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SPRING 2015

PRATTFOLIO THE MAGAZINE OF PRAT T INSTITUTE

THE ART OF THE BOOK Beyond Binding | Books in the Digital Age | The Art of the Yearbook


In Focus The IRB 2600 robot (shown here mounted with a pneumatic tool for six-axis milling) allows Pratt students to shape solid material into complex geometric forms with incredible precision and in a manner that can be easily modified and replicated. The IRB 2600 is one of two robots made by ABB and acquired by Pratt to teach students fundamental concepts in robotic programming and fabrication that introduce new ways of thinking about form making and craft as applied to traditional design. With its emphasis on the practical application of creativity, Pratt is one of the first art and design schools to incorporate robotics into its curriculum.


SPRING 2015

PRATTFOLIO THE MAGA ZINE OF PR AT T INSTITUTE

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BEYOND BINDING Pratt book artists push the form’s limits.

BOOKS IN THE DIGITAL AGE Pratt faculty and students consider the changing nature of publications.

THE ART OF THE YEARBOOK Prattfolio looks back at Prattonia.

6 INSIDE LOOK At Home with Harry Allen, M.I.D. ’94

38 BEYOND THE GATES Pratt's Presence in the Public Realm

30 NEW AND NOTEWORTHY Items in the Marketplace Created by Pratt Alumni, Faculty, and Students

44 FINAL THOUGHTS Of Books and Bytes

Departments 2 SOCIAL@PRAT T 3 FROM THE PRESIDENT 4 INSPIRED Tomie dePaola, B.F.A. ’56: Strega Nona

34 RYERSON WALK Recent Campus News and Activities

ABOU T THE COVER Woman with Hammer In her artists’ book Woman with Hammer, Pratt alumna Rochelle Voyles (B.F.A. Printmaking ’12) explores the emotional and social landscape of being a woman in the traditionally male-dominated field of stage and film carpentry. Voyles fabricated the piece out of discarded materials from the scenic set shop in which she works. These include plywood, from which she made the enclosure, as well as hex bolts, screws, and wood dust, all of which are arranged around hand-written text.

47 HONOR ROLL Recognizing Pratt donors from July 2013 to June 2014


SOCIAL @ PRATT: BEST OF 2014 From dressing icons to winning Oscars, 2014 saw members of the Pratt community designing, creating, and innovating in a whole new way thanks to the sharing capabilities of social media. Here are some of the year’s highlights.

1. November 25, 2014: #Pratt alum Evan Dewhirst pairs his #design background with 3-D printing and handmade finishing touches in his latest wearable work, @shopobjcts (314 likes) 2. October 14, 2014: ‘Assembled Realities,’ a new exhibition of #Pratt #photography alum Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao’s large-scale panoramas, created by combining multiple exposures of the same location taken over the course of several hours, creating composite photographs that capture complex, hyper-real views of familiar #NYC locations, opens tomorrow @museumofcityny. (250 likes) 3. September 21, 2014: At the #PeopleClimateMarch in #NYC today? Look for an installation by #Pratt alum @swoonhq at 34th & 11th. (263 likes)

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4. September 5, 2014: “Design is understood and taught as a way to think and act with change.”- acting #Pratt Industrial Design chair Scott Lundberg spoke to Core 77 about the evolution of industrial design education. Featured are student Kate Tsyrlin’s cowhide ankle boots. (136 likes) 5. June 3, 2014: Last night Rihanna wore a custom design by #PrattFashion alum and winner of this year’s Early Career Award, @AdamSelman, to accept the 2014 @CFDA Fashion Icon Award. (337 likes) 6. April 14, 2014: Have you swung by The Hazel and Robert H. Siegel Gallery in Higgins Hall to see the M. Arch Graduate Architecture and Urban Design Student Installation? (251 likes)

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Join the conversation and stay up to date with all the latest from Pratt on social media. PrattInstitute

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S PRI N G 2015

PRATTFOLIO T H E M AG A ZI N E O F PR AT T I N S T I T U T E

FROM THE PRESIDENT Thomas F. Schutte

Prattfolio is published by the Office of Communications and Marketing in the Division of Institutional Advancement for the alumni and friends of Pratt Institute. ©2015 Pratt Institute Pratt Institute 200 Willoughby Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205

As one of the foremost training grounds for visionaries in the visual arts, design, and library and information science, Pratt Institute considers the book an ideal medium for the creative exploration for which the Institute is known. From creating books made of everyday household items and crafting the Institute’s Prattonia yearbook to engaging with the content of both traditional and digital books, the Pratt community is bringing fresh approaches to every aspect of one of the oldest forms of communication. This issue of Prattfolio explores the many ways that the Institute’s alumni, faculty, and students are using their talents to consider what constitutes a book at a time when its role in culture and society continues to evolve. Pratt’s engagement with the ideas and trends that shape our world extends well beyond the campus, and we have had an exciting fall. The Institute’s new public programs series, Pratt Presents, has met with tremendous success, attracting notable figures from government, industry, and the arts, and garnering extensive press coverage, particularly for the Pratt Presents programming at Art Basel Miami Beach, which you can read more about on page 43. As you peruse this issue of Prattfolio, I hope that you are inspired by the projects and ideas presented on the pages that follow. In the next issue, I look forward to sharing the exciting developments surrounding the recent opening of the Institute’s new film and video building. Please mark your calendar for Saturday, September 19, for Alumni Day 2015, when you will have an opportunity to tour the new building as we celebrate you and the thousands of Pratt alumni who have truly made the Institute what it is today.

Thomas F. Schutte President

Vice President for Institutional Advancement Todd Michael Galitz Executive Director of Communications and Marketing Mara McGinnis Managing Editor Charlotte Savidge Creative Director Mats Håkansson Associate Creative Director Kara Schlindwein Senior Editorial Manager Marion Hammon Graphic Designer Erin Cave Copy Editors Jean Gazis Brandhi Williamson Staff Contributors Amy Aronoff Sarah Bertness Adam Monohon Harris Solomon Jolene Travis Senior Production Manager David Dupont Staff Photographer Peter Tannenbaum

Please submit address changes to alumni@pratt.edu or call 718.399.4447. The editorial staff of Prattfolio would like to hear from you. Please send comments, ideas, questions, and thoughts to prattfolio@pratt.edu. Unfortunately, we cannot publish all submissions, but we consider all ideas and greatly appreciate your feedback.


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INSPIRED Tomie dePaola, B.F.A. ’56: Strega Nona

Recognized by the American Library Association (ALA) for his “distinctive visual style” and “innate understanding of childhood,” children’s book author and illustrator Tomie dePaola is best known for his 12 Strega Nona books, the first of which was named an ALA Caldecott Honor Book in 1976 and received the ALA’s Wilder Award in 2011. He has written and/or illustrated nearly 250 books, which have sold more than 15 million copies worldwide and been translated into more than 20 languages. This year marks the 40th anniversary of Strega Nona and dePaola’s 50th year as a children’s book illustrator. In this milestone year, Prattfolio spoke to dePaola about his experience with Strega Nona over the past four decades.

P: What inspired you to create the Strega Nona character? Strega Nona first appeared as a doodle during one particularly long faculty meeting at Colby-Sawyer College. I was playing with the idea of a children’s theater troupe based on the commedia dell’arte and drew Pulcinella, or Punch. I added a kerchief to the big nose and chin, and the drawing became a little old grandmother. That doodle became the basis for my retelling of the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale, “The Magic Porridge Pot,” which was one of my favorites as a child.

P: Where do your ideas for the Strega Nona stories come from?

Strega Nona decides! I have to be patient and wait until the inspiration for a new tale comes to me. I tell people that Strega Nona whispers in my ear, “Do I have a story for you!”

Above: A sketch of Strega Nona, courtesy of Tomie dePaola; Opposite: Art from Strega Nona, published by Simon & Schuster, courtesy of Tomie dePaola

P: What has surprised you the most about the Strega Nona character over the years?

In order to make sure that my ideas for the sequels were true to her character, I had to get to know her. She very much has a life of her own and I want each book to reveal another facet of the old girl. I also never thought that little old lady would capture the imagination of my readers to such an extent.


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INSIDE LOOK At Home with Harry Allen, M.I.D. ’94


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Above: Harry Allen in his living room, which features a light sculpture of his design; Right: A ceramic teapot by Allen’s late friend Steven Hill, who was lost to AIDS, is surrounded by a glass skull created by the Esque Studio and a bronze skeleton. The wallmounted sculpture in the background is by Nachum Tevet, one of Allen’s early teachers who directed him to Pratt; Opposite: Allen’s dining area features an eclectic mix of items including a painting by Meg Franklin, which sits atop a white sculpture by Sol Lewitt, and a large photograph by Liz Deshenes, who photographed Allen’s work before becoming an artist herself.

“Everything in my life has meaning,” says award-winning designer Harry Allen, M.I.D. ’94. That statement applies aptly to his home in New York City’s East Village, where works of art share space with family heirlooms, classic design pieces, and products from the various collections that Allen has produced over the course of his 20year career. For Allen, whose work can be found in such diverse places as the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and Target, objects can—and should—be in dialogue with each other. He attributes this understanding of how objects interact to Murray Moss, for whom he designed the iconic Moss Gallery and More Moss boutique in the mid-1990s. An emphasis on interaction informs Allen’s overall design ethos, and by extension the products, furniture, and interiors that he creates.

Allen’s creations serve as cornerstones of the dialogue that he promotes. By playfully balancing the look and functionality of his creations, Allen infuses meaning into pieces that are produced and manufactured on a large scale, such as the now classic Kila lamp that he designed for Ikea. In his own home, Allen has made meaning not by collecting for accumulation’s sake, but by bringing together objects—ranging from a Donald Judd chair to his aunt’s candlesticks—that remind him of people he has loved and admired. Displaying pieces from those who have inspired, taught, and known him, Allen pays homage to the people who have been influential in his life. Allen feels that, in his apartment, they are all able to engage with one another. He says, “In so many ways, my apartment is like a party.”


BEYOND BINDING


One of the most contemporary art forms, the artist’s book has its roots in the avant-garde movement that spread throughout Europe and Russia during and after World War I. Book artists frequently addressed complex societal and political issues—a practice that continues to this day. Pratt’s “Art of the Book” studio course was originated in the 1970s by renowned German-born designer and artist Werner Pfeiffer, who taught

by Charlotte Savidge

at the Institute for more than three decades. The course was further developed by Adjunct Associate Professor of Fine Art Robbin Ami Silverberg to give students from a variety of disciplines the technical and conceptual abilities to create impactful works that push the limits of the form. In the pages that follow, five Pratt artists talk about their approach to book arts and recent works.

Pratt Book Artists Push the Form’s Limits


P R AT T F O L IO Opposite: Gilman’s The Mastermind y lo contrario, which consists of a series of marked-up and redacted manuscript pages

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Below: Anne Gilman works in her Brooklyn studio; Previous spread: Rochelle Voyles’s Woman with Hammer

Anne Gilman Adjunct Associate Professor of Fine Art

“It plays with our conception of a book by opening the manuscript up onto a wall and allowing the viewer to experience it without literally ‘reading’ it.”

Anne Gilman is a Brooklyn-based artist whose work has been exhibited in solo and group shows in Latin America, Europe, and the United States and is held in public and private collections in London, Spain, Frankfurt, Australia, Cuba, Mexico, and the United States. She has received fellowships from the Edward Albee Foundation and the MacDowell Colony.

How did you become interested in making artists’ books?

When I was teaching at SUNY Purchase, I sat in on a book arts class that emphasized the connection between format and

content so the work would “read”as a whole conceptually. For me, this is critical.

What role has Pratt played in your development as a book artist?

While I don’t consider myself a “book artist” per se, teaching at Pratt and interacting with students is a very invigorating experience and continues to challenge and expand my thinking and my studio practice in general.

What ideas are you trying to present with The Mastermind y lo contrario?

This project is based on my partner David Unger’s most recent novel, The Mastermind. Although a political thriller, the novel addresses what I consider to be the big themes in life: loss, lack of control, unexpected occurrences, thinking you know something and then finding out maybe you don’t, all the unknowns, and the lack of predictability. The Mastermind y lo contrario focuses on these things that foster introspection and questioning.

Why did you choose to present these ideas in this format? We wanted to use a nontraditional format and hung sections of the manuscript on

the wall to allow for viewer interaction. We also wanted part of the work to be a counterpoint to that, with pages encased in a bolted plexiglass box, making them inaccessible to the viewer.

How does this piece play with our conception of a book?

While this piece uses actual pages of a book manuscript, it plays with our conception of a book by opening the manuscript up onto a wall and allowing the viewer to experience it without literally “reading” it. It is taken in first and foremost as a visual experience.

What was the most challenging aspect of creating this piece?

Deciding on the format. After that, there were questions about how to create the inaccessible section, which was essential to the work. It was David’s idea to bolt the manuscript. From there it was clear to me that I wanted a case that would contain both the bolted section and the wall work when it was collapsed and folded. Left: A portion of Gilman’s The Mastermind y lo contrario is held in a plexiglass container.


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P R AT T F O L IO Opposite, top: A spread from HuaShiHua by Jen Hyde; Bottom: The plates used to print HuaShiHua and a USB drive containing the digital files

Below: Jen Hyde writes in her home studio.

Jen Hyde, B.F.A. Writing ’07

“The physical and textual narrative of an artist’s book deepens the viewer/reader’s understanding or appreciation of the book’s subject matter.”

Jen Hyde is a poet, book artist, and founder of Small Anchor Press. In 2013-14, she was a Global Academic Fellow in Writing at NYU Shanghai, and she is currently a Language Lecturer at New York University. Hyde’s poems from HuaShiHua have been published or are forthcoming in Drunken Boat, The Sink Review, The Volta, The Likewise Folio, and Elsewhere Magazine. HuaShiHua was produced with generous funding and support from the NYU Shanghai Writing Program.

question how the form of the book prompts physical reading.

What is your definition of a book?

What ideas are you trying to present with HuaShiHua?

A book is a container for a text; it represents a narrative sequence or the disruption of that sequence. The physical and textual narrative of an artist’s book deepens the viewer/reader’s understanding or appreciation of the book’s subject matter.

How did you become interested in making artists’ books?

In the Pratt writing program, my professors introduced us to the chapbook genre, and I was excited by the idea of writing within the form of a book I could make myself. In the “Art of the Book” class, Robbin Ami Silverberg pressed us to

What role has Pratt played in your development as a book artist?

Pratt offers a unique environment for the liberal arts in that it is placed within a visual arts context. My writing studio at Pratt prompted me to consider my work as an addition to the writing tradition and in relation to the long history of writing traditions.

This piece is as much about production as it is about content. The bound manuscript, scrolls, and box of plates all illustrate the process and outcomes of my thinking.

Why did you choose to present these ideas in this format? My production process and the book’s aesthetics are modeled after the process and publications of independent publishers in Suzhou in the Qing Dynasty, which operated under the assumption that a single person can produce a book in limited edition. While it seemed obvious

to me from the start that the poems end up as a bound manuscript, after learning about Suzhou’s publishing history and imagining these small press workshops in China, I felt that the scrolls and the box of plates and cut files used to create the book were also a part of the final work.

What did you enjoy most when creating this piece?

I enjoyed the constraints presented by my environment, communication capabilities, and the chase for material. Where to find the silk fabric, how to say brocade in Mandarin, and what type of ink would be suitable. The solutions to these problems shaped my approach to editing the book’s content as the single producer of the work.


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P R AT T F O L IO Opposite: Parson’s Dental Records uses dental floss dispensers to contain silk-screened scrolls of 9/11 victims’ dental records.

Below: Tara Parsons works in her Harlem studio.

Tara Parsons M.F.A. Printmaking/New Forms ’06

“I’m interested in the interplay of the viewer and the art object.”

Tara Parsons is a resident artist at the Chashama studio in Harlem. Her interactive installations combine sculpture, drawing, and printmaking. She has presented participatory projects in DUMBO, on Governors Island, and in Grand Central Terminal. Parsons has shown her work at Washington Square Windows and White Box Annex in Manhattan, McCaig Welles Gallery and Dam Stuhltrager in Brooklyn, the Rochester Contemporary in Rochester, the Annenberg Center in Philadelphia, Aljira in Newark, and the Medizinhistorisches Museum der Charite, in Berlin, Germany.

How did you become interested in making artists’ books? I’m interested in the interplay of the viewer and the art object, which is important with my book projects and my installation work.

What role has Pratt played in your development as a book artist?

