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PUBLISHED FRIDAY 6 APRIL 2018

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MUSE BOUTIQUE COMES TO PONSONBY - P59 PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS Engagements - Weddings - Honeymoons - Holidays & Getaways - P31 ponsonbynews.co.nz


Some timber, a few nails and a long weekend… No wonder Kiwis love Easter.

If you’re spending the long weekend doing up your home, spare a thought for the poor carpenter behind the occasion. And if you’re doing up your home with a view to selling, spare a thought for Matt O’Brien. While I still don’t understand what rabbits have to do with eggs, and what either has to with the Good Lord, I do know how to sell properties. And that’s why I’m the #2 Individual Sales Person in Auckland Central Suburbs year ending March 31st 2017. I’m awaiting your call. To be part of my best year yet, call me on 021 687 866 OR look me up on Facebook: Matt O’Brien Residential Sales


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WHAT’S INSIDE THIS MONTH

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P31: Planning Special Events: engagements, weddings, honeymoons, holidays and getaways; P96: Ponsonby was the place to be for the St Patrick's Day Parade

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR FROM THE EDITOR DAVID HARTNELL: ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW PIPPA COOM: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD MIKE LEE, COUNCILLOR FOR WAITEMATA & GULF JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS U3A PONSONBY HELEN WHITE: LABOUR AUCKLAND

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NIKKI KAYE: AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY VEG FRIENDLY: GARY STEEL FASHION + STYLE: COVER STORY HELENE RAVLICH: HUFFER LIVING, THINKING & BEING

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JOHN APPLETON ON HEALTH FUTURE GENERATION PONSONBY PETS HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS HEIDI PADAIN: ENTERTAINMENT IN YOUR GARDEN ARTS + CULTURE OUT + ABOUT PONSONBY PINK PAGES

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: JONO PARKER

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LETTERS + EMAILS THE WESTERN SPRINGS MONTEREY PINE FOREST IS AN AREA OF HERITAGE SIGNIFICANCE Mike Wilcox in his book Auckland's Remarkable Urban Forest states in page 179 "A block of Monterey pine was planted in 1923 on the slopes between the zoo and what is now Western Springs Stadium, and is still there today. It is now a prominent landmark: approaching 50m high, it is the tallest stand of trees in Auckland."

Residents living locally to this urban forest say it is an area of ecological significance and that the sign saying this, which used to be located on the track, has been taken away. No proper ecological study of the biodiversity living in this living forest has been undertaken. Local residents are taking action to record the biodiversity of the forest and are asking Auckland Council and WLB to come on board to do a proper study. Could the destruction of this forest cause damage to the concrete houses at the top of the cliff? Where is the report? Have WLB even considered this? Local residents are very concerned and have asked Auckland Council and WLB that no more tree removals take place. Local residents have asked Auckland Council and WLB to stop. To call a moratorium until their concerns are openly, honestly and transparently addressed. WLB appears to be proceeding to obtain resource consent for their plan to progress. If concerned, please write to WLB, or contact Tree Advocates. If have any information that might help save the forest, please contact: treeadvocatewendy@gmail.com Wendy Gray, Ponsonby THE ANTI-CYCLEWAY BRIGADE The anti-cycleway brigade appears to have no experience of cycling in Auckland, exemplified in Roger Hawkin’s letter in February’s issue of Ponsonby News, when he wrote that the Nelson Street cycleway “was designed by nutbars” and calls it AT’s worst disaster.

Recently a member of Occupy Garnet Road came across Treescape lumberjacks up three young Monterey pines in the Western Springs Monterey Pine Forest, cutting the tops off these young trees. The trees themselves appeared healthy, were off the paths and looked like they posed no danger of falling onto those who walk on the paths. It was apparent that significant tree felling works had been being carried out by Treescape also damaging the native forest that is growing under the Monterey pines. Treescape was asked to produce its paper work which it failed to do. The council arborist confirmed that no resource consent had been obtained when it should have been and that he was in the process of putting together a public consultation plan about the Waitemata Local Board (WLB) plans for Western Springs Monterey Pine Forest. A plan that was passed by WLB in 2015 without properly informing residents. Further information emerged at a meeting with the council arborist about plans to build a track into the forest to take down all the Monterey pine trees. The arborist did not share this information with the meeting; instead we learnt about this only from a resident who joined the meeting. Waitemata Local Board wishes to cut down the Western Springs Monterey pines. They claim many things about these Monterey pines: they are unsafe; they are dying; they only live 80-90 years; those that have been cut down by council have been dead, dangerous and dying; of the 504 original pines 304 have died or failed to date. Where do they get this information and these figures? Are they accurate? Residents would like to know. The Californians tell us, and they should know, that these trees may live up to 150 years.

As an elderly cyclist with 36 years' experience of cycling in Auckland, I can contend that the Nelson Street cycleway is a success and a pleasure to ride. It is safe, doesn’t impede traffic and is well used. It links Te Ara/Whiti to the waterfront and then goes back up the Grafton cycleway providing not only a joined-up route separated from traffic, but also a very pleasurable ride. Roger Hawkin’s letter is strewn with exaggeration and hyperbole (I counted 11 examples) and he has conflated and distorted AT’s mistakes to the extent that his argument lacks credibility. He and others are beginning to sound desperate as they try to sabotage initiatives to end the dominance of the private motor car. You have over generously allowed him space for a second letter in March, where he uses the same tactics of insults and distortion. He is just one of a 69,000 readership - no more from him please. Barbara Grace, Grey Lynn THE NEW CYCLE LANES I was so pleased to read Jay Faata's letter in last month's Ponsonby News. I, too, had been thinking that your coverage of the new cycle lanes was one sided. I'm a long-term local resident of West Lynn and I wholeheartedly support the introduction of new cycle lanes. I was starting to think that the only voices being listened to were those of aggrieved business owners. Just maybe residents will find other ways to get themselves to the local shops. Maybe it doesn't have to be all about driving and parking right outside. Since the cycle lanes have appeared, my son and I have hauled our unused bikes out of the shed and started riding again. I'm saving up for an e-bike to start riding to work in the city now that it feels safer to ride. That’s one more car off the road. I've recently returned from a trip to Europe where cycle lanes are everywhere, as is frequent and easy to use, public transport and pleasant, accessible, prioritised and user-friendly pedestrian options. The cities were vibrant and alive (even in the middle of winter). This is the way the world is moving and I for one love it. Lisa Prager does not represent me. My only gripe is that the cycle lanes just stop as you approach the top of Richmond Road. I'm not sure if this is the design or because the project has stalled due to the loud voices of those against them. I'd far rather my rates were spent on more cycle lanes and better public transport than more car parks. Christine Olsen, Westmere Views in Ponsonby News reflect the authors’ and not those of Alchemy Media.

69,000 READERS PER MONTH

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FROM THE EDITOR We are concerned by the turn of events in Western Springs Pine Forest Reserve. taken before young trees of danger to developments Photography: Deirdre Thurston aka Annie Leibovitz

A carefully coordinated approach needs to be council authorises Treescape contractors to top and damage the forest without sufficient evidence the community. Ponsonby News will follow these with interest.

In this issue we have highlighted the latest evidence showing clearly that glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide is a probable human carcinogen. We welcome the news that the Waitemata Local Board plans to ban its use in our parks and reserves starting with Albert Park and then Myers Park. Later this year, Auckland Council will take over the maintenance of the roadsides and berms in the Waitemata area. When that occurs we strongly urge the board to ban glyphosate on the streets as well as in the parks and reserves. There’s nothing we like better than getting our hands into the dirt and then later being able to pick our own veggies and herbs straight from our garden. No one in Auckland should need to buy mint, parsley, chives, basil - they are all easily grown herbs - P22. This month, our focus is on planning special events including engagements, weddings, honeymoons, holidays and getaways. We all need a break away to recharge our batteries so we are ready again for the hard slog of life - P31. After three years owning fashion store Muse Boutique in Newmarket, St Marys Bay resident Olivia Vincent decided to open a second store on Ponsonby Road, on the corner of Tole Street. “Once we realised the beautiful corner site was available, it was a bit of a whirlwind, we signed the lease in a week! The space was completely renovated within

L to R: Gwynne Davenport, Joanne Barrett, Melissa Paynter, Martin Leach and Jay Platt four weeks, and I couldn’t be happier with Muse’s second location,” says Olivia - P59. We are always pleased to support New Zealanders celebrating their Irish heritage so it was good to see a big turnout for the St Patrick's Day Parade in Ponsonby last month - P96. Just as this issue went to press, we learned of the passing of real estate agent Colin Meo. He ran his agency Meo Realty in Blake Street, Ponsonby and will be sadly missed by all who knew him. See his PN obituary in the May issue. (MARTIN LEACH) F

So why pick Real Estate Agent Carl Watkins, NEW TO BARFOOTS PONSONBY, to facilitate your future property Sales and Purchases? • Carl has achieved over 80 successful property transactions within the Auckland city fringe over the last 3 years • Strong negotiator • Strives to achieve the best price for his Vendors in the quickest time and the least hassle • Honesty and integrity guaranteed • Quick and clear communicator • Lives locally and understands the local property market • Barfoot & Thompson are the market leader in Auckland residential market, and the Ponsonby Branch is highly successful and embrace a very professional and strong culture • Barfoot & Thompson is privately owned and not franchised so this means that all 1700 or so Barfoot agents Auckland wide are able to work on selling your listing so you can achieve a better price • Offers a FREE no obligation current market appraisal on your property If you have any questions or would like to meet up for an informal chat Carl can be contacted at c.watkins@barfoot.co.nz or for a quicker response 021 424 736.

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DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

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DAVID HARTNELL’S ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW Samantha Tibshraeny lives in the area and works at the Richmond Pharmacy. What’s the best thing about where you live? Westmere is where I call home and the best thing about it is the swims at high tide. My second home is in the block of West Lynn shops where I spend my days meeting the people who form this artistic, innovative and passionate community. What was your childhood like? Busy. From my bedroom I ran a successful classroom, doctor's practice, furniture shop, and real estate agency. I also stole coins from Dad's ashtray for 50 cent lolly mixes. Favorite TV series? I've watched and re-watched the series of Desperate Housewives, and despite it being a pretty tragic chick flick sort of gig, it's actually inspiring to see how strong these seemingly 'desperate' women are as they navigate through everything life seems to bring. Dream holiday? I'd love to go back to my roots and visit Lebanon to see where my family comes from, and be surrounded by a gene pool of people who also require regular mo waxes. Most treasured passion? People! I have such love and appreciation for my friends and family and treasure every relationship I have. I feel very lucky, too, as my job allows me to meet people in the community, where I see first hand the difference made by simply caring for people. Most Kiwi thing about you? Four 'scarfie' years in Dunedin, nothing more Kiwi than lighting a couch on fire. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Happy and healthy, and hopefully one of those fit looking, overly social, insta-famous, super mums. What job would you do other than your own? Tennis lineswoman, for my love of the game, but also in the hope of marrying one of the wealthy lads on court. What do you dislike about your appearance? I spend half my life taming my curly hair; seems you always want what you don't have. Do you read movie or TV reviews? Tend only to read reviews when I have the pressure of choosing a movie for my family who seem to enjoy an 'easy watch' less than I do. How would you like to be remembered? I hope that by the time I die, everyone who cares will be so old they can't even remember, and that no stories of the 'Naughty Naughties' will live to haunt us. If your life was an ice cream, what would it be called? After doing a quick online 'Ice-cream Personality Test' seems as though I'm a Mint Choc-Chip type of gal, and it literally says 'You're pretty cool, to be honest', so sounds accurate. Regrets? I try not to have 'regrets', but to rather see every experience as

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Samantha Tibshraeny something that has formed who I am today. However, I missed the boat on reading Harry Potter as a child which is very disappointing, and a 2018 goal to rectify. If you won a million dollars, what would you would do? Call Mum, pay off my student loan, wave to all the plebs who can't afford their first home in Central Auckland. What happens when we die? I hope we move into a better space where we can all hang out and eat chocolate without getting fat. Then laugh at all the mates down there who are still working their butt off to stay thin. Favorite movie? Mamma Mia! Because of the warm memories of watching it with my best girlfriends whenever someone needed some cheering up, plus an excuse to eat raspberry choc logs and do ABBA karaoke. Give your teenaged self some advice? Don't sweat the small things, no one will ever care about your NCEA level 1 grades, and wear more sunblock. Which item of clothing can't you live without? Running shoes. I'd wear them all day if only it wasn't frowned upon. Tell us something very few people know about you? As a child I was very entrepreneurial and would raise tadpoles in my bedroom and sell them as frogs for a profit. Let me know if you need help with any business ideas. What superpower would you like? To be able to click your fingers and be anywhere you want without hassling traffic or having to walk up the stairs to get to bed. What cliché do you hate most? A woman's place is in the home. I'm sorry, but my place is anywhere I want it to be. A handshake or a hug kind of person? Bit of both. Definitely not the type of person to offer an unnecessary hug though. (DAVID HARTNELL, MNZM) F PN

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PIPPA COOM: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD REPORT Shortly after I was first elected, I got a call from Annette Isbey about a track near her house that took her through native bush and pines down to Western Springs. She wanted help to fix the track because her daily walk was getting more and more difficult. A talented artist and the widow of Labour MP Eddie Isbey, Annette had previously fought off mountain bikers who wanted tracks through 'her' park, and Auckland Zoo, which was eyeing the area in 2010 for walking a proposed herd of elephants. Those ideas led the board to adopt the Western Springs Native Bush Regeneration Project in 2015. It was consulted on as local board priority through the 2015-2025 Long Term Plan. The project’s objectives are to enhance an area of regenerating native bush through an ecological restoration programme, new planting and track maintenance. There is also the chance to expand the track network through the area bordered by West View Road, Auckland Zoo, Western Springs Lakeside Park and Stadium. Annette would have loved the exotic trees to remain, but the board has had expert advice that the project can’t be progressed until two hundred 90-year-old Monterey pines in the area are removed because they are unstable and a public safety risk. A 2013 survey confirmed 224 of the original 506 trees had died or fallen, leaving 282. A 2016 survey showed the live population was down to about 200, after about 60 fell or snapped, and another 20 unstable trees were felled.

A count is now being undertaken to confirm live numbers, but many of the tress are in poor health, with sparse crowns and dead or dying limbs, so that action is critical for safety reasons. Removing only the unhealthy trees would dramatically increase the failure rate of any left behind. Complete removal will enable us to keep the area safe and to start an ecological restoration programme immediately. There has been concern about white-faced herons nesting in the trees. While they are potentially suitable for roosting, a recent survey found no herons, suggesting the area was not an important site for them. Regardless, any felling would be done outside the nesting season, and the area would be surveyed by an ecologist. Approximately 20 totem poles will be left throughout the forest as a potential habitat for kingfisher and morepork. The complexity of the project and the need to ensure the right method is used has caused delays in getting started, but a publicly notified resource consent application is now being processed. The regeneration plans, and track proposals will be developed with input from the local community. Annette is now 90 and in a resthome. I hope her grandchildren will get to enjoy an improved path through a stunning regenerating forest, in PN an area so dear to her. (PIPPA COOM) F Details of consultation events and submission details on the Auckland Council website www.akhaveyoursay.nz

Contact Pippa Coom, Chair of Waitamata Local Board, pippa.coom@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz, www.facebook.com/waitemata

Annette Isbey in her West View Road studio 2010

Western Springs native bush and pine stand

Track through the Western Springs native bush and pine stand

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MIKE LEE: COUNCILLOR FOR WAITEMATA & GULF

‘Have Your Say’ and the consultation frenzy ‘Consultation Frenzy’, my friend Luke Niue calls it. Over the past four weeks Auckland Council has been consulting on the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan - along with a stack of other plans. First of all let’s look at the Long Term Plan (LTP). This is simply council’s budget projected out over 10 years. It will cost a truly massive $65 billion, comprising $25b of capital and $40b of operational expenditure. Breaking it down to a yearly basis that’s $2.5b of capex and $4b of opex. It will be funded annually by $1.69b from rates; with the balance from borrowings, user charges, Government subsidies, eg, for public transport; and dividends from Ports of Auckland and Auckland Airport. This year rates will increase on average by 2.5%. Of course, depending on how individual property valuations have moved, many homeowners will be paying more, some will pay less. But the Super City, as we know, is a hungry beast. Rates and all the other normal revenue sources will be insufficient to cover its spending. A large part of the problem is due to the cost of Auckland’s growth, including New Zealand’s extraordinarily high construction costs. Part of it frankly, is that the council simply spends too much on itself, and part of it is fiscally self-induced. The existing (2015-2025) Long Term Plan was budgeted on rates increases of 3.5% per year. However, in 2016, Phil Goff, while campaigning for mayor, promised to hold rates increases to 2.5%. In this new LTP rates increases will go back to 3.5% but in ‘Year 3’ - after the next local body elections. To cover the shortfall, last year the mayor pushed through a targeted rate on accommodation, the so-called ‘bed tax’. Unfortunately, as it turned out, for reasons never satisfactorily explained, while Auckland central and Waiheke accommodation providers have to pay the full rate, those in other parts of the region, eg, Waitakere, Franklin and most of Rodney pay less or nothing at all. This means that the targeted rate only brought in about $13.5m, half that originally estimated. This year the council is proposing new, additional forms of revenue, most significantly a regional fuel tax of 11.5c per litre. This will go towards the proposed $12b, LTP transport spend. Exactly for what though, rather surprisingly, is still not clear. The mayor announced the setting up a ‘political advisory group’ of his close political colleagues to work out where the fuel tax will go. On top of that, additional targeted rates are being proposed to provide funding for stormwater to reduce the pollution of our harbour, beaches and streams ($66 per year), and for environmental initiatives $21 or $47 per year).

If you thought the LTP was challenging enough to respond to, there is also the raft of other documents the council is consulting on - notably a ‘refreshed’ Auckland Plan. Remember that? The Auckland Plan, legally the ‘Spatial Plan for Auckland’, was produced in 2012 under Mayor Len Brown and designed for 30 years. A great deal of funding and public input went into it and the document as it turned out was actually pretty good. However, council officers argued that despite its time frame, it’s already out of date and needing ‘refreshing’. This they have done by removing much of the content of the original. Of real concern, chapters dedicated to Auckland’s natural environment and built heritage have been removed and the words ‘historic heritage’ totally expunged, despite inclusion of this being a requirement of the Act. This I believe is totally out of step with what most Aucklanders would want. The following ‘Direction’ I think, sums up the ‘refreshed’ Auckland Plan rather succinctly, ‘Use Auckland’s growth and development to protect and enhance our environment’. Oh, really? Council is also consulting on a new Waste Management Plan with changes to services, including ‘pay-as-you-throw’ and kerbside food waste collections. Finally, there is the Regional Pest Management Plan, which deals with serious problems like kauri die back and ecological pests but unfortunately also includes a silly proposal to microchip pet cats. So how do Aucklanders respond to this ‘consultation frenzy’ in a meaningful way in such a short time frame? Unfortunately the traditional right of ordinary ratepayers to present submissions to the councillors was quietly dropped three or so years ago. Now only ‘key’ or ‘regional stakeholders’ retain this right. Regrettably attempts by some of us in the last two years to restore this right have been voted down. Interested citizens, not part of a recognised lobby group, are therefore encouraged to attend ‘Have Your Say’ meetings. The problem with these is that, despite their name, they tend to be dominated by council people having their say. You can also send your thoughts to a website. My advice is to make sure you also email them to the mayor and to all the councillors. Good luck. This council’s track record for listening is not exactly encouraging. And remember while you may ‘have your say’ the council will almost certainly be having its way. (MIKE LEE) F PN

Mike Lee is the Auckland Councillor for Waitemata & Gulf Ward, www.mikelee.co.nz

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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

How much longer will we allow Monsanto to poison Aucklanders? It has now been clearly established internationally that Roundup, containing glyphosate, is a probable human carcinogen. A group of eminent scientists, under the auspices of the World Health Organisation, produced a report in 2015 on the latest research on glyphosate, and made its dramatic declaration.

“As per Auckland Council’s Weed Management Policy, we are committed to minimising our use of agrichemicals,” they said. But one old and one new problem now exist.

Unfortunately, the Auckland Council has either not heard of this announcement, or is ignoring it, risking the health and wellbeing of its citizens. However, there has been progress, although slow.

The old one is that KPIs for Ventia will not produce actual quantities of glyphosate used, nor quantify the actual reductions until July 2018, when the protocol has been in place for a year. Excuse me if this sounds like delay, obfuscation, or downright refusal to accept the real dangers of glyphosate to the citizens of Auckland, including kids who romp around in our city parks and reserves.

Waitemata Local Board Chair, Pippa Coom, promised me the latest information on council contractor Ventia’s progress at reducing the use of Roundup from our parks and reserves.

But it does represent progress, and I thank Pippa Coom for finding the report for me.

Waitemata Local Board has written into its plans a policy to minimise the use of agrichemicals, of which Roundup is one of the most toxic and poisonous, by using more mechanical means for weed removal. I have personally spoken to several Ventia employees working at local parks and reserves who told me they have cut right back on glyphosate use. A report I received on 19 March from Auckland Council says in part, “Since July 2017 we have seen a reduction in the use of agrichemical by Auckland Council contractors. The council has moved from chemical to mechanical edging on vegetation that is encroaching pathways in local parks.

The new problem seems to be that not enough mechanical weeding is taking place, and footpaths and fringes around parks and reserves are looking pretty tatty. The only other issue is what happens next. My understanding is that Auckland Transport will hand back berm and street maintenance to Council Parks and Reserves. I had thought this was for 1 July, but Pippa Coom now says it is likely to be 1 October. I have not been able to establish whether AT will have any on-going role in weed management in Waitemata Ward. It is rumoured they will still be responsible for maintaining hard surfaces in the central city, presumably spraying glyphosate. If the Waitemata Local Board can get clear, quantity KPIs in place with Ventia, which will measure usage year on year, we will be able to clearly see whether use of this poisonous PN agrichemical is actually being fazed out. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

White Wash - a brilliant expose of corruption The story of Roundup and Monsanto’s secretive strategies to protect the probable carcinogenic ingredient glyphosate with EPA assistance. Carey Gillam is a veteran journalist, researcher and writer with more than 25 years of experience covering corporate America, food and farming. She is a former senior correspondent for Reuters. Gillam has been called ‘a brave warrior’ for exposing the ruthless greed and fraud that have led to the poisoning of our planet. In her new book, White Wash, Gillam uncovers one of the most controversial stories in the history of food and agriculture, exposing new evidence of corporate influence. Monsanto has accused Gillam of ‘bias‘, but as she says in the preface to this book, "the only bias I hold is for the truth. What I’ve learned," she says, "and now know with certainty, is that when powerful corporations control the narrative, the truth often gets lost." This book is the story of a weed killer, but it's killing much more than weeds. Scientists call it glyphosate. Consumers know it as Roundup. Gillam outlines how regulatory agencies, including the Environmental Protection Agency, charged with protecting the public, have protected corporate products and profits instead of people. The book reveals how corporations keep a tight rein on regulators pushing ‘science’ that supports their profit-focused interests, while burying evidence of harm. Gillam outlines how the agrochemical industry has secretly funded ‘independent’ professors and other scientists to lobby on behalf of glyphosate’s safety. They have set up front groups and think tanks to support its interests. Most alarmingly, Gillam explains chapter and verse how Monsanto has worked hand-inglove with the EPA, to produce reports saying that glyphosate is safe. "You could drink it," they used to say. In this book you will read about the huge court actions being taken against Monsanto in California. The law suits began after a group of WHO scientists, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), released a finding in 2015 that glyphosate was 'a probable human carcinogen'. One of the positive associations of glyphosate was with

14 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This cancer had increased markedly in the previous 10 years, especially among farm workers. Internal documents sought under the Official Information Act have produced some explosive emails, including conclusive proof of collusion between officers of Monsanto and those in the EPA. One investigator in the US, John Harrington, has said this about Monsanto, "They operate with no regard for the potential harm that may result from their actions - profit is their sole objective. Monsanto is the quintessential example of a corporation that exists exclusively to maximise materialistic self-interest, regardless of the consequences to society." Long time EPA scientist Evaggelos Vallianatos said Monsanto had a long history of improper influence inside the EPA. During his 25-year stint with the EPA he saw repeated examples of what he calls corrupt practices. He now calls the EPA "a polluter’s protection agency." There are 250 pages of very readable information in this book, and anyone interested, and we all should be, in our children’s health, and our children’s, children’s health, must read it. White Wash is more than an expose about the hazards of one chemical, or even the influence of one company. It’s a story of power, politics and the deadly consequences of putting corporate interests ahead of public safety. As Erin Brockovich says on the cover, "White Wash reads like a mystery novel, as Gillam skilfully uncovers Monsanto’s secret strategies." Auckland Council and other local authorities around New Zealand must be running out of excuses for supporting the use of this poison. Pressure is mounting for Auckland Council to be sued for its neglect of the health and PN wellbeing of its citizens. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

Local government is broke - congestion charges are a possible saviour Auckland Transport and the Auckland Council are investigating the possibility of introducing a congestion tax in the central city. A special fuel tax is also on the way. Exactly where the boundaries would be I do not know. London’s successful tax is being touted as a good example to follow. Other cities have had some success with the congestion tax. I’m not necessarily opposed to such a tax, but there are a number of questions that need asking. The first is this: why should thousands of Aucklanders from the far-flung fringes of Auckland, like Pukekohe, Helensville and Wellsford, have to commute to Queen Street or thereabouts each day to work? I know congestion is Auckland wide, but motorways into the city centre are the most clogged. Unlike London, Auckland does not yet have sufficient public transport. London has the underground trains, and when congestion charges were first instituted, 700 new buses were introduced on the day. Many new apartments have sprung up in the central city, housing some thousands of, mainly young, Aucklanders. But there are still many huge towers where hundreds of people work - banks, insurance companies, legal firms, even Fonterra for goodness sake. Shouldn’t Fonterra’s head office be in Hamilton, or Matamata? There are thousands of Aucklanders driving madly for a couple of hours to get to work in our central city - crazy. What we need is commercial hubs and business centres spread across the Super City. But better public transport into and out of the city is critical.

and rates. These charges don’t take into account the time or location of travel - for example driving on a congested motorway in rush hour versus driving along a quiet country road at night.

