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A-Z OF BARS IN GREATER PONSONBY + RENOVATION IDEAS FOR HOME

JUNE 2012

IPANEMA - A LITTLE SLICE OF BRAZILIAN PASSION IN OUR NEIGHBOURHOOD

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WHAT’S INSIDE THIS MONTH 052

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010 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 011 FROM THE EDITOR 012 SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD

014 DAVID HARTNELL:

ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW

015 JOHN ELLIOTT: SOAPBOX 016 PIPPA COOM: GREY LYNN 2030 017 K’RD BUSINESS ASSOCIATION 030 FASHION + STYLE 040 ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE

042 PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE

044 JAY PLATT - WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT

047 EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY 052 AN A-Z OF BARS IN GREATER PONSONBY

058 SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY 060 HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY 062 LIVING, THINKING + BEING 064 HOROSCOPES: MISS PEARL NECLIS 068 JOHN APPLETON ON HEALTH 074 LANI LOPEZ: ON HEALTH 084 FUTURE GENERATION 090 HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS 092 FIONNA HILL: PONSONBY GARDENER 101 STREET NAMES 114 THE BOYS BOOK CLUB

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115 PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS 118 PONSONBY PEOPLE & THEIR PETS 121 ARTS + CULTURE 131 PONSONBY PINK PAGES

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: Michael McClintock

PONSONBY NEWS+ is published monthly, excluding January ry by ALCHEMY A MEDIA LIMITED P.O. BOX 47-282 Ponsonby, Auckland T: (09) 378 8553 or (09) 361 3356 www.ponsonbynews.co.nzz Editor/Publisher Associate Publisher & Advertising Manager Deputy Editor Operations Manager Contributing Fashion Editor Contributing Editor Contributing Editor Proof Reader Layout Designer Designer

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MARTIN LEACH; M: 021 771 147; E: martinleach@xtra.co.nz or martin@ponsonbynews.co.nz JO BARRETT; M: 021 324 510; E: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz JAY PLATT; M: 021 771 146; E: jayplatt@xtra.co.nz or jay@ponsonbynews.co.nz GWYNNE DAVENPORT; M: 021 150 4095; E: ponsonbynews@xtra.co.nz JULIE ROULSTON; M: 027 211 7169; E: julie@ponsonbynews.co.nz DEIRDRE ROELANTS; M: 021 261 8439; E: deir@xtra.co.nz PROUDLY PRINTED JOHN ELLIOTT; M: 021 879 054; E: johnelliott@ihug.co.nz BY GEON GROUP, AUCKLAND. RICHARD GRAVENOR ISSN 1177-3987 ARNA MARTIN; E: arna@cocodesign.co.nz MELISSA PAYNTER; E: melissapaynter@orcon.net.nz

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LETTERS + EMAILS

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LOST CAMERA I was wondering if you could help me. I have just returned from a holiday in Africa,whilst there we met a couple from New Zealand and South Africa. Somehow we have their camera, I remembered when we were on elephant safari in Zambia, they were taking photos of themselves with your publication. His name was Dave and hers wasTammi. They were both keen dancers/instructors and he was also a teacher. Any chance you could find out through your paper where we could post their camera to? NICOLA TAYLOR, Henley-on-Thames, England. KEEPING DOGS UNDER CONTROL As always, it was wonderful to receive a copy of the May Ponsonby News in the letter box on Sunday morning. What a treat to have had a lazy old day when the sun was shining and to be able to devour each and every page! Thinking ourselves pretty damn lucky to live in the neighbourhood we do, we later enjoyed our usual stroll around the streets. Evening walks are a great way to settle our baby girl and our aging labs love it too. They especially love the “free range” of St. Paul’s school ground where they get to roll in the grass and have a good run about. Unfortunately the other night however was a different story and ended in the assault of our rather placid, very gentle, old boy, Toby. We were approaching the John Street exit of the school grounds with our loyal companion and his sister by our side, when we heard another dog-loving-mum persistently calling to “Jimmy” to heel. Jimmy, a little ginger wire-haired terrier type, was far more interested in coming in our direction than returning to his owner despite her constant requests. Our two dogs carried on (they really couldn’t care much for other dogs, although always very pleasant/polite, they far more enjoy company of the human kind!) but alas Jimmy went in for the attack. Our big boy let out an uncharacteristic yelp but fortunately didn’t retaliate. Jimmy’s owner did have the courtesy to apologise for the completely unnecessary behaviour saying “he suffers from a small man complex” and doesn’t like big dogs which we thought was a bit unfair on our two. Anyway, after checking (in the dark) that all seemed to be ok we carried on home only to discover (with some light) that little Jimmy had left a rather large puncture wound in Toby’s upper leg, deep enough to expose the muscle, and quite a bit of it! There was no doubting it was going to require medical intervention. So after a general anaesthetic and a very long day with the caring team at Vet Care Grey Lynn, Toby is now on the mend but I write this letter in hope that other dog owners, especially the ones who know they have little biters on their hands, are motivated to keep their furry friends under control and even on leads if it’s dark and there is a chance they may be scared of others with whom they share the park. Imagine if Toby had been a child? Even a small dog may not have fared so well! Dog-owners have a responsibility, we take ours seriously, and it’s disappointing when we meet others who don’t. Maybe it’s because they believe their smaller dogs are not a threat? Unfortunately for poor Toby, Jimmy was a huge threat and we are now not only nursing a very sad and scared old boy but also feeling the sting of the $700 vet bill. And it hurts! CHARLOTTE PERRY, Ponsonby PN

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FROM THE PUBLISHING TEAM

DOWN AT THE GREAT NORTH ROAD END OF PONSONBY Road, what was Crossroads has had a makeover by three passionate Brazilians and is now Ipanema Food and Art Society. Rebecca Jones says, “ it is more than a restaurant and the new owners have brought a little bit of Brazil, introducing us to their modern culture and the beauty of their country.” As one of the owners told Miss Jones, “It’s exciting to open a place where people can come and feel like they’re in Rio but really we’re all a part of this wonderful Ponsonby community.”

We are spolit for choice with great places to shop and now we have a new one to add to our list with the opening of Farro Fresh. It’s certainly an impressive addition to Grey Lynn. Farro actively encourages small producers into the market and onto their shelves, and the passion and drive of these producers is the cornerstone of what makes this such an exciting place to shop. A popular spot to spend time over the colder months is our own Ponsonby Pool Hall owned and run by a quintessential Ponsonbyite, Elias Hanlon, who has great energy and we like his philosophy “to give a little back, and to get up every morning and face the world cheerfully and with equanimity.” As John Elliott points out Elias runs a good ship and has changed the image of a pool hall from a den of iniquity into a hospitality business of which both he and Ponsonby can be proud. Although summer is now a distant memory we have been inspired by Landscape Architect, Daniel Tohill, who is heavily into permaculture and sustainability. Doing things the sustainable way is always on his mind and not wanting to swim in a chlorinated pool or a dirty little swimming hole, he built one for himself and as our contributing editor Deirdre Roelants says, “Believe me, to see one of these natural pools is to want one!” Evolu is thrilled to announce a beautiful celebration of ‘coming of age’: their gorgeous new luxury fragrance, ‘Adolescent’. This limited-edition eau de toilette marks a milestone in growth for Evolu: their first 15 years in business. Unveiled for the first time

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photography: Jane Blundell @ kloser

We shouldn’t complain about the change in the weather, but it now feels as if winter is well and truly with us. Thank goodness there are plenty of warm, friendly places to drink in the greater Ponsonby area. Earlier last month we sent Rebecca Jones out to compile our A-Z of bars and pubs in our community for this month’s issue.