Pratt was integral because I was mentored by Robbin Ami Silverberg. I appreciated how she moved between artists’ books and installations, particularly the work that

she did around the ideas of memory and forgetting. This, together with the encouragement of my New Forms pro-fessor, Robert Zakarian, inspired me to extend the idea of what mediums and forms could be art.

What ideas are you trying to present with Dental Records?

Dental Records deals with our individuality and how we are identified once we are gone. After the 2001 terrorist attacks, I was asked to collect my close friend’s dental records and bring them to the Medical Examiner’s office. The idea that these X-rays are the link to her identity was sobering.

Why did you choose to present these ideas in this particular format? I originally tried this project as a single scroll, an ancient book form. In the end I decided to create 119 scrolls representing the number of victims that had been identified by their dental records at the time of research. As a group, the containers become symbolic headstones, standing in rows. Coincidentally, 119 is also the inverse of the date that the terrorist attacks happened.

Why do you consider this piece a “book”? How is it similar to what we typically think of as a “book”?

This piece is really a series of books— an installation of the whole edition. Each dental floss dispenser contains a small scroll that tells the story of the dental records of a 9/11 victim and includes information on how the forensic dentists working in the Examiner’s office identify and make matches.

What was the most challenging aspect of creating this piece?

Technically, the most difficult part was silk-screening the floss containers. But, in reality, the most challenging part was the emotional aspect of dealing with the loss of my friend and representing that part of this personal journey.

What did you enjoy most when creating this piece?

For my research for this project, I collaborated with a dentist who worked at the Medical Examiner’s office identifying 9/11 victims. His knowledge and technical contribution became part of the piece, and this connection I found interesting.


P R AT T F O L IO Opposite: A page from Silverberg’s Abriss, which is made up of the remnants of flyers that the artist posted throughout New York City

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Below: Robbin Ami Silverberg works in her Brooklyn studio.

Robbin Ami Silverberg Adjunct Associate Professor of Fine Art

“A book is a container for information; an artist’s book is much more...”

Robbin Ami Silverberg is an artist and the founding director of Dobbin Mill, a handpapermaking studio, and Dobbin Books, a collaborative artist book studio. Silverberg has exhibited and taught extensively in the U.S., Canada, South Africa, South Korea, Mexico, and Europe. Her artwork is found in numerous collections, including those of the Smithsonian Museum of African Art, Museum Meermanno, The Hague, and Yale University’s Art of the Book Collection.

to the tools. Though I considered myself to be a sculptor and installation artist, I realized that the book as a structure for communication fit my sensibility, my love of paper, and my love of writing, image making, and sequencing ideas. It allowed me to focus on content at the same time as I could qualitatively produce the object that became its container.

What is your definition of a book?

My Pratt students are dynamic and exciting. Their unique perspectives have given me food for thought in my own practice, as we continue to exchange ideas.

An artist’s book is much more: It can be an artwork that references what a book is, or an artwork that uses aspects of a book such as sequence, pagination, binding, and reading. Regardless, it is a Gesamtwerk, a whole artwork every part of which is an element of the work of art.

What ideas are you trying to present with Abriss?

A book is a container of information; in many cultures, it is the container of the most precious information.

How did you become interested in making artists’ books?

While training in bookbinding and restoration in Vienna, I began to make artists’ books because I had easy access

What role has Pratt played in your development as a book artist?

This artist’s book edition is made up of the remains of hundreds of handmade flyers that I have posted throughout New York City since 2009. These postings offer viewers private, philosophical, or didactic information in locations where the postings are typically more commercial or mundane. In this way, they engage the viewer in a discourse on “private vs. public” disclosure. The title is taken from the German word for tear-off edge,

Abrisskante, and reflects the fact that pieces of the flyers get torn off between the time they are posted and when I collect them again.

Considering the format of your piece, what is the viewer’s relationship with the work?

The reader/viewer has an intimate and haptic relationship. The book has to be held and handled, pages felt and turned. The handmade paper is hard and rattly, sometimes textured, sometimes translucent, certainly varied, and this all enhances the multisensorial possibilities of the book.

What were the most challenging and enjoyable aspects of creating this piece?

The move into the street. I usually conceive of the artist book as a completely choreographed artwork. In this case, at least 50 percent of the postings that would later become the book’s pages disappeared. This approach was liberating for my art practice and immensely enjoyable, but it made completing the edition a challenge.


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P R AT T F O L IO Opposite: Voyles’s Sewn Roles features intricate illustrations and hand-lettered text on fabric to create a hanging book.

Below: Rochelle Voyles works in her Brooklyn studio.

Rochelle Voyles, B.F.A. Printmaking ’12

“The sculptural possibilities of words and books screamed out to me.”

Rochelle Voyles is a Brooklyn-based visual artist who works with found object artifacts and words to create amalgamations of collage, drawing, paint, and text. Her works process complex emotional states, mechanical human interactions, mortality, and contemporary societal living. She currently works as a scenic artist, carpenter, and fabricator in the film, photography, and production world.

What is your definition of a book?

A book is an expression or transmission of information, which can take the form of words on paper glued or sewn together, or something as intangible as an hour of someone’s voice in a room.

How did you become interested in making artists’ books?

I found a tattered, water- and dirt-soaked pulp fiction novel on the street that was splayed out in the gutter. I picked it up and laid it in the sun for a day. Then I tacked it on my bedroom wall and it looked like a beaten-up accordion. The sculptural possibilities of words and books screamed out to me.

What role has Pratt played in your development as a book artist?

I took a class with Robbin Ami Silverberg at Pratt that presented techniques, exploration, and examination of the book as a sculpture, as an art piece. Through her class I was able to focus and study the medium and develop ideas for book structures.

What ideas are you trying to present with Sewn Roles?

I crafted this book while contemplating the traditional domestic roles of a woman and simultaneously learning how to use industrial sewing machines. The piece is a journey through the mind of a young woman imagining herself in the roles of wife and mother, and what those roles mean today in comparison to what they meant in the past.

Why did you choose to present these ideas in this particular format? As a child I had a few cloth books such as The Ugly Duckling that were precious to me. I crafted this artist’s book in cloth to capture the same playfulness and whimsy and process the idea of being a mother and wife. The women in my family

enjoyed fiber crafts, and I connect these crafts with being a mother and the cycles of a woman’s life.

How were you envisioning the viewer when you conceived this work? This book is intended to be hugged close, opened, dropped, hung up, forgotten, and then found again. It was created to be durable like children’s toys and living room rugs. I wanted the viewer to feel a warm energy from it like a hand-medown, and feel comfortable holding and examining it.

What was the most challenging aspect of creating this piece? Deciding which aspect of motherhood, marriage, and domesticity each page would tackle and how to express each one with figure, form, drawing, and needlework/ fiber manipulation.


Pratt Faculty and Students Consider


the Changing Nature of Publications.

by Harris Solomon


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The idea of using the book as a container for information is thousands of years old. But as recent shifts in technology have shown us, not even something with as much history as the book is beyond reinvention. Nearly 50 percent of Americans now own an e-reader, and more and more people are reading books using mobile devices. What does this mean for the nature of reading and book production? And how does it impact our relationship to both the narrative form of the book and to the physical object itself?

Such a massive change brings with it far-reaching implications for how we conceptualize and make both digital and analog books, as well as how we preserve them and their content. Over the last few years, Pratt faculty, students, and alumni have been exploring our changing conception of the book in classes across the Institute on book production, preservation, and reading.

Beyond the Analog/Digital Divide

Adjunct Associate Professor of Digital Arts Linda Lauro-Lazin is questioning what constitutes the book itself. She teaches how the book can be both a digital and a physical object simultaneously in her combined graduate and undergraduate course “Artists’ Books in the Electronic Age.” Lauro-Lazin’s students create artists’ books that employ traditional book arts as well as digital components, practices, or inspirations. She teaches them to assume a digital mindset—a way to break beyond the confines of the physical object of the book and see how a book can occupy or exist in a variety of spaces. This crucial

concept is often difficult for students to grasp, as many have grown up with an understanding of the book as old media. “The notion that we must choose between analog and digital is dangerous,” says Lauro-Lazin. “It creates a binary, when we really need to learn to fuse them together. That is how books will continue to thrive.” In Lauro-Lazin’s class, students are encouraged to bring together the digital and the analog for major assignments. Some choose to design and brainstorm online before creating the book by hand, while others integrate digital components by developing digital “pages” or “chapters” accessed through QR codes or links. This mash-up of cutting-edge technique with age-old tradition gets at the heart of the struggle for book artists, writers, designers, and archivists. How can we understand how digital and analog books will coexist in the long-term? According to Lauro-Lazin, by making objects that draw from opposite ends of the spectrum,

students begin to understand that different types of books live on in different ways. “While the book as a traditional form has a lasting presence, the technology that students integrate is so fleeting that the books they create may very well not be ‘readable’ in the near future,” Lauro-Lazin points out. “In general, thinking about permanence of material is important, especially when creating a book that spans different media.”

Rethinking Content

The very idea that a book can span different media has been slow to gain acceptance, as technology has often been viewed as being in opposition to analog books. This has drawn a line in the sand between traditionalists and early adopters of new reading platforms. In Pratt classrooms, students and faculty are contributing to the cultural shift in how we define written content and what can be contained within a book or text, a question that is at the heart of Assistant Professor Duncan Hamilton’s “Designing


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E-books” class in Undergraduate Communications Design. The class, which requires students to create a printed book, an enhanced e-book, and an interactive book app, emphasizes user experience and gives added value to the technological evolutions of the book. “In creating these forms, students are not just telling the story, but looking at the entirety of the experience,” says Hamilton. “The books are no longer just words, but have metanarratives and link to the wider data space.”

across Media.” Through writing and reading in nontraditional media, Obadike’s students turn the notion of poetry itself on its head. Obadike introduces her students to poetry in the form of dance performances, sculptures, and font samples. “It’s changing what it means to be literate,” she says. “There is a much greater use of images and sounds as a way of collecting and sharing ideas.”

In Hamilton’s view, the book itself can play a more active role in engaging the reader. Whereas in the past, narratives relied on writing alone, advances in e-books and interactive apps have allowed everything from charts to figures to become interactive features. “The e-book is a more fluid form, and it’s updatable,” clarifies Duncan. “In many ways, thanks to this technology, the book is now a living thing.”

The changing nature of writing and book production has brought with it sweeping implications for the collecting and sharing of ideas that Obadike mentions, as well as for the preservation of books. This is a challenge that faculty at Pratt’s School of Information and Library Science has worked enthusiastically to address in the classroom. Since the rise of digitization, the process of converting analog media to digital files, faculty and students have worked to find new ways to keep both digital and analog books alive. That entails staying informed about the latest strategies for publishing in the digital landscape,

The organic nature of text and narrative is something that Assistant Professor of Humanities Mendi Obadike stresses in her undergraduate class “Poetry

Objects of Reference versus Reverence

something School of Information and Library Science Dean Tula Giannini teaches in “E-publishing and Digital Scholarship,” a special summer course in London taught in collaboration with faculty at Kings College London. In a similar vein, Associate Professor of Information and Library Science Anthony Cocciolo teaches budding archivists to be strategic about digitization, encouraging students to understand the benefits, as well as the limitations, of using technology for preservation. In his “Projects in Digital Archives” class, students collaborate with a range of institutions to digitize collections of analog materials that had previously been available to the general public in limited capacities, if at all. While the delicate nature of rare books can restrict access, Cocciolo thinks that there can be drawbacks to mass digitization and the preservation of online texts. “People in the field are starting to realize that digital-born books are at greater risk than the rare books [e-books],” Cocciolo explains. “With the proper handling and storage conditions, books made of


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paper can last hundreds of years. However, few organizations have developed the capacity for long-term preservation of digital-born books.”

“It’s changing what it means to be literate.” This conundrum has implications well beyond the classroom that current students need to consider as they begin careers in preservation. Discerning how to best preserve both digital and analog content is exactly what many alumni, including Michael Inman (M.L.S. ’02), Curator of Rare Books at the New York Public Library, are trying to do. Inman is tasked with balancing the growing need for digitization with the desire to preserve the physical form of the book. While this seems to be a question of two opposing resources, “there wouldn’t be digitization if these materials didn’t exist in the first place,” Inman says of analog books. “At its inception, the book was nearly perfect as a piece of communications technology, and it hasn’t really improved much

in 2000 years. You can’t say that about much, other than the wheel.” Inman sees digitization as an opportunity to allow library patrons to interact with analog books in new ways. By scanning and making text fully searchable online, the content in analog books can be repurposed for online databases or digital humanities courses, giving digitized content some of the enhanced features that distinguish digital-born books from their printed counterparts. “That allows for manipulation of information in ways that weren’t previously possible.”

What the Future Holds

While we don’t know how the millions of books produced for e-readers, or the technology itself, will fare over the next few years, it seems unlikely that digital technology will edge out traditional books. The Pratt community has found unique ways to emphasize the benefits of each form, giving new life to content across all forms of media.

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Still, as Inman points out, each book form produces experiences that are difficult to replicate outside of that medium, from the enhanced content of an e-book to the tactile experience of encountering a rare book for the first time. “There is no question that technology has opened a lot of doors for us,” he says. “But still, there’s something about handling a book that is hardwired into the human brain. I’ve had researchers cry when they first encounter the book they’re looking for. It’s an experience that can’t be replicated, one that makes sense on an intuitive level. Until we can have a similar experience in the digital world, I don’t think the book as we know it is going anywhere.” Above images, L to R: Fugitive by Rachel Kwak (B.F.A. Digital Arts ’12); Perspectives by Baily Crawford (B.F.A. Communications Design ’15); Untitled (garden of the forking paths) by Meredith Cutinello (M.F.A. Digital Imaging ’14); Previous spread: Core Memory by Ben Fino-Radin (M.S./M.F.A. Library and Information Science and Digital Arts ’14) Image in table of contents: Defiant by Natasha Otrakji (B.F.A. Photography ’09, M.F.A. Digital Arts ’14)


The Prattfolio looks back at Prattonia. by Charlotte Savidge 1923

of 1948

Year- 1967


Art 1935

the 1952

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Since it was first published in 1919, the Prattonia yearbook has epitomized the individualistic spirit and collaborative atmosphere for which Pratt Institute is known. The student-designed yearbook is often most remembered for its format, which has ranged from a traditional book to a series of full-size posters to a time capsule in a coffee can. As with most successful artists’ books, Prattonia’s form reflects the overall concept that the Pratt student design teams develop each year to create lasting mementos of the Pratt experience.

1978

Prattfolio consulted with Pratt archivist Paul Schlotthauer and current Prattonia adviser Michael Kelly (B.F.A. Communications Design ’96) to identify some of the many issues of Prattonia that have captured the spirit of their time—and of Pratt.

1992

1923*

One of the earliest issues of Prattonia, this volume captures the Art Nouveau sensibilities of the time, particularly through the typography and illustrations engraved on the cover.

1935*

The cover of the 1935 Prattonia features an embossed leather Art Deco design reflecting the style for which the era is known.

1948*

Prattonia advisory committee member and undergraduate communications design faculty member Michael Kelly (B.F.A. Communications Design ’96) notes that the contemporary Pratt sensibility is already apparent in this issue.

1952*

This issue of Prattonia features illustrations that convey the Mid-Century Modern aesthetic that is still so strongly associated with the ’50s. *Pictured on previous spread

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1967*

A boxed series of posters created by George Delmerico (B.F.A. Advertising Design ’67) and Nicole Archer (B.F.A. Communications Design ’67) with photography by Robert Pike (B.F.A. ’67), this issue is part of the Museum of Modern Art’s library collection. Kelly says, “There’s a joy to opening the box, unfolding to reveal something—or someone—you have forgotten, then returning it to the box. It’s almost like going through a box of old cards or letters. One cannot flip through it the way one can a book, and I love that about it.”

1978

Designed by Sharon Gresh (B.F.A. Communications Design ’78) and Michael McGinn (Communications Design ’78), this inventive issue of Prattonia includes a magazine featuring original illustrations by 22 Pratt students and a series of postcards with photography by 15. A team of nine Pratt student copywriters developed the text. As the credits page reads, “Whew! It’s a book!”

1980 1980

Created by James Best (B.F.A. Communications Design ’80), Peter Campbell (B.F.A. Communications Design ’80), Lynn Golden (B.F.A. Communications Design ’80), Karen Loccisano (B.F.A. Communications Design ’80), Gregg Lukasiewicz (B.F.A. Communications Design ’80), Miriam Nerlove (M.F.A. Fine Arts ’82), Sharon Occhipihti (B.F.A. Communications Design ’82), Gary Sitomer (B.F.A. Communications Design ’80), Jeffrey Winter (B.F.A. Communications Design ’80), and Jeff Zack (B.F.A. Communications Design ’82), the 1980 issue of Prattonia used Colorforms’ plastic Stick-Ons™, allowing yearbook viewers to create their own campus scenes.

