve 2,250 students.


the global environment.” She also cited a demand for “digital learning experiences”. “We are in the throes of a digital revolution,’ she added, “and the changes in technology are occurring rapidly. Students will expect that faculty members are technologically savvy and willing to use the technology in the classroom settings.” John also predicted a change in focus in the sector in the coming year noting, “institutions will find themselves reevaluating their offerings as well as their target markets. They will find themselves revisiting their mission as many may have experienced ‘mission drift’ and expanded into areas outside of their core.”

Training As with most other sectors, technical and vocational education and training (TVET) has been affected by the economic climate, but Reynold John, General Manager of Training, MIC Institute of Technology (MIC-IT) believes that this is the perfect opportunity for the sector to make positive change. He observed that the government was making some effort to rationalise TVET. According to the new GATE policy, Level III and higher TVET programmes can receive free tuition. He has also observed an increase in enrolment at MIC-IT. As he considered the role of TVET in the present economy he said, “The trend in the coming years will be for a greater emphasis on TVET.” He noted that it provides an “opportunity to migrate to other lucrative economies” like agriculture, manufacturing and automation. He emphasised that very strong policies were needed to develop the sector. Outlining the benefits, he explained that it could be a vehicle out of poverty and could provide good economic development. “I see some good strong revisiting of the structure of TVET with a little more cohesiveness into it,” he said. “I think working together with the institutions... would be a step in the right direction.”

Education Agencies under the Ministry of Education The Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago (ACTT) Tel: (868) 623-2500/5282/ 7340/8389/8620 Toll Free: 800-2288 Email: info@actt.org.tt Website: http://www.actt.org.tt The College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAATT) Tel: (868) 625-5030 Email: info@costaatt.edu.tt Website: http://www.costaatt.edu.tt Metal Industries Company Institute of Technology (MIC-IT) Tel: (868) 663-4642 Email: info@mic.co.tt Website: http://www.mic.co.tt The National Energy Skills Center (NESC) Tel: (868) 636-8315/ 7267/ 7944 Email: info@nesc.edu.tt Website: http://www.nesc.edu.tt The National Training Agency (NTA) Tel: (868) 672-7107/8 Email: consumerservices@ntatt.org Website: www.ntatt.org Trinidad and Tobago Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) Tel: (868) 634-1315/4250/4456 Email: info@tthti.edu.tt Website: www.hospitalitytnt.com The University of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT) Tel: (868) 642-8888 Email: utt.marketing@utt.edu.tt Website: www.u.tt The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine (The UWI, St. Augustine Campus) Tel: (868) 662-2002 Email Undergraduate: admis@sta.uwi.edu Email Postgraduate: postgrad@sta.uwi.edu Website: http://sta.uwi.edu The Youth Training and Employment Partnership Programme (YTEPP) Tel: (868) 672-YTEP (9837) ext 2353 Email Undergraduate: admis@sta.uwi.edu Website: YTEPP Ltd. The National Institute of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (NIHERST) Tel: (868) 663-6130/6988 Email: info@niherst.gov.tt Website: www.niherst.gov.tt

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

COSTAATT President, Dr. Gillian Paul, has stated that the additional space will allow for the growth of the college. It was built to meet the demands of the industry and to spur economic development. In addition, the university council of The University of the West Indies (The UWI) has appointed Robert Bermudez as the sixth chancellor of the university after the retirement of pro-vice chancellor, Professor Clement Sankat after 15 years of service. In keeping with its efforts to solidify industry development partnerships and initiatives, the University of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT) says that it plans to continue to work to pave the way for the realisation of its entrepreneurial mandate and to create opportunities for potential investors to capitalise on the expertise and body of research available within UTT. Regarding changes in the economic landscape, the tertiary institutions are working to adapt to accommodate the needs of their students. A good example can be found in the approach of UWIROYTEC. Heather John, Manager, New Business Development of the institution explained that as they are preparing for their September intake “our priority is our primary stakeholder – our student body”. She noted, “our vision outlines the disciplines in which we continue to be leaders, viz business, education, and technology studies, para-professional programmes and corporate training.” She explained that they were expanding their academic offerings, catering to a student body that is more conscious that education is an investment. In addition, she remarked that in the future more and more students will require “their certification to be portable as they understand

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING

etcetera.

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Energy and Energy-Related Industries Introduction Trinidad and Tobago is one of the many global oil and gas producers which have been hit hard by the precipitous drop in global energy commodity prices over the last two years. One of the main drivers of this decrease in prices has been a dramatic increase in the supply of oil and gas from shale reservoirs. There have been major discoveries, not only in the USA – who is now setting to become a dominant energy exporter – but also in East and West Africa, Israel and Lebanon, to name a few. Consequently, world energy prices are not expected to rebound to pre-2014 prices within the mid-term horizon.

Trinidad and Tobago is

a natural hub for energy investments. This is because it has a significant, installed infrastructure base, skilled manpower and

very capable players in the energy services space.

Ministry of Energy and Energy Industries www.energy.gov.tt Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago www.energynow.tt

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This isn’t to say, however, that the energy business is no longer profitable. During the period of high prices, there was inflated demand for services and equipment, which drove costs up for energy services. New rigs, new seismic vessels etc. were built, while new supplies of steel and engineering services had to be added. The high prices allowed energy services companies to pay off financing and other operational/ commercial debts. When prices dropped, there was an oversupply which has in turn led to Exploration and Production (E&P) costs coming down by over 40% overall. Thus, precipitous price decreases haven’t necessarily meant equivalently precipitous drops in profitability for oil companies. In Trinidad and Tobago’s case however, in addition to lower prices, production has also declined. This has meant significantly reduced taxation revenue for the government, due to the composition of government’s fiscal regime regarding the energy sector.

In order to incentivise activities to increase reserves and production, the government improved the taxation regime in favour of investors. Unfortunately, these have resulted in a reduction of government’s share of revenue, without the anticipated production or reserves increase.

Trinidad and Tobago – Potential Energy Hub for the Region Trinidad and Tobago is a natural hub for energy investments. This is because it has a significant, installed infrastructure base, skilled manpower and very capable players in the energy services space. “The case for the country being used as a hub is easily made, as it’s easy to understand why you would utilise infrastructure that already exists, with [existing] capacity, rather than duplicating expenditure,” said Norman Christie, regional president, BP Trinidad and Tobago. Additionally, as a nation, the capital costs for all the investments that the country has embarked upon over the last 20 years are now generally paid for. Trinidad and Tobago has cheaper operating costs than almost any other country in the world. Additionally, Trinidad and Tobago has had a history of operational excellence. For example,


There are approximately

30 world-scale natural gas plants which have

been built in Trinidad and Tobago, almost entirely with local labour, being delivered within budget and schedule.

Trinidad and Tobago ranks 14th among 89 countries in the initial publication of the Resource Governance Index (RGI) published by the Natural Resource Governance Institute. This enviable ranking was made possible by a positive enabling environment as well as good scores on value realisation. The state company, Petrotrin, ranks even higher at nine among the 74 state energy enterprises surveyed. The survey indicates that Petrotrin received, “Good scores across the board related to rules on reporting of finances and operations”. One of the most recent and notable examples of Trinidad and Tobago’s capability was the completion of the fabrication of the topside of the Juniper Platform in-country at the fabrication yard at La Brea. Juniper is the largest platform structure ever fabricated in Trinidad and Tobago and represents

a US$2.1 billion investment by BP – an offshore structure 12 stories tall (180 ft.) weighing just over 5,500 metric tonnes.

Politics and Labour Relations One of the challenges that the sector has been facing at times, however, is a changing and difficult political and labour relations climate in which to operate. Continuity of policy direction as well as continuing to ensure that commercial operations are competitive, productive and cost efficient will be ongoing challenges. Another item on the watch list for Trinidad and Tobago is the issue of succession planning. Generally, there has been a lack of adequate succession planning at the level of the state sector in particular. As such, there is a threat that the industry may become starved of expert guidance in terms of regulation, leadership, management, and to a lesser extent, operations.

Short-Term Outlook There are more than adequate proven reserves of gas and oil to steady Trinidad and Tobago’s economy for years to come. However, there has been an issue in terms of the level and timing of the investments needed to assist in recovering those reserves. From the country’s current position, there are opportunities to apply new technology to monetising new smaller oil/gas fields and get more out of existing fields, through enhanced recovery methods. There is still much potential left.

Conclusion While Trinidad and Tobago has so far had an enviable run in terms of its energy sector, the country’s changing objective is now not only to increase GDP but also to reduce dependency on oil and gas. Increased use of technology and human capital development will

be key ingredients for sustainability in the future. Additionally, Trinidad and Tobago must have revenue management and administrative regime – fiscal, regulatory policy – that reflects the maturity of some parts of the Trinidad and Tobago basin (on land and offshore), takes into account our experiences in the energy business – failings and successes – and which maximises the impact, value and benefit to citizens of Trinidad and Tobago.

HISTORY The current rate of Petroleum Tax is 50%. There is also a Supplemental Tax at a sliding scale based on oil prices. Corporation Tax rate is 35%.

Gas is now more important to the economy than oil.

First drilling was done in the 1850s, first production in 1902 and the first marine field was developed in 1955. T&T was the first country to convert all its power generation to natural gas in the 1960s. All the majors and leading service companies have had a presence in T&T, from as early as the 1920s.

T&T is one of the oldest oil and gas producing provinces in the world.

ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES

Phoenix Park Gas Processing Limited, one of the largest gas processing facilities in Latin America and the Caribbean, has enjoyed an average 98% efficiency/plant availability over the last 24 years. The National Gas Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (NGC) has never suffered a major outage. Indeed, there has been a culture and capacity of excellence.

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ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES


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ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES


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Suite B2.03, Atlantic Plaza, Atlantic Avenue, Point Lisas, Trinidad P.O. Box 80, San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 6-ENERGY, 679-6623/1398 • Fax: (868) 679-4242 Email: execoffice@energy.tt • Website: www.energy.tt

Vincent Pereira Chairman

Dr. Thackwray Driver President and Chief Executive Officer

ENERGY CHAMBER SERVICES Representation - We advocate for our members on key issues affecting the energy sector. The areas currently pursued are: • Fiscal reform • Local content • Changing the risk and • Energy services export reward equation in the • Energy efficiency gas value chain • Industrial relations Certification - We certify companies/individuals in the energy sector through: • the Safe to Work programme (STOW) • Training opportunities at the Energy Chamber Learning Centre (including PLEA 10 assessments) Information and Networking – Members of the Energy Chamber benefit from: • Information primarily through our Energynow newspaper, e-newsletter, Facebook page and website • Insight into major issues and business opportunities through regular networking events and the annual Trinidad & Tobago Energy Conference, Clean Energy Conference, Local Content Forum. • Targeted research, with an emphasis on corporate governance, international market data and local energy sector data. • Trade facilitation by facilitating contacts and business opportunities through outgoing trade missions.

ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES

THE ENERGY CHAMBER OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

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Health, Safety, Security, Environment and Standards ENVIRONMENT Many are very concerned about saving and protecting the environment in Trinidad and Tobago and this has become evident by the many clean-up efforts throughout the country by various organisations and regional corporations. In March 2017, The Tobago House of Assembly passed a motion to phase out polystyrene foam products on the island. A committee has been set up to take steps to address the calls by many persons and organisations to ban styrofoam in Trinidad and Tobago. Further consultation is taking place on the issue. Caribbean neighbours such as Guyana and St. Vincent and the

In November 2016, government received further financial support to address environmental pollution through access to a shared regional grant of US$8.8 million. Provided by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the grant is for a regional project – ‘Development and Implementation of a Sustainable Mechanism for Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in the Caribbean.’ Ministry of Health www.health.gov.tt Ministry of National Security www.nationalsecurity.gov.tt Trinidad & Tobago Bureau of Standards www.ttbs.org.tt

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Grenadines have already banned the product. Known for the nesting of sea turtles, the country is also making strides in the protection of wildlife and marine life. In April 2017, a new approach was set up for the protection of Sea Turtles at beach events in Tobago. The approach would see a greater level of collaborative planning between promoters and stakeholders, as well as other community-based organisations (CBOs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). The development of policy is anticipated. In November 2016, government received further financial support to address environmental pollution through access to a shared regional grant of US$8.8 million. Provided by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the grant is for a regional project – ‘Development and Implementation of a Sustainable Mechanism for Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in the Caribbean.’

This country is one of eight selected Caribbean countries. Minister of Planning and Development, Camille Robinson-Regis, said the project will help this country to develop mechanisms for the environmentally sound management of persistent organic pollutants, thereby reducing and eliminating the threat they currently pose to the lives of our citizens.

HEALTH Trinidad and Tobago ranks third in the Caribbean on the World Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Index 2017. In the categories of Health and Hygiene, the country has the high score of 5.14. Health remains a major focus for the country and Health Minister Terrence Deyalsingh has deemed childhood obesity a “national crisis”. His administration is committed to this national issue. In mid-2016, the minister announced Cabinet’s approval of a US$48 million loan from the InterAmerican Development Bank for a massive state campaign against Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs). Another major move by the ministry is the ban of sugary drinks at schools. Government and government-assisted schools have been given until September 2017 to remove soft drinks, flavoured water, sports/energy drinks, tea, coffee,


The minister said four key strategic objectives of the plan for NCDs included

multisectoral policies and partnerships for

NCD prevention and control,

risk factors and protective factors, health system responses NCD

to NCDs and risk factors and NCD surveillance and research. In addition, in May this year, Deyalsingh disclosed that the government plans major changes to the drug procurement process to ensure that patients are provided with the best quality medication. He said the government will move to ensure that generic and nongeneric drugs being offered are up to standard. He added that the drug procurement process will be modified to benefit the patients of the country.

SAFETY

SECURITY

Work regarding the reform of the industrial relation laws of the country is underway. The country’s Ministry of Labour and Small Enterprise Development has so far undertaken nine national tripartite stakeholder consultations since January 2016, with the Co-operative Societies Act, then moving to consultations in respect of the Industrial Relations Act, Retrenchment and Severance Benefits Act, Basic Terms and Conditions of Work, the Friendly Societies Act, with the most recent consultation being held in January 2017 in respect of the Cipriani College of Labour and Co-operative Studies Act. Notes are also before the Cabinet for consideration concerning the amendment to the Industrial Relations Act and the amendment to the Retrenchment and Severance Benefit Act. This is according to Labour Minister Jennifer Baptiste-Primus who stated that earlier this year the number of industrial and work-related accidents in Trinidad and Tobago was “alarming”. She said that statistics reveal that for the period 2006 to 2015, a total of 102 fatal accidents occurred in the workplace. The industry with the largest number of fatalities was the construction industry, which recorded 33 fatal accidents for the aforementioned period. Strides have been made where legal enforcement is concerned with the identification and commencement of prosecution. 800 cases of nonreporting accidents (cases which were previously not reported by companies) from 2014 to 2016 have resulted in a number of victories in court.

With terrorism being a major concern around the globe, Trinidad and Tobago’s Minister of National Security, Edmund Dillon met with religious leaders on countering terrorism. After several months of discussions, a round table group of leaders has been formally established. The initiative also involves the government of the United States of America, which will assist the government of Trinidad and Tobago in treating with issues pertaining to terrorism and terrorist activities in a cooperative and collaborative manner. Also, in May 2017, the Airports Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (AATT) conducted a full-scale emergency drill at the Piarco International Airport. The Authority said the purpose of the drill was to test and evaluate the preparedness of the organisation and its relevant stakeholders to respond in the event of an incident at the Piarco International Airport. The Authority added that the exercise was done in compliance with Trinidad and Tobago Civil Aviation Regulations to ensure the highest level of safety and security measures are in place at the airport. The governments of Trinidad and Tobago and the United States have also signed a Memorandum of Intent (MOI) for a state-of-the-art border control system called the Personal Identification Secure Comparison and Evaluation System (PISCES). In a release, the Ministry of National Security said, “PISCES will strengthen the security of Trinidad and Tobago, the United States, and all other partner countries by increasing the ability of the Immigration Division to document travellers’ identities. “Using the latest technology, PISCES will give the government the capacity to

HEALTH, SAFETY, SECURITY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS

milk-based drinks with added sugar or sweeteners and juices from their cafeterias and canteens. Only 100% fruit juices, low-fat milk, blended vegetables or fruit drinks with no added sugars and/or artificial sweeteners are allowed.

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verify a traveller’s identity against both domestic and international databases. The system will also allow officials to identify individuals who might pose a threat to public security. PISCES will support the government of Trinidad and Tobago’s efforts to improve border security and ensure the safety of its citizens. The system will be owned and operated by the government of Trinidad and Tobago and all of the data collected will also belong to the government; any sharing of that information will take place subject to privacy safeguards established by the laws of Trinidad and Tobago.”

STANDARDS The Trinidad and Tobago Bureau of Standards (TTBS) is aggressively executing its mandate to enhance national quality based on its roles outlined in the Standards Act. viz. the National Standards Body (responsible for standards in all areas of the economy except food, medical devices, drugs and

SAFETY The country’s Ministry of Labour and Small Enterprise Development has so far undertaken consultations in respect of the Co-operative Societies Act, Industrial Relations Act, Retrenchment and Severance Benefits Act, Basic Terms and Conditions of Work, the Friendly Societies Act, and the Cipriani College of Labour and Co-operative Studies Act.

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cosmetics), National Certifying Body, National Laboratory Accreditation Body, and its added responsibility for National Metrology based on the Metrology Act. TTBS continues to work with all government ministries/agencies and private sector partners to enhance its national competitiveness by developing the National Quality Infrastructure that is required for sustainable development. Current initiatives include: Standards Development - Several standards are under development, including those for Pre-Painted Roof Sheeting (to improve the quality of construction products); Good Manufacturing Practice for the Food Industry (to improve quality in the food/ beverage sector and increase exports); and Tourist Sites and Attractions (in support of the diversification thrust). A national standard for CNG Vehicular Fuel Systems was recently completed and work on an energy efficiency code for buildings has commenced. Metrology Services – Empowered by the Metrology Act (proclaimed in 2015), verification activities have begun on the integrity of weighing devices (such as weighbridges) as a means of ensuring accuracy of the weight declared for containers in the shipping/export sector.

Certification and Inspection Services – International accreditation was achieved for certain inspection services which are employed in an effort to ensure the safety of imported products, especially high-risk items such as electrical products and components. In addition, accreditation is being sought for our certification services to ensure that our systems can withstand any challenges brought by local or foreign industry players. Laboratory Testing Services – Recent equipment acquisition and training has afforded new capacity for the testing of “hot sticks” and safety gloves used by electrical entities involved in work related to high-voltage electricity. Laboratory Accreditation Services – The accreditation of additional medical, calibration and testing laboratories at the national and regional levels are being actively pursued to ensure the international acceptance of test results. Training and Consultancy Services – Standards-based training and consultancy at both the national and regional levels is the clear focus of TTBS’ fully owned subsidiary, Premier Quality Services Limited, which services both the private and public sector. —With information courtesy TTBS

STANDARDS The Trinidad and Tobago Bureau of Standards (TTBS) is aggressively executing its mandate to enhance national quality based on its roles outlined in the Standards Act. viz. the National Standards Body, National Certifying Body, National Laboratory Accreditation Body, and its added responsibility for National Metrology based on the Metrology Act.

SECURITY The governments of Trinidad and Tobago and the United States have also signed a Memorandum of Intent (MOI) for a state-of-the-art border control system called the Personal Identification Secure Comparison and Evaluation System (PISCES). The Ministry of National Security said, “PISCES will strengthen the security of Trinidad and Tobago, the United States, and all other partner countries by increasing the ability of the Immigration Division to document travellers’ identities.”


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11a Kathleen Street St. James, Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 221-5781 / 374-9333 / 374-8985

Jennifer Lall Director

El Cid Day Spa opened its doors on November 4th, 2014. We proudly offer our luxury experiences: manicure and pedicures, waxing, massages, body scrubs and infrared sauna. Our skin care line is exclusively the “SOTHYS” range of products, which we use for all our facials. Our services are carried out by a welltrained and friendly staff and all our equipment and implements go through a rigorous sanitization process in between our services. We offer group packages gift certificates with a complimentary glass of wine and cake. Ideal for that corporate or personal gift! Enjoy a great and relaxing experience in a safe and secure environment with parking. El Cid Day Spa! Looking Good Everywhere!

HEALTH, SAFETY, SECURITY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS

EL CID DAY SPA

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Human Resource and Management Consultancies

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nation’s greatest asset is its people. This rings true for all countries and despite the abundance of resources prevalent in and around Trinidad and Tobago, it is the paramount factor for both islands as well. Management of the human resource aspect in Trinidad and Tobago has been developed throughout the past three decades; a derivative of the high standards required in the oil industry and the exposure from the administrative departments of foreignbased energy companies. In the past decade, the development has taken a great leap forward, echoing ties to similar trends in the world’s major

The ideal, on the road towards diversification, is that Trinidad and Tobago expands its buoyant HRM sector, eventually exporting the skills en masse or hosting the services in this country for foreign companies, taking full advantage of technology shrinking the world and the consequent globalisation. Service Commissions Department www.scd.org.tt The Human Resource Management Association of Trinidad & Tobago (HRMATT) www.hrmatt.com Arthur Lok Jack Graduate School of Business in Trinidad and Tobago www.lokjackgsb.edu.tt

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business centres, as well as raising the bar due to the increased influx of tertiary level educated individuals. There is now a major network of such consultancies that are crucial to the current standing of Trinidad and Tobago’s business and going forward, the diversification of the economy. The system that has evolved has created healthy competition amongst the consultancies, all making Human Resource Management (HRM) an integral part of the decision-making and management practice in both the private and public sectors. Trinidad and Tobago is reaping the rewards of investment in free tertiary education with local universities now offering masters programmes in HRM. This has led to the emergence of the type of problem that some nations would beg to have: a disproportionate number of graduates to nation size. It is a work in progress, ever-evolving like the

market, as the target of unlocking the full human potential is pursued. To that end, HRM entities host regular conferences in Trinidad and Tobago, covering every theme from ‘HR in the Boardroom’ to ‘Building WorldClass Organisations’. Aspects such as the essentials of HR Law, specific consulting (Human Capital, Technology), Financial and Risk Advisory or Audit and Assurance are on offer across Trinidad and Tobago, with professionals that have been able to tweak the service to suit the local market. The result is a business society that is extremely aware of what HRM entails, cognisant of the fact that it is the people that bring value to any organisation, and a relevant workforce ready to execute on the theory. With the fast pace of globalisation taking hold, it is imperative that Trinidad and Tobago is ready for the shifts necessary to keep up with changing trends. As an example, 20 years ago there were not many female CEOs or Directors at the helm of local companies. Today, female senior executives are well represented and numbers are set to increase. The presence of strong HRM has helped facilitate this gender shift, the adjustments


for the sector’s appointments, ensuring that services are discharged efficiently and ensuring fairness and transparency, the SCD was set up in 1950. It has evolved through the years, drawing upon decades of experience and vision, while welcoming technological changes of the 21st century. Its own appointments are made from the wide cross-section of industries in T&T, ensuring that all bases are covered. In a country where the public sector provides such a large percentage of the jobs, a dedicated body for those roles and the organisational culture of state

boards and the ministries, is pivotal for Trinidad and Tobago to remain competitive in the global market. The ideal, on the road towards diversification, is that Trinidad and Tobago expands its buoyant HRM sector, eventually exporting the skills en masse or hosting the services in this country for foreign companies, taking full advantage of technology shrinking the world and the consequent globalisation. Both of these circumstances already exist, now it is time to be bullish about the HRM and Management skills that abound in Trinidad and Tobago.

