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SECURITY IS MOSTLY A SUPERSTITION. LIFE IS E KELLER / YOU CAN’T SOLVE A PROBLEM ON THE S

RISE ABOVE IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL. –ALBERT EIN

COUPLE AND LEARN HOW TO HANDLE THEM, AND PR

/ THERE’S NO GOOD IDEA THAT CANNOT BE IMPR IS INSIGHT. –MALCOLM FORBES / GIVE ME THE

FOOL OF HIMSELF. –ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON / WE CERTAIN IT WASN’T A FISH. –JOHN CULKIN / I

TEND TO SEE EVERY PROBLEM AS A NAIL. –ABRAH

WORLD IS THE MIND OF A CHILD. –THOMAS EDISON IS LATER. –MILES DAVIS / THE WAY TO GET GOOD

BAD ONES AWAY. –LINUS PAULING / A PILE OF RO

CONTEMPLATES IT WITH THE IDEA OF A CATHEDRAL

100 PERCENT OF THE SHOTS YOU NEVER TAKE. –W

ARE MANY POSSIBILITIES; IN THE EXPERT’S MIND

PEOPLE HOW TO DO THINGS. TELL THEM WHAT TO

INGENUITY. –GENERAL GEORGE PATTON / NEVER DOUB CITIZENS CAN CHANGE THE WORLD. INDEED, IT

MEAD / NO IDEA IS SO OUTLANDISH THAT IT SH


Hello

PRATT INSTITUTE

DxD: DIFFERENTIATE by DESIGN

No.3a Insights Speaking of Design, Innovation Fund, Solar Panels, Preserving Plastic, Pratt Young Scholars, and more.

Innovation comes in many forms. It can take the shape of easier-to-use personal-care product packaging. It can stem from adapting an existing technology to a novel purpose. It can develop from collaborating with colleagues across campus to create new knowledge about how we see the world and our place in it. Regardless of its origin, innovative ideas require research and testing before they can make an impact on the world. Building on its strengths in design, Pratt has developed a new model for research and design that is fostering innovation and jump-starting crossdisciplinary initiatives across campus. Central to that model is the Pratt Innovation Fund, which provides seed grants to support collaborative faculty and staff research projects. By providing such funding, the Institute is encouraging faculty and staff to take a risk in experimenting with an idea that could likely lead to change in a process, program, or course offering that would have a measurable impact at Pratt. Faculty and staff at all levels across the Institute are invited to submit proposals. In the Innovation Fund’s first year, projects were reviewed by a distinguished panel of judges: Pratt alumnus Jay Crawford (B.I.D. ’75), director of Global Personal Care Packaging for Colgate-Palmolive; Ligia Cravo, senior program officer at the Hearst Foundation; Cliff Kuang, senior editor of Wired; Joshua Schneps, co-publisher of Schneps Communications; Denmark West, advisor of Unified Media, Inc.; and Ron Worthy, chief executive officer of Buzzworthy Media Ventures, LLC. The recipients of the inaugural 2013–14 Innovation Fund grants are featured in the pages that follow. As you will see, research at Pratt comes in many forms—each of which reflects the tremendous possibilities inherent in the dynamic creative community that is Pratt Institute.

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Speaking of Design

20 Years of Innovation and Impact Thomas F. Schutte, President, Pratt Institute

When I first came to Pratt in 1993, the Institute was already known as one of the world’s leading schools for art and design. Over the past 20 years, we’ve worked to continually enhance Pratt’s curriculum and bolster its resources to foster innovation across the campus and throughout the greater Institute community.

cross-disciplinary projects and innovative design solutions, giving students the opportunity to work in a collaborative environment akin to that of the professional design world. During this time, we’ve had the privilege to partner with corporations and businesses that share our understanding about the role design and innovation will play in the future economic growth of our country and the world. Ongoing collaborations with industry leaders such as General Motors, Colgate-Palmolive, and Umbra give our students the opportunity to apply their creativity and imaginative thinking to the very real challenges that our corporate partners face, ensuring that Pratt graduates are industry-ready—while giving our industry collaborators novel solutions they can use to enhance their position in the marketplace today.

We began with the understanding that true innovations serve people. They reflect real human needs and desires, and as such, require a holistic approach that takes into account the multifaceted context in which individuals, businesses, and communities operate in the real world beyond Pratt’s campus gates. In 2002, recognizing the tremendous capacity that designers and design-thinking have to solve such interconnected challenges as economic growth, social inequity, and sustainability, we established the Pratt Design Incubator for Sustainable Innovation. Conceived of and led by Debera Johnson, executive director of Pratt’s Center for Sustainable Design Strategies, the Incubator has launched more than 25 design-driven enterprises in the clean energy, fashion, design, and designconsulting sectors, and was recognized by the Center for an Urban Future as a model for fueling new businesses and spurring economic growth. This fall, building on the success of the Incubator under Johnson’s leadership, Pratt created the Brooklyn Fashion and Design Accelerator to offer New York City design start-ups and entrepreneurs the low-cost studio space, mentoring, and production facilities they need to launch successful, sustainable creative enterprises.

As a result of the skills they gain by participating in sponsored studios and design challenges—in addition to the opportunities afforded by our initiatives to bolster entrepreneurialism—Pratt alumni are making a valuable contribution to the country’s economic growth. Through their expertise and skills, they are helping companies of every size succeed, from small businesses like Kurgo and the design entrepreneurs served by Maker’s Row to global firms such as Gensler. This is only the beginning. In 2012 Pratt established the Innovation Fund to help foster a culture of design research across campus. Innovation Fund grantees—faculty and staff whose cross-disciplinary projects have the potential to transform the academic and creative environment at Pratt and beyond—are working with industry and academic partners around the world to develop new approaches to and solutions for a variety of 21stcentury challenges.