JAY PLATT, MARTIN LEACH, JULIE ROULSTON + JO BARRETT to guests at their recent 15th birthday event, ‘Adolescent’ signifies an exciting future for Evolu, and as founder Kati Kasza says, “it brings the brand’s spirited personality into play. For me, fragrance is all about feeling good – it’s the last thing you put on before you head out into the day, and is something that lingers with you.” Our homes are important places, especially when the weather takes a turn and there are always plenty of villa renovations going on around us. Renovations always tend to add value to what is most people’s greatest asset. Local Westmere resident Stacy Gregg is one of our area’s most successful authors having now written a total of 17 books, each averaging about 50,000 words. She is currently working on a new novel for HarperCollins UK, which is due to launch at Frankfurt in October. And yes – she has a horse “Not in Westmere obviously.” Some people commute for work, but Stacy works at home in her garden shed and then commutes to her pony in Coatesville instead.

The month of June is time for our annual ‘Win a Ponsonby wardrobe’ promotion which encourages fashionistas in to our participating stores. We hope you enjoy this issue. PN

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CHAIR’S WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD REPORT: SHALE CHAMBERS It’s winter and the year is half over. How did that happen? As the shortest day of the year fast approaches we look forward to mid-winter Christmas dinners and parties, and piping hot mulled wine beckoning. It’s also a great celebratory time for your Waitemata Local Board members. We finally get to see the fruit of all those meetings over the first eighteen months, delivering as many new good things for our communities as the fiscal restraints we all accept as necessary allow. After six months of finding out what you wanted, then six months of consulting, drafting and finalising the Local Board Plan, then six months of working up project plans with council staff and the community, finding the budgets, and in some cases tweaking previous priorities to do so, we now get to spend the next eighteen months delivering on what you, our communities have told us you want. It has been a laborious, meeting-centric, sometimes frustrating and time consuming task to unravel all the budgets bundled up by the supercity bureaucrats into real ‘on the ground’ place making local projects. The money was swirling around in big buckets claimed by us, Auckland Transport, the governing body of council, Regional Facilities, Waterfront Auckland, to name but a few. Finding out which pot they were in was sometimes a struggle. But we are there! This month our Local Board Agreement and its 10-year budget is signed off with the governing body as part of council’s larger 10-year Long Term Plan. It will be published shortly on the Waitemata Local Board page of the Auckland Council website. Our Waitemata communities have a local board $37m budget this coming year to deliver on capital projects and council services for our communities. Over the ten years it is just shy of half a billion. The vast bulk of this of course is spent on core council local ‘business as usual’ activity like operating and maintaining our local libraries, swimming pools, community centres and halls, parks and sportsfields, beaches, and business district development. In the next year we will be delivering on projects like Western Park lighting, planning for the Grey Lynn old athletics clubrooms upgrade, commencing the long-neglected restoration of Symonds Street cemetery, upgrading Station Square in Newmarket,

building the Pt Resolution section of the coastal walkway connecting Hobson Bay, and installing more drinking fountains in town centres and parks. We are advocating Auckland Transport complete the Regional Cycle Network and deliver in our area a dedicated cycleway in Grey Lynn. We are supporting the delivery of low impact storm water solutions and green links connecting parks and open spaces. We are advocating to Watercare to resolve the issue of non-separated storm water and waste water in our area – specifically in Cox’s Bay. We are still busy consulting on the new Weona Coastal Walkway in Westmere, a major Myers Park upgrade including connecting the park to Aotea Quarter via the Mayoral Drive underpass, a future upgrade of the Pioneer Womens Hall for greater community use, the best use of the Campbell Free Kindergarten and Leys Gym Hall, and a local resource recovery facility. Once these projects have been progressed after your input we will be getting them underway this coming year. At a local service level for this coming year we have for example put aside $50,000 for ecological park restoration and $75,000 for local business area planning development. We have also initially put aside $25,000, set to double for local economic development to partner with our local business associations on local economic development, and $80,000 and $100,000 respectively each year for the next ten years for community grants and contestable support of local community events. We want to give some certainty to the Parnell Festival of Roses, Grey Lynn Park Festival, Art in the Dark and Franklin Road Christmas lights and allow for some new local events to be supported. We as a Board are always acutely aware we are all paying for these community investments through our property rates. Your Local Board wishes to see the best possible spend.The Local Board has budgeted its priorities strictly within its budget provided. The National Government’s insistence the rating system be based on capital value, rather than the old council’s former ‘rentable value’ may mean some significant rates increases for many of us. While that can be smoothed out a little if the Government agrees to a phased transition, it may still hit us hard. We are very aware of the pain this will cause some and we have endeavoured to focus on projects that will most nourish and support our communities. (SHALE CHAMBERS) PN Contact me: schambers@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

CAMPBELL FREE KINDERGARTEN REOPENS IN VICTORIA PARK The historic Campbell Free Kindergarten in Victoria Park has been fully restored and Waitemata Local Board wants your feedback on how you’d like this fantastic new space used for the community. This registered heritage building, built in 1910, has been vacant since 1992. It was named after its benefactor Sir John Logan Campbell and is of national, regional and local significance.

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To find out more information visit: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/waitemata or call the Waitemata Local Board office on T: 09 353 9654. PN

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DAVID HARTNELL’S ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW WITH DORIS DE PONT Doris de Pont is a long time Grey Lynn resident and the curator of the New Zealand Fashion Museum. She recently produced Black: History of Black in Fashion Society and Culture in New Zealand, published by Penguin. Doris brought together 10 richly illustrated essays on the importance of black in the New Zealand psyche in a collection to wow and inspire. I thoroughly recommend her book to anyone who’s at all interested in New Zealand fashion and its history. DID YOU ALWAYS WANT TO BE A FASHION DESIGNER? Yes, I have always loved having something unique and making my own clothes. WHEN DID YOU LAST LAUGH OUT LOUD? Watching Rawiri Paratene as the matchmaker in the Maori Troilus and Cressida, which is going to be part of the big Shakespeare Festival at the Globe this year. While I didn’t understand the words the delivery was hilarious. WHAT IS YOUR MOST MEMORABLE FASHION LOOK TO-DATE? I have always had a soft spot for a big tulle skirt, especially in red. IS YOUR SON OR DAUGHTER FOLLOWING IN YOUR FOOTSTEPS? All of my children are very engaged with what they choose to wear and have developed an individual personal style. WHAT IS THE BEST FASHION STATEMENT A WOMAN COULD HAVE IN HER WARDROBE THAT WOULD NEVER DATE? Pleasure. SO MANY WOMEN WEAR BLACK TODAY – WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON IT? I have just curated an exhibition and a book titled BLACK for the New Zealand Fashion Museum that looks in detail at this very question. YOUR BEST HOLIDAY EVER? I love to be in cities and on foot no matter if it is Paris, Amsterdam or New York, I find it exciting and creatively stimulating. WHAT IS YOUR MOST FAVOURITE FABRIC TO DESIGN WITH? I have a passion for original prints and this was the hallmark of my own design work, collaborating with New Zealand artists to create unique fabrics. IF YOU HADN’T BEEN A FASHION DESIGNER, WHAT OTHER CAREER WOULD YOU HAVE CHOSEN? A fashion curator – luckily that is what I am doing now with the New Zealand Fashion Museum. ONE MEMORABLE MUSICAL MOMENT? Recently a performance by the Yoots at the Splore festival. They have come up with the brilliant idea of updating the old school Maori songs into the coolest grooves and the audience knows the words and joins in. A super new version of the sing-a-long. FAVOURITE TV SHOWS? Seven Days for those laugh out loud and serious cringe worthy moments – how do they get away with it? WITH ENDLESS TIME AND MONEY WHAT WOULD YOU DO FIRST? Build the Fashion Museum website. It is what we have been working towards for the last two years.

