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DIFFERENT VIEWS AROUND THE WORLD

www.positive-magazine.com

Photo by Giacomo Cosua


Founder & Editor in Chief Giacomo Cosua giacomo.cosua@positive-magazine.com Art Directors Marco Forlin marco.forlin@positive-magazine.com

Art and Culture Michela Canessa michela.canessa@positive-magazine.com Matilde Casaglia matilde.casaglia@positive-magazine.com

Livio Chiodega livio.chiodega@positive-magazine.com

Fashion Stefano Guerrini (Editor in Chief) stefano.guerrini@positive-magazine.com

Art Directors Assistant Valentina Siciliani info@positive-magazine.com

Photography Elisabetta Carli (Photo Editor) elisabetta.carli@positive-magazine.com

International Advertising & Special Projects Michela Canessa michela.canessa@positive-magazine.com Giorgia Milani giorgia.milani@positive-magazine.com Francesca Urban francesca.urban@positive-magazine.com Web Master Pietro Gregorini pietro.gregorini@positive-magazine.com Social Media Editor Tommaso Zandinella tommaso.zandinella@positive-magazine.com Contributing Editors Architecture Eugenia Gotti (Editor in Chief) eugenia.gotti@positive-magazine.com

Tobia Piatto tobia.piatto@positive-magazine.com Posi+tive Magazine Berlin Production Manager Julian Roncal julian.roncal@positive-magazine.com Public Relations Andrea Morote JareĂąo andrea.morote@positive-magazine.com Contributing Editors Tom Cameron (Art&Culture) tom.cameron@positive-magazine.com Odeta Catana ( Photography) odeta.catana@positive-magazine.com Petra Fantozzi ( Photography) petra.fantozzi@positive-magazine.com Maria Nitulescu (Fashion) maria.nitulescu@positive-magazine.com

Riccardo Del Fabbro riccardo.delfabbro@positive-magazine.com

Stefanie Schmid Rincon (Fashion&Music) stefanie.schmid@positive-magazine.com

Costanza Madricardo costanza.madricardo@positive-magazine.com

Posi+tive Magazine Italy

Enrico Mancini enrico.mancini@positive-magazine.com

Contributing Editors Michele Brotto (Cultura, Arte & Design) Alessia Ceccherini (Cultura, Arte & Design) Nicolò Marangoni (Territorio) Gaia Fosca Mellone (Territorio) Marta Padovani (Cultura, Arte & Design) Carmen Palmisano (Fotografia) Francesca Rosati (Territorio) Elena Tabarrini (Fotografia) Elena Zago (Territorio) Valeria Zane (Musica)

Generic requests and press releases

DISCLAIMER POSI+TIVE MAGAZINE

info@positive-magazine.com

it's not responsible for texts, photos and illustrations published within, as owned by the authors. All rights are reserved, reproduction is expressly prohibited under the rules governing copyrights.


Index. 06. Interview with Øistein Sæthren Dahle

16. Lovely Sara

18. QUESTION (Ecuador)

36. TRANSINSTRIA FROM INSIDE

66. MATCHLESS


80. wild Children

106. maidomo

120. La lucha

132. input/output

154. youth portraits

160. Fashion riots


Interview with Øistein Sæthren Dahle

Øistein Sæthren Dahle (27) was born and raised on Langhus, Norway. He studied photography in Lofoten and then he moved to paris for 2 years where he studied at the Atelier Smedsby (with Jh Engstrøm and Margot Wallard). He’s now enrolled at Valand Academy doing a BA in Photography in Gothenburg. He worked also as cinematographer on 2 short films, “absalons beyers gate" and "fuglane syng, men min kjæreste vil ikkje danse".