We also sought to build on Pratt’s tradition of interdisciplinary education and its practical approach to the application of creativity by fostering synergies among the design disciplines, which have a long history of using creativity as a means to solve problems. Working with chairman of Rallye Motors and Pratt Trustee Juliana Terian (B.Arch. ’90), we created the Juliana Curran Terian Design Center in 2007, bringing all of Pratt’s design disciplines together under one roof to promote

As we continue to expand and deepen our research agenda, we are excited by the opportunities to collaborate with corporations in a variety of sectors to realize a better, more prosperous future for ourselves and the generations that follow.

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Harnessing Sunlight to Energize Cities

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Considered the “sleeping giant” of Europe’s energy sector, solar thermal energy goes well beyond the rooftop panels that became popular in the 1970s. In an age when finding alternatives to fossil fuels is more essential than ever, researchers at Pratt’s School of Architecture are working to create an entire building envelope that harnesses the sun’s energy to heat and cool urban buildings. 5

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Above Renderings depicting factors such as solar irradiation, sun angle, and sun shading can be inte-

grated to maximize on-site energy production, reduce cooling loads, and create a multi-functional façade system © ACRE 2014

and domestic hot water account for more than 49 percent of building energy consumption and more than 43 percent of greenhouse gas emissions.

With support from Pratt’s Innovation Fund, Pratt Architecture faculty members Lawrence Blough and Simone Giostra are partnering with SunMaxx Solar, a leading manufacturer of solar thermal systems and components, and Clarkson University’s School of Engineering to develop building-integrated solar thermal façade systems. This project is the first of a proposed Architecture Center for Responsive Enclosures (ACRE) that will target innovative energyefficient façade strategies, generate on-site renewable energy, and produce a new vocabulary for sustainable construction. Each ACRE project will combine the School of Architecture’s knowledge base in digital design and fabrication with the advanced engineering expertise and resources of industry partners. The goal is to develop building enclosure systems that combat climate change and enhance quality of life in densely populated cities such as New York, where heating, cooling,

By integrating its research into Pratt’s architecture curriculum, ACRE will also prepare a new generation of architects to design buildings that are environmentally responsive, use energy more efficiently, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Blough says, “In order to meet PlaNYC’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050, solar thermal and other renewable heating and cooling technologies are essential. As one of the first colleges in New York to accept the PlaNYC challenge, Pratt is taking a lead role in developing the technologies necessary to meet this goal, while training architects who will take them to the next level.”

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Above Rendering of a “thermal umbrella” building façade © ACRE 2014

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Crises in coastal cities raise questions about the role that man-made systems and structures play in exacerbating such natural disasters. While scientists and policy makers struggle to predict and mitigate the effects of the next big storm, faculty members in Pratt’s School of Architecture are exploring ways to use design-thinking to find effective approaches to these as-yet unsolvable problems.

broader public as citizen collaborators, Parker and Kolatan aim to produce a paradigm shift in the way that cities are conceived and built. Parker says, “To develop cities that can better respond to crises, it is not enough to look only at metrics. Metrics alone are not sufficient. We must take into account the impact that different geometries, processes, and morphologies have on these complex human-dominated landscapes. Such approaches are crucial to the stability of coastal urban areas—and the enterprises and institutions of all sizes that operate in such environments.”

With initial support from the Innovation Fund, professors Philip Parker and Sulan Kolatan are creating the Ecology Design Global Research Center NY-Istanbul. The first initiative of its kind at a major design college, the research center will draw on Pratt’s expertise in applying design-thinking to a range of social, environmental, and economic issues. It will also build on the network of relationships that Pratt has established with leading architecture and engineering schools in Istanbul.

Previous spread Superstorm Sandy stretched from south Florida to the Bahamas, eastern Cuba, Hispaniola, and western Puerto Rico.

As global design centers and major coastal cities with long and documented histories of complex urban and environmental interaction, New York and Istanbul represent ideal laboratories in which to examine the impact that design-thinking can have on ecological issues unique to the meeting of urban and natural pressures. By drawing on existing urban knowledge in areas ranging from food production and trade to transportation infrastructure, and by engaging the

Credit: NASA/Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team

Opposite The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 13 (GOES-13) captured this natural-color image of Hurricane Sandy at 1:45 PM Eastern Daylight Time (17:45 Universal Time) on October 28, 2012. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon with data courtesy of the NASA/NOAA GOES Project Science team.

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The first decade and a half of the 21st century has been rife with urban environmental crises. Many of these, such as Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy, have been natural disasters that have resulted in damage and losses—of $128 billion and $62 billion respectively in the case of Katrina and Sandy—and wreaked havoc on local and national energy and transportation, disrupting production and slowing sales.

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SAVI is already on the way to becoming a national model for the way design can serve communities and policy. The lab was invited last year to join a select team of scientists working to help the U.S. Department of the Interior develop impact scenarios related to Hurricane Sandy and future storms. SAVI Director Jessie Braden provided realtime mapping during the Department’s response and mitigation workshop.

Few New York–area colleges are better positioned than Pratt Institute to help the region’s coastal communities recover from and prepare for a natural disaster like Hurricane Sandy. Its location in Brooklyn—the borough where many of the hardesthit communities were situated—combined with its commitment to and expertise in community-based planning and creative problem solving through design, make Pratt the ideal base from which to mount an initiative addressing the unprecedented local emergencies brought about by climate change.

