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ponsonbynews.co.nz

NOVEMBER 2015

MICHAEL HEMPHILL & RICO HORSLEY: Popular law practice, Metro Law, has recently relocated to Ponsonby Road, just above Zambesi. The team tells Ponsonby News some of the things they love about the strip. With all the temptations outside, it may be difficult to The World Belongs to the catch Dissatisfied them in the office in the late afternoon - P63 DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015 1


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photography: Gwynne Davenport

WHAT’S INSIDE THIS MONTH

144 P144; PIMPED PINK PARTY - Virgil and Fay Roberts of Fresh Realty celebrated, with friends and family, Pinky’s return from her makeover! P144; 10 Things to do in Bali, which includes a cuddle with Billy Bear. This seven year old honeybear is friendly, very tame and well looked after at his home in the Pod Chocolate Factory.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR FROM THE EDITOR DAVID HARTNELL: ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD U3A PONSONBY NIKKI KAYE: AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP LANDMARK BUILDINGS JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS MIKE LEE, COUNCILLOR FOR WAITEMATA & GULF JACINDA ARDERN: LABOUR LIST MP AUCKLAND

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LAURAINE JACOBS: THE SEASONED PALATE EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY GREY LYNN FARMERS MARKET VEG FRIENDLY: GARY STEEL PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE FASHION + STYLE HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY LIVING, THINKING + BEING ALI LAWRIE: PERSONALITY TYPES

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JOHN APPLETON ON HEALTH FUTURE GENERATION SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY PONSONBY PEOPLE & THEIR PETS LOOK WHO IS IN THE ZOO PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS JAY PLATT: WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT HEIDI PADAIN: ENTERTAINMENT IN YOUR GARDEN ARTS + CULTURE

COVER: Victoria Wickman Photography; www.victoria-wickman.squarespace.com

PONSONBY NEWS+ is published monthly, excluding January by ALCHEMYY MEDIA LIMITED, L 11/386 RICHMOND ROAD, GREY LYNN POSTAL: P.O. BOX 47-282 Ponsonby, Auckland 1144. www.ponsonbynews.co.nz T: 09 378 8553 or 09 361 3356 Editor/Publisher Associate Publisher & Ad Manager Distribution Manager Advertising Sales Operations Manager Contributing Fashion Editor Contributing Editor Contributing Editor Proof Readers Layout Designer Designer

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MARTIN LEACH; M: 021 771 147; E: martinleach@xtra.co.nz or martin@ponsonbynews.co.nz JO BARRETT; M: 021 324 510; E: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz JAY PLATT; M: 021 771 146; E: jayplatt@xtra.co.nz or jay@ponsonbynews.co.nz ANGELA MARTIN; M: 0274 108 320; E: ponsnewsnz@gmail.com GWYNNE DAVENPORT; M: 021 150 4095; E: ponsonbynews@xtra.co.nz JULIE ROULSTON; M: 027 211 7169; E: julie@ponsonbynews.co.nz DEIRDRE ROELANTS; M: 021 261 8439; E: deir42@vodafone.co.nz JOHN ELLIOTT; M: 021 879 054; E: johnelliott@ihug.co.nz JESSIE KOLLEN; DEIRDRE THURSTON ARNA MARTIN; E: arna@cocodesign.co.nz MELISSA PAYNTER; E: melissapaynter@me.com

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LETTERS + EMAILS PONSONBY NEWS FRONT COVER - OCTOBER I must write and praise the artist Pankaj Bhambri. The October cover is the best yet; the colouring and composition of the cover is excellent and I hope he gets recognised with more work from you. Although a father myself, the September Father’s Day cover was boring and dull... Give this guy more work, he deserves it. John O’Sullivan, Herne Bay PONSONBY NEWS FRONT COVER - OCTOBER I just wanted to say that I love the front cover of the October edition of the Ponsonby News. It was a great choice and I really enjoyed reading what Pankaj Bhambri had to say about his design. Fiona Lindop, Grey Lynn OCTOBER’S ISSUE - PONSONBY NEWS I love this month’s cover and the new paper, it gives the pages a more crisp look and feel. Keep up the good work. David Jones, Westmere FROM THE EDITOR: Back in London, I regularly worked with the illustration students from Central Saint Martins for front covers for the magazines I produced back then. It’s a good way to discover new talent and gives the student a published piece for their own portfolio. One of the students back then was commissioned by New Scientist, having been on my magazine’s cover. Thanks for your feedback! THE FORMER LITTLE GROCER SITE IS GOING TO THE ENVIRONMENT COURT Alas it’s true: the application to open a 45-seat, licensed cafe on the former Little Grocer site is going to the Environment Court. At the Resource Consent Hearing held in June /July evidence showed the unsuitability of this site for the scale and intensity of operation which the applicant (Oddfellows Holdings) intends. The Commissioners’ decision to deny the application was no surprise to local residents who know too well the treacherous nature of the intersection at Richmond, Peel and Kingsley; the poor sight-lines into Peel Street; the paucity of parking on Richmond Road; the lack of a loading zone; plus the fact that the neighbourhood already has a host of quality competitors close by (16 cafes within 1.2kms in fact). At least 60 local residents know that it’s a crazy site for this operation, a “square peg in a round hole”- as expressed in their submissions to council early last year. The decision to decline the resource consent application was made on behalf of Auckland Council by three independent commissioners. Now the council is obliged to defend that decision in the Environment Court. The Grey Lynn and Westmere Residents’ Society Incorporated will play a supporting but still weighty role. We will need to re-engage our expert witnesses to work alongside the council’s panel of experts. From a wider Auckland perspective: if this Residential 1-zoned site is allowed to be utilised for wholly commercial purposes, what precedent would this set? Is zoning to be abandoned entirely? The GL and W R Soc. Inc. now has 100 members and another 100 supporters on our database. They come from a wide radius around the proposed cafe site. We’re heartened by the community’s strong support and also that our Local Waitemata Board and its Chair, Shale Chambers, spoke against the cafe at the hearing in June. The board knows the problems of this site as well as we do. We appreciate the column inches dedicated to highlighting this case in the Ponsonby News. In the last 20 months of responding to this situation we have acted in good faith throughout the process knowing that this battle can only be won in court, not by placard -waving. We have consciously chosen not to seek media attention, believing firmly that the arguments against the cafe proposal are strong enough to stand on their own merits. That strategy has served us well, as our success at the first hearing demonstrates. Whether it will be enough to secure a favourable judgement in the Environment Court remains to be seen. It’s clear the applicants now have their gloves off and are preparing for a fight. As they are out-of- towners we can only wonder at who is advising them to keep pursuing such a difficult proposition.

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November 2015

Views in Ponsonby News reflect the authors’, and not those of Alchemy Media. www.twitter.com/Ponsonby_News Next steps: We will attend the Court-mandated mediation between Oddfellows Holdings and Auckland Council on 2 November. On 27 November the council will confirm its position in writing to the Environment Court. On Monday 30 November the Grey Lynn and Westmere Residents’ Incorporated Society will hold its AGM from 7.30 to 8.30pm in the Balcony Room at the Grey Lynn Community Centre. We hope that many members will be able to attend. Non-members are very welcome to join us for an open forum after the meeting, from 8.30 to 9.30pm. The Environment Court hearing is likely to be held in March/April next year. Jessica Fowler (Chair); Mattie Wall (Secretary); Susan Hirst (Treasurer) Grey Lynn and Westmere Residents’ Society Incorporated. LETTER OF THE MONTH - NICE TO KNOW WE HAVE ‘FANS’ Have just gotten my sheathed September number of the Ponsonby News (PN), or (PM) Pseuds Manual as it is unaffectionately dubbed in our household inside the pale. Flow-wrapped cover off (and into recycling - not long before the magazine itself)... and God’s Death - what a snarled conduit for precious barrow-pushing it is! All up front and full frontal straining at the bounds of consumerist credibility and legitimate free-expression. Nothing much else pulses between the snake-oiled lines but the infinitesimally twee touting of extreme wares and darlings’ viewpoints. Limited undesignated parking exists, it seems, between pages 1-149 for tolerance of the seriously real. Can we continue to trust quarter-century-old Ponsonby News to keep well-managed forests falling in the interests of parochial commercial unsustainability? Must we? Kindest regards, Gerald Turnbull, Grey Lynn FROM THE EDITOR: We asked Mr Turnbull for his street address in order that we wouldn’t waste a copy of Ponsonby News on him. However, he declined to reply to our request. DEIRDRE ROELANTS COLUMNS - Street Names + Landmark Buildings I do always enjoy your articles about the historical places or place names in the Ponsonby News. I do hope that many love them too. I was always interested in the history of Grey Lynn and Ponsonby especially. We bought our house in Grey Lynn in 1981 (and haven’t moved since then - but have lived and worked in Europe for some time). I wonder if you could give me a few tips how to start my own research? I am especially interested who built and who lived in the house we own, but I didn’t get too far as we only have the last title from 1946. The house was built around 1890. I have worked my way through to the name of the owner in 1946 until the 70s, Myra Reith, via Internet and even found a few newspaper clips talking about the death of her child and a court case against her husband - an able seaman. He wrote to his Scottish sister in 1946 how bad the situation was in New Zealand after World War II. Also I would love to find photos of the interior of the house from past times. My second ‘obsession’ is to find out more about the old days of the Grey Lynn Football club (soccer) - Grey Lynn Celtic or Grey Lynn Comrades. Where they played, whether the were all Irish and Scottish Celtic Glasgow supporters and whether they were also political (‘comrades’). Founded 1952 in Grey Lynn, Comrades - following amalgamation of Comrades (1924) and Grey Lynn United (1950) - changed name in 1954. The Club Merged with Point Chevalier in 1989 to form Western Springs and is now the Western Springs A.F.C. However, I couldn’t get any proper information from them about the early days. Sol, Grey Lynn

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FROM THE EDITOR IT WAS EASY TO GET BACK INTO WORK MODE, following a two-week break in Bali. Jay has been dealing with terrible insomnia, so the break gave him a chance to reset his body clock. We had the best holiday ever and one of the highlights was a visit to Bali Bird Park. I know Heidi Padain’s column is always popular. Take the opportunity this summer to enjoy the trees and wildlife in your back garden.

a well-kept secret and it’s worth checking what they have to offer.

The first week back, Jo and I attended the AGM for the Ponsonby Business Association. We were pleased to learn that in the year to June 2015, the MarketView report has shown an 8.6% increase with a spend of $217 million reported on the Ponsonby strip. This also indicates that Ponsonby is 3% above Auckland’s other regions in terms of retail spend.

This is an opportunity to be immersed in the glamorous era of the flying boat while enjoying a three course meal featuring dishes from the airline menus of the past, all the while surrounded by MOTAT’s fine aviation collection, including the ‘Aranui’ itself.

Since Rugby World Cup 2011 to Rugby World Cup 2015, Ponsonby’s retail sales growth is up by 11%. The PBA achieve good results, with a relatively small $200,000 marketing budget. Last month Kelmarna Gardens held their Spring Festival which attracted a crowd of close to 1000 people. It was a colourful occasion featuring the fruit and vege gardens with excellent music, lots of good stalls and a hangi sponsored by Orphans Kitchen. John Elliott reported that he’d never seen the gardens looking so good, but the Trust has plans to improve them even further. The gardens are

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MOTAT is hosting a gala dinner and charity auction, ‘Dining in the Skies’, to raise funds for the restoration of the worlds only remaining Solent Mark IV Flying Boat, ‘Aranui’. The event takes place in MOTAT’s Aviation Display Hall in Meola Road on Thursday, 3 December from 6pm.

Our cover this month features popular law practice, Metro Law, which has recently relocated to Ponsonby Road, just above Zambesi. The team tells Ponsonby News some of the things they love about the strip. It may be difficult to catch them in the office late in the afternoon. Look for a major shake-up of our neighbourhood at St Paul’s College with a huge rebuild programme and a new Principal, Kieran Fouhy, with vast experience and a charismatic personality. Don’t forget with Christmas fast approaching to shop local whenever you can. Support our local businesses - they can’t prosper without us. PN (MARTIN LEACH) F

Jay Platt and Martin Leach pictured last month at Bali Bird Park

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DAVID HARTNELL’S ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW

Jesse Mulligan Jesse Mulligan is a writer, comedian and radio host living in Arch Hill. Tell us about your new radio show It’s on Radio New Zealand National from 1-4pm, weekdays. It’s one of the most challenging jobs I’ve ever had but definitely the most enjoyable too. I thought the regular National listeners might have a panic attack when I came along but they’ve been very supportive, warm and only occasionally grumpy. Which do you like best, American or English humour? I was breastfed on English humour. Our family almost died laughing at Blackadder. But with standup it’s the Americans, and usually the Jewish Americans, I get the most out of. Who is your favourite comedian? I’m going with Garry Shandling. What was your childhood like? Happy! If it had been more miserable I’d probably be a better comedian and I would definitely be a better artist. Where would your dream international holiday be? Europe, definitely. Somewhere rural in France or Italy - a little area to explore without too many other English speakers. What is the best thing you have brought back from an overseas trip? I went to writer Dave Eggers’ 826 Valencia store in San Francisco. He runs an after school programme for at-risk kids from a location that happened to be zoned as a retail space, so he has to have a shop out the front. He sells supplies for pirates, and I bought an oyster shucker which I use to this day - a cannonball would have been hell for excess baggage. Do you prefer Tweeting or Facebook? Twitter for sure. I would Facebook suicide if it wasn’t for sharing my kid photos with the family and needing a profile to run Facebook pages for my shows. But it’s mostly dross on there these days, isn’t it? Twitter is a news feed, sprinkled with some comedy. Though some of the regulars are insufferable. Who is the greatest love of your life? My wife, Victoria, of course (is this a trick question, did she ask you to put this in? She thought I would say “numerous fermentation projects” didn’t she? Well, tell her I wasn’t born yesterday). What do you love most about the age you are now? Being at home on a Saturday night and not worrying that I’m missing out. When was the last time you turned off your cell phone? You can turn off your cell phone? What is something you really disapprove of? People who add an ‘x’ to the word ‘espresso’.

including Christians, who are usually very good people trying to do the right thing. The world needs more of that. When is the last time you cried? I struggled to get my vows out at my wedding last year. Who would play you in the movie of your life? Meryl Streep. Let’s see her get an Oscar with that. How do you chill out? Cooking and fermenting. Which item of clothing can’t you live without? My dressing gown probably - and we have a baby due November so it’s about to get a lot more use. What are you insecure about? My inability to come up with interesting answers to these sorts of questionnaires. Tell us something very few people know about you? I would have got 100% in School C maths but I missed a question asking you to sketch a carrot that has been cut diagonally. Which talent would you most like to have? I’d like to be able to fix stuff - cars, doors, hearts. What gizmo can you simply not live without? The Zyliss garlic press, available from Milly’s. You can put the clove in skin-on! Are you a handshake or a hug kind of person? I’ll kiss you hello if we’re at an event, but a hug would give me the heebie-jeebies. Do you travel light or heavy? I cycle almost everywhere now, which has encouraged a certain frugality of luggage. What is your opinion on today’s man? I don’t think we’re all similar enough to merit one opinion. If you could change one law or policy in New Zealand, what would it be? Tougher penalties for parents who let their children ignore the advertised age limit on bouncy castles. DAVID HARTNELL, MNZM) F PN

Your biggest disappointment? Not making more of my opportunity with Seven Sharp. If you won a million dollars what is the first thing you would do? Turn our house around so that the living room faces the sun, not the guest bathroom. Your favourite comfort food? Spaghetti aglio olio e peperoncino - a simple dish of spaghetti with olive oil, garlic and chilli. I learnt how to make it on one of those dream Italian holidays described above. What motivates you? Avoiding being told off. What do you think happens when we die? I think that’s the end of everything. But I’m very supportive of people who think otherwise,

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SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD REPORT The Super City is five years old this month. It also heralds the first five years of your local Waitemata Local Board and the honour I have had in chairing it. Auckland Council remains a large beast. Representing one in three New Zealanders, Rodney Hide’s experiment in bringing together the six legacy councils and one regional council remains a work-in-progress even after five years. Led by an executive mayor, who history will remember well, but whose mayoralty has nearly run its course, Len Brown continues to dominate the all-important budget and rates setting and controls the debate through appointing his deputy and committee chairs. Twenty councillors make up the governing body that spends its days in interminable open and closed meetings considering regional policies, and making the big-picture decisions. Waitemata and Gulf Islands ward has its back covered and has been well served by its experienced councillor Mike Lee. However, a governing body that passes its 10-year budget by one vote, as occurred this year, is a body that has some work to do to gain control of an organisation to give us confidence local democracy is alive and healthy. Twenty-one local boards bring local decision making, and remain the democracy contact point for most residents and ratepayers. Still considered, and often called, community boards, even by many within council, their potential remains yet to be fully tapped. Rounding out the council family are the elusive council controlled organisations, including the huge Auckland Transport. Much of your elected members’ time is spent interacting and responding to these unelected bodies run by independent directors and on paper it shouldn’t work. But somehow it does - most of the time. Auckland Transport still has much to learn, with consultation duds such as the Grey Lynn shops bus changes, amongst other examples. Auckland continues to improve daily - we only need to look around our city and try to remember five years ago, before the last Rubgy World Cup, Wynyard Quarter existed, or the CRL was a project, to know this is so. Much has also been achieved at local board level in five years. Despite getting used to new shared governance our first year 2010-2011, saw early progress. Local highlights were the completion of the destination skatepark in Victoria Park, and the return of the replica three lamps to Ponsonby. That year the board made an official commitment to support Fairtrade. In 2011–2012 the board oversaw the completion of the Tepid Baths’ restoration, the refurbishment of Victoria Park’s Campbell Free Kindergarten, the Judges Bay upgrade,

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and a major commitment to upgrade the long-neglected Symonds Street Cemetery, now evident. We declared all Waitemata sportsfields and playgrounds smokefree and initiated a longterm project to make our coastal areas more publicly accessible with the WeonaWestmere Coastal Walkway, now under construction. The installation of an award-winning Pt Resolution bridge (International Designers Architecture Award) was certainly a highlight for 2012-2013 as was the nearby Judges Bay upgrade reinvigorating the area. A longer-term investment of note was starting our roll-out of public water fountains throughout Waitemata parks. 2013–2014 will forever be remembered as ‘the year of plans’. We seemed to be forever discussing various plans with the community (thank you). We are proud though that development plans have been completed for Symonds Street Cemetery, Myers Park, Pt Resolution Taurarua Reserve, Western Park, Grey Lynn Park, Ponsonby Road, K’Road and Newmarket’s Laneways. These now guide short and future longer-term development. Another large project was the refurbishment of Studio One Toi Tu in Ponsonby, providing an accessible community art space for all. The year just been (2014-2015) was another busy one. We saw Stage 1 of the Myers redevelopment come to fruition with the opening of an award-winning children’s playground (top honours Resene Total Colour Awards). Waitemata was the first local board registered as ‘child friendly’ through the international UNICEF Child Friendly City accreditation process and we celebrated 100 years of Tepid Baths, Parnell Baths and Myers Park. In this selection of highlights, we must mention our advocacy work helping save the six Great North Road heritage pohutukawa trees, and the transformation of thinking around cycling in Auckland. We are part of Auckland Council, but our primary role is, as elected representatives of our local communities, to speak on your behalf. We hope you will agree we have made a good start. We think so. Summer is approaching, and Grey Lynn Park Festival beckons once again on 28 November. Enjoy all the festivals, fireworks, fun and feasting November brings. Copies of all five annual Waitemata Local Board Achievements Reports can be found on the council website and links on our Facebook page. (SHALE CHAMBERS) F PN Contact me: shale.chambers@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

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LOCAL NEWS ICONIC ‘LITTLE BIG MARKETS’ TO LAUNCH AT VICTORIA PARK THIS SUMMER Historic Victoria Park Markets will this summer play host to the established artisan craft and food market - The Little Big Markets - and will feature 50 pop-up crafts, fashion and food vendors and live music every Saturday from 7 November. Event director, Rachelle Duffy, from Little Big Events, who created the original event series in Mount Maunganui in 2009, says receiving a lot of positive feedback from Aucklanders at their regular Bay of Plenty events, meant bringing the popular market series to the region was the next natural step. “Many of our Auckland-based stall-holders have wanted growth within the Auckland market but wanted to remain under our event brand and it has always been our longterm goal to replicate what we’ve done in the Bay of Plenty and take our event model nationwide. So expanding into the Auckland region first, in such an iconic location, is very exciting,” says Rachelle. Victoria Park Markets, home to one of Auckland’s original markets, has undergone a large-scale refurbishment to invigorate the historic building and create a vibrant and fresh central city food and shopping hub. Bayley’s commercial lease manager for Victoria Park, Leah Lahood, says re-establishing a regular market environment with a focus on quality New Zealand-made artisan goods has always been part of the strategic plan for the new-look Victoria Park and welcomes the arrival of the ethos and reputation of the Little Big Events team. “Having witnessed the growth and success of The Little Big Markets over the last six years, we knew partnering with their team would be a positive step to further re-ignite Victoria Park. Aucklanders love a great space to visit on the weekends where they can explore and experience quality artisan products, top New Zealand cuisine, great coffee, fresh flowers and fresh market produce. We are confident the wider community of residents and businesses will all benefit from this new venture,” says Leah.

What originally started out as a hobby in 2009 with 20 stalls at the monthly Mount Maunganui markets, The Little Big Markets now hosts 150 stall holders and has become a full-time job for Rachelle and her husband, Chris, who joined the team full-time earlier this year. The working couple have also created the Little Big Events company to manage hundreds of events in the Bay of Plenty and Waikato annually and this is their first foray into the Auckland market. “The Little Big Events ethos from the beginning has been to create diverse and vibrant events to bring communities closer together whilst offering a platform for more small New Zealand businesses to flourish. We know Kiwis appreciate the opportunity to buy local and we are passionate about working closely with local businesses and artisans to provide a platform for them to grow,” explains Rachelle. As a result, over the last six years, The Little Big Markets have become a spring board for many New Zealand small businesses that have gone on to open their own bricks and mortar stores. Equally Rachelle and Chris’ events company has grown 300 per cent in the last six months; a move encouraged by Geoff Ross, CEO of Moa Beer, who mentored them earlier this year through the 2degrees Building Smarter Business campaign. “Having the opportunity to be mentored by Geoff who has such a depth of business experience really helped us cement our plans for expansion and reminded us that a little community market can go on to achieve big things. He was really impressed with our organic growth over the years and gave us the support and confidence to initiate new community focused events both at a local and regional scale,” says Rachelle. With a focal point on arts, culture, music, fashion and cuisine, all of the market vendors are carefully selected to ensure they align with the company’s ethos to create the best possible community atmosphere and hub for communities to connect. There will be a combination of permanent and casual stall holders every Saturday with seasonal pop-up stores featured during the summer and winter months. “Life is busy enough for people as it is, so it’s important for us to replicate the same vibrant atmosphere as The Little Big Markets at Victoria Park, creating an inviting space for people to catch up with friends, sit and relax with a coffee and chat without having to shop and leave. We will have activities for the kids too and regular live music including a very special performance from Anika Moa at our first November market,” says Rachelle. The Little Big Markets - Victoria Park will be open every Saturday from 7 November, from 9am- 2pm and will feature 50 pop-up stalls offering coffee, quality food, arts and crafts, fashion, fresh flowers, fresh produce and regular live music. For more information please visit www.instagram.com/victoriaparkmarkets. If you are interested in becoming a stall holder or playing music at The Little Big Markets - Victoria Park, please visit www.littlebigevents.co.nz/joinus. F PN

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LOCAL NEWS NEWS FROM GREY LYNN COMMUNITY CENTRE The Annual General Meeting of the Grey Lynn Community Centre is to be held on Sunday 22 November - and a call is out for additional governance committee members, in particular a new treasurer.

Cath Bathe-Taylor

The meeting will be held at 10am in the community centre’s Garden Room. Everyone is welcome to come along and hear about the centre’s activities of the past year and plans and opportunities for the year ahead.

“The committee oversees governance of the centre and is a group of forward-thinking community minded people, who give freely of their time to represent their community. It supports management and makes decisions relating to finances and other vital matters pertaining to the centre,” says community centre manager Cath Bathe-Taylor. Of all the community centres in Auckland, Grey Lynn stands out because it is self governing, giving it the freedom to nurture its community. It has think outside the square management - for example its children’s play group and well-known school holiday programme are both run by men. It is supported by a number of organisations that work towards the betterment of the community, such as the Waitemata Local Board, Grey Lynn 2030, Grey Lynn Community Gardens and the Grey Lynn Business Association. “Some wonderful people are currently committee members, representing a wide range of skills and community interests - but we always have room for more and welcome approaches from anyone interested in contributing,” says Cath Bathe-Taylor. There would be few local people who haven’t visited the centre for one reason or another. Over 10,000 people come in each month either to take part in the 80 classes, activities and groups, from Kids’ Playgroup to yoga for seniors, to see the plunket nurse or seek assistance from the Citizens’ Advice Bureau or a JP, or to attend the hugely popular Sunday Farmers Market. “We are immensely proud of our centre,” says Cath. “It’s a bright modern architecturally designed, purpose-built building, with a variety of spaces from meeting rooms to a hall holding 200 people, and a range of spaces in between. These are available for private hire when not in use and are popular for AGMs, rehearsal spaces, clubs, community groups, 21sts and children’s parties.” After many years Ken Stead stood down from the treasurer’s role earlier this year. Former committee member Andrea Smythe, temporarily stepped into the breach, but with her many commitments is unable to continue. “Much as we would love her to stay, if there is anyone out there with the requisite background who would like to join us at the centre, please do get in touch, we would love to hear from you,” says Cath. New appointees to the Governance Committee ideally: Encourage group decision-making and sense of shared purpose; build working relationships that contribute to reaching informed consensus; have business and financial experience and acumen in and/or be able to adapt these skills to the needs of a small organisation; contribute to the GLCC fundraising strategy and participate in its fundraising activities; have good time management skills and the ability to commit to four-weekly meetings and participate in regular email correspondence; suggest nominees to the board who could make significant contributions; have a sense of humour. Anyone interested in putting their name forward for nomination as a committee member or treasurer (which is then put to a vote at the AGM) should call in to the community centre office to pick up a nomination form or telephone Cath Bathe-Taylor during PN business hours Monday to Thursday, or leave a message. (PHILIPPA TAIT) F GREY LYNN COMMUNITY CENTRE, 510 Richmond Road, T: 09 378 4908, www.greylynn.org.nz

18 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

PONSONBY U3A: OCTOBER 2015 Ponsonby U3A was established in 1994 and such is the sense of enjoyment and involvement that it offers members, many who joined back then are still active in the group today. It is one of 24 U3A groups in Auckland - and is part of a worldwide U3A network of seniors that promotes healthy aging by sharing intellectual, cultural, creative, physical and leisure interests and activities, organised by its retired or semi-retired members. Ponsonby U3A meets monthly on the second Friday morning of the month at the Leys Institute in St Marys Road. A typical meeting has two speakers - a 10-minute speaker - from the membership and an invited guest speaker - along with reports from the convenors of the 15 special interest groups that president Annie Webster describes as “the backbone of our organisation”. Special interest groups include Antiques and Collectibles, Art History, Dining Out, New Zealand History, Classical Studies, Ramblers, Petanque, Armchair Travellers, Genealogy, Scrabble, Green Fingers, Current Affairs, Gallery Visits, Music Appreciation and Garnet Station Tiny Theatre Supporters. An architecture group is due to start soon. “With so much on offer our membership has burgeoned,” says Annie. Intending members are invited to contact either Annie (T: 09 376 2902) or Jane Jones (T: 09 378 7628) to attend a meeting as a guest and see if U3A is for them. Margot Skinner joined Ponsonby U3A earlier this year. She is Professor in Biological Sciences, University of Auckland and in her spare time is a member of Sweet Adelines Greater Auckland Chorus. Margot was the 10-minute speaker at the October U3A meeting. She is a food and health scientist, highly regarded nationally and internationally for her work in immunology and identifying health benefits from food. She was an editor and a contributor to the recently published Bioactives in Fruit - Health Benefits and Functional Food - a major text in her area. Margot talked about a fascinating six -year period as a visiting professor at the University of Shizuoka in Japan, that followed a visit to Japan as a member of a delegation representing the New Zealand government, which wanted to develop functional foods in New Zealand. She explained that functional foods are foods that give benefits beyond basic nutrition and give a multitude of health benefits.

Professor Margot Skinner

Margot developed a research project with a professor at the university investigating New Zealand fruits, such as feijoas and kiwifruit, to see if they had any effect on molecules that break down drugs. She and her husband travelled widely in Japan, getting to know the culture, making personal friends as well as developing professional relationships. The October guest speaker, Boyd Miller, is convenor of the Takapuna U3A geology interest group. His talk was entitled ‘Pacific on the Move - an introduction to plate tectonics’. He explained that over geological time the original single piece of continental crust has moved about, broken up and rejoined, pushed about by the movement in the underlying hot molten core of the earth to give us the shape of the world’s continents as we know them. The process is still going on. He explained the activity of the hot spots of the Hawai’ian chain - an anomaly in the plate building process. Guest speaker for the November meeting will be Dr Lindsay Diggelmann, Senior Lecturer, School of Humanities, Auckland University - ‘The Magna Carta and its Medieval Origins’. PN The 10-minute speaker will be Susan Brockman - ‘Afloat in a Boat’. (PHILIPPA TAIT) F NEXT MEETING:

9.45am, Friday 13 November First Floor, Leys Institute, St Marys Road

ENQUIRIES:

Annie Webster, President, Ponsonby U3A. T: 09 376 2902, www.u3aponsonby.org.nz

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


The New Face of Lexus

29 Great North Road, Grey Lynn, Auckland City. Phone: 09 3700227 Email: ceo@lexusofaucklandcity.co.nz

www.lexusofaucklandcity.co.nz The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

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NIKKI KAYE: AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP

Positive trends in our local economy New Zealand is one of the first developed countries to get its books back in a strong position following the global financial crisis. Over the last seven years it has been a tough grind for both businesses and the Government to get there. As a member of the cabinet, with four portfolios, I have been part of a team that has worked together to get spending under control and reform key areas of the economy - from labour laws, to RMA reforms, to tax reforms, to increasing support for Research and Development. The $414 million surplus in the year to 30 June 2015 is a huge turnaround on the more than $18 billion deficit our country faced in in 2011. There are also other positive longterm trends. There has been 11 straight quarters of job growth, with 69,000 more jobs in the last year. For the first time, the average annual wage is now over $57,000 -$10,000 more than when we first came into office. We’ve recorded five years of positive household savings, the first time this has happened in a generation. Very low interest rates are also helping households and businesses. Our country has high labour market participation and a near-record high employment rate. The number of people collecting a benefit in Auckland City has also dropped by around 5%, compared to last year. More people are gaining independence by moving into employment or study, contributing to our economy, and ensuring children thrive in financially independent households. Auckland is the headquarters for around two thirds of New Zealand’s top 200 companies. Between 2009 and 2014 our local economy expanded by 25%, slightly above the national average of 22%. This was driven by the finance and insurance industries, wholesale trade, transport, postal and warehousing sectors. Our city is a key gateway for international investment and connectivity. Our large Asian population and proximate timezone with Asia, offer us a unique opportunity to benefit from the rapid growth and emerging global importance of the region. The Trans-Pacific

Partnership will help strengthen this economic growth. A number of constituents wrote to me with concerns that they had prior to the deal being announced, and I am pleased that a lot of those concerns, or myths, never eventuated in the final deal. It is our largest ever trade deal, and is expected to be worth at least $2.7 billion a year to New Zealand by 2030. As MP for Auckland Central I represent the electorate with the most small and large businesses, a number of which will benefit from this deal. The deal includes both the United States and Japan, countries that New Zealand has been trying to get free trade agreements with for 25 years. The United States is the largest economy in the world, and responsible for over a quarter of all household consumption in the world, while Japan is the third largest economy. In total the 12 countries involved with the TPP account for 36% of the world economy and 800 million customers - last year alone New Zealand sold $28 billion worth of goods and services to the other 11 countries in the TPP. The TPP will save New Zealand exporters around $259 million a year in tariffs they currently have to pay just to get their products into these markets. Our wine industry will also save millions of dollars in tariffs, benefiting our local wine producers. Each year New Zealand exports around $839 million worth of wine to TPP countries, and under the deal $10 million in tariffs will be saved. Tariff savings are just the start of the benefits this trade agreement offers to New Zealand. Barriers to access are often even more important to exporters. Eliminating these barriers will unlock enormous opportunities. It’s an incredible achievement to get our books back into surplus, despite the challenges New Zealand has faced over recent years. The TPP will ensure our economy continues to grow, and will open up new markets to our exporters. Auckland is in the perfect position to make the most of these opportunities. The building of the New Zealand Convention Centre, ongoing investment in local transport projects, along with the growth in key industries like finance will help our city’s economy grow stronger - giving more people the opportunity to gain financial independence, contribute to our economy, and ensure more children grow up in financially independent PN households. (NIKKI KAYE) F Hon Nikki Kaye is the MP for Auckland Central. www.nikkikaye.co.nz

Minister Nikki Kaye with children, parents and staff from Oranga Kindergarten, who performed a specially written song at the Safekids driveway safety campaign launch

20 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


NOVEMBER 2015

SPOTLIGHT ON

Countdown Ponsonby This update aims to provide Ponsonby News readers with the latest information about what’s happening at the new Countdown Ponsonby site. J`eZ\flicXjklg[Xk\k_\i\ÂjY\\eXcfkf]XZk`m`kpfej`k\Xe[gif^i\jj`j Y\Zfd`e^dfi\m`j`Yc\#n`k_k_\[\m\cfgd\ekkXb`e^j_Xg\XYfm\^ifle[c\m\c%

Vinegar Lane If you’ve been past the site lately you’ll see that construction is well underway for a number of the privately-owned buildings in the Vinegar Lane subdivision. The two buildings near the top end of Crummer Road are due for completion before the end of this p\XiXe[`eZcl[\Xd`of]fÎZ\jgXZ\#i\kX`c and luxury apartments.

Cider Building Work is progressing well on the Cider Building with the concrete structure of level j\m\ekXb`e^j_Xg\#k_\ĂŠijkfĂŽZ\c\m\c%

Work has started on the supermarket roof frame on the Williamson Ave/Pollen Street boundary. Retail spaces on Williamson Ave are also taking shape as the structural works at street level intensify. We also recently started \ok\ieXcnfibj#n_`Z_n`cc j\\k_\`ejkXccXk`fef]kiXÎZ lights at the intersection of Williamson Ave Xe[Gfcc\eJki\\k#Xe[jlYjkXek`Xcn`[\e`e^ of the road in this location. The top end of Rose Road will be turned into a cul-de-sac Xe[Zcfj\[kfk_ifl^_kiXÎZ%K_\j\nfibj Xi\Y\`e^dXeX^\[YpfliZfekiXZkfi#Af_e Filmore Contracting. The external works will be ongoing until February and will generate some noise and kiXÎZ[`jilgk`fe[li`e^k_\[Xp%N\Xi\ conscious of the fact that we’re working in XeXi\Xk_Xk`eZcl[\ji\j`[\ek`Xclj\#Xe[Xi\ dXb`e^\m\ip\ífikkfd`e`d`j\[`jilgk`fe to neighbours where we can.

Comments or questions If you would like to discuss any aspect of the construction please do not hesitate to contact David Lippard our Project Director on 021 727 254 or david@integratedpm.co.nz. You can also contact Ebert’s Project Manager Ifjj;loÊ\c[fe')(+)('+,#Gif^i\jj`m\ Enterprises’ Development Manager Brady Nixonfe').//0*(-+#figfg`ekf k_\j`k\fÎZ\Xk,+GfejfeYpIfX[%

Leasing update

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

C\Xj`e^`jXcjfgif^i\jj`e^n\cc#n`k_=X`i]Xo j`^e`e^lgXjk_\_\X[fĂŽZ\k\eXekK_\pXi\ `em\jk`e^.d`eZi\Xk`e^Xdf[\ienfibjgXZ\ ]fik_\,''jkXĂ­k_Xkn`ccdfm\kfk_\j`k\%N\ jk`cc_Xm\XjdXcceldY\if]jg\Z`Xckpi\kX`c c\Xj\jXmX`cXYc\%@ek\i\jk\[gXik`\jj_flc[ ZfekXZkA\jjDXik`eXk:fcc`\ijfe')(*0)((.% DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

21


LOCAL NEWS ALL SAINTS CHURCH AND ALL SAINTS CHURCH COMMUNITY CRECHE The All Saints Church corner came alive on the recent Ponsonby Market Day as the church and the All Saints Church Community Creche swung into action providing fresh baking, yummy sausages, activities for the littlies, and Devonshire teas accompanied by the toe-tapping sounds of the Queen City Big Band and the All Saints bells. “We want to thank all the people who stopped and shopped so generously to help our fundraising for the CWS Syria Appeal,” said Reverend Diana Rattray. The creche raised a good amount towards the upgrade of their playground and all were thrilled with the fantastic community feel that was generated by the day’s events. F PN www.allsaintsponsonby.org.nz

PONSONBY COMMUNITY CENTRE NEWS Ponsonby Kids

Ponsonby Community Centre Events and Programmes:

• 20 ECE funded hours • New session times developed to meet the needs of our community • We have places available this term and are also enrolling for 2016.

PCC Annual General Meeting Ponsonby Community Centre will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Monday 30 November at 6.30pm at the community centre. All are welcome to attend. If you are interested in joining the board have experience in working in governance roles and IT sector, then please contact the office for more information.

At Ponsy Kids we have been thinking about our environment and how to make it more sustainable. We are already involved in the “Paper4Trees” project which removes our paper and card for recycling on a weekly basis. In return the project gifts us with native plants that we and our children are able to plant in the garden. We now also have two ‘Hungry Bins’ which are a clean, simple and easy way to dispose of organic waste using worms. The children love saving their organic waste to deposit into the ‘Hungry Bin’. Ponsy Kids Community Preschool is a not-for-profit preschool that is licensed for 41 children aged 2yrs-4yrs. We have high-quality teacher/child ratios with six qualified teachers and a teacher aide providing a nurturing and educational learning environment for our children. We are proud to have longterm and dedicated teachers. Building strong relationships with our families and the community is very important to us. Being community based and non for profit means the aspirations and needs of the families in our community come first. Our teaching philosophy is based on extending children’s learning through their individual and group interests. Ponsy Kids T: 09 376 0896 Email: julie@ponsonbycommunity.org.nz

Rudd School of Music Tutor - Odessa Neilands is running music lessons this term at the Ponsonby Community Centre on Thursday evenings. This is a great addition to our classes and activities. Rudd School of Rock provides a range of music/vocal lessons for all ages, for more information contact Peter Rudd on T: 09 479 1081 or email info@ruddschoolofrock.co.nz. Community Garden Workshops Sat 7 November: ‘Time to Garden’ workshops will focus on how to grow a bountiful, organic summer garden. The workshops will cover sowing and planting seeds; learn harvesting techniques and efficient weeding methods and how to improve your soil. 5 December: ‘Foraging’ workshop will focus on and what you can eat from plants growing wild all around you. This increases your ecological wisdom, can improve your health and save money and it’s fun. All the workshops are based at Kelmarna Gardens, 12 Hukanui Crescent, Herne Bay and run from 9am to 12 noon. The cost is $30 per person. Guy Pringle will be facilitating the workshops and they will be practical and hands on for attendees.