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Could you please tell us a little more about yourself? I am 26 years old. Born and raised on Langhus, in Ski kommune. Its a place 30 minutes southeast of oslo. Langhus is a mix of forest, lakes, industry, fields and suburbian landscapes. Beautiful place. The landscapes and atmosphere from this place is very important for me. After school I moved a lot around in norway, 2 years up north in Lofoten, almost 2 years on the western part of norway, different places, farout on the countryside and in periods I also have travelled for longer time.These experiences of living on the countryside has influenced me a lot, I dont know exactly how, but I think it has something to do with seeing different ways of living your life and how different it can be out in the perifiry compared to the cities. People outside of the big cities see and experience different things than a person living in the city. Its nice to see things like that, how people outside the big cities live their lives. I remember the winters on the western part of norway with longer peiods with avalanches and really heavy weather, I think these things affects you as a human. In periods I can appriciate the silent and the loneliness you sometime can feel on the countryside, but right now I really like to live in the city, see a lot of people and get new energy just from meeting new people. After Living on the countryside for too many years, I decided to apply for Atelier Smedsby with JH Engstrøm and Margot Wallard. This is a one year workshop in Paris. This experience of beeing apart of this workshop for two years changed the way I look upon photography and life. Very strong experience. I think it was a mix of meeting people in the same situation and getting totaly blown away of beeing in Paris. The feedback and talks made me really believe on myself and I also found a method for working with my photography. After these years I felt more secure about myself beeing a photographer, and it opened up new doors and it helped me to find a strong method for my work as an artist. Now I study photography in sweden, the second year. But I live in Oslo. I find the situation of beeing in school very ambivalant, on one side it is very good, because of all the facilities, and the fact that you can develop your film for free, but on the other side I find it confusing and depressing beacuse you have to explain to much, write too much and bee a good student. I hate that. Thats maybe the reason that I live in Oslo, then it is easier for me to concentrate about my work. Right now I just want to concentrate around my work and follow my intuitions and dreams. I really want to go for a longer trip and just bring my camera and see what happens. After all, Gothenburg is a perfect place for finishing my ongoing bookproject “ LOVE KILLS MY WORDS”, because of the free developing and the printers. I feel good about the situation, but restless.After finishing school I will just go, hitchhike, rent a car, rent a room in a foreign city. And just bring my camera, nothhing more, camera and passport. How did you start taking pictures? Usually there is always the old story of the boy who finds his grandfather’s camera, did that happen to you as well or not? I didnt find my grandfathers camera, but i found his paintings. My grandfather was a painter and a presser. It was paintings of naked woman, paintings of landscapes, mostly from Ski and Sicilia, paintings of stillife. These paintings fascinated me, and they still do. I think my photography started with these paintings, because when I looked upon these pictures it made me wanted to make my own pictures. And the way my grandfather talked about picures and artists, it made me realize that it is possible to do this in life. I had these visions of becoming an artist, Very romantic dreams, I still have the romantic dreams. My grandfather supported me a lot, and asked me a lot about my pictures, in a way that i understood he was truly interested in what I was doing with my photography. There is for sure different reasons for why i started with photography, but these paintings and my grandfather was an dooropener to try to express myself.

What does it mean photography for you? Photography for me is a tool to express something about myself and my life. A search for meaning and after life. When I take pictures I try not to think about the result, I try to be in that specific feeling of beeing on that specific place or get involved with that specific person. It could have been painting, drawing or music, but photography suits me beacuse I am restless person, I like to move. And photography is also a dooropener to hidden rooms inside myeself, its very much about philosphy and its also a lot about letting go of blockings and barriers around my own life, its very much about living, for me. And I also think the life is more important and meaningfulwhen I have my camera, its a way to confirm life. Do you get any influence by the country you live in? Yes. Especially from the nature, I love walking in the mountains and in the forest, also just walking on the road. Both summer and winter. I love the fact that you get really really tired after walking the whole day. I like the simple lifestyle you have, when you are out walking. Walking with a small compact camera. It is one of my favourite activities. And always when I come back from these trips I feel very motivated and strong to do new portraits and see the city and other landscapes in a newway Where does your inspiration comes from? My inspiration comes from life. I also get very inspired by walking around in the streets. Looking at people, looking at the everydaylife in the city. My inspiration, or I will rather call it motivation, also comes when I have a feeling of missing something or if I have lost something, and in my photography i try to attempt or find these missings parts. Mostly my inspiration comes from doing, when I do, thaugts and feelings appears in my head. I dont beleive in being talented, I believe in having the courage to do the things you want to do. I dont really believe in inspiration, maybe you get inspired sometimes, but if you want to make something, it has little to do about inspiration, for me. Of course you can get inspired, but the important thing is what you do after you have neen inspired, what happens then. Then the inspiration is gone, and then jo just have to do. In a portrait, what is important for you? The contact,the meeting, the eyes, the hands, the shapes. Vulnerability is the word I always say when I talk about portraits, but dignity and strength are equally important. Maybe in the meeting point between vulnerability and strenght. What kind of relationship do you have with your subject when you shoot? Its different. Sometimes the relation is very close, sometimes it is new people, but I always try to spend time with the people i portrait. I rarely take snapshots of people.In some way I have to bee attracted to the person I portrait. Not only sexual attraction, but attraction on some level. It can be the eyes, it can be a way of moving, a way of standing. everything. What’s the photo you want to take and you never did? I dont know. I dont think I have this idea in my head. What’s your photo-mission? Say something about humanity, and life. Be honest to myself! Can you tell us more about your participation at the Leica Oskar Barnak Award? Its not much to say. I sent in 12 pictures and a small text and was selected to the final rouund It was motivating to show the pictures from the book on their website. Witch are the prizes you submit usually your works? I havent sent in too so many prizes. But I send in to everythng that includes visual art.