If I want to go to a meeting in the central city, say at Ellen Melville Hall, I need to allow at least an hour, and even then I arrive in Wellesley Street well up the road from the Ellen Melville Hall. I can drive there in five minutes. That’s why Mike Hosking is poo pooing getting out of private cars. Of course with climate change and scarce oil it will happen, but unlike London we have no Underground and a still inadequate public bus schedule.

Congestion pricing could change this by varying what road users pay at different times and at different locations to better reflect the real costs. Too much variation, though, would increase the cost of implementation.

Let’s use the most sustainable environmental policies at our disposal.

Congestion in Auckland is costly in terms of lost production, time costs for commuters and contractors getting from job to job, not to mention health and safety issues resulting from CO2 emissions on clogged roads at peak times.

There are so many competing claims for council and Government money that we can’t do it all, but one thing I’d say out loud is Auckland should sort infrastructure including water, waste water and drinking water before we approve a ‘Phil Goff Memorial Stadium’ on the waterfront, or extra millions for the America’s Cup. We also must put a carefully thought-out comprehensive commuting programme into practice, and if it includes a congestion charge, the rest of the package must be in place at the same time.

The first stage report doesn’t paint a pretty picture, saying an average motorist is taking 40 to 55% more time to travel Auckland roads at peak time than they did just four years ago.

Although there are contrary views, most Aucklanders applaud the supply of cycleways and safe pedestrian walk ways, but part of the problem was a lack of consultation by AT, and a refusal to do the other necessary things at the same time as cycleways were put in, eg, permit parking, more buses on more routes, smaller buses where more suitable. Parking for cars is still necessary, too.

Local government minister, Nanaia Mahuta, says a funding inquiry into local government pressures would soon be launched, to investigate how infrastructure improvements could be paid for.

Contrary to local fears where congestion charges were introduced in London, the central London retail sector has boomed. There has been an 83% increase in cycling trips, and more than 40,000 have switched from private cars to public transport. So it can work if implemented carefully. Currently motorists pay for the use of roads through a range of methods: petrol taxes, road user charges, vehicle registration fees

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It is critical to remember that many of the world’s cities which have embraced congestion charging have viable alternative methods of transport, like London mentioned above, such as underground rail or bus networks, multiple cycleways and pedestrian malls.

Rate payers will be watching staff salaries at council, and that secret society, Auckland Transport. We will also be seeking a huge reduction in the use of expensive consultants who keep writing reports which are never used. Council must ensure careful coordination of essential improvements and eliminate frivolous projects. Consult your citizens, council, and then act on the congestion problem in Auckland. Do it all together, or don’t do it at all. PN (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

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LOCAL NEWS PONSY KIDS COMMUNITY PRESCHOOL - TEACHER VACANCY Ponsy Kids is a not-for-profit community based centre and we believe that the best outcomes for children occur when teachers are qualified with high teacher-child ratios. This allows teachers to build stronger relationships with children, provide high-quality interactions and deepen their learning. Ponsy Kids is a child’s home away from home where they are nurtured, respected and valued as individuals with a strong sense of belonging. We believe to truly know a child you need to know the family. Our families are an integral part of our teaching and learning environment where they know they have a place and are respected and valued.

We are looking for a qualified, early childhood teacher to join our team. We offer a supportive working environment, free parking, competitive salary, free PD and teacher registration, plus a lot more. Open for venue hire seven days, Preschool open Mon-Fri, we take ages 2-5 years. F PN If you would like to join us or would like more information on the role, please contact julie@ponsykids.org.nz or on T: 09 376 0896, www.ponsonbycommunity.org.nz

WE NEED YOUR EXPERTISE! The Ponsonby Community Centre, including Ponsy Kids Community Preschool, is looking for community LVORRNLQJIRUDTXDOLÂżHG(DUO\&KLOGKRRG minded people with professional skills to join our Board. For more information please email the Manager on WHDFKHU lisa@ponsonbycommunity.org.nz @thePonsonbyCommunityCentre | 20 Ponsonby Tce www.ponsonbycommunity.org.nz | 378 1752 3OHDVHFRQWDFWMXOLH#SRQV\NLGVRUJQ]

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LOCAL NEWS Ponsonby Park - update The ‘10-year budget and Auckland plan 2025’ submission process has closed and we now await confirmation by council of the funding for stage one of Ponsonby Park. Urban parks around the world have evolved from their historic recreational role into a catalyst for community development and enhancement. Parks are an essential component in transforming and enriching our cities. They and their surrounding areas are not only a place to understand and enjoy nature, but they provide a place for social and cultural exchange. They are alive and busy with:

PN (JENNIFER WARD) F

• physical activities, like people playing, walking or dancing • business activities, such as markets and cafes • cultural activities, such as art and community events • or simply for socialising with friends, relaxing and watching the world go by. Many of today's urban parks have a variety of activities and recreational opportunities which attract a diversity of people, the young and not so young, who are often simply looking for a place to sit or walk. Parks provide shaded places and opportunities to buy food or a coffee. The surrounding communities embrace visiting them and realise the enormous value to their neighbourhoods. There are several steps involved in creating a successful local park, one that is important as a community place. At the core of the process is a back and forth discussion with the people who will belong in that space. This was the approach that was employed during the Community-led Design process for Ponsonby Park. It began with understanding the community's desires and concerns about the space, and then the process flowed on to determining how the assets of the community might be used to develop a plan and design for the park. The process was embraced by the community and led to the development of a ‘community vision’ for the site at 254 Ponsonby Road and finally culminated in the LandLAB design being chosen for the site by the community. Like all good parks, it provides for a range of things to do, with flexible spaces for a multitude of activities suiting different age groups and each of the user groups who would wish to use the space. It is easy to get to, and is connected to the surrounding community with good allweather use and accessibility. It will be safe, clean and attractive and there are places to sit for comfort and relaxation. Most important of all is its sociability. Ponsonby Park will be a place to meet new people and old friends, an integral part of the community. Today, everyone knows city parks contribute significantly to the quality of urban life. They integrate the cultural lives of neighbourhoods. Once stage one of Ponsonby Park is developed it will enrich our neighbourhood exponentially. We have held this vision for over three years and we now look forward to the commencement of building the physical part of stage one of Ponsonby Park. Hooray! For more information or to contact us, please see our webpage www.254ponsonbyrd.org.nz or our Facebook page ‘Ponsonby Park'

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PONSONBY U3A: MARCH 2018 Ponsonby U3A members consider themselves spoilt for choice with a rich array of guest speakers at its monthly meetings, complemented by fascinating ten-minute talks from members on aspects of their careers, interests or family stories. The March meeting was a case in point with the guest speaker being a leading figure in the New Zealand exporting world, and the ten-minute speaker a well-known veteran TV journalist and local U3A member. There’s not much Heather Baigent hasn’t done in the export field - and last year Export New Zealand recognised her wide-ranging contributions with the 'Exporters’ Champion' award. She is a judge for the Auckland/Waikato Export Awards and her talk to the March meeting of Ponsonby U3A was entitled 'Inspirational Exporters'. She profiled a number of companies that have been shortlisted for export awards, selling such things as drones, battery monitors, laminated timbers, translation services, IT systems, steel fabricators and magnets, and more. “Exports are New Zealand’s lifeblood, but with a market of only 4.7 million we cannot generate the income we need to sustain our nation. Those who export goods and services earn the foreign exchange that funds everything we purchase from overseas, from aircraft, oil, heavy machinery to pharmaceuticals, coffee, books and T-shirts. “For decades we relied on primary products, but our export range is now much broader and includes innovative products, not well known in the local market, but in demand overseas.” Heather Baigent is a former teacher, diplomat, corporate manager and international consultant. She is past president of St Heliers U3A and was recently elected President of the Auckland U3A Network, encompassing U3A groups from Warkworth to Franklin. The ten-minute talk came from a member with a voice known to us all over the years. U3A member John Stewart is a veteran of television journalism having been involved in the media industry for over 40 years. He spent 28 years with TVNZ and worked in Australia for 10 years. Today he works for a few days each week at Maori Television, mentoring and training. “They seem to enjoy having this old codger around.” He said it was, and still is, a great job being a TV news reporter. “You never know at the beginning of the

day where you will end up.” His career started in the days of film, which had to be processed, then edited in negative - a cumbersome process - to the final positive image on screen. The digital age has revolutionised the making of television news. Walking in the door each day, not knowing what you would be doing was a great way to work, he said. Among other things, he had specialised in court reporting, including Malcolm Rewa and the Wine Box Enquiry. As well as its monthly meeting, Ponsonby U3A has over 20 special interest groups, regarded by many as the lifeblood of the U3A movement, covering a myriad of topics and activities. Details of U3A activities can be found on the Ponsonby U3A website.

John Stewart

Visitors are welcome to attend U3A meetings but are asked to telephone president Collene Roche beforehand. (T: 09 373 3277.) The April guest speaker will be David Reeves, Director of Collections and Research, Auckland War Memorial Museum - 'Beyond the Museum - an overview of the museum’s activities outside the building'. The U3A ten-minute speaker will be Christine Hart - 'What Colour Was My Parachute'. (PHILIPPA TAIT) F PN NEXT MEETING:

10am, Friday 13 April at Herne Bay Petanque Club, Salisbury Reserve, Herne Bay

ENQUIRIES:

Collene Roche, President Ponsonby U3A T: 09 373 3277, www.u3aponsonby.org.nz

'PUNCHING ABOVE THEIR WEIGHT' - ST COLUMBA CHURCH IN ACTIVE SERVICE Many of us will recall that in 2016 St Columba Church's future was uncertain. The Auckland Anglican Diocese was questioning the viability of keeping it open, and put forward recommendations which included the possible redevelopment of the site. Considerable public outrage, local community meetings and offers of support - from both within and outside the church - ensued. This phase of intense re-evaluation had a galvanising effect on St Columba. Determined to go the extra mile, they decided to expand their support within the Grey Lynn and Pt Chevalier communities. The congregation began growing, and in early 2017 the Auckland Diocese gave its blessing for their ongoing work. In 2017, there were three areas of focus: a new playground was recently opened for local community use; the Super G's, a social gathering of seniors every Tuesday for companionship, exercise, lunch, fun activities and outings; and a new initiative, the Friday Community Lunches, welcoming all who come through the door. Numbers have more than doubled since June, as the good news spreads that this is food cooked by parishioners as if for their own families. At Christmas a large multicultural gathering of people shared lunch around a long table, and it was indeed a joyful gathering of whanau. Of course, all the programmes need funding. This year, the Clay Works Potters' Market, St Columba's major fundraiser, will span from 4 to 6 May (10am to 4pm), featuring emerging and established potters, and many new names. All welcome. To help with any of these activities, phone Siniua in the office. F PN

20 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

Playground blessing 24 December with Pippa Coom Anglican Church of St Columba & Community Centre, 92 Surrey Crescent, T: 09 376 9119, www.saintcolumbas.org.nz PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

Growing vegetables in the city There are hundreds of people growing lovely vegetables in their backyard in the city. I don’t pretend to be an expert, but I’m amazed how many able -bodied city slickers have never tried it out. Now that cauliflowers hit $10, lettuces $5, and a bunch of spinach $5, maybe it's time to have a go at growing your own. I grow those three with some success. One of the main benefits is that you can control what fertilisers and pesticides you want to put on them, and get lovely fresh vegetables to eat. If many are ready at the same time, you can be generous and give some away to neighbours or friends. We are told that some of our staple diet veggies, grown commercially, are loaded with poisons. Potatoes, carrots, onions are often mentioned. I don’t get too technical. I know certain vegetables prefer acidic soil, while others like it alkaline. I just use compost, animal manure and general fertiliser before planting. Potatoes like a more acid soil, so I use commercial potato fertiliser on them. Garlic prefers the soil more alkaline, as does spinach, but neither like it too far off neutral, which is ph 7. Most thrive in a slightly acidic to neutral range of 6.0 to 7.0. By all means test your soil if you like, but I find sun versus shade, dry versus moist soil, control of weeds and pests all more important than ph. While garlic was mentioned above, I must report I’m giving up on garlic next season. I’ve had two failed years. Interestingly, I was talking to local home gardener, Greg Moyle, and he, too, is giving up on garlic. So, if you haven’t tried to grow vegetables before, which would I recommend? This depends a lot on which veggies you like. It depends on the time of year too. We are past summer now, and the weather is quite autumnal. Tomatoes and beans are over until the spring. I’d try lettuce, carrots, spinach, spring onions, beetroot, cauliflower and cabbage. All are good to go in March in Auckland. Then prepare a patch for early potatoes in May.

22 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

Before planting, dig the ground over thoroughly and remove all weeds. Give it a coating of compost, at least one bag to every three square metres of garden. Each year you should also give it some general garden fertiliser, or cow, sheep or chicken manure. Most of the packets or punnets give planting instructions. I consult my trusty old Yates Garden Guide. There is plenty of online help too, including suggestions for companion planting. Resist planting too close together. You may not have room for many veggies, but it is surprising how much a smallish garden will grow. I didn’t used to grow potatoes, and remembered my father’s huge crops which kept us going all year round. But I have found them a good choice in my backyard, always with a handful of potato fertiliser. I grow mostly from seedlings, but I do grow from seed too, especially sweet corn, carrots, beans, peas and radish. The two biggies while the plants are growing are weeds and water. No prizes for guessing which one they like and which one they hate. Raised gardens are a big help when weeding. Watering should be done early morning or late afternoon, never in full sunlight. I can always grow lettuce, usually carrots, although carrots can be problematic. (I use seed in tape to spread the plants out). I do pretty well with potatoes too. Caulis and cabbage need special care. You must keep the white butterflies away. I use derris dust (I suppose it's poisonous, but we wash them carefully before eating.) I put snail bait around all new lettuce plants or they’ll be gone by morning. Use it for spinach or silverbeet too. You can cover vegetables while they are growing, with light netting to stop predators if you like. Next month I’ll talk about composting and mulching. Meantime there is nothing more satisfying than watching a cauliflower hearting up, especially when they have been $10 in the supermarket. PN (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

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LOCAL NEWS

300 RICHMOND ROAD When Hugh Stedman bought the building at 300 Richmond Road in the late 80s, he had no idea the 1987 financial crash was just around the corner. With determination and vision he made good of a bad situation. Known at the time as the 'Modern Bags and Bond & Bond' building, 30 years on, 300 Richmond Ltd has grown to a thriving business and continues to set trends. By the start of the 90s, Hugh had converted the building to serviced offices and self-storage, making headlines in the media. This was revolutionary at the time, as there was only one other storage facility in Auckland and shared office space did not have the appeal it has today. Hugh had heard self-storage had taken off in Australia and knew it was only a matter of time before it would be the next big thing in New Zealand. Today, 300 Richmond still offers a very affordable solution for SMEs. With 77 offices, it remains a popular choice for businesses, with a range of services such as virtual offices, boardroom hire, phone service and secretarial support. Over the years the premises has changed inside and out. Recent enhancements to our communal areas have been well received by our residents and we remain committed to improving our customer experience and meeting new technology requirements, while maintaining low overheads for businesses. What sets us apart from our competitors is our accessibility, parking and affordability, but we also believe it is our business community and its diversity.

We encourage our residents to join us for regular events and have celebrated some important milestones with them over the years; while we lease on a month by month basis, we have a number of long term tenants who have been with us for 10 years or more, and feel the importance of recognising their contribution to our success. Having storage on site appeals to businesses but also the wider community; people store for all sorts of reason, moving house, decluttering. With 20 different size units, we help people with all their storage needs, whether you’re needing to store a suitcase or a full four bedroom home, we can recommend movers, packers and cleaners, we have a truck and trailer available for those moving themselves. We also sell boxes and a full range of packing materials. As demand has grown, the storage operation has also evolved over the past 30 years. In 2003 we joined Storage King Management and started trading under licence as Storage King Grey Lynn. In 2009 a larger storage facility was built. We remain, nonetheless, a small business that celebrates small successes. We are very proud we are going stronger than ever 30 years on. Like any business we have challenges too. We always look at ways we can improve and better the business and connect with our clients. We continue to look at ways to work more closely with the local community, and get marketing traction in a highly competitive industry. We feel being part of the Grey Lynn Business Association keeps us connected with the local community and promotes networking.

We have a great mix of businesses in terms of industries, but also a great mix of people of different age groups, cultures and walks This October will mark our 30th anniversary! We believe the secret of life. This gives 300 Richmond a great vibe and creates some to our success is that we continue to evolve as market conditions awesome networking opportunities over the coffee machine. We, change, and the key to being innovative is predicting changes rather ourselves have taken advantage of the huge talent within 300 being reactive. F PN Richmond for a number of services. 300 Richmond Ltd (Suzanne) T: 09 360 3260, www.300richmond.co.nz Storage King Grey Lynn (Chris) 09 360 2015, www.storageking.co.nz/greylynn

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LUCIA MATAIA: LEYS INSTITUTE LIBRARY NEWS The autumn weather brings a wealth of good reads, literary events at the Aotea Centre and the children’s holiday programme. So check out our Book Chat recommendations, grab a programme for the Auckland Writers Festival (coming up 15 -20 May) and bring the children to the library for some holiday fun. APRIL SCHOOL HOLIDAYS Tuesday 17 April 2.30pm-3.30pm The science of UP - Come along and conduct several different science experiments all of which should involve things travelling UP. Thursday 19 April 2.30pm-3.30pm Snacks of America - Travel to the America’s with your taste buds. We will be making popcorn, decorating cookies and even stopping by Peru to make chia seed pudding. Tuesday 24 April 2.30pm-3.30pm Take flight! Kids can test their skills at making paper

planes and gliders. Come along and construct a range of paper planes and gliders then test them with a flight down our stairway. Thursday 26 April 2.30pm-3.30pm Balloon, balloons, balloons! Let’s have an afternoon of riotous fun playing balloon games, making balloon rockets and constructing balloon catapults. Children are also welcome any time to add their personal touch to the children’s room by creating a flying machine to hang in the library or they may like to make their very own flying machine to take home. Book Chat recommends: Each month at Book Chats we preview a wide range of wonderful books. Here are a few new nonfiction recommendations: Black Tudors by Miranda Kaufman, the story of Africans who lived free in Tudor England. And

another funny and revealing read is acclaimed novelist Margaret Foster’s teen diary titled Diary of an Ordinary Schoolgirl, written in 1954. And here’s some fiction: Fools and Mortals the latest from historical novelist Bernard Cornwell, The Rules of Magic, by Alice Hoffman, and This is How It Begins the debut novel from Joan Dempsey. We also talk about the various books we have read over the last month. Books the group have enjoyed include Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari, and crime novels by Peter May and Mick Herron. (LUCIA MATAIA) F PN Open hours: Monday - Friday 9am - 6pm and Saturday 9am - 4pm. We are closed Anzac Day Wednesday 25 April. LEYS INSTITUTE LIBRARY, 20 St Marys Road, T: 09 377 0209, www.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz

DEIRDRE THURSTON: ON MY MIND

Foibles We all have them. Those little foibles and eccentricities that appear endearing, cute - sexy even in the case of partners in the early, heady days. You know - the cracking of knuckles or your beloved driving with one long finger on the wheel, smiling seductively while staring into your eyes instead of on the road; not closing drawers... the sorts of things that become unbearable and definitely not seductive as time passes. One imagines instead, slamming the drawers in question on those long, lazy fingers while wiping the stupid grin off their face. Friends are a little different. We go easier on them. Probably because we don’t live with their foibles 24/7. Anxiety has become a common trait these days. I guess we all have different degrees of anxiety over something. I used to be riddled with anxiety; now, I take most things in my stride. Trauma response shouldn’t be mistaken for anxiety. Different beasts. I have one dear friend who takes anxiety over being late to a new level - read ridiculously early. Recently, she suggested lunch at her favourite ramen noodle place on Ponsonby Road. It was definitely a ramen day - rain and hip-high puddles. First we had to drop her son off at his acting class. What an exciting drive: surface-water skidding is fun. And as she was driving slower than a snail returning home after lunching on a tender, baby cabbage in the garden, we were safe. We arrived at the acting class venue to find an empty car park lot, and locked doors. “Where is everyone?” I asked. “We’re 49 minutes early,” came a peeved 12-year-old voice from the back seat. So, we sat and sat and sat a bit longer. Finally, praise the saturated heavens, another human being appeared. We immediately exited the 12-year-old out of the car and drove, extra slowly, off to slurp ramen five minutes away. My friend had wanted to phone order ahead because an hour and a half before class ended may not be enough time to eat a bowl of noodles in her world. I dissuaded her. The short drive was reminiscent of dodgem rides at the Easter Show when I was a kid. Apparently, every car was coming at her so she slowed at green lights, hugged the kerb at next to nil kph, narrowly missing parked cars and generally incensed following motorists. Finally, we parked – not too close to any other car because of course they are all out to back into you or surge forward and ram you. Perhaps she was correct about not having enough time if parking took this long. Inside the warm, dry cafe, we sat. For two minutes. Then, the usual, changed tables three times, requiring the waiter to shift our waters, menus and coats, until she was happy with our position. I’m used to it now. Ordering

26 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

food is anxiety ridden for her, too. She orders quickly because - time! Then reorders at least twice because - food envy: “What if I like what you ordered better? Or his meal at the next table?” In the end she always, without fail, orders the same thing. By then, I was quite weary and ravenous. We still had an hour and a quarter. To her credit, she only checked the time about 20 times while she ate as if she was about to miss the chance of a lifetime. I had not nearly finished before she said: “Come on, let’s pay and go. Hurry up.” “You pay while I finish,” I replied as I quickly downed a spoonful of divine miso-laden broth. Her face! She looked like she had just been slapped, or missed that chance of a lifetime by a nanosecond. The moths in her purse stirred uneasily. “Only joking,” I said. “Can we stop at Briscoes? They have a sale on, believe it or not.” “No! We’ll be late,” she looked aghast. “We still have 32 minutes. Can I at least drop into Harvest for a bar of chocolate? It’s on the way.” “NO!” Into the car we bundled and once again parked in the lot to wait. And wait. “Where are all the other parents?” she wondered. “Probably scoffing chocolate in front of Netflix arguing which one will drive through the rain to pick up the next Brad or Angelina.” She had the decency to laugh. Anxiety aside, this woman is otherwise a glass-full person. An unrealistic dreamer even. She once sent Ellen Degeneres possum-fur nipple warmers in the hope of a guest appearance on her show to plug her novel. Unfortunately, Ellen is a vegan so that went down like a dose of 1080. So we sat for another 25-odd minutes in the pouring rain with a thankfully misty view of asphalt. On the good side, we got to spend more time together, always a treat, and laugh at my foibles and hers. Also, her son had not been abducted by the security guard who my friend was sure was a member of the white slave trade. (DEIRDRE THURSTON) F PN PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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HELEN WHITE: REPRESENTING LABOUR FOR AUCKLAND CENTRAL While there is lots being done by the new Government to address the housing crisis, I’d like to start by recognising how many people in our city are working hard to find solutions to the housing problems we face. Inspiring community initiatives: Right now there is a little group calling itself 'Build up' building a house on the corner of Wiri and Manukau Station Roads. An architect has created a design for a little, movable house, specifically for emergency use. It can be built for under $50k - albeit that everyone building is working for free. Go and see it and even get stuck in and help build it! You will meet all sorts of good people doing just that. I met a man helping build this house, who lives in his van himself. He told me he does this so he can save the money to buy a house. I am also proud to say my father, who is 86, was working away on it. The little house will be donated to Te Puia Marae but its greatest value is that will hopefully inspire more such buildings, because there is such a serious need. A multi-layered approach: By the time this is published the Government will have announced an exciting housing project in a central-city suburb of Auckland. Phil Twyford is totally committed to fixing this problem. He knows it’s going to be necessary to come at the problem from many angles if we are going to house ordinary people on ordinary incomes. The Affordable Housing Authority: This Government is getting involved leading and fast-tracking the building of affordable, quality houses. Labour’s AHA will do this. Co-operation: Some of the inner-city developments that have sprung up in Central Auckland have not been built with enough consideration as to how it would be to live in them, let alone raise a family in them. They are often on streets dominated by traffic and with no realistic access to play space. We can promote better design if the

Government co-operates with council and others. The approach taken will incentivise others to build quality homes at the more affordable end of the market, rather than just maximising profit by building more expensive homes. Targeted labour: Building enough houses will be hard given the skills shortage, and that having enough apprentices and employees in the right trades is very much part of the solution. Rental: In the next three years rental should become noticeably more secure and fairer. Security and fairness: In employment law, the importance of the security that employment brings to the families and communities it supports is acknowledged by the Government creating rules protecting employees from unfair termination of employment. We need this security in renting for the same reasons: insecurity impacts on whole families and communities. A tenant who asks for the house to be made warm and dry should not fear the termination of their tenancy agreement or that the rent will rise if they making a fuss. Landlords need fairness too. As we live closer together the problem of living next door to a P dealer or renting your house to one is very real. The rules will not ignore the needs of the whole community or the landlord, they will create a just process where tenants are terminated when there is cause. WOFs: We cannot ignore the real cost of providing damp accommodation. It causes chronic disease. Insulation will save us money spent in our hospitals and Middlemore Hospital might stop putting up that sign saying it is 'full'. Changes I’d like to see: Personally, I’d like to see several. A place to put the washing. Some tenants tell me they aren’t allowed to put out their washing. If they use their balcony for that purpose then they get fined but there is nowhere else for them to dry clothes. Drying clothes in the living room means condensation; that is bad for their health, bad for the environment and ignores reality. People need somewhere to dry their clothes free of charge.