IF YOUR HOUSE CAUGHT FIRE THE FIRST THING YOU’D GRAB? My daughter, I am not very attached to things. HOW LONG HAVE YOU LIVED IN GREY LYNN AND WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE THING ABOUT GREY LYNN? I have lived in Grey Lynn for 20 years, before that I lived in Herne Bay, Westmere, Ponsonby and Arch Hill. This is my hood and I feel very connected to the community here. I can’t imagine living anywhere else. WHAT’S YOUR IDEA OF FUN? Getting around on my bike. I belong to a group called Frocks on Bikes and one rule is that your bike should never outshine what you are wearing. I embrace this and ride my bike in my heels and my best dress whether it is to the supermarket to do the shopping, a business meeting or to a performance at Q Theatre. Riding a bike is as much fun as being a kid. ARE YOU A MORNING OR NIGHT PERSON? Definitely night. WHO’S YOUR FAVOURITE SINGER AND WHY? I love interesting voices; Tyra Hammond from Open Souls, Dudley Benson, Merrill Garbus from Tune Yards, Ladi 6. WHAT DO YOU HATE IN PEOPLE? I hate it when people don’t do what they say they will. Just say no, no I can’t, no I don’t want to – that’s cool. WHAT DO YOU LOVE IN PEOPLE? A smile. It costs so little to give, is a pleasure to receive and asks to be passed on. (DAVID H.W. HARTNELL MNZM) PN

TWO THINGS YOU’D TAKE TO A DESERT ISLAND AND WHY? A snorkel and a mask because that’s what I like to do when I am on an island. BEST ADVICE YOU HAVE EVER RECEIVED? Relax. I have yet to take it, but I will, really. DO YOU HAVE A BUCKET LIST? No. IF LIFE HAS TAUGHT YOU ONE THING, WHAT WAS IT? Life is good; I am enjoying every day of it. MOST CHERISHED FASHION ITEM? Shoes, followed closely by shoes, followed closely by... you get the picture.

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JOHN ELLIOTT GENEALOGY - BUILDING THE FAMILY TREE Most of my family yawn when I start reciting my whakapapa from the family trees I have constructed over the last ten years. We have some very revealing letters sent back to England, telling of life among Maori, and how the doughty settlers were coping with the hardships. Some of this included dealing with Maori incursions. This in my case goes back to 1840. I quite understand that it is not everyone’s cup of tea. And the bare facts of births, deaths, and marriages can be pretty boring. But it’s the stories behind those dates that adds human interest. My ancestors were all from England or Scotland - not even any Irish; certainly not Spanish, French or Dutch. How boring! But those Poms and Scots had some stories to tell. One poor woman relative died when lightning struck (down her chimney), in 1874, a number lost very young children, and there were plenty of first children born sooner than nine months after the wedding (we don’t use shotguns any longer do we?) However, those hardy ancestors who came respectively to Whanganui in 1840, Waipu in 1852, and Port Albert (near Wellsford) in 1862, were tough and resilient. They had to break in the land, they lived in whares, and later slab huts, women were constantly bearing children and battling to keep home and hearth together. One of my great, great aunts married in Waipu at 19, had 17 children, the last at 42, and died aged 45. A lovely romantic story I have uncovered, tells the story of John Gower and Mary Ann Atkinson, who met on the Boston (one of the Wakefield immigrant ships), he an agricultural labourer, she a servant to a wealthy family. They married on the Petone foreshore in Wellington shortly after arrival in 1840, and went to farm in Whanganui. They may have witnessed the Treaty signing in Whanganui. They are my earliest arrivals in New Zealand.

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A lot of detective work was necessary to find out about two children (George and Isaac Elliott) who accompanied my great grandparents Albert and Priscilla Elliott from England to a remote finger of the Kaipara Harbour, at Port Albert. It was assumed they were Albert and Priscillas’ children, born in England before they left for New Zealand in 1862. They bore nine children after arrival. But I discovered through British census records of 1861, that Albert and Priscilla were married in 1858, and were living without children in 1861. After much research, I found George. He was born in Wiltshire, was taken into a home where at the census of 1851 he was one year old. The 1861 census finds him aged 11, in an orphanage run by the very church where Albert and Priscilla got married. It seems he was probably the illegitimate son of a relative of Albert, and my great grandparents adopted him and brought him to New Zealand. He married in 1886 in New Zealand, but had no children. I found Isaac too. Guess what - a simple trap to fall into. He was a cousin of Albert and his full name was Herbert Isaac Elliott. So Priscilla and Albert brought two young relatives to the promised land. Tragically, Isaac died aged only 18 years old. So watch out for second names and nicknames when doing your research. And finally a weird one. One of my ancestors was listed in the 1851 British census as Xennasentta Elliott aged 14. Such were the perils of handwriting. The 1841 census listed Henrietta Elliott aged 4. I think I can safely assume they are the same person, but genealogists warn you not to make too many assumptions. Unless your name is quite unique, there will be dozens of the same name. Like the Dilmah tea ads say - do try it and give me a yell if you want any help getting started. (JOHN ELLIOTT) PN

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PIPPA COOM GREY LYNN 2030 NEWS

GREY LYNN 2030 BECOMES A TRUST Nearly four years ago I spotted a small notice in the local paper asking, “Do you want to be part of creating a positive future for Grey Lynn? – come along to a public meeting”. I found this an intriguing invitation at a time when I had decided to make Grey Lynn my long term home and was wondering about how to get involved in my community. The meeting was my first introduction to Transition Towns and the group Grey Lynn 2030. As I learnt, Grey Lynn 2030 is a local response to a global movement that encourages communities to transition to a low carbon future by creating resilient, vibrant, and sustainable neighbourhoods. From the beginning I have found Grey Lynn 2030 to be a wonderfully positive, supportive and creative organisation with which to be involved. So many great initiatives and projects have sprung from the resources and energy of a small number of committed citizens. The Grey Lynn Farmers’ Market, Grey Lynn Business Association, Grey Lynn Community Choir, Wilton Street Community Garden, Waste Away, Green Screen are all groups that have been kicked off by or continue to be supported through Grey Lynn 2030. There has also been submission writing, community events such as Grey Lynn Creates, and countless informative talks and presentations. However, the one thing holding Grey Lynn 2030 back has come down to the lack of any legal status. The group has been run by an informal steering committee with minimal funding from donations and fund-raising events. All this changed last month when, with the assistance of Hopetoun Legal, we became the “Grey Lynn 2030 Transition Community Trust”. The current steering committee of me, Suzanne Kendrick, Dianna Tawharu, Lynn Green has been joined by Colinda Rowe, Charlotte Gordon, Chris Olson and Sarah Guppy to be the first trustees. Suzanne Kendrick, the driving force behind Grey Lynn 2030’s impressive online presence, has taken on the role of Chairperson. Grey Lynn 2030 is now on a more stable footing to support further initiatives such as time banking, energy and water projects. One of the first aims of the Trust is to achieve a financial position to appoint a part time co-ordinator. There is always a warm welcome to anyone who would like to get actively involved with Grey Lynn 2030. There are plenty of opportunities to volunteer with the existing focus groups like Waste Away or develop new projects. Or you might just want to be part of the wider Grey Lynn 2030 network which includes over 4000 friends on Facebook, a regular newsletter and an active website at www.greylynn2030.co.nz Personally I have gained so much since attending my first Grey Lynn 2030 meeting. I’ve met great people, learnt new skills and received vital support to help me get elected onto the local board. I am delighted that Grey Lynn 2030 has now got a secure, sustainable future as a new Trust. (PIPPA COOM) PN

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LOCAL NEWS: DEIRDRE ROELANTS

9 BOISTEROUS BLOOMSDAY ON K ROAD, SATURDAY 16 JUNE 16 June is the literary feast day of the greatest English-language novel of the 20th century, Ulysses. For on that long, lingering, legendary date in 1904, Leopold Bloom, wandering Jew and melancholic hero of James Joyce’s comic masterpiece, set about his droll odyssey round Dublin.

