Page 1

POOL 49 www.poolmagazine.in

Mukul Goyal pg 28  |  Photographed by Kasturi Joshi Sulekha Rajkumar 04  Bhuvan Thaker 12 Anika Mittal Dhawan and Tanya Khanna 14 Shiva Nallaperumal 20  Abin Chaudhury 40  Denver Kotian 48  Saif Faisal 54  Aarushi and Arpan Patel 60


Design Drives Innovation. A philosophy that nurtures a culture of innovation. For over six decades, Forbes Marshall has been building steam engineering and control instrumentation solutions that work for process industry. Today, we are leaders in process efficiency and energy conservation through technology tie ups and focused investments in manufacturing and research. Constant innovation in our product range is what helps us stay at the fore. We have

consistently brought to the market innovations in technology and design. Several of our designs have won awards, the most recent being the Steamon Vortex Flowmeter which has won the iDesign award for the Best Design in Capital Goods. To know more about what drives innovators at Forbes Marshall, write in to us at response@forbesmarshall.com .

Energy Conservation | Environment | Process Efficiency

www.forbesmarshall.com

P B # 29, Mumbai Pune Road, Kasarwadi, Pune 411 034, India. Tel. +91 20 27145595, 39858555, Fax. +91 20 27147413 A-34/35, M.I.D.C., H Block, Pimpri, Pune 411 018, India. Tel. +91 20 27442020, 39851100, Fax. +91 20 27442020


Editor in Chief | sudhir@indidesign.in

July 2014 | # 49

Sudhir at the DDS 2014, IDC, IIT, Mumbai

To be like a bee POOL 49

POOL 49 www.poolmagazine.in

'Every designer is an entrepreneur. But every entrepreneur is not a designer.' I believe this very strongly. To be a designer demands that you know how to work your way, collect resources, marshal approvals, and reach the objective. Designers as entrepreneurs need to remember these five inspirations from the honey bee: Sting, Size, Hive, Buzz, and Honey.

Mukul Goyal pg 28 |

Photographed by Kasturi Joshi

Sulekha Rajkumar 04 Bhuvan Thaker 12 Anika Mittal Dhawan and Tanya Khanna 14 Shiva Nallaperumal 20 Abin Chaudhury 40 Denver Kotian 48 Saif Faisal 54 Aarushi and Arpan Patel 60

www.poolmagazine.in facebook.com/poolmag twitter.com/poolmagazine info@poolmagazine.in

Designindia was founded in 2002. It was started as a platform for interaction for the design community in India and abroad. Over the years it has grown into a forum spread over many social and professional networking domains, linking design professionals into an active, interactive and thought leading community.

http://in.groups.yahoo.com/group/designindia International Design Media Network Participant

Endorsed by

Sting: The sting is the survival instinct of the bee; for us it is our skills and our design process. Keep them sharp. Size: The bee is very small, hardly noticeable. So are designers. We are a small part of a big ecosystem; we need to remember that and be humble. Hive: Bees live together in hives, and hives cannot be ignored. Designers need to group together and help each other to become noticeable. Buzz: Bees are always buzzing. Designers must always be curious and seek to learn...always moving, restless, and asking questions. Honey: The purpose of the bee is to make honey. Designers should not get distracted from their purpose of creating value for life. Sudhir Supported by


Get your pr POOL Maga

POOL Magazine is available on iOS, An www.magzter.com/I

To avail subscriptions & offers w

You can also buy subscriptions at www.tadpolestore.com | ww


rint copy of azine today! POOL 45

n

P OO

www.poolmaga zine.i

L 44

POO L 44 www .poo

lmag

azin

e.in

Deepa Kamath pg

26 | Photographed by Melinda Juan g Auto Expo 2014 02 Preksha Baid 10 Shweta Jain BODW 2013 46 Chopra 20 Jona Aneev Rao 52 s and Liane 40 Harsh Raman Singh Paul 58 Cagri Cankaya 63

Sajith Ansa r pg 3

2

| Pho Aniru togra d phed & Mic dh Ghosh by P ha 04 O anka Sayye el Rodri j Sha gues rProject d Ars h ’s Van 26 A had a 12 ksha Ali 56 tB Aarti Cag Karw ri Can hatt 44 Karis ayun kaya hm C 61 O bitua a Jhalan hawda 18 i&A ry shwin Valay G Willia ada mD Jain rent 50 tel 6 2

ndroid, Web, Amazon and Windows 8 IN/Indi-Design/pool

write to info@poolmagazine.in

ww.poolmagazine.in


Graphic Design

LETTERS FROM SULEKHA Even as a child Sulekha Rajkumar was fascinated by the art of drawing letters. She tells POOL about her passion for typography.

What inspired you to be a designer? SR: When I was nine, my mother gifted me a flip book that sparked my interest in animation. This, in fact, was the reason I decided to go to art school. It was only in my second year of college that I became acquainted with typography and realized how passionate I was about letters. I was taken back to my childhood, to a book my father gave me, called ‘Black on White’ by M. Ilin. Written for children, it is an engaging account of the history of books and letters. In school I would experiment 4  POOL #49

with drawing letters in different styles for class projects. The title and contents pages were always my favorite. In my third year at Sir J.J. Institute of Applied Art in Mumbai, I specialized in typography and lettering under the mentorship of Professor Vinay Saynekar. Apart from being an extremely talented type designer, he is an inspiring guide. He managed to strike the perfect balance between sharing his vast experience and encouraging us to develop our own individual styles. Thereafter lettering has always played a primary role in the work I do. What was your first major design project? SR: After college, I worked with Grandmother India, a Mumbai-based firm known for their very experimental and unconventional approach to design. My learning was significantly enhanced working with Kurnal Rawat, who was the Creative Director at the time. I worked on two major projects with them – Colour Next by Asian Paints, and the publicity and title design for the film Teen Patti.


Graphic Design

'Colour Next' – Asian Paints Designing a typographic planner for Colour Next by Asian Paints. Earth Song is a colour trend for the environment consious. It was brought to life using typography based on the recycle symbol and paper craft.

www.poolmagazine.in  5


Graphic Design

Teen Patti - Film Title & Publicity Design

Why did you move to Bangalore? SR: After spending most of my life at home in Mumbai, I felt the need to get out of my comfort zone, and face the obstacles and opportunities that come with living on your own in a new city. I moved to Bangalore to join Ray+Keshavan (now Brand Union | Ray+Keshavan), where I currently work as Design Director. I’ve been fortunate to work with icons like Sujata Keshavan, and inspiring creative directors like Rob Andrews, Ashutosh Karkhanis and Dan Ellis. Tell us something about the Mother Dairy project. SR: The best part about working on big brands is that you get to reach out to millions of people. Mother Dairy was one such project. In 2011, they approached 6  POOL #49

us (Brand Union) to refresh their milk brand portfolio packaging in order to strengthen their leadership position. The new identity needed to be aligned with Mother Dairy’s core purpose of giving small cooperative farmers a way to reach the market. The packs needed to look contemporary, without losing the brand’s values of warmth and trust. The idea that formed the basis of the design strategy was ‘Pure milk from the farm at your doorstep’. I was very fortunate to have the opportunity to work on the project from the initial design phase right up to proofing and production stages. The very first step was to understand the consumer and the strategy. What followed was an understanding of the production and distribution processes. We began to look


Graphic Design

MOTHER DAIRY - Package design for India's largest producer of milk, Mother Dairy

at the single color restriction less as a design constraint and more of an opportunity. It sparked the idea to play up the variant name itself. After a series of sketches on fluid typography, I settled on a style and went on to illustrate elements that portrayed a happy village. The final touch was to oversee the printing at the production unit to ensure the packs came out just right! The new identity was very well received as it delivered the desired business and brand impact. What kind of research do you engage in? SR: As far as research is concerned, I would say I am in a continual process of documentation of the typographic styles I see around me in my everyday life. I always travel with my graph book and spend a lot of time sketching the letters fabricated in iron gates, and those seen on hand painted signs and scriptures. I find the various grid patterns in old www.poolmagazine.in  7


Graphic Design

PRIVET - Privet is a display typeface inspired by Russian typography. It is currently designed in three weights – Regular, Demi and Bold.

buildings, whether in the tiles, the woodwork or the grills, very interesting. This diary of sketches becomes my starting point when I am designing a font. What do you enjoy most about your work? SR: Design is constantly evolving with technology. The rapid pace at which technology changes keeps us on our toes and encourages designers to come up with design solutions that are not just beautiful but also relevant and effective. Do you have a design goal? SR: I love traveling, and immerse myself in the local culture wherever I go. It gives me the opportunity to meet new people and learn about 8  POOL #49


Graphic Design different scripts, music, art and cuisines. I look forward to self initiated projects that marry design with traveling. What has been your biggest learning experience? SR: As designers, we can get very attached to the work we do. It is so important to embrace rejection of your work along with the praise. Four very intense yet enjoyable years at JJ have equipped me with the confidence to push for what I believe in and have taught me to be open to criticism and other points of view.

