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AUGUST 2014

THE PONSONBY A-Z OF LOCAL BARS P26 JEREMY WELLS WITH THE AWARD WINNING JASON CLARK OF BEDFORD SODA AND LIQUOR P32


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P20; Parking in Ponsonby - the challenges. There is general agreement that good parking management is essential for supporting the economic development of Ponsonby Road. P26; A-Z Local Bars. It’s comforting to know that many of the familiar bars in our neighbourhood are still going strong and there are but a few that have changed owners or renovated. Longroom is a great venue at any time of the day or night.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR FROM THE EDITOR DAVID HARTNELL: ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD MIKE LEE, COUNCILLOR FOR WAITEMATA & GULF NIKKI KAYE, AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP JACINDA ARDERN: LABOUR LIST MP AUCKLAND JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS GREY LYNN NEWS U3A PONSONBY

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A-Z OF LOCAL BARS EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY LAURAINE JACOBS: THE SEASONED PALATE ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE FASHION + STYLE PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY LIVING, THINKING + BEING JOHN APPLETON ON HEALTH

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FUTURE GENERATION SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY PONSONBY PEOPLE & THEIR PETS LOOK WHO IS IN THE ZOO HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS JAY PLATT: WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT STREET NAMES ARTS + CULTURE PONSONBY PINK PAGES

SHEENA SHUVANI: STARDUST ASTROLOGY COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: Michael McClintock

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LETTERS + EMAILS Community wellbeing What a welcome relief to read John Elliott’s articles in your July issue railing against the prevailing wisdom “that the market knows best”. Anybody with a modicum of common sense and concern for community wellbeing, as well as a minor knowledge of history, will well know the prevailing wisdom is nothing but a falsehood peddled by those for whom the status quo accrues the most benefit. New Zealand is unfortunately being smilingly led, like a bunch of lemmings, by a prime minister who cynically understands mass behaviour. His “I’m from a state house and just one of you” patter is a wonderfully practised presentation, which, coupled with his absolute demonic pursuit of balancing the financial books, is successfully frightening enough of the populace into believing that if they do not stand on the heads of those further down the economic scale, then they will in turn be stood on. Keep up the good fight Ponsonby News, we need people like your columnist John Elliott, who can be heard standing up for the good of our whole society, particularly those who have not had the benefits that we have had. COLIN RENNIE, Orakei John Elliott ‘Local News’ column There’s nothing like a pending general election to bring out true colours. I refer to John Elliot’s piece in his ‘Local News’ column in the July issue and his personal comments on a report on page 22. It’s the ‘news’ bit that gets me - why not be up front and call it ‘Views from the left’? It’s not local, it’s personal. It’s not news, it’s opinion. It is important that the media at both local and national level presents balanced political opinions from all sides. KEVIN R FRAEI, Herne Bay Little Grocer site: update Warmest thanks to you and your readers for your support in resisting the application by new owners to put a 60-seater licensed café and coffee roastery on the site on the corner of Richmond Road and Peel Street. Thanks to the community registering its concerns - especially about parking and traffic safety issues at that already dangerous corner - the council agreed to publicly notify the application for a resource consent. By our calculation over 40 submissions were sent to the council by the due date of 25 June which shows the level of community concern about this proposal. These came not just from immediate neighbours, but also those in the surrounding area who are well aware of the growing traffic and parking pressures as a result of the commercial growth and change occurring in the neighbourhood. The submissions focussed not only on the traffic safety and parking issues, but also on the wider environmental effects of a business on this scale and intensity operating in an entirely residential area. Another key issue raised was that of principle: the application is non-complying. ‘cafés and restaurants’ are expressly not allowed in Residential 1 zones. As a number of the submissions pointed out, there is hardly a community need for such a facility given that there are already at least 10 cafés within 1.2km of the site!

Views in Ponsonby News reflect the author’s, and not those of Alchemy Media. www.twitter.com/Ponsonby_News Local housing intensification Housing intensification in any suburb has consequences for the neighbourhood in which it takes place, resulting in the loss in social and other amenities. While affordable housing is a laudable goal for any city, questions must be asked about Housing New Zealand’s motives for its Auckland housing portfolio, and in particular the impact of those motives on Freemans Bay, in light of its recent submission to the Notified Auckland Plan. The submission was both voluminous and unexpected. Unexpected because HNZ appears to have deliberately elected not to make any submission to the draft plan, and thereby gaining a tactical advantage over the public. This effectively removed the public’s right to procedurally question the changes sought, unless someone has greater than public interest in the property concerned. On a site-by-site basis, HNZ seeks the removal of all planning controls currently in place over individual sites owned by HNZ throughout Auckland. Interestingly, the same submission seeks the removal of such controls for a large number of properties it does not own. Significantly, in such cases HNZ has not contacted the private resident or body corporate concerned. Whilst the above behaviour reflects a lack of corporate responsibility and respect for stakeholders, perhaps it shouldn’t be surprising given the submission is clearly a precursor to HNZ selling down its Auckland affordable housing portfolio, including pensioner flats, to private developers. Recently, HNZ management was quoted as saying the purpose of the sale of the Spring Street pensioner flats was the creation of additional affordable or pensioner housing. However, at the same time the HNZ formal expression of interest documents sent to developers stated HNZ had no requirement for affordable or pensioner housing and these did not need to be considered. Neither HNZ nor Nick Smith has bothered to reply to a request for comments. Before anyone says ‘NIMBY’, it is worth noting that in Freemans Bay 14% of the buildings are already used for social housing and 25% are zoned ‘Terraced Housing and Apartment Buildings’ (‘THAB’) in the notified Auckland Plan and consequently can be developed to four storeys as of right. Furthermore, THAB zoning represents just 3.5% of land use in other metropolitan areas, so at 25% Freemans Bay has already been singled out for significantly greater intensification than other Auckland suburbs. It is not unreasonable to question HNZ’s justification for seeking a privileged position in terms of zoning and controls for its property in Auckland, namely an additional 38,000 homes, when the state house waiting list for Auckland in March 2014 was at 5,204. Unfortunately, HNZ has become a government controlled corporation lacking social responsibility, contrary to its mandate set out in the Housing Corporation Act 1974. Furthermore, in concert with central government, it is willing to use the new Special Housing Accord provisions in a socially irresponsible manner to achieve the short-term objectives of central government. This is evident from the indecent haste with which HNZ tried to displace the elderly pensioners of Spring Street to South Auckland using the SHA process earlier this year. The challenge now for Freemans Bay and all fringe Auckland suburbs is to control intensification in a way that doesn’t destroy the character and social amenity of our neighbourhoods. Perhaps this is what Bill English was really alluding to when he said it is going to get “ugly” in Auckland. GREY SEAGAR, barrister & co-chairman of the Freemans Bay Resident’s Association

The next step is for the hearing date to be set. We understand that this may be some months away but we will keep Ponsonby News informed. In the meantime, we’re pleased to report that Alia of The Little Grocer has relocated within the neighbourhood following the end of her lease on the site, and is continuing to offer her fabulous catering services. She can be contacted at thelittlegrocer@gmail.com or through The Little Grocer Facebook page. Our thanks again to you and to the wider community for your interest and support. MATTIE WALL, JESSICA FOWLER AND DALLAS PICKERING, GREG and SAYA JONES, MICHELLE WOBCKE, Grey Lynn

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FROM THE EDITOR THIS ISSUE OF PONSONBY NEWS WE’VE INCLUDED AN A-Z of local bars. It’s comforting to know that many of the familiar bars in our neighbourhood are still going strong and only a few have changed owners or been renovated. We say drink well and responsibly while you enjoy yourself, and we thank you for supporting our local businesses. Last month, Bedford Soda and Liquor manager Jason Clark won the Diageo World Class cocktail championships for the second year in a row. He’s been creating a stir in the beverage world for some time but last year, after winning the inaugural launch of the competition in New Zealand, he went on to place fourth in the world championship - a feat no New Zealander has ever achieved.

photography: Jane Blundell @ Kloser

It’s been a sad month and it wasn’t easy putting together this issue of Ponsonby News. We lost Jack, our Scottie, who had been suffering from chronic renal failure and there were many tears when he passed away. Jack was well known and loved by all who knew him and he leaves a huge gap in our lives. Winter is always our least favourite time of the year and international news has been bleak, with the tragedy of MH17 and the awful events in Gaza. With the loss of Jack and these sad events, we are praying that things can only get better. Jay Platt, Jack and Martin Leach

REST IN PEACE LOVELY JACK (04/05/2002 - 14/07/2014)

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This October, we will be celebrating our 25th anniversary issue, so that’s something to look forward PN to! (MARTIN LEACH) F

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DAVID HARTNELL’S: ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW Max Chao owns Gabidiam Coffee House, Grey Lynn. He and his wife will now have a life long link with Grey Lynn, as their first baby arrived in June of this year. Max is the 2011 Auckland Barista champion. What was your childhood like? My childhood was actually kind of boring to a certain degree; I was skinny and short so I wasn’t very good at sport and definitely not popular with girls. All I was good at was studying as hard as I could to be top of class after every exam, a typical kid in most Asian countries I guess. My bag was always filled with books and could weigh up to 10kg, I had glasses when I was six years old. I had to study lots of subjects, which I found useless when I grew up, and there were endless tests and exams. So I think the kids in New Zealand should be very grateful for not having much homework. The most annoying celebrity today? Justin Bieber. Your favourite TV series? Game of Thrones, it’s just genius to watch them kill the main characters one by one without losing the focus of the storyline. Why did you call your coffee house Gabidiam? The name Gabidiam is actually from my native language of Taiwanese, it simply means ‘coffee place’. I was trying to think of something unique and different. Who do you think is the best dressed woman on Earth? Before I got married, there were many. But right now, just my wife (wink). The last time you turned off your cell phone? Are you kidding me? Turning of my cell phone? Never! Your biggest disappointments? I would say the final of the Barista Championship in 2011. I was prepared and confident that everything would go as I planned, but the cups I used became over heated and couldn’t be used, which screwed up everything and ended up as a big disappointment for me. If you won a million dollars what would you do? I would buy a house for my wife and baby boy, no doubt about that. Then again, is a million dollars enough to buy a house in Auckland now? Your comfort food? Pizza, I just love pizza! Your favourite movie? Gladiator might not be historically accurate, but it sure is a very enjoyable movie to watch every time.

How do you chill out? I used to drive around without a destination in my head, just purely enjoying the driving, but since the petrol prices are going nowhere but up, I think now I would stay home and have a good long sleep. Your favourite time of the day? Morning time, after I have my first cup of coffee. I just like to enjoy the moment when the caffeine is running through my whole body and become energised. Then I can get started! What do you love about your life right now? I love everything about my life right now, I have a beautiful wife, a baby boy, a career that’s starting now, what else can I ask for? Your dream home? Ideally, three to four good size rooms with a big lounge, fully modernised kitchen, wooden floor, nice and cosy, warm and bright. What are you insecure about? When things are not under my control and not going as I planned, it can really frustrate me. I have to admit I am a bit of a control freak! Something very few people know about you? I wear PJs at home all day if I am off work, is that normal? Greatest fear? Spiders, snakes, and bugs. That’s the reason why I don’t like going to Australia. Favourite hero of fiction? Superman! He represents justice and has so many great abilities, he’s just too cool. Change one thing about yourself, what would it be? Seriously, I would really love to have a big chest and a six pack, that would be great thank you very much. Which talent would you most like to have? I have always wanted to play piano and tour around the world as a pianist.

The last time you cried? I cried when my baby boy was born, it’s just amazing to watch a new life happen in front of you.

Which living person do you most admire? My dad, who started from nothing and still supports the whole family, I wouldn’t be here without him for sure.

Who would play you in the movie of your life? Actually, I think it would be fun to have Johnny Depp play me.

What could you not live without? My phone, my life is doomed if I lose my phone. (DAVID HARTNELL) F PN

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SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD REPORT IT IS NOW EIGHT MONTHS SINCE THIS local board was sworn in following the local body elections late last year. With the end of the financial year to June now behind us, it is a good time to reflect on the last year and whether the seven members that make up your local board are meeting your expectations helping to improve your local community even within these constrained economic times. We have worked hard to advocate for our communities to the governing body and council controlled organisations, particularly in regard to heritage protection and quality urban planning, waste minimisation, better walking and cycling infrastructure to improve transport choices, comprehensive parking management plans that address the needs of residents, visitors and local businesses, and local responsibility for decision making. We are seeing some progress in these areas. We’ve asked some of the hard questions. Council’s planning processes seem to treat district planning rules as a starting point for conversation with a developer rather than a set of contract rules with the community; the continued unrestrained destruction of some of our community’s heritage; the appropriateness of the $1.5m Queens Wharf ‘lighthouse’; yesterday’s ‘business as usual’ thinking at Auckland Transport; the destruction of the pohutukawa opposite MOTAT for an unnecessary motorway sliplane. At the local level, we have endeavoured to be a strong, accessible and fiscally responsible local board. Some examples of the achievements this last year: Following an extensive refurbishment of ArtStation over the summer period, the local art precinct facility was re-launched as Studio One Toi Tu recently. The

refurbishment has provided new galleries, studios for hire and creative workspaces for community use. In the four months to June, the board ran a POP programme developed by artists to create events that pop up in unexpected places in public spaces throughout the city centre. An estimated 17,000-plus people took part. The board has made significant progress in developing a robust approach to planning, managing and developing our parks and open spaces through improvements in our renewals process and the creation of 10 year development plans. We’ve installed drinking fountains, including dog facilities in our off-leash parks, in 14 parks and reserves. Playground and toilet facilities in Western Park and Costley Reserve’s playground, Cox’s Bay Reserve’s pathways, the playgrounds in Tole Reserve, Home Street Reserve, and Salisbury Reserve, and both playgrounds in Grey Lynn Park, including the return of the flying fox, are all scheduled for replacement, and in many cases improvement, as part of the board’s wider assessment of community needs in those parks. Development of the first stage of the Waitemata coastal walkway; the Weona-Westmere coastal walkway has been taken to resource consent stage, and is now in detailed design. We’ve continued to support local community, arts, sporting and events groups through grants and partnerships. Events supported include Grey Lynn Park Festival, Art in the Dark, Festival Italiano, Art Week, Franklin Road Christmas Lights, and looking ahead, Fringe Festival and the West End Tennis Cup. The board has also delivered Parnell Festival of Roses and Movies in Parks. We’ve continued to fund a number of long term ecological restoration initiatives within our urban forests and supported the community in restoration of Waipapa Stream.

We’ve delivered local improvement projects such as additional car and bike parking for the new well-used artificial turfs at Seddon Fields, utility box murals throughout Waitemata and bins at Victoria Park’s ever popular skate park. Looking ahead, by 2016 the Pioneer Women’s and Ellen Melville Hall is to be developed with Freyberg Place as a welcome community hub for the city centre. The long -anticipated upgrade of Myers Park to focus on safety with improved lighting, surveillance, improved accessibility into the park, and an expanded playground to achieve the original vision of providing a play space for inner city children commenced last month. The board has also set the foundation for future prioritisation of works with a series of plans prepared in consultation with the community; the Ponsonby, Newton and K’Road Plans, the Accessibility, Greenways and Low Carbon Community Action Plans, and the Waitemata City Fringe Economic Development Action Plan to name but a few. The recently published draft Waitemata Local Board Plan is about creating the world’s most liveable city at the local level. We want to deliver the outcomes proposed but we need to be realistic about what we can and can’t afford. Submissions are now closed but your views will help inform us what is a priority for our communities and whether we are on the right track with our plans. It remains a privilege to serve one of Auckland’s most engaged and active communities, and a great time to be PN an Aucklander. (SHALE CHAMBERS) F Contact me: shale.chambers@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

CANDIDATES TO FACE OFF OVER KIDS Candidates for Auckland Central, and a few others besides, are set to face off at a public meeting to be held at Ponsonby Primary on Wednesday 6 August. ‘Tick for Kids’, the organisation that calls on politicians to place children at the centre of their plans, has organised the event which will challenge candidates to present their vision for children and those who care for them. Those who have agreed to front for the event include Jacinda Ardern (Labour), Alfred Ngaro (National), Denise Roche (Green Party), Tracey Martin (New Zealand First), Miriam Pierard (Internet Mana) and John Thompson (ACT). Speaking also, will be Associate Professor Peter O’Connor (Auckland University and University of Sydney), whose work in education, children’s and family issues made him ‘New Zealander of the Year’ in 2011. The event promises to be lively and informative for those seeking guidance as to where to place their vote in September’s election. Spokesperson Jackson Vogt says the meeting will be a unique opportunity for locals to question politicians about their plans for the future. The meeting is co-sponsored by NZEI Te Riu Roa. Where: Ponsonby Primary School, 44 Curran Street, Herne Bay. When:

Wednesday 6 August, 7.30pm

For information contact: Jackson Vogt on M: 021 242 1977 F PN

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MIKE LEE: COUNCILLOR FOR WAITEMATA & GULF

The Great War 100 years on: have we not learned anything? This month we commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the Great War of 1914-18. I have been aware of this approaching anniversary for some time now and helped set up a special committee of the Auckland Council to oversee remembrance activities over the next four years. The First World War is a subject I have long been interested in - like many other New Zealanders my grandfather served in it, (Samoa, Egypt and the Western Front). Sergeant John J Lee, (not to be confused with the famous politician Sergeant John A Lee), was shot and severely wounded in a place called Ploegsteert (‘Plug Street’), in Flanders, May 1917. Britain declared war on Imperial Germany on 4 August 1914, the next day the Governor General of New Zealand issued the war proclamation from the steps of Parliament. Being a dominion of the British Empire, neither the government nor the New Zealand people were given any say in the matter. Nevertheless the country loyally, indeed enthusiastically supported the declaration and thousands of young, and not so young, men enlisted. Over 102,000 New Zealanders went off to war, some 10% of the population - over 18,500 were killed. Many more were wounded and came back maimed and suffering psychological disorders. The war dragged on for more than four years with some 17 million people killed and 20 million wounded. The First World War was to cause profound social dislocation and suffering and was to lead, only 20 years later, to the Second World War with even greater death, destruction and human misery. One of the interesting aspects of the centennial has been a flood of learned books and articles, especially by British authors, sparking a debate between those historians who believe that Britain had no choice but to go to war, and those who argue that Britain (and her empire) would have been better off staying out. This presupposes the war’s

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outcome being a German dominated Europe, with Germany at the centre of a sort of European union which, the historians remind us, is rather like what we have now. The debate between British scholars is entirely relevant to New Zealand because we were committed to it automatically by Britain. It is a fascinating debate, and yet somehow I feel the academics are missing the point. The Great War was triggered on 28 June 1914 by a tubercular 19-year-old Serbian nationalist who shot and killed the heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and his wife while they passed in a car (normally such hand-gun shootings are not fatal). A callous act by a non-entity, in an obscure place, for an obscure cause. But the killings lit the fuse, inexorably leading on to ultimatums, the activation of alliances, belligerent propaganda, mobilisation of troops and the ultimate catastrophe. But it did so because the statesmen, the diplomats and the generals on all sides did nothing to stop it. In fact, one has the impression that they wanted it to happen. Having watched in recent months the unfolding of a deliberately engineered political conflict in Eastern Europe, whipped up by the corporate media, egged on by an educated liberal political elite - who should know better - my question is: what really has the human race learned in the last 100 years? And now, is the shooting down of airliner MH17 with 298 innocent people an echo of that fateful shot that was fired in Sarajevo? Could it not lead the world to the same dreadful PN consequences? Our ancestors would want an answer. (MIKE LEE) F Councillor for Waitemata & Gulf www.mikelee.co.nz

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NIKKI KAYE: AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP

Enhancing conservation and marine protection in Auckland Auckland’s natural environment is unique and something we should all be working to look after. Protecting and enhancing our local environment is something I care deeply about. In my maiden speech to Parliament I said that I was committed to being a guardian of conservation for the Hauraki Gulf. One of the ways I have progressed this is through helping to establish a marine spatial planning process in the gulf.

The Aotea Conservation Park presents the community with increased recreation and tourism opportunities, which can only benefit the island. The estimated more than 50,000 visitors to the island each year are the main source of income for the island and local businesses.

This plan is now underway and will help shape how we use the Hauraki Gulf for decades. The sheer number of people and boats who travel the gulf each day means we need to be thinking carefully and planning for the projected population growth of Auckland.

The Government has already invested around $1 million to ensure the Great Barrier Island has better cellphone and broadband coverage. The $2.5 million of DOC funding to help repair recent storm damage to island infrastructure, and ensure the Aotea track is in good shape, is crucial for the economic development of the island.

Nationally, we have been working hard on greater marine protection. There have been a record number and area of new marine reserves, with new reserves in North Auckland, the Sub Antarctic, Akaroa, West Coast and Kaikoura. I am also pleased to confirm that last month the Minister of Conservation confirmed the decision to establish a conservation park on Great Barrier Island. I first put forward this proposal to the Government in September last year. Since then, I have talked with many locals and Aucklanders who are very supportive of having another park, along with the benefits of greater protection for Barrier’s precious wildlife and plants. The Department of Conservation has also been consulting with locals on the proposal and it is great to see widespread support for the park. The new conservation park (Aotea Park) on Great Barrier Island will ensure greater protection for the island’s unique flora, fauna, birds and wildlife, while also increasing tourism opportunities for the local community and Auckland. It will be the biggest conservation park administered by DOC, comparable in size to the Auckland Council’s Hunua and Waitakere Ranges parks. In particular I hope that young Aucklanders will visit the new park in the years to come. I have met many who have never visited the islands in the Hauraki Gulf. The park will also be a major draw card and great for enhancing conservation education.

The next project that I would love to see happen on Barrier is the designation of the Aotea track as one of the ‘New Zealand Great Walks’. To have it recognised alongside the Milford, Tongariro, Heaphy and Routeburntracks would be an additional boost for tourism on the island and Auckland. We are also working to protect the environment with our commitment to freshwater - this includes $350 million to cleanup historical contamination of our iconic waterways. We have also provided nearly $100m distributed through the waste disposal levy to help communities minimise waste, added 12,400 hectares of our most valuable land to Schedule 4, and introduced tougher penalties for wildlife, conservation and biosecurity offending. I am pleased that I have been able to help deliver Auckland’s largest conservation park. The park will be special in many ways - from the local iwi project to bring back the kokako, or the enhanced protection provided for the rare brown teal, black petrel, and North Island kaka. The new Aotea Park will be a special treasure for generations of PN Aucklanders to enjoy. (NIKKI KAYE) F HON NIKKI KAYE, MP for Auckland Central www.nikkikaye.co.nz

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JACINDA ARDERN: LABOUR LIST MP AUCKLAND

DEIRDRE TOHILL: LANDMARK BUILDINGS

Supporting teachers to teach

Auckland Municipal Destructor

The first time you’re sworn into Parliament is a pretty big deal. You have that one moment where you walk across the centre of the debating chamber (and hope like crazy you don’t trip) and read aloud an affirmation that you will do your best to work for New Zealand. Unfortunately my family couldn’t join me for that moment, so I picked another person to support me that day - my high school social studies teacher. I was one of those lucky kids that had a few teachers in my life who made all the difference. Teachers who made me question, analyse, and, underneath it all, believe that I could do things that I thought kids from Morrinsville couldn’t do. All our children deserve to have teachers like that. That’s why it has made me incredibly sad to see in recent times that the work of our teachers hasn’t been as valued as it should be. We have debated measurement of kids in a really crude way that seems to have forgotten that yes, curriculum and measuring progress is important, but supporting and listening to our teachers is too. I believe we have all the ingredients to have the best education system in the world, if we invest in the right places. And that’s what Labour is planning to do. Firstly, we know kids do better in smaller classes because their teachers have more time to devote to them. And many teachers have told me what a difference smaller classes make to their ability to do their job. Currently senior primary school classes have a ratio of one teacher to 29 students, which means classes with more than 30 pupils are not uncommon. We will progressively reduce this ratio to 1:26 by 2018. This gradual change will allow time to train almost 1000 more teachers. At secondary schools where there’s an average of 26 students per class, we will reduce this to 23 by 2018 and train 900 more teachers. But we also need to do more to support teacher’s professional development. That’s why we will redirect funding for National Standards into supporting professional development programmes, set up a school advisory service to share best practice and provide mentors to teachers throughout the country, and raise the standards of those wanting to become teachers by pre-screening entry into all initial teacher education programmes. Through my time working on child poverty and youth justice issues over the past six years, I am absolutely convinced that our education system, and our teachers, have the ability to change lives. We’ll support them to keep doing that very thing because all New Zealand children deserve the best start they can have in life. (JACINDA ARDERN) F PN JACINDA ARDERN, Labour List MP based in Auckland Central www.jacinda.co.nz

There’s something scary about the word ‘destructor’. It suggests something to do with extermination, ruination, harm and desolation, but these words do not apply to the huge chimney that stands proudly above Victoria Park Market. It certainly imparts dignity to the retail area below and is an important landmark on our city’s landscape. In the 1850s the land between Union Street and College Hill was occupied by squatters who built huts out of tin, canvas and other materials. These were removed in 1865 and the site was cleared for one of 10 blockhouses designed to protect Auckland from attack by Waikato tribes following the emergence of the Kingitanga movement. When the Crown granted the city to the now-named Auckland Council in 1875, the blockhouse was demolished and the foreshore reclaimed, forming a site for the Municipal Destructor and Depot. In the late 1800s rubbish was collected by the Auckland Sanitary Company that ran horse drawn carts depositing it on wastegrounds around the city including reclaimed land in Freemans Bay. Public health became a main problem but wasn’t addressed successfully until the council experienced strong leadership under Sir Arthur Myers and carried out a number of landmark achievements which included the construction of the destructor and power generator building and Grafton Bridge. The rat population had exploded and there were concerns about a possible outbreak of typhoid and bubonic plague. The council selected the Freemans Bay site for the destructor which was very unpopular with residents as evidenced by the number of petitions and letters protesting the decision. Despite this opposition the council went ahead and accepted a Sydney firm’s tender to build a ‘Meldrum Four Grate Simplex Destructor’ designed by the Meldrum Brothers of England. A Mr Featherstone undertook the construction under a Mr Forsyth’s supervision and the 38 metre high chimney was to become a prominent Auckland landmark and a visible sign of progress. Arthur Myers was hauled up inside the chimney in a bosun’s chair to lay the last brick and J. B. Meldrum, who attended the opening ceremony, commented that the destructor was the most up to date in the world. Initially the complex comprised the destructor building, its chimney, a clinker and screening plant, a weighbridge and its office. The rubbish carts first stopped at the weighbridge to record the load’s weight then proceeded to Drake Street where they accessed the building by a ramp and tipped the waste into two large hoppers where it was raked and sorted by workers. The residue from the ovens consisted of clean ashes and tin ware which was drawn off and used for constructing footpaths. A brick wall was built around the complex and after a year the destructor was burning 20 tons of rubbish daily. Public impatience for an electricity supply motivated the council to construct a power generator building to operate in combination with the destructor. In 1915, when horse transport was at its height, stables were added to the complex as well as two depot buildings, one for council administration offices and the other for garaging the refuse wagons and for storage. They comprised of two single storied brick buildings running almost the length of Patteson Street, now named Victoria Street. 1921 saw a resurgence of bubonic plague fears and the destructor started working at full capacity. Rubbish was collected by 12 two-horse wagons and two single teams that operated from 7am to 5pm. Thirteen employees worked one week on and one off. Councillors admitted their health was a concern because the task was “not of the most pleasing character”. Not the first time the industrial working force was endangered, and still is to this very day. Eventually the destructor deteriorated in spite of day-to-day maintenance and in 1960 the city engineer reported that it was at the end of its economic life and parts of it were on the point of collapse. It finally closed down in 1972 and the council sought to demolish all the buildings on the site, whereupon the Freemans Bay community formed a committee headed by Bruce Hucker which fought for its conservation. Fortunately they succeeded and the whole complex was sold to a private company for $1,025,000 and continues to operate as a market. The destructor chimney is an integral part of Auckland’s early history and PN a tribute to our early forefathers’ energy and innovation. (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F

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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

Parking in Ponsonby - the challenges There is general agreement that good parking management is essential for supporting the economic development of Ponsonby Road. Exactly how to achieve this was the subject of a meeting at the Ponsonby Business Association offices last month. There is considerable tension between the business community and residents, but there is unanimous agreement that commuters who park in Ponsonby and walk or bus to work in the central city, must be discouraged from parking free all day in Ponsonby. To this end, an extension of the St Marys Bay parking permit scheme is favoured. It is likely to be expanded to cover Freemans Bay, Ponsonby, and perhaps Herne Bay.

This should result in a highly efficient use of a limited resource. The consultants went on to tell the meeting that people are more efficient with their parking when they have to pay for it. They park when they have a specific purpose, and this leads to higher turnover of car parks, which in turn reduces the search time for all users. To summarise the consultant’s report: pricing is the most effective parking management method, because time limits don’t give customers the flexibility they need, and can lead to more infringements. Parking that is easily accessed and easy to pay for creates a positive customer experience.

The PBA naturally wants entitlement for business owners and staff to park in Ponsonby. They are also opposed to contractors and tradespeople being given parking permits. Ponsonby News would have thought tradespeople coming and going from Ponsonby is an essential part of general commerce and must be catered for. However, it is irksome having vans double parking or clogging up parking spaces for hours on end. As well, of course, contractors who are repeatedly digging up roads and footpaths are a constant nuisance.

41 Cox’sand Bayso easy to solve, but I think it will be It allRegina soundsStreet, so simple most Ponsonby News readers’ experience that inner city parking in Auckland, including Ponsonby, is difficult and bloody frustrating.

The Ponsonby Business Association also wants any revenue from priced parking returned to Ponsonby.

I’d rather go round and round Ponsonby waiting for parking than suffer the experience I had a couple of weeks ago when I met an old friend at the appallingly awful Sylvia Park. It is a classic example of the lowest common denominator, something we are inclined to forget, unless we make the occasional foray into that suburban mediocrity. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F PN

Auckland Transport’s Parking Discussion Document called for comment on suggestions including:

Good, fast, regular public transport will help, and so will getting commuter cars off our streets. But in the end our business people must provide the kind of experience for their customers that just isn’t provided in the anonymity and drab sameness of the city’s malls, where parking is often easier.

• A Ponsonby-wide residential parking scheme (following the St Marys Bay scheme) to solve the problem of CBD commuters parking free all day in Ponsonby and Freemans Bay. • Introducing priced parking along and adjacent to Ponsonby Road. • Introducing clear ways along arterial roads, which includes Ponsonby Road. The PBA is opposed to clear ways on Ponsonby Road, as this will affect shoppers. The MRCagney Consultancy Group gave an interesting PowerPoint presentation on managing parking supply. There were three main choices MRCagney said: Free parking - do nothing - no prices, no time limits This option would result in high utilisation and low turnover. People are likely to park all day. It rewards those who get in early (often employees). It is likely to actually reduce total expenditure at shops. Time limits High utilisation and high turnover. This may increase traffic due to vehicle shifting. (possibly 25% more traffic). It can benefit employees parking in prime positions. It may lead to more infringements giving a poor customer experience. Pricing This method produces optimal utilisation and high turnover. People willing to pay for parking usually spend in stores. Usually resisted at first, but always successful - provided prices are adjusted. Managing demand is not about revenue gathering. MRCagney then gave the meeting its ‘best practice’ approach to parking management. Ensure the right amount of parking is available in the right locations at the right price. They emphasised that in some areas and at some times the ‘right price’ may be zero. The aim is to achieve 80%-90% occupancy. If 1 in 10 spaces is always available, it is convenient and easy for drivers to find a park.

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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

Population intensification versus amenity values If Auckland is to pursue population intensification in the inner city and prevent further urban sprawl, and I believe it should, the council must address the question of amenity values. There has been a good deal of chat about NIMBYism (Not In My Back Yard). I did think that NIMBYism was a problem, but I have somewhat changed my mind. With particular reference to Great North Road and Jervois Road, I now believe that local residents (many long term, and many in Victorian villas) are genuinely concerned about the loss of amenity values associated with a proliferation of high rise apartments. Amenity values are defined in the Resource Management Act as “natural or physical qualities and characteristics of an area that contribute to people’s appreciation of its pleasantness, aesthetic coherence and cultural and recreational attributes.”

leafy foliage, and in the words of the Waitemata Local Board Plan “a distinctive, high quality urban environment that embraces our heritage.” Some proposed developments are failing to ensure those reasonable amenity values are protected. Much attention has been given to the multi-storeyed apartment block on the corner of Great North Road and Ariki Street (the Turing Building). It is growing larger by the day and sits uncomfortably, and threateningly, above the Victorian villas of Ariki Street. Amenity values will certainly be affected by the scale, traffic movements, noise, and poor relationship of the new building against the old villas.

Contributing factors to suburban amenity values include historic and cultural heritage, neighbourhood character, trees, safety, views and noise levels. Intensification is highly likely to increase traffic, noise levels, and on-street car parking.

But to compound the problem for Ariki Street owners, a new childcare centre is proposed for 4-6 Ariki Street for the Niuean community. The Niueans currently run a community centre (back off the road) on this site, which is open from 6am to 9pm weekdays and 9am to 9pm on weekends. The new childcare centre is scheduled to be open from Monday to Friday, 7am to 6pm.

In a report by the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment in 1997, the Commissioner, Dr Williams said, “a critical measure for managing amenity values is the design of buildings and their relationship to adjacent buildings.” That comment and another about the cumulative effect on amenity values is particularly relevant to both Great North Road and Jervois Road.

Council officers of all stripes and colours (planners, transport experts etc) have assessed the proposal and decided in their wisdom that affects on local residents will be less than minor. They proposed that this activity (discretionary in this residential zone) should be approved without notification.

Allowing one seven storey apartment block on Great North Road would open the door to others along the ridge of a similar scale. This would certainly aid population intensity, but at the risk of amenity loss for existing residents. Two great wind tunnels could easily be created along both Jervois and Great North Roads.

Council discussed the building and even their own conservation architect, Stephen Curham, considered that “the proposed new building does not fit comfortably with the original houses in the street.” He specifically mentions aluminium joinery and concrete panels, which are out of character with the Ariki Street landscape.

Privacy, noise, traffic, incompatible building types, questions of sewerage, water, vegetation (trees, gardens, open space) could all be at risk.

Parking, safety issues with 32 children coming and going from the site, noise levels, and general residential amenity are all discussed in the internal council report, and dismissed as “less than minor.”

I have read through the Waitemata Local Board plan outcomes, and they are admirable. But I don’t see amenity values discussed, nor any plan to draw up sets of local amenity values that residents want to keep and enhance. The report of the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment called for communities to identify their core local amenity values, and have them built into council planning. One of the challenges will be to reconcile infill and multi-storeyed apartments with the hundred years of amenity built up in our precious Victorian villa precincts. I still think it can be done - imaginatively and sensitively - but I have come to the conclusion that it is unfair to label opponents of huge buildings butting up against their sections as NIMBYs. Among other things they wish to continue to enjoy peace, quiet, safe streets, privacy,

Ariki Street resident, Meredith Lee, considers it an affront to locals to so casually dismiss their concerns without even notifying the application for discussion. She and others in her neighbourhood can list a string of amenity values at risk from this development. I know that many of the points I have made are implied in the Waitemata Local Board Plan, but I shall make a submission asking for local community sets of amenity values to be drawn up, so they can be weighed against any planned developments and council assessments, and a proper balance struck. We don’t want to see Whitford, Kumeu and other green belts near Auckland City forming a new tarseal jungle, covering hundreds more hectares of good land, but we also don’t want to jam in thousands more to the city fringe, at the cost of amenity values prized for PN up to a hundred years. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

OCTOBER 1989 - OCTOBER 2014

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Years For more information or to book your advertising contact: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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NEWS FROM What’s up in Grey Lynn? One thing’s for sure: life in Grey Lynn could hardly be described as sleepy hollow. There’s so much development going on, so many new businesses starting up, and so much pressure on land use and public space. When a neighbourhood becomes coveted real estate and is also loved by its existing residents and business people, it can sometimes seem like contested ground. As a result, it’s been a busy few months for the Grey Lynn Residents’ Association. Here’s what the committee has been up to. Hundreds of hours were spent on making thoughtful and detailed submissions to the Draft Auckland Unitary Plan, which in our view had been applied like a very blunt instrument to the fabric of the neighbourhood. Was it appropriate that eight-storey terraced houses should be allowed to be built hard up against old villas and bungalows? We didn’t think so, and we said so. We understand that Auckland’s population is growing rapidly and that more people will come to live here, and will want to live in Grey Lynn. We appreciate that sprawl is bad for the region. But we are after intelligent intensification, done carefully and sympathetically, without wrecking our irreplaceable treasure trove of Victorian and Edwardian residential streets.

We’ve met with the Waitemata Local Board as it consulted with local groups on its threeyear plan for the ward and we feel that many of our concerns and ideas were well received. One of those ideas is for some sort of access to the water at Cox’s Bay for kayaks and other small sail boats. We feel confident that this would be welcomed and well used. We had a stall at the Surrey Crescent market day and used that to survey local residents on what they loved about Grey Lynn, what they wanted to stay the same and what they wanted changed. We are planning a wider needs assessment of the whole neighbourhood so we can establish on what and where local people think the council should spend money in our area.