SAVI also plans to make its services and resources available to New York City–based nonprofit, civic, and community-based planning organizations. “With our help, these groups will be able to efficiently document existing conditions of urban areas, more meaningfully contribute to policy discussions, and create their own visions for improving quality of life and sustainability,” says Braden.

That’s a key goal of Pratt’s recently launched Geographic Information Systems lab, the Spatial Analysis and Visualization Initiative (SAVI), a joint endeavor of the Pratt School of Architecture’s Programs for Sustainable Planning and Development, the Pratt Center for Community Development, and the School of Art and Design’s Graduate Communications Design Department. With initial funding from the Institute’s Innovation Fund, SAVI aims to use its data collection, interpretation, and mapping expertise to address important questions that include: Where was the worst damage and why? Which neighborhoods are subject to “root shock”? What new designs work? What is the best map for the city’s waterfront?

Opposite The map of Sandy’s winds, produced with data from a radar scatterometer on the Indian Space Research Organization’s Oceansat-2, shows the strength and direction of Sandy’s ocean surface winds

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on October 28, 2012. Wind speeds above 40 miles per hour are yellow, above 50 are orange, and above 60 are red. Image Credit: Indian Space Research Organization OceanSat-2 missions.


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Preserving Plastic

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Preserving Plastic

From the Eames chair, Lego, and Tupperware to works of art by such icons as Christo and Claes Oldenburg, synthetic polymers—more commonly known as plastics—have been the defining materials of the twentieth century. D x D

They are also big business: according to the Washington, D.C.–based Society of the Plastics Industry, the industry is the United States’ third largest manufacturing sector, accounting for $373 billion in goods and $58.5 billion in exports in 2012. Yet, art conservators around the world are in a race to understand how plastics that have remained stable for decades can deteriorate in a matter of years—taking with them much of modern art and design heritage.

tion—an experience she plans to bring to Brooklyn youth by partnering with Pratt’s Saturday Art School, which offers arts courses to approximately 300 children and teens each year. “Pratt is uniquely positioned to launch a project of this magnitude,” says Kehlet. “The Institute is the only art and design school in the United States with the nuclear magnetic resonance capabilities to do noninvasive, on-site analysis of materials. In addition, Pratt’s emphasis on innovation and interdisciplinary education make it an ideal place to bring chemistry and art together. Already our work is opening a new world to our students, and we are eager to expand the impact to the community’s young people.”

While Europe has already invested significant resources in research on the degradation of synthetic polymers, Pratt Associate Professor of Chemistry Cindie Kehlet is taking that research to the next level, while expanding the Institute’s expertise in the study of artists’ materials. Supported in part by the Innovation Fund, Kehlet and her students at Pratt are the first worldwide to use nuclear magnetic resonance technology to conduct noninvasive analyses on modern artists’ materials such as plastic and other synthetic polymers. Their goal is to develop and provide guidelines on how best to preserve the present cultural legacy. Kehlet also aims to give current Pratt art and design students, who use synthetic polymers to create everything from products and packaging to fine art and furniture, the means to understand the properties of the materials they work with and make informed choices about them. In so doing, she is also providing students with a valuable chemistry educa-

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Previous spread Plastic mask showing the effects of degradation Opposite and above Plastic Smurf toy and sample showing the effects of degradation overtime

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Pratt Young Scholars

Pratt graduates from the B.F.A. or M.S. programs in Art and Design Education (with initial teacher certification) who go on to teach in the nation’s public schools can attest to the level of knowledge and skills in art and design disciplines that can be developed through sustained and sequential study and practice.

Research indicates that the additional benefits of an art or design education include increased reading, language, mathematics, and social skills; greater motivation to learn; positive school environments; and enhanced cognitive development that lasts a lifetime—and leads to the aptitude for innovation on which the U.S. economy relies. Yet a recent audit by the New York State Comptroller’s office found that the majority of New York City public school students are not receiving the arts education they need. Nationwide, public school access to art and design education has declined since 2002—the hardest hit schools being those serving predominantly minority populations. In this environment, Pratt Institute’s art and design education programs are more vital than ever. With the introduction of the Pratt Young Scholars program, the Institute’s youth programs are becoming a model for college and community partnerships across the country.

of Art and Design Education at Pratt: Saturday Art School, a 117-year-old program that currently provides art classes to approximately 300 children and teens; Summer Design Program, which offers middle school students classes in a variety of design disciplines, allowing them to continue to develop their talents over the summer; and the Design Initiative for Community Empowerment (DICE), which introduces high school students to such professional disciplines as architectural, industrial, and graphic design. The Pratt Young Scholars partner with the Institute’s Pre-College Program, which gives high school students the opportunity to explore the possibility of studying art, design, architecture, creative writing, or critical and visual studies while developing an admissions portfolio and earning college credit. The Pratt Young Scholars program invites 15 Brooklyn high school students every year to participate in the Institute’s youth programs and get a taste of a college experience they might not otherwise have even imagined.

One of the first Innovation Fund grant recipients, the Pratt Young Scholars program—conceived by Acting Chair of Art and Design Education Aileen Wilson and developed with faculty and staff across the campus—aims to provide underserved students in the Institute’s home borough of Brooklyn with immediate access to instruction in art and design as well as the skills, knowledge, and experience needed to pursue advanced studies and eventually careers in art and design. The program builds on the success of three long-standing initiatives run by the Department

Wilson says, “The Pratt Young Scholars builds on the Institute’s demonstrated strengths in partnering with the community to provide art and design education to the young people who can benefit from it most. Parents, teachers, and the students themselves tell us how much these programs have changed their lives. With support from the Innovation Fund, we have an opportunity to build on that momentum.”