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ovely Sara Meet the woman who’s rapidly becoming a key figure on the global fashion scene. + Interview BY ROSARIO MORABITO

For the past two years, Sara Maino appeared among the 500 shortlisted by The Business of Fashion as “the people shaping the global fashion industry”. Being someone discrete, more active on the backstage than on the red carpet, to many her name won’t ring any bell. But for those keen on scratching the fashion’s surface, she represents instead the chance of launching a career. By starting the Vogue Talents project ten years ago (which today includes an online daily magazine and a six-monthly printed edition, supplement to the main fashion bible Vogue Italia), Sara Maino devoted her career to finding new talents. It is her mission to give their work visibility, and ultimately the opportunity they're longing for: bridging the gap between leaving school and starting their own line. Despite a very hectic schedule, which sees Sara flying unflappably from one fashion event to another, she accepted to answer our questions: a rare opportunity for you to know more in depth someone truly committed to give fashion a future.

Is there anything you miss from the old system? Time. We used to enjoy everything a bit longer: it all had a calmer pace. Nowadays you always have this feeling of running out of time.

How did your career in fashion start? After leaving high school I had a few months free before starting to study foreign languages and literature at university, which I never finished. In that period, I started to work at the 10 Corso Como store, which had recently opened. While I was undecided on which direction to take, the opportunity came along to intern at Vogue Italia. I knew about photography, but very little about fashion: it was the start of a long and intense apprenticeship.

Vogue Talents looks for new names practically everywhere. Which countries do you consider “to watch”? Ukraine, Africa, China and the UAE.

Thinking back, what has radically changed in fashion and what, instead, is still the same? Practically everything has changed! When I started, you would work sending faxes and without using computers or emails, apart some rare exceptions. You would produce the magazine’s pages by using glue and cutter, no software…pictures were only on film or polaroids. What stayed the same, and will always be, is one’s own creativity and point of view. 16

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When did you decide to work with new talents? Almost instantly. After a few years interning, I became assistant to several fashion editors and had to do lots of research. On top of my duties, I would always come up with new names found during my spare time or in showrooms. Fifteen years ago they weren’t that many. What do you look for in a portfolio? Firstly, the designer’s point of view: it is vital to understand that he/she has its own idea, and then be able to see it. Secondly, I look at how the work is presented, their creativity. The portfolio is a designer’s soul.

As senior fashion editor of Vogue Italia you also get to work next to a living legend of fashion publishing such as Franca Sozzani. What does it mean working with her? It means to learn something new everyday, plus the fortune of putting to good use your ideas. Any recommendations to a young designer or student reading this interview? To persevere, to keep in mind his focus and to listen.


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QUE STI ON + Photography by nika MARCHi www.nikamarchi.com 18

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Question is a visual itinerary through Ecuador’s everyday life. From the suffocating and chaotic Guayaquil – “the Pacific pearl” – with its 2.5 million clamoring residents, through the little pueblitos of the backcountry, under the shadows of mangoes and aguacates and through endless bananas orchards. And then – with the indispensable bus ride – the arrival in Cuenca, sheltered 2.550 m above the sea level on the Ecuadorean Andes. Here everything is music and colors, in the multicolored chaos which is so typical of South America. Sounds and colors diving in the lives of the inhabitants, always busy with their everyday matters. This is the post-colonial dream with its humblest hues: these are the thriving Andean markets in Cuenca, where steadfast Quechua women tow a prosperously agricultural economy under the absurdly clear sky always blanketing the Andes. Guayaquil is instead throbbing, bold and arrogant with its brazen maze of criminality and abuse of power, a place where the ghetto social Darwinism is still in force. I had the luck and sinister privilege of visiting places that are unknown even to Ecuadoreans, disturbing glimpses of need: I’ve been in a crack house consecrated to the freebase and I’ve crossed the suspicious gazes of veterans always on thresholds in the alleys of Guasmo sur.

