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SPRING 2016

PRATTFOLIO THE MAGAZINE OF PRAT T INSTITUTE

ENTREPRENEURS The Art of Enterprise


In Focus Carly Shiff (B.F.A. ’17, foreground) and Angela Conant, visiting assistant professor of fine arts, draft one of 4,950 lines required to complete Wall Drawing #990 by Sol LeWitt (1928–2007) in the Alumni Reading Room of the Pratt Institute Library in Brooklyn. The installation of this conceptual piece began last spring with Conant’s six-student sculpture class. Completed in February, this monumental work engaged more than 100 volunteers from the Pratt community, an opportunity for all to investigate the artist’s intent through collaborative work. Photo by Peter Tannenbaum


SPRING 2016

PRATTFOLIO THE MAGA ZINE OF PR AT T INSTITUTE

Feature 8

THE ART OF ENTERPRISE Pratt Alumni Entrepreneurs Bring Ingenuity to Industry

Departments 2 SOCIAL@PRAT TINSTITUTE

30 RYERSON WALK Recent Campus News and Activities

3 FROM THE PRESIDENT 4 INSPIRED Laurene Leon Boym, M.I.D. ’93: Babel Blocks™ and the LES History Fence 6 INSIDE LOOK In the Studio with Katharine L. McKenna, M.I.D. ’84 26 NEW AND NOTEWORTHY Items in the Marketplace Created by Pratt Alumni, Faculty, and Students

38 BEYOND THE GATES Pratt's Presence in the Public Realm 45 HONOR ROLL  Recognizing Pratt donors from July 2014 to June 2015 54 FINAL THOUGHTS Redesigning Business

ABOU T THE COVER Kegan Schouwenburg (B.I.D. ’07) founded her footwear company, SOLS, as a way to make customized footwear accessible using 3-D printing technology. Schouwenburg built her business designing and mass-manufacturing made-to-order insoles, including the recently launched ExoSOLS, which are fitted around a stabilizing heel cup such as the one pictured here. Moving forward, Schouwenburg is working to expand the SOLS line to encompass a variety of customized foot-centric products.


SOCIAL @ PRATTINSTITUTE Live from Campus

From fresh beginnings, to flashes of discovery, to work meeting the world—and those unexpected moments in between when campus becomes electric­—the Pratt community frames the spectrum of student experience on social media. Stay tuned and be transported back to Pratt, through the lens of the everyday— follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

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1. S  tudents venture out as Winter Storm Jonas begins to blanket the Pratt Brooklyn campus in snow. 2. Members of Pratt do_ (@prattdo_), the Institute’s student chapter of the Industrial Design Society of America, gather around designer Jeff Smith as he leads a Saturday sketching workshop organized by the group. 3. A team of architecture, fine arts, and industrial design students display a wooden roller chain they created in professor Robert Zakarian’s kinetic sculpture class. Photo by Lea Fales (M.F.A. Fine Arts ’16, @leafales). 4. The Pratt School of Continuing and Professional Studies exhibition Vandalizing Pratt, held at Pratt’s building on 14th Street this spring, presented the work of seven New York City graffiti artists, showcasing their signature styles. 5. Adjunct  Professor of Industrial Design Kathryn Filla lectures on 3-D design in Pratt Studios. Image by Ghufron Yazid (@ghuf_), a Global Innovation Design graduate exchange student from Tokyo. 6. Students bask in the early spring sunshine on Newman Mall.

Be a part of the #PrattInstitute community and keep up with the latest around campus on social media. PrattInstitute

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S PRI N G 2016

PRATTFOLIO T H E M AG A ZI N E O F PR AT T I N S T I T U T E

FROM THE PRESIDENT Thomas F. Schutte

Prattfolio is published by the Office of Communications and Marketing in the Division of Institutional Advancement for the alumni and friends of Pratt Institute. ©2016 Pratt Institute

As a college founded by an entrepreneur, Pratt Institute has a long history of innovation, boldness, and risk taking. Ever since Charles Pratt translated his success as a natural-oil industrialist into an investment in the higher education that he himself was denied, the Institute has been at the forefront of fostering not only technical mastery and creative pursuit, but also independent enterprise. This issue of Prattfolio celebrates the vibrant entrepreneurial spirit of the Pratt community as trailblazers of new business ventures, in fields ranging from industrial design to engineering to education. As a leader in creative innovation, Pratt has brought its expertise to bear on a variety of social and cultural issues, recently breaking ground for new collaborative developments across international borders. With changes to U.S.–Cuba relations opening up opportunities for cultural exchange, this winter I accompanied a group of Pratt alumni to Havana to launch an educational partnership with Cuba’s prestigious Universidad de las Artes (University of the Arts). This trip, which also inaugurated Pratt’s first-ever alumni travel program, marked an important step in forging relationships with Cuban academics and creative professionals and setting the stage for sharing of materials, knowledge, and work. This spring, students from the Schools of Architecture, Art, and Design traveled to Cuba as part of unprecedented cross-cultural coursework and cooperative projects with fellow scholars. You can read more about Pratt’s Cuba initiatives on p. 39. Back on campus, Pratt students are currently participating in Pratt Shows and other end-of-year events in which they introduce their work to industry professionals, highlighting the exceptional skill, artistry, and fresh approach they bring to their chosen disciplines. With commencement on the horizon, we hope that alumni will keep recent Pratt graduates in mind as opportunities arise to hire outstanding new creative talent. Now is the time for innovators who not only identify needs and create solutions but open doors for others in the process, and our gifted Pratt community is poised to do just that. I hope that as you read this issue of Prattfolio, you are inspired by the bold ventures and exciting work of the Pratt alumni highlighted in these pages. This fall, we look forward to welcoming you back to campus on Saturday, September 17, for our annual alumni gathering. Be sure to watch your mailboxes for an invitation to this celebration of our graduates, the forward-thinking individuals who have made Pratt an enterprise for the ages.

Thomas F. Schutte President

Pratt Institute 200 Willoughby Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205 Vice President for Institutional Advancement Joan Barry McCormick Executive Director of Communications and Marketing Mara McGinnis Director of Development Communications Charlotte Savidge Senior Editor Jean Hartig Creative Director Mats Håkansson Associate Creative Director Kara Schlindwein Graphic Designers Erin Cave Rory King Copy Editors Jean Gazis Brandhi Williamson Staff Contributors Holly Graves Marion Hammon Jolene Travis Project Management Ashley Bamman Erica Dagley Galea Senior Production Manager David Dupont Staff Photographer Daniel Terna

Please submit address changes to alumni@pratt.edu or call 718.399.4447. The editorial staff of Prattfolio would like to hear from you. Please send comments, ideas, questions, and thoughts to prattfolio@pratt.edu. Unfortunately, we cannot publish all submissions, but we consider all ideas and greatly appreciate your feedback.


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INSPIRED Laurene Leon Boym, M.I.D. ’93: Babel Blocks™ and the LES History Fence

As one half of the National Design Award–winning studio Boym Partners, Laurene Leon Boym has created numerous designs that reflect the vibrant culture of her native New York City. In addition to work for international brands, her studio, which she runs with partner Constantin Boym (Chair of Industrial Design at Pratt) on the Lower East Side (LES), has designed objects and exhibitions for local clients including Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; the Museum of the City of New York; and the New York Transit Museum. In 2006, Laurene and Constantin designed Babel Blocks, an independent edition of wooden toys based on the LES community where they live and work. The blocks were included in the Museum of Modern Art’s (MoMA) exhibition Design and the Elastic Mind (2007) and, after encouragement by MoMA design curator Paola Antonelli, brought to life by the Boyms in a web video series. The project expanded to the public realm in 2014 when Boym Partners won a street mural competition held by the LES Business Improvement District. Prattfolio spoke with Laurene about the process of creating the Babel Blocks design.

What inspired the idea for Babel Blocks?

Observing our neighbors, we were struck by how very different people from various socioeconomic backgrounds formed genuine friendships organically. We wanted to create toys for children and adults that reflected the free-spirited tradition of this diverse, welcoming community. With the LES History Fence, we saw a unique way to pay homage to the people of the neighborhood, based on the local practice of public mural painting.

How did you go about creating the cast of characters?

Our design methodology follows a literary or cinematic approach. We weren’t setting out to design stereotypes, but to create each block as a composite real person with a name, an occupation, a religious or class affiliation, likes and dislikes. We were intent on giving each character dimensional qualities that contrasted with their neighbor but were derived from the same template—as Constantin and I liked to say, “We are all made of the same blocks.”

What challenges arose in the process of realizing these projects?

With the LES History Fence, we had your typical comedic public-art challenges. For example, everything was going according to our timeline, but the MTA decided to do repairs in the abandoned subway station beneath the sidewalk and fence, and the site was cordoned off. That delayed installation for eight months, but we finally got it up in June 2014. Opposite, top: Babel Blocks figurines. Photo by Davies + Starr; Opposite, bottom: The 408-foot-long LES History Fence installation. Photo courtesy of Boym Partners Inc.


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INSIDE LOOK In the Studio with Katharine L. McKenna, M.I.D. ’84


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Above, left: One of four vintage enameled metal plates collected by McKenna; Above, right: Industrial pattern molds that McKenna uses in her teaching; Opposite: McKenna in her studio.

“Painting is infinite,” says Pratt Trustee and alumna Katharine L. McKenna. Her studio in Saugerties, New York, reflects her many creative passions, which, in addition to painting, include photography, quilting, and metalwork, as well as her lifelong investment in artistic growth. McKenna began her career as a museum and exhibition designer for Ralph Appelbaum (B.I.D. ’64), who urged her to attend Pratt to further hone her natural talents. Her experiences at Pratt provided the seeds not only for her varied design career, but also for her work as a painter and an art teacher. In particular, studying color with Mary Buckley, who coordinated Pratt’s Foundation Art program, reawakened McKenna’s love of painting: “It was my first experience of painting with a paint brush since I was a small child; it opened up a part of me that had been dormant since I was young.”

After graduating from Pratt, McKenna continued studying painting while working as a graphical user interface designer, first on the staff of Albert Woods Design and later as a consultant for banking firms such as Citibank, First Boston, and Lehman Brothers. Her expertise in that arena earned her the nickname “screen goddess,” but she was feeling less and less fulfilled. So, in 1992, at the pinnacle of her professional career, she left the corporate world completely to pursue painting full-time. Today, as a painting teacher at the Woodstock School of Art, McKenna derives the greatest satisfaction from helping students see in a new way. For that, instead of having students paint familiar objects such as vases with flowers, she uses wooden industrial pattern molds, whose abstract shapes force students to see only what is actually in front of them. According to McKenna, the lesson proves so meaningful for students that they come to view the molds they’ve painted as old friends. “They become very attached to the objects they’ve learned from,” she says. Looking around McKenna’s studio, it is clear that she has done the same.


THE ART Pratt Bring by Jean Hartig

OF Alumni

Ingenuity


ENTERPRISE Entrepreneurs to

Industry

A keen eye for the needs of now. A vision for solutions to come. The boldness to set out alone, then to galvanize others to join the journey. The will to welcome risk for the sake of building something new, perhaps even industry-altering—and to find wisdom in failure along the way. Pioneering Pratt alumni channel the spirit of originality and inventiveness cultivated at the Institute to develop smarter products, boundary-breaking tools, and distinctive services, creating new opportunities for others in their fields in the process. Prattfolio spoke to nine alumni entrepreneurs from different disciplines about their ventures as business innovators.


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Kegan Schouwenburg (B.I.D. ’07) Founder, SOLS

A pioneer in mass customization, Kegan Schouwenburg (B.I.D. ’07) is the founder and CEO of SOLS, a footwear company that uses 3-D printing technology and state-of-the-art design software to deliver optimal fit. Before launching SOLS in 2013, Schouwenburg was the director of engineering and operations at Shapeways, one of the world’s largest 3-D printing factories. Last year, she was recognized on “30 Under 30” lists from Forbes and Inc., and she has been included in Business Insider’s roundups “The 30 Most Important Women under 30 in Tech,” “The 20 Hottest Startups Founded by Women,” and “The Coolest People in New York City Tech.”

What aspect of running and growing your entrepreneurial business have you found the most challenging? And what have you found most satisfying?

Do you consider yourself an entrepreneur? Why, or why not?

Pratt taught me, and specifically industrial design taught me, that building a product, whether that product is a physical object or a company, is about building end-to-end interactions and experiences that surprise and delight. That education gave me the entrepreneurial bug, and I’ve been building things ever since.

For the longest time, I didn’t like the word entrepreneur. Over the years, I think it’s become a role that I’ve stepped into. At the end of the day, I love building, designing, and creating things. Whatever title is assigned to that is good with me.

What inspired you to develop SOLS?

I 3-D printed for the first time at Pratt. At the time, I remember thinking to myself, why isn’t everything made like this? Flash forward 10 years and I’m running the Factory of the Future for Shapeways. We’re making shoes for Lady Gaga, and again I think to myself, why can’t we 3-D print shoes people actually want to wear? Two weeks later, SOLS was born. We started with orthotics because they make sense for where the technology is today, but our ambitions are limitless.

What obstacles did you need to overcome starting out?

Learning how to wear every hat, learning how to hire and manage people who are often my seniors, learning how to build technology as a nontechnical person, or fundraise as a female— these were all growing experiences.

On both ends, the people. I get to come to work and be inspired by amazing individuals, all experts in their own domains, working together to build a product. On the flip side, being a CEO means learning how to handle tough situations, be fair, and deliver not always great news while still motivating and driving the team.

How did your time at Pratt contribute to your desire to be an entrepreneur?

What advice might you offer to an aspiring entrepreneur in the Pratt community?

There are so many tools out there for entrepreneurs that weren’t there when I started out. You can build a website for next to no money, crowdfund your product, market it through social media. The barrier to entry, particularly for physical goods companies, is so low. Just push yourself and do it!


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Samantha Razook Murphy (M.I.D. ’05) Founder, Curious Jane Camp

Samantha Razook Murphy (M.I.D. ’05) launched Curious Jane Camp in 2008 as a way to engage her young daughters and other New York City girls in science, design, and engineering projects during time off from school. Now in its eighth year, Curious Jane runs summer and holiday camps as well as yearround workshops for girls, all centered on using simple materials in an inventive way to create fun and surprising results. The team also produces a magazine in-house, featuring projects to do at home, with themes ranging from toy design to “spa science” to graphic novel creation. Camper enrollment has grown from 78 the first summer to nearly 2,000 in recent years, and in 2013, Curious Jane was selected from among 35,000 national applicants to receive one of 12 Chase Bank Mission Main Street Grants to help grow small businesses.

What inspired you to develop Curious Jane Camp?

Curious Jane came out of two needs: The first was practical: to earn an income in a serious economic downturn. The second was personal: to create something for my own girls, then ages four and seven, that they would love and learn from. I had my background in design—and love that world—and I also had experience running summer camps, so I rolled these together. I created Curious Jane to give my girls, and all girls, a chance to be creative and inventive in a hands-on way.

What obstacles did you need to overcome starting out?

One of the biggest obstacles of any new business is getting your first customers. I really pounded the pavement, wearing a fun T-shirt with the logo ironed on, passing out postcards at playgrounds, and telling families I knew about camp, until we pulled together our first little group of campers. I remember the names of the very first girls who ever signed up for camp, and the excitement of seeing them in the registration system! I am always indebted to our families and girls who come to camp, but those first customers hold special meaning.

How did your time at Pratt contribute to your desire to be an entrepreneur?

When you spend time in an educational environment where the primary mode of learning is peer review, critique, prototyping, and incorporating feedback, you learn to crave it, not shy away from it. Being able to collaborate, test ideas, and really jump in with both feet is essential to entrepreneurship. I approach growing a business in the same way I would a design challenge. I think of composition and balance, customer experience, packaging, all of it.

What advice might you offer to an aspiring entrepreneur in the Pratt community? Go for it! Be realistic, and be fearless. Keep pushing forward, and make sure you are developing skills and resources and connections along the way.


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Matthew Burnett (B.I.D. ’07) Cofounder, Maker’s Row

After cutting his entrepreneurial teeth in the design industry as owner of two accessories companies, Matthew Burnett (B.I.D. ’07) cofounded Maker’s Row, a web forum for designers and brands to source American factories and suppliers for the production of their goods. Since its launch in 2012, Maker’s Row has grown to offer product creation software and e-courses for entrepreneurs, in addition to its database of manufacturers in the areas of apparel, accessories, home furnishings, and decor—with more industries on the horizon. Burnett and his team have been recognized by FastCompany, Entrepreneur, Business Insider, and other media outlets for reinventing the way American businesses connect with domestic suppliers.

Do you consider yourself an entrepreneur? Why, or why not?

Of course—I identify myself as an entrepreneur because I, along with my partner, Tanya Menendez, identified a problem and successfully built a solution.

How do you see Maker’s Row having an impact on the industry?

Maker’s Row has lowered the bar for entrepreneurship and domestic manufacturing by educating a community of more than 10,000 business owners on how domestic production is the future of manufacturing.