A NEW ZEALAND FIRST Landscape Architect, Daniel Tohill is heavily into permaculture and sustainability. His built straw bale house on the edge of the Kaipara has a waste disposal system. The grey water was filtered through gravel beds where reeds and other water plants grew and he noticed that when it flowed out the other end it was crystal clear. This phenomena gave him the idea of creating a natural, biological swimming pool. Doing things the sustainable way is always on his mind and not wanting to swim in a chlorinated pool or a dirty little swimming hole, he built one for himself. Next, he built another for an enlightened client in Mahurangi. Like Daniel’s, it’s still running beautifully clear 16 years later. Daniel thought his concept was unique till he did some research and found similar systems had been used in Europe for the last 35 years. His reaction? “Damn, not new, but at least New Zealand new.”

While brave Ulysses in Homer’s Odyssey roamed ten years over ten seas before returning home at last to his faithful wife Penelope, timid Bloom, advertising canvasser and wounded cuckold, spends but a day and night, 16 June, out and about on Dublin streets and parlours before returning in the early hours to his faithless wife, Molly. The consequence of all this is that every 16 June Bloom’s perambulations round Dublin are remembered and re-enacted around the globe. In Auckland, a boisterous Bloomsday cabaret has been celebrated every year in the red-light district of Karangahape Road. This year, like last, the show will be at The Thirsty Dog. Relishing in the Jewishness of Poldy Bloom, the Auckland show presents itself as “the only Hiberno-Hebrew Bloomsday in the known world” and features an international line-up. Music comes from Grey Lynn’s own chanteuse Linn Lorkin and top klezmer exponents The Jews Brothers Band. As well there’s opera from Japanese mezzo-soprano Yuko Takahashi and performers that include the singing tenor Chris Trotter, international busker Farrell Cleary and fabulous Robyn Malcolm from Outrageous Fortune - who was such a sensation last year. PN THIRSTY DOG HOTEL, Karangahape Road, Saturday night, 16 June, 7.30pm - 10.30pm.

When he built his own pool some frogs took up residence in it and suddenly there were millions of tadpoles enjoying the pristine water. Daniel was dismayed at the prospect of a large frog population creating as much noise in his rural retreat as motorway traffic, but help was at hand. Saviours in the shape of kingfishers arrived and in no time the pool was free of the invaders. Apparently there’s a saying in permaculture that the problem is the solution, so for a while Daniel had too many tadpoles and a kingfisher deficiency but in the end the imbalance was righted, much to his relief. Thirteen years passed before his pools attracted a wider interest here then suddenly orders for them started to happen. He has completed seven around the country so far and is currently installing one in a very large garden on Richmond Road. He’s also doing two in Christchurch and a massive one at a retreat near Featherston. The pools are divided into a swimming area surrounded by a shallower excavation with a layer of stones that is planted with water species such as reeds, water lilies and irises. These filter the nitrates and phosphates in the water and stop algae from forming. The water gets pumped from skimmers, just as in a normal swimming pool, into perforated pipes under the gravel, then clean water percolates up again. The pools can be any depth, shape or size from olympic standard to a plunge pool in a tiny garden. For the first couple of years the plants need to be tended as in a conventional garden but once they are established the pools are virtually maintenance free. The cost of a ten by four metre version is between $25,000 to $30,000 and takes about two months to install. The wetland is established on a one to one ratio so it also measures ten by four metres. The swimming area always has a liner which can be concrete, fibreglass, pvc or even an old para rubber pool. Conventional swimming pools are really easy to convert and does away with all the chlorine and chemicals so injurious to health. The natural pools are an eco system with all the micro organisms that keep the water clean and they are teeming with microscopic life. They are safe for birds to drink from and goldfish or grass carp can even be introduced. The fish help keep unwanted insects away and reduced nutrients in the water restrict their growth and breeding. Daniel’s clients are mainly people moving out into the country to little farms wanting to be more self reliant and get the productivity of the land up and running. He comes up with a master plan that incorporates everything sustainable. He also does big projects, presently a park in Glenorchy and another in Northern Queensland. He runs permaculture courses throughout the country and is starting one in Japan in January. All this activity doesn’t leave much time for swimming pools but to his delight his son is coming aboard to run that part of the business. To see how beautiful these pools are go to www.sustainablehabitats.co.nz and view the many photos on the site. Believe me, to see one is to want one! PN (DEIRDRE ROELANTS)

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Grey Lynn’s HERSHAL and LINN LORKIN standing with James Joyce outside the THIRSTY DOG. PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


LOCAL NEWS 9 IMMIGRATION ASSISTANCE ON K’ROAD AT GLOBAL VISAS, WE KNOW EVERYBODY’S NEEDS ARE DIFFERENT. Whether your requirements are for an individual, a family or an entire organisation, we can supply and manage the right solution to meet and exceed your expectations. Our company has been working from the same office in Karangahape Road for 18 years and our team of four licensed advisers are friendly and highly trained. We are happy to welcome Allister Simpson into our team. Allister operated a successful tourism business in Queenstown for seven years before becoming an Immigration advisor in the U.K in 2005 for those seeking a new life in New Zealand and Australia. He has seven years experience as an immigration consultant and has held a full licence from the IAA since licensing began in 2009. His overseas experience and local knowledge means Global Visas clients receive exceptional service. Allister has an understanding of the needs and concerns of migrants of different cultures and can ensure the best result – a visa! Since its establishment in 1994, Global Visas has been working with individuals, families, small businesses, employment agencies and travel agencies and is an active member of the K’Road business association. We are dedicated to giving a high quality service and our experience and skill gives us a competitive edge. We have successfully handled many complex and difficult cases including permanent residence, work, student and business visas as well as over-stayers and Ministerial appeals. PN GLOBAL VISAS - Call T: 09 358 0018 or visit us at 501 Karangahape Road.

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AUCKLAND WRITERS AND READERS FESTIVAL This annual festival celebrating books and ideas has a growing national audience. This year’s programme showcased 23 international writers alongside more than 90 New Zealanders in sessions covering everything from serious fiction to popular reads, poetry and spoken word performances, science, history, religion, biography, food and wine, film, art, music and fashion. The highly successful ‘True Stories Told Live’ format, developed by the New Zealand Book Council, returned to launch this year’s festival at the New Zealand Listener Gala Night on Thursday 10 May. A number of this year’s stellar guests delivered an hour and a half of live and true storytelling that was MC’d by Carol Hirschfeld who is no stranger to New Zealand’s television audience. Carole Beu’s life is immersed in the world of books and reading. She is the owner of The Women’s Bookshop on Ponsonby Road, a member of the board of Booksellers New Zealand and a trustee of the Auckland Writers & Readers Festival. Carol also regularly reviews books on the radio and for Triangle Television’s Let’s Talk programme. Ian Wedde has published dozens of works including collections of poetry, novels, art catalogues, and a monograph on the artist Bill Culbert. As New Zealand’s current Poet Laureate he promotes the reading and writing of poetry to both children and adults. He contributed to the festival’s schools programme and participated in the Hone Tuwhare tribute. Albert Wendt, novelist, poet, short story writer, playwright and painter, is Emeritus Professor of English at The University of Auckland and he also joined other poets in the tribute to Hone Tuwhare, our best loved poet ever. Finlay Macdonald is a widely respected contributor to various newspapers and publications around the country. He is the former editor of the Listener and commissioning editor for Penguin Books, and now writes columns, and social commentary. Greg McGee talked with him about his genre-wide writing for the screen, stage and page. Finlay also spoke with Jesmyn Ward who the ‘Publishers Weekly’ has labelled “a refreshing new voice in American literature.”