Ranga Shankara - Shakespeare. Multilingual. Indian. Communication for Ranga Shankara Theatre Company's annual theatre festival.

Custom monograms for wedding invites and personalized stationery.

In your opinion, what are the emerging design trends for India? SR: Designers today are beginning to benchmark their work against global standards as opposed to global trends. We’re beginning to see a lot of contemporary design that is rooted in Indian art and culture. What, in your opinion, should young designers focus their efforts on? SR: Choose your internships and your first job wisely. It is important to be positively influenced in one’s formative years. A lot of young designers run after big agencies in an attempt to have an impressive resume. Pick a studio because of the work it produces and the opportunity it will give you to develop a good portfolio. hello@sulekharajkumar.com

www.poolmagazine.in  9


Get your pr POOL Maga

POOL Magazine is available on iOS, An www.magzter.com/I

To avail subscriptions & offers w

You can also buy subscriptions at www.tadpolestore.com | ww


rint copy of azine today! POOL 45

n

P OO

www.poolmaga zine.i

L 44

POO L 44 www .poo

lmag

azin

e.in

Deepa Kamath pg

26 | Photographed by Melinda Juan g Auto Expo 2014 02 Preksha Baid 10 Shweta Jain BODW 2013 46 Chopra 20 Jona Aneev Rao 52 s and Liane 40 Harsh Raman Singh Paul 58 Cagri Cankaya 63

Sajith Ansa r pg 3

2

| Pho Aniru togra d phed & Mic dh Ghosh by P ha 04 O anka Sayye el Rodri j Sha gues rProject d Ars h ’s Van 26 A had a 12 ksha Ali 56 tB Aarti Cag Karw ri Can hatt 44 Karis ayun kaya hm C 61 O bitua a Jhalan hawda 18 i&A ry shwin Valay G Willia ada mD Jain rent 50 tel 6 2

ndroid, Web, Amazon and Windows 8 IN/Indi-Design/pool

write to info@poolmagazine.in

ww.poolmagazine.in


infographic

marketing MANTRAS Brand and marketing professional Bhuvan Thaker has created an infographic that highlights the ‘3 Pillars of Marketing’ that are so essential in a rapidly changing world

What was the idea behind the infographic? BT: Marketing is going through changes. The world is rapidly moving towards the digital era; in the coming years everything will become technology driven, and in a world where technology takes the front seat, changes will happen at breakneck speed. Consumers will have more power to own the conversation they want to have with businesses/brands. The way we see things, marketing organizations have to accommodate this changing nature to keep pace with the consumers and evolve a new marketing structure that can change as quickly as the market. The infographic explains the context behind the change and why this new thinking is required within every marketing department. It also makes a comparison of the new structure vs. the old one; as well as shares a cheat sheet in the form of a reference card for all the senior marketers who can then refer back when taking a strategic or tactical decision on marketing within their own industries. Who developed the infographic? BT: It is an initiative of thoughts2connect, which is a Bangalore-based boutique venture advisory firm, focused on new age growth stage businesses funded by VCs or PEs in multiple industries. We are a small team of forward looking independent professionals who work together when a project comes calling. We are currently focusing on three core areas of business: Brand & Marketing, Market Development, and Design. We like to call ourselves an ‘advisory for businesses of a different kind’. 12  POOL #49


infographic I am a Brand and Marketing Advisory Partner at t2c - I work with entrepreneurs in Venture Development in the area of Business and Brand & Marketing. What kind of research was involved? BT: This infographic is the result of gazing at the fundamentals of the marketing practice and comparing it with how we are operationally implementing in organizations. The typical marketing structure today is role based; we believe it should be based on the key activities instead. The key activities for marketing are Acquiring, Retaining, and Developing customers profitably, and this was an important insight into developing a structure which can be measured as well as be flexible to accommodate many different types and size of organizations.

Tell us something about yourself. BT: I graduated with a degree in commerce and went on to do my post graduation in brand and marketing in the early 2000s. This led to a career in advertising where I worked for a variety of interesting brands. My first real step towards the unknown world of entrepreneurship happened when I left my 9 to 10 job and believe me, it has been quite an enjoyable ride. I like to believe I have a necessary understanding of traditional marketing and media, and am inclined to design-led thinking. bhuvan.thaker@gmail.com

www.poolmagazine.in  13


lifestyle design

The Right Blend Anika Mittal Dhawan and Tanya Khanna’s furniture and home accessories are an attractive amalgam of tradition and modernity

How did Amalgam come to be? A&T: We are both architects, with a B. Arch degree from Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Gurgaon. We went on to The Bartlett, University College London where Anika pursued an M.Sc in Urban Design and Tanya did an M.Arch (Architectural Design). Both of us recognized our calling for design even when we were in school. As architects, we are constantly designing things, whether buildings or products. Design for us is a way of life. We felt that traditional craft was waning in India. It’s surprising that Indian artisans are recognized across the world, yet contemporary Indian design does not recognize and appreciate Indian craft and locally available materials. We figured that the only way for it to survive is by adapting it to modern times. In 2010 we conceived Amalgam, a design firm specializing in home accessories, furniture and lighting products, based out of New Delhi. 14  POOL #49


lifestyle design

Coasters - 'Royal Rajasthan Collection'

Coasters Multi-purpose knobs

Tray

www.poolmagazine.in  15


lifestyle design Tell us more about your products. A&T: We draw inspiration from patterns and culture around us and our products are a modern reference to contemporary life. Amalgam emphasizes on customization and innovation: an array (of patterns, textures, colors) of materials is available, which are amalgamated with the client’s requirements and function. Apart from furniture, Amalgam manufactures various home and lifestyle accessories in wood, stone and inlay in MOP and semi-precious stone; table tops, cheese platters, trays, coasters, placemats, table mats, hardware, etc. We also customize walls and facades.

(Top) 'The Circling Clique' sidetable (Right) 'The Ray Burst' sidetable

16  POOL #49


lifestyle design

Set of cheese knives

How do you engage with your craftsmen? A&T: Our workshops are based in New Delhi and Agra, where we work directly with the craftsmen, innovating with materials and adding to their competencies through the implication of technology. We work with different craftsmen, depending on the product, materials and technique. We usually source the material ourselves, but on many occasions, our skilled craftsmen suggest materials and techniques.We provide the design to the craftsmen, but we do take their feedback about the workability and craftsmanship of each design. Who forms your main target market? A&T: The products cater to all ranges: from colored composite to semiprecious stones, from traditional patterns to trendy, fashionable, modern interpretations, hence creating products for all age groups. What is the future of contemporary craft in India? A&T: Amalgam emphasizes design as a craft, and views it as a holistic experience, where, from spatial mediation, to lifestyle and accessory www.poolmagazine.in  17


18  POOL #49


lifestyle design

'The Knots & Crosses set' A simple board game handcrafted in Makrana stone with Granite / Red Onyx

design, every product is viewed as a blend of function and esthetic, tradition and modernity, style and utility, color and pattern, technique and retro style.

Coasters - 'The Card Play'

What is your vision for Amalgam for the next three years? A&T: Innovation is crucial - in today’s global era of constant dialogue and exchange of ideas, we need to continuously innovate and use traditional Indian art and craft as a means to represent the Indian design ethos. Our intent is to take Amalgam and the craft of inlay to the next level not only in India, but globally. We also plan to increase our range of products. info@amalgam.me www.poolmagazine.in  19


Get your pr POOL Maga

POOL Magazine is available on iOS, An www.magzter.com/I

To avail subscriptions & offers w

You can also buy subscriptions at www.tadpolestore.com | ww


rint copy of azine today! POOL 45

n

P OO

www.poolmaga zine.i

L 44

POO L 44 www .poo

lmag

azin

e.in

Deepa Kamath pg

26 | Photographed by Melinda Juan g Auto Expo 2014 02 Preksha Baid 10 Shweta Jain BODW 2013 46 Chopra 20 Jona Aneev Rao 52 s and Liane 40 Harsh Raman Singh Paul 58 Cagri Cankaya 63

Sajith Ansa r pg 3

2

| Pho Aniru togra d phed & Mic dh Ghosh by P ha 04 O anka Sayye el Rodri j Sha gues rProject d Ars h ’s Van 26 A had a 12 ksha Ali 56 tB Aarti Cag Karw ri Can hatt 44 Karis ayun kaya hm C 61 O bitua a Jhalan hawda 18 i&A ry shwin Valay G Willia ada mD Jain rent 50 tel 6 2

ndroid, Web, Amazon and Windows 8 IN/Indi-Design/pool

write to info@poolmagazine.in

ww.poolmagazine.in


typography

TRUE TO TYPE

Freelance graphic designer Shiva Nallaperumal is working on creating a typeface that fills the grey area between onetime lettering and a more versatile typeface