What aspect of running and growing your entrepreneurial business have you found the most satisfying? The most satisfying aspect of growing a business is experiencing a team victory. At Maker’s Row, that team victory best manifests itself when we hear success stories of factories’ growth and scale through our platform.

How did your time at Pratt contribute to your desire to be an entrepreneur? It was an internship opportunity that I received through a Pratt professor, to work with Marc Jacobs, that inspired me to launch my own line of watches.

How did you determine the need for Maker’s Row?

My cofounder Tanya was the first to identify the opportunity, in 2012, to build this solution for business owners, and I was able to take my experience in manufacturing to add meat to that skeleton. Prior to Maker’s Row, I had two other businesses. My first products were 100 percent manufactured in China. The following company’s designs were produced 100 percent in the United States. Understanding production internationally and domestically allowed me to compare the opportunities and challenges behind starting and growing a company from scratch.

What obstacles did you need to overcome starting out? As someone with an industrial design and manufacturing background without experience in engineering, it was challenging to break into the tech-startup scene. My partner and I had to network and learn the ropes quickly.

What advice might you offer to an aspiring entrepreneur in the Pratt community? Find a business partner who complements your skill set. Never hire a partner who has the same strengths as you have.


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Peter Harvey (B.S. Structural Engineering ’79) Founder, Intellidyn/Intelli-Global

Before the term was a tech-business buzzword, Peter Harvey (B.S. Structural Engineering ’79) was leading the charge in “big data” analysis as founder of Intellidyn, a direct marketing and data services provider for corporate clients. In 2000, Harvey left the corporate world to launch his business, which went on to become an Inc. 500 company, and in 2005, Harvey was named Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year for Realizing Business Potential in the metro New York area. When the recession hit in the late 2000s, Harvey bounced back with the launch of Boston-areabased Intelli-Global, building on his previous company’s strengths in analytics and marketing to focus on consumer experience and help businesses create relationships with their customers.

The most satisfying: Building a reputation as a leading expert in marketing technology and being able to mentor a large group of employees and watch them grow in their careers. Also, being able to bring aboard my two sons and working side by side with them.

How did your time at Pratt contribute to your desire to be an entrepreneur?

I was in the architectural engineering program. As an engineering student, I learned how to approach and solve problems. As an architecture student, I learned how to be wildly creative, at first not so much on my own, but in watching classmates. Also, the New York City urban experience was great.

What inspired you to develop Intellidyn?

It was the challenge of creating a business from an idea, with no funding, and I wanted to build a marketing company that was unique to the industry.

Who have been some of your role models?

First, my wife. She preceded me as an entrepreneur, building her own company, and she is the most positive influencer I have ever met.

How did you determine the need for your company?

I was leading marketing and technology operations within Fortune 500 companies and saw gaping holes in what service providers were offering—there were few that had the ability to create and execute unique marketing strategies.

What obstacles did you need to overcome starting out?

First, feeding my family, starting with no revenues and one employee: myself. Next, getting agreements with suppliers to provide massive amounts of data to me on the promise that I’d generate the revenues to pay them back. Third, changing my work and management styles from being a corporate executive to being an entrepreneur, at a time when there was no roadmap.

What aspect of running and growing your entrepreneurial business have you found the most challenging? And what have you found most satisfying? The most challenging: unforeseen events. Getting through the economic downturn from 2007 to 2009 was brutal. Every week, a client would call and tell me they were filing for bankruptcy.

What advice might you offer to an aspiring entrepreneur in the Pratt community? Work for someone first. Be a “sponge” and listen. Get involved in the detail—you will become a better decision maker. Then, don’t wait too long to venture out on your own. The worst that can happen is you fail, and you will, and that experience is invaluable. Don’t dwell on your mistakes. Imagine what you can do next.


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Sacha Wynne (M.P.S. Arts and Cultural Management ’14) Founder, WÆRK

In 2015, Sacha Wynne (M.P.S. Arts and Cultural Management ’14) traded a career as a freelance writer and editor to make an investment in other creative professionals with the launch of her corporate consulting practice, WÆRK. During her earlier tenure as an executive assistant in the Fortune 500 sector, she had identified untapped potential for artists to spur innovation in business, from workplace communications to the way companies relate to consumers. She founded WÆRK as a way to bring artists into the corporate conversation. Informed by Wynne’s storytelling background and her commercial work in marketing content creation and analytics, WÆRK’s approach is to create relatable informational resources, such as narrative profiles of target customers, which companies can use to guide product development, corporate education, customer service campaigns, expansion strategies, and other facets of business. WÆRK’s artist-consultants employ an arts-based method to interpret data into narratives, using formats such as short film, illustration series, and photo essay to help clients connect with the human stories behind the numbers.

What aspect of running and growing your entrepreneurial business have you found the most challenging? And what have you found most satisfying?

What inspired you to develop WÆRK?

Allow your frustrations to be sources of inspiration and exploration instead of anxiety. Always be kind while you hustle.

I was inspired by three problems: the popular belief that the arts and culture are frivolous; that too many artists languish in day gigs unrelated to their skills and training, to pay rent; and that many businesses struggle to connect with their consumers and employees meaningfully. I believe that these are connected and can be solved by bringing the arts into business processes and practices.

How did your time at Pratt contribute to your desire to be an entrepreneur?

I never considered being an entrepreneur before studying at Pratt, so my time there was instrumental in my decision to follow that path. In every class, whether through a reading, a project, a paper, or a discussion, possibilities were revealed. And I made the decision to build upon them.

What I continue to find most challenging is constantly being forced to confront my fears—for example, at first I was nervous about whether I had what it takes not only to do the work, but also to sell and advocate for it. What I’ve found most satisfying is breaking through those self-imposed barriers—the thoughts of what if this doesn’t work, what if I can’t do this—and finding myself surprisingly comfortable in this leadership role.

Who have been some of your entrepreneurial role models? Danielle Gould of Food+Tech Connect; Coco Smith of Lifeistry; Patricia Pinto of Love, Surf, Yoga; T. Bernie of COCOACHiC; Roseann Warren of Muphoric Sounds; and Sarah Stodola of Flung magazine. They created niches from their passions and remain generous of spirit while they reap success.

What advice might you offer to an aspiring entrepreneur in the Pratt community?


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Aubrey Smyth (B.F.A. Film ’10) Founder, Gingersnap

Aubrey Smyth (B.F.A. Film ’10) founded Gingersnap, a fullservice video production company specializing in narrative and documentary filmmaking for brands, in 2011. Smyth identified an opportunity for cinematic storytelling in the growing digital content market and set out to produce branded films and commercials, with clients ranging from Pantene to actor Mark Ruffalo’s nonprofit organization the Solutions Project. Propelled by her fundamental passion for directing, in addition to running Gingersnap, she also recently joined another woman-owned business, Cutter Productions, as the first woman director on its roster. Now Smyth has steered her company into the feature film space, beginning with a project of her own. Gingersnap is currently developing a feature based on Smyth’s short film Ginger with a Snap, which was partially filmed at Pratt.

Do you consider yourself an entrepreneur? Why, or why not?

I consider myself first and foremost a commercial and film director who needed to be business savvy and, in the process, became an entrepreneur.

What inspired you to develop Gingersnap?

Actually, Pratt inspired me to develop Gingersnap! Right before I graduated, the Human Resources Department hired me to produce and direct a long-form video, and they liked it so much they asked me to do three more. I loved waking up every day as my own boss, and I realized this was the right time for risk and an opportunity to invest in myself.

How do you see Gingersnap having an impact on the industry?

As a Pratt freshman, I learned about Laura Mulvey’s male gaze theory, the idea that visual arts are constructed around a male viewpoint. This greatly influenced me, and I want to impact the industry through the perspective of the female gaze in my comedic films.

Who have been some of your role models?

I love comedy and admire multifaceted creators like Lucille Ball, Tina Fey, Jill Soloway, and Larry David. Sheryl Sandberg’s book Lean In inspired me to write and direct a PSA, “Little Leading Ladies,” that portrays young girls as leaders instead of the stereotype of being “bossy.”

What advice might you offer to an aspiring entrepreneur in the Pratt community? I’ve had two talented interns from Pratt and would tell them to be bold—don’t wait to be invited to the table. As freelance artists, we are often alone on ventures, and seeking information is key. When I started asking questions, a whole world of possibilities opened up to me.


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Laura Bellmont and Emily Brink (B.F.A. Illustration ’04; M.S. Art and Design Education ’12) and (M.S. Art and Design Education ’12) Cofounders, The Good School

After beginning careers as arts educators in a traditional classroom setting, Laura Bellmont (B.F.A. Illustration ’04; M.S. Art and Design Education ’12) and Emily Brink (M.S. Art and Design Education ’12) joined forces to take their teaching on the road. In 2012, the duo founded The Good School, a mobile arts education enterprise that brings stop-motion animation filmmaking workshops to schools and museums around New York State, aiming to cultivate art-making skills and technology learning among students as young as three. Bellmont and Brink have also launched a nonprofit sister organization to expand the communities they serve, and their first book, on how to teach stop-motion filmmaking, will be published in the fall by Quarry Books.

Do you consider yourself entrepreneurs? Why, or why not?

Yes! We do consider ourselves educational entrepreneurs. When we graduated with our master’s degrees from the Art and Design Education Department at Pratt, we saw the need to bridge the booming emphasis on technology in the classroom with the time-tested benefits of art education and fine-art making.

What inspired you to develop The Good School?

In our case, timing was truly everything. We had both gotten jobs right out of school working in a media lab teaching traditional filmmaking and stop-motion animation. At the same time, we both had all of these great progressive concepts in our heads from grad school, and we started to see potential for taking our art education ideas to a new level using stop motion as a vehicle.

How did you decide upon the mobile arts education approach?

Our first commitment was to the quality of programming we would offer, and that meant we needed to spend all of our startup money on beautiful equipment, leaving nothing

for renting a space. We wanted to provide our students with access to professional-grade equipment, and artwork looks so much better through a digital single-lens reflex camera! It made the most sense to bring this whole experience to our clients—we saw the merit of “Art on a Cart” and wanted to elevate that practice.

How did your time at Pratt contribute to your desire to be an entrepreneur?

When we were studying at Pratt, there was a hiring freeze in the public education sector, so job prospects were bleak. Within the Art Ed Department there was a real spirit of invention in the face of a challenging job market. Our department was rich with supportive and brilliant professors who always encouraged us and nudged us toward creating our own way.

What advice might you offer to an aspiring entrepreneur in the Pratt community? This is a time that’s so ripe for creative combinations in the job market. Invent something useful that serves others, and the world will be receptive. If you see a need, and you believe in a cause, the rest will fall into place. Another huge help to us has been working with other organizations and visionaries. Collaboration with others opens up new places to work that might not be apparent otherwise.


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Albert Wurz (Bachelor of Electrical Engineering ’60) Founder, Accu-Sort Systems

Albert Wurz (Bachelor of Electrical Engineering ’60) was determined to run his own operation from the time he was a machinist apprentice in Germany, before immigrating to the United States at age 21. After earning his bachelor’s degree at Pratt, he made his way to Magnavox, posted in the corporation’s tiny barcoding department—and when the company put the division up for sale, Wurz landed on the oppor-tunity he’d been seeking. He bought the division for $50,000 and founded his own company, Accu-Sort Systems, in 1971. Wurz went on to become a forerunner in the field, designing and producing barcode systems that to this day manage the flow of goods and packages—from cereal boxes to mail to luggage—all over the world. Wurz, who received Ernst & Young’s Greater Philadelphia Entrepreneur of the Year Award in 2001, grew the company from a 5-person team to 500, and when he sold the company in 2002, it was worth $40 million. Now retired, he splits his time between Pennsylvania and Marco Island, Florida.

What inspired you to develop Accu-Sort?

The barcoding industry was in its infancy when I got involved, and for a small company, there was significant potential out there. At first, we did a number of small jobs, and then Kellogg’s came along, and they wanted to automate their warehousing operation. They had so many different cereals, and people were sorting them out. We got a job from them— over $100,000, which of course was major for a small company. And from there on, it grew.

How did you determine the need for your products? That’s very easy. I spent a lot of time with customers, all over the world, talking to them about what they wanted. The customers always tell you what they need if you listen, and I think that’s what I did.

What obstacles did you need to overcome as a business owner?

Sometimes we developed a product that really didn’t sell. Once, we developed a product that looked good and was supposed

to read everything, but a customer went through testing our equipment—fancy scanning, a circular pattern, it looked beautiful—and realized there were areas it couldn’t read. It was a bad design, which we had to pull the plug on. But that’s what happens.

What aspect of running and growing your entrepreneurial business did you find the most challenging? I spent too much time engineering—I wasn’t a very good businessman! I did not spend a lot of time looking at finances. I need to give my wife credit here: When we started the company, I asked her to help run it, which gave me the time to develop products. She worked for 18 years and for the first five never got paid.

And what did you find most satisfying?

The people. They were so committed to working and helping and building things, it was amazing how willing they were to make things go. We had fantastic relationships within the company.

What advice might you offer to an aspiring entrepreneur in the Pratt community? I think a person needs to be creative—fix things, create things, build devices. I grew up during the war, and there was nothing; you had to build everything. Success isn’t financial—it’s the development of better products, that’s the reward.


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NEW AND NOTEWORTHY Items in the Marketplace Created by Pratt Alumni, Faculty, and Students

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Coral Branch Necklace Kelly Horrigan (B.F.A. Fashion Design ’98), Adjunct Professor of Fashion Design $245

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Kulwicki is the owner of EMKY, a made-inthe-USA fashion scarf company. The company’s scarves feature one-of-a-kind prints and original artwork and are designed to be tied in multiple ways. This semi-sheer scarf is made of 100 percent silk chiffon and features a boldly colored abstract flower print with chevronprint borders. Available at emkyshop.com.

Horrigan’s bold handmade statement jewelry exemplifies her one-of-a-kind aesthetic: lending experimental touches to old-world techniques. This long-hanging necklace is made from branch coral accented with antique brass hardware, sandcast coral, beads, and repurposed leather fringe. Available at kellyhorriganhandmade.com. 4 3

Kaufmann Gathering Bench Evan Dublin (B.I.D. ’09) $1,395–$1,499 As design director for the Kaufmann collection of Kaufmann Mercantile, an online store that specializes in elegantly crafted home essentials, Dublin designed this classic two-person gathering bench. Made to order from solid black walnut wood with a black walnut or black leather seat inlay, the slim bench makes a perfect addition to any entryway or hallway. A mineral oil and natural beeswax finish ensures that the bench will age beautifully. Available at kaufmann-mercantile.com.

Silk Scarf Emily Kulwicki (B.F.A. Fashion Design ’06) $72

The Counterfeit Detective Paul R. Paradise (M.S. L.I.S. ’02) $14.90 Paradise’s latest book is a mystery thriller based on his expertise on the subject of trademark counterfeiting and his research on private investigator David Woods. Paradise brings together family secrets, betrayal, and murder in the tale of a New York private investigator who infiltrates an interstate counterfeiting ring. Available at amazon.com.


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Cactus Stationery Set Caroline Rose Kaufman (B.F.A. Fashion Design ’14) $20

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Cavanaugh created this black leather card holder for his newly founded accessory design company, Heavy Eyes. Available in pebbled or smooth saddle leather, the sturdy card holder features a single pocket perfect for carrying cards, cash, and other small essentials. Each piece is assembled by hand in the Heavy Eyes Brooklyn studio. Available at heavyeyes.co.

This playful stationery echoes the aesthetic of Kaufman’s clothing designs, which feature poppy colors and nature-inspired prints. Each stationery set is made in Kaufman’s studio at Pratt’s Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator, where Kaufman is a junior venture fellow, and contains five whimsical desert designs and brown paper envelopes. Available at carolinerosekaufman.com. 8 7

Mosaic House Numbers Randi (Shalit) Wolf (M.S. Communications Design ’80) $87 Wolf’s custom-made mosaics turn plain house numbers into colorful works of art. Created from a charming assortment of items ranging from painted tile and glass to seashells, gems, and coins, the numbers are perfect for the front of a house or the side of a mailbox. Numbers are available in one-, two-, three-, and four-digit sets. Available at etsy.com/shop/ SecondLookMosaics.

Submissions Alumni, Faculty, and Students We invite submissions to New and Noteworthy. Send information and images of your latest creation for sale in the marketplace to prattfolio@pratt.edu with the subject “New and Noteworthy.”

Soft Box Card Holder Matt Cavanaugh (M.I.D. ’14) $65

Lessons in Realistic Watercolor Mario Andres Robinson (B.F.A. ’92) $18.75 Robinson presents contemporary and innovative techniques for creating classical watercolor paintings, providing an inspiring and practical guide for watercolorists of every skill level. The richly illustrated book features more than 100 of Robinson’s luminous watercolors alongside works by past and present masters. Available at amazon.com.

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RYERSON WALK Recent Campus News and Activities

Members of the Class of 1965 celebrated their 50th Reunion with Pratt President Thomas F. Schutte.