have had to be the highlight of the festival when Brian joined the famous Irish writer for readings and conversation. No book festival would be complete without book blogger supremo, Graham Beattie’s input. Graham is a full-time book blogger and reviewer following a highly successful career as a publisher. His blog is one of the country’s most read, receiving in excess of 10,000 visitors a week. He talked to award-winning crime writer, Peter James about his successful career, whose books have sold more than eleven million copies worldwide. Stephanie Johnson is the author of two collections of poetry, three collections of short stories and nine novels. She is a founding trustee of the Auckland Writers and Readers Festival, and its acting artistic director. Her latest book, The Open World was published in April 2012. Stephanie chaired a session with Charlotte Wood, a rising star of Australian fiction. Charlotte also writes a popular food blog and has just published a book of food writing, ‘Love and Hunger’. For the Sunday Gallery Series, award winning journalist, Josie McNaught introduced, Dick Frizzell and Doris De Pont. Dick guided the audience through a selection of paintings from his book ‘It’s all about the Image’ and explained why they have resonated with him. Doris provided an illustrated romp through the history of iconic black outfits throughout New Zealand fashion from the pioneering women of The Piano era, to sports teams, the Fred Dagg singlet and leading contemporary designers. Jenny Carlyon has worked as an independent historian on a variety of projects. She is the co-author with Diana Morrow of ‘Urban Village: A History of Ponsonby, Freemans Bay and St Mary’s Bay’. Jenny presented a session on their more recent book ‘A Fine Prospect: A History of Remuera, Meadowbank and St Johns’. So there we have it, a run-down on eleven local residents from Ponsonby’s wider area who contributed to one of New Zealand’s major cultural events. PN (DEIRDRE ROELANTS)

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Brian Edwards is one of New Zealand’s most respected broadcasters and writers. His career spans every branch of the media - columnist, author, radio and television interviewer, media commentator and consultant. ‘An evening with Roddy Doyle‘ would

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NIKKI KAYE: AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP BUDGET 2012 – FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY WITH A FOCUS ON GROWTH Auckland Central is home to a wide variety of businesses - from our country’s largest corporations in the CBD to small businesses in Ponsonby. All these businesses have one thing in common: to be successful, you need a good plan and a responsible budget. This is especially true when times are tough. Through talking with business owners around the electorate I know that the last few years have been difficult for so many business owners. When we came into office in 2008 the financial crisis had reached its peak and the New Zealand economy, which had gone into recession before anyone else, had shrunk three per cent in a year, topping off five years of historically low growth. Between 2000 and 2009, total core Crown expenditure jumped more than 80 per cent - from $35 billion to $64 billion. Treasury forecasts indicated that if no action was taken, the New Zealand economy would be trapped in a spiral that would see increasing debt, rising interest costs, and the likelihood of no future surpluses. Over the past three years, we have remained committed to good, responsible economic management. We have worked hard to put the economy on a sound footing that is based on more savings, more exports and more productive investment, while relying less on debt, and unsustainable government spending. At the same time, we have tried to protect our most vulnerable and reduce the sharp edge of the recession for families and businesses. Despite tight financial times, we have announced big funding boosts to improve services in health and education. Over the last 3 and a half years we have started to see improvements in the health of New Zealanders. We’ve dramatically improved immunisation rates for children, boosted elective operations, reduced waiting times for cancer treatment and emergency care, and put more doctors and nurses on the frontline. We know there is still so much more to do. As part of Budget 2012, we have announced a $101 million boost for surgery and cancer services. This will provide more elective operations and faster services for cancer patients. These funds will reduce waiting times for MRI scans, CT scans, and other vital diagnostic tests. We have also announced $144 million for disability support to help more disabled people get care in the community, while ensuring residential support is available for those who need it. These funding increases come from savings in health and other areas of government. To help meet cost pressures and fund new health initiatives, we will increase prescription charges from $3 to $5. This is the first increase in 20 years. We will ensure that no person or family will pay more than $40 extra a year for prescriptions and prescriptions for children under six will remain free.

The Government’s books are on track to be back in surplus by 2014/15, for the first time since the global financial crisis and worldwide recession. We believe we need to start creating a buffer for the next potential global economic crisis. Surpluses give us options and a greater degree of security which we simply do not have while running deficits. This is the second year in a row that the Government has delivered a zero budget to ensure we can get into surplus and have more options in the future. Our next steps are focussed on investing more in science and innovation to help develop the research and innovation base of our economy. Budget 2012 is about building a more competitive economy that supports jobs, higher incomes, and allows New Zealand to earn its way in the world. (NIKKI KAYE, AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP) PN

LET’S GET PHYSICAL Club Physical on K Road has been in operation since 2004 but now has new owner operators, Marco Blum and Munisha Harverye. Marco and Munisha bought the gym in April this year and their aim is to develop a fitness centre where people can have fun exercising, enhance the quality of people’s lives, and build a culture of wellness. And the good news, there are no joining fees. They are both passionate about keeping fit and healthy and they want to encourage others to take up the challenge to also be fit and healthy. The facilities at Club Physical offer a wide range of areas to work out in including cardiovascular training and two weight areas with one area specifically for women. And if you want a private trainer then they have trainers there to assist. If boxing is more your forte then you will be pleased to know they have a boxing room run by a dedicated boxing instructor who generously gives his time for free - purely because of his love for the sport. At Club Physical they have developed a series of very successful fitness programmes to ensure each member gets the results they aim for. The gym offers a wide range of classes to choose from including Energiser, Zumba, boot camp type classes and Awesome Abs to name a few. All these classes are included free within your membership. Opening hours are Monday to Thursday 5.30am - 9pm, Friday 5.30am - 8.30pm and Saturday and Sunday 8am - 4pm. PN CLUB PHYSICAL, 184 Karangahape Road T: 09 414 3973 www.clubpysical.co.nz

We are also increasing education spending for the fourth year in a row, with an extra $512 million over four years. We want all children to leave school with the skills they need to reach their potential in a modern economy. We are investing more in teacher development, collaborate on an appraisal system, provide stronger mentoring, and introduce new qualifications for teachers and principals. To help pay for this, we are standardising teacher-student ratios in years two to ten, and lowering the ratio in years 11 - 13. This will free up an average of $43 million in each of the next four years to lift teacher quality and achievement in schools.

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9 PONSONBY U3A: MAY 2012 Ten minute speaker, Anne Macfarlane entitled her talk ‘Collectives and Co-operatives’ and proceeded to tell of her involvement with five such groups. The first was the Mairangi Bay Play Centre, where parents did everything from painting buildings to cleaning, landscaping and gardening, and training in suitable programmes and activities for the children. A babysitting co-operative followed with between 30 and 40 families involved. The next venture was the founding of Rosedale School by a group of 15 families, who for a peppercorn rental, adapted a farmhouse, landscaped the grounds, rostered help and hired a teacher. Involvement with the Broadsheet collective was next. This was a monthly feminist magazine published in Whanganui with three paid staff and a large number of volunteers. Her final group was a vegetable co-operative on Waiheke Island. These brought back memories for many members of similar collectives they had been involved with. The guest speaker was Catherine Lomas, Head of Operations at Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki. She spoke to an excellent series of slides starting with the preliminary design in 1884 - 1885, when it was the Free Library Art Gallery, and continuing through to discuss the redevelopment and re-opening on 3 September 2011. She also spoke of recent, present and future exhibitions. In the past eight months over 500,000 people have visited the gallery enjoying some of the 800 works of art on display, only a fraction of the over 15,000 works held. Apart from the enjoyable visitor experience of the soaring kauri ceilings, sourced sustainably from trees felled in storms, the American oak or the stone floors complete with fossils and the visual connection between the Gallery and Albert Park, the Auckland Art Gallery now meets the standards of all international galleries. She demonstrated how collections can now be driven straight into the gallery and offloaded efficiently and safely, when previously they had to be offloaded outside and winched in. She used the phrase ‘connecting art and people’ several times and spoke of the programmes for children, gallery tours for tourists and visitors, and holiday workshops.