What kindled your passion for design? SN: Since I was a child I’ve been interested in the more visual side of the world. From comic books and animated cartoons to cinema and posters, visual culture fascinated me. I didn’t quite understand the connection between these fields until I went to design school but I knew that this was where my passion lay. My parents were supportive of my love for the arts, encouraged me at every step, and did not hesitate to buy me books and materials. As I matured, so did my taste in books and cinema. From watching entertainment films and reading harmless super hero comics, I started getting into more mature, serious works that tended to challenge my perception of the world. I was fascinated by the artistic individuality of comic book artists like Frank Miller and Charles Burns and filmmakers such as David Lynch and Orson Welles among others. How did you get drawn to typography? SN: I enrolled in DJ Academy of Design, Coimbatore after finishing my 12th standard, 20  POOL #49

and there I met the designers and teachers who would change my life forever. I initially had a keen interest in illustration and comic books, but was soon fascinated by the intricate and complex the world of typography. I started observing its influence on daily life around me. I learnt to apply what we were learning in a professional context from my internship with Grandmother India, where I had the opportunity to work closely with its founder, Kurnal Rawat, who exposed me to typography in the real world and in the Indian context. By this time lots of great things were happening in the design industry, such as the annual design conference, Design Yatra, setting up of The Indian Type Foundry, Codesign’s book on Indian design, ‘Dekho’, Sameer Kulavoor’s experiments in publishing, and design interventions in the craft sector, all of which influenced me in a huge way. I started to understand how I, as a young designer, could contribute to this fledging industry. What came next? SN: After graduating from DJ I enrolled in the MFA Graphic Design Program at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), Baltimore, USA. This was a turning point in my life as after four intense years of trying to find an Indian identity in design I


typography

'Breda' - Posters on the rising use of photo manipulation tools that have effectively changed our perception of beauty. These posters won the Graphic Design Festival Breda poster competition and were displayed around the world as part of a mobile exhibition.

suddenly found myself in a global context. The program is run by two of the greatest designers I have known - Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips. We were propelled into complex projects and taught by greats like Tal Leming, Kim Walker and Dave Plunkert. Here I found opportunities where I could take my work to a more serious, real world context by working on several ‘real time’ projects. On returning to India (Chennai) after a very intense first year, I was invited to join the Indian Type Foundry (ITF) and work on Latin script fonts for some of their multi script projects. Though I am still studying at MICA, I am also a freelance graphic designer. What kind of projects have you done so far? SN: I’ve had the good fortune to have worked on a variety of multi disciplinary projects that were both independent and collaborative. I’ve worked on identity systems, typefaces, an exhibition, and books. I have also commissioned illustration pieces for a variety of clients from type foundries to feminist

'Orwellian' is an upcoming typeface based on George Orwell’s 1984 and Caslon’s Italian.

publishers to large corporations. Apart from commercial and college work I have worked on several self initiated projects. Do you prefer hand drawing over the digital medium? SN: Technique is always dictated by the project. I don’t let technique or style influence the problem solving process, because then it often becomes self indulgent work. Hand done technique is very enjoyable and I really love hand done processes like screen www.poolmagazine.in  21


typography printing, collage or just plain drawing. It gives a very personal relationship with the work whereas digital work will always have a sense of detachment. Sketching is a very integral part of my design process. It has evolved over time but drawing ideas and constantly doodling forms a foundation to any digital work I do. It’s very interesting for me to look back at my sketchbooks from the past. They reflect my interests and stylistic obsessions at the time of use. But purely as a step in the design process, drawing is very important to me. I often find myself lost and staring at the screen while designing type if I haven’t drawn the letters beforehand. I don’t draw the final perfected letters on paper but to understand the contours and the character of the shapes and how the visual language is followed among all the glyphs in the set, it is very important to draw them first. Do you have a favorite project?

'The Empathy Project' (Top to Bottom) 1. Logo | 2. Exhibition at the Mica Graduate Building, Baltimore. | 3. Type 22  POOL #49

SN: I really enjoyed a recent project that I did for MICA. Called ‘’The Empathy Project’ (TEP), it was an exhibition and identity design project that far exceeded the intended brief and I was given free rein as a designer. It was an interactive art exhibition initiated by multi disciplinary artist and musician Paul Rucker and curated by Marcus Civin. The idea was to explore ‘empathy’ as a tool to celebrate diversity. Through the project the artist invited the MICA community to contribute work exploring one’s own experiences with empathy. As the designer of the identity and the exhibition space itself, I had to design a system that would bring together all this diversity under one banner. I had to create a visual language that could act as an umbrella for the varied styles and techniques used to create the submissions. It was an interesting challenge and my first time doing a large scale project. The target audience comprised artists and designers so it was somewhat like cooking for a group of chefs!


typography hand is a system, letters drawn to work in any composition, with any arrangement of letters. The work of the aforementioned calligraphers is strictly lettering. I wanted to create a typeface that works in the grey area between lettering and typeface.

'Barin' - The modular, interlocking typeface I’ve been working on with my teacher Tal Leming

What are you currently working on? SN: I am currently working on several typeface design projects. There is one which has been particularly challenging and influential in my life. Its working title is ‘Barin’ and it is a modular, interactive, quasi artificially intelligent typeface that has been half drawn and half built with python code. It’s an experiment that I think has little commercial viability but one which has taught me much. It started as a class project in our Graduate Typeface Design class with Tal Leming, who is a master type designer and a legendary programmer. For my final project I chose to design a typeface inspired by Kufi calligraphy, especially the work of Emin Barin and Hassan Masoudy. Their work is highly geometric and typographic but is too free to be a typeface. Lettering, as Erik Van Blokland once explained, is letters drawn to fit in a specific space, dictated by the composition. It is a onetime affair. A typeface on the other

This, I learned is no simple affair. The typeface had to be quasi intelligent and should be able to type like building blocks on a matrix. Tal guided me into designing a large framework that would make this possible. I devised a grid and drew the characters according to their places on the grid (that was dictated by the character before and after said character) and Tal created unique opentype code that would build ligatures and make the unique interlocking possible. Though the typeface is in its final stages, there is still much to be done. Right now, the number of glyphs in the font is around 5,000 and counting! I like the fact that the typeface challenged its own production and we had to find new ways to make it function. It was a great learning experience. What inspires you? SN: The most inspiring environment for me is to be surrounded by books. I’ve collected all kinds of books from design specific ones to a large collection of comic books, graphic novels, film retrospectives, Indian political history, feminist theory, popular culture reference books, art history books, etc. I also hoard magazines and films. Cinema is integral to my life as I believe there is no greater form of mass communication than a good film. A designer can learn much about a time, its conventions and culture from watching a film and more importantly, film teaches one storytelling. Storytelling is integral to graphic design. How important is research in the design process? SN: I’m quite obsessive about research actually. I’m always reading or collecting www.poolmagazine.in  23


MoUA - Branding and custom typeface design for the Museum of Urban Art (A class project at MICA.) The subsequent typeface, 'Enemy' is now commercially available through Lost Type Co-Op.

things, articles, books, essays about anything and everything that interests me. I find that everything I read or every film I watch, whether it’s related to my work or not, somehow influences my work. No knowledge is wasted. Speaking strictly about the design process, research is the most important stage. I think that knowing the problem in and out is actually half the solution. It’s very easy to differentiate between good design and bad or inappropriate design because lack of research bleeds through bad work. It shows the designer’s indifference to the problem he/she was hired to solve. But when a design solution seems perfect, no matter how simple it is, it reflects the designer’s thorough understanding of the brief, the target audience, the problem and its roots. What is the most rewarding part of your work? SN: This is an interesting question! I think it is the joy of seeing people interact with the 24  POOL #49

finished product or seeing my typeface in use somewhere. It’s always about the user. It gives me happiness if the user finds value in the design and it is somehow helpful or insightful to them. Contrarily, I understand that a different method is required if I see that the intended message is not being communicated to the user. I’ve learnt that I must never underestimate my users and over-estimate my role in the world. As designers, we are not to be celebrated like artists, we merely act as a bridge between humans and products and services and customers. Recently I found that my typeface ‘Enemy’ was being used by a world famous rock band called Iron & Wine for their 2014 tour promotion. My friends called me to congratulate me but I had never heard of this band! It was really funny. But later I listened and really liked them! It was an intense feeling to see social media posters and ads


typography

'Juxtapose' - A new series of collages that explore the relationship between content and context within the framework of open source imagery