1992

Harris Forman (B.F.A. Communications Design ’92) and Heather MacKay (B.F.A. Communications Design ’92) devised the time capsule concept for the 1992 Prattonia, which included a booklet, Prattonia T-shirt, and New York City subway and bus maps, as well as plastic roaches, all contained in a metal canister.

2008

In 2008, design team members Ellie Clayman (B.F.A. Communications Design ’08), Elizabeth Dilk (B.F.A. Communications Design ’08), Andrew W. Kay (B.F.A. Communications Design ’08), Collin Lewis (B.F.A. Communications Design ’08), and Kaitlyn Pepe (B.F.A. Communications Design ’08) took an anthropological approach to Pratt students and faculty in creating An Institute of Modesty and Convention. One of the most popular and acclaimed issues of Prattonia ever, An Institute of Modesty and Convention earned the design team the 2008 HOW International Design Competition Merit award, and was also featured in Print Magazine’s 2009 Regional Design Annual and in ID Magazine’s 2009 Annual Design Review.

2014

The 2014 Prattonia illustrates the role that the concept plays in developing both the format and the content. Wanting to portray Pratt as a unified whole that encompasses many different views, design team members Robert Blair (B.F.A. Communications Design ’14), Thomas Colligan (B.F.A. Communications Design ’15), and Kurt Woerpel (B.F.A. Communications Design ’14) created a series of booklets contained in a slipcase. This format allowed the team to use different documentation methods for each booklet, making each one distinctive and giving the entire piece a degree of variety that reflects the Pratt campus community.

2014

Submit images of your favorite issue of Prattonia on Instagram by tagging @PrattInstitute and using the hashtag #Prattonia.


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NEW AND NOTEWORTHY Items in the Marketplace Created by Pratt Alumni, Faculty, and Students

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Neon Earrings Katrin Zimmermann, Visiting Assistant Professor, Fine Arts $33

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Laurene Leon Boym created this Absinthe vase in homage to the still-life paintings of Picasso and Braque. By fusing optical crystal—a material known for multifaceted reflections and distortions—together with immaterial ultraviolet glue, Boym creates a three-dimensional object that recalls Cubism. Available at museum stores.

The latex rubber and stainless steel hoops from Zimmermann’s Neon collection exemplify her innovation in modernizing classic pieces. Available in six bright colors, these fun earrings make a simple shape striking. All jewelry is made to order at Zimmermann’s studio in New York. Available at www.exovo.com.

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David Weinrib David Weinrib, Adjunct Professor, Foundation Art $169.24 Brooklyn-born artist David Weinrib has embraced variety throughout his tenure in the arts, from his start in pottery to his moves into sculpture, painting, film, and photography. This richly illustrated volume showcases the tremendous range of his pursuits and work in locations around the world. Available from www.blurb.com.

Absinthe Cubist Vase Laurene Leon Boym (M.I.D. ’93) $83

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Rumigami Concrete Housewares Patricio D. Andrade (B.Arch. ’10) $22-$30 The eclectic and bold products from Spacio Terreno, a design workshop of multidisciplinary husband-and-wife duo Isabel Becerra and Patricio Andrade, explore the similarities of different cultures through textures, colors, and materials. Featuring a concrete modernistic planter, coaster, and candlestick holder, their Rumigami Concrete Housewares collection blends crisp lines with natural stone architecture. Available at www.spacioterreno.com and www.stevenalan.com.


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Tornado Collection Alvaro Uribe (B.I.D. ’10) $100–$200 (single bowl, vase, candleholder pair, or pillar)

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Alvaro Uribe combines the tension and power of a cyclone with the timeless elegance of crystal in his Tornado collection. The multiple rings that form the body of each design create a fluid movement and pattern that evoke positive energy and connection. Available through www.nambe.com.

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Midcentury Houses Today Michael Biondo (B.F.A. Photography ’84) and Jeffrey Matz (B.Arch. ’85) $65 Architects Jeffrey Matz and Cristina A. Ross, photographer Michael Biondo, and graphic designer Lorenzo Ottaviani take a fresh look at 16 modern aesthetic American houses from New Canaan, Connecticut, in the 1940s and ’50s. Each house is portrayed in great detail, with floor plans, timelines, and both archival and luminous new photography. Through the examination of these modernist homes, which focus on the principles of simplicity, openness, and sensitivity to site and nature, Midcentury Houses Today illustrates not only the philosophy of design, but the philosophy of living. Available at www.monacellipress.com, www.amazon.com, and www.barnesandnoble.com.

Hold on Tight Bookshelf Colleen Whiteley (B.I.D. ’03) and Eric Whiteley (Industrial Design ’03) $600 Books are no longer in danger of toppling over with the Hold on Tight bookshelf from Colleen and Eric Whiteley, who met while studying industrial design at Pratt Institute. Available in beech, walnut, and oak, the shelf features an oversized wing nut that allows the bookend to slide into place and be secured, wherever it is needed. Available at www.fiercelymade.com.

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Overlay/Underlay Wall Covering Kevin Walz, Visiting Associate Professor, Interior Design (Fine Arts ’71) $32.50/yard In his new collection of wall coverings for Wolf-Gordon, titled Overlay/Underlay, Kevin Walz uses translucent ink to mimic the effect of paint seeping through canvas. While serially manufactured, the wall coverings retain a handcrafted quality found in block prints or silk screen. The process begins when Walz first paints the patterns on linen, allowing them to bleed through to the other side. He then scans the front pattern with the images created on the back to achieve a “dual image.” The wall coverings come in five patterns and assorted colors. Available at www.wolfgordon.com.

Submissions Alumni, Faculty, and Students We invite submissions to New and Noteworthy. Send information and images of your latest creation for sale in the marketplace to prattfolio@pratt.edu with the subject “New and Noteworthy.”

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RYERSON WALK Recent Campus News and Activities

L to R: Tamara J. Robbins (M.S. Communications Design ’00), Hilda Janice Arroyo Colon (M.S. Communications Design ’00), and Sanders Anderson (M.S. Communications Design ’99)

Alumni Day 2014 Draws Hundreds Back to Campus Hundreds of alumni came together on the Brooklyn campus to reconnect with classmates for Alumni Day on September 20. The daylong event included Pratt’s third annual Alumni Art and Design Fair, gallery exhibitions, career roundtable discussions, campus tours, and an evening cocktail celebration. There were also special events for engineering alumni as well as those celebrating their 5th, 10th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 35th, 40th, 45th, and 50th+ reunions. Another highlight of the day was a tour of the newly renovated Main Building, which was reopened to staff and students in 2014 after the fire in February 2013.

Jorge Oliver, chair of the Film/Video Department, hosted a Creative Conversation with alumnus, award-winning artist, film producer, and art director, Michael C. Gross (B.F.A. Fine Arts ’66). Gross shared entertaining anecdotes and insights from his days as a Pratt student as well as his work for National Lampoon magazine and companies such as Mobil Oil. He also spoke about his long Hollywood career producing films, which also famously included designing the logo for the movie Ghostbusters. The day came to a close with a concert featuring Madame Pat Tandy and her trio and an alumni cocktail reception on the lawn. Preparations are under way for Alumni Day 2015, which will take place on Saturday, September 19.


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Pratt Young Scholar Ashley Bridgewater Cruz and Provost Peter Barna | Photo by Sam Stuart

Pratt Young Scholars Reception Celebrates New Class of High School Scholarship Recipients Photography Department Celebrates Garry Garry Winogrand, New York, 1965 © The Estate of Garry Winogrand | Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

Winogrand with Distinguished Speakers A panel of prominent speakers came together to discuss the cultural legacy of renowned American photographer Garry Winogrand and share their personal recollections of him. The evening featured Leo Rubinfien, a photographer and writer who guest-curated the Garry Winogrand exhibition and who is known as a protégé of Winogrand; Jeff L. Rosenheim, curator in charge of photography at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; Susan Kismaric, former curator of photography at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Thomas Roma, a photographer and director of the Photography Department at Columbia University. The discussion, moderated by Stephen Hilger, chair of Photography at Pratt, coincided with a major retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art that offered a complete overview of the photographer’s working life.

The Pratt community welcomed some of its youngest members at a reception for the second class of students in the Pratt Young Scholars program. The 15 students, all sophomores attending Brooklyn public high schools, will receive three-year scholarships to attend the Department of Art and Design Education’s Youth Programs at Pratt, which include the Saturday Art School, Design Initiative for Community Empowerment, and the Summer Design program. The reception at the Caroline Ladd Pratt House gave the Young Scholars, as well as their parents and families, the opportunity to meet each other for the first time. Pratt Young Scholars is supported by The Edward and Sally Van Lier Fund of The New York Community Trust, The Pinkerton Foundation, the New York State Council on the Arts, and the Turrell Fund.

Pratt Offers New Degree Programs Pratt Institute’s new Master of Fine Arts in Writing program welcomed its inaugural incoming class in fall 2014. The unique two-year program is designed to support and encourage intellectually rigorous and inspired writing practices that are philosophically, socially, and politically informed. Beginning in fall 2015, the Institute will offer a new Master of Fine Arts degree program in Interior Design. The new program will replace the current Master of Science degree program, emphasizing a research-based approach to the discipline while preparing graduates for professional practice and teaching positions at the college and university level.


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The new Pratt catalog featuring Christina Hillman’s winning cover design

Students on the Engineering Quadrangle on the Brooklyn campus

Institute’s New Catalog Covers Feature Winning Design by Student Christina Hillman

U.S. News & World Report Ranks Pratt One of the Region’s Top 20 Colleges

They say you can’t judge a book by its cover, but if you could, the 2014-15 graduate and undergraduate course catalogs for prospective students would score high marks. They feature covers designed by Christina Hillman (B.F.A. Communications Design, Class of ’15), who was named winner of the Pratt Institute Catalog Cover Design Competition held last spring. The contest challenged students in the Undergraduate Communications Design Department to submit covers for the 2014-15 catalogs. Robert Blair (B.F.A. Communications Design, ’14) and Chantal Persad (B.F.A. Communications Design, Class of ’15) were selected as runners-up.

Pratt Institute ranked 19th out of 181 peer institutions in U.S. News & World Report’s “Regional Universities North” category this year, rising from number 20 in the same category last year. For the third year in a row, Pratt was the only independent college of art and design to place in this category.

Hillman’s winning design features a hand-drawn illustration that incorporates the Institute’s motto, “Be true to your work and your work will be true to you.” “I viewed the catalog as an invitation to join the Pratt family and wanted to create a hand-done invitation,” said Hillman, whose cover illustrations were created without the use of digital tools. Kathleen Creighton, chair of the Undergraduate Communications Design Department, partnered with the creative services team in Pratt’s Office of Communications and Marketing and the Division of Enrollment to organize the contest.

According to U.S. News & World Report, the “Best Colleges 2015″ rankings compare the relative quality of institutions based on widely accepted indicators of excellence such as freshman retention, strength of faculty, and graduation rates.

Pratt Ranked Number One College of Art and Design for Salaries of Graduates PayScale’s “2014-15 College Salary Report” has ranked Pratt Institute first in its “Art and Design Schools by Salary Potential (Bachelor’s Degree Only)” category, ahead of 15 other peer institutions. The rankings are based on actual median salaries for graduates who received a bachelor’s degree from the institutions listed. PayScale is a Seattle-based company with a database containing more than 40 million salary profiles. Its annual “College Salary Report” ranks colleges on alumni earnings. The data used in the report is collected through an ongoing, online compensation survey.


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Shaping Pratt’s future begins today. That future begins with you. Making a planned gift to Pratt means making an impact on the Institute for generations to come. From retirement accounts to naming the Institute in your will, Pratt offers a variety of ways that alumni and friends can lay the foundation for the creative leaders of the future. Your planned gift will also benefit you and your heirs— for example, by providing you with income for life or helping offset income or estate taxes.

To find out more, contact Drew Babitts, Major and Planned Gifts Officer, at dbabitts@pratt.edu or 718.399.4296.


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BEYOND THE GATES Pratt’s Presence in the Public Realm

L to R: Cody Miller, Carolina Pabon-Escobar, Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman, Debera Johnson, Carson Stanch, and Theo Ferlauto | Courtesy of Pratt Institute Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator

The White House Invites Faculty to Lead Fashion Education Workshop in Wearable Technology Led by Debera Johnson (B.I.D. ’86), executive director of Pratt Institute’s Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator (BF+DA), a select group of research fellows and students traveled to Washington, D.C. to participate in the first-ever White House Fashion Education Workshop in October. Hosted by First Lady Michelle Obama, the event brought together key fashion industry leaders and innovators with area students to promote education and encourage the students to pursue their dreams and achieve their career goals. The First Lady made

a personal visit to the workshop to speak with the session leaders and students, commenting on the importance of creating an opportunity for industry professionals to interact with those who are coming up in the next generation. As part of the intergenerational exchange encouraged by Obama, Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman (B.F.A. ’85), BF+DA research fellow and adjunct associate professor of industrial design and fashion, led a wearable technology workshop with the assistance of students Carolina Pabon-Escobar (M.I.D. ’14), Theo Ferlauto (B.I.D. ’15), Cody Miller (B.I.D. ’15), and Carson Stanch (B.I.D. ’15). The session gave high school students an introduction to wearable technology and taught them the basics of a sewable electrical circuit.


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New York State Senator Martin J. Golden and Pratt President Thomas F. Schutte at the BF+DA opening reception

L to R: Legends Honorees Iris Apfel, David Yurman, and Kim Hastreiter | Courtesy of Patrick McMullan Company

Pratt Institute’s Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator Debuts New Facility for Design and Fashion Start-Ups

Legends 2014 Gala Raises More than $760,000 for Student Scholarships

More than 500 people gathered to celebrate the opening of Pratt Institute’s Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator (BF+DA) at a November opening reception attended by government and industry leaders, including New York State Senator Martin J. Golden and Deputy Brooklyn Borough President Diana Reyna. Launched last year, the BF+DA aims to provide high-potential start-ups with the resources necessary to establish viable businesses. Supported with funding from Pratt Institute, the State of New York, and the Office of the Brooklyn Borough President, the BF+DA provides workspace for 30 design-oriented start-ups, among them numerous New York City Venture Fellows. Debera Johnson (B.I.D. ’86), executive director, founded the BF+DA following the success of the Pratt Design Incubator for Sustainable Innovation, which has helped create more than 30 new companies and dozens of jobs since its inception in 2002. Attendees at the opening had the opportunity to meet Venture Fellows, tour the workspaces, and view the array of resources available in the facility.

School of Architecture Professor Signe Nielsen Guides Design of New York City’s High Line Park Signe Nielsen (B.S. Construction Management ’01), professor of landscape architecture, urban design, and environmental planning in Pratt’s School of Architecture, played a vital role in leading the High Line’s third phase to completion. As president of the New York City Public Design Commission (PDC), the commission responsible for overseeing design aspects of public projects, and an award-winning landscape architect, Nielsen has had an integral role in shaping the acclaimed park’s landscape design since the project’s inception.

Pratt Institute’s Legends 2014 gala was held in November at the Mandarin Oriental and raised more than $700,000 in advance and an additional $60,000 in pledges at the event to benefit student scholarships. The glamorous gala honored style icon and designer Iris Apfel, PAPER magazine co-founder and editor-in-chief Kim Hastreiter, and designer and CEO David Yurman. Legends 2014 was chaired by Pratt Trustee Emeritus Bruce M. Newman (B.F.A. Interior Design ’53) and his wife, Judith, and Pratt Trustee David Walentas and his wife, Jane. The evening’s awards—created by senior industrial design student Chengtao Yi— were presented by acclaimed Nigerian fashion designer Duro Olowu (Iris Apfel); award-winning author, model, and host of Bravo’s Emmy-winning television series Top Chef, Padma Lakshmi (Kim Hastreiter); and Sainsbury Center for Visual Arts director Paul Greenhalgh (David Yurman).

Alumni and Friends Gather around the Globe In a continuing effort to expand outreach to alumni and friends around the world, Pratt Regional Network events were held in Atlanta at the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art and in New Canaan, Connecticut, at the home of Adjunct Graduate Communications Design Professor Bill Hilson and his wife, Barbara. Additionally, Pratt Institute President Thomas F. Schutte and his wife, Tess L. Schutte, joined gatherings in Seoul, Korea, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In addition, the Recent Alumni Committee, which offers programs of interest to graduates of the last decade, held networking receptions at Pratt Manhattan Gallery and Wix Lounge, and a behind-the-scenes tour of the New York Public Library’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. Alumni can register for Pratt Connect at connect.pratt.edu to learn more about alumni programming across the country and around the world.