Pratt Institute Celebrates Alumni Day and Alumni Exhibition in Locations Across Campus Alumni Day and Reunion 2015 on September 19 saw several hundred attendees returning to the Brooklyn campus to reconnect with classmates. Activities included readings, outdoor sketching, workshops, a meet-and-greet hosted by the Recent Alumni Committee, and student/alumni roundtable discussions. Reunions were celebrated for class years ending in zero and five, and members of the class of 1965 gathered for a special 50th Reunion brunch in the Main Hall courtyard, organized by Reunion committee members Carol Zarookian Anastasian (B.F.A. Fashion Design ’65), Neil Keller (B.F.A. Advertising Design and Visual Communications ’65), Peter Krasnow (B.Arch. ’65),

and Mark Solomon (B.F.A. Interior Design ’65). Alumni had the opportunity to attend a lunch with the deans of each school, with welcome remarks by Pratt’s new provost, Kirk E. Pillow. A juried Alumni Exhibition showcased the work of 100 graduates, including Mickalene Thomas (B.F.A. ’00) and Adam Selman (B.F.A. Fashion Design ’04). The Black Alumni of Pratt (BAP) celebrated its 25th anniversary at a gathering attended by alumni from a range of class years, with Jean Ellington (Costume Design ’52) as the guest of honor. Concluding the day was a reception at the Caroline Ladd Pratt House, capped off by a surprise, public marriage proposal by Michael Sargent (B.Arch. ’03) to Erin Robertson (B.F.A. Photography ’02), who met during their freshman year at Pratt. She said yes. Pratt looks forward to hosting Alumni Day 2016 on Saturday, September 17.


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Christopher D. Shyer has been appointed to Pratt’s Board of Trustees.

Joan Barry McCormick has been appointed Pratt’s new Vice President for Institutional Advancement.

Eyewear Entrepreneur Christopher D. Shyer Elected to Board of Trustees

Joan Barry McCormick Named Vice President for Institutional Advancement

The Board of Trustees has named Christopher D. Shyer as its newest member. Shyer, whose appointment was effective December 9, 2015, was also named to the Board’s Development Committee.

Joan Barry McCormick has been named as the Institute’s Vice President for Institutional Advancement. McCormick assumed the position on January 11, succeeding Nancy Walker, of Interim Solutions, who has served as Interim Vice President since April 2015.

Shyer is designer, president, and owner of Zyloware Eyewear, a leading manufacturer of innovative eyewear based in Port Chester, New York, and Shenzhen, China. With 26 years’ experience designing and marketing eyewear, and extensive expertise in manufacturing, branding, business development, licensing, and general management, Shyer has transformed Zyloware into a top supplier to retailers including Pearle Vision, Walmart, Costco, Sears, and Cohen’s Fashion Optical. Before Zyloware, Shyer was a brand manager for Lever Brothers Company. Shyer serves on the boards of the Historic House Trust of New York City, the Acting Company, GLSEN (the Gay Lesbian Straight Education Network), and Public Health Solutions. He is also a member of the Leadership Council for VisionSpring and an active member of the Young Presidents Organization. In addition, Shyer is the coauthor, with Marlene Fanta Shyer, of the award-winning memoir Not Like Other Boys: Growing Up Gay: A Mother and Son Look Back (Houghton Mifflin, 1996). The book, which was recently rereleased for Amazon Kindle, received the 1997 outstanding book award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights in North America. Shyer received his M.B.A. in marketing and finance from Columbia University, where he was president of the American Marketing Association. He also holds a B.A. in economics and political science from the University of Vermont.

McCormick worked most recently at New York University’s Stern School of Business, where she served as the Associate Dean for Development and Alumni Relations. Prior to that, she held various fundraising positions at Rutgers University, where she was responsible for securing transformational gifts of $5 million or more. “With Joan’s outstanding past success in fundraising, I am confident that she will effectively lead us in achieving our ambitious goals,” said President Thomas F. Schutte. “I look forward to working closely with her and our Board of Trustees so that Pratt can continue to provide the best possible educational experience for the next generation of creative professionals.” In addition to her development background in higher education, McCormick has experience initiating and developing successful fundraising campaigns for other types of nonprofit institutions including the National Kidney Foundation, where she created the organization’s first-ever major gifts program. McCormick holds a Master of Public Administration from Kean University and earned a Mini-MBA™ in Strategic Healthcare Management and a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism/Mass Media, both from Rutgers. “I am proud to join Pratt in this role at such a critical time in the institution’s history,” said McCormick. “It is an exciting opportunity to build on the momentum of President Schutte and to work with the entire community at Pratt to support its talented students and prestigious faculty.”


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Fine arts students at work in a drawing class.

A wearable cargo-location device designed for astronauts aboard the International Space Station, created by Pratt students. Photo by Luke Simmons

U.S. News & World Report, DesignIntelligence Rank Pratt Among Top Colleges

Professor Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman’s Wearable Tech Class Profiled in U.S. News & World Report Feature

U.S. News & World Report has ranked Pratt 18th out of 131 peer institutions in the Regional Universities North category of its 2016 Best Colleges list. This marks the second year that Pratt, the only independent college of art and design to place in the category, has advanced in the rankings, rising from number 20 on the list in 2014 to number 19 in 2015. According to U.S. News & World Report, the 2016 Best Colleges rankings allow comparisons of the relative quality of institutions based on indicators of academic excellence such as freshman retention rates, graduation rates, and strength of faculty. Meanwhile, several Pratt design programs rose in rankings published by DesignIntelligence, the bimonthly architecture and design journal of the Design Futures Council. The America’s Best Architecture and Design Schools 2016 rankings, based on DesignIntelligence’s annual survey of industry professionals, rated the Institute’s industrial design programs among the top 10 in the nation (undergraduate ranked 9th, graduate 10th); in the regional category, the undergraduate program rose to 2nd, up from 3rd in 2015’s rankings, with the graduate program ranked 3rd. Pratt’s undergraduate architecture program was ranked 11th nationally and 5th in the region for Eastern colleges. In the area of interior design, Pratt’s undergraduate program was ranked 3rd in the nation and 2nd in the region. The interior design graduate program was rated 2nd in the nation and first in the region, up from 2nd in the 2015 rankings.

This winter, U.S. News & World Report published a feature on the wearable technology studio class taught by Rebeccah PailesFriedman, adjunct associate professor of industrial design and fashion, and Pratt’s ongoing wearable technology collaboration with NASA. The article, “Designers, Students Mesh Apparel with Technology,” was featured on STEM Solutions, the U.S. News & World Report website’s hub for news about science, technology, engineering, and math. The story profiles the work of Pailes-Friedman’s students, who were challenged last fall to research life on the International Space Station (ISS) and design a piece of wearable technology that would improve efficiency and quality of life for ISS astronauts. One team of students invented a wearable product equipped with stainless steel conductor threads that works like a dimmer switch to give astronauts greater control over the brightness of light in an ISS module. Another group designed a watch-like device that uses signals to make it easier for astronauts to locate objects in ISS storage areas. The feature highlights Pratt as one of the higher education institutions participating in the NASA Wearable Technology CLUSTER (Collaboration for Leveraging Universities in Sciences, Technology, Engineering, and Research), a collaboration that is now in its third year at Pratt. As part of the Wearable Technology CLUSTER program, Pailes-Friedman’s students attended the 2016 NASA Wearable Technology Symposium, held this spring at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.


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Pratt is committed to providing a welcoming campus community.

David Weinrib (left); W. Christopher Hunte.

Pratt Fosters Continued Discussion of Equity and Inclusion on Campus

Institute Mourns the Loss of Two Beloved Faculty Members

In its ongoing commitment to ensuring a welcoming community for all of its members, Pratt has continued working to assess and improve all areas related to equity and inclusion on campus. The Institute held two open forums last fall, which invited the campus community to discuss issues related to diversity at Pratt, followed by ongoing working group meetings this spring to identify solutions for some of the concerns raised at the earlier sessions.

David Weinrib, adjunct professor of foundation art and curator of the Pratt Institute Sculpture Park, died on February 6, 2016, at the age of 91. He had taught at Pratt since 1979. Weinrib’s artistic career began in pottery and moved into mediums including sculpture, painting, film, photography, and set design. He established potteries in New York State; Sesto Fiorentino in Italy; and at Black Mountain College in North Carolina. Weinrib was a Fulbright scholar and recipient of grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts, and his work has been included in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Jewish Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the São Paulo Museum of Art in Brazil, and in many private collections.

Established in 2010, the Institute’s Diversity Committee has been actively engaged in a number of initiatives to promote a campus climate of belonging and inclusiveness and to educate members of the community about the value of diversity. In the last five years, the Committee hired Cambridge Hill Partners, a diversity-consulting firm, and has collaborated across the Institute to organize diversity talks and training sessions for individuals hiring faculty and staff. Pratt has established a Diversity Advocate program, in which more than 80 staff, faculty, and students have been trained to serve as advocates within their departments and organizations regarding issues of diversity and inclusion. Cambridge Hill Partners has been invited back to campus to assist in setting measurable goals to augment Pratt’s diversity strategic plan. Meanwhile, the Student Affairs division is preparing to open a new Center for Equity and Inclusion, establishing a space for students interested in coming together to address diversityrelated issues both on and off campus. A full-time assistant director of special projects, who will join the Institute in June, will oversee the Center and focus on student programming and education about diversity.

W. Christopher Hunte, adjunct associate professor of fashion design (CCE) and a Pratt alumnus, died on February 5, 2016, at the age of 63. Hunte earned his B.F.A. in Fashion Design at Pratt in 1979 and went on to open Christopher Hunte Ltd., a couture design studio in Manhattan, in 1981. He designed for clients including jazz singer Nancy Wilson, Metropolitan Opera singer Florence Quivar, actress Debbie de Coudreaux, soprano Marvis Martin, television anchor Rolanda Watts, and the Consuls General to Barbados and Jamaica. Hunte began teaching at Pratt in 1998 and received a Certification of Continuous Employment (CCE) in 2007, while also serving as a mentor to high school and college students. He received the Black Retailers Action Group Entrepreneur Award and was recognized with a New York State Assembly Citation for Community Service.


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Grant Brooker delivered the 2016 Syrop Lecture.

The Performance and Performance Studies program will launch in Fall 2016.

Eminent Architect Grant Booker Discusses His Work in Talk on Brooklyn Campus

Performance and Performance Studies Program to Launch in the Fall

World-renowned architect Grant Brooker delivered this year’s Arnold Syrop (B.Arch. ’61) and Joanne Syrop Annual Lecture, endowed by the Selz Foundation, which highlights outstanding individuals in architecture. Based in London, Brooker is the head of Studio 1 at Foster + Partners. In his talk, Brooker discussed his firm’s work and approach, touching on international projects including the Viaduc du Millau (Millau Viaduct), the Swiss Re Headquarters—London’s first ecological tall building—and three “ports”—the Hong Kong International Airport, Spaceport America in New Mexico, and Marseille’s Vieux Port (Old Port) in France.

In fall 2016, Pratt Institute will launch a new graduate program in Performance and Performance Studies, welcoming students from across creative and academic fields and with a range of performance-related experience. The 60-credit, four-semester program, which leads to a master of fine arts degree, will be part of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences. It will be coordinated by poet, performer, and scholar Tracie Morris, with renowned avant-garde artist Jennifer Miller spearheading the performance practice aspect of the program. Both professors are in the Humanities and Media Studies Department. Building on the Institute’s undergraduate and graduate curricula in Performance and Performance Studies, including the undergraduate minor, the new graduate program will provide students with the benefits of a terminal M.F.A. degree, as well as opportunities to build a professional network through internships, community-based practice, symposia, publications, workshops, and presentations. For more information, visit www.pratt.edu/performanceand-performance-studies.

American Association for the Advancement of Science Honors Professor Mark Rosin Mark Rosin, assistant professor of math and science, has received the 2015 Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The award recognizes early-career scientists and engineers who have made remarkable contributions to public engagement with science. Rosin was presented with the award at the 182nd AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., on February 12. Rosin, a physicist who works in the field of applied mathematics and plasma physics, is also the director and cofounder of Guerilla Science, an international organization that aims to engage public audiences with science through innovative public events and interactive installments at venues ranging from museums to art and music festivals.

School of Architecture Presents 10th Annual Christina Porter Poetry Lecture This spring, the School of Architecture presented the 10th Annual Christina Porter Poetry Lecture delivered by author and actor John Buffalo Mailer. Mailer is the son of author Norman Mailer and a principal actor in the 2015 operatic film River of Fundament, which was inspired by his father’s 1983 novel Ancient Evenings. Mailer showed a preview of the film, and students in the School of Architecture displayed design projects addressing pollution in Newtown Creek and other New York City waterways, related to themes in the film. The lecture honors Christina Porter, the late daughter of Brent Porter, adjunct professor of architecture, and is part of the School of Architecture’s Christina Porter Poetry in the Schools program.


SAVE THE DATE: WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2016

Where visionaries champion the future of creativity. LEGENDS 2016 A Pratt Institute Scholarship Benefit Honoring Icons of Art and Design For more information, visit www.pratt.edu/legends.


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Giving News

David and Sondra Mack Gift to Transform Pratt Manhattan Trustee David Mack knew of Pratt’s reputation for excellence well before he joined the Institute’s Board in 2004. To help extend that reputation in the heart of Manhattan’s gallery district, he and his wife, Sondra, have made a significant gift to create the Sondra and David S. Mack Pratt Manhattan Center. Their generosity will allow the Institute to transform its landmark 14th Street building into a world-class campus that attracts students, faculty, and creative industry leaders from across the country and around the world. “The atmosphere of the campus speaks directly to how much the Institute cares about its students and wants them to succeed,” said Mack. “I want everyone who visits or walks by Pratt Manhattan to know that it is home to one of the world’s greatest centers for creative exploration and learning.” To that end, the Mack gift will allow Pratt to create a new streetlevel gallery with floor-to-ceiling windows to replace the current second-floor gallery. This magnificent gallery will allow Pratt to showcase an innovative exhibition program of national and international scope. The gallery will also provide opportunities to highlight the work of Pratt’s extraordinarily talented students in the professional context they deserve, thereby positioning graduating students for even greater creative and career success. In addition, the gift will allow the Institute to create a student commons adjacent to the gallery, thereby highlighting Pratt’s educational mission and commitment to providing a level of student service commensurate with the quality of its graduate and undergraduate populations. Together, these changes will greatly increase visibility and help the Institute continue to attract higher-caliber students, faculty, and creative leaders who will build on Pratt’s longstanding reputation for excellence and increasing status in the worlds of art and design. “The Macks’ commitment is truly a transformative gift that will usher in a new era for Pratt Manhattan and the Institute at large,” said Pratt President Thomas F. Schutte. “By helping Pratt to create these new facilities, David has set a wonderful example for everyone in the extended Pratt community. We are indeed fortunate to count him among the Institute’s most dedicated trustees and supporters.” A senior partner and vice president of the Mack Company, a real estate development firm, and a director of Mack-Cali Realty Corporation, Mack was inspired to name the Pratt Manhattan

David S. Mack and Sondra Mack.

gallery and conference center in part by his family’s tradition of philanthropy. The Institute’s current leadership also played a pivotal role in Mack’s commitment. “President Schutte has done wonders for Pratt Institute. I am delighted to support his vision for this truly remarkable school,” said Mack. By providing an attractive and highly visible space in which to showcase professionally curated exhibitions and the work of the Institute’s alumni and faculty, Mack also hopes that the new gallery will inspire locals and visitors to apply to and take an interest in the Institute. “Pratt alumni have truly made a name for themselves. As a trustee, I’m tremendously proud of the Institute’s graduates and hope that the new face of Pratt Manhattan will encourage others to aspire to such heights by pursuing an education at Pratt.” Mack, who has served on the Board of Trustees development committee since 2007, hopes his pledge will be an inspiration to others in the Pratt community, particularly his fellow trustees, whom he believes have a responsibility to support the Institute. “I am proud to be able to leave a legacy to the Institute through this gift to Pratt Manhattan and hope that others will join me in making their mark at Pratt,” he said. The new Sondra and David S. Mack Pratt Manhattan Center is being designed by Selldorf Architects. The founding principal of the firm is internationally renowned architect and Pratt alumna Annabelle M. Selldorf (B.Arch. ’85), whose cultural and landmark projects include the Neue Galerie New York, Brown University’s John Hay Library, and the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts.


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L to R: Mark Braunstein, Katharine L. McKenna, Film/Video Chair Jorge Oliver, Provost Kirk E. Pillow, and Dean of the School of Art Gerry Snyder.

A fashion student works in the studio.

Gift from Pratt Trustee Katharine L. McKenna Supports State-of-the-Art Film/Video Facility

Gift Honoring Alumna’s Parents to Create Scholarships for Film and Fashion Students

Pratt Trustee and alumna Katharine L. McKenna (M.I.D. ’84) has made a generous gift to support the Institute’s new state-ofthe-art Film/Video Building, which opened on Myrtle Avenue in January 2015. McKenna, who has had successful careers in exhibition design, user interface design, painting, teaching, and gallery management, credits the Institute for her many professional and artistic accomplishments. “I received a top education, skills, connections, and philosophy from Pratt and want to help others have the same opportunities that arose for me after graduating from Pratt,” she said.