Labour Force by Employment Status Occupational Group

6,392

2016 3Q

6,136

6,439

2015 4Q

6,216

2014 4Q

6,298

6,510

0

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000

5,000

6,000

7,000

Total All Education (Hundreds ‘00) Total Labour Force

Persons With Jobs Source: www.cso.gov.tt

HUMAN RESOURCE AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES

required and will continue to facilitate other changes in years to come. Though this may all sound relatively new, many of Trinidad and Tobago’s management consultancies have had a foothold in Trinidad since the early 1980s, when the need to improve resource management was recognised. Though the public sector has also adopted HRM into its strategic planning, it is still the private sector that drives HRM practice. Indeed, many government institutions engage private HRM firms in mapping out a model for drawing upon the knowledge, global alliances, methodologies and resources that HRM consultancies can provide for the best chance of success. This also makes Trinidad and Tobago extremely attractive to do business with as the global standard is already in place. The presence of international icons such as Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, Ernst & Young, KPMG and PricewaterhouseCoopers lends itself to the networking required in the global market and with a combined presence of almost 150 years, provides a lot of HR experience of the Trinidad and Tobago economy. The professional ethos set by such consultancies means that the local companies have to keep pace, which they are doing with aplomb. The Service Commissions Department (SCD) provides HR solutions for Trinidad and Tobago’s public sector. Acting as the watchdog

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17 Samaroo Road, Aranguez Roundabout North, Aranguez, Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-9388/5873 Fax: (868) 675-4866 Email: communications@ecatt.org Website: www.ecatt.org Follow us: Facebook (@ecatnt), Twitter (@ECATrinidad), LinkedIn

Suzetta Ali Chairman

Joycelyn Francois Chief Executive Officer

For over 57 years, the Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA) has represented, with excellence and professionalism, the interests of Employers as they relate to labour and social policy at the national and international levels. Originally founded as an association to assist exclusively with industrial relations matters and to speak on matters of interest for Employers, the ECA continuously grew its service portfolio, which led to the birth of its subsidiary, the Employers’ Solution Centre (ESC) in 2008. The ESC’s primary focus is professional consultancy on workplace matters, a strategic move which allowed the ECA to refocus its resources on providing quality representation to employers, while still fulfilling requests for training and other related services. Overall, we offer professional Support, Protection and Advisory to your business via our expert suite of services • Free telephone advisory (members only) • Exclusive e-content (members only) • Advocacy and representation for employers • Industrial relations solutions • Professional training and development • Human resource solutions • Publications and library resources • Market research and compensation surveys

HUMAN RESOURCE AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES

EMPLOYERS CONSULTATIVE ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Give us a call today, and hear how membership with the ECA can bring tremendous benefits to your company!

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Chairman

PAYROLL SERVICES

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Derek Walcott (1930 – 2017)

“…because Art can make us love two countries with one heart...”

Derek Walcott

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s a boy, Derek Alton Walcott and his friend, Dunstan St. Omer, travelled the countryside intent on capturing the beauty of St. Lucia on canvas, ignoring the jeers of onlookers, “for no one had yet written of this landscape/that it was possible”. Born on 23rd January 1930, in St. Lucia, Derek and his twin brother, Roderick, joined their older sister Pamela at ‘The Trusted House’ on Chaussee Road, Castries. The home was often filled with painters, dramatists and musicians. Unfortunately, just a couple of years later, Walcott’s father, Warwick, would become ill and die. A civil servant and amateur watercolourist, he was just 30. Now, it was his independent widow, known as Teacher Alix, who as Walcott would write, had to “steer the house’s human freight”. The young teacher, a seamstress and gifted actress, with a penchant for reciting Shakespeare, would become Principal of the Methodist School. At 18, Walcott would borrow a couple of hundred dollars from his mother to publish his first book of poems. Then in 1949, he received a Colonial Development and Welfare scholarship to study at The University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, and in 1953, moved to Trinidad, raised his family, worked as a theatre/art critic and founded the Trinidad Theatre Workshop. He would spend the next two decades in Trinidad, before leaving for the USA where he taught at several universities and established the Boston University Playwright’s Theatre. Author of 17 collections of poetry, nine collections of plays and a book of essays, Walcott was also a prolific painter.

Over the years, his plays would be performed worldwide by celebrated theatre companies, including The Royal Shakespeare Company and Shakespeare’s Globe. He was awarded several prizes, including The Queen’s Medal for Poetry (1986), Nobel Prize for Literature (1992), the T.S. Eliot Prize (for the White Egrets in 2011), the Griffin Trust for Excellence in Poetry Lifetime Recognition Award (2015) and the Trinity Cross from the Government of Trinidad and Tobago, as well as a knighthood by the Order of St Lucia. Yet, he often spoke of wanting “to do so much more” writing and painting. Joseph Brodsky, the Russian Nobel Laureate who became one of Walcott’s closest friends, described him as the finest poet writing in English. He also noted that “a poet’s biography lies in his twists of language, in his metres, rhymes, and metaphors.” And it is in his work that we will find Walcott’s world, which immortalised those people and places that he loved. It is a country full of paintable names: Paramin, Fyzabad, Couva, where the trees rhyme. She sleeps in the country where there is no time, As my pen and your brushstroke blend in one metre. ‘Lapeyrouse Umbrella’ from Morning, Paramin (2016)

If the writer had a “blockbuster” poem, it would be ‘Love After Love’ (Sea Grapes, 1976). One fan told Walcott that reading the piece “saved her life”. In the New York Times, Julian Lucas writes “In Praise of Derek Walcott’s Epic of the Americas”, that “it is a simple tender promise of healing after heartbreak”: The time will come When, with elation You will greet yourself arriving At your own door, in your own mirror. The professor travelled frequently for lectures and readings while teaching in the USA, yet he always returned to Trinidad and Tobago to visit family, write and collaborate on new projects including Steel and O Starry Starry Night. One day, during a drive through the countryside he came upon the celebration of Ramleela in the village of Felicity, which is featured in the Nobel Prize lecture, ‘The Antilles: Fragments of Epic Memory’. His final collection of poems, the critically acclaimed Morning, Paramin was a collaboration with the renowned Trinidad-based artist, Peter Doig,

whom he met at his daughter Elizabeth’s home in Santa Cruz after the funeral service for his second wife, Margaret. I see it through crossing tree trunks framed with love And she is gone but the hill is still there And when I join her it will be Paramin for both of us and the children, the mountain air and music with no hint of what the name could mean rocking gently by itself, “Paramin,” “Paramin.” ‘Paramin’ from Morning, Paramin (2016)

Walcott died at his seaside home at Cap Estate on 17th March 2017. A week later, hundreds came from across the island and the globe to honour the poet while his body lay in state in the Parliament; the coffin draped in the national flag which was designed by his dear friend, Dunstan. Crowds lined the streets to view the military procession, members of the family, including his partner Sigrid Nama, son Peter, daughters and grandchildren, walked slowly to the Minor Basilica of the Immaculate Conception for the service. “He was a generous man, considerate of others, always willing to promote talent where he spotted it. He was a kind and considerate father, and in his daughter Anna’s words, ‘a doting absolutely besotted grandfather’,” Professor Edward Baugh stated in the eulogy. The Governor General of St Lucia, Dame Pearlette Louisy wrote ‘On the Passing of a Patriot’ that he “pledged not to leave home until he had showcased every inch of his island “in paint and in words,” and in so doing, has so faithfully shared St. Lucia with the world that it has come to know us, and to understand the endearing love and passion which shaped both him and his work. Indeed, he showed us the beauty of our country through his eyes.” With a moving tribute, which included a gun salute and where among the hymns sung was Walcott’s lyrical ‘The Sower’, Derek Walcott was laid to rest after final rites, “in everlasting peace” at the Inniskilling Monument on Morne Fortune, overlooking his beloved city and the sea. “When he left the beach, the sea was still going on” from Omeros (1992)

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Information and Communications Technology

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ver the last 10-15 years, Trinidad and Tobago has done well to lay a platform of ICT infrastructure and connectivity. This infrastructure includes multiple data centres, an Internet Exchange Point (IXP), hosting facilities, a DNS root server, five international subsea cables as well as terrestrial fibre. Mobile network coverage is at 100% and mobile penetration has hovered around 145% over the last three years, which ranks this small Caribbean nation in the top quartile globally.

Market Evolution Over the last few years, the telecommunications sector has gone

Internet Service Providers: Air Link Communications Columbus Communications Trinidad Limited Digicel (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited NOVO Communications Limited (formerly Diversified Technologies Limited) Green Dot Limited Lisa Communications Limited Massy Communications Limited (formerly Three Sixty Communications Limited) Massy Technologies Infocom (Trinidad) Limited [formerly Illuminat (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited] Open Telecom Limited Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (TSTT)

Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (TATT) www.tatt.org.tt

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through several rounds of increased competition, thereby enhancing affordability, which has led to accelerated market consolidation. In 2014, Digicel, the largest mobile player in the region, bought the submarine cable assets of Global Caribbean Fibre and Global Caribbean Network to create a fibre optic cable network of approximately 3,100km providing capacity from Trinidad in the southern Caribbean to Puerto Rico in the north. Cable and Wireless (C&W) which has traditionally held a 49% share of the incumbent state telecoms provider – Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago (TSTT) – has been required to relinquish that holding ever since it fully acquired Columbus International (trading as FLOW) in 2015 – a main domestic competitor. In turn, in 2016, C&W was subsequently bought by London-based telecom giant Liberty Global for US$5 billion.

TSTT has been getting in on the act too. Just this month (May 2017) the company purchased 100% of the shares of Massy Communications for $255 million. The purchase will allow TSTT to have immediate access to an additional 34,000 homes in Diego Martin, Port of Spain, Trincity, Arima and San Fernando, which Massy Communications has already passed with fibre optic technology.

Trinidad and Tobago - Potential To Become a Regional Hub Trinidad and Tobago is fortunate in that it lies below that transatlantic hurricane belt. As such, it is much less prone to natural disasters as compared to many of its Caribbean and Latin American counterparts such as Puerto Rico, Jamaica and The Bahamas. This makes the country a good centre for the location of regional data centres. Commentators from the UK-based Oxford Group report that, “The [ongoing] development of Tier-3 data centres with security certifications in Trinidad and Tobago… means the sector may have reached the critical mass needed to persuade clients [to host their data locally].” One company which has been building out operations in


Spectrum The Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (TATT) has indicated that there are plans afoot to auction the 700 megahertz spectrum band to add capacity to the market. Given that data is the single biggest growth area in mobility, further announcements on this spectrum band are anxiously anticipated.

Legislation The legislation which covers the telecommunications sector is in place, although needed amendments to the Telecommunications Act and attendant regulations have been slow in coming. The key regulatory aspects that are missing however are specific policies, laws and regulations that would govern the online financial/trading environment. For example, it is not clear whether a domestic (or international)

IT service provider operating in the domestic online payments space should be subject to oversight by the Central Bank. There is also a lack of clarity with regard to issues of cross-border taxation, standards for sharing credit information, standards for information security and privacy, as well as institutional infrastructure to facilitate individual citizen/business redress in the event of an e-commerce related trading dispute. As with other CARICOM territories, other areas requiring attention include:

comprehensively in place for some time. This however has not translated into a vibrant e-payments availability dynamic for local firms. The population with access to credit cards stands at only 15% and the majority of both the citizen and business population – as well as the government – still do not have access to digital payment (and receipt of digital payment) technology through the local banking sector.

• Data Protection including Privacy Impact Assessment and Government Information Systems

Over the past decade, Trinidad and Tobago has laid an enviable foundation of telecommunications infrastructure and stands out as a gem within the Caribbean from a communication and internet access perspective. The challenge will be to translate that foundation into accelerated economic and social development progress for its citizens. In this regard, the government needs to fast-track its efforts to digitise its internal processes and e-services. The private sector needs to convert cheap bandwidth and data-centre availability into a vibrant and innovative e-commerce dynamic which will drive innovation, increase incomes, bolster exports, and create a prosperous, diversified and resilient economy for this high potential nation state.

• Consumer Protection Guidelines for Online Transactions • Electronic Payment Offences • E-Evidence

E-Commerce and E-Payment Many of the core electronic payment infrastructures are in place. In this regard, the automated clearing house, the real time gross settlement system, the inter-bank payment system, pointof-sale devices, automated teller machines, automated bill payment services, and the international credit card switch have all been

Conclusion

Fixed Telephone (Landline) Operators:

Mobile Telephone:

Columbus Communications Trinidad Limited

Digicel (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited

Digicel (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited

Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (TSTT)

Massy Communications Limited (formerly Three Sixty Communications Limited) RVR Technologies Limited Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (TSTT)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

Trinidad to manage their regional portfolio of services, is Cable and Wireless/Liberty Global. “There are many elements that made Trinidad and Tobago the firm’s obvious choice, including its vastly higher education levels compared to regional peers and the overall amount of resources within the country. Trinidad is going to become the hub for delivering our managed services for all English-speaking countries, including Trinidad” says David D’Oliveira, Vice President of C&W Business Trinidad. The result of all of this is that corporate customers are benefiting from better quality services, lower prices, increased bandwidth and fewer concerns regarding business continuity.

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25 projects successfully completed on time over the last 24 months.

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Ryan Lee Young Creating His Own Opportunities

Ryan Lee Young

“H

ow can I now make this into something that will benefit not just one organisation, but the industry; and not just the local industry but the global industry?” Those words sum up the view of Ryan Lee Young, one of Trinidad and Tobago’s brightest young entrepreneurs. As he asked himself this question, he drew upon his considerable experience of both the accounting and energy sectors, coupled with the 21st century technology so readily available, and decided to form Offshore Sharing Solutions (OSS). The concept is typically born of an accounting brain; trim the wastage encountered by companies and make it super efficient. “There is a lot of wastage and a lot of duplication and they do not utilise their excess capacities.” OSS has begun in the energy industry but ‘Offshore’ is slightly misleading because their product can be applied to any sector, anywhere. “The good thing about a startup is that you can change to suit the market. The market is pushing us towards licensed products, certain users want their own operating systems, want their own applications, so we’re now licensing the software; we tailor it, rebrand it and add ‘Powered by OSS’.” But what powers the founder and CEO, whose product have already received global plaudits and acclaim? Conversing with Lee Young gives the idea that his ethos is about not just removing the excess but doing so with a view to simplifying matters. The Arima native had grand

ambitions of becoming a marine biologist until he “was forced into Accounting” by his grandmother, who said, “There is no money in marine biology!” His family has a background in accountancy... “the Chinese side,” he laughs. Lee Young’s relaxed manner belies the stereotype of the busy go-getter at the helm of one of the world’s most exciting and attractive start-ups. Perhaps it’s his firm knowledge of what his company will bring to various industries or he simply has his gear engaged in a calm ‘drive’ all of the time. With aspirations of working with sea animals cast aside, he left for London to become a Certified Accounting Technician before starting his Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) qualification. Lee Young then began his seven-year upward trajectory through his first employer, one of the big four of global accounting, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Ltd. Drive. Ambition led to him becoming Financial Controller for the Energy Infrastructure & Utilities Group where he says, “That got me into oil and gas.” What it also did was expose him to the inefficiencies that exist within the energy industry and the first seeds of OSS began taking root with the benefit of moving away from solely dealing with numbers, especially as he states unequivocally that “I am good at finance but I don’t particularly like it.”

I was able to challenge things that no one else would. If it works then fine but I would ask ‘Can it not work even better?’ Returning to Trinidad and Tobago in 2009, his portfolio expanded into the service industry as CFO of Tiger Tanks before joining Trinity Exploration. It offered Lee Young a unique and unhindered perspective of an age-old industry. “It brought a different twist to it. With a financial background, coming into operations and asking why there is so much wastage etc., it gave a very open view. I was able to challenge things that no one else would. If it works then fine but I would ask ‘Can it not work even better?’ It’s a culture that is extremely difficult to

change but that is what OSS is attempting to do and it is not just about Trinidad and Tobago but all over the world. It takes a lot of work.” Once Lee Young decided to act upon the niche that he recognised and wanted to exploit, he formed a strong team around him that shared his vision and thought in 21st century terms, beyond the confines of a local market. Shirley Cansfield, John Gransaull and Geoff Ingham are the likeminded individuals that moulded into the team that got OSS almost immediate recognition. Lee Young takes up the story of April 2016: “We got accepted to be part of the Alpha programme at the Collision Tech Conference in New Orleans and I didn’t see anything big in it until we got there and people were saying ‘you got into Alpha? We didn’t get accepted.’ So clearly it was a big deal.” He continues with his ubiquitous modest tone, “After they reviewed, we were told that we got into the pitch competition – again it’s quite limited to start-ups with great ideas. So, we took part in the pitch which was nerve wracking as it’s in front of thousands of people...I am quite reserved and don’t like public speaking.” Liking it or not, the conference ended with OSS finishing in the top 10 of over 400 start-ups, gaining invaluable benefits from potential funding and networking. It was the global rubber stamp of approval to set OSS on its way. The father of two returns to his first love to unwind – fishing. We exercise reluctance and do not test the universal trait of fishermen’s tales though we would expect Lee Young to practise the same lack of exaggeration for what may have been some fine achievements on the water, as he has done with business success. This universal thinker has set in place an idea that emanates from Trinidad and Tobago but will be global in its execution. As Trinidad and Tobago pontificates about diversification, Lee Young is exporting from a service perspective and points out, “It’s tough. People think that it’s all glory but it’s hard and you have to keep on sticking at it, finding ways around blocks you never thought about; if you don’t have the stomach for it then you cannot succeed. You need tenacity and to forget the naysayers. As we have proven, there are a lot of bright people and a lot of opportunities in Trinidad and Tobago.” Ryan Lee Young is proof that you can create your own.

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Insurance

T

he insurance industry faces some key challenges in 2017/2018 but will also embrace several positive developments, according to the Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC).

Significant Developments The most notable development impacting the industry was the pending passage of the new Insurance Bill 2016, ATTIC said. “During the year (and into 2017) ATTIC was able to articulate its position on the Bill in its meetings with the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago and the Opposition. These comments were documented and circulated among the Ministry of Finance, the

“Insurance companies will be forced to maintain

higher levels of capital which increase the stability and hence security of companies in the insurance industry.”

Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC) www.attic.org.tt Ministry of Finance www.finance.gov.tt

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Opposition and the Central Bank. The members of ATTIC’s insurance committee also appeared before the Joint Select Committee of Parliament for the Insurance Bill 2016 which will be submitting its final report soon,” ATTIC told Who’s Who in May 2017. Another significant development was the passing of the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA). However, ATTIC noted, it has expressed its concerns to the Ministry of Finance that insurance companies who are subject to the provisions of the Act were still to be fully apprised of their reporting requirements. Also in 2016, ATTIC lobbied for the payment of reinsurance premiums to be recognised as an item of trade by the Ministry of Finance, the Central Bank and the Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago. “This will enable members’ requests for foreign exchange to meet their reinsurance obligations to be given equal priority as that afforded to tangible imports by

their bankers. Reinsurance cover is a requirement of the current legislation and is monitored by the industry’s regulator, the Central Bank. This request is under consideration,” ATTIC said. Based on feedback from its general insurance members, ATTIC has also made representations to the Central Bank for the exemption of general insurance classes of business, health and term life insurance from anti-money laundering (AML) and combatting of terrorist financing (CTF) requirements. ATTIC said its request was “favourably received” and that, “the Central Bank is currently preparing a policy proposal to recommend legislative amendments in this regard.” At the request of the Law Association of Trinidad and Tobago, ATTIC has submitted comments and recommendations on the proposed Motor Vehicle Insurance (Third Party Risks) Bill. “We are hopeful that proposals for amendment to this legislation as well as the Motor Vehicle Accident Fund will be successfully addressed in this current Parliament,” ATTIC said. Noting that there was an increase in the number of fraudulent insurance certificates in 2016, ATTIC has cautioned the motoring public to


would strengthen the industry because of its risk-based approach to managing insurance companies. “Insurance companies will be forced to maintain higher levels of capital which increases the stability and hence security of companies in the insurance industry.”

Key Issues/Challenges

Already in place is the new vehicle online validation system, launched in May 2017, which provides

The availability of foreign exchange for reinsurance, the increase of fraudulent motor vehicle certificates, and the availability and cost of vehicle parts all continue to present challenges in meeting customer service expectations as they slow the claim settlement process, ATTIC said. It also pointed out that the placement of business on the overseas market reduced the size of the local market while increasing the need for foreign exchange to settle those direct placements. “ATTIC continues its effort to meet with the Ministry of Finance and the Board of Inland Revenue to resolve other issues of high importance such as the revision of the taxation of life insurance companies, taxes on pension payments and portability of pension plans,” the Association said.