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Saul Schisler (B.F.A. Fine Arts ’14), right, with his modern single pull printing press | Photo by Alex Weber

Artist Shepard Fairey with Lillian Ling (M.F.A. Communications Design ’15) and Eduardo Palma (M.F.A. Communications Design ’15) | Courtesy of Hennessy

Students Create Work and Exhibition at Pratt Manhattan Gallery to Celebrate The Wall Street Journal’s 125th Anniversary

Student Winners of Third Annual Pratt/ Hennessy V.S Competition Join Artist Shepard Fairey for Panel in Los Angeles

Eleven students took part in an initiative to create work that celebrated the rich history and future innovations of The Wall Street Journal (WSJ), which commemorated its 125th anniversary in July. The resulting works, which stem from a partnership between Pratt and WSJ parent company Dow Jones, were on display in a summer exhibition titled Pratt Celebrates 125 Years of The Wall Street Journal.

This summer, two communications design students discussed their work with renowned street artist Shepard Fairey and other art world leaders as part of a salon series in Los Angeles, sponsored by Hennessy and organized by Pratt’s Office of Strategic Partnerships and Institutional Support. The students, Eduardo Palma (M.F.A. Communications Design ’15) and Lillian Ling (M.F.A. Communications Design ’15), finished in first and third place in the third annual Pratt/Hennessy V.S competition, in which nine Pratt students from a variety of disciplines were challenged to create works of art influenced by Hennessy’s mantra, “Never stop. Never settle.”

The students, whose diverse backgrounds, disciplines, and interests embody the worldwide influence of the Journal, created work in their chosen medium, taking inspiration from one or more of eight themes provided by WSJ parent company Dow Jones. The themes ranged from technology’s impact on media consumption to the evolution of the Journal from 1889’s four-page newsletter to the global news-gathering powerhouse it is today. A portrait series in the style of WSJ’s signature hand-drawn stipple illustrations, or hedcuts, by Michael Levin (M.F.A. ’15) was selected to go on permanent display in Dow Jones’s corporate office in New York as a result of the initiative, which was overseen by Eric O’Toole, adjunct assistant professor of graduate communications design, and organized by Pratt’s Office of Strategic Partnerships and Institutional Support.

Palma and Ling’s winning works were displayed during a private two-day salon series at the Ralph Pucci International Showroom in the Design District of Los Angeles, where a panel discussed the future of art and the role of collaboration between artists, brands, and institutions. The designers presented and discussed their pieces with guests including Fairey and fellow street artist Futura, alumnus and artist Derrick Adams (B.F.A. Art and Design Education ’96), and Saatchi Art CEO Sean Moriarty. Second-place winner and fine arts student Eden Daniell’s (B.F.A. Fine Art Jewelry ’14) folding silver ring design was also on display at the Pucci showroom.


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Claire McKinney (B.F.A. Fashion Design ’15) and Ralph Pucci with McKinney’s designs at the Organic Matter exhibition in Las Vegas | Photo by Chris Poore

Paint the Sky Canvas Notebook, designed by Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya (M.S. Communications Design ’14) | Courtesy of Barnes & Noble

Organic Matter Exhibition of Student Knitwear Designs Travels to Las Vegas

Barnes & Noble Debuts New Pratt-Designed Back-to-School Collection

Organic Matter, an exhibition of innovative knitwear created by Pratt fashion students last fall in collaboration with Ralph Pucci International, traveled to the Delano Las Vegas, a new boutique hotel in Las Vegas, gaining further national exposure after displays in New York and Dallas. Among the students whose work was on display was Claire McKinney (B.F.A. Fashion Design, Class of ’15), who traveled to Las Vegas for the show conceived by Pucci and Timothy Opsomer, Vice President of Visual Merchandising and Store Planning for MGM Resorts Retail.

For the sixth year in a row, Pratt collaborated with Barnes & Noble to bring a collection of Pratt Institute student-designed products to more than 400 Barnes & Noble stores nationwide, as well as online at BN.com. This fall’s “For Students by Students” collection of journals, notebooks, pencil cases, and other backto-school items was designed by a group of 10 students working toward their master’s degrees at Pratt, as part of an ongoing partnership with Barnes & Noble. Under the leadership of Pratt faculty adviser Professor Thomas Dolle, the student designers created unique designs that appeal to students in high school, college, and beyond. This year’s products feature eye-catching graphics, including colorful mirrored sunglasses and black-andwhite computer symbols.

Created in partnership with Pratt Trustee Ralph Pucci, who is renowned for his high-end mannequin, lighting, furniture, and sculpture company Ralph Pucci International, Organic Matter is the result of a challenge to reimagine the form, function, and design of knitwear as fine art. Ranging from elegant sheaths to artfully crafted crocheted scarves, the pieces reflect a cuttingedge approach to knitwear, with each one illustrating a different forward-thinking approach to woven design.

Recent Jewelry Graduates Exhibit and Sell Work at Museum of Arts and Design Three recent graduates of the studio jewelry program were invited to sell their works at LOOT: MAD about Jewelry, an annual juried jewelry sale and exhibition held at the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), in October. LOOT: MAD about Jewelry featured the creations of 50 emerging and acclaimed jewelry artists from around the world, including Shuoyuan Bai (B.F.A. Jewelry ’14), Lisa Lee (B.F.A. Jewelry ’14), and Lauren Pineda (B.F.A. Jewelry ’14). This was the third time that Pratt students have participated in LOOT: Mad about Jewelry.

Longtime Supporters of Black Alumni of Pratt Honored at High Tea The Black Alumni of Pratt (BAP) recently hosted a high tea event at the Hotel Plaza Athénée in New York to honor fashion entrepreneur Bethann Hardison; tourism professional and former CNN anchor Prudence Inzerillo; gallery owner and Pratt Trustee June Kelly; and Marva Smalls, executive vice president of Global Inclusion Strategy, MTV Networks. All are longtime members of BAP, which celebrates and supports Pratt’s black and Latino students and alumni. Attendees included Pratt President Thomas F. Schutte and his wife, Tess L. Schutte; former New York City Mayor David N. Dinkins; Director and Chief Curator of the Studio Museum Thelma Golden; and Bruce Gitlin, chair of Pratt’s Board of Trustees. Pratt students Mirland Terlonge (M.F.A., Painting and Drawing ’15) and Matthew Hernandez (B.F.A., Illustration ’15) co-hosted the event.


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Pratt Presents First Fall Season

The New York Line-Up Pratt launched its new signature series of free public programs with events exploring big ideas in art, design, and architecture, including: • “Michael Kimmelman in Conversation with Annabelle Selldorf,” copresented by Surface magazine and moderated by Executive Editor Spencer Bailey • “The Art of Dining: How Master Chefs and Designers Collaborate,” with hospitality designer Adam D. Tihany, chefs Daniel Boulud and Lydia Shire, and ELLE DECOR Editor in Chief Michael Boodro • “An Evening with Fernando Botero,” a President’s Lecture Series Event celebrating the publication of Botero’s book, Bullfight

• “Planning for Parks: What’s Next?” with Commissioner of New York City Parks and Recreation and Pratt alumnus Mitchell J. Silver (B.Arch. ’87) • “Language and Culture: A Conversation and Interactive Installation,” copresented by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and featuring work by Eduardo Palma (M.F.A. Communications Design, Class of ’15) and a discussion between Palma, NPR’s Maria Hinojosa, Pratt Associate Professor Ellery Washington, and visual artist Shantell Martin Clockwise from top left: Annabelle Selldorf (B.Arch. ’85) and Michael Kimmelman in conversation; L to R: Pratt President Thomas F. Schutte, Karyn Zieve, Fernando Botero, Eva Diaz, Dorothea Dietrich; Daniel Boulud addressing the audience during “The Art of Dining”; Pratt student Eduardo Palma (M.F.A. Communications Design, Class of ’15) and Maria Hinojosa in front of Palma’s installation at the Schomburg Center; Pratt professor David Burney and Commissioner Mitchell J. Silver, FAICP (B.Arch. ’87) discuss the future of New York City’s parks


P R AT TFOLIO

Pratt Digital Arts Exhibition Attracts Industry Leaders at Art Basel Miami Beach Pratt Digital Arts, an exhibition organized by Pratt Institute in partnership with LG Electronics USA and Surface magazine, attracted lively crowds to the Miami Beach EDITION hotel for a special Pratt reception and an exclusive Surface magazine talk with curator Hans Ulrich Obrist, musician FKA Twigs, and artist Alex Israel during Art Basel Miami Beach on December 4th and 5th. The exhibition, curated by Pratt’s Department of Digital Arts Chair Peter Patchen, featured digital artwork by Pratt students and recent graduates shown on state-of-the-art LG Ultra HD 4K TVs and OLED TVs. Highlights included 110 Fathoms by Pratt student Joseph Bui (B.F.A. Communications Design ’16), who won second place in LG’s acclaimed national “The Art of the Pixel” competition held earlier this year. A special art installation by Pratt alumnus and faculty member Alvaro Uribe (B.I.D. ’10) also was presented by reception sponsor Corzo Tequila.

43

The event was attended by such art and design notables as Serpentine Galleries co-director Julia Peyton-Jones, Jeffrey Deitch, China Chow, Klaus Biesenbach, John Pawson, Gavin Brown, Almine Rech-Picasso, Norman and Norah Stone, Kesh, Bettina Korek, Dev Hynes (Blood Orange), Samantha Urbani, and Jane and David Walentas, who is a Pratt trustee. Clockwise from top left: View of Pratt Digital Arts at the Miami Beach EDITION hotel; David Walentas, Pratt Institute trustee, and Jane Walentas at the Pratt Digital Arts exhibition; Joseph Bui (B.F.A. Communications Design, Class of ’16) with his work, 110 Fathoms; L to R: Ludovic Leroy, executive director, Strategic Partnerships and Institutional Support, Pratt Institute, Spencer Bailey, executive editor, Surface magazine, FKA Twigs, Alex Israel, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Marc Lotenberg, CEO, Surface magazine, and Peter Patchen, chair of Digital Arts, Pratt Institute; Alvaro Uribe (B.I.D. ’10) with Surface magazine Executive Editor Spencer Bailey | Group photo courtesy of Getty Images


44

P R AT T F O L IO

FINAL THOUGHTS Of Books and Bytes

by Andrew W. Barnes, Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences

A few years ago, a friend of mine engaged in an extensive renovation of her apartment. She is a writer and an avid reader. Along one wall was a large, 12-foot by eight-foot built-in bookcase filled with the work that has influenced her writing career and her life. During the renovation, though, she reached the decision to do away with the bookcase completely, recycling the paperbacks and moving valuable hardbacks to a smaller space in her home office. Her reasoning was simple: with the ability to electronically store a large number of books on her tablet, she saw no need to keep the physical duplicates around.

I sympathize with her. I never go to a bookstore anymore to buy a book. Instead, when someone recommends a good read, I pull out my phone, search for it electronically, and download it right there. On my long subway rides to and from work, I read these books on my phone, which is far less cumbersome than hauling a paper book around. Years ago, I gave up on the romantic idea that many bibliophiles hold about the tactile engagement with a material book: the weight, the smell of the ink, the physical act of turning a page. In my creative practice, I used to handwrite everything and then transcribe my writing into Word. But I’ve given up that practice as well and now compose directly on the computer, or my tablet, or even my phone. The digital age has affected the production, manufacturing, and distribution of books, for better and for worse. More writers can get their books out to the public, either through traditional publishing houses that produce digital books, or through selfpublishing, which is gaining a legitimate presence in the book world. But the production of literature has been concentrated in the hands of a few mega-publishers

that can monopolize the market and control the fee that is paid to writers. E-books give more people access to books because of their convenience. And yet, the e-business has put many bookstores and small presses out of business. My biggest concern about the e-revolution in the literary world, though, is that it has created much more “noise” via a proliferation of books that anyone can write and put online. Frankly, most of these books are not very good. There is a lot of clutter out there, which is ironic, especially given my friend’s desire to de-clutter her apartment by getting rid of physical books. If e-books were supposed to make our lives easier, they have also made it more difficult to find the literary gems among all the junk. But still, I favor the e-book for its convenience and portability. And as with any art today, I believe that really good work will rise above the static that is inevitably produced when technology expands the access and reach of any cultural product. We readers, though, may have to look a little harder to find it.


Creativity begins with The Fund for Pratt. The Fund for Pratt begins with you. If each of Pratt’s

40,000+ alumni gave just $50 this year, together we’d raise over $2,000,000, enough to pay for:*

500 study abroad programs, or

books for 1,000 students, or

100 faculty projects and initiatives, or

200 President’s Scholarships

Make your gift today. Visit www.pratt.edu/give or call 718.636.3576 to learn more about giving to The Fund for Pratt. *Items listed are for illustration purposes and do not indicate actual Fund for Pratt allocations. Illustrations by Anthony Bayoneto, B.F.A. Communications Design ’14

The Fund for Pratt


HONOR ROLL A letter from Board Chair Bruce Gitlin

On behalf of the Board of Trustees, it is my great pleasure to acknowledge each of the generous donors who made gifts to Pratt Institute in the past fiscal year. From recent graduates, proud parents, and alumni leaders to prominent foundations, corporations, and government agencies, each of the individuals and organizations listed on the pages that follow plays an integral role in enabling Pratt to offer the highest-quality education to the creative visionaries who will shape our future. This year we have seen many exciting changes on Pratt’s Brooklyn campus. First and foremost, the much-anticipated reopening of Main Building allowed students, faculty, and staff to return to the Institute’s signature historic structure, which now features stunning new studio and classroom spaces as well as a green roof. In addition, thanks to the generosity of Pratt Trustee Emeritus Bruce M. Newman (B.F.A. ’53), extensive landscaping has transformed the Engineering Quadrangle, which, along with the Newman Mall, has become one of the most beautiful and inspiring outdoor locations on campus. By providing essential unrestricted resources that can be allocated wherever they are needed most, The Fund for Pratt impacts the entire Institute community every day. I am excited to report that parent participation in The Fund for Pratt reached an alltime high this past fiscal year. At the same time, we were delighted to welcome record numbers of donors into the Institute’s Leadership Society, which recognizes individuals who have made gifts of $1,000 or more. In addition to the increases in Leadership Society giving, this year 477 individuals made their first gift ever to The Fund for Pratt, which provided essential resources for scholarships, study abroad, and teaching and learning excellence. The increased participation in The Fund for Pratt represents a tremendous vote of confidence in the Institute’s mission and activities, and I am deeply grateful for this wonderful show of support. Again, to everyone who has played a part in our success, thank you for your generosity. I look forward to our continued partnership on behalf of this remarkable institution. With best wishes,

Bruce J. Gitlin Chair, Board of Trustees


All listings represent gifts, pledge commitments, and pledge payments made to the entire Pratt community from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014. $200,000-$449,999

Brooklyn Borough President’s Office CEC Stuyvesant Cove, Inc. The Fern B. Macchi Revocable Trust New York City Comptroller Bruce M. Newman ’53 (Trustee Emeritus) & Judith Newman* Carole A. Sirovich & Lawrence Sirovich* Matthew I. Sirovich & Meredith Elson

$100,000-$199,999

Booth Ferris Foundation Center for Social Inclusion Conservation Services Group, Inc. Cotton Incorporated The David & Sondra Mack Foundation, Inc.* Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund The Kresge Foundation David S. Mack (Trustee) & Sondra Mack* Paul N. Marcus & Annette S. Marcus New York City Small Business Services Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Inc. Surdna Foundation University Settlement Society of New York US Department of Commerce US Economic Development Agency Walentas Foundation, Ltd. David C. Walentas (Trustee) & Jane Walentas* Young S. Woo ’80 & Nan H. Woo

$50,000-$99,999

Kathryn C. Chenault ’12 (Hon.) (Trustee) & Kenneth I. Chenault The Peter and Virginia Cherry Giving Fund Citi Community Development Cohn & Wolfe Dow Jones & Co., Inc. Global Strategy Group, LLC Laura P. Gregg & A. J. Gregg J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. James Dyson Foundation Jonathan Rose Companies, LLC Legacy Global Foundation Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City Mertz Gilmore Foundation* New York City Rebuilding Donors Collaborative New York State Education Department David O. Pratt (Trustee) & Kathleen Pratt* P ’14 Mary O. Pratt* Thomas R. Pratt & Aleta Pratt Pucci International, Ltd. Ralph Pucci (Trustee) & Ann Pucci Santander Universities The Spionkop Charitable Trust* Juliana C. Terian (Trustee) ’90* Visa USA Inc.