Surrey Crescent market day

Our careful work obviously paid off, as many of the re-zoning blunders were righted. However we’ve now had to spend many more hours responding to the counter submissions that came in on the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan, whereby many developers are seeking to overturn the protections we sought. Indeed, Housing New Zealand has made a submission on every single one of its local properties, seeking to be exempted from any heritage, special character, volcanic cone view-shaft protection and other planning overlays or codes that might restrict its right to develop its properties as it sees fit. We’ve been involved in supporting the Arch Hill Resident’s Association, the group of local residents that has sprung up to fight the application to build a seven-storey apartment building at the top of Harcourt Street (when only four storeys are permitted) and the residents around Richmond Road and Peel Street who are so concerned about the traffic impact of the café and coffee roasting business that intends to move into the Little Grocer site.

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We had input into the consultants’ report on the future development of Grey Lynn Park and are pleased that many of our recommendations were integrated into the plan.

We made presentations to the Electoral Commission on the proposed electorate boundary changes that would place half of Grey Lynn in Auckland Central and half in Mt Albert for voting at the general elections. That was heard, and the neighbourhood is no longer arbitrarily split down the middle of Grey Lynn Park; it is now all in the Mt Albert electorate. Many would no doubt argue that that’s a pity, given the historical ties to Auckland Central, but our view is that it’s better for the neighbourhood to all be in the same electorate. We welcome your views and input and suggestions. You can find out what we are up to by visiting our website and our Facebook page. Better still, come along to our AGM and vote for the new committee - or put yourself or someone you know forward for election. It’s our neighbourhood and we love it and we can all of us make a difference through even PN the smallest amount of community action. F The AGM starts at 7pm, Tuesday 19 August. www.greylynnresidents.org.nz www.facebook.com/GreyLynnResidents

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PONSONBY U3A: JULY 2014 THE MARVELLOUS THEATRE GROUP ‘NEVER TOO OLD TO PLAY’ IS THE MOTTO OF THE MARVELLOUS THEATRE GROUP FOR people over the age of 65, which has recently settled into its new home at TAPAC (the Auckland Performing Arts Centre) in Motions Road and is actively seeking new members to join in the fun. “Marvellous is for everyone from rank amateur to seasoned performer,” says Annie Webster, who is acting secretary/organiser for the group. “If you are an aspiring actor, director, a backstage beaver or a musician, Marvellous caters for every shade of skill, enthusiasm and experience. If you have any interest in theatre or would just like to give it a go, the only qualification you need is that you are over the age of 65. One of our older members is 93 and performing as well as she ever has.” The group meets every Tuesday evening at TAPAC in Motions Road, opposite the zoo. Marvellous was established three years ago as part of Auckland Theatre Company Participate Programme in collaboration with New Zealand Arts Laureate Michael Hurst. Its first production, an adaptation of TS Eliot’s great poem The Waste Land, directed by Michael Hurst, won the accolade of “best new cast 2011” in Metro magazine. A variety of productions and activities have followed. Until recently its home was at ATC’s Dominion Road headquarters, but the group has recently taken on an independent role, assuming responsibility for its own administration, management and funding, which included the move to TAPAC. It retains a link with ATC, but now has its own structure headed by local residents acting chair Kathy Walker and Annie Webster, acting secretary/organiser. Former English language teacher, Kathy has taken on the membership role and is spreading the word to organisations, such as U3A and Probus, around Auckland. A group of Marvellous members gives presentations to interested groups. Annie, who has been a television and radio host and journalist, has her hands full writing and submitting funding applications. Newly on board is well known local artist and former creative director for Television New Zealand, Janet Williamson. She will be involved in set design, costumes, poster design and more. “TAPAC has been incredibly generous and supportive with time and space and absolutely inspirational in terms of what we are doing and our plans for the immediate future. Plans which include a production for the Short and Sweet Festival in the coming months and White Night as part of TAPAC’s presentation at the Auckland Festival,” says Annie. “As our membership grows, so does our confidence and experience, through workshops, productions, acting classes and public performances,” says Kathy. “Our members include people who have been active in theatre in many ways - writing, teaching, acting and dancing - but there are many more with no theatrical background who are thrilled to have the opportunity to become involved in theatre at a time in life when they have the time to do so. Everyone is welcome at Marvellous and a marvellous time is had by all.” With their eyes firmly on the future, Marvellous strives to reach levels of creativity and commitment that many had not dreamed possible. In a demographic that is often under represented and sometimes feels invisible, Marvellous offers opportunities for mutually rewarding interaction between the group’s participants and the community through the exciting world of live theatre. Membership is $20 per annum and a weekly koha. PN (PHILIPPA TAIT) F Contacts; Kathy Walker: T: 09 376 7346; Annie Webster: T: 09 376 2902; E: marvelloustheatre@gmail.com

Raewyn Butler, the Salvation Army’s public relations coordinator for the northern region, gave a thought provoking address at the July meeting of Ponsonby U3A. She gave a brief snapshot of the history of the Salvation Army, an overview of the current work and services provided in the community and shared true accounts of people helped by the Salvation Army. The Salvation Army motto is “Caring for people, transforming lives, reforming society” and the Salvation Army has been fighting poverty since 1883. In New Zealand in the past year alone over 120,000 people from all walks of life have been the recipients of services from the Salvation Army. As public relations coordinator, Raewyn Butler, Salvation Army Public Raewyn’s role is fundraising, which Relations Coordinator for the Northern Region includes organising the Red Shield Appeal and working alongside corporate partners, as well as matters concerning the public. The main sources of funding are the Red Shield Appeal each May, wills and bequests, government grants, the army’s own self denial appeal where members donate one week’s salary a year, applications to trusts, corporate sponsorship and the continual struggle for enough collectors for appeals. She gave examples of the generosity of significant supporter Bluebird, as well as Warehouse Stationery, Watties and Kmart. OPSM provides a number of vouchers for free eye checks and glasses, and a Manukau dentist has partnered with the Salvation Army giving a day of free treatment each week. Bosch has recently become a partner with the army. Raewyn outlined the myriad of services and community programmes the Salvation Army provides. Three Ponsonby U3A members belong to the Marvellous Theatre Group for people over the age of 65. It has recently become independent from the Auckland Theatre Company’s community programme and is now located at TAPAC in Motions Road. Marvellous is for anyone over the age of 65 with a love of theatre and wishing to become involved in the fun and excitement of theatre productions. Experience is not a prerequisite and new members are welcome. U3A members Kathy Walker, Annie Webster and Rosalie Williams and other Marvellous members gave a short presentation to the meeting demonstrating some of the activities of the group. August marks the 20th Anniversary of Ponsonby U3A. The inaugural meeting was held in All Saints Church Hall, Ponsonby in August 1994. Many of our current members were at that first meeting. The Ponsonby News has had a relationship with U3A dating back to its first year when John Elliot editor of the Ponsonby News was one of the earliest guest speakers. Last year current editor/publisher Martin Leach was a popular guest speaker. The Ponsonby News has published reports of U3A meetings since its inception. U3A meetings have been held at the Leys Institute on the second Friday of the month since 1995. Today Ponsonby U3A has around 70 members, attending the monthly meeting as well as special interest groups, which are the lifeblood of the organisation. Special interest groups include Antiques and Collectibles, Armchair Travellers, Art History, Classical Studies, Current Affairs, Dining Out, Gallery Visits, Green Fingers, Music Appreciation, New Zealand History, Petanque, Ramblers and Scrabble. New members and guests are welcome at meetings. The August meeting will be the AGM. President Jane Jones is standing down after two years at the helm. Speaker for the August meeting will be Professor Tim Hazledine, Faculty of Business and Economics, Auckland University. “Why economics is harder than physics and what we PN can do about it.” (PHILIPPA TAIT) F

Marvellous Theatre Group recently gave a dramatic presentation of ‘The Ballad of Don Buck’ at the Selwyn Village theatre. It was written by Marvellous member Marianne Simpkins (third from right). The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

NEXT MEETING: ENQUIRIES:

9.45am, Friday 8 August, Leys Institute, 20 St Marys Bay Road. Jane Jones, President, Ponsonby U3A. T: 09 378 7628

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LOCAL PONSONBY A-Z OF BARS

SPQR

It’s comforting to know that many of the familiar bars in our neighbourhood are still going strong and there are but a few that have changed owners or renovated. We say drink well and responsibly while you enjoy yourself. BARRIO, 44 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 8147 www.barrionz.com A popular local featuring a rotating cast of DJs including Roger Perry, Manuel Bundy, Murray Cammick, Greg Harper, T.D.K and more. Check out their website or Facebook for session times. Coopers Pale Ale is on tap. Open Wednesday - Friday from 4pm, Saturday from 6pm, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday by arrangement. BEDFORD SODA & LIQUOR, Ponsonby Central, 5 Richmond Road T: 09 378 7362 www.bedfordsodaliquor.co.nz Bedford Soda & Liquor is a New York inspired neighbourhood bar named after Bedford Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Serving handmade sodas, cocktails, floats, shakes, meatballs and sundaes. Open 12pm - 12am, 7 days with an eclectic mix of DJs playing from 6pm Thursday - Saturday. BONITA, 242 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 5670 www.bonitabar.co.nz Bonita is a wine and tapas bar with an excellent wine list and cocktail credentials. Bonita’s relaxed atmosphere is the perfect place for a casual drink or tapas indulgence. Happy hour runs from 4pm - 6pm daily. Open Tuesday - Sunday 4pm - late.

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CALUZZI BAR AND CABARET, 461 Karangahape Road T: 09 357 0778 www.caluzzi.co.nz Legendary Caluzzi Bar and Cabaret offers an unforgettable dining experience with entertainment by New Zealand’s most awarded drag artistes. It’s an interactive cabaret show with fabulous food, dazzling costumes, DJs and disco and is a great place to have a social get together. Bookings are essential. CHAPEL BAR & BISTRO, 147 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 4528 www.chapel.co.nz Now a Ponsonby institution, Chapel embodies the spirit of Auckland’s most iconic and sociable boulevard. It is the perfect place for drinks with friends after work, for dinner, a snack or a night out. Well worth the visit to sample delicious and very affordable fare such as the crispy Italian style pizzas. Open Monday - Wednesday 3pm - late and Thursday - Sunday 12pm - late. COSH BAR, 155 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 1534 M: 027 450 4798 www.cosh.co.nz Cosh is a New York style cocktail lounge bar specialising in after dinner cocktails and cocktail shots. Two function rooms are available for private parties. Visit Facebook for upcoming events and DJ entertainment. Open Wednesday - Friday 4pm - late, Saturday and Sunday 3pm - late.

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LOCAL PONSONBY A-Z OF BARS DIDA’S WINE LOUNGE, 54 Jervois Road, Herne Bay T: 09 376 2813 www.didas.co.nz Dida’s offers warm wood and leather with cool tunes and great service; a glass of good wine from the extensive Glengarry portfolio and a plate or two of interesting and wellpriced tapas. Open 7 days 11.30am - late. ELBOW ROOM, 198 Jervois Road T: 09 376 2613 www.elbowroom.co.nz The Elbow Room is a favourite neighbourhood bar with a discerning wine list, a wide range of beers including Peroni, Asahi and Coopers Pale Ale on tap, as well as an extensive cocktail selection. The bar can be booked for private functions, either exclusively or shared use. Open 7 nights Monday - Thursday 3.30pm - late and Friday - Sunday 3pm - late. FAMILY BAR, 270 Karangahape Road T: 09 309 0213 www.familybar.co.nz Family Bar is an open minded venue that is inclusive rather than exclusive. There’s a dance floor and a stage that regularly hosts pageants, sing-alongs and karaoke and Miss Ribena is the resident drag queen. FREIDA MARGOLIS, 440 Richmond Road T: 09 378 6625 You’ll find Freida Margolis on the corner of Richmond Road and Hakanoa Street tucked away in 112 years of Grey Lynn history. Ask for a Garage Project Craft Brew or a French Pomegranate Punch... as well as fine wine, bottled beer and sliders. FREEMAN & GREY, 43 Ponsonby Road T: 09 378 6496 www.freemanandgrey.co.nz Freeman & Grey is a great sunny spot in Ponsonby with a laid-back atmosphere, great sharing plates menu and a heap of fun to be had. It’s the perfect location for that special event, birthday, corporate or Christmas. They’ll take the stress out of your next function, offering a wide range of food and beverage options, and can sort audio visual details for you. Open from 12pm Monday - Sunday. GABLES SPEIGHT’S ALE HOUSE, 248 Jervois Road T: 09 376 4994 www.gablesspeightsalehouse.co.nz Gables Speight’s Ale House is a local gastro bar and restaurant, which can cater for all your function requirements, be it a table for two or a party for 300. They pride themselves on serving their customers with great quality products and friendly, professional service. They provide a family friendly environment with Kids Dine Free on Sunday nights and 2 for 1 main meals on Monday nights (terms and conditions apply).

list, beer including Asahi and Coopers Pale Ale on tap and cocktails for the discerning. This is a great place to meet friends old and new. Open 7 days Monday - Thursday 4pm - 11.30pm, Friday and Saturday 3pm - 2am and Sunday 3pm - 11.30pm. LA ZEPPA, 33 Drake Street T: 09 379 8167 www.lazeppa.co.nz One of Auckland’s favourite rooftop bars with impressive views over Victoria Park and to the sky tower. La Zeppa offers delicious hot and cold tapas to enjoy with friends and a glass of wine, and is the perfect venue for social functions from 2 to 200. Visit their website for more details. Open Monday - Thursday 4pm - late and Friday - Sunday 12pm - late. LEGEND BAR, 373 Karangahape Road T: 021 137 2124 A host of entertainment brought to you by GoGo dancers and gorgeous drag queens, Legend bar has six of the best DJs in Auckland serving up top of the chart hits to gay anthem classics that will have you instantly on the dance floor. Comfortable surroundings, available for private functions and home to some of Auckland’s biggest gay events, check out the Legend Facebook page for more exciting news. Open Wednesday 9pm 2am and Thursday - Saturday 10pm - 4am. LIBERTINE, 37 Drake Street T: 09 929 2790 www.libertine.co.nz With great cocktails, delicious bar snacks and an atmosphere of comfortable sophistication, Libertine is the place to meet friends. Nestled above Victoria Park Market, Libertine takes its cue loosely from the Americas, serving a variety of small and large plates in a fusion of Creole, French, Latin, Cajun and southern style cuisines. Open Tuesday - Thursday 3pm - late, Friday - Saturday 4pm - late. LIME BAR, 167 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 7167 Small but perfectly formed, Lime is a quintessential Ponsonby favourite and the perfect spot for a refreshing craft beer, celebratory champagne or a really well made cocktail. It’s an easy vibe featuring their trademark tunes from Sinatra to Springfield and an older, more sophisticated late night crowd letting their hair down. Open Monday and Tuesday 5pm - 2am and Wednesday - Saturday 5pm - 3am.

GRAND CENTRAL, 126 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 1260 www.grandcentral.net.nz Ponsonby’s longest serving and most happening bar, famous for its live music and late nights. Friendly, unpretentious and welcoming, with great new outdoor spaces. Grand Central now has FOUR free function areas, available for any type of party or get together. Open 7 days from 4pm with the latest licence in Ponsonby of 4am. GREY LYNN RSC, 1 Francis Street T: 09 376 2909 www.greylynnrsc.org.nz Live music every Friday night and no cover charge. Bistro dining - new caterers, TAB, gaming machines, function room upstairs, big screen TVs for live sport. Visitors are most welcome. GREY LYNN TAVERN, 521 - 523 Great North Road T: 09 376 6521 The Grey Lynn Tavern is a friendly neighbourhood place to have a drink, dance, sing or watch the game on the big screen. TAB facilities and pokie machines are also available and the bar can be hired for private functions. Open 7 days 11am - late. GYPSY TEA ROOM, 455 Richmond Road T: 09 361 6970 www.gypsytearoom.co.nz Gypsy Tea Room has been attracting people from far and wide for the past 12 years. There is a smaller private room for up to 30 people, a tasty bar snack menu, thoughtful wine The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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LOCAL PONSONBY A-Z OF BARS LITTLE EASY, 198 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 0098 At Little Easy these are the good old days. They’re not just talking about them, they’re bringing back the charms of yesteryear, celebrating an easy going approach to life - reviving that ‘everybody knows your name’ vibe to within the four walls of your ‘local’. They only use free-range eggs, 100% pure New Zealand Angus beef, 100% New Zealand pork and chicken, locally sourced vegetables and bread that is baked just down the road. Their inspired twists on no-fuss Kiwi classics will keep you well fed and your drinks well watered. It’s a promise. Little Easy - your local. LONGROOM, 114 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 8803 www.longroom.co.nz With a covered courtyard, north facing sun deck and spacious warm interior, Longroom offers a great range of spaces for those special drinking occasions. Whether it’s an after work glass of wine and catch up with friends, a girls’ night out on the cocktails, or a nice cold beer on Saturday after the game, Longroom has a substantial range of beverages to suit. Longroom also has a great offering of tasty treats to accompany that special libation. Choose from a selection of small plates, pizzas and platters through to salads, main courses and desserts. Must try cocktails are: Long-jito, Calfresa Margarita, Coppa-tini and Longroom’s Bloody Mary. DJs play during the evening Thursday to Saturday. Open Monday - Friday 11am - late, Saturday, Sunday and public holidays (for brunch) 10am - late. MALT BAR & RESTAURANT, 442 Richmond Road T: 09 360 9537 www.maltbar.co.nz A friendly neighbourhood bar and restaurant in the heart of West Lynn. Malt serves a variety of delicious lunches, mains, woodfire pizzas and tapas - enjoy with a cold pint or glass of pinot gris. They offer specials such as $10 curry on Monday, free quiz night on Tuesday, 2 for 1 tapas on Thursday. Happy hour 4pm - 6pm Monday - Thursday, Friday and Saturday 5pm - 7pm. Open Monday - Friday 10am - late, Saturday and Sunday 11am - late. MEA CULPA, 3/175 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 4460 www.meaculpabar.com A bar for the serious cocktail drinker, whether it’s a classic or modern creation using seasonal produce, the drinks menu displays imagination and finesse. Passion and love go into every glass and it’s easy to see why they have won so many awards. Open Monday - Thursday 5pm - 1am, Friday 5pm - 3am and Saturday 6pm - 3am.

PLATFORM 2

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LOCAL PONSONBY A-Z OF BARS

PONSONBY POOL HALL PICCOLI PIATTI, 170 Jervois Road T: 09 376 5367 www.piccolipiatti.co.nz A modern Italian restaurant serving a selection of small plates (piccoli piatti) and homemade pasta with a great local and Italian wine list and delicious cocktails. Open Tuesday - Sunday, 5pm - late. PLATFORM 2, 65a Mackelvie Street T: 09 360 1260 Platform 2, formerly Pintxos, is now a quaint, nostalgic wine bar with Ponsonby’s sunniest courtyard. Specialising in delicious pizza slices and an ever changing cocktail menu as well as an extensive craft beer selection. Now available for your private function with three areas available to book. PONSONBY FRIENDS LICENSED BAR, 106 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 0800 A fully licensed bar with a great selection of beer and wine at reasonable prices. Located at the centre of the Ponsonby International Foodcourt. You can also quench your thirst with freshly squeezed fruit or vegetable juice and soft drinks. Open 7 days 10am - 10pm. PONSONBY POOL HALL, 106 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 2356 www.ponsonbypoolhall.co.nz This is the longest running pool hall in Auckland, with 15 pool tables and a private snooker lounge featuring Rolling Stones memorabilia. There are over 40 bottled beers to enjoy while you play and they’re open every day except Christmas Day. Available to hire for social functions, watch the video on Facebook. Open 7 days 1pm - 1am. POOF, 212 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 0396 Sister bar to Family bar on K’Road, Poof is on Ponsonby Road. The Pink Link party bus runs on Friday and Saturday nights carrying revellers between the two venues - don’t miss the drag show at Poof 11pm on weekends. With a Tuesday quiz night, a live band on Thursdays and resident DJ Michael Kelly on Fridays and Saturdays, Poof is open 7 days from 5pm till 3am. REVELRY, 106 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 8663 www.revelry.co.nz A luxurious bohemian-style parlour with hints of opium den chic, this venue boasts one of the best decks in Ponsonby, a warming double sided fireplace and visual delights from lanterns to antique furniture. The delicious food menu includes a selection of Asian fusion sharing plates, platters and bar snacks. An extensive New Zealand and international wine list, classic and original cocktails with seasonal recipes, and craft beers will give you something new to try every visit. Open from early afternoon until late every night of the week. Brunch service is available Friday - Sunday. SALE STREET BREWERY, 7 Sale Street T: 09 307 8148 www.salest.co.nz Situated in the heart of the Victoria Quadrant, Sale St is a uniquely Kiwi mega-venue that The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

defines style. Sale St features a bar, a micro-brewery, bistro dining, live music stage, The Velvet Room private bar and Auckland’s largest deck and garden bar. Open Monday - Sunday 11.30am - late. SNATCH BAR, 171A Ponsonby Road T: 09 361 6170 www.snatchbar.co.nz Snatch Bar is a retro 1950s lounge bar with delicious cocktails, a relaxed atmosphere and great music. Enjoy one of their special cocktails in a comfortable leather sofa as you watch the evening unfold on Ponsonby Road. Open mic comedy on Wednesday from 8.30pm and visit their Facebook page for upcoming events and promotions. Open Tuesday - Saturday 6pm - 3am. SPQR, 150 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 1710 www.spqrnz.co.nz A Ponsonby institution, SPQR has been a prominent fixture along the Ponsonby strip for 20 years. The lively atmosphere and friendly service gives SPQR an authentic, first-rate reputation. The pizza is great for an any time snack and Veal Marsala is an old favourite. Open 7 days 12pm - late. THE BIRDCAGE RESTAURANT & BAR, 133 Franklin Road T: 09 280 1690 www.birdcage.co.nz The Birdcage has been returned to her former glory with stained glass windows and original brick walls blended with more modern elements to give it a chic, metropolitan vibe. The north-facing courtyard bar is one of the biggest and sunniest in Auckland, a perfect inner city destination to gather with friends. The food is rustic in style and they are open for lunch and dinner, 7 days a week. THE CAV, 68 College Hill T: 09 376 4230 www.thecav.co.nz It’s a Ponsonby institution for everything from an upmarket lunch and dinner through to a great place to relax. The talented kitchen, recently overhauled by Eugene Hamilton from Euro, offers a menu of succulent modern cuisine based on good value for money. From a weekend brunch venue where families can feel comfortable, by night the Cav evolves into a premier venue with a vibrant atmosphere and great music. Open Monday - Saturday 11am - 1am and Sunday 11am -11pm. THE DOG’S BOLLIX, 2 Newton Road T: 09 378 1845 A well known Auckland live music venue, the Dog’s Bollix, has been all cleaned up and is ready to get down once more. Catch bands from across the spectrum of the local music scene performing live by checking the Facebook page or book a table for a group by calling Steve 09 378 1845. Tuesday - Wednesday 4pm - 11pm, Thursday 4pm - 12am, Friday - Saturday 4pm - 3am and Sunday 2pm - 9pm.

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LOCAL PONSONBY A-Z OF BARS THE EAGLE BAR, 259 Karangahape Road T: 09 309 4979 The Eagle Bar is K’ Road’s friendly local pub with a quirky, friendly atmosphere that always attracts an eclectic crowd. Famous for its free jukebox and cut price Long Island Iced Teas, the heated outdoor seating is also the best spot on the strip for people watching. Come early for cocktails and conversation, or late for antics and anarchy. Open Tuesday - Sunday 4pm - late.

THE SURREY HOTEL, 465 Great North Road T: 09 378 9059 www.thesurreyhotel.co.nz This local pub has a cosy atmosphere, friendly service and food available all day. There is a breakfast buffet, brunch, lunch and dinner menu as well as bar snacks and wood-fired pizza. Open 7 days 7am - 9.30pm.

THE GOLDEN DAWN, Corner Ponsonby and Richmond Roads T: 09 376 9929 www.goldendawn.co.nz There is a green door and behind it is this must visit bar with local and imported ‘guest’ beers, cool tunes and super styled service. If you cannot find the green door, they are not there. Open Tuesday - Thursday 4pm - late and Friday - Sunday 3pm - late.

THE WHISKEY, 210 Ponsonby Road T: 09 361 2666 This hip bar plays classic rock and offers intimacy and action seven nights a week. There is a huge range of whiskey to suit all palates and wallets. Not only is the spirit selection outstanding, the cocktails are sublime. A great spot to meet friends after work, relax in the surrounds and continue late into the night. Check out their Facebook for more information. Open 7 nights 5pm - 3am.

THE OAKROOM, 17 Drake Street, Freemans Bay T: 09 300 6313 www.theoakroom.co.nz Situated in Victoria Park Market, one of Auckland’s most historic and treasured landmarks, The Oakroom is a new bar in an old part of town. The Oakroom, formerly a stable in the 1800s, has been carefully crafted in order to enhance a contemporary feel and maintain its natural and historic features. They offer an impressive wine list, tasty cocktail list, beer and spirits. Open Monday 11am - 5pm, Tuesday - Friday 11am - late and Saturday 4pm - late.

TIN SOLDIER, 151 Ponsonby Road T: 09 378 1719 www.thetinsoldier.co.nz Located on the corner of Anglesea Street, Tin Soldier offers a fresh approach to modern dining. A sharing menu is at once contemporary and nostalgic - old savoury and sweet favourites given a very modern twist in both ingredients and presentation. And for those who don’t like to share, there are a variety of larger plates you can at least try to keep all to yourself. The menu is complemented by an extensive selection of New Zealand craft beers along with Dedwood Brewing Co. brews and an extensive international wine list. Open from 4pm on Tuesday, Wednesday - Sunday 11.30am - late.

THE PONSONBY SOCIAL CLUB, 152 Ponsonby Road T: 09 361 2320 www.ponsonbysocialclub.co.nz Just like the RSA but without the asparagus rolls or pokies. Live music and DJs throughout the week, check the website for details. Open 7 nights 5pm - late.

TOM TOM BAR & EATERY, 27 Drake Street T: 09 377 5737 www.tom-tom.co.nz Elevated above Victoria Park with north facing views through the treetops across Auckland, Tom Tom Bar & Eatery is the brainchild of Dayna Siarkiewicz and Andrew Clapham - of Herne Bay Local fame. Enjoy the uptown decor and fine dining with unique cuisine by head chef Fraser Shenton, or call in and book a function. Monday - Sunday 11.30am -10pm for a la carte dining, 10pm-late for late night dining menu.

THE STATION, 2 Beresford Street, Newton T: 09 300 5040 www.stationbar.co.nz This is a unique character bar situated off K’ Road. Plenty of seating available in the main bar area, outside on the deck and a chill-out lounge downstairs. A perfect spot for parties of 20 to 100 people, they have a long list of DJs with a wide range of styles, and can arrange live music or even karaoke DJs for your party! The experienced staff know their drinks and can make a wide range of cocktails to suit everyone’s tastes. Open Thursday 4pm - late, Friday 3pm - 3am and Saturday 9pm - 3am.

URGE, 490 Karangahape Road T: 09 307 2155 www.urge.co.nz Urge is New Zealand’s longest running gay men’s bar and since 1997 has aimed to create a safe and fun place to dance, drink and cruise. It’s a no attitude masculine space catering for the bear, rugged, masculine leather crowd and admirers. There are all sorts of theme parties, quiz nights and DJs, visit their website for the latest listings. Open Thursday - Saturday 9pm - late and Sunday 3pm - 7pm.

THE CAV’S slick new renovation

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY THE BIGGEST FAMILY BIRTHDAY YET! It’s time to celebrate Family bar’s 9th birthday with as much glitter and festivity as the biggest LGBT venue in New Zealand deserves. After nine years on Auckland’s infamous K’ Road, Family bar invites you to join the family ‘under the rainbow’ on Sunday 24 August from 6pm. Hosted by the rainbow-diva Miss Ribena, Family’s resident drag queen since the very beginning, there will be 15 fabulous drag shows throughout the evening including the luscious Miss K and Miss Kola, while DJs Wanda and Love will keep the dance floor packed. On arrival you’ll be ushered along the rainbow carpet and under the rainbow balloon arch where drag queens and topless waiters will welcome you with a complimentary cocktail. There will be an hour of complimentary drinks and the first drag show starts at 7.30pm. With four bars and the biggest mirror ball in any nightclub in the country, Family is also the place to go for events and charity nights, including NZAF and Body Positive. Drag shows every Friday and Saturday keep Family loud and colourful, as well as a Sunday club from 6-8pm and karaoke Wednesday to Saturday in the saloon bar. Family bar’s 9th birthday will be a night of glittering surprises, with a confetti cannon, balloon and money drops throughout the night - Miss Ribena will blow gorgeous clouds of confetti over everyone, and of course, don’t forget the birthday cake. F PN FAMILY BAR, 270 Karangahape Road, T: 09 309 0213, www.familybar.co.nz

A HOME AWAY FROM HOME Whether you know it as ‘The Suffolk’, ‘The Cavalier Tavern’ or its latest incarnation ‘The Cav’, 68 College Hill is an Auckland Institution which has been grazing and watering the good folk of Ponsonby since 1866. As per its gastropub theme, The Cav offers bistro quality food in a causal friendly environment. The talented kitchen, recently overhauled by Eugene Hamilton of Euro fame, offers an extensive menu featuring succulent, modern cuisine, with an ethos of providing great value for money. At the Cav they like to think they provide the total package for all walks of life. Whether it be the family friendly, ‘feed the shrimp’ kids menu, Ponsonby’s best live sporting experience, a vibrant and friendly atmosphere with unrivalled cuisine, or a happening evening spot for those of you more inclined to party the night away, the Cav is your new home away from home and a perfect venue to enjoy legendary Kiwi hospitality.

68 College Hill, T: 09 376 4230 www.thecav.co.nz

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY

BEDFORD SODA & LIQUOR FOR YOUR DRINKING PLEASURE Two weeks ago Bedford Soda & Liquor manager Jason Clark won the Diageo World Class cocktail championships for the second year in a row. He’s been creating a stir in the beverage world for a number of years but last year, after winning the inaugural launch of the competition in New Zealand, he went on to place fourth in the world championship - a feat no New Zealander has ever achieved. This year he’s aiming to do even better and is confident he now knows what it takes to win the world title. Since opening in December last year Bedford Soda & Liquor has become renown for making the best drinks in Auckland. Specialising in cocktails and handmade sodas, Jason’s finesse and delicate attention to texture and aesthetic means the drinker can enjoy an internationally comparable cocktail taste experience. Bedford’s drinks are delivered in a completely unpretentious environment by genuinely friendly, helpful wait staff. Bedford was conceptualised by owners Sam Ansley, Matt Nicholls and Jeremy Wells, three friends who visited New York and were blown away by the local hospitality scene - particularly in the Brooklyn and Williamsburg precincts. The name, Bedford Soda & Liquor derives from Bedford Ave, an avenue dotted with amazing eating and drinking establishments that runs between Williamsburg and Brooklyn. Food-wise, Bedford’s menu is based around organic, gluten free meatballs. Diners are given a marker pen and a laminated menu to tick boxes and mix and match their meatball, sauce and base options. As well as the regular carb-friendly choices like spaghetti and mash, head chef Croydon Cole has created a number of popular, lighter, greener options which can be used as a meatball bed. With Jason’s delectable drinks and Croydon’s formidable food it’s easy to see why in seven short months Bedford Soda & Liquor has created a reputation as one of the city’s PN best places to enjoy an evening out. F Opening Hours: Monday - Sunday 12pm - 12am

photography: Michael McClintock

BEDFORD SODA & LIQUOR, 4 Brown Street Ponsonby Central, T: 09 378 7362 www.bedfordsodaliquor.co.nz

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LIZ WHEADON: WINE, GLORIOUS WINE

The best of Europe European wines are often referred to as Old World wines, making note of the history and age of the wine industry in Europe. More often the term is becoming somewhat idiosyncratic; line up a range of the modern face of Spanish wine for example and you could almost swear you were taking wine from somewhere in the so-called New World. That aside, the wines of Europe are often looked to as benchmarks of particular styles and reference points for the wines that winemakers the world over aspire to produce. Glengarry has been for many years importing wines from Europe and while the relationships we have do stand the test of time, we are not resting on our laurels, rather constantly searching for new wines to import. A part of my job that I really enjoy is the relationships with our European suppliers and sourcing new and exciting things. Most recently we’ve re-looked at Italy and expanded our range from the top of the country to the bottom, and checked back in on Spain, a country whose wines have improved tenfold in a very short period of time. At the end of August, we are hosting an amazing event in Auckland and Wellington, opening the doors on our European range. With over 100 wines open for tasting over the four hour event, you’ll be able to explore wines from Spain, Italy, France, Germany and Hungary. On hand will be members of our experienced team to guide you through the wines. We’ll be tasting in the Riedel Magnum glass, the glass used for tasting at the Air New Zealand Wine Awards, the Royal Easter Show and many international competitions. At the end of the tasting, the glass will be yours to take home. So mark it in your calendar now - we’d love to see you there. Here are a few of my favourite (it’s like choosing between children saying that) European wines for right now; Palacios Remondo La Vendimia Made from grapes grown in the Rioja sub region, Rioja Baja, this excellent wine is made by the very talented Alvaro Palacios who produces Spain’s most exclusive and expensive wine L’Ermita - a 100% Grenache wine. La Vendimia, meaning ‘the vintage’, is made from 100% Tempranillo, a fruit driven forward style, it’s great right now. Domaine Boiron Côtes du Rhône Domaine Boiron Côtes du Rhône is the Côtes du Rhône of Domaine Bosquet de Papes. So why not call it - Bosquet de Papes Côtes du Rhône? Well it was, until recently when the authorities decided the use of Pape with a Côtes du Rhône was not allowed, so Nicolas Boiron, owner of Bosquet de Papes, changed the name to his own. A Grenache dominant Côtes du Rhône, made with the same traditional approach of Bosquet de Papes Chateauneuf du Pape. (LIZ WHEADON) F PN www.glengarrywines.co.nz

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$5 DELI - GARY FRANCIS Tucked in the south west corner, between the crêpes and wine, is the newest addition to Ponsonby Central’s market; the $5 Deli. You may be familiar with the concept from the farmer’s markets; a sizeable punnet of hummus, paté, Israeli couscous, or some other antipasto delight, at the bargain price of $5. Laid out market-style in an open chiller, there are some 20 products to choose from, all handmade from imported and local ingredients, fresh and preservative free.

MALDITO MENDEZ SARAH GINELLA AND NICO MENDEZ Maldito Mendez in The Lane at Ponsonby Central is owned and operated by hospitality couple Nico Mendez and Sarah Ginella. The name Maldito translates to naughty or cheeky, and is the perfect name for this eatery where fresh and spicy flavours tease your palate. Sarah, who is English born but has lived a good part of her life in New Zealand, spent two years in Uruguay cooking for the British Embassy. It was there that she developed a love for Latin American food. Her partner Nico is Uruguayan, and began his career cooking with Argentinean celebrity chef Francis Mallman, from whom he learnt to appreciate the art of rustic yet exquisite food. Whilst the empanadas are straight out of Uruguay, the rest of the menu at Maldito Mendez is drawn from all over Latin America. “We like to think we have taken the best out of South American street food; the freshness of the ingredients, where you can taste all the components, then add the heat of the chilli. It’s labour intensive, involving a lot of chopping; all the salsas are prepared fresh each day.”

Gary Francis came up with the concept of the $5 Deli six years ago, holding his first market stall at Howick Farmer’s market. Nowadays he supplies up to a dozen markets every weekend and has established quite a following, particularly for his paté de parfait and baba ganoush. There’s a reason it all tastes so good; Gary is a trained chef who has been in the hospitality game for 40 years. He has cooked at some of the best hotels in the world and for some very pampered palates; Prince Charles, the Queen, and the Sheik of Bahrain to name a few. Alongside his deli range, Gary has also created his own truffle and crayfish oils. The crayfish oil is amber in colour, intensely crayfish, and will turn an everyday seafood dish into a spectacular one. His truffle oil can elevate mashed potato to something out of this world! Lining the shelves of the $5 Deli you will also find a range of Mediterranean products; from dried pasta and legumes to olive oil and capers. Gary and Avi Fadida of La Mamma met at the markets years ago and theirs is a friendship forged over the shared ethos ‘great food at a great price’. That, and their products are a good fit. Gary is always happy to suggest recipes utilising both ranges; his divine mushroom duxelle stirred through tagliatelle is a favourite. At $5 Deli you can grab a tasty $5 boxed lunch, then pick out a range of dips and nibbles for your evening soiree, followed by the ingredients for a quick but fabulous evening meal. What more could you want? Gary Francis M: 021 419 282

Maldito Mendez started life as a truck and trailer catering operation; feeding film crews and wedding parties. During the Rugby World Cup, they were a key vendor on the waterfront where they successfully fed the proverbial five thousand with their Latin style street food. From there, the concept of Maldito Mendez was born - to create somewhere casual to go for a quick meal that was well priced, fresh and tasty, like the cantinas in South America. They were one of the founding tenants at Ponsonby Central and haven’t looked back since the opening. They enjoy the stability of a restaurant, and the couple continue to run their successful outdoor catering business particularly during the summer months. Riding the wave of popularity for a more casual dining experience, the Maldito trailer is in demand for functions in remote but spectacular locations; like Rangiputa in the far north, or on a Coromandel beach. Right now I would rather cosy up inside the restaurant amidst the piles of fresh tomatoes, herbs and images of Che Guevara. www.mendez.co.nz T: 09 378 9107

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WHAT’S HOT AT SABATO BRRR, COME IN FROM THE COLD PEOPLE! At Gina’s Italian Kitchen they have winter wrapped up with their wonderful Tuscan inspired specials. First you’ll kick off with Vin Brule; hot mulled wine with mixed spices and citrus zest. But you might also want to try the tangy Limoncello Mojito - it is divine. To start why not share a plate of the handmade tortellini filled with chicken, ricotta and spinach served with a light cherry tomato and basil sauce topped with lashings of parmesan cheese. For mains you’re spoilt for choice. They offer Guanciale di Manzo, braised beef cheeks that melt in your mouth. Capra al Limone, slow-cooked goat casserole with gremolata. And the Tuscan-style roast pork with rosemary and garlic served with creamed mushrooms is ah-mazing. All generously portioned and reasonably priced under $30.00.