Pratt alumna Lily Pao Hsu (B.F.A. Fashion ’73) and her husband, Dr. Tony S. Hsu, have made a generous contribution to the Institute to create the Yunni and Maxine Pao Memorial Scholarships. Named for Lily Pao Hsu’s late parents, the awards will provide partial tuition to outstanding incoming students in Pratt film and fashion programs who also demonstrate financial need. The scholarships, which will first be awarded in the 2016–17 academic year, are renewable for four years provided the recipients remain in good academic standing.

In recognition of McKenna’s support for the Film/Video Building, the Institute has named the screening room for her. The Katharine L. McKenna Screening Room was dedicated on February 2 in a ceremony that included the presentation of several films by current students in the Institute’s top-ranked Film/Video program. These included Spectrum, by Savannah Magruder (B.F.A. Film ’16); Nowhere But Here, by Dylan Pailes-Friedman (B.F.A. Film ’17) and Dakota Pailes-Friedman (B.F.A. Film ’15); La Proxima Semana, by Alvaro Ceballos (B.F.A. Film ’17); and Suburbia, by Jenna Nash (B.F.A. Film ’18).

In establishing this scholarship, Lily Pao Hsu aims to acknowledge and perpetuate the philanthropic spirit of her parents. The Hsus chose to support Pratt film and fashion students because of their personal connections to these disciplines. Lily Pao Hsu graduated from the Institute’s Fashion program, and the couple’s daughter, Alexandra, is a filmmaker.


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BEYOND THE GATES Pratt’s Presence in the Public Realm

Pratt Alumni Achievement Award winners (L to R) Mitchell J. Silver (B.Arch. ’87), Carl L. Olsen (B.I.D. ’57), Harry Allen (M.I.D. ’94), Melisa Goldie (B.F.A. Photography ’91), Katie Middleton (B.F.A. Painting ’07), and Jed Winokur (M.S.L.I.S. ’07).

Distinguished Graduates Honored at 2016 Alumni Achievement Awards On March 16, Pratt trustees, faculty, friends, and alumni came together at the Whitney Museum of American Art to recognize six distinguished graduates with Alumni Achievement Awards: industrial and interior designer Harry Allen (M.I.D. ’94) received the Career Achievement Award for the School of Design; Chief Marketing Officer of Calvin Klein, Inc. Melisa Goldie (B.F.A. Photography ’91) received the Career Achievement Award for the School of Art; special effects makeup artist Katie Middleton (B.F.A. Painting ’07) received the Early Career Achievement

Award; transportation and automotive designer Carl L. Olsen (B.I.D. ’57) received the International Career Achievement Award; New York City Parks Department Commissioner Mitchell J. Silver (B.Arch. ’87) received the Career Achievement Award for the School of Architecture; and Coach Archivist Jed Winokur (M.S.L.I.S. ’07) received the Career Achievement Award for the School of Information. The awards luncheon was also attended by a number of previous Alumni Achievement Award recipients, including Lou Ambrogio (B.Arch. ’76), Kenneth Browne (B.S. ’75), James Gager (B.I.D. ’67), Joseph Mizzi (B.S. ’91), and Barbara Nessim (B.F.A. ’60).


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Rector of the Universidad de las Artes Rolando González Patricio and Pratt President Thomas F. Schutte sign an agreement to foster an educational alliance between institutions.

Legends honorees (L to R) Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Nina Campbell, Tod Williams, Billie Tsien, and Daniel Boulud with industrial design student Kerchuan Soong (B.I.D. ’16).

Changes in US-Cuba Relations Inspire New Pratt Academic Initiatives and Travel to Cuba

Legends 2015 Gala Raises $800,000 for Student Scholarships

This spring, Pratt has begun offering new opportunities for students, faculty, and alumni to visit Cuba and explore the country’s rich history and culture firsthand, as well as to exchange knowledge with Cuban academics and professionals. In February, President Schutte and his wife, Tess Schutte, journeyed to Cuba with a group of Pratt alumni and friends for the Institute’s first-ever travel program, during which he signed an agreement between Pratt and Cuba’s Universidad de las Artes (ISA) that aims to encourage cooperation between the two institutions, including the joint development of academic courses and a study abroad program.

The Legends 2015 gala, held at the Mandarin Oriental in October, raised $800,000 to benefit student scholarships while celebrating icons of art and design whose works have helped shape the cultural landscape.

The School of Architecture’s Programs for Sustainable Planning and Development ran two courses sending groups to Havana to focus on the preservation of modernist architecture, the reuse of Havana’s harbor, and economic development strategies, led by Ron Shiffman, founder of the Pratt Center, and David Burney, founder and head of Pratt’s new Urban Placemaking and Management program.

The event honored distinguished chef and restaurateur Daniel Boulud, influential designer Nina Campbell, renowned photographer and filmmaker Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, and visionary architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien. Legends 2015 was chaired by Judith and Bruce M. Newman (B.F.A. Interior Design ’53) and Jane and David Walentas. The Benefit Committee was chaired by Carolyn B. MacDonald and included Peter Arbeeny, Deborah J. Buck, Wendy A. Kvalheim (B.F.A. Sculpture ’83), Gerrianne Puntervold, and Joanna L. Silver. Speakers included undergraduate architecture student and scholarship recipient Eli Eskenazi Boné, introduced by Pratt Board of Trustees Chair Bruce Gitlin. New York State Senator Martin J. Golden also delivered remarks.

As part of a course taught by Film/Video Department Chair Jorge Oliver and Photography Department Assistant Chair Tori Purcell, students from the School of Art traveled to Havana to work on a project with students from the ISA’s Facultad Arte de los Medios de Comunicación Audiovisual (School of the Art of Audiovisual Media Communication).

The evening’s awards were presented by ELLE Décor Editor in Chief Michael Boodro (Boulud); Academy Award-nominated director Darren Aronofsky (Greenfield-Sanders); New York Design Center President Jim Druckman (Campbell); and former President and CEO of the American Academy in Rome Adele Chatfield-Taylor and playwright John Guare (Williams and Tsien).

In the School of Design, undergraduate and graduate industrial design students traveled to Cuba to work alongside students at Havana’s Higher Institute of Design (ISDI), part of a course created by Industrial Design Chair Constantin Boym. Associate Professor of Industrial Design Ignacio Urbina Polo led the students to explore alternative design processes in an environment with minimal resources and means of production.

The awards given to the honorees were designed for the event by Pratt industrial design student Kerchuan Soong (B.I.D. ’16).


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A still from Alejandro Torres Viera’s animation Forest & Life.

Casey Sobel’s Domina Collar neckpiece. Photo by Nicole Neenan

Alumnus Alejandro Torres Viera Presents Forest Awareness Animation at Paris Conference

Museum of Arts and Design Acquires Work by Casey Sobel (B.F.A. Jewelry ’15)

Alejandro Torres Viera (M.S. Communications Design ’14) was selected by the French forest restoration organization Kinomé to present Forest & Life, an animation he developed about the effects of deforestation, at its conference in Paris late last fall. Kinomé commissioned the work from Torres Viera after seeing the animation he created in 2014 for an initiative celebrating The Wall Street Journal’s 125th anniversary that stemmed from a partnership between Pratt and WSJ parent company Dow Jones. Kinomé’s conference was organized as part of the group’s 10th anniversary and as a lead-up to the Sustainable Innovation Forum 2015, held during the annual Conference of Parties in conjunction with the United Nations Environment Programme.

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) has acquired Jewelry alumna Casey Sobel’s Domina Collar for its permanent collection. The neckpiece is part of Sobel’s senior thesis collection and was included in the 2015 edition of LOOT: MAD about Jewelry, the museum’s 15th annual juried sale and exhibition held last fall. Domina Collar is the only piece from LOOT 2015 to be acquired by the museum, which has a tradition of making acquisitions from LOOT artists.

Steven Spielberg Film Tells Story of Former Pratt President James B. Donovan Former Pratt President James B. Donovan is the focus of Bridge of Spies, a Cold War–era biographical drama by director Steven Spielberg released in October. Filmed in Brooklyn, the movie features Tom Hanks as Donovan, the famed attorney who later served as president of the Institute (from 1968 until his death in 1970). In a statement released following his death, he was remembered by colleagues on the Board of Trustees as “a brilliant leader who was determined to bring the Institute to a new plateau of excellence.”

Women of the World Poetry Slam Tournament and Festival Held on Pratt’s Brooklyn Campus This spring, 96 international women and gender-nonconforming poets came together on the Pratt Brooklyn campus for the 2016 Women of the World Poetry Slam (WOWps), a multiday poetry tournament and festival. Coordinated by Mahogany Browne (M.F.A. Writing ’16), the WOWps was part of Browne’s fieldwork residency for the MFA in Writing program. Cecily Schuler (M.F.A. Writing ’16) served as volunteer coordinator. Fieldwork residencies require Browne and the other secondyear M.F.A. candidates to expand their writing and research interests through collaborations with outside institutions, organizations, or groups. The WOWps, an event series held in a different host city each year by the nonprofit organization Poetry Slam Incorporated, drew a sold-out crowd to many of the events at Pratt, including the slam finals. In addition to the competition, won by cochampions Emi Mahmoud and Imani Cezanne, the festival included poetry workshops, open mics, and other community-building literary gatherings.


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Graduate and undergraduate architecture students gather with Mark Parsons (right), director of production technologies, School of Architecture, in front of the Putnam Triangle Installation.

Christiana Theophanopoulos’s winning work, Meraki.

Students Partner with Local Business Improvement Group to Build Sidewalk Pavilion

Student Work from Fourth Annual Pratt/ Hennessy V.S Competition Shown in Pop-Up Gallery Exhibition

Students from Pratt’s graduate and undergraduate architecture programs designed and installed a temporary sidewalk pavilion to provide shade for community space at the Putnam Triangle Plaza in Brooklyn’s Clinton Hill neighborhood. The Putnam Triangle Installation, led by Mark Parsons, director of production technologies in the School of Architecture, is a collaborative project involving PrattSIDE, the Pratt Student International Design Efforts organization; the Fulton Area Business Alliance, which proposed the pavilion; and the Pratt Center for Community Development, which provided funding through a Taconic Fellowship grant. The pavilion will remain in place through fall 2016 at Fulton Street between Cambridge Place and Grand Avenue.

Regional Events Reunite Alumni Coast to Coast Pratt alumni, parents, and incoming students came together at events across the country as part of the Institute’s expanded Regional Alumni Program, which gives participants an opportunity to strengthen their connections to Pratt and to each other, and welcomes new students to the Pratt community. Beginning in October, Pratt held events in Westchester, New York; Tampa, Florida; and three California cities: Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco. Special guests included Pratt President Thomas F. Schutte and current fashion design student Jean-Baptiste Riviere (B.F.A. Fashion Design ’18), who told the crowds how much he relies on contributions to The Fund for Pratt to continue his education. The events also gave attendees an opportunity to learn about new academic programs, a variety of campus improvements, and activities beyond Pratt’s gates, including the launch of the Institute’s alumni travel program.

Christiana Theophanopoulos (M.F.A. Communications Design ’16) was named the winner of the fourth annual Pratt/Hennessy V.S competition for her work Meraki (Greek for little things). As part of an ongoing collaboration between the Institute and Hennessy V.S, 15 students from a range of disciplines were challenged to create artwork inspired by the brand’s “Wild Rabbit” campaign and its mantra, “Never stop. Never settle.” Artwork by the finalists was displayed in a 24-hour pop-up art gallery, Project Wild Rabbit: Gallery 24, at OPENHOUSE NYC Gallery in Soho in Manhattan. Theophanopoulos was announced as the winner at the opening of the exhibition on November 4, an event attended by members of the judging panel, including renowned artists Futura and Ryan McGinness.

Graduate Interior Design Students Win Competition at 2015 SOFA CHICAGO Fair In November, graduate interior design students and faculty from Pratt competed for the third consecutive year at the SOFA CHICAGO (Sculptural Objects Functional Art + Design) CONNECT competition and won first place for the second time, tying with the University of Iowa. Pratt’s team members explored the idea of constantly changing city landscapes through their winning installation, Paper + Air, a transportable lounge space. The installation was a collaboration between a graduate Interior Design Thesis Studio taught by Professor of Interior Design Deborah Schneiderman and a graduate Interior Inflatable Design Options Lab taught by Visiting Associate Professor of Interior Design Alex Schweder.


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Pratt Presents 2015 Public Programs

Dynamic Conversations with Artists, Experts, and Innovators

Clockwise from top: Surface Editor in Chief Spencer Bailey (left) and the Elgort family; L to R: Lou Switzer, Eddie Opara, Bibhu Mohapatra, Erica Eden (M.I.D. ‘02), and J. J. McCorvey; L to R: Dean Andrew Barnes, Salman Rushdie, Laurie Anderson, Pratt Board Chair Bruce Gitlin, and President Thomas F. Schutte.

The New York Calendar Pratt’s signature series of free public programs kicked off its second year with events highlighting luminaries of art, performance, literature, and design whose ideas shape today’s cultural landscape. Last fall’s line-up of events included: “An  Evening with the Elgort Family,” copresented by Surface magazine and moderated by Surface Editor in Chief Spencer Bailey, with iconic fashion photographer Arthur Elgort and his wife, Grethe Barrett Holby, founder of American Opera Projects, along with their children, Sophie Elgort, an upand-coming fashion photographer; Warren Elgort, an independent filmmaker and producer; and actor Ansel Elgort, who starred in The Fault in Our Stars and the Divergent film series.

“The Norman Mailer Center Annual Awards and Lecture: At Home in Brooklyn,” honoring Salman Rushdie, recipient of the Norman Mailer Center Lifetime Achievement Award, and celebrating the winners of the High School, Two-Year College, Four-Year College, College Poetry, and Teacher Writing Awards. Gay Talese served as emcee for the evening, which included a conversation between Rushdie and writer Randy Boyagoda. Special guests included Laurie Anderson and Billy Collins. “Diversity  in Design,” held at Steelcase’s showroom, with alumna Erica Eden (M.I.D. ’02), director of global design innovation, PepsiCo; Bibhu Mohapatra, founder and creative director, the Bibhu Mohapatra label; Eddie Opara, partner at Pentagram; and Lou Switzer, CEO, the Switzer Group; and moderated by J. J. McCorvey, senior associate editor of Fast Company.


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Clockwise from left, L to R: Stefano Tonchi, Shirin Neshat, Heidi Zuckerman, and Mickalene Thomas (B.F.A. ’00); L to R: Juliana Terian, Mickalene Thomas, and Provost Kirk E. Pillow; Susan Luss (B.F.A. ’13) and Drew Babbits, Pratt Institute interim executive director, campaign and major gifts. Photos by BFA

Pratt Presents Panel Spotlights Influential Women in Art at Art Basel Miami Beach A large audience gathered to attend the Pratt Presents panel “Women of Influence in the Business of Art” held during Art Basel Miami Beach at the EDITION Hotel on December 3. Renowned visual artists Shirin Neshat and Pratt alumna Mickalene Thomas (B.F.A. ’00), along with Heidi Zuckerman, director of the Aspen Art Museum, discussed the qualities that define female artists and leaders in art today, as well as inspiration and challenges related to their own experiences in overcoming obstacles to achieve success. Stefano Tonchi, editor of W magazine, served as the moderator.

Thomas spoke about the importance of women as a source of inspiration in her work, and Neshat described how art has helped her find a voice within her home country of Iran. Zuckerman discussed the potential for art to be inclusive, applauding both Neshat and Thomas for the bravery reflected through their art, as well as for the strides they’ve taken in a male-dominated business. She also thanked Neshat and Thomas for giving her the opportunity to expose the world to, and influence it through, their art. Sponsorship for “Women of Influence in the Business of Art” was provided by Simon Property Group and Perrier-Jouët.


“My Pratt education gave me a wonderful career and so much more; it broadened my world in ways I could never have imagined.” — Pauline Rothstein (M.S. L.I.S. ’70)  Pratt opened a world of opportunities for alumna Pauline Rothstein. Now, through a generous bequest, she’s helping the Institute do the same for future generations. And you can, too.

Including Pratt in your will is an easy way to support the Institute and its students for years to come. Your gift could support a scholarship, sponsor faculty research, or fund future technology needs within a specific school or throughout the Institute. The choice is yours. To learn more about making a bequest to Pratt, or other gift planning options that can benefit you and your heirs as well as the Institute, contact Drew Babitts, Interim Executive Director of Campaign and Major Gifts, at 718.399.4296 or dbabitts@pratt.edu. Above: A data visualization created for a study on the interdisciplinary nature of bioethics being conducted by Pratt School of Information faculty member Chris Alen Sula in collaboration with CUNY doctoral candidate Amanda Favia.