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Join Us

JOIN US THE WALL STREET JOURNAL ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION

LEGENDS 2014 Thursday, November 20, 2014

Opening July 2014

Mandarin Oriental Hotel 80 Columbus Circle New York, NY 10023

Pratt Manhattan Gallery 144 West 14th Street New York, NY 10011

Each year, Legends celebrates distinguished individuals and corporations in the world of art and design and raises essential funds to provide financial aid to Pratt students based on need and merit. Eighty percent of Pratt’s students require financial aid to pursue their educations. Past Legends honorees include Lawrence Herbert, Pantone, Inc.; Marc Jacobs; and John Loring, Tiffany & Co.

Join Pratt Institute and Dow Jones to celebrate the 125th anniversary of The Wall Street Journal with an exhibition of original work. For information, email CorporateRelations@pratt.edu.

For information, visit www.pratt.edu/legends. ALUMNI DAY 2014 Saturday, September 20, 2014 Pratt Institute 200 Willoughby Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205 For information, email alumni@pratt.edu.

Article opening spread Three students in the Adventures in Art Class present their shadow puppets during Saturday Art School’s Open Studio Exhibition. Photo by Kevin Wick. Previous spread Glory and Grace Flores Opposite Atlas Side and Coffee Tables. Brad Ascalon, M.I.D. ‘06, for Design Within Reach. Photo by Jim Bastardo.

About the cover Based on vectors developed by ACRE.

CREDITS Corporate Relations at Pratt Institute: Ludovic Leroy, Director lleroy@pratt.edu

Inside front cover (Book A.) Lighting designed by Alvaro Uribe (B.I.D. ’10) for tsunami glassworks, inc.

Design: Joshua Graver

Inside front cover (Book B.) Plastic mask showing the effects of degradation

Photography: Peter Tannenbaum Production: David Dupont

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Typeface: Aperçu Writers: Karen Horton Charlotte Savidge Printing: High Road Press 220 Anderson Avenue Moonachie, NJ 07074

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SECURITY IS MOSTLY A TextSUPERSTITION. LIFE IS E KELLER / YOU CAN’T SOLVE A PROBLEM ON THE S

RISE ABOVE IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL. –ALBERT EIN

COUPLE AND LEARN HOW TO HANDLE THEM, AND PR

/ THERE’S NO GOOD IDEA THAT CANNOT BE IMPR IS INSIGHT. –MALCOLM FORBES / GIVE ME THE

FOOL OF HIMSELF. –ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON / WE CERTAIN IT WASN’T A FISH. –JOHN CULKIN / I

TEND TO SEE EVERY PROBLEM AS A NAIL. –ABRAH D

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ARE MANY POSSIBILITIES; IN THE EXPERT’S MIND

PEOPLE HOW TO DO THINGS. TELL THEM WHAT TO

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Hello

PRATT INSTITUTE

DxD: DIFFERENTIATE by DESIGN

No.3b Insights Speaking of Design, Alumni Innovators, The Wall Street Journal, Pucci, Alumni Profile, Faculty Profile.

Innovators can be found in a wide range of industries—from design and manufacturing to consultancies and services. From mentoring the design leaders of the future to developing novel products and networks, Pratt alumni, faculty, and students are using their design expertise to create new opportunities in every facet of life. At the heart of their success is an inherent understanding of the power of design-thinking. For corporations looking to bring the benefits of design-thinking to their enterprise, Pratt offers a unique opportunity to gain access to the resources of one of the largest art and design schools in the country. Through sponsored studios and design competitions led by Pratt faculty, the Institute’s students develop original approaches to a variety of challenges that Pratt’s corporate partners face. These partners also gain access to the unbridled creativity of aspiring designers in fields ranging from digital arts, fashion, and graphic design to architecture, industrial design, and interior design. The results speak for themselves—top-selling products, inspirational brand campaigns, and award-winning designs. On the pages that follow, you will read about innovators who are making a difference in their companies, their industries, their communities, and their world—and learn about some of the innovations on the horizon that could one day, soon, bolster a new sector of the economy.

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Creativity: The Business Innovators’ Imperative Essay for Pratt Institute from Jim Moffatt, CEO, Deloitte Consulting LLP On the surface, my day job may not seem like it would demand much in the way of artistic talent. And I have to admit, I’m not sure if I could sketch anything more complex than a Venn diagram.

artists and designers, you see a willingness to experiment that many business leaders say they want but don’t know how to deliver. Experimentation and innovation require courage and confidence.

That said, I learn a lot from the world of design and how artists and designers work. I’m not alone. I spend a significant amount of time with the CEOs and top executives at some of the world’s biggest companies. Increasingly, they see and appreciate that design can differentiate what they do and how they do it.

That kind of courage needs to be built into the culture of an organization. Taking risks in a big company is fraught with danger. Everything conspires against it. Yet no company that aspires to become stronger can avoid taking risks. Organizations need to be bold. They need to be smart. They need to embrace risk. Every investment is like a brushstroke on a canvas or the decision to use white space to lend clarity to a subject. It’s an original choice. It could lead to something great. It could transform the way we think and act. It could attract millions, even billions, of customers eager to buy it, use it and, as we’ve seen from social media, build it.

In industry after industry, designers are reshaping and rethinking ordinary products and services. Hospitals have become safer and more welcoming thanks to the insights of systems designers. Today’s smart phones don’t just deliver information—their design helps us quickly interact with the world around us. The driver’s seat of a car is a more comfortable place when designers have thoughtfully placed the most important controls within easy reach. In each case, form and function are seamlessly fused.