Interested in getting involved with Labour in the Auckland Central electorate? Get in touch! aklcentrallabour@gmail.com Authorised by Andrew Kirton, 160 Willis St, Wellington

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Pet-friendly accommodation. I would also love to see more rentals where animals were appropriate and allowed. They are a great thing, especially for people living alone. Your thoughts? I would be very keen to hear what things you would like to see change out there. Finally, for those who want to know more about housing policy in Auckland, a panel, including the Associate Housing Minister, will be speaking at a public meeting at the Fickling Centre in Mount Roskill PN 7pm on 26 April 2018. (HELEN WHITE) F Helen White representing Labour for Auckland Central. www.labour.org.nz/helenwhite PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


Avoid rodeo and horse racing Rodeo and Racing are frightening for horses. They cause stress and put horses' at risk of serious injury. You can help horses by avoiding these events, and others where animals are used for entertainment. Can you think of another way to help horses and be their friend? Let us know.

Name: Age & date of birth:

Complete SAFE Animal Squad's ‘Horses need our help’ colouring competition and be in to win 1 of 6 prize packs, valued at $150 each, Containing bath goodies, seeds, raw macaroons, a safe tee, and more! Send your entries to: PO Box 13366, Armagh, Christchurch 8141 by Friday 4th May.

Winners will be displayed on the SAFE Animal Squad website from 11th May.

Phone: Address:

Email: Parent or Guardian’s name:

safeanimalsquad.org.nz This competition is open to 5-7, 8-10 and 11-14-year-olds.

I would like to Join SAFE animal squad and learn more. (you must be 8-14 to join)


NIKKI KAYE: AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP

New National leadership and progressing projects in education I was hugely sad and really gutted when Rt. Hon Bill English stepped down. Bill is a rare breed of politician. He achieved such a huge amount in 27 years. The sheer number of achievements, his emotional, political and intellectual depth, his understanding of policy, his strong social conscience and his integrity make him someone that history will look kindly on and single out. Politics is ultimately about what you do - leading New Zealand from staring down a decade of deficits as Finance Minister to being one of a few countries in surplus, and designing a system to spend much more on our most vulnerable through social investment, are pretty big achievements in themselves. At the heart of Bill’s connection with many people has been his humility and his genuine interest in helping others. As you will be aware Hon Simon Bridges has been elected Leader of the National Party. Simon is already setting out his priorities and some different ways of working. Hon Amy Adams becomes the second woman in New Zealand history to be a finance spokesperson. This was a great decision by Simon. The current Government has set up a Tax Working Group to review the tax system including considerations into wealth tax, land tax, capital gains tax and more. The Working Group members were announced late December last year. Adding new taxes could result in fewer saving and investment and tax revenues collected by Government are rising with the current strong economy. You can read documents released and make submissions online or written by visiting taxworkinggroup.govt.nz.

Hon Nikki Kaye MP for Auckland Central I regularly work on local issues and meet with constituents. Please contact my office if you would like to meet with me. Drop In Constituency Clinic: 48C College Hill, Freemans Bay April 13th 2:00pm

In our full caucus we have huge depth of experience, skills and knowledge in many areas. It’s a group of smart people that have a collective mix of decades of political experience, diverse backgrounds and new ideas. I am thrilled to have been confirmed again as Spokesperson for Education and to move up to number 10 in the list ranking. I love being involved in education and with so much to do to improve our education system, I will be working to hold the Government to account and to develop new policy. I am working hard on a number of projects in education. The Minister of Education has announced he is undertaking a review of NCEA and I am looking forward to contributing to the cross-party review process. When National were in government we signalled that we would review NCEA by the end of 2018, as is required under the regulations, so I am supportive of the review in principle. I will be focused on ensuring the Government does not let the review result in a dumbing down of education, while balancing the need to develop 21st Century skills and strengthen the role of technology in education. The Government is pushing a lot of big changes in education all at once and my concern is how teachers, students and their families are going to manage these changes, as well as the impact of rushing to decisions without proper processes. I am particularly concerned about the minister scrapping National Standards without having any system to replace it with, leaving parents in the dark about their children's achievement at school. I am also worried about the Government’s treatment of partnership schools. The minister's stated preference is terminating their contracts and he has not been open to meeting with these schools to see the important work they do and discuss options going forward. I have sent a letter to the Auditor-General asking him to investigate potential evidence that the schools have undue pressure being put on them to terminate their contracts, and potential preferential treatment of some partnership schools. Parents often write to me and tell me how partnership schools are making a real difference to the lives of their kids who have struggled in mainstream education, and so I will continue to fight for these schools to remain open. I am making progress on my private member’s bill to strengthen second language learning in primary and intermediate schools. I have also worked with my colleague Erica Stanford, MP for East Coast Bays, to lodge a private member’s bill on the decile system, the Education (Social Investment Funding and Abolition of Decile System) Amendment Bill. This bill aims to replace the school decile system with a needs index to better target funding to the children and young people most at risk of not achieving due to disadvantages. Ending the decile system will change the way many schools are viewed, ending the stigma of decile PN and supporting schools to lift achievement. (NIKKI KAYE) F If you have any local or national issues or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact me or my office on 09 378 2088 or send me an email on mp.aucklandcentral@parliament.govt.nz

Funded by the Parliamentary Service and authorised by Nikki Kaye MP, 48C College Hill, Freemans Bay, Auckland.

30 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

Authorised by Hon Nikki Kaye, MP for Auckland Central, 48C College Hill, Freemans Bay.

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS WEDDINGS AT PLUME Plume, the vineyard restaurant, is set amid the rolling hills of Matakana. It provides a glorious and intimate setting for your special day, surrounded by the vines of the local wineries where you will enjoy the luxurious space and essence of a rustic New Zealand landscape. Only 60 minutes from Auckland, Plume provides a spectacular setting for all couples taking the next step in their journey together. Your day will benefit from the special atmosphere we have created in our modern character restaurant, with a seamless flow of inside and outside spaces to allow you to have your wedding ceremony on our beautiful lawns. Your guests can enjoy our very own sparkling wine JOY, Matakana (Methode Traditionelle) and canapes on our expansive deck before being welcomed into the stunning Rengarenga room for dinner and an evening you will cherish forever... simply perfect!

from 1 July 2018 - right next door to Plume Restaurant - the ultimate word in comfort and convenience. You won’t have to worry about hiring transport to take your guests to their accommodation for the night!

We offer wine hand-tended from our own vineyard Runner Duck Estate and cuisine from our award winning chefs to delight your guests. There is a fully staffed bar, elegant bridal table with personal attention from our staff, friendly attentive, professional staff to take good care of your guests and to spoil you on your wedding day - Plume has everything on site that you would require.

We have an extremely simple, no hidden costs, wedding package for a minimum of 80 guests and a maximum of 130 guests - download our wedding brochure from our website plumerestaurant.co.nz for all details or email farida@plumerestaurant.co.nz. Winter and weekday weddings are very popular and easier on the pocket, too - and don’t worry at all about the cold in winter, we have underfloor heating to keep you warm and toasty!

And to add a further layer of comfort, Plume Villas with the capacity to accommodate up to 40 adult guests plus children will commence

“We love weddings and we promise you a glorious wedding day!” www.plumerestaurant.co.nz

Plume Restaurant is the ultimate wedding venue, offering stunning indoor and outdoor settings for your most memorable and special day.

09 422 7915 plumerestaurant.co.nz

Plume, proudly the house of Runner Duck Wines.

49a Sharp Road, Matakana

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS

THE SHIP - A HIDDEN GEM The Ship is tucked away on the water’s edge of Cox’s Bay, surrounded by large pohutukawa. It's an ideal venue for events. You may have driven past many times without noticing the Hawke Sea Scouts hall, which has a prime waterfront position overlooking Cox’s Bay. It has been there for almost 100 years and five years ago the building was extensively renovated and renamed ‘The Ship’. The renovations include a high-quality audio video suite, acoustic, fibre broadband, heat pumps and a commercial kitchen (all caterers will love it). The Ship has become a great hire venue for business events (workshops, seminars, strategy day and training events) when you need a setting with more character and wow factor. It’s easy to get to, has disabled access and a large council carpark. On weekends, The Ship can also be rented for a special birthday celebration, cocktail party, private lunch or dinner for up to 100 people. It is a byo and self-catered facility offering great flexibility. All venue enquiries and bookings are handled by a professional property management company on behalf of Hawke Sea Scouts and optional hire services such as tablecloths hire, post function tidy up are available to corporate clients. Check out the walk through You Tube video and floor plan on http://www.hawke.org.nz/home/hall-rentals and feel free to contact Sandie directly for an enquiry. This is a very special venue with character and a maritime flair, in a beautiful location, guaranteed to impress and gives a wow factor. Here are some of the testimonials The Ship has received: Hi Sandie, yesterday went well - it is a fantastic facility with great, easy-to-use AV. Would love to use it again and will recommend to the wider TVNZ peeps - all tidied up and all rubbish gone. L.H. Thank you so much for the use of the ship yesterday - what a fabulous venue, many of the people at the event hadn’t seen it before and were very impressed so I’m sure lots more bookings will be coming your way! J.O.

I just want to let you know that the family were very happy with the venue for their loved one’s memorial service. We were all impressed with the cleanliness, AV equipment, modern bathroom facilities and well-equipped kitchen. The view of course was a bonus! We will certainly recommend this as a venue to families in future. M.M. THE SHIP, 55 West End Road, Herne Bay, Sandie Casano, The Ship Venue Manager, T: 021 352 670, E: sandie@catalise.co.nz, www.catalise.co.nz SANDIE CASANO A Herne Bay local for over 10 years, Sandie owns a boutique property management business, Catalise. A property investor herself, one of the reasons for Sandie’s success is that she is hands-on, focuses on understanding her clients’ objectives and will advise how to maximise returns for owners. Sandie is noted for taking the stress out of letting and managing rental properties, which can be a minefield. If you are interested in hiring The Ship, or in any other matters regarding property management, do call Sandie.

VENUE FOR HIRE

Hawke Sea Scouts, 55 West End Rd, Herne Bay

THE SHIP

This space is 120sqm of open plan with the addition of covered decks, a commercial kitchen, a stage and 2 toilets to accommodate up to 100 people. It is a new building built to high quality standards with a distinctive maritime flair.

Pricing: From $280+GST for a morning or afternoon booking of 3 hrs. For full days, weekends, evenings or multi-day hire: prices on request. For enquiries on availability and bookings contact the Hall Manager:

Polished wooden floors and off white wall panelling run throughout. Enjoy drinks on the balcony and the million dollar view! Projector, screen, microphone, TV, UFB wifi, heat pumps, tables and chairs are available.

Sandie Casano

Seminars, business breakfasts or functions, birthday parties, family lunches, private family or wedding functions

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021 352 670

sandie@catalise.co.nz PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


Share the gossip, and the laughter Girls’ Day Out At Gusto – $49 per person Sharing menu, served with a glass of Pelorus Rosé: Clevedon buffalo mozzarella. Curious Croppers tomato, basil Octopus carpaccio, capers, shallots, chilli Barley, broccoli, chilli, lemon, anchovy Pork, veal, meatball and pecorino sliders Orgy of mushrooms, Clevedon buffalo ricotta gnocchi Rocket, pear, parmesan salad Salted caramel popcorn semifreddo Raspberry ripple meringue clouds Chocolate bark – Dark hazelnut, milk chocolate rocky road, white chocolate raspberry Beautifully dreamy naked cakes: Dark and stormy chocolate and banging banana ($49 optional)

Book now. Call 09 363 7030 90 Federal Street. Available 12PM–2.30PM. Menu items are subject to availability. R18 for the service of alcohol. Host Responsibility limits apply.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS ST COLUMBA CENTRE The Marist Brothers opened their first school in Auckland on Pitt Street in 1885. However, the site was unsuitable, being at the junction of three busy streets near the heart of the city. When Denis Gilmore MacDonnell died in 1908, Bishop Cleary purchased two acres of land on Vermont Street from his estate. The site was perfect for The Marist Brothers’ school because of purer air, a picturesque outlook and its proximity to the Sacred Heart Church on O’Neill Street. Two long, one-storey brick buildings were erected, comprising a residence for the brothers and classrooms for the boys - in 1917 further land was purchased for girls’ classrooms. The school was named St Columba’s and was opened in 1913 by Bishop Cleary, which was timely because the original Pitt Street school had grown too small. The number of students was about 220 with classes ranging from Standard 1 to 6 under the tutelage of six brothers and the Sisters of Mercy. Before the First World War ended, an influenza epidemic scourged New Zealand, Auckland suffering the most heavily. Between October and December one thousand Aucklanders died of the disease. The regular hospitals couldn’t cope with the continuous stream of admissions and desperate appeals were made for volunteer helpers. Bishop Cleary immediately offered the two Vermont Street schools as temporary hospitals, fully equipped by Auckland Catholics. The Health Department gladly accepted the Bishop’s offer because the buildings were able to accommodate 250 patients. Boarders from the convent schools were sent home, freeing the skilled Sisters to nurse the sick. The hospital gave shelter and healing to scores of patients. In fact it came to light later that the Bishop had offered every school in the diocese for the same purpose. He himself was indefatigable, transporting the sick in his own car, assisting at their bedsides, taking a turn in the kitchen and reverently attending the dead. By November, when the epidemic was clearly on the wane, the Vermont Street hospital had admitted 254 patients, 85 of whom died. The Sisters of Mercy worked calmly and cheerfully as long as there were sick to care for and they were lauded by the secular press as an example to other women in a desperate request for volunteers. The Sisters weren’t concerned with public recognition, just continuing their work as long as they were needed then quietly returning to their convents to resume normal life. By the 1920s the school expanded to such an extent that Standards 1 and 2 had to be dropped and by 1925 St Columba’s was one of the largest schools in Auckland, boasting a role of 328 boys. Due to further expansion, Standard 3 was dropped in 1934, leaving just Standard 4, Forms 1 and 2. In the school’s archives there is an account by a past pupil describing his part in a working bee during the Second World War, digging air raid shelters in the grounds. All pupils had to turn out for air raid drills with cotton wool to stuff in their ears, a large cork to bite on and a cardboard name-tag on a string around the neck. They took the drill seriously because a Japanese scout plane had been reported off the coast and a submarine detected in Sydney Harbour. Also in the archives, a Standard 5 boy, William Bagley, describes the new school as “two separate brick buildings, one for the boys and the other for the girls. The hall is very large and the boys’ classrooms off the hall are each 25 feet square. Every room has a fireplace and there are hat and cloak pegs in profusion.” By 1995 it was ‘all over Rover’ when Lockwood Smith signed a notice for the New Zealand Gazette cancelling and annulling the integration agreement for Vermont Street school. He conveyed appreciation to the Catholic Education Office for valuable contributions made by the school, and its education of children over many years. The building was restored in 2000 and opened by Bishop Patrick Dunn as a high-quality meeting centre. (DEIRDRE ROELANTS) ST COLUMBA CENTRE, 40 Vermont Street, T: 09 376 1195, www.saintcolumba.org.nz

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A MEETING PLACE - For conferences, seminars, meetings, workshops or launches - Situated in a central location with five versatile meeting rooms - AV equipment and Internet access available - Extensive parking available - Since 2001 the St Columba Centre has gained a reputation as a centre of excellence and as such has become a location of choice for many organisations FOR ENQUIRIES AND RESERVATIONS P: 09 376 1195 E: COLUMBA@CDA.ORG.NZ 40 VERMONT STREET PONSONBY, AUCKLAND SAINTCOLUMBA.ORG.NZ

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS HERITAGE AUCKLAND ROOF-TOP GRAND TEAROOM MAY EVENTS The Heritage Auckland Hotel is set in the landmark building on Hobson Street. The building began as a warehouse in 1914, but by the 1930s with a new Deco façade and a roof-top tearoom addition, it became home of the department store Farmers for the next 60 years. When the store closed the building was re-imagined as a classic hotel and the Heritage Auckland Hotel opened in 1998. The Grand Tearoom was reprised and quickly became a sought-after venue. Over the last 20 years, the room has hosted a roll call of the who’s who for weddings and gala events. With the passing of time comes the end of another era. The Grand Tearoom will close to the public in October 2018. Two public high tea events in May offer a chance to treat Mum and enjoy one of the last opportunities to visit the Grand Tearoom to sip a cup of tea in this special place. On Sunday 6 May, Lorraine Downes will share her new book Life, Loss, Love: a memoir. From her Miss Universe win to the tragic death of her soulmate Martin Crowe, Lorraine Downes' life journey offers insights and inspiration. For event information visit paperplus.co.nz For vintage fans, Heritage Auckland is staging a final nostalgia high tea on Mother’s Day Sunday 13 May. Guests can dress in a favourite retro outfit and enjoy an afternoon of yesteryear. To book go to heritagehotels.co.nz/hectors F PN The Grand Tearoom is available for weddings, banquets, conferences and events until 31 October. www.heritagehotels.co.nz

Mother’s Day to remember Heritage Auckland is hosting the final Mother’s Day High Tea events in The Grand Tearoom. SUNDAY 6 MAY Celebrate Lorraine Downes new book launch with a High Tea. For tickets and information visit paperplus.co.nz SUNDAY 13 MAY MOTHER’S DAY NOSTALGIA HIGH TEA 10:30AM or 2:00PM Dress up in your vintage finery and enjoy a classic high tea with Mum and friends. Savour an array of savoury and sweet treats for $75* per person. *Bookings are essential. See website for more detail. Choose from traditional or plant based High Tea menu.

HERITAGEHOTELS.CO.NZ/HECTORS

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Heritage Auckland 35 Hobson Street, Auckland +64 (09) 979 7436 DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS

Whitehaven Beach on Whitsunday Island

PLANNING YOUR PROPOSAL You’ve reached a point in your relationship where the next step towards ‘forever’ is getting down on that one knee. But where does one even start? Planning a proposal can seem overwhelming... you need a ring, a plan of action and finally, courage. One of the first crucial steps in this exciting journey is getting permission from your partner’s parents (or their nearest and dearest). Whilst we tend to lack in traditional etiquette in many ways these days, this thoughtful and courteous gesture remains true. This is especially important if your partner is close with their family and shares traditional values. It can also be of benefit to you if your partner has a sibling or friend that may be able to help you with ideas on an ideal design.

Taking his partner to the locally acclaimed ‘Jump Rock’, he was equipped with a big picnic, a bottle of Champagne and a Bon Ivor playlist. She told Diamonds On Richmond the proposal was ‘perfect’. Another lovely client of the boutique jeweller shared that he proposed to his partner on the world famous Whitehaven Beach on Whitsunday Island, where he had promised to take her one day. Proposing somewhere overseas is a great option for those wanting to purchase their engagement ring duty free. Diamonds On Richmond provides a duty-free service, where the ring has to leave the country and in turn you don’t have to pay any gst on the purchase price of the ring.

Making it a special moment for your partner is an obvious one, but making it personal and special for yourself is also important. This could mean proposing in a place that has meaning to you - perhaps somewhere you and your partner have talked about often, or a place that the two of you share a love for, or somewhere you both have always wanted to go to.

Lastly, a beautiful way to capture this moment forever is by organising a photographer (could even be a friend or family member!). This way, the moment is always there to look at and be reminisced as vividly as it was when you got down on one knee.

A client from our local boutique jewellery store, Diamonds On Richmond, proposed to his partner in Waipu where he grew up.