PONSONBY COMMUNITY CENTRE, 20 Ponsonby Terrace, T: 09 378 1752, E: info@ponsonbycommunity.org.nz, Facebook: Ponsonby Community Centre, www.ponsonbycommunity.org.nz

22 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

23


40 years young and still playing strong.

Ever walked passed the vibrant mural on the corner of Collingwood and Wellington Streets and wondered how a playcentre, a non-profit organisation run entirely by parents, could come to take up some of the most valuable land in Auckland? By the grace of one Rosemary Hagg: a young mother who’d recently moved to Freemans Bay and was wondering how the centre, closed at the time, could be saved. Hagg’s contacts at the then Auckland City Council revealed the building was set to be removed to Avondale. It wasn’t until she’d dug deeper that she discovered that it was part-owned by the then Education Department and it was not in fact up to the council to take this kind of action unilaterally. Many meetings later, the parties agreed the building could remain and Hagg and another young mother, Marg McManus, took it upon themselves to re-open what was then known as Auckland Central Playcentre. Recruiting new members from the local community at that time was no straightforward matter and they found themselves going to all kinds of lengths to spread the word about the fact the centre was now open for the important business of play. “We used to just grab people with young kids off the street and say ‘Come on in!’” Back then, she remembers, there were empty lots and piles of rubble up and down Wellington Street - Freemans Bay was part of a huge urban renewal project the likes of which is rarely seen in Auckland these days. “It’s great to see Freemans Bay Playcentre thriving these days,” says Hagg, who still lives in the same house she moved into in the 1970s and is planning to attend the celebration to mark Freemans Bay Playcentre’s 40th Jubilee on Sunday 15 November. Various makeovers have occurred to the centre since Hagg’s time and, apart from the exterior of the building - a trusty Lockwood - the centre is largely unrecognisable. A ponga fence and mural now stand where there was once a wire fence. The sandpit has moved locations numerous times. The inside has been reconfigured, opened up and the interior walls and colour scheme updated, all with the guiding principle of maximising children’s natural urges to learn through free and joyful play. All this requires a heavy load of fundraising by members, including through community grants, some sponsorship by local business, and the now regular bake sale at Ponsonby Market Days - the rocky road alone draws multiple repeat customers. The centre is still run entirely voluntarily by parents, including dads and grandparents along with the many dedicated mothers, who receive ongoing free NZQA-approved training in early child development and play. Following the Education Review Office’s recent inspection, it received the best possible review for providing the highest quality early-childhood education. As a member-based organisation, the centre continually needs to attract new members who want to be a part of their children’s early-childhood education. The 40th Jubilee is an opportunity to strengthen ties to the community of Freemans Bay and beyond. Says current Centre Co-ordinator Kyra Rice, “We warmly welcome all past members of the centre to attend our Jubilee Open Day and are excited to reconnect with the many whanau who have started their journey in education at Freemans Bay Playcentre.” Prospective members are also most welcome to pop in and join the revelry. (AMY MANSFIELD) If you’d like to contact Freemans Bay Playcentre to share your part of its history or to PN find out more, please visit www.freemansbayplaycentre.org.nz. F FREEMANS BAY PLAYCENTRE 40th JUBILEE OPEN DAY - SUNDAY 15 November, 2-5pm, Corner Wellington Street and Franklin Road.

WHAT IS PARKBUBBLE? PARKBUBBLE IS A NEW PLATFORM FOR sharing your unused driveway, empty parks or vacant spaces. It connects people who have these empty parking spaces during a set time to people that need them. Drivers find a place to park, and space owners make money from their empty parking spaces. ParkBubble parks in most cases will be cheaper and more convenient than other options; everybody wins! The concept for ParkBubble was born out of the frustration with inner-city parking.

Torben Landl

“Why not have ParkBubble give you the ability to make some extra cash that could help you go on that summer holiday, buy that new instrument or take your partner out for a nice dinner?” says local entrepreneur Torben Landl. The concept was born out of the frustration with inner-city parking. Co-Founder Torben Landl had recently arrived back in Auckland after living a summer of convenience in Gisborne to find that meeting someone at a cafe in Ponsonby was no easy feat! While he searched high and low for a park near the cafe, he couldn’t help but notice the number of empty parking spaces and driveways just sitting there unused. Wouldn’t it be great if he could just park in one of those? Torben teamed up with Co-Founder Ewart Maclucas who brought the technical skills and background to build the platform and ParkBubble was born. Since then Foundry has come on board as the seed investor. The businesses Foundry invests in make life flow better for us all, many of which are at the heart of our sharing economy, such as ParkBubble. Foundry invests its talent, experience and capital behind the smarts that connect people, data and automation so that we can all do more with what we already have. “Parking in Ponsonby is a nightmare, we want to change that and make it easier!” The ParkBubble platform comes together in a web application that is live and ready to use now. The application facilitates the communication, co-ordination and sharing of parks between members of the community. It organises and publishes parking opportunities, enables commuters to search for suitable spaces in a given neighbourhood by location, time available and price, provides the option to pre-book the desired park and facilitates payment between the parties. Since establishment, ParkBubble has acquired parks in key inner-city areas. Ponsonby in particular has been a key focus. ParkBubble will offer both short term and longer term parks that are more cost effective and convenient with the ability to pre-book so whether someone is looking for a space on an ongoing basis for say five days or more, or are simply looking for a park near their favourite restaurant or shop for a period of 30mins - 8 hours, ParkBubble will provide the solution. The ParkBubble customer is a commuter who works or plays in the Auckland City Centre. They want to live the inner-city life without being saddled by the expense of owning property. More often than not, however, they can’t find a park when they want one near their work or desired location, whether it be a restaurant, shop or a friend’s house. On the supply side, the ParkBubble customer is someone who has a parking space that sits empty for either all or part of the day. It could be a personal off-street park or a facility associated with business, retail, sporting and recreation uses with low occupancy rates. They can empathise with the commuter not being able to find a park, as they experience the same issues when they travel to other parts of the Auckland CBD. Being a customer of ParkBubble enables them to make some additional cash from their under-used asset. The shared parking model has seen great success overseas and with the heightened sense of community in Auckland, Torben can see how this success will be emulated in New Zealand. After all, sharing is the new owning! “The days of ownership are fast being replaced by the new sharing economy.” If you have a space you want to list, are looking for that regular park next to work or want to save time when you head out to meet friends go to www.parkbubble.com F PN

24 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)

photography: Gwynne Davenport

LOCAL NEWS FREEMANS BAY PLAYCENTRE


The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

25


DEIRDRE ROELANTS: LANDMARK BUILDINGS

The Birdcage THE FORMER ROB ROY HOTEL, RENAMED THE BIRDCAGE IN 1981 WAS DESIGNED BY prolific architect Edward Mahoney whose work remains evident in many commercial, residential, school and church buildings still standing in Auckland which contribute substantially to Auckland’s architectural heritage. Freemans Bay was originally used by Maori for fishing and trading but after the founding of colonial Auckland in 1840 it was purchased from the crown in 1853 and the Rob Roy Hotel was located on the foreshore until the bay’s reclamation started to take place in the 1870s. During those early days Freemans Bay was well known as a place of recreational drinking and Maori referred to it as Waipiro (stinking water or spirits) Bay. Once the reclamation was done, Samuel Jagger, a well-known brewer, purchased a vacant site on the corner of Franklin Road and Patteson Street (renamed Victoria Street). The Rob Roy, now located on the corner of the newly formed Drake and Centre Streets had been operating since the early 1860s, but in June 1885 the Licensing Committee would not renew its license so Samuel Jagger undertook the construction of a new hotel utilising the earlier name. The temperance movement had gained power when the Licensing Act of 1881 was passed, implementing stringent hygiene, comfort and accommodation requirements in public houses. Such upgrading was designed to minimise alcohol consumption’s worst excesses. Contrary to the temperance movement’s expectations the new law led to a hotel construction boom, with older licensees upgrading their establishments. Edward Mahoney designed a highly ornamented facade for the Rob Roy Hotel in the Victorian Italinate style which was commonly used in 19th Century British public houses and emulated here on corner pubs. They provided elaborate separate spaces within the buildings to cater for technical requirements and groups of differing social status. The Rob Roy’s facade was divided into bays with expressed pilasters and pediments that capped the central bays. Each level was defined with a string course and the parapet incorporated sections to open circular balustrades above the windows. It was visually impressive with decorative plasterwork and two plastered brick chimneys. When the new Rob Roy was completed in 1886 it had 25 rooms. A kitchen, pantry, scullery, coal cellar, storeroom and three servants’ bedrooms were on the basement floor. The kitchen had every convenience such as a lift up to the dining room plus hot and cold water taps. The bar was on the ground floor facing a 24 by 20 foot furnished room and a large dining room fronted Drake Street which had three adjoining sitting rooms with electric bells connecting them to the bar. A staircase led up to the top floor which contained nine bedrooms, a bathroom, WC and linen closet. There was also a 20 x 16 sitting room with an oriel window that afforded a view over the harbour. In spite of all this splendour, the Temperance candidates for the licence committee election made it clear they would not grant the Rob Roy a licence. The election attracted wide public attention, was won by the Temperance movement’s opponents and immediately the licence was transferred from the old hotel to the new one. The Rob Roy has historical significance for many reasons: The land-use changes in Auckland; the foreshore reclamations; it demonstrates the importance of public houses as centres for recreation and relaxation; the impact of the Temperance movement; its association with brewing companies and Mayor John Banks who co-owned the building with Tony White in the 1980s, renaming it ‘The Birdcage’; its importance to a notable industrial working class community in Freemans Bay; the impacts of the Great Depression; the 1913 Waterfront Strike when 64 hotels were closed since they were deemed places where radicals met to discuss labour relations. On 11 November 1913, one thousand strikers marched past the closed Rob Roy on their way to a rally in Victoria Park.

A TRAGEDY ON BROWN STREET Ponsonby local personality, 71-year-old Valerie Gibson died on Friday 2 October late at night when her house was engulfed by flames. Her next door neighbour, Maggie Thompson, was woken by her dog and immediately dialled 111, but the blaze was so intense she realised Valerie could not have survived. The fire was reaching her own house so she ran into the garden and tried spraying both dwellings till the firefighters arrived and eventually controlled the furnace. Now nearby residents and many others in the wider community are mourning the loss of a very special person. Valerie was born in Hamilton and when she turned five, attended Diocesan School for Girls where her mischievous nature bucked against the trend, even encouraging a boyfriend to ride his motorbike through the school grounds. At age 21, London called where she flatted with Judith Durham of The Seekers and rubbed shoulders with the Kray brothers. She was actually employed for a time by the notorious criminals as a cashier in one of their nightclubs. Sydney was her next destination before returning like a homing pigeon to New Zealand where she bought her house in Ponsonby. Valerie, a well-known Japanese Chin breeder, won many awards on the dog show circuit. Her camper van was a well-known sight at these events with her many darlings taking up observance of the proceedings from the windows. After she retired from showing, they remained her constant companions and she was often observed by neighbours having to round them up when they escaped into the street. The camper van was swapped for a large station wagon which she often parked in the disabled area at New World supermarket with all nine of her pets taking up pride of place in the rear. Needless to say they attracted a lot of amused interest and requests from people wanting to buy one, but Valerie refused to part with any, explaining they were her dearest companions and rather than sleeping alone she shared her bed with all nine of her Chins. Her enchanting little dogs deserved this special treatment because the Japanese Chin is a true aristocrat hailing from Asia, being prized as a companion for more than a thousand years. He was a popular member of Chinese and Japanese imperial courts, and his distinctive look was developed in Japan where ownership was restricted to those of royal and noble blood. They are elegant, dainty, mild-mannered and playful. Mercifully Valerie and her dogs must have been deeply asleep when the fire broke out and smoke inhalation would have rendered them unconscious before they perished. Aspen, the sole survivor has been adopted by close friends. After news of the disaster was broadcast, messages of condolence flooded in from all parts of New Zealand and Australia. A service was held for Valerie at Grange Manor in Mt Eden on Wednesday 7 October with all donations given to the SPCA. PN (DEIRDRE ROELANTS) F

The hotel was purchased by the Crown under the Public Works Act and its temporary relocation in 2010 reflected Auckland’s ongoing motorway development. PN (DEIRDRE ROELANTS) F

26 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

What sort of pigsty should smokers be allowed to create? We are encouraged, if we are walking our dogs on public streets, to pick up their excrement. We often see owners scooping poos into a plastic bag. Most people seem to understand that people walking around city streets do not want to step into smelly doggy doos. But what about smokers? They seem to think they can just chuck their cigarette butts anywhere they like. The New Zealand community has decided that smoking should be banned from work places - inside at least. Smoking is not allowed on school properties, in public buildings, even in jails. So how much longer should we tolerate dirty cigarette butts clogging our gutters, and festooning the ground under city trees? Until I began looking around Ponsonby I had no idea how much mess there was. One or two Ponsonby people who I know saw me skulking around with my camera and when I told them what I was doing they were only too happy to show me more evidence. Come with me, said one well-known real estate agent who shall be nameless. She showed me piles of butts all over the base of trees, in gutters, near the toilets. All of this mess was either near, or right on, Ponsonby Road. I didn’t spend more than half an hour walking around and taking photos. Most gutters were the same. Most tree bases were the same. Both were littered with cigarette butts, a few of which are shown in accompanying photos. The question is: where does this tobacco finish up? The answer is: in our waterways. This casual disregard for the cleanliness of our community is a disgrace. It is one reason why some councils are thinking about banning outside smoking too. Too hard? Too authoritarian? Too anti-democratic?

Finally, here is a message to any of those who may be guilty. Smoke if you must in your own home. Chuck your cigarette butts on your own lawn, and keep the tobacco out of our waterways.

Maybe all of those things, but finally it is a dirty blot on our clean green image, and an insult to our residents and business people.

Better still, give up the filthy habit, it’s killing too many of us, and now it’s polluting our precious environment. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F PN

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RACHAEL TE AOTONGA: LEYS INSTITUTE LIBRARY NEWS The fabulous Diwali events around Auckland last month... You may have attended some of the fabulous Diwali events around Auckland last month. Not being one to miss out on the fun, Auckland Libraries is celebrating this annual event from 31 October to 15 November. This year Diwali falls on 11 November. Diwali (or Deepavali), ‘the festival of lights’, is an ancient Hindu festival. As one of the most important festivals in the Hindu calendar, it signifies the victory of light over darkness. Extending over a five-day period, Hindus prepare by cleaning and decorating their homes and offices before the many rituals and celebrations to come. On Diwali night people dress up in new clothes, light up lamps or candles, participate in family puja (prayers), and end the night with an extensive feast of sweets and gift giving. The festival provides opportunities to share popular aspects of Indian culture with other Aucklanders. This is an occasion for the wider community to learn, engage, celebrate and share in cultural, educational and community activities. Auckland Libraries celebrates Diwali every year with a region-wide programme of henna workshops, music and dance demonstrations, special storytimes and much more. Check the website for more information. Celebrate with us here at Leys by getting a Henna Tattoo Henna has been used for body adornment as part of Indian celebrations for centuries. A paste made out of crushed leaves and twigs of henna plant, it was applied for luck as well as joy and decoration. Come celebrate the festival of lights with us by getting an authentic henna tattoo done by talented young artist Mikayla. When: Thursday 12 November, 3.30 - 5.30pm The Auckland Libraries’ collection boasts many excellent Indian novels. Here are a few of our favourites. Narcopolis by Jeet Thayil Narcopolis stretches across three decades as Bombay becomes Mumbai and portrays a city in collision with itself. With a cast of pimps, pushers, poets, gangsters and eunuchs, it is a journey into a sprawling underworld written in electric and utterly original prose. The Accidental Apprentice by Vikas Swarup The accidental apprentice is the story of a shop assistant who is approached by a man who claims to be CEO of one of India’s biggest companies. He tells her he is looking for an heir for his business empire, and that he has decided to test her for the position. All she has to do is pass seven tests. Fasting, Feasting by Anita Desai Fasting, Feasting looks gently but without sentimentality at an Indian family that, despite Western influence, is bound by Eastern tradition. Anita Desai’s novels focus on relationships and family life in India, particularly the problems of women in Indian society. A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry A Fine Balance is a compelling narrative about four unlikely characters who come together in circumstances no one could have foreseen, soon after the government declares a ‘State of Internal Emergency’ in the mid 1970s. Ibis Trilogy by Amitav Ghosh Sea of Poppies is the first part of this trilogy. An epic saga set just before the Opium Wars, it was spun from the threads of his own family memories. It was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2008 and awarded the India Plaza Golden Quill Award. Ghosh continued the story in River of Smoke. The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri The lowland focusses on family ties: two brothers growing up in Calcutta amidst the political tumult of 1960s. One chooses an academic career in the United States while the other remains in Calcutta, committed to correcting the inequities of his country. Last Man in Tower by Aravind Adiga Last Man in Tower is a riveting story of money and power, luxury and deprivation. Set in the booming city of Mumbai, it’s the new India as only Aravind Adiga could explore and expose it: vivid, visceral, told with both humour and poignancy. The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai The Inheritance of Loss is set in mid 1980s India on the cusp of the Nepalese movement for an independent state. It took almost seven years to write and won the 2006 Booker Prize. Its characters struggle with their cultural identity and the forces of modernisation, while trying to maintain their emotional connection to one another. Drop in and see us for more recommendations, or check out the Auckland Libraries website. Happy Diwali to all! (RACHAEL TE AOTONGA) F PN LEYS INSTITUTE, 20 St Marys Road, T: 09 374 1315, www.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz

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DEIRDRE THURSTON

On my mind... 8am, Sunday, 18 October Settled on sofa in cosy dressing gown, sipping green tea and munching Marmite and mint paleo toast, eyes glued to the telly. Out comes the team led by our Richie holding the hand of a young would-be All Black either side of him. I immediately choke - not on the dry paleo crumbs - on pure emotion. I’m always gobsmacked at how much pride I have in our great sports teams. Especially the AB’s. Through the tears, I notice poor Richie’s ears have seen better days but his nerves of steel and leadership strengths echo around Cardiff’s Millenium Stadium as he fronts the Haka before the French side. And the Rugby World Cup NZ vs France quarter-final begins. I have a good friend there. She will be hysterical. For one thing she is very claustrophobic - and that crowd! I suspect she will have her back to the field for a large part of it. All too much to deal with. Wish I was there screaming along with her. Goodness knows what my neighbours looking down out of windows in their tall towers thought of my waving arms, wiggling fingers, hair tugging and jumping up and down. “Is that woman practising the Macarena or her lines for a one-woman, street theatre show? Or is she just completely bonkers?” I don’t care. If they’re not watching the game, they’re bonkers. What a game. Of course we played with heart and soul and those AB’s clearly show what teamwork is. How it can give their booted feet wings. It must be incredible to feel such trust and belief in each other on that level. And, of course, always the humility in the after-game interviews. I almost felt sorry for the French. Almost. (I transcended my ‘poor things’ moment miraculously quickly.) They had no show from the first minute. A final score of 64 to 13 made a complete mockery of the angstful naysayers before the game. Lesson to you all: have faith in our boys. The final will have been played and hopefully won by us by the time this issue hits the stands. Whatever the outcome, I couldn’t be more proud of our team and how they represent our nation. While I travelled through Dubai, Greece and Turkey recently, I loved that everyone flashed wide grins and had nothing bad and everything kind to say once they knew I was a New Zealander. Pretty much every person I spoke to, including locals in the many tiny villages I explored, had heard of the All Blacks. Often those two words were the only English they could muster. I found it heartwarming and the experience has refuelled my pride in this country. We are not perfect by any means: way too PC and watered down on many levels in my opinion. But as one gorgeous Greek said to me: “You all smile and are friendly. Not like other countries.” He was trying to sell me a bag at the time but I think he meant it genuinely. It wasn’t the last time I heard how smiley we are as my travels continued. I’m home again and the quarter-final is well under our belts. And the semi-final between our AB’s and South Africa. My body hurts just thinking about how physically brutal the matches are. No worries, she’ll be right: we’ve got Richie. And Dan. And Ma’a. And each and every brilliant AB that runs out on to that field willing, ready and able to give it his absolute best. Without ego. Time to properly unpack and rid my lounge of strewn clothes, Turkish Delight, and hundreds of scrunched-up receipts I will never go through. Well done AB’s. (DEIRDRE THURSTON) F PN PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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MIKE LEE: COUNCILLOR FOR WAITEMATA & GULF

Auckland’s unique heritage townscapes - if we want to keep them we may have to fight for them It was predictable but still disappointing that Auckland Council has revealed there is no heritage merit in thousands of houses and buildings across the garden suburbs of Auckland - effectively leaving them open for demolition. The protective net temporarily cast over large parts of the older city has now been hauled in and only 18% of the housing stock within has been found to merit protection.

developers’ chorus. In July the Unitary Plan Panel issued an ‘interim guidance’ to the council warning it to drop the overlay protection.

One could argue about the assessment criteria but let us put that to one side for the moment because it is fair to point out that the news is not all bad. Fortunately for much of the inner city, the historic quarters of Ponsonby, Herne Bay, Grey Lynn and Parnell, etc, retain their existing ‘residential 1 zone’ (soon to become ‘historic character zone’) protection. Many of these zones have actually been expanded though several blocks of Art Deco apartments in Herne Bay inexplicably have missed out.

The council has quite properly chosen to ignore this advice. To abandon the overlay process at this late stage would have been completely farcical. All the Unitary Plan Panel has achieved, in my view, is to signal to the public that the panel is dominated by a group of deregulatory zealots. Panel members apparently believe that requiring a consent to smash down a building with prima facie evidence of heritage value places, ‘unnecessary constraints and burdens on landowners seeking to develop their property’. In the world of the Unitary Plan Independent Hearing Panel, apparently ‘property rights’ and money -making trump public good and Auckland’s civic responsibility to protect its uniquely built heritage handed down by our ancestors.

However, thanks to the hard work of the council heritage department some extra 9000 houses across the city, previously unprotected, have been found to merit protection. It should be pointed out that in the ‘Super City’ the difference between protection and destruction can often be a slim one. Despite their historic and aesthetic merit, buildings, some of them dating back to the 19th Century, have been demolished or removed on a regular basis. The recent ‘disappearing’ of the beautiful Erewan building in Jervois Road comes to mind. This brings me to the controversial ‘pre-1944 overlay’ that lies at the centre of the council’s present heritage protection strategy. This has been both vaunted and criticised, as a ‘blanket control’ similar to Brisbane’s ‘pre-1940’ heritage building protection rules. I had much to do with the adoption of this measure by the Auckland Council after meeting a heritage architect from Brisbane, Peter Marquis-Kyle, after an interview with Chris Laidlaw. In Brisbane, as Peter told Radio New Zealand listeners, planning rules absolutely prohibit the demolition of any building in the inner city in existence up to 1940 (unless there are compelling grounds, like safety). Inspired by what I learned about Brisbane, I lobbied hard for a similar approach in Auckland. In this I was firmly supported by heritage advocates like Sally Hughes, Sandra Coney, Allan Matson, Shale Chambers, the Character Coalition, backed by a public angered by the council’s poor performance on heritage protection. What Auckland actually got however, while superficially similar to Brisbane’s, is something quite different. Unlike the Brisbane rules, all that Auckland’s so-called ‘blanket protection’ means is that before demolishing a building within the pre-1944 overlay, the owner has to obtain a resource consent. Given that citizens are obliged to obtain resource consents for a whole range of routine activities, this is really no big deal. Despite this, the pre-1944 overlay has drawn heated criticism from the developer lobby led by the NZ Property Council and the other usual suspects. While pressure from vested interests is to be expected, what is really worrying is that the Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel, which is currently adjudicating on Auckland’s future planning rules, joined the

That is not, I suggest, the formula for a sustainable civilization - let alone a liveable city. So where do we go from here? Auckland’s pre-1944 overlay, while a pale shadow compared to Brisbane’s straight-out ban on demolition, is at least a good start. It is proving to be coherent and robust - so far. The next step is to ensure that those historic buildings that have been left out are put back in, and those areas and buildings that have cleared the council’s very high assessment bar are given meaningful protection. A genuine Brisbane approach making demolition of buildings in the ‘historic character’ zones non-complying or even prohibited activity under RMA, is what we should be demanding. This is not the end of the matter because in another twist to the story, the council has informed the Unitary Plan Panel that it intends to review the previously agreed ‘single-house zones’ with the intent to reduce them from 32% of Auckland’s housing stock to just 10%. If this happens, thousands more single-house sites across the city will be opened up for mixed use, infill and highrise. But these single-house zones also are the basis of our ‘historic character’ townscapes. There seems to be a mixed message coming from the council. However, the hardline views of the Unitary Plan Panel are quite clear and mean our historic townscapes are still under threat. The upshot of all this means that Aucklanders can not rely on what comes out of the Unitary Plan Hearing Panel to safeguard our built heritage. If we want to keep it, we may PN have to fight for it, quarter by quarter, street-by-street, house by house. (MIKE LEE) F Councillor for Waitemata and Gulf www.mikelee.co.nz Mike Lee is the councillor for the Waitemata & Gulf ward. He is the chair of the Council’s Heritage Advisory Panel.

RANGE OF QUALITY ICONIC BRANDS CATER FOR ALL Since January 1989 Winger has continued to grow and evolve in many different ways. There have been a lot of positive changes but one thing has remained the same. Wayne Leach has always been and still is the proud owner of Winger Motors. Since the beginning, Wayne has been in the drivers-seat of what has turned into a multi brand, multi-location premium dealership. In the spirit of change, new General Manager Steve Hilson has joined the company in July 2015 and will, along with Wayne, grow Winger to its full potential. Brands have been strategically added to the Winger portfolio over the last 26 years with the main focus being on reaching a wide target market. The latest additions to the Winger family are Jeep, Chrysler and Dodge at the dealership on the North Shore. These three exclusive quality brands will allow them to care for a different part of the market and will truly complement the existing brands, especially their cornerstone brands; Subaru and Suzuki.

30 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

As well as adding Jeep, Chrysler and Dodge to their North Shore dealership they have also introduced these iconic brands to their dealership in Queenstown. “We will truly suit and cater to the adventurous demographic in Central Otago and provide our customers with a wide range of choice when it comes to choosing the perfect vehicle for their lifestyle,” says Wayne. “The time for Winger is now and we welcome you to visit one of our six locations nationwide.” What else will the future bring for Winger Motors? “Who knows,” says Steve, “but we’ll have a great time getting there, driving one of the fantastic new models available from Wingers!” F PN WINGER MOTORS, 75 Wairau Road, Glenfield, T: 09 09 441 4750, www.winger.co.nz

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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

Auckland Transport - residential parking schemes As Auckland intensifies, managing parking on residential streets is becoming increasingly important. Auckland Transport reports that overcrowded parking is particularly an issue in fringe city suburbs where many heritage properties have no off-street parking. Many residential communities have given AT feedback that they are increasingly being impacted by commuter parking in their streets. Auckland Transport told Ponsonby News that public consultation revealed that residents in inner city suburbs wanted residential permit schemes to manage the parking pressure. So that is what AT has vowed to do. They insist the plans will be preceded by comprehensive community consultation and engagement. AT implemented a trial programme in St Marys Bay in July 2012. This was particularly to address the problem of all-day commuter parking. Blanket two-hour time restrictions were placed on some local streets, and residents were able to purchase permits that provided an exemption. This trial has been judged by AT and locals as successful, and a similar model is being prepared for Freeman’s Bay, with Ponsonby to follow with consultation before Christmas, and Grey Lynn about mid-2016. These schemes are not always straightforward. There are fishhooks. For example, some owners want to be able to park outside their home but don’t want to pay any more rates (which is what a parking permit actually is). Some also complain that they should have a dedicated spot outside their own home. The AT sells permits to home owners but does not promise they will be able to park outside their house - just in the permitted neighbourhood. Owners also worry about friends and tradespeople working on their property. AT makes allowance for visitor passes for tradespeople working on their property, but not the latter. There will, however, be the ability to pay

for a full day’s parking for businesses within a residential zone. This one day permit will cost $5. Others have said the complete cleanout of cars on St Marys Bay streets during the day shows the system to have been overkill. One interesting AT rule will be that new developments within residential parking zones should not be eligible for parking permits. This will avoid developers passing on the costs of providing parking to ratepayers. Developers and new residents, according to AT, have a responsibility to ensure they have sufficient parking off -street to meet their needs. AT will prepare information to assist developers, new buyers and tenants in understanding the new restrictions, but insist they will not allow developers to pass on costs of providing parking to AT.

Residents and businesses within the zone can apply for permits and coupons that give exemption from the time restriction. A permit costs $70 and is valid for one year. The number of permits issued will be capped at 85% of the total number of spaces in the zone. Residents can apply for as many permits as there are vehicles registered to their address, but there will be a series of allocation ‘rounds’, for a second, third or fourth permit. Businesses can apply for one permit, but permits are not issued for boats, trailers, caravans or trucks - these should be parked off-street. Permits are paperless. A vehicle’s licence plate is linked to an electronic permit.

Apart from the proposals for Freeman’s Bay, Ponsonby and Grey Lynn, AT will consider the implementation of a residential parking zone when the parking occupancy of an area is regularly above 85% at peak times. They will also act if they receive multiple requests for a parking zone and there is support from the local board.

The highest permit priority will be for a house without off-street parking. AT has created a hierachy of 1= high, 5= low priority.

So, Grey Lynn residents, if you consider a scheme should be in place, lobby your local board members and force your way up the queue.

These comprehensive moves by Auckland Transport should remove many of the existing problems, one of the peskiest being commuter parking in inner city streets, but it is not foolproof.

Clearly, the Freeman’s Bay residential parking zone is the model which AT aims to roll out across the inner city, so how will it work? The residential parking zone is a two hour parking time restriction that applies Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm.

One-day coupons will be available at a $5 price, but each resident will receive 50 free coupons per year.

A degree of tolerance will still be needed from residents, or they will be told to beggar off to Eketahuna if they can’t live in a more densely populated city and walk or cycle around their hood. When does the last bus to the PN Hokianga leave Grey Lynn? (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

DIVERSITY WEEK IS BACK @ VICTORIA PARK Diversity week is a week-long Circability event celebrating inclusion. It kicks off with a free Family Circus Sunday on 8 November from 2pm - 4 pm. The whole family can learn to circus together or watch the fun and tricks on the trapeze, unicycle, juggling, diabolo, tightrope, globe, hoops, plates, acrobatics, etc. There is an Autism Seminar for people working in the sector on Monday 9 November, an exhibition from Mapura Studios and short film night on Tuesday 10 November. Short films including Circability’s performance on Cirque du Soleil’s stage, Hohepa’s Matariki show and Toi Ora who present two award-winning short films from the Houston International Film Festival - ‘Walter Out of the Blue’ and ‘Walter Satyricon’. There is action and sausage sizzle every lunchtime in the park with a different focus each day from 12noon - 2pm.

The Victory Convention Centre is sponsoring the venue, situated just across the road from Circability Central in Victoria Park. Ticket prices are Adults $15, Child $10, and PN Family (2 adults and 2 children) $40. F The Fiesta is part of Circability’s Diversity Week 2105 featuring workshops, film, exhibitions: www.eventfinda.co.nz/2015/circability-circus-fiesta/auckland/ freemans-bay

CIRCUS FIESTA Friday 13 November - 12.30pm and 7pm This November, Circability present their Circus Fiesta - a Music Circus Mash-Up featuring an all-ages and abilities cast celebrating inclusion and diversity. Join jugglers, strongmen, stilt walkers and acrobats in a classic circus extravaganza, with live music by Strangers in a Strange Band, The Mutes from Mars and other special guests. Directed by Thomas Hinz, Circability shows never fail to surprise, delight and entertain beyond expectations. Their last shows at the PumpHouse Theatre sold out and snapped up the Arts Access Aotearoa Community Partnership Award. Bring the whole family to the Music Circus Mash-Up and experience the best in inclusive circus up close.

32 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

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JACINDA ARDERN: LABOUR LIST MP AUCKLAND

Climate change - our challenge and opportunity I remember it distinctly - it was my first candidate meeting and was attended almost entirely by farmers. I was asked for my view on climate change, and outlined my belief that we needed to act and with urgency. My answer was met with a resounding boo. Thankfully it’s the only time I have ever heard a response like that to such a pressing issue, but that doesn’t mean we are making the progress we need. At the end of the month, New Zealand will participate in the Paris Climate Change Conference to negotiate a global response to the threat that climate change poses to us all. Hopefully, countries can agree to an international and legally binding agreement which achieves significant and meaningful results. Jacinda Ardern at black petrel tagging This conference provides us with a timely opportunity to reflect on where we are right now, and where we desperately need to be. If the Government is serious about sustainability, then it needs to do more to lower our emissions. Earlier this year the Government announced new targets to reduce New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions by 30% of our 2005 levels, by 2030. However, this will not produce meaningful gains because our emissions rose by more than 20% between 1990 and 2012 alone. This underwhelming target also essentially means that it will be impossible to achieve National’s target of reaching a 50% reduction on our 1990 levels by 2050, and we continue to operate with almost no plan at all on how we will get there. As a result, New Zealand had the fifth highest emissions per person out of all developed countries in 2012, hardly the clean, green image we are trying so hard to promote and trade on. It is important that the Government does more to reduce the threat of climate change. There is a generally held international consensus that it would be dangerous to allow global temperatures to rise by more than two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. At current emissions rates it is likely that global temperatures would rise by more than four degrees Celsius by 2100. This would have disastrous economic, environmental and human effects worldwide. That’s why we need to take a different path. First, it’s Labour’s policy to reduce New Zealand’s CO2 emissions to 40% below our 1990 levels, by 2030, to minimise the adverse effects of climate change. This would ensure that our target is in line with that of the European Union. It’s an achievable target, and its impact on New Zealand households would only be modest. Labour would also establish an independent climate commission to ensure that these targets are being met - we will build a plan. But it’s not just about targets, it’s about how we view the entire challenge of climate change. It may be a ‘problem’ but climate change also represents a massive opportunity to lead the way on renewable technology, on solutions that help us tackle our agricultural emissions, and to model how to transition an economy from being heavily reliant on fossil fuels to one based on clean energy, green technology and being low-carbon. We can and should be world leaders. This is after all what our country’s brand is predicated on. A global response to climate change is necessary, but that means doing our bit. New Zealand can and should lead the way on the global response to climate change. PN Anything less should be met with a massive, collective boooo! (JACINDA ARDERN) F JACINDA ARDERN, Labour List MP based in Auckland Central. www.jacinda.co.nz

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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

Spring Festival at Kelmarna Gardens On Sunday 11 October, Kelmarna Gardens held their Spring Festival. Nearly 1000 people enjoyed a fun day of music, food and garden demonstrations. There were herbal teas, tasty cookies, honey bees, even a Pt Chevalier resident cuddling his pet lamb. One of the highlights was the music from The Remarkables - a blues and country inspired group, featuring guitar, double bass and Robbie, the amazing drummer, wash -boarder, fiddler and even saw player. This city farm is a paradise in this densely urban environment of Herne Bay - Grey Lynn. The photograph below shows Chair of the Trust, Mary Paul with Local Board Deputy Chair Pippa Coom looking out over the gardens. There have been questionmarks over the garden’s future since the Framework Trust pulled out of funding Therapeutic Gardening for mental health people at Kelmarna, earlier this year. A new lease with the council, who owns the property, is ready to be signed and new volunteers are arriving all the time. New trustees are locals Margaret Fleming (secretary), Pip Wilkie, Karen Mann and John Shaw, who join Simon Wilson and longterm trustees Michael Graham Stewart, Mary Paul and Caroline Banks (treasurer). I have never seen the gardens look so tidy and well looked after, but the trust is not resting on its laurels and has new development plans with the help of a landscaper and other volunteers. Conversation with the DHB is continuing so Kelmarna can regain some funds for training and supporting the gardens as a therapeutic centre. Adrian Roche is still at Kelmarna doing a sterling job as manager, after some 20 years of service. He is supervising spring planting and blossom and flowers are appearing everywhere. Staple food grown at Kelmarna includes potatoes, pumpkins, courgettes and sweet corn. As well as those vegetables, salad plants have always been a feature of Kelmarna Gardens, and locals can buy a bucket load for a few dollars, picked while you wait. Adrian welcomes more volunteers. After gardening, everyone sits down together to a lunch cooked from the gardens. During the winter you can almost guarantee that delicious pumpkin soup will be on the menu. A new mental health group called ‘Cook Ease’ from Richmond Fellowship is gardening at Kelmarna once a week. Another new development is that Kelmarna is now part of the ‘Gardens for Health’ network, a DHB funded programme which supports community-based organisations to set up edible gardens. Nine weaner calves from Mt Albert Grammar School are out in the paddock behind the gardens and a flock of sheep is due to arrive soon. The place is a hive of activity, a real treasure in our urban community, and one that we should all endeavour to nurture. Good luck Mary, Adrian and all the volunteers and trustees. Kelmarna is what ‘community’ is all PN Continued p132 about. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

Chair of the Trust, Mary Paul with Local Board Deputy Chair Pippa Coom

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Lead singer of the Remarkables, Neil Finlay with another member Robbie Laven awaiting their turn on stage at Kelmarna Gardens

Gael with umbrella

Veggies growing while visitors listen to the music at Kelmarna Festival

Picking fresh herbs at Kelmarna Festival

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LOCAL NEWS CITY VISION AECT CAMPAIGN LAUNCH “AUCKLAND’S ASSETS MUST WORK FOR ALL AUCKLANDERS,” SAYS JUDITH TIZARD, longtime Minister for Auckland and Auckland Central MP, who is standing with Anne -Marie Coury, President of Auckland Grey Power, Jeanette Elley, Green candidate and energy policy expert, Simon Mitchell, lawyer and community activist and Kirk Serpes, an engineer and Generation Zero co-founder; to retain public ownership of Vector, to futureproof Auckland’s energy networks to ensure there are ongoing dividends to Aucklanders and to ensure we have affordable power to live and work. David Shand and Michael Coppolelli hosted a party at their St Marys Bay home to launch City Vision’s campaign for the Auckland Energy Consumer Trust. For more information www.cityvisionforaect.org.nz F PN

L-R: Simon Mitchell, Anne-Marie Coury, Jeanette Elley, Judith Tizard and Kirk Serpes

L to R: Anne-Marie Coury; David Shand; Judith Tizard; Kirk Serpes

L to R: Kevin Dunseath (Miss Ribena), Judith Tizard, Dame Cath Tizard and Bim Wilkinson; Jeanette Elley and Judith Tizard; a group of friends and supporters

IMPORTS TO ORDER + TRANSPARENT PRICING + OPEN UP A WORLD OF CHOICE Lincoln and Sally Roberts offer a bespoke car import service - you tell them about your dream car and they find it and deliver it to your door. They will search in New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Europe and Japan to find you the best car for the best price. They specialise in importing near-new European vehicles from the United Kingdom. “Both Lincoln and Sally went above and beyond the call of duty, they are honest and trustworthy - a rare find in the automotive industry!” Mike D-M, Auckland.