HONOR ROLL A letter from Board Chair Bruce Gitlin

One of the distinguishing characteristics of a Pratt education is students’ ability to impact their world in a number of different ways. Whether through art, design, architecture, information science, or the liberal arts, our students have profound creative abilities that influence the way we perceive our cities, small towns, and everything in between. Our students design our buildings and open spaces, help organize our lives, capture our stories, and show us a different way of looking at things. What you put into the world will come back to you. On that note, we are so fortunate to have the support of a diverse group of alumni, recent graduates, proud parents, foundations, corporations, government agencies, and a host of other organizations and groups that acknowledge the impact of these students and support their visions for how we can better our world. We thank each and every one of these donors. Whether they graduated from Pratt, took some classes here, employ an intern or alumni, teach here, or simply admire the Institute and its work, it is this financial support that keeps our doors, and our minds, open. Last year, giving to The Fund for Pratt has increased, which gives us wide discretion in how we can continue to improve the Institute. Our Leadership Society remains strong, and our alumni support continues to grow. Every contribution that we receive, regardless of amount, is significant. These gifts allowed us to create a state-of-the-art Film/Video facility and support faculty research and other initiatives that enrich our curricula. We can continue to renovate historic town houses for on-campus student housing and move forward with plans for a new student center. We have been able to give students a significant amount of scholarship support. More than anything, it means that we can afford to attract the best students and faculty to Pratt Institute. On behalf of the Board of Trustees, and everyone here at Pratt, thank you for all that you do for us. With best wishes,

Bruce J. Gitlin Chair, Board of Trustees


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All listings represent gifts, pledge commitments, and pledge payments made to the entire Pratt community from July 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015. $2,500,000+

David S. Mack (Trustee) and Sondra Mack*

$1,000,000-$2,499,999

Katharine L. McKenna ’84 (Trustee) Robert H. Thayer Jr. (dec.) David C. Walentas (Trustee) and Jane Walentas*

$450,000–$999,999

Bruce J. Gitlin (Trustee) and Carol A. Schrager Juliana C. Terian ’90* (Trustee) The David & Sondra Mack Foundation, Inc.*

$200,000–$449,999

New York City Comptroller New York Community Trust Jane B. Nord ’45* Estate of Winifred V. Shearer ’36

$100,000–$199,999

CulinArt, Inc.* Jack S. Esterson ’75 and Richard Montelione George I. Alden Trust William Hilson ’81 and Barbara Hilson* Knight Foundation Local Initiatives Support Corp* Conrad H. Milster Bruce M. Newman ’53 (Trustee Emeritus) and Judith Newman* David O. Pratt (Trustee) and Kathleen Pratt, P ’14* Surdna Foundation The Ford Foundation The Kresge Foundation Two Trees Management Company, LLC U.S. Department of Commerce

$50,000–$99,999

100 Grand Ave, LLC Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation BMW of North America, LLC Booth Ferris Foundation CEC Stuyvesant Cove, Inc. Kathryn C. Chenault ’12 (Hon.) (Trustee) and Kenneth I. Chenault Conservation Services Group, Inc. Cotton Incorporated* Estate of Isabel Morton Martin J. Golden Laura P. Gregg and A. J. Gregg* James Dyson Foundation Mertz Gilmore Foundation* New York State Council on the Arts* New York State Education Department Ogilvy & Mather, Inc. PNC Institutional Investments Mary O. Pratt* Thomas R. Pratt and Aleta Pratt* Pucci International, Ltd. Ralph Pucci (Trustee) and Ann Pucci Erminia Rivera Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, Inc. Santander

Donald J. Schwarz ’51 and Anastasia Malamas Schwarz ’53* The Spionkop Charitable Trust* Edmund S. Twining III and Diana Twining* The Wege Foundation Tihany Design Adam D. Tihany (Trustee) and Marnie M. Tihany P ’03 Visa USA Inc.

$25,000–$49,999

Air Force Office of Scientific Research Evan Akselrad PE and Yasmine Anavi Lou Ambrogio ’76 and Cynthia B. Ambrogio* Autodesk, Inc. Deborah J. Buck* (Trustee) Citibank Cohn and Wolfe David Yurman Enterprises, LLC Deutsche Bank Estee Lauder, Inc.* Mauricio Fabre and Clara Fabre P ’17 Delbert I. Footer ’53* Karl R. Greenfield ’53 and Valerie Greenfield* Haworth, Inc. Henry C. Bornemann Charitable Trust Interpublic Group of Companies Young Ho Kim ’71 (Trustee Emeritus) Alan Kornberg Latattore Foundation Ted B. Lewin ’56 and Betsy R. Lewin ’59* LG Electronics U.S.A., Inc. McCann-Erickson Mizuho USA Foundation, Inc. Mike Pratt (Trustee) and Carol S. Pratt* Stan H. Richards ’53*(Trustee) David Saylor ’69 Bernard T. Selz and Lisa Selz* Robert H. Siegel FAIA ’62 (Trustee) and Hazel Siegel* Roy B. Simpson Sr. and Edith Simpson Tamaas Foundation The Ayco Charitable Foundation The David Rockefeller Fund The Pinkerton Foundation The Resource Foundation, Inc. The Richards Group The Scherman Foundation* The Selz Foundation* Tory Burch, LLC Anne H. Van Ingen (Trustee) and Wesley Haynes*

$10,000–$24,999

Alexander C. and Tillie S. Speyer Foundation* Anisa International Anonymous Arcade, Inc. Array Marketing Estate of Jean E. Bice Blackmagic Design Kenneth P. Browne ’75* Capital One Foundation Leslie E. Christenson ’59

*Donors who made consecutive gifts for 5+ years, P=Parent donor, (dec.)=Deceased

Chromavis USA Combined Jewish Philanthropies Con Edison Company of New York Cullen and Dykman LLP* David and Sybil Yurman Humanitarian Arts Foundation, Inc. Grace Engbring and Paul Engbring Firmenich Fine Fragrance* Friedman Family Foundation Sheree A. Friedman ’92 and Gerald Friedman General Motors Corporation Givaudan Fragrances Corporation* Steven H. Goodstein ’66 and Linda Goodstein* Robert N. Giraldi ’60 and Patti Greaney H.W. Wilson Foundation, Inc. Gary S. Hattem ’75 (Trustee) and Frazier Holloway* HCT Packaging, Inc. Heart of Neiman Marcus Foundation Fund at the Communities Foundation of Texas Romer Holleran and Deming P. Holleran* Joseph Ianelli Deborah S. Iarussi International Flavors and Fragrances, Inc. iProspect John Bull Ltd Julie Pratt Shattuck Charitable Lead Trust KPMG, LLP Marjorie and James D. Kuhn (Trustee)* Estate of Naomi Leff 1973* Legacy Builders/Developers Corporation Mary Ellen Letterman ’65 and Raymond D. Letterman Mana Products, Inc. Anita B. Mandl Catharine C. Maslow and Harvey A. Eisen MG New York Joseph Mizzi Jr. ’91 Leon Moed ’54 (Trustee Emeritus) and Marilyn Moed* Newmark Grubb Knight Frank Nordstrom John K. Orberg ’75 and Janet I. Kuhl ’77* Rochester Institute of Technology Charles D. Rogalski & Karen Rogalski* Saks Incorporated Peter P. Schreter ’59 and Brouria Schreter Thomas F. Schutte (President) and Tess L. Schutte* Sciame Construction, LLC John R. Shapiro AICP ’79* RitaSue Siegel ’61* Sills Family Foundation Michael and Margaret Simon Squarespace Inc. Howard S. Stein (Trustee) and B. Jill Comins* STV CS AKRF Joint Venture

John M. Takeuchi ’47 The Stutzman Family Foundation Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc. Umbra, LLC* Diana Wege and Timothy Sherogan* Windsor Construction Enterprise Young S. Woo ’80 and Nan H. Woo Xerox Corporation Youth Ministries for Peace and Justice David Yurman and Sybil Yurman Michael S. Zetlin (Trustee) and Gerri Zetlin*

$5,000–$9,999

Albea Beauty Solutions USA, LLC Aptar Axilone USA Belway Electrical Contracting Corp. Black Entertainment Television Bloomingdale’s, Inc. BP Mechanical Corporation David Burney Calvin Klein, Inc. In Young Choi MD and Hyun Oun Hahn, P ’07 Colgate-Palmolive Company* Competition Architectural Metals, Inc. Con Edison, Inc.* D3, LLC Decotech, Inc. Design Display Group, Inc. Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation* Dow Jones & Co., Inc. Mildred M. Fatovic ’72* Estelle Y. Friedman ’69 H.J. Kalikow & Co., LLC Susan Hakkarainen (Trustee) and Pekka Hakkarainen* HCP Packaging USA, Inc. Hearst Magazines, International Heinz Glas USA, Inc.* Industry City Intercos America, Inc. Interfaith Medical Center Kimberly and Erika Pearson Foundation Rachael Krinsky Wendy A. Kvalheim ’83 and Grant Kvalheim Lara Designs Luigi Bormioli Corp. Lutron Electronics Macy’s, Inc. Mane Fine Fragrance Sheila B. Marshall and George B. Marshall Mary Kay Inc. John F. Morning ’55* (Trustee) Michelle V. Nahum-Albright ’75 and Donn Albright, P ’13 Richard Nasti and Maura Nasti James J. Nazemetz ’72 and Patricia Nazemetz Neuberger Berman* New Hampshire Charitable Foundation New York City Environmental Justice Alliance


P R AT TFOLIO Omnicom, Inc. Ornamental Metal Institute of New York Kimberly Pearson Cooke Erika Pearson Pfizer Foundation Matching Gifts Program* Harry L. Posin ’76 and Lisa Posin Maria Pucci Qualcomm Qualipac Corporation Joan D. Rapaport ’67 Reinhold Jewelers Martin E. Rich AIA ’63 and Donna Rich* Robert Lehman Foundation, Inc. Robertet, Inc. Daryl M. Rosenblatt AIA ’77 and Susan J. Miller* Schwan Stabilo Cosmetics Joanne F. Serraino ’83* SGD North America, Inc.* Ronald Shiffman ’61 and Yvette Shiffman ’74 Ruth L. Shuman ’89* Society of Digital Agencies, Inc. Mark D. Stumer ’74 (Trustee) and Susan Stumer* Symrise AG Takasago International Corporation (USA)* The Kaneff Foundation The Steel Institute of New York Barbara D. Tober and Donald G. Tober* Turrell Fund Viacom, Inc. Zachys Wine Auction

$2,500–$4,999

Abco Peerless Sprinkler Corporation AG Foundation* Alarmingly Affordable, Inc.* Amazon.com Kurt B. Andersen (Trustee) and Anne Kreamer* Carl Apfel (dec.) and Iris Apfel Barbara and Donald Tober Foundation* Peter L. Barna ’83 and Myonggi Sul Barna ’82* Barnes & Noble Bookstores, Inc.* Lee Berg Freya Block ’77 and Richard H. Block Samy Brahimy ’80 and Lizanne Merrill* Bambi Breakstone Jonathan Breene Amy M. Cappellazzo ’97 (Trustee) and Joanne Rosen Joan Carotenuto ’52 City Safety Compliance Corp College Publications, Inc. Commission on the Public Health Solutions Concrete Industries One Corp. Marie C. Cooper ’53 and William M. Cooper Andrea B. Dibner-Orozco ’94 and Gerard Orozco ’97* Donna Karan International Patrick J. Donnelly Dooley Electric, Inc. Richard W. Eiger ’55 (Trustee Emeritus) and Ruth Eiger* David Erb and Bonnie Garmus ExxonMobil Foundation*

Fieldland Investment Co. Fink’s Jewelers Joseph Fiorentino and Beverly Vollaro Forest Electric Freya & Richard Block Family Foundation James F. Gager ’67 Anne Goldrach and Alain Goldrach Robert Gorton Agnes Gund* Jiwoo Hahn ’07 Thomas G. Hanrahan Harmony Ball Co. Frederic P. Herter and Solange B. Herter Hudson’s Bay Company Alice N. Hunt and Malcolm A. McCulloch David P. Hunt* IBM Matching Grants Program Island Acoustics, LLC Stephen B. Jacobs ’65 and Andi Pepper Jahn Foundation Helmut Jahn and Deborah Jahn June N. Kelly (Trustee) and Charles D. Storer Jr.* King Hoist and Scaffolding, Inc. Leslie B. Lane ’86 and Bruce Lane Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry London Jewelers Long Island Concrete, Inc. Edward W. Lukasiewicz ’54 and Gail Lukasiewicz MAC Cosmetics McKissack and McKissack Caroline Milbank Mary Murrill Oakes Phillips-Van Heusen Corporation Precision Dialogue James David Price Warrie L. Price and James D. Price Pro Helvetia Pyramid Floor Covering, Inc. RBS Citizens Regi Srl Sigmund J. Rusen ’43 Margaret Russell Joanna L. Silver-Harris Beach LLC SPIE Staples, Inc. Stephen B. Jacobs Group, P.C. Ted Lewin, Ltd. The Mary Murrill Oakes Family Private Foundation Wahab Construction Robert H. Welz ’51 and Mary Louise Welz* Charles P. Werner and Shelby S. Werner Wolf Kahn and Emily Mason Foundation, Inc.

$1,000–$2,499

Judith Aaron and Mitchell K. Aaron Advertising Educational Foundation All H.V.A.C. Service Co., Inc. Peg Alston American Spray-On Corp. Peter Arbeeny Audrey and Martin Gruss Foundation Robert E. Beach AIA ’82 and Martha Beach Charles A. Belfoure ’83 Barbara R. Belin ’61 Ric Bell Bellwyck Packaging Solutions

Benjamin Moore & Co. John Bennardo Robert Bersh Douglas Blonsky Barbara Z. Bordnick ’64 George O. Brome ’78 and Sheila Gibbs-Brome* Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce Robert E. Buckholz Jr. and Lizanne Buckholz Madeline Burke-Vigeland AIA ’81 and Nils Vigeland* Cabot Wrenn Steven Capogna* Cardoza Plumbing Corporation Raymond Cardoza Gina B. Caspi-Levy ’80 and Jay B. Levy ’85* CCS Project Management, LLC Central Park Conservancy Camila Chaves Cortes ’81 Young Cho and Mi Cho Colbeck Coloredge Construction Specifications Institute Roger Cook ’53 and Margit F. Cook ’54* Creative Finishes, Ltd. Jill S. Cuddire ’91 Currimbhoy Design Tarik A. Currimbhoy ’79 and Nayana Currimbhoy Maria Damon Maria G. D’Annunzio Arnold J. Davis ’45 and Seena Davis Deborah Drucker Inc. DeLaCour Family Foundation Willis S. DeLaCour Jr. ’69 Ronald H. DeLuca ’49 and Lois H. DeLuca George Denegre and Milly Denegre DesignTex Harris Diamond Mark A. Dickson ’70 and Katharine Dickson Ray H. Dovell Jr. ’81* Anne N. Edwards (Trustee) and R. Augustus Edwards III Anton J. Egner ’52 and Joan R. Egner Eula Eikerenkoetter Mary J. Ellis ’49* Eugenia Evangelou Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Fragrance Resources, Inc. Carl E. Galioto FAIA ’76, P ’03 Donald M. Genaro ’57* George Lucas Family Foundation Rocco Giannetti AIA ’86 Richard Gioscia ’84 Richard J. Glasebrook II* Charlynn Goins and Warren H Goins Thomas Goodman Erin Gray and Christopher S. Gray Greater Houston Community Foundation Greater New Orleans Foundation Martin D. Gruss and Audrey Gruss Peter B. Halfon ’60 and Carol E. Halfon* Hancock and Moore Whitney C. Harkleroad ’64 and Susan Harkleroad Henry and Elaine Kaufman Foundation Daniel P. Hetteix ’10

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Sharon Hurowitz Sonoe Hutchinson International Facility Management Association NYC Iowa Foundation for Education Environment and the Arts* Jacobson & Company, Inc. Janney Montgomery Scott, LLC David Jarman and Maggie Jarman P ’16 Jazz at Lincoln Center, Inc. Jewels St. Thomas /Little Switzerland Jill Stuart Arlene D. Jonach* Berti S. Jones ’70 and Robert Jones* June Kelly Gallery, Inc. Michael W. Kamen and Sandra Kamen Kevin L. Kane ’75 and Mary Kane* Henry Kaufman and Elaine Kaufman Mariana Kaufman and George S. Kaufman Peter L. Kern ’62 and Carol H. Kern* Renee N. Khatami ’93 and John R. MacArthur* Leevi Kiil ’63 and Mall Kiil Myoung Oak Kim ’82 and Myoung Sik Park Knoll, Inc. Harold Koda Richard Korchien AIA ’53 and Sheila A. Korchien* Elenore Kowalchek ’47* Andrew J. Langer ’64 and Patricia Langer Kwang Ok Lee ’91 Edward T. Lewis and Carolyn Lewis Theodore Liebman FAIA ’62 and Nina Liebman* Donald Lizzul ’57 and Kathryn Lizzul Henry Loheac ’55* Lukasiewicz Design, Inc. Carolyn B. MacDonald (Trustee) Cynthia M. Mailman ’64 and Silver G. Sullivan ’66 Frank A. Mallalieu ’57* Peter P. Marino and Jane Trapnell Marino Martin E. Rich Architect, PC Maspeth Welding, Inc Math for America, Inc. Juan C. Matiz ’94 and Sara Matiz Caryn Melrose & Michael Moser Michael E. Menatian ’94 and Erin L. Menatian Edith W. Meyers* Angie Mills ’50* Edward Miner and Sumaya Miner John L. (Jack) Moe ’48* Arthur Moretti and Yvonne Moretti* George T. Moy ’56* Ted Muehling III ’75* Mule Family Foundation Marian M. Mule ’92 and Ed Mule Ann Mustard and Allan Mustard, P ’12 Brooke G. Neidich and Daniel M. Neidich Neiman Marcus Stores Barbara Nessim ’60 Susan Norris and John Norris Niles R. Oliver ’70 and Sandra Oliver* Robert M. Parnes ’69 and Gwenn Parnes Laura Parsons PG&E Corporation Foundation Alice Phillips Swistel and Daniel Swistel