$25,000-$49,999

Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation Bloomberg L.P. Deborah J. Buck (Trustee)* Citibank Colgate-Palmolive Company* Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation* Estee Lauder, Inc.* The Ford Foundation Bruce J. Gitlin (Chairman) & Carol A. Schrager* Karl R. Greenfield ’53 & Valerie Greenfield* H.W. Wilson Foundation, Inc. HPI International, Inc. Young Ho Kim ’71 (Trustee Emeritus) Katharine L. McKenna ’84 (Trustee) & Mark S. Braunstein* Mizuho USA Foundation, Inc. Isabel Morton (dec.)* New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development New York Foundation New York State Council on the Arts* The Pinkerton Foundation Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Mike Pratt (Trustee) & Carol S. Pratt* Martin E. Rich AIA ’63 & Donna Rich* The Richards Group Stan H. Richards ’53 (Trustee) & Betty Richards (dec.)* David Rockefeller David Saylor ’69 The Scherman Foundation* Thomas F. Schutte (President) & Tess L. Schutte* The Selz Foundation Bernard T. Selz & Lisa Selz Robert H. Siegel FAIA ’62 (Trustee) & Hazel Siegel* The Stutzman Family Foundation John M. Takeuchi ’47 Umbra, LLC* Anne H. Van Ingen (Trustee) & Wesley Haynes* Zeno Group

$10,000-$24,999

Anonymous Arcade Marketing, Inc.* The Ayco Charitable Foundation BET Holdings, Inc. Estate of Jean E. Bice Kenneth P. Browne ’75* Capital One Foundation Citigroup, Inc. Con Edison, Inc.* CulinArt, Inc.* Cullen and Dykman LLP* Dick Blick Holdings, Inc. The Durst Organization Anita Durst & Rick Kariolic Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation Mauricio Fabre & Clara Vega The Fascitelli Family Foundation*

*Donors who made consecutive gifts for 5+ years, P=Parent donor, (dec.)=Deceased

Michael D. Fascitelli & Elizabeth Cogan Fascitelli* Firmenich Fine Fragrance* Robert E. Gallagher & Jane Gallagher Givaudan Fragrances Corporation* Steven H. Goodstein ’66 & Linda Goodstein* Gary S. Hattem ’75 (Trustee) & Frazier Holloway* William Hilson ’81 & Barbara Hilson* International Flavors & Fragrances, Inc. Julie Pratt Shattuck Charitable Lead Trust* Kauffman Foundation KPMG International James D. Kuhn (Trustee) & Marjorie Kuhn* Debra Lee Estate of Naomi Leff ’73* Legacy Builders/Developers Corporation LG Electronics U.S.A., Inc. Liberty Mutual Group, Inc. Local Initiatives Support Corp. The M&T Charitable Foundation Mah Brands Limited Anita B. Mandl Mane USA Mary Kay Inc. Leon Moed ’54 (Trustee Emeritus) & Marilyn Moed* Moet Hennessy USA John F. Morning ’55 (Trustee)* National Art Education Foundation National Endowment for the Arts The Netherlands Consulate General in New York Newmark Grubb Knight Frank New York State Pollution Prevention Institute Jane B. Nord ’45 Norman Rosenfeld Architects, LLC. Estate of Frances C. Northam* John K. Orberg ’75 & Janet I. Kuhl ’77* The Robert E. Gallagher Charitable Trust Rochester Institute of Technology Norman Rosenfeld FAIA ’56 (dec.)* John R. Shapiro AICP ’79* Ruth L. Shuman ’89* Sills Family Foundation St. Nicks Alliance Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects & Planners, LLC State of New York Howard S. Stein (Trustee) & B. Jill Comins* The Stoddard Trust STV CS AKRF Joint Venture Turrell Fund Unilever Xhema of NY, Inc. Youth Ministries for Peace and Justice Michael S. Zetlin (Trustee) & Gerri Zetlin*

$5,000-$9,999 AG Foundation

Alexander C. & Tillie S. Speyer Foundation* American Express Company Architectural Digest Barnes & Noble Bookstores, Inc.* Harold Behl Bentley Systems, Incorporated Freya Block ’77 & Richard H. Block Carl Hansen & Son Center for Children’s Initiatives Kristina Christensen & Jeffry Christensen Condé Nast Publications, Inc. Darino Films Edward Darino & Sylvia Darino David and Sybil Yurman Humanitarian Arts Foundation, Inc. Ermenegildo Zegna Mildred M. Fatovic ’72* Fragrance Resources, Inc. Freya & Richard Block Family Foundation Estelle Y. Friedman ’69 General Electric Company The Gino & Clarice Nahum Charitable Trust Agnes Gund* The Hearst Corporation Heinz Glas USA, Inc.* Gerard E. Hilferty ’63 & Jacqueline Folks Romer Holleran & Deming P. Holleran Infopro Digital USA, LLC Intercos America, Inc. The Kaneff Foundation June N. Kelly (Trustee) & Charles D. Storer Jr.* Nicholas P. Koutsomitis AIA ’78 & Maria Koutsomitis, P ’12 Donald Kramer & Elizabeth Kramer Ted B. Lewin ’56 & Betsy R. Lewin ’59* Bormioli Luigi Sheila B. Marshall & George B. Marshall Michael Kors (USA) Inc. Michael Sheridan & Company Inc. Michelle V. Nahum-Albright ’75 & Donn Albright, P ’13 Hiroko Nakamoto ’55 Neuberger Berman* New York City Environmental Justice Alliance New York Hotel Trades Council Heidi Nitze (Trustee Emeritus) Phillips-Van Heusen Corporation Pochet of America, Inc.* Harry L. Posin ’76 & Lisa Posin Maria Pucci Qualcomm Katherine Rander Robert Lehman Foundation, Inc. Charles D. Rogalski & Karen Rogalski* Daryl M. Rosenblatt AIA ’77 & Susan J. Miller* Jack C. Rudin Sigmund J. Rusen ’43 Margaret Russell SGD North America, Inc.*


Squarespace Inc. TD Bank* TD Charitable Foundation Edmund S. Twining III & Diana Twining Reginald Van Lee Diana Wege & Tim Sherogan

$2,500-$4,999

Evan Akselrad Alarmingly Affordable, Inc. All HVAC Service Co, Inc. American Forest & Paper Association Kurt B. Andersen (Trustee) & Anne Kreamer* Anonymous Peter Arbeeny Clarence Avant Barbara and Donald Tober Foundation* Peter L. Barna ’83 & Myonggi Sul Barna ’82* John Bennardo Katherine Bickerdike Samy Brahimy ’80 & Lizanne Merrill* Madeline Burke-Vigeland AIA ’81 & Nils Vigeland* Dennis Burns & Kimberly Burns Steven Capogna Amy M. Cappellazzo ’97 (Trustee) & Joanne Rosen* Allen L. Carlsen ’59 Carry Hot, Inc. Charles E. Culpeper Foundation College Publications, Inc. Cosmetic Laboratories of America Cullman & Kravis, Inc. Carolyn Cunniffe & Maurice Cunniffe Cypress Hills Local Development Corporation The Daniel M. Neidich and Brooke Garber Foundation* Design Within Reach, Inc. DesignTex Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel ’10 (Hon.) & Carl Spielvogel* Andrea B. Dibner-Orozco ’94 & Gerard Orozco ’97 Patrick J. Donnelly John Edelman Thomas R. Eich Richard W. Eiger ’55 (Trustee Emeritus) & Ruth Eiger* ExxonMobil Foundation* Stephen Graham & Cathy Graham Dorothy Greenberg ’82* Henry W. Grussinger ’48 & Ethel Grussinger Harris Beach PLLC Alice N. Hunt & Malcolm A. McCulloch David P. Hunt* IBM International Foundation Industry City Jazz at Lincoln Center, Inc. June Kelly Gallery, Inc. Tom Kligerman Wendy A. Kvalheim ’83 & Grant Kvalheim Leaddog Marketing Group, Inc. Edward W. Lukasiewicz ’54 & Gail Lukasiewicz Jerry Mahoney

Juan Montoya & Urban Karlsson National Philanthropic Trust Daniel M. Neidich & Brooke G. Neidich* New York Community Trust New York Design Center Michele Oka Doner & Frederick Doner Ordung Family Trust Orlandi, Inc.* RBS Citizens Robert Zaccone & Associates, P.C. Keith F. Rosen AIA ’79* Ted Sarandos Donald J. Schwarz ’51 & Anastasia Schwarz ’53* Joanne F. Serraino ’83* Stanley S. Shuman & Sydney Shuman Emily D. Silber Marva Smalls SPIE Stanley S. Shuman Family Foundation Staples, Inc. Symrise AG Takasago International Corporation (USA)* Jonathan Tibett Barbara D. Tober & Donald G. Tober* Toly USA, Inc. Tuning the Student Mind Urban Expositions, LLC. Craig M. Vogel ’80 Robert H. Welz ’51 & Mary Louise Welz*

$1,000-$2,499

Charles S. Adorney ’48 & Leila M. Adorney ’47 (dec.) Advanced Environmental Corp.— Edward Namath Alexander Antonelli Architect, PLLC Joseph Allen & Annette Tapert Allen Sebastian L. Ambrogio ’76 & Cynthia Ambrogio* American Endowment Foundation Eleanor W. Anderson ’49* John B. Anderson ’52* Alexander Antonelli ’82 Carolyne J. Barnes Renee Belfer & Robert A. Belfer Robert Bersh Laura J. Bohn ’77 & Richard C. Fiore Sr. George O. Brome ’78 & Sheila Gibbs-Brome* Franklin J. Buccella ’55 & Virginia M. Buccella Robert E. Buckholz Jr. & Lizanne Buckholz Melva Bucksbaum & Raymond Learsy Hiram Butler John A. Cafaro ’77 & Beth Cafaro Peggy Cafritz CCS Project Management, LLC Camila Chaves Cortes ’82 Young Cho & Mi Cho Jae Hoon Choi ’96 Peter Claman ’49 & Dale Claman Kamara Coaxum Kofi Coaxum Wole C. Coaxum Leonard P. Cohen Roger Cook ’53 & Margit F. Cook ’54*

Coyne Public Relations, LLC. Norma Dana Christina R. Davis & Richard R. Davis George Denegre & Milly Denegre Mark A. Dickson ’70 & Katharine Dickson Jeffrey A. Dodd ’10 Donna Karan International Ray H. Dovell Jr. ’81 Terri Eagle Anne N. Edwards & R. Augustus Edwards III Anton J. Egner ’52 & Joan R. Egner Eula Eikerenkoetter Mary J. Ellis ’49* David Erb & Bonnie Garmus Rainey Day Erwin F. Schumacher & Co. Susan Fales-Hill Richard E. Feinbloom* Alan J. Feltoon ’74, P ’08 Ferguson & Shamamian Architects, LLP Delbert I. Footer ’53 The Fragrance Foundation Dale Frank & Dawn Evans Arnold A. Friedmann ’53 & Susi Friedmann* Fulbright & Jaworski Fusion Packaging I LP James F. Gager ’67 Todd M. Galitz & Kathryn C. Galitz* Donald M. Genaro ’57* George & Milly Denegre Fund Amanda M. Gerdes ’06 Rocco Giannetti ’86 Richard Gioscia ’84 Richard J. Glasebrook II* Thomas Goodman Greater Houston Community Foundation Peter B. Halfon ’60 & Carol E. Halfon* Charles J. Hamm (Trustee Emeritus) & Irene F. Hamm Guido Hartray, Marvel Architects Frederic P. Herter & Solange B. Herter Jeffrey Horner & Anna M. Horner Diane D. Hoyt-Goldsmith ’73 & David L. Goldsmith* Sonoe Hutchinson Iowa Foundation for Education Environment & the Arts Stephen B. Jacobs ’63 & Andi Pepper Jahn Foundation Helmut Jahn & Deborah Jahn Janney Montgomery Scott, LLC Joseph Jaroff jhchoi LLC Arlene D. Jonach Berti S. Jones ’70 & Robert Jones* Michael W. Kamen & Sandra Kamen Kevin L. Kane ’75 & Mary Kane* Kara Ross Kara Ross New York, LLC Tod J. Kaufman & Barrie Kaufman Mary E. Kelly ’61 Peter L. Kern ’62 & Carol H. Kern* Leevi Kiil ’63 & Mall Kiil Judi Kilachand The Knoll Group Albert H. Konetzni Jr. Richard Korchien AIA ’53 & Sheila A. Korchien*

Manfred Krankl & Elaine Krankl Lafayette 148 New York Mon Ling Landegger Andrew J. Langer ’64 & Patricia Langer Laura Bohn Design Associates, Inc. Theodore Liebman FAIA ’62 & Nina Liebman* Henry Loheac ’55* Jan K. Lorenzen ’83 & Margaret Richardson ’89 Louis Feinberg Foundation* Susan Lowry & Glenn D. Lowry Frank A. Mallalieu ’57* Jennifer and James Marden Marlborough Gallery Martin County Community Foundation, Inc. Matthew Patrick Smyth Emily S. May ’99 & William May Edward Mazria ’63 & Marcia Mazria ’68 Inger McCabe Elliott Carole Holmes McCarthy Robert M. McLane Michael E. Menatian ’94 & Erin L. Menatian Bonnie L. Messing The Metropolitan Museum of Art Edith W. Meyers* Angie Mills ’50* Richard Mishaan & Marcia Mishaan John L. (Jack) Moe ’48* Richard Montmeat ’47 & Phyllis Nelson Montmeat ’47 Arthur Moretti & Yvonne Moretti* John D. Moser AIA ’74 & Lynda Speilman* George T. Moy ’56 Ted Muehling III ’75* Ann Mustard & Allan Mustard, P ’12* Richard Nasti & Maura Nasti Neenah Paper Company Nessim & Associates Barbara Nessim ’60 Patricia R. Nussbaum & Mark S. Nussbaum* P.M.S. Enterprises John Y. Pai ’62 & Eunsook Pai, P ’94* Mary Y. Parr Richard D. Parsons Mary J. Petras ’67 & Charles F. Petras ’74 Alice Phillips Swistel & Daniel Swistel Platt Byard Dovell White Architects LLP Pollack Consulting Richard N. Pollack AIA ’73 & Sandra E. Pollack ’76* Jane S. Pratt Raymond J. Ripper ’63 & Barbara Fleming Santiago Rivera Gonzalez ’11 Robert & Renee Belfer Family Foundation Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Michele Rollins, P ’06 Anna Rosich Barbara Rothschild & Richard Rothschild Jack L. Rothschild ’52 & Arlene S. Rothschild* Safe Environment Business Solutions Giuseppe San Filipo & Lina Phillips* Peter P. Schreter ’59 & Brouria Schreter


David L. Schutte Schwab Charitable Fund Alan Schwartzman ’75 & Ruth Schwartzman* Colleen V. Scott ’97 Joan K. Sherman & Marc Sherman* James E. Shipp ’75* Alexandra Shuman & Michael Shuman Joanna L. Silver Leonard Sirowitz ’53 & Myrna Sirowitz Matthew Patrick Smyth Harmony C. Spongberg & Stephen A. Spongberg James R. Stanton Jr. ’51 & Marlene N. Stanton Stephen B. Jacobs Group, P.C. Thelma K. Stevens ’54* Sheldon Streisand ’56 & Judith Streisand Mark D. Stumer ’74 (Trustee) & Susan Stumer* Target Corporation Joan E. Taylor ’60* Ted Muehling, Inc.* David Teiger Suzanne L. Tick Dan C. Tutcher & Kim Tutcher P ’10 Erin G. Tutcher ’10 Estate of Dorothy C. Voorhees Jennifer A. Walsh ’81 & Bernard M. Wharton Wells Fargo Foundation Educational Matching Gift Program* Charles S. Whelan Jr. ’74 Kate Whitney & Franklin A. Thomas Frank S. Wiechnik ’74 Victoria Wiener Kathleen S. Wild ’79 & W. Irving Phillips Jr. Mark Wilkerson Adelaide F. Wolfanger ’57 Robert M. Zaccone ’71 & Paula Zaccone