Avant Black Edition, delivered it to Rod just after his plane landed in the UK (fully insured), and helped ship it home at the end of the trip. Why waste money and drive an inferior rental when you can ‘make’ money by importing a car? Vehicle searches are free of charge so to start the search for your next quality European car contact Lincoln or Sally.

One client, Rod Francis, recently contacted them to help source a car for his European road trip. 24 hours after his initial contact Lincoln had found him a perfect 2013 Audi A6

EUROPEAN CAR IMPORTS, sally@europeancarimports.co.nz or Lincoln M: 021 500 166 www.europeancarimports.co.nz

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LAURAINE JACOBS: THE SEASONED PALATE

Swashbucklers - an oldie but a goodie Sometimes the most established restaurants provide the best experiences. Perched right beside the waters of the Westhaven Marina, Swashbucklers, the well-known haunt of sailors, sportsmen and more than a few businessmen, has a tonne of appeal with its outdoor bar tables, the funkiest bar in the city by a country mile and the added attraction of the ritual stingray feeding session daily at low tide. Most importantly, the kitchen serves up some of the freshest fish around in a totally unassuming manner. Sniffy diners, who like everything just so-so and want to head to the newest fancy-schmancy place to be able to trump their mates could well do to take in a breath of the salty air and relax here. They might even take the family as this is a place where everyone is welcome. An extensive choice of great comfort food including a kids’ menu is offered, all instantly recognisable stuff rather than the type of fashionista-fare that needs a clever waiter and five minutes to explain what’s on the plate. It is almost worthy of an historic places designation for in its early days late last century Swashbucklers was presided over by the legendary ‘Ginger.’ Regulars all have tales to tell about him, some of which are fairly hair raising and many of which I am sure have become embellished over the years. Ginger passed away nine years ago, and the joint was taken over by a group of three or four friendly investors. These wise guys did not meddle with much as changing things too much as that would have been crazy. It remains a much loved place where everyone can feel comfortable. They did attempt to declutter, refurbish and bring in a few kitchen improvements, but for the most part it is still the same old Swashbucklers with much of the same old clientele. Bruno the Bear remains - what the hell a grizzly brown bear is doing there alongside the three decorative fish tanks and a collection of ancient outboard motors and other nautical paraphernalia I cannot work out, but it adds to the eclectic scene. The first key to all this is the affable general manager Paul Smit. He was known to many from his previous restaurant Headquarters in the same Westhaven precinct, where he looked after the locals and regulars with the same enthusiasm he’s brought to Swashbucklers (my first introduction to HQ was the mighty hangover breakfast back in the day, which was so hearty it was cited as the ultimate cure-all. Smit has taken that idea and there it is - served on weekend brunches and called the Pirate’s Breakfast with the famous HQ Hash Brown, Mixed Grain Toast, Eggs, Grilled Tomato, Mushroom, Baked Beans, Beef Sausage and Bacon - worth every penny of the charge of $24.50). Secondly, he took with him a chef from HQ, Shaun Margan, a young guy with a tonne of talent who had grown up in a family with a love of good food, especially fishy stuff. Margan has a great kitchen team behind him and his passion for sourcing the freshest fish shows. Every night he cooks a huge number of plates of Swashbucklers Fish and Chips - gurnard, lightly battered with a mountainous pile of fries, tomato sauce and tartare at $23. But whatever other fresh fish fillets have been delivered for the day’s menu can be substituted. On a recent visit I couldn’t go past this house specialty, choosing to have snapper, and was warned by fellow diners to order a small portion of the fish but was still served two huge fillets that fairly melted in my mouth; moist, fresh and covered in one of the lightest, crisp batters I have encountered in ages.

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Meanwhile, the fish of the day, hapuku was as expertly styled as any in the city. Big thick chunks on a tasty potato rosti with roasted tomato and caper buttery sauce and a flourish of balsamic were superb, especially alongside one of the heartiest piles of green vegetables on the side I have seen anywhere. Amongst other choices, the pan fried John Dory in butter is the essence of simplicity, the Pirate’s Platter is a veritable cacophony of fresh seafood that can be scaled up for a group to look simply spectacular, there are scallops cooked the old-fashioned way in a genuine mornay sauce, an tasty and comforting seafood chowder that is a meal in itself, fresh oysters in the shell, calamari, salmon, tuna, a sparkling sashimi plate, chicken parmigiana, fantastic steaks and much more. I’d go back in a heartbeat for the pile of paper thin rings of calamari, ever so lightly floured with salt, pepper, fresh garlic and herbs and quickly deep fried. All they needed was a squirt of lemon to complement their delicacy - could this be Auckland’s favourite dish of the year? ‘Afters’, if anyone could possible tuck into dessert after their hearty meal, has all the most loved favourites; apple crumble, steamed ginger pudd, bread and butter pudd, ice-cream sundae made the old fashioned way and a Whitestone cheese board. The cheesecake of the day the other night was peanut butter and chocolate topped with ice cream and butterscotch... hmmm. But the boys loved it! And that bar. That’s another total experience. The regulars all know each other but mingle happily with newly arrived ocean-going sailors and salty types who breeze in after regular racing on the harbour. A chalkboard lists bar snacks that get the same careful attention the regular menu does in the adjacent dining room. The place is chockful of Ginger’s collection of number plates, yachting memorabilia, quirky signs and a roaring fire. Despite beer being the drink of choice (14 beers by the bottle and eight on tap) the wine list is short, succinct and most importantly focussed on recognised brands of decent chardonnay, pinot gris, sauvignon blanc and hearty reds, all pretty decently priced. I am sure the sophisticates will head for chilled Veuve Clicquot or the delicious Rochfort Rees Rosé on perfect summery evenings when they can relax outdoors and watch the sun set over the masts of Westhaven. It’s a happy place, and to round off the experience the service is terrific. Friendly types to look after everyone, a private room called the Gibbs Landing which can be hired for private parties of up to 100 people, locals can walk cross the motorway on that swanky overhead bridge from St Marys Bay, and best of all Swashbucklers has its own carpark right by the door. Do not miss the fun! Open 11am till late daily, brunch on weekends from 7.30am. (LAURAINE JACOBS) F PN www.laurainejacobs.co.nz Swashbucklers, 23 Westhaven Drive, St Marys Bay, T: 09 307 5979, www.swashbucklers.co.nz

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY BEER AND SAUSAGES A WINNING COMBINATION Congratulations are in order again to Lucia and Eddie from Grey Lynn Butchers, joint winners of this year’s @hallertaubrewery Beer Banger competition. Lucia and Eddie’s winning sausage creation, ‘Sweet Deception’ is made with wild venison, truffle and Portobello mushrooms infused with No.4 Hallertau Beer and these award -winning sausages are now available from their Grey Lynn store and on the Hallertau menu. Each year the craft brewery challenges six Auckland sausage makers to create a new sausage recipe using one of the following randomly allocated hops ingredients: Hallertau Statesman Pale Ale, Copper Tart - Red Ale, Deception - Schwarzbier, Maximus IPA, Stuntman IIPA, Double Stout, and Granny Smith Cider. The six entrants’ sausages were served on Hallertau’s menu for a week, and open to public vote for their favourite ‘snarler.’ Over the 10 days of the ‘Glorious Society of Bangers and Beer’ competition over 90kgs sausages were consumed and 300+ votes cast. F PN GREY LYNN BUTCHERS, 531 Great North Road, T: 09 376 3567, www.greylynnbutchers.co.nz

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Owner of Hallertau Brewery & Restaurant Stephen Plowman with Lucia and Eddie Rodrigues of Grey Lynn Butchers

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photography: Martin Leach

EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY

NEWS FROM GREY LYNN FARMERS MARKET Debbie Majurey from Paradiselost Gardens is at the Grey Lynn Farmers Market on the second and last Sunday of the month. What products do you grow and which are your favourites? I grow an eclectic mix of flowers including nostalgic, bee friendly, cottage garden, perennials, wild flowers, proteas, waratahs and of course bird of paradise, our first flower. In 2006 when I met Alan I began learning about bird of paradise, he had been growing for some years before I met him, and I suppose because of his love for this very retro flower it became mine too. Very hard to single out one or two others as every season brings new beauty and magic to the garden. My fave at the moment is Campanula glomerata superba, with exquisite violet bluebell flowers. How long have you been growing flowers? I have always enjoyed growing flowers but never had the opportunity to go big. We decided on creating a flower farm when we moved to South Head three years ago. Where did you grow up? I grew up on a dairy farm in Clevedon, South Auckland.

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What’s the biggest business decision you have had to make? To reduce my hours as an early childhood teacher so I can spend more time developing the flower farm with Alan. What’s your favourite way to relax after work? I practically leap into the garden after work then stop and breathe in the garden. I love seeing the little changes happening each day. Where is your favourite New Zealand holiday spot? While we haven’t been there for a few years, Pataua, Whangarei Heads is beautiful. Great camping, views and swimming. What’s your favourite thing about coming to the Grey Lynn Farmers Market? There’s something about flowers that makes smiles and I love that! Without a doubt it is meeting and chatting with the wonderful Grey Lynn Farmers Market community about flowers, growing stuff and life.

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY

MOTAT’s Solent Mark IV Flying Boat ‘Aranui’

MUSEUM SEEKS TO RESTORE THE LAST REMAINING SOLENT FLYING BOAT MOTAT is hosting a gala dinner and charity auction, ‘Dining in the Skies, to raise funds for the restoration of the world’s only remaining Solent Mark IV Flying Boat, ‘Aranui’. The event takes place in MOTAT’s Aviation Display Hall in Meola Road on Thursday, 3 December from 6pm. This is an opportunity to be immersed in the glamorous era of the flying boat while enjoying a three course meal featuring dishes from the airline menus of the past, all the while surrounded by MOTAT’s fine aviation collection, including the ‘Aranui’ itself. MOTAT’S Commercial Manager, Jeff Morris, explains that the Solent on display at MOTAT is one of New Zealand’s most iconic aircraft. “This majestic flying boat once graced the Pacific skies ferrying passengers along the Coral Route. It was operated by Tasman Empire Airways Limited (TEAL) and the route was labelled the most romantic in the world by those who flew it,” he says. The first phase of the project, focussing on the interior of the aircraft, was made possible by a significant donation from Air New Zealand, who succeeded TEAL and celebrated their 75th anniversary earlier in the year. Now MOTAT is actively seeking funding to complete the restoration and begin work on the exterior. The aim is to return the Solent to the way it looked during the flying boat heydays of the 1950s. Richard Foss, a California-based journalist, author, culinary historian and lecturer will be the guest speaker at the elegant black-tie event. He will be discussing his recently released book, ‘Food In The Air and Space: The Surprising History of Food and Drink in the Skies’. Supporters can play a vital role in helping MOTAT restore the Solent MK IV Flying Boat to its former glory by purchasing Dining in the Skies tickets through the MOTAT website. Prices are $125 per person or $1125 for a table of 10. This event would also make an ideal year-end function for small businesses. If anyone is unable to attend the gala event but would still like to contribute to this important project, the following Givealittle page has been set up to collect donations: givealittle.co.nz/cause/motatsolent/ www.motat.org.nz

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PHIL PARKER: WHOSE WINE IS IT ANYWAY?

Six wines under $16 As a hobby wine writer on a modest income I do like to open a different bottle of wine each night and share it with my charming spouse during dinner and over the course of an evening. But, aside from trade samples, I am obliged to buy my own wines. And these generally fall under the $25 dollar mark. I’d dearly love to say that I have a huge cellar stocked with many hand-picked bottles from the very best vintages and producers, but the sad fact is I don’t. Thus, I’m always on the lookout for a bargain and sometimes stumble upon the odd gem - largely by trial and error. As a rule of thumb, it’s extremely rare to get anything drinkable under $10. And there are some truly awful imported supermarket cheapies in the $8.99 and below range. Generally you do get what you pay for, so don’t expect concentration of flavour, longevity or complexity in a sub $10 wine. Wines in the $25 plus range are generally produced with a lot more TLC, including crop-thinning and vineyard selection. Anyway, here’s a selection of very good value wines that I managed to bring in under the $16 price point, on a recent hunting and gathering expedition into deepest Ponsonby. Disclaimer: I bought the wines on special at the time of writing, from Glengarry in late September, so current prices may vary depending on where you buy these wines. Kumeu Village Pinot Gris 2013 - $14.99 Yeasty lime aromas, leading on to a rich and complex medium palate of nougat, lime juice quince and grapefruit, with a mineral dry finish. Yum. Reflects a hot dry vintage in west Auckland. Fantastic value. A brilliant pre-dinner wine. And during. And after. Available from Glengarry or direct from the winery www.kumeuriver.co.nz

Coopers Creek Fat Cat East Coast Chardonnay 2014 - $14.99 Smells like rock melon and citrus with a whiff of funky yeast. A nice soft and light easy-drinking style with flavours of melon, lemon squash and nougat and a dry finish. Nice chilled as a picnic wine or a friendly BBQ white wine option for the savvie averse. Available from Glengarry, or direct from the winery www.cooperscreek.co.nz Kate Radburnd Vine Velvet Martinborough Pinot Noir 2013 - $15.99 Earthy and briny, savoury aromas. This is a great value intense and complex Martinborough pinot. Flavours of ripe black cherry, tamarillo and earthy spice with a dry finish. Available from Glengarry, Pask winery www.pask.co.nz and Boozee Liquor Online. www.boozee.co.nz Yalumba Y Series South Australia Shiraz/Viognier 2013 - $10.99 Bang for buck. Typical South Aussie dark fruit number. Blackberry and spice on the nose and again on the palate. Also some savoury baked meat flavours, plus black cherry, with medium firm tannins and a dry finish. Great with BBQ steak and snarlers. Available from Glengarry. Rosemount Estate Diamond South Australia Shiraz 2011 - $14.99 Yum. Big fat and sweet like a juicy ripe blackberry in the summer heat. Again, the Aussies nail it with a value for money stunning red. Num num num. Boysenberry, blackberry, black cherry, hint of spice and a voluptuous silky palate with a soft mouthfeel. Available from Glengarry and Countdown online. (PHIL PARKER) F PN

Waipara Hills Waipara Valley Pinot Gris 2014 - $14.99 A clean, crisp and mineral style of pinot gris. Smells like lime juice and cut grass. Medium palate of prince melon, lime juice, Nashi pear and a tangy dry, crisp finish. Good match with seafood. Available from Glengarry. Phil Parker is a wine writer and operates Fine Wine & Food Tours in Auckland. See: www.finewinetours.co.nz Phil’s new cellar door book ‘NZ Wine Regions - A Visitor’s Guide’ is now available on Amazon Kindle.

ONE BISTRO BREATHES NEW LIFE INTO OLD PONSONBY FIRE STATION Located in Williamson Avenue in the old Ponsonby Fire Station, One Bistro is the latest addition to Ponsonby’s gastronomic offerings. One Bistro is open for brunch seven days a week serving international cuisine and a kids’ menu is available all day. Dinner service is coming soon, the menu promises to be exciting with a signature dish flamed to your table. One Bistro is fully licensed, it is available for private functions upstairs catering for up to 80 guests with an out-door facility also available. In addition there are corporate daily delegate packages, catering for up to 30 people. The room comes with free Wi-Fi and two 55 inch hi-definition TV’s for presentations. Book now for Christmas as limited dates are available. One Bistro opening hours are 7am - 5pm, Monday to Friday and 8am - 5pm on weekends.

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In addition to dishing up healthy food options, One Bistro host’s e LIFE, this high tech, innovative and multi-benefit health and beauty care device, provides Electric Field Therapy to relieve pain and promote health, in a non-invasive, non-intrusive and non -addictive treatment. It is applied as a holistic treatment, used as an adjacent means to modern medicine. It improves energy and blood circulation in the body, increases the burning of calories and promotes detoxification. Approved and endorsed by various international health institutions it is recognised by the United States, Europe and Asia, accredited with the EU’s medical CE certificate and PN has ANZAC (GMDN) code. F ONE BISTRO, 1 Williamson Avenue, T: 09 360 1115, www.onebistro.co.nz

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY Tasting room Tast

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GARY STEEL: VEG FRIENDLY

Get it right. ‘Vegetarian delight’, with oyster sauce is not vegetarian Most of the time I’m a cool, calm and collected, live-and-let-live kind of guy. But something happened yesterday that really gets my goat. I was sitting in a famous restaurant and a friend-of-a-friend started telling me about how her friend is a vegetarian. So far, so good. But then she casually mentioned that her friend eats chicken. Oh, and fish. Call me a pedant, or anal-retentive; in fact, call me what you want, but a vegetarian never eats chicken or fish. As our friend Wikipedia notes: “A vegetarian diet is derived from plants, with or without eggs or dairy.” So, by definition, if you eat chicken or even soup with chicken stock in it you’re a carnivore, and if you eat fish or fish products, but not chicken or meat products, you’re a pescatarian. I’m tired of having the same old conversation, so at the risk of coming across like Mr Grumpy, I figured it might be educational to inform the populous about the pernicious and quite ridiculous ideas carnivores have about what constitutes vegetarianism. I mean, really! Most of the vegetarians I know are in fact not grumpy people, but in this day and age where practically every snippet of information known to humankind is available at the click of a button, it seems ingenuous (or perhaps even downright ignorant) that people could still not know even the basics about what constitutes vegetarianism. Or veganism, come to that. Vegans don’t eat any products derived from animals, alive or dead, some for health reasons and many because they maintain that having dairy products or eggs still involves the exploitation and, sometimes, death of an animal. Calves are habitually slaughtered, for instance, so that there’s enough cow milk for our lattes. Some vegans don’t eat honey, because it’s produced by bees for bees, but it is possible to call yourself a vegan and still eat honey, despite the controversy over insect exploitation. Most people don’t categorise insects as animals, and some argue that they’re not sentient (and therefore capable of feeling pain) in the same way as our four-legged friends - but that’s a debate that will run and run! Discrimination and disrespect of vegetarians runs throughout society, and it’s something that carnivores probably never consider. While it has become trendy (and probably a savvy business move) for food manufacturers to flag a product as ‘Halal’ or ‘Paleo’,

there are loads of products on our shelves that might seem like they’re suitable for vegetarians or vegans, but which aren’t. There are all those prescription and pharmacy medicines and supplements that are either on the shelves as a result of animal testing, or contain animal products, but seldom state it. There are various ice-creams, biscuits and chocolates that use emulsifiers or colourings containing animal products. One that’s new to me is roasted nuts, which apparently contain gelatine. Who would have thought? Then there’s the ubiquitous usage of meat and fish stocks in restaurants. How can we be sure that the pumpkin soup is free of chicken stock, even if the waitress is “pretty sure it’s vegetarian”? We can’t. How can we be sure that the chips aren’t cooked in beef fat? We can’t. How can we be sure that our veg isn’t cut up on the same surface as meat is chopped? We can’t. It’s incredibly hard to get a genuinely vegetarian (let alone vegan) meal at a Japanese restaurant, because just about every sauce contains fish. The same is true of Thai food - while it may seem innocuous enough with a whole section on the menu flagged ‘vegetarian’, both green and red curries almost always contain fish sauce. Then there’s the classic Chinese restaurant with its famous ‘vegetarian delight’ with oyster sauce. Lastly, let’s go back to my recent lunch at Mt Eden’s Molten restaurant, where my request for vegetarian food unleashed the above quoted “my friend who is a vegetarian and eats chicken and fish” comment. Despite its high ranking as a gourmet eating establishment, all they could come up with for this non-carnivore was a rather boring mushroom risotto (currently the de facto veg fallback menu item in unimaginative venues) and some uninspiring cheesy eggplants. I couldn’t even eat the potatoes, as they were cooked in PN duck fat. Sad face! (GARY STEEL) F Gary Steel is an Auckland-based journalist who runs online vegetarian resource www.doctorfeelgood.co.nz He can be contacted via beautmusic@gmail.com

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY HOW YOU CAN CREATE GOURMET DINNERS IN JUST 15 MINUTES You get home after working late, fighting through traffic or the gym and you’re exhausted. You open the fridge and nothing inspires you, and every recipe book you’ve got means 50 minutes of prep. Oh, and you don’t have three critical ingredients. Maybe a snack while you desperately hope for inspiration, or maybe some takeaways with dubious ingredients. Neither of those will help your waistline, though! How about a gourmet dinner you can prepare in 15 minutes? That’s what Thomas Dietz, the Parisian foodie who launched TOMeTTe from Grey Lynn, three years ago, offers with Woop: three new meals per week, inspired from around the world, that any kitchen novice can prepare in just 15 minutes. The secret is in mise-en-place - it’s what chefs do in restaurants to cut down the time to make food. It’s the preparation before the cooking. A WOOP dinner box contains all

the fresh, free-range ingredients you need for three dinners for two or four people. Follow the simple instructions for the final few minutes of fun cooking and you’ll have a restaurant quality meal on your plate faster than ever. This is a gourmet product for people who love food. If your mouth waters at the sound of salmon, duck, venison and steak you won’t be disappointed. Find out more about Woop’s gourmet meal subscriptions (regular and gluten-free options) at woop.co.nz, and as a special gift to Ponsonby News readers you can get $25 off your first box by using the coupon code PNEWS. F PN WOOP, 8 Albert Street, Auckland City, T: 0800 WOOPNZ, www.woop.co.nz

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY FROM THE CREATORS OF CAFE HANOI A new Thai restaurant opens in Ponsonby

Authentic Northern and North Eastern Thai cuisine comes to the popular Ponsonby Road strip with the opening of saan, the latest offering from the owners of Cafe Hanoi. Head chef Wichian Trirattanavatin, better known as Lek, takes the helm in the kitchen at saan. Born, raised and trained in Thailand, Lek serves a taste of his homeland that many Kiwis will not have been exposed to. Focusing on Lanna (northern) and Isaan (north eastern) cuisine, the menu showcases traditional dishes from the Trirattanavatin family. The recipes have been passed down from generation to generation, a concept known as ‘sueb saan’ which represents the history of creating sustenance from your own land and this is evident in Lek’s use of fresh, seasonal ingredients. With attention to authenticity, the menu is divided into Khang Thang (street snacks), Jarn Rerm (smaller dishes), Jarn Lak (grand dishes or larger dishes), Khong Kiang (sides) and Khong Warn (desserts).

Chef Lek received his formal training at Thailand’s premier culinary institute, the prestigious Dusit Thani Palace College. Previously head chef at Cafe Hanoi, it has been Lek’s dream to run his own Thai restaurant and share his family’s recipes with guests. Coming from a family of chefs, Lek cites his grandmother as being his major inspiration. “I have a very deep respect for the tradition and culture which underpins the food we are offering our customers,” Lek says. “It is my most important guide to ensure our dishes respectfully represent the traditional food my family and community would be proud of. I am so honoured to have this opportunity to develop saan; it’s a dream come true for me.” Inspired by Lek, the restaurant is the latest offering from inveterate restaurateurs Krishna Botica, Tony McGeorge and Jason van Dorsten owners of Cafe Hanoi and XuXu Dumpling Bar. Saan director Botica says cosmopolitan Ponsonby is an excellent precinct for saan. “Ponsonby is in a key position in Auckland’s buoyant dining economy where there’s a local population which is adventurous and knowledgeable in its dining habits. “We are delighted the concept for saan came internally from our Hanoi family and a chef who is respected for his professionalism and integrity. We felt Ponsonby was ready for something different in its already vibrant restaurant scene.

photography: Sarah Grace

Dishes include Sai Ua, Sai Krok Isaan, Lanna and Isaan pork sausages, Geang Sadoong, a semi-cured venison and Larb Ped, a wok-seared spicy duck and mint salad - all recipes from Lek’s grandmother. Another highlight on the menu is a crispy pork curry recipe called Moo Krob Prik Khing, from Lek’s father.

Wichian Trirattanavatin ‘Lek’ head chef at saan The restaurant décor and design, created by Cheshire Architects, reflects Lek’s origin and his desire to bring a new style of Thai restaurant to Auckland. The restaurant is open plan and designed to create an exotic and elegant ambience. All the finishings are bespoke with Cheshire Architects collaborating on all design elements from the custom-dyed fabric and upholstery, pendant lampshades made using traditional ceramic techniques by a Thai craftsman, through to the bleached raw timber that is acid -washed to convey the effect of a century of installation. The restaurant capacity is 127, including a bar area seating 16, as well as a private dining room seating 20. *The word saan has several meanings including ‘to weave or fabricate, generally using cane’. The name also represents the passing down of tradition, culture, techniques with PN respect and knowledge. F SAAN, 160 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 320 4237, www.saan.co.nz

“There is a pride in the local community and combined with their entrepreneurial spirit we thought it would be the perfect setting for Lek’s vision of the home away from home he wanted to create,” Botica says. The saan beverage list includes a range of cocktails such as the Weeping Butterfly, Tomyum Martini and the Bittersweet Eternal Youth designed to evoke the senses of Thailand. Wines were chosen by sommelier Yahn Hansen to balance and enhance what is widely regarded as the most intense flavour profiles in international cuisine.

photography: Sarah Grace

“He accomplished this by finding mainly dry and mineral-driven varietals that are lesser known but no less impressive,” Botica says. “The simple wine list demonstrates the diversity between some of the greatest regions and sub regions the world has to offer.” She says a craft beer has been made especially for the restaurant by Hallertau and will be available from 10 November.

saan’s Moo Krob Prik Khing (pork curry)

48 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

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LIZ WHEADON: WINE, GLORIOUS WINE

So many bubbles Sparkling wine choices have never looked as good. Cava, Prosecco, New Zealand Methode, Champagne, Asti; there are a myriad of gems to select from. So how do you tell them apart? What to expect inside? A big subject, not one that you can really do justice to in a short piece, though I’m always up for a challenge, so here goes.

Sparkling wine is traditionally made the way they do in Champagne. The very basic version is the grapes are picked and then pressed, the juice is fermented into wine. The wine is then put into bottles where a secondary fermentation occurs - as this occurs, the bubbles released during the process are trapped in the bottle. The bottles are then turned and slowly the dead yeast cells from the second fermentation collect in the neck of the bottle. The temporary closure that is used during the secondary fermentation is then removed, a little ‘dosage’ added (a liquor to top the bottle up that, depending on the amount added, affects the final sweetness of the wine) and a cork closure is applied to hold the bubbles in the bottle. This process is referred to as Methode Traditionelle. Champagne is produced this way and can only be called Champagne as long as it’s from the Champagne Appellation (78,000 acres of vine in Champagne, France), bottle aged for 15 months minimum for NV or three years for vintage and made from permitted grape varieties.

Another method of production is the Charmat method; invented in 1907 by a Frenchman, Eugene Charmat. In this process the second fermentation happens in large tanks and is then pumped under pressure into bottles and sealed. Examples of sparkling wine crafted through this process include Prosecco and Asti. Prosecco is made from the Glera grape variety; as a style Prosecco is clean, crisp, often appley and very refreshing. Asti is probably the most underrated of all sparkling wines; low in alcohol, sweet in style, it makes a great midday wine, aperitif and matches beautifully with dessert. Covering both of these methods you then get non vintage and vintages varieties; When a wine is labelled non-vintage, it means that it is a blend of different base wines from a number of years. The blending occurs before the secondary fermentation. In Champagne, non-vintage champagne is considered the house style, it’s the wine that the house stands or falls on.

Non-vintage wines are best purchased for drinking; as There are wines made the same way in other parts of a general rule they don’t age. the world, including Champagne, but unless they meet these requirements, they can’t be called Champagne, Liz Wheadon samples some delicious Champagne A wine labelled with a vintage must contain wine from but they can be called Methode Traditionelle. So this rather lengthy description covers off Champagne, New World Methode and Cava. Yes, that particular vintage; vintage sparkling wines differ in style from year to year, as they Cava is included in this set; made in the traditional method, just from different grape reflect the particular vintage they are from. Like good wines, vintage Champagne ages PN varieties to Champagne and, naturally, grapes grown in Spain. This group of wines very well. (LIZ WHEADON) F generally have have a broad texture and flavour profile with yeasty, toasty notes. The www.glengarry.co.nz secondary fermentation in bottle and quality production method are key here.

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY SABATO MAKES CHRISTMAS GIFTING EASY Here we are again approaching the festive season. Keep Christmas gifting stress-free and treat your foodie friends and family to a Sabato gourmet gift hamper. With an array of options to suit your taste and budget, our gourmet food hampers are beautifully presented and filled with specially selected, artisan-made products that are sure to delight. The ‘Good for You’ hamper is full of wholesome, organic ingredients making it the ideal gift for the health conscious. Passionate cooks will love our ‘Gourmet Pantry Hamper’, a delicious selection of Sabato essentials to enhance any pantry. The ‘Hamper for Him’ is full of flavourful combinations that will appeal to blokes of all ages. The Spanish flavours in our ‘Paella Kit’ are perfect for summer dining and the ‘Getaway Pack’ makes a great ‘grab and go’ gift basket - just add cheese, cured meat and wine to create a gourmet picnic. All our hampers include recipe ideas and serving suggestions so the recipient can make the most of their fabulous gift. If you prefer, you can create your own personal selection, we will put your gifts together, include a complementary card with your special message and deliver nationwide. View our full hamper range at www.sabato.co.nz or visit our Mt Eden store, open 7 days. SABATO Limited, 57 Normanby Road, Mt Eden, T: 09 630 8751, www.sabato.co.nz

CORN FRITTERS WITH ROASTED CHERRY TOMATOES AND AVOCADO SALSA Makes 8-12 fritters Serves 4 (2 large or 3 small), Cost per serve $3.70 Time to make 30 minutes, vegetarian. Fritter away some time in the kitchen and you’ll have a tasty nutritious meal the whole family will love. Roasted cherry tomatoes 2 cups cherry tomatoes oil spray freshly ground black pepper or chilli flakes Fritters 1 teaspoon oil 1 small red onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1½ cups self-raising flour ¼ teaspoon salt 1 cup trim milk 1 egg, lightly beaten 1½ cups corn kernels 4 spring onions, finely chopped 4 tablespoons fresh coriander ½ teaspoon chilli powder oil spray

Avocado salsa 1 ripe avocado, chopped 2 medium tomatoes, chopped ½-1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon oil 2 tablespoons lemon juice 4 tablespoons fresh coriander fresh coriander sprigs to garnish

1. Heat oven to 180°. Place tomatoes on baking tray, spray with oil and cook for 15 minutes or until softened. 2. While tomatoes are cooking, heat oil in a pan and cook onion and garlic until softened. 3. Sift flour into a bowl and add salt. In a separate bowl, beat milk and egg together. Make a well in the centre of the flour. Add liquid to flour and whisk. Add cooked onion and garlic, corn, spring onion, coriander and pepper or chilli and mix well. 4. Spray a non-stick pan with oil and place over a medium heat. Place spoonfuls of fritter mix in the pan, up to 4 fritters at a time, making sure they are separated from each other. Cook until they are firm, slide around the pan easily and small bubbles appear on the surface. 5. Using a spatula, turn over each fritter - the underside should be golden brown. Cook for a further few minutes, spraying with a little extra oil if necessary. 6. Mix salsa ingredients together. Sprinkle cherry tomatoes with pepper or chilli flakes. 7. Serve fritters topped with the salsa and the cherry tomatoes on the side. Garnish with coriander. Recipe, styling and food prep Sarah Swain, photography Devin Hart. Recipe reprinted from Healthy Food Guide magazine with permission from Healthy Life Media Ltd. You’ll find more quick, easy fritter recipes in the November 2015 issue of Healthy Food Guide ($6.30), on sale now in supermarkets and bookstores or subscribe PN at www.healthyfood.co.nz. F

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY

MID WEEK DINING SIDART invites diners to create their own tasting menus on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 4 to 9 courses from our monthly changing menu. Each course is priced at $17. The whole table is required to have the same dishes and number of courses. Please advise of any dietary requirements at time of booking.

SIDART, Level 1, Three Lamps Plaza, 283 Ponsonby Road | T: 360 2122 | www.sidart.co.nz

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JULIE BONNER: NEWS FROM FROG POND FARM If someone had said to me years ago when I was working in advertising (tottering around in heels) that I would be hauling a sick chook with a bandaged foot off to the vets in a kitty carrier first up on a Monday morning, I would have screamed with laughter. More importantly a chicken with bumble foot, which as it happens is a nasty infection, causing the foot to enlarge and heat up. Strangely enough, all these maladies seem to happen to my favourite birds. Dolly (said chook) while not overly enjoying the visit and the car trip, was returned safely to her paddock and is now on antibiotics. She is also sporting a bright red bandage that needs to be changed daily - a chic chick! And at last, I have a rooster. Finally, my hens have got a young man in their lives. Just because he is half their size is irrelevant! The fact is, he has a melodious crow, is a nice little guy and is totally enamored with the fact that he has 14 girls all to himself. Oh dear me. He may be a ‘light weight’ but is more than capable of flexing his muscles when required to intervene with two squabbling wild ducks. I honestly don’t know who was more surprised, them or me. So what is happening in my garden you may ask? I have finally poked seeds in trays, which germinated and have since been pricked out into pots. A nice variety of zinnias, sunflowers, beetroot, lettuce, zucchini, cucumber, pumpkin and dwarf beans. Needless to say, they are now happily ensconced in our kitchen, lined up in trays and luxuriating in the spring sunshine when it appears. Do you have a secret garden? Years ago I went on holiday to Australia and came back to find that a veg garden had been installed near our forest, miles away from the house and devoid of water. Oh dear out of sight out of mind, get the picture? I was shocked if not mildly amused when I stumbled on it. Anyway, over the years it has grown yakons, spuds and pumpkins for us although the yields of the latter have been diminishing each year thanks to the rather dry summers we have been experiencing. So with this in mind, a few weeks back I opted not to plant those from the cucurbit family, but instead shoved some Cliff Kidney spuds into this space. Hubby had previously broad forked the bed as it was compacted, I’m not a fan of disturbing the soil as you may recall, but sometimes it is necessary. Our ATV parked close by was loaded with coffee grounds, planting mix, Rok Solid fish / seaweed fertiliser and the contents of a well pickled Bokasi bin which gets tossed into holes in the garden and buried. The spuds are now safely entrenched in the soil, coffee grounds and fertiliser have been strewn about. While this bed doesn’t get all day sun, I’m hoping that we may be removing the odd potato in time for Christmas. The good news? We have activity in the garden. My garlic is looking gorgeous; the broad beans are podding up nicely, the pea trellis is still smothered in peas and we are munching on brassicas and juicing kale. I don’t know about you, but I enjoy nothing more than whizzing out to the garden and grabbing tucker for dinner. There is something very special about homegrown, it just seems to taste better. We have ducklings on our pond, turkeys everywhere (damned things), bunnies digging holes, bees loving the cherry blossom and cats being cats and ignoring me! What’s happening at your place? PN (JULIE BONNER) F If you are interested in more news from our place or perhaps some gardening tips then visit my blog www.frogpondfarm.co.nz

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ROSS THORBY: SEA FEVER Welcome to one of the most isolated communities on earth, a culture whose history is immortalised in numerous myths, books and movies. Sitting 3500 nautical miles from the nearest landfall and 7500 from Mother England, it is one of the last outposts of British Empire dating right back to when the “Sun never Sets”. Many people know the story; in 1790 after seizing the ‘Bounty’ from Captain Bligh, nine mutineers along with a few Tahitian men and women, arrived on the island and subsequently, in the rocky inhospitable harbour, scuttled their only means of escape. When they were finally discovered, alcoholism, fights over the women and ‘island justice’ had reduced the population on the island to the point where only one of the original mutineers had survived in an early version of “Lord of the Flies”. The island was chosen by the group for the very reason that it remains sparsely populated and isolated from civilisation. Surrounded by sharp craggy cliffs and fearsome seas, with one small beach affording a very perilous landing site for the island’s only long-boat, it lacks anywhere to anchor a cruise ship let alone any landing strip for a Boeing. Its isolation protects a glorious diversity of flora and fauna including a rare Galapagos giant tortoise named Mr T lying in the middle of a large featureless blue ocean with an abundance of rich sea life and surrounded by a protected marine reserve. The tropical climate provides fertile growing conditions on the island. Today it is inhabited by 56 descendants of the mutineers and Tahitians in a reasonably harmonious environment, counselled by the Seventh Day Adventist church which established itself on the island in 1790. Today will hopefully be the closest most of us will ever come to pirates. We wouldn’t have been more surprised if the locals had boarded the ship up a rope ladder, knives between their teeth crying “Avast ye lubbers!” Crammed into their long-boat, the whole island had come to meet us. A more entertaining lot we couldn’t have wished to meet - the men, sporting the dark skin of their ancestors, tattoos and a jaunty disposition that hinted at their forebears. As the ship tiki toured around the island, they sang, they danced, they lectured in the theatre and they set up a stall in the ballroom selling their homemade products including their world-famous honey and handcrafted models of the Bounty signed by the descendants of Fletcher Christian. The most pirate-looking of them all did a roaring trade posing for photos minus his cutlass, possibly seized by the ship’s security. They might have been remote islanders but they drove a hard bargain; 80% of the island’s economy is derived from boarding ships such as ours so they were well versed in exchange rates and the high value of their uniqueness as a currency. Our pockets were considerably lighter in foreign currency by the time they departed. Together with the income derived from cruiseships, Pitcairn has developed a thriving trade in homestays. Most of the locals compete with each other to provide a unique experience for the hardy tourists who arrive via a regular three-weekly cargo service, one of the Island’s infrequent contacts with the outside world. High cliffs, dramatic scenery and an abundance of palm trees and breadfruit thrive in the tropical climate and because there is no pollution here, the colours seemed much more vibrant and deep... or maybe it was just the drama of the island that made it look that way. Soon it was time for the islanders to pack up and leave, and the long-boat that had dropped them off earlier returned filled to the brim with freshly caught tuna. Unsurprisingly, more negotiating ensued until a deal was struck with our chef and, much to my distress, some of the delicious Argentinean beef that we had been so enjoying this trip was offloaded into the boat’s hold along with the islanders. We departed amongst the noise from the ship’s horn and a crescendo of clapping and cheering from the passenger decks, leaving the long-boat to make its lonely trip back to the shore, both cultures richer for the experience; ours with knowledge and theirs with contraband and cash. It was interesting to learn that more people have visited the South Pole in the last five years than have visited Pitcairn Island. I know the island would be a warmer and a more PN welcoming destination. (ROSS THORBY) F

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TRAVEL BREAKS: THE NEW THERAPY!