Children and animals are the main characters in the streets – they are everywhere – actors and victims of a game that’s often bigger than them. The houses are humble, minimal, often lacking tap water and electricity. The richer ones benefit instead of reinforced concrete houses and television. Poultry is usually kept in internal courtyards or even in the house, sheltered from thieves or someone vindictive after a rooster fight gone bad. Gunshots are the soundtrack of everyday life here, from the Sunday lunch with the family to the city’s championship game where the whole village goes. There’s someone preaching redemption from sin singing in the street, someone resting on his balcony, someone controlling the neighborhood smoking a joint, someone in his underwear on the street and someone sleeping on the pavement – worn out by too much aguardiente de caña. All this merges in an auditory, olfactory and visual universe, as fascinating but at the same time as unsettling as Ecuador – a gaudy land of human contrasts immersed in a gaudy and prosperous nature.

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TRANSINSTRIA FROM INSIDE

+ Photography by Anton Polyakov Website www.anton-polyakov.com

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For 23 years, officially being part of Republic of Moldova, Transnistria de facto is an independent state called Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic, which has a territory of narrow strip (approx. 30 km width and 200 km length) along the left bank of the river Dniester. If the course of Moldovan politics has a clear pro-European vector, especially after the signing EU Association Agreement in November 2013, Transnistria, whose population is mostly Russian-speaking, throughout its existence, has a strongly pro-Russian course. The whole new generation which identifies itself as “Transnistrians” was grown during 23 years.

The territory of Transnistria was a part of Moldova in Soviet period. After the dissolution of USSR, when Moldova became an independent state, Transnistria with its prorussian position hadn’t accepted the Moldovan nationalism politics and decided to secede from Moldova. Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic was proclaimed as independent state in 1990. It led to armed conflict in 1992. Russia intervented in it, and the conflict was transformed from a military into political one. The border passed along the river Dniester: the left bank is Transnistrian and the right bank is Moldovan with some deflections. Now Transnistria has an undefinite status, none of the countries recognizes the transnistrian independence except Abkhazia, South Ossetia and Nagorno-Karabakh which also are unrecognized republics.

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Despite its non-recognition, now Transnistria is a presidential republic, has its legislative and executive authority, the state border and army, own constitution, flag, emblem and anthem. The citizens of Transnistria has its own currency and passports, although nowhere except in Transnistria are not valid. This frozen political conflict has been going on for 23 years. During this time, the new generation was formed and I belong to it. In my story about Transnistria I tried to concentrate on people in their everyday life, on people which belong to different generations and different epochs, which lives in countryside and urban areas. For some people it’s absolutely new country without any past, for another Transnistria is like successor of Soviet Union. As a citizen and coeval with Transnistria, I’d like to present my country not only as the museum of Soviet symbols with Lenin on every corner, but to try to abstract from the cliches and to show completely diverse aspects of the everyday life of people who live in Transnistria.


My project is called Transnistria Conglomerate. Conglomerate is a mix of something heterogeneous in one system. I consider that this term captures the essence of the territory which now is Transnistria. Throughout its history, this coastal strip of land has been a crossroads of cultures, ethnic groups and political interests. At various times it was inhabited by the Scythians, Sarmatians, Huns, Greeks. Armenians, Jews and the German colonists formed their settlements here. Transnistria was the part of different empires (the Golden Horde, Rzeczpospolita, Romania), often being the border area. But this territory had become the most actively developed, populated and modern entered the Russian Empire. Industrialization and agriculture rising took place in the Soviet period. In many ways it explicates the present pro-Russian position of region. Though Transnistria declares its independence now, in fact it’s the part of the “Russian world”, a kind of Russian foothold in the southern part of the Eastern European region. Russia, in turn, supports the region and gives subsidies and political hope