DR PONSONBY CARING ‘FOR OUR PEOPLE IN THE HOOD’ DR PONSONBY WHITE CROSS HAS BEEN SERVICING THE NEEDS OF THE greater Ponsonby area for over 20 years! When you’re sick or have an accident and can’t see your GP straight away, their friendly staff is there to help. Open seven days week from 7.30am - 8pm (except some public holidays) you don’t need an appointment to see them. They prioritise patients needs (the sickest patients or seriously injured take priority). However their aim is always to see everyone as soon as possible. Now their service is FREE for accidents so there is no patient co-payment for any ACC acceptable claim for an injury. This even includes the X-ray service on site. The clinic is ACC accredited which means they have to be audited every 18 months (to a high medical standard) to ensure the best level of service and patient management for the local community. The Medical Director Dr Rob Kofoed has been at the clinic for the past 20 years and is a highly experienced Urgent Care practitioner. Also there are their regular experienced doctors with a wealth of knowledge and friendly attitude. Doctors Adam Afraz, Naomi Bell, Rama Velalagan, Aideen Collins and Sheryl Larsen are available at different times during the week. Charge Nurse, Alison Simmons has been practising for over 20 years in Urgent Care and oversees the nursing and clinical team. Administration Manager Kimm Pak ensures the smooth running of the clinic, and keeps the doctors and nurses in line! “We value patient feedback so we can continually monitor and improve our service to you ‘Our people in the Hood’.” PN WHITE CROSS, 202 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 5555 www.whitecross.co.nz

The ‘Degas to Dali’ collection on loan from the National Gallery of Scotland consisting of 63 paintings, 10 sculptures and six etchings will be on display in the gallery for a few more weeks. The Ponsonby U3A ‘gallery visits’ group very much enjoyed their April tour of this exhibition. A visit to the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki, is an enjoyable experience that enriches the understanding and meaning of art. The next U3A meeting will be held on Friday 8 June at 9.45am at the Leys Institute. The 10 minute speaker will be Judith Crimmins followed by Guest speaker Ken Ring who will talk about predicting weather by the moon. Visitors welcome. PN (NOELINE CREIGHTON) is the Head of Operations for the new Auckland Art Gallery.

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WHITE CROSS PONSONBY, Back Row: AFRAZ ADAM, KIMM PAK, ALISON BERRY, ROB KOFOED Front Row: NAOMI BELL, SHANANA BEGUM, MICHELLE BLACK, ALISON SIMMONS

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9 LOCAL NEWS FREE ENTRY TO MOTAT FOR ALL IN JUNE THANKS TO VOLUNTEERS Maintaining MOTAT as New Zealand’s leading transport and technology museum is a huge undertaking – a task which would be impossible without a loyal team of over 300 volunteers. As part of New Zealand Volunteer Awareness Week (17–23 June), MOTAT is opening its gates to the public free of charge throughout the whole month of June in celebration of its hard-working volunteers who ensure the collection is beautifully restored and maintained for everyone to enjoy. Spread across 40 acres, MOTAT will take all visitors on an interactive journey to explore and discover the achievements and stories that have helped shape New Zealand from the 1800s to today. Explore the enormous range of collection objects, stories and interactive activities that MOTAT has to offer including 1950s themed exhibition “I am the Last Tram” or iconic kiwi culture exhibition “Signposts to Godzone.” Learn about the wonders of New Zealand’s aviation history at MOTAT’s remarkable Aviation Display Hall. The 3,000m2 custom designed Display Hall recently won a New Zealand Architecture award for sustainability and currently houses an impressive collection of MOTAT aircraft, including a Lancaster Bomber, Cessna and Tiger Moth. Before you visit, find out when is the right time to catch the different volunteer teams in action as they care for New Zealand heritage objects using authentic techniques. Take a behind the scenes tour of MOTAT’s impressive rail collection from Monday to Friday and learn the special stories from these volunteers. Experience a real Blacksmith in action on Sundays or witness live aviation restoration work on Wednesdays. MOTAT’s offer of free general admission is unlimited from 1-30 June 2012, so visitors can spend days on end uncovering the mysteries and excitement of MOTAT’s wonderful exhibitions and activities. PN MOTAT, 805 Great North Road and Meola Road, Western Springs www.motat.org.nz

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GINGER GIBBS’ LEGACY TO AUCKLAND Ginger Gibbs had a way with the ladies, that’s for sure. He was famous for his chat-up lines, but even more notable as a fisherman, restaurateur, biker, powerboat racer and pirate. When he died in 2007 Auckland lost one of its more colourful characters. He ran away to serve as a cabin boy on a ship when only 14 and his life on the ocean waves lasted for 28 years before he established Swashbucklers Pub on the edge of the shore at Westhaven Marina. According to Martin Read, author of ‘The Auckland Pub Guide’, Swashbucklers is reminiscent of the harbourside pubs found in the villages of Devon and Cornwall. This is not surprising when it was set up by a man who was the son of a whaler, born in a lighthouse, and who made more than 200 Tasman crossings on ships, the last as the Flying Pirate. Ginger Gibbs and his Swashbucklers Flying Pirate Challenge Crew broke the trans-Tasman record for sailing from the Sydney Harbour Bridge to the Auckland Harbour Bridge. There’s a glass trophy at the bar with exact details of this achievement. The Swashbucklers Flying Pirates RIB Team set a new world record on Sunday 4 March 2007. To circumnavigate New Zealand in a custom built powerboat was skipper Ginger’s dream but sadly he died suddenly before the challenge was to start. His brother, Shag Gibbs stepped in as fourth crew member and the team carried on to ensure the record would be beaten in his honour. As you enter through the front door of Swashbucklers the first thing you see is a semi -nude figurehead of a woman fixed to a tree in the centre of the room. Life buoys, pulley blocks, ships bells and all sorts of nautical accoutrements are scattered throughout the entire building. Ship name boards, navigation lights, lighthouse etchings, signage, gaffs and fenders are fixed to the wooden walls. An assortment of tools, fishing equipment, foreign number plates and ships maps are suspended from the corrugated iron ceiling. The furniture consists of tall tables and slabs of kauri fixed to the wall.

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There’s almost an onsite clientele from the adjacent boat yards and the marine based businesses that abound in Westhaven and its environs. Swashbucklers extends on to what must be the largest deck in Auckland where, during summer, people sit on the waterfront and enjoy a great view of the boats in the harbour. Martin gives points to the staff for homely attentiveness. When he dined there on a hot day they spotted his dog and brought out a large bowl of water for the thirsty animal. The beautifully decorated function room is ideal for a bit of a do and can accommodate large numbers. The bar food is predominantly fish as it was in Ginger’s day when he would bring his own daily catch to the table. Nowadays it comes from the nearby fish market. During his lifetime Ginger evinced plenty of macho bravado and many of his exploits were just a little ahead of the law. He could drink most people under the table but once he gained a liquor license for his restaurant and bar, he rarely touched alcohol. The rough edged drunken fisherman’s enterprise grew in popularity and became known as the finest seafood restaurant in town. The new mantle of ‘respectability’ did not change the essence of the man who retained his colourful vocabulary, his penchant for the ladies and readiness to tell a good yarn. More than 600 people attended his funeral and he was laid to rest in his chosen spot at the Tryphena cemetery on Great Barrier Island. Swashbucklers is not quite what it was when Ginger reigned supreme. It receives mixed reviews, some very good, some less so, but the more than generous servings are still appreciated and it’s retained a unique nautical ambience. According to one customer, “It’s quite cool being able to smell the salt in the air and hear the creak of ropes against the wharf while you’re dining out on fish.” (DEIRDRE ROELANTS) PN

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LOCAL NEWS 9 A QUINTESSENTIAL PONSONBYITE ELIAS HANLON Elias Hanlon, owner of the Ponsonby Pool Hall on Ponsonby Road, was born and bred in Ponsonby in 1955. That was a year before I left school, and also a year before Peter Jones scored that famous try against the 1956 Springboks, and uttered those immortal words which shocked the nation, “I’m absolutely buggered.”