Father’s Day for foodies Just around the corner, on 7 September, Father’s Day is a time to show the men in our lives that we love and appreciate them. Treat fathers, husbands and partners to a gourmet gift or why not cook them a delicious dinner... Our Gentleman’s Gift is a collection of products that any father will love. A beautiful Laguiole carving set, our rich Giusti Riccardo balsamic vinegar - divine drizzled over meat or cheese, and some sweet treats to enjoy after dinner. For the sweet-toothed, browse our range of quality Valrhona chocolate, authentic Italian liquorice and other sublime sweets. For a savoury selection, chat to our cheesemonger and delight dad with a combination of cheeses to enjoy - with some chutneys and meats alongside - delicious! Why not go a step further and cook a special meal on the day? Pay a visit to our showroom and our friendly staff will help you to create the perfect Father’s Day menu. With recipes ranging from simple pasta dishes to authentic Spanish tapas and paella to meals from some, of New Zealand’s top chefs, you are bound to find something that will take your father’s fancy. Take a look at our website for more inspirational recipes. No matter what your father’s foodie favorites are, we have something sure to make him PN feel special this Father’s Day! F SABATO Limited, 57 Normanby Road T: 09 630 8751 www.sabato.co.nz

Oh and in case you didn’t notice, they are also now BYO... but they’ll keep their tops on for that service. Nice huh? Gina’s Italian Kitchen is open for dinner seven days and lunch Monday to Friday. F PN GINA’S ITALIAN KITCHEN, 161 Symonds Street, T: 09 302 2061 www.ginas.co.nz

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JULIE BONNER: NEWS FROM FROG POND FARM WE HAD SOME OF THE WORST WEATHER I HAVE EXPERIENCED IN Auckland during July, which, I guess, isn’t all that surprising given we live on an island in the South Pacific and it is winter time! Frog Pond Farm was hammered relentlessly by north east winds which rocked the house, tore branches from trees, and made venturing outdoors seriously unpleasant, then there were those inevitable power cuts! And the rain... the heavens opened up and threw it down, volumes of it, causing flooding, soggy paddocks, bedraggled livestock and chooks and general winter blues. My veggie gardens, how did they fare? Well, as they are positioned on a hillside, (which by the way isn’t the smartest place for them to be) the drainage wasn’t an issue. But they did cop it from the northeast wind, and while it isn’t the prevailing wind, it always manages to cause loads of damage. Now there just happens to be a garden full of trees, shrubs and a phoenix palm which sits adjacent to these beds and bears much of this wind, but not all of it mind you. So, a walk out to the garden on day three revealed that my peas had been stripped from their trellis and were smothering the garlic and my brassicas had been dumped unceremoniously on the ground. What did I do? Stuffed the tear-stained tissue back in my jacket pocket, pegged the peas back on the trellis (and by the way, this is still where they are) then grabbed some homemade mulch and mounded those broccoli back up again. I stood back admiring my handiwork, which, if I don’t mind saying so myself, worked brilliantly! What’s more amazing though is that the following week, the weather was stunning! Beautiful bright blue skies, cloud puffs, light breeze, perfect gardening weather. While there may not be too much happening in our veggie plot, we still have lots to do. Surprisingly (I’m joking) we have yet to finish pruning those olive trees. I attended a meeting held by Oliveti New Zealand a few weeks back, convincing me more than ever that we need to be ruthless with our pruning. As olive trees fruit on second year wood, a good prune can often mean a reduced crop the following year. But in saying this, harvesting a tree that is huge, has low and crossed branches; a centre that is dense with foliage and is positioned on a hillside is a nightmare. My hubby was also concerned about the lichen growth on our olives and other trees in our orchard and, as you do, I plonked myself down next to the laptop and asked Google what it thought. I found some very interesting information. Apparently lichen doesn’t harm the plants on which it grows. However, it can be more common on plants lacking vigour (not the olive trees, trust me). Seems that it likes damp places, can be found where branches have become overcrowded, enjoys humid conditions (it no doubt loves Auckland) and will grow facing the prevailing wind as it enjoys moisture. Ah, there is plenty of wind on that hillside. It also likes growing in clean unpolluted air, which explains why we have so much of it. Everyone needs a ‘to do’ list don’t they? Do you have one for the garden? Mine goes a bit like this: • prune the olives - HARD. • feed the olives, not much happens in winter, but they haven’t received a foliar spray in ages and I’m trying to make myself feel better. • pop the sprayer in the back of the ATV and spray the veggie garden with seaweed brew. • trim back some plants that are being bolshie in the veggie garden. • prune back the roses which are the bane of my life. • plant my newly acquired strawberry plants which I have never grown before and have no intention of sharing with the wildlife (this will be interesting). • talk to the garden - this is easy to do, good idea to make sure other people aren’t about though. • weed. • throw things at the wandering jew which is creeping into the forest. • dream about that summer planting plan. We are still enjoying lots of produce from our organic garden. I’m making soups, juices, casseroles and salads, with a huge bowl of lemons just waiting to be preserved! Yum. PN Happy gardening. (JULIE BONNER) F www.frogpondfarm.co.nz

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY PLASTIC BAG FREE DAY - 31 JULY It was great to see the Grey Lynn retailers who signed up for Plastic Bag Free day on 31 July. The Grey Lynn 2030 Waste Away group asked local businesses to provide an alternative to single use plastic shopping bags and encouraged shoppers to take their own re-usable bags. Thank you to those who took part. It was just one small step towards PN permanently getting rid of plastic bag pollution from Auckland. F www.greylynn2030.co.nz

The Grey Lynn Butcher and Selector boutique show their support for Plastic Bag Free Day

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LAURAINE JACOBS: THE SEASONED PALATE

Cassia THE FIRST CLUE CAME WITH THE RECENTLY PUBLISHED BLOCKBUSTER BOOK, THE Great New Zealand Cookbook. Eighty of our country’s best chefs, cooks and bakers are portrayed with recipes, and there on pages 272 and 273, Sid Sahrawat and his little daughter Zoya the ‘hospobaby’, are pictured foraging for herbs in a wild field. Turn the page and there’s a sumptuous double page spread of a glorious Indian family banquet, followed by more pages of traditional Indian recipes. Everyone who’s a foodie in the Ponsonby area will be proud of the achievements of this likeable and talented chef who has won almost every accolade there is to win on the New Zealand culinary scene including Metro’s Chef of the Year and Cuisine’s Restaurant of the Year. But we all know him for the elegant and upmarket food he carefully crafts in his local restaurant, Sidart. We wondered whether we would ever get a chance to see him cooking the food he grew up with in India and taste the spicy fare of his childhood in Chandigarh. Now Sid and his wife Chandni have fulfilled a dream they’ve had for a while and opened their casual, intimate new restaurant, Cassia, in the central city. They are serving a menu of deliciously piquant food to perk up the tastebuds and to show Aucklanders a new style of modern Indian fare not seen in the city before. Their restaurant is in a basement site in Fort Lane, a far cry from the very first Indian restaurant I ever ate in, which was also in a basement but 12,000 kilometres away in London. That life changing meal, in another century, was a revelation at the time for a Kiwi lass on the big OE. The fare then was simple but beautifully spiced curries, and I recall taking a seven pint can of beer to accompany our meal. That meal could not be more different from the stylish dishes that Cassia’s menu delivers today and although genuine Indian Kingfisher beer is on tap, there’s also a sophisticated list of gin cocktails and a wonderful wine list of labels specially selected to accompany the food. The dining area is long and low, hung with clever globe lighting, and a long bar with the kitchen beyond allows diners to perch and drink, snack or watch the chefs weave their magic at the stoves. White painted wooden chairs are reminiscent of classic home kitchen furniture and the room buzzes with chatter. Beyond the main area is a colourful overflow room, Holi, with a brightly painted wall depicting the festival of colours of the

Cassia - Cardamom pannacotta, lychee, rose water, sunflower seeds same name. It has a large dark table for casual seating to sip or nibble. And there’s a more formal private dining room to the rear, tucked away from the view of the crowds. It is all very sophisticated and subtly decorated, with the old building’s historic brick walls providing sharp contrast. The kitchen has two tandoor clay ovens, pivotal to creating the flavours Sid Sahrawat and his team coax from the seasonal New Zealand ingredients he likes to work with. Everyone around town worth his salt as a chef now has a ‘slider’ on the menu, and Cassia’s version must be up there at the top. Soft brioche buns, lightly curried and flavoured with fennel and sesame seeds are filled with fragrant chicken from the tandoor, a superb kuchumber slaw and finished with fried almonds, lemon juice and yogurt. There are so many layers of flavour that the taste is the stuff of dreams. Garlic naan and a soft onion kulcha, accompanied by a fresh coriander relish emerge hot from the tandoor, as do many of the meaty dishes and vegetables. This method of cooking provides maximum heat in minimum time and the smokiness gives the food an edge that cannot be replicated in any other oven. Some other gems from the menu not to be missed: a Sahrawat family favourite, Delhi duck is a sumptuous curry with kumara, lychee and tomatoey garlicky, gingery sauce, so good that every drop of sauce will be licked up. Juicy lamb chops with fenugreek, onions two ways - both pickled and fried in rings, is accompanied by an aromatic coconut chutney. Bengali style fish has been marinated before being cooked with curry leaves, mustard seeds and coconut cream and served with crispy fried kale leaves. Gasp! Who knew kale was part of the Indian pantry? I am not sure it is but it certainly shows just how in sync Sid is with what’s hot and currently vogue on the food scene. Fish lovers will savour the seared scallops which are jumbo sized and served with foie gras mousse, refreshing apple and mooli, and a stunning rendition of pickled fish spiced with garam masala, chickpeas, tamarind water in a light-as-air buri shell and mint dressing. Spicy dishes to warm the heart of every vegetarian are offered too. Roasted potato and cauliflower with burrata, spinach and cashews is a winner, along with fried eggplant, mushrooms, onion seeds, fresh cow’s curd and a generous dose of fresh chilli and mint. Be sure to leave room for dessert. The cardamom pannacotta with lychee and rosewater sorbets, marshmallow and sunflower seed praline may be the prettiest and most subtly sweet dessert in the city. As for the chocolate kulfi, a smooth icy concoction that comes with banana mousse, date puree, cumin caramel and some astonishing curry notes has to be devoured to be believed.

photography: Charlie Smith

The prices of these items are all the $13 to $29 range and when the quality of the ingredients and the work that is evident in every dish, Cassia may be the bargain of the Auckland dining scene. Just how he does it I cannot even guess. But more importantly, Sid has assembled a keen and talented kitchen team that will allow him to continue to cook regularly at Sidart, while Chandni and Matthew Aitchison oversee some excellent service from Cassia’s smart team. I have always said if you want to open a new restaurant in Auckland, it’s essential to bring something new and exciting to the food scene. Sid Sahrawat has done exactly that. Don’t miss it. Open for lunch Wednesday to Friday. Dinner Tuesday - Saturday. Reservations for parties of eight or more only. PN (LAURAINE JACOBS) F www.laurainejacobs.co.nz Sid Sahrawat

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CASSIA, 8 Fort Lane T: 09 379 9702 www.cassiarestaurant.co.nz PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY DEATH CAFÉ WESTMERE Death is not often talked about in our society, until we are faced with it through illness or someone close to us dying. When Kay and Carol of the Garnet Sation Café found the concept of ‘Death Café’ on the internet, they were excited by the idea and opportunity to take the topic of death into the community, creating a space to explore with anyone who came along. At their first Death Café on 9 May, people of different ages, experiences and perspectives gathered over tea/ coffee and cake at Garnet Station Café. In a confidential environment they talked about their experiences of dying, hopes for their own passing and things we all grapple with. The Death Café continues to meet every second Sunday of the month from 3pm - 4.30pm. Kay and Carol are experienced facilitators. As well as being through their own personal losses, both Kay and Carol work with the dying and their families at local hospices. Kay in a permanent role and Carol as a volunteer. The Death Café is open to all. The only cost is if you want to buy tea/coffee. Numbers are limited to allow for deeper conversation. If you are interested contact Carol on M: PN 021 878 730 or Death Café on Garnet - Facebook, to book in. F GARNET STATION CAFÉ, 85 Garnet Road, Westmere T: 09 360 3397 www.garnetstation.co.nz

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photography: Nicky MacDonald

Death Café.com is an international phenomena. Death Cafés are popping up worldwide, the latest in Hong Kong.


EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY PONSONBY BUTCHERS NEW OWNER, NEW VISION, OLD VALUES New Ponsonby Butchers owner Chris Sims says, “Our vision and goal is to provide the same quality, service and community thinking as Brian Hall and Superior Meat Market did for over 35 years with the only difference being that we now offer organic and free range meats.”

Chris Sims and Brian Hall

Ponsonby Butchers have sponsored Ponsonby Primary, Freemans Bay Primary, Sacred Heart Catholic Parish and Ponsonby Rugby Club as well as West Auckland Racing. As Ponsonby Butchers grows and re-establishes itself in the local community, they aim to earn the loyalty and respect that comes with being the local butcher maintaining the traditional way of butchery. Chris has been working in the meat industry for nearly 10 years and comes from a family background in butchery. Chris’ dad started butchering in 1955 and his two brothers are butchers. Chris has spent considerable time in the wholesale export side of the industry and is now enjoying being in the retail side. He has spent time working here and in Australia. “I’m very focused on providing quality meat and unbeatable service to the community of Ponsonby.” Chris’s colleague Preston Page is a qualified chef having worked in several restaurants serving up fine dining cuisine for weddings, functions and high end à la carte. Preston is passionate about fresh, high quality ingredients with a range of ideas and inspiration to pass on to his customers. “My past experience has given me great knowledge of flavour PN matching which is perfect for our hand-made sausages.” F PONSONBY BUTCHERS, 224 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 376 1862 www.ponsonbybutchers.co.nz

NEW SOCIAL GROUP FOR LGBTIQ* ASIANS IN AUCKLAND Did you know that over one in five people living in Auckland are of Asian ethnicity? Despite this, Asian people often lack visibility and representation in LGBTIQ services and community groups. Seeking to fill this gap, EquAsian is a new social-support group for LGBTIQ people of all ages who descend from all parts of the Asian region. In a nutshell, EquAsian's philosophy is 'equal and Asian', as the name of the group suggests. The group emerged out of the last Pride Festival, when Rainbow Youth hosted a community meeting about the experiences of Asian people in the LGBTIQ community. Participants at this meeting voiced the challenges they faced as a ‘minority within a minority’, and it was clear that LGBTIQ Asians need a greater sense of belonging in the rainbow community. Consequently, EquAsian was established to provide a safe, fun and inclusive space for Asians to socialise and support one another. The formation of EquAsian is a significant step towards creating a more culturally inclusive LGBTIQ community. F PN The social group meets at 7pm on the third Saturday of every month at Rainbow Youth’s office on K’ Road. For more information, see EquAsian’s Facebook page: www.facebook.com/groups/equasiangroup/ *LGBTIQ = Lesbian / Gay / Bisexual / Transgender / Intersexed / Questioning.

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CELIA HAY: NZ SCHOOL OF FOOD & WINE

Cheese is the natural companion of wine As part of the inaugural W&F Wine and Food Event at the New Zealand School of Food and Wine in the Viaduct, I have been putting together a fascinating programme of wine tastings enhanced by a series of seminars on the great cheeses of the world. Juliet Harbutt, author of the World Cheese Book and international authority on cheese will join us from London to share her extensive knowledge and experience. Juliet has two options for her programme. On Sunday 14 and Monday 15 September Juliet will run a series of 90-minute sessions on the great cheeses of the world. Here, Juliet will explain the four important styles of cheese and you will smell and taste a selection of outstanding local and international cheeses.

We are a cheese nation, but most of the cheese consumed in New Zealand remains at the cheddar-pizza end of the scale. It is so helpful to understand the different styles of cheese, how they are made and then to experiment and taste some of our local cheeses alongside the intriguing cheeses from Europe.

For those wanting more in depth knowledge, Juliet will run a five-day Certificate in Cheese from Tuesday 16 - Saturday 20 September. In this workshop, Juliet will explain in more detail and discuss the seven categories of cheese, their history, how they are made and how they should be enjoyed and cared for to ensure that the cheeses are tasted at their optimum. Juliet offers practical advice on cooking with cheese, preparation and presentation of cheeseboards and storage of cheese. In this course, participants will even make their own fresh cheese to take home.

Juliet is a popular and respected educator in the United Kingdom especially for those working with cheese. Originally from New Zealand, Juliet has spent the last 30 years working in and around London. She ran her own cheese shop for many years and has consulted widely to restaurants, cafés, supermarkets and speciality food retailers.

Some years ago I attended Juliet’s seminars myself and from her learned many things. For instance, it was a revelation to be told that when you use premium quality cheese, although it may cost more, you need to use far less because the flavour is more intense. So even a small wedge of parmigiano can be satisfying as its flavour is so concentrated and that is why we only need a dusting of fresh parmigiano on pasta.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

For most of us, what we love about cheese is how it melts and oozes when warmed. The smooth, mouth-coating feeling of melted cheese is something to savour again and again. Where Juliet can offer advice is in suggesting styles of cheese that you may have overlooked or felt too nervous to try. It took me a long time to perfect melting a strong blue cheese on top of a piece of fillet steak but with roasted onions and potato, such a cheese becomes your sauce and tastes amazing.

While in New Zealand, Juliet will also teach a one-day programme on charcuterie where meat, vegetables, cheeses are preserved. How to preserve produce to be eaten some time in the future is an ancient art with some products being cured and others fermented - another intriguing subject to enjoy at the New Zealand School of Food and Wine’s W&F PN event. (CELIA HAY) F See the full programme of W&F Wine and Food Event which runs from 14 September. http://event.foodandwine.co.nz

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY PUNJABI BY NATURE OPENS IN GREY LYNN Infused with vibrant culture and food, Punjabi is the green state of India and has enchanted many visitors. Considered the green belt of India, the streets of Punjab are filled with music and the fragrance of delicious food. Punjab means ‘land of five rivers’, and where five rivers converge there is also the meeting of flavours and traditional cuisines. The team at Punjabi by Nature says that the nature of Punjabi is in all of us - we are all full of life and colour with an appetite for great food. The newly opened Grey Lynn restaurant is pleased to offer the finest culinary delights from this fabulous land to bring out the Punjabi nature in all of us! Carefully selected, the dishes on the menu will surely take diners on a journey - the cuisine of Punjab is known for its diverse range of dishes, with tandoori being a specialty. The onion bhaji are an absolute must as a starter or an accompaniment to a curry and the chicken saagwala is a harmony of specially selected herbs and spices. Nishant Sood of Punjabi by Nature says, “I will be able to achieve what we call ‘our great Punjab’ by fulfilling and satisfying your hunger with savouries from this wonder land.” Indulge in a delicious dining experience and first time customers will receive 15% off their first order. With takeaway and delivery, there’s every reason to enjoy the sumptuousness PN the land of Punjabi has to offer right here in Auckland. F PUNJABI BY NATURE, 280 Richmond Road, T: 09 360 0440 www.punjabibynature.co.nz

JSH - REIGNING SUPREME WITH HEARTY FOOD AND BIG FLAVOURS The Jervois Steak House provides testament to the quality and excellence that Simon Gault demands of a kitchen’s ingredients, complemented by the highest expertise both in the kitchen and front-of-house. Chef Simon Gault and restaurateur Richard Sigley schemed up a plan to launch New Zealand’s first authentic steak house. JSH, or simply Jervois as it is affectionately known by its swathe of ardent fans, was launched in 2007. The duo travelled extensively throughout the United States to research, sample and understand what makes a great steakhouse truly great. Years later, Jervois Steakhouse still reigns supreme as New Zealand’s premier restaurant designed to showcase meat in all its glory. The menu reads like a who’s who of meats in all forms, with cuts derived from the very best beef and lamb producers around New Zealand and the world. Beef is carefully selected from the highest pedigree and is meticulously defined by its breed and feed. Similar to the great steakhouses of the United States, you’ll also find options other than red meat: World-famous red king crab, oysters, calamari, prawn and Simon Gault’s legendary onion rings. The restaurant’s exposed ‘distressed’ timber and brick will cocoon you in the earthy warmth, that reflects Jervois Steak House’s hearty food and rewarding big flavours. On a winters day you can relax next to the open fire or step out onto the Jervois Road street frontage on a summer’s day to sip a cool drink. The highly knowledgeable staff and quality wine list for matching with the extensive menu will make your dining experience PN one to remember. F JERVOIS STEAK HOUSE, 70 Jervois Road T: 09 376 2049 www.jervoissteakhouse.co.nz

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY BERRY BRÛLÉE Impress at dinner with this brûlée - it’s light and easy, and made with readily available ingredients. Serves 6 Time to make 50 minutes ½ cup trim milk 1 ½ tablespoons custard powder 375ml can 'light and creamy' evaporated milk 1/3 cup white sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla essence 4 egg yolks ¾ cup berries (frozen or fresh) 6 teaspoons white sugar, for caramel 1. Preheat oven to 160ºC. Place six ramekin dishes (125ml capacity) in a large roasting pan. 2. In a medium sized heavy-based saucepan, combine trim milk, custard powder, evaporated milk, sugar and vanilla. Whisk until smooth. Bring to the boil over a medium heat, stirring often, until mixture thickens slightly. Remove from heat. 3. Place egg yolks in a small bowl. Whisk lightly to combine. Add a small amount of hot custard to yolks while stirring. Pour this mixture into saucepan, all the while continually whisking. 4. Divide berries among ramekins. Pour hot custard over top. Pour hot water into roasting dish to make a water bath for custards. Bake for about 25-30 minutes or until custard is set. Remove ramekins from water bath and refrigerate several hours or until completely cold. When ready to serve, sprinkle 1 teaspoon sugar on top of each ramekin. Place under a hot grill and cook until the sugar is caramelised. Recipe: Bronwen King Photography: André Martin

RE-INVENTING CONTEMPORARY VIETNAMESE CUISINE ‘Vietflames’ is the newest Auckland restaurant with a global-come -local difference and is situated in the heart of the rejuvenated Victoria Park Market. Their menu is based upon locally sourced and seasonally available products with a tempting array of starters and mains. Dishes include Goi Cuon, fresh summer rolls filled with herbs, braised pork and poached prawns with a peanut sauce, or a lunchtime Banh Mi baguette filled with Vietnamese pate, roast pork, fragrant herbs and chili sauce. The Goi Tom tiger prawn cutlet salad with lotus roots, capsicum, cucumber, carrot, glass onion and Asian herbs is another delight. Care has been taken to put together a wine list that is both diverse and complementary to the exciting flavours of the dishes. The kitchen team have been trained in Vietnam, and hand picked by Hanoi born and raised head chef Johnny, who has been working in the Auckland restaurant scene for the past 10 years. Johnny’s signature dish is ‘Bun Cha Hanoi’ which is a refined and aromatic re-interpretation of the Vietnamese pork classic. The main focus of the restaurant’s design team was to create a contemporary yet comfortable setting in which to showcase the Vietnamese chefs’ stylisation and re-interpretation of home and street-style Vietnamese cuisine within the context of Auckland’s sphere of gastronomic influences. Vietflames is now open for express or leisurely lunches and dinners every day from 11.30am until late. F PN VIETFLAMES, Shop BB 102, 210-218 Victoria Street West, Victoria Park Market, T: 09 379 4033

Recipe reprinted from Healthy Food Guide magazine with permission from Healthy Life Media Ltd. Find delicious (and super-quick) dessert recipes in the August 2014 issue of Healthy Food Guide magazine ($5.90), on sale in supermarkets and bookstores or subscribe at www.healthyfood.co.nz F PN

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GARY STEEL: VEG FRIENDLY

Dear Jervois What a pleasure it is to eat at a café that literally personifies the name of this column, Veg Friendly. Dear Jervois is just that: an eating house that, while offering food to placate the meat eater as well, makes the vegetarian feel right at home. While the instantly iconic Little Bird is the real deal for those who want strictly vegan, raw food offerings, Dear Jervois is the first café in the orbit of Ponsonby News that likes it both ways. Owner David Lee has trialled the concept at Little King in Milford, and now brings the whole kit and caboodle to a site right on the bend at the end of the last set of Jervois Road shops that I had always marked as unworkable and essentially doomed. Over the years, many eateries have tried and died there, so I was surprised and delighted to find that on a miserable, rainy Saturday morning, Dear Jervois was heaving with customers. They’ve done everything right. This full service café means that you’re met at the door, and if the place is full, there’s a comfy waiting area. The staff was amazingly attentive, and the queue was dealt with efficiently and with smiling faces, which always helps. Sitting at a large table with a bunch of other happy munchers, I couldn’t help noticing that, despite the babble, we could still hear each other talk, perhaps because of the rather low ceiling, or the many intentionally rough surfaces on the walls. It looks great, and there’s plenty to look at, with flowers and plants growing around the oddly shaped space that amounts to two rooms. The lovely Yoko (I can call her that because she’s my wife) got the poorer deal of the two of us, but made up for it by eating some of my frankly amazing dish. She ordered the Best Ugly Bagels with halloumi, which was just okay. For $15, the bagel was split in half on a long plate with pesto, tomato, baby kale and avocado. While the bagel itself was not of the chewy, teeth-breaking variety, somehow the overall flavour was a bit bland, and not helped by two thin wedges of halloumi when two fat salty wedges would have really added some zing. While the bagel was slightly overpriced and a taste disappointment, my Be Good Vegan (for only $2 more!) was a taste sensation. Vegetarian risottos are often a lazy fallback option for restaurants, and the Be Good Vegan turned out to be a kind of risotto, but one that made me rethink the often stodgy muck that too many venues churn out. In fact, the Be Good Vegan is a kind of superfood delight that contains quinoa, cashew aioli, beetroot and, among other good things, the coup de grace, kimchi! Usually, the spicy fermented Korean condiment is off limits to vegetarians, because in restaurants and Asian foodmarkets it almost always contains fish. Yoko has been making delicious vegetarian kimchi at home, and there’s certainly no taste deficiency without fishy matter. We eat it in all sorts of ways - by itself, as a side dish, in soups, whatever. And it’s incredibly good for you, and your tummy. In Be Good Vegan, it’s layered into the dish so that it reveals its taste sensation in the most superb manner. It’s a really ‘wow’ dish that tastes just as good as it looks - and it looks good enough to eat! Dear Jervois also offers a range of milk options for coffees, and a selection of superfood smoothies. I had to try a coffee and a smoothie, both of which were just right. They use Supreme Coffee, and honestly, my soy latté was just as good as the hundreds I’ve lapped up at Good One down the road in Douglas Street And it was only $4.50, although I question the practice of adding 50 cents for soy milk when it’s now cheaper than dairy milk! The Cacao Maca Smoothie ($9) was super yum (that’s what I say when words fail me) - while the banana flavour was perhaps just a tad too strong in balance, the coconut cream and the crunchy nuttiness made for a guilt-free indulgence. Dear Jervois attends to dairy free and gluten free patrons as well, and it’s a pleasure to PN have it in the ‘hood. (GARY STEEL) F Gary Steel is an Auckland-based journalist who runs online vegetarian resource www.doctorfeelgood.co.nz. He can be contacted via beautmusic@gmail.com

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PHIL PARKER: WHOSE WINE IS IT ANYWAY?

Marlborough snapshot In 1976, our first commercial Sauvignon Blanc vineyards were planted by Montana (now known as Brancott) - and the rest is history. Marlborough is New Zealand’s star wine region, with over 75% of the country’s grape harvest and around 23,200 hectares in vines. High sunshine hours and cool night temperatures, combined with old stony alluvial soils produce not only our internationally successful zingy Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc, but also very good Chardonnay, Riesling, Pinot Gris, Pinot Noir and traditional method sparkling wines.

POVERTY IS A REAL PROBLEM IN OUR COUNTRY

Today if you fly in to Marlborough to land at Blenheim airport you will see a patchwork of vineyards extending right up to the runway and further across the broad alluvial Wairau Plains. During the school holidays, we flew down to Blenheim to catch up with family, but of course - somehow (gosh - how did that happen?) managed to visit a few wineries.

It means going without education, employment and basic healthcare. It means living in cold and overcrowded housing that keeps you permanently ill. It means there are times when you go without food and so do your kids.

Rock Ferry Wines, 80 Hammerichs Road, Rapaura Open 7 days a week 10am - 4.30pm A small family winery, Rock Ferry is operated by Tom Hutchison and his wife and co -owner Fiona Harvey. Tom is a former Wellingtonian who followed his love of wine to explore Europe’s wine regions and ended up studying viticulture in the United States. On his return he started his own vineyards in Marlborough, and in 2005 they launched the Rock Ferry label. All vineyards are certified organic, and have a diverse range of grape varieties including Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Riesling, Pinot Blanc, Grüner Veltliner, Viognier, Pinot Noir, Tempranillo and Nebbiolo.

But perhaps the worst thing about living in poverty is living with the knowledge that people think you do so because you are lazy. To uncover the real reasons why people remain locked in a never-ending cycle of crippling poverty, the Auckland City Mission followed 100 disadvantaged families for a year.

Notable wines - Pinot Blanc $29, Chardonnay $35, Pinot Noir $45 Food - Small, friendly and cosy, the café has a relaxed feel, with a good range of organic and largely gluten-free local produce on the menu. Reasonably priced and generous servings at about $25.

The result is a report titled: Speaking for Ourselves; the truth about what keeps people in poverty by those people who live it. The mission invites you to join them for breakfast and listen to Auckland City Missioner Diane Robertson and hear for yourself the real reasons why poverty becomes the life sentence for so many people.

Cloudy Bay Vineyards, Jacksons Road, Blenheim Open 7 Days 10am - 4.00pm Probably our most famous Sauvignon Blanc label in the key markets of US, UK, Australia and Japan, and largely responsible for the worldwide awareness of Marlborough as a New Zealand wine region - now part of the international wine portfolio of Luis Vuitton Moët Hennessy. In addition to Sauvignon Blanc, they also produce a super-premium $49 sparkler - Pelorus. Friendly staff and wide list of wines to sample. The building is suitably handsome in unpainted concrete, with a welcoming Cellar Door which has wide polished wooden counters.

For some New Zealand families, living in poverty means battling to survive against an inescapable cycle of hardship and sacrifice.

DATE:

Tuesday 19 August

TIME:

7am start with continental breakfast. Speaker starts at 7.45am Diane Robertson.

PLACE:

Richmond Yacht Club (free parking at the door in white marked car parks)

RSVP:

Essential - seats are limited cdaji@vodafone.co.nz

INVESTMENT: $20 per person included continental breakfast and coffee, tea or juice. In the morning, you will hear a summary of the report, which outlines the eight key drivers that lock people into a state of constant financial hardship. You will also learn from the interviewed families what needs to change to help them break the cycle of poverty. Knowing what needs to change is the first step towards making a meaningful difference in the lives of so many Kiwis, because the sad truth is poverty is a very real PN problem in our country. F

Notable wines - As above, Pelorus Traditional Method both vintage and non-vintage. Also Chardonnay $40, Gewürztraminer $30, standard label Sauvignon Blanc $30, and Te Koko (oak aged) Sauvignon Blanc $58, Pinot Noir $45. Food - Jacks’ Raw Bar Open summer December 1st to end of April. Freshly shucked oysters, sashimi and other raw delights such as venison Carpaccio, salmon sashimi and gazpacho. Giesen Wines, 26 Rapaura Rd, Renwick Ph: 03 572 8500 Web: www. giesen.co.nz Email: cellardoor@giesen.co.nz Open 7 Days 10am - 4.30pm The three Giesen brothers from Germany - Alex, Theo and Marcel came all the way to New Zealand and initially planted grapes in Canterbury in 1981, establishing a company that would become a major exporter and significant player in New Zealand’s wine scene. Yet... it all could have gone differently. But for Australia’s heat and snakes, the Giesen brothers could well have settled there (after suffering in 40 degree temperatures and an incident involving a snake in a swimming pool, they decided that New Zealand was the better option). Notable wines - Marlborough Riesling $19, ‘August’ Barrel Fermented Sauvignon Blanc $40, Pinot Noir $22 Food - selection of platters available at the Cellar Door, with a cosy eating area adjacent. (PHIL PARKER) F PN Read Phil’s blog at nzwineblogger.blogspot.co.nz Phil Parker is a wine writer and operates Fine Wine & Food Tours in Auckland. www.insidertouring.co.nz

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OUT + ABOUT

Above: Michael Kennedy, Sin Mae Chung, Rachael Garvey, Shonya Singh and Christine Mansford

Above L to R: Misery, Kezia Barnett and Aimee Ralfini; Kezia Barnett, Rachael Jackman and Larnie Nicolson

Above L to R: Nicki Sunderland, Aimee Ralfini and Edward Gains; Karlya Smith and Anthonie Tonnon; Liam Gerrard and Helen Clegg

THE ARTISTS DINNER @ GOLDEN DAWN - 26 JUNE

Fiona Pardington, Flox, Liam Gerrad, Stephen Langdon and Michael Kennedy exhibited limited edition signed prints alongside other previously unseen treasures. Curated by Aimee Ralfini, the event saw Golden Dawn transformed into turn of the century Montmartre as artists and the beautiful conversed under twinkling fairy lights with glasses of mulled wine to the sounds of live piano accordion.

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ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE The monthly jottings of a free-spirited Ponsonby dressmaker of the 1920s, as imagined by Angela Lassig. VERMONT STREET, PONSONBY 15 AUGUST 1925

Dear Clarissa, it up with a bright silk lining and a Chinese knot closure that I could create in a matching silk cord... doesn’t it sound divine? Hmmm... perhaps I’ll make one up for myself !

It was so lovely to hear from you, especially so soon after your return from the ‘grand tour’. Thank you for all the postcards, especially the series of flapper cards. Aren’t they just a hoot! I’m going to frame the four of them together and put them in the workroom.

Did you manage to buy any fabric while you were in London? I’m especially hoping that you were able to secure some dress lengths of those lovely light embroidered cotton voiles that you must have seen there. If not, both Shanlys[iv] and Oswald’s[v] have just received their summer shipments, which they say will include a good variety of the voiles. I’m sure that they’ll be out on view by the time you come up. You must have at least one frock in this!

I’m having a bit of trouble writing as Pusskins is in a passionate mood and keeps knocking my pen as she tries to smooch my hand away to pat her instead. So please forgive the erratic penmanship and the odd drop of ink. How is your little Missy? Did she treat you as a complete stranger as my little minx does if ever I leave her for even a few days? They soon come around though don’t they... it only takes a fillet of fresh fish from Antunovich’s[i] for all to be forgiven in my household! Tiger is fast asleep (at last) after a very long walk right down the lengths of Ponsonby and Jervois Roads for shopping and visiting, and then another long walk in Western Park with George and I. It’s been such a lovely, warm sunny day with azure skies and the hint of spring in the fattened buds of many of the trees. Daffodils are to be seen everywhere and my freesias are almost ready to bloom. The ‘surprise mix’ of bulbs that George’s mother gave me after my garden was ruined (when my little studio workroom was built) have made such a wonderful difference to what would have otherwise been a forlorn-looking front garden this year. George (who is also my honorary gardener) has promised to spend a few weekends helping transform the garden into at least the semblance of what it was before. He is very good friends with Rupert Girvan[ii], owner of a local florist shop and who also sells the most extraordinary selection of seeds. He often gives George seeds of some exotic this or that for his mother’s garden which is why, as I had wondered, it is such a delightful raggle taggle and a veritable pot pourri of scents in the summer. I’m hoping for the same by mid-Summer. You must tell me dear about the suit you ordered in London. I must say that I am rather jealous if it looks anything like those I’ve seen in my latest batch of fashion journals. Please do bring it with you when you come up next month. I am keen to examine it all over. I promise not to unpick it!