A SOUTH AFRICAN SOJOURN Tony O’Callaghan, World Journeys

On arrival in Johannesburg early on a cool but sunny Sunday morning, I could not have imagined what the ensuing two weeks were to bring. With prolific wildlife, wine, history, incredible landscapes and no less than eleven official languages, South Africa is the very definition of diversity. There is nothing like rail travel for covering great distances, and there is simply nothing like The Blue Train. I took the overnight journey between Pretoria and Cape Town on this 5-star ‘hotel on wheels’. The suites are luxurious, the butler service impeccable, and dinner is a dress up affair - jacket and tie please gentlemen! The indulgence continued in the Cape Winelands, home to legendary wines, Cape-Dutch architecture and excellent restaurants. Dinner at the Franschhoek Country House & Villas’ award-winning Monneaux Restaurant was a memorable Duck Liver Burger - mini brioche with pan fried duck liver, apricot curry glaze, red onion marmalade, mushrooms, rocket and crispy onion rings. Bon appetit! Back in Cape Town I stayed in the Cape Grace Hotel on the vibrant V&A Waterfront. With stunning views of Table Mountain and complementary chauffeur transfers within a 10km radius, it’s a great base from which to explore. From glitteringly trendy Camp’s Bay to the sprawling township of Langa, Cape Town’s contrasts illustrate the challenges South Africa faces today. Replete with urban sophistication, it was time to go bush! I headed for world renowned Sabi Sand Game Reserve where the safari lodges offer spectacular game viewing. Full of history, the campfire has burned for over 82 years at Londolozi Varty Camp, and Kirkman’s Kamp was built in the early 1920s, an air of colonial graciousness lingering in the original homestead which now houses the lodge’s dining and bar areas. Great rolling lawns provide a velvety contrast to the surrounding wilderness. Home to a host of wildlife including the ‘Big Five’, Sabi Sand is part of a conservation area that covers over two million hectares, with no boundary fences between it and Kruger National Park. Game drives are led by experienced rangers and trackers with a sixth sense for finding even the most elusive animals. The exclusive nature of the Reserve, and the ability to go ‘off-road’ give you the best chance of some truly thrilling up-close wildlife encounters. Highlights for me included hyena pups emerging from their den (a rare sight), and a dawn encounter with a leopard at a water hole - the bush was so still you could hear her tongue lapping the water as she drank.

mock-charged by an exuberant teenage male elephant, ears flapping; and the simply stunning sight of a herd of elephants drinking from the swimming pool while I stood literally metres away on the deck taking photos. Magic!

From Kruger we flew by light aircraft to Phinda Private Game Reserve - a great way to get around when road transport can be quite arduous. My highlights here were being

For me, South Africa has it all - stunning natural beauty, award winning food and wine, PN friendly people and fantastic wildlife. Ube nohambo oluhle! Have a good journey! F

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PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE

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4 1. Garnet Station cafe owner Verity George just couldn’t resist taking her copy of Ponsonby News to NEW YORK CITY and while others look to their phones, Verity seen here in the subway, prefers to read Ponsonby News. 2. Freeman’s Bay resident Julie Tuck is photographed in the SAHARA, MOROCCO about to take a camel ride for an overnight camp in September. A truly memorable experience, she tells us. 3. Locals Raiden and Toshiko Frederiksens are photographed on the last day of their holiday at Villa No 10, Moorea, TAHITI.

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4. Sarasa Shimura photographed here, is a Director of Tokyo Club, Ponsonby. She is on a trip to Japan to enjoy to autumn colours. Sarasa is standing in front of the Tsuzumi (‘drum’) Gate - an impressive architectural landscape art designed as in a traditional drum gate to a temple, but in this case then entrance to KANAZAWA JR train station!

5. Cath Bathe-Taylor, the head honcho of Grey Lynn Community Centre is seen relaxing in RAROTONGA with the Ponsonby News. We expected a bikini shot at the very least! 6-8. Local St Marys Bay residents’ Allan Horner & Gerard Hall told Ponsonby News: “The September issue arrived in our letterbox just before our departure, so it was an ideal time to read it on our two longhaul flights taking us to FRANKFURT. The three photos are from our travels included an 11 night cruise from Hamburg to Genoa. The first was taken on the viewing deck of Frankfurt’s Main Tower. The viewing deck is on the 56th floor of the skyscraper and is 656ft high. Its the fourth tallest building in Germany. The second photo was taken on the steps of ‘The Tower of Hercules’ which is a World Heritage site. It’s in a seaside city in north western Spain called LA CORUNA. The tower was built by the Romans in the 1st Century AD and the lighthouse atop the tower is the only lighthouse of antiquity that is still operational today. The third photo was taken at GIBRALTAR, with the upper rock standing at 1400ft above sea level, providing a dramatic backdrop. PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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9. Caroline Malservisi and David Brewer (now Mr and Mrs Brewer) former Clarence Street residents, a few days after their Chamonix wedding with the Ponsonby News at 3842m AIGUILLE DU MIDI, with Mont-Blanc in the background. 15

10. Grey Lynn Local Jennifer Northover is photographed at the ruins of the ancient settlement of Merv in southern TURKMENISTAN. Merv was founded in the 6th Century BC by the Persians and was destroyed by the Mongols under Genghis Khan in 1221. It is a UNESCO heritage site. 11. Pearl Robson from Ponsonby, pictured while on holiday at Muri Beach in RAROTONGA for a birthday. 12. Ina and Juni are two of the receptionists at Maya’s smart new hotel in Sanur, BALI. They took a moment to catch up on the October issue. 13. On her last day at Maya UBUD, Dewik Yendratini takes a quick peek at the latest issue of Ponsonby News. She has worked in the resort, since it first opened 15 years ago. Stop press: Dewik is back at Maya! She was gone for 10 days, but missed Maya Ubud, so has returned to her duties. 14. Andy Grant and Iain Smith ran ME, a hair dressing salon on Ponsonby Road. The pair enjoyed a nice lunch at La Lucciola, Seminyak, BALI. Check out what they are up to in Bali on their facebook page www.facebook.com/andianevents 15. Regina Leiko Matsubara is part Japanese and is a gynaecologist a long way from home in São Paulo. She is spending a week on vacation in BALI... she loved reading the latest issue of Ponsonby News, over her breakfast at the Maya Ubud Resort & Spa, BALI, Indonesia. 16. Regina Leiko Matsubara, a gynaecologist, took her copy of Ponsonby News into the operating room in her hospital in Sao Paulo, BRAZIL. 17. Martin Leach had a catch up on the fashion pages with the lovely Ridge ladies, Jaime and Sally, at the uber cool WOO BAR @ W Retreat & Spa, Seminyak, BALI.

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Dear readers please keep sending us your holiday snaps reading your favourite magazine, we love getting them! Photos need to be in high resolution (300dpi), so please email them to info@ponsonbynews.co.nz without reducing the size. DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE The monthly jottings of a free-spirited Ponsonby dressmaker of the 1920s, as imagined by Angela Lassig. VERMONT STREET, PONSONBY 15 OCTOBER 1925

Dear Violet, After a lovely long lie in (a luxury that I hardly ever allow myself to do) and a walk to the shops to pick up a box of tea and a slab of spiced apple cake, I’m now happily cosseted in my favourite chair and enjoying the morning sunshine in my little sitting room. Please forgive the specks left by the cake crumbs. Call me rude, but my little slice of heaven is simply too delicious to leave until I finish your letter. Cullens[i] make the most delicious baked goods! While it’s still very fresh in my mind, I’m going to tell you - as promised - all about my very exciting mannequin parades held only yesterday. The ‘Fashion Teas’, one at 10.15, the other at 3.15, were held at Queen’s Hall in Paget Street, a darling of a building, run by the delightful Mrs. Bessie Thorne[ii]. As a passionate supporter of Plunket, Bessie offered the hall free of charge to raise funds for our local branch. Only six weeks ago, over the course of lunch, Bessie, who is a good customer of mine, approached me with the idea of a mannequin parade. It probably took me a full minute of consideration to accept, the haste of which I must admit I have regretted over and over during the past weeks, especially as the task consumed my every waking moment. Actually, Violet, it is difficult to believe that it is all over! I think the reason I so readily accepted is that I was completely seduced by the concept after attending a parade held by the House of Flackson[iii] in the Town Hall in March. I’d certainly read about mannequin parades held overseas and thought that they sounded marvellous, but I remember well how absolutely delighted I was to see the creations - dozens of them, one after the other - on living models over the course of a whole hour. It was rather a delicious treat, even for clothes-weary me. I wish you could have been at the show! The hall has never looked so pretty, bedecked as it was with large vases of early summer flowers donated by Girvan’s[iv], and the tea tables strewn with delicate ferns gathered in Western Park. Three cake shops - Cullens, Adams[v] and Charles Palmer[vi] - donated all the delicious treats and Waiwai[vii] supplied us with refreshing aerated waters. Even the tea was supplied by a local merchant![viii] The audience was rather gorgeously frocked for the occasion and the room buzzed with a frisson of anticipation, which made me feel extremely nervous. Happily, Bessie handed me a thimblefull of brandy, which I gladly accepted. It took three full nips before I felt my nerves subside and for the trembling to cease! However, once the mannequins started to enter the room and to wander amongst the tables, I felt the pressure release completely. The details of the dresses (which took me a full day to describe) were eloquently read by the daughter of one of Bessie’s friends, a young lady who is very active in local theatre. I showed three collections, each featuring eight creations, over the course of an hour, interspersed with musical interludes when the tea and cakes were served. My first collection was of afternoon frocks, followed by dinner ensembles and then special occasion wear. I must say that I was especially pleased with my first ensemble which drew a murmur of admiration when the mannequin removed her beautifully cut

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coat of black patterned silk brocade to disclose a beautiful sleeveless race frock of finely pleated delphinium blue georgette. Setting off both most tastefully was a large black silk hat, which I had lined with the soft blue of the frock, and trimmed with a drooping ostrich plume and a small posy of flowers that matched the posy on her frock. My final garment was designed to elicit sighs of admiration and it certainly did that! I had five requests to buy it following the showing! It is a simple sleeveless crepe de chine gown of old rose hue with an overdress of antique silver lace. The only trimming is a bunch of handmade silk georgette roses of matching and complementary hues, which I attached at the hip. My mannequin, a lovely young thing from Herne Bay, wore a pair of her own silver brocade Louis heeled pumps, which went perfectly with the dress. Because the lace used in the overdress is an old piece from my collection, I won’t be able to replicate it exactly for customers but I think I should be able to find some fine quality metal lace through my contacts. Shanly’s[ix] buyers are also keeping an eye out for me when they meet with their suppliers. Although it was very stressful, especially as the day of the parades drew close, I do believe that I enjoyed the experience very much. Unexpectedly, I have had lots of orders and enquiries already... quite a few ladies pressed their cards into my hands with a promise of an appointment soon. Two young ladies, heading to London on the Rangitira late next week begged me to sell them each an evening cloak (which I agreed to). They are coming tomorrow for a fitting to see if any adjustments are required. Well my dear, I must close now and get ready. Poor George has hardly seen me the past two weeks and has promised to take me on a mystery excursion. As it’s a gorgeous day, I’m hoping that it involves a steamer trip and cake at a tearoom overlooking the beach. Please do write soon and give my love to Tom,

Much love Maudie xx [i] H. S. Cullen, Cake Shop, 16 Ponsonby Road (in 1925) [ii] While Mrs Bessie Thorne was Proprietress of Queen’s Hall in 1925, all other details are fictional [iii] House of Flackson was on Karangahape Road and sold fashionable clothing for women [iv] R. W, Girvan, Ponsonby Buildings, Ponsonby Road [v] Adams, Bell & Co, Ponsonby Buildings, Ponsonby Road [vi] Charles Palmer, Home-made cakes, 285 Ponsonby Road [vii] Waiwai Ltd, 130 Ponsonby Road (C J McCulloch, Manager - 1925) [viii] Robert Noton, Tea Merchant, 304 Ponsonby Road [ix] Shanly’s (drapery store), Ponsonby Buildings, Ponsonby Road

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illustration: Michael McClintock

How are you my dear? In good health and in good spirits (as ever) I hope.


Top from GLASSONS, pants from MAX, sunglasses from DUCK LIMITED, KAREN WALKER necklace from FLYING SAUCERS, bag from COUNTRY ROAD, KEDS shoes from HANNAHS The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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FASHION + STYLE THE GEMSTONE FOR NOVEMBER Donna Mills, owner of Jewels and Gems introduces us to the qualities of the gemstone, Turquoise. Most of the information comes from the scientifically conducted trials of German stone specialist Michael Gienger and interpreted by Donna. We are the creators of our own fate. That is what turquoise tells us. It’s a stand up, wake up, action stone! It dissolves apathy and the tendency to martyr ourselves or give in to a victim state. It has a mood balancing effect, bringing inner calm and yet stimulating wakefulness and lively action. It refreshes us when we are tired, downcast, or exhausted and protects us from sensitivity to outside influences. It also encourages good intuition and foresight, making our actions well directed. Physically, turquoise neutralises rheumatism, gout, stomach problems, over-acidity and viral infections. It increases brain activity, sensory perception, growth, muscular strength, the ability to regenerate and the creation of warmth. It also alleviates pain, relaxes cramp, has anti-inflammatory and detoxifying effects. I’m writing this from a hotel room in Bangkok having just watched an inspiring movie on TV last night, about Cesar Chavez, an American farm worker, labour leader and civil rights activist, who, with Dolores Huerta, co-founded the National Farm Workers Association. They stood up to and beat the worst kind of prejudice and cruelty against poor farm workers - gaining fair conditions for all, right across the United States. It is a Gandhian story. Non-violent, persistent protest against all odds. A great movie. This is a turquoise story. Cesar Chavez is a turquoise man. I cannot describe this stone in a better way. Watch the movie and you will understand. If you want to change your life and start creating your own destiny and fortune, this is the stone you need. It is a good stone for spring and is one of the main birth stones for Sagittarius - people known for action and hard work. But remember, all the stones can help whoever needs them. In many old cultures, turquoise was believed to protect the wearer against harmful spells and danger, at the same time imparting strength, good health and joie de vivre. Now we can understand why people had so much faith in this strong, blue-green stone. Buying turquoise today can be a field of deception, so be careful who you buy it from. The very hardest veins of pure, brightly coloured rock are nearly mined out, the world over. To buy this caviar of stones, you will need to pay a high sum. However a lot of the softer, outer stone can also be crushed and stabilised with a relatively small amount of resin and formed into jewellery. This can be a good way to own turquoise today. It is not dyed and is still real turquoise.There is also plenty of lower quality material available, with variegated colour and black lines through it. But beware of the dyed and fake replicas which do not have a trace of the real stone about them. Much of the so-called turquoise being sold today is of this ilk. It is most often dyed howlite, a very cheap white stone with black veins which looks like turquoise when dyed. Viva la turquesa! Bring on the Mariachis! Hola ! I’m going all Mexican now after Cesar Chavez. Bonkers in Bangkok! Grab your turquoise and have a great month stone lovers. JEWELS AND GEMS, 54 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 378 4389, www.jewelsandgems.co.nz

Clothing Alterations

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M: 021 032 9128

182-4a Jervois Road, Herne Bay E: ra_cha29@yahoo.com “I get all my bits & pieces done by the smiling helpful Roong... and she’s got Eftpos = sorted...” MARTIN LEACH

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FASHION + STYLE METRO LAW HAS RECENTLY RELOCATED TO PONSONBY ROAD - ABOVE ZAMBESI We asked its team to tell us the two things that it loves about Ponsonby. Alannah: “For me, it has to be the food! Ponsonby has so many amazing places to eat and I love finding a new hidden gem down an unsuspecting alleyway. Street Eats has become a fast favourite. Secondly, I love the mix of people and the ‘anything goes’ attitude. Everyone is so diverse, individual and unique.” Caroline: “5 at 5 at Revelry Bar on a sunny Friday afternoon, The perfect work/leisure balance at Metro Law that comes from being situated in the cultural hub of Auckland.” Hugo: “I like the bustle of the main strip combined with the tucked away pockets of greenery. Western Park has such an enchanting atmosphere and is a really calming escape from the ratrace. Ponsonby Food Court is always jam packed and has such an eclectic mix of cheapeats. Even after years I still never tire of the Vietnamese Stew or Malaysian Laksa.”

Oliver Routledge of oliverroutledgesignage.com; Peter Stoneham of www.virtualight.co.nz

Mac: “Sunsoaked bars, and winegums from Jairam’s Dairy & Flower Shop.” Mel: “Dumpling Tuesdays at Xiao Dan, coffee and horoscopes at Fred’s Cafe. Michael: “Music at the Golden Dawn - Tavern of Power and the quiet calm of the Ponsonby Pool Hall.” Rico: “Dizengoff Cafe and Mea Culpa.”

Lucy: “Furry person Fridays and the firemen opposite our building.” METRO LAW, 169a Ponsonby Road, T: 09 929 0808, www.metrolaw.co.nz

“Everything is fine, until it’s not. Things can always get worse” - MICHAEL HEMPHILL

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FASHION + STYLE: JULIE ROULSTON

Party season Having a great frock (or pantsuit) in your wardrobe removes any ‘what should I wear’ stress from the party season equation. Accessorise with polished nails, good hair and striking, fashion forward jewellery.

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WHERE TO BUY IN GREATER PONSONBY 1. State of Grace dress $449 www.stateofgrace.co.nz Mimco clutch $249 www.mimco.com.au 2. Cybele dress $449 www.cybele.co.nz Kagi brooch $179 www.kagijewellery.com 3. Cybele dress $445 www.cybele.co.nz Karen Walker earrings $30 www.karenwalker.com 4. Zambesi dress $755 www.zambesi.co.nz Silk&Steel earrings $129 www.silkandsteel.co.nz 5. Carlson dress $569 www.tanyacarlson-shop.co.nz Meadowlark ring $2655 www.meadowlark.co.nz 6. Witchery bandeau, $109.90 www.witchery.co.nz Silk&Steel choker $119 www.silkandsteel.co.nz 7. Liam top $199 and pant $299 www.rubynz.com Meadowlark ring from $2359 www.meadowlark.co.nz 8. Carlson dress $1499 www.tanyacarlson-shop.co.nz SeventySix Design ring $6450 www.seventysixdesign.co.nz 9. Vaughan Geeson dress $370 www.vaughangeeson.com Karen Walker headband $50 www.karenwalker.com 10. State of Grace dress $469 www.stateofgrace.co.nz SeventySix Design earrings $280 www.seventysixdesign.co.nz 11. Ruby pantsuit $299 and earrings $129 www.rubynz.com The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

WHO IS CARL WATKINS? Carl Watkins, owner of Trucolor Hair Salon ‘the Specialist Colour Salon that Cuts’, discusses his return to Ponsonby and the introduction of his one-on-one specialised hair care services. Carl, how do you like to define yourself? I’m a specialised provider of quality colour and hairdressing services for women. Being one of the few winners of the Schwarzkopf New Zealand Hairdresser of the Year award, and with over 30 years experience, I feel pretty confident about knowing that I provide a quality service to my clients. What gives you the greatest satisfaction in your job? Making women feel fantastic. There’s an art to it and it stems from great communication. When I meet with a client, there is literally only one chair in my salon and the experience is all about them. I get to know what kind of person they are, what kind of hair cut and colour they need to fit in with their lifestyle and how they see themselves. Some women like to spend time styling their hair every day, others don’t. Change can be dramatic or incremental. It’s up to the client. They have to be comfortable with the process. Why should the women of Ponsonby and surrounds come to see you? I’m good at what I do. I looked after Pamela Anderson when she came to New Zealand Fashion week, have done Hillary Clinton’s hair and launched many international hair brands in New Zealand and overseas. I apply the same professionalism and care to all of my clients. Besides, when was the last time YOU had a New Zealand Hairdresser of the Year do your hair? We also specialise in curl relaxing and chemical straightening. TRUCOLOR (by appointment only), Eden Terrace, T: 09 359 9311, www.trucolor.co.nz

NEW CLIENTS: First Cut and Colour $130 (Value $250) Includes: TruColor consultation - Schwarzkopf Colour Product - Shiatsu Head Massage - Designer Cut - Global Colour or ½ Head Foils - Blowwave and Finish

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FASHION + STYLE RETAIL SUPERSTAR

Sarah Ray - Manager, Repertoire Ponsonby How did you come to be a retail salesperson? Having a creative background in my previous career and being a very visual person, I have always found myself drawn to fashion, so I decided to get involved in the retail fashion industry. What’s more fun than getting to go to work and play dress up every day! What brought you to the Repertoire Ponsonby store? I was driving past Repertoire's Takapuna store and saw a position there advertised in the window. I did some research on the brand and loved the fact that the clothing is New Zealand designed and made! I applied, and I was fortunate enough to get the position. Having worked at the Takapuna branch for five years, the opportunity arose to move to a new store opening in the vibrant Ponsonby district.

TENNIS ANYONE? Tennis Bracelet - “A bracelet containing many small gemstones, such as diamonds, that are set and linked one after the other to form a chain.” Not many people know that it was actually a sporting incident that occurred at the US Open in 1987 that coined the name ‘Tennis Bracelet’. Chris Evert was playing in the US Open wearing a diamond bracelet. During the match, the bracelet broke. Officials stopped play so that Evert could find the bracelet. Thus, the term ‘tennis bracelet’; a fashion trend was born. The classic version of the tennis bracelet is a single row of symmetrical, individually set diamonds. Individual settings make the bracelet flexible, so that it moves with the wearer and is more comfortable. Tennis bracelets vary in size and are usually made to a total diamond weight (ie, the bracelet has a total diamond weight of 1.00 ct) The varying weight of the diamonds and the diamond gradings chosen can change the price of the piece considerably. Tennis bracelets hold great sentimental value and are treasured heirlooms that are passed on through many generations. Treat yourself or treat someone special in your life. Diamonds on Richmond have tennis bracelets from $3900 incl GST or $3391 duty free. DIAMONDS ON RICHMOND, 98 Richmond Road, Grey Lynn, T: 09 376 9045, www.dor.co.nz

What do you love about your store? I love that our amazing clothing designer Lee Kleiman's artworks are also adorning our walls. The store is a light, open and visually aesthetic space - where women feel welcomed. What makes a standout retail salesperson? It is so important to listen to each customer's individual needs. To create a happy and personalised experience is vital, and gaining trust is key. Standards of service are constantly improving so keeping customers satisfied is a continuously changing process. Tell us about a memorable sale you've made this year I had a wonderful lady in who had recently lost over 25kg. Being able to style her and help her on her journey was a privilege. How you look can have a profound impact on your self esteem so to see the joy she was experiencing that day was very rewarding - and you know you've got it right when you receive a huge hug at the end! If you could wave your magic wand and have anyone in the world walk into your store right now, who would it be? Alexa Chung - I admire her effortlessly put together style and I would love to see what pieces she would pick out. If you could wave your magic wand and have anyone in greater Ponsonby walk into your store right now, who would it be? The team from Blue Breeze Inn can drop in with a platter of prawn dumplings and crispy pork buns any day! Where do you enjoy shopping? It's hard to beat the Ponsonby strip when it comes to Auckland. Otherwise Melbourne is a favourite - especially when it comes to shoes, shoes, shoes! Name someone you think is an outstanding greater Ponsonby retail salesperson Rata Miller from Too Good in nearby Brown Street has excellent coffee and he makes the best velvety hot chocolates in town. The sumptuous treats are also very hard to resist. REPERTOIRE, 100 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 280 3392, www.repertoire.co.nz

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FASHION + STYLE The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL Susan Frear - Square Inch Functional Furniture Susan Frear describes herself as a bit of a Jack of all trades. She’s had an eclectic background and says that like most small and medium enterprise owners, she needs to know a bit about a lot of things. “I dream big and want to make a difference to people’s lives,” says Susan. “With Square Inch the idea is to allow everyone to live large without wasting their resources or compromising style and comfort. It’s all about improving urban living for more people.” Who is your partner? John, who is a marketing and sales manager. Do you have any children? Two boys, Henry (15) and Oliver (12). How do you keep fit? By wishing it be so, and walking hills with the occasional jog back to base. Your best friend would say of you... “A loyal friend who really cares about my happiness.” Your mother would say of you... “Full of energy and ideas.” What are your virtues? Hard working, lots of ideas, kind, interested in people’s wellbeing, organised. And your vices? Perfectionist, impatient, easily bored. Who’s your ultimate rock icon? More of a jazz, ballad type artist like Norah Jones. What’s your secret passion? To be a concert pianist. What’s your secret talent? I can walk en pointe on my toes. Where do you live? Titirangi - a village vibe much like Ponsonby. Where do you spend your holidays? We like to show the kids somewhere different each time - recently we’ve holidayed in the Hokianga, East Coast and Japan. What were you going to be when you grew up? I wanted to be a doctor until I realised I didn’t like blood, or the responsibility of holding another’s life in my hands. How did you come to start Square Inch? Utilising space wisely makes sense when house prices are soaring, so the trend to live in smaller spaces will only increase and is a pragmatic solution. Square Inch believes that with good design and multifunctional furniture you can maximise the function and living out of a space so small doesn’t have to mean less comfortable living or a life full of compromise. This makes sense, and I saw a real need for good quality, functional furniture that does more with less. If you weren’t doing this you’d be... A health advocate. What’s your favourite Ponsonby cafe? Zus & Zo. What’s your favourite Ponsonby restaurant? Prego. Your favourite Ponsonby store? Endemic World.

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Susan (Square Inch), Nigel (Key2Metro) @ 54 Ponsonby Road featuring the Sleek Sofabed Favourite Ponsonby fashion label? Wallace Rose. Please share your best kept Ponsonby secret All the beaches, but my favourite is Tibb’s Beach, quiet and central, your own private getaway. What’s inspired you recently? My New York-based designers. They are into furniture, architecture and amazing collaborative projects. Recently they won first prize in Reshape15: Wearable Technology Competition. Together with University of California PhD students and professors, they designed a sponge suit bikini that absorbs pollutants from the ocean as you swim. I love their innovative ideas and ability to get projects underway with great international networks that give them flexibility. The tiny living movement - I love the idea that you can make do with less and live a rich full life while keeping a light footprint on the earth. I also like the freedom that comes with downsizing all the stuff we accumulate in our lives. It works through good design and careful thought - an inspiration for Square Inch. What would be your desert island distractions? George Clarke’s Amazing Small Spaces. The house is on fire and your family is safe - what do you save? My boys’ memory boxes. I’d be lost without... My boys - all three of them, they keep me grounded. One thing you have learned about life is... It is never as expected, and the best laid plans need at times to be put aside for you to be able to listen to serendipity. Your advice to Ponsonby furniture shoppers? Think about what you want to use your space for, and how with a few simple tweaks it could achieve multiple things. Think ahead and buy versatile pieces that can work in different settings and be added to or altered. Buy quality which will last. Remember to be true to your own tastes, not what current trends dictate. F PN SQUARE INCH, 54 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 212 8822, www.squareinch.co.nz PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FASHION + STYLE SHOP & WIN* AT JERVOIS CORNER THIS NOVEMBER The fabulous shops on Jervois Road between Blake Street and the Three Lamps intersection are offering you the chance to win a luxury hamper every time you shop at a participating store in the month of November. Simply fill out an entry form and pop it into the box every time you make a purchase at one of the stores between 6 - 29 November and go into the draw to win the hamper - how easy is that! The hamper is full of beautiful gifts and vouchers and is worth over $2000. There is something in it for everyone and it’s full of treats and heaps of special gifts so you really don’t want to miss this! Askew is giving away a trendy and very useful Bunt umbrella to make sure you keep your fabulous new cut and colour from Servilles or Linda Forgie looking good. You’ll receive a gift from G Room full of haircare products so there’ll be no more ‘bad hair days’. Your home will look great with fresh flowers from Enchanted Rose and a lovely, pale dove grey throw with deep fringing from Trove Design. There’s a summer decor package from Smith & Western with candles, bowls and a jar lantern and Un Deux Trois has contributed a beautiful package for your home. SeventySix Design is making sure you’ll have a new piece of jewellery to wear over summer with your Yvonne Bennetti waistcoat. You’ll receive children’s books and toys from Dorothy Butler to treat the little people in your life and the ladies from Paper Room have included an interior design consultation to make sure your home is styled to perfection. F PN Make sure you Shop & Win* at Jervois Corner this November. *Every purchase gives you the chance to win a luxury hamper worth over $2000.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

SHOUT HAIR IS RELOCATING CLOSER TO PONSONBY Shout Hair is excited to be relocating from the Summerfield Villas at 386 Richmond Road to 166 Richmond Road - next to Ripe. The re-cladding of the Summerfield Villas complex is starting at the end of November this year and all tenants have been asked to move out for the eight -month project. Brett Martin, owner of Shout Hair, was initially sad to be leaving the villas but then soon realised what a great opportunity it was. Making the decision to take over the site from Covet, which had been a little further up Richmond Road, was thereafter an easy one. Although it will take a few months to complete the fitout, Shout will start operating in the new site after Labour Weekend. The only real issue for Brett and his team now, will be the potential for an increase in their waistlines, due to the fact that Ripe, the Busy Oven Bakery and Epolitos Pizzeria will be right next door. Too much temptation! To keep in touch with Brett and the team, contact them at team@shouthair.co.nz or give them a call on 09 376 6360. F PN SHOUT HAIR, 166 Richmond Road, T: 09 376 6360, www.shouthair.co.nz

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FASHION + STYLE A FUSION OF FOOD AND FASHION WITH SOUL Hot on the heels of the very successful Kathryn Wilson Sole to Soul show, top Auckland restaurateur Judith Tabron showcases yet another high-profile fusion event of food and fashion. Premier restaurant Soul Bar and Bistro in Auckland’s Viaduct will present internationally renowned fashion designer Trelise Cooper’s 2015/16 summer collection on Tuesday 17 November to fashionistas and foodies alike. As one of New Zealand’s most successful fashion designers, Trelise Cooper has captivated imaginations around the world. Bringing the modern fashion icon the glamour she craves and the level of luxury she has come to expect, her designs have been worn by high-profile celebrities including Liv Tyler and Miranda Kerr. Tabron is thrilled to present the Trelise Cooper Runway Show for Soul Bar diners for the third year running. “Trelise creates gorgeous but extremely wearable designs that our clientele love,” says Tabron. “The show is our way of giving back to our loyal diners and support such an incredible New Zealand talent. “This special event is also an opportunity for us to give back to one of our preferred charities - Breast Cancer Cure, with $20 from every ticket sold and $40 from upgraded tickets donated to the charity.”

Guests are treated to a glass of Mumm Champagne on arrival and a beautiful three -course lunch. For an additional $25, guests receive guaranteed seating on the terrace and a glass of Mumm Rose. All showcased looks on the day will be available in-store and online for purchasing. Tickets are $95 and $120 and include a luxury goodie bag. F PN The Trelise Cooper Runway Show, Soul Bar and Bistro, 16-18 Corner of Lower Hobson Street & Customs Street West, T: 09 356 7249, www.soulbar.co.nz

KEEPING IT PLAYFUL AND FUNKY AT SEVENTYSIX DESIGN Customised jewellery design is our specialty at SeventySix. We love coming up with new ways to enhance traditional wedding bands and engagement rings or to remodel pieces that you no longer wear. Currently, we have a fabulous new collection, ‘Silver’, in store. Inspired by our creative visions and a celebration of fun, the ‘Silver’ collection encompasses an innovative and playful range; from pendants to rings. And starting at prices as affordable as $140, there is no better place to shop for Christmas. If it’s a bepoke present that you’re after this Christmas, however, there is definitely still time before Santa’s reindeers arrive. Come into the store and we will get straight onto designing and handcrafting something special for you. F PN SEVENTYSIX DESIGN, 14 Jervois Road, T: 09 376 0676, www.seventysixdesign.co.nz

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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HELENE RAVLICH: LOCAL BEAUTY

New season, new fragrances I personally don’t need any excuse to indulge in the purchase of my favourite fragrances, and have quite the ‘wardrobe’ to prove it! I love updating it each season, and there are a handful of absolute beauties floating around at the moment that I wholeheartedly recommend for you - or for Christmas gifting. First up, a release from one of my favourite brands. If you’ve ever been into a Jo Malone fragrance boutique (and if you haven’t then I sincerely recommend that you do), then you’ll have noticed that the much-loved company is keen not to label its fragrances by gender. Traditionally, the vast majority of its fragrances have tended to favour sweeter, more feminine florals, which are hugely popular for their non -cookie cutter approach and signature fragrance combination possibilities. I’m not usually a florals fan but can always find a way to make a Jo Malone London release work with some of my greener or spicier favourites, and I seriously never get as many compliments on my perfume with any other brand. However, having said that, recently I’ve noticed the brand adding more scents to its Cologne Intense line, which tend to take more masculine notes as their base - and the tenth addition, Incense & Cedrat, is no different. GQ UK called it “perhaps the most guy-friendly iteration yet”, but I think it’s just plain gorgeous - and gloriously unisex. Incense & Cedrat was inspired by Omani incense, which is harvested from the Boswellia sacra tree. Marie Salamagne, the perfumer who created Incense & Cedrat, said that Omani incense has never been captured before. She used the NaturePrint™ technique to help it make its way into the perfume, and it comes surrounded by lemon, pepper, elemi, labdanum and benzoin. The NaturePrint™ technique involves taking resinous incense tears into the fragrance house to create and infusion and essential oil, which are then analysed in the laboratory in order to recreate the scent using natural ingredients, under the direction of a Master Perfumer. The science blows my mind a little but let’s just say that the end result is flawless, and I can’t get enough. I have been a fan of the brand’s Incense & Embers home candle since it arrived on the shelves and have long lamented that it wasn’t a fragrance, so the release of Incense & Cedrat has satisfied my longing and more. Next up is the latest from international beauty house Lancôme, and takes the form of the beautiful La Vie Est Belle Eau de Parfum Intense. The new fragrance for women is a deeper, more gourmand variation on 2012’s original La Vie Est Belle Eau de Parfum, as was last year’s La Vie Est Belle L’Absolu. Like the others it was developed by perfumers Dominique Ropion and Anne Flipo though, and notes include bergamot, orange, pear, blackcurrant bud, pink pepper, iris pallida, tuberose, ylang ylang, jasmine, orange blossom and a nut accord. The bottle is also an absolute delight, and a hand-finished couture bow around the neck makes every one a little bit unique.