After three years in the bank, Elias decided he wanted to be an entrepreneur. So at the tender age of 19 he bought a Pizza Bar in New North Road. He left home, made and sold pizza, and lived above the shop. When a planned motorway right through his shop pushed him out, Elias had difficulty getting re-established. He marked time cleaning on the early morning shift at the Bus Terminal. “Nothing like cleaning all night toilets and sweeping streets to bring you right back to earth,” muses Elias. After another few ventures, including a partnership which introduced freshly squeezed orange juice to cafes and restaurants - one of the first was Ponsonby’s Bronze Goat, an opportunity to get back into business in Ponsonby arose, and Elias bought into the College Hill Billiard Hall. He was still only 34 but demolition stepped in again, once again in the form of bulldozers. The Hydra building came down, rats as big as cats scattering in all directions, and a brand new building which now houses Elias’s old bank ASB, was built. But destiny was on Elias’s side. A new site on Ponsonby Road became available, and one Friday in 1992, Elias, along with friends and followers, moved the pool room, and opened on Ponsonby Road as Ponsonby Pool Hall the following Monday morning. Elias has been there ever since, and is extremely devoted to Ponsonby. He’s never ever been overseas. In the old days people did things for the community out of the goodness of their hearts, Elias asserts. Now they always look for the payback. “Community service has become a commercial commodity.”

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For six years Elias served on the board of the Ponsonby Business Association. He says many see Ponsonby Road as “the yellow brick road,” but it often winds up, “the boulevard of broken dreams.” Elias Hanlon is not impressed with some of the activities of the Business Association. “We left the board with a foolproof five year plan for management of staff, with on-going systems in place,” Elias says. “You can make something foolproof, but you can’t make it idiot proof,” he complains.

photography: Jo Barrett

Elias Hanlon - ASB Bank Teller. That was Elias’s first job, in Ponsonby of course!

He gave his time freely and without thought of personal gain, something he believes does not extend to many of those people he served with on the board. Those times were frustratingly satisfying because Elias is an eternally positive and congenial individual. His philosophy is to give a little back, and to get up every morning and face the world cheerfully and with equanimity. Elias Hanlon runs a good ship and has changed the image of a pool hall from a den of iniquity into a hospitality business of which both he and Ponsonby can be proud. A survivor of a 1997 heart attack Elias Hanlon loves life, and is a perpetually cheery presence on the streets of Ponsonby. (JOHN ELLIOTT) PN

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FASHION + STYLE WORLD FAMOUS AND IN WESTMERE EMILY PERKINS MAY HAVE BASED HER BOOKER PRIZE-TIPPED NOVEL THE Forrests in the Auckland suburb of Westmere, but the suburb is also famous for being the home of another international New Zealand author. Stacy Gregg, writer of the best-selling children’s Pony Club Secrets and Pony Club Rivals series, lives nearby the local Garnet Road shops in a Spanish mission-style house she describes as “a remaining relic of the 1920s in the street.” Stacy has spent much of her adult life in the Greater Ponsonby area, and we were curious to know how she got there. She was born in Melbourne (where her father was working as a geologist) but grew up in Titirangi in ‘70s hippy splendour complete with pottery kiln - but lacking in a pony, as there’s no room in the bush. When Stacy was 10 the family moved to her mother’s hometown, Ngaruawahia. She left Ngaruawahia High School for Kings College and started flatting in Auckland after that. Thinking she might like to be a copywriter, Stacy spent a year at advertising school at ATI and went on to become general assistant to the advertising department at ACP, who at the time owned Metro and had just bought More magazine. The “world’s worst secretary”, she was fired from the position “with three months of unposted mail in my desk drawer” and simultaneously rehired as a staff writer. Living with her father and sister in Howick she wrote her first published article for Metro editor Warwick Roger. At that time if you missed the last evening bus from the city to Howick, you had to wait until 6am for the first morning bus, and Stacy’s article namechecked underground haunts like Ponsonby’s Open Late Cafe. Stacy went on to work for Lindsay Dawson at More, which she loved. She credits Dawson for giving her a kind of apprenticeship and despite the fact that Stacy hadn’t been to journalism school, she loved being thrust into feature writing. Meantime, Stacy held a second job. “I used to work upstairs in the bar at the Gluepot Tavern when it was still there at Three Lamps (working at More Magazine during the day and bartending while the bands played at night). Stacy was now living in St Mary’s Bay, which was cheap at the time - she paid $60/week rent. She lived with musician Greg Fleming and art director Richard Kingsford and occasionally Wellington poet Anna Jackson. The quartet flatted together in varying configurations for some nine years - in Arthur Street, John Street and Shelly Beach Road. After a bit of freelancing Stacy went to RTR Countdown “to be a rock journalist” she laughs. “I didn’t know much about music, but I liked going to gigs and having my name on the door!” The ensuing years saw her take on a wide variety of roles, from Shortland Street publicist, to freelancing for Paula Ryan at Fashion Quarterly - and living where Kermadec is now, in an arty, low-fi concrete loft-type space. “I had no kitchen, but I could skateboard to my bathroom.” Living in Point Chevalier with her partner Michael Lamb and their baby daughter, Isadora, Stacy found newspaper freelancing too hard to juggle. “So Michael suggested that I write a novel.” She decided to write the sort of book she would have loved to read when she was a kid – a gripping mystery that mixed the supernatural with the classic pony genre. That book would sit in the ‘slush pile’ at Harper Collins UK for the next five years, during which time Stacy became fashion and beauty editor at Sunday magazine. She spent time with Style.com writer Tim Blanks at the Paris collections and was impressed by the immediacy and sheer fun of what the online journalists did. Long story short, she and Michael launched fashion website Runway Reporter, to instant and rather large success. “It was only ever intended to be what is nowadays a blog” Stacy says. “But almost before we knew it we had staff and advertisers.” Still performing her “day job” and raising her daughter, a call from Harper Collins UK asking for not just the rights to her first Pony Club Secrets manuscript, but offering a four-book deal, left Stacy in tears - which like a good, sensible horsey girl she promptly dried off, selling Runway Reporter to ACP just six months into the website’s existence. Stacy commenced writing what now totals 17 books, each averaging about 50,000 words. She is currently working on a new novel for HarperCollins UK which is due to launch in Frankfurt in October. And yes – she has a horse “Not in Westmere obviously.” Some people commute for work, but Stacy works at home in her garden shed and then commutes to the pony in Coatesville instead. (JULIE ROULSTON) PN

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FASHION + STYLE SERVILLES AMBASSADORS Top young stylists from the five Auckland Servilles salons met at Servilles Ponsonby in late May, to compete in a session styling challenge under the tutelage of Louise Pilkington and Redken’s Sunny Humphries. Ponsonby News’ own Julie Roulston judged Jennifer Lunn and Jessica Honey to be the winning team, complimenting them on their acknowledgement of their model’s stature and face shape, their use of contrasting smoothness to offset textured work, and the definition of their style via the sweeping front fringe. PN

Back row: MANJU BATHIJA, CLAIRE CROUSE, MORAH ELLA, VANESSA CROSBIE, JESSICA HONEY Middle row: CAMPBELL GORDON, JENNIFER LUN, STEFANY PENNEY Front row: SHARN LEATHEM, LOUISE PILKINGTON, JASMINE DOUGHERTY, SUNNY HUMPHRIES

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The SERVILLES Newmarket team’s winning look

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FASHION + STYLE SIX KEEPS IT LOCAL WITH NEW STYLES ARRIVING WEEKLY NEW TO THE PONSONBY STRIP, SIX BOUTIQUE IS A COLLECTIVE EFFORT OF six local designers: Harriett Falvey, Ribbon on a Bombshell, Selector, Hannah Morgan, Chelsea Gale and a collection of Jeweller Friends. The store has racks loaded with locally designed and produced ranges, each with a distinctive style and flair. Harriet Falvey designs fun and feminine signature pieces. Ribbon on a Bombshell creates bold and bright colour-ways. Selector specialises in yummy winter knits. Hannah Morgan makes gorgeous hand-worked pieces. Chelsea Gale creates cute styles in beautiful prints. The store is open Monday to Friday 10am - 6pm, Saturday and Sunday 10am - 5pm SIX BOUTIQUE, 95b Ponsonby Road T: 09 378 2147 www.sixponsonby.co.nz PN