$500-$999

ABM Facility Services Mark Ackermann Teri Agins Norma Agosto Miriam H. Allman ’64 Dita Amory Tokunbo Anifalaje Anonymous* Eric A. Appel ’67 The Art Fair Company Nora Aswad Donald M. Axleroad ’56 Joel Barkley Andrew W. Barnes Richard Barrett Susan S. Bates & John E. Bates Nicholas R. Battista ’74 & Ann M. Battista* Suzanne S. Baum ’67 Bellwyck Packaging Solutions Bergen Transport Inc. Bessemer Trust Company Nancy Brown ’54 Jeanine M. Carey Thomas Carroll & Kathleen Miko Vicky Chan ’08 James K. M. Cheng Diane B. Chichura ’54* Christie’s International, PLC Joe Colosi Jill S. Cuddire ’91

Morgan A. Daly ’65 & Rita Daly ’65 Theoharis L. David FAIA ’61 Bruce M. Degen ’75 & Christine Degen Ronald H. DeLuca ’49 & Lois H. DeLuca Drake Design II, Inc. Harold Einhorn AIA ’64 & Valery Einhorn Carl S. Erickson ’64 Dan Evans IIDA Colin Faber ’98 & Leni Niemegeers-Faber Roger N. Fleck ’63 George Frayne ’43 Lisa Kaye Fuld* Philip Gallo & Victorio Gallo GE Foundation* General William Mayer Foundation, Inc. Gilbert B. and Lila Silverman Foundation Muriel S. Gluckman, P ’81 Goldsmith Mannequins Gerardo Gomez ’62 Gorton and Partners, LLC Cristina Grajales Gran Kriegel Associates Architects & Planners, LLC Jeffrey Gronning & Jennifer Gronning Kathy Haime Nohra Haime Susan Hakkarainen (Trustee) & Pekka Hakkarainen Michael Hambouz* Brian Harvey Marilyn Hemery David Highsmith & Gretchen Highsmith Stephen A. Hootkin Masanori Igarashi, P ’02 Ike Kligerman Barkley Architects P.C. ING* Barbara S. Italie ’71 & Ralph Italie* Harvey Jacoby ’60 & Janice Jacoby Laura P. Jagodzinski ’72 & Andrew J. Alexander AIA ’73 Dwight C. Johnson PhD ’72 Guido G. Karcher ’60 & Patricia A. Karcher* Renee N. Khatami ’93 & John R. MacArthur* Leonard Koven ’63 Elenore Kowalchek ’47* Lisa Kravet David Kriegel AIA ’82 & Cynthia Flynt Kum Kau Chinese Kitchen, Inc. Ellen Lazarus John M. Leibel ’71 Lisa Kaye Design Associates, Inc. John Lobell and Alissa Grimaldi Nancy Loy Macro Consultants, LLC Emily K. Mann ’65 & Samuel J. Mann Marquis Studios David Marquis (Trustee) & Elizabeth Crehan John I. Martone ’48* Michael Marzialo ’78 & Linda Marzialo R. Beatrice McCalman 1948 Caryn Melrose & Michael Moser Edward Miner & Sumaya Miner

*Donors who made consecutive gifts for 5+ years, P=Parent donor, (dec.)=Deceased

Craig Moffett & Jackie Moffett Moose Boats, Inc. Sylvia M. Morgenstern ’49 & Ernest H. Morgenstern* Kim Morque ’83 Gabriella Morri The Namm Foundation Anne B. Namm ’71 & Andrew I. Namm Kadir A. Nelson ’96 & Keara Nelson Michel Nespoulous & Helene Ausseil Dennis O’Brien ’77 & Deborah O’Brien Mark O’Grady & Marijo R. O’Grady* Thomas J. Patti ’67 & Marilyn Holtz-Patti Nicholas R. Pedersen ’11 William J. Peterson Pfizer Foundation Matching Gifts Program* Peter B. Phelan & Cynthia L. Phelan* James Pickrel & Carolyn Woolley Leighton Pierce Ralph Appelbaum Associates Tracy Reese Layton L. Register Robert K. & Evelyn D. Pedersen Family Foundation Monique M. Rollins ’06 & Marco Ceccatelli Barbara L. Ronon Ann W. Seigel ’52 & Jerome W. Seigel ’54 Mark Seigle, P ’13 RitaSue Siegel ’61* Kenneth A. Smaltz Brian T. Sullivan ’74 & Catherine M. Herman ’75 Susan S. Sullivan ’92 & T. D. Sullivan II* Arnold W. Syrop ’61 & Joanne Syrop* T2 Media Jessica L. Tallman ’10 & Mark Tallman* Paul Teshima Lillian Thiede Urban Outfitters Katherine A. Wagner ’61 & Ross Wagner Paul A. Wagner & Jeanette S. Wagner Sara G. Wagschal ’83 Leonard N. Walker Mark Weber, P ’12* Beth L. Weinberger ’68 & Samuel M. Weinberger Brendan R. Whalen ’94 & Karen Glasbow Stephen R. Wilkonski ’89 Martha Wilson Vicente Wolf Gerard Wollner & Rita Wollner Patricia Ziegler & Mel Ziegler Pratt Institute would like to thank its donors who have made gifts up to $499, whose names are listed on our website. Please visit www.pratt.edu/honor-roll to view the complete list of donors.

Leadership Society

Pratt Institute is proud to recognize its most generous and loyal supporters through the Leadership Society.

1887 Society

Pratt Institute’s influential leaders, with lifetime giving of over $1 million Bruce M. Newman ’53 (Trustee Emeritus) & Judith Newman* Mary O. Pratt* Carole A. Sirovich & Lawrence Sirovich* Matthew I. Sirovich & Meredith Elson Juliana C. Terian ’90 (Trustee)*

Charles Pratt Circle

Gifts of $25,000 and above to The Fund for Pratt Deborah J. Buck (Trustee)* Kathryn C. Chenault ’12 (Hon.) (Trustee) & Kenneth I. Chenault Katharine L. McKenna ’84 (Trustee) & Mark S. Braunstein* David O. Pratt (Trustee) & Kathleen Pratt* P ’14 Ralph Pucci (Trustee) & Ann Pucci Anne H. Van Ingen (Trustee) & Wesley Haynes*

Chairman’s Circle

Gifts of $10,000-$24,999 to The Fund for Pratt Robert E. Gallagher & Jane Gallagher Leon Moed ’54 (Trustee Emeritus) & Marilyn Moed* Jane B. Nord ’45 John K. Orberg ’75 & Janet I. Kuhl ’77* Mike Pratt (Trustee) & Carol S. Pratt* Stan H. Richards ’53 (Trustee) & Betty Richards (dec.)* Robert H. Siegel FAIA ’62 (Trustee) & Hazel Siegel* Howard S. Stein (Trustee) & B. Jill Comins* Michael S. Zetlin (Trustee) & Gerri Zetlin*

President’s Circle

Gifts of $5,000-$9,999 to The Fund for Pratt Gary S. Hattem ’75 (Trustee) & Frazier Holloway* Romer Holleran & Deming P. Holleran Nicholas P. Koutsomitis AIA ’78 & Maria Koutsomitis, P ’12 Daryl M. Rosenblatt AIA ’77 & Susan J. Miller* Sigmund J. Rusen ’43 Thomas F. Schutte (President) & Tess L. Schutte*

Provost’s Circle

Gifts of $2,500-$4,999 to The Fund for Pratt Evan Akselrad Samy Brahimy ’80 & Lizanne Merrill* Madeline Burke-Vigeland AIA ’81 & Nils Vigeland* Dennis Burns & Kimberly Burns Andrea B. Dibner-Orozco ’94 & Gerard Orozco ’97 Mildred M. Fatovic ’72* Henry W. Grussinger ’48 & Ethel Grussinger


Gerard E. Hilferty ’63 & Jacqueline Folks Edward W. Lukasiewicz ’54 & Gail Lukasiewicz Martin E. Rich AIA ’63 & Donna Rich* Donald J. Schwarz ’51 & Anastasia Schwarz ’53*

Leadership Circle

Gifts of $1,000-$2,499 to The Fund for Pratt Charles S. Adorney ’48 & Leila M. Adorney ’47 (dec.) Sebastian L. Ambrogio ’76 & Cynthia Ambrogio* Eleanor W. Anderson ’49* John B. Anderson ’52* Alexander Antonelli ’82 Barbara R. Belin ’61 Robert Bersh George O. Brome ’78 & Sheila Gibbs-Brome* Franklin J. Buccella ’55 & Virginia M. Buccella Robert E. Buckholz Jr. & Lizanne Buckholz Young Cho & Mi Cho Jae Hoon Choi ’96 Peter Claman ’49 & Dale Claman Roger Cook ’53 & Margit F. Cook ’54* George Denegre & Milly Denegre Mark A. Dickson ’70 & Katharine Dickson Ray H. Dovell Jr. ’81 Anne N. Edwards & R. Augustus Edwards III Anton J. Egner ’52 & Joan R. Egner Mary J. Ellis ’49* David Erb & Bonnie Garmus Richard E. Feinbloom* Alan J. Feltoon ’74, P ’08 Delbert I. Footer ’53 Donald M. Genaro ’57* Richard Gioscia ’84 Peter B. Halfon ’60 & Carol E. Halfon* Diane D. Hoyt-Goldsmith ’73 & David L. Goldsmith* Sonoe Hutchinson Stephen B. Jacobs ’63 & Andi Pepper Helmut Jahn & Deborah Jahn Arlene D. Jonach Berti S. Jones ’70 & Robert Jones* Kevin L. Kane ’75 & Mary Kane* Guido G. Karcher ’60 & Patricia A. Karcher* Peter L. Kern ’62 & Carol H. Kern* Leevi Kiil ’63 & Mall Kiil Albert H. Konetzni Jr. Richard Korchien AIA ’53 & Sheila A. Korchien* Manfred Krankl & Elaine Krankl Wendy A. Kvalheim ’83 & Grant Kvalheim Andrew J. Langer ’64 & Patricia Langer Kwang Ok Lee ’91 Theodore Liebman FAIA ’62 & Nina Liebman* Henry Loheac ’55* Jan K. Lorenzen ’83 & Margaret Richardson ’89 Frank A. Mallalieu ’57* Emily S. May ’99 & William May

Edward Mazria ’63 & Marcia Mazria ’68 Robert M. McLane John L. (Jack) Moe ’48* John D. Moser AIA ’74 & Lynda Speilman* George T. Moy ’56 Ann Mustard & Allan Mustard, P ’12* Barbara Nessim ’60 Patricia R. Nussbaum & Mark S. Nussbaum John Y. Pai ’62 & Eunsook Pai Mary Y. Parr Alice Phillips Swistel & Daniel Swistel Richard N. Pollack AIA ’73 & Sandra E. Pollack ’76* Jane S. Pratt Raymond J. Ripper ’63 & Barbara Fleming Keith F. Rosen AIA ’79* Norman Rosenfeld FAIA ’56 (dec.)* Jack L. Rothschild ’52 & Arlene S. Rothschild* Giuseppe San Filipo & Lina Phillips* Alan Schwartzman ’75 & Ruth Schwartzman* Harmony C. Spongberg & Stephen A. Spongberg James R. Stanton Jr. ’51 & Marlene N. Stanton Thelma K. Stevens ’54* Sheldon Streisand ’56 & Judith Streisand Joan E. Taylor ’60* Dan C. Tutcher & Kim Tutcher P’10 Erin G. Tutcher ’10 Jennifer A. Walsh ’81 & Bernard M. Wharton Diana Wege and Tim Sherogan Robert H. Welz ’51 & Mary Louise Welz* Charles S. Whelan Jr. ’74 Adelaide F. Wolfanger ’57

Gatekeeper Society

The Fund for Pratt’s most dedicated donors, with an unbroken commitment of five or more years of consecutive giving James P. Agalloco III ’68 & Linda Agalloco* Catherine W. Aker ’48* Grace Akillian ’58* Charles H. Amann ’63 & Mary Amann* Sebastian L. Ambrogio ’76 & Cynthia Ambrogio* Eleanor W. Anderson ’49* Janet M. Anderson ’60* John B. Anderson ’52* Lisa Anderson-Gaona ’07* Kevin J. Andreano & Elizabeth Andreano* Michael H. Ankuda ’79 & Michele A. Ankuda ’80* Anonymous (3) Irvin K. Atkinson ’60 & Jane Atkinson* Arsho Baghsarian ’62 & Avedis Baghsarian* Nicholas R. Battista ’74 & Ann M. Battista* William B. Bedford ’61 & Robin Bedford*

John H. Behrmann ’60 & Dianne Behrmann* Christine Bennethum ’09* Ashley M. Berger ’06* Alexandra Bilyard ’46* Margaret Birnstiel ’69* Billie F. Bivins ’04* Lawrence Black ’65 & Linda Black* Joel C. Blau PE ’50* Robert H. Blend ’40* Martin M. Bloomenthal ’70 & Anne M. Bloomenthal* Marsha W. Blum ’74* Samy Brahimy ’80 & Lizanne Merrill* Elizabeth V. Braun* David Brewster ’69 & Nancy Brewster* David S. Broad ’50 & Suzanne Broad* Ruth G. Brody ’43* George O. Brome ’78 & Sheila Gibbs-Brome* Hope Brown ’98* Josephine T. Brown ’45* Kathryn W. Brown ’68* Richard J. Bubnowski ’98* Kenneth H. Buchanan* Deborah J. Buck (Trustee)* Joan B. Bunting ’48* Madeline Burke-Vigeland AIA ’81 & Nils Vigeland* Bernardine M. Butcaris ’51* Mark B. Cannon ’77* Gloria J. Caranica ’53* Clayton C. Carlisle ’74* James M. Casker ’67* Casimir Cetnarowski ’50* Kenneth S. L. Chang & Vivian V. Chang* Harvey Chertoff* Wayland Chew ’06* Dorothy E. Christiansen ’67* Joseph M. Cidras ’64 & Carol F. Cidras* Marie E. Clarke ’48* Thomas F. Clemente ’49* Doris D. Cohen ’51* Margaret M. Colome ’77* Roger Cook ’53 & Margit F. Cook ’54* James H. Cowles ’61 & Nancy V. Cowles* Jonathan Cramer ’89 & Orlie L. Kraus ’81* Alexander M. Cranstoun ’56 & Margaret A. Cranstoun ’56* Adele G. Crawford ’59* Robert W. Cresko ’68 & Catherine A. Cresko* Darwin S. Crouser ’59 & Carol Drugan* Janet E. Dash ’60 & Joseph Dash* Christopher P. DeCostanza ’75* David A. Deyell PhD ’60 & Joanne M. Deyell* Dennis P. Di Vincenzo ’77 & Maria Ackerman* Noël Aurell Digennaro ’70* Lori DiGiacinto ’76 & Joel P. DiGiacinto* Lawrence DiPietra ’72* Donald L. Doyle ’70 & Gertrude M. Doyle* Carolyn D. Edge ’75* Robert Eliot ’78 & Debra Eliot* Mary J. Ellis ’49*

Robert P. Emory ’69 & Susan G. Emory* Henry Eng FAICP ’67* Janet England ’84* Graham B. English ’73* Ronald W. Erickson ’68 & Catherine Erickson* Rose Fabricant-Pattavina ’71 & Emanuel Pattavina* Jean R. Fahrenbach ’72* Michael F. Feno ’63 & Barbara A. Feno* Jack P. Fermery ’58 & Carol Fermery* Margaret R. Fischer* Carla A. Franciose ’09* Jacqueline K. Freedman ’58* Arnold A. Friedmann ’53 & Susi Friedmann* Todd M. Galitz & Kathryn C. Galitz* Nora E. Gardner ’77* Barbara A. Genco ’75* Eloise G. Giles ’51 & Lester A. Giles Jr.* Kenneth E. Gillman ’68* Paul V. Gish ’08 & Elise K. Gish* Suzanne J. Glomb ’66 & John W. Glomb* Lewis Gluck ’72* Arthur A. Goldstein ’83 & Rose Goldstein* Judith S. Goldstein ’69 & Stephen L. Goldstein* Kathleen E. Golini & Donald J. Golini Irwin Gray PhD ’56 & Myra Gray* Edward R. Greninger ’68* Toni Ann Grimley ’73 & Vincent J. Grimley* Carl P. Gruswitz AIA ’97 & Florence Lee ’94* Robert C. Gutmann ’62 & Rosemarie Gutmann* David W. Haase ’80 & Esther R. Schwalb ’87* William Haberman ’53* Georgia R. Hadley ’56 & Edward W. Hadley* Henry Haggland ’40 & Betty Jane Haggland* Peter B. Halfon ’60 & Carol E. Halfon* Harold Halvorsen ’58 & Norita Halvorsen* Carl O. Harbart ’57* James W. Harbison Jr. & Margaret Harbison* June H. Harland ’68* Luke M. Hart ’07 & Faith B. Hart* Gary S. Hattem ’75 (Trustee) & Frazier Holloway* Ruth Herzog ’50* Samuel Hornick ’75 & Linda Hornick* Marguerite A. Houseworth ’89* Ronald J. Howanich ’73* Diane D. Hoyt-Goldsmith ’73 & David L. Goldsmith* Lily P. T. Huang ’66* Jean M. Iker ’54* Barbara S. Italie ’71 & Ralph Italie* Samuel Itzkowitz ’72* George Jacobs ’49 & Beatrice Jacobs* Frank Jagisch & Christine Jagisch* Lukasz A. Jastrzebski ’76* Robert N. Johnson*