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Another fragrance I’m loving at the moment is the heady, sexy Alaïa Paris, the first release ever from the legendary, diminutive designer Azzedine Alaïa. As you’d expect from ‘The King of Cling’, the scent has been created to go on like a sexy, second skin - just like his designs. It has animalistic tones of musk, blended with notes freesia and pink pepper, and is as provocative as any of the Tunisian -born, Paris-based designer bust-hugging, waist-cinching dresses. “Above all, Mr Alaïa did not want to be able to recognise a single ingredient individually,” explained perfumer Marie Salamagne (she’s popular!) of the enigmatic scent. “Every time we were able to isolate an ingredient, we had to change something. In particular he didn’t want to be able to recognise any flowers, and definitely not white flowers. The idea was not to be able to tell a ‘story’ through fragrance, just to capture something of Alaia’s vision.” Misty, and mysterious, are definitely apt descriptions. Lastly, one for the boys (or women like me who like wearing men’s fragrance) in the form of Giorgio Armani’s newest men’s fragrance, Acqua di Giò Profumo. Armani first presented its popular masculine aquatic fragrance Acqua di Giò back in 1996. Nearly 20 years later, the new version - Acqua di Giò Profumo - is elegant, airy and deep and I have to say I’ve loved it so much that I’ve been wearing it with aplomb. The fragrance ‘symbolises the merging of sea waves with black rocks’, and the formulation includes a spectacular ‘bittersweet’ accord that was designed to recall sunbaked skin, beaded with fresh saltwater. Just gorgeous! It is the antithesis of the body armour-type fragrances that invade the olfactory personal space of others and will be a brilliant choice for the warmer months. In its top notes, calone reproduces the luminous, airy and aquatic accords of watermelon and cantaloupe - with an added touch of aniseed - to perfectly mimic a marine note, and it is the first time persimmon has been used in a masculine fragrance. I think you’ll love it as much as PN I do. (HELENE RAVLICH) F

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


LIVIING, THINKING + BEING The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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ALI LAWRIE: PERSONALITY TYPES

Composer Eve de Castro-Robinson: A perfectly orchestrated career path People who have found careers that provide satisfaction and engagement are few and far between, a recent Gallop poll showed only 13% of people do! The lucky ones that sit within this elite bunch will be doing the kind of work that accords with their personality type. Ponsonby resident and leading New Zealand composer Eve de Castro-Robinson is a stellar example of this. I was fascinated to know what cognitive processes were at work to make this creative and dynamic woman tick. Eve, Associate Professor and Head of Composition at the University of Auckland has a string of awards and accolades in her sway including being twice winner of the APRA Silver Scroll SOUNZ Contemporary Award and her work has been performed by performers ranging from the Scottish BBC Symphony Orchestra to the Auckland Philharmonia as well as a multitude of compositions including the highly successful recent ‘Len Lye the Opera’ with libretto by Roger Horrocks. She has several solo CDs on the Atoll label and her first vinyl release on Rattle Records is due for December. Most importantly, however, for the purposes of this column Eve also identifies with the Myers Briggs type INFP. Introverted, Intuition, Feeling and Perceiving. INFPs are often creative with a love of language. It follows; the language of music perhaps one of the more complex languages is a language rich in abstract metaphors and INFPs love a good metaphor! Initially, Eve went down the career path of a graphic artist as she had always had visual talent but found it was not really her thing. Her love of music drew her to the further study of music at the University of Auckland and it was during this time that she found composition was her natural groove. She has always been fiercely creative and as she was particularly inspired by sound, found that structure and design of music was the perfect vehicle through which to channel her creativity. Eve’s conversation is littered with evocative imagery and with her desire to bring meaning to sound and make sound work in time she brings imagery to life in musical form. INFPs need to be able to attribute meaning to their work and for Eve composing is a vehicle for understanding self, where she fits into the scheme of things and discovering meaning through creativity. It is not surprising that music is one of the most common areas for INFPs to be drawn to. The dominant function of this type is Introverted Feeling. American Dr Dario Nardi has found through his neuroscientific research that certain parts of the brain are energised and ‘light up’ during particular activities. Listening is one activity that lights up the area just above the ears where the cognitive process of Introverted Feeling resides. As Nardi says “INFPs are consummate listeners who listen in a holistic way”. For Eve, her listening skills are finely tuned and combined with her creativity (Intuition) she can transpose this into the astonishing work she does today. Introversion is a concept often misunderstood . In Jungian terms it refers to the direction from which we gain energy. Introverts will draw their energy from their inner world of

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thought, ideas and feelings and will lose energy from too much interaction with people. An Extravert on the other hand draws energy from social interaction and loses it from too much time alone. This explains why after a full on day an Extravert can still enjoy the idea of going out to a social engagement whereas an Introvert will want to run for the hills. Contrary to common opinion Introverts can be very sociable and enjoy interaction, they can in fact appear to be extraverted when talking about things they are passionate about. Many are highly competent public speakers, performers, leaders and actors. Meeting Eve with her statuesque poise and style one could assume she would be an Extravert, but as she has matured her extraverted side has come more into light, whereas she is confident, social and engaging she still remains private and appreciative of alone time. Finding a satisfying career path is one of the most important journeys we make in life, considering so much of our time will be spent there. Most of us are fortunate at this time in the 21st Century to afford the luxury of making career decisions rather than be forced into something. Understanding your unique cognitive make up will help you orchestrate PN your best career pathway. (ALI LAWRIE) F To book your personality match session or gift a session to friends go to www.personalitytype.co.nz/personality-match.html

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

Local beauty haven, White Spa “White is positive and mindful beauty, tailored treatments and restorative floats…” There are a plethora of beauty therapists in our neighbourhood doing amazing work - think high -performance, effective and brilliant facials that leave skin looking as smooth and clear as a baby’s proverbial. There are not many that provide that within a truly relaxing, spa-style venue though, an element that many of us need from time to time, alongside skincare that does what it says. Add the mantra “mindful beauty” to all of the above and you have the very unique White Spa, situated down an unassuming arcade in suburban Herne Bay. Led by the knowledge and passion of both Lani Allard (owner and senior therapist) and Emma Robins (owner and Holistic Health Coach/Healer), White believes in positive mindful beauty therapy solutions and in taking a holistic approach to inner health and beauty for all of their clients. All beauty therapies are adapted and tailored for what they term as “each client’s truth”. because “the truth is, the condition of our skin reflects the condition of our whole selves, not just our beauty products. Our levels of stress mirror what we allow ourselves to hold onto,” says Lani. After careful analysis, one of their skilled therapists will create a treatment - either as a one-off or as part of a programme - that will best effect positive change in your skin. Floatation therapy is an exciting addition to the range of treatments available, and further evidence of the team’s mindful contribution to their clients’ wellness. All of the products used at White - from anti-bacterials to body butters and even cleaning products - are as organic and as clean as they can source. Beautiful refreshments have also been chosen with great care, and are available for enjoyment in the White lounge, including ionized water, kombucha tea and tea infusions. The place is also awash with some of the most beautiful crystals I have seen in a long time, if that’s your thing - I know it is mine, and I got serious gem envy at every turn. I had my first White Spa experience in the form of a one-hour facial with Kosha Richardson Johnson, senior therapist/senior facialist. I was told that Kosha’s knowledge of skin and its response to White’s bespoke therapies is inspiring, and I was definitely in magic hands.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

After listening to their clients over the years, and learning what’s best for their skin, Lani and her team made the call to remove the jargon and over-the-top adjectives from White’s menu of facials, and they are merely advertised in increments of time ie, White 30, White 45, White 60 et al, up to the White 100 super facial at an amazing 110 minutes in length. This means that once you’ve chosen the time your schedule and budget allows you, your White therapist will create a bespoke facial just for you. They also offer body treatments incorporating beautiful NuMe coconut body butters, lotions oils and sugar rubs straight from the islands that are both natural and paraben-free, and manicures, waxing and spray tanning to tick the more traditional beauty boxes. Salon owner Lani says the new Herne Bay location gave her a unique opportunity to reset, and create a more holistic approach to beauty and body care in an environment more conducive to restoration and relaxation. When we speak, I ask if the spa is always as busy as it is on the Saturday morning I am visiting, when the place is humming with clients well before the clock has even hit 9am! “It actually has,” she says with a laugh, “I guess we have been around a while in Three Lamps and people love the new space even more.” The move was motivated by a need for more space and a more atmospheric feel, as well as a need for ground floor space as the recently arrived float tanks are so heavy. They new space also allows Lani and her team to stock only products that they truly believe in, which are free of nasties and able to deliver results without any necessary trauma to the skin via microdermabrasion and the like. “We are getting amazing results with Osmosis and Environ and we’re all about reversing damage and ageing,” she says, “and I love getting reports from clients about people quizzing them on what they’ve done to their skin, because they look so great!” She is also really excited about getting the float tanks up and running seven days a week. “For me it brings together the whole mind/body relationship in such a perfect way. It de-stresses, replenishes the body’s magnesium levels and works incredibly on a restorative level.” I for one can’t wait to try one - bring on a summer of floating!

Lani Allard of White Beauty Spa + Float Lounge Lani says, “White has been a long time coming for me. I’ve watched the market and seen a gap appear. People need more to believe in. A facial isn’t enough to affect the kind of change they’re seeking. They need to be an active part of that change. We can do that now.” (HELENE RAVLICH) F PN WHITE BEAUTY SPA + FLOAT LOUNGE, The Yard - Tenancy 2, 182 Jervois Road, T: 09 376 9969, www.whitespa.co.nz

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING THE ARVIGO TECHNIQUES OF MAYA ABDOMINAL THERAPY® “Digestion, of all the bodily functions, is the one which exercises the greatest influence on the mental state of the individual.” - Jean Antheme Brillat-Savarin. Having trained as a licensed massage therapist, aesthetician and cosmetologist in 1994, Rosanna Marks, director of Aroha Healing, has long sought holistic techniques that she can integrate into her practice to meet client health-and-wellness needs. Arvigo abdominal massage is one technique that delivers benefits to the whole body system, therefore after attending the initial self-care workshop, Rosanna knew this work would help her clients tremendously in areas of fertility, post-partum care and digestive and reproductive system issues for men and women. She recently travelled to New Hampshire in the United States to become an Arvigo practitioner for abdominal and reproductive health and wellbeing. The Arvigo Techniques of Maya Abdominal Therapy® encompass a holistic approach to health and wellness that integrates massage, pelvic steam baths, nutrition, herbal support and spiritual healing. Arvigo bodywork is a non-invasive yet powerful technique based on traditional work passed down by the Maya people of Central America. By realigning organs that have become congested, skilled practitioners are able to gently restore the homeostasis (balance) and hemodynamics (good blood flow) to improve organ function. By repositioning and massaging abdominal organs, Arvigo practitioners are able to address a number of common conditions for women, men and children involving reproductive, digestive and musculoskeletal problems, as well as positively affecting general wellness. When the organs are in place, life force flows without restraint, generating efficient organ function and permitting balanced hormonal secretions and assimilation, as well as proper elimination of toxins. Posterior techniques are taught that address the alignment of the spinal column, hips and sacrum, thereby improving nerve conduction to organs and surrounding structures. Individuals may hold emotional tension in tissues, further constricting the conduction of the five systems of flow - arterial, venous, nerve, chi and lymph - to organs. When the emotional component is released, the constriction that was impeding the flow is removed and health is restored to the area. Rosita Arvigo, D.N., developed the techniques based on the traditional massage of the Maya people and her education and background as a naprapathic doctor. In 30 years of research, Arvigo has combined traditional massage techniques with modern knowledge of anatomy, physiology, homeostasis and hemodynamics to address the consequences of malposition or crowded organs in the pelvic region. Such crowding blocks the proper flow of lymph, blood and nerve connections. Arvigo practitioners are often able to bring about relief from common health issues for which clients have unsuccessfully sought help from mainstream sources. These conditions range from digestive disorders like heartburn, gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and fertility challenges, as well as reproductive system disorders. Practitioners of The Arvigo Techniques of Maya Abdominal Therapy® report that many common healthcare symptoms are alleviated by these techniques and organ functions are supported and enhanced.

Rosanna Marks from Aroha Healing is pictured in Greenfield, New Hampshire, United States whilst studying to become an Arvigo abdominal therapies practitioner For everyone Headaches/migraines, digestive disorders, low energy, irritable bowel syndrome, gastro oesophageal reflux, Crohn’s disease, chronic constipation, lower back ache, chronic indigestion or heartburn, gastritis, restricted breathing due to tension. Digestive and emotional benefits for men and women and individuals with digestive disorders benefit greatly from the application of these techniques. Many of our common disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, indigestion, constipation, and heartburn are treated with antacids, muscle relaxants, and a variety of other medications. These treatments address symptoms, not the causes. By using the Arvigo techniques, the upper abdomen is given a deep, thorough massage to loosen the tight muscles around the stomach and the arteries that feed the digestive and eliminative organs with their vital blood supply. The diaphragm is gently massaged allowing relaxation of tight musculature. Rosanna is one of a handful of Arvigo practitioners currently practising in New Zealand. To learn more about The Arvigo Techniques of Maya Abdominal Therapy® contact the Aroha Healing team directly or check out the Aroha Healing website. F PN AROHA HEALING, 3 Maidstone Street, T: 0800 646 326, E: info@arohahealing.co.nz, www.arohahealing.co.nz, www.arohahealingcandles.co.nz

This list contains the most common symptoms that may be improved by incorporating this holistic modality into one’s healthcare. For women Displaced or prolapsed uterus and or bladder, painful menstrual cycles and ovulation, irregular menstrual cycles and ovulation, bladder or yeast infections. Miscarriages, difficult pregnancies, endometriosis, peri menopause, menopausal symptoms, infertility, PMS/depression with menstruation, ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids, abnormal uterine bleeding. Enhances pregnancy, aids in labour and birthing, pelvic congestion, pain. For men Early stages of prostate swelling, benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis (mild), impotence, erectile dysfunction (depending on cause).

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JOHN APPLETON: ON HEALTH

Obesity in the news again Somehow our clean, green little country of four million people has got itself in the record books as the third fattest among developed nations. Only the United States and Mexico are ahead of us. Around one in three New Zealand adults are now obese - including nearly half of Maori and 68% of Pacific Island people. So why is it that in today’s world everything is 99% fat-free apart from the people? The answer to this question is (to quote Al Gore) “an inconvenient truth”. We have been led up the garden path by a massively powerful food processing industry to believe that fat is the demon and thus highly addictive junk foods loaded with sugar have been consumed in increasingly large quantities. Anyone who dares to suggest that sugary cereals, snack foods, soft drinks, white flour products, yoghurts and ice cream (which can be up to 50% sugar) are major contributors to our woeful health statistics, is attacked by institutionalised nutritionists and dieticians who are paid by industry. While there are processed food lobbyists gaining the ear of politicians across the political spectrum, there will be no easy solutions. The reason processed foods are very profitable is that they are made from very cheap ingredients and they can sit on supermarket shelves for months. One doesn’t need to have a PhD in biochemistry to understand that these foods have no place in a healthy human body. The reason that fat consumption has been so easy to target is because when we talk about energy, the number of calories in our diet are used as the yardstick. A calorie is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1g of water by 1°C. At nine calories per gramme, fat supplies more than twice the calories per gramme as carbohydrates and protein which weigh in at around four calories per gramme. Using this comparison, the food processing industry has found it easy to focus the attention on fat but there is one very important fact that has been conveniently overlooked. It’s the effect of the calories on your hormones, and the effect of the hormones on how your body decides to use the calories you’re eating that is behind the problem.

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When we consume calories by way of carbohydrates (refined) which are converted in the body to glucose, our blood sugar rises and our pancreas responds by releasing the hormone insulin, which is needed to regulate the blood sugar. When we eat fat, we don’t raise blood sugar levels and thus insulin is not required. Insulin has an evolutionary role to store excess nutrients and thus it is often referred to as ‘the storage hormone’. When we raise our insulin production in response to consumption of carbohydrates we are sending a hormonal message to store fat. Not only does an increased insulin level tell the body to store carbohydrates as fat, it tells it not to release any stored fat. It does this by activating an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase. This enzyme acts as a roadblock for the removal of triglycerides (fat) out of the fat cells. To make it even worse, insulin inhibits another enzyme called hormone sensitive lipase which is responsible for the breaking down of stored fats, on the waistline, thighs and buttocks. So, the excess carbohydrates in your diet not only make you fat, they make sure you stay fat. This is why most people see very little or no results in weight reduction, even though they exercise. Anyone who is genuinely concerned about the issue of obesity and everything it means to society has to look beyond the misinformation that is pumped out ad nauseam by industry spin doctors and focus on the biochemistry of the problem. Consumption of carbohydrates (in the form of refined grains and sugars) = increase in blood sugar PN levels = insulin production = sugar stored as fat. (JOHN APPLETON) F APPLETON ASSOCIATES, T: 09 489 9362, john@johnappleton.co.nz www.johnappleton.co.nz

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING BEHIND THE SCENES: FIVE MINUTES WITH SMASHBOX PRO ARTIST, SAM HART

$70

1-ON-1 MAKEUP LESSON

Take a seat with one of our Pro Artists for a 90min 1-on-1 makeup lesson Master the basics for an all day flawless look of your choice! Concept Store 342 Ponsonby Rd ponsonby@smashboxcosmetics.co.nz 0800 SMASHBOX Hours: Mon & Sat: 10am - 5pm Tue - Fri: 9.30am - 5:30pm Sun: 11am-4pm T&C’s: Available all days except Saturday, subject to availability. Bookings are essential, bookings are $70 and must be prepaid and not redeemable on product.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

The Smashbox Concept Store has been an industry staple on Ponsonby Road for many years. We caught up Smashbox Pro Artist, Sam Hart to talk about mastering flawless makeup. What exactly is a masterclass? A masterclass is a personalised 90-minute one-on-one lesson in a relaxed environment with a pro artist who will teach you how to apply a full-face makeover that will look flawless for any occasion. And what happens during the lesson? We find that the best way to master make-up application is for us to do one half and you do the other. That way you’re learning the techniques for applying your make-up on - your own face. What if I’m new to using make-up? Is this class right for me? Yes of course, it’s suited to any level. You’ll learn skills and confidence to apply your make-up like a pro too. Is the masterclass available at the Ponsonby Concept Store? Yes, sure is! Come on in and hang out with us. The pro team are on hand to help you with all of your make-up questions - plus we are stocked with a complete range of make-up that can fit in with your lifestyle. Masterclasses are not available on Saturdays. Bookings are essential. The cost is $70 and must be pre-paid, not redeemable on product. F PN SMASHBOX CONCEPT STORE, 342 Ponsonby Road, T: 0800 SMASHBOX, www.facebook.com/SmashboxCosmeticsNZ, www.smashboxcosmetics.co.nz

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CARING PROFESSIONAL Helen Leahy - True Pilates “I was working on superyachts in the United States and had heard about Pilates. I found a studio across the road from the marina and started having lessons. After about eight months of training, my teacher suggested I look at the certification programme as she thought I would be a good teacher. 10 years later and I have my own studio - I’m loving it!” The biggest job satisfaction for me is helping a client overcome body pain with exercise. As the client progresses and becomes more ‘in tune’ with their body, they are able to perform some very challenging exercises. To see their life getting easier without pain or with more flexibilty, is the best reward. The other bonus is that I can have my boxer dog, Daisy, with me at the studio to greet all the clients. It really changes the dynamics of the studio when you can have pets around. The most challenging thing at the moment is finding a balance between work and life! Running a business that you are passionate about takes time. True Pilates is an Authentic Method Pilates studio. This means we only teach from the original method created by Joseph Pilates using the originally designed apparatus. We are a small, private, boutique studio, specialising in private and duet lessons. My biggest indulgence is my two-hour massage every fortnight. It’s a great way to relax and unwind after a busy week. The best advice I can give people looking at starting Pilates is to research the studios and their instructors. Find out how long it takes for the instructors to get their full certification. On average, it takes around 700 hours. As with any profession, you only want the best - you only have one body. - as told to Ponsonby News. F PN TRUE PILATES, 2/5 Seymour Street, St Marys Bay, T: (09) 376 7203, www.truepilatesnz.co.nz

Helen Leahy of True Pilates

MERINO KIDS LOOK FOR NEWBORNS TO JOIN THEIR FLOCK! THE ‘FACE OF MERINO KIDS’ competition is back. New Zealand’s favourite sleepbag company are hoping to find the cutest, cuddliest and coolest newborn out there to join their flock and front up their brand new Autumn/ Winter 2016 range. In the eight years since the competition began, Kiwis everywhere have been purchasing, sharing and gifting Go Go Bags and baby wraps, with new generations joining their flock every year. The competition, which launched on 1 October, encouraged Kiwis around the nation to submit their scrummy newborn baby photos and stories via the Merino Kids website for a chance to win a prize pack valued at over $4000, as well as having their beautiful baby featuring in the Autumn/ Winter 2016 advertising campaign. This was a fantastic opportunity to capture some timeless family photos of loved ones also. In true Kiwi spirit, the team at Merino Kids provided a special thank you gift to each entrant for their ongoing support! The photo entries will be narrowed down to just six finalists, where a winner will then be chosen by our specialist baby judging panel, including representatives from Merino Kids, OHbaby! magazine, ecostore, Trilogy and some well-known celebrity mums. Amie Nilsson, founder of Herne Bay local business Merino Kids, says that it is a fun and exciting campaign for New Zealanders to get involved in again and she loves having the opportunity to spend more time with the babies. “Since launching Merino Kids back in 2003, we have grown from a New Zealand-based sleepwear solutions company into a popular global brand. This is very exciting for us and we are thrilled to be offering a chance to feature one of our own Kiwi babies in our Autumn/ Winter campaign and give them an opportunity to be a part of our beloved Merino family.” Included in the prize package will be a fab $1000 worth of Merino Kids products, a two year subscription to OHbaby! magazine, a year’s supply of ecostore products, a Triolgy skincare pack for mum and dad, a framed print from the professional photoshoot and a family session with international photographer C J Hadlow. Sadly, since we went to press, entries are now closed. Merino Kids, who have also been featured in the Deloitte’s Fast 50 due to their rapid growth, specialises in using 100% natural fibres for the design of newborn, baby, infant and toddler sleepwear, which help reduce the risk of overheating, underheating, strangulation, smothering, cot falls and SUDI and enabling your loved ones to be kept appropriately warm. F PN www.merinokids.co.nz

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING EIGHT GLASSES A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY How many glasses of water do you drink a day? Not enough according to a new survey which found 54% of New Zealanders are drinking less than half of the recommended eight glasses. The second HRV State of Home Survey, conducted by independent research company Buzz Channel, found that on average New Zealanders drink around four glasses of water per day. The commonly held recommendation for fluid intake, including that of the Ministry of Health, is around eight glasses each day, which can also include soft drinks, tea and coffee, and milk. However, various studies suggest certain fluids such as coffee also dehydrate a person. The State of Home survey found 10% of people drink one glass of water or less per day. On the flip side, those aged 18-34 years old drank the most water, with an average of five glasses being downed during the day. Peoples’ attitudes to water quality in New Zealand were also surveyed, with one in five people concerned about the quality of the water in their home. This concern is highest when people consider the purity of water in households, with more than 10% saying the purity of their water is “not good” or “terrible”.

PONSONBY LOCALS COME OUT IN SUPPORT OF DFSA CHARITY DRESS FOR SUCCESS AUCKLAND CHANGES THE LIVES OF women through professional work attire, styling, confidence and career advice - and Ponsonby area residents have long been a staple for clothing donations as well as monetary contributions. “We receive a lot of support from Ponsonby, Herne Bay, Westmere and Grey Lynn,” says Lani French, Executive Director, Dress for Success Auckland. “The clothing from local women and young professionals is always top quality, modern and perfect for helping women secure work, find success, and support their families.” Lani French Ponsonby, as a fashion hotspot with the capacity for significant donations, has been a natural fit for the charity. “It’s wonderful that so many people in the Ponsonby area have chosen Dress for Success Auckland as their go-to charity,” says Lani. The drop-off point for good quality clothing in new or near-new condition (no jeans, PN nightwear or children’s clothing) is Herne Bay Drycleaners in Jervois Road. F DRESS FOR SUCCESS AUCKLAND, www.dressforsuccessauckland.org.nz

Those on low incomes, living in rental properties, and Maori are most concerned about water quality and Aucklanders felt their water tasted and smelled worse than those in other areas. Bruce Gordon, CEO of HRV, says one of the reasons people don’t drink as much water as they should is because it tastes bad. “You can’t help but think it’s also because they are wary of the quality of the water that’s coming into their home, although New Zealand has a great water quality record, it’s not the case in every area,” he says.

L to R: Chloe; Marae; Jacqui; Justine

“The results of the survey reflect this because it’s clear many people are concerned about the quality of their water and what’s in the water that they are drinking and bathing in every day. “More needs to be done to ensure every New Zealander has access to clean and pure water and that’s the reason HRV started the Water In Schools Project this year. It’s a great little project where water filters are installed at schools in areas with water quality issues, which means that the water these kids are drinking is clean and pure. Not only is it about doing something good - and healthy - for schools, at the same time it helps raise awareness about water quality in New Zealand. The water filters are designed to filter the whole water supply connected to a home, school or workplace, and removes heavy metals and up to 98% of chlorine, as well as PN other contaminants and waterborne nasties such as giardia. F

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CLARE CALDWELL: THE ART OF LIVING “Friendship is a mirror to presence and a testament to forgiveness.” This is a quote from British poet, writer, lecturer and philosopher David Whyte, who I shall continue to quote throughout this column. He surmises that true and lasting friendship helps us to see ourselves through another’s eyes, that this friendship can only be sustained by both parties seeing and experiencing each other’s flaws but finding it within themselves to constantly forgive the other. [sic]

HOUSE OF TRAVEL CELEBRATES 10 YEARS WITH HOSPICE NEW ZEALAND Last month, House of Travel celebrated 10 years of supporting Hospice New Zealand with a function at Mercy Hospice in Ponsonby.

“In the course of the years, a close friendship will always reveal the shadow in the other as much as ourselves. To remain friends we must know the other and their difficulties... and encourage the best in them, not through constant critique but through addressing the better part of them, the leading creative edge of their incarnation, thus subtly discouraging what makes them smaller, less generous, less of themselves.” It is often through these eyes of another that we see an idealised version of who we aspire to be, one in which they have faith and a sense of possibility of who we could become.

Following formal addresses from House of Travel Executive Chairman Chris Paulsen and Mercy Hospice CEO Lynda Smith, House of Travel presented Mercy Hospice with a $4000 cheque generated from fundraising efforts by head office staff over the past few months.

True friendship, however, is as much about holding the lost opportunities and vulnerabilities for each other as it is about celebrating dreamed of possibilities and actual triumphs. Revealing ourselves to another requires enormous trust that this vulnerability will not be exploited or used against us.

“We are proud to have supported hospice locations throughout New Zealand since October 2005. Staff across HOT Holdings and our retail stores have been involved with a number of activities over the years to raise awareness and funds for Hospice New Zealand,” he says.

A diminishing circle of friends is an indication of a life in trouble, where we are closing off, too busy, too critical or going through changes that are slowly cutting us off from this vitally important lifeline.

“We are committed to the communities within which our people live and work and Hospice is an organisation which touches a great number of Kiwi lives. Hospice’s mission is to help people make the most of their lives and to live every moment in whatever way is important to them - a philosophy we celebrate at House of Travel.”

“The dynamic of friendship is almost always underestimated as a constant force in human life.” Through the eyes of a friend we can become interesting to others. This can create curiosity and animation and bring fresh energy in the form of new potential friends. Boredom in a friendship is a killer but often happens when one party want this fresh energy of inclusion and expansion and the other one doesn’t.

Chris Paulsen says it has been extremely gratifying for House of Travel to provide support for an organisation so significant to the community.

Attendees at the 10-year celebration included representatives from Mercy Hospice, House of Travel Holdings and representatives from local House of Travel stores. F PN www.houseoftravel.co.nz

One party moving passionately into newly discovered areas of thinking or doing which alters the effortless empathy the friendship had before, can also affect its stability. However, it can be salvaged if both parties open their minds to new ways of being together and finding enrichment in the new situation rather than dislocation. If a friendship can make us feel fully alive, privileged, safe, enriched, enjoyed and held unconditionally, then we are truly blessed! The ultimate touchstone of a friendship is not about improving the other or making them more like us or vice versa. The ultimate touchstone is witness: “the privilege of having been seen by someone and the equal privilege of being granted the sight of the essence of another, to have walked with them and to have believed in them, and sometimes just to have accompanied them for however brief a span, on a journey impossible to accomplish alone.” Clare (Claudie) Caldwell is a creative arts therapist who runs a small private practice from home. She now runs a voluntary art and art therapy programme at Auckland City Mission. She is also a freelance artist. Enquiries: T: 09 836 3618; M: 021 293 3171; E: clare.e.caldwell@gmail.com PN (CLARE CALDWELL) F

Chris Paulsen & Lynda Smith

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FUTURE GENERATION KING'S SCHOOL IS BUILDING THE FUTURE... ONE BOY AT A TIME As a champion of boys’ education, King’s School Headmaster Tony Sissons believes passionately that all boys should be nurtured academically. “At King’s, we know how boys learn. We allow them to be boys, both in and out of the classroom, and we have a high number of male teachers who act as their role models. We encourage our students to be self-motivated, to strive to do their best in everything they do and to have the confidence to take risks. “As Headmaster, I have a clear belief that every boy should have the opportunity to be nurtured to reach his full potential. “I believe strongly that the school has a responsibility to care for each individual and to create an environment which acknowledges and celebrates boys’ successes - developing a culture where it is great to succeed and where the boys are encouraged to develop strong self-esteem. “We are a strong community at King’s and I believe a close partnership between the home and school is critical in bringing out the best in our boys. I am delighted now that we are able to provide the Ponsonby and Herne Bay areas with King’s School mini-buses so that boys may enjoy coming to and from school in a safe environment. It is all part of creating an environment for them to build self-esteem and do well. This will continue to PN be my focus going forward.” F KING'S SCHOOL, 258 Remuera Road, T: 09 520 7770, www.kings.school.nz

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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photography: Carmen Bird Photography

FUTURE GENERATION

ALL BLACKS OFFICIAL SUPPORTERS’ SONG TO CURE KIDS RELEASED All-star Kiwi cast sing for a cure. The official All Blacks supporters’ song, “Team Ball Player Thing”, has been released last month by charity partner Cure Kids, featuring an impressive line-up of Kiwi entertainers and the players themselves ahead of the team’s international campaign. More than 20 of New Zealand’s greatest musicians and performers, including Taika Waititi, Lorde, Sir Peter Jackson, Brooke Fraser and Joel Little collaborated to record the hilarious track, with the aim of raising funds to help cure Batten disease and supporting our All Blacks. The song and video, directed by Taika Waititi, features lyrics inspired by Kiwi kids who offered up advice for the team as they prepare for the United Kingdom.

musicians to record it. The team is always keen to help Cure Kids in any way we can and we’re blown away by the support they’ve shown us with this song.” Cure Kids is hopeful that the song will provide support for our boys on the field, and money raised from downloads will help fund ground-breaking research for the kids who need it most. “Team Ball Player Thing is a fun collaboration, but behind it is a real Kiwi effort find a cure for Batten disease and support our beloved All Blacks. It’s a huge honour to have such an incredible line up of talent involved, especially for a small country, that punches well above its weight on the rugby field and in the field of medical research,” says Cure Kids Interim CEO, Dellwyn Stuart.

Joel Little lent his Grammy Award-winning production skills to lay down the track. “We talked to kids about how the All Blacks could win and used their actual answers as the song lyrics and, of course, the catchy name of the song - ‘Team Ball Player Thing’. There were excellent suggestions involving Vikings, unicorns and getting Dave Dobbyn to sabotage the event by singing a supporters song for Australia, all of which we’ve fed back to Cure Kids and to be brought to life in the official music video,” says Joel. Academy Award-nominated Director, Taika Waititi, said he jumped at the chance to be involved. “I’m pretty keen on any project that involves working with unicorns and Dave Dobbyn. But really, I am a dad now and seeing what some of the families who are affected by Batten disease are going through made it all the more worthwhile.” The track and video features some of New Zealand’s best talent including Lorde, Gin Wigmore, Dave Dobbyn, Broods, Joel Little, Flight of the Conchords, Kimbra, The Naked and Famous, Savage, and Brooke Fraser among others, to make it uniquely Kiwi. All Black Jerome Kaino stars in the video as a Viking wielding a sword that shoots lightning into the sky. Kaino said the video shoot was heaps of fun and a chance to be a big kid. “The song is very cool, people are going to love it. For all these singers and actors to come together for such a great cause is pretty special. I had the easy part, dressing up as a Viking, but it was the kids that put in all the effort to write the song and the

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Batten disease is an inherited collection of illnesses affecting the brain with the effects comparable to a child having a combination of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, epilepsy and blindness. New Zealand led research, conducted through the University of Otago and Lincoln University, has been financially supported by Cure Kids and is actively working towards a cure for this disease. Supporters can download the official song for free when they make a donation at www.kiwiscurebatten.com or by purchasing the song for $2.49 through iTunes. Cure Kids will also utilise #donate; an innovative new technology from US-based, Kiwi -led company GoodWorld, to allow fans to contribute directly to #KiwisCureBatten on Facebook and Twitter simply with the use of a hashtag. GoodWorld was founded by Invercargill woman, Dale Pfeifer. F PN Join the conversation online by using #KiwisCureBatten and #CureKidsNZ or watch the video here: www.youtu.be/1voi7Z4CsLs. The full video (including the contributing children) can be found here: www.youtu.be/tcwuPTlQSxI. For more behind the scenes footage visit Facebook (www.facebook.com/CureKidsCharity), Twitter (www.twitter.com/CureKidsNZ) or YouTube (www.youtube.com/CureKidsNZ). F PN

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FUTURE GENERATION INTRODUCING THE KRISTIN SPORTS ACADEMY A comprehensive new programme for athlete development is being launched at Kristin. The Kristin Sports Academy will run in direct partnership with AUT Millennium to provide customised development pathways for athletes in Years 7-10 from Term 1, 2016, and with a taster programme being offered to selected Year 6 students from next term. Initially focusing on basketball, football, hockey, netball and water polo, the Kristin Sports Academy will deliver code-specific skill training and specialised strength and conditioning programmes within the school timetable. High-performing students will be invited to participate in the 2016 programme, which will include 1-3 in-class training sessions per 7-day cycle. Individual athletes from outside of the five core sports will have the opportunity to be included in the strength and conditioning component. Kristin’s Director of Sport Rob Taylor is thrilled to launch the academy, which he sees as one of the most exciting opportunities for athlete development to be offered at the school in recent years. “Elite performance pathways are vital for students who seek to compete at the highest levels of age group competition and beyond,” he says. “This is the first major step in what will be an evolving programme.” New to Kristin but a familiar face within sport on the North Shore, Rob has spent the last nine years running the Sport Institute at Westlake Boys. He joined Kristin as Director of Sport earlier this year and has already put his extensive experience in the area of student-athlete development into practice. “It is about giving Kristin students the opportunity to be the best they can be, every day.” Executive Principal Tim Oughton is a strong advocate for school sport and believes establishing high-performance pathways is fundamental in ensuring the future success of student athletes. “The resilience of our Kristin sports teams depends on the on-going development of strong and capable athletes. By accessing quality development programmes from a young age, our students will establish a strong foundation in fundamental and core skills to become faster, fitter and stronger - ready to realise their PN potential when they face the challenges of senior sport.” F KRISTIN SCHOOL, 360 Albany Highway, Albany, T: 09 415 9566, www.kristin.school.nz

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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MEET THE TEACHER Sheryl Fletcher

Principal, Bayfield School (8th year, 400 students) How did you come to be a primary school principal? After a long and successful career as a teacher and a leader in middle management positions, it was time to step up to the Principal role. Where did you train? Palmerston North Teachers College and Massey University. What brought you to your current school? I had encouragement from mentors and other principals to apply for Bayfield School, as they saw me being a good fit for the school. What are your favourite things about being a teacher? Setting up opportunities so children are happy at school, hooked into learning and achieving wonderful things across a rich and balanced curriculum. What has been a highlight of your teaching career? As a teacher, many successful years of teaching New Entrant children and getting them and their families settled into school, and creating a love of learning. As a principal, opening our new building at the beginning of term 2 and seeing teachers and children doing amazing things and being totally engaged in their new collaborative learning environment, right from that first day. What has been a low point of your teaching career? Any time a parent or family is disappointed with the school. How would other teachers describe you? Hard working, professional, positive, caring and supportive. How would your students describe you? “Caring and friendly, focused on our learning and encourages us to always do our best.” If you could wave a magic wand in your classroom... Every child would find it easy to learn to read. Five tips for mums and dads of primary school kids 1. Keep reading to your children - a love of reading will set children up for life. 2. Talk to your children about all kinds of things to grow their general knowledge about the world around them. 3. Don’t be too quick to solve problems for your children - children learn from taking risks and making mistakes. 4. Be present (and that’s for all of us, not just parents) - resist the urge to always look at your phone. That email can wait. 5. Be aware of your child’s online life. Know what your child is doing/saying/looking at online and instill the importance of being a responsible online citizen at all times.

TAMAKI SPORTS ACADEMY - FREE METAL COLLECTION TAMAKI SPORTS ACADEMY OFFERS MENTORING, COACHING, AND WORK EXPERIENCE to South Auckland youth who have dropped out of the mainstream school system but show some sporting talent. A major fundraiser for the academy, and an excellent source of work experience for our members, is the free metal collection service we offer. We will pick up any old metal - computers, whiteware, roofing iron, metal piping, venetian blinds, batteries, car panels, cars, metal shelving, filing cabinets, machinery, lawnmowers, engines, and so on. If you do have any metal rubbish to get rid of, we are keen to pick it up for you. It is a win-win for both of us. Thank you to everyone in advance, and to those who have donated metal to us previously. F PN M: 027 510 5890; T: 09 276 0328, www.facebook.com/#!/TamakiSportsAcademy

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Sheryl Fletcher, Principal, Bayfield School

ROUGH SLEEPING STUDY WINS GOLD AWARD A study into rough sleeping in central Auckland has won a gold award in the Public Good category at the Designers Institute of New Zealand’s Best Awards 2015. The annual Best Awards celebrate New Zealand’s best graphic, interactive, product and spatial design projects annually and included 514 finalists this year. The winning study, “An insight into the experience of rough sleeping in central Auckland”, published in January this year, was an initiative of the Auckland Homelessness Steering Group made up of Auckland Council, Auckland City Mission and Lifewise Trust. Auckland Council took an empathy research approach with rough sleepers, former rough sleepers, the public, retailers and some families of rough sleepers in order to gain deep insights into the experience. This collaborative team was mentored by service design agency ThinkPlace to visualise the experience of rough sleeping in a powerful and authentic way. Councillor Cathy Casey, Chair of the Community Development and Safety Committee, said the study provided a huge step forward in understanding why people sleep rough and helped create meaningful change for people experiencing homelessness. “Hearing from homeless people themselves and giving them a voice with this report has been the most important part of the project,” Casey says. “The steering group worked very hard on this public good study and our design partners at ThinkPlace understood the need to deliver a powerful visualisation at a low cost. This award proves we can do both.” An Auckland City Mission count in October 2014 found 147 people sleeping rough within a 3km radius of the Sky Tower - up 116% from a count of 68 in 2013. Moira Lawler of Lifewise Trust, which organises the Big Sleepout homelessness awareness event every year, says the award reflects a straightforward and clear approach to understanding a complex and often uncomfortable issue. “This report is something that our rough sleepers take a lot of pride in - it shows that homelessness is not a choice and shows people the hard realities of having no place to call home at a glance. We’ve already seen our local community use the report to make meaningful changes for Auckland’s homeless,” she says. F PN More information about the Rough Sleeping Report can be found at www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FUTURE GENERATION GIRLS EMBRACE TECH AT #GIRLSINNOV8 CODE CAMP St Cuthbert’s College teacher, Klaris Philipson, has long recognised the need for girls across New Zealand to learn to code and, in doing so, break down the gender stereotypes of the IT industry. This inspired her to create the #GirlsInnov8 Code Camp, giving young women the opportunity to build with digital technology. “I knew that if girls were denied the chance to explore, learn and create with technology, a traditionally male dominated area, then there was little chance of them choosing to pursue it as a study or career path,” says the Director of Technologies at St Cuthbert’s. After a hugely successful inaugural camp in January 2015, #GirlsInnov8 Code Camp is back in January 2016. This year’s camp will see girls exploring coding languages; game, app and website development; robotics and 3D design, with a variety of industry experts. Self-confessed gadget girl, Klaris says the goal of the #GirlsInnov8 initiative is to help girls to realise that technology can be fun, challenging, rewarding, collaborative and exciting. “Ultimately, if girls are curious, enjoy strategising, problem solving, learning by doing and can be resilient when failure comes, then technology is a field in which they have great potential to excel and the #GirlsInnov8 Code Camp is a great place to start.” Registrations for #GirlsInnov8 Code Camp (Wednesday 20 January - Friday 22 January 2016) are now open. 50 places are available for Year 9 - 13 female students. Full details are available at www.girlsinnov8.net F PN ST CUTHBERT’S COLLEGE, 122 Market Road, Epsom, T: 09 520 4159 www.stcuthberts.school.nz

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

Rugby at its best! The saying “ignorance is bliss” might best sum up the young Auckland ITM cup sides year in 2015 and their run to the final against old foes Canterbury. With the Southerners having won seven of the last eight titles, their season has been built on a long ingrained culture of success. The Aucklanders’ on the other hand has been built on young talent who simply don’t know better than to play to their best every time they set foot on the park. Auckland coach Paul Feeney has introduced fifteen rookies to the ITM Cup this season while a further four have been inducted to the wider Auckland squad. Their record in the past has been far from the standard expected by a team representing our largest city. But this year, led by a number of New Zealand under 20 representatives, Eden Park has not only been restored to the fortress it once was, but their performances away have also been something to be proud of, losing just one game on the road. Number 8 Akira Ioane and open side flanker and former King’s High School’s Michael Karpik have been standouts this year, so too senior players George Moala and Charles Piutau. It’s great to see some homegrown talent coming through the Auckland system, just slightly unfortunate that they can’t all be secured by the Blues as well. Bungled calls by referees, poor performances by the host nations and pretty much the bulk of the other Northern Hemisphere teams when it truly mattered, South Africa losing to Japan, Japan beating Samoa and America, and that game by the All Blacks against France.