DIAMONDS ON RICHMOND, 98 Richmond Road, Grey Lynn, T: 09 376 9045, www.dor.co.nz

Head on over to dor.co.nz for more proposal inspiration and tips. F PN

@ DIAMONDS ON RICHMOND 1

1. 9ct Yellow and Rose Gold Bracelet - $1250 2. Diamond Tennis Bracelet - starting from $1950 3. Diamond Ring - $1250 4 4. Ruby and Diamond Earrings - $1750 5. Sapphire and Diamond Ring - $8500 6. Diamond Earrings - $600 7. Diamond Ring - $1950 8. Ruby and Diamond Pendant plus Chain - $1090

3

2

5 8

6 7

DIAMONDS ON RICHMOND, 98 Richmond Road, Grey Lynn, T: 09 376 9045, www.dor.co.nz

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


VICTORIA PARK'S ..ż

"PARKED UP BEER GARDEN & VENUE" Parked Up Beer Garden & Venue is Auckland's leading event space on a mission to bring you the best venue, entertainment and hosting services in Auckland. Their gorgeous beer garden and enchanting historic caretaker's cottage on vic park haveb hosted some of Auckland's leading cocktail parties, birthdays, corporate functions and intimate dinner parties that have left guests with long lasting memories. Book out the legendary craft beer truckb for afterwork staff parties, next to their chiringuitos bar; allowing guests to pour their own beer from the beer truck while they play a game or two of pétanque or backyard cricket with colleagues and mates.b Parked Up Beer Garden & Venue is a great local bar and eatery and true specialists when it comes to events. They've partnered up with Auckland's leading performers,bDJs, artists,

entertainers, dancers - all of which are available as featured guests in any event, big or small. Cocktail Parties Private Meeting Rooms Birthday Parties Corporate Functions Staff Drinks Launch & PRbEvents With a max capacity of 240 people and six sections available for private events, they can cater for pretty much any event you could think of. You'll also be stoked to know that they've developed an event cost calculator tool to easily price up your event (see link below). Come check out their venue, have a beer, taco and bask in Victoria Park's gorgeous sun. To cost up your event visit their interactive event cost tool on their website and you'll receive some incredibly decent event prices with everything laid out before you:

VENUE COST CALCULATOR: WWW.PARKEDUP.CO.NZ/EVENT-COST

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

ż PARKEDUP.CO.NZ ż 021 943 966 ż NICK@PARKEDUP.CO.NZż

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS @ STEP INN SHOES 2

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1. Peter Kaiser - low heeled pump in carbon & black suede - $375 2. Ria from Israel - $695 3. Fur lined, gortex lace up ankle boot from ‘Ara’ Germany - $329 4. Casual lace up sneaker from Mephisto in silver & rose, exclusive to Step Inn Shoes - $499 4

5. Peter Kaiser - gorgeous embroidered ankle boot - $450 8

6. Issey in red and black, suede loafer from Israel - $645 7. Tommy Lee - mustard, black & cobalt - $345 8. United Nude - fold mid pump, cobalt, black & red - $299

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STEP INN SHOES, Three Lamps Plaza, 283 Ponsonby Road, T:09 360 5512, www.stepinnshoes.nz

winter 2018 instore now

Step Inn Shoes Auckland, Three Lamps Plaza, 283 Ponsonby Rd, Ponsonby

Ph 09 360 5512 MONDAY TO FRIDAY: 9am to 5pm SATURDAY: 9am to 4pm SUNDAY: 11am to 3pm

Step Inn Shoes www.stepinnshoes.nz

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS WICKEN OPENS IN PONSONBY Wicken jewellery launched in December 2016 and has been a regular pop up store at Ponsonby Central, Coatesville markets, Shed 10, The Cloud and General Collective. It now has six retail stockists selling internationally through its online store and has recently opened its first flagship store at 125 Ponsonby Road.

“My journey back to wellness was as much about healing my mind and spirit as it was my body. The symbols you see woven into every Wicken piece are at the heart of that. They’re my chance to send out into the world a powerful, yet beautiful piece of jewellery to help women uncover their own strength and beauty.

Wicken jewellery harnesses the ancient symbols and knowledge of Wicca, combined with protective and healing crystals. The purpose is not only to adorn the body, but to inspire the soul and invigorate the spirit.

"During my recovery, I turned to nature and crystals for healing. Wicken was born from this, and I started to design and research the pieces for the White Witch collection and several other collections to follow,” says Kim.

Wicken’s collection holds true meaning with each piece acting like a talisman, there to help you find balance, strength, reconnect with who you are and empower your inner goddess.

Wicken jewellery is not your typical jewellery store, it has a beautiful bo-ho vibe and customers often comment that they feel they have been drawn into another world. The combination of elegant contemporary design with old-world magic drawing on the feminine goddess connects strongly with customers uplifting and empowering them. WICKEN, 125 Ponsonby Road, T: 021 0285 2635, www.wicken.co.nz

All of the pieces in the Wicken collection are designed by Kim Mackay and manufactured locally in Auckland from pure sterling silver or rose gold, with gems and crystals sourced internationally from reputable suppliers. “After a truly beautiful and inspiring trip to London and Paris in 2015, I suffered a life threatening medical event on the flight back home to New Zealand. Surviving this, brought me a renewed perspective on life and an openness to everything it brings,” says Kim Mackay.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Triple Goddess - $289

Moon Goddess - $289

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS A PLACE TO MEET FRIENDS AND FAMILY The Grey Lynn RSC is no longer a formidable beige building in West Lynn. Recent years have seen the GLRSC having a makeover and engaging the local community. The building is a fabulous venue for not only returned and service people, but also the more than 90% associate members who make up the membership. The upstairs function room, ‘The Grey Lynn Ballroom’, is a popular choice for weddings, celebrations, meetings and is often used as a film set. This Anzac Day will see the membership, the local community and schools, commemorating in Grey Lynn style, held together by the fabulous Reverend Mua -Strickson-Pua. All our neighbours are most welcome to attend but also to march in the parade which leaves the corner of Castle Street and Richmond Road at 9.30am. Your support by joining, gives you a great place to meet friends and family. GLRSC supports quality live music, and popular sports events can be seen on the big -screen televisions. The function room is there for your use or hire. Just call and ask to have a look at the room, at a time to suit. Plan your special occasion, mid-winter Christmas party or your work event. GLRSC caterer Jimmy the Cook, can assist you with your catering needs. GLRSC have a lot of groups using the rooms for fundraisers, and quiz nights are very popular. If you need a band or a solo musician, they have got the best in town on their books. F PN Visit GLRSC, 1 Francis Street, T: 09 376 2909, or check their Facebook page. www.facebook.com/www.greylynnrsc.org.nz

Visitors are Welcome

the kind bake sale Make a difference for animals one ingredient at a time! APRIL 15TH - 22ND

#kindbakesale

GREY LYNN RSC OPEN 365 DAYS A YEAR Ph 376 2909 / www.greylynnrsc.org.nz

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For more information and to register visit safe.org.nz PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS www.thesurreyhotel.co.nz

Retail, restaurants and recreation all on your doorstep ™ ™ ™ ™ ™

-BSHFTFMGDPOUBJOFESPPNTBOEBQBSUNFOUT 4FMFDUJPOPGNFFUJOHSPPNT )PNFPGUIF4VSSFZ1VC 'SFFDPBDIBOEDBSQBSLJOH )BQQZ)PVSQNQN The Surrey Hotel 465 Great North Road, Grey Lynn, Auckland, New Zealand Phone + 64 9 378 9059 Fax + 64 9 378 1464 Email reservations@thesurreyhotel.co.nz www.thesurreyhotel.co.nz

WHAT’S ON THE MENU AT YOUR CAFE, RESTAURANT OR BAR? Our readers would love to know

May Issue Special Feature - Bars, Cafes, Restaurants, Venues To book your space, call Jo or Melissa on 09 378 8553 or email joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz or melissapaynter@me.com www.ponsonbynews.co.nz The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS @ MAGAZINE DESIGNER CLOTHING

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1. Maud Dainty Memories Shirt; 2. Maud Dainty Disguised Green Jacket MAGAZINE DESIGNER CLOTHING, 4 Byron Avenue, Takapuna, T: 09 488 0406, 937 Mt Eden Road, T: 09 630 5354, www.magazineclothing.co.nz

@ ZEBRANO

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1. Siren Basic Cardi from Zebrano -$123 2. Maaike Parallel Robe from Zebrano - $353 3. 17 Sundays Striped Maxi Dress from Zebrano -$147 4. Megan Salmon Monsteria Romance Dress from Zebrano - $317

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ZEBRANO, 10 Kingdon Street, Newmarket, T: 09 523 2500, www.zebrano.co.nz

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS @ CARATS

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1. Gents' black and white diamond ring - made to order 2. Stunning Colombian Emerald ring - $58,000 4

3. Orange Sapphire heart cluster $5995, Diamond halo cluster - $7890 4. Purple Sapphire and Diamond Deco ring - $17,195 5. Choose from a selection of our Fine Blue Sapphires 6. Gents cushion shaped 18ct gold wedders from $2100

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7. Diamond engagement rings from our 'Life' collection from $8500 8. 18ct gold gents' wedders from $3650

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CARATS, 25 Vulcan Lane, Auckland CBD, T: 09 309 5145, www.caratsjewellery.co.nz

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS @ BOLT OF CLOTH

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Urna Handmade Vase in Olive - $295 Paaryna Plate 15cm x 12cm in white, green, brown - $29.99 Siirtolapuutarha Platter 32cm in white, black, pink - $145 Golden Honeysuckle Candle - $24.99 Siirtol Coffee Cup In white, black, yellow - $29.95 Laguiole Boxed 2 Piece Cheese Set in ivory - $36.99 Menu Salt and Pepper Grinders - hunter green and beige with walnut lid - $139 Mini Unikko Plywood Tray 31cm in beige, white, blue - $75

BOLT OF CLOTH, 2 Osborne Street, Newmarket, T: 09 520 5660, www.boltofcloth.com

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS

Gerard Murphy received the gold award from Ryan Taibel of P&O Cruises (category sponsor)

BON VOYAGE CRUISES & TRAVEL WINS THE GOLD MEDAL FOR NEW ZEALAND “CRUISE AGENCY OF THE YEAR” CRUISE LINES INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION (AUSTRALASIA) IS MADE UP OF OVER 40 international and local cruise lines and its CLIA awards, the biggest night on the cruise calendar, recently attracted over 500 members of the Australasian cruise industry to The Star in Sydney. Norwegian Cruise Lines flew in their 'Burn the Floor' dance troupe from their ship Norwegian Jewel especially for the evening’s entertainment. The awards recognise the contribution of the travel agency community to the success of cruise lines and growth of cruising in the region. Parnell travel agency, Bon Voyage Cruises & Travel took out the gold medal for New Zealand, being awarded 'Cruise Agency of the Year'. This follows a bronze in 2015 and gold marketing award in 2016. Agency owner, Gerard Murphy was thrilled with the win. “I am very proud of winning the New Zealand gold award. We always thought we had the best cruise people around and this award is some confirmation of that.” Murphy says that “While most customers are cruising away from New Zealand, with the Mediterranean and northern Europe being most popular, with more and newer ships in our waters over our summers mean that people trying cruising locally for the first time are fast becoming converts.” Cruising has been experiencing record growth in recent years but Murphy’s agency is no newcomer, he himself starting with P&O Travel just on 40 years ago, and his 2IC, Jill Gothard, also a long-standing cruise expert. “Our role as a cruise agency is to match our clients to the ideal ship and itinerary for them, then wrapping the cruise arrangements with the best flight, hotel and tour arrangements to make a complete trip - all on one itinerary document.” F PN BON VOYAGE CRUISES & TRAVEL, 8A Cleveland Road, Parnell, T: 09 368 6800, www.bonvoyage.co.nz

Newer luxury ships like Silversea’s Silver Muse are making local, close to home cruising attractive The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS NAMIBIA Namibia was an absolute surprise! From the vast wilderness and geological attractions millions of years old to Etosha National Park and surrounding private reserves abundant in wildlife, Namibia was unforgettable. My experiences here rate at the top of all travel opportunities I have ever had. From the first moment here I felt very welcomed in Namibia. I was on my own and the night before my safari I was staying at a little boutique hotel in Windhoek, when my appointed safari guide phoned to see if I would come down to “Joe’s” (I learnt quickly that Joe’s is the mainstay for pre and post safari drinks!). After a couple of meet and greets with the other guests in my group, we got off to a great start. Our first safari destination was Damaraland - an enormous region of expansive and beautifully wild landscapes. After arriving at the little airstrip, we had a 4×4 transfer - with game viewing en route - to our camp, quickly realising we are in a very remote region on Earth. Two days into the safari and I learned more about the geology and history of the Earth’s continents here than ever taught (or took in) at school. How fascinating! Whilst here we participated in tracking rare, desertadapted black rhino on foot with Save the Rhino Trust. This rated as a major highlight of the whole trip! Departing Desert Rhino Camp, we fly over the incredible Skeleton Coast - renowned for its large number of shipwrecks over the last century - and to the extreme north of the country. We arrive in Serra Cafema, just a sand airstrip with little else but why not? If I thought Damaraland was remote, this is like being on the moon! An hour and a half later we arrive at Serra Cafema Camp, a little oasis situated on the banks of the Kunene River. Our stunning rooms are dark wood, floating curtains, and veranda complete with hammock and views to the river. Sublime! Our days here are spent visiting remote Himba people, who are still nomadic and very authentic to their traditional way of life. We also have a couple of blitzes up and down massive sand dunes on the quad bikes which is another highlight of the trip. Our last stop on this trip is the world-famous Etosha National Park. We stayed in Ongava Private Game Reserve at Little Ongava - a six star experience in the wild. With only six spacious suites at the whole property, it ensures a very personalised experience and we enjoyed excellent game drives and surprise bush dinners during our stay. The focal point of Etosha is the enormous salt pan with fringes edged with productive waterholes that are frequented by a great number of mammals including elephant, lion, giraffe, zebra, gemsbok and others. Namibia is a hidden gem and a perfect introduction to Africa for those dreaming of going but don’t know where to go first. PN (ANGE PIRIE, WORLD JOURNEYS) F

TAILOR-MADE TRAVEL See the best of Namibia and enjoy its dramatic scenery, from the majestic dunes of Sossusvlei to the abundant wildlife of Etosha National Park and more! You will be transferred by air seamlessly between camps, all set within private concessions.

WINGS OVER NAMIBIA 46 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

7 DAY TOUR from $9,325pp (share twin)

T 09 360 7311 www.worldjourneys.co.nz /worldjourneys

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PLANNING SPECIAL EVENTS WELCOME TO HOUSE OF TRAVEL PONSONBY There are so many good reasons why you should book with House of Travel Ponsonby’s award-winning team. They understand that travel planning can be stressful and time consuming. They are there to take the stress away for you, saving yourself valuable hours away from your friends and loved ones. Let House of Travel Ponsonby do the rest for you.

Planning your honeymoon should be exciting and fun for you and your partner. How does sipping on a Mai-Tai in an over-water bungalow in Tahiti sound? Or how about watching the sky burn orange in a luxurious safari tent in Africa?

With over 50 years of travel experience, they combine your travel ideas with their first-hand destination expertise to create something remarkable. Committed to providing the best holidays at the best value, House of Travel Ponsonby can help make your dreams become a reality.

Come talk to us! We have many ideas for you!

“Our team here are travel experts - some would say ‘travel nuts’ with a wealth of travel knowledge under our belts. We have excellent relationships and connections that allow us to access valuable add-ons.” House of Travel Ponsonby, pride themselves on creating memorable customer experiences - whether it be planning your dream holiday, special work event, wedding or just a quick escape from Auckland. Their team has the know-how you are seeking. Together, they can create the most enriching journey for you. Wedding Registry and Honeymoon Set up a Wedding Registry and use the funds for your dream honeymoon instead. It’s super easy to set up and House of Travel Ponsonby can take care of it for you.

Getaways In desperate need for that family holiday or romantic escape? With tons of options to choose from, House of Travel Ponsonby can have you skiing in Japan, devouring New York’s delicacies or cycling though the wonders of Tuscany. Inspirational ideas are what we provide. Cruises The evolution of cruising has resulted in some big changes. The industry now caters to every type of traveller. Whether it be a threenight comedy cruise, a journey through Cuba, or experiencing the growing popularity of river cruising, we are here to help you choose. “House of Travel Ponsonby has the passion and expertise to make your holiday an amazing experience, from the moment you walk through the door. Let’s create something incredible together, contact us any time.” F PN

HOUSE OF TRAVEL PONSONBY, Three Lamps, 340 Ponsonby Road, T: 360 5760, E: ponsonby@hot.co.nz, www.houseoftravel.co.nz

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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ROSS THORBY: SEA FEVER

A game park is an excellent introduction to South Africa I have some travel advice for anyone who has the inclination to follow it. Taking an iPhone to a Safari park is like taking a pea shooter to a nuclear war.

a pathetic click and I'd be left with a distant shot of some animal exiting stage left or the blurred image of a bird from its insignificant lens.

Our previous stop in the Seychelles was memorable for several things, huge 150-year-old tortoises, an abandoned slave village and the most crushing event - me leaving my camera behind in a supermarket.

That is until we rounded a corner to find the mother rhino and her calf. On the verge of extinction, these Arnold Schwarzeneggers of the animal world are the second largest land animal after the elephant and to see one here just in front of me was simply too important an opportunity to miss.

Well, they called it a supermarket but it was a basic concrete bunker in the middle of nowhere with bars on the windows and a native Seychellian behind the counter muttering in a language I could not understand even if I had wanted to... and I did. We were trying to negotiate for the much needed petrol to get us back to port with our departure imminent. So considering the loss of my pride and joy, it was with a great deal of distress that we berthed at the next highlight of this trip - Port Elizabeth and the Pumba Safari Reserve. There are basically two ways to see game in Africa. Game reserves are your poor man's safari. Large open-air zoos, stocked with the Big Five as well as a general sprinkling of some of the continent's vast array of animal and birdlife. The reserves contain their animals within a barrier of electric fencing and security guards - they electronically track the really good stuff so don't let them tell you that they don’t know where they are. You can visit and experience the thrill of game all within a day's excursion from most of the main centres of Africa.

With the good humour and co-operation of my fellow travellers, holding our collective breath, I leant the phone on the side of the vehicle and prayed for just one decent shot of the day. Just one... I promise I will never ask for anything ever again and surprise surprise the fluke of the moment rather than the expertise of the technology came through. After a full day of fumbling and blurring I achieved just one decent shot - the shot as rare and nearly extinct as the subject itself. If you have never been on safari, never experienced an overnight stay on the edge of the plains of Botswana, watched the sun set over a herd of gnu on the Serengeti, had breakfast beside the Zambezi as a herd of hippos bask in the morning sun, a game park is a terrific introduction to South Africa. PN Just don’t substitute your camera for an iPhone. (ROSS THORBY) F

On the other hand, you have your real safari, usually a day's flight from anywhere but have wild, open savannas and plains without fences or so much as a nod to a country’s border and it's here where the beasts roam wild and free - though their lives are in constant danger of poachers and the sons of despot presidents tracking them from government helicopters. As we set off early from the ship, we had high expectations of the day at Pumba - a game reserve - and some of us were overloaded with camera equipment, tripods and plenty of spare batteries. I, on the other hand, had a backpack filled with muffins, a bottle of water, an iPhone, and a moody disposition to match the disappointment of my loss. Arriving at the reserve bright and early, we were ushered onto a series of Land-Rovers with stadium-style seating with very little suspension but a cheery guide with an accent thicker than an Axminster carpet. We were jolted, bumped and jiggled along water and animal tracks through the various areas of the park, all whilst admiring the game. Elephant, giraffe, wildebeest, zebra, black backed jackal, kudu, impala, white lion and hippopotamus all passed before us in a blur of colour and wild splendour. Jade, our guide, worked as hard as she could to try and track the park's elusive rhino and her two-month old calf. I tried the best I could with the iPhone - amongst the clicking and whirring of more technical cameras - my iPhone would give out

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE

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1. Ross Thorby and friends Roger and Susan enjoyed celebrating Roger’s birthday at Kilcare, SYDNEY, NSW.

2. Mr & Mrs Peter Stopforth packed their Ponsonby News to read while they cruised from the UNITED STATES to New Zealand on the Queen Elizabeth.

Dear readers, please keep sending us your holiday snaps reading your favourite magazine, we love getting them! Photos need to be in high resolution (300dpi), so please email them to info@ponsonbynews.co.nz without reducing the size.

EAST IMPERIAL GIN JUBILEE FESTIVAL Following the success of last year's East Imperial Gin Jubilee festival, the 10-day celebration of the iconic spirit is back for 2018, bringing together some of New Zealand’s, and the world’s, finest gins, all expertly mixed with East Imperial premium tonics by Auckland’s best bartenders. The Auckland festival will run from 4-14 April, 2018, and will showcase a curated selection of internationally renowned, local and boutique brands to highlight the best of what the gin industry has to offer. The festival will see some of Auckland's best bars competing to create their own version of the classic G&T cocktail, in the hope of being crowned Auckland's Best Gin & Tonic. Some of Ponsonby's best-loved institutions will be joining the celebrations and competition including Azabu, Mr Tom's, Mea Culpa and Longroom. G&T lovers can vote for their favourite entry by posting a photo of the cocktail on Instagram with the tag #GinJubilee2018 and the bar's Geotag. The festivities are set to finish in the heart of Ponsonby, with Gypsy Caravan hosting the East Imperial Gin Jubilee 'Gin Lane' closing party on 14 April. Showcasing a series of pop up bars and gin brands culminating with the winner of Auckland's 'Best Gin & Tonic' being announced. The Gin Lane party is free for all to attend, and guests are encouraged to try out some of the competing bars' Gin & Tonic creations. More information can be found at ginjubilee.com F PN The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY @ SABATO A defining ingredient of the Spanish kitchen, La Chinata Spanish smoked paprika is favoured by top chefs and food writers worldwide. It is instantly recognisable in its red tin and can be seen in the kitchens of the likes of Jamie Oliver, Nigella Lawson and Gordon Ramsay. Smoked over oak for 10-15 days, La Chinata paprika provides a depth of flavour that is unparalleled. An essential staple of the Sabato pantry, there are three varieties of La Chinata smoked paprika to choose from, dulce (sweet), agridulce (bittersweet) and picante (spicy). Our paprika flakes are a new addition to the range. These are packaged in convenient glass bottles with grinders and are perfect over steak, eggs and potato and for use at the table. La Chinata has made its way into much of our cooking over the years, so we thought we would share some of our favourite ways to use it... • Toss kumara, pumpkin or potato wedges in extra virgin olive oil (EVO), salt and La Chinata paprika and bake in a hot oven until golden and crisp. • In a mortar and pestle, combine La Chinata paprika with fresh garlic, oregano and a splash of EVO and Romulo sherry vinegar. Use as a marinade for lamb, chicken, fish or pork. • Try the La Chinata flakes ground over a classic Spanish tortilla of eggs and potato. • Add to Sabato aioli or salad dressings for a smoky flavour. • Mix with EVO and lemon and rub all over and inside a whole duck or chicken before roasting. • Grind La Chinata paprika flakes onto fish, prawns or squid after cooking. • Liven up your macaroni or cauliflower cheese with the addition of La Chinata paprika to the béchamel. • Sweat chopped onions and garlic gently in EVO with La Chinata paprika. Use as a base to start braises, soups, lentil, rice or meat dishes. • The La Chinata flakes are also perfect to add a kick to your mashed potato or over avocado on toast. For more recipe ideas visit us in-store or on our website www.sabato.co.nz SABATO, 57 Normanby Road, Mt Eden, T: 09 630 8751

FACES @ GREY LYNN FARMERS MARKET Felicity O'Driscoll - Not Milk Felicity O’Driscoll wears a lot of hats - she runs the popular Cook the Books bookshop and demonstration kitchen in Williamson Avenue, she is Chair of the Ponsonby Business Association Board, she is on the executive of Food Writers New Zealand, and now she has started making nut milk under the Not Milk brand. What got you into making nut milks? I was buying almond milk from an artisan producer. When she stopped making it, I started experimenting with my own and sharing it with friends. From there, more and more people wanted it and my production grew. Why didn’t you just buy almond milk from a supermarket? I couldn’t drink that. Most of those nut milks have so few nuts that they are almost water, and they have preservatives to give them shelf life. My almond milk is 18.5% almonds - per almond, mine is cheaper. And mine is very fresh. It should be stored in the fridge and drunk within a week - ideally within four days. What happens if you let it get older than that? Like most natural products, it will just start fermenting. It’s still good for you but would be nicer in a smoothie or in baking. Where do you get your almonds from? I tried out every source of almonds and settled on Australian almonds that are sustainably grown, are fresher and taste neutral. A lot of American sources do not use sustainable water sources - almonds need a lot of water. American almonds also tend to have a marzipan flavour and no one wants that in their tea or coffee. Everyone asks why I don’t use locally grown almonds. I would love to, but there is no commercial source of New Zealand grown almonds. How do you milk an almond? The almonds are soaked for 36 hours to soften and activate them. Then they are blended, cold-pressed and filtered. It’s a long and intense process. The almond pulp that is left over after pressing, goes to feed some very happy pigs and chickens at Motutara farm near Muriwai. How does Grey Lynn Farmers Market fit with what you are doing? The sustainable ethos of the market is important to me and the people who come to the market are very interested in Not Milk. Some of my market customers have become commercial customers, getting Not Milk into their cafes and restaurants. What do you do for fun? I love cooking and eating great food, and I run. I love running and I have done a few half marathons. What is your favourite marathon? The Hawke's Bay Marathon. It has that most beautiful course. It starts along the river, and passes through olive groves and vineyards, finishing at Sileni Estates Winery for wood-fired pizza. F PN

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY 5 Fort Lane, CBD T: 09 379 9702 cassiarestaurant.co.nz The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

SIDART, Level 1, Three Lamps Plaza, 283 Ponsonby Road T: 360 2122 www.sidart.co.nz

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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LIZ WHEADON: WINE, GLORIOUS WINE

Syrah Syrah or shiraz? The same? Yes, they are. The Australian’s call theirs shiraz and the term tends to conjure up warm, juicy red fruits (an abundance of), voluptuous tannins and a creamy, rich palate. Descriptors that are far from what New Zealand’s expression is all about, hence our tendency towards syrah on the label of ours. Syrah’s spiritual home is Hermitage in the Northern Rhône; the great hill itself sitting as a backdrop to the village of Tain-l’Hermitage. (For chocolate fans, yes, that is the home of Valrhona chocolate - no wonder syrah and chocolate go together). It’s here that the greatest syrah are made; those that many a producer crafts a homage to (hence where the name of Trinity Hill’s top syrah comes from). New Zealand syrah’s have far more in common with syrah from the Northern Rhône than they do with our neighbour across the ditch. Stephen Tanzer from America noting - “In weight and level of ripeness, think of Crozes-Hermitage or Saint-Joseph rather than Cote-Rotie or Hermitage... fresh, firm and food-friendly.” Whilst only 0.5% of total New Zealand wine produced, syrah is creating a bigger name for itself than the volume suggests. Our friends in the Rhône are always asking to try New Zealand syrah when visiting or when we visit them. Seventy percent of the relatively small plantings of syrah in New Zealand are in Hawke’s Bay, with great syrah also coming from Waiheke Island and Fromm’s Marlborough syrah leading a rather solo, though long-lived Marlborough expedition. Syrah is not new to New Zealand. However, the international reputation it’s amassing is, and a recent string of gorgeous vintages means there’s never been a better time to be enjoying New Zealand syrah.