You’ll have to inspect the spring styles that I’ve designed and am making up now to show my regular customers. I’m very pleased with them all, especially the evening frocks. I could easily adapt one for you, as I know you’ll want something quite original. Most of the hard work has been done, the patterns are drafted and the samples sewn up in some lovely oddments. Anyway, enough of fashion, I’ll save all that for when you’re here! I’m thinking of having a little party while you’re up. Are you amenable to the idea? I’ve a couple of newish friends (who make lovely things) that I’m sure you’ll like, as well as the regular crowd who are always pleased for an excuse for get together. It’s been about six months since we’ve all seen each other I think... far too long! I’m sure if you bring along all your holiday photographs, all will be forgiven. Well dearest, I must take leave of my cosy little sitting room, even though it’s Sunday, and do a little more work on a frock that will be having a fitting tomorrow morning. Don’t forget to let me know what time I should expect you at the station. With much anticipation,

On one of your postcards you sketched a rather exquisite evening coat that you said you’d like made up in fuchsia crepe. I am having rather a difficult time finding the desired hue however I have found a rather lovely, clear pinkish -red crepe remnant at Leach’s drapery[iii]. There should be enough for the coat, but only if you like the colour. I’ve purchased it anyway as I’ll use it for something if you don’t want it. You know dear, I really think you should consider having the coat made up in black. There are so many delicious patterns and textures of black in the shops at present. We could easily jazz

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Love Maudie xx [i] Tony Antunovich is listed as having a ‘fish shop’ at 278 Ponsonby Road in the 1925 Wise’s Auckland Post Office Directory [ii] ‘Rupert’ is a fictional name; in the 1925 Wise’s Auckland Post Office Directory, R. W. Girvan is listed as ‘Florist and Seedsman’, Ponsonby Buildings [iii] Miss Julia Mary Leach is listed as ‘draper’ at 290 Ponsonby Road in the 1925 Wise’s Auckland Post Office Directory [iv] Shanly’s Ltd, Drapers, Ponsonby Buildings, Ponsonby Road [v] Oswald & Co, Drapers, 11-13 Jervois Road, Ponsonby

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)

illustration: Michael McClintock

Now about your visit. It would help me immensely dear if you could have a flick through all the latest journals and have at least a little idea of what you might like to order. I’d better do a new set of measurements too... just in case all those Austrian pastries, Parisian dainties and English cream teas have taken their toll! You know I jest... it is quite unfair that you are able to eat whatever you like and still retain such a lovely figure.


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FASHION + STYLE RETAIL SUPERSTAR Klara Eichholz - twenty-seven names How did you come to be a retail salesperson? I’ve always been passionate about the creative aspects of the industry. My mum had her own label and boutique until I was born, she was always sewing. Dad had his own business for 20 years and I really admired his work ethic. Combining these two passions, I studied business majoring in retailing at AUT. What brought you to twenty-seven names? After university I moved to Brisbane where I worked for two and a half years. With every trip home my love for Auckland grew and I decided on the last visit that I had to come back. The ethos behind twenty-seven names has always appealed to me greatly. The fact that everything is designed and made here in New Zealand is so rare and beautiful, so I jumped at the opportunity when I saw it. What do you love about your store? Everything about this space is fantastic. I arrive at work with a smile. It’s clean and bright and full of the most beautiful things. I really admire that Anjali and Rachel did this whole space up themselves. What makes a standout retail salesperson? Kindness is paramount. Everyone must feel welcome and be accommodated. It’s nice to have a chat with everyone that walks in the door whether they are here to buy something or not. It’s nice to build a relationship with everyone who visits. Time is precious and so are people. Tell us about a memorable sale you’ve made this year... A lovely girl who bought our Oxford cable knit sweater referred to it as one of the “fruits and vegetables of the wardrobe.” This was code for absolutely essential. I had a good chuckle. If you could wave your wand and have anyone in the world walk into your store right now, who would it be? Anna Pavlova. She was such an incredible woman. She was the first woman to tour ballet around the world and also the inspiration behind our nation’s favourite dessert. Diagnosed with pneumonia and told that she would require surgery that would stop her from ever dancing again, Anna exclaimed “if I can’t dance, I’d rather be dead.” If you could wave your wand and have anyone in greater Ponsonby walk into your store right now, who would it be? My friend, flatmate and most favourite person to break into song and dance with, Amanda from Fatimas. Where do you enjoy shopping? In my evenings and on my days off I am always out at comedy, jazz or the cinema so there’s little time for shopping. Tatty’s is beautiful though. I like the mystery that goes part and parcel with shopping at pre-loved stores. Naturally I like everything here at twenty-seven names too. The attention to detail and custom prints win me over every time.

NOM*D RETURNS TO NEW ZEALAND FASHION WEEK NOM*D has been announced as the second big name making a return to New Zealand Fashion Week in late August this year, following the news of Kate Sylvester’s show released last month. Designed by Margarita Robertson and Dunedin-based, NOM*D’s high energy shows have been Fashion Week favourites over the years. The label last showed in 2011. Juliette Hogan also returns to the schedule, alongside newcomers Lucy McIntosh, Pardon My French and SHEN. The ‘Ponsonby Presents’ shows which debuted last year, will this year see a group show of Andrea Moore, Storm and taylor, and a solo Yvonne Bennetti show, taking place over Fashion Weekend. F PN Public tickets are available at www.iticket.co.nz/go-to/new-zealand-fashion-week-2014 NEW ZEALAND FASHION WEEK, www.nzfashionweek.com

Name someone you think is a great greater Ponsonby retail salesperson... The whole crew at Fred’s on Franklin Road are delightful and make both my mocha and my day. F PN

ANY PAGE IN PONSONBY NEWS IS A GOOD PLACE TO BE SEEN

Margi Robertson

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FASHION + STYLE JUNA MENSWEAR: 27 YEARS IN THE MAKING Juna Menswear is a new label that connects urban Grey Lynn with rural New Zealand. ‘Shut the Gate’ Winter 2014 is Juna’s first capsule collection of limited edition men’s jackets, t-shirts, beanies and hats. This menswear collection has been long in the making; after 27 years designing women’s clothing but making the odd men’s jacket, Juna has finally released a highly anticipated collection of 10 jackets named after streets in Grey Lynn. The Winter Campaign, shot by Nikau Hindin, is a collection of photographs of different local men: the neighbour, the

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

brother, the son, the local brewer, wearing different jackets. The campaign was shot in Grey Lynn to reflect the craftsmanship of each garment, as everything is designed and made locally. For this reason each jacket is limited edition: only 3-10 will be made of each. F PN JUNA MENSWEAR, junamenswear.tumblr.com

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FASHION + STYLE THE GEMSTONE FOR AUGUST Donna Mills, owner of Jewels and Gems introduces us to the qualities of the gemstone, tourmaline. The information comes from the scientifically conducted trials of German stone specialist Michael Gienger. Tourmaline is layered with as many colours as the rainbow and has equally as many healing attributes. Black tourmaline is known for providing protection from intrusive external influences, electro smog or mental/emotional energy. Tourmalines are energy conducting ring silicates and when worn on the body help the flow of energy through the meridians, clearing blockages, releasing trapped energy and revitalising areas with low energy. This harmonises the conductivity of nerve impulses, relieves tension and strengthens the body’s ability to heal itself. Intrusive energy can be diverted more efficiently when the energy channels are clear, helping to prevent energy loss or ailments from arising, as well as relieving pain. All colours of tourmaline will do this, not only the black schorl. However schorl crystals can neutralise the influence of radiation. They also have a pain alleviating effect and arranged in lines radiating out from a painful area can give rapid relief, or pointed towards the pain will increase energy for healing. Schorl also stimulates clear, logical and rational thought processes. Each colour in the tourmaline spectrum has its own name and their mental/emotional healing attributes include; enhancing the imagination, broadening the mind, helping clear self-expression, promoting tolerance, responsibility and problem solving. They release sadness, bestow joie de vivre and encourage love, understanding and friendship, making us charming, relaxed, open and social. A relationship, family and community stone par excellence. The specific physical healing properties of the seven colours are too numerous PN to detail here. Tourmaline can be worn on the body or placed on it when required. F

photography: Sheena Haywood

JEWELS AND GEMS, 54 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 378 4389 www.jewelsandgems.co.nz

photography: Sheena Haywood

Above: Deryn Schmidt and Sarah Taylor; Karen Eady, Fiona McLeod, Janet Jackson and Tania Sharp

Above: Michelle Rush and James McCarty; Flaunt interior

FLAUNT STORE VIP MEDIA OPENING - 5 JUNE

Guests were treated to Piper-Heidsieck champagne and gorgeous canapĂŠs along with live entertainment.

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FASHION + STYLE

FLAUNT STORE - YOUR SKINCARE AND STYLE SANCTUARY Sometimes all you need is a new lipstick, an aromatherapy candle or herbal tea to lift your mood. Other times nutritional supplements such as Lifestream’s vitamin D spray or Radiance vitamin B complex can give you a healthy ‘pick me up’. However, if you’re in need of serious retail therapy, maybe it’s time for a new dress! Ponsonby’s newest holistic venture, Flaunt Store showcases products for clients of Flaunt PR. Owner Fiona McLeod has combined her interior design and fashion skills, her training in medical herbalism, nutrition, aromatherapy and massage therapy to create this elegant health, fashion and wellness escape. Flaunt Store is a peaceful, ‘vintage glam’ haven, where you will be welcomed with herbal tea served in a fine antique cup. The friendly staff will introduce you to invigorating organic skincare remedies - Grown Alchemist and La Mav, and organic health and wellness products including energy sprays by Aura-Soma and aromatherapy oils by Absolute Essential. Explore glamorous New Zealand bespoke fashion designs by Deryn Schmidt, Sheryl May and Two Worlds or delve into beauty products made from botanical plants along with aromatherapy oils and organic make-up - all under one cosy roof located in the iconic Letham Gallery. “It’s about finding health and happiness in a holistic sense,” says Fiona. Flaunt Store is offering all customers a complementary hand treatment until the end of August. This treatment, including an exfoliation, an organic masque and massage, is sure to purge any winter blues. F PN FLAUNT STORE, 37 Jervois Road T: 09 376 8181 www.facebook.com/FLAUNTSTORE

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FASHION + STYLE: JULIE ROULSTON

Menswear roundup With Father’s Day (Sunday 7 September) approaching Ponsonby News caught up with some of our standout menswear retailers to hear what’s happening instore and what to expect come spring. WORKSHOP www.workshop.co.nz Along with its own brands Workshop and Workshop Denim, Workshop stores are known for an exclusive edit of international menswear designer brands including Alexander Wang, Common Projects and Marc by Marc Jacobs. What’s hot right now? Founder Chris Cherry says, “Our new seam sealed technical anoraks and bombers have been great sellers this season - a perfect blend of form and function with sealed seams, waterproof zips and our usual attention to the functional details of the garment. The new slim fit selvedge in grey has also been very popular.” What are you looking forward to seeing your customers wearing when the new season arrives? “We are very excited about our new hand-dyed programme which features natural plant indigo and silver grey bamboo carbon. The Natural Hand Dyed Collection includes cotton tees and jackets, viscose rayon short sleeve shirts and premium selvedge jeans.” What makes the Workshop store special? “We have always focused on large and unique retail environments and the Mackelvie Street store, at over 300 square metres, is no exception. It features soaring ceilings, beautiful natural light, found objects from its previous industrial life and in situ artworks by Max Gimblett, John Reynolds and Martin Poppelwell.” WORKING STYLE www.workingstyle.co.nz Working Style is a premium menswear store in Ponsonby. Store manager Roderick Singh says, “Our look is a modern take on classic tailored clothing using luxurious cloths with subtle detailing and a superior fit.”

What makes your store special? We are solely a men’s premium streetwear store. We spend endless hours searching worldwide to bring exclusive and niche brands to create a point of difference in style and rarity in the items we stock. Our new Ponsonby store location will have a large focus on sneaker trends and culture. NICHOLAS JERMYN www.nicholasjermyn.co.nz Nicholas Jermyn is an authority on shirting for the workplace, whether your dress code is a formal suit and tie or a smart-casual shirt and jeans or anything in between. Our design team curates a range of men’s shirts across four different fits so that if you are looking for ‘The Shirt’ you are sure to find it - and another three just as good. What’s hot right now? We have just delivered new Super Slim Shirts and we are loving the dark, tonal checks that are great with our men’s knitwear range but also look sharp under any colour suit. What are you looking forward to seeing your customers wearing when the new season arrives? This year we launch our first line of limited edition shirts, made in collaboration with a luxury Italian cotton mill - these shirts are sure to be the envy of anyone who appreciates high quality shirting. What makes your store special? What makes shopping with Nicholas Jermyn special is the attention you get from our knowledgeable staff. It’s a big decision choosing the shirt that will help you impress in that job interview, at that important meeting or on that first date. We make it easy to find the perfect shirt in an exceptional fit - then we’ll remember for next time.

Roderick, what makes your store special? “A relaxed atmosphere where you can have a few beers or a couple of wines or coffee and a chat on all things sartorial. ‘Made to measure one-off garments just for you’ would be another element that sets us apart.” What are you looking forward to seeing your customers wearing when the new season arrives? Eddie von Dadelszen - Working Style creative director responds, “For the new season we need to talk about all the soft construction jackets that are arriving as they are perfect for the Ponsonby man. We are presenting quite simply the most exquisite range of lightweight cotton jackets that we have ever developed. Pairing incredible quality Italian cotton blends with expert lightweight construction and a tailored fit, these jackets will be among the most sought-after items in our new season range. We are also excited to be releasing another exceptional range of shoes featuring several new burnishing techniques and leather colours.” NEEDLES & THREADS www.needlesandthreads.co.nz Needles & Threads defines itself as a premium men’s streetwear store. It stocks New Zealand and international labels including Huffer, Sly Guild, Federation, Thing Thing, Reebok, Wrangler, New Balance, Billionaire Boys Club and more. The new Needles & Threads location will be opening soon at Lot 3 (the old Mini Garage site) on Ponsonby Road. What’s hot right now? Reebok classic and reserve ranges - exclusive styles stocked in store featuring leather, suede and canvas styles. “Reebok’s current range of sneakers have a vast classic style which has been redesigned with new technology to give a modern day twist to true classic models,” says Needles & Threads’ Hadley Pegden. What are you looking forward to seeing your customers wearing when the new season arrives? Our new exclusive to New Zealand premium streetwear brands such as Mister (United States), Staple (United States), Sample Designs (United States) and Underated Co (London). We have lots of rare jewellery pieces, tall t-shirts, minimalistic black and white tonal pieces, along with leather and plaid ranges dropping instore soon.

MARR FACTORY BACK FOR 2014 Stephen Marr will once again host six nights of in-season fashion shows at The Golden Dawn in Ponsonby (between 17 and 23 August), with a series of shows open to the public. Karen Walker, NOM*D, Zambesi, Workshop, Helen Cherry and Kate Sylvester are all confirmed to present their spring/summer 2014 collections. Stephen Marr and Lucy Vincent-Marr’s team of stylists will work their magic on the shows, presenting contemporary hair trends for the season. A new event will wrap up the week in true Marr Factory style, providing a platform for five of the country’s most exciting new fashion labels to present their collections. Eugenie, Harman Grubisa, Penny Sage, Glen Prentice and Georgia Alice make up the ‘MF Gatecrashers’ and will show on Saturday 23rd August at The Golden Dawn in an PN R18 event that will be completely open to the public. F Limited tickets are on sale now for just $45 at www.iTicket.co.nz

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FASHION + STYLE: JULIE ROULSTON

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1. Roderick Singh, manager at Working Style Ponsonby; 2. Edie von Dadelszen, creative director at Working Style Ponsonby; 3. Needles & Threads; 4. Nicholas Jermyn; 5. Workshop: Unlined Hand Dyed Jacket $398, Hand Dyed Pocket T $198, Hand Dyed Selvedge Straight Leg $349; 6. Workshop: Hand Dyed Viscose Rayon S/S Shirt $398, Selvedge Straight Leg $298)

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FASHION + STYLE NZ FASHION MUSEUM ON THE HUNT M.A.C TO OPEN ON PONSONBY ROAD FOR NEW ‘60S EXHIBITION M.A.C cosmetics will open its 11th store in New Zealand this October at 130 -134 Ponsonby Road.

In late September the New Zealand Fashion Museum will present a new pop-up exhibition that looks at 1960s youth fashion and its present day exponents. Elle and the Youthquake: The changing face of fashion will be an exhibition of original photographs and iconic 1960s fashion, telling the story of Wendy Ganley and her boutique Elle. The exhibition will also look at the current face of young New Zealand fashion design and offer some of today's up and coming designers a platform to showcase their ideas and sell their creations.

The new 50 square metre store will boast the latest New York designed M.A.C fit-out and, the company promises, will reflect M.A.C’s artfully irreverent attitude. As with M.A.C stores globally, the new store will be home to M.A.C artists and the brand’s lineup of trendsetting colour collections, artistry tools and brushes, and skincare as well as its universal range of foundations, powders, blushes and concealers ‘providing the right choices for people of all ages, all races’. F PN

The New Zealand Fashion Museum seeks: • garments with the ELLE label (or Adèle, Wendy's first label) • late 1950s and early 1960s garments by Babs Radon (Barbara Herrick) who trained Wendy Ganley • early Marilyn Sainty garments, as she began her fashion career in Wendy Ganley's Hamilton workroom in 1963. • any photos or memories of Wendy Ganley and her ELLE boutiques NZFM is also asking for expressions of interest from young designers who would like to be considered for inclusion in the exhibition and pop-up shop, to open from 27 September to 19 October 2014. Please contact NZFM for more information about supporting the Elle and the Youthquake PN exhibition. F NEW ZEALAND FASHION MUSEUM, T: 09 376 0929 www.nzfashionmuseum.org.nz

photography: c/- Waikato Pix

M.A.C for Alberta Ferretti, AW 2015

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FASHION + STYLE WORDS THAT HAVE A RING TO THEM LOCAL PONSONBY JEWELLER JAMES MCCARTY HAS CREATED A NEW COLLECTION OF contemporary rings that combine expressions of personal identity, attitude and passion. The JAMES collection is comprised of thought provoking ‘word’ rings and ‘shape’ rings. The word rings individually represent expressions of identity, attitude and passion. The shape rings have been designed with meticulous attention to form and balance, creating pieces that are simple and powerful. As James explains the rings have been crafted to make a statement. “I wanted each ring to speak for itself and mirror a wearer’s personality, as an expression of one’s innerself worn outwardly.” The word designs include GOD, MR, NO and NZ while the shape rings reflect balanced geometric shapes that are the inverse of each other. The GOD ring: Based on a powerful three-letter word, a ring to believe in. The MR ring: A guy’s ring that makes a statement. Who do you think you are - Mr Right, Mr Trouble or Mr Me? The NO ring: A ring with attitude written all over it; NO to you but ON to me. Then by putting the ring on differently you may alter that, ‘it is what it is attitude’. Attitude also has colour in six beautiful gemstone rings. The NZ ring: A ring about identity and representation, no matter where you come from it’s a ring to be proud of. The SHAPE rings. Elegantly pronounce nature through balanced geometric shapes, combined are the inverse of each other at the highest point. This sterling silver range is available in all sizes, nationwide exclusively through New Zealand’s longest established PN silver retailer, Walker & Hall. F www.jamesmccarty.co.nz www.walkerandhall.co.nz

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FASHION + STYLE START YOUR FASHION CAREER The New Zealand Academy of Fashion’s mission is ‘where fashion careers begin.’ They supply the important technical skills needed for a career in fashion, specialising in pattern drafting and garment construction. The Academy was asked by Madrina Fashion Show in the United States to put forward an emerging designer to compete against designers from other countries. The aim was to design a range of clothing for people with CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. Sufferers of this condition find it hard to wear clothes, as even the slightest touch can trigger an episode. Each of the competitors range was showcased and judged at New York City Fashion Week. New Zealand Academy of Fashion put forward Yeonjae Choi as an entrant and she won the prize from a number of international contestants. The prize was $US1000 and the opportunity to design for the Madrina range. Yeonjae is still studying at Westlake Girls College, she graduated from New Zealand Academy of Fashion with a Fashion Diploma in Apparel Product Development from PAA\VQ-SET in the United Kingdom. You can find Yeonjae’s trailer for the Madrina Fashion Show on the academy’s blog. So if you are looking to make a career change or simply want to learn a new skill set, the academy’s part-time Diploma in Apparel Product Development gives you a head start for whatever career path you take, whether it’s starting up your own business, going on to further study or designing for your own satisfaction. Another specialty is patternmaking and the academy has further classes and workshops to choose from, whatever your PN level of interest. F NZ ACADEMY OF FASHION, T: 09 475 5868 www.fashiondesign.co.nz

PONSONBY NEWS NEXT ISSUE DEADLINE 20 AUGUST 2014

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FASHION + STYLE FABRIC-A-BRAC - BRINGING FABRIC FROM THE PEOPLE TO THE PEOPLE Fabric-A-Brac is all about connecting community treasure troves of fabric, buttons and other sewing notions to craft and sewing enthusiasts. The event has a warm and friendly vibe where attendees will get a chance to purchase an array of unique and quality fabric and haberdashery. Proceeds from this event will also go towards Mercy Hospice. From humble beginnings in Wellington back in 2009, Fabric-A-Brac has grown across New Zealand and Australia to become a favourite fabric fest now also held in Auckland, New Plymouth, Palmerston North, Sydney and Brisbane. This Fabric-A-Brac event of the year promises to delight with plenty of modern and vintage fabric and haberdashery on offer. The new Crafting Corner will showcase craft demonstrations like crocheting where attendees will get a chance to have a go. To top things off, the Mercy Hospice fundraiser cafĂŠ will once again be offering cuppas and delectable treats. Fabric-A-Brac never fails to attract lovers of all things fabric who keep coming back for more! Event details: When: Saturday, 23 August, 9am - 12.30pm Where: Freemans Bay Community Hall, 52 Hepburn Street, Freemans Bay Cost: Free entry Contact: Grace for stall bookings, email fabricabracauck@gmail.com Website: www.fabricabrac.co.nz

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PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE

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1-2; Johanna McIntosh has been on holiday in CANADA for the Calgary Stampede. “I met the lovely Royal Canadian Mounted Police as they were doing a walk-about. I also photographed one of the the Stampede girl riders.” 3-4; Ponsonby local Jacques de Reuck tells us, “I’m sending you two photos, from Kashobwe in the Democratic Republic of CONGO, where I visited my brother who works there. I spent a couple of weeks with him and this gracious lady said she very much enjoyed your publication! “Hope you can publish it!

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Dear readers please keep sending us your holiday snaps reading your favourite magazine, we love getting them! Photos need to be in high resolution (300dpi), so please email them to info@ponsonbynews.co.nz without reducing the size. PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


TRAVEL BREAKS: THE NEW THERAPY!

THE SEASONS OF JAPAN By Brett Barclay, World Journeys Director The notoriously changeable Auckland weather will never rival the vast changes the seasons bring to Japan. The allure of the cherry blossoms of spring and the stunning colours of autumn foliage present a completely different Japan to the traveller. Springtime cherry blossoms carry huge cultural significance for the Japanese. It is a time for festivals, celebration and communal drinking of sake under the trees by a people usually known for their reserve. Masses of pink and white tissue paper-like flowers provide beautiful backdrops to ancient temples and exquisite gardens. A great time to travel, it may be a littler cooler than summer, but the more southern parts of the country are still very pleasant. Head from bustling Tokyo to the countryside where ancient towns such as Takayama and Shirakawago, with their centuries old farm houses, will show you an entirely new side to this fascinating country. Further south is Kyoto, the centre of artistic and cultural history, with breath-taking temples and gardens, castles and palaces. The memorial monuments of Hiroshima offer a poignant contrast to what is now a vibrant modern city, and a journey aboard the bullet train is an absolute must.

-through penguin aquarium. Also near Sapporo is Dunedin’s sister city, Otaru, famous for its canal, lined with Victorian buildings. A highlight of a recent visit was visiting many different gardens - some in the grounds of temples, others surrounding historical palaces. Quite how Japan with its 138 million people can have so many areas of such tranquil serenity made me think deeply about how different cultures embrace the balance of modern day living. I particularly enjoyed that these gardens are used by young and old in harmony - Japan is most definitely a culture with deep respect for nature.

As autumn arrives with its glorious colours Japan is again transformed. The colourful leaves (koyo) are also revered by the Japanese people who each have their own favourite spots in the mountains and the cities to enjoy the spectacle. An almost surreal visage is the sight of the trees during evening illuminations held at selected gardens and temples.

While in Japan, sampling the local cuisine is an absolute highlight, and this also changes with the seasons. Dive in and sample all the regional variations, all washed down with an excellent Japanese beer or sake.

Travel further north to discover a region of Shogun history, colonial influences, idyllic lakes and tranquil villages. A most extraordinary sight is found in the spa town of Yudanaka. Here you want it to be cold, preferably snowing, as this attracts the local macaque monkeys who bathe in the hot springs - quite a sight! More exotic wildlife can be found at the Asahiyama Zoo in Sapporo, with its polar bear aquatic park and walk

World Journeys have created two distinctly different small group escorted journeys, each timed to one of our favourite seasons. Whichever season captures your heart, you will inevitably discover a unique and incredibly scenic country PN with an enchanting culture and gracious people. F

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE

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5-6; Jonathan Smith emailed two photographs of himself with Kevin Baker on their belated honeymoon to EUROPE. “Travelling with us was our ‘bridesmaid’ - Ed Jenner aka Mr Strawberry. “You included a photo in this month’s issue of Ross Thorby on a cruise with a cruise staff member called Pilar. Small small world - she is one of our very best friends from Valencia in Spain. We spent a lot of time with her when we lived there. And when the cruise arrived into Auckland with Ross on board we took her out for lunch. She mentioned that she had met someone on the cruise that knew us - we didn’t know it was Ross!” What a small world!

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10 7-8; Jacques de Reuck I also sent you one of me in Waterloo, BELGIUM a couple of weeks ago. Keep up the good work with your magazine.” 9-10; Shelley King from Koko Classics Ponsonby is in Europe with her best friend Julie. They are photographed on board the Splendida berthed at Toulon FRANCE. As Shelley says, “Living it up with the Ponsonby News and a mai tai.”

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


ROSS THORBY: SEA FEVER

A cruise to Rapa Nui - a paradise lost Settled around 400 AD, the island of Rapa Nui or Easter Island, was originally a paradise of 100 foot trees, plentiful birdlife and abundant resources created by a perfect tropical climate. It didn’t stay that way for long. Unfortunately, the arrival of the Melanesians also brought rats who thrived on the palm roots and native wildlife until the island was almost deforested and the unique bird, plants and wildlife gone forever. A paradise lost. The Rapa Nui people adapted as much as they could but after the rats had raped the island there were not enough trees left to build a canoe, and the seafaring knowledge and navigational skills so familiar with previous generations were lost. They were trapped forever on one of the most remote islands in the world. With the island’s climate change, pestilence, war, famine and water shortages, the population fell from a peak of around 16,000 to about 3,000. Then Peruvian slave traders arrived and took half the islanders in bloody and violent raids. Later, when slavery was abolished and the islanders were repatriated, they brought with them small pox and tuberculosis, further devastating the population down to about 200. Then the Spanish killed about 50 in a “misunderstanding”. Captain Cook arrived bringing venereal disease and finally, in the 20th century, Chilean farmers who were encouraged by General Pinochet moved the population to ‘reservations’ and left sheep to rule the land, further damaging the fragile ecosystem.

An ice sculpture of an Easter Island statue

A people to whom everything that could go wrong did go wrong and yet against this tragic background a rich artistic culture thrived which included a written language and many of the stones on the island were decorated with hieroglyphic and petroglyphic carvings. For 1000 years the islanders also carved the 887 large statues that made them famous. These monoliths, some weighing 80 tonnes, were moved from their quarry to stand with their backs to the sea to watch over the populace. Each took about a year to complete and once in place the sculptures were decorated with a red scoria topping, white coral eyes and black obsidian pupils. As subsequent invaders arrived on the island, more and more of these statues were found to have been toppled over, Captain Cook noted that only a few remained standing. By the time of the missionaries, all were toppled and some destroyed in the process. Who, what or why remains a mystery, for when the missionaries arrived they encouraged the natives to destroy their written history as “the work of the devil”, and so now we will never know. Those blimmin’ evangelists have a lot to answer for. Fortunately in modern times, various philanthropists have raised money to re-erect some of the statues but the written script that explains their history is long gone. It is alongside this sad history of invasion and bad luck that the world now threatens the islanders with a new pestilence. Tourism. On our approach, and during the many lectures and movies about the island and its inhabitants, we are told that there is a strong resistance from the native islanders to the outside world. Understandably, every time the islanders have dealt with the outside world it has spelled disaster for them. In 1970 an international runway was built by NASA, (in case the shuttle ever needed to land) and twice a week a plane load of eager visitors descends on the island putting tremendous pressure on a fledgling tourism infrastructure with very few assets. Understandably you can appreciate their reluctance to accept a ship-load of 1800 passengers and 1000 crew stampeding their island.

11 11; Our good mate Jillian Bashford-Evers is in Europe on a buying trip... she tells me, "Photo attached of me doing my Ponsonby News thing at the Joan Miro Museum in BARCELONA. Staying just out of Sitges with friends celebrating a 60th birthday before heading back to France to finish the buying. Putting together a collection from well known antique dealer Faye Chandler, which she has been amassing for over 30 years, so should be an interesting container." The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Typical of the Chilean bureaucracy that we had already experienced on this cruise, the guys controlling the red tape decided that even though we had already been through immigration on the mainland, we would again be processed on the island, which would cut detrimentally into our short four hour stop. It was Cunard’s decision therefore, that we would only get a ‘sail by’. Several hours of the ship tootling alongside the island’s coastline affording us a fleeting but tantalising ‘so close and yet so far’ look at the visible statues. At sea nothing is guaranteed, ports of call are always subject to local conditions whether it be political or weather, and disappointingly the closest we would come to the iconic sculptures that morning was the ice carvings created in our restaurant. It was still an intriguing look at a fated people and one that would invite closer investigation, although considering their history, one done from a respectful distance. PN (ROSS THORBY) F DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

Loxy’s owner Kate Jarrett WHEN LOXY’S HAIR BOUTIQUE OWNER - AND GENERALLY inspirational, wonderful woman - Kate Jarrett opened her first ‘official’ salon premises on 1 July last year in Grey Lynn, little did she know that she would be doing exactly the same thing precisely one year later - albeit on a very different scale. Recently moved to premises that are bigger and brighter than ever before at 4 Ponsonby Road, she says that if someone told her she’d be not only moving her salon but also expanding her staff, renovating her home and getting married in the space of one year she would have told them they were completely mad. With a background in account management and advertising agency work, up until a few years ago the successful salon owner didn’t even have any training in the area of hair, full stop - just a love of her own hair extensions and a growing desire to take the best of what was on offer and make it available to women all over Auckland. “When I was about 18 I had clip in hair extensions,” she says with a smile, “which were actually totally horrific and I could only get away with them because I was so young! My partner at the time (now her husband) pointed out to me how ridiculous they were on a regular basis, and one day surprised me with a visit from a woman who gave me a proper weave - a set of sewn in extensions that were a hundred times better!” She says that began her love affair with extensions, and six months later she started to train in how to apply them herself, whilst still working in offices and agencies. “I had some great jobs over the next couple of years but wasn’t fulfilled,” says the petite pocket rocket. “So about four years ago I put a rent-a-cabin on my front lawn and started doing extensions for a living.” Within a year she’d outgrown that space and her partner built her a purpose -built studio at the back of their home, which she also outgrew. Next it was a move to her aforementioned salon on Richmond Road, where she also brought on board hair stylist Amy Phengsavath. A veteran with over eight years experience in the business, Amy worked on all three cycles of ‘New Zealand’s Next Top Model’, backstage at New Zealand Fashion Week and in one of the city’s busiest and largest salons. “She was a godsend as she meant we could offer cuts and colours as well as extensions,” says Kate, and the business soon outgrew its Grey Lynn space and a move was inevitable.

AROHA HEALING'S SPRING NATURE RETREAT Would you like to feel more grounded, balanced and sensual, whilst connecting with like-minded women wanting to feel the same? If you missed the June Sacred Feminine retreat, Aroha Healing have a spring nature retreat for you. Practitioners at Aroha Healing are passionate and skilled at healing, educating and empowering women. The team have found that many women have become masters at giving. Giving of their energy, love, everything, leaving very little energy and time for their own self nurturing, healing, time out and receiving of love. Women can often feel guilty about doing just that. Aside from their amazing healing and massage work, Aroha Healing have designed a nature workshop that reawakens and re-ignites the goddess within. Rosanna will be teaching a fusion of two ancient spiritual modalities designed to empower, heal and free the feminine form. Frances Miller-Roza will run a Sunday morning Tantric Yoga class for participants. During the Sacred Feminine workshop you will learn ancient tantric philosophy; chakras, mudra, body awareness, sisterhood, honouring, healing yoga and simple beautiful bellydance movements including rituals that reflect the tantric philosophies. You will be immersed in the beauty of nature, peace and be treated to delicious vegetarian food, sauna and an outdoor spa. This workshop is for every woman of every age, size or shape wishing to awaken and learn the sacred, ancient secrets of feminine vitality, movement and expression. With her background in presenting, bodywork, healing, bellydance and tantra philosophies, Rosanna Marks will be facilitating her Sacred Feminine workshop at Aio Wira retreat centre near Bethells Beach this month, beginning on Friday evening 19 September - Sunday afternoon September 21. F PN For more information about Aroha Healing’s Sacred Feminine Retreat please contact Rosanna directly, email info@arohahealing.co.nz AROHA HEALING, 3 Maidstone Street T: 0800 mindbody www.arohahealing.co.nz

The new premises means even more staff members coming on board, including a salon manager to take the pressure off Kate. As well as an expert in extensions, Kate loves spray tanning “for the same instant gratification factor I think! Both can really transform a person and how they feel about themselves, and I love that.” Loxy’s are New Zealand’s exclusive supplier of the amazing range of Vita Liberata organic spray tanning products, which Kate believes are the best in the business. For hair they also stock the fabulous range of Davines and O+M haircare, which are both pure and natural, in line with the Loxy’s philosophy. When I ask her about the reputation for error that many styles of hair extensions have acquired over the past few years she says, “they have got a really bad rap recently, and with good reason. Most applications have a gluing or braiding aspect, and if you see photos of celebrities with bald spots then it’s usually due to the former. My own hair couldn’t handle the braiding technique after a while as it’s so fine, and the method just added too much tension for it to handle.” The method that Loxy’s offers and Kate trained in (amongst others) involves no gluing and no braiding, but rather wide wefts or rows, of hair being attached using a silicone banded micro ring that holds it in place. “This means that the hair can be put in without gluing or braiding your hair - which can be very painful,” says Kate “and it significantly decreases the chances of damage to your own hair. We work with 100 percent human remy hair to ensure a natural look too, and the technique is perfect for giving length or adding volume.” It’s also quicker and easier to put in, “because we’re not putting in 100-150 individual clusters of hair, a lot of time is saved. You shouldn’t need to sit in a chair for four or five hours to achieve a look you can get in one.” Kate says that she and her team are always fighting to change the “stigma of hair extensions, which when they are done well should be totally undetectable. I love it when people are shocked that I have them and then saying “that’s the whole idea! It’s a rare kind of job where you get to make people happy every day,” she adds with a smile, and I PN for one think that she is perfectly suited to the position. (HELENE RAVLICH) F LOXY’S HAIR BOUTIQUE, 4 Ponsonby Road T: 09 378 7650 www.loxys.co.nz

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PLANET AYURVEDA: ASK DOCTOR AJIT

Q:

My children have been ill for almost the entire winter with runny noses, sore throats and coughs. I have tried to bring them up naturally so have avoided giving them doses of antibiotics but I am desperate for some advice. B. Henderson, Herne Bay

A:

You are certainly not the only parent who faces this predicament. Over the winter I have seen many children with these symptoms and counselled worried parents.