Or it could fail. And failure is something that businesses—and the individuals who lead those businesses—are, more often than not, afraid of for all the obvious reasons. Corporate leaders would do well to look to the world of art and design for inspiration. Even the greatest masters of art have produced massive and legendary failures. The reason these great masters—and all design professionals—are able to move forward from these setbacks is simple. They learn something from every experience, even every failure. They see how someone else executed an idea better than they did. They study what happened and take a fresh approach.

Design is where an idea—not just a product—can achieve differentiation, where it can stand apart from the pack and shape the way we think. This is why it’s increasingly important to look at more than what designers produce. It’s critical that we look at how they work. Because the outcome of a great design is something distinctive, designers are often independent thinkers and innovative. They have to be. The essence of a great piece of art or design is its originality. Artists or designers have to create something new and previously unseen or not yet experienced, and to put forth a vision for something that has never before been imagined. They are able to do this because they have thought deeply about their subject and considered their options. In the end, they have the confidence to pursue their vision.

Thomas Edison famously said that his many failures to find a material for a light bulb filament were not failures at all, but rather the discovery of “10,000 ways that won’t work.” Great designers think the same way. They build on every experience—the good, the bad, and everything in between. I recognize, of course, that a multinational corporation can never do what an artist does. The scale is different. The expectations are different. The risks are different. The training is different. But the need to be courageous, bold, and innovative? That’s very much the same. After all, great design is about standing apart. Great companies want to do the same thing. Be different. Don’t just hire great designers. Think like one.

I believe that business leaders should take time to study how artists and designers work. How they summon their experience to create confidence and momentum. How they take their vision from a seedling stage and let it breathe. How they often invite their colleagues to provide feedback. How they take early criticism as a cue to pursue their vision or redirect it entirely. In the world of great

Photo: Courtesy of Deloitte

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The United States loves its pets. According to the American Pet Products Association (APPA), 3 percent of dog owners bring their canine companions with them in the car when they’re away for two or more nights. APPA statistics also show more than 80 percent growth in the U.S. pet industry over the past decade. During that time, Kurgo has made a name for itself by producing high-quality, durable, and innovative dog travel products that encourage owners to travel, hike, go camping, and even run with their dogs—while protecting their pets and their vehicles.

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Founded in 2003 by Christopher (Kitter) Spater (M.I.D. ’03) and his brother Gordie, Kurgo grew out of the Spater family’s need to keep their energetic 70-pound plott hound-mix from jumping into the front seat of the car. As one of the pioneers in Pratt Institute’s Design Incubator for Sustainable Innovation, Spater took his ideas from concept to prototype to create what would ultimately become Kurgo’s first product—the Backseat Barrier. From that beginning, Kurgo now has revenue of approximately $7.5 million and has enjoyed nearly 30 percent growth over the past four years, which has earned the company a place on the Inc. 5000 list of fastest growing companies every year since 2010. Spater credits Kurgo’s success to both the industrial design foundation he received at Pratt and to the spirit of determination and collaboration the Institute fostered in him. “The greatest lesson I learned was that anything is possible,” he says. “One of the major components of growing Kurgo was simply having the faith that solutions existed if we asked the right people the right questions, worked hard, and continued to push forward.”

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Cesar Kuriyama

1 Second Everyday: Seizing the Day

Cesar Kuriyama (B.F.A. ’04) infuses everything he does with an entrepreneurial spirit, continually building on the knowledge he’s gained and taking risks to break new ground. Kuriyama came to Pratt with no previous art training and was admitted on the strength of the 3-D computer animation projects he developed for fun during high school. Once at the Institute, he continued to expand his artistic repertoire, exploring graphic design, photography, and film—all of which proved to be a springboard for professional work in fields ranging from advertising to lighting design for such clients as Marvel Entertainment, ABC’s Monday Night Football, MSNBC, Toshiba, Tommy Hilfiger, Swarovski, and BMW. In 2011, Kuriyama left advertising to focus full-time on his own creative ideas—one of which was the project 1 Second Everyday. The principle was simple enough: video record one second of every day of his life for the rest of his life. The immediate goal was to trigger Kuriyama’s memory about the various things he’d done; but he quickly realized that if he wasn’t doing anything interesting on a particular day, he would probably forget to record the video. As a result, the project challenged him to do something notable every day. The 1 Second Everyday project also earned Kuriyama a spot in the TED2012 conference, where he presented his idea to approximately 1,200 CEOs, designers, intellectuals, scientists, and thought leaders. The following year, Kuriyama launched the 1 Second Everyday (1SE) app, which allows users to create their own personal 1SE videos. This year the app launched a new feature called 1SECrowds, which allows people everywhere to upload one-second videos on a given theme. These are then compiled into a single video, capturing different perspectives on that theme at a particular moment in time. The 1SE app is an Apple staff pick and has been featured multiple times on the App Store—occasionally at the top of the charts. Most recently, the ISE app was featured in the Jon Favreau movie, Chef, which opened in the United States on May 9. The app is just the latest expression of Kuriyama’s drive to innovate: “I don’t like doing anything I’ve ever seen before. I’m always trying to take a risk, to use what I’ve learned and do something different with it.”

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Alumni Innovators

With Maker’s Row, cofounders Matthew Burnett (B.I.D. ’07) and Tanya Menendez have revolutionized the way small businesses across the country move their products from concept to creation by helping them identify appropriate local manufacturers. An online service that connects designers and small firms with industry-specific manufacturers and suppliers, Maker’s Row grew out of Burnett’s own frustrations as an independent watchmaker and producer of leather goods. Through the challenges Menendez and Burnett faced, Menendez saw an opportunity to solve a problem they shared with countless small businesses across the country: finding U.S.-based manufacturers who could meet their supply needs.