typeset in my typeface, which I had actually thought was quite unusable! So joy comes from little things like this. Those millions of people who see and like the posters will never know who I am or that the typeface was actually designed by somebody, but that’s the best part. A designer must always be behind the curtains, invisibly observing the field’s influence on the world. And the most challenging? SN: The most challenging aspect is to bring Indian design onto the world forum. I do not yet have the professional maturity to claim to have had a part in that process but I am always conscious of my own Indian identity in my work, if there is one. In the wake of globalization and the IT boom the Indian visual language mixed with aspects of common world visual culture to form this confused sort of state we have right now. And the recent obsession with kitsch sort of diverted the attention from the actual vernacular graphic ideas of the country. What is your opinion of the Indian design industry today? SN: In the two years or so that I have been in the industry, I have seen things that have both delighted and frightened me. I believe

that the design industry in India is in a rapid process of growth. More independent, socially conscious and process driven designers have started to make an impression. More and more corporations and business owners have started acknowledging the positive impact of good design on their businesses and have started respecting the field more and therefore improving the commercial viability of the industry as a whole. Much is being designed with the user in mind, making good products and services powered by design available to the people of the country. Globalization has brought on a larger challenge for Indian designers and has put us on the path to finding a true Indian identity for our work. But on the downside, most good design rarely reaches a mass audience at the same time. Though large corporations are now investing in good design to improve their products and services, the government and many basic models are yet to acknowledge the importance of design. I feel that there would be a real change in the way we live if the great designers were to be involved with the public sector more. While designers are more than ready to take on projects that would have a positive effect on the common man, sadly, the bureaucracy in our country often kills most projects that are proposed and commissioned. Design can improve many basic aspects of daily life. For instance, a good, conscious system redesign of the country’s public signage can improve communication and reduce problems on the road caused due to miscommunication. Good design is expensive, but the government can truly benefit from investing in and implementing changes proposed by designers. shiva.nallaperumal@gmail.com www.poolmagazine.in  25


Get your pr POOL Maga

POOL Magazine is available on iOS, An www.magzter.com/I

To avail subscriptions & offers w

You can also buy subscriptions at www.tadpolestore.com | ww


rint copy of azine today! POOL 45

n

P OO

www.poolmaga zine.i

L 44

POO L 44 www .poo

lmag

azin

e.in

Deepa Kamath pg

26 | Photographed by Melinda Juan g Auto Expo 2014 02 Preksha Baid 10 Shweta Jain BODW 2013 46 Chopra 20 Jona Aneev Rao 52 s and Liane 40 Harsh Raman Singh Paul 58 Cagri Cankaya 63

Sajith Ansa r pg 3

2

| Pho Aniru togra d phed & Mic dh Ghosh by P ha 04 O anka Sayye el Rodri j Sha gues rProject d Ars h ’s Van 26 A had a 12 ksha Ali 56 tB Aarti Cag Karw ri Can hatt 44 Karis ayun kaya hm C 61 O bitua a Jhalan hawda 18 i&A ry shwin Valay G Willia ada mD Jain rent 50 tel 6 2

ndroid, Web, Amazon and Windows 8 IN/Indi-Design/pool

write to info@poolmagazine.in

ww.poolmagazine.in


cover story

TURNING OBJECTS INTO ART

Product Designer Mukul Goyal’s home décor and lifestyle products have a simple elegance that sets them apart. The would-have-been-engineer tells POOL about his sometimes trying but always fulfilling experiences as a design entrepreneur.

How did you go from studying Metallurgical Engineering at IIT-Kanpur to Product Design at NID? MG: While at IITK I got exposed to art, and started developing some serious interest in it. Upon graduation, I worked for a year with Eicher Gooderath as a trainee. Art seriously intrigued me, and I decided to take some time off and explore options. A series of serendipitous events led me to NID as a research assistant. It was there that I realized my connect with design as an activity and took it up as the journey of my life. My only fear was that I might turn out to be a pathetic designer! I consoled myself with the thought that it is better to be a bad designer, and love design, than to be a great manager/engineer and hate it! What does design mean to you? MG: Design to me is an activity which aims to better the status quo. The perspectives and reasons for engaging in design then define its outcome. To define good design is difficult, but to define bad design is easier. Bad design is an outcome of design activity which fails to meet its objectives. The 28  POOL #49


cover story

'MA BELLE' - Bell sculpture in the form of a woman with a height of 11ft. Made out of cast brass and patinated. Installed at Crown Plaza, Mussoorie. www.poolmagazine.in  29


cover story

Eden Vase Clockwise in Chrome

Primitive Cheese Knife

Crumpled Tissue Box

30  POOL #49


cover story

Lunchtime Salt & Pepper Cellars

definition of good design is always in a context, be it price, esthetics, cultural, materials, etc. We always need to be aware of the context while evaluating design success.

to design intuitively. I learnt to work with a combination of materials, about the concept of quality and how to take a design concept through production, while trying to preserve its essentials.

Tell us about your early years in design. MG: When I graduated from NID, all I wanted to do was to work in leather. I was in love with it. It was a beautiful material with a lovely touch and smell, and challenged me to create something beautiful. However, I failed to find design opportunities in leather that I could work on, so I moved on. I had started to make junk jewelry in my spare time, and moved on to working in the craft sector for a couple of years.

After three very exciting years with this company, yearning to get back to product design, I went on to Domus Academy, Milan. After I returned I worked with a company as Design Director for a year, before starting off on my own to explore my own sensibilities in design.

An opportunity led me to join an Italian joint venture in India, making fashion jewelry and accessories. It is here that I learnt the synergy between design, manufacturing and marketing‌how design can contribute to all of these and yet have its own space. I also began

How was the experience of becoming an entrepreneur? MG: In 1998 I started Designwise India Pvt. Ltd. (of which I am Principal Designer and Director) in Gurgaon. Things were not as rosy as I thought they would be. I had no experience in design consulting, and only knew how to make objects. Since sustenance was a major issue, I started out by making objects for the export market, for people www.poolmagazine.in  31


cover story

Eden Centerpiece - Candlestand

Rope Towel Bar from Tattva

I knew. Every new order added a new machine in my workshop and a couple of people. Tattva, a range of curtain hardware, was conceived within a year of my starting out. We started selling through some stores, and found some acceptance. It grew from there and today, Tattva is a complete range of hardware curtain hardware, handles, mortise handles, bath accessories, lighting and signage. It sells from over 250 stores across the country.

Harvest Bowl

32  POOL #49

Mukul Goyal, the brand, started out as a different set of standalone objects related to home décor which could be sold through shops. With a small offering in 2004, the collection of objects has redefined itself and today it sells in over 30 countries worldwide, as well as in over 50 stores across the country.


cover story

Bookends

My experiences in making objects and creation of a brand identity by having a group of objects that communicate an underlying philosophy have made me stretch my scope of design in all possible directions, be it marketing, communications, pricing, quality, materials, manufacturing, etc. In all it’s been a very trying but fulfilling experience. Tell us about Mukul Goyal, the brand. MG: The brand was conceived in 2004 and we started with an assorted collection of objects, but quickly realized that we needed to be more focused in our collection for recall value. We offer a range of tableware, barware, desktop, and home décor products. The prime focus is to offer products of great quality and decent packaging which we think people would love to own and use. What kind of materials do you experiment with? MG: My experiences and experiments have been essentially in all types

of metal and metal manufacturing, though not limited to it. I have also worked in leather, concrete, stone, wood, plastics. One can never emphasize enough on understanding the medium in design. If we don’t understand the materials and processes, we will be seriously handicapped, and have to let others make the decisions for us. What has been your inspiration? MG: Inspirations are not acquired but silently get inside you and give you a high. My inspirations are from all kinds of sources, whether it is nature, our societies and culture, machines, processes, materials…or just notions of wit, humor, sensuality, balance, and poise. Do you have a specific design process? MG: I don’t normally have any set design process, but I guess over the years one gets comfortable with a way of working that delivers results. www.poolmagazine.in  33


cover story

Mumbai's International Terminal - T2 ' Flying Locomotives' (At Sight)

Do you believe in the conventional method of sketching your ideas first? MG: Yes, I do. It is the most intimate and quickest method to sort out my ideas. I do not however believe in detailed sketches; rough ones are good enough at the concept level. After clarity, I tend to prototype. I treat my prototypes as 3D sketches. I iterate and refine my ideas on prototypes. How did you get involved with Mumbai’s new integrated International Terminal T2? MG: In October 2012, IICD (Indian Institute of Crafts Design, Jaipur) asked if I was interested in working on a project which involved making a mobile sculpture. I jumped at the opportunity! I have always loved Alexander Calder’s work in Kinetic Art and mobiles, and even though I had no prior experience in making mobiles, I somehow convinced them that I could handle the job. The brief for the project, which was part of a much larger project, was defined by Rajeev Sethi, the eminent scenographer. I was given a 20 meter long x 10 meter high x 3 meter wide space, and told to use motifs from Gond art of Bhopal; the name of the piece was ‘Flying Locomotives’ and it was in a section called ‘India Moves’. We worked with some Gond artists from Bhopal, who developed imagery of flying objects from the Indian milieu, such as Ambassador cars, scooters, rickshaws, elephants, etc. Under the guidance of Rajeev Sethi, we shortlisted about 30 images which could be used in the final sculpture. 34  POOL #49


cover story

Mumbai's International Terminal - T2 ' Flying Locomotives'

www.poolmagazine.in  35


cover story

'SWIMMING' 1.8m in height and 4.5m in width. Made in Patinated Brass. Installed at JW Marriott, Chandigarh.