Ayurveda believes that it is important to live our lives in harmony with the seasons by making changes to our diet and lifestyle to keep the body in balance. In winter, the environment is dominated by the qualities of coldness, dampness, heaviness, dullness, slowness and sluggishness. Because we are exposed to these qualities every day, it is natural that they will have an impact, so our bodies start feeling the same. All Ayurvedic treatments are based on the simple principle of introducing lifestyle and diet changes with opposing qualities to bring the body back into balance while avoiding things that can cause further aggravation. Therefore in winter, Ayurveda recommends avoiding the following foods: • Bread, cheese, butter, white sugar, bananas, cold meat, ice cream, yoghurt and smoothies all have heavy, cold, damp and sticky qualities that will accumulate in our bodies. • Deep fried, oily foods like fish and chips and carbonated drinks - these are heavy and when we drink cold carbonated drinks on top of them it makes the oil sticky, causing it to adhere to mucous linings in the throat and lungs, causing sore throat, bronchitis, sinus and hay fever. You might feel panicked by reading this and think there is nothing left to eat. This is not true! With a little effort, we can find many things to nourish us during winter: • Ear more warm cooked foods. • Try porridge for breakfast. Add cinnamon and cardamom as these spices are known for their warming and flushing actions.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

• If eating fruit, make sure it is cooked and not eaten raw. If you must eat raw fruit, make sure it is eaten mid-morning on a warm and sunny day to minimise its adverse impact. • Snack on nuts and raisins. • Roasted peanuts are very good in winter. Also roasted almonds, cashews, walnuts and pinenuts coated with jaggery and lightly baked are delicious. Ayurveda also recommends a number of routines that we should incorporate into our lives during winter to keep the body in balance: • Brush your teeth and scrape your tongue every morning (this removes waste products that accumulate on the tongue overnight and prevents them from being re-absorbed). • Every morning drink a glass of warm water with ½ tsp of fresh ginger, ½ tsp of fenugreek powder, ½ tbs of honey and ½ tbs of lemon juice. This helps counter any sluggishness in the lymphatic system. Give children just ½ a glass. • Apply warm medicated nasal drops to the nose each morning. Your children might not like this but it will help clear any mucous congestion. • A regular self massage with warm sesame oil or kapha oil (available at Planet Ayurveda) helps remove lymphatic stagnation and makes you feel more energetic, light and vibrant at all levels: physical, mental and emotional. I have to say that children love this. • The best Ayurvedic formulations to protect yourself over winter is Chyawanprash, a jam rich in antioxidants and vitamin C that supports the immune system. • For your children’s coughs and colds try Kofnil Syrup, a herbal formulation that will break up mucous congestion and sooth a sore throat. Ayurveda teaches that by incorporating these changes in to our lives we can keep these winter illnesses from occurring by keeping the body in balance. In my 35 years of clinical practice, both here and in India, I have seen the profound benefits of this health science help thousands of people achieve balance in their lives. (DR AJIT) F PN PLANET AYURVEDA, 41 Gillies Avenue, T: 09 522 5390 www.planetayurveda.co.nz

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CLARE CALDWELL: THE ART OF LIVING A few weeks ago I went to the launching of Dream Network Aotearoa NZ Inc - an initiative begun by Margaret Bowater. Its members are all professional therapists and counsellors who wish to incorporate working with dreams into their practices and promote the study of dreams generally. The basic objectives are to examine the “power and relevance of dreams for purposes of insight, healing, problem-solving, creativity and potential guidance in personal, inter -personal and spiritual development.” Wonderful stuff! And it was a wonderful evening full of discussion around shamanism, dream drawing, visions and ancient myths. As an art therapist I couldn’t help seeing the obvious connection between the two modalities. Working with dreams as with art therapy means working with our right brained inner world - a world full of symbols, metaphors and hidden meanings from deep within our subconscious. For many indigenous cultures there is no separation between the waking and sleeping worlds nor between the conscious and subconscious states of being. They see them as parts of a whole - a holistic integration of information and nuances leading to the total experience of the individual and the wider collective experience of the group.

Clare Caldwell and Scruff (Peter Ralph) at his opening at Mercy Hospice on 27 June

In our Western way of being and thinking we have tended to split off from this integration of Self and tried to solve the problems of our existence with the logic and rationality of the left brain. Dreams and subconscious material is seen as “other” and potentially primitive and irrelevant. By trawling through our deeper right brained and subconscious territories we can access a wealth of often unexplored and unexplained material that, when brought up to consciousness and gentle reflection, can help hugely in showing what is going on for us and why. There is a lot to be learnt from this more collective way of thinking and being, where one is not separate from other humans nor the natural world that surrounds us. This way of living is more sustainable in terms of the planet and more respectful of the integration of all life forms upon her surface. Watching the news every night I cannot help but react to the cruelty and complete lack of connection to or compassion for victims in war torn and impoverished areas across the world by brainwashed perpetrators who are no doubt just ‘following orders’. It makes me fearful that the ultimate puppet masters have moved so far into left brained territory as to be neurologically addicted to one agenda only - the cold blooded and lineal pursuit of unlimited power and control no matter what the cost. Where is the ‘insight, healing, problem-solving, potential guidance in personal, interpersonal and spiritual development’ befitting these leaders of our world? (CLARE CALDWELL) F PN Clare (Claudie) Caldwell is a creative arts therapist who runs a small private practice from home. She is voluntary team leader of creative arts as therapy at Mercy Hospice Auckland, College Hill, where she has worked for the last 10 years. She is also a freelance artist. Enquiries: T: 09 836 3618; M: 021 293 3171; E: clare.e.caldwell@gmail.com

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING PONSONBY WRITER IN RUNNING FOR NATIONAL LITERATURE AWARD I’m very proud of my dear friend Michelle Buchanan. Our favourite Ponsonby resident is one of 10 authors nationwide to be long -listed in the Published Book category of the 2014 Ashton Wylie Charitable Trust Literature Award. The prestigious nationwide writing competition recognises exceptional writing talent in the mind, body and spirit genre. The winners of both the Unpublished Manuscript and Published Book categories will be presented with a $10,000 prize, one of the largest monetary prizes for literature in the country. Michelle has a passion for numerology and her newly published book ‘The Numerology Guidebook’ teaches readers to forecast the future and calculate personal charts for themselves, their friends and family. Director of the Ashton Wylie Charitable Trust Book Awards, Tim Eddington says that as with previous years, the 2014 awards have attracted works of an extremely high calibre. “The finalists this year have created works of excellent quality that demonstrate they are naturally talented writers, and also have a deep understanding of the mind, body and spirit genre,” says Eddington. The awards will be announced in a ceremony at the Ashton Wylie Charitable Trust’s own PN venue, the Hopetoun Alpha, in Auckland on Friday 15 August. F

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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JOHN APPLETON: ON HEALTH

Antioxidants, are they important? IN 2005, I ATTENDED THE INTERNATIONAL COENZYME Q10 Conference in Los Angeles. This was my first big lesson in biochemistry and listening to many scientists from 30 countries was somewhat overwhelming. It was a lot to take in. One scientist who seemed to have a mind like a razor impressed me immensely. It was Lester Packer PhD (Berkeley University) who is regarded as one of the world’s leading authorities on antioxidants. Dr Packer kindly sent me a signed copy of his book ‘The Antioxidant Miracle’. Today as ‘medicine’ struggles to answer the questions about chronic illness and aging, clinicians continue to overlook the potential of antioxidants and in many cases flatly refuse to acknowledge that they have any role to play in our health. I find this incredible and as I see it, this intransigence is putting a massive burden on a health system which is almost entirely focused on drugs. Apart from the cost in dollars there is surely a significant cost in lives. In June 1992, Dr Packer met with 17 of the world’s leading scientists at the village of Saas Fee in Switzerland. Dr Packer says “at the Saas Fee meeting, we studied the overwhelming body of evidence that shows that if used strategically, antioxidants can help maintain health and vigour well into our seventh, eighth and ninth decades, and perhaps even longer.” Eager to generate greater scientific and public interest in the field of antioxidants, Dr Packer and seven of the conference participants from Russia - United States - Germany - United Kingdom and Italy composed and affixed their signatures to a document they called the ‘Saas Fee Declaration’. The essence of the declaration is that the scientific evidence that antioxidants play a pivotal role in maintaining health and preventing disease is now overwhelming and incontrovertible, and that scientists, health care professionals and governments have a duty to inform the public about this. After the meeting the ‘Saas Fee Declaration’ was circulated to colleagues around the world and it has since been signed by hundreds from the international scientific community. In the present day environment, the human body has to suffer the onslaught of more and more free radicals due to pollutants in air and water and in the food that we eat. Although our life expectancy is higher than that of our forefathers, very often today, the quality of life drastically

diminishes in our waning years. We do not really live longer, in the true sense of the word - in many cases we only vegetate longer. The aim should be as the ancient Greeks used to say “to die as young as possible as old as possible”. A free radical is a molecule with an unpaired electron, seeking to strip an electron from another molecule, and thus having the capacity to damage vital compounds such as lipids and proteins. An antioxidant is basically an electron donor: it can quickly ‘disarm’ a free radical by easily giving up one of its electrons. In the process however, the antioxidant itself becomes a weak free radical. Fortunately, if other antioxidants are present, the original electron donor can be ‘regenerated,’ or restored to its antioxidant status. Without antioxidant ‘protection’ there is oxidation. Rust is an example of oxidation on metal and when an apple goes brown after it is peeled this is also due to oxidation. Oxidation leads to aging. Some will continue to claim that we can obtain all the nutrients and antioxidants from our food but it’s becoming increasingly obvious that because our highly processed diets are devoid of antioxidant rich foods, our need for antioxidant protection is increasing due to the highly ‘chemicalised’ and toxic world we live in today. Fruits have antioxidants first and foremost to protect themselves and in many cases most of the antioxidants are found in the skin. The peel of an orange has approximately 136 mgs of vitamin C/100 grams while the flesh has just 71 mgs/100grams. The sceptics are forever calling for more evidence and for some reason even when the evidence is presented, entrenched beliefs cloud their judgement. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association reports that simply by taking a multi-vitamin 130,000 cancer deaths (in the United States) may be prevented and another reports on vitamin E as an effective treatment option for Alzheimer’s. Sepsis (sometimes known as blood poisoning) is responsible for many hospital deaths and a recent study has shown that intravenous vitamin C is a very effective treatment option. There are many more examples. Here’s what I think all New Zealanders should be considering in addition to a health inducing diet which is plant based:

Vitamin C. Unlike most mammals humans have lost the ability to make vitamin C from glucose - thus we all need vitamin C every day. Necessary for a strong immune system and for the formation of collagen (cartilage and blood vessel walls rely on collagen for integrity). I suspect our need for vitamin C is significantly greater than what is recommended. Albert Szent Gyorgyi (Hungarian) who is credited with discovering Vitamin C said “If you don’t take ascorbic acid with your food you get scurvy, so the medical profession said that if you don’t get scurvy you must be all right.I think this is a very grave error.” A really good multi-vitamin with natural B12 (methylcobalamin). A multi has most of the key minerals which are not found in our soils - including selenium and iodine. B vitamins are water soluble and thus needed every day. They are involved in a very important biochemical process known as methylation which can ‘turn off’ genes that may otherwise pre-dispose us to diseases. B vitamins are also important for stress and helping offset depression and dementia (possibly by reducing homocysteine an important risk factor for dementia and heart disease). Omega 3 is an essential fatty acid that we must obtain in our food or via supplementation. We find Omega 3 (DHA - EPA) in marine oils and from algae. Omega 3 protects our joints - blood vessel walls - the brain and helps regulate heart rhythm. Many cheap encapsulated products are of very poor quality and often rancid. Any fish aftertaste suggests rancidity. I take a high potency liquid. Vitamin D has a huge role to play in the body and most New Zealanders may have less than optimal levels. Patients are often told that their vitamin D is normal but if most are low that’s normal. Normal is not necessarily optimal. I take 4,000 IU daily and I try to keep my level at close to 120 nmols/L. The use of sunblock during the summer and lack of UV light in the winter is not helpful. The choices we have are to sit back and take life as it comes or to use the available information to our advantage. I am on the ‘front’ foot and am doing everything I can to help myself. Will it work? I can’t say for sure but I am pretty confident that I am on the right track. PN (JOHN APPLETON) F APPLETON ASSOCIATES, T: 09 489 9362 john@johnappleton.co.nz www.johnappleton.co.nz

OCTOBER 1989 - OCTOBER 2014 + CELEBRATES

Years

For more information or to book your advertising contact: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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MICHELLE OWEN: POSTURE TO PERFORMANCE

JOHN APPLETON: ON HEALTH

Disc injuries - retrain your body with skilled postural assessment and exercise Intervertebral discs are shock absorbers for the spine. Their inner is made of a gel-like substance called the nucleus pulposus. The nucleus has a high water content and is enclosed in a tough fibrous casing called the annulus fibrosis. Together they cushion the spinal joints and allow space for nerves to flow out to control every part of the body. This tougher outer casing of the invertebral disc should hold and support all the inner substance of the disc material. It is then all held together by the surrounding ligaments and muscles. Disc injuries, sometimes referred to as disc derangement, prolapsed disc, herniated disc or slipped disc, are extremely common. Many people walk around everyday with a disc herniation that goes undiscovered until pain occurs. The most common age for a disc injury is 30 to 50 but even teenagers can have disc problems. Symptoms can be a gradual or sudden onset of pain. This pain can be constant or intermittent. The symptoms can range from pins and needles or numbness right through to debilitating pain which makes it difficult to move.

Learning functional movement patterns gives a person strength and confidence to lift and move in the correct way so further injury can be avoided and lifetime activities can still be enjoyed.

Pain can be local to the area or referred through the gluteus (butt) down through the leg and foot.

Other factors of importance are staying hydrated to keep discs plump. Dehydrated discs are like flat tyres to a car - much more likely to wear faster or blow out. As a disc dehydrates and shrinks it causes the surrounding ligaments to be loose (known as ligament laxity).

Symptoms can be even or just one side. A general rule is that the further the symptoms travel through the limbs the more severe the problem. This can also depend on the amount of the gel like substance (nucleus pulpous) protruding through the harder casing (annulus fibrosis) and putting pressure on the nerve canal. Why do disc bulges occur? While accidents, knocks and bangs can cause disc injuries, they are more often the result of damaging long-term sitting, working or sporting positions along with weak supporting muscles.

Correct nutrition and appropriate rest/sleep is also imperative for all healing. Postural improvement, muscle balance and movement retraining are key to long term success. Doing balanced exercise will not correct an imbalance. PN (MICHELLE OWEN) F MICHELLE OWEN, Level 2, 10 New North Road M: 021 770 153 www.michelleowen.co.nz www.fitness-n-function.co.nz

The most common muscle imbalance associated with disc injuries is a flat or sway back position in the low back with a kyphotic (slouched upper back). This generally includes tight hamstrings and glutes (butt) and a weak core/abdominals. This muscle imbalance puts a constant pressure on the disc that weakens it over time, leading to the disc material pushing outwards or sideways and pressing on the spinal canal. Think of it like a hole in the toothpaste tube: if the toothpaste squirts out it is sometimes impossible to get back in. If the problem is not addressed in early stages, sometimes surgery is needed. There are seven different stages of disc derangement. If the disc material has protruded a long way, surgery may be required. A discectomy is when a surgeon goes in, sometimes microscopically to minimise scarring and damage, and shaves off the disc material that is pressing on the nerves and causing pain. This can help relieve the pain but it does not fix the underlying problem. Symptoms are the body’s warning signs. It is important to listen to your body and take action to address the problem. Just like the old saying “A stitch in time saves nine”. Fixing the problem Disc injuries can be slow healing because of the limited blood supply in the discs. Muscle imbalance and poor posture must be addressed and movement patterns re-educated from a neural level to get the body back to function and strength. It is extremely important to do the corrective exercises that will centralise and stabilise the disc. Incorrect movement can push your body into more vulnerable positions.

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CARING UP CLOSEPROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL JIANNI FELPAS - PHYSIOTHERAPIST Jianni Felpas immigrated to New Zealand from Australia in 1999 - to the dismay of his family who were themselves immigrants from Greece. “I guess you could say I’m twice displaced,” he says. Over the past 14 years Jianni has lived in the Ponsonby area, and he says he couldn’t imagine living anywhere else. How did you come to be a physiotherapist? It was actually an evolutionary process. Initially, I started a BA in Performance Studies back in Australia but was very interested in sport science. I took many elective subjects in this area before one day realising I was qualified to work in the fitness industry. Eventually, once I had moved to New Zealand, I enrolled in BHSc Sport Science, and later transferred to physiotherapy. I finally realised I was keenly interested in rehabilitating the injured, and improving human performance and function. What do you love about your job? I have to admit to an addiction to making people feel better! There’s no greater feeling in the world than taking away someone’s pain, or getting them back to the things they enjoy such as sports and exercise, or simple tasks most of us take for granted such as walking and running! What do you find challenging? The most challenging aspect besides all the paperwork and administrative tasks is figuring out the best approach for each individual’s injury or unique needs. Once I get to know a patient I find it’s pretty straightforward to treat them, however every person is different, and an approach that works for one individual may not work for another. How do you differ from other physiotherapists? Typically most physiotherapists only see their patients when they are injured, or require programming to prevent injury. I enjoy seeing many of my former patients after they’ve recovered to work on high performance strength training. It’s one thing to get a person on crutches walking again, but another to get them running and jumping and in better shape than they were pre-injury! So, in a nutshell ‘from bandages and therabands to swiss ball and dumbbells!’

place to start is by asking your GP or specialist who they recommend. The good physios’ names keep coming up again and again when you ask around. F PN JIANNI FELPAS MUSCULOSKELETAL REHABILITATION, T: 021 542 664

What do you do to stay at the top of your field? Aside from all of the obligatory conventions and weekend courses I work with other professionals in my field to hone my skills in areas such as pilates, kettlebells, and high performance strength training. Part of my training in the hospital system was to recognise I was part of an MDT (multidisciplinary team.) I know how important it is to include the skills and expertise of other health professionals when needed. Recognising your limitations and knowing there is a lot to learn from other allied and complementary health practitioners means I am learning all the time and not simply seeing everything from a narrow point of view. Can you tell us about a standout ‘case’? At the start of the year I had a patient roll in on a wheelchair after having a pretty gruesome bilateral orthopaedic procedure. There had been three months of non-weight bearing for this individual so as you can imagine after this time there were all sorts of additional problems to deal with. Despite a 12 month prognosis we managed to get the patient back to the gym, in shape and in half the time indicated by their surgeon! This month they begin running! I’ve never seen anybody recover so quickly from this type of injury and procedure. What do you do to care for yourself? You’ve heard the expression the plumber’s tap is always dripping? Well, I’m ‘blessed’ with a number or chronic musculoskeletal injuries and conditions which mean I’m forever at the gym and Pilates studio. I do a combination of corrective and high performance gym-based training, kettlebells, pilates and gyrokinesis. If I get lazy or complacent and miss a few weeks (typically 3-plus) my body lets me know it! Training keeps me focused, releases stress and keeps me fit and in shape too. What’s your advice to people seeking physiotherapy? My advice is to find somebody who comes recommended by someone who has experienced them firsthand. You can’t beat word of mouth to find a really great therapist worth their weight in gold. Although you do not require a referral to see a physiotherapist, a good

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SHEENA SHUVANI STARDUST ASTROLOGY

LEO 23 July - 21 August Element of Fire. Symbol: The Lion. Quality: Fixed (stability)

Planetary ruler: Sun Character Royal right to rule - autocratic, commanding, sincere, dare I say it; magnificent. I could sing your praises all day and you’d love that, Leo, as you must have an admiring audience to mirror your greatness and you cannot resist flattery. Great virtues you have; noble, brave (even if inwardly quaking), passionate about life, funny, generous, supremely confident, vivacity, grace, often athletic, naturally high esteem, popular, dignified, fiery, extravagant, regal, well groomed and immaculate, lots of new clothes, great hair. (Sometimes you blow up problems and roar if provoked but we won’t talk about that). And you live it up in great style, so your credit cards are often maxed, but you’re seen all over town dancing, wining, dining, night clubbing and in the best theatre seats. Career You love to give advice and educate people. Leos make excellent teachers, educators, university lecturers, statesmen, psychiatrists, psychologists, instructors, and members of royal families and excel in positions of status and authority. Also can be found as movie directors, producers, principal actors and chairmen of boards. Also writers of self-help books and children’s stories. Off duty Leo can be lazy and indolent, majestically lying around. Love and sexuality The chase/the kill. Hot lust/cold shoulder. Leo’s secret desire - to have whomever they want, whenever they want. But if you are ‘mated’ with Leo you will find them protective, kind, generous and also possessive and jealous. Leo will love and lecture you and has a heart of gold. Past directions You have been known to get into the odd right royal paddy, roaring when displeased with the poor efforts of minions. Try not to chew their heads off! Helpful advice Make sure your hair is being shampooed, cut and groomed by the very best hairdresser in town. Always carry a mirror on you so you can look your best to impress at all public functions. Direct an accountant to assist and control your money expenditure.

GREENCANE PAPER A LOCAL BUSINESS Many locals will be familiar with the name Helen Geddes. She ran a dental practice on Jervois Road for 10 years. In 2009, Helen and her husband Geoff Arden launched Greencane Paper. This business established five years ago has grown out of Geoff and Helen’s ongoing environmental awareness. This sustainable alternative to forest-sourced paper recycles the fibre waste from the sugarcane industry into a range of hand and toilet paper suitable for both home and business use. Geoff Arden explains his inspiration, “It’s frightening to see how much paper we consume and even more frightening to understand where it comes from; with deforestation posing environmental problems and with unregulated forestry causing threats to animal and bird life. Cutting down on paper use is one thing, but when it comes to the practical uses of paper, it’s not always easy, particularly in the bathroom!” Greencane is fortunate to have gained great support in New Zealand, quickly becoming a leading sustainable brand in most wholefood type speciality stores. Following a successful launch in Australia in mid-2013, Greencane Paper has now set up a base of over 80 stores. Then in early 2014, the company entered the United Kingdom and now has a growing number of distributors promoting the Greencane range. Sugarcane is a tropical grass grown commercially in over 200 countries. The current world supply of sugarcane is believed to be at a mature stage resulting in no additional demand for land expansion. When harvested, sugarcane is crushed to remove the sugar leaving behind a fibrous residue which can be recycled in a pulp suitable for paper making. Greencane products are: 100% biodegradable paper; equally as effective as tree based products; cost comparable; environmentally manufactured with no plastic. PN For more information www.greencane.com/faqs F

Your lucky number According to Cheiro (the world’s most famous seer), the date of the day of your birth is the luckiest of all numbers for you!” Favoured precious stones Diamonds, topaz, amber, neroli Favoured metal Pure gold Favoured colours Gold, orange, scarlet, crimson, yellow (SHEENA SHUVANI) F PN

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING HAIR IN LAYS THE TRUTH The long and short of forming a stylist relationship based on trust. It takes a long time to build trust in a new hair stylist. For me, I’ve known Gareth Chitty for nearly 15 years. We first met when Gareth was a senior stylist in a new swanky Ponsonby Salon; I travelled from Parnell each month to enjoy his easy nature and excellent hair colour and cutting skills. Over time we’ve formed a friendship based on mutual respect. He asks, “Lou what are we doing today?” Every time I reply, “G you are the expert, do what you think needs doing.” Travelling back in time, when talking to Martin Leach about my respect and affection for Gareth, I recalled the moment that we forged our friendship. I was a stressed out working mother of two sons, working in a fairly high stakes and stress world of Advertising Agency life with, a crazy schedule that lead to the occasional (yeah right) forgetfulness moment. Some moments would see me forgetting the kids, others would be leaving keys on a counter in the supermarket etc. On this one occasion it was almost dire. A mobile phone, for me, is not a luxury, it is a survival mechanism. I left my phone at the salon. Upon arriving home at my apartment in Parnell, the landline rang, it was Gareth “Hey Lou you left your phone at the salon, don’t worry I’ll finish work and drop it over on my way home”. “Legend” I said. No way could I trek across town in rush hour traffic to retract it. Fast forward 30 minutes and the gate buzzer went, I looked out and there was Gareth on his Vespa. I went down to receive the phone and asked where Gareth lived in the hood; after all it was on his way home. Gareth replied, “Westmere.” Game on, there was the beginning of the Gareth experience. His actions spoke louder than his words. Time passed and the swanky Ponsonby salon opened in Newmarket. As much as I enjoyed my time with Gareth, common sense had to prevail over a busy lifestyle and off I went to ‘support my local’.

SMELLS SUBLIME Fragrant candles are a dime a dozen these days, but Superette’s new Fig and Black Gardenia candle is a standout. The brand has collaborated for a second time with local scent makers Ashley & Co to create what it is deeming the ultimate winter companion. Fragrantica.com describes fig fragrance as evoking ‘late August days spent in the Greek countryside,’ while gardenia is a lush floral. The combo is sophisticated without being cloying. F PN Superette Fig and Black Gardenia candle $59

Moving later to Herne Bay the bonus of returning to the care of Gareth & Co became a migration that once again saw Gareth and I enjoying time together. So when I suggested he might like to work and collaborate with a friend of mine Lorraine Downes, he in his very humble way, said “yeah that could be good”. Introducing Lorraine to Gareth was easy. Lorraine is a girl from Pakuranga and Gareth a guy from Hamilton - they immediately connected and 12 months later Gareth had the major task and responsibility of taking her mane and reducing it to a pixie cut. Most stylists would tremble at that moment, but after a few exchanges of emails and a mood board prepared by Lorraine, 45 minutes later her hair was gone and she was liberated and possibly regained five years of life from not having to sit in a stylist chair twice a week for several hours at a time. Since the cover story of Lorraine’s new look, Gareth has had untold new clients. Some local and some have travelled from Nelson and Tauranga. Each of them has experienced a transformation that has lead to a boost in confidence and a delight at their experience. From a small acorn a mighty oak tree can grow. As our friendship has grown so has his PN business, I like that. You might too. (LOUISE HENDERSON) F GARETH & CO HAIR, 1 Francis Street T: 09 378 0031 www.garethandco.co.nz

SUPERETTE, 282 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 360 2360, www.superette.co.nz

Gareth Chitty of Gareth & Co cutting client Deirdre McOnie’s hair The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

I meet: Mailelani Samoa’s Kathy Johnston When I first tell people that I’m a beauty writer and all-roundskincare-fiend, their eyes often light up and they want to know what products I think are the best out there in the marketplace, and how to know exactly what is right for them. My advice is usually to do their own research and most definitely shop around, so the next question is usually about my own beauty ‘secrets’ and tips. I have a few, I tell them, but perhaps one of the best secrets is extra virgin coconut oil. It’s the perfect product because it’s organic (no more putting dodgy ingredients on your skin that could get absorbed into your bloodstream, causing who-knows-what to happen to you a few years down the line), is incredibly moisturising, can be used for a variety of purposes and it smells great. I use it in the winter when my skin gets dried out from the cold and air conditioning, and I use it in the summer when my skin gets parched after spending a lot of time in the ocean and basking in the sun. The latest coconut oil-based beauty collection I’ve been introduced to is Mailelani Samoa, which is as gorgeous as the island nation from which it hails. Mailelani - meaning ‘from Heaven’ in Samoan - is a skin and bodycare range using cold pressed organic Suau’u Popo, or coconut oil. Its creator is Sylvie Salanoa, a Swiss woman who married her Samoan husband Kitiona after they met working as missionaries in Hawai’i. When the pair moved back to Samoa to live after travelling all around the globe with their work, Sylvie decided that she wanted to create a business that would help build the profile of and support the local community, and she and Kitiona first hit on the idea of making soaps using the locally produced coconut oil. Sylvie had a background in pharmacy and saw it as the perfect fit given the area’s abundance of coconut palms, and organic, cold -pressed coconut oil is still the main ingredient in Mailelani skincare. The virgin coconut oil is produced in the Samoan villages around the Islands of Upolu and Savaii, and the Direct Micro Expelling Technology Method (DME) used to expel the coconut oil does not need further processing, meaning it is pure, simple and environment friendly. I love that! The local distributor for the beautiful brand is Kathy Johnston, a local mum who fell in love with the Mailelani Samoa range many years ago. Her husband Willy has Samoan heritage - and is also one of the team at Ponsonby’s Johnston Associates Chartered Accountants. Kathy has been a long time visitor to the beautiful Pacific nation since they married. “We have been going there for years during pretty much every school holidays,” says Kathy, “and during one of our trips I was told ‘you’ve got to visit the soap factory’, which didn’t sound that exciting to me to be honest!” She soon realised how wrong she could be, and was amazed at both the purity and the quality of what was being produced in the small house owned by Sylvie and her husband just outside of Apia. She left with some products purchased from the Mailelani shop and soon became a regular customer. Over the years that followed the range was starting to be sold more and more in Samoa’s gift shops and showed great potential for exporting - which is where Kathy stepped in to assume her current mantle. “Sylvie made her first soap a long time ago,” she explains, “and this became her first range just called Mailelani Samoa, which used coconut and is incredibly fresh and light. Since then she’s developed some other collections within the range and I thought it was a great time to market and sell the brand in New Zealand.” With a background in personal training Kathy has long had an interest in health and wellness, and she did her research to ensure that the product was as high quality and pure as she hoped. The range includes scented and unscented products, and is made up of soaps, lotions, scrubs and oils that feel and smell absolutely incredible on the skin. The fragrance-free element in the range goes by the name Pure & Simple, and it is perfect for those allergic to fragrance or for use on little ones like my son who suffers from eczema and has seen an amazing improvement with regular application. I love the Pure & Simple Organic Coconut Body Oil after a shower or bath, and favourite collection within the range is Natura by Mailelani, their premium collection. A unique blend of fresh Polynesian ingredients, it is made from organic coconut oil and organic Tamanu oil (Fetau). Tamanu oil is extracted from the nut of the Tamanu tree that grows along the coastal beaches of Samoa. It is an all natural multi-functional product, and aids in the healing of scar tissue as well as being anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-oxidant. Amazing. At the moment the team are testing the new Mailelani organic coconut oil sunscreen, which promises to be something rather special too. PN (HELENE RAVLICH) F

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING IT’S ALL ABOUT YOU AND YOUR HAIR CELEBRATING 21 YEARS’ For 50 years Toni&Guy has been at the forefront of hairdressing OF LOOKING AFTER YOU... - bridging the gap between high fashion looks and styles you can wear and maintain. The New Zealand flagship salon is located at the top end of Ponsonby Road. Toni&Guy are dedicated to providing the highest level of skill, in a friendly, accessible environment. Toni&Guy hair stylists and colour technicians have completed extensive training, so whether it’s a cut, colour, highlights or a new style you can rest easy. At Toni&Guy it’s all about you and your hair; you’ll feel like a VIP every time you walk in the door. And that’s why they’re inviting you to come and meet Bradley Polwart, the new Client Relationship Manager, “I’m your go-to man, I’m here to ensure every client walks out knowing they’re a VIP,” explains Brad. Sit down, grab a coffee, and Brad can assist you with what will be right for you and your hair. Whether it’s a full re-style, touch up, or a blow dry before heading out, Brad is there to help. Brad Polwart

During August, Toni&Guy Ponsonby has a special new client offer. Come in for a cut or colour service during August and receive your choice of label.m product: Age Therapy Oil or Matt Paste. Hurry, stocks are limited. There’s plenty of free parking available behind the salon off Crummer Road. Give Brad a call for more information or to make your booking. F PN TONI&GUY, 48A Ponsonby Road, T: 09 378 8998 www.toniandguy.co.nz

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This August, More Than Skin Spa & Beauty celebrate 21 years since first opening the doors of their original Queen Street salon 9 August 1993. Since that auspicious day, they have grown to become Auckland’s premier skin care destination with three convenient locations across the city. After the Queen Street salon was relocated to Ponsonby in 2006, and reopened as a contemporary Urban Spa, their focus shifted to a more holistic philosophy and More Than Skin became the undisputed leader in essential spa services. This accolade is reflected through their recent winning of ‘Best Beauty Destination’ in the 2014 Bauer Media’s Best in Beauty Awards, which follows their 2013 achievement as ‘Best Day Spa’ in 2013. Both were achieved through public vote. Discover our essential More Than Skin experiences At More Than Skin they understand the importance of looking and feeling your best, so their treatments are about more than just skin health. Accordingly, their treatments combine aromatic essential oils with indispensible wellbeing services to create a necessary escape from busy lives, to rejuvenate and replenish mind, body and soul. The combination of effective professional products and the therapeutic action of touch from their experienced team will make all the difference to your skin, as well as helping you to relax, unwind and stay balanced. They appreciate that your time is precious, so they also offer a range of intensive, results-driven treatments for those clients looking for immediate, visible improvements. Visit them today and enjoy the benefits of 21 years’ experience for yourself! F PN MORE THAN SKIN, 100 College Hill T: 09 361 2231 www.morethanskin.co.nz

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING SMASHBOX PRESENTS: A SHOWCASE THERMOLYSIS - JULIE MARTIN OF BEAUTIFUL BROWS! BEAUTY THERAPY At Smashbox Cosmetics we’re always looking at beauty through a new lens - from the creation of our products and tools to the development of our artistry tips and tricks.

Even after 30 years in beauty therapy Julie Martin still finds that many people will come to her not knowing the difference between electrolysis and thermolysis.

The Ponsonby Smashbox store is the only one of its type in the world, offering makeup classes and makeovers. The Smashbox Pro Artist team are there to help you gain make up confidence and look your best.

The treatment has been in use for over 80 years and when in skilful, qualified hands thermolysis can achieve excellent results. Electrolysis/thermolysis can be used anywhere on the body but is most commonly used on the face, chest, underarms and bikini line area.

Introducing the Smashbox Brow Bar - we offer precision tweezing and custom tinting, ensuring you have the perfect brows. If you’re wanting a quick brow shape, or need to check into Brow Rehab, we have you sorted, starting from only $20. A great brow shape can bring balance to your face structure, a fuller brow looks best on a higher set brow bone, whereas a finer brow is perfect for someone with more delicate features. The colour of your brows can set the whole look. Smashbox pro artist, Sam Hart recommends “tinting the arch of your brow a couple of shades darker will instantly PN give your brow extra definition and lift the eye area.” Bookings are essential. F SMASHBOX, 342 Ponsonby Road, T: 0800 SMASHBOX www.smashboxcosmetics.co.nz

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Unlike laser, electrolysis is an electrical treatment that produces a by-product in the bottom of the follicle. This current on its own is called electrolysis. It becomes thermolysis (also known as the ‘blend’) when heat is added to the chemical action of the electrolysis current. The dual effect dissolves the bulb and prevents the hair from growing. A fully qualified and registered beauty therapist, electrologist/thermologist with national and international qualifications, Julie says the key to her success is twofold. First is good communication with her clients so they understand the process, and secondly executing treatments to a high professional standard. Julie specialises in issues of unwanted hair, and skin issues such as acne, congested skin, premature ageing, rosacea, eczema, and general skin wellness. Julie says a lot of clients come to her confused and disappointed when their unwanted hair issues aren’t resolved. Julie offers a complimentary and confidential electrolysis and/or skin consultation, individual issues can be discussed in depth and a treatment plan made to meet each client’s needs. F PN JULIE MARTIN BEAUTY THERAPY, 100 West End Road, Westmere T: 09 940 77 54 www.juliemartin.co.nz

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

A beauty with compassion The Centre’s Rebecca Wadey POINT CHEVALIER RESIDENT REBECCA Wadey was diagnosed with cancer at age 26, and years later has opened a unique wellness space that offers multistyle yoga, meditation and massage for all - as well as complimentary classes for women facing the same challenge she did over a decade ago. Known as The Centre, it can be found in Kingsland, located conveniently above the original Little Bird Unbakery, whose founder Megan May she has teamed up with to create something rather special. Upstairs is a studio space for yoga classes and rooms for therapists (they offer an acupuncturist and massage therapist on certain days of the week), whilst downstairs the cafe adds a social flavour for those that like to linger, or sustenance to go for those needing to hit the ground running. For breast cancer survivor Wadey, now married to husband Ant Timpson and mum to two beautiful boys, the journey from loneliness and fear of the future to a happier, more holistic outlook was a key motivator when she decided it was time to “do my own thing. I wanted to help others see and feel the enormous benefits of the changes I had made in my own life, and hopefully they would then pass on the message to others”. Yoga, a shift in diet and regular meditation have all played a part in helping her become as strong and happy as she is today, and when she first entertained the idea of passing on the love “people suggested I start with a blog or something similar,” she explains, “but I felt it was my time to go the whole hog”. Drawing on a few ‘amazing’ experiences at international health and wellness retreats and the nutritional knowledge she had gained from spending time with Little Bird owner Megan, the idea of The Centre as a health and wellness hub gradually began to take shape. Several of Auckland’s leading yoga instructors soon came on board to teach, including Wadey’s own teacher Vincent Bolletta, Jacqueline Wilson, Claire Robbie and Karla Brodie, who has experience working with people in hospices. When we spoke she had just seen the first of the planned yoga classes for cancer patients finally come to fruition, an experience she says was “amazing, and just so

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

incredible to be able to offer people. It was with Karla Brodie and had a really restorative feel to it, and I really want to thank everyone who has been coming to our regular classes for directly helping to fund it.” She says to be included in the class students “have to be in active cancer mode - whether they are undergoing treatment or not. They are for anyone in that active phase of cancer that wants to experience what yoga and care can do for them. The classes begin with a bit of an introduction as well, so you can talk about how you are doing if you like, or just listen if you don’t want to say anything at all. You don’t have to do anything you don’t want to, it’s all about rest and Karla helping facilitate that with instruction or stretches. Whatever works.” From September onwards, once a week, these free classes and a green smoothie will be offered to those who qualify and are interested, split into sessions for over and under 40s. She hopes the environment will encourage them to mix and mingle and share experiences, “as it can be such a lonely disease, and so frightening to go through by yourself. Even caregivers can’t possibly know how you feel, so being amongst others can be so therapeutic - even if it’s just to have a bit of a vent here and there.” Rebecca is actively looking for sponsors for the classes and other charitable initiatives in the planning, as well as just feeling generally excited about how things will unfold with her brand new baby. “It’s been hard work so far, but good hard work,” says Wadey with a smile, and you get the feeling that she wouldn’t have it any other way. PN (HELENE RAVLICH) F www.the-centre.co.nz If you would like to enquire about sponsorship opportunities for The Centre’s classes please email rebecca@the-centre.co.nz

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MEET THE TEACHER Jerome Brown, Pasadena Intermediate Currently teaching Year 7 and 8 (composite class) - 29 students

CHILDREN’S BOOK REVIEW

How did you come to be a primary school teacher? After Uni I worked at SkyCity Casino, eventually entering the world of management. I had always wanted to be a teacher, having being inspired by several wonderful, caring teachers throughout my young life so decided to pursue that after 12 years at SkyCity.