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Plan A Advisors Platt Byard Dovell White Architects LLP* Peter M. Plumley Lisa Pottasch Aisha Potts ’01 Noni S. Pratt* James L. Quinlan ’51 Layton L. Register Suzanne M. Revy ’84 Raymond J. Ripper ’63 and Barbara Fleming Robert Mark Parnes Architecture, LLC Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Robert Zaccone & Associates, P.C. Michele Rollins, P ’06 Daniel Romualdez Rose Creative Group, Inc. Keith F. Rosen AIA ’79* Marjorie Rosen Jack L. Rothschild ’52 and Arlene S. Rothschild* Safe Environment Business Solutions Giuseppe San Filipo and Lina Phillips* Schwab Charitable Fund Alan Schwartzman ’75 and Ruth Schwartzman* Colleen V. Scott ’97 Joan K. Sherman and Marc Sherman* Leonard Sirowitz ’53 and Myrna Sirowitz Joshua L. Smith (Trustee) Harmony C. Spongberg and Stephen A. Spongberg Burton B. Staniar and Nancy Staniar Sheldon J. Streisand ’56 and Judith Streisand* Jill Stuart Brian T. Sullivan ’74 and Catherine M. Herman ’75 Ronald D. Swann ’77 Joan E. Taylor ’60* Ted Muehling, Inc.* TEI Group The Daniel M. Neidich and Brooke Garber Foundation* The Edward Lewis Revocable Trust Calvin Tsao Dan C. Tutcher and Kim Tutcher, P ’10 Erin G. Tutcher ’10 United Christian Evangelistic Association Urban Expositions, LLC Stephen A. Valentine ’77 Voya Foundation Jennifer A. Walsh ’81 and Bernard M. Wharton Mark Weber JD*, P ’12 Naomi D. Z. Weinberger ’94 and Michael D. Weinberger Charles S. Whelan Jr. ’74 Frank S. Wiechnik ’74 Janice S. Williams Adelaide F. Wolfanger ’57 Sarah Wolfe Robert M. Zaccone ’71 and Paula Zaccone

$500–$999

Miriam H. Allman ’64 American Association of Advertising Agencies Janet M. Anderson ’60* Apogee Construction Eric A. Appel ’67

Chandra F. Aquilina ’78 and Robert Aquilina Andrew W. Barnes Barrett, Inc. Richard Barrett Bessemer Trust Company Alison L. Bills ’65 and James P. Searls Nancy M. Boszhardt ’90 Criselda Breene Thom Browne and Andrew Bolton Lawrence F. Bullwinkel ’77 Joseph P. Cacarillo ’67 and Elaine J. Cacarillo Peggy Cafritz Regina Cahill Thomas A. Calamari ’93 and Desiree Calamari James M. Casker ’67* Philip M. Catullo ’85 Barbara Charton ’74, P ’81 Brian S. Chertok ’79 Diane B. Chichura ’54* Hyun Cho Sheila Colgin Community Foundation for the National Capital Region Anita Cooney ’92* Calvin Cross and Catherine Daum Cynthia Cunningham Morgan A. Daly ’65 and Rita Daly ’65 Bruce M. Degen ’75 and Christine Degen Anne C. DeMuth ’56 and Ron Demuth Julie E. Desnick ’83 and Robert Desnick Kevin L. DeVorsey ’05 and Christina DeVorsey Robert O. DiNozzi Jen M. Doman Dynamic Resources Harold Einhorn AIA ’64 and Valery Einhorn* Joel M. Ergas ’63 Eric Appel, LLC Carl S. Erickson ’64 Dan Evans IIDA* Evo Pak FMB, Inc. Friends of Marie Zimmermann General William Mayer Foundation, Inc. Muriel S. Gluckman, P ’81 Wendy Goodman Matthew P. Goodrich ’03 Marc E. Gordon ’86 Sharon A. Harwood Gerard E. Hilferty ’63 and Jacqueline Folks Victoria R. Hill ’89 Barbara Hilsee and Todd Hilsee Margaret R. Hoh ’74 and Mike Bellamy Masanori Igarashi, P ’03 Harvey Jacoby ’60 and Janice Jacoby Frank Jagisch and Christine Jagisch, P ’98* Laura P. Jagodzinski ’72 and Andrew J. Alexander AIA ’73 Janet M. Anderson Trust Carolina V. Jannicelli ’13 Dwight C. Johnson PhD ’72 Edward J. Jones ’77 and Jeanne Wilson Jones* Jeffrey S. Kapec ’72 and Susan Kapec, P ’08* Kevin Kelly and Anne Marie Kelly James Laforce Louis Feinberg Foundation*

*Donors who made consecutive gifts for 5+ years, P=Parent donor, (dec.)=Deceased

Gerald Luss ’48 and Susan S. Luss ’13 Chris MacDonald Ann Mahoney Jerry Mahoney Rodney Mangus and Suzanne Smith Jennifer and James Marden R. Beatrice McCalman ’48 William D. McIntosh ’80 Mclean Packaging Mickalene Thomas ’00 and Carmen McLeod Kim Morque ’83 Gabriella E. Morris John D. Moser AIA ’74 and Lynda Speilman* Cory L. Murphy ’09 Anne B. Namm ’71 and Andrew I. Namm* Michel Nespoulous and Helene Ausseil Newport Dennis O’Brien ’77 and Deborah O’Brien Kevin J. O’Mara ’72 and Joan H. O’Mara* Elisa Ostafin, P ’08 Jon Otis and Diane Barnes* Susanne Padilla and Eduardo Padilla, P ’12 Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman ’85 and Daniel D. Pailes-Friedman ’83 Thomas J. Patti ’67 and Marilyn Patti Carol Pennelli Cheryl Penny William J. Peterson Mary J. Petras ’67 and Charles F. Petras ’74 Peter B. Phelan and Cynthia L. Phelan* James Pickrel and Carolyn Woolley Fran Pojdl Princeton Architectural Press Public Works Partners LLC 04-13 Rekha Leigh Punch Marius C. Radulescu ’88* Jonathan Reed Robert A. M. Stern Architects Robert K. and Evelyn D. Pedersen Family Foundation Louis B. Rosenberg IIDA ’64 and Lynda Schmid Francisco Sanchez ’03 Leonard J. Schwemmer PE ’57 Annabelle M. Selldorf ’85 Limin Sheng and Yan Wang Alexandra Shuman and Michael Shuman Christopher Shyer and David S. Ehrich III Carole A. Sirovich and Lawrence Sirovich* Marva Smalls Lisa Loraine Smith Robert A. M. Stern Stolzle Glass USA, Inc. The Namm Foundation* Town Of Palm Beach United Way Inc. Irene Treiber George E. Trogler Jr. ’61 Alice C. Van de Wetering ’68 and James Van de Wetering Paul A. Wagner and Jeanette S. Wagner Sara G. Wagschal ’83 Walid Wahab and Susie Wahab Stephen H. Warhaftig ’64 and Paula Warhaftig Michael V. Warlick and Amy L. Warlick, P ’13

Pamela J. Waters ’63 Vivian White Kate Whitney and Franklin A. Thomas Victoria Wiener Allen Wyett Yixin Zhang Bernard Zyscovich ’71 Pratt Institute would like to thank its donors who have made gifts up to $499, whose names are listed on our website. Please visit www.pratt.edu/honor-roll to view the complete list of donors.

Leadership Society

Pratt Institute is proud to recognize its most generous and loyal supporters through the Leadership and Renaissance Societies.

1887 Society

Pratt Institute’s influential leaders, with lifetime giving of over $1 million David S. Mack (Trustee) and Sondra Mack* Katharine L. McKenna ‘84 (Trustee)* Bruce M. Newman ’53 (Trustee Emeritus) and Judith Newman* Mary O. Pratt* Carole A. Sirovich and Lawrence Sirovich* Matthew I. Sirovich and Meredith Elson Juliana C. Terian ’90 (Trustee)* David C. Walentas (Trustee) and Jane Walentas*

Charles Pratt Circle

Gifts of $25,000 and above to The Fund for Pratt Jane B. Nord ’45 Robert H. Siegel FAIA ’62 and Hazel Siegel Howard S. Stein and B. Jill Comins Adam D. Tihany (Trustee) and Marnie M. Tihany P ’03

Chairman’s Circle

Gifts of $10,000-$24,999 to The Fund for Pratt Combined Jewish Philanthropies Grace Engbring and Paul Engbring Deborah S. Iarussi Katharine L. McKenna ’84 (Trustee) and Mark S. Braunstein Leon Moed ’54 (Trustee Emeritus) and Marilyn Moed Jane B. Nord John K. Orberg ’75 and Janet I. Kuhl ’77 Mike Pratt (Trustee) and Carol S. Pratt Stan H. Richards ’53 Robert H. Siegel FAIA ’62 and Hazel Siegel Michael and Margaret Simon Howard S. Stein and B. Jill Comins

President’s Circle

Gifts of $5,000-$9,999 to The Fund for Pratt Gary S. Hattem ’75 and Frazier Holloway Romer Holleran and Deming P. Holleran Wendy A. Kvalheim ’83 and Grant Kvalheim


P R AT TFOLIO James J. Nazemetz ’72 and Patricia Nazemetz Harry L. Posin ’76 and Lisa Posin Mike Pratt (Trustee) and Carol S. Pratt Daryl M. Rosenblatt AIA ’77 and Susan J. Miller

Provost’s Circle

Gifts of $2,500-$4,999 to The Fund for Pratt Samy Brahimy ’80 and Lizanne Merrill Joan Carotenuto Marie C. Cooper ’53 and William M. Cooper Andrea B. Dibner-Orozco ’94 and Gerard Orozco ’97 David Erb and Bonnie Garmus Henry W. Grussinger ’48 and Ethel Grussinger Jiwoo Hahn Stephen B. Jacobs ’65 and Andi Pepper Helmut Jahn and Deborah Jahn Myoung Oak Kim ’82 and Myoung Sik Park Leslie B. Lane ’86 and Bruce Lane Edward W. Lukasiewicz ’54 and Gail Lukasiewicz Mary Murrill Oakes Sigmund J. Rusen Donald J. Schwarz ’51 and Anastasia Schwarz ’53 Robert H. Welz ’51 and Mary Louise Welz

Leadership Circle

Gifts of $1,000-$2,499 to The Fund for Pratt Judith Aaron and Mitchell K. Aaron Lou Ambrogio ’76 and Cynthia B. Ambrogio Kurt B. Andersen and Anne Kreamer Robert E. Beach AIA ’82 and Martha Beach Charles A. Belfoure Barbara R. Belin Robert Bersh Barbara Z. Bordnick George O. Brome ’78 and Sheila Gibbs-Brome Robert E. Buckholz Jr. and Lizanne Buckholz Madeline Burke-Vigeland AIA ’81 and Nils Vigeland Amy M. Cappellazzo ’97 and Joanne Rosen Young Cho and Mi Cho Roger Cook ’53 and Margit F. Cook ’54 Jill S. Cuddire Arnold J. Davis ’45 and Seena Davis Willis S. DeLaCour George Denegre and Milly Denegre Mark A. Dickson ’70 and Katharine Dickson Ray H. Dovell Anne N. Edwards (Trustee) and R. Augustus Edwards III Anton J. Egner ’52 and Joan R. Egner Mary J. Ellis Carl E. Galioto Richard Gioscia Susan Hakkarainen and Pekka Hakkarainen Peter B. Halfon ’60 and Carol E. Halfon Whitney C. Harkleroad ’64 and Susan Harkleroad Daniel P. Hetteix Sonoe Hutchinson

David Jarman and Maggie Jarman Arlene D. Jonach Berti S. Jones ’70 and Robert Jones Kevin L. Kane ’75 and Mary Kane Guido G. Karcher ’60 and Patricia A. Karcher Peter L. Kern ’62 and Carol H. Kern Leevi Kiil ’63 and Mall Kiil Richard Korchien AIA ’53 and Sheila A. Korchien Elenore Kowalchek Andrew J. Langer ’64 and Patricia Langer Kwang Ok Lee Theodore Liebman FAIA ’62 and Nina Liebman Donald Lizzul ’57 and Kathryn Lizzul Henry Loheac Cynthia M. Mailman ’64 and Silver G. Sullivan ’66 Frank A. Mallalieu Juan C. Matiz ’94 and Sara Matiz Caryn Melrose and Michael Moser Michael E. Menatian ’94 and Erin L. Menatian Angie Mills John L. Moe George T. Moy Marian M. Mule ’92 and Ed Mule Barbara Nessim Susan Norris and John Norris Niles R. Oliver ’70 and Sandra Oliver Robert M. Parnes ’69 and Gwenn Parnes Mary J. Petras ’67 and Charles F. Petras ’74 Alice Phillips Swistel and Daniel Swistel Lisa Pottasch Noni S. Pratt James L. Quinlan Suzanne M. Revy Martin E. Rich AIA ’63 and Donna Rich Raymond J. Ripper ’63 and Barbara Fleming Keith F. Rosen Jack L. Rothschild ’52 and Arlene S. Rothschild Alan Schwartzman ’75 and Ruth Schwartzman Joshua L. Smith (Trustee) Chun Hua Song Harmony C. Spongberg and Stephen A. Spongberg Sheldon J. Streisand ’56 and Judith Streisand Ronald D. Swann Joan E. Taylor Dan C. Tutcher and Kim Tutcher Erin G. Tutcher Jennifer A. Walsh ’81 and Bernard M. Wharton Naomi D. Z. Weinberger ’94 and Michael D. Weinberger Charles S. Whelan Frank S. Wiechnik Adelaide F. Wolfanger

Gatekeeper Society

The Fund for Pratt’s most dedicated donors, with an unbroken commitment of five or more years of consecutive giving James P. Agalloco III ’68 and Linda Agalloco Catherine W. Aker Charles H. Amann ’63 and Mary Amann

Lou Ambrogio ’76 and Cynthia B. Ambrogio Carol R. Anastasian ’65 and Mardiros Anastasian Janet M. Anderson Lisa Anderson-Gaona Kevin J. Andreano and Elizabeth Andreano Michael H. Ankuda ’79 and Michele A. Ankuda ’80 Irvin K. Atkinson ’60 and Jane Atkinson Arsho Baghsarian ’62 and Avedis Baghsarian Susan B. Baker Nicholas R. Battista ’74 and Ann M. Battista John H. Behrmann ’60 and Dianne Behrmann Christine Bennethum Susan A. Bickford Alexandra Bilyard Margaret Birnstiel Lawrence Black ’65 and Linda Black Joel C. Blau Robert H. Blend Martin M. Bloomenthal ’70 and Anne M. Bloomenthal Stanley M. Boruchow-Brent Samy Brahimy ‘80 and Lizanne Merrill Delos J. Branning and Royee Chen Elizabeth V. Braun David Brewster ‘69 and Nancy Brewster David S. Broad ’50 and Suzanne Broad George O. Brome ’78 and Sheila Gibbs-Brome Marvelous B. Brooks Hope Brown Josephine T. Brown Richard J. Bubnowski Kenneth H. Buchanan Deborah J. Buck Madeline Burke-Vigeland AIA ’81 and Nils Vigeland Bernardine M. Butcaris Peter G. Campbell Mark B. Cannon Clayton C. Carlisle William V. Carney PE ’58 and Joan P. Carney James M. Casker Casimir Cetnarowski Kenneth S. L. Chang and Vivian V. Chang Diane B. Chichura Dorothy E. Christiansen Doris D. Cohen Roger Cook ’53 and Margit F. Cook ’54 James H. Cowles ’61 and Nancy V. Cowles Jonathan Cramer ’89 and Orlie L. Kraus ’81 Alexander M. Cranstoun ’56 and Margaret A. Cranstoun ’56 Adele G. Crawford Robert W. Cresko ’68 and Catherine A. Cresko Darwin S. Crouser ’59 and Carol Drugan Christopher Cummings and Barbara Cummings Janet E. Dash ’60 and Joseph Dash Thomas A. Dean ’87 and Yun-Ah Hong Christopher P. DeCostanza David A. Deyell PhD ’60 and Joanne M. Deyell