My favourites right now include: Brookfields Hillside Syrah 2015 Peter Robertson has been making excellent syrah for quite some years now in Hawke’s Bay. This hillside site an exceptional northfacing site that is just perfect for syrah. Walking through it just before vintage in 2015, you could feel the warmth in the vineyard that has resulted in this sweet, spicy and intensely flavoured syrah being beautifully crafted into an elegant wine. Montes Alpha Syrah 2015 Chile is all too often lumped with the stereotype of producing sweet, juicy wines that are all about the fruit and have little else to offer. In reality, yes, there’s great-value juicy red wines made there, but there’s also an exceptional range of quality wines that are world class. The Alpha wines are impeccably made and, at the price, Montes’ best-kept secret. Intensely floral, elegant and polished, this will reward you generously for being carefully cellared for 5-10 years. (LIZ WHEADON) F PN www.glengarry.co.nz

THE LEGENDARY RED GRAPE BROOKFIELDS H I L L S I D E S Y R A H 2 0 1 5 MAN O’ WAR D R E A D N O U G H T S Y R A H 2 0 1 5 MONTES A L P H A S Y R A H 2 0 1 5 FROMM L A S T R A D A S Y R A H 2 0 1 6

$39.99 $49.99 $24.99 $32.99

*PR I C ES VA L I D U N T I L 2 9/0 4/2 018 O R W H I L E STO C KS L AST.

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY

DIDA’S: YOUR LOCAL - RECIPE OF THE MONTH Avocado Bruschetta with Roquette-Fennel Salad and Beetroot Ketchup - Serves 2 Avocado smash 2 avocados Juice of 1 lemon 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil Salt and pepper Roquette-fennel salad 200g roquette leaf 50g sliced fennel bulb 6 slices of radish 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar 1 tbsp brown sugar 1 tsp wholegrain mustard 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil Salt and pepper Beetroot ketchup 1 large beetroot 2 tbsp pomegranate molasses 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar 1 tsp ground cinnamon Salt and pepper To serve 4 slices sourdough bread, toasted 2 vine tomatoes, pan-fried 2 poached eggs

METHOD Beetroot ketchup Boil the beetroot with salt until it is soft in the middle, then peel the skin and trim the ends off. In a blender, combine the beetroot with the remainder of the ketchup ingredients until it is the consistency of ketchup. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Avocado smash Cut the avocados in half, remove the stones and place into a mixing bowl. Using a folk, smash the avocados, adding the lemon juice and olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Roquette-fennel salad In a separate bowl, mix the balsamic vinegar, brown sugar, wholegrain mustard, olive oil, and salt and pepper to make a vinaigrette. Add the roquette leaf, sliced fennel bulb and sliced radish and mix well. To serve Toast the sourdough bread, spread one piece per person with the avocado smash, placing one poached egg on top of the avocado. Serve the grilled tomatoes, roquette salad and beetroot ketchup on the side, with an additional piece of sourdough bread. DIDA’S, 55 Jervois Road, T: 09 361 6157, www.didas.co.nz

BOOK YOUR NEXT FUNCTION AT DIDA’S. A R A N G E O F S PA C E S AVAILABLE FOR HIRE. TO BOOK CALL US ON: 09 376 2813 E M A I L : D I D A S F O O D S T O R E @ G L E N G A R R Y. C O. N Z O R P O P I N A N D A S K O U R F R I E N D LY S TA F F

WINE LOUNGE O P E N E V E R Y D AY M O N D AY- S U N D AY : 1 2 P M - LATE 54 JERVOIS RD PONSONBY | CALL US ON 09 376 2813

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PHIL PARKER: WHOSE WINE IS IT ANYWAY?

A good year for the rosĂŠs There has been a huge surge in the popularity of rosĂŠ-style wines in New Zealand in the past five years. Particularly in summer, the allure of a chilled pink rosĂŠ on a hot, blue-skied day is hard to resist. RosĂŠ wines essentially pair with any food style, appeal to both red and white wine drinkers and are particularly suited to picnic fare and barbecues. The dominant style now has moved way away from the ‘lolly water’ sweet rosĂŠs of the 70s and 80s to the traditional Provence bone-dry or just offdry style. Indeed, we are starting to see some French rosĂŠs on the shelves at wine stores and on some restaurant menus. Here’s some local and imported examples. Spade Oak Heart of Gold Gisborne Tempranillo RosĂŠ 2017 - $23 A new twist on the Spanish grape variety Tempranillo. Salmon pink in the glass. Aromas of summer fruit compote and cherry. In the mouth it is just nudging off-dry with complex and elegant flavours of strawberry, marzipan and sour cherry with a medium-dry, lengthy finish. Available from Countdown. La Mascaronne Quat Saisonas Provence French RosĂŠ 2017 - $27 Sealed with a Diam composite cork closure. Classic Provence style, with aromas of watermelon and a whiff of strawberry compote.

Crisp, clean and tangy with a hint of strawberry and ripe pineapple. Complex and mouth filling. Available from Glengarry. Tupari ‘Pink Pukeko’ Marlborough RosĂŠ 2017 - $20 Pale rose pink, with aromas of strawberry and a whiff of confectionary. Very much in the Provence style - bone dry, with cranberry and red berry fruit flavours. Finishes dry, clean and tangy. Available from Glengarry. Soho ‘Pink Sheep’ Marlborough RosĂŠ 2017 - $22.99 Aromas of canned peach and rhubarb. Just nudging dry at 12.5% alcohol. Flavours of red apple and watermelon. A clean fruity finish. But wait, there’s more - 50c per bottle sold goes to mental health charity ‘Key to Life’ charitable trust, spearheaded by Mike King. Available from Herne Bay Cellars. ‘R’ Château Riotor CĂ´tes de Provence 2016 - $20 Provence wine, sealed with a screwcap (zut alors!) Flavours of summer red berries, sour cherry and cranberry with a lengthy, tangy, bone dry almost astringent finish that reminds me of canned pink guava. Available from Glengarry. (PHIL PARKER) F PN

Phil Parker is a wine writer and operates Fine Wine & Food Tours in Auckland. See: www.finewinetours.co.nz. Phil’s new cellar door book ‘NZ Wine Regions - A Visitor’s Guide’ is now available on Amazon Kindle.

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54 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


TINA PLUNKETT: PONSONBY CENTRAL

GO... GO GO DADDY Che Barrington, the chef behind the popular Blue Breeze Inn and Chop Chop has brought an exciting addition to the Ponsonby Central stable, Go Go Daddy. Transforming what was Honey Bear into a fun canteen serving a fast and affordable selection of the tastes of Thailand. A canteen is a space designed for people to meet, eat or sip - the heart of any community. The Ponsonby Central team got distracted by the amazing smells coming from our newest restaurant so the boss said we could go out for lunch and it was everything we had imagined... Perched up in the front outdoor space, collecting the afternoon sun, the service was fast and cheerful, the food was delicious and we couldn’t stop ourselves from ordering more. You may see some similarities among a few of the offerings to the hugely popular, but now closed, Moo Chow Chow. Yes, Ms Moo's Caramelised Pork Hock ($22) is on the menu and it’s hard not to order the familiar Stir-fried Soft Shell Crab ($18) but the menu is largely a brand-new experience of flavours. We, of course, had piles of the sticky pork hock cut through with Green Papaya Salad ($15), but were impressed with the delectable Coconut Curry of Smashed Prawn & Fish ($28) and the Slow-Cooked Beef Cheek Laksa ($20). Make sure you save some room for dessert, we all fought over the Milo Chocolate Mousse and the Lychee Sorbet ($15 each). We hear whispers of a cocktail room coming for those who take the taste of what they drink seriously, but in the meantime, go Go Go Daddy for lunch or dinner today.

GO GO DADDY THAI CANTEEN. STREET FOOD WITH STYLE.

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GARY STEEL: VEG FRIENDLY

Cultivating compassion - how the light gets in Watching a documentary on the last five years of rock icon David Bowie’s life, I found myself nodding in agreement when he said: “What a disappointing 21st Century this has been so far.” I’m sure he would have agreed that there are plenty of amazing things about this time on Earth, including the incredible advances of technology that have the potential to connect us all in a way never even imagined by previous generations. But Bowie had become increasingly appalled at the more sinister manifestations and manipulations of the power elite, including the gun lobby’s success at making deadly weapons so easily available in America, and the terrible price society has paid in the rash of school massacres.

San Suu Kyi ignore her own military’s purging of the Rohingya people? And on and on.

He would have been equally appalled - as most of us are - in the ascendance of powerful world leaders whose ethics are questionable, to say the least. Having lived through flower power and the peace and love generation and the rise of environmentalism, feminism, human rights and gay rights, and observing so many seeking a more just world, it must have been galling for Bowie to find himself in his late 60s staring into the face of an even more insane, dangerous world than the post-World War II ‘Cold War’ that birthed him.

I thought I could make a difference by not causing any animals to die, simply by not eating them. Demonstrating compassion to animals should, in theory, make us more compassionate to humans, too. But even with something as simple as this, us humans have a funny way of distorting things. As a teenager one of my first flatting experiences was with a vegetarian Buddhist couple who wouldn’t even harm an army of ants when they invaded the kitchen. When that relationship broke up and the chap moved out, his ex told me that he’d been beating her up, and that it had been a feature of their time together. So much for peace-loving and compassionate.

Is Putin for real? How much more civilized is he than Ivan The Terrible? How could that Trump nut ever have made it to the most powerful position in the United States of America? Will Syrian president Bashar al-Assad ever be made to account for the mass killing of his own people? Why did our own former government happily host Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte, despite his murderous rampage against anyone suspected of drug activity? How could Nobel Prize winner Aung

I find if I dwell too much on this cauldron of insane world affairs, it all starts spinning round and round, because there’s a profound sense of impotence. It seems that nothing can be done. Perhaps that’s why most of those who want to change the world in any way for the better have to choose one specific area in which they can make a difference.

But still, cultivating a sense of ethics based both on compassion and logical thinking is the only weapon we’ve got to deal with this mad, mad world. And although there’s much that’s terrible, and terrifying, as Leonard Cohen once sang, “There’s a crack in everything, it’s how the light gets in.” (GARY STEEL) F PN

Gary Steel is an Auckland-based journalist who runs online vegetarian resource www.doctorfeelgood.co.nz. He can be contacted via beautmusic@gmail.com

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY R & D KITCHEN... A NEW GREY LYNN LOCAL Richmond & Domain Kitchen has opened in the space that was once home to Jafa. The new owners now have two cafes, with the other based in Parnell. What is your cafe philosophy? Healthy simplicity and seasonality. Our food reflects the seasons. Our wines are from small producers largely handpicked, organic and with low sulphur. Coffee is important and we will have a new seasonal blend every quarter developed by Atomic Roasters. What is your favourite dish? The seasonal fish omelette. The dish is for us is a celebration of simple things done well and uncluttered. Your smoothies sound good‌ tell us more? We have developed our pre- and post-workout smoothies with Emily from Feel Fresh Nutrition at the Movement Lab. They are good for you and functional... beetroot, turmeric and cold brew coffee and a dairy-free, pea protein shake for after your workout. Can you cater to vegans and gluten free? Yes, this is the world we live in and celebrate. We love accommodating everyone and have great vegan and gluten-free options - both sweet and savoury. Why did you choose Grey Lynn? When we talked about what we want to be as a business, and people we asked, a repeating theme was community. Grey Lynn has that and we have enjoyed great support from local businesses and this community. What else will be happening at Richmond & Domain? We have what we think will be the first community wine list. We will gather locals and taste and vote on which wines make the list. Evenings are coming... Coffee cupping and single origin tastings with Atomic Roasters. R & D KITCHEN, 551 Richmond Road, T: 09 361 1100

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FASHION + STYLE SAY HELLO TO MUSE After three years owning fashion store Muse Boutique in Newmarket, Olivia Vincent decided to extend her offering. In December last year, she and her team opened a second store in Ponsonby. “Once we realised the beautiful site on the corner of Tole Street and Ponsonby Road was available, it was in a bit of a whirlwind, we signed the lease in a week! The space was completely renovated within four weeks, and I couldn’t be happier with Muse’s second location,” says Olivia.

The store’s location is enviable, next door to Allpress Coffee and Bambina, with lots of foot traffic, especially on the weekends. "We love how our customers bring their families, dogs, children and friends in. That’s the best part about Ponsonby Road, there’s a great community here. Everyone’s always strolling past or out to enjoy a coffee in the sun.”

Muse Boutique was founded almost 23 years ago by Jo Gould and Madeline Healy, and a second store felt like the right step for Olivia once she had settled into her role as the new owner. “I worked with Rufus Knight on renovating our Newmarket store, and this gave me the confidence to open a second space.”

The corner site makes the most of the sunlight, which floods in through glass fronted bay windows. Olivia’s team regularly transforms the window display by working with local artists. Open Monday - Saturday 9.30am - 5.30pm; Sunday 11am - 4pm.

MUSE, 264 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 378 8850, www.museboutique.co.nz

58 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

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MUSE Edit Our Picks for Autumn

Meet the Team

Olivia

S LEAT TIBI P MUSE CASHMERE Funnel Neck

KHAITE DENIM Vanessa Jean in Vintage Blue

TIBI Dean Heels in Dijon

MIH Lesson Sweater

I’ve worked in boutiques around Auckland and in London since I was 15. I love the experience, helping make women feel ƺɁȶˎǁljȶɽƃȶǁˎȶǁȈȶǼɽȃljȴ special pieces they wouldn’t normally wear. Everything in store has been hand picked by me; the fabrics, the colours and design elements excite me.

Gemma

Stella

For 6 years I worked as Fashion Editor for CLEO Magazine and then Next Magazine. When I had my son I took a break from my career and 3 years later decided I missed working in fashion. When the opportunity to work at Muse came up I just could not pass it up! I love the clothes and I adore styling our clients.

A hairdresser for 10 years, I was always passionate about fashion. I enjoy mixing and matching pieces and styling new looks. Muse has long been my favourite place to shop so I jumped at the chance to work at the Ponsonby Boutique. I also work as a personal shopper; at MUSE there is always something for everyone.

Rebe

Caitlin

Muse has become my second home! I have been working alongside Olivia for the last 2 years as Social Media Manager and Buying Assistant and my role couldn’t be more varied ƃȶǁǁɨljƃȴʰӝťɁʍԇȢȢˎȶǁȴlj working between both our Boutiques, usually holding a camera.

I have been a part of Muse Ponsonby since the opening of the Boutique. Muse was the dream workplace! With a background in fashion production, business and design, my role at Muse is the perfect mix. I feel lucky to work with a team of such intelligent and inspiring women.

CHRISTOPHER ESBER Bias Cut Trousers

LAURA LOMBARDI JEWELS Porta Earring

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ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE The monthly jottings of a free-spirited Ponsonby dressmaker of the 1920s, as imagined by Angela Lassig. VERMONT STREET, PONSONBY 15 APRIL 1925

Dear Edith, I’m writing to you from my sparkling clean and very neat sitting room, just one of many rooms which have been thoroughly ‘spring cleaned’ for Easter - yes, I know it’s almost winter! And, I’ve just picked the last of my large dahlias which I’ve poked into generous arrangements of Japanese anemones dotted all around the house. This year the anemones are going mad along my back fence. I don’t mind at all as I absolutely love them and won’t have to buy flowers for myself for at least another month. The reason for all this unseasonal (and frankly, unusual) activity is the fact that Lambourne’s[i] (Ponsonby’s best furnishing shop) had a wonderful Easter offer, of which I enthusiastically partook, even though the advertisement was addressed to 'Easter brides'. Well, who were they to know that I wasn’t getting married! I might have been planning to, for all they knew, and then it might have all gone horribly wrong, just after I’d placed the order. The trouble is that being Ponsonby, I’ll probably be found out, if they didn’t know already know that George and I are not even engaged. Anyway, the offer took the form of a thirty-two piece dinner set - English at that - being given away free with any furniture purchases over 50 pounds. I’ve been wanting to update the furniture in the spare room for an age now, so I took the opportunity to buy some new pieces. I bought a full-size oiled rimu bedstead with carved panels, a matching wardrobe with bevelled mirror and leadlight panels and a little pedestal cupboard for a jug and basin, all for around 20 pounds! To make up the 50 pounds, I also bought a rimu dressing table that looked really well with the other pieces, two small folding oak bookcases for my sitting room, two beautiful large oval carpet rugs (one for the spare bedroom and one for the living room) and a new hall runner. I feel so happy it all that I spent the last week ‘spring cleaning’ the entire house so that everything else lives up to the new acquisitions. The dinner set is too dainty to use for everyday so I shall save it for when I have visitors. It is white with a very pretty border pattern of bluebirds carrying branches of apple blossom. As you’re coming to stay very soon, I think that you might be the very first to eat from my new plates! I shall have to look through my cookery books for something delicious to serve on them. And we shall eat off my new supper cloth, one of a few bargains I picked up only this Monday from George Courts on Karangahape Road. They had a one-day sale of manchester[ii], cotton dress and soft furnishing fabrics salvaged from 'S.S. Wiltshire' - that poor ship that got wrecked on Great Barrier Island after that huge storm in February[iii]. You’ll remember it - I think it was in all the papers. Everything was half price or less. I got my perfectly lovely supper cloth for only four shillings! They had very similar ones (not salvage goods) for three times the price! And I also got a very pretty pair of slightly soiled, cotton net curtains for the spare room for half the usual price. The marks all came out in the wash I gave them when I got them home. Such a bargain! I should have bought more but I just wasn’t sure how well they’d look after laundering. The nets have an all-over design of small

birds frolicking amongst climbing roses growing through trellis, the trellis forming the background. I wish you could have been here two weeks ago - I would have taken you to a fabulous little event held at the West End theatre after a showing of 'Irene', a comedy starring Colleen Moore as a shopgirl who becomes a mannequin and falls in love with a wealthy young man who has a horrid stuck up mother. It was really just an excuse to show a lot of gorgeous gowns I think! After the film we were treated to a delicious cream tea[iv] and a mannequin parade of a selection of new season’s models from Milne and Choyce. Oh my, Edith, some of the costumes were singularly exquisite! One might be tempted to copy some of the details if one was unprincipled. I especially loved a black satin ensemble afternoon suit which was beautifully embroidered in jade and had a matching black coat lined with jade georgette. The bottom of the dress was finished with three rows of silk fringing, with jade silk braid edging each row. The other piece I thought really divine was a silk crepe afternoon dress in deep green (like Robin Hood) which had a high neck and tight sleeves trimmed with rabbit fur dyed to match. It had a matching silk scarf and close-fitting hat. Talking of ‘close fitting’, how much chocolate have you consumed this Easter, Edith? Personally, I ate a whole henhouse full... literally! Hutchinson’s’[v] had a most artful display of Easter confectionary in their window which gave me the idea of creating a little barnyard of goodies on the round table in my sitting room. On a nest of straw I had three large chocolate hens, one chocolate cock, five smaller chickens and ten little chocolate eggs. Every day over Easter, two or three would ‘mysteriously’ disappear, usually around mid-afternoon. I wondered if we had a loose fox in the neighborhood. If we did, it must be very fat by now as the inhabitants of my henhouse vanished over the course of four days! Well, my dear, I am so looking forward to your visit. Is it really only two weeks away? I can’t wait for you to stay in my ‘new’ guestroom. We’re going to have lots of fun. With much love,

Maudie x

W. Lambourne-Complete House Furnisher, Three Lamps, Ponsonby (Auckland Star, 17 March 1923, p.15) Old fashioned term for household items made of cotton, linen, etc., such as sheets, pillowcases, or tablecloths The S.S.Wiltshire was wrecked in a severe storm on 2 June 1922 [iv] A light meal taken in the afternoon, consisting of tea taken with a combination of scones, clotted cream and jam [v] Hutchinson Bros Ltd ‘Auckland’s Leading Grocers’ had a branch in Ponsonby Road in the 1920s [i]

[ii]

[iii]

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FASHION + STYLE: HELENE RAVLICH

Huffer comes to Ponsonby... at last After over 20 years in the business, Huffer could now correctly be termed one of Aotearoa’s most iconic brands. So it comes as no surprise that it is opening its very first Ponsonby store in one of the neighbourhood’s most iconic buildings: the exPonsonby Fire Station at 182 Ponsonby Road. Since hitting the stores in 1997 as an underground snowboard label, Huffer has grown exponentially, in particular over the past three years when the sky has been quite simply, the limit. Their mission has long been to exist in that sweet spot where fashion and functionality meet, delivering seasonal collections through to technical outerwear and print stories that graphically represent the brand. It’s a formula that works, and has seen their clothing worn - and loved - by people all over the world, whether they are grabbing coffee or hitting the slopes. When I talk to Huffer co-founder and general walking billboard for the brand, Steve Dunstan, he is beyond fizzing to be bringing Huffer to his adopted home, after first moving to Ponsonby in his late teens. Now a long-time resident of nearby Grey Lynn, he says that he has had his eye on the fire station for some time now, and he can’t wait to officially move in. Huffer will be one of three retail stores in the space, but Steve is claiming the entire top floor for the brand’s new headquarters. He says that aesthetically, the new store - Huffer’s ninth flagship - will pay homage in part to the building’s previous tenants, the New Zealand Fire Service, and have the stripped back, warm feel common to many of their other retail destinations. There will be imagery from the Huffer Locals campaign, and also a solid coffee machine in place to roll out their infamous Free Coffee Friday events there each week. “We want to contribute to and engage with the local community from the moment we open the doors,” explains Steve, “and that will be through everything from casual events to little things like having a bike rack outside for people to stop by and hang out for a while.” Huffer has two stores in Sydney, Australia’s Bondi and Newtown, with another set to open soon in the fashion-centric city of Melbourne. Steve says that he hopes to foster the same kind of vibe in the new Ponsonby store as has been established in Bondi, which has attracted its own little community of fans and friends. “The Bondi area has the same kind of feel as Ponsonby,” he says, “and it was great to open our first Australian store there, as opposed to in a mall. We do events and parties there, and Free Coffee Friday, and I see the new store here functioning in a really similar way.” He confesses that he may spend more time hanging out in the store than upstairs at his desk, and I don’t doubt it! After living and working in the likes of Queenstown, the US and of late, part-time in Bondi, it’s safe to say that Steve is really looking forward to the company’s move to Ponsonby, and the kind of community vibe that comes with. This time he won’t be working in the cutrice Indonesian furniture store near the corner of Picton Street that he lived above in his early 20s, but gazing out the window onto a very different Ponsonby Road from his desk at the new Huffer HQ. “Although I was born in Christchurch, Ponsonby is my home,” he says, “and walking to work is a bonus. I can’t wait.” (HELENE RAVLICH) F PN www.huffer.co.nz

P O N S O N B Y

Opening Soon

182 Ponsonby Road

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FASHION + STYLE HARRISON & GRAHAM OPTOMETRISTS Familiar faces with a new look.