We started from understanding mobiles, making some structures and eventually fitting images into the structure. Once the basic look and feel of the piece was finalized, we started working on the Gond art pieces and the structure. We spent almost three months just balancing the structures, fine tuning the total experience, all in full scale. My role essentially was to bring to life what Rajeev had conceived as part of the larger whole. His overall guidance and belief was very instrumental. This is the most challenging work I have done so far, and today I feel enthused and confident about undertaking more such challenges. Are there any well designed products that you just can’t live without? MG: There are many well designed products around me, whether it is my iPhone, my Hidesign bag, or my HMT Janata watch…and one can live without all of them. I would love to live without the phone, because even though the iPhone is as good as it gets, the concept has become invasive. The watch is 36  POOL #49

beautiful, hand wound, and does exactly what it is supposed to do, but watches have practically outlived their existence as necessity products. My leather bag (which carries all my basic needs to work) has lived with me daily for the last five years and has probably entered its old age, but it has aged gracefully and continues to work perfectly. If I was to analyze the bag from a design perspective, I could find many faults with it. I can’t think of replacing it as of now, but sooner or later, it will have finished its life cycle. Is there a mantra you live by? MG: There cannot be only one mantra that can lead to a complete life. However, the one mantra that has helped me most, especially in times of restlessness is ‘believe in what you do and do what you believe in’. What has been your biggest learning so far? MG: Lots of small learnings lead to a larger life. One of my biggest learnings is that learning never stops. Every day,


cover story 'WINE & DINE' 3.2m H X 4m W, made out of Forged Steel. Installed at Westin, Gurgaon

everything that you do, every person that you meet will teach you something if your mind is willing to learn. This is the beauty of life… And finally, what would you advise the new generation of designers? MG: I am not qualified to give advice but can offer a few pointers: don’t Google design from your heart. Computers are only a tool for better design and not the end result. Immerse yourself in the physical world around you if you really want to design for it. mukul@mukulgoyal.com

'THE WALL' 2m H X 5m W, made out of Stainless Steel & Patinated Brass. Installed at Realistic Realtors Pvt. Ltd., Gurgaon. www.poolmagazine.in  37


Get your pr POOL Maga

POOL Magazine is available on iOS, An www.magzter.com/I

To avail subscriptions & offers w

You can also buy subscriptions at www.tadpolestore.com | ww


rint copy of azine today! POOL 45

n

P OO

www.poolmaga zine.i

L 44

POO L 44 www .poo

lmag

azin

e.in

Deepa Kamath pg

26 | Photographed by Melinda Juan g Auto Expo 2014 02 Preksha Baid 10 Shweta Jain BODW 2013 46 Chopra 20 Jona Aneev Rao 52 s and Liane 40 Harsh Raman Singh Paul 58 Cagri Cankaya 63

Sajith Ansa r pg 3

2

| Pho Aniru togra d phed & Mic dh Ghosh by P ha 04 O anka Sayye el Rodri j Sha gues rProject d Ars h ’s Van 26 A had a 12 ksha Ali 56 tB Aarti Cag Karw ri Can hatt 44 Karis ayun kaya hm C 61 O bitua a Jhalan hawda 18 i&A ry shwin Valay G Willia ada mD Jain rent 50 tel 6 2

ndroid, Web, Amazon and Windows 8 IN/Indi-Design/pool

write to info@poolmagazine.in

ww.poolmagazine.in


architecture

SPACE STORY Head of an award winning design studio in Kolkata, Abin Chaudhury believes in a holistic approach to architecture

40  POOL #49


architecture

What does architecture mean to you? AC: Architecture to me is ‘delineation of space and composition of elements along with the latest technology to create an experience which is sustainable yet visually, physically and spatially appealing to the users’. I believe in a holistic approach to design.

IMI, Kolkata View of the entrance

What drew you to architecture as a career? AC: I was good at drawing from my childhood. After the 12th standard I was planning to pursue Mathematics Hons. when I happened to see a building designed by Ar. Charles Correa. That changed my life! I went on to study architecture instead - B.Arch from, Jadavpur University, Kolkata. I also have a Specialization in Industrial Design from Domus Academy, Milan. As a strong believer in a comprehensive design approach, I work on anything that needs design - architecture, interiors, graphics, products, and signage. In 2005 I set up Abin Design Studio in Kolkata, and am its Principal & Design Director. www.poolmagazine.in  41


architecture

IMI, Kolkata View of the Integrated Plaza

42  POOL #49


architecture

IMI, Kolkata View from Placement Office towards Reception

What kind of work comes out of Abin Design Studio? AC: We have worked on various hospitality, education, residential and commercial projects. We try to deliver every design at a very fundamental level. What is important is that our work not only inspires amazement once, but innumerable times after that; maybe even for many years to come. Our aim is to approach every project with a new thought, its own unique design vocabulary. This is important because every project is unique, with its own unique location, context, requirements, and of course the end user. It seems easy when you say it aloud, but you have to understand the social aspect, the significance of the materials used, and the users’ response. We would describe ourselves as a creative mind, constantly in the process of exploration of new thoughts and ideas, new materials and technology, drawing inspiration from ordinary things. We essentially believe in extensive research work, are open to what’s happening worldwide, and are extremely passionate about the work we do. Do you have a design philosophy/vision? AC: Our inherent design philosophy is to deal with every design problem at a fundamental level. We believe that a lasting experience is seldom about a first ‘wow’ www.poolmagazine.in  43


architecture

International Management Institute (IMI), BHUBANESWAR (Clockwise) 1. Academic block from approach road 2. Central court and feature tower 3. Library block, close up at night 44  POOL #49


architecture

TIRUMANI CLUB Reception - Sculptures and artwork, along with a touch of spot lighting, adorn the walls of the common areas

Spa - Sculpted wall - a visual point of demarcation between the entrance to the spa and the functions within gym - A craft-fully concealed column proves to be the focal piece of the gymnasium

and hence do not necessarily believe in a single ‘big idea’ approach. Our practice explores ways to engage the users, the way they move through spaces, and interact with them. We like the fact that designing a space offers the opportunity to weave layers which unfold differently for different people. Our vision is to constantly explore new paradigms in an inherent desire to push boundaries in architecture and lead our firm to an international level in the near future. How did you bag your first major design project? AC: Our first major project was the International Management Institute, Kolkata, which we got by winning a design www.poolmagazine.in  45


Get your print copy of POOL Magazine today! 47

ww w.p

oolma

gazine

POOL 46

POOL

POOL

.org

48 POOL

47 POOL

ww w.p

oolmagaz

ine .in

POOL 46

www.poo lmag

azine.in

.in

48

POOL 45

Deshna Me hta

www.poo lmag

pg 26

| Photog 361° Con raphed by ference 201 Carol Nair 4 02 Anp Alicia Sou u Varkey za 38 Ren 06 Jasleen u Riswadk Cagri Can Bindra 14 YVD ar 46 Nup kaya 63 Amrit & Mrig Prasad ur Madhav a 18 phed by 52 Shweta otogra alla 24 Ph 63 Malhotra Bh | a ya 58 Canka Suparn wal pg 30 puria 18 56 Cagri ar I) Jai Ag uti (DF y India d 12 Shr Sanjay t Banso n Factor hiji sig Ab De i 50 mar 02 a Prithv nas Tanay Ku Ma Pittie 42 Suhani

ms in

2 year ster uate Ma Postgrad grams from level pro

mission

e 2014

15th Jun

ons admissi open

e of sub

Last dat

or 8, c28c sect 01, India 2013 noida 4566695 +91 120 166695 village.org.org llage thedesign +91 7042 edesignvi

info@ s@th admission

ap

ply now

l Bhavsar by Rahu graphed rtinez 22 | Photo ena Ma

16 Jim pg 30 utam 60 hpande y 10 Nasheet Shadani rshita Ga nk Des entse lai 54 Ha ing Ny Shasha deep Pil 02 Tenz 47 Pra dhury Mody Jit Chow 42 Anjali la Saha Anushee

Deepa Ka math

pg

26 | Photog raphed by Melinda Jua Auto Exp ng o 2014 02 Preksha Baid BODW 201 10 Shweta 3 46 Ane ev Rao 52 Jain Cho pra 20 Jon Harsh Ram as and Lian an Singh Paul 58 Cag e 40 ri Cankay a 63