49

Dennis P. Di Vincenzo ’77 and Maria Ackerman Andrea B. Dibner-Orozco ’94 and Gerard Orozco ’97 Lori DiGiacinto ’76 and Joel P. DiGiacinto Lawrence DiPietra Bruce J. Dominguez Laurie B. Donovan ’57 and William P. Donovan Lisa Doocy and Paul Doocy John D. Doran ’59 and Anne F. Doran Ray H. Dovell Donald L. Doyle ’70 and Gertrude M. Doyle Robert E. Drucker Gabrielle Dujue Marjory M. Duncalfe Anton F. Eckert ’51 and Virginia Eckert Carolyn D. Edge Frederick Eickelberg Harold Einhorn AIA ’64 and Valery Einhorn Robert Eliot ’78 and Debra Eliot Gwendolyn J. Elliott Mary J. Ellis Henry Eng Graham B. English Ronald W. Erickson ’68 and Catherine Erickson Rose Fabricant-Pattavina Jean R. Fahrenbach Michael F. Feno ’63 and Barbara A. Feno Jack P. Fermery ’58 and Carol Fermery Mary Ann Ferrarese John P. Fillo John M. Fraioli ’60 and Constance Fraioli Patt Franklin ’62 and Lynn Franklin Jacqueline K. Freedman Arnold A. Friedmann ’53 and Susi Friedmann Philip A. Fruchter Barbara A. Genco Jonathan A. Gibson ’06 and Monica Gibson Eloise G. Giles ’51 and Lester A. Giles Jr. Kenneth E. Gillman Kerry Glass ’98 and Neil S. Glass Suzanne J. Glomb ’66 and John W. Glomb Lewis Gluck Judith S. Goldstein ’69 and Stephen L. Goldstein Norma J. Goldwyn Kathleen E. Golini and Donald J. Golini Michael Goscinsky ’61 and Margaret Goscinsky Shirlee Greenberg Stuart C. Greene Todd W. Greenwood ’83 and Ruth Greenwood Edward R. Greninger Toni Ann Grimley ’73 and Vincent J. Grimley Robert C. Gutmann ’62 and Rosemarie Gutmann David W. Haase ’80 and Esther R. Schwalb ’87 William Haberman Georgia R. Hadley ’56 and Edward W. Hadley


50

P R AT TFOLIO

Henry Haggland ’40 and Betty Jane Haggland Joan E. Hain Peter B. Halfon ’60 and Carol E. Halfon Harold Halvorsen ’58 and Norita Halvorsen Jean M. Hanson Carl O. Harbart James W. Harbison Jr. and Margaret Harbison June H. Harland Howard J. Harris ’73 and Michele Harris Luke M. Hart ’07 and Faith B. Hart Robin S. Hartmann ’78 and Rainer Hartmann Gary S. Hattem ’75 and Frazier Holloway Marlene Hazzikostas ’08 and Dimitri Hazzikostas Wayne L. Herpich ’68 and Cynthia F. Herpich ’70 Ruth Herzog Romer Holleran and Deming P. Holleran Samuel Hornick ’75 and Linda Hornick Marguerite A. Houseworth Ronald J. Howanich Lily P. Huang Jean M. Iker Frank Jagisch and Christine Jagisch David I. Johnson ’50 and Valerie Johnson William B. Johnston ’71 and Meredith C. Johnston Arlene D. Jonach Berti S. Jones ’70 and Robert Jones David E. Jones Edward J. Jones ’77 and Jeanne Wilson Jones Timothy C. Joseph Kevin L. Kane ’75 and Mary Kane Monica I. Kane-Hughes ’81 and Ralph Hughes Guido G. Karcher ’60 and Patricia A. Karcher Barbara G. Karyo ’63 and Bernard E. Karyo Vivian L. Kasen AICP ’69 and Leonard Kasen Karl H. Kastan ’57 and Esther O. Kastan Eve D. Keberle ’67 and William O. Keberle Mary J. Kehoe Michele L. Keir ’71 and Raymond C. Keith Jr. ’69 and Janet L. Keith ’72 Robert P. Keller Rita M. Kent Lawrence M. Kerbs Peter L. Kern ’62 and Carol H. Kern Carolee W. Kiernan Boris Y. Klapwald ’53 and Myrna Klapwald Edmund Kleiman ’68 and Francine Kleiman Martin R. Kleinman ’69 and Luba H. Kleinman ’69 David S. Kletter ’63 and Esther Kletter Anne P. Kofler Sylvia C. Kokatnur ’52 and Arvind V. Kokatnur Mary B. Kolischak ’49 and Michael J. Kolischak Richard Korchien AIA ’53 and Sheila A. Korchien

Betty K. Kormusis Crumley Elenore Kowalchek Philip J. Kropf ’65 and Sandra S. Kropf Jien Kuon Zenon Kurowycky Frederick J. Kurtz Edward L. La Mura ’59 and Aileen LaMura Lillian Langotsky Jill L. Lanier Don A. Lasker ’70 and Russell Lasker Doris S. Latham Edmund H. Lee ’74 and Alice B. Lee Irwin B. Lefkowitz AIA ’59 and Linda B. Lefkowitz Jane M. Leverich Walter E. Levi Theodore Liebman FAIA ’62 and Nina Liebman Hugh A. Lifson ’62 and Delores S. Lifson Sophia C. Livanos ’82 and Michael B. Livanos Henry Loheac Charles Lundrigan ’79 and Laura Lundrigan Diane L. Maass ’81 and Douglas O. Maass Lester J. Macklin ’61 and Ellen Macklin Eva R. MacLowry ’57 and James D. MacLowry Gustavo Madera and Llini Madera Beatrice M. Mady Frank A. Mallalieu Joseph Mannino Sheila S. Marks Renee K. Martin ’82 and Michael J. Martin Lila Matlin Robert G. Matthews ’56 and Mary B. Matthews Rosamond B. Mattiello Albert R. Maykut Charles P. Mazurak PE ’71 and Betsy J. Mazurak Joyce G. McCarron ’86 and Matthew J. McCarron Stuart H. McFeely Katharine L. McKenna ’84 (Trustee) and Mark S. Braunstein Stephen F. McKeon ’64 and Elizabeth McKeon Robert J. McMahon ’67 and Jeanne Randorf James N. Mehmet John I. Mesick Lois M. Meyer Walter J. Miclo Emil J. Mikity ’51 and Phyllis A. Mikity Holmes E. Miller and Jeannie S. Miller Longia M. Miller ’69 and William Miller John V. Mizzi PE ’63 and Joann Mizzi John L. Moe Gary P. Molan Harriet Montag Sylvia M. Morgenstern ’49 and Ernest H. Morgenstern R. P. Morris ’65 and Karen Morris John D. Moser AIA ’74 and Lynda Speilman Bernard Most ’59 and Amy B. Most George T. Moy Lawrence G. Muller ’83 and Cheryl H. Muller ’82 Craig P. Nadel Anne B. Namm ’71 and Andrew I. Namm Saradendu K. Narayan

*Donors who made consecutive gifts for 5+ years, P=Parent donor, (dec.)=Deceased

Norma Nelson Nancy Ness Stanley Nitzky ’55 and Bette E. Nitzky Pamela M. Norcross-Sherrick ’72 and James H. Sherrick Jane B. Nord Kevin J. O’Mara ’72 and Joan H. O’Mara Niles R. Oliver ’70 and Sandra Oliver Anita Olsan Strauss ’49 and Fred Strauss Vivian C. Olshen ’61 and Paul Olshen John K. Orberg ’75 and Janet I. Kuhl ‘77 David C. Ostman Paul R. Paradise Charles A. Passut PhD ’67 and Genevieve Passut Sidney S. Paul Adali Pearlstein Albert A. Pedulla ’60 and Beverly A. Pedulla Marie I. Pelosi ’73 and Emiddio Pelosi Vincent R. Perez ’60 and Bette Perez Kathleen J. Perry Andrew L. Phelan Mary Ellen Plitt ’81 and Henry Dickerson David O. Pratt and Kathleen Pratt Mike Pratt (Trustee) and Carol S. Pratt Robert W. Prigge Sr. ’55 and Ruth Prigge Michele Przybylski Howard L. Ptaszek Saverio A. Quaranta ’80 and Claire Quaranta William R. Quinnell Martin Rabb ’52 and Ethel Rabb Marius C. Radulescu David J. Ramsay Ronald W. Ratcliffe ’66 and Lydia Ratcliffe ’67 Claire B. Reeve Herman W. Reinius ’69 and Dorothy W. Reinius Debora K. Reiser Christopher T. Restak Patrick M. Reynolds ’63 Martin E. Rich AIA ’63 and Donna Rich Stan H. Richards ’53 (Trustee) Joseph L. Richardson Robert H. Romero ’70 and Casey Romero Gerald I. Rosen AIA ’57 and Janice Rosen Keith F. Rosen Daryl M. Rosenblatt AIA ’77 and Susan J. Miller Joyce B. Rosenstein ’53 and Dennis M. Rosenstein Judith Rosenstein Jack L. Rothschild ’52 and Arlene S. Rothschild Gali Rotstein and Chen Rotstein Roger W. Rubens ’49 and Francine Rubens Edward O. Ruitberg ’71 and Laura A. Ruitberg Hideki Sahara ’95 and Yuki Sahara Margaret A. Santacroce ’52 and Joseph Santacroce Michael J. Santangelo Muriel H. Savery ’49 and William M. Savery Louis A. Scanapico Thomas L. Scelza

Susan K. Schickedanz ’90 and Steven W. Schickedanz ’89 Barbara G. Schiffer Florence Schreibstein Brian C. Schuchardt ’59 and Marianne Schuchardt Marvin I. Schwartz Alan Schwartzman ’75 and Ruth Schwartzman Donald J. Schwarz ’51 and Anastasia Schwarz ’53 Frank J. Scire ’52 and Jacqueline Scire Gloria J. Scott ’48 and Charles J. Scott Alan J. Segan George E. Segnini ’67 and Valerie Segnini Zeljko Segota ’84 and Teresa Segota Ann W. Seigel ’52 and Jerome W. Seigel ’54 Harriet S. Selverstone ’83 and Robert Selverstone Ronald E. Shapiro Harland W. Shunk III ’82 and Joyce Shunk Bruce H. Sicherman ’69 and Susan L. Sicherman Robert H. Siegel FAIA ’62 and Hazel Siegel James J. Simonis Philip Sirota Eric Soslau ’72 and Judy A. Soslau Michele E. Spence ’73 and John Spence Biruta A. Spruds ’72 and Andris Spruds Sydney Starr Howard S. Stein and B. Jill Comins Irene R. Stewart Anne Stoddard Joyce E. Stone Roslyn J. Streifer ’74 and Robert Pasternak ’73 Sheldon J. Streisand ’56 and Judith Streisand Richard Stripeikis Frank F. Sturm Susan S. Sullivan ’92 and T. D. Sullivan II Timothy M. Sullivan ’57 and Carol Sullivan Robert E. Svec Jessica L. Tallman ’10 and Mark Tallman* Rita V. Tanski ’50 and John F. Tanski Jerome Tauber ’66 and Janet Sawyer Joan E. Taylor Roy R. Thomson AIA ’59 and Sally Thomson John W. Truxall Sherrie L. Turkheimer ’58 and Allan Turkheimer James H. T. Uehling ’57 and Lindley H. Uehling Candace W. Van Aken Claude Van Lingen Sharyn R. Vansant Roman J. Verostko John L. Vezendy Margaret A. Vickers Edward C. Vollmer Peter A. Wachtel ’92 and Sue Wachtel Peter A. Wallack Sarah K. Walsh Gloria A. Walton


P R AT TFOLIO Margaret C. Weatherly Lawrence Weinstein ’65 and Irma Weinstein Stanley J. Weisbrod AIA ’78 and Haegyung Weisbrod Claudette M. Wellington Robert H. Welz ’51 and Mary Louise Welz Susan A. Wetsell Marcia E. Wiener ’57 and Joseph F. Wiener Carol S. Willson ’56 and James A. Willson Harold J. Wilson ’60 and Olga Wilson Elizabeth L. Winsch Carla A. Woldt Adelaide F. Wolfanger Teresa Y. Yuan Jon R. Zogg Donald W. Zurwelle ’60 and Lynn C. Zurwelle

Renaissance Society

Pratt Institute’s loyal planned giving benefactors Anonymous (6) Janet M. Anderson ’60* Donald M. Axleroad ’56 Roger M. Bazeley ’73 and Noriko Bazeley Joan L. Benson ’50 Laura J. Bohn ’77 and Richard C. Fiore Sr. Melinda Brisben Neil E. Campbell ’69 and Barbara Campbell Allen L. Carlsen ’59 Victor Carnuccio ’79 James M. Casker ’67* Virginia Chakejian ’62* Gerardo Contreras and Ruth Contreras Jack U. Davidson ’75 Ronald H. DeLuca ’49 and Lois H. DeLuca MaryEllen Dohrs ’50 Rosemary Doyle ’72 Richard W. Eiger ’55 (Trustee Emeritus) and Ruth Eiger* Jack S. Esterson ’75 and Richard Montelione Mildred M. Fatovic ’72* Delbert I. Footer ’53* Arnold A. Friedmann ’53 and Susi Friedmann* Constance B. Gee ’79 and E. G. Gee Emil M. Gentilella ’49 Morton Gerard ’56 and Adriana Aquino-Gerard Edward M. Giordano Jr. ’85 Robert W. Glenn (dec.) Pamela G. Griesinger ’73 Deming P. Holleran and Romer Holleran Parthasarathy Iyengar ’68 and Sashikala Iyengar Susan M. Kamm ’64 Mary E. Kelly ’61 Judith Kingsley Lawrence R. Koltnow ’66 and Emily Numeroff Koltnow ’64 Rachael Krinsky Don A. Lasker ’70 Lois Lazarus Mary Ellen Letterman ’65 and Raymond D. Letterman John P. Martin ’68

David B. Mattingly Angie Mills ’50* Philip R. Monaghan ’79 Annemarie P. Morris in memory of George W. Morris ’43 John L. Morrow Jr. ’48 and Helen C. Morrow Bruce M. Newman ’53 (Trustee Emeritus) and Judith Newman* Kevin J. O’Mara ’72 and Joan H. O’Mara* Mike Pratt (Trustee) and Carol S. Pratt* Michael C. Pyatok ’66 Joan D. Rapaport ’67 Jean Raper Layton L. Register Martin E. Rich AIA ’63 and Donna Rich* Judith Rosenstein ’64* Pauline M. Rothstein PhD ’70 Louise C. Rust ’56 and Herbert H. Rust DDS Adeline Sadowski ’57 David Saylor ’69 Thomas F. Schutte (President) and Tess L. Schutte* Lucy M. Sikes ’58 Patricia Dedula Stokes ’68 and Ronald Romano Louis M. Taylor ’40 Fern Tiger ’67 Irving R. Toben ’47 and Rhoda S. Toben Hugo H. Todebush (dec.) Patricia E. Tuohy ’79 Ernestine T. L. Vallen ’54 Claudette M. Wellington ’88* Robert H. Welz ’51 and Mary Louise Welz*

Corporations and Corporate Foundations

100 Grand Ave, LLC Abco Peerless Sprinkler Corporation Agalloco & Associates Alarmingly Affordable, Inc.* Albea Beauty Solutions USA, LLC All H.V.A.C. Service Co., Inc. Amazon.com American Association of Advertising Agencies American Legion Hoboken Post 107 American Spray-On Corp. Anisa International Apogee Construction Aptar Arcade, Inc. Array Marketing Autodesk, Inc. Avon Products Foundation, Inc. Axilone USA Barnes & Noble Bookstores, Inc.* Barrett, Inc. Bellwyck Packaging Solutions Belway Electrical Contracting Corp. Benevity Community Impact Fund Benjamin Moore & Co. Bessemer Trust Company Between the Notes, LLC Black Entertainment Television Blackmagic Design Bloomingdale’s, Inc. BMW of North America, LLC BNY Mellon Community Partnership BNY Mellon Community Partnership Employee Funds BP Mechanical Corporation Bridge Street Architect

Cabot Wrenn Calvin Klein, Inc. Capital One Foundation Cardoza Plumbing Corporation CCS Project Management, LLC Chris Lee Photographer Chromavis USA Citibank City Safety Compliance Corp Cohn & Wolfe Colgate-Palmolive Company* College Publications, Inc. Coloredge Commission on The Public Health Solutions Competition Architectural Metals, Inc. Con Edison Company of New York Con Edison, Inc.* Concrete Industries One Corp. Conservation Services Group, Inc. Construction Specifications Institute Cotton Incorporated* Creative Finishes, Ltd. CulinArt, Inc.* Cullen and Dykman LLP* Currimbhoy Design D. Douglas Virtue, Ltd. D3, LLC. Dassault Systemes David Yurman Enterprises, LLC Deborah Drucker Inc. Decotech, Inc. Design Display Group, Inc. DesignTex Deutsche Bank Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation* Digital City Services, LLC Donna Karan International Dooley Electric, Inc. Dow Jones & Co., Inc. Dynamic Resources E.J. York, Inc. Eastern Paint Industries, Inc. Elizabeth Capuzzo Eric Appel, LLC Estee Lauder, Inc.* Evo Pak ExxonMobil Foundation* Felderman Keatinge & Associates Fieldland Investment Co. Fink’s Jewelers Firmenich Fine Fragrance* FMB, Inc. Forest Electric Fragrance Resources, Inc. Friends of Marie Zimmermann GE Foundation* General Mills Foundation General Motors Corporation Gensler George Lucas Family Foundation Get Dressed, Inc. Givaudan Fragrances Corporation* Goldman, Sachs & Co. Matching Gift Program Grimm Lyon Planning and Design H.J. Kalikow & Co., LLC H.W. Wilson Foundation, Inc. Hancock & Moore Harmony Ball Co. Haworth, Inc. HCP Packaging USA, Inc. HCT Packaging, Inc. Hearst Magazines, International