Longstanding Three Lamps business Harrison & Graham Optometrists is undergoing a little transformation. Established by Cliff Harrison and Malcom Graham in 1993, the practice has recently become part of the Matthews Group of independent optometry practices. Established in 1957, Matthews Eyewear Eyecare is a New Zealand family -owned company that excels in offering patients leading clinical eyecare and beautifully made eyewear. Their simple philosophy is see better, look better, feel better While Malcom Graham has retired, Cliff Harrison remains as principle optometrist. He is joined by familiar local optometrist, Adele Jefferies. Adele has been an optometrist to many in the local area for almost 15 years. After having children and teaching at the University of Auckland, her relationship with Matthews CEO, Phil Matthews, has brought her not only into the group as the Clinical Manager but back into our local area as an optometrist. “I’m excited to be back practicing in Ponsonby again, seeing familiar faces, and in such a well-established practice. With the support of the Matthews Group we’re now able to offer more speciality eyecare services, such as Intense Pulse Light for dry eyes, Speciality Contact Lenses and of course world-leading technology in Zeiss Eyewear Lenses,” says Adele Jefferies. Cliff is further supported by optometrist Joyce Mathan, Dispensing Optician Sasha Perry, Optical Assistants Erin Gribble and Narelle Melissa and Paediatric Dispensing Optician, Steph Cawte. Steph brings with her Poppet Optics, to finally be able to offer Western Bays residents’ a great selection of children’s eyewear and eyecare services. Matthews also brings an enhanced, often exclusive, selection of sunglasses and eyewear, with boutique French collections from Caroline Abrams and Res Rei, fashion collections from Chloe, Tom Ford, Stella McCartney and Longchamp; and eyewear favourites ProDesign and Kate Sylvester. You’ll also see further enhancements and speciality eyecare services offered in the coming month, so pop in and see some of the changes being made. F PN

AVAILABLE AT HARRISON & GRAHAM OPTOMETRIST

HARRISON & GRAHAM OPTOMETRISTS - proudly now a Matthews Eyewear Eyecare practice, Shop 12, 1 Jervois Road, Ponsonby, T: 09-376 2565, E. Ponsonby@matthews.co.nz, www.matthews.co.nz

62 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING DOCTOR VISITS NEW IN-HOME SERVICE ‘New Zealand Home Doctors’ is New Zealand’s first home-visiting doctor service committed to bringing expert medical care to you in your home. Many Kiwis will remember the days when their doctor would make a house call on their way home or during their morning rounds, but times changed and it became a thing of the past, until now... That’s right, house calls are back and New Zealand Home Doctors is a brand new medical service that comes to you. Our lives have become increasingly busy over the past decade and for many different reasons getting to the doctor can be difficult. You could be at home with the kids and even the thought of getting them all to go and sit in a waiting room for hours on end is unbearable. You may feel so unwell that you’re actually physically unable to get out of bed or you may not be as mobile as you used to be, so getting out anywhere is a task. It may even be a simple flu jab that you need.

There are many reasons why you might find it a lot easier to have a doctor come to you and, whatever they are, rest assured we are here for you. We are available Monday to Friday between 8am - 8pm, and weekends and public holidays 9am - 6pm. Our fully registered and experienced GPs will aim to get you treated straight away in your own home or place of work. With extensive experience working in Australia, we have no shortage of skill and understanding of how to provide excellent patient care in the home. We specialise purely in home visits, which means no extra paperwork to register or enrol, all you need to do is call! We have partnered with Southern Cross Health Care so, if you have private health insurance with them or any other insurer, you may be able to claim a significant amount back on the consultation fee. NEW ZEALAND HOME DOCTORS For information on this service, please call 0800 GP 2 YOU (0800 472 968) or email admin@nzhomedoctors.co.nz F PN To see if your location is currently being serviced or for more information, please check the website, www.nzhomedoctors.co.nz.

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CLARE CALDWELL: THE ART OF LIVING It’s said that the humpback whales (paikea) sang to the giant kauri on the tree-laden coasts of ancient New Zealand as they swam by, en route to Antarctica and their breeding grounds. Did this happen? Given the immensity of the cetacean brain and the as yet unquantified immensity of tree energy, I find this enchantingly possible. Maybe this interchange helped both species to thrive. Many of us feel interconnectedness when we enter an ancient forest. Our bodies respond to these gentle energies and we feel as if we’ve come ‘home’. “Human evolution adapted us to living in forests, therefore we’re able to ‘feel’ their energy and they ours.” (Peter Wohlleben “The Hidden Life of Trees: What they feel. How they communicate. Discoveries from a Secret World.”) Trees form vast family networks via fungi (their information centres) that grow on their roots. Like a giant brain, these impulses run underground, connecting each tree with the other. Every community has a mother tree, which like the wise matriarch, passes on accumulated wisdom and healing to her family and even extended family (ie, other species of tree). They warn each other against insect infestations or oncoming drought and respond accordingly with secretions of toxins in their bark and leaves or make changes to their strategies of water consumption. All this knowledge and much, much more is passed on to each successive generation by the mother tree. It’s a system that has served the healthy survival of trees for millennia. We’re apt to forget trees are living beings and too often see them as resources, obstructions to farming and subdivisions, or just landscape features. Back in the last century when logging began in these kauri forests, the huge mother trees were often removed for timber and to clear the land for farming. By removing the matriarchs, the trees left standing become ‘loners’ and the whole ecosystem is weakened. Cut off from a nurturing family network, they can no longer support each other. Our diverse city trees in particular are like homeless street kids now - devoid of altruism and nurturing, and struggling to survive with no imparted wisdom or guidance from the mother. These trees also become severely sleep-deprived because

of overhead street lighting, become exhausted over time and are forced to grow up too fast, usually only living for a few hundred years. Normally a young tree is protected for a few centuries and then allowed to grow. This is how the Tane Mahutas were formed - very, very, very slowly. We must remember the life of a tree is measured in centuries! By growing very slowly, trees left in their natural forest environment have enough energy and imparted knowledge to combat insect and fungal attacks. By removing so many of the mother trees from our kauri forests over time, have we weakened them and the gene pool of subsequent generations of younger trees, thus exposing them to the kauri die-back disease (Phytophthora agathidicida) that’s decimating our northern forests? “This micro-organism seems to have existed in New Zealand for centuries, possibly predating human arrival and has only recently become a danger to kauri.” (Wikipedia). So what has activated it? We now know how it’s spread but we’ve no clue as to how to prevent it. Maybe many kauri tree communities that were pillaged all those years ago are now paying the price. Without a guiding wisdom at the helm sending out strategies for adaptation and survival to combat this previously dormant disease, they may be simply succumbing to this microbial and aggressive invader. We humans need to constantly remind ourselves of the importance and interconnectedness of all living things: of the exquisite life forms all around us that have lived quietly and successfully for millions of years. This interconnectedness helps us all to thrive. We need to move away from our anthropocentric attitude to nature that she’s there as our resource and replace some of what we’ve taken. Then maybe, just maybe, one day the humpback whales might once again sing to the kauri on our shores. (CLARE CALDWELL) F PN

Clare (Claudie) Caldwell is a creative arts therapist who runs a small private practice from home. She is currently running a voluntary art and art as therapy programme at Auckland City Mission. She is also a freelance artist. Enquiries: T: 09 836 3618; M: 021 293 3171; E: clare.e.caldwell@gmail.com

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JOHN APPLETON: ON HEALTH

Winter is on the way - be prepared Media reports warning us that the so called ‘flu’ season will soon be here should get us thinking about what we might do to reduce the likelihood of catching the flu. The common cold can make anyone feel really miserable for a week or more, and while both colds and flu are both caused by a virus, influenza is a significantly more serious condition, which for some elderly and infirm people can be life threatening. As the years pass, our once robust immune system can become less able to resist infections and thus it’s really important that we do our utmost to ensure that we can fight back if the often unavoidable invaders get through. First on my list is to put some focus on the diet. Daily consumption of highly processed carbohydrates devoid of any real nutritional value and often loaded with sugar will do little to ‘shore up’ already weakened defences. All humans require ‘real’ food every day. If anything you are eating doesn’t look as though it was once alive, don’t eat it. Avoid the central aisles in the supermarket. Processed foods are made so they can sit on shelves for months without deteriorating. Even milk is processed to the point where it has a shelf life way in excess of what it was years ago. Fresh fruits and vegetables, which we know are really good for us, are so often overlooked in favour of easier and cheaper options. I have previously written about a wonderful winter immune booster; bone broth. This is a really easy way to have health-inducing and enjoyable meals at any time of year but particularly during the winter season. Bone broth is great for all members of the family both young and not so young. I get all my ingredients from Joyce at IE Produce. All you need in terms of hardware is a slow cooker and they are not expensive to buy.

Three key nutrients are on my list as a must when it comes to preparing for winter. Vitamin D is very important and we should all ensure that we maintain an optimal level. During the summer we are told to avoid the sun so we arrive at the end of summer often with a much lower than acceptable level. Optimal vitamin D is approx 120 nmols/L. Very few of us would be close to that level. Vitamin C is a key nutrient that all humans need every day. Animals make vitamin C daily, particularly in response to stress. When we are stressed our immune system is compromised and we are not able to respond by making any vitamin C. All vitamin C in whatever form is good. Don’t wait until you are ill before you start taking it. I take 4000mg daily. Cats and dogs make around 3500mg daily. When we are ill our need for vitamin C can increase very significantly. If I were to feel a cold coming on I would increase my vitamin C to around 10,000mg daily. Zinc is a very important mineral for the immune system and our soils have very low levels of zinc. Supplementation is the only sure way to achieve optimal zinc in our diet. Up to 20mg daily may be required. In addition to modulating the immune system zinc also assists a protein called human cytokine interferon alpha that is responsible for inhibiting the replication of viruses within the body.

If you are travelling overseas, consider wearing a surgical mask on the aircraft. Airborne droplets are forever present during a flight and a mask may help you to arrive in good Try as we might, it is not easy to get optimal levels of nutrients from our foods. Plants shape ready for your holiday or business trip. (JOHN APPLETON) F can only uptake what is in the soil and more and more now our foods are grown in PN depleted soils. APPLETON ASSOCIATES, T: 09 489 9362, appletonassoc@xtra.co.nz, www.johnappleton.co.nz

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING

JULIA DARLING THERAPY RELOCATES TO KINGSLAND Julia Darling (MSSW) received her Master of Science in Social Work from New York’s Columbia University. Julia has recently relocated her private practice to Auckland and specialises in couple and individual therapy for adults experiencing emotional distress, depression and anxiety, personality disorders, issues with relationships and communication, infertility and parenting, LGBTQAI-plus issues, as well as concerns around grief, disability, eating disorders and substance abuse. Born and raised in Taranaki, New Zealand, Julia studied performing arts in Melbourne before moving to the United States as a musician. It was during her career that she discovered her passion for psychotherapy. Now, with over 20 years studying and practising in New York City, Julia has acquired a unique set of skills that make her empathetic, compassionate, non-judgmental and experienced with talking to people from all walks of life. Julia has many techniques of practice, but focuses on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) - a form of psychotherapy which is goal-oriented, active, and evidence -based. CBT requires you and Julia to work as a team, which allows you an active role in your own treatment. Each session is focused on identifying ways of thinking and behaving differently. You won’t always be able to change the situations you find yourself in, but you can change your reactions and behaviour. Julia also offers sessions via Skype and Facetime. F PN JULIA DARLING THERAPY, Third Avenue, Kingsland, E: Julia@juliadarlingtherapy.co.nz, T: 09 889-3541, www.juliadarlingtherapy.co.nz

66 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

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FUTURE GENERATION AUCKLAND GIRLS’ GRAMMAR - POWERFUL AT POLYFEST 2018 Auckland Girls’ Grammar School shone at the 2018 Polyfest, with some of the school’s best results at the festival to date. With a full contingent of supporters in tow - wearing T-shirts designed by students especially for the event - the school produced some brilliant performances at Auckland’s Manukau Sports Bowl with the results a reflection of the hard work and tireless efforts of AGGS students, teachers, tutors and parents.

On the non-competitive stages, the Cook Island group was the first placed girls school with a colourful and energetic display and Iti Kahurangi wowed with its beauty and flair.

Auckland Girls’ top results saw its stunning Tongan Group finish as the first placed girls school in both the Soko and Ma’ulu’ulu, while its Niuean Group was also the first placed girls school with an equally show-stopping performance.

On the Diversity Stage, the school’s other groups covered Fijian, Filipino, Chinese and Indian - reflecting and celebrating AGGS’s cultural multiplicity. F PN Polyfest 2018 - the 43rd Polyfest - was held from 14-17 March.

Its Samoan Group was the third placed girls school while Kahurangi Ki Maungawhau finished fifth on the Maori Stage, division one.

www.aggs.school.nz

3

2

4

5

1. Ravin Te Wano, leader of the AGGS Kahurangi Ki Maungawhau Group; 2. L-R Jane Leota, Lillian Epati, Head Girl Lauryn Patea and Principal Ngaire Ashmore; 3. AGGS 2018 Polyfest Samoan Group; 4. AGGS fans Inertia Cassidy, Te Aroha Taka, Manuevaha Latu & Tururai Te Wano; 5. The AGGS Niuean Group performing

Olivia Couillault Future Juilliard Vocalist

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS O T T E R HO US E

report card 2 0 1 7

report card 2 0 1 7

name: A n g u s S o n d e r e r

name:

breed: S h i h T z u

breed: C a v o o d l e

age:

8 years

age:

class: l Colehill Cottage

Alfie Farouk Chewbacca Booth

SOCI A L

1 year 10 months

class: l Colehill Cottage

Overall Behaviour

PL AY F U L C A R EFR EE

Overall Behaviour

best achievement

Leading by example in the manners department.

best achievement

Working hard at curbing some of that morning energy!

needs some work

Learning to not shout when asked by the teachers to go outside.

needs some work

Learning to have patience at the gates nearing home time.

core subjects

physical education

social studies

core subjects

physical education

social studies

manners

A+

ball & tug

B

gregarious / outgoing

A

manners

B+

ball & tug

B+

gregarious / outgoing

A+

attentiveness

A+

chase & wrestle

B

amiable / charming

A+

attentiveness

B

chase & wrestle

A+

amiable / charming

A

attitude

A+

interactive games

B-

reliable / thoughtful

A+

attitude

A+

interactive games

B+

reliable / thoughtful

B+

best friends

best known f for or

best friends

best known f for or

Bud Mudgway,Pabu Jeffery,Teddy

Their superstar manners and

Boris Cawse,Maisie Dee,Zoe

Always having plenty to say!

adorable face.

Andrews,Nutmeg Murray,Pooka

Mudgway,Leo Magasiva,Charlie Coster,Kookie Boomert,Finnigan Curran,Max Woodcock,Harley

Carbonaro,Ruby McMeeken

Jones,Bobbie Bridgwater,Fred Reynolds,Ccino Wilson,Fiddich Wilson,Kimi Marangoni

overall comments

overall comments

A real staff favourite, Angus knows how to charm us all with

Alfie is always on the move and keeps us entertained with his

his infectious personality and cheeky grin.

cheeky nature. He is learning that a little patience pays off and

With the best

manners and the most lovable loyalty, Angus is the pawfect

that good manners are rewarded. We love his positive attitude and

student.

zest for life.

BARKLE Y MANOR 2 0 1 7 - 1 0 T H Y E A R A N N I V E RS A RY

68 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

BARKLE Y MANOR 2 0 1 7 - 1 0 T H Y E A R A N N I V E RS A RY

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS O T T E R HO US E

report card 2 0 1 7

report card 2 0 1 7

name: A n g u s J o h n s t o n

name: B a x t e r M u r r a y

breed: F r e n c h B u l l d o g age:

breed: S p o o d l e

SOCI A L

3 years

age:

PL AY F U L

class: l Colehill Cottage

Overall Behaviour

Overall Behaviour Understanding that listening to their Aunties and Uncles often

best achievement

Baxter has been working very hard on settling himself in the

best achievement

afternoons and making a consistent effort to keep his volume down.

results in a tasty reward.

Improving their patience when waiting for treats.

needs some work

core subjects

5 years

class: l Colehill Cottage

C A R EFR EE

physical education

social studies

Learning to wait nicely at the gates.

needs some work

core subjects

physical education

social studies

manners

A

ball & tug

A

gregarious / outgoing

A

manners

B+

ball & tug

B-

gregarious / outgoing

B+

attentiveness

A

chase & wrestle

A

amiable / charming

A

attentiveness

B

chase & wrestle

B+

amiable / charming

A+

attitude

A+

interactive games

A

reliable / thoughtful

A

attitude

B

interactive games

B-

reliable / thoughtful

A+

best friends

best known f for or

best friends

best known f for or

Eastwood Wallace ,Gizmo

That delicious face!

Harry Myers,Max Olsen

Their superstar manners and

Harrison,Kondo Murray,Stella

Davies,Elfie Hirst,Harry

adorable face.

Ivy Pirie

Coster,Paddy Hooper,Bobbie Bridgwater,Chester Gardner

overall comments

overall comments

A real staff favourite, Angus knows how to charm us all with

Gorgeous Baxter has had another great year, a real teacher’s pet

his infectious personality and cheeky grin.

who just loves his snuggles and is always first in line for a

A real cheeky

monkey, his antics sure do keep us on our toes!

treat. While he loves a cuddle or silly game with the teachers, he is encouraged to build confidence even further by joining in on group games and activities. With the best manners and the most lovable loyalty, he is the pawfect student.

BARKLE Y MANOR 2 0 1 7 - 1 0 T H Y E A R A N N I V E RS A RY

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BARKLE Y MANOR 2 0 1 7 - 1 0 T H Y E A R A N N I V E RS A RY

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS

IT’S A DOG’S LIFE Food enrichment for dogs. Eating the same food from the same bowl every morning and night can become a snooze. Your dog can quickly get bored of its daily feeding routine. Food enrichment is a great way to teach dogs to use their brains to work for their food. Using toys bought from your local pet store or ingredients from your supermarket, food enrichment is a simple way to keep dogs occupied with an interactive activity while you are at work or if the weather is too severe to take them for a walk. Food enrichment is important because it can help decrease dogs’ boredom and stress levels by providing them with mental stimulation. Think less destructive behaviour, barking and whining. With that in mind, the SPCA has put together some enrichment ideas for dog owners: Puzzle toys: Wobblers and puzzle toys are designed to encourage your dog to work for its food using their paws or snout to move the object to reveal the food from the inside. It’s a good idea to fill puzzle toys up with dry kibble - don’t use wet food as it won’t come out of the puzzle toy, can frustrate your dog and can be extremely hard to clean out thoroughly! When carrying

out all food enrichment, wait for your dog to be calm. Ask them to “sit,” place the toy down on the floor and monitor your dog for the first few minutes. Nose games: This activity is simple and stimulating for dogs. All it requires is a room, some objects, tasty treats and your dog. This activity starts by hiding treats in plain view so your dog can find them. Once you’ve hidden a treat, step back and say, “find it.” Let your dog explore till they do. Once they find the treat mark this behaviour with a “click” from a clicker or verbal praise. Slow feeders: A slow feeder is a bowl that is specifically designed to prevent dogs from gulping their meals. The design of the bowls mean that your dog will have to work to reach their food, slowing down their eating as well as providing mental stimulation. Slow feeders can be filled with various dog-friendly foods but a good way to start is to scatter dry kibble throughout the slow feeder and add a small amount of wet food to encourage the dog to start eating the food. F PN www.spca.org.nz

Start a relationship that lasts for life. Adopt a pet from spcaauckland.org.nz today.

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS

@ SPCA - PLEASE MAKE ME YOURS Many beautiful animals are looking for a loving and forever home. Adopt an SPCA animal and in return you will be rewarded with a lifetime of unconditional love. www.spcaauckland.org.nz/adopt

Bella

Lady M and McG

Jazmin

Brony

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71


PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: HANNAH McQUEEN

A FOOT IN THE DOOR It will be news to no one that the housing market is harder to get into now than ever before, and no amount of smashed avocado you forgo will change that. Perhaps unsurprisingly, new data now shows withdrawing from the bank of Mum and Dad has become a key tool for first-home buyers trying to get on the property ladder. In Australia, 55% of first-home buyers had parental help in 2017, compared to just 3.3% back in 2010. Here, there is no comprehensive sector-wide data, but one mortgage broker, Mike Pero Mortgages, has run some numbers with its clients which suggest it’s even higher here. They reported that 60-70% of first-home buyers had help from their parents, and if you looked at first-home buyers under 30, the figure was closer to 80 or 90%. That’s backed up, anecdotally at least, by other mortgage brokers - although inevitably the figures in Auckland are higher than elsewhere. The most common way parents help their kids into a home tends to be to use the equity in their own home, while others may provide help through cash or a loan. Whichever way you do it, there are some fish hooks that are worth being aware of. The first thing you need to work out is whether your own retirement is sorted. If not, you might have to make some hard decisions about how much help you can afford to give. Or, an option might be to use equity in your own property to invest in your child’s, meaning you help

72 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

them get a foot in the door, but also benefit from any capital gain to help fund your own future - so you can help each other out. If you want to gift money to your child and they’re in a relationship, you need to be careful as you don’t want that help being halved if the relationship fails. The smarter way to do this is advance the money as a loan to both partners, in a deed of acknowledgement of debt that both partners sign. Even if you’re not expecting it back, that deed would say that in the event of the relationship ending, death, or the property being sold, the money needs to be repaid. That helps ring fence your assistance from the outcome of the relationship. If the bank insists the money be gifted, then I recommend your child contract out of the Relationship Properties Act, specifying the money you gave is not relationship property. If you choose to go guarantor, set up the loan to repay the portion you’re guaranteeing first. You also should ensure the guarantee is limited and doesn’t include any future borrowings. Giving your kids a leg up into the property market is a great start for their financial journey, but make sure you can afford to help, make sure it’s well documented and protect that assistance from relationship failure. And remember, if you can’t afford to help financially, there are other ways to help your child than handing over a cheque. (HANNAH McQUEEN) F PN www.enableme.co.nz

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PONSONBY PONSONBYPROFESSIONALS: PROFESSIONALS: LOGAN LOGANGRANGER GRANGER

Entertainment expenditure deductions INCOME TAX DEDUCTIONS FOR EXPENDITURE ON specified types of entertainment which provide both a private and business benefit are limited to 50%. Where entertainment is provided to a staff member the Fringe Benefit Tax (FBT) rules also need to be considered. Private Entertainment Expenses - If the entertainment expenditure does not benefit the business then it won’t be deductible at all, even if it is paid from the business. 50% Deductible Entertainment Expenses The following is a list of the types of specified business entertainment expenditure where deductibility is limited to 50%: • The cost of corporate boxes, corporate marques or tents • The cost of accommodation in a holiday home or time-share apartment (for business) • The cost of hiring a pleasure craft • The cost of food and beverages provided off the business premises Entertainment Expenses and FBT - If employees can enjoy an entertainment benefit at their discretion and outside of their employment duties, this benefit will be subject to FBT instead of the entertainment rules. For example, if an employee is provided with a bottle of wine or a ham for Christmas, this will be subject to the FBT rules. Where the expenditure falls within the definition of an unclassified benefit for FBT purposes (for example, wine and ham) it is important to consider if the de minimis FBT exemption can apply. The exemption will apply to an employee if:

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1. The total value of all unclassified benefits does not exceed $300 for the employee for the quarter (or $1200 per annum for an annual filer 2); and 2. The total value of all unclassified benefits does not exceed $22,500 for all employees for the current and previous three quarters. If the total value of the unclassified benefits exceeds either threshold for an employee the entire benefit will be subject to FBT, not just the amount exceeding the threshold. 100% Deductible Entertainment Expenses - The following entertainment expenses are specifically excluded from the 50% limitation rule and are therefore fully deductible: 1. Food and drink while travelling on business as long as there are no business contacts present and is not at a party, reception or celebration while travelling. 2. Food and drink at a conference or business course, which continues for four hours or more. 3. A tax-free meal allowance paid by an employer to an employee working overtime is fully deductible. 4. The cost of a light meal provided to employees in an area reserved for senior management when the meal is provided during the course of the employees’ normal duties. 5. Morning and afternoon teas provided on business premises.