To avail subscriptions & offers write to info@poolmagazine.in You can also buy subscriptions at www.tadpolestore.com | www.poolmagazine.in

POOL Magazine is available on iOS, Android, Web, Amazon and Windows 8 www.magzter.com/IN/Indi-Design/pool 46  POOL #49

azine.in


architecture

Kazi Nazrul Museum (Top) Main View (Left) An indigenous sculptural feature wall inscribed with the words of the famous poet

research for every project in terms of contextual parameters.

competition. Using colored glass as a predominant feature in this public service building was a big challenge, especially in Kolkata. The building made a bold statement and it inspired the architect community in Kolkata. Do you incorporate cultural aspects while designing a space? AC: We believe in a holistic design approach. Cultural context is part of our design approach. We do extensive

What’s in the pipeline currently? AC: We are working on various projects with global partners like Herzog & de Meuron, H Architects, etc. Our other projects include commercial towers, schools and a museum. What is your advice to the new generation architects and designers? AC: There is no alternative to complete education and learning. You can only succeed if you have a passion and vision, and constantly upgrade your learning through research, technology, etc. abin@abindesignstudio.com www.poolmagazine.in  47


Get your pr POOL Maga

POOL Magazine is available on iOS, An www.magzter.com/I

To avail subscriptions & offers w

You can also buy subscriptions at www.tadpolestore.com | ww


rint copy of azine today! POOL 45

n

P OO

www.poolmaga zine.i

L 44

POO L 44 www .poo

lmag

azin

e.in

Deepa Kamath pg

26 | Photographed by Melinda Juan g Auto Expo 2014 02 Preksha Baid 10 Shweta Jain BODW 2013 46 Chopra 20 Jona Aneev Rao 52 s and Liane 40 Harsh Raman Singh Paul 58 Cagri Cankaya 63

Sajith Ansa r pg 3

2

| Pho Aniru togra d phed & Mic dh Ghosh by P ha 04 O anka Sayye el Rodri j Sha gues rProject d Ars h ’s Van 26 A had a 12 ksha Ali 56 tB Aarti Cag Karw ri Can hatt 44 Karis ayun kaya hm C 61 O bitua a Jhalan hawda 18 i&A ry shwin Valay G Willia ada mD Jain rent 50 tel 6 2

ndroid, Web, Amazon and Windows 8 IN/Indi-Design/pool

write to info@poolmagazine.in

ww.poolmagazine.in


illustrator

THROUGH SCIENCE INTO ART Denver Kotian opted to study science before he realized art was his métier. As a freelance illustrator and designer, he also explores his creativity through activities like cooking, dancing, writing and occasionally partying! How did you get started in illustration? DK: I didn’t really pick up illustration as much as I was born into it. It’s something that has been with me throughout my life. Although I initially had no idea what the term ‘illustration’ even meant, it was art and that was all that mattered to me. Art is and will always be my first love and like all great love stories, mine had a villain as well - science. Now don’t get me wrong, I have great respect and admiration for people in the medical and engineering fields but that was not who I wanted to be. I completed my education in science at the junior college level and it was then that I realized 48  POOL #49


illustrator that I had had enough of academics. I’ve always been creatively inclined, so as a big surprise, I decided to pursue a career in the fine arts, much to the vexation of my parents. They did eventually support my decision however and I joined Rachana Sansad College of Applied Arts and Craft in Mumbai to get a Bachelor’s degree in Applied Arts and Advertising. The rest, as they say, is history. What mediums do you work with? DK: I’m not really picky when it comes to mediums in art. I’ve worked with oils, acrylics, watercolors, poster paints, watercolor pencils, charcoal, felt tips, ink and pigment liners to name a few. It all depends on the project I’m working on and client requirements. I believe in experimentation and I don’t like to stick to one particular style or medium. For the past few years however, most of my personal work has been digital. It’s a very forgiving medium and not to mention the cheapest. I’ve recently begun dabbling in oils once again. It has to be my favorite out of all the available media.

American Horror Story - Sister Jude www.poolmagazine.in  49


what inspires you it’s easy to build a style out of that. Lastly, do not let others dictate your individual style. This applies to art as much as it applies to fashion. If you’re comfortable using a style and if you have your own distinct sense of it then do not be afraid to show it. What are your favorite pieces of work?

Pidilite ‘Atoot Rishtey’

What dos and don’ts do you set yourself to achieve your style of design? DK: As a rule I try to not repeat anything I’ve already done before. Experimentation is a definite ‘do’. I’m constantly experimenting with my style and letting it evolve on its own. I’m a terribly competitive person so it’s important for me to constantly outdo myself. Another aspect that’s conducive to achieving growth is freedom. I do not like to be bogged down by expectations and so I tend to set myself free from being obliged to create my art according to a certain preconceived ideology. One more definite ‘do’ on the list would be to reference. References, when used properly, can help you become a much better artist. I’m constantly looking at various artworks, reading books and watching the television for inspiration. Once you know 50  POOL #49

DK: This is a tough question! I don’t really have any favorites but there are a few that I appreciate more than others. Out of my most recent artworks, I like the one titled ‘Fragility’ mainly owing to the fact that there’s a noticeable improvement in my rendering ability. I’m constantly looking to improve, so any sign of improvement excites me terribly! ‘The Swagger Monster’ and the Pidilite ‘Atoot Rishtey’ Project are two of my more liked pieces. They forced me to get out of my comfort zone and experiment with my abilities. I was very comfortable with my realistic approach and muted palettes and therefore this was a muchneeded push in the right direction. ‘Thorin Oakenshield’ is one of my most realistically rendered artworks and thus holds a special place in my heart. I was going through a ‘my-art-isn’t-improving’ phase and this painting snapped me out of it. ‘Mortality’ is another one of my better paintings but I’m currently obsessed with multiple arms so that could be a reason for my bias. What do you love most about your work? DK: Honestly, absolutely nothing. I do not love anything about my work. I barely even like my work and I strongly believe that that’s a very good thing. I’m of the opinion that artists shouldn’t fall in love with their work (with the subject of their work, maybe; but not with the work itself.) According to me, an artist gets stuck when he or she begins to love his or her work. Once you begin to appreciate your own work, you begin to see more perfection and fewer flaws. One’s


illustrator

Thorin Oakenshield

vision gets polluted with narcissism and egotism and that, I believe, is how artists stagnate. It’s healthy to appreciate certain aspects of your art and even like or be proud of a few pieces but I could never love my work. The whole point of art is to change and evolve and we, as artists, should evolve with it. Art would not evolve if it were already perfect in the eyes of the artist. Who are your biggest inspirations? DK: The two people who directly inspired me to take up a career in Art are Krishna Israney and Shreya Shetty. Shreya is an amazing artist who used to work at the now defunct Rhythm and Hues Studios. She had taken an art workshop to demonstrate her techniques in rendering to the audience and I was absolutely hooked from the minute she placed her stylus onto her Wacom pad. I wanted to be as talented as she was and I wanted to do what she did for a living. Krishna was the man responsible for forcing me to attend her workshop. So I guess I owe him plenty! Other than them I have way too many inspirations in the art world. James Jean is one of my absolute favorites along with Jason Chan, Lucian Freud, Erik Jones, Jean Giraud aka Moebius, Jeremy Enecio, Benjamin Bjorklund, Zach Montoya and Serge Birault. Gustav Klimt is another great inspiration along with Caravaggio and S. H. Raza. Botticelli, Michelangelo, Monet and Matisse make up a few of the other names on a very large list. What’s the most surprising thing you’ve learnt during your career as an illustrator? DK: By far the most surprising (as well as shocking) thing I’ve learnt is that people are constantly out to undervalue you and your art. I’ve dealt with a lot of clients and potential clients over the past few years and while some of them are genuinely decent and nice, others are all out to gain a ridiculous profit at your expense. I can’t tell you the number of people who’ve approached me and asked me to do unpaid art because their project is an ‘independent project’ that’s being funded by themselves. Even corporate biggies haggle over costs like a person bargaining at a fish market. It’s downright demeaning as an artist for people to undervalue your art in this manner, especially when it comes from seasoned professionals in the same field. You don’t go to a store to buy a designer suit and ask the manager to give it to you for the lowest possible price because you’re paying for it yourself. Similarly, you don’t ask an artist to do the same. The worth of art is directly proportionate to the artist’s own worth. What’s even more surprising is that some artists do this to themselves. They undervalue their own work and therefore, the client undervalues their work and underpays them. If your www.poolmagazine.in  51


illustrator than hire an artist who is stuck in his or her ways. And ironically, the thing I’ve noticed is that most clients tend to give artists free rein in determining the style for their projects. So as an artist, one needs to be able to determine what style will best suit the project and the client’s needs, and gives them the best bang for their buck. What emerging trends do you see in the design industry, and especially in illustration?