William B. Johnston ’71 & Meredith C. Johnston* Berti S. Jones ’70 & Robert Jones* Bruce M. Jones ’61* David E. Jones ’73* Edward J. Jones ’77 & Jeanne Wilson Jones* Marc L. Josloff ’69 & Sara Josloff* Susan J. Kaehrle ’70* Kevin L. Kane ’75 & Mary Kane* Heidi R. Karagianis ’91 & Tracy Karagianis* Guido G. Karcher ’60 & Patricia A. Karcher* Barbara G. Karyo ’63 & Bernard E. Karyo* Karl H. Kastan ’57 & Esther O. Kastan* Eve D. Keberle ’67 & William O. Keberle* Mildred L. Keeler ’50 (dec.)* Mary J. Kehoe ’93* Michele L. Keir ’71 & Richard Blackman* Robert P. Keller ’79* Lawrence M. Kerbs ’49* Peter L. Kern ’62 & Carol H. Kern* Edward E. Kimball Jr. & Mary J. Kimball, P ’06* David Kisacky ’93* Boris Y. Klapwald ’53 & Myrna Klapwald* David S. Kletter ’63 & Esther Kletter* John T. Koehler ’50* Anne P. Kofler ’70* Mary B. Kolischak ’49 & Michael J. Kolischak* Richard Korchien AIA ’53 & Sheila A. Korchien* Betty Kormusis Crumley 1952* Elenore Kowalchek ’47* Jien Kuon ’86* Frederick J. Kurtz ’75* Edward L. La Mura ’59 & Aileen LaMura* Steven Lane ’81* Lillian Langotsky ’65* Jill L. Lanier ’92* Don A. Lasker ’70 & Russell Lasker* Doris S. Latham ’69* Elizabeth A. Lee ’49* Irwin B. Lefkowitz AIA ’59 & Linda B. Lefkowitz* Stephen B. Lewis ’59 & Priscilla Lewis* Theodore Liebman FAIA ’6 & Nina Liebman* Henry Loheac ’55* Diane L. Maass ’81 & Douglas O. Maass* Eva R. MacLowry ’57 & James D. MacLowry* Virginia L. Macomber ’77 & Rogelio L. Williams* Gustavo Madera & Llini Madera* Beatrice M. Mady ’78* Frank A. Mallalieu ’57* Robert F. Manning ’58 & Libby Hillhouse* Joseph Mannino ’76* Sheila S. Marks ’60* Renee K. Martin ’82 & Michael J. Martin* John I. Martone ’48* Lila Matlin ’44* Robert G. Matthews ’56 & Mary B. Matthews*

Rosamond B. Mattiello ’47* Jean M. McGonigle ’67* Patricia J. McHugh ’93 & Matthew W. Seig* Henry W. McIver ’48 & Joan S. McIver* Katharine L. McKenna ’84 (Trustee) & Mark S. Braunstein* Robert J. McMahon ’67 & Jeanne Randorf* Thomas L. Medsger ’62* James N. Mehmet ’69* John I. Mesick ’58* Lois M. Meyer ’50* Walter J. Miclo ’72* Holmes E. Miller & Jeannie S. Miller* George H. Millicker ’54* John V. Mizzi PE ’63 & Joann Mizzi* John L. (Jack) Moe ’48* Leon Moed ’54 (Trustee Emeritus) & Marilyn Moed* Gary P. Molan ’71* Harriet Montag ’51* Sylvia M. Morgenstern ’49 & Ernest H. Morgenstern* John D. Moser AIA ’74 & Lynda Speilman* Bernard Most ’59 & Amy B. Most* George T. Moy ’56* Norma Nelson ’69* Stanley Nitzky ’55 & Bette E. Nitzky* Patricia R. Nussbaum & Mark S. Nussbaum* Betty Odabashian ’67* Kevin J. O’Mara ’72 & Joan H. O’Mara* John K. Orberg ’75 & Janet I. Kuhl ’77* Susan A. Orlie ’69* David C. Ostman ’70* John Y. Pai ’62 & Eunsook Pai* F. Rodney Paine ’87* Charles A. Passut PhD ’67 & Genevieve Passut* Sidney S. Paul ’54* Adali Pearlstein ’48* Albert A. Pedulla ’60 & Beverly A. Pedulla* Vincent R. Perez ’60 & Bette Perez* Susan M. Peterson ’80 & Bruce O. Peterson ’75* James V. Petitto ’82* Andrew L. Phelan ’69* Mary Ellen Plitt ’81 & Henry Dickerson* Richard N. Pollack AIA ’73 & Sandra E. Pollack ’76* Mike Pratt (Trustee) & Carol S. Pratt* Robert W. Prigge Sr. ’55 & Ruth Prigge* Howard L. Ptaszek ’98* Marilou Querns ’85* Martin Rabb ’52 & Ethel Rabb* Col. David J. Ramsay, AUS (Ret.) ’56 & Carolyn B. Ramsay* Ronald W. Ratcliffe ’66 & Lydia Ratcliffe ’67* Helene L. Reed ’55 & Edward M. Reed* Claire B. Reeve ’37* Patrick M. Reynolds ’63* Martin E. Rich AIA ’63 & Donna Rich* Stan H. Richards ’53 (Trustee) & Betty Richards (dec.)* Joseph L. Richardson ’73* Martha N. Roberts ’59* James R. Rogala ’02 & Gwen Rogala*

*Donors who made consecutive gifts for 5+ years, P=Parent donor, (dec.)=Deceased

Robert H. Romero ’70 & Casey Romero* Gerald I. Rosen AIA ’57 & Janice Rosen* Keith F. Rosen AIA ’79* Daryl M. Rosenblatt AIA ’77 & Susan J. Miller* Judith Rosenstein ’64* Jack L. Rothschild ’52 & Arlene S. Rothschild* Gali Rotstein & Chen Rotstein Jerome Rubin ’53 & Miriam Rubin* Margaret A. Santacroce ’52 & Joseph Santacroce* Michael J. Santangelo ’09* Louis A. Scanapico ’72* Susan K. Schickedanz ’90 & Steven W. Schickedanz ’89* Florence Schreibstein ’67* Thomas F. Schutte (President) & Tess L. Schutte* Marvin I. Schwartz PhD ’58* Alan Schwartzman ’75 & Ruth Schwartzman* Donald J. Schwarz ’51 & Anastasia Schwarz ’53* Frank J. Scire ’52 & Jacqueline Scire* Gloria J. Scott ’48 & Charles J. Scott* Alan J. Segan ’77* George E. Segnini ’67 & Valerie Segnini* Zeljko Segota ’84 & Teresa Segota* Ann W. Seigel ’52 & Jerome W. Seigel ’54* Harriet S. Selverstone ’83 & Robert Selverstone* Ronald E. Shapiro ’64* Robert H. Siegel FAIA ’62 (Trustee) & Hazel Siegel* James J. Simonis ’65* Philip Sirota ’49* Barbara J. Solomon ’70* Eric Soslau ’72 & Judy A. Soslau* Biruta A. Spruds ’72 & Andris Spruds* Howard S. Stein (Trustee) & B. Jill Comins* Thelma K. Stevens ’54* Anne Stoddard ’73* Richard Stripeikis ’84* Frank F. Sturm Jr. ’57* Susan S. Sullivan ’92 & T. D. Sullivan II* Timothy M. Sullivan ’57 & Carol Sullivan* Louise M. Sutter ’47* Richard H. Sylvester ’58 & Patricia W. Sylvester* Jessica L. Tallman ’10 & Mark Tallman* Jerome Tauber ’66 & Janet Sawyer* Joan E. Taylor ’60* Roy R. Thomson AIA ’59 & Sally Thomson* Irving R. Toben ’47 & Rhoda S. Toben* John Tom ’51 & Geraldine S. Tom* James H. T. Uehling ’57 & Lindley H. Uehling* Candace W. Van Aken ’75* Claude Van Lingen ’80* Roman J. Verostko ’61* John Vezendy Jr. ’61* Margaret A. Vickers ’83* Edward C. Vollmer ’62* Charles W. Volz AIA ’54 & Rosalie Volz*

Dorothy C. Voorhees ’43 (dec.)* Peter A. Wachtel ’92 & Sue Wachtel* Peter A. Wallack* Gloria A. Walton ’48* Elaine N. Warshaw ’44* Roberta K. Warshawsky ’53* Margaret C. Weatherly ’88 & Charles H. Weatherly* Mark Weber, P ’12* Lawrence Weinstein ’65 & Irma Weinstein, P ’97* Stanley J. Weisbrod AIA ’78 & Haegyung Weisbrod* Claudette M. Wellington ’88* Robert H. Welz ’51 & Mary Louise Welz* Marcia E. Wiener ’57 & Joseph F. Wiener* Carol S. Willson ’56 & James A. Willson* Harold J. Wilson ’60 & Olga Wilson* Elizabeth L. Winsch ’62* Adelaide F. Wolfanger ’57 Michael S. Zetlin (Trustee) & Gerri Zetlin* Jon R. Zogg ’68* Donald W. Zurwelle ’60 & Lynn C. Zurwelle*

Renaissance Society

Pratt Institute’s loyal planned giving benefactors Anonymous (6) Janet M. Anderson ’60* Donald M. Axleroad ’56 Roger M. Bazeley ’73 & Noriko Bazeley Joan L. Benson ’50 Laura J. Bohn ’77 & Richard C. Fiore Sr. Melinda Brisben Neil E. Campbell ’69 & Barbara Campbell Robertina M. Campbell ’66 Allen L. Carlsen ’59 Victor Carnuccio ’79 James M. Casker ’67* Virginia Chakejian ’62 Gerardo Contreras & Ruth Contreras Ronald H. DeLuca ’49 & Lois H. DeLuca MaryEllen Dohrs ’50 Rosemary Doyle ’72 Richard W. Eiger ’55 (Trustee Emeritus) & Ruth Eiger* Mildred M. Fatovic ’72* Delbert I. Footer ’53 Arnold A. Friedmann ’53 & Susi Friedmann* Constance B. Gee ’79 Emil M. Gentilella ’49 Morton Gerard ’56 & Adriana Aquino-Gerard Edward M. Giordano Jr. ’85 Parthasarathy Iyengar ’68 & Sashikala Iyengar Susan M. Kamm ’64 Mary E. Kelly ’61 Jisun Kim ’98 Judith Kingsley Lawrence R. Koltnow ’66 & Emily Numeroff Koltnow ’64 Rachael Krinsky Elizabeth J. Kuhn ’42 Lois Lazarus


Mary Ellen Letterman ’65 & Raymond D. Letterman John P. Martin ’68 David B. Mattingly Carl J. Mays ’48 Angie Mills ’50* Philip R. Monaghan ’79 Annemarie P. Morris in memory of George W. Morris ’43 John L. Morrow Jr. ’48 & Helen C. Morrow Bruce M. Newman ’53 (Trustee Emeritus) & Judith Newman* Kevin J. O’Mara ’72 & Joan H. O’Mara* Mike Pratt (Trustee) & Carol S. Pratt* Michael C. Pyatok ’66 Joan D. Rapaport ’67 Jean Raper Layton L. Register ’85 Martin E. Rich AIA ’63 & Donna Rich* Pauline M. Rothstein PhD ’70 Louise C. Rust ’56 & Herbert H. Rust DDS Adeline Sadowski ’57 David Saylor ’69 Thomas F. Schutte (President) & Tess L. Schutte* Lucy M. Sikes ’58 Patricia Dedula Stokes ’68 & Ronald Romano Louis M. Taylor ’40 Fern Tiger ’67 Irving R. Toben ’47 & Rhoda S. Toben* Patricia E. Tuohy ’79 Ernestine T. L. Vallen ’54 Claudette M. Wellington ’88* Robert H. Welz ’51 & Mary Louise Welz* Millicent C. Wettstein

Corporations and Corporate Foundations

1-10 Bush Terminal Owner, LP ABM Facility Services Alarmingly Affordable, Inc. Alexander Antonelli Architect, PLLC All HVAC Service Co, Inc Allen Press Amelia Panico Photography American Express Company American Forest & Paper Association American Foundation for the Univ. of the West Indies, Inc. Arcade Marketing, Inc.* Architectural Digest Architectural Foundation of Cincinnati The Art Fair Company Assured Environments The Ayco Charitable Foundation Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi* Barnes & Noble Bookstores, Inc.* Benevity Community Impact Fund Bentley Systems, Incorporated Bergen Transport Inc. Bessemer Trust Company BET Holdings, Inc. Bloomberg L.P. BNY Mellon Community Partnership BNY Mellon Community Partnership Employee Funds Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation* Captain Wood Carpentry, LLC Carl Hansen & Son

Carry Hot, Inc. Cartervine Inc. CCS Project Management, LLC Center for Children’s Initiatives Christie’s International, PLC Christopher Coleman Interior Design Citibank Citigroup, Inc. Cohn & Wolfe Colgate-Palmolive Company* College Publications, Inc. Comerford Collection Con Edison, Inc.* Condé Nast Publications, Inc. Conservation Services Group, Inc. Cosmetic Laboratories of America Cotton Incorporated Coyne Public Relations, LLC CulinArt, Inc.* Cullen and Dykman LLP* Cullman & Kravis, Inc. D. Douglas Virtue, Ltd. Darino Films Design at Work Design Within Reach, Inc. DesignTex Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation* Dick Blick Holdings, Inc. Donna Karan International Dow Jones & Co., Inc. Drake Design II, Inc. Drawing Board Farm, Inc. The Durst Organization Eileen Fisher, Inc. Ermenegildo Zegna Estee Lauder, Inc.* Eva Park Riley Interiors ExxonMobil Foundation* F. Schumacher & Co. Ferguson & Shamamian Architects, LLP Firmenich Fine Fragrance* The Fragrance Foundation Fragrance Resources, Inc. Fraver Design, LLC Fulbright & Jaworski Fusion Packaging I LP GE Foundation* General Electric Company Gensler Givaudan Fragrances Corporation* Global Strategy Group, LLC Goldsmith Mannequins Google Matching Gifts Program Gorton and Partners, LLC Gran Kriegel Associates Architects & Planners, LLC Gustavo R. Madera, Co. H.W. Wilson Foundation, Inc. Hancock & Moore Harris Beach PLLC The Hearst Corporation Heinz Glas USA, Inc.* Howard Romero Fine Art Photography HPI International, Inc. IBM International Foundation Ike Kligerman Barkley Architects P.C. Infopro Digital USA, LLC ING* Ingersoll-Rand Charitable Foundation Intercos America, Inc. International Flavors & Fragrances, Inc.