for the future. The citizens of Transnistria voted for entry into Russia on a referendum in 2006. But Russia doesn’t hurry either to take Transnistria in its membership, or even to recognize it, preferring to keep this territory with an uncertain status as a tool to influence the pro-European directional Moldova. In geopolitical terms, Transnistria, with its pro-Russian position, is like an island surrounded by a pro-European Moldova in the west and Ukraine to the east. It creates a lot of economic difficulties for the region. The region had a very high level of development in Soviet period: Transnistria was considered the most industrialized region of the Moldavian SSR. Many factories and industrial complexes didn’t survive in the 90s or are deprived of the former power and live their days using outdated equipment and experiencing financial difficulties. From this point of view, the Transnistrian environment can be called post-industrial. The basis of wealth of the region is either Russian monetary subsidies and energy, or money sent by migrants, which went to work in Russia. POSI TIVE 39


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+ Photography by PAOLO SIMi www.paolosimi.com Photographer assistant Alessandro Leonardo valentina berlinghieri Stylist Enrica Lamonaca 66

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Make up Sara Del Re @ Freelancer Artist Agency Hair stylist Vessy Vess Model Lera Bubleyko @ MONSTER MILANO special thanks DAYLIGHT STUDIO MILANO NAVIGLI


+ TRENCH BY Annie P belt BY Mangano lingerie BY 25th Hour Lingerie

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+ sweatshirt BY Wesc skirt BY Stefano De Lellis

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+ Denim Jacked by Levis sequined jacket by Parosh leggins by American Appareal lingerie by 25th Hour Lingerie

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+ Dress by Greta Boldini studded leather jacket by Piccione and Piccione

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+ Coat by annie p

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+ Total look by Stefano De Lellis

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+ Denim Jacked by Levis metallic shirt by Stefano De lellis lingerie by 25th Hour Lingerie

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+ lingerie BY 25th Hour Lingerie

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+ lingerie BY 25th Hour Lingerie

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+ Photography by Robin Kater Fashion stylist and casting director Steven Doan Makeup and hair stylist Timo Bloom Models Malcolm @ Supa models and Feyoena @ Established models

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+ Feyoena wears whole look by Escada Malcome wears jumper by Whistle jeans by Dsquare boots by Hugo Boss

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+ Feyoena wears whole look by Escada Malcome wears jumper by Whistle jeans by Dsquare boots by Hugo Boss

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+ Malcome wears Lou Dalton whole look

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+ Malcome wears trench coat by Burberry scarf and hat by DAKS LONDON

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+ Feyoena wears coat by Pepe Jeans

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+ Malcome wears trench coat by Burberry trousers by DAKS LONDON shoes by Oliver Sweeney Feyoena wears jumper by Self-Portrait trousers by Goat shoes by Rebecca Minkoff

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+ Maclome wears coat by Topman

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+ Maclome wears coat by Topman jumper by Dolce and Gabbana gloves by REISS LONDON Feyoena wears hat by Bernstock Speirs jumper by Self-Portrait scarf owns by stylist

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+ Malcome wears shirt and jeans by Levi’s jacket by Topman scarf by DKNY boots by Hugo Boss

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+ Malcome wears shirt and jeans by Levi’s jacket by Topman scarf by DKNY boots by Hugo Boss

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+ Feyoena wears top and scarf by Escada jacket by Pepe Jeans skirt by Yui Teiler

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+ Feyoena wears jumpsuit by Self-Portrait coat by Pepe Jeans

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+ Feyoena wears jumpsuit by Self-Portrait coat by Pepe Jeans

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+ Malcome wears coat by REISS LONDON jumper by Dolce and Gabbana scarf and trousers by DAKS LONDON gloves by Hugo Boss

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+ Feyoena wears jacket by Pepe Jeans dress by Self-Portrait shoes owns by model

+ Malcome wears whole look Allsaints Feyoena wears scarf top and coat by Escada skirt by Yui Teiler 102 POSI TIVE shoes by Rebecca Minkoff socks owns by model


+ Malcome wears whole look Allsaints Feyoena wears scarf top and coat by Escada skirt by Yui Teiler shoes by Rebecca Minkoff socks owns by model POSI TIVE 103


+ Malcome wears whole look Allsaints Feyoena wears scarf top and coat by Escada skirt by Yui Teiler shoes by Rebecca Minkoff socks owns by model