51

Heart of Neiman Marcus Foundation Fund at the Communities Foundation of Texas Heinz Glas USA, Inc.* Helium Design Inc. Hudson’s Bay Company IBM Matching Grants Program IDSA NY Industry City Intercos America, Inc. International Facility Management Association NYC International Flavors & Fragrances, Inc. Interpublic Group of Companies Intradesign Group, Inc. iProspect Island Acoustics, LLC Jacobson & Company, Inc. James Dyson Foundation Janney Montgomery Scott, LLC Jeffrey Dodd Jewels St. Thomas/Little Switzerland Jill Stuart John Bull Ltd. Johnson & Johnson Employee Funds Johnson & Johnson Matching Gifts Program* King Hoist and Scaffolding, Inc. Knoll, Inc. KPMG, LLP Lara Designs Launch Designs, LLC Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry Legacy Builders/Developers Corporation LG Electronics U.S.A., Inc. Liberty Mutual Group, Inc. London Jewelers Long Island Concrete, Inc. Luigi Bormioli Corp. Lukasiewicz Design, Inc. Lutron Electronics MAC Cosmetics Macy’s, Inc. Madison Alley Advertising Studio Mana Products, Inc. Mane Fine Fragrance Martin E. Rich Architect, PC Mary Kay Inc. Maspeth Welding, Inc Math for America, Inc. McCann-Erickson McGahren, Inc. McKissack & McKissack Mclean Packaging Merck Partnership for Giving MG New York Mizuho USA Foundation, Inc. Morgan Stanley & Company Mycak Associates, LLC Nadel Network, LLC Neiman Marcus Stores Neuberger Berman* New York City Environmental Justice Alliance Newmark Grubb Knight Frank Newport Nordstrom Ogilvy & Mather, Inc. Omnicom, Inc. Ornamental Metal Institute of New York P&P Life LLC


52

P R AT TFOLIO

Pfizer Foundation Matching Gifts Program* PG&E Corporation Foundation Phillips-Van Heusen Corporation Pierz Architecture Interior Design Pitch Blue Plan A Advisors Platt Byard Dovell White Architects LLP* PNC Institutional Investments Pompeii Studios Precision Dialogue Princeton Architectural Press Pro Helvetia Public Works Partners LLC 04-13 Pucci International, Ltd. Pyramid Floor Covering, Inc. Qualcomm Qualipac Corporation RBS Citizens Red Mountain Ranch SMGA Reinhold Jewelers Robert A. M. Stern Architects Robert Mark Parnes Architecture, LLC Robert Samen Architects Robert Zaccone & Associates, P.C. Robertet, Inc. Robinson Architects, PC Rose Creative Group, Inc. S&F Partners, USA Inc Saks Incorporated Santander Sargent & McKinney Advertising Schwab Charitable Fund Schwan Stabilo Cosmetics Sciame Construction, LLC seventy2architects SGD North America, Inc.* Silver Bait Design, Inc. SLJ Aviation Consulting Society of Digital Agencies, Inc. Squarespace Inc. Staples, Inc. Stephen B. Jacobs Group, P.C. Stolzle Glass USA, Inc. STV CS AKRF Joint Venture Symrise AG Takasago International Corporation (USA)* Ted Lewin, Ltd. Ted Muehling, Inc.* TEI Group The Ayco Charitable Foundation The Resource Foundation, Inc. The Richards Group The Steel Institute of New York Think About It Design Studio Tihany Design Tory Burch, LLC Town Of Palm Beach United Way Inc. Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc. Two Trees Management Company, LLC Umbra, LLC* United Christian Evangelistic Association Urban Expositions, LLC. Utley’s Incorporated Vance And Engles Aircraft Brokers Viacom, Inc. Vincent Perez Studio* Visa USA Inc. Visual Persuasion Studio Wahab Construction Windsor Construction Enterprise Xerox Corporation Zachys Wine Auction

Foundations

Advertising Educational Foundation Alexander C. & Tillie S. Speyer Foundation* Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation Booth Ferris Foundation Community Foundation for the National Capital Region George I. Alden Trust Greater Houston Community Foundation Greater New Orleans Foundation Iowa Foundation for Education Environment & the Arts* Kimberly and Erika Pearson Foundation Knight Foundation Mertz Gilmore Foundation* New Hampshire Charitable Foundation New York Community Trust Robert Lehman Foundation, Inc. Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, Inc. Surdna Foundation The Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region* The David Rockefeller Fund The Ford Foundation The Kresge Foundation The Pinkerton Foundation The Scherman Foundation* The Stutzman Family Foundation The Wege Foundation Turrell Fund Voya Foundation Wolf Kahn And Emily Mason Foundation, Inc.

Government Agencies

Air Force Office of Scientific Research New York City Comptroller New York State Council on the Arts* New York State Education Department US Department of Commerce

Planned Gifts

Pratt Institute would like to recognize the following estates and trusts from which the Institute received distributions in fiscal year 2015. Estate of Jean E. Bice Henry C. Bornemann Charitable Trust Joan D. Rapaport ’67 Estate of Winifred V. Shearer ’36 Robert H. Thayer Jr. (dec.) Estate of Frank Young

Gifts in Honor

In honor of Iris Apfel Barbara and Donald Tober Foundation* Barbara D. Tober and Donald G. Tober* In honor of Lizanne Brown David Brown and Marianne Brown In honor of Josh Dull Matt Dull In honor of Gamal El-Zoghby Qualcomm Anonymous In honor of Sophie Erb David Erb and Bonnie Garmus

*Donors who made consecutive gifts for 5+ years, P=Parent donor, (dec.)=Deceased

In honor of Todd Galitz Jennifer Cho In honor of Daniel Gerzog Lloyd F. Lampell ’65 In honor of Tula Giannini Suzanna B. Simor ’77 In honor of Amelia Golini Kathleen E. Golini and Donald J. Golini, P ’10* In honor of Kenneth Goode Raymond A. Geary ’63 and Elizabeth C. Geary In honor of Jack and Florence Goodstein Steven H. Goodstein ’66 and Linda Goodstein* In honor of Eva Hanhardt Bruce A. Rosen ’74 In honor of June Kelly Paul A. Wagner and Jeanette S. Wagner In honor of Harold Koda Brooke G. Neidich and Daniel M. Neidich The Daniel M. Neidich and Brooke Garber Foundation* In honor of Marjorie Kuhn Lisa Kaye Fuld* In honor of Jacob Lemon Bryant Lemon and Pamela Breaux In honor of Sondra and David Mack Richard Nasti and Maura Nasti Mark D. Stumer ’74 (Trustee) and Susan Stumer* In honor of Bruce Newman Town of Palm Beach United Way Inc. Allen Wyett In honor of Julie Schott George Schott and Elizabeth Rimer, P ’10 In honor of President and Mrs. Schutte Jenny H. Lee ’79 In honor of Tess Schutte Jessica L. Tallman ’10 and Mark Tallman* In honor of Anne Van Ingen Susan Borozan In honor of Maria Zimmermann Anne C. DeMuth ’56 and Ron Demuth Friends of Marie Zimmermann

GIfts in Memory

In memory of Joan Abel American Legion Hoboken Post 107 John P. Carey Nariman Farvardin Beverly Hans Yong J. Kang Robert Maffia ’84 Elisabeth W. McGrath Anne M. Michael ’81 Becky Newsom SLJ Aviation Consulting Vance and Engles Aircraft Brokers Claire Walter Norma Worden and Robert Worden In memory of Benjamin Bauer Philip J. Bauer In memory of Frances L. Bergen William S. Bergen In memory of Ettie May and Gordon R. Bice Estate of Jean E. Bice

In memory of William Breger Roy R. Thomson AIA ’59 and Sally Thomson* In memory of James Cavanagh Lillian Cushny Romer Holleran and Deming P. Holleran* Elise B. Mackay In memory of Mildred Engel Rena Samin In memory of Ruth Farmer Margaret Bergman In memory of Abe Finkelstein David S. Bovee In memory of William Fogler Roger K. Westerman ’88 In memory of James Fulton Robert G. Smith ’51 and Maggie P. Silver* In memory of Vita Hollander Richard Hollander In memory of Robert Jennee Louise Jennee* In memory of Rowena Reed Kostellow Ronald J. Howanich ’73* In memory of Herman Y. Krinsky Myra A. Oltsik* In memory of Alar Kruus IBM Matching Grants Program Mary J. Petras ’67 and Charles F. Petras ’74 In memory of Leonard C. Leone Marie G. Leone In memory of Herschel Levit Richard E. Schwab ‘77 In memory of Mimi Lobell Friedman Family Foundation Sheree A. Friedman ’92 and Gerald Friedman In memory of Leon Luxenberg Michael G. Luxenberg ’72 and Joan Garfield In memory of Michael Mahoney Jean H. Clough Richard M. Gibbons In memory Of John Matt Peter B. Lewis ’61* In memory of Herbert M. Meyers Edith W. Meyers* In memory of Richard Mooney Cia G. Mooney In memory of Norma H. Nelson Jerome De Bruin In memory of Leon Polansky Jacqueline J. Downey ’65 In memory of Jules Sobel Louise F. Saltzman and Melvin Saltzman In memory of Masao Tsuji Barbara Berry Katie Bongiovanni Suzanne R. Butcher and Gene Butcher Hyun Cho Ruth Crawford Paula Dudley Carol Harmon and Charles Harmon Dale Hawk and Judith Hawk Marcia A. Ketchum and Joseph Ketchum Dennis Martin Gary McGregor and Toni McGregor Michael Melone and Jerri Melone Edith Melton Michael Omta and Claudia Omta Bob Pape and Barbara Pape


P R AT TFOLIO Robert Ralston Red Mountain Ranch SMGA Hyun Shin Fred Snyder and Margaret Snyder Anne Swope and Gordon Swope Howard Trucks and Pamela A. Trucks In memory of Donald G. Typondji Eleanor M. Taormina ’56 In memory of Benjamin Wallack Peter A. Wallack*

Faculty and Staff Donors

Faculty Evan Akselrad PE and Yasmine Anavi Maria Cecilia Almeida ’07 Peter L. Barna ’83 and Myonggi Sul Barna ’82* Andrew W. Barnes William B. Bedford ’61 and Robin Bedford Mona Brody Kenneth P. Browne ’75* Mary A. Burke Gina B. Caspi-Levy ’80 and Jay B. Levy ’85* Barbara Charton ’74, P ’81 Anita Cooney ’92* Kathleen Creighton ’73 Maria Damon Eva Diaz Laura K. Elrick Kathryn A. Filla ’71 Barbara S. Friedman ’80 Kevin P. Gatta ’81 and Barbara Gatta ’92 Barbara A. Genco ‘75* Tula J. Giannini Diana Gisolfi* Stephen Hilger William Hilson ’81 and Barbara Hilson* Debera M. Johnson ’86 David E. Jones ’73* Jeffrey S. Kapec ’72 and Susan Kapec, P ’08* Gusty Lange ’86 and Stephen Ettlinger Jenny H. Lee ’79 Jay R. Levy ’68 and Claudia Levy John Lobell and Alissa Grimaldi Jennifer Logun John P. Martin ’68 Jennifer Minniti Norman M. Mintz ’63* Donna L. Moran ’71 and Charles Moran* James L. Moroney ’67 and Judith Moroney Marsha Morton Mark O’Grady and Marijo R. O’Grady* Jon Otis and Diane Barnes* Mary B. Rozkewicz Giuseppe San Filipo and Lina Phillips* Michael V. Sarno ’99 Andrew B. M. Schloss ’94 John R. Shapiro AICP ’79* Carole A. Sirovich and Lawrence Sirovich* Karin Tehve Tanya H. Van Cott ’93 and Bruce R. Hannah ’63 Scott E. Vander Voort and Linda Stern Borhua Wang and Yoon Siow Pamela J. Waters ’63 Staff Judith Aaron and Mitchell K. Aaron Kevin J. Andreano and Elizabeth Andreano* Amy I. Aronoff Drew Babitts

Vladimir Briller* Martha Cedarholm Todd M. Galitz and Kathryn C. Galitz* Anina Gayla and Edwin Gayla Thomas Greene Thomas G. Hanrahan Joseph M. Hemway Daniel P. Hetteix ’10 Meghan Hickey Don Ketteler Gayle Rodda Kurtz Daniel Lawson Elizabeth J. Leeber ’13 and Daniel Schwartz Emma Legge Ludovic LeRoy II Scott A. Lundberg ’98 Helen Matusow-Ayres and Phread Ayres* Aida Mejia Nadia Merzliakow ’75 Conrad H. Milster Emily M. Moqtaderi* Lynn J. Pierre and Kevin Cabralis Shannon Price Thomas F. Schutte (President) and Tess L. Schutte* Michael V. Sclafani Kenneth Shook Jessica L. Tallman ’10 and Mark Tallman* Pratt Institute would like to thank the generous individuals who helped to secure gifts on its behalf.

Please address any questions related to the Honor Roll to: Anina Gayla Donor Relations Officer Pratt Institute Institutional Advancement 200 Willoughby Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205 718.230.6810 advancement@pratt.edu

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P R AT T F O L IO

FINAL THOUGHTS Redesigning Business

by Debera Johnson (B.I.D.’86), Executive Director, Center for Sustainable Design Studies and Research

There has never been a more exciting time for the entrepreneur. As we have moved from the productiondriven industrial economy of the 20th century into the innovation economy of today, the landscape of business is in the midst of a paradigm shift. With the emergence of new technologies and increased connectivity, consumer interests are changing. The potential for products and services are seemingly endless, and businesses must be more agile and adaptive than ever before. Business leaders have looked to designers to keep pace, and the entrepreneurs of today understand the power of design— indeed, many founders are designers— and their attributes position them to transform business as we know it. The best designers are enthusiastic problem solvers with an empathetic ear to others’ needs. Designers are relentlessly resourceful and persevering, embracing failure as a means to learn and limitations as an invitation for invention. These traits

are shared by today’s startup founders, who aren’t conforming to a preconceived model of doing business. Built into the foundation of a company, a design-driven approach disrupts rigid hierarchies in favor of collaboration, considers context and systems in problem solving, and prioritizes user experience. Meanwhile, many companies are also responding to consumers’ call for transparency in how products are made. Consumers want real data about environmental impacts and social accountability for workplace conditions, leading to a new economy—the impact economy. Design-driven entrepreneurship is becoming a platform for more widespread change—that includes humanity. As business practices evolve, so does the definition of success. Where 20thcentury commerce was focused on growth at any cost, today’s business leaders are taking into account financial, societal, and environmental metrics at the outset. It is understood that 90 percent of the impact of a product is determined during the design phase. Positive impact not

only sets a company apart in the marketplace, but this is proactive problem solving on a deeper level. For bold, designthinking entrepreneurs, the challenges set in motion by old business—from environmental pollution to resource depletion to social injustices—present a real and tangible set of problems to confront, and problems are rocket fuel for designers. Esteemed Pratt industrial design and foundation professor William Fogler taught us that “designers create the products of their culture.” If Fogler were here today, I think he’d posit that good design is an expectation of our culture. Design-minded entrepreneurs are already changing the way we live—from how we monitor our health and organize our days to how we travel and share our inspirations. With the same ingenuity and responsiveness that brings us groundbreaking objects, tools, and platforms, these leaders are poised to redefine the nature of business itself.


Contributing to Community Arts

Contributing to Pratt “We shouldn’t take anything for granted. Every contribution, regardless of the size, means so much to students like me, and will allow us to give back after we graduate.” —Jean-Baptiste Riviere (B.F.A. Fashion ’18)

Your gift today helps students like Jean-Baptiste Riviere (B.F.A. Fashion ’18) stay in school. He relies on contributions to The Fund for Pratt. He’s not alone. More than 80 percent of Pratt students require financial assistance to pursue their academic and creative goals at the Institute. Thanks to The Fund for Pratt, Jean-Baptiste knows he can receive the education he needs to succeed—and go on to give back to his community and the world. Above: Riviere in Pratt’s green academic and administrative building, Myrtle Hall.

Make your gift today at www.pratt.edu/give.

The Fund for Pratt


CRE ATE

Pratt Institute School of Continuing and Professional Studies

Architecture, Art, and Design Manhattan/Brooklyn For information, call 855.551.7727 www.pratt.edu/scps


PRATT INSTITUTE Institutional Advancement 200 Willoughby Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205

w SAVE THE DATE: 09.17.16

Come back and see for yourself. PRAT T INSTITUTE ALUMNI DAY AND REUNIONS Saturday, September 17, 2016 Pratt Institute Brooklyn Campus For more information: Visit alumni.pratt.edu/alumniday Call 718.399.4447 Email alumni@pratt.edu

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Prattfolio Spring 2016  

Prattfolio Spring 2016