J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. James Dyson Foundation Janney Montgomery Scott, LLC jhchoi LLC Johnson & Johnson Employee Funds Johnson & Johnson Matching Gifts Program* Jonathan Rose Companies, LLC June Kelly Gallery, Inc. JV Designs Kara Ross Kara Ross New York, LLC The Knoll Group KPMG International Kum Kau Chinese Kitchen, Inc. Lafayette 148 New York Laura Bohn Design Associates, Inc. Leaddog Marketing Group, Inc. Legacy Builders/Developers Corporation LG Electronics U.S.A., Inc. Liberty Mutual Group, Inc. Lisa Kaye Design Associates, Inc. Local Initiatives Support Corp Lulu Studio The M&T Charitable Foundation Macro Consultants, LLC Mah Brands Limited Mane USA Manor Electric Supply Corporation Marlborough Gallery Marquis Studios Martin County Community Foundation, Inc. Mary Kay Inc. Matthew Patrick Smyth McGahren, Inc. Metropolitan Life Foundation Michael Kors (USA) Inc. Michael Sheridan & Company Inc. Moet Hennessy USA Moose Boats, Inc. Morgan Stanley & Company Movement Strategy Center Mycak Associates, LLC Neenah Paper Company Nessim & Associates Neuberger Berman* New York City Environmental Justice Alliance New York Design Center New York Hotel Trades Council Newmark Grubb Knight Frank Niego Associates Norman Rosenfeld Architects, LLC North Atlantic Industries, Inc. Orlandi, Inc.* P.M.S. Enterprises Pfizer Foundation Matching Gifts Program* PG&E Corporation Foundation Phillips-Van Heusen Corporation Platt Byard Dovell White Architects LLP Pochet of America, Inc.* Pollack Consulting Pomarico Design Studio Pompeii Studios Port Authority of NY & NJ Pucci International, Ltd. Qualcomm R.G.A. Incorporated Ralph Appelbaum Associates Raquel Ramati Associates, Inc. RBS Citizens The Richards Group

Robert Cerutti Architect Robert Mark Parnes Architecture, LLC Robert Schwartz & Associates Robert Zaccone & Associates, P.C. S.J. Fenwick Associates Santander Universities Sapient Corporation Save A Sample Corp. Schwab Charitable Fund Sercander Design Associates SGD North America, Inc.* Sonnenfeld & Trocchia Architects, P.A. Squarespace Inc. Staples, Inc. Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects & Planners, LLC Stelair Design Corporation Stephen B. Jacobs Group, P.C. Studio Dumitru STV CS AKRF Joint Venture Symrise AG T2 Media Takasago International Corporation (USA)* Tanaka Kapec Design Group, Inc. Taormina Associates Target Corporation TD Bank* TD Charitable Foundation Ted Muehling, Inc.* Toly USA, Inc. Tracy Reese Tuning the Student Mind Umbra, LLC* Unilever University Settlement Society of New York Urban Expositions, LLC Urban Outfitters Verizon Foundation* Vincent Perez Studio* Visa USA Inc. Wells Fargo Foundation Educational Matching Gift Program* Xhema of NY, Inc. The K Young Group Zeno Group

Foundations

AG Foundation Alexander C. & Tillie S. Speyer Foundation* American Endowment Foundation Barbara and Donald Tober Foundation* Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation Booth Ferris Foundation Capital One Foundation Center for Social Inclusion Charles E. Culpeper Foundation Citi Community Development The Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region* The Daniel M. Neidich and Brooke Garber Foundation* The David & Sondra Mack Foundation, Inc.* David and Sybil Yurman Humanitarian Arts Foundation, Inc. Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation The Fascitelli Family Foundation* The Fashion Group Foundation, Inc. Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund The Ford Foundation


Freya & Richard Block Family Foundation General William Mayer Foundation, Inc. George & Milly Denegre Fund Gilbert B. and Lila Silverman Foundation The Gino & Clarice Nahum Charitable Trust Greater Houston Community Foundation Heimbinder Family Foundation Iowa Foundation for Education Environment & the Arts Jahn Foundation Julie Pratt Shattuck Charitable Lead Trust* The Kaneff Foundation The Kresge Foundation Kurz-Kneiger Foundation, Inc. Legacy Global Foundation Louis Feinberg Foundation* Mertz Gilmore Foundation* Mizuho USA Foundation, Inc. The Namm Foundation National Art Education Foundation National Philanthropic Trust New York Community Trust New York Foundation The Philene Foundation The Pinkerton Foundation Robert & Renee Belfer Family Foundation The Robert E. Gallagher Charitable Trust Robert K. & Evelyn D. Pedersen Family Foundation Robert Lehman Foundation, Inc. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Inc. The Scherman Foundation* The Selz Foundation Sills Family Foundation The Spionkop Charitable Trust* Stanley S. Shuman Family Foundation The Stutzman Family Foundation Surdna Foundation Turrell Fund Youth Ministries for Peace and Justice

Government Agencies

Brooklyn Borough President’s Office CEC Stuyvesant Cove, Inc. Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City National Endowment for the Arts The Netherlands Consulate General in New York New York City Comptroller New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development New York City Rebuilding Donors Collaborative New York City Small Business Services New York State Council on the Arts* New York State Education Department New York State Pollution Prevention Institute State of New York US Economic Development Agency 

Planned Gifts

Pratt Institute would like to recognize the following estates and trusts from which the Institute received distributions in Fiscal Year 2014. Estate of Jean E. Bice The Fern B. Macchi Revocable Trust Estate of Charlotte E. Kowalewski Estate of Naomi Leff ’73* Isabel Morton (dec.)* Estate of Frances C. Northam* Ordung Family Trust The Stoddard Trust Estate of Dorothy C. Voorhees ’43* Estate of Frank Young

Gifts in Honor

In honor of Professor Calvin Albert Harry A. Rich Jr. ’57 & Mallory Rich In honor of Julia A. Bates Susan S. Bates & John E. Bates In honor of Jose E. Bouscayrol Maria I. Bouscayrol In honor of Tim Donahue Sophie Frost Laurel Thornburg In honor of David Easton Stanley S. Shuman & Sydney Shuman Stanley S. Shuman Family Foundation In honor of Todd Galitz Jennifer Cho In honor of Amelia L. Golini Kathleen E. Golini & Donald J. Golini, P ’10* In honor of Jack & Florence Goodstein Steven H. Goodstein ’66 & Linda Goodstein* In honor of Sean Gordon Peter C. Gordon & Laura E. Gordon, P ’10 In honor of Leonora I. Hallums Ashley M. Berger ’06* In honor of Alexander Kostellow William Macowski Jr. ’53 & Betty Macowski In honor of Joel & Chizuko Kroin Seth Morrison In honor of Marjorie & James Kuhn Lisa Kaye Design Associates, Inc. Lisa Kaye Fuld* Craig Moffett & Jackie Moffett The Daniel M. Neidich & Brooke Garber Foundation* Daniel M. Neidich & Brooke G. Neidich* In honor of Elizabeth Lanier Jill L. Lanier ’92* In honor of Byron Lars Urban Outfitters In honor of Hannah Lueptow Maiya L. Lueptow & Richard M. Lueptow, P ’13 In honor of Sondra & David Mack Barbara Rothschild & Richard Rothschild In honor of Main Building Elizabeth Andreadis In honor of Brian Nussbaum Patricia R. Nussbaum & Mark S. Nussbaum* Wells Fargo Foundation Educational Matching Gift Program*

*Donors who made consecutive gifts for 5+ years, P=Parent donor, (dec.)=Deceased

In honor of Michele Oka Doner Barbara and Donald Tober Foundation* Stephen A. Hootkin National Philanthropic Trust Barbara D. Tober & Donald G. Tober* In honor of Ariadne E. Pavlakis American Endowment Foundation Bonnie L. Messing In honor of Gideon Peyser Lloyd F. Lampell ’65 In honor of David O. Pratt Caroline P. Pratt ’14 In honor of Karisha Quiogue Ludi V. Quiogue In honor of President & Mrs. Schutte Michele Ateyeh John Bennardo Laura J. Bohn ’77 & Richard C. Fiore Sr. Giulio Capua Joe Colosi CulinArt, Inc.* Design Within Reach, Inc. Terri Eagle John Edelman Rainey Day Erwin F. Schumacher & Co. Thomas Goodman Michael Hambouz* Charles J. Hamm (Trustee Emeritus) & Irene F. Hamm Guido Hartray, Marvel Architects Gary S. Hattem ’75 (Trustee) & Frazier Holloway* Joseph Jaroff Michael W. Kamen & Sandra Kamen Judith Kingsley Wendy A. Kvalheim ’83 & Grant Kvalheim Laura Bohn Design Associates, Inc. Ellen Lazarus Richard Mishaan & Marcia Mishaan Mark O’Grady & Marijo R. O’Grady* Robert Zaccone & Associates, P.C. Margaret Russell David L. Schutte Alexandra Shuman ’90 & Michael Shuman Suzanne L. Tick Walentas Foundation, Ltd. David C. Walentas (Trustee) & Jane Walentas* Diana Wege and Tim Sherogan Vicente Wolf In honor of Ruth Shuman Debrah Feinn Michael Hambouz* In honor of Robert Siegel Architectural Foundation of Cincinnati In honor of Audrey Smaltz Drake Design II, Inc. Marilyn Hemery Gary Lampley Barbara G. Summers Paul A. Wagner & Jeanette S. Wagner In honor of Karen Stone Michael Hambouz* Michael T. O’Shea ’04 In honor of Vivian Telgarsky Katherine S. Sparks

In honor of Miyoko Urushihara Arnold A. Friedmann ’53 & Susi Friedmann* In honor of Alisa Zamir Gabriel T. Alves

GIfts in Memory

In memory of Ettie May & Gordon R. Bice Estate of Jean E. Bice In memory of Anna Boetzel Theodore Woodruff In memory of Richard Budelis Donald M. Axleroad ’56 John Barnes Constance Budelis Myrna Lipton Christine Luce Joseph Malone Rachel L. Smith Jonathan Thiede Laura Thiede Lillian Thiede In memory of Elaine Carey Anonymous Jeanine M. Carey Robert H. Carey Reno Fusani J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. In memory of Lucille J. Carrea Caress Kennedy In memory of Ralph Castenir Dawn F. Smith In memory of Reagan Cook Anonymous In memory of Helen Gayer Degnan Patricia G. Sidas In memory of George Delmerico ExxonMobil Foundation* Beth L. Weinberger ’68 & Samuel M. Weinberger In memory of Meeko & Enzo Dibner-Orozco Andrea B. Dibner-Orozco ’94 & Gerard Orozco ’97 In memory of Jean Judith Doyle Katherine Lenard ’81 & Mike Magor In memory of Donald Duncan David Duncan & Mary June Nestler P ’17 In memory of Katherine Frayne George Frayne ’43 In memory of Israel Golub Bernard Bier ’47 & Ruth Bier Gordon Crocker In memory of Robert Hagan Jean Karam Cheryl McClure Marcia H. Olsson In memory of Herman Y. Krinsky Myra A. Oltsik* In memory of Eric P. Landers Thomas M. Hughey In memory of Francisco Laurier Suzanne L. Tick In memory of Harold Leeds Marsha W. Blum ’74* In memory of Leonard C. Leone Marie G. Leone In memory of Monte Levin Catherine Cascio & John Cascio In memory of Mabel Lewis Ewart A. Marshall ’90 In memory of John Matt Peter B. Lewis ’61


In memory of Herbert M. Meyers Edith W. Meyers In memory of Robert & Barbara Mooney Francia K. Mooney ’78 In memory of Clarence Norberg Richard L. Norberg In memory of William O’Connor Thomas W. Saporito In memory of Betty S. Ordung Katherine Bickerdike Ordung Family Trust In memory of Will C. Perkins Anonymous In memory of Charles Pollock Clionike Bradley ’53 & Thomas W. Bradley ’53 Thomas J. Feeney Sheryl Fratell Lawrence C. Heintjes ’79 & Mary C. Rieser-Heintjes ’85 Dane J. Neller Estate of Charles Pollock In memory of Elaine Popowitz Muriel S. Gluckman, P ’81 In memory of Helen Rogalski Charles D. Rogalski & Karen Rogalski* In memory of Thomas Rush Joy Haines In memory of Linda Schlundt Michael Hambouz* In memory of Jerome T. Schwartz Emily S. May ’99 & William May In memory of Nasser Sharify Ellen Rittberg Alexander Shahidi In memory of Karla Tate Sylvia M. Aho In memory of Joan Doblin Vogel Dorothy Greenberg ’82* Craig M. Vogel ’80 In memory of Doris Platz Zoeller Sandra Grant

Faculty and Staff Donors

Abdellah Aamiewa Evan Akselrad Kevin J. Andreano & Elizabeth Andreano* Amy I. Aronoff Caron Atlas Drew Babitts Peter L. Barna ’83 & Myonggi Sul Barna ’82* Andrew W. Barnes William B. Bedford ’61 & Robin Bedford Jeffrey Bellantoni & Kim Bellantoni Vladimir Briller Kenneth P. Browne ’75* David Burney Gina B. Caspi-Levy ’80 & Jay B. Levy ’85* Linda N. Celentano ’80 Damon Chaky Anita Cooney ’92 Kathleen Creighton ’73 Kathryn Cullen-DuPont Edward Darino & Sylvia Darino Theoharis L. David FAIA ’61 Steve Diskin Tim Donahue Arem K. Duplessis ’96 & Wendi Duplessis Lee Epstein

Amanda Fabrizio Todd M. Galitz & Kathryn C. Galitz* Anthony R. Gelber LEED AP ’97 & Gail G. Gelber Tula J. Giannini Nedzad Goga Elizabeth S. Goldberg-Johnson ’81 & William Johnson Thomas Greene Bruce R. Hannah ’63 & Tanya H. Van Cott ’93 Daniel P. Hetteix ’10 William Hilson ’81 & Barbara Hilson* Kelly M. Horrigan ’98 Andrea Jeyaveeran Debera M. Johnson ’86 Berti S. Jones ’70 & Robert Jones* Nicholas P. Koutsomitis AIA ’78 & Maria Koutsomitis, P ’12 David J. Krause ’10 Haresh Lalvani ’72 Jenny J. Lee & David White Esq. John Lobell and Alissa Grimaldi Scott A. Lundberg ’98 Vangheli Lupu Emily Mader Alan Mallach Helen Matusow-Ayres & Phread Ayres Martin J. McManus Aida I. Mejia David M. Minder Agnes Mocsy Emily M. Moqtaderi* Donna L. Moran ’71 & Charles Mvoran* Mark O’Grady & Marijo R. O’Grady* Jon Otis & Diane Barnes* Jesse D. Packer ’05 Amir Parsa Leighton Pierce Caterina Y. Pierre Shannon Price Catherine C. Redmond Norman Rosenfeld FAIA ’56 (dec.)* Charlotte Savidge Laura C. Scarano ’11 Andrew B. M. Schloss ’94 Thomas F. Schutte (President) & Tess L. Schutte* Robert Schwartz RA ’72 & Sandy Schwartz Michael V. Sclafani Paul Segal Gina Shelton Carole A. Sirovich & Lawrence Sirovich* Jojo R. Spiker ’07 & Mia Spiker Cheryl Stockton Karen J. Stone ’94 Drake Stutesman Jessica L. Tallman ’10 & Mark Tallman* Vinette B. Thomas ’12 & Leeford Pennthomas Benjamin Wellington & Leslie S. Wellington Suzan Wines Robert M. Zaccone ’71 & Paula Zaccone Nina J. Zilka ’10 Pratt Institute would like to thank the generous individuals who helped to secure gifts on its behalf.

Please address any questions related to the Honor Roll to: Anina Gayla Donor Relations Officer Pratt Institute Institutional Advancement 200 Willoughby Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205 718.230.6810 advancement@pratt.edu


Pratt Presents SPRING 2015

A series of curated public programs presented by Pratt Institute. Big ideas. Bold thinkers. Brilliant dialogue.

Jeffrey Deitch in Conversation with Stefan Sagmeister Co-presented by Surface magazine and moderated by Spencer Bailey of Surface Tuesday, March 31, 7 PM Memorial Hall Auditorium, Pratt Institute Free and open to the public; reservations are required.

BAM and Pratt Institute Present Unbound: Philip Glass with Kurt Andersen Co-presented with Greenlight Bookstore Monday, April 20, 8 PM Brooklyn Academy of Music, Howard Gilman Opera House Tickets: $25, general public; $21.25, with a valid Pratt I.D.

Women of Influence in the Business of Style With Shirley Cook, CEO of Proenza Schouler and Melisa Goldie, CMO of Calvin Klein; and moderated by Eric Wilson, InStyle magazine Friday, May 8, 6:30 PM Reception included IAC Building, 550 West 18th Street Free and open to the public; reservations are required.

For reservation details and to see our full lineup of programs, please visit www.pratt.edu/public-programs


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PRATT INSTITUTE Institutional Advancement 200 Willoughby Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205

SAVE THE DATE: THURSDAY, MAY 7, 2015

Go beyond the look book. 2015 Pratt Institute Fashion Show + Cocktail Benefit Honoring Francisco Costa, Women’s Creative Director, Calvin Klein Collection 6 PM Fashion Show at Center548, 548 West 22nd Street, Manhattan 7:30 PM Cocktail Benefit at Dream Meatpacking District, 355 West 16th Street, Manhattan For more information, visit www.pratt.edu/fashionshow

Funding for the Pratt Fashion Show was awarded in part through a competitive grant presented to Pratt Institute by the Importer Support Program of the Cotton Board and Cotton Incorporated. Lead Sponsor

Platinum Sponsor

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Prattfolio - Spring 2015  

The Magazine of Pratt Institute

Prattfolio - Spring 2015  

The Magazine of Pratt Institute