What happens next? Written and illustrated by Tull Suwannakit, Walker, $29.99

Where did you train? Epsom campus (Auckland Faculty of Education). What brought you to Pasadena Intermediate? I wanted to work at a widely respected school within my community (as a Point Chevalier resident). What are your favourite things about being a teacher? The question here is really “Where do I start?” There’s nothing like inspiring young people to strive, to set goals and achieve! Watching students do some of the amazing things they can do is a marvel in itself. Teaching is truly a fun-filled job and not a single day in my five years has ever dragged. There are some awesome kids who have left a wonderful imprint on my life, as I know I have with them.

Little Ellie and her grandma go on an adventure. But who’s that following them? “Can you tell me a story, Granny?” Little Ellie asked on the way to town one morning. “Deep in the woods, not far from here, lives Grandma Bear and Little Bear...” But what will happen next? This is the perfect picture book with words and images both telling the story of a little girl listening while Granny narrates her tale. As the story unfolds she wonders is it her imagination or is it real? What happens when Granny finally spies what is following them too? F PN DOROTHY BUTLER CHILDREN’S BOOKSHOP, 1 Jervois Road T: 09 376 7283 www.childrensbookshop.co.nz

Highlight of your teaching career? Being hired by two brilliant schools - first TNIS (Takapuna Normal Intermediate School three years) and now Pasadena. Low point of your teaching career? I broke my patella playing rugby for Ponsonby Prezzies and was away from work for two weeks. That was hard for me. How would your principal describe you? I’m sure he’d say a vibrant, positive and organised teacher who takes on too much - LOL. How would other teachers describe you? Ditto (although I’m sure they’d add in talented dancer/singer (wink). How would your students describe you? The coolest teacher... My daughter has even mentioned that this has been said at the local primary school. I’ve overheard kids say “Mr Brown - sporty, brainy, caring etc... If you could wave a magic wand in your classroom... We’d all go to the movies to watch a great Samoan icon, the Rock, play Hercules as part of our myths and legends movie making inquiry... I wouldn’t change anyone as my class are wonderful as they are. Five tips for mums and dads of primary school kids 1. Celebrate achievements and small successes. Be calm and offer constructive feedback when things don’t go according to plan. 2. Invest in some sort of digital device - tablets, smartphones. 3. Help out with homework when you can. 4. It’s ok for kids to play video games. In fact, play with them... 5. Foster their gifts, talents and extra-curricular activities. F PN

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FUTURE GENERATION PRESENTATION OF DICTIONARIES TO STUDENTS AT ST JOSEPH’S PRIMARY SCHOOL, GREY LYNN “The dictionaries help us to find words we do not know and also help us with our homework” - Victoria “The dictionaries help us with words we do not know” - Jorjia “I enjoy using the dictionaries because they help us understand words that I cannot spell” - Fatongia “The dictionaries help us with our goal setting” - Raiden These are the comments of some of the year four students at St Joseph’s Primary School, Grey Lynn, who were recently presented with a Pictorial Dictionary by members of Westhaven Rotary. This is an annual ‘ongoing’ project by Westhaven Rotary Club which was started in 2010 and each year a new intake of year four students are presented with their own dictionary. The Rotary Pictorial Dictionary Project is proving hugely successful. The dictionary is hard cover and has a reading age of approximately 9 years. It has English spelling and contains over 1000 full colour illustrations. There are now many Rotary clubs countrywide that distribute these dictionaries to their local schools. The students treasure receiving them and Jenny Bernard, the Principal of St Joseph’s Primary School says “The dictionaries are a wonderful resource. The students are so excited when they receive these books and thoroughly enjoy looking through the pages. It has helped them immensely with their literacy skills and they are able to share the dictionary with other family members as it is given to them as a keepsake.” Westhaven Rotary is a breakfast club and meets on the 1st, 3rd and 5th Tuesday mornings of each month at 7am for a 7.15am start and a prompt end at 8.30am at the Richmond Yacht Club, Westhaven Marina, Auckland. The members of the club are proud supporters and fundraisers for the local community and Rotary projects. Visitors are invited to join us for the best morning views and stunning sunrises in the city, great early morning fellowship and interesting and entertaining speakers.

We have a number of community projects, one of our favourites is on Motuihe Island where we help with the native tree re-afforestation - we even have our own Westhaven Rotary Club lookout corner which we are very proud of. We are always looking for volunteers. Come and join us and have fun helping in the community. PN (JILL KITCHEN) F Like us and follow us on Facebook - Westhaven Rotary Club

CELEBRATING 21 YEARS OF THE PONSONBY COMMUNITY TOY LIBRARY With the support of the local community, Ponsonby Community Toy Library has been in operation for 21 years this year, providing access to over 1700 toys to members. In the past 12 months, they have been very fortunate to receive grants from Lotteries and Pub Charity for the purchase of new toys; COGS funding towards their librarian's wages; Lion Foundation grant funding to assist with the upgrade of their loans room and Ponsonby Herne Bay also kindly donated colourful new wall decals. They have also received assistance from their main sponsor Custom Residential this year to upgrade their computer. They have a wide variety of quality toys to suit ages six months to seven years, including infant toys, puzzles, DVDs, outdoor toys, bikes, scooters, musical, electronic dress ups and more. Members pay an annual fee and can borrow up to six toys at a time for up to three weeks.

New look for the loans room at Ponsonby Community Toy Library

It can be hard to keep children entertained in the cooler months, the toy library is a great cost effective way to provide new and interesting toys, whilst reducing waste and clutter around your home. As a special offer this winter members can join in August and pay the September fee, to find out more, drop in to one of their three morning sessions; Tuesday and Friday 9.30 -11.45am, Saturday 9.00-12noon at 3 Dedwood Terrace (next to Plunket), view details on their website www.ponsonbytoylibrary.org or email ponsonbytoylib@gmail.com

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

PONSONBY NEWS+ August 2014

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FUTURE GENERATION WESTERN SPRINGS COLLEGE GET ON YOUR BIKES PONSONBY ANNUAL QUIZ NIGHT BRAINS BUSTER Friday 29 August What has become a very popular social event is on again - the annual Western Springs College quiz night. Join parents and students of the college for a fabulous night out, and a chance to put your heads together and win great prizes. Apart from the quiz, there are raffles, an auction, and a superb antipasto platter of delicious food, all for $42 per ticket. Drinks and refreshments are available at the cash bar. You can also buy a table’s worth of tickets at a discount if you book online, or you can sponsor a table and provide prizes and auction items. This is the school’s main fund-raiser, organised by the parents’ action group to contribute towards the school’s academic, sports and arts facilities. With Western Springs College due to be rebuilt, the quiz night provides a great opportunity to show your support. And it has become a must-do social event. There’s a lot of friendly rivalry between tables, a challenging list of questions, and a wonderful atmosphere. Tickets on sale now at fabquiz.eventbrite.com and for latest updates like them at: facebook.com/fabquiz. And if you are a business, you can sponsor a table or provide prizes! For all enquiries please call Jody on M: 027 677 3429, or Stephen on T: 360 0757, or PN E: Stephen.knight.lenihan@gmail.com. F

Ponsonby local bike shop CYCO turned 21 this year and Ponsonby resident and owner, Chris Auld, wonders what the next 21 years will hold. The Ponsonby Draft plan has been much discussed and it would seem that improved facilities and environment for cycling are key planks of the plan. This is extremely encouraging for Ponsonby as a community. Someone riding to meet for a coffee, pick up the paper, grab a couple of ingredients for dinner and head home is much more likely to stop and talk to friends and browse in shops along the way, than someone driving. They become part of the colourful fabric of Ponsonby rather than a faceless component of traffic passing through it. A natural progression will be the improvement in cycling infrastructure provided by businesses and schools. Parents would be more inclined to allow children to ride to school if the school provided secure covered bike storage. Employees may contemplate an electric bike for commuting if there was somewhere provided to store it. CYCO has always enjoyed great support from the local residents, stocking a hand picked range of kids bikes, urban bikes, roads bikes, mountain bikes and, increasingly, electric bikes. This translates into a great riding experience because CYCO are experts in putting you on the most suitable bike for your purpose. With CYCO’s sale now in progress, it is a great opportunity to get a market leading brand at a budget brand price. That doesn’t happen every day. CYCO are now open seven days a week and have an online store meaning access to their PN products all day, every day. F CYCO, 228 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 376 4447 www.cyco.co.nz

86 PONSONBY NEWS+ August 2014

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FUTURE GENERATION CENTENARY ASSEMBLY AT WESTMERE SCHOOL Westmere School celebrates 100 years this year, and marked the occasion on the last day of Term 2 with a ceremony attended by local MP David Shearer.

photography: Fionna Hill

The school first opened on 6 July 1914 as Richmond Road West School, built to accommodate 170 students. In 1930 the name of the school was changed to Westmere School, in order to avoid confusion with Richmond Road School, and to coincide with the new Westmere District that had emerged out of the paddocks and fields. As the school is currently a major building site, a formal centenary celebration will be held to coincide with the opening of the new school in Term 3 2015.

SCHOOL HOLIDAY ACTIVITY AT GREY LYNN SCHOOL GARDEN CLUB

Pictured above: Carolyn Marino (Principal), David Shearer, and Ivanna Thomson (Board Chair) as well as the youngest and oldest student in school as at 4th July.

Nine year-old Sierra often comes from Wellington to Auckland for the school holidays and has been involved with the Grey Lynn School Garden Club plot at St Columba Church, Grey Lynn several times. These holidays the garden plot sign received a colourful makeover as well as signs for some of the plants. F PN Students taking part in the ‘Centenary Assembly’

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

Eleven pints a night before a game does little to impair performance Imagine being able to head out on the town and enjoy your Friday after work drinks as normal, drink as much as you like then head out on Saturday and play sport to your maximum or at least close to it. Not possible? I was recently handed an article regarding a Massey University study that suggests that this scenario is just that, possible. The study concluded by saying drinking up to 11 pints a night before a game does little to impair performance. Even after reading the article I still felt a little sceptical, especially given my mornings after a big drinking session now seem to leave me feeling like I’ve played 80 minutes of rugby long before kickoff. So I caught up with a friend of mine, former sports nutritionist and now lifestyle dietician Catherine Sissons, to try to decipher whether this was true or not.

of what we need. “Stress, caffeine and alcohol are all lifestyle factors that cause water loss (as well as standard practices such as breathing, air conditioning, heaters, blinking and going to the toilet) so it is very important to start the day with the right ingredients so your body can have the nutrients and water content already available in your body cells instead of trying to make it up later in the day in the form of instant energy from foods that are more easily absorbed and don’t sustain us for long. “Many ask - isn’t drinking water enough? Yes it is helpful however we need to keep in mind that we can’t guarantee the quality of the water we are drinking and food also gives us the benefit of fibre, vitamins and minerals.

“The question of consuming 11 pints of alcohol and it not affecting elements of the player’s performance doesn’t lead to say that every day people should be encouraged to consume alcohol in excess.

It is always easier to supply the body with what it needs than try to recover it later especially thirst once we are already dehydrated.

However, it does bring about the question; can the body handle alcohol as part of a healthy eating regime instead of cutting it out altogether?” Catherine replied. Given most of us have found some form of balance between drinking and exercise I attempted to get a few more of Catherine’s thoughts on the topic. “The basis of the study could have some grounds; however the size of the study, the age of the subjects as well as their general health would need to be considered. It can be assumed they are under guidance for their nutrition so if they are well hydrated before consuming the alcohol there could be a chance their bodies had enough time to recover before their game.” Therefore this is only possible for those who are young and/or an athlete in full time training. So there lay my next question: if you had to choose between going to the gym and just watching what you eat which should we choose? “Exercise is a stress on the body and although has many benefits including relieving stress, burning body fat and improving heart health we need to be mindful that we can’t expect optimal performance without fuelling the system correctly. Yes, exercise is very helpful - however we need to know what type of exercise is best for your lifestyle and also what foods are going to be most helpful in promoting a better performing body for exercise. “Much like sports nutrition - everyday events cause stress on the body - including exercise. These stressors cause water loss which then causes the blood to become thicker - the heart then has to work harder to pump it around the body. It is a fact that water makes up about two thirds of our body weight and is mostly housed in our blood - however, we fail to eat foods that are going to provide water content for our cells and that can nourish the system at the same time. “Water is required for keeping eyes, nose, mouth moistened, protecting organs and tissues, dissolving minerals and other nutrients to make them accessible for the body, carrying oxygen and nutrients to body cells, lubricating joints (minimising the risk of injury), balances body temperature and lessens the burden on the kidneys and liver by flushing waste products away.”

When a person consumes the right combinations at their main meals throughout the day they can achieve 1500ml of water absorbed. Drinking water is helpful to top this up however drinking too much water can also have a negative effect resulting in an increase in urination output because of homeostasis - so it’s important to know how much water you need. “Helpful foods for the body to improve daily energy: Tomatoes - they are 94% water content and contain vitamin A and vitamin C, powerful antioxidants that help fight free radical damage and potassium which is helpful for transporting water into and out of body cells. Tomatoes contain lycopene which helps reduce the risk of several cancers including prostate, cervical, mouth, pharynx, throat, oesophagus, stomach, colon, rectal, prostate and ovarian cancer. Broccoli - has 88% water content so is an efficient way of transporting water into the blood because it has to travel further throughout the digestive system. Eating broccoli (as long as you don’t have thyroid issues) can be helpful by increasing enzyme production in the liver which helps fight toxins and flush them out. Broccoli is similar to tomatoes in that it also contains high concentrations of vitamin A and vitamin C. It also plays a role in controlling high blood pressure. Be mindful not to overcook it - it should still have the same colour once it is cooked as when it is raw. Beetroot - has 83% water content and is also known to help blood flow and improve liver function. It also contains potassium which is helpful for fluid balance as well as vitamins A and C. The pectin in beetroot helps flush out toxins and it is recommended that beetroot is eaten raw without juicing so that these fibres can be ingested as completely as possible.” To conclude, as we’ve always been told, water and hydration are the key to most things when it comes to the body, and also preparation. Catherine’s company Nova Nutrition is an online company that helps people find balance PN between good nutrition, socialising and exercise. (GEORGE BERRY) F

All and all nutrition first, exercise second. Given that, I thought we should know a few things to try and reduce in our daily lives as well as ensuring we have plenty

88 PONSONBY NEWS+ August 2014

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

Disappointed with the way the Blues lost the match against the Crusaders While being a true Cantabrian at heart I enjoyed little more than seeing the Crusaders beat the Blues in Christchurch the other week, but on the other hand I couldn’t help but be disappointed with the way the Blues lost the match. It pretty much summed up their season, the loss effectively knocking them of any chance of making this year’s Super Rugby playoffs. It’s been a season where they’ve showed some real promise at home but aside from their win over the Western Force in Perth they have been decidedly average away from home. I was a big advocate for giving Sir John Kirwan the job and I still am, he’s an Aucklander, a Blues man that has worn the jersey to much success and can relay what that feels like and looks like to his players. But I’m starting to wonder if he has surrounded himself with the right type of people. There’s an old saying in business that if you’re the smartest person in the room then you’re probably in the wrong room, but it’s also equally dangerous to be surrounded by Chiefs and next to no Indians. Using the Crusaders and Highlanders for example you consistently see their assistant coaches down in the trenches helping fight the fight with their front line players. Running the tee, water and messages from the head coach. And at trainings Tony Brown, Aaron Mauger and Tabai Matson are constantly seen on tackle bags, staying behind to work one on one with specific players and just generally bridging the gap between the head coach and the players.

This is something I’ve never seen at the Blues, and maybe rightly so. No one expects Sir Graham Henry to slip into the turtle suit and take a few hits from Tony Woodcock or Jerome Kaino, but he is filling a role that otherwise would have someone doing just that. The reason I use the Crusaders and Highlanders as examples of this is they’re the top two teams in New Zealand, they’re where the Blues should aspire to be, but it’s not just a southern or even a rugby thing, take a look at the man with the H20 bib on at the next Warriors game, there you’ll find none other than a rugby league legend, Ruben Wiki, relaying messages, offering words of encouragement and pointing out holes in the opposition defences. Sir Graham Henry and Mick Bryne have already indicated they, like Ma’a Nonu, won’t be returning for the Blues next year, so I can only hope Sir John uses this opportunity to build his team the way he needs it. He’s now got a couple of years of Super Rugby experience under his belt, he no longer needs that sort of advice on a daily basis, what he needs is men in the trenches and for him to sit up at the front of his cavalry and lead his Blues army back to the top of Super Rugby. To back himself to do the job, just like he’s trying to do with his young backline. Lets hope the owners of the Blues see fit to do the same and back him without all the hangers on, the team needs front line weapons both in the playing group and the PN management team. (GEORGE BERRY) F

CHAMPIONSHIP ROUND FOR THE HERNE BAY HUSTLERS Friday 6 June marked our last game of the 2014 grading round, and our first year in the Championship competition. We have relinquished the Speight’s Plate as the 2013 winners, and we’re moving onwards and upwards, with our eye on some new silverware. They weren’t offering any odds on Simon “Benji” Hamilton, as even the TAB know he’ll definitely be first. Back to the footy, as any long season does, we have been hit by injuries, poor weather and European holidays and we have had to call on all of our 40 strong squad. With all of the title contenders still to play everyone is ready to rise to the challenge. We are well into the championship round and we are still in semi-final contention. With 144 dozen Speights on the line, each and every side-line support is very much appreciated! Our draw for the championship round is below:

Our last Hustler of the month, Callum Ross, has managed to get a few phone calls, one in particular from Central America has resulted in a plane ticket to New Zealand and we suspect come mid-August there will be a lot of love in the air. Speaking of love, Hustlers’ co-founder Nathan Lawrence has finally succumbed to the pressure from fellow players and death threats from Natalya’s friends, dropping the knee whilst on their European escapade. He left it very late in the trip, only increasing the suspense from angry friends back home. Preparations for a Hustlers stag do are already under way. The TAB has opened odds on who will be next to join the queue at the altar: $1.20 George Young $1.75 Tim Kerr $5.00 Callum Ross $80.00 Gerwyn “Iceman” Samuel $500.00 Jase “you can’t tie me down” Ghinis. The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DATE

TIME

OPPOSITION

LOCATION

26 Jul

2.45pm

Grammar TEC

Cox’s Bay

2 Aug

2.45pm

College Rifles Bombers

College Rifles

9 Aug

1.00pm

Eden Lizards

War Memorial Park

One of our key sponsors - Kiwi Pong, is holding a beer pong tournament on 2 August, commencing at 6.00pm. Come and support our team and the club. Entries are limited to 32 teams, at a price of $20 per team. To register get in touch with Susan - susan@ponsonbyrugby.co.nz. All supporters welcome! The Herne Bay Hustlers are proudly sponsored by: Genesis Communication Kiwi Pong, Ellis Terry, Nature's Support, JAG Kitchens, Germar Limited, Ray White Ponsonby, Metro Law, Zurri Hairdressing, Corporate Cabs, Grey Lynn Butcher, Hall Machinery Ltd, Ponsonby Central , Conbrio Technology, George FM, Deploy Partners, RIPD, Wynyard Wood, Countdown Grey Lynn, Countdown Richmond Rd, Countdown PN Vinegar Lane, Fivo WiFi. (GEORGE YOUNG) F www.ponsonbyrugby.co.nz/herne-bay-hustlers

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

PONSONBY NEWS+ August 2014

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS

AMANDA BETTS AND MONTY Amanda Betts is former co-founder/owner/director of Red11 Models, which is where she met the then-Bowie. When the pair met Monty was a little nine week old puppy, “not much bigger than a size 10 Converse Chuck Taylor,” she says. “One of the models at the time, a guy called Red, needed someone to look after this little klutzy guy with really big paws and a tongue so long, it dragged on the ground.” Red had saved Monty from the SPCA and was trying to find a home for him. Amanda told Ponsonby News, “My son and partner had talked about getting a dog... Our landlord said it was ok to get a goat, but not a dog. We couldn’t be the weirdos who walked around with a goat on a leash. So we dismissed the idea of getting a dog.”

“As cute as he was, he peed and pooed everywhere…in the bathroom, on the floor in the lounge, in the back seat of my car, and, his most spectacular choice for toilet, on my bed. I was thrilled to be able to hand him back to Red on Monday. Red asked if we could have him one more night. It was only one more night, so why not? I took him home, and we never gave him back. We changed his name to Monty - my son and partner argue over who named him. He suits Monty, though.”

photography: Luke White

It was 2007 when Amanda had just returned home from a model scouting trip to New York, when Red brought Monty into the agency asking if anyone could look after him for the weekend - Red was working and didn’t want to leave him alone in his apartment all day. So Amanda volunteered and took Monty home for the weekend.

Monty, Amanda Betts and her son Izaac

Monty used to go into the agency with Amanda every day until she left in December last year. He loves people, babies and other dogs, though is frightened of little yappy dogs... and kittens. Amanda says, “Because he has such a beautiful nature, long skinny legs, a pretty face and is so chilled out and obedient, he ended up doing modelling jobs. He’s done German GQ Magazine, NZ Weddings, M2 Magazine and has even been in a television commercial. His best modelling job yet though (and it would be a tough one to beat), was the very first publicity shot of Monty posing with Lorde shot by Garth Badger. Lorde was amazing with him, and Monty didn’t care. Everyone is the same in a dog’s eyes.” Monty is now seven years old. He has his own hashtag (#montymodeldog). He often sits in the car like a person and is super-chilled despite how massive he is. We don’t know exactly what breed/s Monty is, though the vet reckons he’s a Rhodesian Ridgeback crossed with a Great Dane. I always just say he’s an oversized Licorice Allsort. Because he’s so massive (though he thinks he’s small) he needs lots of free time to run around like crazy. So I exercise him almost every day usually on Point Chev beach and often in Kendalls Bay (my favourite bush/beach walk), or at Meola Reef or Jagger’s Bush down by the zoo. He eats anything, and although he is like a small pony and we feed him three times a day, he doesn’t actually eat that much.

SPCA’s Lucky is a quiet, patient older cat. Raven is a Staffy Cross pup - a real sweetie.

He has the most gorgeous best friends in Bob Dog the Border Collie and Orca the Black Labrador. I was watching Monty interacting with some dogs he’d never met and I reckon we as humans could learn some stuff from dogs. Imagine if we accepted and struck up conversations with people as they were and just enjoyed them despite where they come from, what colour they are, what they do, what they’re wearing or what they look like. This world would be a way happier place. Our life is a way happier place because of Monty. I believe he’s an angel with clipped wings stuck in a dog’s body. He’s been responsible for helping many people overcome their fear of big dogs, children have ridden him like a pony and he has been one of the greatest gifts we’ve ever been fortunate enough to have encountered. Monty helps bond people together.

90 PONSONBY NEWS+ August 2014

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS ASK ALEX

JOIN SPCA AUCKLAND FOR THE SWEETEST FUNDRAISER OF THE YEAR! MONDAY 25 AUGUST SEES THE RETURN OF CUPCAKE DAY FOR THE SPCA AND WE NEED your help. Whether you bake, sell or eat cupcakes on August 25, you’ll be making a huge difference to the lives of thousands of injured, abandoned and abused animals across Auckland. There are lots of different ways to get involved with Cupcake Day 2014: • Register as a cook, bake cupcakes and sell them to your friends. • Get your schoolmates involved by hosting a Cupcake Day at your school. • Get your boss to shout a Cupcake Day morning tea. • Collect donations from your friends and family. All proceeds raised from baking and selling cupcakes this Cupcake Day 2014, will go to support the fight against animal cruelty in New Zealand. So get involved, and register now at www.spcacupcakeday.co.nz How it works: 1. Register at www.spcacupcakeday.co.nz to become a cupcake baker - you can register as an individual, school or team. 2. Download your cupcake kit, which includes poster and flyer templates to help you make your Cupcake Day a success. 3. Tell your mates! 4. Get the test-kitchen going - whip up some taste-tests so you can perfect your baking and decorating skills. 5. Bake, bake, bake; and sell, sell, sell! (don’t forget to use SPCA Blue Tick eggs) 6. Count up your donations and send them in. 7. Receive your certificate of participation. 8. You’re done! Thank you for helping us to raise money to fight animal cruelty. For more information and for inspiration (including delicious recipes) go to www.spcacupcakeday.co.nz or visit the SPCA Auckland Facebook page at www.facebook.com/SPCAFriends

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Each month Dr Alex Melrose answers readers’ pet related issues. Email yours to: alex@vetcare.net.nz

Q:

I have been thinking about having my mate Zac’s ‘Boy Op’ due to the reality that this writer will require the odd day or part time basis, whereas Zac can hopefully attend Barkley Manor.

My intention and my work situation allows for Zac to accompany me most days. However there will be days when this will not be ideal for Zac and I would like for him to be able to attend daycare for his happiness, socialisation and training. Hence, I am thinking about Zac going under the knife and I am wondering about what is involved during and after the procedure. Zac also in the last two weeks has had some vaccinations at VetCare and I need to check whether Zac requires any additional booster vaccinations. Also what would be the stand down period for removal of stitches? He has a lovely nature and I have no doubt he will interact well with the other dogs and be a good team member for the staff at Barkley Manor. SIMON by email. Zac sounds like one lucky dog. I totally understand your reservations about neutering him, it’s natural to wince at the thought of such delicately positioned surgery. The health and societal benefits are pretty clear however and of course it’s required for entry into Barkley Manor. As long as we do the surgery around 6 months of age, rather than younger when it can affect skeletal development, there really are no negatives to neutering. Even lovely dogs like Zac are much more likely to have problems socialising peacefully with other dogs if left entire. It’s just a day stay with one skipped breakfast and one slightly groggy night, the procedure taking about 20 minutes. He’ll be a little sore for one day or so but will be trotting around happily in no time. Good painkillers, modern anaesthetics, body warming, gentle surgery and IV fluids all assist his speedy recovery. He’s had all his vaccinations now for this year and we just need him to take it easy for 7-10 days with his sutures. PN (DR ALEX MELROSE, BVSC, MRCVS) F

A:

VETCARE GREY LYNN, 408 Great North Road T: 09 361 3500 www.vetcare.net.nz F PN

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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LOOK... WHO IS IN THE ZOO!

BIG CATS IN THE ‘HOOD’ CHANCES ARE, IF YOU’VE VISITED US, OR LIVE RELATIVELY CLOSE TO AUCKLAND ZOO you’ll have heard that great growly roar of our lions. In the right conditions, a lion’s roar can be heard for up to 8km away and soar up to 114 decibels! These big cats get vocal to proclaim their territory, communicate with each other and also to rally stray members of a pride if under threat. They mostly roar at night when the air is thinner and their sound can travel further. Tigers are also good at making themselves heard. They roar to communicate with other tigers, and their roars can carry up to 3km. Unlike most big cats (that have triangular -shaped cords), lions and tigers have vocal cords or folds that are flat and square shaped and can withstand strong stretching and shearing.

Breakfast with our tigers!

Our lion pride - male Ngala and females Kura, Amira and Sheeka and our Sumatran tiger group (males Jaka and Berani and female Molek) are both part of zoo-based international breeding programmes and important advocates for their wild cousins. African lions are now listed as ‘Vulnerable’ on the IUCN Red List. Sadly, it’s estimated that approximately 30% of their population has been lost in the past 20 years - due to loss of habitat, poaching and conflict with farmers.

AUCKLAND ZOO IS OFFERING LOCALS A RARE OPPORTUNITY TO ENJOY BREAKFAST AT its tiger exhibit on Saturday 9 August as part of our Big Cat Weekend (9-10 August) celebrations. The 7.30am -10am tiger breakfast will be raising vital funds to help tigers in the wild. Enjoy a hot breakfast, watch our tigers eat theirs, and listen to a tiger keeper talk about these critically endangered big cats. You’ll also be treated to a special cheetah encounter and a serval encounter.

Sumatran tigers are facing an even tougher time with an estimated wild population of only around 400 animals remaining in isolated pockets of protected land - due to poaching, illegal logging, and agricultural encroachment into their forest home. You can help!

Tickets cost $125 per person, with all proceeds going to the Auckland Zoo Conservation Fund to support tigers in the wild. To book, phone 360 3805. After breakfast, you’re welcome to stay and get along to other Big Cat Weekend activities, including encounters, big-cat themed story time, face-painting, and other fun games and activities.

Auckland Zoo supports the work of 21st Century Tiger project. The incredible efforts of its Tiger Protection & Conservation Units have contributed to tiger numbers increasing in the world heritage site of Sumatra’s Kerinci Seblat National Park. A key threat to this tiger’s survival (as is the case for orangutans, rhinos and elephants) is the destruction of their habitat for oil palm plantations.

Plus, be sure to fill in the big cat activity sheet to go in the draw to win a behind-the -scenes Big Cat (lion or tiger) experience! Age restrictions apply. Full details on the Tiger Breakfast and weekend activities at www.aucklandzoo.co.nz

photography: Brian Cairns

There are some easy ways you can help. Use Auckland Zoo’s online Palm Oil-Free shopping guide, support Unmask Palm Oil www.unmaskpalmoil.com and only purchase wood products that are Forest Stewardship Council approved. You can also donate to the Auckland Zoo Conservation Fund online at www.aucklandzoo.co.nz/donate to help projects like 21st Century Tiger.

World orangutan expert Dr Ian Singleton speaks at Takapuna’s Bruce Mason Centre on Tuesday 19 August.

Inspirational night out for orangutans WORLD-RENOWNED ORANGUTAN EXPERT AND CONSERVATIONIST DR IAN SINGLETON visits Auckland this month for a one-off public talk, ‘In Your Hands’, at the Bruce Mason Centre on Tuesday 19 August at 7pm. The director of the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme, a conservation project Auckland Zoo has supported for over 12 years, has devoted his life to saving this critically endangered great ape and its forest home. Active in many orangutan projects, Dr Singleton is also co-founder of Earth 4 Orangutans, which is working to raise funds to establish an Orangutan Haven and Conservation Education Centre in north Sumatra. All profits from the 19 August talk, supported by Auckland Zoo, will go towards establishing this important new haven and centre. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to hear Dr Singleton share his inspirational journey, the latest news from the field, the pressing issues facing the orangutan and what we can all do to help ensure the survival of this remarkable great ape. Tickets cost $20 per person. Purchase from Auckland Zoo via phone: 360 3805, or in person at Auckland Zoo Info Centre. Visit www.aucklandzoo.co.nz and www.earth4orangutans.com

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: LOGAN GRANGER

Employee allowances - recent changes The IRD has recently updated the rules relating to Employee Allowances. It is essential for both employers and employees to be mindful of these changes. These changes come into effect on 1 April 2015 where they will replace the previous rules in relation to accommodation, allowances and reimbursement payments. It is important to note that in some cases these rules can be retrospectively applied. The purpose of the changes to the act is to eliminate ambiguities in the rules and to bring greater clarity, so the taxpayer has a greater understanding of how to comply with their tax obligations. Key changes - Accommodation Time limits on out of town accommodation. The time limit applies to secondments where accommodation payments are deemed non-taxable for two years. Capital projects are non-taxable for three years. Canterbury earthquake recovery projects have a special transition rule (five years). The IRD has a full list of these changes on their webpage. For example, Rick lives in Hamilton and his job is moved permanently to Auckland but his wife and kids remain in Hamilton. He returns to Hamilton every second weekend. Rick’s employer pays him an accommodation allowance towards his Auckland accommodation costs. Rick and his employer expect he will work at the Auckland workplace for more than two years. The accommodation allowance is not tax exempt under the two-year rule. However, if Rick and his employer only expect Rick to be working for no more than two years in Hamilton, the accommodation allowance is tax exempt. This means it does not have be declared as income by Rick and his employer can record it as an expense and not as a part of wages or salary and PAYE. Meals Payments for meals linked to work travel are exempt, limited to three months at particular

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area of work. Meal payments and light refreshments outside of work-related travel are exempt without a time limit at places such as a conference. Clothing Payments provided for distinct work clothing, such as uniform will be exempt from tax (contrary to the fringe benefit tax rules). Plain clothes will also be exempt for those who are required to wear ordinary clothing instead of a uniform (for example, an under-cover police officer). Certain conditions must be met to be exempt. The Inland Revenue has the power to determine payments made to wider groups or a class of employees, whether the expense payment is taxable. These changes can also be back dated by employers from 1 January 2011 (if they have not taken a tax position before 6 December 2012). The IRD also has a full list of exceptions related to back dating on their website. The full extent of these changes may be quite difficult to understand. If you would like to seek further information relative to these changes, or general support with your business services, we can provide you with tax tips and guidance here at Johnston Associates. (LOGAN GRANGER) F PN Disclaimer - While all care has been take, Johnston Associates Chartered Accountants Ltd and its staff accept no liability for the content of this article; always see your professional advisor before taking any action that you are unsure about. JOHNSTON ASSOCIATES, 202 Ponsonby Road T: 09 361 6701 www.jacal.co.nz

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: METROLAW GOT A LEGAL QUESTION? ASK MICHAEL@METROLAW.CO.NZ

Email Michael with your question and include PONSONBY NEWS in the subject line. Michael Hemphill, a partner of the firm will answer one topical question each month.

Q:

I live with my partner, we have been together for 10 years and have a child. However, the house we live in is owned solely by my partner. We are in the process of refinancing the property and the bank has said that they want me as a borrower on the loan even though I am not on the title. Should I agree to this?

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It is a little unusual to be recorded as a borrower when you do not have a registered interest in the property that is used as security. Your liability under a loan will almost certainly be joint and several with all co-borrowers meaning that the bank may call on any one of you to repay all amounts outstanding to the bank. However, as you are not on the title to the property you may have difficulty in relying on the property as collateral for your loan.

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You are likely to have an interest in property owned by your partner or spouse. The law on the sharing of property applies to marriages, civil unions and de facto relationships. In your circumstances your relationship would be a de facto relationship under the Property (Relationships) Act 1976. Relationship property is usually divided equally. The home that you live in is most likely to be relationship property whether you jointly own it or if only one of you owns it, so even though the property you live in may be owned entirely by your partner you are likely to have a beneficial entitlement to half of it.

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A:

Your rights under the Act usually only crystallise if you separate from your partner or if one of you passes away. In the meantime, your partner could borrow more money against the property, take a second mortgage out on the property or even sell the property without your knowledge and the bank may still call upon you to repay any amounts outstanding. This is obviously less than ideal.

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TO BOOK ADVERTISING: ask about our special positions! Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

If the bank is requiring you to be registered as a borrower on the loan and you intend to make repayments then it would be in your interests for the ownership of the property to be changed to reflect your interest. You would want the protection of owning half of the property as your are liable for a debt in respect of that property. If you and your partner do not wish for the property to become relationship property then it is possible to ‘opt out’ of the Act through a Relationship Property Agreement. This can define what property is intended to remain separate and can provide for a sole interest or an unequal sharing of the property if this is what you intend. It is important to deal with the property in your respective wills. You do not want to find yourself potentially homeless and in debt if your partner dies and you would not want this to happen to your partner. The best way to deal with this is to discuss your expectations with your partner and then take steps to put your plans into place legally. Although you could personally make a claim against your partner’s estate if they pass away first, this would be costly in time, money and emotion. It is worth considering whether insurance is a good option for retiring debt in such an event. My final advice is of course to seek proper professional legal advice. Home will kits are almost always a false economy, most of the results that I see are flawed in some way if not just ineffective. (MICHAEL HEMPHILL) F PN Disclaimer - This article is for general information purposes only. If you have a legal problem you should seek advice from a lawyer. Metro Law does not accept any liability other than to its clients and then only when advice is sought on specific matters.

METROLAW, Level 2, 36 Williamson Avenue T: 09 929 0800 www.metrolaw.co.nz

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS SMART MONEY # 7 How long is a piece of string? Imagining your retirement Retirement will come for all of us, sooner or later. Have you taken the time to imagine how your ideal retirement might look? Do you envisage travelling each year, or do you long for a simpler life on a lifestyle block somewhere? For some of us the status quo with the addition of some grandkids running around sounds blissful. The answer is very personal to you and your family, as are your timeframes until retirement and means to get there, however the one answer that is true for all of us is that a little planning today will make achieving our ideal retirement ever more likely. With Superannuation currently allowing income of a little over $14,600 per person for couples and $17,600 for single persons sharing accommodation it is likely that you will

have to fund much of your retirement lifestyle above the bare minimum yourself. So how much will you need? The Financial Services Council recently put forward a goal nest Jocelyn Weatherall Phil Ashton Richard Knight egg for a ‘comfortable retirement’ of $350,000 for retirees which has been much debated in the media, some saying it is too • Make sure you get maximum benefit from your low, some too high; our response to this is ‘how long KiwiSaver (see last month’s article), if not joined is a piece of string?’. Depending on your answers already then join today! to the above questions your goal nest egg will vary • Consider ‘what if scenarios’ and attend to your wildly from other readers and definitely be different legal needs (Wills, power of attorneys etc.) and from the $350,000. Basing what is likely to be one insurance matters seeking advice from suitable of the defining goals to see you through hopefully professionals. 20 plus years of your life on the averaged estimate ($350,000) just isn’t smart in our book. What we do Whether you are confident and knowledgeable enough agree on is that you should be planning to supplement to go it alone or you would rather seek the advice of your Superannuation entitlement; this planning may a professional to put your plan together the one thing include some of the following (and then some): we implore you to do is take an interest in your future and develop a personalised financial plan today. • Plan today and write it down, sit down with your family and map it all out together • The sooner you plan the greater the probability you will achieve your goals • Try to be mortgage free at least before your 60th birthday • Start a flexible savings/investment scheme for any disposable income above the minimum for KiwiSaver • If you get a pay rise put at least some of the increase in to some sort of savings scheme

Needing guidance? Feel free to speak with us. www.rutherfordrede.co.nz Ph. 09 361 3670 Jocelyn jweatherall@rutherfordrede.co.nz Phil pashton@rutherfordrede.co.nz or Richard rknight@rutherfordrede.co.nz Opinions are of a general nature and is not to be considered financial advice, specific advice is recommended to be sought before action is taken. Disclosure Statement(s) relating to our advisers are available on request and free of charge.