Alice in Wonderland

work is good, it’s good. Artists should never compromise on their worth or on the worth of their art. What has been the hardest part of the freelance illustrator learning curve? DK: I think the most difficult part of the learning curve in a field like illustration is adapting to various new styles. Each individual client has their own specific needs and requirements for their particular project. And each of these projects needs to be rendered in a style that is appropriate in context. Some projects may require a realistic approach while some others may need a more stylized approach. An illustrator can’t conform to the style he or she is comfortable with and use it over and over again. It reduces the market value of the illustrator. Clients will be more willing to hire someone who is capable of working as per their requirements and specifications rather 52  POOL #49

DK: Every time I look at art I find that there’s a new trend that’s emerged in the field. Art is constantly changing into something better and that’s what’s so provocative about it; you never know what’s going to be trending next. Currently, I’ve noticed that a lot of art, especially graphic design and illustration, is bordering on minimalism. Elements that would otherwise be complex and intricate are being broken down into their core structure, thereby forcing the viewer to focus on function rather than form. A crown, for example, doesn’t need an intricate design and precious gemstones to make it a symbol of power anymore. A simple row of triangles resting on a forehead is enough to portray the idea just as well without being overbearing to the viewer. Its reality is dictated by its purpose and not by its physical structure. Graphic shapes and bold colors are being used on an increasing basis to portray objects and ideologies. In synchronicity to this, another little factor that I call ‘Lateral Art’ is creeping into contemporary art. An increasing number of artists are beginning to lace their art with various layers of thought that are neither directly viewable nor the central purpose of


illustrator

Theater Adaptations

the artwork but rather only viewable from other perspectives. Two or more seemingly unconnected elements that when brought together create an entirely new idea. These factors give layers of depth and meaning to an otherwise visually simple artwork without over-complicating its visual space. Now this isn’t a new factor or trend but it’s been gaining prominence in recent years. Philosophy, theology and other intellectual bravura are gaining a greater foothold in today’s art world, thereby creating a new, braver world for art to move forward into. What is your dream for the next five years?

The Swagger Monster

DK: I’m interested in film direction and cinematography and in five years I’d probably like to be making my mark somewhere in the film industry…combining my love for art and film into something bigger and better. My dream is to work with Hollywood biggies like Snyder and Singer and maybe make a film of my own along the way. But then again, you never know what the future has in store for you, so fingers crossed! dennykotian@gmail.com www.poolmagazine.in  53


Get your pr POOL Maga

POOL Magazine is available on iOS, An www.magzter.com/I

To avail subscriptions & offers w

You can also buy subscriptions at www.tadpolestore.com | ww


rint copy of azine today! POOL 45

n

P OO

www.poolmaga zine.i

L 44

POO L 44 www .poo

lmag

azin

e.in

Deepa Kamath pg

26 | Photographed by Melinda Juan g Auto Expo 2014 02 Preksha Baid 10 Shweta Jain BODW 2013 46 Chopra 20 Jona Aneev Rao 52 s and Liane 40 Harsh Raman Singh Paul 58 Cagri Cankaya 63

Sajith Ansa r pg 3

2

| Pho Aniru togra d phed & Mic dh Ghosh by P ha 04 O anka Sayye el Rodri j Sha gues rProject d Ars h ’s Van 26 A had a 12 ksha Ali 56 tB Aarti Cag Karw ri Can hatt 44 Karis ayun kaya hm C 61 O bitua a Jhalan hawda 18 i&A ry shwin Valay G Willia ada mD Jain rent 50 tel 6 2

ndroid, Web, Amazon and Windows 8 IN/Indi-Design/pool

write to info@poolmagazine.in

ww.poolmagazine.in


industrial design

RARING TO GO! Industrial designer Saif Faisal has interests ranging from car racing to gastronomy and anthropology, all of which impact his design process

(in Karnataka), amidst which I played, made me curious to know more about architecture and design history.

How would you define design? SF: Quite simply, anything we do in a deliberate manner, we are ‘designing’. Often design is mistaken for ‘decoration’. There is a clean and clear distinction; design has substance and decoration is just superfluous. Decoration need not be necessarily in space, it can even be decoration of ideas and expressions. Design is always honest, sensible, legible, and expressive. Design performs and looks beautiful. What inspired you to become a designer? Tell us a little about your design journey. SF: I think it was there from the beginning, it stems from my hobbies as a child. At a very early age at my grandparent’s home in a small town, I used to make miniature houses and farms irrigated with dams. I was always making things and admired the skills of local carpenters, blacksmiths, potters, etc. The ruins of the fort, palaces and tombs in Bidar 54  POOL #49

I studied architecture at R V School of Architecture in Bangalore, after which I worked for D+A Architects. It was a very good experience and my boss and mentor, Ar. Ananth Swamy, always insisted on keeping design good and honest, with none of the pastiche. Among other projects here I worked on a very expressive design - a fire station on Sarjapur Road in Bangalore. I also went on to learn cabinet making and joinery. I have been part of Ashwa Racing (a university Formula student racing team) through my degree from 2006-2010, and I still serve as an advisor. When did you decide to start ‘SAIF FAISAL design workshop’? SF: While in college I had started developing some designs of my own and always felt the need to mass produce them. Realizing that I would not have the freedom to work across different fields if I was working in a typical design firm, I decided to establish SAIF FAISAL design workshop in 2012. We believe in a hands-on approach to design. We work extensively with physical models along with CAD. What kind of projects do you undertake? SF: We are a multidisciplinary studio, working across architecture, furniture, lighting, and


industrial design

ALHAZEN TASK LAMP

automotive design. Lately we have been consulted for art direction for some European lighting resellers for their collection. Do you follow a specific design process? SF: Honestly speaking I have no particular style. I strictly stay away from ‘happening’ trends. In essence we keep the project true to its brief. The stress is on the ‘needs’ of the user, not the ‘wants’. The legibility in terms of social and physical environment of a design is an early motivation. Different projects demand different approaches; almost half of our work constitutes self-initiated projects. Our design motivations are usually out of a social concern, a beautiful form, a practical need, a curiosity... We believe the designer plays a very conscious and responsible role for the whole

life cycle of a project, from its conception to production, and use to after-use. Our designs draw heavily from the appreciation of technology, processes and our understanding of the cultural psychology. Our designs have always been characterized by strong geometry in space that renders the formal strictness to visual and functional attributes. Is there a project that particularly speaks to you? SF: The ‘Flexible and Adaptable Urban Habitat’ project aims at addressing the need for urban housing for the rising urbannomadic population, expected to be about 70% by 2050. Half of humanity is now living in cities - we can’t continue to ‘develop’ the way we are going with our limited energy and resources. In future we need to be sharing and reusing what we already have, and for that, architecture needs to be flexible. The www.poolmagazine.in  55


industrial design

ALHAZEN TASK LAMP & STRING TABLE

habitat in response to the occupants must also shift and evolve and change in time and space to be virtuous. The project has been exhibited at 100% Design, London, and has been nominated for the BE OPEN Award London 2012. In this project the design responds easily to change throughout the lifetime of the users. This architecture has the greater potential to remain relevant to cultural and social developments. The building remains in use longer, fits its purpose better, and is more economically and ecologically viable. The main structure (armature) and the sub structures which make up the ‘space module’ form a very loose-fit configuration that can be fitted out as required by different users. Future changes can easily be accommodated within the fixed block. For day to day needs there are kinetic elements that expand and collapse the spaces. 56  POOL #49

How are you associated with Formula SAE racing? SF: I used to sketch cars and bikes from my school days and was a motor racing enthusiast. I joined Ashwa Racing in the first year of college as a stylist. Having had a flair for design and technology I then went on to work on ergonomics, safety, chassis brakes and suspension as well. Being involved with F-SAE Racing and graduating as an architect has exposed me to diverse experiences. I have been part of the Formula SAE team which represented India in Australia, Germany and Italy. For 2014 we have a hybrid racing car for Formula Student Italy. What was the inspiration for the ‘VastuCar’ you designed? SF: This work is the result of an interesting dialogue with an automobile designer about


industrial design

FLEXIBLE & ADAPTABLE URBAN HABITAT - Design Development (L) FLEXIBLE & ADAPTABLE URBAN HABITAT SINGLE UNIT - Liberating ground for play area and parking (R) FLEXIBLE & ADAPTABLE URBAN HABITAT BLOCK with expandable volumes

applying vastu principles in Contemporary Architecture. It then moved on to how it would affect automotive design if anything like vastu were to be applied. In recent decades vastu has become pretty much ubiquitous in architecture. The supposedly most expensive home in the world, estimated at about $1 billion, lies unused, because vastu consultants deemed it non-compliant with the guidelines. Now some architects are digging into vastu for application in areas of public architecture and car parks. That's the inspiration for this satirical sculpture. Don't you think it's ironic that the hindi term for an architect is ‘vastukar’? What have been the guiding influences in your life? SF: Many things actually - the little things, the big things. Firstly, spending the formative

part of my childhood close to nature and experiencing the simple ways of country life taught me the value of resources and the harmony in which man can live with nature. Like the Italian Maestro Renzo Piano says, “You only grow till seven years.” Another influence was my great grandfather’s library, which housed some very intriguing and unique books. I discovered the works of medieval Iberian and Persian polymaths that drove me away from the misconception that you must follow a single faculty and excel. This gave me the guts to pursue my interest in different fields. Since I was a teenager, motorsports has been a huge influence…the sophistication, the human will and endeavor in what seems otherwise like a thing for the ‘crazies’. The honesty, pure and essential nature of racing has shaped my www.poolmagazine.in  57