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According to Burnett, small businesses have taken note of General Electric’s, Apple’s, and other industry giants’ searches for domestic production solutions—and have begun to follow suit. But small businesses and independent design entrepreneurs face barriers to entry that established firms with greater resources and reputation can avoid. Maker’s Row bypasses that barrier by establishing a network of more than 4,000 U.S.-based producers that specifically want to work with small firms and independent designers. Following a summer in the Brooklyn Beta incubator, Burnett and Menendez launched Maker’s Row in November 2012. Since then, the company, which continues to operate in Brooklyn, N.Y., has assembled a roster of approximately 26,000 small business and nearly 4,000 U.S.-based factories and suppliers specializing in apparel, accessories, furniture, and home decor. In addition to access to manufacturers, Maker’s Row also provides a road map to help businesses construct the supply chain necessary to manufacture their products—building on the knowledge that Burnett gained as an undergraduate in the Institute’s industrial design program. “Pratt exposed me to opportunities to work with top-tier design companies,” he says. “Working with brands such as Fossil, I got a picture of what it took to go from basic concept to physical product.”

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Maker’s Row

Made in America Makes a Comeback


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Alumni Innovators

Who Gives a Crap

If People Give a Crap, Good Things Happen

Danny Alexander, B.I.D. ’06, almost became a sculptor. As a sophomore majoring in industrial design, he was worried about how to align his own values with what he imagined would be a career centered on designing mass-produced items. At least as a sculptor he would create one-of-a-kind pieces. But how would either major help him create change and allow him to solve major social problems? His professor, Debera Johnson, founder and director of The Pratt Design Incubator for Sustainable Innovation, encouraged him to see industrial design as a means of finding solutions through innovative design and encouraged him to hold onto his passion while putting it to good use. “She encouraged me to stay in industrial design and to use design as a way of solving problems,” he said. One example: earlier in his career he worked for Method, which delivers environmentally friendly cleaning products in beautiful, simple designs. “People may have bought the products because they liked the shape of the bottle,” he said, “but design was a Trojan horse that enabled us to sell a more environmentally friendly product.” Today Alexander is Senior Designer at IDEO.org, a nonprofit whose mission is to use human-centered design to alleviate poverty around the world. He is also a partner in a start up that is doing great things but is perhaps best known for its name: Who Gives a Crap. It’s the ultimate Trojan Horse for doing good—the organization sells beautifully designed toilet paper (made of recycled, very soft material), and turns over 50 percent of its profits to WaterAid, which helps families in the poorest countries get access to clean toilets. Though the toilet paper is not currently available in the U.S., it is a big hit in Australia and New Zealand. Founded by two Australians, Simon Griffiths and Jehan Ratnatunga, and Alexander, Who Gives a Crap is an innovative feel good/do good product designed to support a major social initiative.

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Alumni Innovators

It’s not often that an ongoing nightmare during graduate school helps shape a career. “I would dream I was stuck on a project. And instead of figuring it out, I would talk with other students and give them advice,” says Angela Yeh (M.I.D. ’93). A consultant was hatching, even if gestation took some time. Today, as president and founder of Yeh IDeology, Yeh believes her Pratt education and those dreams helped her to create a new, innovative business model for recruiting.

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Yeh IDeology does a lot more than match employee and employer. It takes an inventive, consultative approach that includes helping its corporate and agency clients learn how to value design and invest in it. “We focus a great deal on strategy; we are like a McKinsey for industrial design. That is why being multilingual, in the business sense, is so important. We understand our clients’ industries and can help them identify and solve problems. At the same time, we also help them understand the many ways design, in all of its variations, can be one of their most important tools.” Yeh’s interest in the bigger picture came early. When she entered the industrial design graduate program as a psychology major, her classmates had backgrounds in marketing, finance, and engineering. “I learned that people work, process, and solve problems differently—and discovered how to collaborate to take advantage of these different perspectives.” Later, she had her on-the-job revelation as associate design director at Estee Lauder: Yeh realized she was fascinated by design and interacting with designers, but not with doing design work herself. That is when she moved into recruiting and began to shape her innovative approach. “Pratt’s ID program encouraged us to think on our own and gave us the means to take our thinking to another level,” she says. “That is how I was able to envision, and then build, Yeh IDeology.”

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Yeh IDeology

Strong Foundation: Detours Lead to Pioneering Firm


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The Wall Street Journal

Dow Jones/Pratt Partner to Celebrate The Wall Street Journal

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The Wall Street Journal

When media icon The Wall Street Journal celebrates its 125th anniversary in July, the event calls for something more enduring than a party and a cake. Legacy 1976 The Asian Wall Street Journal launches

Here’s a quick look at some of the many ways The Wall Street Journal and its parent Dow Jones have innovated to find new ways to bring information to the world.

1983 The Wall Street Journal Europe launches, further establishing the Journal as a global entity.

1889 The first edition of The Wall Street Journal is published. An afternoon newspaper, it’s just four pages and sells for two cents.

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1995 The first version of WSJ.com launches online and Dow Jones builds the Internet’s most successful paid news website.

1897 The Ticker, a real-time newswire and the fundamental source for news in the investment community, is announced.

2008 WSJ, the Journal’s luxury lifestyle magazine, launches as a glossy quarterly publication, expanding fashion and lifestyle coverage.

1926 The Dow Jones engineering department builds a key innovation in the delivery of real-time news: a motor-driven version of the “Ticker.”

2010 The Journal expands its print and digital offerings, adding Greater New York, an enhanced weekend publication called WSJ Weekend, and editions for tablets.