6. Entertainment provided by a business as part of a function open to the public, or at trade displays to advertise the business. For example: The costs of crockery/glassware hire, food, room hire, equipment. 7. Entertainment enjoyed outside New Zealand. 8. The cost of sponsoring entertainment where the sponsorship is principally for promotion or advertising to the public. 9. Providing entertainment for market value. For example: the cost incurred by a restaurant in providing meals to patrons. 10. The cost of providing samples for advertising or promotional purposes. Goods and services tax (GST) - You can claim the full GST portion on all entertainment expenses you have incurred throughout the year. If the entertainment expenses are only 50% deductible, you need to make an adjustment once a year for the 50% non -deductible portion. The GST adjustment is calculated by multiplying by 3 and dividing by 23 the non-deductible entertainment expenses, exclusive of GST. This needs to be returned in the GST return in the period your income tax return is filed. (LOGAN GRANGER) F PN Disclaimer - While all care has been take, Johnston Associates Chartered Accountants Ltd and its staff accept no liability for the content of this article; always see your professional advisor before taking any action that you are unsure about.

JOHNSTON ASSOCIATES, 202 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 361 6701, www.jacal.co.nz

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: METROLAW Got a legal question? Ask michael@metrolaw.co.nz

Q:

A close friend has offered my wife and I 50% of the shares in his company for what I believe to be a reasonable price. I am assured the business is profitable, efficiently managed and is set to boom. My friend is the sole owner of the company. Should I be considering anything in particular before I pull the trigger?

Thanks for your email, this sounds like an exciting opportunity. My first suggestion is a thorough review of the company financials with a trusted chartered accountant. This is both to understand the value of the business and to highlight any financial issues. When you buy shares in a company you are also buying the tax history as well as an interest in the business owned by the company and you want to make sure that all tax is up to date.

A:

Your accountant and/or lawyer should also be able to help you with a due diligence checklist with regards to the business to highlight areas of risk for the business that may affect its future income and value. How does the business make money? What assets or agreements need to be in place to secure that income? In terms of working with your friend in the business, it is a good idea for you to bullet point your expectations together. Issues include: • Will you be directors? • Who will work in the business, how much will they be remunerated? • How will decisions be made? Is there a $ limit for particular decisions? • Dividend policy. • What is the exit strategy? • What happens if you disagree? I strongly recommend getting advice from a lawyer at this stage. It is much easier to work on your bullet point list rather than you trying to create an overarching shareholders agreement. It is much harder to get a good workable agreement out of a 50-page agreement that someone has copied from another document than to discuss and address a dozen bullet points. The company structure provides some structure and mechanisms, eg, 50% for ordinary resolutions, including to appoint directors, 75% for major transactions, unanimous shareholder consent for interested director transactions. It does not provide for a deadlock between 50:50 shareholders. All companies can benefit from a good, clear Shareholder’s Agreement that can be an easy point of reference for the parties to understand their rights and obligations to each other. (MICHAEL HEMPHILL) F PN Disclaimer - this article is for general information purposes only. If you have a legal problem you should seek advice from a lawyer. Metro Law does not accept any liability other than to its clients and then only when advice is sought on specific matters.

METRO LAW, Level 1, 169A Ponsonby Road, T: 09 929 0800, www.metrolaw.co.nz

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Bullying animals for entertainment. Help end rodeo cruelty for good.

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS GOODS YOU BUY MUST BE OF ‘ACCEPTABLE QUALITY’ “A lot of people don’t realise what protections they have when they buy consumer goods from a New Zealand business,” says Margaret Antunovich of Grey Lynn/Ponsonby Citizens Advice Bureau. “According to the Consumer Guarantees Act, those goods must be of acceptable quality. This means that the product must do what you would expect it to, and last a reasonable length of time.” Margaret Antunovich says, "The product must be fit for its normal purpose and in good working order, have an acceptable finish and appearance, no minor defects, be safe to use and durable. For example, if you buy a new vacuum cleaner and it doesn’t clean the floor very well, overheats easily or needs repairs not long after the purchase, then it is not of acceptable quality. Also, if you’ve arranged for the business to deliver the product to you, they are responsible for ensuring that it arrives in good working order. “Secondhand consumer goods that are sold by businesses must also be of acceptable quality, though of course you shouldn’t expect a secondhand product to last as long as a brand new one, nor that it will be free of dents or scratches. You do need to take into consideration the age and price of the item. “If something you’ve bought from a business is of unacceptable quality, you can go back to the business and the business must put it right. They have to get it repaired at their own cost, or if it can’t be easily fixed they have to replace the item or give you a refund. The business can’t simply refer you to the manufacturer, require you to return the item in its original packaging or offer you store credit instead of a refund. “Some people think that once the warranty expires then that’s the end of the story, but in fact even if something is out of warranty you still have the same rights under the law. You should expect what you’ve bought to last a reasonable length of time, regardless of the warranty. “If you do strike any problems with getting a remedy for goods of unacceptable quality, we can help,” says Margaret. We’re open Monday to Friday 9am-4pm and Saturday 10.30am-12.30pm. Just pop into the CAB at 510 Richmond Road, Grey Lynn, T: 09 376 0392 or send us an email at ponsonby@cab.org.nz. F PN

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‘extensive knowledge & passion for property since 1987’

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Suzie Paine 021 976 008 | suzie.paine@bayleys.co.nz Bayleys Real Estate Limited, Ponsonby Licensed under the REA Act 2008

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS GROWING ACCEPTANCE THAT CURRENT HOUSE PRICES ARE BENCHMARK Greater sales activity returned to the Auckland property market in February, while prices eased back on those being achieved for the previous three months. “Caution as to which direction the market is likely to take eased in February,” said Peter Thompson, Managing Director, Barfoot & Thompson.

“Many of the under $500,000 sales took place in central south Auckland, and on the northern, western and southern fringes of the metropolitan area.

“There is a growing acceptance that where prices are at presently is likely to be the benchmark for the remainder of the summer/autumn sales season.

“Sales of properties for in excess of $2 million (at 22) and those for more than $1 million (a further 185) were in line with those for the same period last year.

“Sales numbers were up, there was strong growth in new listings while prices, although softening a little on the previous three months, were stable.

“New listings for the month at 1747 were up 45.6% on those for January and up 40.7% on the average number for the previous three months.

“Combined with the relatively high number of properties on the market, the current stable conditions make it a good time to be looking to buy.

New listings being nearly three times greater than sales in the month resulted in a healthy level of available properties at month end. At 4648, this is the highest available listings have been since November, and 4.7% higher than the average level for the previous three months.

“Sales numbers for the month at 665 were up 12.1% on those for January, and were up 19.6% on those for the previous February. The average sales price at $919,454 was down 1.6% on that for January, and down 1.1% on the average price for the previous three months. “A feature of February’s trading was the relatively high number of sales of properties valued at under $500,000. At 127 sales, they accounted for 19.1% of all sales, a significant increase on the 8% of sales in January. This also influenced the median price, which at $820,000 for the month, was down 1.2% on January’s median price.

ANAH JORDAN Everything I touch turns to SOLD

“The rural and lifestyle markets are experiencing similar trading conditions to those in the residential market. “Buyers interest is strong throughout the region but there is caution as to whether prices have settled. “Those sales that are being made are at prices consistent with those paid in the last quarter of 2017.” F PN

@ ROSE & HEATHER 1. Trenail Simple Chest in a choice of finishes - $4880 2. Tumblehome coffee table 178cm x 90cm - $5590 3. Newport Bed, queen size from $4280, mattress from $2640

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M 022 127 9080 B 09 376 3039 E a.jordan@barfoot.co.nz barfoot.co.nz/a.jordan anahjrealestate 3

184 Ponsonby Rd, Ponsonby

76 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

ROSE & HEATHER, 406 Great North Road, T: 09 376 2895, www.roseandheather.com PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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HEIDI PADAIN: ENTERTAINMENT IN YOUR GARDEN

King Tui I don’t know about you, but I don’t spend a great deal of time peering under my furniture. However, after a flurry of activity took place in my lounge, I found myself flat on the floor with a torch searching for the unknown. Our resident male tui, King Tui, is often in hot pursuit of perceived intruders. It's like having a pit bull on wings. I wasn't particularly surprised to see him whip through the house like a jet plane. As always, he exited just as speedily, but on this occasion, he left something behind, the bird he was chasing. It happened so quickly. I had no idea what kind of bird it was. I only knew it was in the house because I could hear a scuttling sound underneath a chair in the corner of the lounge. I couldn't see under the chair, so I reached in hoping to persuade my frightened visitor to come out into the light. This technique worked a treat, except it didn't take flight. Instead, I heard it dash around the corner and under the couch. At this stage, I lay there sneezing in a cloud of dust, contemplating my next move. I grabbed a torch and, laying flat on the floor, I shone my torchlight into the dark depths under the couch. It's like that imagined parallel universe where all lost things seem to gravitate. I discovered a shameful layer of dust, doggie fur balls, a tennis ball, a lonely sock, and an unrecognisable bird. I was looking at brown plumage with creamy dots, a large beak and eyes that portrayed a mix of fear and anger. There wasn't room under the couch for me to wrap my hands around this bird, so there was only one option, we were going to have to play ball. I gently rolled the tennis ball toward the bird and leapt up in time to grab it as it came scuttling out from under the couch. Once in the daylight, I realised what it was. The bird was a juvenile long-tailed cuckoo. Just like the shining cuckoo. This brood parasite comes to New Zealand to breed. Their hosts are the whitehead, brown creeper and the yellowhead. Thankfully, this stunning bird was not injured, and after a short rest on the top of my rocking chair, it continued its journey toward the Pacific Islands where it will spend the winter months. I have handled many birds, but the length of this bird took me by surprise, as did its claws. While the long-tailed cuckoo was reconfiguring its migration map, I was left with some rather nasty wounds and the overwhelming desire to spring PN clean my house. (HEIDI PADAIN) F To see some of Heidi’s other photographic work, go to www.flickr.com and type Heidi Padain into the search box, or, you can contact Heidi by email hidihi@xtra.co.nz, or look her up on Facebook... Heidi Padain Photography.

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DESI GNED AND M ADE IN N E W Z E AL AN D 0800 MELUKA • I NFO@ M E LU K A.C O.N Z

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TH R E E KIN G S 9 8 3 M T E DE N R O AD N O RTH SH O R E 13A L IN K DR IV E BOTAN Y D O W N S 501 TI RAKAU DRIVE TAUR AN G A 4/6 8 3 C AM E R O N R O AD

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Joe is without a shadow of a doubt, the best agent I have dealt with. – Happy client

Make sure you’re listed with the down-to-earth agent who is devoted to best-practice professionalism and carries real insight into the opportunities that exist in today’s market.

Give Joe a call today. Joe Telford | 021 1917769 | joe.telford@bayleys.co.nz | FB @joetelfordbayleysrealestate

Bayleys Real Estate Ltd Ponsonby, Licensed under the REA Act 2008


HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

YOUR DREAM - YOUR HOME - YOUR WAY ORANGE Design & Build’s approach is simple; the focus is always on the client. Regardless of how big the idea or how small the detail, Orange Design & Build stands by its promise to provide its clients with the ultimate in service and product offering. Without doubt their sole aim is to work with integrity to ensure work is carried out to meet all codes and standards according to NBHC and ultimately meet client expectations. Orange love what they do. Their dedication to excellence means that every step of the way they deliver honest and up-front advice. Before any work is undertaken, they make available a simple but detailed breakdown of what is required to complete the project. It’s their honest communication that allows clients to choose either a more complex, bespoke design or simply the basic build with cost-saving methodology and ideas. Orange Design & Build will conceptualise those ideas with the aim to keep cost at a minimum. “In the main our quotes are fixed, unless stated otherwise, and we will deliver in full on our quotes, with no surprises at the end,” says Managing Director, Jonathan Morgan. “From start to finish we work collaboratively to set budget and together we complete those figures.

“Our clients' trust in us is valuable. We appreciate the time it takes for most to accrue enough savings and we understand what it takes to build a dream. With us your dream, will become a reality and within budget.” Orange Design & Build is driven to be unique. The team places ardent attention to the smallest detail and emphasis on building homes to suit clients' lifestyles. The Orange team is small. It includes a designer, engineer, architect, technical project manager, and builders and tradespeople - all specialise in renovations, new-build projects, commercial, heritage, restaurant bar and shop fitouts. The in-house team creates bespoke projects that are seamless. They manage small renovation conversions to large-scale, ambitious new builds. “When it comes to architecture, design and building, we are passionate and the results of our dedication are revealed in the quality of our work,” says Jonathan. “We use only the finest materials, and our highly skilled team comes together to create homes that our clients love. For more than 30 years our approach and craftmanship has delivered us a reputation for excellence that we are quietly very proud of.” F PN www.orangedesignbuild.co.nz

Service & Experience NEVER WENT OUT OF STYLE

“Don’t be fooled by Jonathan’s quiet manner. You really feel as though Jonathan is working for you, the vendor. A refreshing change.” P.H. KPMG Jonathan White AREINZ, Barfoot & Thompson, Grey Lynn, M: 021 320 850 E: j.white@barfoot.co.nz www.facebook.com/jonathan.white.547727

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

@ FREEDOM 1. Freedom Furniture Romain Pouffe - $249 Character doesn’t always come in big and bold colours; neutral, textured palettes creates subtle interest. Rest your feet on the Romain Pouffe at the end of a long day, or pull up as a seat for guests. 2. Freedom Furniture Amser Hourglass in Black - $26.95 Be caught in a time warp with mesmerising sands of Amser - a perfect study distraction or ornament for the bookshelf.

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3. Freedom Furniture Shaggy Cushion - $69.95 Warm up the home for chillier days ahead: a seasonal cushion swap will instantly refresh a room and add comfort to your next movie night session. 4. Freedom Furniture Rocky Cove Framed Canvas 150x100cm - $319 Create a sense of serenity with the still waters of the Rocky Cove: adorn the walls of the family bach or an earthy textured living room.

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Shop the collection 24/7 at www.freedomfurniture.co.nz or head into your local Newmarket, Sylvia Park, Westgate, Wairau Park or Albany store.

A very approachable property expert with over 26 years in Auckland Real Estate

2017 TOP Salesperson Barfoot & Thompson, Grey Lynn branch Year ending 31 March 2017

Over 26 years selling Auckland real estate has awarded Repeka a substantial knowledge base and 26 years of shining testimony

027 499 0855 I r.lelaulu@barfoot.co.nz The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

 

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

A GREAT NIGHT IN What’s the secret to a great night in? A sense of impulse and possibility... With this in mind, Timothy Oulton, British interiors company and masters of a great night in, launch a range of exciting designs inspired by the speakeasy; those clandestine establishments of 1920s America that welcomed those in the know to enjoy an illegal tipple and some (mostly) harmless fun.

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1. Hudson Sideboard by Timothy Oulton - $9339 2. Night Rod Floor Lamp by Timothy Oulton - $4299 3. Mentor chair by Timothy Oulton - $4299 4. Bio Hazard Bar Cabinet by Timothy Oulton - $6239

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DAWSON & CO., 115 The Strand, Parnell and 38 Constellation Drive, Rosedale, T: 09 476 1121, www.dawsonandco.nz

82 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

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DAW S O N & C O .


HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

@ DESIGN WAREHOUSE 1. Copenhague Modular Sofa The Copenhague Modular Sofa can be configured any way you like. The design is organic with a midcentury vibe. The luxury outdoor cushions are included as shown on site. Everything is in stock and available today.

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2. Blok Concrete & Sydney Dining Set This dining set has the perfect balance of chic style and modern design. The Blok Concrete Rectangle Dining Table is robust, yet sleek. The French cafe - inspired Sydney Dining Chairs soften the edges and complete this stunning dining set. Create any dining you set you like at Design Warehouse. Over 157 styles of chairs and 53 styles of tables to choose from. 3. Granada Club Chair & Oslo Side Table The modern, yet classic Granada Club Chair is fresh and beachy and extremely comfortable. We paired it with our organic teak Oslo Side Table making this an enticing spot to relax. We have over 70 styles of relaxing chairs to choose from.

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DESIGN WAREHOUSE, 137/147 The Strand, Parnell, T: 09 377 7710, www.designwarehouse.co.nz

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

EXTRA ROOM WITH AWNINGS Autumn is well underway and the unpredictability of the weather does tend to get tiresome, even for the most optimistic of us Kiwis. As lovers of the outdoors, not being able to spend our evenings at home sat outside, enjoying the fresh air, entertaining guests and cooking on the barbeque, can feel restrictive and, on occasions, claustrophobic. For these reasons, an increasing number of Kiwi homeowners are making the investment and having an awning fitted to their property. This simple solution effectively adds an extra room to your home and allows you to enjoy the outdoors all year round. Technology and the aesthetic design of awnings has vastly improved in recent years, which means no longer compromising on functionality over style. The team at Artisan specialises in awnings and has noticed the increase in demand. Architects now specify awnings as a standard rather than an optional extra and clients get beautiful temporary extensions, tailored to suit each individual installation. The Weinor awnings range, for example, are a German-made brand exclusively available at Artisan. They have a palette of 200 colours to choose from and that’s just for the metal work. Their range of Teflon-coated fabrics is equally as extensive in colour and pattern and are state-of-the-art manufactured to hold colour, repel dirt, water and oil and to give the optimum in UV protection. An awning doesn’t need to break the bank either, but any investment will pay dividends and enhance the quality of your life-style. F PN Plaza Viva awnings exclusively available at Artisan, 31a Normanby Road, Mt Eden. artisancolllective.co.nz +64 9 302 2499

ARTISAN COLLECTIVE, 31a Normanby Road, Mt Eden, T: 0508 ARTISAN, info@artisancollective.co.nz www.artisancollective.co.nz

Coffee & Catch Up with Anna Are you wondering what is happening in the market right now? Or thinking of buying, bmˆ;vাm]ouv;Ń´Ń´bm]Äľ Ä˝l-Ń´o1-Ń´-m7Ń´oˆ;Ń´bˆbm]-m7 ‰ouhbm]bm|_;1b|‹=ubm];Äş bˆ;l;-1-Ń´Ń´=ou-mbm=oul-Ń´ 1_-|oˆ;u1o@;;ġl‹v_o†|Ä´ Anna Birkenhead +o†uŃ´o1-Ń´-r-u|l;m|-m7 u;vb7;mা-Ń´vr;1b-Ń´bv|Äş

Anna Birkenhead Licensed Salesperson

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

anna.birkenhead@raywhite.com 021 269 6640

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REAL ESTATE UPDATE: KAREN SPIRES

What’s happening in the market? ‘Back to business as usual’ is the prevailing sentiment from our agents in Ponsonby and surrounding areas. The initial uncertainty following the formation of the new Government in the latter half of 2017 has for the most part departed, and with further clarity on Government policy surrounding lenders, we are now seeing a lot of positives. With one quarter of 2018 now behind us, the residential property market in and around greater Auckland has largely become a static market. There have been marginal increases in property prices, with the average value of homes in Auckland now sitting at around 1% higher than a year ago. What we are seeing now is more stability surrounding house prices. This stability gives buyers, sellers and investors the confidence to financially plan for their next big move without the threat of sudden price hikes or drops. While it is still difficult to ascertain the true impact of the relaxing of the loan-to-value ratio (LVR), banks have been more willing to lend to buyers who had less than the previously required 20% deposit. This has created opportunities for more first-time buyers to gain a foothold in the market. As the stabilising of house prices continues and confidence and a degree of normality returns to the market, we are seeing a continued strong interest from buyers at our latest auctions and open homes. There is a continued solid demand for properties in the higher-price ratios, particularly those selling in excess of $1million. Latest market research from Bayleys reflected the continuing popularity of Ponsonby and surrounding suburbs. Ponsonby, Freemans Bay, St Marys Bay, Herne Bay, Westmere, Pt Chevalier and Grey Lynn all performed strongly in the final quarter of 2017 with sales activity increasing by 29%. This is in stark contrast to the wider region which experienced a 13% drop in the number of sales over the same period.

Market & Economic update reflect an increase in owner-occupiers choosing to move between properties. Consistently sitting at around 40% of sales in Auckland are multiple property owners, perhaps reflecting the impact of lower interest rates on mortgages. First-time buyers have remained consistently active in the residential housing market, sitting at 23% of sales for January.

Buyer interest is remaining strong among all areas, with average transactions for the year coming in at $1.52 million, an increase of 2.5% from the previous quarter and 9% higher than across the rest of the year.

Going into the autumn months, a number of factors will continue to drive the property market and give confidence to homeowners and buyers. Interest rates are largely expected to remain low throughout most of the year and continue to be a main driver of first home affordability. Net migration rates have remained much the same, with figures remaining at near all-time highs. With property prices delicately yet comfortably poised, sentiment remains positive with buyers continuing to see good value in their purchases. Thanks for PN reading. (KAREN SPIRES) F

A further indication of where we are sitting at in the market is to look at who the buyers are. Results from the CoreLogic February Property

Karen Spires AREINZ, M 027 273 8220, E karen.spires@bayleys.co.nz www.karenspires.bayleys.co.nz

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PONSONBY NEWS MAY May feature:

NEXT&ISSUE LOCAL CAFES RESTAURANTS Including Dining Out, Wines, Coffee, Functions COPY DEADLINE: Friday 20 APRIL PUBLISHED: Friday 4 MAY

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

WE’RE IN GREY LYNN @ GREENPOINT Greenpoint opened last month in the heart of the Grey Lynn shops on Great North Road. It offers something for everyone with flowers, plants, botanical prints and curios by Georgie Malyon and a barbershop at the back of the shop run by her partner Tim Castelow. With 15 years of floristry in some of Auckland's top flower shops and the last four years creating floral dreamscapes in her botanical photographic prints, Georgie Malyon knew it was time to look for a studio space where she could display her art and share her love and wisdom of flowers and plants. Georgie makes fresh bunches of flowers each week with weekend deliveries. She is there to talk with you about any exciting events you might have coming up or just bring in your favourite vase and have her style flowers into it - and have a chat about life. Tim has been working as a barber at a tattoo/barbershop, Flash City, on Ponsonby Road since it began about five years ago. He has built a strong client base of people who appreciate good conversation, good music and, of course, a good haircut.

To follow and get updates on what’s happening at Greenpoint, follow on Instagram @greenpoint.studio for the latest fresh flowers, art and curios Georgie has hunted and gathered for you. Follow on Instagram @greenpoint.barber for Tim’s latest news and updates. Check out our hours on instagram. Email: wearegreenpoint@gmail.com - website on the way! F PN GREENPOINT, 566 Great North Road, Grey Lynn, www.greenpoint.co.nz

Georgie Malyon and Tim Castelow @ Greenpoint

Successfully Selling Brilliant Homes In Your Neighbourhood NEW LISTING

FOR SALE BY AUCTION 2 1 1 2/29 Hamilton Road, Herne Bay • Unique north facing 1960’s unit with park like grounds • One of only eight and are very rarely available to buy • Fantastic central northern slopes location, an easy walk to the waterfront and local shops and cafes • Owners cashing up this great investment so don’t miss out FOR SALE BY NEGOTIATION 1 3 1 12 Edgars Road, Westmere - Ref: 753204 • North facing site with wonderful views over Coxs Bay and the upper harbour. • Bungalow has the potential to be extended or you can start from scratch and build you dream home. • Land size - 546m2 SOLD 2 4 1 1 7 warwick Avenue, Westmere “From our first meeting to the final result Felicity was fantastic. She engaged with us; understood what we were wanting to achieve; explained the process clearly to us and really just worked with us to achieve what we wanted. She is a great communicator, and has got great insight into the current market conditions and what is happening. She helped us with every aspect of our house sale and we are really pleased we decided to work with her. We would certainly recommend her to others and would have no hesitation in using her services again in the future.”- Hugh and Jacinta Morrison

Felicity Scott BBS | Residential Sales M 0274 522 241 B 09 376 3039 E f.scott@barfoot.co.nz | barfoot.co.nz/f.scott The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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photography: Holly Davies

Tim has always wanted to have his own barbershop, so when Georgie suggested they branch out on their own and share a space she had found in the Grey Lynn shops, he jumped at the chance and Greenpoint was born.


HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

APARTMENT LIVING - IDEAL LIFESTYLE CHOICE! You’ve seen it in the news and heard it on the radio - house prices in Auckland have risen to lofty new heights and council rates have sky-rocketed since the release of the 2017 Rateable Valuations. More than before people are selling their large and high-maintenance homes and opting for some of the ‘right-size’ high-quality apartments Auckland now has to offer. There’s no need to leave the fur babies behind, they are welcome, with most new apartment buildings being pet-friendly. With all the fabulous benefits that apartment living offers, this carefree and secure lifestyle is now in high demand. This is what influenced Trent and Julie Quinton to launch their new apartment brand in Freemans Bay: VIP Auckland Apartments. Opened in March this year, the VIP Auckland Apartments' office located at the entrance to ‘Hereford Residences’ on Hereford Street is a Bayleys Real Estate Satellite office that links through the Remuera and City Living branches. It focuses on a large and wide variety of available stock and off-the-plan apartments. Assisted by their fantastic team, Trent and Julie are a couple taking on the city and city fringe apartment market by force. The VIP Auckland Apartment team is 10 strong, with over 40 years’ combined experience in real estate. While the focus of their satellite office is on central city and city fringe apartments, the team has a variety of options stretching from Hobsonville Point to Otahuhu. “The beauty of our new brand is that we connect to a variety of people, from young couples trying to find their first home to retirees looking to right-size and make the most of their golden years,” says Julie. Trent and Julie have sold many apartment developments around the Grey Lynn, Ponsonby, Freemans Bay and Eden Terrace areas over

the past four years; a key factor that influenced the opening of VIP Auckland Apartments Trent says, “While selling these buildings we grew to love the area - the people, the vibrancy, the variety and the characteristics that all make Ponsonby, Freemans Bay and surrounding areas a unique place to live. We moved from Remuera to Grey Lynn, and we are building our dream home just down the road from the new office. We see something special in each property, it’s hard to pick a favourite. We list everything from historic character buildings to award -winning, architecturally designed developments and stand-alone modern homes.” Auckland Council recently released its February ‘Auckland Plan 2050 Evidence Report’ on homes and places. In it, they estimate Auckland requires another 320,000 dwellings to be built by 2050. The council suggests that Auckland will need a broader mix of housing types and sizes to reach this goal, including building more apartments and townhouses. “Aucklanders have really warmed to the idea of living in apartments, and we think it’s fantastic to see more variety now available for people to choose from,” says Julie. “Gone are the days of ‘shoe boxes’ being the only apartment option. Many of our happy owners also include astute investors looking for quality and freehold residential investments.” Trent and Julie would love you to visit their new office to discuss the unique opportunities apartment living can offer. Contact Trent on M: 021 894 070 or Julie on M: 021 894 071.

VIP AUCKLAND APARTMENTS, 8 Hereford Street, Freemans Bay. www.vipaucklandapartments.co.nz

WIN A SET OF BESPOKE COAST OUTDOOR BEANBAGS COAST is excited to now offer bespoke Marine Bean and Isla Beanbag ranges in a wide selection of beautiful Sunbrella fabric options. To celebrate, Coast is giving away a set of two Coast Marine Bean outdoor beanbags in the winner’s choice of colour. View our Sunbrella fabric range online at: www.coastnewzealand.com/sunbrella then send us your preferred colour and contact details by email: info@coast.co.nz by message from our Instagram page: www.instagram.com/ coastnewzealand/ or instore. Enter between 4 and 11 April 2018. Terms and conditions apply: see their website for details. COAST New Zealand, 77 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 354 4552. Parking around the back of the shop on Colin Shaw Lane. www.coastnewzealand.com/sunbrella

88 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS 18 Edgars Road, Westmere Sold on Auction Day

Ashley Tait

15 O’Neil Street, Ponsonby

Your Local Quiet Achiever

E X P E R I E N C E H A S I T S R E WA R D S

Ashley 021 325 009 | a.tait@barfoot.co.nz

19 Masons Ave, Herne Bay

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ARTCOPI French furniture collection – exquisitely crafted, with a modern industrial aesthetic. Exclusive to Corso de’ Fiori.

1. Charme des Temps white panel four door cabinet $6,299 2. Factory sideboard $5,990 3. Bristol low cabinet (close-up) $5,590 2

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THE FOUNDATION 8 GEORGE ST, NEWMARKET TEL 09 307 9166 | CORSO.CO.NZ

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ARTS + CULTURE A MOVEMENT IMAGINING NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR AUCKLAND TRASH A new competition encourages Aucklanders to imagine new possibilities for their discarded trash. The Trash to Trade competition, run by Grey Lynn 2030, encourages Aucklanders to have a go at upcycling waste items that would otherwise end up in the landfill. The entrants will get to showcase their creations to the public on Sunday 29 April, with a view to sell or reproduce their final product for sale or hire. “The competition gives participants the opportunity to create something desirable from something discarded, adding a unique story to the new product,” says competition organiser Brigitte Sistig. To enter, contestants are required to find a trash item and upcycle it into a new creation that has some monetary worth. It could be something as simple as a bookshelf made of old drawers, wooden pallets turned into a coffee table or billboards sewn into handbags. “The ultimate goal is to create something that people actually want to buy,” says Brigitte. The competition is suitable for all levels - from young makers to new designers and established businesses or artisans. Entry forms can be downloaded from www.greylynn2030.co.nz. First prize for each category is $500. Trash to Trade also invites businesses to donate their business waste to Trash to Trade contestants, who can then create a prototype product. “There’s certainly no shortage of potential waste streams from many businesses that could be diverted,” says Brigitte. Entry form for business partners is available via www.greylynn2030.co.nz/2018/02/05/trash-to-trade-business-partner. Trash to Trade is a joint initiative between Grey Lynn 2030, the Grey Lynn and Kingsland Business Associations, as well as the educational sector, with support from the Waitemata Local Board. Final competition showcase will be held on: Sunday, 29 April, 10am-12 noon at the Grey Lynn RSC, 3 Francis Street. To find out more or to enter, visit www.greylynn2030.co.nz/eventposts/trash-to-trade-competition-2018 For all enquiries, please contact Brigitte Sistig on infogreylynn2030@gmail.com or by phoning M: 021 113 4171.

90 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT

Nigel Gavin - early days and the seven-string guitar Nigel Gavin is a name synonymous with guitar playing in New Zealand. He plays with everyone, has played in countless projects since his arrival in the country in the 1980s, and is ever-present at many of our biggest festivals. Most of you may know him as one of the crew behind the highly successful music nights at Cafe One2one (and before that - when it was Atomic Cafe). I decided it was time to shine some light on Nigel and see what has made him tick and where he’s come from. I wasn’t quite prepared (I really should have been) for how much he had to say or how much story there is to tell. This is only the first part of our interview and you’ll have to stay tuned for the second half next month! I sat down with New York-born Nigel Gavin and he casually dropped into the conversation that he was reading about his god-daughter in the paper as I arrived - Aldous Harding. He played with her mother, Lorina Harding, once upon a time. He still gets out to tour a lot, although possibly not as much as in those days. “There’s always something to do,” he tells me before we launch in to a discussion about how music came to be his passion and life. He just celebrated his 60th birthday last month, with a huge night of music at Cafe One2one. Looking back at where it began, he tells me of his first concert. “My musical cherry got popped, if you can say such a thing, when I was being taken as a child to see Fantasia, the Walt Disney movie. It was the Rite of Spring with the dinosaurs - to this day the beginning of the bassoon opening line still gives me chills. Although I’m not involved with classical music as such, that was the beginning. “Then the first real concert I saw was George Harrison with Ravi Shankar. This was in the mid 70s, I was really young. The Indian music came out and the drums to me sounded like water pouring out of bottles. And then George Harrison came out and jammed with Ravi and then he came out and did his solo stuff. That was the first real concert. “Then I saw The Who.” This had a slight pause as if it was an important moment. “That was like seeing energy.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

“The first guitar I picked up was one of those learner models where you couldn’t play past the third fret without pliers. Then about a year later I picked up an electric guitar and realised I could maybe play like those I’d watched.” Nigel has become known for his seven-string guitar, an oddity within the music world. He told me the story of the seven-string guitar. “I was playing with one of the bands I was playing with, The Jews Brothers. We were playing at a festival in Europe called the North Seas Jazz Festival, probably the biggest jazz festival in Europe. All the artists are in one hotel, and we’re at breakfast with the gods of jazz. I remember sitting in my room and I could hear all the people around me practising in their rooms - absolute monsters. I said what’s my direction, what’s that one direction I’ve never really done. I thought an acoustic guitar album with no overdubs, and no editing, just to actually play. I made myself a pact, not realising how hard that would be! “Later I was playing at a festival in Queenstown and I was interested to talk to a guitar maker called Laurie Williams. He said, I need people playing my guitars so I’d like to make you one. I was so humbled. I thought about what I wanted, and all the weird combinations, and finally said, a seven-string guitar would be cool. That was that. Then I had to learn how to play it. It was only a few weeks until the six-string sounded empty!” We skipped forward a bit in the timeline to his arrival in New Zealand and his coincidental and fateful meeting with Chris Priestley. This partnership has led to many collaborations over the years and has largely pinned Nigel down as a Ponsonby local. But that will have to wait for the second instalment! You can find Nigel at Cafe One2one on most Thursdays, some Fridays, and occasional Saturday nights. Or around town in his various bands, including Gitbox Rebellion, which will feature in the second half of our PN story next month. (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT

Frank Burkitt performing American-influenced folk music Every now and again you ask yourself, how did this music come about? Frank Burkitt is a Scotsman living in Wellington and performing American-influenced folk music. He’s become one of the names most recognised within the New Zealand folk music scene, having performed with his band, The Frank Burkitt Band, at almost every folk festival and venue in the country. He brings together three other hooligans, on double bass, mandolin and backing vocals, and writes songs that audiences have lapped up. The band has just returned from its debut appearance in Australia, as guests of the Port Fairy and Blue Mountains Folk Festivals. They embark on their third national tour in so many years, and stop by Auckland on Saturday 21 April with local heartbreakers Albi & The Wolves. I spoke with Frank just before he got on the plane to fly to Australia. The band has just released its second album, Raconteur, and it’s tasty. They worked with producer and Wellington maestro, Gerry Paul, and really upped the ante for this record. They brought in guests from all over the orchestra - brass, flute, cello and keys. The album requires a long and concentrated listen to catch the intricate melodies and harmonies, the stories and all the depth in the arrangements. Frank writes the songs himself, but he takes into account the band more these days. “I still write all the songs but like always, we develop them and arrange them as a band during rehearsals. We did a lot of work in tightening up arrangements this time around to maximise our time in the studio. I did write some of these new songs more with the band in mind as I now have a better idea of what type of thing we do well after being together for four years.” The album starts with a bang, with the upbeat ‘Work So Hard’. It’s a cracker of a tune, and gives you a taste of what the band would be like live. This is followed up by two of the standouts of the album, ‘Simple’ and ‘Raconteur’. If you know the band, you can hear that another hand has had a bit of a play with these songs, the arrangements, production and depth of them goes beyond just the four in the band. I spoke to Frank about producer Gerry Paul.

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“I met Gerry shortly after I moved to New Zealand in 2014. He gave me so much great advice for how to approach the music world and was so open in sharing his phenomenal experience as a musician, promoter and producer. He has been involved in so many amazing projects and when I asked him if he would like to produce our album, he agreed and was a complete joy to work with. I have no doubt that this album is 10 times better than our first album, and so much of that improvement is Gerry Paul. “Working with him was great. A really good mix of professional but friendly. He hears things that others don’t and executes them brilliantly to make huge differences to our songs.” They take Oscar Laven on the road with them in New Zealand, a Wellington-based multi-instrumentalist and woodwind/wind master. He performed on their album, playing clarinet and horns. “Oscar is a total legend too. He put down all the horns (clarinet, sax, trombone and trumpet) on over half the album, all in one day in the studio. The man is insanely talented and we are honoured to have him join us for all of our New Zealand tour dates in April.” Gerry made a lot of suggestions on what they could add to the album, “Gerry brought loads more new ideas that sometimes seemed really subtle, but made an enormous impact. Like the trumpet and slide guitar throughout ‘Raconteur’ or the amazing cello in ‘Simple’ and ‘Albert Woodfox’ played by the amazing Irish cellist Vyvienne Long. Catch The Frank Burkitt Band on tour in New Zealand throughout April, including a concert with Albi & The Wolves at The Vic Theatre, PN Devonport, on Saturday 21 April. (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F www.frankburkitt.co.nz

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


ARTS + CULTURE @ MASTERWORKS GALLERY

@ OREXART

Luke Jacomb immersed himself in glass from an early age. His father, John Croucher, set up one of New Zealand’s first glass blowing studios in the 1970s. Luke’s training includes eight years living in the US, training under the best, working in Corning Glass Museum, conversing with the finest of curatorial minds.

Jeremy Blincoe is a New Zealand born, Melbourne-based photographer and winner of The Kaipara Wallace Arts Trust Award, 2016.

Luke Jacomb Glass Artist - 25 Years On 25 March - 21 April

His work is technically sublime, using reticello, murano and many other hot and cold working techniques to produce impossibly beautiful, intricate, detailed works. Masterworks Gallery will be showing a range of Luke’s work including his signature paddle forms, fish traps and a stunning screen, alongside the ‘jacks’, glass working tools that his father brought to New Zealand from Murano in the 1970s. "Once glass gets a hold of you, it's impossible to break free," Luke Jacomb. Also, in the gallery is a range of Areez Katki’s textile works. F PN MASTERWORKS GALLERY, 71 Upper Queen Street, T: 09 373 5446, www.masterworksgallery.co.nz

Jeremy Blincoe - Wander and Wonder 5 - 28 April Opening 5 April, 5.30 - 7.30pm

A predominate focus of his work is on youth, and are set in wondrous Australian landscapes. Blincoe’s photographs use a combination of studio and natural lighting to give the works an augmented, hyper real quality. Many of Blincoe’s images deal with the impact of material desire and the pursuit of perfection. He attempts to create drama using out-of-the-ordinary settings with layered signs and symbols. Blincoe tries to seduce viewers to ‘enter’ the imagery and create their own narratives and responses - and ask: what are we doing to ourselves and to the environment, and where are we heading... Do his ragamuffin-like child subjects wander through these marvellous landscapes and wonder about where they fit in the world, or do the images create a sense of wonder for viewers, inviting questions about their meaning? F PN

photography: Jason Berge

Please contact rex@orexart.co.nz for details. OREXART, 15 Putiki Street, Arch Hill, T: 09 378 0588, www.orexart.co.nz

Luke Jacomb and Katherine Rutecki: Fish Trap - detail

Areez Katki: Dwelling Series: Square Cushion, embroidered silk

Jeremy Blincoe 5 - 28 April 2018 Opening Thursday 5 April 5-7pm 15 putiki street, arch hill open tue-sat, 09 3780588 The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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ARTS + CULTURE @ GREY

MATT ALMER FEATURES @ THE FRAME WORKSHOP & GALLERY

TEMPORAL MATTER - Antony Densham 10 - 21 April Opening: 13 April

‘Temporal Matter,’ a solo exhibition by artist Antony Densham combines his fascination with paint and collage taxonomies. He encourages the viewer to appreciate the aesthetics of the end-product that goes through artistic exploration of found, ripped, manipulated paper that creates a form. There is a deeper acknowledgement of ideas that surface in the works that have formed from the present and past.

Matt Palmers works blend photography with printmaking and explores the rural landscape of New Zealand. The Frame Workshop and Gallery proudly houses many of his unique works on paper. F PN THE FRAME WORKSHOP & GALLERY, 1/182 Jervois Road, T: 09 376 4749, www.frameworkshop.co.nz

Antony Densham FORGET THE NIGHT - Cruz Jimenez + Issac Katzoff 24 April - 12 May ‘Forget the Night’ is the combination of shared ideas and individual artistic practises. Friends Cruz Jimenez, a painter + Issac Katzoff, a master of glass, have been building ideas towards this exciting exhibition for years. ‘Forget the Night’ brings together both artists' experiences, expertise and intellect with their thoughts, artistic mediums and aesthetics of form and nature. Please contact here@thegreyplace.nz for details. F PN GREY, 37 Scanlan Street, T: 021 98 77 66, www.thegreyplace.nz Cruz Jimenez + Issac Katzoff

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


ARTS + CULTURE

UPTOWN ART SCENE Objectspace is a great, local public gallery dedicated to craft, design and architecture. Last year, Objectspace moved a short distance from the top of Ponsonby Road to fantastic new premises at 13 Rose Road. Currently on display is a full-size Toyota Corolla made out of wood and paint - a crazy mix of model, soapbox derby entry and painstaking replication. The artist is Dr Glen Hayward, who makes painted carvings of everyday objects, such as banana boxes, nails, security cameras and skulls. There’s a cow’s skull here, wedged in the passenger foot well of the Toyota, looking very real yet carved from wood and painted. The Toyota Corolla is a ubiquitous vehicle - we probably all have a memory of one. Hayward’s version is based on an abandoned wreck in a Whanganui paddock, which he used to play in as a child. Unlike his previous sculptures, it is only the interior of the car that is meticulously modelled to fool us of its (un)reality; the exterior is made with plywood signs salvaged from the renovation of his new Whanganui studio. Inside the car, we are led into a child’s view of the worn-out vehicle, with detritus littering the interior: cigarette butts, bottle tops, a cassette tape, all carved and painted to look just like the originals. The seats and dash are weathered, and the car is up on cinder blocks, also sculpted from wood and paint. The work is called Dendrochronology, which is the study of data from tree ring growth. Hayward works exclusively in wood (and paint), spending an incredible amount of time on each piece. He measures this time not in hours or days, but in how many sacks of sawdust he produces. When I visited his studio back in July, he was up to sack number four, and he still had a way to go... The work was completed and shown at Sydney Contemporary in September, and afterwards was shown at Dunedin Public Art Gallery, before coming to Ponsonby. That’s quite a few kilometres on this Corolla’s clock. (WILL PAYNT) F PN

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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OUT + ABOUT

Julia

Barnaby, Linda & Rupert

Dale, Rosemary, Kerry & Brendan

Erin & Penelope

Irish Hula

Michelle & Ashley

Leo & Danielle

Parade

Mariam Almasri

Cathy & Donna

Mackenzie & Kylie

photography: Clare Gemima

Angela & Michael

SAINT PATRICKS DAY, PONSONBY - SATURDAY 17 MARCH

96 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


OUT + ABOUT

Pope Float

Rose of Tralee

Tara & Tinker

Western Park

Revellers at St Patrick's Day in Ponsonby

photography: Clare Gemima

Shelegh, Kiera & Anna

Dancers

Dancing fever

Gathering on the strip

SAINT PATRICKS DAY, PONSONBY - SATURDAY 17 MARCH The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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HOROSCOPES: MISS PEARL NECLIS

What your stars hold for April ♈

Aries (the Ram): 21 March - 20 April You seem to be running at your peak capacity this month but at the same time you feel like you’re not getting anywhere. Take a look at what you want to achieve and see how close you are to realising your goals.

♉ Taurus (the Bull): 21 April - 21 May

Just because you’re able to impress the boss and upgrade your status amongst your peers, take care that you don’t alienate some of the other people that matter.

Gemini (the Twins): 22 May - 21 June You’re working blindingly fast this month, almost as if you wish to take your mind off other, more important matters. Become aware of what you’re avoiding, if you can, and it could bring you peace of mind.

♋ Cancer (the Crab): 22 June - 22 July

You may be feeling quite stressed of late, as the world that you have been used to has all come to an end. Remain flexible, as it will be beneficial in the long term.

♌ Leo (the Lion): 23 July - 21 August

You have a lovely life and are blessed in all sorts of ways but still you yearn for that little bit more. Everything is going according to your plan but the results are a long time arriving.

♍ Virgo (the Virgin): 22 August - 23 September

You’re looking for something this month but you’re not quite sure what it is or where to start looking. You could be driven to distraction if you’re not careful.

♎ Libra (the Scales): 24 September - 23 October

You need to get to the bottom of why there is distance opening up in your relationship. Don’t look too deep though, as you might not like what you find.

♏ Scorpio (the Scorpion): 24 October - 22 November

You love trying new things and new experiences, but this month maybe just ease down on the throttle a bit. Maybe you’ll find life a bit easier to handle than you normally do.

Sagittarius (the Archer): 23 November - 22 December You feel the need to hold back your enthusiasm for a project this month, as it doesn’t feel right to you. Be cautious and check over every detail before you commit.

♑ Capricorn (the Goat): 23 December - 20 January

Just recently you’ve bumped into a few faces that have cropped up from your past that you are not altogether comfortable with. To have a clear run at life, you have to deal with your past.

♒ Aquarius (the Water Carrier): 21 January - 19 February

You could be working so hard to avoid dealing with your personal life. You’re preoccupied with making sure everything on the outside is fine but internally there is conflict.

♓ Pisces (the Fish): 20 February - 20 March

Being by yourself appeals to you greatly this month but you need to let people know what’s going on. You’re always good at reading situations, just make sure you read the small print that comes along too.

PONSONBY NEWS OUTLETS FREEMANS BAY

NEWMARKET

Ecostore, 1 Scotland Street Glengarry, Corner Sale and Wellesley Streets Kellands Real Estate, 4 Drake Street New World, Victoria Park

Rugs Direct, 108 Carlton Gore Road

GREY LYNN Barfoot & Thompson, 533 Great North Road Barkley Manor, 400 - 402 Great North Road Grey Lynn Community Centre, 520 Richmond Road Grey Lynn Community Library, 474 Great North Road Raw Essentials, 401B Richmond Road Ripe, 172 Richmond Road Tapac, 100 Motions Road Vetcare, 408 Great North Road

HERNE BAY Herne Bay Post & Stationers, 240 Jervois Road Five Loaves, 206 Jervois Road Icing on the Cake, 188 Jervois Road Momentum, 182 Jervois Road

KINGSLAND Atomic, 420c New North Road

MT EDEN

NORTH SHORE Rug Direct, Wairau Park Dawson’s Furniture, Mairangi Bay

Ponsonby News is published on the first Friday of each month excluding January. Copies go quickly so be quick to collect yours from any of the following outlets. The issue is also published on our website www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

PARNELL Jane Daniels, 2 Birdwood Crescent Parnell Community Centre, 545 Parnell Road

PONSONBY Askew, 2b Jervois Road Bayleys, 305 Ponsonby Road Countdown, 7 Williamson Avenue Harcourts, 89 Ponsonby Road Leys Institute, 20 St Mary’s Road The Longroom, 114 Ponsonby Road Mag Nation, 123 Ponsonby Road Paper Plus, 332 Ponsonby Road Ponsonby Community Centre, 20 Ponsonby Terrace Servilles, Corner Jervois & Ponsonby Road Studio One, 1 Ponsonby Road

WESTMERE Glengarry, 164 Garnet Road

Citta Outlet Store, Corner Enfield & Normanby Road Sabato, 57 Normanby Road Studio Italia, 25 Nugent Street

98 PONSONBY NEWS+ April 2018

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


THE PONSONBY PINK PAGES

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36B Picton Street Freemans Bay

16 Scanlan Street Grey Lynn

28 Tirotai Crescent Westmere

33 Peel Street Westmere

51 Albany Road Herne Bay

78 Beresford Street West Freemans Bay

Exceptionally tuned in to what’s happening in your area, Karen’s your No. 1 property professional. For an outstanding result, let Karen direct your sale.

43 Sussex Street Grey Lynn

For a free, no obligation market appraisal of your home please give me a call today.

Karen Spires AREINZ 22 Herne Bay Road Herne Bay

027 273 8220

karen.spires@bayleys.co.nz

Bayleys Real Estate Limited, Ponsonby, Licensed under the REA Act 2008.

Profile for Ponsonby News

PONSONBY NEWS - APRIL'18  

Ponsonby? Anyone not heard of us? We are Auckland's most-talked about part of town. The print issue is published next Friday 6 April. Meanwh...

PONSONBY NEWS - APRIL'18  

Ponsonby? Anyone not heard of us? We are Auckland's most-talked about part of town. The print issue is published next Friday 6 April. Meanwh...