DEVELOPING A TOUCH POINT STRATEGY TO INCREASE YOUR SALES Kristin Moolman from Revisit Solutions specialises in systemisation. When things get busy it is natural for some leads to slip through the cracks. This can occur when we receive an initial enquiry from a prospect that may not be ready to buy right now. However they are in your store on your website for a reason. If people don’t purchase then and there, they typically intend to come back and purchase. Then life gets in the way. Another company with a similar offering comes along and because your business may not be top-of-mind at the time, the prospect may well buy from your competitor. So how do you keep someone ‘warm’ until they are ready to buy? You can send out promotional material based on their interest but who has time to customise and follow up with every single lead? Developing a touch point strategy can help you stay top-of-mind and greatly enhance your chances of converting that sale. When a prospect first contacts us, our chances of converting that sale are only 2%. The sixth touch point onwards increases your chances of conversion to over 80%. 48% of sales people give up after that first touch point. That’s a lot of missed opportunity. So what does a touch point strategy look like? By mixing up your marketing to include educational, value-add emails, something sent in the post, conversations, a video testimonial from a delighted customer, all delivered over time will help to build a rapport and trust with your prospect, increasing your sales conversion rates. Designing this strategy around your offerings and automating its delivery helps your business grow and retain customers. Try it for yourself! F PN www.revisitsolutions.co.nz The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS WINTER SLOWS AUCKLAND HOME SALES HEATING OPTIONS FOR YOUR HOME The type of heating system you select will greatly influence NUMBERS, BUT VALUES EDGE UP The onset of winter had its traditional impact on the Auckland property market in terms of sales numbers and new property listings during June. However, prices continued to edge up during the month. “The average sales price during June was $714,054, which was up 1.6 percent on May’s average price, and the second highest average price on record,” said Wendy Alexander, Chief Executive Officer of Barfoot & Thompson. “While the number of sales at 1037 for the month was lower by 6.5 percent on those for May, and right in line with those for May last year, the demand for higher value properties from prospective buyers saw the average sales price increase by $11,000 over that for May. “The average sales price has now risen by 9.9 percent over what it was in June 2013. “During the month we sold 179 homes for in excess of $1 million, which represents 17.3 percent of all the homes sold, and 35.9 percent of the total sales value of all homes sold. “Even six months ago, sales of this number of high value homes would have been exceptional. “What this underlines is that while supply continues to lag behind demand, values for high end homes will climb. “With close to a third of all June properties selling for less than $500,000, the median sales price for the month edged down by 2.9 percent on that for May to $626,500.

how warm and comfortable your home is during those long, cold winter months. There are many heating options available, but one heating system stands out from the rest in terms of performance and comfort. That system is European designed and manufactured gas boiler radiator central heating - the heating system that heats your whole home. What is radiator central heating? A central boiler running on natural gas or LPG heats water; this then circulates through a network of pipes to a series of radiator panels. The hot water heats these radiator panels before returning to the boiler to be reheated and re-circulated. The radiators heat quickly and provide a clean silent draught free form of whole house-heating. Why choose radiator (whole-house) central heating? Comfortable and healthy - gentle ambient heat Radiant heating is widely accepted as the most comfortable form of heating. Naturally silent it delivers consistent warmth. And it doesn’t rely on forced air, it provides a gentle ambient form of heat for the whole house, not just one or two rooms. Controllable - heat where and when you need it Radiator Central Heating is highly efficient and able to heat your whole house. A fully programmable thermostatically controlled Radiator Central Heating system gives you the flexibility to heat the whole house or heat different rooms to different temperatures, at different times of the day. www.betterheatingsolutions.co.nz F PN

“The median price tends to be more volatile than the average price, but at $626,500 it is 8.2 percent higher than the median price for the 2013 year. “The number of new listings in June was 1149, our lowest number this year and down 12.8 percent on those for May. While a fall in new listings is a trend commonly seen at the start of winter, it will add pressure to lack of choice in coming months. “At month end we had 3274 properties listed, our lowest number for 5 months. Compared to the number of properties available at this time of year over the past 10 years, choice remains very limited.” F PN

RAVAGED BY TIME AND NATURE Part of the Adventurer collection inspired by the escapades of the rugged yet thoroughly gentlemanly British hero Biggles. The tracks coffee table epitomises beauty made by nature. Railway wood, deeply pitted and grooved by time is salvaged from exotic corners of the globe and paired on a Timothy Oulton classic Spitfire finish leg to showcase PN its natural beauty. F Also available as a console table and available exclusively from: DAWSON’S FURNITURE, 1/1 Holder Place, Rosedale, North Shore, T: 09 476 1121, www.dawsonsfurniture.co.nz

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

TEXTILE MAGIC In a new column, fabric and interiors expert Rebecca Bowering will share her passion for design and textiles every month. I think I probably have the best job in the world and I know I’m lucky to be able to feel and say that. My passion for fabric spans three generations in my family and as part of my job I get to travel and work with creative people. But best of all, I get to bring the Rebecca Bowering treasures I find all over the world back home to share with New Zealanders. These textile treasures become part of their most intimate spaces, part of their lives and make them smile each day. The soft furnishing design industry starts its journey each January. At Maison et Objet and Paris Deco Off, both held in Paris, the industry gathers to attend the latest showings. Meeting each year is a reunion, somewhat of a party, where we talk, compare trends and designs across countries and continents and reignite our love for what we do. We ‘ooh’ and ‘ah’ at the presentations and are often caught grabbing fabrics from their designers so we can touch and feel. These fabric designers are what we call the Les Editeurs; they think outside the square and represent the leading edge for the interior design community. Whether it is the colours, the look and technical weaves, or the design, these Editeurs shine the light on the coming interior trends. Often the colour palette and inspiration is mirrored in the fashion industry. Once upon a time, fashion came first and then interiors, but now it is almost simultaneous. In this column in the coming months, it will be my pleasure to give you a glimpse into this world. I’ll try and be a lens on what is coming through and offer insight into what inspires these extraordinary designers, including the stories they are trying to tell, and how they envisage the fabrics being woven into our physical and emotional lives. Within the context of New Zealand and our own interior design industry, I will share these glorious works of art, fabulous photos and snippets of design theory (and sometimes a complete digression thrown in for good measure). New Zealand is blessed with a fantastic design community. Our interior and furniture designers and architects truly punch way above their weight and we should be rightly proud. As a nation we travel widely and enjoy the aesthetics of life. We have a sophistication that surprises most design visitors Down Under (although I do believe that some think the land is only populated with sheep and hobbits - but that is another story). So watch this space for what is new in colour and design, for the romance and origin of the furnishings. It’ll be fun, I promise! Atelier Textiles owner and managing director Rebecca Bowering explores the latest PN textile trends and new interior design ideas every week. F For more information visit www.atelier.co.nz

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

FRINGE OFFICE MARKETS OFFER NEXT OPPORTUNITIES With the city of Auckland set to see robust economic and population growth over the coming 10 to 15 years, the need for office space will continue apace, a commodity which is currently in short supply. Office vacancy to June 2014 was 8.1% in the Auckland CBD against a long term average of 10% plus. Akira Hobcraft, Commercial Office Leasing Agent for JLL says, “Whilst a fall in vacancy and a rise in rents may be positive for landlords, the occupier market now faces challenges to find suitable space in a preferable location.” Office options for occupiers are dwindling in the CBD and, as a result, demand is reaching out to city fringe office locations. Grafton, Freemans Bay, Grey Lynn and Ponsonby are located within the Fringe Auckland office markets and these areas are beginning to react to positive changes in the wider economy and a tightening of the market in Auckland CBD. As a result, vacancy in the wider Fringe precinct is showing signs of falling. The Grafton, Freemans Bay, Grey Lynn and Ponsonby areas are well connected both into and out of Auckland City via a variety of good transport links. Akira, who specialises in office leasing within these precincts, says, “These areas are highly desirable for occupiers due to the immense amenities, with high densities of retail, restaurants and bars.” Ponsonby is seeing the majority of planned new stock, with Lot 3 on Ponsonby Road currently under construction and Vinegar Lane which will provide an element of commercial space. F PN JONES LANG LASALLE, T: 09 366 1666 www.jll.co.nz

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DEIRDRE TOHILL: LOCAL NEWS possibility of a promenade and when she presented the idea to the actors, they loved it. Her sister, Donough Rees who plays the Matron, had done promenades since she was very young and was not at all daunted by the prospect. This was reassuring to the younger actors who could call on her experience. Most of the spaces are close together so it won’t be a long progression but more like a small tour group in a gallery.

SISTER ANZAC WHEN GEOFF ALLEN ASKED AMANDA REES TO DIRECT HIS PLAY, ‘SISTER ANZAC’ SHE was delighted because it’s a moving story about nurses who served on hospital ships during World War One. On their return when war ended, they received no acknowledgment from the government even though many of them were shellshocked and had been through horrendous experiences. They dealt with terrible wounds and their mental state was constantly challenged. It was very common for them to work a 50 hour stretch with maybe only a two hour catnap. On one occasion 10 New Zealand nurses were mistakenly put on a ship that was mean’t to transport them to hospitals. The vessel was torpedoed and they all drowned. The play tells the story of those who were stationed at ANZAC Cove on the hospital ship Maheno and the women portrayed are fictionalised so ‘SISTER ANZAC is not a documentary. ‘SISTER ANZAC’ has already played at the Torpedo Bay Navy Museum in Devonport but its presentation at the Maritime Museum is really special because it will be a promenade performance with the audience following the actors from room to room. The Museum has amazing spaces such as the pioneer room that rocks as though it’s on water, then they’ll all move to another area, and yet another so the audience is limited to 20 a night. The museum has bent over backwards to accommodate the play even though it could have been performed in the gallery. Nonetheless, Amanda became excited at the

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Donough describes the nurse’s uniforms as incredibly hot with long skirts, two petticoats, long sleeves with only the face uncovered. The garments would have been difficult to move round in even though the nurses were constantly on the run. It was so hot in the cabins, many slept on deck before the wounded started to arrive, then they had to cope with negotiating below deck in restrictive clothing. They were incredibly stoic and displayed extraordinary courage and endurance. Much of their nursing also involved keeping morale high. They had to tap into their own resources to keep the wounded men happy by singing to them, writing letters for them, reading to them if they were blinded because they were aware many of the men would be away from home for a long time. And there was always laughter in order to keep up their own spirits when they were in that high state of exhaustion and anxiety. The story hasn’t been told before and Amanda wouldn’t be surprised if someone picked it up for maybe a TV production. She would like to put it on again in 2015 but that would be funding dependent so this performance could be a last hurrah. Geoff’s wide research is based on stories that are a drama on their own but he’s taken five nurses’ stories and put them into one character. For Donough, her part has taken her into a different world and it has been an eye-opener to the stuff of humanity displayed by a group of women whose duties were outside normal life and discharged unstintingly under extreme danger. Amanda’s feelings are similar to Donough’s and she is grateful to the Navy for their assistance and support that has been consistent throughout preparation and rehearsals. She feels privileged to be in the position to retell a really passionate story. For her, playing it in the Maritime Museum is special because it replicates the intimate space the nurses shared with the wounded soldiers. Sister ANZAC plays at the Maritime Museum from 6 - 10 August at 7.30pm This unique and intimate experience is limited to 20 audience members for each performance so PN early booking is advised. (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F

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MY FAVOURITE ROOM

TINA MOORE Tina Moore is co-owner of boutique marketing agency Media JAM, where she specialises in creating content for print, digital and social media. When Tina’s not busy with work, you'll find her working out and coaching gymnastics at Ponsonby's Crossfit Quattro, or in her kitchen cooking up a storm for her blog teenymoore.com. “I live with my partner Rowan, an energetic Cairn terrier named Buddy, and a small, aloof cat called Charlie. We live on Jervois Road, right next to what used to be the Ponsonby Bowling Club, currently a major construction site. I've worked and lived in and around the Greater Ponsonby area for a number of years... I love the area, it has such a unique character and vibe. This is my favourite room, the lounge, although we call it the 'red room' due to the fullon red velvet curtains. We use it for watching TV and occasionally hosting very decent house parties! The red room is my favourite room because I love the natural light. It has floor to ceiling windows on two sides so it's always sunny and warm. On cold days, the gas fire (which you can't see in the picture) keeps things cosy. And the red velvet curtains give it a major luxury factor at night. My favourite thing in the room is Buddy! He loves to sleep in the sun on the couch (as you can see). The giant goldfish painting on the right is a remnant of a custom billboard created by the Cut Collective for an advertising project that Rowan worked on. The crazy pixel artwork on the left is a depiction of New York City by the artist eBoy. I also love the two big terrariums - Rowan and I coincidentally bought these for each other on Valentine's Day this year. Weird.” F PN Media JAM, 101 Jervois Road, T: 021 313 440, www.mediajam.co.nz

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UNDER-FLOOR HEATING AND TILED SHOWER SOLUTIONS Having heated more than 55,000 homes over the last 20 years, Warmup enables you to comfortably heat a space in an economically and environmentally friendly manner. Warmup under-tile heating is ideal for renovations and is the only product in its class that is BRANZ appraised for use in both internal wet and dry areas of a building. The system can be laid by the Warmup trained installers offering you peace of mind and a lifetime warranty. Warmup under-floor heating is laid directly under tiles and carpet, avoiding intermediary heat loss. Maximum effectiveness is achieved when used in conjunction with Warmup insulation boards. Warmup Insulation Boards are an efficient insulation barrier as they reflect the heat upwards into the room instead of allowing heat loss down through the sub-floor below. This increases the response time of your heating and significantly improves energy efficiency and running costs. Offered in a sleek modern design, Warmup’s user-friendly thermostats provide seven-day, fully programmable control over your heating. The Warmup Tiled Shower & Wet-room Solution is BRANZ appraised to meet the demands and needs of specifiers, installers and home owners who want to have confidence in a totally waterproof, peace-of-mind wet area in their bathroom. We use only proven, tested, appraised and code compliant components and offer a 15 year warranty on product and installation. We offer unrestricted shower size and a variety of 316 stainless steel channel drain and centre waste options. Your entire bathroom will be completely waterproofed and ready-to-tile over within 24 hours. Warmup is committed to helping New Zealanders create better and more comfortable homes for the future. F PN WARMUP, Copsey Business Park 2/20 Copsey Place, Avondale T: 0800 927 687 www.warmup.co.nz

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REAL ESTATE UPDATE: KAREN SPIRES

This little piggy went to market While it is hard to imagine spring as we rug up and battle to keep our umbrellas from turning inside out, rest assured the warmer weather is on its way. For us at Bayleys this means preparing for a series of exciting marketing opportunities beginning in September with the Opportunities NZ Expo in the United Kingdom. Bayleys has attended the expo in London and Manchester every year since 2002 to showcase a selection of our vendors’ properties to a United Kingdom audience. The level of interest in pursuing the Kiwi lifestyle has been overwhelming and in the past 12 years Bayleys has introduced United Kingdom investors and purchasers to more than $600 million worth of New Zealand property as a result of the expo and the Bayleys Global magazine distributed there each year. Migrants from the United Kingdom make up 17 per cent of foreign property purchasers in New Zealand. Ponsonby and its surrounding suburbs offer a lifestyle and location that is second to none and so it comes as no surprise that I am seeing more and more demand from overseas buyers in our neighbourhood. Being on the city’s doorstep, the central suburbs will always be highly sought after and held among the trophy neighbourhoods of New Zealand. This is great news for my vendors as it means we can aim high and more often than not exceed expectations. Another one to look out for is the annual Big Call in October - arguably the single largest residential auction campaign in New Zealand. The expert Bayleys auction team, led by Australasian and New Zealand champion Daniel Coulson, is looking to build on the impressive results of the past three years. Thousands of dollars have been invested into the campaign to reach the widest possible audience of potential vendors and buyers and ultimately maximise the value of each home involved. For vendors there is the opportunity to take advantage of heavily discounted advertising across a range of publications leading up to the Big Call.

PONSONBY POST OFFICE RESTAURANT/ RETAIL/OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE This property is an instantly recognised monument on the Auckland skyline, and one of New Zealand’s best known landmark buildings. Situated at the crossroads of St Mary’s Road, College Hill and Jervois Road, the surrounding precinct is home to a mix of convenience retailers, banks, and cafes catering to the office workers along College Hill and the residential suburbs of Ponsonby, Herne Bay, St Marys Bay and Freemans Bay. Signage opportunities are available on the Eastern face of the building with high exposure to College Hill. Originally developed in 1912, the building was originally used as a post office and training centre for postal workers. Enjoying a rich history spanning over a century, the ground floor of this iconic building is vacant for the first time in many years, providing a unique turn-key opportunity for a restaurant operator, or with refurbishment is suitable for a retail operator or service provider. It has undergone substantial renovation and structural work, to achieve its 100% NBS seismic rating. Floor Area:

251m2 (approx.) ground floor Plus a 76m2 courtyard, 25m2 of office space, and basement storage

Chattels:

Commercial Kitchen and bar chattels available if required

Net Rental:

POA

Outgoings:

56.92% share of total outgoings

Zoning:

Residential 7A

An opportunity not to be missed, call the agent below now to secure this prestigious property in the heart of Auckland’s dining and retail precinct. F PN Brice Clark, T: 09 304 1453; M: 027 493 6223 E: brice.clark@rwcauckland.co.nz

And lastly we are all looking forward to the release of the annual Bayleys Waterfront magazine in November. Waterfront is New Zealand’s flagship portfolio of premium waterfront properties for sale across the country. It showcases the pick of the bunch when it comes to beachfront, lakeside and riverfront properties and, regardless of whether or not you are in the market for a property, it is a great coffee table read. Looking at the mix of charming villas and stunning contemporary homes in the area I can see huge potential in showing these off to a far-reaching buyer audience via the Bayleys marketing initiatives mentioned above. I encourage anyone looking to enter the market to get in touch as these are opportunities PN not to be missed. (KAREN SPIRES) F Karen Spires is a Bayleys Real Estate ‘Top Achiever’ - placing her sales data among the top five percent of salespeople within the company.

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JAY PLATT: WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT...

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1. Stansborough wool scarf $115 @ Republic www.republichome.com; 2. Elements candles by Tom Dixon Earth, Air, Fire and Water $188 each @ Simon James Concept Store www.store.simonjamesdesign.com; 3. HourGlass by Lisa Black each unique piece contains a 24K gold plated skull $1750 @ Design55 www.design55.co.nz; 4. Anorak ‘Proud Fox’ towel $110, hand towel $54.90 and mug $29 @ Republic www.republichome.com; 5. Penhaligans ‘Opus 1870’ Eau de Toilette $259 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; 6. Architecturally designed corkscrew by Rondel $284 @ Tessuti www.tessuti.co.nz; 7. ‘Hide and Seek’ mens leather wallet by Bellroy $119.95 @ Needles and Threads www.needlesandthreads.co.nz; 8. Alessi ‘Pop Up’ Stainless Steel Bottle cap remover $125 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz

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1. Whiskey glasses by Normann Copenhagen $147 a pair @ Design Denmark www.designdenmark.co.nz; 2. Digitally printed bulldog cushion $89 @ Republic www.republichome.com; 3. Pepper grinder and pouch by Rondel $376 @ Tessuti www.tessuti.co.nz; 4. Huron slow juicer $599 @ Millys www.millyskitchen.co.nz; 5. Mondaine mens sports watch $445 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; 6. KGDMOF Aka Kingdom - white beanie $39.95 @ Needles and PN Threads www.needlesandthreads.co.nz; 7. Mid 20th Century Leather Americans fireman’s helmet $720 @ Koko Classics www.kokoclassics.com F STYLING: Jay Platt PHOTOGRAPHY: Danilo Santana David, Fisher Santana.

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THE GRASS ROOTS OF PONSONBY REAL ESTATE For many of us our keen interest in Ponsonby real estate means that we are mostly familiar with what our local real estate offices and salespeople are up to. But it seems there is more to their story than just marketing and selling homes; what else are these Ponsonby professionals involved with? This month we invited our local real estate offices to tell us about what their commitments are in supporting local community initiatives, what are they actively involved with or planning for 2015. TIM IRVINE - BARFOOT & THOMPSON, PONSONBY It has been a busy year for us at Barfoot & Thompson Ponsonby not only in the listing and selling of property but also in our endeavours to support the local community. As a company Barfoot & Thompson sponsors the Starship Foundation and last August our Ponsonby branch raised $17,000 with a ‘bucket’ collection and Trade Me auctions of items kindly donated by our fellow Ponsonby retailers. The support from not only our team but the wider community was truly amazing! The total fundraising effort of $200,000 allowed Barfoot & Thompson to purchase two ventilators for Starship and later this year the remaining money will be used to create a new garden area for the Child & Family Unit. Closer to home we support two neighbouring primary schools, Freemans Bay Primary and Ponsonby Primary. It’s great to get behind the local kids to support sporting developments and achievements. Several of our Ponsonby agents also support local organisations such as the Auckland City Mission and Bellyful who provide meals for families with new-born babies and families who are struggling with illness. We would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has helped us achieve these great results, we know fundraising can be a challenge and without the local support this would not be possible. Planning is underway for our annual Starship Foundation fundraiser which we look forward to sharing with our local community in due course. www.barfoot.co.nz BERNADETTE MORRISON - BAYLEYS REAL ESTATE LTD, PONSONBY At Bayleys community is everything. It is at the centre of our business. On a day to day basis we are helping people into a new home and a new neighbourhood. It is only fitting that we give back to the community through a range of sponsorships and charity events each year. At the heart of each community is the local school. Bayleys Ponsonby are proud to sponsor the Inner City Arts Programme together with Master Kelwin Flooring. Starting in June, children from 12 participating primary schools produce artwork for their school exhibitions. The children whose pieces are judged the best receive a book voucher as recognition of their achievement. Their artwork is featured in a public display at New World supermarket in September. Later this year we will once again sponsor the Ponsonby School Fireworks show, a safe and exciting night out for families to celebrate Guy Fawkes.

Bayleys Bernadette Morrison and auctioneer Richard Valentine at Ponsonby Primary’s recent Taste of Ponsonby fund raising evening.

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Bayleys Ponsonby is also a keen sponsor of the Western Springs Associated Football Club and popular Westmere Kid’s Triathlon. Encouraging our kids to keep active is an important part of our community philosophy and also gives us the opportunity to get out on the side lines to cheer on our local team. For members of the football club or inner city school community who list and sell their homes through Bayleys Ponsonby we offer a donation back to the club or school on the unconditional sale of their property. Our support also extends to a national level and for 10 years Bayleys has been the principal sponsor of Blind Foundation guide dogs, raising more than $2.6 million towards the training of guide dog puppies. www.bayleys.co.nz NICOLA KELLAND - KELLANDS REAL ESTATE LTD The Kellands team is very committed to local community sponsorship and events. Currently we have several diverse sponsorships. We have been the proud sponsors of Bayfield School for the past 12 months. This sponsorship involves a significant financial contribution as well as assistance and support with their fund-raising in the form of providing auctioneers and spotters and running events such as quiz nights. Kellands also sponsors the Auckland Architecture Association. We have always had a strong interest in beautifully designed homes and apartment buildings many of which have been designed by some very talented local architects and designers. On the sporting side we support The Pink Dragons. They are an inspirational team of dynamic breast cancer survivors with a zest for life. They participate in the sport of dragon boat racing regardless of age or athletic ability. They paddle to support each other, to stay strong and to have heaps of fun doing it. Finally we supported Epsom Rotary, with an auctioneer and prizes when they held their Annual Lawn Bowls tournament, barbeque and fund-raising evening to raise funds for Randwick Park Primary School to assist them to excel at sport. www.kellands.co.nz STEVEN GLUCINA - L J HOOKER The L J Hooker Group is one of the major sponsors of cystic fibrosis and has raised several million dollars to assist children with this life threatening disorder on both sides of the Tasman. The Ponsonby office regularly participates in the annual appeal and has done numerous fundraising activities over the years for this very worthy cause - participating in the opening of the Ponsonby Christmas lights and various sausage sizzles at the Ponsonby Day Markets. The Ponsonby office is the major sponsor of the Richmond Rovers Rugby League Club here in Grey Lynn and has separately supported their junior league academy by providing funds for sports equipment, coaching camps and clothing for these talented young players.

Bayleys Inner City Arts Programme on public display at Victoria Park New World Supermarket. PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS On top of that, the L J Hooker Ponsonby and Sandringham offices offer $1,000 to the club’s funds for any property sold that club members or supporters introduced to our offices. The Richmond Rovers celebrated their centenary last year and former players came from all around the world for the long weekend of celebrations. We have supported the Richmond Primary books for schools programme and do an annual Easter colouring competition for children with generous prizes for winning participants. If you require a marquee for your fundraising event, the L J Hooker marquee is available, free of charge for any charitable group to use within the central suburbs. We are currently seeking requests from groups for grants for 2015 and if we can assist you, contact the office at 190 Ponsonby Road with your cause and tell us how we can help you. www.ljhooker.co.nz SIMON DAMERELL - RAY WHITE, PONSONBY Coming up to 19 years operating in Greater Ponsonby, the team at Ray White Damerell Group have spent many years helping throughout the community to make our little slice of heaven the best it can be. With a team not afraid to muck in, we often get our hands and gumboots dirty with clean up projects and environmental projects throughout the Greater Ponsonby and Point Chevalier area. Such as our efforts last year in planting over 200 plants along Meola Creek to help stabilise the creeks beds and stop them from washing away in strong rain. In June this year, we held our annual clean up of our local Coxs Bay and the neighbouring stream in collaboration with Hayden Smith from Sea Cleaners, the Water Care Trust and help from approximately 25 local families and children. The removal of this rubbish is vital in protecting our marine environment as it washes into the Waitemata Harbour.

We have also been assisting both Westmere and Bayfield schools in their fundraising activities to replace buildings suffering from weather tightness issues. Ronald McDonald House and City Mission have again benefited from our team’s efforts. If you have any local projects that you would like some extra help with please feel free to contact the office on T: 09 376 2186 www.rwponsonby.co.nz ROSS BRADER - PROFESSIONALS, LOCHORES REAL ESTATE MREINZ The Professionals have proudly supported many community initiatives and events for 18 years since we opened our original inner city office at Three Lamps, Ponsonby in 1996 and we continue to support the local community from our Pt Chevalier and Grey Lynn branches. Our major sponsorship supports the NZ Child Cancer Foundation. In conjunction with the Professionals NZ Group, we have raised almost $4,000,000 over the last 20 years and this has been used to purchase two Family Places in Auckland and Wellington, the purchase and maintenance of two holiday homes in Taupo and Queenstown and in 2007 towards the purchase of a National Centre in Auckland. Professionals Group is incredibly passionate about the work the Foundation does for children and their families affected by cancer. We recognise every week there are three children diagnosed with cancer and every year there are over 100,000 treatments. We truly admire the work the Foundation undertakes to ensure that ‘every child and their family walking the child cancer journey will never feel alone’. Locally we are members of the BISC group supporting Pt Chevalier and Westmere Schools, Pasadena Intermediate and Western Springs College and have also provided sponsorship for events at local schools and many quiz nights. We are a main sponsor of the Pt Chevalier Plunket Group and have in the past sponsored the West End Cup. We are keen to assist any community groups so please feel free to run proposals past us at team@sellrealty.co.nz or call Ross Brader M: 0274 755 977 www.sellrealty.co.nz

Kellands are proud sponsors of Bayfield School in Herne Bay, through our network we organised for the children to participate in a fun day at the BASF at Auckland University. Just look at the fun they had!

Professionals Group Chairman Eddie Winkel and CEO Mike Henderson with the cheque presented to the Child Cancer Foundation. The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Above: Ray White Damerell Group muck in to clean-up areas in the greater Ponsonby and Pt Chevalier areas. DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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BIRD OF THE MONTH I decided to take a different tack to normal for this Bird of the Month. In many sanctuaries, reserves and forested areas the two most common participants in the dawn chorus and the most vocal of songbirds are the tui and bellbird.

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Tui are widespread and common throughout all of New Zealand, both in forested areas and within cities. Their presence in suburbia is limited to areas with flowering and fruiting tress such as kowhai, puriri, fuschia and flax. They will travel 10 kilometres daily to feed if there are rich sources of flowering plants outside their nesting territory. Tui are the largest of our honey eaters, with its two smaller family members, bellbird and stitchbird, regularly bullied away from nectar. Tui appear black at a distance but are actually many shades of blue, green and bronze. They have white throat tufts and are extremely noisy. They have a wide array of calls, ranging from grunts and coughs to the full melody that is often heard in our forests. They are noisy fliers and can often be seen diving and twisting at remarkable speeds through the canopy. On numerous occasions I have ducked or dodged for fear of clocking a tui to the head. Tui are found on most offshore islands and all the main islands of New Zealand. They have a larger subspecies on the Chatham Islands and are absent from the Poor Knights most likely due to competition from the high density of bellbirds. They live in native forest, scrub, gardens and in suburban parks. They follow the seasonal flowering of plants and so there is a lot of local movement within populations.

12 12; Local Herne Bay residents, Brian and Zana Ward of Systems Commercial Furniture with Mitchell and Denise Stronge of BBQ's & More. These locals were enjoying the warm Mediterranean waters of Cleopatra's Bath House at Ruin Bay, TURKEY, while catching up on local news.

Bellbirds are the most widespread honeyeater in the South Island, but they are uncommon in Auckland and Northland. They rapidly declined in the area in the 1860s and despite many attempts to reintroduce them to mainland sites they have been slow to repopulate. They are small, green and their song is as equally present in forests as the tui. They compete directly with tui for food. They are an important part of the ecosystem as they are a pollinator for many native trees and shrubs. Bellbirds feed mostly on nectar although occasionally on insects and fruit. Their song is more bell-like than the tui, with less grunts or coughs. They have a repetitive, harsh alarm call (often the first sound you’ll hear if a morepork has been spotted during the day). Tiritiri Matangi is one of the best sites to witness tui and bellbirds in a natural environment. They are both very common on the island and along with the stitchbird make up the honeyeater family. There is a dominant hierarchy of feeding on Tiritiri which can be seen at the feeding boxes that were designed for stitchbirds. Tui push bellbirds and stitchbirds away from natural flowers, and then the bellbirds rule the feeding boxes. Tui are extremely aggressive and the feeding boxes have been sized with entrance holes to only allow bellbirds and stitchbirds to access the nectar. Any time of the year is a good time to see these birds on Tiritiri, and if you want to see tui in your own backyard, get PN planting! (FINN MCLENNAN- ELLIOTT) F

13 13; Terri Heard is a Ponsonby local who took her copy of Ponsonby News to the Rainforest World Music Festival in Borneo, MALAYSIA recently. She tells us, "The festival was unlike anything I've every experienced! People from all walks of life coming together to celebrate music and cultures of the world. The festival site is nestled between the jungle and the ocean - an incredible place to boogie the day or night away! "Although the weather was hot and humid my Ponsonby News came in very handy during a sudden downpour one afternoon. Needless to say, it was a tad too soggy to bring back home with me."

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MILLY NOLAN: DESIGNER GIFTS

Goldrush From earthy metallics to an extravagant sparkle, using gold in a living space has been making a comeback of late. With just the right touch, a mixture of metallic accents in varying hues will add a whole new level of glamour to your home. Here’s a few of our favourite items that offer the perfect hint of gold, without being at all pretentious.

General Eclectic Gatsby Cushion, $105 With its geometric pattern in shades of charcoal, grey and gold, this eye-catching cushion will add a touch of glamour to your living space.

Mamasita Moroccan Leather Pouf, $250 Handmade in Marrakesh, these leather goatskin poufs are the perfect addition to your home - ideal as a glamorous footrest, stool or side table.

Kitchen Aid Platinum Stand Mixer, $1149 Make cakes in style with this Kitchen Aid platinum stand mixer. Made to perform and built to last, this gold beauty will be your kitchen’s prize possession.

House Doctor Stainless Steel Thermos, $80 Perfect for any excursion, this stainless steel thermos is as practical as it is good looking. It will keep your drinks icy cold in summer and comfortingly hot in winter.

Leff Amsterdam Block Index Alarm Clock, $125 Small in size but strong in appearance, this lovely gold alarm clock tells an interesting story, not just the time.

Flux Boutique Antler Sculpture, $399 This one-of-a-kind sculpture is hand-made from the antlers of a New Zealand Wapiti Stag, which are painted in gloss black and dipped in gold paint, before being cast in solid concrete.

House Doctor Sola Tray Set, $285 Contrasting textures combine in this stunning tray set by Danish company House Doctor. Simple yet effective, these trays look just as good out of use.

Citta Diamond Coffee Cup Set, $80 With its elegant gold-foiled detail, this set of four coffee cups, is ideal for both everyday use and entertaining. (MILLY NOLAN) F PN All products available from www.mildredandco.com

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PONSONBY KITCHENS IN THE SPOTLIGHT Internationally acclaimed New Zealand kitchen designer Mal Corboy is breaking new ground with the launch of a stunning coffee table book, which showcases the best of his award winning kitchen designs paired with recipes inspired by his work.

MAUVIEL AT CORSO DE’ FIORI Established in 1830, this world-renowned French brand offers cookware unsurpassed in quality and design - praised by professional chefs and household cooks alike. Corso de’ Fiori is proud to bring Mauviel to the discerning New Zealand market. See online or in-store for full range and pricing. www.corso.co.nz F PN

Of the 18 incredible kitchens featured in the book, five are within the Greater Ponsonby area. A passionate designer at the forefront of his profession, Mal Corboy is in demand around the world designing bespoke kitchens for clients from New Zealand to Australia to the United States and currently a complete home fit out in Trinidad and Tobago. Corboy, who has honed his specialist set of skills and continually pushed boundaries to create challenging, dynamic kitchens, has teamed up with Simon Gault and his network of highly skilled chefs to marry exclusively created recipes with Corboy’s kitchen designs in an innovative new book, thought to be a world first. “For Kiwis, the kitchen is the heart and soul of the house, it’s where we congregate, entertain and relax, so for me it’s the extra knowledge I bring for products, rules and regulations that make the kitchens a functional space my clients can be truly proud of,” says Corboy. A celebration of Corboy’s work, the book is also testament to the quality and skilled craftsmanship in New Zealand, as with all Corboy’s projects, where possible everything is built and sourced in New Zealand. Published in both New Zealand and Australia, ‘Mal Corboy Kitchens’ retails at $60 and is available at selected bookstores (including Cook The Books), and online. F PN MAL CORBOY KITCHENS, www.malcorboy.com

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ASK AN ARCHITECT: PAUL LEUSCHKE Each month Grey Lynn resident and architect Paul Leuschke of Leuschke Kahn answers readers’ property related questions. Email yours to jane@leuschkekahn.co.nz

Q: A:

We have finished doing up our villa and now want your opinion of the landscaping. How much should we spend? Is there a rule of thumb house value to landscaping?

For me landscaping finishes a house. One doesn’t come without the other. Higher value suburbs seem to have more landscaping than other areas, beginning with street trees. Who doesn’t like Franklin Road? (Apart from whoever collects all those leaves). Good landscaping can enhance the house and create a sense that the home owners care about their living environment. There is no rule of thumb regarding additional value added to a property directly through landscaping. But a nicely presented house in a garden setting will always increase its value, appeal and be an enjoyable place to live in. As many real estate agents will tell you, houses sell from the street, it’s called street appeal. Attractive fencing provides security, privacy and enjoyment. Security through keeping the kids safely contained within the property, and the neighborhood’s dogs out. Additionally

it increases a threshold which must be crossed. Privacy by screening your outdoor living area from the street, or immediate neighbours. Plants soften the hard landscaping. A well-placed tree can hide an ugly neighbour, or provide a focal point to your garden. A great garden design can draw your eye from within the house down the backyard. This increases the feeling of space from the house. Lighting can make your garden a feature at night. A covered outdoor area in the garden increases the usability of the garden and the use of the barbeque. Add an outdoor fire or heater and summer is lengthened. If you have a sloping site retaining and leveling seems a sensible idea, as people want usable land. Adding a swimming pool can be attractive to a family. But it can also be a negative to non-swimmers or older couples who don’t want the maintenance or cost. Pools are not money making features but rather a personal choice. Landscaping is definitely worth considering; my suggestion is to hire a landscape designer to create an outdoor environment that suits your lifestyle and budget requirements. (PAUL LEUSCHKE) www.leuschkekahn.co.nz F PN

PLAN TO CUT AUCKLAND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS BY 40% A plan that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Auckland by 40% by 2040 has been launched by Mayor Len Brown. The Low Carbon Auckland Action Plan sets out a 30 year pathway and a 10 year plan of action and aligns with the nationally agreed target to reduce New Zealand emissions by 50% by 2050.

houses. It will encourage and support new and existing industries and technologies emerging to meet this challenge. It also means more jobs for Aucklanders and another giant stride towards making Auckland the world’s most liveable city.