I’m currently penning this prior to the semi finals in order to meet the print deadline, but so far there’s been so much to write about at the Rugby World Cup, it’s hard to know where to start. So let’s just enjoy the All Blacks entire team performance against France in the quarter finals for a little while longer. Justin Marshall raving and screaming during an All Blacks match is nothing abnormal and can sometimes be very frustrating, but he was right on the money with his calls and his astonishment at the skill level shown by each and every one of the All Blacks throughout the match. Especially as both replacement props Charlie Faumuina and Joe Moody delivered off loads that are usually reserved for the likes of outside backs or Ma’a Nonu and Sonny Bill Williams. Sam Whitelock and Brodie Retallick’s brutality at the breakdown allowed the likes of Richie McCaw and Jerome Kaino to shine, and Dan Carter’s sheer skill and ability to control the game is exactly why he is regarded as one of the best the game has ever produced.

Dan Carter was interviewed post semi final

And let’s not forget about the two wings, Nehe Milner Skudder and Julian Savea. We had been waiting for Savea to produce the type of performance he’s famous for and, at the expense of France, he certainly didn’t under-deliver.

were holding back. Given how unconvincing they were, even against sides like Tonga, many found it hard to believe him but wow, it turns out there was no World Cup trickery coming out of his mouth, the trickery was being played out on the pitch for every opposition scout to see.

Coach Steve Hansen consistently asked for New Zealand not to panic, that the All Blacks were intentionally putting themselves under pressure during pool play and that they

Whatever happens, the All Blacks have now set a new performance benchmark, and if they continue to play like PN that, no team will come close. (GEORGE BERRY) F

A recipe worth following Growing up in a small rural servicing town on the outskirts of South Canterbury couldn’t be further from the designer shops of Ponsonby and the hustle and bustle of Auckland, but Hayden Paddon’s story transcends towns, cities and all in between. It’s a story of determination, courage, and ultimately never giving up. On the back of a handful of top five finishes and even a spot on the podium whilst on a part-time contract, the 28-year-old has just signed a three-year deal with Hyundai Motorsport in the World Rally Championship.

Paddon’s words ring very true; I remember meeting with him just three and a half years ago in a small tea rooms in Leicester, England. That year he’d had a few drives for Abu Dhabi racing, which he was partly funding himself and through the help of many of his supporters. I was asked to meet with him to provide some media advice, and given his obvious commitment and determination to succeed, more so than just his raw talent, I jumped at the chance to help him.

Simply put, a Kiwi has a real tangible chance of being world number one. “It’s amazing to have the security of the next few years, in which time we aim to be at the top,” said Paddon. But even as the driver from Geraldine was announcing his new multi-year deal, his reaction was one of just another step on his road to success detailing where his ambitions truly lie. “Some may say that with this contract ‘we have made it’. I can tell you it has been a huge journey to this point that hundreds of people have helped make happen. And while this is a big step towards the ultimate goal, it’s far from my expectations. We will work even harder and not rest until we are winning - not just me, the whole team. “It also means the pressure of performing for a job is less and [I/we] can focus more on preparation, driving faster and achieving better results.”

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I remember saying that unless you’re the All Blacks and perhaps the Blackcaps, Kiwis only really love winners and losers, and are pretty lukewarm on the in-between. So, if he was competing in far-flung places like Corsica, Poland and Finland, then it would be up to him to make sure people back in New Zealand got the news. That he’d have to do something Kiwis often shy away from, and promote himself, blow his own trumpet, until such time as he’s winning and ignoring his successes is no longer an option. This three-year deal with Hyundai is confirmation that the 28-year-old is worth taking notice of, not just by the words he says, or by his actions, but the actions of others around him to lock in his talents and services, proving they’re more than happy to blow his trumpet for him. Expect to hear plenty more about Hayden Paddon, because through his own commitment and determination, he’s made it pretty hard not to. (GEORGE BERRY) F PN PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FUTURE GENERATION NURTURING CARE GIVES THE BEST START TO CHILDREN’S EDUCATION At a BestStart education and childcare centre, your child will be nurtured and cared for in a warm, friendly and positive environment by qualified and caring teachers. Our centres have teachers who will care for and support your child, providing experiences that introduce concepts of maths, science, art, reading and other curriculum areas. Our infants, toddlers and preschoolers have environments designed to support their specific developmental needs. Our unique Be School ReadyTM initiative ensures that every child is fully prepared for school and helps them develop as natural, confident learners. Our centres also offer the e-portfolio Storypark, allowing parents to access real-time information about their child’s learning. The BestStart ethos believes in highly-trained adult-to-child ratios working with small groups, all providing responsive caregiving in well-defined spaces. There’s always a focus on health and safety and the curriculum is socially, culturally and developmentally appropriate to the children in our care.

BestStart has the country’s most recognised professional guidance programme. It supports teachers in acquiring new skills and knowledge, keeping them up-to-date with child development. This enables us to be the best we can be so that your child can achieve great learning outcomes. BestStart is one of New Zealand’s most trusted providers of Early Childhood Education. As a social enterprise, parents can be assured that the quality of our care is paramount, with continued reinvestment into professional development, centre upgrades and new centres. You can be sure a BestStart centre will provide your child with the best start in their learning journey. F PN BESTSTART EDUCATION AND CARE CENTRES, www.beststarteducare.co.nz

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

Golf right up Streets Alley TONI STREET’S LIFE HAS BEEN DOMINATED BY SPORT. FROM SPENDING ENDLESS summers as a lifeguard at East End in Taranaki, attending Lincoln University on a cricket scholarship and also playing representative netball for Canterbury, Street and sport went hand-in-hand. But since switching from her role as a OneNews Sports journalist to Seven Sharp presenter following a stint on the Breakfast couch, she’s found little to no time for extracurricular activities. Taking care of her two lovely daughters has also meant her old cricket bat and netball shoes have slid further and further into the back of the closet. So when NZ Golf asked her to give golf a go and also become a “She Loves Golf” ambassador, she couldn’t help but say yes! “I’ve been wanting to give golf a go for a long time, but never followed through.” (See, even her lingo is still sporting). “I saw this as the push I finally needed to have a crack, and I love the idea that I might encourage other women to have a go too. My job doesn’t really allow me to play a team sport, my hours are all over the place, so I think golf could be a perfect fit... You can squeeze a few holes in when it suits you.”

VILLA EDUCATION TRUST - LEARNING THAT IS SPECIALISED AND UNIQUE

While Street’s first response was pretty common, “I think I’ll love smashing the ball, Gilmore styles.” Having only played golf a few times so far in her life, her sporting and competitive nature shone through when I asked how she planned on introducing golf to her hectic life, especially given it can be seen as quite a technical sport for those looking from the outside. “I am really keen to have a few lessons from the experts, I’ve only played two or three times, so it would be good to start from scratch and learn from the pros before the bad habits creep in.

For over 13 years, Villa Education Trust has been offering its own brand of unique education to students at Mt Hobson Middle School.

“I’m hoping my years of cricket might help!” Sounds like a fairly good idea given how people, such as co-host on Seven Sharp Mike Hosking, who attests to having once played on as low as a six handicap, have already been trying to give her advice on her backswing.” Mixing time with her girls and getting out on the range might also be easier than Street first thought, with her parents providing an obvious push to get Toni playing more golf. “Mum and Dad have just brought my three-year-old a set of mini clubs for her birthday so I might take her with us to the driving range, hopefully I won’t live to regret this!” Toni’s also realising just how inclusive golf can be, with the possibility of playing alongside her kids, the opportunity is also there with people at the other end of the spectrum. “Dad is a really good golfer and plays regularly so he’s been wanting me to have a go for a long time. I’m really looking forward to having a few rounds with him, and my sister has just taken it up too.” It seems by the sound of those comments that Toni Street’s old netball shoes and cricket gear might find themselves pulled out of the back of her closet, just so they can make way for some new golf gear. The “She Loves Golf” initiative is designed to get more women into the sport, it’s also intended to pull down the barriers and stigma that the sport is for the elderly or people who like to dress a little weird - with rules seen more as suggestions and tips for what to wear on the course. The initiative is an extension of Love Golf, for which former All Black Israel Dagg is an ambassador. Toni is an ambassador alongside Amber Peebles, Laura PN McGoldrick and Lydia Ko. (GEORGE BERRY) F

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The approach has maximum class sizes of 12 students and is, in practice, an integrated project based curriculum where children get a range of experiences including academic learning in the mornings and sport, art and community involvement in the afternoons. It’s delivered in one complete package to keep them interested and wondering about how and what they are learning links to the world around them. The middle school has a maximum role of 48 students and its programme is structured to cater for all academic levels and learning styles. Academic standards and expectations are high. Expanding on this model, the Trust is launching the Villa NCEA Academy for the 2016 academic year. VNA offers a truly unique individualised educational experience to fully engage children at the most critical time in their schooling - the NCEA standards. With class sizes of no more than 12, the academy is designed for students in Years 11 -13 who will benefit from being in a small, positive environment where they will have the chance to mature their thinking and flourish as individuals. Utilising the well-resourced facilities of Mt Hobson Special School in Newmarket, students will attend the academy on weekdays between 1-6pm, where they will embark on courses across the three NCEA levels. Core subjects of english and mathematics will be taught by specialist teachers who will also guide students in their additional subject choices (chosen in conjunction with the principal and parents/guardians). To enrol for next year, to request a prospectus or to arrange a tour of the school and meeting with the Principal, telephone the school or email admin@mthobson.school.nz VILLA EDUCATION TRUST, T: 09 523 1241, E: development@villaeducation.org.nz, www.villaeducation.org.nz

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


BILLY HARRIS: KIDS IN THE COMMUNITY

BILLY HARRIS: KIDS IN THE COMMUNITY

The first bit of what could be the very long story of dancer Rosa Tubman Dancing has been in Rosa Tubman’s blood from the moment she could stand. Probably longer actually, but her parents weren’t aware of it until Mum started taking her along to her sister’s dance class and the two-year-old would copy the older girls, bopping along at the back of the room. Fast forward nine years and Rosa is where she was perhaps destined to be - dancing her heart out alongside the Swagganauts from the Identity Dance Company at the World Hip Hop Championships. In San Diego, Rosa and the Swagganauts had the time of their lives. On the business side, the team finished 11th in a field of 38 crews from all over the globe, an achievement which might have been a little less amazing without some gold ol’ Kiwi ingenuity. With rehearsal space hard to find, and temperatures hard to handle, the Aucklanders would practise in the hotel carpark from 8.30-10.30 at night! If the team was tired from the late nights, they didn’t show it, as they impressed the judges with their energetic and imaginative routines. During down time, the whole group - dancers, teachers and supporters - visited Disneyland and San Diego Zoo, and did their best to reduce the United States’ national debt with an epic shop at an outlet mall! To round off the trip of a lifetime, Team Tubman, which included Rosa’s family of five plus two grandparents, carried on to Ohio to see the cousins. That fantastic experience was the best chapter to date in a story filled with dance. Shortly after demonstrating her readiness to express herself through movement, and an unwillingness to sit still, Rosa, just two and a half years old, started ballet and kept that going until, at eight, she changed to jazz and hip hop. Last year she began competing in competitions in jazz, lyrical, musical theatre and jazz troupes (what, no Cossack?). In dance exams, regardless of genre, she has always gained passes with distinction. Not that Rosa, now 12, is alone in the Tubman household. At times it must be like the Rio Carnival, with big sister Eleanor into jazz and contemporary dance, and little bro Joel doing hip hop and, just recently, tap. Mum and Dad have no formal dance experience, but enjoy dancing around the house (and embarrassing the kids). Only Lili the cat doesn’t dance, not that anyone’s seen anyway. As with any story about excellence, there are always those who helped along the way. Rosa’s mum Mandy explains that Rosa was incredibly lucky to start jazz with Samantha French. Sam, who over the past four years has been a teacher, mentor and friend, encouraged Rosa to try hip hop and has choreographed Rosa’s solos. It was Sam’s idea that Rosa audition for Identity Dance Company and she continues to teach Rosa in both contemporary and her competition solos. Rosa attends The Dance Studio for all her dance lessons. Another major influence in Rosa’s life is Joshua Cesan, the choreographer and crew leader for Swagganauts. Josh did the amazing job of getting a new team of 11 and 12-year-olds to world standard in only eight months. Talent and teachers are only two of the ingredients required to excell. Passion is another, and clearly Rosa is blessed in that department as well, with a workload crazy enough to make the rest of us break into a sweat just reading about it. She dances six hours a week on her routine classes. Last January, the team did a four-day intensive of six hours a day to start them on the road to the Streetdance NZ Regionals. Prior

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

to Regionals they trained twice a week during term and every day in the holidays for three to six hours, which carried through to Nationals and then training for the Worlds. The September holidays were the first school holiday this year where she didn’t dance every day! Not that work seems like work to Rosa. The Pasadena Intermediate student is known everywhere for her permanent smile, which can be a disadvantage when a routine requires a fierce expression. Fortunately at the world champs the routine had a big cheesy grin section, so Rosa had only revert to default mode. But San Diego is now in the past and the Swagganauts jugganaut goes on. They’ve performed on What Now, at Rainbow’s End and at Tempo dance festival, a performance Rosa missed because she was at her great grandmother’s 100th birthday. That’s good news. If Rosa inherits her great grandmother’s longevity, she might still be dancing in the year 2103. We’ll keep you posted. (BILLY HARRIS) F PN

Rosa Tubman rocks it in San Diego

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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FUTURE GENERATION EXCITING TIMES AHEAD AT ST PAUL’S COLLEGE NEW BUILDINGS AND NEW HEADMASTER St Paul’s College in Richmond Road has a new ambitious strategic plan for the redevelopment and revitalisation of the college. The college owners, the Marist Brothers, have set out a vision statement and a mission statement. The vision statement says “St Paul’s will provide an outstanding holistic education based on Catholic Marist traditions of excellence.” While the mission statement says this: “St Paul’s will be the college of choice for Catholic boys from the local community and from within the college’s sphere of influence.” The strategic plan goes on to explain that the vision statement makes it clear that the college’s purpose is the development of the whole person in all aspects of academic and pastoral care. The mission statement places the onus on the college to develop an environment of innovation, enquiry, participation, professional standards and facilities management that will encourage students and their caregivers to choose St Paul’s. Two major initiatives will help St Paul’s achieve its goal to attract local boys. The first is a major new building programme, including a new state-of-the-art middle school, for years 7-10 to open in 2017. It will be an ultra-modern learning environment with quality teachers and an enhanced curriculum. There will also be a new administration wing, for reception, staff facilities and student services. But the second new initiative will arguably be the more significant one. Following the resignation of Mark Rice as Headmaster, the current retiring headmaster of St Peter’s College, Epsom, has taken up the challenge of foregoing retirement to become the new headmaster of St Paul’s College. At 68, it was widely expected that after 27 years as head at St Peter’s, Kieran Fouhy would take retirement and spend more time with his extended family, most of whom cluster closely together in Mt Albert. Ponsonby News spent a delightful hour with the articulate, passionate and charismatic, Fouhy. Kieran Fouhy takes a holistic view of education. At St Peter’s he has insisted every boy learn a musical instrument. He values sporting participation, and has a burning desire to produce good men for the parents who entrust their boys to his school. We asked Kieran Fouhy about his interests outside education. Isn’t he looking forward to time for golf, fishing or bowls? He isn’t! “We are a service family,” he told us. “My wife Diana was a teacher, and so are my five daughters.” I suggested that he must have been a good role model for teaching, for all five of his girls to take it up after graduating with Masters Degrees from Auckland University. “I’m fit,” he insisted. “I’ve walked the Camino trail between Spain and France over the Pyrenees three times,” he says proudly. The Camino trail is no Sunday stroll, it is 900km long.

So it seems the patriach of this family which values education so highly will carry on serving for a while yet. Kieran Fouhy’s holistic view of education places the school as the centre of a village - a one stop shop for academic study, music and sport. Fouhy himself learned the flute as a youngster. He is harder to draw on what he wants to achieve at St Paul’s, but believes it has what he described as “a huge asset base potential”. “It’s not the size of the roll or the buildings, it’s what we do in a school that matters.” Kieran was not about to exaggerate the importance of the new building programme. Not that he wanted to denigrate it, but he wants to emphasise the routines and rituals in a school that help boys succeed. He thinks schools are becoming too big. He likes to start the day with a full school assembly after meeting the boys at the gate. “We enrol families, not boys,” Fouhy insists. He worries about inequality, and what he calls “poverty of the mind.” Inequality may benefit some, but the losses are inevitably socialised and we all pay for them, just as happened when banks and finance institutions failed during the global financial crisis. All society suffers under inequality. Kieran Fouhy accepts that change is inevitable, but seeks always to ask who is benefiting from that change. He worries too, about falling academic standards - stressing the importance of content, as well as, process. He’s not a huge fan of NCEA. St Paul’s has selected a dynamic new headmaster, who is both gentle and caring, but strong-minded and decisive. He brings to St Paul’s a lifetime of service to boys’ education, and instinctively knows how boys think, knowing when they are ‘acting for help’, perhaps taking an unwarranted punch at someone. He works hard to give boys a sense of belonging, stressing that no man is an island. Kieran Fouhy’s ‘one gate policy’, is about coming together, living and working together, playing together, and finally leaving together. St Paul’s is fortunate to be getting the services of such a highly respected educator, one who literally walks the talk. The Marist Brothers values of faith, perseverance, passion, courage, brotherhood and respect will PN all be carefully upheld and nurtured during Kieran Fouhy’s tenure. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F ST PAUL’S COLLEGE, 183 Richmond Road, T: 09 376 1287, www.stpaulscollege.co.nz

94 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FUTURE GENERATION MUGGED IN PONSONBY

photography: Fionna Hill

LAST MONTH, TALLULAH OF Grey Lynn received a free pottery mug of her choice from Auckland Studio Potters Inc. The mugs were given away on Ponsonby Road during ARTWEEK, raising awareness for handmade vs mass produced.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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FURRY AND FABULOUS: ANGELA BEER

PONSONBY CENTRAL FOUNDER SHINES A LIGHT FOR FURS Aside from the beautiful new dog mural outside Ponsonby Central, there are many clues that its owner Andy Davies is a major animal lover so we had to go and have a chat to him. I’ve been beside myself to meet the man behind Ponsonby Central and he didn’t fail to deliver. He is a kind, inspiring human. When we caught up at his office he was joined by his two lovely rescues Missy and Philly. Dogs and animals have always been part of Andy’s life, they are family, completing his home and life. We ‘ruff’ that. So it was wonderful to hear that his latest project is “The Last Lampost”, a dog and animal rescue centre on 17 acres he has just bought in Albany. His dream is to take animals who have run out of time for re-homing and give them a place where they will be safe. A few years ago, he started fostering dogs for the SPCA and through his network of friends and fellow animal lovers he found them homes. Good old Ponsonby News was there in full support, providing free editorial to help these ‘kids’ get new families. Lately, he hasn’t been able to foster. As much due to work commitments and the fact that fosters Missy and Philly have woven their way into his heart and he couldn’t bear to see them go. Bless. Philly, who has been with him for about eight years was an emergency foster, as looks go, he says she’s no Angelina Jolie and that she was one of the worst cases of abuse he had run into. After months of trying to rehome her, he had fallen madly and decided she was a keeper. Then along came Missy. She was found by the motorway with her sister, when she was about seven weeks old, just a bubba. She had ongoing health issues so was really not able to be re-homed, so of course she stayed too. In a movie of her life, Philly would be played by Jodie Foster. She’s intelligent, calm, quiet and Andy says sly and sneaky. We prefer resourceful. Missy on the other hand, is cheeky, tenacious, vocal and apparently greedy and emotionally needy. We’d say quirky. Lindsay Lohan would win the part. We think these girls have definitely won the doggie lottery and the rest of us are pretty damn fortunate to have this visionary man as part of our community. Remember: If you can’t adopt - foster - if you can’t foster - sponsor - if you can’t sponsor - volunteer - if you can’t volunteer - donate - if you can’t donate - educate. Go shine your light people. If you know a local animal lover, email us at angela@petsandpats.com Furry and fabulous, brought to you by Angela Beer, owner of www.petsandpats.com and Fiona Tomlinson photographer www.fionatomlinson.co.nz

96 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS ASK ALEX

DOGS IN HOT CARS

Each month Dr Alex Melrose answers readers’ pet -related issues. Email yours to: alex@vetcare.net.nz

With a long, hot, summer forecast, SPCA Auckland is urging dog owners to take extra care when travelling in cars with their pets.

Q:

While scorching hot days can be fun for humans, for dogs left in cars they can sadly be a tragedy waiting to happen. Unlike us, dogs don’t sweat; it is their panting that cools them down, so when they only have hot air to breathe in, and no water to rehydrate with, they can find themselves in trouble in a matter of minutes. In fact, just 15 minutes in a hot car can be enough to raise their body temperatures to potentially lethal levels causing catastrophic damage to their nervous and cardiovascular systems. People think that leaving a window partially rolled down is enough to prevent their dog from suffering these consequences, but that is simply not true. Whether the window is slightly open or the car is parked in the shade temperatures within the vehicle can still climb surprisingly high. On a 20 degree celsius day, temperatures in a car parked in the shade can exceed 32 degrees - and hit a scorching 70-90 degrees if parked in the sun! Sadly, SPCA Auckland is all too familiar with the heart breaking results of dogs being left in hot cars. We’re spreading the word of the dangers of leaving dogs for even just five minutes in the hope that some tragedies will be averted. First and foremost, if you are likely to have to leave your dog in the car for any amount of time, it is better to leave them at home on hot days. It is important that if you do take your dog with you that you ensure you have water to keep them hydrated and if going on a long trip take plenty of breaks to allow them to walk in the shade. Should you come across a dog that has been left in a car, note down the car’s details and try to track the owner down. In the case of emergency you can contact SPCA Auckland or the Police. For more advice on caring for your pets, visit www.spcaauckland.org.nz or call T: 09 256 7300.

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I have a 10-year-old Labrador, Betty, and she has got pretty bad arthritis. She has had hip dysplasia since she was young, but has coped really well, being a real trooper. We have managed it with medication, supplements and lately with hydrotherapy. I’m just wondering if there is anything else we could be doing to help her? She is getting older now and does sometimes seem to be in discomfort or more restless? Darren, Freemans Bay

A:

Arthritis affects a lot of dogs, not just the elderly, especially when there is a genetic weakness or a history of trauma. It can affect dogs of any size or breed, and the resulting pain can range from minor to extreme.

You sound like you are doing the right things but you could also look at massage, which is a non invasive method of relieving tension and reducing pain. Whilst massage certainly cannot cure the underlying hip joint degeneration, it can help relieve the secondary condition of muscle tightness and pain for Betty. From a muscular perspective, the muscles tighten around the area of discomfort to protect it, but over time, excessive or prolonged tightening can lead to these muscles becoming ischemic (blood flow is impeded) and trigger points (knots) developing. Because the blood flow can’t get there, waste (such as lactic acid) builds up and the muscles themselves start to hurt. Massage therapy stimulates the circulation and gradually releases the muscle tension to increase the blood flow. Increasing the blood flow to the tissues helps reduce soreness and congestion and promotes joint health. Improved blood flow around the joint improves flexibility and reduces pain. Massage makes sense when keeping a dog’s musculoskeletal tissues as healthy as possible and keeping you and your dog moving. (DR ALEX MELROSE BVSC, MRCVS) F PN VETCARE GREY LYNN & UNITEC, 408 Great North Road, Gate 3, 101 Carrington Road, T: 09 361 3500, www.vetcare.net.nz

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LOOK... WHO IS IN THE ZOO!

Capybara Kosh joins Consuela and Rosita Auckland Zoo’s new capybara Kosh from Chester Zoo moved into the zoo’s rainforest exhibit recently, much to the delight of resident females Rosita and Consuela. Their welcome, which included mating with the young male at the earliest available opportunity, could result in the pitter patter of little capybara feet in early 2016! Primate section keeper Vanessa Johnson says following his required quarantine, as part of the standard integration process, three-year-old Kosh was initially given just visual access to his new mates before all three were fully introduced. “From the get-go it’s been very positive. Rosita was super excited to see Kosh for the first time, chirping very loudly (a bit like a guinea pig, but louder!), and climbing up to nose bump him through the mesh of their respective dens. Once we did open up the gate between their dens, it wasn’t long before both females had mated with Kosh, which is a fantastic result,” says Vanessa. Vanessa and her team mates have nick-named Kosh their ‘silver fox’ due to his lighter colouring. They report that he’s a still a little shyer and less The capybara, from Central and South America, is the world’s largest rodent confident than 18-month-old Rosita and Consuela (who arrived at the Zoo earlier this year,) but is doing well. He is now hand-feeding from Say ‘Happy Birthday’ and farewell: Bornean orangutan Madju turns 10 years old them, especially his favourite foods - carrot, apple and fresh grasses. on 9 November. Then on 12 November he and fellow orangutans, Isim and Gangsa will be leaving us for zoos in the United States to help the international breeding programme Not a primate, the capybara is in fact the world’s largest rodent - an extremely efficient for these precious primates. grazer and a great swimmer (with webbing between its toes) it lives throughout Central and South America in dense vegetation that’s close to freshwater. “While we’re sad to see them go, this is a really positive move, and of course, our other three beautiful orangutans, Charlie, Melur and Wanita remain a key part of the Auckland As they do in the wild, the zoo’s capybara share a habitat with squirrel monkeys, whom Zoo family,” says primate team leader Amy Robbins. they seem very relaxed about. Normal zoo admission prices apply. For full event details on Conservation Week and “As a team, we’re all loving working with a non-primate species and having a mixed Mission Possible, visit www.aucklandzoo.co.nz exhibit, which our visitors are also loving. Capybara love to swim, they have a fascinating range of vocalisations - from chirrups to whistles, and are very curious and easy-going, so are great to manage,” says Vanessa. Did you know? • As the world’s largest rodent, capybara can weigh up to 60kg. • As well as being excellent swimmers, capybara can run as fast as a horse!

Conservation Week ‘Backyard Nature’ (1 - 8 November): Join us to discover and celebrate all that’s in our awesome Aotearoa backyards! The zoo is teaming up with Sustainable Coastlines, Rotoroa Island Trust, the Department of Conservation and Kiwis for Kiwi. Check out what the zoo and all our conservation colleagues are doing to keep New Zealand beautiful, and how you can help. Mission Possible (daily until 22 November): Join Mission Possible and help us build a future for wildlife by becoming a trainee zookeeper. Collect your Mission Possible Official Trainee Zookeeper notebook and start your assignment!

98 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

photography: Brian Cairns

Roar in for...

Orangutan Madju (right) pictured here with his mother, Melur, relocates to Busch Gardens in Florida on 12 November PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS

Wendy Dobson and Rosie “I am Wendy Dobson (Rosie’s Mum) and the owner of Art of Travel in Grey Lynn. Rosie is our ‘puppy’ and often comes to the office with me when not at Barkley Manor. Rosie’s dad is Graham Dobson - chiropractor - so he often checks her spine for optimum health. As our children have left home, Rosie is our often-spoilt baby and we adore her - she brings a lot of vitality and love to our home along with our 15-year-old Persian cat, Oscar.”

LEADING THE WAY IN CANINE MASSAGE Just like us, massage for dogs can assist with recovery from injury and pain reduction especially in conditions such as arthritis. It also improves range of motion and flexibility, reduces anxiety and assists with trust building in nervous dogs. It is extremely beneficial to massage a dog suffering from any of a number of physiological or psychological conditions.

How old is Rosie? What breed is she? She’s eight months old - a Hungarian vizla.

Helen Morphew is a United States-trained certified canine massage therapist and the owner of Auckland Canine Massage. Helen has treated all kinds of dogs from a two legged pit-bull to a three-legged Chihuahua, dogs in pain, dogs post-surgery, elderly dogs, anxious dogs, shelter dogs and many more.

How did Rosie get her name? My husband chose it. Would you believe her kennel name is Ponsonby Super model? Named by her breeder from Ponsonby Gun Dogs in Napier. The breeders are originally from Ponsonby in the United Kingdom. Maybe she was destined for Ponsonby News!

Some of the dogs currently benefiting from massage include an arthritic rottweiler mastiff cross, a red setter with peripheral neuropathy, an anxious shih-poo, an ageing spaniel and a pointer cross recovering from surgery. You can read stories about some of her clients on her website.

How long have you had Rosie? How did you come to chose her? Since 24 April - six months - through my daughter-in-law’s recommendation. What is your favourite thing to do together? Take her to Grey Lynn Park and Takapuna Beach. Does Rosie have any friends? My son and daughter-in-law’s German pointer, Mieko who is eight years old. Also Oscar our 15-year-old Persian cat.

If you are wondering whether a therapeutic massage may benefit your dog, Helen is always happy to discuss it with you. Sessions are conducted at home or in VetCare Grey Lynn clinic on a Thursday afternoon. Bookings are essential. To find out more, go to her website and Facebook; Auckland Canine Massage - Helen will also be at Munky’s Corner in Ponsonby Central for a ‘Meet the Masseuse’ day on 14 November, so please drop in and say hello to her. F PN AUCKLAND CANINE MASSAGE, M: 021 0262 0391 www.aucklandcaninemassage.co.nz

What does Rosie like to eat? Cat biscuits, raw minced chicken. Rosie’s favourite place to go is Barkley Manor three mornings a week, and also visiting Vetcare Grey Lynn. F PN

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: METRO LAW GOT A LEGAL QUESTION? ASK MICHAEL@METROLAW.CO.NZ

Email Michael with your question and include PONSONBY NEWS in the subject line. Michael Hemphill, a partner of the firm, will answer one topical question each month.

Q:

My husband and I are retired and have our own home, mortgage-free. The problem is we do not get as much from our super as we thought we would and we are a bit low on cash.

We would really like to go and visit our grandchildren in New York but we just do not have the money for airfares. We have heard about a thing called a reverse mortgage - what is it and how does it work? Is it a good idea for us? Any advice would be appreciated. An ordinary mortgage works where you make monthly repayments to the bank in order to repay the loan secured against your property. A reverse mortgage, on the other hand, is where the bank pays you. The bank secures a mortgage over the equity in your home as security to make payments to you. It is essentially an advance payment on your home equity.

A:

You do not need to make any repayments with a reverse mortgage but interest is charged. A reverse mortgage can be a useful option to borrowers who are asset rich but cash poor and do not meet the bank’s traditional lending criteria. You will need to check whether your bank offers a reverse mortgage. ASB, Southland Building Society, Heartland and TSB all offer a reverse mortgage and eligibility varies from ages 60 to 65. Each bank offers similar products with varying terms and conditions. But before you decide whether a reverse mortgage is right for you it is important to consider what this might mean for both you and your family. The main reason that many retirees, like yourself, are drawn to the idea of a reverse mortgage is because of the security it can offer. Once you have the facility in place you know you have access to funds when you need them, such as in the event of a sudden illness or if you need to make emergency repairs to your property. Drawing on equity means you can retain ownership of your own home and stay there as long as you wish so you do not need to downsize or move away from your community network. Like every loan it is important you carefully consider the risks. The reality is that you will be on the wrong end of compounding interest that may be charged at a higher rate than an ordinary loan. You might be surprised at how your loan increases. This might be okay if the property increases in value but it could be a problem if property prices stagnate or drop. Even the Auckland property market has to slow down at some stage. Because a reverse mortgage draws on the equity in your home, there may be fewer assets for you and your heirs. When you die, sell your home or move out, you, your husband or your estate will have to repay the loan, which could mean you have to sell the property to repay the loan. My advice is to make certain that the terms of the loan include a ‘no negative equity guarantee’. A term like this ensures that you will not have to pay the lender back more than the net sale proceeds of the property. You could even look into ring-fencing portions of equity to ensure something is left to pass onto family members. Keep in mind that protections like these will limit the amount of money you can borrow. Remember, you do not need to borrow to the level of your entitlement at the outset so only draw on what you need at any given time. (MICHAEL HEMPHILL) F PN Disclaimer - This article is for general information purposes only. If you have a legal problem you should seek advice from a lawyer. Metro Law does not accept any liability other than to its clients and then only when advice is sought on specific matters.

METRO LAW, Level 1, 169A Ponsonby Road, T: 09 929 0800, www.metrolaw.co.nz

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: LOGAN GRANGER

Entertainment tax It’s almost that time of the year when businesses entertain clients and staff and give them gifts. Surely this expenditure is deductible? Unfortunately, it’s not as straight forward as you may think. Specific rules apply to different categories of entertainment. Some entertainment expenses can be fully deducted, while others can only be 50% deducted. If the expenditure has some amount of personal benefit, then it will fall under the 50% group. 50% Deductible expenses The following types of expenses include a private element and only 50% tax deductible: • Corporate boxes, whether permanent or temporary. Tickets to a rugby game would be 50% tax deductible • Holiday accommodation - accommodation in a holiday home, time-share apartment • Recreation boats such as yachts, launches or similar recreational boats • Food and drinks at work - if there is a personal enjoyment, the cost is likely to be 50% deductible. 100% Deductible expenses The following types of expenses are generally fully deductible: • Business trips, meals and accommodation while travelling unless entertaining a business contact or attending a function • Food and drink at conferences or business courses, provided they last longer than four consecutive hours • Meals for staff working overtime • Light refreshments (such as morning and afternoon tea) • Monetary sponsorship where the sponsorship is principally for promotion or advertising to the public

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

• Samples - the cost of providing samples for advertising or promotional purposes • Offshore entertainment - entertainment consumed or enjoyed outside New Zealand. GST GST registered business can usually deduct the full amount of all business-related entertainment expenses in their GST return. An annual adjustment needs to be made on a business’ GST return to pay GST on the 50% non deductible expense previously claimed. This is usually made by your accountant when they complete your annual financial statements. Gifts Many business give their staff/customers gifts. The tax implications depend on the type of gift given. • If cash is given to the staff, it will generally be considered part of their remuneration and subject to PAYE. Non-cash gifts to staff however are considered Fringe Benefit. These gifts are fully deductible by the business but subject to FBT • Non-cash gifts of up to $300 per quarter per employee and no more than $22,500 for all employees, are generally exempt from FBT. However, if you exceed the threshold, the whole benefit would be subject to FBT • Gifts to clients or other business contacts are treated differently and are not subject to FBT. They are generally fully deductible.

Fringe benefit tax Certain expenditure falls out of the entertainment regime and becomes subject to Fringe Benefit Tax (FBT). If the benefits are provided to shareholder-employees, and they have a discretion to choose when to receive or use the benefit, it would no longer be entertainment expenditure but a Fringe Benefit. The general rule is that if the expenditure is subject to FBT, it will be fully deductible for income tax purposes. Record keeping When you deduct an expense, you need to have invoices and receipts to support your deduction. Keep a record of people you entertain, the date and the reason. If you do not keep documentation, Inland Revenue Department may deny a full deduction for the expenditure.

(LOGAN GRANGER) F PN The above is a general overview and if you need any clarification on any expenditure you are contemplating, please do not hesitate to contact Logan Granger. Disclaimer - while all care has been taken, Johnston Associates Chartered Accountants Ltd and its staff accept no liability for the content of this article; always see your professional advisor before taking any action that you are unsure about.

JOHNSTON ASSOCIATES, 202 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 361 6701, www.jacal.co.nz

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MILLY NOLAN: DESIGNER GIFTS

Prints charming This summer, say goodbye to plain colours and hello to bold, bright and wonderful prints. From kitchen accessories to decorative pieces and from the classic to the contemporary, printed designs allow you to express your own personality while also adding a creative touch to your living space. Here’s our top picks: 1. Citta Design Arrow Canvas Weekender Bag, $119 This stylish monochrome printed canvas bag is the perfect travel companion for a weekend escape. 2. The Good Housewife linen tea towel set, $50 Available in black and white or a range of colours, this set of quick-drying linen tea towels includes one with a teardrop pattern and another with stripes. 3. Kanuka Collective plantain cushion cover, $129 Designed in New Zealand, this fabulous banana print cushion cover will bring the tropics indoors.

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4. General Eclectic stripe paper bag, $22 This patterned washable paper bag has countless uses, from stylish storage to plant holders. And in a wide range of sizes, colours and prints, they can be easily mixed and matched. 5. Seletti laundry bag, $142 With a quirky yet chic graphic print, this laundry bag will keep your waiting washing housed in style. 6. Aura Kolmio hand towel, $25 Dare to dress your bathroom with vivid pops of colour with this fiery coral and dove hand towel. On the other side is the opposite design.

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7. General Eclectic small yellow grid canister, $15 This white ceramic canister with a bright yellow grid pattern will brighten up any kitchen with it’s sunny 60s vibe. 8. Kip&Co Forever Diamond linen pillowcase pair, $99 Printed with scatterings of black diamonds, you will dream sweetly while resting your head on these 100% linen pillowcases. (MILLY NOLAN) F PN

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Words by Milly Nolan. All products available at www.mildredandco.com

102 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

CELEBRATE WITH MASSES OF FRESH SEASONAL FLOWERS The Floral Studio is the vision of manager and designer Natalie Parmenter of applying her skills to working with beautiful, fresh exquisite flowers combined with the luminescence of New Zealand’s rich green foliage to create simple elegant floral designs. Natalie and her family’s heritage is one of passion for their homeland, they are sixth generation New Zealanders. Flowers and floral artistry have always been part of their family. From growing beautiful roses in Wellington’s early days to daffodils, chrysanthemums and exporting cymbidium orchids in the Bay of Plenty and now the Floral Studio is indicative of the more metro Auckland lifestyle of the family today. They believe the essence and perfume of flowers energises and enriches your wellbeing, uplifting your soul. Reflecting this belief, their family tradition is one of celebrating grandmothers and Mother’s Day, birthdays, weddings, births, graduations, Easter and Christmas as well as the lives of those who mean the most with masses of fresh seasonal flowers or more lasting silk floral designs. The flowers in their Surrey Crescent shop are refreshed three times a week from Auckland growers markets, ensuring that the designs will last upwards of three weeks. They are the exclusive Auckland-based stockists of candles from the Nga Hau e Wha - Four Winds Candle collection of local creative director Cheryl Dawn Scott and supplied to the Floral Studio by Te Ohonga interiors. These candles have a lingering aroma, are PN hand-poured, eco-friendly and paraffin-free. F THE FLOWER STUDIO, 2/29 Surrey Crescent, T: 09 360 4541, www.floralstudio.co.nz The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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JAY PLATT: WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT...