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M A I D O M O

+ Photography by Andrea Roversi website www.andrearoversi.it


“Americans will never understand Cricket. The British can't grasp American Football. What makes MMA so great is that every single man on the planet gets it immediately. It's just two guys beating each other up in a cage.” Lorenzo Fertitta – UFC CEO Two years of work which have been filled with more than twenty different MMA (Mixed Martial Arts) events. A way to expose the public to this discipline not only from sports' point of view. It isn't just a fight, there are other aspects which spectators wouldn't know about: I have followed the athletes' training. I have stalked them to the changing rooms before their match. I have portrayed their ways of preparing, focusing, praying and empowering themselves. I have followed them to the cage and back, far away from the limelight. The joy of the winners, the grief and tears of the defeated, the first aid support. A fighting sport, as extreme as fascinating that deserved to be deeply explored and portrayed as never done before.

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LA LUCHA + Photography by Stefanie Schmid Rincon website www.stefanieschmidrincon.com

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Stefanie was always very intrigued about the famous culture of 'Lucha Libre' in Mexico. This mexican Wrestling has been the most popular sport and spectacle since the early 1900's. After two weeks documenting the life at the Lucha Libre matches through mexico city, Stefanie found herself in Tlalnepantla, a small town outside of Mexico City at the Arena Lopez Mateo, where she discovered and captured another side of the traditional and know match of Lucha Libre. This particular fight consists in getting the mask off with a fork of a wrestler, once the mask is off and the identity of a wrestler is revealed, he looses and can never wear a mask in a fight again.

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INPUT/OUTPUT


My name is Kamil Sleszynski (1982). I am a documentary photographer from Poland, Bialystok. I’m working on long-term projects, focusing on intimate stories. I don’t like to write about myself. I’m a little bit shy, but photography helps me to discover myself and the people around me. When I’m hidden over my photo camera I feel a little more brave than in the others situations.   my website: www.kamilsleszynski.com Input/Output They often waste their freedom at their own request, over something stupid. While serving the sentence they promise themselves that they will never again make a mistake and will not return to prison. However, this resolution is not enough. Long-term sentence leaves it’s stamp on a man that they have to struggle with for the rest of

their lives. Habits that help to survive in prison reality become a burden when it comes to living a normal life. This burden makes the longed-for freedom a state in which it is hard for them to find themselves and only few manage to succeed. The majority choose more simple solution. They return to previous behaviours, to familiar environment and in the end land behind bars once again, because only there they feel sure and safe. Only there they do not have to make any difficult practical decisions. The whole process starts from the beginning. It does not have to be like that, though. This photographic series of works tells a story about prisoners in Poland. I am interested how they think about freedom, what do they feel about it, why many of them couldn’t live outside prison and come back again. These photographs I took in a prisons and in a centers that support ex-prisoners in the north-east Poland. POSI TIVE 133


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+ website www.cristian-dorme.tumblr.com

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+ Photography by Giacomo Cosua Sylist Isabella Venerosi Photo Assistant Andrea Francesco Berni Xavier Buestel and Dirk van der Graaf @ I LOVE Models Management Jake Hold @ Joy Models 160 POSI TIVE


+ kwai by nike sweater by AQUA

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+ Kefiah by italia indipendent Tshirt by Givenchy trousers by Camo

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+ jacket by fred perry tracksuit by bikkembergs

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+ hoodie by vespa POSI TIVE 167


+ shirt by vintage 55 tshirt by Levis made and crafted tracksuit by nike

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+ kwai BY nike AIR 170 POSI TIVE


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Founder & Editor in Chief Giacomo Cosua giacomo.cosua@positive-magazine.com Art Directors Marco Forlin marco.forlin@positive-magazine.com

Art and Culture Michela Canessa michela.canessa@positive-magazine.com Matilde Casaglia matilde.casaglia@positive-magazine.com

Livio Chiodega livio.chiodega@positive-magazine.com

Fashion Stefano Guerrini (Editor in Chief) stefano.guerrini@positive-magazine.com

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POSI TIVE 173


#13

DIFFERENT VIEWS AROUND THE WORLD

www.positive-magazine.com

Photo by Giacomo Cosua

Positive Magazine N° 13  

The 13th issue of Positive Magazine. In this number: Fashion, Reportage, interviews and much more. All original contents for free!