Major Developments Looking forward, the Association said: “ATTIC fully supports the expeditious passage of the Insurance Bill 2016 and regulations which, in our opinion, will protect the interests of policyholders, strengthen corporate governance, raise the standards of professionalism within the industry, and improve accountability.” Noting that the Bill should be enacted in 2017, ATTIC said it

24-hour access to the public via the internet and is a free and alternate method of quickly checking unique vehicle information in various scenarios such as:

An owner needing to

verify transfer or prove ownership

A third party needing to

verify ownership A finance institution needing to verify ownership. Welcoming the service, ATTIC said in a press release that benefits would include: • Transparency in the vehicle registration process • Addressing the issue of unregistered vehicles

• Greater assistance to the public, the TTPS, and insurers in the instance of hit and run accidents • Assisting in the discovery of uninsured vehicles when reconciled with the insurance industry databases • Providing benefits to insurers and police to aid in enforcing motor insurance use • Forming the basis for a shared network with the TTPS and insurance industry, and • Laying the foundation for combating incidents of counterfeit insurance certificates and motor vehicle larceny. On the industry outlook for 2017/2018, ATTIC said: “We envision the insurance industry as a significant contributor towards the sustainable economic development of Trinidad and Tobago. We saw the finance sector grow in 2015 and 2016 by 8.4% and 3.8% respectively. Going forward, however, we may see some levelling off of growth, due to the current economic climate in Trinidad and Tobago. We can expect continued growth for life insurance companies in premium income, investment income and profitability due to the increasing interest rate environment.” Over the next two years, ATTIC will continue to discuss pertinent issues that may arise and affect the industry, uphold the goodwill of the industry by dispelling stereotypes and being the benchmark for customer service to clients, continue to work with stakeholders to enhance industry relevance, and ensure that local and international best practices are adhered to in meeting industry standards. It will also be executing campaigns to mitigate against instances of fraud as well as offering education and public advocacy programmes on financial literacy.

INSURANCE

verify that the agent or salesperson from whom they purchase insurance is properly licensed by the Central Bank. “We also continue collaboration with the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service (TTPS) and the Transport Commission to address this practice,” the Association said.

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INSURANCE


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CUNA Caribbean Insurance is a member of CUNA Mutual Group and the leading provider of insurance solutions for credit unions and their members. Backed by an international organization with over 80 years of market insights and an asset base of USD 18.5 billion, we provide affordable insurance solutions to millions of people in the Caribbean. We strive to understand and meet the needs of those we serve by offering products that add value to their lives. With the support of our dedicated team we service 12 territories across the Caribbean, including Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada, St. Kitts, Dominica, Montserrat, Curacao and Antigua.

Andre Goindoo

Managing Director &

For All People: Our tagline “For All People” is an extension of our belief that “…everyone should feel the comfort of financial security.” This philosophy informs how we do business and is a testament to our commitment for delivering quality insurance products and services to our customers.

Our line of insurance products includes: -

The Family Indemnity Plan Critical Illness Loan Protection Life Savings Mortgage Cover

Lana Forbes Vice President Sales, Product & Branding

Mukesh Mallian

Vice President Operations & Information Technology

Rayon Kirby Vice President Finance

Our mission: Contact us for more information on our insurance products: CUNA Caribbean Insurance Society Limited Savannah East, Third Floor, 11 Queen’s Park East, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, W.I., P.O. Box 193 T: (868) 628-CUNA (2862) F: (868) 628-3568 CUNA Caribbean Insurance Jamaica Limited #2a, Manhattan Road, Kingston 5, Jamaica T: (876) 929-3570/2 F: (876) 929-1630

Rosemarie A. Henry Vice President Risk & Compliance

Wanda Bernard

Vice President Human Resources & Corporate Services

www.cunacaribbean.com

INSURANCE

ion “For All

CUNA Caribbean Insurance

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(8 8)

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ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO INSURANCE COMPANIES 8 Stanmore Avenue, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 624-2817 or 625-2940 • Fax: (868) 625-5132 Email: mail@attic.org.tt • Website: www.attic.org.tt

Paul Traboulay President

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Established in 1966, the members of the Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC) include all life insurance companies, the majority of general insurance companies, as well as insurance intermediaries including brokers, adjusters and other entities with an involvement in the Trinidad and Tobago Insurance industry. As the voice of the insurance industry, ATTIC is committed to advancing the interests of its membership and ultimately the policy holding public. ATTIC pursues these interests through its collaborative work with other private sector organisations involved with trade and commerce, various governmental bodies and the Insurance regulator in providing the industry’s perspectives on matters of public interest, risk and insurance, legislative development, public education and capital development and mobilization. ATTIC continues to make recommendations to the National Budget on behalf of the industry, and has an established Code of Ethics in support of robust corporate governance and service to all policyholders and other stakeholders.


Dr. Anthony N. Sabga (1923 – 2017)

Mover and Shaker

T

Dr. Anthony N. Sabga

he passing of Dr. Anthony N. Sabga, ORTT, on May 3, at the age of 94, saw the passing of an era. Dr. Sabga was one of a generation of businessmen and entrepreneurs who shaped the post-war and postcolonial economies of Trinidad & Tobago and the English-speaking Caribbean. He was born in Syria in 1923, and emigrated to Trinidad in 1930 at the age of seven with his parents, two brothers and two sisters. His earliest experience of business was running the family store on Queen Street in Port of Spain at age 14, after his father returned to Syria for an extended period. From the early introduction, the young Sabga never followed any other career but commerce. He left his father’s store and struck out on his own after the Second World War, and began a successful import and distribution business. Trinidad and Tobago at the time was underdeveloped and had little local production capacity. It was at this time (in 1948) that he formed the still existing Standard Distributors, which would be the first company in the ANSA Group. Dr. Sabga was able to secure the distribution rights in the early 1950s for famous international products like Bosch appliances, Heidelberg printing presses, and Frico milk, which became iconic brands locally. He is responsible for the setting up of more than 200 printing businesses throughout the Englishspeaking Caribbean.

With the coming of independence, Dr. Sabga answered the call of the new government in the mid-1960s and formed ANSA Industries, which was the first appliance manufacturing concern in the country. The company built refrigerators from the ground up, and manufactured televisions, cookers and other household appliances. The venture was so successful, ANSA Industries won the first Prime Minister’s Export Award in 1968. However, the business did not last. In the 1970s, Dr. Sabga ventured into construction and garment manufacturing, in addition to his food and dry-goods distribution businesses. His significant accomplishments during this period were the Regents Park development, which was built on reclaimed land on the northwest coast of the island. In this period, he also undertook investments in Barbados. The Norman Centre in Bridgetown is one of his earliest business ventures in Barbados, which today includes financial services and distribution via Standard Barbados.

With the coming of independence, Dr. Sabga answered the call of the new government in the mid-1960s and formed ANSA Industries, which was the first appliance manufacturing concern in the country. In the early 1980s, the ANSA Group of companies included Standard Distributors, Crown Industries, Farmhouse Industries, Norman Investments, Standard Barbados, ANSA Construction, Bell Furniture and Standard Equipment. But this was also a period of turmoil in the local economy when the “oil boom” ended in 1983, and the economy began a long period of stagnation. One of the consequences of the downturn was a devaluation, which

severely affected the old McEnearney Alstons Group of Companies. The group went into receivership, its share price plummeted to below $1, and was on the verge of collapse. Local investors saw it as an opportunity to buy, break up, and sell the assets. Dr. Sabga had a different vision: he proposed to save the 3,000 jobs which were in jeopardy. Instead of buying the existing shares, Dr. Sabga proposed the creation of new shares to preserve the existing shareholders’ value. The strategy was wildly successful. Today, ANSA McAL, as the new conglomerate was called, comprises 70 companies and more than 5,000 employees with a share price (as of June 2017) of $65.48. Handing control of ANSA McAL to his son, current Chairman and Chief Executive, A. Norman Sabga, in 2000, Dr. Sabga then turned his attention to banking. He had formed the ANSA Fleming Merchant Bank, in partnership with London Merchant Bank, Robert Fleming Ltd, in 1994. The ANSA Merchant Bank Ltd, now an interlocking financial entity with TATIL Insurance and TATIL Life, is today fully owned by the ANSA McAL Group. In addition to his business success, Dr. Sabga’s life also included a significant amount of philanthropy, via the ASNA McAL Foundation which supports several charitable institutions. His most significant achievement was the creation of the Anthony N. Sabga Caribbean Awards for Excellence. It is the only awards programme in the region which gives significant awards to Caribbean people in arts, sciences, civic work and entrepreneurship. Dr. Sabga was also recognised many times by government and commercial and civic institutions for his many contributions to national life. He was, inter alia, awarded the Order of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago in 2011, presented with the Key to the City of Port of Spain in 2016, an honorary doctorate from The University of the West Indies (LLD, Honoris Causa) in 1998, recognised by the Trinidad & Tobago Chamber of Commerce (2008), the Chaguanas Chamber of Commerce (2016) and named an Ernst & Young Master Entrepreneur (1998).

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Manufacturing and Retail Distribution

T

rinidad and Tobago’s manufacturing sector, traditionally one of the pillars of the non-energy sector, continues to make its contribution to the economy while the contribution from the energy sector has fallen due to the slide in global energy prices. Paul Scott, President of the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ) who visited Trinidad in May 2017, praised Trinidad and Tobago’s manufacturing sector as the region’s most robust and vibrant. Apart from foreign recognition of the country’s manufacturing sector, other specialised manufacturing and

• T&T manufacturing industry is competitive and locally produced

goods can enter 32 markets worldwide without attracting import duty.

Canada, EU and USA have removed import duties on several T&T-produced goods.

• T&T goods attract 0% import

duty in most Caribbean markets.

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T&T has trade agreements

with Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba and Dominican Republic and trade agreements with EL Salvador, Guatemala will be ratified shortly.

Chile is another potential export market for T&T.

trade groups also remain optimistic about the sector’s future outlook. Christopher Alcazar, President of the Trinidad and Tobago’s Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA) told the Who’s Who magazine that the manufacturing sector has been holding its own for the most part, despite the existing national economic challenges. He said manufacturers remain optimistic that they can rally through this period and turn these challenges into opportunities. “In each company, leaders are continuously assessing and making decisions which will ensure survival. Some of our manufacturers are forced to curtail production and reduce their shifts in some circumstances according to demand and other factors. There are those who have dropped certain lines as a result of rationalising because of shortfall in foreign exchange.” Alcazar also said that other manufacturers have sought new

markets during this period so as to grow their businesses and earn foreign exchange, and that the current climate has led them to become more creative and innovative. “I suppose I can cite this as a positive occurrence which has emerged from our current circumstances. This would be something we needed to do anyway because the global marketplace is very competitive and it is the global marketplace in which we need to become substantial players,” Alcazar said. According to statistics Alcazar provided, the sector continues to employ over 55,000 persons. “The manufacturers I have spoken with are adamant to hold on to good employees and so the companies have tried to adjust themselves to maintain their headcount as far as possible and persevere through this difficult financial period. Big pay raises are sometimes difficult to grant during tough times, so employers are trying new ways to become better to their employees outside of monetary incentives.” Alcazar is adamant that manufacturers are the ones who are willing to take on the challenge


10,000 8,000

2,000 0

2012

2013

2014

8,288.8

4,000

8,549.0

6,000

2015

2016

Source: Central Bank Data Centre

MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION

GDP at Market Prices Manufacturing (TT$ Mn)

12,000

8,979.7

Alcazar pointed to work that the TTMA has been doing on analysis of growth of the sector, and they anticipate short- to medium-term growth of the sector from 3% to 5% over the next five years. However, he said a number of factors must come into play for this to materialise since the manufacturing sector does not have control over certain outcomes. “We need governmental processes to become more efficient. Our border agencies such as the Chemistry, Food and Drug Division (CFDD), Customs, and Bureau of Standards need to be working optimally and be properly resourced in order to achieve this. Inefficiencies in the system need to be addressed urgently. For many manufacturers, growth would come from exporting but to realise this goal, we cannot meaningfully move forward without fixing inefficiencies in our system.” He also spoke about how innovative the sector is becoming and gave

aware of people losing jobs in many other sectors, their members are continuously looking for the right individuals to join their teams. “A strong work ethic and an innovative personality would be a winning combination to join any of our companies. Other than being a substantial employer, it is essential for our citizens, to be aware that the manufacturing sector affects our import bill in a positive manner and that ‘buying local’ is very important, especially during a financial downturn. As citizens, we need to become invested in seeing our economy turn around and we all can play a part in making this recovery possible”. Alcazar remains optimistic that with the right employees, efficient governmental processes and innovative approaches, the manufacturing sector will lead the economy to sustainability and stability which would be greatly welcomed by the government, the manufacturing sector and all citizens of Trinidad and Tobago.

10,122.4

Growth Projection

examples of innovation happening in the food and beverage, printing and packaging as well as construction sectors. He said the linkage between the agricultural sector and manufacturing (agroprocessing) is also showing great promise. “I wouldn’t want to single out any particular company or project because I feel that we are all working arduously in our areas. I can see that we are all trying to become more innovative, some by re-engineering processes, others by investment in capital equipment and others by entering large international markets.” Despite the advances of the manufacturing sector in the middle of a recession, he also acknowledged some challenges. He said that accessing foreign exchange is a major challenge. “I believe most people in our nation have felt the effects of our foreign exchange issue. We know that this is not only a manufacturing industry problem.” In concluding, he said manufacturers are a major employer in Trinidad and Tobago and although they are

8,884.2

of leading the diversification of the economy. He said for this to become possible, they are critically assessing the impediments to their success recognising that diversification is now mandatory for the country’s economic survival. “We need to grow our contribution to the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP) and so our challenges need to be mitigated very quickly. Manufacturers are entrepreneurs, innovators, producers and risk takers. Collectively, we are the ones who can take this initiative forward.”

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MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION


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MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION


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MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION


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Satyakama Maharaj Cosmetic Reality

A

Satyakama Maharaj

s he eases back into his chair to be interviewed – a brief respite between his daily diet of meetings and presentations – Satyakama Maharaj (‘Call me Kama’) hands over his business card. The card itself represents its owner’s ethos: it’s about branding, making a great first impression and leaving a lasting one. A thin strip of metal, with the name ‘SACHA’ cut out at one end, it’s hardly the type of object that one discards and thus Kama’s company has already left its mark on the consciousness. In the global fashion industry in which Kama succeeds, a unique business card is par for the course. A cosmetics company from Trinidad and Tobago taking on established names on the world market however, is breaking boundaries. The influence for Sacha Cosmetics came from Satyakama’s mother, known as ‘Madame Maharaj’, a hairdresser that also did makeup for her clients, the ineffective results of which made Kama realise there were no products on the market suited to darker skin tones. But it was also his mother’s single-minded attitude to achieving one’s goals by taking on and embracing the world, which left residual effects on Kama’s psyche. “East Indian women were supposed to get married at 14 and not work; she became a rebel. She jumped on a ship – leaving her five children – and went to Paris to train because she wanted to be the best hairdresser in San Fernando.” Achieving her dream of a nationally renowned saloon, a young Kama was called upon to help. “She saw

something in me – that I have a gift in the beauty industry – and encouraged me. She would buy every brand of makeup that existed but found none that could match the women’s skin tones. So that became ingrained in my mind as I went to Toronto to study and over there, I also saw multicultural women with makeup that didn’t work for them.” Returning to a recession-hit Trinidad and Tobago as a teacher, Kama found the economic climate not favourable to investment and entrepreneurship but with businesses closing down, he (along with his mother) managed to convince a bank to loan him just enough to take over a small makeup company. Madame Maharaj gave him only one piece of advice: “Just focus on making women more beautiful.” The fledging business that would evolve into Sacha began in his home where “with my wife, two children, a mortgage and $3,000 here I am trying to build a premium brand that I could eventually sell worldwide.” There was never the idea to limit product to the local market, hence the universal moniker. “In Canada I found that people could not say ‘Satyakama’ but called me ‘Satya’ instead but some pronounced it ‘Sacha’. I found that every language could say that, from Chinese to Russian to Latin Americans.” The brand was born.

“Don’t tell me the sky is the limit when there are man’s footprints on the moon.” Kama quickly adds, “Makeup is 10% chemistry and 90% artistry.” The road to success began with the outlook that “we looked at the advantages as we aimed for a niche market. Fortunately, Trinidad has all the skin tones for us to test upon until we perfected it.” Promotion was of course key to gaining his foothold in the industry but belief in his product was paramount. “I walked with my makeup artists and the world was blown away with how beautiful the models looked, especially the darker skinned ones who previously looked like a Christmas tree,” he said. Starting regionally with CARICOM, Sacha then targeted the lucrative Latin American market, establishing stores in the major hub of Panama City. Packaged as a

premium brand, it then infiltrated the North American market where its Buttercup Powder is now a number one bestseller on Amazon. Sacha is on the verge of cracking the Indian market (‘a huge deal’). While spending a considerable amount of resources and effort on developing the franchise business model to add to the initial franchisee in El Salvador, Kama sees it as Sacha’s future. “We’re going to franchise the brand worldwide,” he said. Embracing the business trends of the 21st century, Kama has also jumped upon technology. “We can log in to any store, see the sales for the day, observe staff and shoppers via cameras.” Sacha’s success places Kama is in a very good position to dissect the challenges of attaining global success from a small nation; he believes that lack of knowledge about the country puts local companies at a distinct disadvantage, citing “Why should I buy a product from a country that I don’t even know exists? We had to sidestep the question as to ‘where is Trinidad and Tobago?’ and let the brand become its own country. We have opportunities to create Trinidad and Tobago as its own brand, which will help businesses to export.” Kama offers optimism mixed with reality: “We are not a poor country; relatively speaking, we are a very rich country that could be managed a lot better. When you look at how wealth is created, it’s about circulating money within communities. The money has to be circulated within our country, rather than bled out (abroad). If we implement stronger taxes on foreign goods, the business that imports those goods should look instead at producing them locally. Then you therefore have the circulation, job and wealth creation. Our governments have to empower our manufacturing industry.” As he evokes the importance of creating “Brand Trinidad and Tobago” much in the way that he has created Sacha’s largescale success, Kama is continuing along the trajectory that will see his product in 50-foot-high ads along Manhattan’s 5th Avenue, as the official cosmetic range of New York Fashion Week 2017. One would think therefore, that the sky is the limit. Not so, as the winner of Caribbean Exporter of the Year 2015 and Ernst & Young Country Entrepreneur of the Year 2017 quickly sets things straight: “Don’t tell me the sky is the limit when there are man’s footprints on the moon.”

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Professional Services, Public and Private Sector Organisations

T

he ethos of diversification is in the air as Trinidad and Tobago seeks to increase the already significant contribution from its service sector towards its gross domestic product (GDP). According to invesTT, the growing contribution of the service sector to GDP – 51% in 2012 to 54.9% in 2016 represents the paradigm shift that already gives it the greatest economic significance. Falling global prices in the oil and natural gas sectors – the staple of the nation’s revenue streams has not just prompted the further emphasis on the service sector, it absolutely necessitates it.

One of the major advantages that T&T enjoys is that the

infrastructure of services is already in place, together with the

recognition and strategic planning to exploit. The service sector will easily maintain its position as the

country’s number one economic contributor. invesTT - Invest in Trinidad & Tobago www.investt.co.tt CreativeTT www.creativett.co.tt The Sports Company of Trinidad and Tobago www.sportt-tt.com

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The great news is that as a consequence of the trickle down factors of the decades-long energy sector, together with investment in education (tertiary, in particular), a sound infrastructure of professional services already exists across the two islands. Truth be told, reliance on energy has meant that Trinidad and Tobago has not always promoted the plethora of services available to foreign investors, which hold a wealth of experience across the Caribbean region and covers the majority of sectors, existing and burgeoning. However, it does mean that the service sector that has evolved is of the high global standard that any energy sector would demand. As such, whereas the service sector was adversely affected by the long recessionary period from the mid1980s to mid-1990s, the combination of prolonged investment in education, training and experience gained has raised the bar and resulted in the

continued gains of higher contributions towards GDP that is currently occurring. The nation employs the model of using state companies to execute services under the umbrella of the relevant ministry. ExporTT, InvesTT, CreativeTT & SporTT are not just clever monikers incorporating the country’s initials, but entities that stand ready to drive diversification by exploring avenues of opportunity both local and foreign, as well as informing and advising on the pursuit of said opportunities. One of the crucial advantages is not just that these state companies provide the ability to map out the trajectory to success but that they also contain major expertise to help do so. CreativeTT offers a prime example of such undertaking, especially given its priority as being earmarked by the government for developing the creative industries - of which plenty abound in a society steeped in Carnival – that fall under Music, Film and Fashion. CreativeTT is the parent that oversees the strategic plan outlined to foster more jobs in these industries, which are seen as a major strength given the creative genius on display year round. Ideally, the end result will be a marked rise in Trinidad and Tobago’s export of its music and fashion, as well as revenue earned from the world market


As one of the major

business hubs in the region, T&T’s

financial sector is one of the

largest employers and a crucially large portion of the country’s private

sector services.