Zoe Kratzmann leather re reptile eptile print shoes $320 Askew www www.askew.co.nz askew co nz

Mini world globe $52.95 Republic www.republichome.com

Jen2 Studio ‘Aroha Heart’ $60 The Garden Party www.thegardenparty.co.nz Daniel Wellington Watch $299.99 Needles & Threads www.needlesandthreads.co.nz

Adler ‘Muse’ gold candle $179 Askew www.askew.co.nz

Ruffoni copper risotto pot and lid $699.99 Millys www.millyskitchen.co.nz

Chrome piggy bank $349 Askew www.askew.co.nz Borrowed earth mountain volcano vases large $36.90 medium $24.90 and small $17.90 ikoiko www.ikoiko.co.nz

104 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT

CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEAS

Borrowed Earth cat bowls $34.90 each ikoiko www.ikoiko.co.nz

Michele Bryant artwork $195 each The Poi Room www.thepoiroom.co.nz

‘Kia Ora’ sign $35 The Garden Party www.thegardenparty.co.nz

Freya & Sabine black leather flat shoes $215 Askew www.askew.co.nz

Tropical Bird ornament $129 Republic www.republichome.com

Coast Marine Bean Chair $599 ex filling Coast www.coastnewzealand.com

Bodum Chambord copper coffee maker $68.99 Millys www.millyskitchen.co.nz

Adidas Originals ZX Flux Sneakers $139.99 a pair Needles & Threads www.needlesandthreads.co.nz STYLING: Jay Platt PHOTOGRAPHY: Danilo Santana David, Fisher Santana.

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BIRD OF THE MONTH

THE BOLD AND SCHEMING PUKEKO

CORSO DE’ FIORI

The pukeko is one of the most commonly-known and widespread birds in New Zealand. Many people have experienced the pukeko stealing feijoas, squawking loudly in the early hours or providing endless entertainment when they struggle to fly away when disturbed.

1. Moulin Roty kiwi doll From French toy makers Moulin Roty, and measuring a very generous 30cm high, this adorably plump kiwi plush, with a long velvet beak and two cute feet, sits squarely on his thick feather plumage. $69.90

Pukeko have only been established in New Zealand for around 1000 years, invading from Australia. It is found throughout the South Pacific, including Australia and New Guinea. It could have been introduced by the ancestors of Maori, but it is uncertain whether they became established here before or after Maori arrival. Many tribes attest to their ancestors having introduced them. Despite this, there is some evidence of pukeko being able to self-introduce, with a specimen being found on L’Esperance Rock, a tiny rock in the Kermadec group, one that is over 2000km from any pukeko population. This kind of dispersion is common in rails, which are often found on remote islands. The pukeko are very similar to our highly endangered takahe and there have been some unfortunate situations of pukeko culling near takahe populations resulting in the latter being killed. The pukeko is not threatened and, in fact, it is one of the few species that has adapted well to human interference and populations. As they are not threatened, they are allowed to be hunted with a licence during game season - although this will now be carefully managed away from takahe populations. They very rarely fly when disturbed, and will most often walk away. When they do fly they look very clumsy, especially on landing and take-off. Sometimes pukeko can be seen struggling to land in a bush or clump of undergrowth, wings and legs flailing around. They live in large family groups and are rarely seen alone. Pukeko regularly appear in Maori myths, the main one being the story of ‘how the kiwi lost her wings’. That myth tells the story of how several birds were asked to come down from the trees to eat the bugs on the ground and save the forest, but all gave excuses, except the kiwi who is willing to give up his colours and the ability to fly. The pukeko's excuse is that it looks too damp down there, and he does not want to get his feet wet. The pukeko is punished for his reluctance and told he must live forever in the swamps. The colour red is associated with nobility and power with Maori, and the pukeko’s red legs meant they were held in high esteem. They are bold and scheming birds, raiding many gardens for fruit and vegetables. Maori rarely used them for food, as they are sinewy and tough. One tale makes the joke that the way to cook pukeko is to boil them with rocks for hours and hours, throw out the pukeko and eat the rocks.

2. Vidivi glasses Perfect for those cool summer drinks, Vidivi highball glasses and old-fashioned tumblers are available in Honeycomb or Diva design. $11 each 3. Baobab Jungle Python candles Add a little luxe to your life with Baobab’s limited edition Jungle Python candle collection (shown in Burmese and Royal Blue). With an exterior inspired by the shimmer of snake skin, the spicy and earthy notes of the scent evoke an elegantly wild glamour. $259.90 each 4. Prospector Co. men’s grooming products Established in Savannah, Georgia in 2010, Prospector Co. makes grooming products and interior scents for men, created in low-volume batches and individually made by hand (shown here K.C. Atwood Aftershave & Tester Vials kit) from $39.90 5. Vitra Girard Eyes coffee mug From Vitra design house, this coffee mug - with ‘Eyes’ motif designed by Alexander Girard in 1971 - is available with blue or green eyes $34.90 6. Mirabello Carrara beach towels Generously sized and super soft, choose your favourite towel from a range of summer-inspired designs from $89.90 CORSO DE’ FIORI, The Foundation, 8 George Street, Newmarket, T: 09 307 9166, wwwcorso.co.nz

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They are easy to find in cities, in farmland and especially anywhere near wetlands, rivers or lakes. It wouldn’t take you long to find one if you set your mind to it, and if you have PN any feijoa trees, keep an eye out for pukeko when they begin to fruit. F (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT)

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INTERIORS TRENDING SUMMER 2015/16 You’d think that in this high-tech world, we’d be populating our homes with movie screens, personal robots and other Jetson-like gadgets. However, there’s actually a reaction against electronics and a move toward old school home comforts. We’re now creating sanctuaries at home. In this crazy-busy world, when stress is at its highest, it’s not just a glass of wine we need at the end of the day. Having a home to relax and unwind in is the winning ticket to sanity. Nurture with nature Copper and brass mirrors, lightshades and bowls are trending, mixed with yellow-based greens. Darker shades of timber furniture work best in this ensemble, such as the Vega sideboard and copper console from Republic Home. Throw in palm print cushions and wall-hung planters to complete the nature vibe in your home.

EXCLUSIVE AUCKLAND HOMES OPEN THEIR DOORS FOR GOOD CAUSES Diocesan School for Girls presents The Dio House Tour: Houses for Causes

Summer sorbet Soothe your soul with delicate hues of coral, blue and green. A cluster of cushions and accessories in sorbet shades is an ideal way to introduce these trending colours. Combine with light timber and white wood furniture such as the Rebel pieces in the United Strangers Collection at Republic Home.

Homes in some of Auckland’s more desirable streets are opening their doors for Diocesan School for Girls’ Houses For Causes on Friday 20 November 2015. This fundraising and charity event will give the public a sneak peek behind the doors of some of Auckland’s most exclusive properties.

Fresh and clear For those set on white design, try warmer whites blended with inky blues to evoke thoughts of the sea and sky. Introduce these hues into your home using statement accessories such as lamps, ceramics, platters and even large pots. F PN

From the leafy streets of Parnell to sweeping views in Kohimarama, the 10 properties on show range in architectural style from the grand to the modern. Luxurious swimming pools, enviable tennis courts and exquisite gardens are just some of the delights gracing the grounds of the homes on this year’s tour.

REPUBLIC HOME, 3 Pompallier Terrace and 56 Parnell Road, www.republichome.com

Opening its doors for Houses for Causes for the first time this year is Bishopscourt in St Stephen’s Avenue, home of the Bishop of Auckland, The Right Reverend Ross Bay, and his wife Jacquie (a Diocesan Old Girl). Built in 1865, this stately gothic home is celebrating its 150th anniversary, and the tour will give visitors a rare opportunity to glimpse inside the Bishop’s private residence. The Selwyn Library at Bishopscourt is the perfect venue to host the tour’s Dio Store. At the other end of the architectural scale on the tour is a stunning new home that won a gold award, plus two lifestyle awards for kitchen and bathroom design, at the 2015 Master Builder’s Awards. This feat of modern architecture, also in St Stephen’s Avenue, is designed by one of the tour’s partner sponsors, Patterson Associates. “We are thrilled to be able to share these wonderful, inspiring homes on the tour,” says organiser Sue Gault. “Opening your home to a large number of visitors is not for everyone, but we have been overwhelmed by the enthusiastic response of our homeowners, and humbled by their generosity of spirit and trust.” Building on the sell-out success of the last House Tour in 2013, Diocesan hopes to raise over $100,000. Monies raised will go towards Diocesan’s planned Arts Centre and charities nominated by the homeowners, including the Child Cancer Foundation, GICI (Gastrointestinal Cancer Institute), Sistema Aotearoa, Auckland City Mission, Selwyn’s Vision, Children’s Autism Foundation, Dove Hospice, First Foundation, and Play It Strange. The charities are selected by the homeowners and represent causes that are close to their hearts. “We are delighted to be back again this year,” says Gastrointestinal Cancer Institute founder, Grant Baker. “The awareness raised in 2013 was invaluable for GICI.” Visitors will receive a goodie bag on arrival, and there will be refreshments on offer at the House Tour Cafe, run by the Dio Old Girls’ League out of a home in Remuera, with seating in a garden on the cliff edge overlooking Hobson Bay. Diocesan’s Parents & Friends Association is delighted to announce three principal sponsors, New Zealand Sotheby’s International Realty, Fuji Xerox and Winger Motors. Other key sponsors include Matrix Security, Humphreys Landscaping, Metrix New Zealand, Prudence Lane Design, and Architects, Patterson Associates. PN Tickets are $70 and are available through iTicket. F

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YOUR LOCAL PROPERTY ADVISOR Luke Dallow optimises tenacity, creativeness and attention to detail which all lead to an edge in every property transaction. With a 40 year family history in property he has developed his own style, introducing, completing and creating ways to maximize the client’s expectations whether being a vendor or purchaser. After only nine months in the industry, he has already had extraordinary success with over $15 million in property sales. These intriguing results demonstrate Luke’s ability to deliver clients what they want through good property strategic planning and creative marketing concepts. You will know the brand ‘Luke Dallow’ through his award winning hospitality establishments in Ponsonby, Grey Lynn, Freemans Bay and Westmere. Many have experienced the Luke Dallow ‘magic and style’ by walking through his establishment doors and now Luke wants to transfer that energy into your sale or purchase with the same passion and enthusiasm. He has Auckland wide connections and networks to connect people with property. Luke believes it is important to contribute to the community where he lives and works. He has been a member of the Board of Trustees for Bayfield School for the past six years and looks after the finance portfolio. Luke is always keen to be involved in community events and a generous sponsor where possible. He proudly supports Starship Children’s Hospital, Child Cancer Foundation and the New Zealand Breast Cancer Foundation. In his spare time, Luke enjoys a good happy hour with friends, runs around after his three children attending their sports events whilst enjoying a spot of fishing when he can. So sit down with Luke, have a cup of tea or maybe go for a fish and talk through your property needs with him. F PN Luke Dallow

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LUKE DALLOW, M: 027 291 0476, E: l.dallow@barfoot.co.nz

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MY FAVOURITE ROOM Fiona Hayvice - YOYO Furniture Design Fiona Hayvice is a self-confessed ultra marathon junkie, and maintains a whole-food diet and balanced lifestyle to support this. In order to rack up the high mileage (100-150km per week) needed for racing ultras, she travels by foot (mostly running) at every opportunity. Aside from training Fiona’s days are spent managing YOYO from home (alongside her husband Todd a.k.a Mr YOYO) while being the principal carer of their three-year-old son. Fiona says, “Returning to New Zealand, after a number of years working abroad, Mr YOYO and I were perturbed that Kiwi design was not being spunout on its own shores. The off shoot was YOYO; a retail platform that champions quality Kiwi-designed furniture, homeware and lighting.” Fiona lives with Todd and three-year-old Spike in an ex factory, two-level apartment within walking distance of everything they need. The family rarely use their car and love the fact they predominantly support local. The Hayvice’s apartment is the first home they (and now Spike) have shared. Hence, it's filled with an amalgamation of furniture and homeware, mainly pieces they have inherited. Since joining forces, the couple has purchased a number of artworks - many of them whilst exploring foreign shores - to adorn their walls. In the future they intend to build a standalone home; it will be influenced by the modernist movement, with a splash of fun. “Kiwi design, of course.” Fiona says, “In a past life (approximately 15 years ago - pre living abroad, meeting Mr YOYO, embarking in business and having a child) I was a greater Ponsonby resident. Today I reside mostly in Wellington, commuting to Ponsonby regularly to oversee our Auckland showroom. Time spent in Auckland is primarily for business, although we have the bonus of mixing it up with family time, with a lot of them residing in central Auckland.” FIona’s favourite room is her living room - a space that comprises kitchen, dining and lounge. “We spend the majority of our home-time in our living room,” she says. Cooking, wining and dining, socialising, planning for the next big ultra event, reading, listening to vinyl, constructing buildings, boats and train-tracks (all of the miniature / toy variety of course!), and running a small business inevitably means working at the dining table (late nights and over breakfast!), business meetings in person and over Skype. The living room is her favourite because it’s the biggest space in her home; the family can all be in there together engaging in different activities, yet still feels like they are in their own zones.

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Her favourite things in the room are the artworks that she and Todd have purchased together. “Each of them has history for us,” Fiona says, “like our two Rona Green pieces; Lady (the butterfly chested cat) was a gift from my father to mark our wedding, and Dutch (the masked rabbit) was the first piece we bought together.” Fiona is also very found of the extensive vinyl collection that is a mash-up of the couple’s pasts and the present. She says, “Spike’s taste is starting to feature now too. Our living room is a bit of a musical shrine with a piano inherited from Mr YOYO's family and an electric drum kit from his past life. I enjoy listening to Spike experimenting with these and PN other instruments, secretly hoping he'll be more musically apt than me.” F YOYO FURNITURE DESIGN, 24A Williamson Avenue, T: 09 376 4884, www.yoyo.co.nz

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BEAUTIFUL GIFTS AVAILABLE AT UN DEUX TROIS La Chamba - From the Andes of Colombia comes French Country’s unique, versatile and distinctive La Chamba cookware. Whether you are a gourmet chef or just prefer simple fare, La Chamba will offer you years of cooking and serving pleasure and makes the perfect Christmas gift. Metallic Dome Candles - French Country’s luxury Scent.5 Dome Candles are available in three fragrances - soothing Bergamot & Camomile, zesty French Verbena and tropical Wild Frangipani. The soy wax candles are beautifully presented in luxury jars, with glass dome and PN box - the perfect gift for someone special. F

Available at UN DEUX TROIS, 6 Jervois Road, Herne Bay or shop online www.undeuxtrois.nz

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THE LATEST BOOK I READ AND ENJOYED Ponsonby News friends tell us about a great book they’ve read recently - and why they loved it.

NOVEMBER AT FORMA Nordic Bedside Table Stunning Scandinavian design made from European oak. Available with one or two drawers.

Murray Bevan - Showroom 22 The last book I read was ‘Sick In The Head’ by Judd Apatow. It’s a brilliant and well-edited account of his interviews with seminal comedians and entertainers of our time. It’s lighthearted and insightful, and a good release from my day job. I would highly recommend it. Jianni Felpas - Movement Lab ‘Church of Marvels’ by Leslie Parry is an intriguing mix of characters with seemingly no possible connection, who find by the end of this gritty tale are all inextricable linked. It’s beautifully written and transports you to early New York. Dion Nash - Triumph & Disaster ‘Lonesome Dove’ by Larry McMurtry. One of the last great cattle drives is so much more than that. Gus and Col take you on a journey with richly entwined characters as they head north to Montana, all the time being tracked by Blueduck the feared Indian chief. Sounds cheesy but it’s masterfully written, you can almost taste the dust, whiskey and tobacco. Definitely recommended. Angie Tinker - Goodness Boutique ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ - loved it because it led me away to a mystical far eastern place of excess and luxury. It took me down a Chinese rabbit hole... loved every page.

FORMA, 51-53 The Strand Parnell, T: 09 368 7694, www.forma.co.nz www.facebook.com/formafurniturenz

Catriona Stewart - MitoQ/Marketing The last book I read: ‘Hear the Wind Sing/Pinball’ by Haruki Murakami. I’m a huge Murakami fan so I was excited to get my hands on this, actually two novellas in one - his earliest works, written in 1973 but never before published in English outside Japan. In quintessential Murakami style, they are a unique mix of the simple, prosaic everyday reality and a more surreal world that is whimsical, intriguing, beguiling. I love his writing, its purity and magical beauty. Sometimes you read a paragraph that is so beautiful, you just have to stop a moment... to marvel at the power and pure emotion of his words. I truly love books and treat them as one of the greatest pleasures and treasures in this world. I buy all my books from Andrew at Novel on Jervois Road. I guess I’m old-school, I never read on a Kindle or screen of any sort. We have to support our local bookshops, they are such an important part of the fabric of our community. Our city would feel soulless and barren without our independent bookshops. So stop buying online and get out there and buy your books locally! Angela Redfern - Ripe Deli Recently I saw Wayne Dyer talk at the Aotea Centre, he passed away a few days later. He had much to say that meant a lot to me and I have since bought some of the kids’ books he has written. This line struck a cord with me when reading it to Sam, one of my children: ‘Think of something you love to do. That is your passion, so let it shine through. Never let fear hold you back. Do what you love - you’re on the right track!” The book is Incredible You! Dr Wayne Dyer - ‘10 ways to let your greatness shine through’. Anna Jobz - Ecoboutique.co.nz The last book I read was ‘Golden Earrings’ by Belinda Alexandra. I’ve read all her books and this one didn’t disappoint. Belinda takes you back to the Spanish Civil War and the main character is a refugee in Barcelona. It follows Paloma through a life in both Spain and France learning ballet and flamenco dancing, while unravelling her family secrets. She meets some interesting characters along the way and, combined with historical and geographical story elements, you’re taken on a journey of love, loss, betrayal and self discovery. Golden Earrings really draws you in and I couldn’t put it down! I would PN recommend this book and all Belinda’s books. F

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STREET NAMES: THE HISTORICAL BOROUGH OF PONSONBY AND GREY LYNN

PICTON STREET Sir Thomas Picton fought in a number of campaigns in the Napoleonic wars and was “respected for his courage but feared for his irascible temperament”. He was born in Pembrokeshire 1758 and obtained an ensign’s commission in the Regiment of Foot at the tender age of 13. Some years later when stationed at Gibraltar he was made a captain, then returned to Britain, where he lived on his father’s estate for nearly 12 years before going to the West Indies as the commander -in-chief’s aide-de-camp, and was eventually promoted to major. During his tenure, he gained a reputation for having a violent temper but also respect for courageously leading troops into battle. He was present at the capture of Saint Lucia after which he was promoted to lieutenant colonel. Following the British victory in Trinidad, Picton was made governor of the island. When reports of the brutality associated with his command reached Britain, there was a demand for his removal. He was making money from speculation in land and slaves, supposedly influenced by his mulatto mistress. Further, he authorised a magistrate’s request to force a confession from a 14-year-old ‘free’ mulatto girl by picketing. She was accused of assisting in a burglary of the house belonging to a man she was living with and was suspended by her wrists while supporting her body weight on an upturned peg, which didn’t break the skin but caused excruciating pain. Picton was ordered home to stand trial and the girl, Luisa Calderon, was brought over to give evidence. The widespread sale of engravings depicting a very personable young girl trussed up and enduring torture in a semi-undressed state generated unprecedented interest in the trial. Though convicted, Picton immediately sought a retrial which was granted. His counsel stressed that the use of torture was legal under Spanish law and that Picton acted without malice. The jury found it was legal at the time of the cession and the guilty verdict was overturned. Military friends and many slave owners subscribed towards his legal expenses and he in turn contributed the same amount to a relief fund following an extensive fire in Port of Spain. Apparently Luisa suffered no ill effects from her treatment and after being released from custody, walked more than a mile to where the crime took place, smoking a cigar. In 1802 William Fullerton was appointed senior member of a commission to govern the island, and Picton became his junior. Picton’s policy regarding various sections of the Trinidad’s population had been ‘let them hate so long as they fear’ so he and the liberal minded Fullerton soon fell out. Fullerton commenced a series of enquiries to do with allegations about Picton’s governance and reported unfavourable views to the commission whereupon Picton resigned. Surprisingly, in spite of a his dodgy reputation, the Duke of Wellington appointed Picton commander of a division in Spain, finding him “a rough foul-mouthed devil as ever lived but no man could do better in different services I assigned to him”. For the remaining years of the Peninsular War, Picton was one of Wellington’s chief subordinates. His greatest successes were in Spain where he was instrumental in the battle of Vitoria helping Wellington claim victory. He was wounded in a terrible engagement at Badajoz but the day after, having recently inheriting a fortune, he gave a guinea to every survivor in the battle. His wound and a fever forced him to return to Britain where he was invested with a knighthood by the Prince Regent and was made a Lieutenant-general in the army. He reappeared at the front in 1813 and a number of engagements further raised his reputation as a resolute and skilful fighting general. When Napoleon returned from Elba, Picton was appointed high commander of the Anglo-Dutch army. He was severely wounded at the Battle of Quatre Bras but concealed his injury and retained command. When Napoleon sent troops to attack the Angloallied centre, Picton launched a bayonet charge on the advancing enemy shouting his last words “Charge! Charge! Hurrah! Hurrah!” before being shot through the head by a musket ball. Since his luggage had not arrived in time, he had worn civilian clothes but family folklore contends he did not wear tails but a nightshirt and top hat because he had overslept and that he was shot by one of his men, who all hated him. This is not backed by any historical source! By order of Parliament, a monument was erected to his memory in St Paul’s Cathedral PN and his body lies there close to that of the Duke of Wellington. (DEIRDRE ROELANTS) F

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REAL ESTATE UPDATE: KAREN SPIRES

Getting behind the next generation of talented Kiwi artists It always inspires me when I see school children from the city fringe pouring their imaginations and visions out onto the canvas as they prepare artwork for the annual inner city arts programme co-sponsored by Bayleys. For 16 years, the programme ‘Through the Eyes of a Child’ has supported primary and intermediate-aged students to produce artwork for individual exhibitions at their schools and later a combined exhibition showcasing the best pieces from the area. From May to November, the students paint, sketch, sculpt, mould and dye artwork as part of the curriculum to follow a theme selected by their individual schools. Schools involved this year include Ponsonby Primary, Marist, Pasadena Intermediate, Bayfield, Freemans Bay, Pt Chevalier, Grey Lynn and Ponsonby Intermediate, St Joseph’s, Newton, Richmond Road, and St Francis. Bayleys is proud to be associated with this event for more than a decade, alongside long-standing sponsor Hills Commercial Flooring which has been on board since the programme’s inception. The programme offers students a chance to experiment with different artistic techniques and explore their creative talents at an early age. Year after year we are all so impressed by the artwork the children produce. They have so much fun along the way and really get a kick out of seeing their art on display for their parents and the public to see. Book vouchers courtesy of Bayleys Ponsonby and Hills Commercial Flooring are awarded to around 20 prize winners from each school and a cheque for $1000 is donated towards each school’s art programme. A selection of artwork from each school is then delivered to the Bayleys Ponsonby office where the team works to collate it for a public installation at New World in Freemans Bay. The Bayleys Ponsonby team loves being a part of the programme and seeing the students taking a real interest in art both for enjoyment and as the beginnings of a potential career in the creative industry down the track.

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Artworks on display at New World supermarket in Freemans Bay Hills Commercial Flooring managing director George Hill and wife Lynda take an active role in supporting the programme by contributing not only financially, but by delivering and collecting display screens for the exhibitions. The pair attends each exhibition and co-ordinates the calendar of events for each year. The first exhibition this year was held at St Joseph’s School in the last week of May to a great response from the local community. Most school exhibitions will be held in term three with a selection of work to be showcased at New World supermarket in Freemans Bay during the spring school holidays. (KAREN SPIRES) F PN Karen Spires is the leading residential salesperson for Bayleys in the Herne Bay/ Freeman’s Bay areas.

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STYLISH SUMMER LIVING AT DESIGN WAREHOUSE 1. Franklin dining set Shown with six Edge side chairs and two Edge arm chairs The Franklin dining set shows how to mix materials to create a unique and stunning look.

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2. Cabo teak daybed left The Cabo teak daybed can be combined with the Cabo right daybed and Cabo corner to make a sectional sofa. 3. Ibiza teak outdoor sofa shown with bloc waterfall coffee table The A-grade teak Ibiza sofa by Design Warehouse is a great example of style, class and comfort combined, shown with their Bloc concrete waterfall coffee table.

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4. Rope outdoor relaxing chair Inspired by European influences and new materials, Design Warehouse have created the Rope club chair - stunning, unique and comfortable. 5. Lodge distressed teak outdoor planter As part of the new Lodge deep seating collection by Design Warehouse, the Lodge distressed teak outdoor planter is perfect for flowering fruit trees, large shrubs and fragrant lavender plants.

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DESIGN WAREHOUSE, 137/147 The Strand, Parnell, T: 09 377 7710, www.designwarehouse.co.nz

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AUCKLAND HOUSE PRICES REBOUND IN SEPTEMBER

POPULAR CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEAS AVAILABLE AT COAST

Following a three-month cooling, the arrival of spring has seen a rebound in the rate at which Auckland house prices increased in September.

1. COAST Picnic Bag. Great unisex gift.

“The average sales price in September at $836,275 jumped 1.9% in one month and the median sales price at $790,000 increased by 4.6%, with both setting new price records,” said Peter Thompson, Managing Director of Barfoot & Thompson.

2. COAST Mackenzie Woollen Throw. Luxury NZ woolen throw. Overseas guest. 3. COAST Classic Canvas Weekender and Cabin bag. Perfect for weekends away. 4. COAST Marine Bean and Ottoman - slate. For the ultimate in summer relaxing. All made in New Zealand. Available at www.coastnewzealand.com and at PN COAST, 77 Ponsonby Road. F

“September was extremely active with sales at 1358, which were up 3.4% on those for August and up 41.6% on those for September last year. “Nearly a third of all those homes (428) were for in excess of $1 million, which is the highest number of $1 million plus homes we have sold in a month. 2

“You have to go back to June this year to see a similar lift in values in one month to that we experienced in September. “In part the price surge may be down to buyers getting in ahead of the new regulations around equity ratios for investors, which came into force in October, but without doubt an element of the traditional lift that comes with spring was there. 1

“New listings at 1940 were the highest in a September for 12 years, and created a reasonable level of choice. “Whether September’s prices have set a trend for the remainder of the year has yet to be seen. “New regulations for international buyers are due to come into force in November and these have coincided with a tightening of requirements around the export of money out of China.

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“In the last week of the month there was a fall off in sales made under the hammer at auctions, and there was less pressure on buyers to make immediate decisions. “This end of the month development carries with it a note of caution for sellers in that September’s prices may not prove to be the start of a new round of increases, and that buyer’s may not be prepared to overstretch themselves to secure a property. “The future direction of prices still remains at the crossroads. “At month end, the number of properties on the company’s books was 3148, the highest number for the past five months. “During the month we sold 161 homes or 11.9% of all homes for under $500,000. This is significantly lower than the 14.3% of sales in August or the 31.8 % of sales recorded PN in September last year.” F

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HEIDI PADAIN: ENTERTAINMENT IN YOUR GARDEN Spring is definitely the best time of year to observe the bird life in your garden. I have discovered so many new things in the past six weeks, I’m excited and wide-eyed with it all. Firstly, I am pleased to advise that I finally managed to get a photograph of the male and female tui sitting together. This pair of tui birds have won the pohutukawa tree territory battle this year. Female on the left, male on the right. Note the difference in size, and that the male has a much fuller poi (curled white feather tufts on the throat). The female tui builds the nest, and does all the work initially, and the male tui will help feed the young once they have left the nest. It has been amusing to see the male tui birds sitting around singing together instead of chasing each other around in their usual manic fashion. I suspect they’re bragging about their superb nest building skills. There’s an area at the back of our property that is a little messy. We use this area to place fallen tree branches, and redundant plant pots. The piwakawaka (fantail birds) have built a nest here in one of the kawakawa trees (pepper tree). It has been fascinating watching them, both male and female work together. They use tiny twigs, dried flimsy bits of bark and lichen. The nest is shaped like a cone with a tail of material below the base. I know both male and female take turns keeping the eggs warm, I was lucky enough to spot them during a shift change. Blackbirds are more territorial than I realised. They’re occasionally sitting somewhat close to the fantail’s nest. They look rather menacing, and should be busy minding their own nest building projects. It would be fair to assume that the fantails feel intimidated by the blackbirds. I observed both male and female fantail wage an attack on a male blackbird, and they won! At the front of our property, hopping around in the grass, we often see a song thrush family. I’m always amazed at the size of the fledglings, only the short tail feathers, and

yellow around the beak is a sign of their age, otherwise they’re as big as their parents. The adults look quite harrassed, to be honest. A pair of kereru are visiting regularly at the same time every day, so, I like to think that they’re nesting nearby, and that I will be lucky enough to see their young. The piwakawaka have become accustomed to my sitting and observing nearby, so you can expect to see baby fantail photos in the next issue of Ponsonby News. (HEIDI PADAIN) F PN

To see some of Heidi’s other photographic work, go to www.flickr.com and type Heidi Padain into the search box or you can contact Heidi by email hidihi@xtra.co.nz

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MY HOMIES Marie Dyhrberg

Marie Dyhrberg, QC is a Queen’s Counsel specialising as defence counsel in criminal law trials and human rights law. Her practice is located in Franklin Road and she works from her home in Freemans Bay. Marie has represented clients for over 30 years in many high-profile cases, including murder cases as well as cases that involve name suppression and clients being discharged without convictions. She is current convenor of the Auckland District Law Society Criminal Law Committee; past Chair of the International Bar Association Criminal Law Committee and past president of the New Zealand Criminal Bar association. Marie was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 2014. Marie has a very busy practice and relies heavily on people to help manage her day and keep her on top of her game - emotionally, physically and psychologically. It is critical for clients to know Marie is totally focussed on their case and is in the best position to achieve a high standard. Pets Marie has two dogs and is ‘grandmother’ to two others. The physical and mental health of her pets is a top priority for Marie. Angela and her top-class team at Pets and Pats ensure the dogs are well socialised and exercised through the week, which removes a huge amount of potential stress during the day. The furry ones adore all members of Pets and Pats and get so excited when they hear the van arrive and see their caregiver for the day. Briar McKenna takes the dogs on fabulous adventures on weekends, to beaches and horse farms in Clevedon, and road trips to Coromandel and Taupo. Dogworkz provide top notch mobile grooming with lots of cuddles thrown in. House cleaning Feng has been with Marie for a few years now and can be trusted to keep confidences and clean the house to a high standard.

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Entertainment Perrin Robinson, Marie’s Godson, cooks for her when she is entertaining at home. Perrin’s specialities are Asian, Italian and fish/chicken dishes and Marie says his cooking is up there with top restaurants. Rocket Kitchen on Ponsonby Road takes care of desserts. Online shopping Shopping is a luxury for Marie due to time limits so she purchases make-up, beauty care, accessories, and tickets for music and comedy events online through the talents of Briar McKenna, who works at Metro Law. Although Marie has sharpened her computer skills, Briar knows the value of products and how to spot sites that are reliable. Maintenance of properties Briar also organises tradespeople for Marie’s home and investment properties, which takes a high degree of management skill. The high-quality garden at Marie’s home is due to Briar’s flair for plants and trees and she makes sure it is well maintained. Practice manager Sharron Jorgensen is totally responsible for keeping the management of the practice steady and Marie ready for court and clients. She is a calming influence on Marie who can be excitable at times. Sharron’s management skills and people skills are the best and she has helped Marie succeed and enjoy the practice of law for seven years now. She would be irreplaceable and her honesty and commitment to Marie’s practice and are without question. Hairdresser Farouk Ullah is a gifted haircutter who has taken such good care of Marie’s challenging hair for many years now. He has always been ready to be bold when Marie has gone down an exotic path with hair colours. Farouk is prepared to accommodate Marie’s unpredictable timetable and does her hair at his home. F PN

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PRODUCTS ON TREND FOR SUMMER @ BOCONCEPT 1. Tivoli Model One Bluetooth: In short, a perfect gift for any music lover this Christmas. The Tivoli Audio range of high-quality radios offer performance and simplicity in compact, attractive enclosures. Simply start listening to your favourite music wirelessly from $449 2. Milano Extendable Dining Table: Sleek, easy and functional are the best words to describe the Milano dining table. This modern dining table features cleverly placed built-in extension leaves which are hidden underneath the table top, allowing you to unfold the table in one easy pull. From $2295 3. Geneva Sound Lab: Enjoy award-winning wireless sound with Geneva Sound Lab. Based in Switzerland, Geneva Lab builds sophisticated sound systems that offer the perfect balance of performance, simplicity, and style. Available in four different colours from $599

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4. Adelaide Outdoor Collection: Entertain your guests in style this summer! The Adelaide outdoor range erases the border between outdoor and indoor furniture. The beautiful contrast between the white high pressure laminate and the warm eucalyptus gives it identity - letting it stand out from most other outdoor furniture.

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5. Monaco Sofa: The Monaco sofa is an exciting new addition to the BoConcept collection, with unique heavy-stitched seams and hexagonal armrests that combine quality and attention to detail. The modular sofa pieces can be customised to meet your own personal needs and are available in the complete range of BoConcept’s fabrics and leathers. From $5629 BOCONCEPT, 20 Normanby Road, Mt Eden, T: 09 630 0557, www.boconcept.co.nz

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ASK AN ARCHITECT: DANIEL MARSHALL Each month architect Daniel Marshall answers readers’ property related questions.

Q:

We have a 1920s weatherboard villa in Grey Lynn and are trying to find a solution to reduce the noise coming in from outside (mainly party noise and voices from our neighbours).

It may not necessarily be an architectural matter (or at least not of the type you deal with), but with the impending birth of our second child, we are very keen to find a way forward that does not involve us selling and moving. We are struggling to find reliable and clear information about how to reduce noise ingress, in particular through the windows. We have sash windows which are in good condition, but still have thin glass and gaps in the frames. We are confused about the differences between secondary glazing (such as Winterglaze) and retrofit double -glazing, and whether they will be effective compared to just replacing the current glass with laminated or Soundstop glass. We hope you will be able to help. Thank you for your question, which is about a subject that I am very interested in, as I live in a villa, and noise transmittance is very much a problem. Mostly from me, but it’s still a problem. Weirdly, the impact of noise and reverberation is very much considered in work environments but virtually ignored in most residential situations. Sound, like touch and sight and smell, is a sense that impacts how we experience architecture and should be used.

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I think the starting point in your mind should be, if you live in an original villa, it is something like living in a tent, in that the separation between yourself and nature or any neighbours is at best, notional. The science of acoustics is incredibly complex, and the pitch of the sound you are trying to keep out, say the difference between voices, bass or traffic noise, can have an impact on the approach that one would take. However, in general terms, one can consider

insulating a house acoustically in a similar way to how you would insulate the house against heat escaping, in that you are attempting to limit ‘bridging’ where noise or heat are directly transmitted across air and through a solid material. The best approach is to ‘isolate’ the interior space as much as possible. So the first four steps would be to insulate the big holes in the villa; 1. The roof cavity. 2. The underfloor. 3. The walls. 4. Remove, restore and reglaze the double -hung window joinery. The good news is that taking these steps will also significantly enhance the thermal performance of the house. If you already have roof insulation, put another layer in and it will help significantly. For the floor, if you have already insulated, a high-quality carpet with an acoustic latex underlay would significantly help with noise reduction The walls and windows are extremely important, unlike heat, which rises, noise travels in a direct line of sight, so these areas are likely to be the biggest areas of transmittance. Branz have a guide to retrofitting insulation into villa walls and if you were to follow these steps, with the optional addition of horizontal metal furlings to separate the interior, the use of 13mm Soundline Gibboard and even a layer of Forman Insulation Wavebar dBX. I must note it is important to consult a professional to work through consenting issues. Work on the exterior walls, and especially the windows, would require a building consent. For getting the best benefit for retrofitting existing double-hung glazing there is a great Branz article written about restoring heritage windows by Paul Cammick from Athfield Architects, available online. I hope this helps! (DANIEL MARSHALL) F PN DANIEL MARSHALL ARCHITECTS, 472 Karangahape Road, T: 09 354 3587, www.marshall-architect.co.nz

DAWSON & CO HAS OPENED RESIDENCE IN PARNELL After nearly 40 years in the business Dawson’s Furniture launches a new chapter as they rebrand to Dawson & Co alongside opening a new concept showroom in the coveted design precinct of Parnell. “We are still a family business, however the family is now bigger,” says owner Angus Dawson, who feels the rebranding is a reflection of how the business has evolved in recent years. Situated in the renovated E&H Buildings on The Strand, the new showroom for Dawson & Co is a space to outplay all others and brings to the central city an impressive furniture store boasting humble luxury and international talent.

A minimalist and sleek designer kitchen bench is positioned through the heart of the store. Fully functional and just like the heart of the home; this kitchen serves as both a service and discussion area as well as a discreet point of sale. The aesthetic of the new showroom has a tangible focus on natural elements and how they have evolved to serve as the building blocks for our home - inside and out.

Designed by Veneer’s Kirsty Mitchell, Dawson & Co’s new concept showroom is a fresh, contemporary space that also pays homage to the industrial heritage of the original building. Concrete walls are met with high-studded ceilings and visible wooden rafters that frame a grand interior space dedicated to Dawson & Co’s portfolio of designer brands. Raw timber was reclaimed from the Hobsonville Airbase and repurposed to create heavy wooden partitions that section off the exclusive Timothy Oulton space of British opulence hidden at the rear of the showroom.

Recently acquired leading international outdoor brand Tribu brings to the shop floor a range of discerning luxury and innovative design. Also new to Dawson & Co is the Nest homewares gallery of contemporary bed linen, glassware and dinnerware. Now open, Dawson & Co has over 20 on-site parking spaces and is situated conveniently near PN Auckland’s motorway. F

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STACKED TO THE GUNNELS WITH GIFT IDEAS Mark McGuinness, CEO Willis Bond & PM John Key

PM BREAKS GROUND ON FIRST WYNYARD QUARTER APARTMENTS Last month, the Prime Minister broke the ground on the first residential development in Auckland’s new waterfront neighbourhood, Wynyard Quarter.