58  POOL #49


industrial design design thought, and also inspires me in my personal life. The design movements of De Stijl and Bauhaus, and Nordic, Japanese and Scandinavian design cultures inspire me. The people in my life also inspire me - my parents and family, mentors and my wife Ayesha who is an architect and my best critic. What plans do you have for the future? SF: To develop furniture and lighting for international producers and continue the interdisciplinary design practice. I would like to get into academics; I have been part of certain design workshops for design schools and high schools.

'vastucar'

ASHWA RACING Formula SAE

Is there anything you would tell youngsters on the verge of stepping into a design career? SF: Don’t follow anything just because you are ‘taught’ to do so. Try exploring the true and honest way, an appropriate way. Never compromise on quality of thought in design; if you feel you are weak in some aspect, work on it rather than trying to ‘make-do’. Always try to get the feel of the medium you are working with by getting in touch with the crafts and technology. I feel design is a very responsible profession; designers are culture generators as much as philosophers and artists. Learn from tradition and look beyond for a more forward and fresh approach to your work, with a global outlook and much freer perspective. design@saif-faisal.com www.poolmagazine.in  59


Get your pr POOL Maga

POOL Magazine is available on iOS, An www.magzter.com/I

To avail subscriptions & offers w

You can also buy subscriptions at www.tadpolestore.com | ww


rint copy of azine today! POOL 45

n

P OO

www.poolmaga zine.i

L 44

POO L 44 www .poo

lmag

azin

e.in

Deepa Kamath pg

26 | Photographed by Melinda Juan g Auto Expo 2014 02 Preksha Baid 10 Shweta Jain BODW 2013 46 Chopra 20 Jona Aneev Rao 52 s and Liane 40 Harsh Raman Singh Paul 58 Cagri Cankaya 63

Sajith Ansa r pg 3

2

| Pho Aniru togra d phed & Mic dh Ghosh by P ha 04 O anka Sayye el Rodri j Sha gues rProject d Ars h ’s Van 26 A had a 12 ksha Ali 56 tB Aarti Cag Karw ri Can hatt 44 Karis ayun kaya hm C 61 O bitua a Jhalan hawda 18 i&A ry shwin Valay G Willia ada mD Jain rent 50 tel 6 2

ndroid, Web, Amazon and Windows 8 IN/Indi-Design/pool

write to info@poolmagazine.in

ww.poolmagazine.in


accessory design

skin fit

Aarushi and Arpan Patel of Jaipur-based Kassa have created a range of hand-crafted bags and accessories that indulges their passion for leather his Master’s in Product Design from the University of Arts London. He worked independently on an art project called ‘Tea Stories’ for his solo show last year at Jehangir Art Gallery, Mumbai.

Can you tell us a little about yourself? Kassa: I (Aarushi) completed my graduation in Fine Arts and went on to do a Master’s in Art Direction from MICA (Mudra Institute of Communication, Ahmedabad). I worked as an Art Director for two years; alongside I also worked as a freelance artist/graphic designer/ painter/illustrator. Arpan completed his graduation from IICD (Indian Institute of Craft and Design, Jaipur) in hard material and did 60  POOL #49

When did decide to team up? Kassa: Back in 2011 we decided to work with each other after realizing that we were a perfect fix when it came to creating art/design together. We went on to pursue our Master’s degrees and then got back together to create ‘Kassa’, our leather goods and accessories brand. We are fascinated by bags and accessories and wanted to explore various design possibilities in leather. Tell us more about Kassa. Kassa: ‘Kassa’ means‘Home’. We wanted people to come to a place where they could feel at home and fall in love with the products as if it was a second skin. The brand is an amalgamation of art and design, and focuses on simplicity in products and on a classic au courant look. Kassa sees exclusivity in natural beauty. Our designer collection has


accessory design

Clench

Tessel Tote bag

Saddlebag - Bauhaus www.poolmagazine.in  61


accessory design a rustic yet finished appeal. Each product is therefore, by its nature, a limited edition and an art piece. Our work has been influenced by the key idea to establish our brand among the high-end fashion labels, maintaining a standard level of finishing and detailing.

Office Attaché

Tessellation Foldover 62  POOL #49

What does your design process entail? Kassa: We both dream like artists and think like entrepreneurs. After working in leather we found that there was a lot of scope and design potential in this area as yet undiscovered in the Indian market. This led us to experiment with various possible design themes. We believe in creating something that is uniquely our own and with our mute touch. Something that we would see, fall in love with, buy and use. We follow both the design processes – form follows function, and vice versa. Our design fits in harmoniously with the contrasting nature of various techniques. Reusing, recycling and re-interpretation of materials is one of the major processes and the base of modern functionality and utility. What materials do you use? Kassa: We are working with leather, canvas, felt and cloth right now; of these, leather is the core and crux. We are also very experimental with materials such as wood, mehendi, lacquer, cement, porcelain, damar (raw material used in roads), brass, metal, terracotta, etc.


accessory design there is something for everyone. We also keep collecting interesting pieces on our travels, and photography of all things beautiful is a great inspirational database.

Envelope Clench

Who is a ‘Kassa’ customer? Kassa: We cater to the savvy and sophisticated urban customer. Our products represent somebody who is esthetically inclined but has a pragmatic bent and understands design - a new age consumer. What inspires your designs? Kassa: It’s about falling in love with what we see. Our inspiration comes from everyday things, anything that catches our eye, and captures our imagination. We do have a set idea about the look and feel of each product/or a series through prototypes and sampling. Attempting to break away from the cookie cutter, our designer statement pieces esthetic follows simple, bold clean lines, tessellations, bauhaus, shapes with minimalist and unconventional designs that are not heavily textured but true art. Kassa’s designs are primarily urban and

What have been the challenges of establishing and building your brand? Kassa: The major challenges were with the sourcing as we had to depend on others for accessories used or leather buying. But as we have been doing this for some time now, we have a better view and insight of the market. Leather love is an extravagant and sky high affair and requires complete knowledge. How has the journey been so far? Kassa: The journey has been worthy and shipshape. We have learnt a lot as artists and we are trying to combine craft and design in a contemporary form. And with Kassa, so far it has been really exceptional. Customers have really loved our earlier collection and we are all set to provide them with finer and superior quality than before, maintaining a standard level of finishing and detailing. Can you share some advice for other independent designers? Kassa: Only two things make you different from the rest and keep you going – hard work and visualizing how things can be unique and uncommon. contact@studiokassa.com www.poolmagazine.in  63


www.poolmagazine.in facebook.com/poolmag

twitter.com/poolmagazine

Subscribing Institutions

Partners

pune • mumbai • delhi • jaipur • bikaner • srinagar berlin • hanoi • paris • riyadh • hong kong

Publisher INDI Design Pvt Ltd www.indidesign.in Contact us Indi Design Pvt Ltd C-1, Unit No 503-504, Saudamini Commercial Complex, Bhusari Colony-Right, Paud Road, Pune 411038 Tel.: +91 20 2528 1433 Direct Mails All subscription enquiries to subscribe@poolmagazine.in All sponsorship enquiries to sponsor@poolmagazine.in All content related enquiries to content@poolmagazine.in Printing & Binding Vinayak Arts, Pune 64  POOL #49

Editor in Chief

Digital

Sudhir Sharma

Marianna Korniienko

sudhir@indidesign.in Finance Content & Design Director

Deepak Gautam

Shriya Nagi

shriya@indidesign.in

Assistants Yamanappa Dodamani

Copy Editor

Pranil Gaikwad

Ashvina Vakil

Rafik G Shaikh

Layout & Production

Subscription & Logistics

Pradeep Arora

Seema Sharma

Satyajit Harpude

subscribe@poolmagazine.in

Art & Design

Marketing

Pradip Goswami

Tarun Thakkar

Sayali Shah

tarun@indidesign.in


RNI-No. MAHENG12606/13/1/2010-TC

POOL 49

POOL 49  
POOL 49  

POOL Magazine

Advertisement