Staggering growth in a short space of time has been facilitated by a number of mergers between foreign and local institutions, leading to expansion of these businesses throughout the Caribbean. Banking and insurance in particular represent the model that would ideally develop the entire services sector, i.e., the export of expertise from a Trinidad and Tobago base. TT and US dollar savings and investment, foreign exchange dealings, money market instruments, project financing and underwriting of shares and bonds offered by commercial banks, as well as the relatively high number of non-bank financial institutions, is a major backbone of Trinidad and Tobago’s economy and its continued push towards diversification. A major part of that thrust is based on reaping the rewards of heavy investment on education over Trinidad and Tobago’s recent history. Governments have consistently allocated the largest

portion of the national budget towards education, enabling free schooling even at tertiary level, with the outcome being a plethora of wide-ranging qualifications across a diverse number of subjects. Part of the ethos is to add expertise to the raw materials that the nation exports as globalisation makes it easier to reach emerging markets. In what would be a two-way street of revenue streams, the establishment and diversity of these tertiary education institutions means that Trinidad and Tobago can now capitalise on the opportunity to have foreign students come to study in the higher education institutes, with tuition fees, accommodation, food and other add-ons contributing significantly to GDP. In the Caribbean, only Cuba has pursued a similar route with education windfalls. Tourism represents another of the pillars of the service industry, with the public sector leading the way through the Ministry of Tourism. Mandated to realise its full potential, and therefore, continue to create jobs

and competiveness, the sector has begun to create specialised tourism. Sports and eco-tourism lead the way, creating new roles within these sectors to entice and deliver to the global market. SporTT has conducted a number of conferences with private sector service providers as a guide to aiding them to be ready to support the initiatives undertaken by the public sector to bring sport enthusiasts to the islands. The design of the trickledown effect benefiting one service sector from the efforts of another represents the blend going forward, to maximise the potential of the abundant number of professional services in Trinidad and Tobago and create the ongoing contribution shift into 2018 and beyond. One of the major advantages that Trinidad and Tobago enjoys is that the infrastructure of services is already in place, together with the recognition and strategic planning to exploit. The service sector will easily maintain its position as the country’s number one economic contributor.

The Growing Contribution of the Service Sector to GDP

51%

54.9%

2012

2016 Source: InvesTT

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS

coming to the twin island republic to utilise its offerings. CreativeTT represents the wider philosophy for the entire services sector that fall under the Ministry of Trade and Industry.

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS


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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS


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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS


BRISON Trinidad & Tobago Tel. T&T: (868) 755-7475 (RISK) Tel. USA: (210) 504-7475 (RISK) Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1949, Port of Spain, Trinidad & Tobago 3213 Duke St. Suite 614, Alexandria, Virginia, 22314 Email: training@brisonltd.com Website: www.brisonltd.com Brison is an international Risk management consultancy and training firm. Our services span the Americas region and we have won international awards for excellence in our field. Some of the key areas we offer advisory and training services on are: • Security Management/ Risk assessments • Business Continuity Planning Malcolm Reid

BSc., MSc., MBA, CPP, MBCI, CBCP, CFE, CISMP

• International Certification Training • Fraud Detection & Prevention • E-learning Solutions The Brison advantage is that we offer world class services delivered through the highest levels of technical expertise, with a thorough understanding of the local and regional environment. Call us today for a free assessment of your organisation’s needs. Follow us on Twitter: BrisonLtd Like us on Facebook: BrisonLtd

Jamie Sanderson-Reid

BSc., MSc., CPP, MBCI, ABCP

Connect with us on LinkedIn: brison-ltd

Caribbean Discovery Tours Limited 9B Fondes Amandes Rd., St. Anns, P.O.S. Trinidad Mobile: (868) 620-1989 Fax: (868) 624-8596 Email: caribbeandiscoverytours@yahoo.com Website: www.caribbeandiscoverytours.com

Caribbean Discovery Tours, a pioneer of eco-tourism in Trinidad and Tobago, offers expertly guided kayaking, hiking, camping and scuba adventures, and services for academics and film-makers. On his travels, Stephen

Stephen Broadbridge Managing Director

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Broadbridge, Managing Director, has photographed wildlife, birds, wetlands, forests and urban landscapes, and his images have been widely published. Caribbean Discovery Tours co-produced the film Wild T&T, documenting the country’s flora and fauna, which won a Green Leaf Award in 2005. Stephen has held positions on several private and state boards including the EMBD as deputy chairman, Creative TT, Papa Bois Conservation, and was a director on state owned company TT Free Zone Company. He is currently the vice president of the T&T Incoming Tour Operators Association.


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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS


AMERICAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (AMCHAM T&T) 62 Maraval Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad, W.I. • PO Bag 150, Newtown, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-4466/0340, 628-2508 • Fax: (868) 628-9428 Website: www.amchamtt.com

Mitchell De Silva President

Nirad Tewarie

Chief Executive Officer

The American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad & Tobago represents some 286 companies, 75% of which are local and 25% multinationals. As the Pathway to the Americas, AMCHAM T&T adds value to its member companies by focusing on the following key areas: 1. Strategic Linkages • AMCHAM T&T facilitates the generation of new business and market access for goods and services by promoting interaction among member companies, key T&T and U.S. Government agents and its 23 sister AmChams throughout the Western Hemisphere. We connect firms with potential investors, suppliers, partners and buyers. 2. Influence policies and legislation to enhance competitiveness • AMCHAM T&T actively participates in and contributes to the national discussion on key economic issues. It works with Government Ministries and State Agencies to create a favourable environment for business and Foreign Direct Investment destination. • Lobbying U.S. administration for favourable trade policy towards the Caribbean. 3. Transfer of Knowledge • AMCHAM T&T facilitates access to information and leverages experiences to raise industry standards and positively impact national systemic issues.

Lennox H. Sealy & Associates Ltd. Lot 7A O’Meara Industrial Estate, Arima, Trinidad. (868) 678-3164; 376-4104; 643-7136 Email: lensealy@yahoo.com

Lennox H. Sealy & Associates Ltd. is the region’s leading provider of management consultancy, training and personal development services based on complex systems theory. Dr Sealy is our Managing Director and Lead Consultant. He offers his extensive knowledge of the natural sciences, systems theory and management combined with his vast consultancy experience in many sectors.

Dr. Lennox Sealy Managing Director and Lead Consultant

Our services include: Management Consultancy Interventions: • System Redesign • Strategic Modelling • Process Re-engineering • Team Building • Strategic Planning • Implementing the Balanced Scorecard Training Programmes: • Quality Customer Service • Successful Conflict Management • 5-S Performance Management Personal Development: • Success Training • Stress Management • Presentation Skills And much more …. We give you the edge by implementing systems that yield enhanced benefits to you and your customers.

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coenting

h won

everal g the eative was a ny TT tly the g Tour

Columbus Circle, Westmoorings P.O. Box 499, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 637-6966; Fax: (868) 637-7425 Email: chamber@chamber.org.tt; Website: www.chamber.org.tt

Ronald Hinds President

Gabriel Faria

Chief Executive Officer

Established since 14 March 1879, the T&T Chamber has forged on in its efforts to create opportunities for its membership, while leveraging shared resources and knowledge. We have fostered a competitive advantage in the marketplace through robust representation, advocacy and advisory services – all with a view to building business resilience. Our mission challenges us “to be the Champion of business towards the development of a strong, sustainable national economy”, and we continue to work towards accomplishing our goals in that sphere. The T&T Chamber offers an extensive portfolio of services to assist members in developing their business. These include: networking opportunities through the promotion of trade and investment facilitation missions; signature events, workshops and seminars; business consultancy and mentorship service; webinars and training for business by business initiative. We also offer mediation and arbitration services, meeting and conference facilities, business referrals, and the opportunity to boost your company’s visibility through CONTACT magazine - our flagship business publication. We invite readers to visit our website for more information about the T&T Chamber, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Tobago Hotel and Tourism Association Apt 1, Lambeau Credit Union Bldg Auchenskeoch Road, Carnbee, Tobago P.O. Box 295, Scarborough, Tobago Tel/Fax: (868) 639-9543 Email: tobagohoteltourismassoc@gmail.com Website: www.tobagohoteltourism.com

2nd Floor, ANSA McAL Building, Milford Road, Scarborough, Tobago Tel: (868) 639 2669; Fax: (868) 639 3014 Email: tobagochamber@chamber.org.tt Website: www.chamber.org.tt

Demi John Cruickshank Chairman

Trinidad and Tobago Incoming Tour Operators Association Member of the

The Tobago Hotel and Tourism Association (THTA) is a non-profit organization founded in 1991 to be the voice of the island’s tourism sector and to represent the diverse interests of all its tourism-related businesses. Like so many Caribbean Islands, Tobago’s economy and workforce are heavily dependent upon tourism and the Association takes seriously the pivotal role it plays between the Government and the Private Sector.

Secretariat Email: ttitoatnt@gmail.com, info@touroperatorsassociationtt.com Website: www.touroperatorsassociationtt.com Tel: (868) 633-1403 / (868) 753-2775 Fax: (868) 633-1771

The motto of the THTA is “Together! Getting Tobago Tourism Right”. The focus of the Association’s work is on the following prime areas: Marketing: Defining the unique Brand Tobago; having input to national and local marketing campaigns that enhance the Tobago experience for visitors, liaising with overseas representatives in source markets; guiding future development that will ensure the sustainability of the tourism industry and supporting industries, airlift, job training, security and so on. Advocacy and Partnership: Strengthening the working relationship between central and local government; participating in national development policy and planning — especially as it impacts tourism; creating linkages between the private sectors on both islands via the Chamber and other tourism organizations like the THRTA, to maximize their commercial support of the Tobago market, thereby increasing retained tourism revenues. Finance/Administration and Membership: Fund-raising to support the work of the self-funding association; building of the membership base to better represent the many interests of Tobago businesses; representation at local and international trade shows. Christopher James - President

Trinidad and Tobago Incoming Tour Operators

The Tobago Chamber was formed in 1936 and merged with the Trinidad Chamber in 1973 to become the Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce. Representing the interests of Tobagobased companies, the Division lobbies on their behalf primarily to the Tobago House of Assembly (THA), on issues affecting business, commerce and the community. The Chairman of the Tobago Division champions Tobagospecific issues at the national level with a view to bringing resolve wherever possible. With over 75 members, the Tobago Division operates under the leadership of an annually-elected chairperson and management committee. The elected Chair also serves on the Board of Directors of the T&T Chamber. Some eight sub-committees within the Division review and report on key areas such as Business Development, Airlift and Tourism, Security, Manufacturing, the Environment and Inter-Island Transport. The membership hosts monthly meetings to ensure that the Division stays current and impactful.

Lorraine Pouchet President of T&TITOA

The Trinidad and Tobago Incoming Tour Operators Association (T&TITOA) was formed in 1990 in an effort to introduce and monitor standards for the tour-operating sector of the tourism industry. The association started with six members and now has a membership of 15 private sector Destination Management Companies (DMC’S) and twelve Allied members. T&TITOA is the official body representing the commercial interests of producers and suppliers of tourism products and services, and its varied and comprehensive membership ensures that it is an effective focal point within the tourism industry. The membership operates with a Constitution and within a strict established and documented Code of Ethics. Our criteria for membership ensure that all members have experience in this highly sensitive segment of tourism and that they provide all the necessary professional and financial guarantees required by law (e.g. public liability insurance). T&TITOA members provide services such as, but not restricted to, “meet & greet”, airport transfers, accommodation bookings, sightseeing tours and event management services.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS

oneer obago, hiking, , and akers. bridge, aphed s and s have

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (TOBAGO DIVISION)

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE

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Real Estate, Property Development and Facilities Management

R

eal estate mirrors the larger economy, as ripples in the economy reverberate through businesses, construction, and the property market in general. This is by no means an exhaustive list but unmistakably demonstrates the interconnectedness among these sectors, with the economy being the independent variable impacting all the other dependant variables. The impact is also felt at the lower end of the food chain, as the performance of the economy indicates how facilities are managed and facilities management budgets. The local economy mimics the global economy, therefore the outlook for

The number of mortgages disbursed for newly constructed houses steadily

decreased from

226 in 2012 to 105 in 2016. The number of mortgages disbursed for purchasing existing houses

increased steadily

from 120 to 306 during the same period. Source: Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago

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the real estate, property development, and facilities management sectors must be viewed in the context of the global economy. Mid-way through 2017, the global economic prospects were still unclear for myriad reasons. The outcome of the US Presidential Election created some uncertainty, as the new administration signalled its intention to reassess and renegotiate significant trade agreements, notably the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and withdrew from the ill-fated Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement. In addition to its divergence on trade matters, the US administration’s approach to border security and immigration undoubtedly impacts the movement of labour and capital. Most recently, the decision to withdraw the US from the Paris Agreement sent shockwaves through the global climate change community. The US now joins Syria and Nicaragua as the only countries not subscribing to the

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change aimed at mitigating global warming. This is coupled with the decision to downgrade the regulatory role of the Environmental Protection Agency. These developments are likely to significantly impact how sustainability is managed in the built environment. Trinidad and Tobago continues to experience negative real GDP growth, recording -0.6% in 2014 and 2015 and -2.3% in 2016 (source: Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago). Public sector debt continues to escalate and there is increasing retrenchment in both the public and private sectors. The impact on the real estate, property development and facilities management sectors is inescapable. The slowdown in property development and construction activity is manifested in declining sales in cement, hardware and construction materials and employment in the sector, according to the latest Central Bank statistics. In the real estate sector, there are some interesting statistics relating to commercial bank mortgage lending. The number of mortgages disbursed for newly constructed houses steadily decreased from 226 in 2012 to 105 in 2016, whereas the number of mortgages disbursed for purchasing


as the government had envisaged. Property tax is an ad valorem charge on real estate in which the rate of taxation is based upon the Annual Rental Value of the property. Property Tax represents an added cost of ownership of property and, depending upon the terms of the lease, can translate to added cost of occupancy for tenants. Property owners and occupiers therefore need to ensure that they make the appropriate budget allocation for this expense. As the sector continues to grapple with the current economic reality and its attendant challenges, industry stakeholders need to recalibrate, innovate and create opportunities to ensure the sustainability of the sector.

Figure 1: Relationship between GDP and Real Estate Sector

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9 19 7 98 19 99 20 00 20 01 20 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07 20 08 20 09 20 10 20 11 20 12 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16

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Commercial Bank: Real Estate Mortgage (TT$Mn) Commercial Bank: Construction Loans to Private Sector (TT$Mn) GDP Current Prices (TT$Mn)

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

Two key issues that will continue to gain the attention of the sector in 2017-18 are the phasing out of R22 refrigerant gas used in air-conditioning systems and the reintroduction of property tax. As of January 2015, the importation of all assembled equipment using hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) or their blends were banned and all imports of refrigerants require a licence from the Ministry of Trade and Industry. The implication for the sector is that facilities managers need to ensure that their capital replacement plans for air-conditioning equipment upgrades are informed by these considerations. The attempted reintroduction of Property Tax has not been as smooth

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existing houses increased steadily from 120 to 306 during the same period. The number of mortgages disbursed to purchase land also increased steadily from 140 to 242 during the same period (source: Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago). Interestingly, the average price for a three-bedroom house has held steadily at TT$1.0 Mn – TT$1.25 Mn between 2011 and 2016 according to the Central Bank data. Figure 1 shows the relationship between GDP and the real estate sector during the period 1995 to 2016. This graph was constructed from longitudinal data available from the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago. The graph shows a positive correlation between GDP and the real estate market, with the demand for real estate mortgages increasing as the economy grew. Construction loans to the private sector declined steadily from 2011, while home improvement renovation loans increased marginally as the economy started to recede in 2014. Despite the slowdown in property development activity, the sector still has cause for celebration – the completion of Trinidad and Tobago’s three Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) buildings – Eteck’s flagship building at Wallerfield, RGM’s Savannah East, and the National Insurance Board’s new head office. Sustainability of the built environment and LEED certification have been driven primarily by the US Green Building Council and it is hoped that the new US government’s change in policy in relation to climate change does not cause reversal in the advances made to date. Worthy of celebration also is the completion and occupation of the Government Campus Plaza and the Brian Lara Cricket Academy in Toruba.

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REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT


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67 Nina Drive, Columbus Circle, Westmoorings, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-2721 Mobile: (868) 497-4863 Email: wendy@1on1realtors.com Find us on www.trinidadrealtors.com

Wendy Abraham Owner/Broker

1 On 1 Realty is one of Trinidad and Tobago‘s leading and respected real estate companies under the strategic management of Wendy Abraham. Formed nine years ago, 1 On 1 Realty consists of a team of dedicated professionals who concentrate on excellence in customer service while adding value at all times. Our core skills include commercial and residential sales and rentals throughout the West and Port of Spain, but on a wider scale we capture the entire market of Trinidad and Tobago through our networking associates. Our client-focused approach and desire is to serve people who come to us to the very best of our ability. We offer our services seven days a week at any time convenient to the client.

CLEAN IMAGE HOUSE OF CARPETS AND ONSITE SPECIALTY SERVICES 11a Kathleen Street St. James, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-8755 Tel/Fax: (868) 628-8109 Email: marketing@cleanimageonsite.com

Jennifer Lall

Marketing Manager

At Clean Image, quality, efficiency, professionalism and guarantee are words that represent our leadership position in the local industry. With over 25 years of experience, Clean Image’s strengths are our highly trained technicians; the latest technologies; and world-class products, techniques and equipment. As a certified member of the Trinidad and Tobago Bureau of Standards under the Quality and Environmental Management System (TTBS-Q&E-SME 2000), we are dedicated to providing the highest levels of quality and safety. Our operations are in compliance with environmental laws and “best practice”, and we carry them out with a standard of professionalism that is enjoyed in advanced countries. To meet the sophisticated needs of our corporate clients’ homes and offices, we offer onsite specialty restoration services for drapes, window dressing, fabric sofa sets and business chairs, fabric wall partitions, carpets and floor care (same day use). We also offer the supply and installation of carpets, furniture and full interior decorating.

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

1 ON 1 REALTY

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“We don’t just sell Real Estate,” “We make Dreams Come True”

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Understanding Property Tax The introduction of a new tax by government can sometimes be met with great opposition by taxpayers and state officials alike, particularly in times when citizens are being cautioned to show economic restraint. In May, a High Court judge ruled that there was no need to file property tax declaration forms until the determination of a lawsuit challenging the fiscal measure. The government has since conceded that the tax is a voluntary one and although the matter is still being contested in the courts, details of the tax have been shared for the public’s information. 1. Property value is calculated based on four factors The ministry says the following four factors decide property values: • Location of the Property (Neighbourhood) • Classification of the Property (Executive, Modern, Standard [I & II]) • Category of the Property (Agricultural, Commercial, Residential, Industrial) • Dimensions – Property Floor Area • Modifications to the particular property 2. Property Tax is calculated based on the Annual Taxable Value of all land. According to the Property Tax Act 2009, all land, including vacant land, in Trinidad and Tobago shall be Rated on a Rental Value basis. Annual Rental Value (ARV) is the rent at which a property will let from year to year. Annual Taxable Value (ATV) is the rent at which a property will let from year to year after a deduction of 10% for Voids. Tax rates are as follows: Residential: 3%; Commercial: 5%; Industrial with building: 6%; Industrial without building: 3%; Agricultural: 1% Vacant Land will also be taxed: The Annual Rental Value of vacant land will be found by taking a percentage of the Current Market Value of the land. Property Tax is calculated by taking a percentage (rate of tax) of the Annual Taxable Value of all Land. Tax rates are as follows: Agricultural: 2 % Residential: 3.5 % Commercial and Industrial: 5% 3. Once authorised, officers can enter and inspect your premises at any time during the day Once authorised by the Commissioner, officers can enter and inspect your property, whether you want them to or not. According to the Valuation of Land Act 18 of 1969:- “Sect. 15. (1) Subject to subsection (2), the Commissioner, or any officer authorised by the Commissioner in writing for that purpose, shall for the purpose of ascertaining the value of any land have power to enter, at all reasonable hours during the daylight, in or upon any land without being liable to any legal proceedings or molestation whatever on account of the entry.” 4. You could be fined for not submitting your property tax valuation form According to Section 6 of the Valuation of Land Act 18 of 1969:- “Sect. 6. (1) Every owner of land in Trinidad and Tobago shall make with the Commissioner, a return of the land in the form set out in Schedule II. (2) Where the owner of land fails to file a return, the Commissioner shall by Notice inform the owner that he is required to file a return, failing which he may be liable to conviction under this section. (3) A Notice under subsection (2) shall be sent by registered post. (4) A person who willfully— (a) fails to make a return within the prescribed time under subsection (1); or

(b) makes a return which is defective or incomplete or which is to his knowledge false in any material particular, commits an offence and is liable on summary conviction to a fine.” 5. You have 30 days to challenge your valuation By law, citizens have up to 30 days to lodge a complaint after receiving their notice of valuation. According to Section 19 of the Valuation of Land Act 18 of 1969:- “An owner or local authority who is dissatisfied with a valuation may, within thirty days after service of the notice of valuation, post to or lodge with the Commissioner an objection in writing against the valuation stating the grounds upon which he relies. The objection shall be limited to one or more of the following grounds: (a) that the values assessed are too high or too low; (b) that lands which should be included in one valuation have been valued separately; (c) that lands which should be valued separately have been included in one valuation; (d) that the person named in the notice is not the owner of the land.” 6. You have until March 31, 2018, to actually pay your property tax Section 17 of the Property Tax Act 2009 states: “17. (1) The Board shall, on or before the March 31 in each year, cause a notice of assessment specifying— (a) the unique land identification number or other number by which the land is identified; (b) the annual rental value of the land; (c) the annual taxable value of the land; (d) the annual tax payable in respect thereof; (e) any deductions and allowances applied to the tax on the land; (f) the time when and where such annual tax is to be paid; (g) penalties and consequences for failure to pay the tax; and (h) the right to object to such assessment made under this Act and the procedures to be utilised in making an objection, to be served on or delivered to the owner or occupier of the land personally or his agent or attorney or by being sent by post to his last known business or private address.” Additionally, Section 33 of the Act states: “33. The annual tax due and payable in respect of every land shall be paid to the Board on or before the March 31 in every year ending on the next ensuing December 31.” 7. If you don’t pay by September 15, you pay more Section 34 of the Property Tax Act 2009 adds that: “(2) A Notice under subsection (2) shall be sent by registered post. (3) Where any amount of tax is not paid on or before September 15— (a) a further sum of 10% on the amount of tax shall be added thereto by way of an increased tax; and (b) interest at the rate of 15% per annum on the amount of tax is to be applied to the tax as increased from September 16 to the date of payment, unless the Board is satisfied that the failure to pay the taxes did not result from the default of the taxpayer.” Section 36 adds if six months have elapsed since the outstanding due date, a Notice of Demand will be sent. “36. Where arrears of annual tax payable on land are outstanding, or part thereof is unpaid, and six months have elapsed since the same became due and owing, the Board shall cause a Notice of Demand to be sent to the owner of the land by registered post.” 8. After a year of non-payment, your goods may be seized, once Notice has been served Section 37 of the Property Tax Act 2009 states:

“37. (1) Where any tax assessed under this Act or part thereof is unpaid, the Board has served Notice under section 36 and 12 months have elapsed since the same became due and owing, the Comptroller of Accounts, District Revenue Officer or other person to whom the same ought to be paid may at anytime before actual forfeiture under section 41 authorise the levying of a distress— (a) upon the goods, chattels, and effects of the owner; or (b) upon the goods, chattels and effects, being upon the lands so charged with such tax of the tenant or occupier of the lands or any part thereof charged with such tax. (2) The authority to distrain under this section may be made in the form set out in Schedule II, and such authority shall be a sufficient warrant and authority to levy by distress the amount of taxes unpaid and in arrears and penalties and interests thereon. (3) For the purpose of levying any distress under this section, any person may, if expressly authorised in writing by the Board, execute any warrant of distress, and if necessary, break open any building in the daytime for the purpose of levying such distress.” 9. After five years of non-payment, your land could be forfeit Section 41 of the Property Tax Act 2009 states if no taxes are paid for a five-year period, pending a notice published in the Gazette by the Board, the President may deem your land as forfeit, unless you are able to pay all of the arrears before the stated expiration date. “41. (1) Where any tax or any part thereof due in respect of any land remains in arrears and unpaid for the period of five years from the day when it became due and payable, the President may, by warrant under his hand, reciting that a sum specified in such warrant, due on account of the tax and for five years in such warrant, is and has for the full period of five years been in arrears and unpaid, order that such lands be forfeited to the State, and immediately upon the registration of such warrant as hereinafter provided, such land shall be forfeited, and shall vest in the State, in absolute dominion, free and discharged from all rights, estates, interests, equities and claims of any other person.” “(2) The President shall not sign a warrant under subsection (1), unless the Board has previously caused a notice to be published in the Gazette and in one newspaper in daily circulation in Trinidad and Tobago and posted up in a conspicuous place at its office and suboffices for a period of one month, notifying the owners of the lands, and all persons interested in them, that unless a sum specified in such notice, being the sum which at the expiration of a specified period of five years or some longer period, became or would become due in respect of the tax in arrears, increasing according to the Act, is paid before the expiration of the specified period, together with all sums which at the time of payment may be due in respect of any tax, the said lands will be liable to forfeiture to the State.” 10. You can apply for a tax deferral, once relevant criteria are met Section 23 of the Property Tax Act 2009 states that the Board may, upon application of the land owner, authorise the deferral of the payment of the assessed tax on the land on the grounds of the “impoverished condition of the owner and his inability to improve his financial position significantly by reason of age, impaired health or other special circumstances, that undue hardship to that owner would otherwise ensue”. The Act says if approved, a certificate showing the owner’s inability to pay tax will be issued. Citizens can find out more at www.finance.gov.tt propertytax. Credit: Excerpt taken from Loop.tt

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Shipping, Ports and Maritime Services

T

he shipping and maritime sector believes that great opportunities lie ahead once it is able to navigate the obstacles in its path – and if promised developments actually materialise in 2017/2018.

Stormy Seas Sourcing US dollars was the number one challenge impacting the industry in 2016. “We expect this to persist and be further exacerbated by absent policy mechanisms to facilitate foreign exchange generating activity in new and existing maritime business lines, even as foreign exchange from more traditional shipping activity is

Ports are taking a much more cautious approach to major developments and placing more

declining,” the Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago (SATT) told Who’s Who in May 2017. Customs Administration also presented a significant drag on business in 2016 with SATT noting that despite the potential of TTBizLink to reduce bureaucracy and therefore improve trade facilitation, Customs continued to resist the changes that ICT brought. “For every improvement brought about or implied by Customs’ automation through the roll-out of Automated Systems for Customs Data (ASYCUDA), they introduced highly questionable new requirements, thereby eroding any gains from automation. Transactions for which the procedures were long entrenched were suddenly changed to facilitate the introduction of new fees and/or bureaucracy,” the Association complained. SATT stressed: “Without significant Customs Reform – including Standard Operating Procedures in the short term, revision of the Customs Act,

emphasis on short

to medium-term improvements such as equipment acquisitions, process improvements and infrastructure rehabilitation.

Shipping Association of Trinidad & Tobago www.shipping.co.tt Customs and Excise Division www.customs.gov.tt

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Photo: Christopher Anderson

and a system of recourse, all of which will result in greater transparency in Customs Administration and accountability on the part of the Customs officers – our trading environment and international competitiveness and reputation will continue to be negatively impacted.” The third major challenge, SATT said, was the decline in traditional forms of shipping business without significant new opportunities being progressed or operationalised. Noting that absent trade facilitation mechanisms were preventing new and existing maritime business from being operationalised, SATT told Who’s Who: “A condition of what appears to be apathy prevails, and there appears to be a lack of genuine interest or focus to facilitate growth in the maritime industry. If this persists, tremendous opportunities which now exist will be lost. Government needs to hasten to take swift action to bring policy and strategy that demonstrates that we are ready for international maritime business.” These opportunities, SATT said, relate to regional and international development projects necessitating transshipment of miscellaneous commodities and petroleum cargoes (ship-to-ship transfers).


Sunnier Skies Ahead? SATT is looking forward to three significant developments in 2017 that would positively impact the industry: 1) “We expect the results of a port study commissioned in 2016 to be disclosed, and a decision conclusively made with respect to port rationalisation or, put simply, a strategy for port investment and infrastructure…we are hoping that, at a minimum, the study resolves the notion of relocating the Port of Port of Spain,” SATT said. SATT also hopes the policy would ensure at least one port of an international standard to serve the larger vessels now in the trade. “We won’t get or need the ultra mega vessels but the (secondary) vessels being deployed are getting larger and larger as they cascade the ultra large vessels into the trade,” SATT added. 2) “We also expect the shipping bill to be finalised and passed; more so, to facilitate the removal of a significant piece of antiquated legislation called the Droghers Act. This Act significantly restricts international vessels from efficiently moving cargo between ports in Trinidad and moving cargo between Trinidad and Tobago. Without this legislation, far more cargo could be moved by commercial ocean carriers, versus by road and heavily subsidised ferry,” the Association pointed out. 3) The Standing Committee on maritime development playing a more effective and proactive role in advancing economic diversification

throughout the maritime industry. “Significant opportunities to establish new business lines and earn foreign exchange were lost in 2016 due to absent policy and administration. If effective policy, regulation, and administration are not forthcoming, we will continue to lose significant business,” SATT cautioned.

Government’s Maritime Initiatives Four high-impact areas identified for further development by the Ministry of Trade and Industry are: ship repair and dry docking, transshipment, cold stacking and maritime logistics.

Industry Outlook for 2017/2018 Summarising the outlook for the local shipping industry and port operations for 2017/2018, SATT sees: a) Continued challenges due to depressed volumes largely as a result of the slowed local economy and anaemic growth and demand regionally and internationally. b) Ports taking a much more cautious approach to major developments and placing more emphasis on short to medium-term improvements such as equipment acquisitions,

process improvements and infrastructure rehabilitation.

c) More government focus on the maritime industry for economic diversification. “Provided the relevant trade facilitating mechanisms can be put in place, inclusive of some level of customs reform and policy where applicable, we can

capture new maritime business that is emerging as a result of growth in proximate jurisdictions, acting as a hub for transshipment as well as logistics,” SATT said.

“Analyses are being done to determine the feasibility of each activity,” the ministry told Who’s Who. Government’s maritime initiatives up to May 2017 include: • The development of a draft framework for the expansion of transshipment and cold stacking activities in the Gulf of Paria • VAT exemption on yachting services, effective February 1, 2017 • Foreign yachts can now stay up to six months in Trinidad and Tobago • Work has begun on the development of a maritime spatial plan for the Gulf of Paria • Government has plans to remove a number of derelict vessels along Trinidad and Tobago’s coastlines, including the Gulf of Paria • The sourcing of finance for the expansion of ship repair and dry docking facilities through the facilitation of meetings between ship repair and dry docking companies and the Andean Development Bank (Corporacion Andina de Fomento – CAF). • The development of a full-time, one-year maritime apprenticeship programme, launched in December 2016, to address the need for skilled labour in the ship repair and dry docking industry. Under the pilot programme, 18 young men are receiving training at Caribbean Dockyard and Engineering Services Ltd. (CARIDOC/CL Marine). According to the ministry, the programme is a prototype that could be replicated at other ship repair and dry docking facilities in Trinidad and Tobago.

SHIPPING, PORTS AND MARITIME SERVICES

“These are time sensitive and our strategic location within the Gulf of Paria gives us a competitive advantage. Additionally, the dry docking and ship repair sector is also quite viable.”

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SHIPPING, PORTS AND MARITIME SERVICES


Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Limited 107 Ninth Street, Barataria, Trinidad & Tobago, W.I. Tel: (868) 222-7595 Fax: (868) 222-7596 Email: info@acclaimfreight.com Website: www.acclaimfreight.com

In your version, Foxx Logistics Limited remove address Couriers of Trinidad & Tobago and the 1 in the email Tel: (868) 628-1774/290-1037 Email: foxxlogistics@gmail.com address. In your

Derek Telfer

Managing Director

Kyle Telfer

Director Operations

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Acclaim Freight and Logistics is a full service version, shipping operation which caters to all modes of international and domestic transportation. insert With a streamlined, efficient team of image from over 80 years combined experience in the lastbeing year industry, Acclaim prides itself with unencumbered by big business bureaucracy and its ability to exercise flexibility to meet the needs of a wide range of modern consumer demands. For both Import and Export with N.V.O.C.C. operations and Customs Clearance, we provide in-house worldwide transportation of cargo by Sea and Air Freight. We also specialize in value added logistics and door-to-door services to ensure that we maintain control of your product at all times. Acclaim Freight and Logistics Services Limited caters to the needs of both corporate and private clients and is the most suitable option for the smart customer who just wants the job done.  Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Ltd. “Our Service, Your Acclaim.”

FOXX Logistics of Trinidad & Tobago collects and delivers all your packages. Our services include ground and island-to-island logistics, repackaging, inventory management, just-in-time supply management, cheque collections and warehousing. We ensure that customer service, security, confidentiality and delivery of our promised service are always maintained. Contact us at (868) 628-1774/290-1037.

Take a trip to

FOXX ONLINE STORE

For all your Shopping Needs

We are an Online Store aimed at an easy and fast way to shop locally in Trinidad and Tobago. Our range of services include from Direct buying, Sky Box Service and Ocean Freight. • Website: www.foxxestorett.com • Tel# : 868-499-3143 We Deliver | You Save | FREE Delivery!!! | NO Membership Fees


SHIPPING SOLUTIONS & SERVICES LIMITED

SHIPPING ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Unit #22, One Woodbrook Place Damian Street, Woodbrook, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 627-3627 / 623-6386 Fax: (868) 623-4475 Email: ashton@sssltt.com Website: www.sssltt.com

Sonja Voisin President

E. Joanne Edwards General Manager

Established in 1938, the Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago (SATT) represents the interests of key industry stakeholders such as shipping agents, ship owners and/or ship operators, ship brokers, freight forwarders, ports and terminals, and NVOCCs, among others. Some of the members include long-standing Agents and entities such as Gordon Grant & Company Limited, Gulf Shipping, Seaboard (Trinidad) Ltd, NEC, and both container ports – PLIPDECO and PPOS, T & T Marine Pilots Association. SATT’s principal objectives include: • Lobby and advocacy in maritime-related matters, • Representing members’ interests to the industry’s regulators, • Facilitating interaction between members and these entities to influence key efficiencies vital to SATT, trade facilitation and industry reform. The Association remains committed to strengthening the position of its members in the marketplace, and promoting capacity-building in the Maritime Industry. We continue to evolve to strategically respond to the challenges plaguing the industry, and we remain the strongest advocate for more aggressive development and transformation of the Maritime Industry.

Ashton Le Blanc Managing Director

Judy Le Blanc

Director of Business Development

Shipping Solutions and Services Ltd (SSSL), has over 30 years experience in the Marine and Logistics Industry. Our knowledge and expertise is evident in our high success rate and positive customer feedback. We are your reliable import and export logistics partner in FCL, LCL, Air and Ocean Globally. Additionally, as Vessel and Port Agents, in the Energy Oil and Gas Industry SSSL manages all aspects of a Port Call, from Government Authorities and Port Management to Vendor Services and invoicing. SSSL engages with quality and reliable Vendors who meets the Industry Service and Safety Standards. SSSL is continuously building long term client business relationships by solving near impossible challenges and delivering on promises made! Knowledge, Expertise, Experience, Innovation, Customer Satisfaction and Ingenuity are key to our success.

SHIPPING, PORTS AND MARITIME SERVICES

15 Scott Bushe Street, Port of Spain, Trinidad, W.I. Tel: (868) 623-3355; Fax: (868) 623-8570 Email: om@shipping.co.tt; Website: www.shipping.co.tt

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Informational Lists & Indices

Honorary Consuls Accredited to The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago

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Diplomatic Missions and International Organisations

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The Government of Trinidad and Tobago

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Chambers of Commerce

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Fast Facts of Trinidad and Tobago

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Map of Trinidad

152

Map of Tobago

153

Index by Surname

154

Index by Company

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Honorary Consuls Accredited to The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago REPUBLIC OF AUSTRIA Mr. Karl Pilstl  Honorary Consul Blue Haven, Bacolet Bay P.O. Box 8, Scarborough, Tobago Tel: (868) 660-7500 Fax: (868) 660-7900 Email: kpilstl@yahoo.com THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dr. E. Monica Davis  Honorary Consul c/o The University of the West Indies Faculty of Medical Sciences Complex Building 35,Room 101 Uriah Butler Highway Champs Fleurs, Trinidad Tel: (868) 663-8986 Fax: (868) 645-1642/637-9422 Email: thebahamasconsulatett@gmail.com PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF BANGLADESH Mr. Razai Azard Rahaman Honorary Consul-General 1 Shafik Drive, Cross Crossing San Fernando, Trinidad Tel: (868) 652-2637/657-8425 Fax: (868) 652-7108 Email: azard_rahaman@rahamutgroup.com imtiaz_rahaman@rahamutgroup.com KINGDOM OF BELGIUM Mr. Paul Jay Williams  Honorary Consul #2, Sixth Avenue Barataria, Trinidad Tel: (868) 674-1677 Fax: (868) 675-9831 Email: honoraryconsulbelgium@gmail.com BELIZE Mr. Thomas Chanona  Honorary Consul Corner Warren and Smart Streets St. Augustine, Trinidad Tel: (868) 645-4062/645-4063 Fax: (868) 645-4064 Email: tchanona@kee-chanona.com BOTSWANA Mr. Robin Debideen  Honorary Consul 74 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-7770/627-2888 Fax : 627-3338 Mobile: (868) 625-4875 Email: boss@ultracoolgroup.com CHILE Mr. Lennox A. Persad  Honorary Consul 1A, 1st Avenue South Western Main Road Chaguramas Tel: (868) 634-4500 Email: lennox@lennoxoffshore.com KINGDOM OF DENMARK Mr. Ravi R. Dolsingh, LLB, PG, Dip, LPC Honorary Consul, General Mansfield House 1st Floor, No. 24 Abercromby Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 780-3772 Email: ravi.dolsingh@gmail.com

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REPUBLIC OF FINLAND Mr. Troy Garcia  Honorary Consul #153 Eastern Main Road Barataria Tel: (868) 680-7278 Fax: (868) 674-2644 Email: tgarcia6@hotmail.com

MAURITIUS Dr. V. R Mooneeram  Honorary Consul 12 Wahid Circular Drive Sumadh Gardens San Fernando, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 657-6440 Email: vinomooneeram@hotmail.com

GRENADA Dr. Patrick Antoine Honorary Consul Tel: (868) 625-9235 Fax: (868) 624-1257 Email: grenadaconsulate@gmail.com

NEW ZEALAND Mr. Donald Kelshall 31 Alberto Street, Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-3829 Fax: (868) 624-6521 Email: dkelshall@savannahcomputing.com

CO-OPERATIVE OF REPUBLIC OF GUYANA Mr. Ernie Ross   Honorary Consul 16 Gray Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 622-2913 Email: ernieross1@msn.com g_consulate@yahoo.com REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA Mr. Ian Anthony  Honorary Consul Building 5, Christina Courts 33-35 Boissiere No. 1 Maraval, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 628-4818 Email: iananthony@renavatio.net IRELAND Mr. Brian K. O’Farrell  Honorary Consul Suite A4, Kencita Court 76 Picton Street, Newtown Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-2385 Fax: (868) 628-9049 Email: irishconsul.tt@gmail.com STATE OF ISRAEL Mrs. Whilhelmina Barbara Malins-Smith Honorary Consul 46C Ridgewood Towers Diego Martin, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-7093 Email: malinssmith@yahoo.com ITALIAN REPUBLIC Ms. Shira Serena Mohammed  Honorary Consul 8 Hillcote, Scott Street St. Augustine, Trinidad Tel: 756-3939 Email: italconstt@gmail.com REPUBLIC OF LATVIA Mr. Kirby Anthony Hosang Honorary Consul 112 Saddle Road, Maraval, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-3234 Email: hosanganthony@gmail.com LEBANESE REPUBLIC Mr. Amer G. Haidar  Honorary Consul (Dean) 5 Cipriani Boulevard, Second Floor Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-0209 Email: aghaidar3@gmail.com MALTA Mr. John Hadad  Honorary Consul JRJ Warehousing Compound LP #56 Bhagoutie Trace San Juan, Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-7628 Ext. 1221 Email: johnh@hadcoltd.com

KINGDOM OF NORWAY Mr. Staurt Jardine K.F.O  Honorary Consul 101 St. Anthony’s Drive, Westmoorings P.O. Box 13, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-7687 Email: staurttisal@twinislandshipping.com ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF PAKISTAN Mr. Amjad Ali  Honorary Consul General 10 Morne Coco Road Westmoorings North, Trinidad Tel: (868) 640-6595 Fax: (868) 640-6594 Email: amjad@adfoam.com REPUBLIC OF PERU Mr. Patrick A. Ferreira  Honorary Consul Furness House, #90 Independence Square Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-4959 Fax: (868) 623-9576 Email: patrickaidenferreira@gmail.com REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Dr. Marie Magno Advani  Honorary Consul B41 Ridgewood Towers, Four Roads, Diego Martin, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-2988 Fax: (868) 633-6946 Email: alchemy41@yahoo.com REPUBLIC OF POLAND Mr. David Lewis  Honorary Consul Lot 25 Frederick Settlement Industrial Estate Caroni, Trinidad Tel: (868) 645-5522 Fax: (868) 663-0897 Email: davidl@labelhouse.com REPUBLIC OF PORTUGAL Mr. Williams Ferreira  Vice Consul 11-13 Milling Avenue, Sea Lots P.O. Box 283, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-1745/625-1131 Fax: (868) 625-1243 Email: furness@furnessgroup.com SLOVAK REPUBLIC (SLOVAKIA) Mr. Lawrence S. Naipaul  Honorary Consul Port Authority of Trinidad and Tobago Administration Building, 1st Floor Dock Road Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-6273 Mobile: (868) 680-4863 Email: lsnaipaul@msn.com

SLOVENIA Mr. Om Prakash Lalla  Honorary Consul c/o K R Lalla & Co. 41 Edward Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-5074 Fax: (868) 625-6110 Email: omlalla@krlalla.com DEMOCRATIC SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF SRI LANKA Mr. Krishna Seegobin  Honorary Consul Corner Hugh & Algernon Street Montrose, Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 665-1237 Fax: (868) 665-1237 Email: kseegobinco@gmail.com REPUBLIC OF SURINAME Mr. Jerome Khan Honorary Consul 24 Fitzgerald Lane P.O. Box 437, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-4747/627-0102 Fax: (868) 627-1936 Email: Honoraryconsul.suriname@gmail.com KINGDOM OF SWEDEN Mr. David O’ Brien Honorary Consul c/o Massy Motors, Lady Young Road, Morvant, Trinidad Tel: (868) 674-4200 Ext. 1100 Fax: (868) 674-7761 Email: david.obrien@massygroup.com THE SWISS CONFEDERATION Mrs. Michele Khan  Honorary Consul General 70 Dundonald Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-7816 Fax: (868) 624-8544 Email: portspain@honrep.ch SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC Mr. Marwan Yousef  Syrian - Honorary Consul 15 Queen Street, Arima, Trinidad Tel: (868) 667-3927 Fax: (868) 667-7019 Email: micholtd@hotmail.com syrianconsolatect@gmail.com KINGDOM OF THAILAND Mrs. Joan Wilson Honorary Consul 148 Belmont Circular Road, Belmont, Trinidad Tel: (868) 621-1574 Email: thaiconsulatett@gmail.com REPUBLIC OF TURKEY Mr. Michael Llanos  Honorary Consul 64 Nina Drive, Westmoorings, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-3222/324-4989 Fax: (868) 622-6661 Email: mike@llanosgroup.com REPUBLIC OF UGANDA Dr. Dinesh Mor Honorary Consul 133 Columbus Circle Westmoorings, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-2215 Fax: (868) 625-4366/628-9780 Email: dineshizmor@gmail.com ORIENTAL REPUBLIC OF URUGUAY Mr. Anthony Edwards  Honorary Consul D14 Ridgewood Towers Four Roads, Diego Martin Tel: (868) 632-6786 Fax: (868) 783-6671 Email: edwardsanthony62@gmail.com