1934 Bernard “Barney” Kilgore develops the “What’s News” column – marking the first major summary of the news.

2011 WSJ Live, the Journal’s video news and reporting initiative, is born.

1971 Electronic delivery of Dow Jones Newswires is possible for the first time.

2012 The Journal adds three new languages to its suite of local-language sites, bringing the total to 12 sites in nine languages, including English, Chinese, Japanese, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Bahasa, Turkish and Korean.

1975 An entire edition of the Journal is sent by satellite from Massachusetts to Florida. The Orlando newspaper printing plant is the first in the world built to operate exclusively via a communications satellite transmission system.

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The students (see above) will work in their chosen creative medium, taking inspiration from one or more of the eight themes provided by Dow Jones: Technology; Dedicated Reporters/Exceptional Journalism; Signature Style; From Niche to Powerhouse; Shedding Light on Global Events; Global Footprint; Trailblazer; and Leading the New World Leaders. Their goal will be to create a work that is an artistic embodiment of The Wall Street Journal’s history, culture, and high journalistic standards.

The Journal’s parent, Dow Jones & Company, will mark the occasion in ways that befit the rich history and bright future of the newspaper. The paper, which has the largest paid circulation of any U.S. daily paper, is published in nine languages and has won 35 Pulitzers. In the Journal’s first issue in 1889, the founders noted in a statement of principles that, “We appreciate the confidence reposed in our work. We mean to make it better.” Those words sum up the goals that have guided the Journal from a four-page newsletter launched in 1889 to the international powerhouse it is today.

“We are eager to see how the students consider the impact of the Journal’s 125 year history through their respective mediums,” said Paula Keve, Chief Communications Officer, Dow Jones. “Working with Pratt on this innovative partnership is an exciting and creative way to celebrate the paper’s past, present, and future.”

Dow Jones wants to make the WSJ’s history come alive through a visual representation of its past, present, and future by collaborating with Pratt. Eleven students, selected because of their diverse backgrounds, disciplines and interests that embody the global influence of the WSJ, will participate in this partnership.

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Eric O’Toole, adjunct assistant professor of Graduate Communications Design who is overseeing the students’ work, describes the complexity of the project. “Not only do the students need to address these critical themes, but their pieces must also contribute to internal motivation and creativity at the Journal while underscoring its commitment to journalistic integrity.” O’Toole adds, “Their job doesn’t end when the piece is completed. To ensure that their works are properly and appropriately displayed, the students will also participate in the planning and installation of the exhibition.”

Participants (clockwise from top left): Tania Lili - Mexico

(M.F.A. Communications Design, Class of ’15)

Alejandro Torres Viera - Puerto Rico

(M.F.A. Communications Design, Class of ’15)

Olivia Michaels - New Jersey

(B.F.A. Fine Arts, Class of ’14)

Saul Schister - Texas

(B.F.A. Fine Arts, Class of ’14)

Desiree Guedez - Venezuela

(M.I.D. Class of ’15)

Michael Levin - California

(M.F.A. Fine Arts, Class of ’15)

Melanie Merenda - New York

(B.F.A. Fine Arts, Class of ’14)

Calvin Roberts - New Jersey

(B.F.A. Photography, Class of ’14)

These works will be shown at a WSJ 125th Anniversary exhibition at the Pratt Manhattan Gallery beginning in early July. Later in the month, one or more participants will have their work selected for permanent placement in a Dow Jones office.

Pedro Atienzar - Spain

(M.F.A. Digital Arts, Class of ’14)

Eric O’Toole - New York

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Graduate Communications Design

Sean Fogarty - New York

(M.I.D. Class of ‘15)

Saana Hellsten - Finland

(M.F.A. Communications Design, Class of ’15)

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Pucci

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Pucci

ATT ION + CCI 21

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Pucci

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Pucci

Designs created by Pratt Fashion students as part of a collaboration with Ralph Pucci International highlighted the renowned mannequin, lighting, furniture, and sculpture creator with window displays in two of the country’s most prominent department stores during major art and design events. yarns donated by Lion Brand Yarn—selected to complement Pucci’s matte-gray palette—to create more than 90 projects. The final exhibition pieces were selected by Pratt Institute Trustee Ralph Pucci, Pratt Fashion Chair Jennifer Minniti, and Assistant Professor Susan Cianciolo.

Following a widely publicized exhibition at Ralph Pucci’s Gallery Nine in Manhattan in January, Organic Matter: Woven Artwear by Pratt Fashion was front and center in the Broadway windows of Macy’s flagship Herald Square store during New York Fashion Week in February. The exhibition then traveled to Texas to be showcased in the Dallas Neiman Marcus store during the Dallas Art Fair.

The second Pratt-Pucci collaboration, this year’s partnership gave the Institute’s fashion students an invaluable opportunity to test and showcase the creative abilities they have honed during their time at the Institute. Pratt curriculum’s emphasis on innovation and its practical applications allowed them to develop imaginative designs within the context of a real-world creative brief.