Adopted by the Auckland Council’s Regional Strategy and Policy Committee, the plan focuses on five priority areas for transformation:

“Auckland Council’s role is critical, first and foremost in providing an enabling regulatory environment starting with the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan.

• • • • •

“We’ve already initiated an effective waste minimisation plan, we are actively working on public transport options for Aucklanders and we are working with developers to design and construct more resource efficient buildings. But we can do more. We are ready to work with central government, business and the community to ensure Auckland extracts the most benefit from this process.

the way we use and generate energy the way we travel the way we build and our urban infrastructure the way we think about and manage waste the way we manage our forests, agriculture and natural carbon assets

More than 150 business, community, non-governmental organisations and knowledge institutions have worked collaboratively with the council to develop the plan. Len Brown says the plan is about future-proofing Auckland and all of Auckland needs to embrace and actively participate in the concept. “We know that achieving this target will do more than just reduce some abstract amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It will give our children cleaner air and better quality

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“Huge opportunities are emerging from a new global understanding that the environment and the economy must be viewed as a whole, not in competition. Other international cities are already on this path. Auckland now has an opportunity to be part of the transition. “The benefits of this plan are broad and far-reaching. The impacts of inaction would be far greater.” F PN PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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LOCAL NEWS TONGAN COMMUNITY CELEBRATES 40 YEARS’ WORSHIP AT ST COLUMBA GREY LYNN St Columba, Grey Lynn, saw a large gathering as Tongan worshippers flocked to celebrate the 40th anniversary of establishing a home for Tongan Anglicans on their arrival from Tonga. They had come to Auckland in the 1950s seeking a new life and opportunities for their families. The late Lillie Edwards - aunt of present Tongan priest, Rev’d Talau Hoeft - and her family attended St Columba in the late 1950s, and many of the founding families from the 1970s still attend today. During this special service, Bishop Ross Bay acknowledged St Columba’s uniqueness in comprising ‘three tikanga’ - Pacific Island, Maori and Pakeha - a true reflection of Auckland today. On receiving a magnificent tapa cloth presented by the Tongan community to St Columba, vicar Rev’d Brent Swann said, ‘‘It recognises the special bond they have with this place and its people, the friendships we have forged - Tongan, Pakeha, Maori and Samoan all together - and we are humbled and moved to receive such a beautiful gift.” During the service he blessed the tapa cloth, now hanging on the eastern wall of the church. The service was bursting with energy; the altar and sanctuary dressed with traditional Tongan mats. Clergy, visitors, and members of St Columba who were to be baptised, confirmed or licensed to lay ministry, were called to enter the church by the sound of the conch shell and karanga. The liturgy - rich in the diversity of four languages - was interspersed with the joyful harmonies that are so beloved of Tongan churches. After the service, over a traditional Tongan feast and with many whaikorero from clergy past and present, old friendships were renewed and memories shared. Visitors, including the Archdeacon of Polynesia `Amanaki, and previous vicars Rev’ds John and Joyce Marcon, Rev’d Hugh Kempster and Rev’d Susan Adams, swapped stories as they mingled with the present-day congregation. The service concluded outside in the Peace garden. There, a Kowhai Ngutu Kaka tree was planted by some of the original Tongan founders, along with the youth who were confirmed that day. Rev’d Brent Swann told those gathered that this tree was used for healing by Maori and that it was his hope that St Columba would be a place of healing for everyone who comes there. (REV BRENT SWANN) F PN

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ARE YOU SELLING YOUR BIGGEST ASSET? ‘you can’t sell a secret... good property marketing makes a difference every time’ Rates start at $235 + GST www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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RIP: PHILIPPE ALAIN GALLAIS 2 June 1952 - 26 June 2014. WE LOVED PHILIPPE. HE WAS one of our favourite clients here at Ponsonby News with his infectious French wit and charm. But more than that Philippe became a good friend. Every month I would deliver the Ponsonby News to ‘Philippe’s Antiques’ showroom in Manukau Road, greeted each time by his warm smile. We would often have a quick chat about antiques and ‘sort out the world’ all in the space of five minutes. Philippe’s real passion though was flying - he had been qualified pilot for around 25 years. A few years back he invited Martin, Jay and me over to Flight Experience in Takapuna, where he was a part-time flight instructor. We had fun that day flying a Boeing 737 in the flight simulator and Philippe was amused to see Martin almost ‘crash land’ at LaGuardia airport in New York and Jay attempt Heathrow. I chose to tackle a landing in Wellington. Sadly in June Philippe passed away. We attended his service at Davis Funerals on Dominion Road; Philippe was buried in his pilot’s uniform. Keith King officiated, he talked about the significance of the DASH placed between the date of birth and date of death and as important as those dates are it’s how you spend your “dash” is what’s important he said. Philippe certainly spent his DASH with flair, love, passion and great humour. PN (JO BARRETT) F

LEIGH CAUGHEY - WHY NOW? Leigh Caughey has recently joined Harcourt’s Ponsonby after a long association with real estate and a passion for presenting homes for sale. Leigh established THE LOOK, one of Auckland’s most successful home staging companies 12 years ago and knows what it takes to get a premium price in today’s market. “People and their homes are simply my passion and I enjoy helping them to add value,” says Leigh, “There is a lot of speculation out there at the moment about what is going on in the property market and you might be left wondering; should I buy, should I sell, should I rent, should I float, should I fix?” In Leigh’s years of service in the property and interior design industries she has seen trends come and go and so you may ask, what is different about this cycle? If you are curious to know more you are invited to take her WHY NOW? assessment. Why should you take it? Because there’s nothing like a clear resolution as it will help you make that important decision. The WHY NOW? assessment has been put together by Leigh based on her 25 years experience in this industry. Leigh has a keen eye for what appeals and has many success stories to tell about obtaining her clients their premium price. She is a naturally open and honest person who works with intelligence and determination and is committed to achieving the best results for her sellers and buyers alike. For Leigh this is about helping people realise their dreams. To complete the WHY NOW? assessment you can phone Leigh on M: 021 495 477 or email PN her leigh.caughey@harcourts.co.nz F

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THE HISTORICAL BOROUGH OF PONSONBY AND GREY LYNN: STREET NAMES

COLLINGWOOD STREET Admiral Lord Cuthbert Collingwood is a forgotten hero in naval history. He’s the man who saved the British Navy along with his close friend, Horatio Nelson at the famous Battle of Trafalgar and afterwards he continued to ensure that Britain ruled the waves in the 18th and early 19th centuries. He is depicted as a background player in most history books despite his immense contribution to the Empire’s dominance at sea. In 1750 Cuthbert Collingwood was born in Newcastle-upon Tyne, son of a local merchant. He received an early education at the city’s free grammar school, but at the age of 11 entered the Royal Navy as a volunteer on board HMS Shannon under Captain Braithwaite, his maternal cousin. He stayed with Braithwaite for 10 years then was transferred to the Lennox before joining the HMS Preston which sailed to North America. He continued to rise through the ranks when appointed to Lowestoffe where he met Horatio Nelson who was serving as lieutenant. Both men distinguished themselves fighting the French and Americans in the Caribbean. Their careers were entwined from then on and it was the start of lifelong friendship and despite their ambitions there was never any jealousy between them. This state of mutual admiration continued until the Battle of Trafalgar during which Nelson was killed. Collingwood replaced Nelson in a number of posts in quick succession. He played a leading part in the San Juan expedition, an abortive attempt to cross the isthmus into the Pacific which was dogged by disease with 180 of the 200 crew falling ill, including Nelson who almost died. Collingwood took command of the expedition during the return to Jamaica. With peace declared in the West Indies, from 1876 Collingwood was able to spend some years away from naval duties and consolidate his position in Northumberland society, marrying Sarah Blacket, the Mayor of Newcastle’s daughter in1791 who gave birth to two daughters. When back on duty he could only rarely return home but his letters reveal the deep affection he held for his wife and children. With the outbreak of the French Revolutionary wars, he was soon back in action. and was appointed command of HMS

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Prince, Rear Admiral George Bowyer’s flagship, then moved to HMS Barfleur to take part in the battle of the Glorious First of June off Ushant. Bowyer lost a leg during the engagement and Collingwood was forced to take command but was overlooked by not receiving the Naval Gold Medal awarded to other commanders. Following a spell with Nelson in the Mediterranean he took command of HMS Excellent which played a significant part in the Battle of Cape St Vincent. After the victory, Nelson was appointed KCB but when Collingwood was informed he would receive a Naval Gold Medal he refused to accept it until he was also given one for the Glorious First of June. Two years later he was advanced to the rank of Rear-Admiral and in 1804 he became Vice-Admiral. While his career took him all over Europe, North America and the West Indies his visits home were few and far between. In 1801 he met his family in Portsmouth as he couldn’t be released to travel north himself. The 400 mile journey over difficult roads took about two weeks and it was one of the limited opportunities to meet his wife over the course of his time at sea - he only spent three years on dry land. The Battle of Trafalgar is linked with Lord Nelson but Collingwood’s involvement was huge. In 1805 the combined forces of France and Spain were annihilated by the English fleet. Nelson was mortally wounded and as he lay dying, Collingwood took control and routed the enemy. Had the Royal Navy lost the battle, Napoleon would have swept across the channel with his 115,000 troops and invaded England. After the British victory Collingwood received an annual pension, was made Baron of Caldburne and Hethpoole, and received his third Navy Gold Medal, one of only three men to be so honoured, along with Nelson and Sir Edward Berry. His next few years were occupied with diplomatic duties, but by 1810 his health had deteriorated and he received permission to return to England, which he hadn’t visited since 1803. Sadly he died shortly after leaving Port Mahon, so his body was brought home and interred in the Crypt of St Paul’s Cathedral PN near Nelson’s tomb. (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F

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FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT

The Auckland Chamber Orchestra Concert The Auckland Chamber Orchestra are performing on Sunday 10 August at the Raye Freedman Arts Centre in Epsom. They are performing the Son of Chamber Symphony by critically acclaimed American John Adams. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential composers of the present day. From amongst the string sections of the orchestra the magnificent Jade Quartet will be performing Mozart’s String Quartet no23. These four accomplished soloists comprise one of New Zealand’s most established ensembles. Musical Director Peter Scholes is once again providing a diverse and exciting programme with the Auckland Chamber Orchestra. If you are looking for something to do on the same afternoon, the Auckland Youth Orchestra perform at the Auckland Town Hall at 2pm. The AYO is the premier orchestra for young people in Auckland and they are about to head on a tour of the country which will culminate at the Town Hall on 10 August. They are performing Dvorak’s Carnival Overture and Sibelius’ Symphony No.1 and feature Edward King in Schumann’s Cello Concerto. AYO present free concerts at the Town Hall regularly throughout the year and it is a great chance to see performances from New Zealand’s future classical musicians. 10 August is looking like a full-on day of orchestral music. The music in movies is something I have only paid special attention to in recent years and in many ways it has improved my movie watching experience tenfold. My music collection is littered with soundtracks to films - from the fantastic O Brother Where Art Thou to the numerous Hans Zimmer films (Gladiator, The Lion King and The Dark Knight). I watched the latest Jim Jarmusch film Only Lovers Left Alive recently, featuring Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston. I’d heard good things about the film, and it lived up to its reputation as slightly odd, unpredictable and moody but what struck me was the excellent score and soundtrack. Jarmusch has a history of interesting soundtracks, Neil Young composed the entire score to his 1995 film Dead Man. The score to Only Lovers was done by Jarmusch with assistance from his band Squrl. The music fits the film perfectly, ranging from melodic dirge and feedback to rock ‘n’ roll classics, soul jams and Middle Eastern music. The soundtrack carried the film for me, and is well worth a listen, even if you don’t catch the picture itself. (FINN McLENNAN-ELLIOTT) www.iticket.co.nz F PN Finn McLennan-Elliott is studing for a Bachelor of Science Honours Degree, specialising in human geography at Auckland University. In his spare time, Finn plays the clarinet and guitar. He has a great appreciation of all types of music. E: finn.huia@gmail.com

Blackbird Ensemble perform The Wilderness It is not often I walk out of a performance with nothing to say. I was left near speechless after seeing the Blackbird Ensemble perform their show, The Wilderness, in the middle of July. Stepping into the Q Theatre Loft it was clear this was not your ordinary classical ensemble performance. Greenery coated the stairwell and bird song greeted us as we waited to be seated. This was only the beginning, the entire stage had been transformed into a midwinter forest, complete with full moon, a pond and a smattering of classical musicians. This last is what makes Blackbird such an exciting and interesting ensemble. Director Claire Cowan (who herself plays many instruments within the ensemble) has succeeded in modernising classical music by making it more accessible and more attractive to younger audiences. But from the first sounds to be heard as I walked in to the theatre it was clear this was no simplified classical ensemble. Their bill contained a remake of the Four Seasons and pieces by Bjork, Bat for Lashes and Joanna Newsom - a variety not commonly performed together by any ensemble. The performance of Max Richter’s Vivaldi Recomposed, an avant-garde, modernised reworking of the Four Seasons, was breath-taking. This was the first time his piece had been performed in New Zealand and it achieved its desired purpose of making me rethink and return to the original with a different outlook. A newfound love of Vivaldi has risen to the surface, as was the intention of Richter when he arranged and recomposed the piece. One of the difficulties of playing this arrangement of Vivaldi is Richter’s additions, subtractions and changes to the original violin solo part. The natural movements and muscle memory of performing the Four Seasons must be forgotten as his signature melodies are moved around by Richter and the rhythms are changed. Blackbird’s soloist Amalia Hall was phenomenal, beautifully expressive and brought this 300 year old piece to life. This section of Wilderness was one of the highlights of live music I’ve seen all year. She took us through the familiar sections, those from the National Bank advertisements, and those less familiar. This was the standout for me of the concert but it was by no means all there was to see. Vocalist Jessie Cassin came out to perform the three modern pieces. These were arranged to fit an array of instruments, including tabla, banjo and accordion. On stage for Vivaldi had already been the string family plus harpsichord and harp. There was not the intensity or dynamic range in Bjork’s Hyperballad, Newsom’s Cosmia or Bat for Lashes’ Wilderness that had been bursting from the Four Seasons, but this may have just been my preference for the classical masterpiece. Despite this, there was something delightful about these arrangements, and Jessie Cassin’s voice added beautifully to the textures of the instruments and was a much needed grounding after the auditory rollercoaster of the violin solo. The Loft was a perfect venue for the performance, lending itself to intimacy with the audience as the musicians were mere feet away. The costuming was out of this world, created by Russian Ballet’s Valentina Serebrennikova, perfectly capturing the feeling of wilderness. There is something amazing about seeing a classical performance in which the performers are barefoot, stepping on twigs, moss and bark. The intimacy of the space allowed the audience to see the smiles, gestures and interactions of those on stage. Conductor-less, I was always interested to see how they began each piece or movement, and without a conductor it only served to show off the tightness and unity of the ensemble.

Peter Scholes

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Each Blackbird performance is different, and they often include full brass and woodwind sections. The staging, costumes and makeup bring the theme and music together to create a unique experience for classical listeners. Watch this space, as who knows what the next PN performance from this exciting group will bring. (FINN MCLENNAN- ELLIOTT) F PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT DEPOT ARTSPACE PAUL HARTIGAN: HELIUM 2 - 27 August Opening: 2 August 2.00 - 3.30pm Gallery talk: 9 August 2pm with Don Abbott and Paul Hartigan Depot Artspace is pleased to present an exhibition from Grey Lynn-based contemporary artist Paul Hartigan. Helium looks at light, form and colour through Hartigan’s photographic and sculptural practice. The Power Flower series stems from consecutive in-camera Polaroid exposures, each analogue snap taken of a different botanical subject at the Auckland Domain. Hartigan manipulates time, floral form and colour. The Power Flowers are a mashed-up map to a garden city - not a clear snapshot to guide you from A to B, but overlays that result from the milky haze of memory, pictured through the scent, light and texture that muddies in remembrance.

DAVID GUERIN PERFORMING WITH ST MATTHEW’S CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 17 August 2.30 pm PROGRAMME: Beethoven Coriolan Overture, Beethoven Piano Concerto No 5 Emperor, Beethoven Symphony No 7. David Guerin is a pianist of rare taste and discretion, without whose talents and dedication New Zealand music would be inestimably poorer. (William Dart). His performance of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No 5 in E-flat major, Op 73 (The Emperor) with St Matthew’s Chamber Orchestra will be a riveting experience.

These bursts of colour and emanating light are mirrored in the neon works that make up the other half of Helium. With centres like plucked specimens they pulse as if alive. They may appear synthetic and man-made, but the neon inside these tubes is as natural as the flowers with which they share the room, an organic gas that provides the atmosphere with the colour that turns a sunset red. Harnessed and electrified, neon pollinates the spaces it illuminates. Side by side these photographic and neon works echo each other’s form, colour and intent. They both pump out light, but in differently ethereal ways. The mist of photographic memory and the fog of neon light are both given breath, and in the one room, they breathe new life into each other. Don Abbott 2014. F PN DEPOT ARTSPACE, 28 Clarence Street, Devonport, T: 09 963 2331 www.depotartspace.co.nz

David Guerin’s performance of Bach’s Goldberg Variations is still remarked upon - a musical highlight that lingers in the memory of his fans. Visiting David in his house-by-the-sea one has a sense of his rich inner life: he is deeply absorbed in his work and his teaching (both private and at the University of Auckland’s School of Music). He has a few spaces for private students so if you are looking for a piano teacher... St Matthew’s Chamber Orchestra produces the kind of music that is magic. Excellence is their only option; they play in the Heart of the City on Sundays. Highly recommended - Recent concerts have played to a full house. Make sure you get there early! PN TICKETS: Door Sales, cash or cheque only. F ST MATTHEW-IN-THE-CITY CHURCH, corner Wellesley and Hobson Streets www.smco.org.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT TOI ORA KAMA’S SOLO SHOW 7 August Dedicated Auckland artist Joshua Kama-Lee Szabo (aka Kama) makes stylistic connections with painterly gestures and repetitive mark making. Using acrylics he creates spontaneous, mesmerizing works.

SHOWING AT OREXART REBECCA WALLIS - ‘THE ONES THAT KEEP US GOLDEN’ DEAN TERCEL - ‘AT A CLOSE DISTANCE’ 5 - 23 August, Opening: 5 August 5.30 - 7.30pm Orexart presents two local artists this August, both well known to the arts community and collectors alike.

Kama states: “I am very interested in repeated forms and in the patterns that appear through repetition. This current work comes out of a period of expanding my practise by experimenting with new forms. I love design.”

Dean Tercel is Studio Art Supplies supreme canvas stretcher and has been exhibiting since 1994 with Orexart. Always interesting, always trying new things, Dean’s new works are a snapshot of places we know.

Kama works independently at the Toi Ora studio and he exhibits regularly and collaborates PN on community murals. We welcome you to the opening of Kama’s solo show. F

Rebecca Wallis follows her 2013 solo show with new works that “convey those tiny, invisible and internal feelings that are initiated by our desires, which leave us hanging and needing more.” Both shows are proof of the great talents living and working in this special area. F PN

TOI ORA LIVE ART TRUST, 6 Putiki Street T: 09 360 4171 www.toiora.org.nz

OREXART, 15 Putiki Street Arch Hill, T: 09 378 0588. For more information visit www.orexart.co.nz or contact: rex@orexart.co.nz

Rebecca Wallis, a Hesitant, 2014, Gouache on canvas,1200 x 1200mm

Dean Tercel, #97 (Shangri La), 2014, Oil on linen, 550 x 750mm

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ARTS + CULTURE UPTOWN ART SCENE Moving right along… From one end of the strip to the other, Michael Lett has opened his new space in East Street, off K’Road, in an Edwardian bank building, replete with Corinthian columns, hexagonal light shafts with stained glass, and a basement vault with glam-grunge appeal. This month at Michael Lett sees Peter Stichbury re-establishing with a New Zealand gallery (previously his work was only available through his New York dealer), the first opportunity to see a collection of his work locally since 2008. Upstairs, Ivan Anthony have moved their entrance, doing away with the corridor and placing it just to the right of Michael Lett. With Artspace on the opposite corner, the Film Archive, RM, the Audio Foundation, and Starkwhite all within a stone’s throw, K’Road’s galleries are beginning to outnumber its bottle-shops! As always, culture leads the way. Artists are compelled to keep moving too, away from habits and into new territory. At OREXART, two painters who had built reputations for largely monochromatic work have emerged with brilliantly coloured paintings in almost successive shows recently. Both Evan Woodruffe and Glen Wolfgramm had explored the formals of composition through monochrome before introducing colour to give emotional weight to their work. Definitely PN a move in the right direction! F WILL PAYNT, STUDIO ART SUPPLIES

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ARTS + CULTURE AN OCCASIONAL COLUMN I love Glen Campbell. I’ve always liked his music, but it was only earlier this month when I was passing Real Groovy Records that I popped in and actually bought a CD of his. I was actually after a Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons CD - having just seen the movie of Jersey Boys at a Queen Street cinema - I bought their greatest hits too. But as my mate and I cruised home down K’Road, I could tell I was beginning to drive my somewhat younger partner a little mad by playing ‘Country Boy’ loudly on the car stereo; not so loud of course as to attract those irritating - or are they envious stares - from others at the traffic lights. But I had come out of the closet. I’ve always loved that song. It didn’t stop when we got home either. I continued to play the track over and over again until I felt one more time might just bring a loud knock to the front door. You know what I mean. Growing up in a provincial North Island city-town, it was never cool in my peer group at that time to admit to liking country music. Hell, Germaine Greer had just turned New Zealand upside down and liberated ‘bullshit’ from the country’s list of most shocking expletives. Moreover the stage show ‘Hair’ had just toured with the first ever full nude scene ever seen here. Horror upon horror! And Ziggy Stardust was in the mix there too somewhere - perhaps that was a little later. We were never quite the same after all that. We started to look much further than just across the first paddock. After living several years in cities bigger than ours and enjoying the anonymity of being surrounded by strangers, it has taken me a while to feel comfortable walking around our fair Ponsonby streets. I’m not really sure why. There’s so much to see with interesting nooks and crannies in the most unexpected places. Perhaps I have felt a little paranoid that people were noticing me. How stupid was that. I have never had two heads, or eyes that dangle from the end of a pair of springy coils! I do now; feel comfortable walking, I mean. And I’m older so it’s good exercise. I don’t care so much what others think. Others have always been braver and unafraid of expressing their individuality - like that fabulous Dutch looking man on that Dutch looking bicycle, or that always beautiful colourfully clothed woman you see sometimes. But some of us still hide in our houses and keep our net curtains closed. I wonder why. It isn’t - relatively speaking - a hostile climate out there in Ponsonbyland, is it? What can we be afraid of, spy satellites? My GP says, “Walking is good for you.” My shrink agrees.

‘NOTES FROM THE KEYBOARDS’ CONCERT AT PONSONBY BAPTIST CHURCH The historic Ponsonby Baptist Church, frequently the venue for music-making, will host a concert entitled ‘Notes from the Keyboards’ on Sunday 31 August at 2pm. The programme will consist of music for pipe organ, piano and voice. Organist Anita Banbury will present solos from the 17th-18th centuries on the historic John Avery pipe organ, which dates from 1779 and is thought to be the oldest pipe organ in Australasia. Pianist Warwick Gibbs will contribute piano solos, and both keyboard artists will take turns to accompany mezzo-soprano Margo Knightbridge for vocal solos from the 20th-21st centuries. Anita Banbury has had a teaching career in piano, organ and theory and has had a long association with Auckland choirs, having sung with the Dorian Choir, Musica Sacra, and Bach Musica to mention a few. She has directed the chamber choir Orlando Singers for over 30 years and formed and directs the St Mary's Singers. She founded the Many Choirs Festival and organised it for 21 years. She has also played for church services. Margo Knightbridge was deeply involved in community music-making from an early age. Her singing career has included studies with Philip Todd and Dorothy Hopkins, performing with community choirs and chorus work in opera and musicals. She sang with the renowned Dorian Choir for 20 years, and with the specialist choir Musica Sacra. She co-founded the chamber ensemble Orlando Singers, which recently celebrated its 40th anniversary. She also founded the vocal trio Three Mezzos. Margo also has a busy spare-time career as a freelance soloist and presenter of salon concerts. Warwick Gibbs has an Honours degree in French and has worked as a teacher of languages at the University of Auckland and Mt Albert Grammar School. His skills as an accompanist have seen him play for numerous school musicals and he works with singers, string players and choirs. He also teaches the piano privately. F PN The concert will last for approximately one hour and all music-lovers are welcome. Information: T: 09 846 6982; E: m.knightbridge@auckland.ac.nz

But I have digressed. The opening lyrics of Country Boy sing something like this; “Living in the city ain’t never been my idea of getting it on, but the job demands that you make new plans before your big chance is gone, you get a house in the hills, you’re paying everyone’s bills and they tell you that you gonna go far, but in the back of my mind I hear it time after time, is that who you really are?” Glen’s got me thinking; perhaps it’s time for me to move back to the provinces. Yes, I’d surely miss the diversity, but at least I’d be able to afford to buy a house with a big back yard and listen to everyone mowing the lawns on sunny Saturdays! Maybe I’ll just take down the remaining net curtains, pull out my platform shoes, dust off my flared trousers, slip into my tank-top, walk confidently, and stay here for a little bit PN longer. (GREG THOMAS) F

OCTOBER 1989 - OCTOBER 2014 + CELEBRATES

Years

For more information or to book your advertising contact: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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SHOWING AT WHITESPACE KATHRYN STEVENS: PLOT Until 16 August Kathryn Stevens’ work is an ongoing exploration of the construction of space and our understanding or reading of it. Our perception of space is a process through which we become aware of our environment and our relative position in the world. We physically and imaginatively construct spaces, perhaps altering their function, and, in doing so, contain them. Are we just attempting to locate ourselves? In this exhibition Stevens explores the boundary between the two dimensional plane and the three dimensional object. The paintings, now surfaces that float out from the wall, both acknowledge and utilise pictorial space. Yet there is tension between the internal space of a painting and the real space behind it. A space activated with colour that appropriates and implicates the wall. The installations assert the three dimensional materiality of the object while articulating the line and referring to the two dimensional plane. There is a resulting tension between line and space that heightens our perception of the space occupied by the work.

Greer Twiss; Works on Paper 1963 to the present 19 August - 14 September

ARTS + CULTURE PETER LANGE AT COLLECT Peter Lange, a pioneer in the New Zealand ceramics world, brings with him a long history of respect, achievement and exploration. Peter describes his work as minimalist, simple, and attractive. He first began making pottery and clay sculpture during the 1970s while living on a farm with his family and learning basic pottery techniques from neighbour Lex Dawson, another well known pottery identity. This month Collect features Peter’s salt glazed teapots, mugs and bottles. Salt-glazed ceramics were first created in the Rhine Valley of Germany in the 1500s. Whether by accident or clear intent, salt was introduced into the kiln and the resulting ware was coated with a glossy, pebbly, glazed surface. This is what salt-glaze potters call the telltale ‘orange peel’ effect. Because salt-glazed ceramics are fired to stoneware temperatures in the Cone 10 (2381 degrees Fahrenheit) range and have a non-toxic, salt-glazed surface, they are extremely durable and may be used for food and liquids. Decorative pieces may be displayed outdoors but should not be left out in freezing conditions. All salt-glazed PN pieces are dishwasher safe. F COLLECT @ WHITESPACE, 12 Crummer Road T: 09 361 6331 www.collect.net.nz

The artist and Deborah White have together selected a group of 40 works that survey over half a century. Many of these works have never been previously exhibited. Local Ponsonby legend, Greer Twiss was born in 1937, he was a student at the Elam School of Fine Arts in the 50s where he graduated with honours. He became interested in cast metals and, in 1965, he was awarded a QEII Arts Council Travel Grant that enabled him to travel to Britain and Europe where he studied the lost-wax process. Greer has worked in a number of media including lead and sheet galvanised iron, but he is best known for his tactile bronzes. Bronze casting had seldom been undertaken by artists in New Zealand when Greer began, and that necessitated setting up his own foundry. Greer has exhibited for over 50 years. His work is included regularly in both group and solo exhibitions throughout New Zealand and overseas. His work has also been included in major exhibitions such as Volume and Form, Singapore, Content/Context at Shed 11 - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, and Aspects of Recent New Zealand Art, Auckland City Art Gallery. He has been the subject of two retrospective exhibitions; one organised by the Wellington City Art Gallery and the other by the Auckland Art Gallery. His sculpture is included in all major public and many private collections in New Zealand including Auckland Art Gallery -Toi o Tamaki and Te Papa Tongarewa Museum of New Zealand. He is also represented in numerous international public and private collections. One of the largest and most important early contemporary public sculpture commissions was his large untitled bronze commissioned for Karangahape Road by the Auckland City PN Council in 1968. F WHITESPACE, 12 Crummer Road. T: 09 361 6331 www.whitespace.co.nz

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OUT + ABOUT

Above: Ms Farrell, Leah Winiata, Dasha Goryacheva

Above L to R: Adrian Hailwood, Maria Pomirska and Soren Stewart; Helene Ravlich and Jooles Clements

Above L to R: Boys behind the bar; Mexico resident artist, Margarita Vovna; tattooist Dan Sacred and Peter Jackson

MEXICO’S ‘LOST IN MEXICO’ PARTY @ 164 PONSONBY ROAD - 10 JULY

Rich colours, bold imagery, art, tattoo and candles set the mood for the party; the atmosphere was energetic! Dressed for the occasion guests were treated to margaritas and generous helpings of finger food tastings.

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OCTOBER 1989 - OCTOBER 2014

+ CELEBRATES

Years BRINGING LOCAL NEWS AND VIEWS TO THE GREATER PONSONBY AREA AND ITS SURROUNDS. Be a part of our special celebratory October

2014 issue. There will be a limited number

of bound advertisement inserts available plus special positions and regular run of paper.

SPECIAL FEATURES: + Three Lamps + Gardens & Outdoor Living + Home Renovations + High Summer Fashion + NZ Fashion Week

BE SURE TO SECURE YOUR ADVERTISING SPACE. For more information or to book your advertising contact: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: David and Somboon’s two nieces Elizabeth Blackwell and Gemma Rushton; Award winning Magician Mick Peck did close up magic at every table

Above L to R: Anna Hoffmann and Isabella Bray; Pat and Gary Brooks

Above L to R: Peter and Linda Stopforth; Christine and Mark Windram

Left L to R: Somboon, Gordon and Maryanne Rushton Richard Blackwell and Gemma Rushton

DAVID HARTNELL’S CELEBRATIONS

Last month our columnist David Hartnell and his partner Somboon Khansuk celebrated 21 years together, along with David writing Hollywood gossip for the past 50 years and his 70th birthday at the Surrey Hotel in Grey Lynn.

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FIREFIGHTER OF THE MONTH HELPFUL WINTER FIRE SAFETY TIPS MANUEL GALLO FROM PONSONBY FIRE Hello everyone, the cold weather is still with us and so is winter’s unique set of fire dangers. Follow these fire safety tips to help keep you and your family safe and warm. Fireplaces and chimneys: • Clean chimneys and flues before your first fire of the season. Always use a fireguard or spark guard with open fires. Ashes can take up to five days to cool - always empty fireplace or wood burner ashes and ashtrays into a metal bin and pour water over them before disposal. Before going to sleep, make sure your fireplace fire is out. Electric blankets: • If your electric blanket or cord is showing signs of wear, have it checked by a competent service person or have it replaced. Don’t take the risk. Always make sure that your electric blanket is switched off before getting in to bed. Never use pins or sharp objects to secure the electric blanket to the bed and never tuck it under the mattress or bed. When putting your electric blanket away for summer, don’t fold it, roll it. Heaters and clothes dryers: • Remember the heater-metre rule: Always keep children, clothes, furniture and curtains at least one metre away from heaters and fireplaces. Don’t store objects on top of your heating appliance. Never cover heating appliances. Don’t overload clothes dryers and clean the lint filter after each load cycle.

Local Ponsonby Firefighter, 35-year-old Manuel Gallo has been in New Zealand for 12 years and is originally from Argentina. He has been based at the Ponsonby Fire Station for three months. How do you keep fit? I work out in the gym at the station, I enjoy surfing and off road running. Best part of the job? Supporting and helping our community. Most unusual call out? Rescued a bird from a chimney. Favourite local cafe? Richmond Road Café. Best Ponsonby secret? Its people. Favourite super hero? Argentine footballer Lionel Messi.

Top fire safety tips for winter: • Keep looking while you are cooking. Keep everything at least a metre from a heater. Put hot ash and embers in a metal container and wet thoroughly before disposal. Have your chimney and electric blankets checked annually before winter. Do not put too many plugs in to your multi boards. Remember: Smoke alarms save lives! Have functioning smoke alarms installed and clean and test them regularly. Have a fire safe winter, thank you from your local Ponsonby firefighters. F PN For information and advice on fire safety. T: 09 376 3558; E: shane.olsen@fire.org.nz

OCTOBER 1989 - OCTOBER 2014 + CELEBRATES

Years

For more information or to book your advertising contact: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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RIP JACK 04/05/2002 - 14/07/2014 Jack was our baby, our best friend - and we adored every moment of his life. He made us laugh every day. He was fun and very active. But he got frightened of traffic noise, so we avoided taking him to bustling Ponsonby Road. Thinking of noise, he loved thunder and would go crazy and bark at the sky. Jack loved going out with us and we chose to take him to Western Springs Lakeside Park - he went there more than 5,000 times - daily, sometimes twice in a day, if he wanted walkies. We felt safe there, as all dogs are on leads, so he was never confronted by other dogs. For a big chunk of his life he was very healthy, but developed a cancer on his back toe, which got sorted - then he started to limp and we thought he was developing arthritis, instead it was a tumor and about one year ago he had his front leg amputated. We all got on with life and he hopped about, rather than walked. Several months ago we noticed he was drinking more and on a routine check our vets confirmed that he was in chronic renal failure. Sadly, too common in senior dogs. It was his failing kidneys which slowed him down and finally, his quality of life started to suffer. He loved standing, or lying, on our front veranda, watching the cars crawling along the motorway beneath us. We had to carry him up and down steps as he couldn’t get up into our garden on his own. In the last month, he woke us sometimes four times a night as he needed to wee. We got up at all hours and are glad we did.

Goodbye to our beautiful Jack, our handsome boy, we don’t know what we’ll do without you. Life won’t be half as much fun! We will never forget you and only time can heal our broken hearts. (MARTIN LEACH) F PN

PONSONBY NEWS OUTLETS FREEMANS BAY Glengarry, Corner Sale and Wellesley Streets Kellands Real Estate, 4 Drake Street New World, Victoria Park Sale St, 7 Sale Street

GREY LYNN Barfoot & Thompson, 533 Great North Road Barkley Manor, 400 - 402 Great North Road Grey Lynn Community Centre, 520 Richmond Road Grey Lynn Community Library, 474 Great North Road Raw Essentials, 401B Richmond Road Ripe, 172 Richmond Road Tapac, 100 Motions Road Vetcare, 408 Great North Road

HERNE BAY Herne Bay Post & Stationers, 240 Jervois Road Five Loaves & 2 Fish, 206 Jervois Road Icing on the Cake, 188 Jervois Road Momentum, 182 Jervois Road

KINGSLAND Atomic, 420c New North Road

MT EDEN Citta Outlet Store, Corner Enfield & Normanby Road Sabato, 57 Normanby Road

photography: Jane Blundell @ Kloser

There were plenty of tears when our vets called to inform us Jack’s ashes were ready to be collected. We still can’t believe he’s not with us. We collected them and went to Western Springs. We talked to Jack, as we always did... and Jay and I discussed about how our lives revolved around our boy. He was considered and put first every day. We like to believe he’s now happy and having fun with his brothers, Mr Scottie and Tiger. Jay can now start to get uninterrupted sleep, as he’d been waking and getting up to attend to Jack.

Jack is immortalised in video footage at www.youtube.com/scottiew11

NEWMARKET Planet Ayurveda, 41 Gillies Avenue Studio Italia, 96 Carlton Gore Road Taylor Boutique, 1 Teed Street

NEWTON Benediction Café, 30 St Benedicts Street Design 55, 55 Upper Queen Street

NORTH SHORE

Ponsonby News is published on the first Friday of each month excluding January. Copies go quickly so be quick to collect yours from any of the following outlets. The issue is also published on our website www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

Rug Direct, Wairau Park Dawson’s Furniture, Mairangi Bay Nose To Tail Dog Wash, Albany

PARNELL Jane Daniels, 2 Birdwood Crescent Parnell Community Centre, 545 Parnell Road

PONSONBY Barfoot & Thompson, 184 Ponsonby Road Chapel Bar, 147 Ponsonby Road Fitness Trainer, 36 Jervois Road Harcourts, 89 Ponsonby Road Leys Institute, 20 St Mary’s Road The Longroom, 114 Ponsonby Road Mag Nation, 123 Ponsonby Road Ponsonby Community Centre, 20 Ponsonby Terrace Spa Ayurda, 213 Ponsonby Road Studio One, 1 Ponsonby Road Whitespace, 12 Crummer Road

WESTMERE Glengarry, 164 Garnet Road

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THE PONSONBY PINK PAGES

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PONSONBY NEWS - AUGUST'14  

Ponsonby. Anyone not heard of us. We are Auckland's most talked about part of town.

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