Diplomatic Missions and International Organisations EMBASSIES Apostolic Nunciature His Excellency Archbishop Apostolic Nuncio Nicola Girasoli 11 Mary Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-5009/622-6359 Fax: (868) 222-9814 Email: apnuntt@googlemail.com Embassy of the Argentine Republic Her Excellency Ambassador Ana Celia Pisano 4th Floor, Tatil Building 11 Maraval Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-7557/628-7587 Fax: (868) 628-7544 Email: etrin@mrecic.gov.ar High Commission for the Commonwealth of Australia His Excellency Ambassador John Pilbeam 18 Herbert Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 822-5450 Fax: (868) 622-5490 Email: ahc.portofspain@dfat.gov.au Embassy of the Federative Republic of Brazil His Excellency Paulo Sergio Traballi Bozzi 18 Sweet Briar Road, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-5779/622-5771 Fax: (868) 622-4323 Email: ambassadorsoffice@brazil.org.tt High Commission of Canada Her Excellency High Commissioner Carla Wymn-Hogan Rufelos 3–3A Sweet Briar Road, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-6232 Fax: (868) 628-2581 Email: pspan@international.gc.ca Website: www.canadainternational.gc.ca/ Embassy of the Republic of Chile His Excellency Ambassador Fernando Schmidt Ariztia 4 Alexandra Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 628-0540/628-4763 Fax: (868) 622-9894 Email: echilett@minrel.gob.cl Embassy of the People’s Republic of China His Excellency Ambassador Song Yumin 39 Alexandra Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-1832/628-6417 Fax: (868) 622-7613 Email: chinaemb_tt@mfa.gov.cn Embassy of the Republic of Colombia His Excellency Ambassador Alfonso Munera 4th Floor, Newtown Centre 30-36 Maraval Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-5656/222-2275 Email: eptoespana@cancilleria.gov.co Embassy of the Republic of Costa Rica Her Excellency Ambassador Lilly Edgerton 2nd Floor, 63 Tragarete Road, Woodbrook Tel: (868) 628-9601/628-8775 Fax: (868) 628-9203 Email: embcr-tt@rree.go.cr Embassy of the Republic of Cuba His Excellency Ambassador Guillermo Vazquez Moreno 74 Elm Street, Bayshore, Westmoorings Tel: (868) 633-3268/632-8691 Email: embajada@tt.embacuba.cu secretaria@tt.embacuba.cu

Embassy of the Dominican Republic His Excellency Ambassador Jose Selrulle Rania 10B Queen’s Park West, Suite 101 Port of Spain Tel: (868) 624-7930/627-2605 Fax: (868) 623-7779 Email: embadom@hotmail.com

Embassy of Japan His Excellency Ambassador Mitsuhiko Okada 5 Hayes Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 628-5991/628-5993 Fax: (868) 622-0858 Email: embassyofjapan@po.mofa.go.jp Website: http://www.tt.emb-japan.go.jp/

Embassy of the Republic of El Salvador His Excellency Ambassador Raymundo Ernesto Rodriguez Diaz 29 Long Circular Road, St. James Tel: (868) 628-4454 Tel/Fax: (868) 622-8314 Email: rerodriguez@rree.gob.sv

Embassy of the Republic of Korea His Excellency Ambassador Doo-Young Lee 36 Elizabeth Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-9081/622-1069 Fax: (868) 628-8745 Email: koremb.tt@gmail.com

Delegation of the European Union to Trinidad and Tobago His Excellency Ambassador Arend Biesebroek Level 2, Sagicor Financial Centre, 16 Queen’s Park West, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-6628/622-0591 Fax: (868) 622-6355 Email: delegation-trinidad-andtobago-hod@ eeas.europa.eu Website: www.deltto.ec.europa.eu Embassy of the French Republic His Excellency Ambassador Hédi Picquart 7 Mary Street, St. Clair Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-1931 Fax: (868) 628-2632 Email: info@ambafrance-tt.org Website: http://www.ambafrance-tt.org/ Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany His Excellency Ambassador Dr. Lutz Hermann Goergens 19 St. Clair Avenue, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-1630/628-1631/628-1632 Fax: (868) 628-5278 Email: info@ports.diplo.de Website: www.port-of-spain.diplo.de/ Grenada Trade and Economic Commissioner Grenada House Dr. Patrick Antoine #127 Henry Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-9235 Fax: (868) 624-1257 Email: grenadaconsular@gmail.com Embassy of the Republic of Guatemala His Excellency Ambassador Mario Estuardo Torres Townson Apt. 701, Regents Tower, Westmoorings By The Sea, Westmoorings Tel: (868) 632-7629 Fax: (868) 632-7629 Email: embtrintobago@minex.gob.gt High Commission for the Republic of India His Excellency High Commissioner Bishwadip Dey 6 Victoria Avenue, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-7480/627-7481/ 627-4027 Fax: (868) 627-6985 Email: hoc.pospain@mea.gov.in High Commission for Jamaica His Excellency High Commissioner David Prendergast 2 Newbold Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-4995 Fax: (868) 622-9043 Email: Jamaica@jhcpos.org

Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands His Excellency Ambassador Gilles Jerrit Bijl Trinre Building, 69–71 Edward Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-1210/625-1722/ 625-2532 Fax: (868) 625-1704 Email: por@minbuza.nl High Commission for the Federal Republic of Nigeria Acting High Commissioner Ganiyu Adekunle Adeyemi 3 Maxwell-Phillip Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-4002 Email: sosecnigeria@gmail.com Embassy of the Republic of Panama Her Excellency Ambassador Carmen Gabriela Menendez 25 De Verteuil Street Woodbrook, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-9956/628-9957 Fax: (868) 622-8992 Email: embpanamatyt@mire.dob.pa Embassy of the Republic of Peru Charge d’ Affaires a.i. Jorge Antonio Rosado La Torre #4 Trinidad Crescent Federation Park Port of Spain Tel: (868) 221-8642/221-2939 Email: missiontt@embassyofperutt.net High Commission for the Republic of South Africa Her Excellency High Commissioner Xoliswa Nomathamsanqa Ngwevela 4 Scott Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-9869/628-6997 Fax: (868) 622-7089 Email: sahctt.general@dirco.gov.za / sahctt.consular@dirco.gov.za Embassy of the Kingdom of Spain His Excellency Ambassador Jose Maria Fernandez Lopez de Turiso 7th Floor, Tatil Building 11 Maraval Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-7938/628-2560/ 622-1151 Ext. 237 Fax: (868) 622-3032 Email: emb.puertoespana.vis@maec.es Embassy of the Republic of Suriname Charge d’ Affaires a.i. Oquemele Denz 5th Floor, TATIL Building 11 Maraval Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-0704 Fax: (868) 628-0086 Email: surinameembassy.tt@gmail.com

High Commission for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland His Excellency High Commissioner Tim Stew 19 St Clair Avenue, St. Clair Tel: (868) 350-0444/350-0422 Email: generalenquiries.ptofs@fco.gov.uk Embassy of the United Mexican States His Excellency Ambassador Jesus Alberto Lopez Gonzalez 12 Hayes Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-1422 Fax: (868) 628-8488 Email: info@mexico.tt Embassy of the United States of America His Excellency Ambassador John E. Estrada 15 Queen’s Park West, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-6371/622-6376 Fax: (868) 822-5905 Email: POSExecutiveOffice@state.gov Website: http://trinidad.usembassy.gov/ The Embassy of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela Her Excellency Ambassador Coromoto Godoy Calderon 16 Victoria Avenue, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-9821/627-9823/627-9824 Fax: (868) 624-2508 Email: embve.ttpsp@mppre.gob.ve REGIONAL ORGANISATIONS Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) President Sir, Charles Michael Dennis Byron 134 Henry Street, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-2225 Fax: (868) 624-4710 Email: info@ccj.org INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS Association of Caribbean States (ACS) 5–7 Sweet Briar Road, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-9575/628-0936/ 628-6756/628-7222 Fax: (868) 622-1653 Email: mail@acs-aec.org International Labour Organisation (ILO) Director Claudia Coenjaerts Stanmore House, 6 Stanmore Avenue Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-7704/623-7178/623-3359/ 625-0524/627-6304/624-8751 Fax: (868) 627-8978 Email: ilocarib@ilo.org Pan American Health Organisation Dr. Bernadette Thedore Gandi 1st Floor, Sweet Briar Place 10-12 Sweet Briar Road, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-4202/622-5445/ 622-5132/622-0731/622-4433 Fax: (868) 628-4719 Email: emailtto@paho.org United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Trinidad and Tobago Resident Representative Richard Bleinitt UN House 3 Chancery Lane, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-7056 Fax: (868) 623-1658 Email: registry.tt@undp.org

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The Government of Trinidad and Tobago

The Office of the President Circular Road, St Ann’s, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 624-1261/2 Website: http://www.otp.tt/ Office of the Prime Minister 13-15 St. Clair Avenue St. Clair, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-1625 Website: http://www.opm.gov.tt/ Ministry of the Attorney General and Legal Affairs Cabildo Chambers 1st & 3rd Floor 23-27 St. Vincent Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-7010/625-5505/8901 Fax: (868) 624-1986 Website: http://www.ag.gov.tt/ Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Fisheries St. Clair Circle St. Clair, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-1221-5/622-5481-7 Fax: (868) 622-8202 Website : http://ministryof agriculturelandandfisheries.gov.tt Ministry of Community Development, Culture and the Arts Level 20, Nicholas Towers 63-65 Independence Square Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-3012/3112/7425 Fax: (868) 627-5954 Email: communications@community.gov.tt Website: http://www.community.gov.tt/ Ministry of Education 5 St. Vincent Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-2181 Fax: (868) 628-2088 Website: http://www.moe.edu.tt/ Ministry of Energy and Energy Industries Levels 15 & 22-26, Energy Tower International Waterfront Centre 1 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-6334/623-6708 Fax: (868) 625-0306 Email: info@energy.gov.tt Website: http://www.energy.gov.tt/ Ministry of Finance Level 8, Eric Williams Finance Building Independence Square Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-9700 ext. 2806 & 2805 Fax: (868) 627-9700 ext. 2810 Website: http://www.finance.gov.tt/

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Ministry of Foreign and CARICOM Affairs Levels 10-14, Tower C International Waterfront Complex 1A Wrightson Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-6894 Fax: (868) 627-5853 Email: hostmaster@gov.tt Website: http://www.foreign.gov.tt/

Ministry of Rural Development and Local Government Kent House Long Circular Road Maraval, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-1669/1979/628-1323-5 Fax: (868) 622-7283 Website: http://www.localgov.gov.tt/

Ministry of Health 63 Park Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-0010 Fax: (868) 623-9528 Website: http://www.health.gov.tt/

Ministry of Social Development and Family Services Colonial Life Building 39-43 St. Vincent Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-2608 Website: http://www2.mpsd.gov.tt/

Ministry of Housing and Urban Development NHA Building 44-46 South Quay Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-4663 Fax: (868) 625-2793 Website: http://www.housing.gov.tt/ Ministry of Labour and Small Enterprise Development Level 5 & 6, Tower C International Waterfront Complex 1 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-8478 Fax: (868) 624-4091 Email: communicationsmolsmed@gov.tt Website: http://www.molsmed.gov.tt/ Ministry of National Security Temple Court 31-33 Abercromby Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-2441-5 Fax: (868) 627-8044 Email: info@mns.gov.tt Website: http://www.nationalsecurity.gov.tt/ Ministry of Planning and Development Level 14 Eric Williams Financial Complex Independence Square Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-9700 Website: http://www.planning.gov.tt/ Ministry of Public Administration and Communications Level 7, National Library Building Corner Hart and Abercromby Streets Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-6724/623-7122/8578 Website: http://www.mpa.gov.tt/ Ministry of Public Utilities 2 Elizabeth Street St. Clair, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-0749/628-6129 Fax: (868) 628-0105 Website: http://www.mpu.gov.tt/home/

Ministry of Sport and Youth Affairs 2 Elizabeth Street St. Clair Tel: (868) 628-6792/622-0902/ 622-9078/622-7330/622-8812 Fax: (868) 623-0174 Email: info@sport.gov.tt Website: http://www.sport.gov.tt/ Ministry of Tourism Levels 8 & 9, Tower C International Waterfront Complex 1 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain Tel: 624-1403/624-3151/ 624-4792/625-0963 Fax: 625-1825/625-3894 Email: mintourism@tourism.gov.tt touresearch@tourism.gov.tt Website: http://www.tourism.gov.tt/ Ministry of Trade and Industry Levels 9, 11-17 Nicholas Towers 63-65 Independence Square Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-2931-4 Fax: (868) 627-8488 Email: mti-info@gov.tt Website: http://www.tradeind.gov.tt/ Ministry of Works and Transport Level 6, Main Administrative Building Corner Richmond and London Streets Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-1225 Fax: (868) 625-8070 Website: http://www.mowt.gov.tt/general/ homepage.aspx Office of the Parliament Levels G-8, Tower D International Waterfront Centre 1A Wrightson Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 624-7275 Fax: (868) 625-4672 Email: webmaster@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.ttparliament.org/


Chambers of Commerce American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T) Mitchell De Silva — President Nirad Tewarie — Chief Executive Officer 62 Maraval Road, Port of Spain Trinidad W.I. PO Bag 150, Newtown, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-4466/0340, 628-2508 Fax: (868) 628-9428 Email: inbox@amchamtt.com Website: www.amchamtt.com

British Caribbean Chamber of Commerce Nadira N. Persad — Country Manager ESG Business Suites, Fitt Court 9-11 Fitt Street, Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 352-0923 Email: npersad@britishcaribbean.com Website: www.britishcaribbean.com

Couva/Point Lisas Chamber of Commerce Liaquat Ali — President Ramchand Rajbal Maraj — Vice President Campden Road, Couva, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 636-5017; 223-6670 Email: couva.chamber@gmail.com

Greater Tunapuna Chamber of Industry and Commerce Mrs. Nalini Maharaj — President Ms. Surindra Maharaj — Vice President Lot#8 Macoya Industrial Estate Tunapuna, Trinidad Tel: (868) 645-5639 Email: info@tunapunachamber.org Website: www.gtcic.org

Penal/Debe Chamber of Commerce Shiva Roopnarine — President Rampersad Sieuraj — Vice President 18 Penal Rock Road, Penal, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 647-0452 Email: penaldebechamber@gmail.com

Sangre Grande Business Association Kenneth Boodhu — President Garvin Lezama — Secretary

c/o OJOE’S Building 193 B Eastern Main Road Sangre Grande, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 678-2852 Email: kenboodhu@hotmail.com

The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce Vishnu Charran — President Allan Julien — Vice President

17 Cumberbatch Street Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 671-2242; 779-8804 Email: gccic@chaguanaschamber.org Website:www.chaguanaschamber.org/

The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago Vincent Pereira — Chairman Dr. Thackwray Driver President and Chief Executive Officer

Suite B2.03, Atlantic Plaza Atlantic Avenue, Point Lisas, Trinidad P.O. Box 80, San Fernando Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 6-ENERGY, 679-6623/1398 Fax: (868) 679-4242 Email: execoffice@energy.tt Website: www.energy.tt

Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce Ronald Hinds — President Gabriel Faria — Chief Executive Officer Columbus Circle, Westmoorings P.O. Box 499, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 637-6966 Fax: (868) 637-7425 Email: chamber@chamber.org.tt Website: www.chamber.org.tt

Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce (Tobago Division) Demi John Cruickshank — Chairman

Point Fortin South Western Chamber of Industry and Commerce George Alexis — President Carlton Semper — 2nd Vice President M6 Furlong Street, Mahaica Point Fortin, Trinidad Tel: (868) 648-4961 Email: pfswcic@gmail.com Website: www.pfswcic.com

2nd Floor ANSA McAL Building Milford Road, Scarborough, Tobago Tel: (868) 639-2669 Fax: (868) 639-3014 Email: tobagochamber@chamber.org.tt Website: www.chamber.org.tt

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Fast Facts of Trinidad and Tobago

Located at the gateway to the Caribbean, the Republic of

Trinidad and Tobago

is renowned for its industrialised, energy export-driven economy, vibrant culture and multiethnic society. T&T is a leading regional economy with an international presence in the oil and gas-based energy industry, and a profitable and productive services sector. T&T is also pursuing a policy of economic diversification and is investing in several other sectors. Trade, investment and innovation are also policy priorities of this two-island nation as it continues its path to development.

148

Geography and Location

Time Zone

Trinidad Once attached to the South American mainland, Trinidad is situated at 12 km (7 miles) northeast of the coast of Venezuela and is separated from it by the Gulf of Paria. Trinidad has three mountain ranges — the Northern Range, the Central Range and the Southern Range. The highest point, El Cerro del Aripo, is 940 metres (3,084 ft) above sea level. About 40% of all land is undeveloped forest and woodlands, although the island is experiencing rapid development. Trinidad’s Pitch Lake is the largest natural reservoir of asphalt in the world. Total Area: 4,828 sq km (1,864 sq miles) 81.25 km long by 57-73 km wide (50 miles by 35-45 miles) Location: Latitude 10.5° N; Longitude 61.5° W

Greenwich Mean Time: Minus four hours (GMT -4)

Tobago Tobago lies 34 km (21 miles) northeast of Trinidad. Of volcanic origin, the island is a single mountain mass, although the south-west is flat or undulating and coralline. The highest peak, the Main Ridge, reaches an elevation of about 576 metres (1,890 ft). The coastline is broken up by inlets and sheltered beaches, and there are several uninhabited islets. Total Area: 300 sq km (116 sq miles) Location: Latitude 11.5° N Longitude 60.5° W

In US Winter: Eastern Standard Time plus one hour (EST +1) In US Summer: Eastern Standard Time (EST) There is no Daylight Saving Time (DST).

Climate Trinidad and Tobago has a tropical climate and two distinct seasons: dry, from January to May and wet, from June to December. There is a short dry period around mid-September called Petit Carême. Trinidad and Tobago are just outside the usual path of hurricanes and other tropical storms, but Tobago can experience inclement weather as a result of such weather systems. Daytime Average: 31.9°C (Trinidad June 2017); 30.9°C (Tobago June 2017) Nighttime Average: 24.3°C (June 2017); 25.2°C (Tobago June 2017) Seasons: Dry (Jan-May); Wet (June-Dec)


Fast Facts of Trinidad and Tobago Continued

TRINIDAD Capital: Port of Spain Main Towns: City of San Fernando, Arima, Point Fortin, Chaguanas (Trinidad) TOBAGO Capital: Scarborough (Tobago) NATIONALITY: Trinidad: Trinidadian Tobago: Tobagonian OFFICIAL LANGUAGE: English POPULATION: 1,353,895 (2016 figures) ELECTRICITY: 110 volts/220 volts (+/-6%); 60 Hz TELEPHONE: 1 (868) + seven-digit local

Trinidad and Tobago has more than 97 mammal species,

400 bird species, 90 reptile species, 30 amphibian species,

600 butterfly species and over 2,100 species of flowering plants.

People and Society

Government

Ethnic Groups (2011 census) East Indian 35.4% African 34.2% Mixed 15.1% Dougla (mixed African and Indian) 7.7% Other 1.4% Life Expectancy Male: 71.41 (2011 census) Life Expectancy Female: 77.81 (2011 census) Population Growth Rate: 0.3 (2016) Birth Rate: 12.8 / 1000 (2016) Total Median Age: 32.6 (2011 census)

Trinidad and Tobago’s government is a parliamentary democracy. The head of state is the President, who is elected by an Electoral College of members of the Senate and House of Representatives for a five-year term. Executive power, however, is vested in the Prime Minister and Government, following elections every five years. The local government body in Tobago is the Tobago House of Assembly and its seat is in the capital city, Scarborough.

Culture The festivals, music, customs, cuisine, religions and races of Trinidad and Tobago reflect a rich and unique cultural diversity. The nation has a passionate and colourful history spanning five centuries. Festivals and religious and cultural observances include Divali (the Hindu Festival of Light), Eid-ul-Fitr (Muslim religious day), Emancipation Day, Indian Arrival Day and Corpus Christi (Catholic). Trinidad and Tobago Carnival is a world-famous event that brings together artists, musicians, masqueraders and revellers for a month-long celebration that culminates in a two-day parade. http://www.culture.gov.tt/

Eco-Tourism Trinidad and Tobago, although relatively distinct ecologically, are both blessed with rich natural environments well suited for ecotourism. Once part of the South American mainland, Trinidad’s flora and fauna have comingled, leading to a great density of plant and animal types in a relatively small location. Trinidad and Tobago has more than 97 mammal species, 400 bird species, 90 reptile species, 30 amphibian species, 600 butterfly species and over 2,100 species of flowering plants. The island’s nature reserves attract major international traffic from naturalists and nature watchers. The terrain is just as diverse, with tropical rainforests, mangrove swamps, mountainous terrain and savannahs. Bird watching is a major attraction in Tobago as well, with Little Tobago island recognised as one of the Caribbean’s top seabird sanctuaries. Tobago is also a hub of aquatic tourism. The waters off the island are a haven for wildlife, an attraction for both divers and boat tourists. Buccoo Reef (a large coral reef and protected marine park) is a popular destination. Tobago’s Main Ridge Forest is known to be the oldest protected rainforest. http://www.gotrinidadandtobago.com/ http://www.tourism.gov.tt/ www.insandoutstt.com

General elections take place every five years Parliament: Westminster system Tobago: Tobago House of Assembly Local Government Body Head of State: Non-Executive President http://www.ttconnect.gov.tt/gortt/portal/ ttconnect https://www.otp.tt http://www.opm.gov.tt/ http://www.tha.gov.tt/

Legal System The legal system is based on common law and statutes. The judicial system comprises magistrates’ courts and the Supreme Court, which is made up of the High Court and the Court of Appeal. There is a separate Industrial Court that deals with most labour matters. The Judicial and Legal Service Commission appoints judges of the Supreme Court. The Attorney General is responsible for the administration of the legal and judicial system. Final appeal from Trinidad and Tobago courts is to the Privy Council in England, but consideration is being given to replacing the Privy Council with the Caribbean Court of Justice, which was inaugurated in April 2005, with its headquarters located in Port of Spain. http://www.ag.gov.tt/ http://www.legalaffairs.gov.tt/ http://www.moj.gov.tt/

Meeting Places and Conference Centres Trinidad and Tobago is one of the top five Caribbean meeting and conference destinations. Many hotels have facilities for conferences, including international brands such as the Hyatt Regency Trinidad and the Hilton Trinidad and Conference Centre. In addition, the state-of-the-art National Academy for the Performing Arts (NAPA), South Academy for the Performing Arts, award-winning spots like Coco Reef and the Magdalena Grand Beach Resort in Tobago are ideal for corporate meetings and team-building retreats. Trinidad and Tobago hosted 29,449 business travellers during the first half of 2017.