Paul Olszewski, visual director of windows and interior flagship marketing for Macy’s, personally selected the collection after visiting the exhibition at Pucci’s gallery. “Retailers in New York put their best foot forward during fashion week, and what better way to do that than to highlight a show like this? The pieces are amazing,” Olszewski said. The 27 pieces displayed in Organic Matter were created in a design studio that challenged the students to rethink the form, function, and design of knitwear to dress Pucci’s classic MANNEQUIN collection. Students worked exclusively with neutral-colored

Opposite from top Windows of the Dallas Neiman Marcus showcased Organic Matter. Photo: Holly Kuper

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L to R, Kate Sullivan (Class of ’16), Neiman Marcus Vice President for Store Development Ignatz Gorischek, and Meghan O’Sullivan (Class of ’16). Photo: Holly Kuper

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Alumni Profile

Putting Pratt Lessons and Students to Work

Maddy Burke-Vigeland (B.Arch. ’81) is a principal at Gensler, a global design firm that integrates architecture, design, planning, and consulting. She also leads the firm’s education and culture practice—a fitting position for someone who clearly understands the importance of environments that enhance learning and innovation. D x D

As an example, Santiago Rivera (B.Arch. ’11) was on the Gensler team that recently completed a new high school in the Bronx, part of the network of Kipp Public Charter Schools. The challenge of a tight urban site resulted in a design solution which integrates pedagogy, progressive planning, and sustainability. Rivera brought multidisciplinary skills gained at Pratt to the project—and the result is architecture as a platform for 21st-century learning.

She believes that Pratt has influenced her life and career from the start: “Right away, I understood the importance of being surrounded by creative people from diverse backgrounds. I quickly realized that we learn from others, not just our instructors, and that the range of perspectives that envelop students is what distinguishes the Pratt education, then and today.

Burke-Vigeland credits President Thomas Schutte and Provost Peter Barna with creating an atmosphere that nurtures the kind of graduates sought by employers targeting progressive thinkers: “Dr. Schutte’s master plan has students live and learn among the richness of the original historic buildings in combination with the introduction of contemporary structures—all punctuated by the art placed around campus.” The meaningful way the school is integrated with its neighborhood underscores Barna’s belief that a school does not exist by itself.

“There’s a richness of thought, an institutional insistence on the fact that there is no one right answer. Students are encouraged to come up with unique, innovative solutions and the ability to do that is reinforced by the quality and diversity of the faculty and student body,” Burke-Vigeland says. This environment helps make Pratt students appealing to Gensler, which currently counts 80 Pratt alumni on its employee roster.

She says, “In attending Pratt, students realize that being part of the community is a key element of a full education.” Some graduates are devoted to their colleges in concept, perhaps even making a dutiful yearly contribution. Burke-Vigeland has stoked her passion for Pratt in more far-reaching ways. She and her Gensler team believe that education and culture design offer a way to ignite imagination, buttress institutional identity, and encourage community development—all of which echoes her Pratt education. And she also hires Pratt graduates, ensuring that people with a shared vision continue Gensler’s mission.

Burke-Vigeland, one of several Pratt champions within the firm, doesn’t rely on memories of Pratt to make hiring decisions. She has stayed connected since graduation. “I have seen the growth—in students and the school. The caliber of graduates just gets better every year,” she says. “They are confident, concerned about their world, and willing to work toward positive change. When I go back to the School of Architecture for juries, I am impressed by the phenomenal quality of the students, the level of inquiry, and their sensitivity in presenting ideas.”

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Alumni Profile

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Faculty Profile

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Faculty Profile

On Top of Top Design

Goil Amornvivat has built his career using innovation to overcome design challenges. He demonstrates his expertise as an associate professor of interior design at Pratt, as principal at AM/MOR Architecture LLP, and since 2007, as a frequent guest on a variety of design television shows. These include being a contestant on Bravo’s Top Design and HGTV’s White Room Challenge, an on-screen designer on Discovery’s TLC: Trading Spaces, and making appearances on ABC’s The View and Bravo’s Watch What Happens with Andy Cohen. While many designers might dream of such opportunities, Amornvivat believes it takes additional know-how to come out on top of shows like Top Design.

and clients who related to Amornvivat and valued what he and his team could accomplish under pressure. “After Top Design, my partner and I became ‘known’ designers. People stopped us in the middle of the street,” he says. “The day after my ‘ousted’ episode aired, a stranger hugged me on the subway. But not all contestants had the same experience.” D

To help Pratt students learn how to use themselves to drive innovation and create a personal brand that can enhance their careers, Amornvivat developed the advanced studio “The Hunger Games—A Survival Edge: Personality, Persona, and Branding.” In it, Pratt students—who had learned in previous Institute courses how to use design as a powerful means of problem solving—were challenged to look inward and consider themselves as a design problem with their own specific set of potentials and opportunities, as well as a context in which they operated. Defining their own personal brand gives students the confidence to take the risks required to develop truly innovative approaches.

“Top Design creates drama by placing larger-thanlife personalities in design scenarios with impossible budgets and time frames,” Amornvivat explains. “The media campaign entailed building on the aspects of contestants’ personalities that would emerge based on the opportunities and constraints placed on us within the context of the show. However, because most of the promotional materials were created before the filming, each contestant had to know what they were about, what their brand was.”

Amornvivat adds, “This exercise is as useful for designers who want to join an existing practice with an established brand as it is for those who wish to establish themselves as a brand. In either case, you have to know how to communicate your mission through the entire package that is you.”

Amornvivat’s brand involves using his own largerthan-life personality to generate new ideas and energize others to do the same. Appearing on Top Design boosted his career and led to new projects

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A F T E R Y E A R S O F T E L LTextI N G C O R P O R A T E C I T I Z E N

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WANT AND THEN TRY TO GIVE THAT TO THEM. BY S O M E T H I N G N E W . –S T E V E J O B S / I A M L O O K I N G CAPACITY

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Profile for Pratt Institute

DxD: Differentiate by Design No. 3 "Insights"  

The third issue of DXD features the recipients of the inaugural 2013–14 Innovation Fund grants. As you will see, research at Pratt comes in...

DxD: Differentiate by Design No. 3 "Insights"  

The third issue of DXD features the recipients of the inaugural 2013–14 Innovation Fund grants. As you will see, research at Pratt comes in...