Shut the Front Door!! Check out the second branch of this awesome lifestyle store just opened at the Three Lamps end of Ponsonby Road. Shut the Front Door is a beautifully curated store packed full of the latest trends in homewares and gifts for the whole family. They opened their first store in Takapuna last year and the Ponsonby store brings this unique retail concept to the city side of the bridge. Key homeware brands stocked by Shut the Front Door include General Eclectic, Aura Home, Milk and Sugar and Middle of Nowhere. The range covers decor items such as vases, plants pots, cushions, towels and bed linen as well as a great range of plants. They have an extensive range of wall art with framed artworks from Melbourne brand Middle of Nowhere. There is also a vast selection of unframed prints from local artists such as Evie Kemp and Leden and matching frames so you can pick your print and frame and then do your own framing. Shut the Front Door really is a one stop shop for your Christmas shopping with a range of awesome gifts for the whole family. The younger generation are covered with cute toys from Lily & George or Seedling. They have a well curated book selection focusing on interior design and cookery books. While you are there, you can pick up a gift for yourself with Saben bags, Silk and Steel jewellery and Mooi Bags being stand out PN features of the accessories section! F

Prime Minister John Key broke the ground in Wynyard Quarter

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SHUT THE FRONT DOOR, 275 Ponsonby Road and 57 Barry’s Point Road, Takapuna, www.shutthefrontdoor.co.nz

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SPECIAL CHRISTMAS GIFTS AT TRENZSEATER Whether you are looking for Christmas gifts or home decor accessories, TRENZSEATER have the complete solution, offering the very finest of product for your home. 1. Kate Moss Print $648 2. Buccaneer Tray Medium $471 3. Thomas Fraser clock Aged Brass (also available in Nickel) $256 4. Ethan Desk Accessory $433

Narae and Adam Young - owner operators of the concept store, Sleep Gallery by Bedpost

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SLEEP GALLERY FOR BEAUTIFUL SLEEP

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At The Strand in Parnell nestled between Matisse and Dawson & Co. is a new concept store, Sleep Gallery by Bedpost.

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TRENZSEATER, 80 Parnell Road, T: 09 303 4151, www.trenzseater.com

Narae and Adam Young are the owner-operators of the new concept store which is the first of its kind in Australasia. Both have a passion for quality customer service and have extensive experience providing sleep solutions. If you have bedroom furnishing needs, their brand new showroom is worth exploring. A good night’s sleep makes such a difference to your quality of life. With you in mind, the Sleep Gallery bring luxury sleep options under one roof. Discover mattresses and adjustable lifestyle beds from Tempur, Sealy Crown Jewel and Beautyrest Royale. They feature products never before seen in New Zealand and all at highly competitive prices. Sleep comfort is so important. With this in mind their Sleep Experience Zone allows you to try Tempur mattresses in a subdued, relaxing environment. They won’t rush you so feel free to take your time when choosing a luxurious new mattress. For your peace of mind the friendly team is supported by industry knowledge and will PN ensure satisfaction. F THE SLEEP GALLERY, 101 The Strand, Parnell, T: 09 9 369 1273, M: 0277 239 239, E: sales@sleepgallery.co.nz

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Luxury sleep options under one roof

101 THE STRAND, PARNELL, AUCKLAND NEXT TO MATISSE, +64 9 369 1273 SALES@SLEEPGALLERY.CO.NZ The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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ADD LUXURY, TEXTURE OR COLOUR TO YOUR FLOOR Earlier this month, Artisan opened the doors to their new showroom on Normanby Road, Mt Eden. The newly renovated space encompasses a clean, open plan interior with welcoming accents of wood, providing the perfect foundation to showcase the large range of beautiful high-quality products. Mt Eden is becoming a design mecca and Artisan is positioned amongst some of the city’s top design destinations. The large open space is free flowing yet divided into zones to separate the range of products including luxury and handmade rugs, sisal, blinds, awnings, New Zealand and international carpet brands and tiles. The New Zealand-owned company run by innovative design enthusiasts services the needs of homeowners, interior designers and architects. Artisan offers a complete service and will project manage your jobs, from sourcing product through to complete installation. They have exclusive relationships with an incredible selection of international

brands, including Florence Broadhurst and Jan Kath, in addition to collaborations with a number of designers and artists. No matter the project, Artisan can help. Artisan has a bespoke rug service which is complemented by a unique binding programme. This enables clients to custom design their own rug by choosing from the vast range of flooring options, or even bringing in their own and Artisan will help them find a binding fabric or style to finish their rug. With over 30 years’ experience in the luxury flooring market, Artisan can help you make the right decision on product, texture, and colour for your floor. Opening hours: Monday to Friday 9am - 5pm. Saturday 10am - 3pm. Closed on Sunday. F PN ARTISAN FLOORING, 31A Normanby Road, Mt Eden, T: 09 302 2499, E: info@artisanflooring.co.nz www.artisanflooring.co.nz

THAT’S OUTDOOR LIVING SORTED AT STUDIO ITALIA 1. Basket chair by Nana & Jorgen Ditzel for Kettal 2. Riba armchairs and side table by Triconfort for Kettal Contract 3. Maia armchair by Patricia Urquiola for Kettal 4. Bitta dining table and chairs by Rodolfo Dordoni for Kettal STUDIO ITALIA, 25 Nugent Street, T: 09 523 2105, www.studioitalia.co.nz

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OUT + ABOUT

L to R: A small girl has her face painted; Reid Leahy welcomes people aboard his ‘pirate ship’

L to R: Max Martins gets his face painted by Tamarin Garfield; Joshua Mainwaring from Wilderland serves up enticing juices; Sunny Rae entertains the crowd

photography: Gwynne Davenport

Kelsey Emery of Bayfield School feeds a curious cow

L to R: Gary ‘the Tiger’ Glavas and Gael Baldock; Patrick Schmitt and Carlo Buenoventura feed the masses; Carol Downer educates people about bees

CONTINUED FROM P36 -

KELMARNA GARDEN SPRING FESTIVAL - SUNDAY 12 OCTOBER

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ARTS + CULTURE HIGHWIC CHRISTMAS GARDEN FESTIVAL: A LATE SPRING TREAT Highwic will burst into flower once again this spring - this time combining a floral extravaganza with all the fun of the festive season. The first Highwic Christmas Garden Festival takes place on the weekend of 21 and 22 November and builds on Highwic’s Sweet Pea festivals of previous years. “The Highwic Christmas Garden Festival will be bigger and even better, with a range of spectacular flowers including chocolate cosmos and six varieties of dianthus in the Heaven Scent range developed by Dr Keith Hammett, along with a variety of seasonal spring plants,” says the manager of Highwic, Cheryl Laurie. “We’ll also have a show garden of sweet peas grown around our specially constructed teepees, and Christmas-themed flower beds in festive red and white. The overall experience will be stunning.” Internationally renowned horticulturist Dr Keith Hammett will lead garden tours at 11am and 2pm on both days, and will also have a range of high quality sweet pea seed available for purchase at the festival. Inside Highwic itself, the Garden Festival theme will continue with an exhibition of avant garde pieces by designers from Auckland Floral Art. People can also enjoy a range of Christmas-themed entertainment - including harpists, a duo singing carols, hand bell ringers, as well as two pipers and drummers from the Auckland Grammar School Pipe Band. And for those wanting to tackle a bit of early Christmas shopping, an amazing range of retro toys, games and other goodies will also be on sale at the Highwic Christmas Shop. For more information, including entertainment times and details, visit their website. F PN HIGHWIC, 40 Gillies Avenue, Newmarket, T: 09 524 5729 www.facebook.com/Highwic www.highwic.co.nz

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FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT

Uwe Grodd - conductor and flautist extraordinaire I caught Uwe Grodd in between one rehearsal and another for a chat over coffee in Ponsonby Central. He is a musician who does not have many quiet moments, and hasn’t had one for many years. But he likes it that way and wouldn’t want to change it for the world. Uwe is originally from Germany. “I came to New Zealand a long time ago, in the backpacking time, and fell in love with the country, I didn’t know what I was up for. People were so inviting, it was very different to Germany, the open door policy, with no one locking their cars or houses.” That this was over 30 years ago when Uwe was still a student studying conducting and flute. He found himself in Nelson, a city that calls out to Germans. The fiords, mountains, beaches and seas are such distinctive landscapes and they are all within driving distance. Uwe settled in to a job at the Nelson School of Music, but before long the commute to another new job teaching at the University of Auckland became too much. “I’ve been living in New Zealand longer than in Germany, and in Ponsonby for most of that. I moved to Herne Bay, and bought a house in the early 90s, when you were still able to follow that dream.” This was back in the time where there were only Prego and Atomic Cafe, Uwe informs me. He was the founding Music Director for the Manukau Symphony Orchestra, a position he still holds today. He was invited to become Music Director of the Auckland Choral about eight years ago. Alongside these conducting roles he has always kept playing the flute in parallel and is professor for flute at Auckland University. He teaches the full range from stage 1 through to masters students and doctoral students - 17 year olds to adults. As a flautist and a founding member of the new Aotea Flute Quartet, Uwe is working on concertos for next year. One of Uwe’s greatest passions is discovering, presenting and recording obscure composers from the late 18th Century and early 19th Century. This is the ‘Classical’ era of classical music, the time of Mozart and Haydn. His specialty is the students of the great masters. “In their time they were just as popular, the superstars who have been forgotten. Hummel was the student of Mozart, the Elton John of the late 18th Century,

people would stand on chairs and shout when he played.” Uwe has presented many pieces that were previously unknown and works with New Zealand publishing house Artaria Editions to offer these to the world. The Auckland Choral and their concert in December of Handel’s Messiah, a performance has happened every year since 1855, “I joined this incredibly proud tradition of the Messiah. It is an incredible acheivement by an organisation in New Zealand to do it every year in such a stylish and compelling way. I’m trying to bring something new to it every year, bring out different aspects of it. Every other year we have a slightly shorter version but this year is the full version. Every note that Handel wrote about it. It’s a big one, about three hours.” Don’t worry, he does give people an intermission and a little stretch between acts. “It’s a real buzz, for the choir, the orchestra, myself and the soloists. Everyone’s so familiar with the piece that it’s kind of like a homecoming. You’re going to have the best party, with your best mates for the best reason on the best night out. That’s what it feels like when we go out on stage. When the opening overture starts, it goes really quiet and everyone goes ‘ah, it’s Christmas’.” Just to make sure he doesn’t get too much free time, he has started a new project that will span the next five years! His schedule now freed up with the last project completed, he can begin this new one that has been in his head for many years. Once again working with the student of the masters, he will present Hummel’s arrangements of seven Beethoven symphonies for chamber orchestra. How does it feel to start a new project like that? “Mind numbing,” Uwe says. (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F PN Catch Uwe Grodd conducting Handel’s Messiah at the Auckland Town Hall on Monday 14 December, or Tuesday 15 December. www.aucklandchoral.com

Finn McLennan-Elliott has a Bachelor of Science Honours degree specialising in human geography at Auckland University. In his spare time, Finn plays clarinet and guitar in an orchestra and a folk music group. He is hosting ‘Folk at the Old Folks’ on the first Sunday of every month at the Auckland Old Folks Association Hall, an intimate afternoon concert of folk music.

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING @ OREXART

Sarah Dolby - Creatures of Habit 3 - 28 November Opening 3 November - 5.30 - 7.30pm Sarah Dolby’s work has always been character driven and combines traditional portraiture with narrative. The haunting, romantic women of her Gothic paintings are often famous literary figures including Ophelia and Mary Shelley, or more recently, fairy tale archetypes such as the Fairy Godmother or the Damsel-in-Distress. Dolby’s characters are immediately dazzling in their power and beauty, but on closer inspection reveal hands rubbed raw, flushed complexions and above all else, unnerving expressions. Set against stark, yet luminous backgrounds, the focus of each work is firmly on the character, and the depth and complexity of emotions barely contained behind their gaze.

Dolby works patiently, building up the graceful lines of thin necks and arms, the folds of garments and the subtle pallor of skin in layers of fine detail. For Dolby, giving time to the paintings allows their emotive qualities to slowly emerge in the midst of their atmospheric palettes, creating works that are as personal and as resonant as diary entries. Please contact rex@orexart.co.nz for details. F PN OREXART, 15 Putiki Street, Arch Hill, T: 09 378 0588, www.orexart.co.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE THE BUSHMANS SON - TERRY FERGUSSON SHOWING @ WHITESPACE Philip Trusttum AN EMERGING ARTIST TO WATCH 10-28 November Local Grey Lynn emerging artist Terry Fergusson has a unique style and paints under the brand name of ‘The Bushmans Son’.

Philip Trusttum's new exhibition of paintings present a mix and match of uniforms and bodies breaking down any sense of identity and avoiding any actual specific representation. They become Trusttum’s generic expression of ‘any aggressor’ or ‘any defender’. Uniform merges with flesh, body merges with body and weapons abound. These figures are totally contemporary; part real, part war game and part galactic gladiator. They have the strident ‘in your face’ directness associated with pop art: a hint of Trusttum’s playfulness remains, but once you connect with the eyes it quickly dawns on you that the game is up and this is a deadly business. For most of his heads Trusttum took Picasso’s lead and turned to African art; to masks with large, staring eyes coming out of the dark with the sole intent of intimidation - dramatically reinforced by rows of bared white teeth. Trusttum has built a formidable band of warriors, eyes flashing, armed to the teeth, all sufficent to send shivers down any unsuspecting viewers spine. Those who stand their ground will be rewarded with a vibrant, visual feast. This series of paintings are amongst the most important paintings made by Trusttum over his extensive career, they are powerful visual laments, factual in content, inspired in observation, spiritual in reflection and masterful in creation. Edited essay excerpt by PN Bill Milbank. F

The Bushmans Son: ‘Beautifully Complicated’ was a finalist in the 2015 TCAC Emerging Artist Awards The name comes from his upbringing in small town New Zealand and from being the sixth child and youngest son of a Waikato bushman. Apart from the occasional portrait for family and friends, Terry put his artistic work on hold while he concentrated on his life as a young gay solo parent and building his career in media to secure his family’s survival. Terry explains, “After my children left home I decided to pick the brush again and create not only art but also the brand I would paint under. Even though I am a late comer and not the usual age to be an emerging artist, I am totally committed and extremely excited to be creating and evolving my own style.” Terry uses a mix of photography and paint to create the images and the look he is after. Faces tell a story and this mix of paint and film captures the essence of the subject and brings it to life with colour and text. “Sometimes, actually most times, I am guided by my brush and it just evolves on its own.” says Terry. Exhibitions Gallery Of Fine Art located in Newmarket Auckland and Wellington have signed Terry as one of their artists with exhibitions scheduled for 5 April in Auckland and PN in Wellington in November 2016. F 2015 (C) THE BUSHMANS SON, M: 021 909 827. For more information www.thebushmansson.com or follow Terry on Facebook www.facebook.com/thebushmansson Instagram: #thebushmansson

29s IK, 2610 x 2700mm Philip Trusttum acrylic on canvas

Graham Bennett - Loss Adjuster 10-28 November Bennett continues to reference wayfinding and measuring devices. His unlikely/faux mechanisms question not only “what are we measuring?” but also “what do we do with the results?” Bennett is still taking stock “where are we? Where are we going?” The language of redundant or repurposed tools suggest that to progress we have to be inventive and seek new standards. The ‘Loss Adjuster’ series follows ‘Weighting and Waiting’ series in bringing attention to the results of measurement that require us to juggle, compromise, reconcile and compensate for loss. He speaks of a reluctance to address issues that confront us and underscores the need to set a direction, agree the problem and mark the trajectory. Graham’s public sculptures grace the foreground of the Christchurch Art Gallery and Connell’s Back Sculpture Park and Rocky Bay on Waiheke Island as well as Kurashiki City in Japan, among others. Graham has held numerous solo exhibitions throughout New Zealand and Japan and has participated in group shows internationally. F PN WHITESPACE, 12 Crummer Road, T: 09 361 6331, www.whitespace.co.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE THE FRAME WORKSHOP FEATURES SALLY TAGG Local artist, Sally Tagg, creates intricate botanical artworks using collected plant materials as a starting point to create symmetrical circular forms that transform into kaleidoscopic images. Many people think they are photoshopped, says Sally, but actually it involves hours of painstaking arranging and then elaborate set-ups with the camera overhead to achieve the alluring symmetry. Being a passionate gardener helps, says Sally, as she will often grow plants and flowers that are eye-catching to include in future artworks. “I have boxes of dried plants and flowers that I cant bear to part with... they often remind me of gardens I have visited, or people that I have harrassed for their prize blooms! My favourites are some of the carnivorous pitcher plants, which are beautifully sculptural, yet so bizarre,” Living in a converted power substation has provided Sally with a great environment to create her large artworks. High studs and lots of natural light are essential when it comes to capturing the colour and textures that make the work so vibrant.

Sally works with a variety of substrates, creating large outdoor artworks, which are then printed onto vinyl, Perspex or stainless steel. Her outdoor work has featured at the Sydney Botanical Gardens, NZ Sculpture Onshore, at Brick Bay, and at the Connells Bay Sculpture Trail.

THE FRAME WORKSHOP NOVEMBER SPECIAL... If your passion is for all things botanical, The Frame Workshop invites you to visit the gallery during November and enter the draw to win an amazing Sally Tagg archival framed print of her image ‘Summer Nectar’.

Her creative projects have been interspersed with book and magazine assignments, published books include ‘Contemporary Gardens of NZ’ with writer Carol Bucknell and ‘Seasons: a Journey through the NZ Garden,’ a three-year project with Jack Hobbs from the Auckland Botanic Gardens.

WHAT A MONTH! “We have been operating for four weeks now, and are blown away with the support and enthusiasm from our customers,” says Jo Chalmers co-owner of the Frame Workshop. “Due to demand, we are increasing the choice of mouldings for picture framing with the addition of many new profiles of the latest ranges, which you will see on display in our showroom.” Currently the Frame Workshop is representing the following artists: Michael Smithers, Sean Chen, Marika Jones, Ross Jones, Craig Primrose, Tony Ogle, Dagmar Dyck, Matt Payne, Erin Simpson, Jane Crisp, Sally Tagg, Para Matchitt, Brad Novak, Fatu Feu’u. THE FRAME WORKSHOP, 182 Jervois Road, T: 09 376 4749 and 49 Neilson Street, Onehunga, T: 09 633 0218, E: frameworkshop@xtra.co.nz

Jo Chalmers The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING @ TOI ORA GALLERY Artists in Residence - Exhibition 3 - 27 November Exhibition opens: 3 November 12noon - 2pm

Toi Ora’s artists in residence for 2015 are showing selected works, celebrating their creative professional development over the past year. They work in a variety of mediums, including painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, harakeke and mosaics. This opportunity has enabled them to engage with their practice in a dedicated space, developing ideas, and promoting themselves in their chosen direction. The 10 artists in residence are: Andrew Blythe (in association with Tim Melville Gallery) Damion Von Sturmer, Selwyn Vercoe, Patrick Te Ariki, Christine Mansford, Liam O’Halloran, Raymond Stewart, Kama Szabo, Ezekiel Kennedy and Matthew Yeates. F PN TOI ORA GALLERY, 6 Putiki Street, T: 09 360 4171, E: info@toiora.org.nz, www.toiora.org.nz

PLAYING @ THE RAYE FREEDMAN ARTS CENTRE, EPSOM The Auckland Chamber Orchestra Sunday 8 November The Auckland Chamber Orchestra is performing its final concert of 2015, featuring the stunning Eliah Sakakushev-von Bismarck on cello. He will perform three pieces with the symphony Adagio on Celtic Melodies by Max Bruch, Antonin Dvorak’s Silent Woods and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s Andante Cantabile. Eliah is the principal cellist of the Auckland Philharmonic Orchestra and artistic director of the Musikfest Schloss Wonfurt in Bavaria. Musical Director for the ACO is once again proving that they can find engaging, exciting and wonderful programmes to offer to their audiences. Surrounding Eliah will be Eliah Sakakushev-von Bismarck Gustav Holst’s St Paul’s Suite and Beethoven’s Symphony No.5. F PN

Artist Damion Von Sturmer

Kama Szabo - Untitled

Matthew Yeates - Untitled

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ARTS + CULTURE CANTORUM IN CONCERT @ ALL SAINTS CHURCH PONSONBY Renaissance and Baroque music - 7 November - 7.30pm Christmas Concert - 13 December 5pm Adults $30, Seniors $20, Students with I.D. $15 Recently formed Ponsonby choir Cantorum is presenting a concert of varied Renaissance and early Baroque music at All Saints Church, Ponsonby, at 7.30pm on Saturday 7 November. Featuring music by composers such as William Byrd, Thomas Tallis, Monteverdi, Purcell and Palestrina, the concert promises to be a beautifully absorbing occasion for all lovers of 16th and 17th Century choral music. Cantorum has emerged from the legacy of former chamber choir Musica Sacra, featuring many members of that choir. A close bond has developed that ensures musical and atmospheric harmony. The main work being performed is Palestrina’s “Missa Brevis”. Despite its title, it is one of the most substantial of his four-part masses, contrasting strength of sonority with gentleness and beauty that transport the listener. Come and see Cantorum in concert. They are looking forward to building on the successes of their three concerts since forming in 2014, and welcome you to their next concert. Cantorum will also perform a Christmas concert on Sunday 13 December at 5pm, at All Saints Church, Ponsonby. Contact sheenaablett@gmail.com or call Sheena T: 09 238 5948. All Saints Church PN is located at 284 Ponsonby Road. F

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

MR SCROOGE A FESTIVE MUSICAL PRODUCTION 12 December 4pm - 6pm and 13 December 6pm - 8pm

Life will be showcasing the classic story of Mr Scrooge this Christmas, brought forward into the 21st Century. Hilarious, poignant and full of energy, this brand new musical production promises a fabulously fun evening for all ages. Marley’s Department Store is bursting with Christmas cheer and festivity, until the CEO Mr Scrooge walks in... Mr Scrooge hates Christmas and plans to take away everyone else’s joy! But throughout this fateful night, three mysterious visitors appear to take him on a journey through his past, present and future. Revealing the memories that Mr Scrooge has tried so desperately to escape, we uncover the reasons for why he became the way he is, and how he can rewrite his future. Will Mr Scrooge allow his heart and life to be changed? Or will the staff and customers of Marley’s have their Christmas ruined by this grim, grey, grinchy grump? ‘Mr Scrooge’ is a festive show jam-packed with singing and dancing, featuring a solid cast of actors led by Paul Norell as Scrooge. You’ll feel like you’re actually a customer in Marley’s Department Store! Bring the whole family along to this exciting new production and discover, along with Mr Scrooge, the true joy and freedom of Christmas this year. F PN To buy tickets go to www.mrscrooge.org LIFE AUDITORIUM, 95 Mt Eden Road, Grafton, T: 09 306 4222

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ARTS + CULTURE LOVING MAKING YOU LAUGH There’s nothing like the buzz of an excellent live show, made even better with great food and a glass of wine that you can take into the theatre! GUSH: Love & Other Filthy Habits: 5 - 7 November, 8pm, $25/$20 Nominated Best Comedy Dunedin Fringe, Hot Pink Penny Ashton and her fiancé Matthew Harvey are hilarious. Duelling ukuleles, Tom Jones and Rohypnol all combine in this jamboree of comedy, poetry and songs guaranteed to get you laughing. Ashton and Harvey will keep you entertained as they spew forth their observations not only on love, but on Dave’s fabric softener, dolphins and dinosaurs. Gloria’s Handbag: 11 - 13 November, 8pm, $25/20 A return season of Helen Moulder’s impressive solo show about a 97-year-old who hasn’t long to Penny Ashton - GUSH live and splashes out on a one-off Italian designer handbag, thus setting off a chain of events that livens up Gloria’s last days. Helen’s characterisations are masterful and the script is witty so don’t miss this Wellingtonian in full flight. Flaming Mudcats: 20 November, 8pm, $15 A rocking rhythm and blues band fronted by Craig Bracken, one of the country’s most accomplished harmonica players, with guitarist Doug Bygrave, Ian Thomson on drums and Sean McCarthy on bass. These cats do it all - swing, shuffle and boogie. Zen Dog: 26 - 27 November, 8pm, $25/$20 Hazy recollections from the life of Mick Innes, Mick bares all with tales of love, loss, tears and the odd spot of debauchery in his 30 years as an actor over the ditch. “I didn’t buy this face, I earned it, and I’m kind of lucky to be alive.” Written by Mick Innes and Roberto Nascimento. F PN

SHOWING @ NO.1 PARNELL LAND 7 November - 12 December

Artists include: Karen Browne, Sue Bridgen, Tame Iti, Joanne Barrett, Brett a’Court, Nigel Brown, Dean Buchanan. Land, is an exhibition portraying perceptions of and relationships with the land and featuring, alongside Hokianga artists, artists from throughout Aotearoa for whom the land has been a preoccupation and feature of their work. Each of us cannot but acknowledge our relationship to the land. The depth of that relationship is determined by whether the land is perceived as a gift to be cherished and nurtured, a giver of sustenance and wisdom or a resource to be exploited and exhausted. In the city, land appears less of a presence, suffocated by every kind of construction and yet it is the source of our sustainability. This statement, from Joseph Land of St Francis Farm in Whirinaki, articulates the hope for this exhibition; that it raises awareness of our place on this earth, and facilitates greater appreciation and respect, humility even, for the privilege of our presence here. Fundamental to building a spiritual, just and ecologically sound environment is Te Whenua, the Earth: nurturer, source of life. We are developing with increasing success a way of farming that is both sustaining and sustainable. The rewards are many: good organic food; a shift from being dependent on the multinational, capitalist economy swallowing this world; a security based on the ups and downs of nature; a knowledge that we are trying not to be on the side of the oppressors; and a great sense of hope PN for the possibilities ahead. (JOSEPH LAND) F NO.1 PARNELL, 1 Parnell Street, Rawene, Hokianga, T: 09 405 7520, M: 021 685 737, E: lynnlawton@gmail.com

Micke Innes - Zen Dog

TINY THEATRE Garnet Station Cafe, 85 Garnet Road, T: 09 360 3397

Sue Bridgen - ‘Once upon a time’

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ARTS + CULTURE

UPTOWN ART SCENE We are situated in the middle of New Zealand’s most art-laden neighbourhood (over 20 art establishments within 10 minutes’ walk), and although we play down our involvement, lately it’s been hard to ignore: the staff of Studio Art Supplies have been busy! In October, Evan Woodruffe’s show Here Comes Everyone at Orexart opened with an almost carnival atmosphere. Wall-to-wall people and the brightly coloured, intensely patterned artworks seemed to orbit around an Edwardian armoire covered inside and out with shapes and membrane-like screens of hand-drawn circles. All the staff contributed to the annual Art Hall exhibition at Studio Art Supplies as part of Artweek Auckland. Dean Tercel played with our perception of medium, with a finely crafted oil painting that appeared just like a Pop Art screen print; Michael Mitchell’s images explored the shift between abstraction and figuration; Patrick Lundberg’s quiet shoelace paintings descended the wall like measuring tapes; and Imogen Taylor served up a tasty soup of art references with her unique mix of grubby seduction. The store also held, as part of Artweek, Social Painting for a dozen customers: an exciting selection of paints and surfaces were supplied, along with refreshments, and

under the guidance of staff they constructed artworks over the course of the evening. Painting was never so much fun! Imogen Taylor’s exhibition Body Language opens at Artspace on 6 November and runs through to 5 December. This show features significant new work by Imogen, who has just been awarded the McCahon Residency for summer 2017 - don’t miss it! Patrick Lundberg (‘the new guy’) is included in a painting show that’s coming up soon at a public institution... but we’re not allowed to say where. Patrick may be our latest addition, but comes with a good pedigree, being awarded the Frances Hodgkin Fellowship 2014 and the Trust Waikato National Contemporary Art Award 2008. Amazing that there’s PN been any time to work, really! F (WILL PAYNT, STUDIO ART SUPPLIES)

Evan Woodruffe’s show ‘Here Comes Everyone’ at OREXART

Artweek, ‘Social Painting’ at Studio Art supplies The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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OUT + ABOUT

L to R: Michael Van Den Abeele and Gemma Schofield; Leisa Neumann and Faazleen Sterk; David Peez and Fiona McLeod

photography: Gwynne Davenport

L to R: Yvette Collins, Sarah Gregory, Fiona McLeod and Andrew Peez; Andrew Peez and Fiona McLeod; Republic Home

L to R: Fiona McLeod of Flaunt PR & Sarah Gregory of Resene; Fiona McLeod of Flaunt PR & Sarah Gregory present season colours; David Peez of Republic Home

‘SPRING STYLE MY HOME’ EVENT AT REPUBLIC HOME - THURSDAY 8 OCTOBER Guests were invited to discover top tips for the home with Resene’s colour consultant and view the latest shipment of furniture and accessories in Republic Home.

A NIGHT OUT TO HELP REFUGEES Local Ponsonby women are holding a fundraising dinner at St Matthew in the City on Saturday 14 November to raise funds to help prevent more drownings at sea by refugees. Charitable trust, Refugee Aid has been formed by four local woman Diana Collie, Ginny Openshaw, Michelle Taylor and Jane Ormsby in response to the worsening refugee crisis. Jane commented, “The world is facing the worst humanitarian crisis since the Second World War with over 13 million people displaced from their homes due to war and violence. Thousands of people have lost their lives crossing the Mediterranean to try to get to Europe in shoddy makeshift rafts.” The trust identified the work of Migrant Offshore Aid Station who have so far saved 11,000 lives at sea, mainly Syrian and Eritrean. MOAS consists of international humanitarians, security professionals, medical staff, and experienced maritime officers who have come together to help prevent further catastrophes at sea. MOAS was founded after the 400 migrants drowned near the Italian island of Lampedusa in 2013. There will be guest speakers from the New Zealand refugee community, delicious canapes, a Mediterranean-style dinner and dessert with Villa Maria wines, Monteiths beer and cocktails from Rogue Society, plus music and dancing. The night will also include the auctioning off of prizes such as dinner for eight with Chef Nick Honeyman. F PN All proceeds from the dinner will go towards MOAS. To purchase tickets - $150 per ticket, email refugeeaidnz@gmail.com

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OUT + ABOUT

L to R: David Krull, Mark Maddren and Paul Graham; Jessica Lee Hunt and Brenna Gregg; Mexico Ponsonby paraphernalia

L to R: Mike Matelic and Jure Mohar; Rachel Murtagh and Morgan Tait

photography: Gwynne Davenport

L to R: Rachel and Finn Wotherspoon; Photo board fun at Mexico Ponsonby

L to R: Mariano Zeppa and Dan Philippou; Manny Satisfied and Sarah Lindsay; Shaun Beckett makes margaritas

MEXICO PONSONBY 2ND BIRTHDAY - THURSDAY 15 OCTOBER Mexico Ponsonby celebrated turning two years old yesterday. Guests enjoyed tasty canapes and mouth-watering margaritas. The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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OUT + ABOUT

photography: Gwynne Davenport

L to R: Virgil and Fay Roberts with their beautiful Pinky; Hakan Isaksson and Yvette Jay; Rico Sheath and Maria Bethell

L to R: Yvette Jay and Sandi Anderson; Pinky exterior and interior

PIMPED PINK PARTY - THURSDAY 8 OCTOBER

Virgil and Fay Roberts of Fresh Realty celebrated Pinky’s return from her makeover with friends and family!

10 THINGS TO DO IN BALI - IN OR NEAR TO UBUD... 1. Bali Bird Park - this plays a key role in protecting and conserving Indonesia’s endangered wildlife. Don’t miss the daily 11.30am show. 2. Taro Elephant Sanctuary - the elephants are happy and well looked after. Daily shows are on at 11.45am, 1.45pm, 3.45pm and 6.45pm. 3. Locavore Local - we booked two months ahead and enjoyed the incredible Herbivore Tasting menu. We paid for five courses, but had 12 in total. 4. Pod Chocolate Factory - we created our own chocolates and enjoyed a cuddle with Billy Boy, their seven-year-old honey bear.

6. A healthy lunch and juice at Maya Ubud’s River Cafe with a swim, and a reflexology treatment in their spa. 7. Take a guided walk through the rice fields. We went with Maya’s yoga instructor. 8. Enjoy an outdoor degustation dinner at the award-winning Mozaic. You will love the ‘Alice in Wonderland’ entrance. 9. Plant a tree - we planted two fruit trees back in 2013, a sour sap and a rambutan.

5. Try a Five Elements silent meditation retreat with delicious vegan food produced by executive chef, Felix Schoener.

The wonderful Locavore team in their kitchen stopped for a quick photo

144 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

10. A delightful Italian lunch at La Lucciola, right on the beach at Seminyak. A Ponsonby favourite. (MARTIN LEACH & JAY PLATT)

Jay Platt is pictured with the Ponsonby News tree planted in August 2013 PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


OUT + ABOUT

photography: Gwynne Davenport

L to R: Katherine Simpson and Leanne Etheridge; Alison Boyce and Sally Tagg; Michael Best with Jo and Don Chalmers

L to R: Ross Jones and Trent Rule; The Frame Workshop opening party; Ross Jones with his limited edition print ‘Field of Dreams’

THE FRAME WORKSHOP OPENING PARTY - FRIDAY 9 OCTOBER

photography: Jason Fell

Jo and Don Chalmers have expanded their business with the acquisition of the iconic Momentum Gallery located at 182 Jervois Road, Herne Bay. Last Friday their loyal customers and artists were invited to celebrate the opening over some drinks and nibbles.

Candy Lane QSM receiving a Scroll of Honour from David Hartnell MNZM, the patron of the Variety Artists Club of New Zealand. Candy was awarded a scroll of honour in recognition of her outstanding achievements and unwavering commitment in the world of dance both in New Zealand and internationally.

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HOROSCOPES: MISS PEARL NECLIS

What your stars hold for November

Scorpio (the Scorpion): 24 October - 22 November You are in for a very romantic month and you will be feeling exceptionally glamorous. You are also likely to receive a number of compliments from unexpected sources and this is just the build up to an exciting month of possibilities with a special someone in your life.

♐ Sagittarius (the Archer): 23 November - 22 December A peaceful, quiet month is in the stars for you, but that doesn’t mean it will be boring! If

you have been feeling a little stressed about your personal life recently, put those worries out of your mind and resolve to enjoy whatever may come your way, because someone should bring you some interesting news!

♑ Capricorn (the Goat): 23 December - 20 January Romance might be a little confusing this month, you might be getting mixed vibes - then

again you might be giving out the wrong signals! However, there is a positive influence from the sun which might suggest that you’re overcoming your shyness and expanding your social network, keep at it please.

♉ Taurus (the Bull): 21 April - 21 May The significance of something important that’s been niggling you resurfaces and might

complicate your love life this month. Because of influences from someone who should know better, you are likely to feel things even more deeply than normal. Doing something for you will be great for your self-confidence.

♊ Gemini (the Twins): 22 May - 21 June I hate to say it again, but romance is back on the menu this month, whether you have a partner or not. A new start could be just the ticket for you to take control again, although you might find that you’re not as good at making decisions as you used to be. Make sure you have someone you trust on hand.

Cancer (the Crab): 22 June - 22 July You are still in a buoyant mood as you feel refreshed and invigorated. With summer just around the corner, you can afford to be positive all the time.

♌ Leo (the Lion): 23 July - 21 August ♒ Aquarius (the Water Carrier): 21 January - 19 February This could be a great month for you, as all indications are that some luck is coming your Prepare yourself for a couple of challenging moments this month. The challenges are likely to come from a friend who really does have your best interests at heart, but who is going to be rather clueless in voicing their concerns. You’ll need to peer a little deeper under the surface on this one.

♓ Pisces (the Fish): 20 February - 20 March There could be a day this month when you need to take a step back in order to give

someone some air - you might be smothering them. Your natural inclination will be to offer plenty of comfort to a friend going through a challenging time, but the best help you can give is to let them come to their own conclusions.

♈ Aries (the Ram): 21 March - 20 April An appearance from someone unexpected this month may have you behaving in an

uncertain way. If you’re feeling like you have seen and done it all and are bored with everything, then why not make a change to your image, which might help to refocus your mind. A new hairdo or even some beauty treatments will help with your mood.

way. Also, it’s likely that everything will fall in to place for a while, the trick is to keep things in place all of the time.

♍ Virgo (the Virgin): 22 August - 23 September If last month felt a little bit extreme in terms of emotional issues then this month will be the complete opposite. You will be free to experience guilt-free pleasures that you have wanted to do for a while. Do them now before it’s too late. As well as all this, you might have unexpectedly encouraged an admirer.

♎ Libra (the Scales): 24 September - 23 October You should receive another boost to your confidence this month which is needed. Be

careful about agreeing to too many engagements this month as you usually over commit and end up disappointed. Try and be aware of what you’re good at and improve on that, that’s where your strength is best served.

PONSONBY NEWS OUTLETS FREEMANS BAY

NEWMARKET

Ecostore, 1 Scotland Street Glengarry, Corner Sale and Wellesley Streets Kellands Real Estate, 4 Drake Street New World, Victoria Park

NORTH SHORE

GREY LYNN Barfoot & Thompson, 533 Great North Road Barkley Manor, 400 - 402 Great North Road Grey Lynn Community Centre, 520 Richmond Road Grey Lynn Community Library, 474 Great North Road Raw Essentials, 401B Richmond Road Ripe, 172 Richmond Road Tapac, 100 Motions Road Vetcare, 408 Great North Road

Planet Ayurveda, 41 Gillies Avenue Taylor Boutique, 1 Teed Street

Rug Direct, Wairau Park Dawson’s Furniture, Mairangi Bay

PARNELL Jane Daniels, 2 Birdwood Crescent Parnell Community Centre, 545 Parnell Road

PONSONBY

Atomic, 420c New North Road

Askew, 2b Jervois Road Bayleys, 305 Ponsonby Road Harcourts, 89 Ponsonby Road Leys Institute, 20 St Mary’s Road The Longroom, 114 Ponsonby Road Mag Nation, 123 Ponsonby Road Paper Plus, 332 Ponsonby Road Ponsonby Community Centre, 20 Ponsonby Terrace Servilles, Corner Jervois & Ponsonby Road Studio One, 1 Ponsonby Road Whitespace, 12 Crummer Road

MT EDEN

WESTMERE

HERNE BAY Herne Bay Post & Stationers, 240 Jervois Road Five Loaves, 206 Jervois Road Icing on the Cake, 188 Jervois Road Momentum, 182 Jervois Road

KINGSLAND

Citta Outlet Store, Corner Enfield & Normanby Road Sabato, 57 Normanby Road Studio Italia, 25 Nugent Street

146 PONSONBY NEWS+ November 2015

Ponsonby News is published on the first Friday of each month excluding January. Copies go quickly so be quick to collect yours from any of the following outlets. The issue is also published on our website www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

Glengarry, 164 Garnet Road

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


THE PONSONBY PINK PAGES

PONS ONBY FLOWE RS by Bill Patel

290 PONSONBY ROAD M: 021 258 8399 T: 378 6695

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PONSONBY NEWS - NOVEMBER'15  

Ponsonby? Anyone NOT heard of us? We are Auckland's most talked-about part of town.

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