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Fast Facts of Trinidad and Tobago Continued

BANKING

Economic Data

Public Utilities

The financial system consists of Commercial Banks, Trust and Mortgage Finance Companies, Finance Houses and Merchant Banks

Declining economic activity in the second half of 2016 dominated the energy sector. Weaknesses were manifested in contractions in crude oil, natural gas, LNG and petrochemical production which outweighed increases in petroleum refining. Latest figures show natural gas production fell by 15.4% in the second half of 2016. The decline was a result of a drop in production from bpTT, however, production from bpTT’s Juniper platform should boost natural gas supplies and the energy sector on the whole in the latter part of 2017.

Electricity Trinidad and Tobago has a reliable supply of electricity with rates still among the lowest in the Caribbean. The domestic and commercial supply voltage is 110/220 volts, 60 cycles. The Trinidad and Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC) is the agency responsible for T&T’s electrical supply. http://www.ttec.co.tt/

Number of Commercial Banks: 8 Number of Branches: 122 Number of Automatic Banking Machines: 458 BANK HOURS OF OPERATION City Centres: Monday to Thursday – 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. RBC and Scotiabank (not mall branches) 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 8 RBC Branches open on Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Shopping Centres (Daily): 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Exchange Rate: TTD 6.76: USD 1 (June 2017) GDP 2016 TTD Million Constant (2000) = 91,939.2 GDP Per Capita 2016 = USD 13,681.4 Labour Force 2016 = 640,600 Unemployment Rate 2016 = 4.0% Inflation Rate 2016 = 3.1% Major Exports: Natural gas and oil, ammonia, alcohol, fertilizers, iron and steel

Growth in the non-energy sectors such as distribution, construction and manufacturing contracted in Q3, 2016. Manufacturing activity declined by 4.3% and this is attributable to lower chemicals and assembly-type output. There was a reduction in electricity generation at the end of 2016 as electricity and water output declined by 3.7%. The closure of ArcelorMittal, the largest single industrial consumer of electricity, is linked to this development. The finance, insurance and real estate subsectors rose by 0.8% on account of an increase in commercial banking but there was a decline in activity in trust companies, real estate and mutual funds. The agriculture sector increased by 0.4 %.

Education The educational system is based on the British model and produces one of the highest standards of education in the Caribbean. Primary and secondary level education at most institutions are free, but private school options are available for a fee.

Source: Summary Economic Indicators, Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago, Central Statistical Office, Trinidad and Tobago,

Post-secondary and tertiary education providers include The University of the West Indies (The UWI), the College of Science, Technology & Applied Arts of Trinidad & Tobago (COSTAATT), distance learning tertiary-level institutions, vocational/technical training schools and colleges, the technology-based University of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT), and the National Institute of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (NIHERST).

Global Finance, www.tradingeconomics.com.

Health

Major Trading Partners: US, CARICOM, Spain, Mexico, France, UK, China, Venezuela, Japan, Nigeria, The Netherlands, Dominican Republic

Trinidad and Tobago’s health system consists of government-funded and private hospitals, wellqualified specialists, private medical practitioners and clinics scattered throughout the islands. Specialists trained in gynaecology, paediatrics, radiology, physiotherapy, cardiology, gastrology, urology and orthopaedics work both in private practice and healthcare facilities. Medical services are free at the governmentfunded institutions and clinics, but a fee is charged at all others. Twenty-four-hour emergency services are available at several government and private medical facilities. There is also a 24-hour Emergency Air Ambulance Service. http://www.health.gov.tt/

Post/Courier Services Regular mail, express mail and courier delivery are reliable and available from local provider TTPost at excellent rates. International courier services are efficient and readily available. http://www.ttpost.net/

150

Water The Water and Sewerage Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (WASA), a state enterprise, is the sole provider of water and wastewater services in Trinidad and Tobago. http://www.wasa.gov.tt/

Telecommunications The Telecommunications and Broadcasting sectors generated an estimated TT$5.6 billion (US$836.0 million) in 2016, which as a percentage of GDP equates to 3.8%. This represented a 0.3% decrease in total revenues generated by this industry compared to last year. Total Telecom revenues increased by 2% while total broadcasting revenues decreased by 11%. TSTT has, for many years, been the major provider of landline and mobile telephone services. Digicel offers mobile and cable television to both islands and has also introduced fixed line and domestic wireless services. Flow offers cable television, internet and landline telephone services. With broad coverage throughout the islands, mobile phones are an easy and available option. Wireless Internet services are readily available at hotels and cybercafés. International Access Code: 1 Country Code: 868 1. Fixed Internet Subscriptions 255,600 2. Mobile Internet Subscriptions 707,300 http://tatt.org.tt/

Media Daily Newspapers: Trinidad Express, Trinidad Guardian and Newsday Monday – Friday: Newsday Tobago Bi-weekly Newspapers: TNT Mirror Weekly Newspapers: Tobago News, Catholic News, Bomb, Punch, Trinidad and Tobago Sunshine, Tobago Today Television Stations: : CNC (Channel 3), CCN TV6 (Channels 5 and 18), Gayelle Television (Channel 7), IBN (Channel 8), CTV (Channel 6), NCC (Channel 4), IETV (Channel 1 and 16), Parliament (Channel 11), Tobago Channel 5 (Tobago only), Synergy (Channel 15) FM Radio Stations: TBC Network (95.1, Vibe CT 105, Sangeet 106.1, Aakash Vani 106.5, Slam 100.5, Sky 99.5) CL Network (90.5, 104.1, 97.1, 103.5) Caribbean New Media Group (Talk City 91.1, Next 99.1, Sweet 100.1) T&T Radio Network (Star 94.7, 96.1, 107.7) Gem Radio 5 Limited (Red 96.7, i95.5, the Word 107.1, Hott 93.5, Taj 92.3) Power 102, Boom Champions 94.1, Isaac 98.1, Street 91.9, Radio Jaagriti 102.7, Wack 90.1, Pulse 91.5 (Tobago), Radio Toco 106.7, 103.1, Radio Tambrin 92.7 (Tobago), 104.7, and Heritage 101.7.


Fast Facts of Trinidad and Tobago Continued

Immigration, Work Permits & Visas

MAJOR AIRLINES

Piarco Airport American Airlines...........1 (868) 821-6000 Caribbean Airlines..........1 (868) 625-7200 British Airways................1 (800) 247-9297 Copa Airlines...................1 (868) 669-5189 LIAT....................................1 (800) 669-2982 Surinam Airways.............1 (868) 627-0102 United Airlines................1 (800) 864-8331 West Jet Airlines............1 (403) 444-2586 JetBlue...............................1 (800) 538-2583 Rutaca...............................1 (868) 625-4324

ANR Robinson Airport Virgin Atlantic................. 1 (800) 744-7477 Condor and Thomas Cook Group Airlines.......1 (868) 639-5201 British Airways................1 (800) 247-9297 The following airlines/flights are sometimes scheduled to operate during peak periods. Air Canada Rouge...........1 (868) 623-2721 LASER Airlines.................laser.com.ve INSEL Air...........................fly-inselair.com Conviasa Airlines............1 (868) 627-8172/6078

Visitors to Trinidad and Tobago must possess valid passports and return or ongoing tickets for successful entry. Most Commonwealth countries do not require visas for entry, except Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Cameroon, Fiji Islands, Mozambique, Uganda and South Africa. For business travel and vacations lasting 90 days or less (within a 180-day period) European Union citizens do not need visas for entry. The same applies for nationals from non-European Union Schengen countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland). Holders of CARICOM passports, with the exception of Haiti, do not require visas. Visitors from several other countries are allowed to enter Trinidad and Tobago for periods of up to three months without a visa. http://www.immigration.gov.tt/ Work permits are required for business stays beyond 30 days. Visa extensions can be obtained from the Immigration Office at 67 Frederick Street, Port of Spain, while work permits can be obtained from the Ministry of National Security, Temple Court II, 52-60 Abercromby Street, Port of Spain. www.nationalsecurity.gov.tt

Transportation Airports Piarco International Airport is located about 45 minutes from the capital city, Port of Spain. It plays an important role as a vital hub for international air traffic in the Caribbean. There are non-stop daily scheduled flights to and from major international cities. Trinidad and Tobago’s national airline, Caribbean Airlines, serves Toronto, New York, Miami, Jamaica, Saint Maarten, Antigua, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana and Suriname. International and regional airlines that fly to Trinidad and Tobago include American Airlines, British Airways, Caribbean Airlines, United Airlines, West Jet, JetBlue, LIAT and several charter flight companies. International flights are also available direct from Tobago’s ANR Robinson International Airport. http://www.tntairports.com/

TOP NEWS & MEDIA WEBSITES TrinidadExpress.com Guardian.co.tt Newsday.co.tt TrinidadandTobagoNews.com Power102fm.com TriniView.com Cnc3.co.tt

707,300 Fixed Internet Subscriptions

255,600

Source: http://tatt.org.tt/

Seaports The main seaports are located in Port of Spain and Point Lisas. The Port of Port of Spain handles dry and general cargo, break bulk, containers and passenger traffic. The Point Lisas Industrial Port Development Corporation Ltd. (PLIPDECO), mainly a bulk port for industrial commerce, also handles container and general cargo traffic. There are ferries travelling the inter-island route daily. Port of Spain Ferry: (868) 625-4906/3055 Tobago Ferry: (868) 639-2417/4906 The CARICOM Jetty, which is located at the Port of Port of Spain and operates the passenger inter-island ferry, receives, stores and delivers CARICOM cargo and multipurpose containers for trade within the Caribbean region. A water taxi ferry connects Port of Spain and San Fernando. Scheduled sailing times are Monday to Friday. Tickets cost TT$15 one-way and can be purchased at the Water Taxi Terminal located at Flat Rock, Lady Hailes Avenue, San Fernando or the Cruise Ship Complex, Port of Spain. Free parking is available at both ports. There is a Public Transport Service Corporation (PTSC) shuttle service, which costs TT$3 through the city of Port of Spain. For further information, visit: www.nidco.co.tt or call 624-3281 (POS) or 800-4WTS (San Fernando)

Year-on-Year Change in Consumer Spending

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15

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Mobile Internet Subscriptions

Per cent

Trinidad and Tobago: GDP Growth Rates

Roads Trinidad and Tobago has an extensive transportation network of paved roads. Highways link the north and south of the island (Uriah Butler Highway, Solomon Hochoy Highway), and the east and west (ChurchillRoosevelt Highway). Traffic is extremely heavy at peak hours when a high number of vehicles head into and out of the capital city and environs. Driving is on the left-hand side. http://www.mowt.gov.tt/ http://www.ptsc.co.tt/

-5 -10 -15

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Q1

Q2

Q3

2015

Total

Energy

Q4

Q1

Q2

2016

Non-Energy

-5

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

All Retail Items

Source: Summary Economic Indications, Advanced Copy, September 2016

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Airport

Rivers & Streams

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Main Roads

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AT L A N T I C OCEAN


Index by Surname A Abass, Renée..............................................69 Abdulla Ali Taib, Alya...............................98 Abraham, Nigel...........................................56 Abraham, Wendy..................................... 133 Adams, Eric A..............................................36 Alcazar, Alan...............................................96 Alcazar, Christopher....................................11 Alexander, Lisa-Maria............................... 32 Alfonso, Lesley J....................................... 103 Ali, Brandon............................................... 120 Ali, Nazra......................................................97 Ali, Shazan....................................................42 Ali-D’Arbasie Dayne............................... 102 Ali, Nikolaiski...............................................82 Ali, Riyad (Ray)......................................... 134 Ali, Salahdeen............................................ 103 Ali, Suzetta.............................................13, 77 Allaham-Hosein, Anisa.............................49 Allahar-Cape, Nicole................................. 33 Alleyne, Robert.......................................... 121 Ammon, Elizabeth......................................86 Ammon, Ronald..........................................43 Andrews, Marvin......................................100 Antar, Farid..................................................24 Apang, Megan.............................................76 Augustus, Wendy......................................50 Austin, Talia................................................ 131 Awai, Anthony............................................28 Ayoung, Ronald......................................... 132

B Baah, Emmanuel..........................................16 Bachan, Brian...............................................87 Bachoo, Donna............................................49 Bahadoor-Hosein, Christina....................76 Bailey, Marsha.............................................56 Baldeo, Annie..............................................82 Balwah-Frontin, Dianne............................42 Baksh, Bhagmania V..................................65 Baksh-Edwards, Kameel...........................26 Balbirsingh, Valmiki.................................. 118 Balkissoon, Roger.......................................97 Ballah-Lashley, Lennon.............................59 Ballah-Tull, Lindi.........................................22 Bamber, Lawrence.......................................61 Baptiste, Andre......................................... 103 Baptiste, Nigel M........................................24 Beckles, Clifford..........................................92 Beepath, Sookdeo..................................... 102 Beeput, Chester..........................................59 Beharry, Jimmy...........................................29 Beharry, Wayne........................................ 139 Belgrave, David.......................................... 90

154

Bellille, Afeisha.......................................... 120 Benisar, Dennis.........................................100 Benjamin, Dexter.........................................18 Bernard, Wanda..........................................99 Best, Jorrell.................................................104 Bhola, Dinesh............................................. 124 Bissessar, Ann Marie Prof........................46 Bobb-Semple, Charles...............................88 Boodasingh, Dinelle.................................100 Boodhai, Krishna....................................... 124 Boodoo, Russell...........................................42 Boodoo, Winston........................................49 Boodoosingh, Jo-Anne..............................46 Boodram, Winston.....................................28 Boucaud-Blake, Jennifer............................18 Brijbassie, Arvind........................................28 Bristol, Laurette Dr.....................................50 Broadbridge, Stephen.............................. 124 Brooks, Gerry C........................................... 57 Bryan, Patricia.............................................97 Budhooram, Kathryn.................................36 Bujun, Neil....................................................42 Bute-Seaton, Kelly...................................... 37 Butler, Eric....................................................82

C Camacho-Mohammed, Gretchen..........34 Campbell, Samantha.................................49 Camps, Oliver............................................ 103 Cardinez, Joy................................................31 Carrington, Lennox G................................65 Carrington, Pete..........................................65 Carter, Charles............................................84 Carter, Ronald............................................. 32 Caruth, Erica................................................69 Cassim, Aleem............................................ 37 Castro, Felipe...............................................22 Chan, Jonathan........................................... 33 Chang, Andrew........................................... 32 Chang, Karen...............................................34 Chang, Robert.............................................89 Chapman, Donna........................................56 Charran, Vishnu...........................................12 Charles, Anthony........................................96 Charles, Jason.............................................65 Charles, Kelvin............................................ 10 Charles, Leslie..............................................16 Charles, Michael P.A.................................42 Chattoo-Kissoon, Francesca...................78 Cheng, Eva....................................................98 Cheng Wing, Marc.....................................76 Chinapoo, Ian.............................................. 35 Chinpire-O’Reilly, Denise....................... 124 Chong Ton, Maria......................................76

Cipriani-Orziv, Marisa............................. 130 Clarke, Peter................................................96 Cobham, Melissa........................................76 Codallo, Ronald......................................... 134 Cohen, Dennis............................................. 33 Cole, Lerielle................................................ 77 Contant, Kimberly......................................97 Cooper, Gerard...........................................84 Cooper-Gaskill, Jillian.............................. 123 Copeland, Brian Prof..................................46 Creese, Lisa..................................................76 Creese, Marli............................................... 33 Cruickshank, Demi John................... 12, 127 Cuffie, Gladston...........................................31

D Da Costa-Vieira, Agna.............................. 55 Daniell, K. Michael.....................................36 Darbasie, Karen..........................................22 D’arcy, Gerard........................................... 132 Darsan, Samuel...........................................28 Dass, Nisa.....................................................97 Dass, Wayne...............................................36 Dass-Mungal, Riah.....................................24 David, Carol.................................................84 Davis, Kevin................................................101 Davis, Natasha M....................................... 35 De Freitas, Abigail..................................... 121 De Freitas, Nicole.......................................22 De La Rosa-Camacho, Tricia...................26 de Meillac, Jean........................................ 133 de Meillac, Jean-Paul............................... 133 Dempster, Stephen..................................100 Deokiesingh, Vidya....................................56 De Silva, Eric.............................................. 130 De Silva, Mitchell..........................11, 34, 126 Dhoray, Sasha.............................................46 Dolsingh, Ravi............................................ 130 Driver, Thackwray Dr.................................61 Drysdale, Natalie...................................... 130 Dutta, Suresh............................................. 103

E Edghill, Mark.............................................. 130 Edwards, Avril.............................................22 Edwards, E. Joanne....................................141 Edwards, Nigel ........................................... 35 Edwards, Delvert........................................49 Edwards, Simone........................................34 Elcock, Oliver...............................................82 Elder, Irwin K............................................. 130 Eleuthere-Jn, Carol Marie........................22 Elliot, Timothy........................................... 134 Esau, Joseph................................................46


Index by Surname continued F Fagien, Zakiya, Dr...................................... 113 Farah, Anthony D.....................................104 Farfan, Marsha..........................................100 Faria, Gabriel............................................. 127 Farray, Nigel................................................. 77 Ferguson, Andrew.................................... 103 Ferguson, Nigel............................................16 Fletcher, Lyndon..........................................18 Forbes, Ian..................................................108 Forbes, Lana.................................................99 Fortune, Stefan............................................36 Francis, Garth.............................................. 77 Franco, Mark................................................43 Frankland, Steven.......................................66 Francois, Joycelyn...................................... 77 Fraser-Lee Wen, Mekeisha......................28 Frederick, Neshon......................................49 Fridy, Joanna.................................................16 Frost, Sterling K...........................................22

G Ganness, Marcus.........................................18 Garcia, Marina.......................................... 130 Garcia, Miguel.............................................84 Garcia, Nicholas..........................................97 Garcia-Brooks, Anna-MarĂ­a....................24 Gardner, Elysia..........................................104 Gaudet, Marcia...........................................26 Geeban, Indira.............................................30 George, Venice......................................... 102 Gibbon, Donald......................................... 103 Gilbert, Abraham....................................... 131 Gill, Karlene.................................................. 77 Glaisher, Dawn.......................................... 130 Gittens, Kevon..............................................31 Goindoo, Andre..........................................99 Golding, Stacy-Ann.......................... 121, 124 Golikeri, Vashti...........................................34 Gomes, Roger............................................ 103 Gomez, Arnella......................................... 130 Gomez, Aqiyla Dr.......................................66 Gomez, Blayne............................................66 Gomez-Miller, Claire.................................56 Gomez, Nicholas........................................29 Gonsalves, Lindsay....................................97 Gooden, Samantha.................................... 33 Gooden, Steven........................................... 33 Goorahlal, Michelle....................................87 Gopaulsingh, David....................................26 Gopee-Scoon, Paula Hon........................... 9 Gopeesingh, Anyl Dr.................................66 Gormandy, John..........................................59 Gosein, Reya.............................................. 134

Goswami, Rakesh.......................................84 Grannum, Lisa............................................. 33 Granville, Joseph.........................................16 Gregory, Christopher................................. 33 Griffith, Adlyne............................................97 Griffith, Albert, Col......................................16 Guischard, Vernetta..................................76

H Hackett, David............................................97 Hadeed, Gerald...........................................97 Hagley, Christopher...................................56 Hale, Susan..................................................76 Hamilton, Dinesha.....................................86 Hamilton, Nickisha.....................................50 Harford, Anthony.......................................89 Harford, Ronald...........................................46 Harrikisoon, Kris..........................................18 Hassanali, Karlene......................................78 Headley, Kurt...............................................22 Henderson, Anna.......................................89 Henderson, Douglas................................108 Henry, Rosemarie A...................................99 Henry, Terrence..........................................82 Hepburn, Karrian........................................ 35 Herbert, Ricky...............................................18 Heywood, Dion......................................... 102 Hilaire, Sheila J............................................66 Hilton-Clarke Scott....................................29 Hinds, Ronald...................................... 12, 127 Hines, Gregory............................................26 Hornby, Chris............................................. 121 Hosein, Imtiaz......................................37, 65 Hosein, Leary A...........................................56 Hosein, Kazim............................................ 113 Hosein-Paramsook, Mishaal...................34 Hosein, Neil................................................. 113 Hosein, Safiyya........................................... 113 Hosein, Silounge..........................................61 Howell, Derwin M......................................24 Hunte, Wayne Prof....................................46 Hutcheon, Roger..........................................31 Hyland, Hilton.............................................24 Hylton, Patrick............................................. 33

I Ilkhtchoui, Patricia......................................30 Imbert, ClĂŠment, Professor Emeritus....49

J Jadoonanan, Sushilla.................................87 James, Brian.................................................49 James, Christopher.................................. 127 James, Jessica ............................................59

Jardine, Mary............................................. 130 Jardine, Rosemary......................................76 Jodhan, Genevieve...................................108 Jogie, Andy...................................................34 John, Heather..............................................50 John, Marsha R........................................... 37 John, Reynold..............................................49 John-Williams, Christopher.....................56 Jordan, Cheryl-Ann..................................104 Joseph, Andre..............................................36 Joseph, Dwayne........................................ 120 Joseph, Delia.............................................. 123 Joseph, Nicole................................... 121, 124 Joseph, Zola..................................................16 Joyeau-Flores, Arlene................................ 33 Julien, Jason.................................................22

K Kanhai, John................................................101 Kanhai, Relindor J..................................... 130 Kelshall, Richard Admiral....................... 139 Khan, Dale....................................................26 Khan, Kameel............................................ 133 Khan, Rehana................................................31 Khan, Shabir.................................................96 Khan-Ali, Allison.........................................59 Khatic, Narad............................................... 73 Khodai, Keshwar.........................................22 King, Ernest............................................. 8, 78 Kirby, Rayon.................................................99 Kissoon, Neela............................................22

L Lake, Nigel..................................................109 Lalchan, Moonilal..................................... 124 Lall, Jennifer........................................ 73, 133 Lange, Clayre............................................. 139 Laquis, Rachel..............................................26 Lawrence, Kenosha..................................109 Lazzari, Robert............................................96 Lee Loy, Angela.............................. 13, 33, 76 Lee-Persad, Pamela.................................. 60 Lee Wo-Mollenthiel, Anouk....................97 Lee Young, Ryan.........................................93 Le Blanc, Ashton........................................141 Le Blanc, Judy.............................................141 Le Gendre, Esther..............................88, 124 Le Saldo, Michele..................................... 134 Lewis, David................................................ 118 Lewis, Joseph............................................. 130 Lewis, Karlene.............................................69 Lewis, Keith..................................................58 Lewis, Mark................................................. 118 Lewis, Robin.................................................22

155


Index by Surname continued

Lewis, Ryan................................................. 118 Lewis, Richard................................ 8, 97, 118 Lewis, Shane............................................... 118 Lewis-Cameron, Acolla Dr.......................46 Lewis-Eversley, Barbara............................49 Libert, Trevor...............................................88 Llanos, Stephaine.......................................66 Lok Jack, Arthur..........................................46 Lok Jack, Nicholas......................................46 Look Kin, Richard........................................22 Long, Rod......................................................58 Lopez, Lyn...................................................108 Lopez, Susan.............................................. 102 Loquan, Mark.............................................. 57 Lousaing, Elisa.............................................97 Lutchman, Ramesh.....................................16

M Mallalieu, Kim Dr. ......................................82 Mallian, Mukesh.........................................99 Mahabir, Joshey...........................................18 Mahabir-Wyatt, Diana............................ 123 Mahabir, Sham.............................................18 Mahabirsingh Glenn..................................43 Maharaj, Deepak........................................88 Maharaj, Navene.........................................16 Maharaj, Nirmala.......................................46 Maharaj, Satyakama................................. 115 Maharaj, Sharon.........................................34 Maharaj, Vashti..........................................88 Maharajh, Ramadhar.................................86 Maingot, Kristi............................................66 Mangal, Sita........................................30, 130 Manraj, Shiva...............................................22 Mano, Dianne A........................................ 124 Mansoor, Natalie........................................34 Marcano, Akhenaton.................................22 Mark, Sekou................................................. 35 Martin, George..........................................140 Marchan, Sydelle........................................69 Marquez, Maxim......................................104 Matthews, Swedaka..................................56 Maxwell, Gerard.........................................69 Maynard, Shivani........................................66 McCarthy, Marsha...................................104 Mc Clashie, Stephen..................................56 Mc Clean, Kevin..........................................78 Mc Intosh, Ian.............................................49 McIntosh, Larry D.......................................18 Mc Millan, Sherry.......................................82 Mc Pherson, Vanessa................................26 McSood Amjad, Imran.............................101 Melville, Sharon.........................................101 Mendes, Douglas....................................... 37

156

Minors, Nigel...............................................56 Mills, Keith Andre.....................................101 Misra, Amit................................................ 102 Mitchell, Bernard........................................59 Mitchell, Ryan.............................................56 Modeste, Errol.............................................56 Modeste, Laurence....................................86 Mohammed, Curtis.................................... 57 Mohammed, Derek.................................. 124 Mohammed, Lisa........................................42 Mohammed, Nadira..................................69 Mohammed, Reshard................................26 Mohan, Lutchmin..................................... 102 Mooleedhar, Devati................................... 32 Moore, Kent..................................................16 Mongru, Ishwarlal......................................22 Monilal, Randy............................................49 Morris, Jacqueline......................................88 Montas, Adi.................................................46 Morton, Gerard...........................................28 Motilal, Kevin..............................................59 Mouttet, Charles A....................................24 Mungal, Kamla Dr......................................46 Murray-Solomon, Susan...........................96 Mustapha-Scott, Natasha......................108

N Narinesingh, Jason.....................................26 Narinesingh, Pria...................................... 124 Nasib, Mala...................................................16 Nathai-Gyan, Nadra...................................71 Nelson, Leslie............................................ 124 Neptune, Cheryl-Ann................................30 Newallo, Kathy Ann...................................76 Newton, Hayden..........................................16 Nicholas, Fayola..........................................46 Nicol, Debbie............................................. 134 Niles, Kevaughn........................................ 120 Nunes, Ryan............................................... 124

O Ogeer-Ali, Aleema.....................................76 Olton, Larry .................................................22 Osbourne, Dominique............................... 77 Ottley, Graeme...........................................86 Oumade Singh, Roopnarine.....................25

P Padmore, Shinelle.......................................76 Palmer-Keizer, Michelle...........................25 Paltoo, Vernon, Dr...................................... 57 Pantin, Averne........................................... 138 Pantin, Bernard............................................87 Parabdeen, Vijay.........................................76

Parmasar, Vindra.........................................16 Paterson, Michelle.....................................69 Patrick, Dexter.............................................31 Patrick, Stuart..............................................78 Paty, Stacey-Ann........................................34 Paul-Lewis, Caroline.................................. 77 Pazos, Gayle M...........................................26 Pazos, Jesus.................................................34 Pereira, Michael..........................................92 Pereira, Vincent..................................... 11, 61 Perryman, Keitha........................................50 Persad, Angella...........................................46 Persad, Savon..............................................26 Persad, Wayne L.A.................................... 60 Persaud, Avinash Prof...............................97 Peterson, Gilbert.........................................82 Pettier, Natasha........................................100 Phang, Lee.................................................. 120 Phillip, Paul...................................................56 Phillips, Edmund......................................... 33 Phillip, Michael A...................................... 138 Pierre, Anthony P.............................124, 125 Placide, Denielle.........................................65 Poliah, Beena...............................................59 Pooran, Tamara..........................................87 Pouchet, Lorraine..................................... 127 Prevatt, Osmond........................................30 Prime, Archibald.........................................49 Primus, Brandon.......................................104 Prince, John Dr............................................82 Prince-Wilson, Kalana..............................82

Q Quan, Greer...............................................104 Quashie, Marissa...................................... 121 Quentrall-Thomas, Lara...........................78 Quesnel, Stephanie................................... 131

R Ragbir, Harold........................................... 138 Ragbir, Sana.................................................22 Ragoonath, Dave........................................42 Ragoonath, Tamara...................................87 Ragoonanan, Vijai......................................25 Rajkumar, Gerard....................................... 73 Rajkumar, Ava.............................................56 Rajnauth-Elliot, Heidi............................... 134 Ram, Shane................................................108 Ramcharan, Ancil....................................... 33 Ramdath, Trudy........................................ 132 Ramdial, Sherine........................................101 Ramdin, Rosemarie.....................................31 Ramgoolam, Aldrin....................................25 Ramlal, Roshni.............................................76


Index by Surname continued

Ramlogan, Rawle........................................30 Ramkissoon, Adrian....................................31 Ramnarine, Anil..........................................49 Ramnarine-Hill, Uthra.............................100 Ramnath, Rodney.......................................69 Ramos, Ria.................................................. 133 Ramoutar, Ian..............................................59 Ramoutar, Ravi............................................ 35 Rampaul, Errol.............................................69 Rampersad, Dominic................................. 57 Rampersad, Terrance................................59 Ramsaran, Roysce...................................... 32 Ramsumair, Brent.......................................76 Ramsundar, Nievia.....................................82 Raphael, Edison................................... 96, 98 Reddock, Theodore....................................69 Reddock-Downes, Cynthia......................82 Reid, Fenwick....................................... 89, 90 Reid, Malcolm........................................... 124 Reid, Sean Capt............................................18 Reneaud-Lewis, Angela............................49 Reuben, Joash..............................................87 Richards, Dawn........................................... 77 Richards, Roger...........................................84 Rivers, Euon............................................... 123 Ripla, Andre.................................................87 Robinson-Regis, Camille Hon...................71 Robinson, David..........................................24 Robinson, Glenroy....................................109 Robinson, Joan M.....................................109 Rocke, Natalie...........................................140 Rocke, Sean Dr............................................88 Rodriguez-Greaves, Crystal..................... 35 Rodriguez-Seijas, Dwayne..................... 124 Rodulfo, Tyrone Gp. Capt. (R’td.)...........18 Romano, Hayden.........................................71 Romano, Nigel............................................. 32 Romany-Fournillier, Paulesca..................98 Roopnarinesingh, Ramlogan....................43 Rudd, Shannon.............................................16

S Sabga III, Anthony N. ................................46 Sabga, Anthony N. Dr............................. 105 Sahadeo, Christine.....................................46 Salick, Brenton............................................ 113 Salickram, Parasram..................................25 Sampson, Andrew.................................... 133 Samuel-James, Anastacia........................88 Samuel, Nicole.......................................... 120 Sanderson-Reid, Jamie............................ 124 Sandy, Christopher....................................22 Sandy, Mark Francis..................................49 Santos, Devin...............................................66

Saunders, Richard.................................... 130 Sawh, Vasudev Amrit Free......................28 Sawh, Baliram............................................ 103 Schnoor, Anya M.......................... 26, 27, 37 Scott, Jevorn................................................89 Sealy, Lennox H. Dr.................................. 126 Sealy, Sherry-Ann......................................82 Seecharan, Wendell...................................56 Seegobin, Deoraj........................................82 Seepersad, Dawn........................................ 35 Seeraj, Anthony..........................................28 Seereeram, Mariska...................................76 Seudat, Carlene...........................................26 Sheppard, George....................................... 33 Shim, Melissa..............................................78 Simms, Errol.................................................46 Simon-Thompson, Rafer...........................82 Singh, Joanne............................................. 102 Singh, Rishi..................................................101 Singh, Sally................................................. 130 Singh, Shirlanne Sacha..............................70 Singh, Stephen A........................................36 Sirju, Peter....................................................42 Siu, Kimlyn.................................................140 Small, David.................................................97 Smart, Jamal................................................92 Smith, John H............................................ 103 Sobion, Judith.............................................. 35 Solomon, Homer, Capt..............................18 Solomon, Patrick......................................... 37 Sookdar, Warren........................................ 35 Sooklal-Behary, Natasha..........................42 Sooklal-Benny, Cindy.............................. 102 Sooknarine-Ragoo, Gail............................49 Sookoo, Olivia..............................................31 Sookram, Dushyant.................................. 121 Sookram, Kirk..............................................82 Sookram, Ron Dr. ......................................46 Soverall, Robert...........................................26 Spicer, Yvan..................................................18 St. Clair, Anthony.......................................22 Stephens, Gerard........................................ 32 Steuart, Anya............................................. 132 Subiah, Niegel............................................ 138 Subero, Anthony C.....................................25

T Tang Yuk, Robert.........................................16 Taylor, Ashley........................................... 138 Taylor-Lee Chee, Suzette......................... 37 Telfer, Derek..............................................140 Telfer, Kyle.................................................140 Temal, Timmy............................................. 73 Tewarie, Nirad........................................... 126

Ticklal, Dinesh.............................................89 Titus, Heather.............................................28 Toby, Keith D...............................................49 Thom, Hassel................................................13 Thomas, Jason............................................34 Thompson, Ayana......................................56 Thompson, Kristine...................................46 Tiah, Eugene................................................46 Trabuolay, Paul.........................................104 Trim, Karen..................................................76

V Valley, Kurt..................................................22 Van Lowe, Amoy........................................ 35 Vieira, H. Anthony Captain...................... 55 Vishal, Ravikant........................................ 102 Voisin, Sonja...............................................141

W Walcott, Derek............................................79 Walcott, Ronald Dr....................................84 Walter, Kendal.............................................18 Warner, Gervase........................................46 Webb, Joanne.............................................76 Welch-Farrell, Sandra............................. 125 White, Darryl...............................................34 Wight, Mark................................................30 Wiggins, Roger............................................56 Wilcox, Terry...............................................96 Williams, Pamela........................................ 35 Williams, Ulis..............................................89 Wilson, Kris.................................................28 Wilson, Lygia............................................. 102 Wolffe, Gillian............................................ 121 Woo, Brian...................................................22 Wooding, Camille................................. 8, 78 Woodhams, Christopher..........................97 Wong, Anthony .........................................25 Wong Won, Wendy..................................76

Y Yip Chuck, Karen .......................................25 Young, Angus P.......................................... 33 Young, Melanie...........................................89

Z Zephyrine, Enid........................................... 37

157


Index by Company 1 On 1 Realty......................................................................................... 133

CEEJAY Engineering Limited............................................................ 113

Access Trinidad.................................................................................. 122

CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank........................................28

Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Limited.............................140

Citibank Trinidad and Tobago Limited.............. Inside Back Cover

Advance Readymix Ltd....................................................................... 41

CL Marine Ltd (CLM)........................................................................ 139

Aegis........................................................................................................76

Clean Image Carpet and Janitorial Services Limited................. 133

Agostini Insurance Brokers Limited................................................96

CPRC Realty.........................................................................................130

Airports Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (AATT)............ 16, 17

CUNA Caribbean Insurance..............................................................99

Almawi Limited, The Holistic Clinic................................................72

C&W Business......................................................................................86

AMS Biotech Security Concepts Limited...................................... 70 AMS Technologies.............................................................................. 70

Debt Recovery and Administrative Services Limited (DR&ASL).............................................................................120

AmSure Trinidad and Tobago Limited........................................... 70

Digital Broadcast Technology Limited............................................92

Anthony P. Pierre & Co. Chartered Accountants ..................... 125

DIRECTV Caribbean Limited.............................................................87

American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T)......................................11, 126

DRA Consulting ...................................................................................77

Angostura Limited.............................................................................108

Ecosol Services Limited..................................................................... 70

ANSA Motors.......................................................................................... 3

El Cid Day Spa.......................................................................................73

ANSA Rentals.......................................................................................... 5 Arnella Gomez Real Estate Agent..................................................130

Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobgao (ECA)........................................................13, 77

Arthur Lok Jack Graduate School of Business...............46, 47, 48

Engineering Associates Limited.....................................................109

AST Security International Distribution LLC................................ 70

EPL Properties Limited...................................................................... 126

ASCO Trinidad Ltd.............................................................................. 60

Eve Anderson Recruitment Limited.................................................76

Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA).................................130

Falck Safety Services...........................................................................54

Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC)......................................................104

Farah Insurance Brokers Ltd............................................................104

Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT)...............37 BDO Trinidad and Tobago............................................................... 122 Beacon.....................................................................................................97 Benca Process and Engineering Solutions Limited..................... 40 bmobile........................................................................................... 84, 85 Brison.....................................................................................................124 Cardea Health Solutions Ltd.............................................................98 Caribbean Dockyard and Engineering Services Limited (CDESL)................................................................................................ 139

158

Dynamic Real Estate Consultancy Ltd.......................................... 134

Fircroft......................................................................................................61 First Citizens Bank.........................................................................22, 23 Foxx Logistics Limited ......................................................................140 Funds International Limited...............................................................36 Grand Bay Paper Products Ltd..........................................................68 Gravitas Business Solutions Limited...............................................29 Gulf View Medical Centre..................................................................71 Happi Products Ltd............................................................................. 113 HHSL Safety Systems Limited..........................................................55

Caribbean Discovery Tours Limited..............................................124

Home Mortgage Bank.........................................................................30

Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI)......................72

Innovative Security Technologies Ltd.............................................65

Caribbean Information & Credit Rating Services Limited (CariCRIS)..............................................................36

Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF)..........................................................................................37

CaribbeanJobs.com ............................................................................77

Intrarealty............................................................................................. 134

Caribbean Resourcing Solutions......................................................76

Island Finance Trinidad and Tobago ...............................................31

Cevara Realty......................................................................................130

J & G Supplies Just Clean Janitorial Services.............................. 134


Index by Company continued JMMB Group Trinidad and Tobago.................................................32

Regus...................................................................................................... 131

Kanhai Real Estate.............................................................................130

RE/MAX Nexus Realty Trinidad & Tobago................................. 134

Kentz-OJ’s E&I Services JV................................................................43

Renew Star Serpentine Ltd................................................................66

Key West Real Estate........................................................................130

Republic Financial Holdings Limited........................................24, 25

KPMG..................................................................................................... 121

RGM Limited....................................................................................... 132

Label House Group Limited (LH Group)............................... 118, 119

Ric’s Real Estate Services.................................................................130

Lake Asphalt of Trinidad and Tobago (1978) Limited................56

Robust Security Network Ltd............................................................73

Lennox H. Sealy & Associates Limited......................................... 126

S2 Real Estate Services......................................................................130

Lennox Petroleum Services Limited............................................... 60

Sacoda Serv Limited.......................................................................... 126

Massy Motors.........................................................Inside Front Cover

Safety Pass Alliance Trinidad and Tobago Limited (SPATT)...................................................................................................61

Massy Technologies Applied Imaging............................................89 Massy Technologies InfoCom......................................................... 90 Massy United Insurance.................................................................. 100 MDC-UM..............................................................................................110 Medcorp Limited..................................................................................67 MIC Institute of Technology ........................................................... 49 NAGICO Insurance (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited..................101 National Energy Corporation............................................................57 National Helicopter Services Limited (NHSL).............................. 18 National Information and Communication Technology Company Limited (iGovTT)..............................................................88

Scotiabank Trinidad and Tobago Limited...............................26, 27 Scrip-J.....................................................................................................114 SeaBox................................................................................................... 138 Sea Jade Investments........................................................................130 Servus Limited..................................................................................... 132 Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago (SATT).............141 Shipping Solutions & Services Ltd. (SSSL)....................................141 SI Media ..................................................................................................91 Sookhai’s Diesel Service Limited.......................................................19 St. Clair Medical Centre.....................................................................67

NCB Global Finance Limited..............................................................33

Streamline Systems ............................................................................92

NEM Leadership Consultants...........................................................78

SWF&Co............................................................................................... 125

Nescafé Dolce Gusto...........................................................................111

Sygma Environmental.........................................................................73

New India Assurance Company (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited......................................................102 NGC CNG Company Limited............................................................57 ODYSSEY CONSULTinc Limited.................................................... 123 Offshore Innovators ...........................................................................58

Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (TATT).............................................................................82, 83 Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (TSTT).............................................................. 84, 85 Terra Caribbean.................................................................................. 133 The Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago (ACTT).....51

Pan American Life Insurance Group.............................................104

The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce................12

Personnel Management Services Limited (PMSL).................... 123

The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago......................... 11, 61

Phoenix Park Gas Processors Limited.............................................57 Piranha International Limited............................................................72

The Environmental Management Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (EMA)..............................................................71

Point Lisas Industrial Port Development Corporation Limited (PLIPDECO)......................................................................................... 138

The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Trinidad and Tobago (ICATT)........................................................124

Prestige Business Publications Limited............................................ 7

The Maritime Financial Group........................................................103

RBC Royal Bank.....................................................................................34

The Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI) of Trinidad and Tobago...................................................................................................... 9

Realty Broker Services......................................................................130 Regency Recruitment and Resources Limited..............................78

The National Gas Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited....................................................................................................57

159


Index by Company continued The National Insurance Board of Trinidad and Tobago (NIB)..... 1 The NGC Group of Companies .......................................................57

EMERGENCY CONTACTS

The Paramount Transport & Trading Company Limited........... 41

Police/Rapid Response.................................999

The Professional Institute of Marketing & Business Studies Ltd. (PIMBS)...........................................................51 Tobago Hotel and Tourism Association (THTA)...................... 127 Tobago House of Assembly.............................................................. 10 TOSL Engineering Limited..................................................................42 Trade and Investment Convention (TIC)....................................114 Tricon..................................................................................................... 112

Ambulance........................................................ 811 Global Medical Response.................653-4343 Coast Guard........................................634-4440

Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce .................................................................................... 12, 127

The Office of Disaster Preparedness and Management (ODPM)............................. 800-ODPM (6376) - Trinidad.................................. 640-1285/8905 640-8653; 640-6493 - Tobago............................................... 660-7489

Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce (Tobago Division).................................................. 12, 127

Port of Spain General Hospital ........623-2951

Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries Limited (TTCSI) ....................................................................................13

San Fernando General Hospital.......652-3581

Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association.............13 Trinidad Tissues Limited....................................................................68 Trinidad and Tobago Bureau of Standards (TTBS).....................69

Trinidad and Tobago Contractors Association (TTCA)............43 Trinidad and Tobago Incoming Tour Operators Association (T&TITOA)................................................................... 127 Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects (TTIA)..................43 Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA)............................................................................................11, 114 Trinidad & Tobago National Petroleum Marketing Company Limited (NP).......................................................................59 Trinidad and Tobago NGL Limited..................................................57 Trinidad and Tobago Unit Trust Corporation (UTC).................35 Trinidad and Tobago Postal Corporation (TTPOST)................140 Trinidad and Tobago Securities and Exchange Commission (TTSEC)..................................................................................................37 Tropical Express Couriers Limited..................................................141 TSG Consulting.....................................................................................78 UWI School of Business and Applied Studies Limited (UWI-ROYTEC)..........................................................................50, 130 Vega Minerals....................................................................................... 41

160

Fire..................................................................... 990

Scarborough General Hospital ...............................660-4SGH (4744) Roxborough Health Centre and Hyperbaric Facility, Tobago ........... 660-4392 Crime Stoppers......................800-TIPS (8477) Directory Services (Trinidad).....................6411 Directory Services (Tobago).........................211


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Who's Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business 2017-2018  
Who's Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business 2017-2018  

The Who’s Who in Trinidad and Tobago Business is a unique business directory which specifically targets businesses that seek to invest, and...