AT KILT WE LOVE WHAT WE DO! Founded 12 years ago at the home of owner Melissa Williams -Lamb, KILT has now grown to seven boutiques throughout the country with several more planned along with an online store. There is a real passion amongst all KILTies, they truly love coming to work each day; a very close knit bunch that refer to themselves as family. ‘We love communicating, we call ourselves, over sharers anonymous.’ From the word go KILT has involved staff and customers in the decision making process. ‘We love hearing from our customers.’ Each boutique emails a weekly report to the design team; it is full of ideas from the staff (KILTies) as well as customer comments. We love change and welcome all opinions from our KILTies and customers. The design team and management use this feedback for inspiration for future designs and to evolve the company. The highly motivated and talented design team takes their inspiration from retro themes, op shop expeditions or simply what they want to wear. Each new design goes through a wear-ability test before it is launched in the boutiques. KILT is very proud to have all of their clothing designed and made in New Zealand. The design team creates new designs weekly to keep things fresh. An added bonus of being New Zealand made is they can have a new design in their boutiques within two weeks of receiving customer feedback. Customers can enjoy extra benefits by becoming a Friend of KILT at one of our boutiques or at www.kilt.co.nz PN KILT, 271A Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 1222

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WIN A TO-DIE-FOR ‘PONSONBY’ WARDROBE VALUED AT OVER $4000 during June 2012 - CONDITIIONS APPLY

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FASHION + STYLE PUBLICITY PR IS BORN New Zealand’s Best PR Personality* Angelique Fris-Taylor has decided to go back to what she loves doing best - boutique beauty PR. Publicity PR was launched on 14 May 2012 with Angelique, who founded Fresh PR 10 years ago, at the helm. Publicity PR is a boutique specialist agency that represents hair, beauty, lifestyle and fashion brands. Given Angelique’s more than 25 years in the industry it’s no surprise that Publicity PR’s client list includes industry heavyweights like Joico Haircare, Fudge Haircare, Caci Clinic, Murad Skincare, Smashbox Cosmetics, ORLY, St Tropez, The Jojoba Company, Ryder Salon and Shape Salon.

Providing the perfect launchpad for Publicity PR was Colin Mathura-Jeffree’s Masquerade Party, where over 550 guests from all over the world joined Colin to celebrate his 40th birthday. From family to fashionistas, media head-honchos to television and radio personalities, Publicity PR managed the hundreds of invites and RSVPs and made sure this exclusive event attracted the right publicity. PN PUBLICITY PR www.publicitypr.co.nz T: 09 950 4944 *ACP Beauty Awards 2012

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Internationally renowned fashion photographer and Ponsonby resident, CRAIG OWEN, tragically passed away last month. This image from “Camorra Widow” was his final collaboration with DANNY PATO for D&M HAIR DESIGN. Our thoughts are with his friends and family, in particular his beautiful wife, GRACE. PN

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photography: Craig Owen

Assisting Angelique is Account Manager Kristen Allison, who brings previous experience in corporate account management from London along with a passion for creative writing, online blogging and endless beauty tips and tricks.


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FASHION + STYLE CALLING HOME-SEWING FASHIONISTAS REDESIGN, RECYCLE & REFASHION THE NEW ZEALAND FASHION Museum’s upcoming exhibition HOME SEWN, to be held in September 2012, is a view of the evolution of home sewing in New Zealand. With a focus on the fashion garments, the machines, the technology plus illustrations, photographs, newspaper and magazine features, it will reignite a memory or create a newfound interest for anyone who has a passion for fashion. Finding that special item can be elusive. Way back, when availability was marginal, necessity harboured a home sewing industry. Today there’s a resurgence for different reasons. Self expression and the need for novelty are nurturing a newfound interest in creating your own clothes.

REUSE YOUR HEIRLOOM JEWELLERY TODAY Local Ponsonby jeweller Auckland Ring Company are bespoke jewellers, meaning their jewellery is one-off and custom designed just for you. Conveniently located in Three Lamps, they provide everything from bespoke jewellery design through to faithfully remaking jewellery for insurance claims, redesigning jewellery into something fashionable and new, repairing and restoring jewellery to its former glory, independent valuations, jewellery cleaning, and duty free for your annual winter escape. Earlier this month was noted on their Facebook page (18,000+ followers) they recently redesigned a 1950s Sapphire and Diamond gold brooch into a gorgeous new dress ring. Economic for today, as we all have old gold jewellery hiding away that we don’t wear for various reasons and being able to recycle and reuse the same gold and gemstones makes for a great saving and it’s bespoke! Call in and see them, and while you’re there ask them to give your jewellery a winter ‘warrant of fitness’. They’ll check your jewellery and make sure everything is secure and not about to break. Tell them you read this in the Ponsonby News and they’ll give your jewellery a complimentary clean and polish so your jewellery will look sparkling new again. PN AUCKLAND RING COMPANY, 275 Ponsonby Road, Three Lamps T: 09 376 0275 www.aucklandringcompany.co.nz

If we hark back to pioneer times needlecraft was taught at the knee. Proficiency was handed down from mother to daughter when New Zealand’s very remoteness demanded it – even for the most basic of wardrobe needs. And though ultimately the choice widened, for any woman who had an inkling of style, home sewing – whether by you or your dressmaker – was the only means of getting it. The figures related to the dress pattern industry even as late as the seventies are proof. Nowadays the choice is almost overwhelming. When anything goes, the getting of what you want to wear can be equally as challenging. Much easier then to simply sit down and sew it yourself. And increasingly women are doing just that. HOME SEWN will mine this rich history and resurgence of appeal. The Fashion Museum is seeking material and stories from private collections: examples of home sewn fashion garments, the paper patterns or the illustrations that inspired them and the tales behind their creation. PN For further information contact Doris de Pont: doris@fashionmuseum.co.nz M: 021 680 860

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FASHION + STYLE

JULIE ROULSTON EVOLU’S GORGEOUS NEW LUXURY FRAGRANCE Evolu is thrilled to announce a beautiful celebration of ‘coming of age’: their gorgeous new luxury fragrance, ‘Adolescent’. This limited-edition eau de toilette marks a milestone in growth for Evolu: their first 15 years in business. Unveiled for the first time to guests at their recent 15th birthday event, ‘Adolescent’ signifies an exciting future for Evolu, and as founder Kati Kasza says, “it brings the brand’s spirited personality into play. For me, fragrance is all about feeling good – it’s the last thing you put on before you head out into the day, and is something that lingers with you.” This fresh, oriental fragrance displays multiple aspects, including sharp peppery notes and spices, mixed with sensual jasmine and rose flowers. It also has undercurrents of amber, vanilla and tonka bean and was developed in collaboration with a French perfumier to create the final sensational result. They’ve created a very special bottle and handmade giftbox to complete the beautiful product.

JAMIE, MYKEN with FRANKIE and KURA

EVOLU CELEBRATES 15 YEARS Evolu hosted a party at its Williamson Avenue premises on 15 May, to celebrate “15 years of beauty and celebrating life.” The party also saw the launch of the brand’s limited edition fragrance Adolescent and its charitable initiative.

While celebrating 15 years of beauty, ‘Adolescent’ also celebrates life. Evolu will donate all of the profits from the launch of the fragrance to the Sweet Louise Charitable Trust www.sweetlouise.co.nz, for whom Kati is an ambassador. Sweet Louise works to help improve on a daily basis the quality of life of those battling secondary breast cancer. As Kati says, “We’d like those who purchase Adolescent to feel good not just by wearing the fragrance, but also knowing they’re helping those who may not be feeling quite as good about the days ahead.” Sue Brewster, CEO of the Trust says that her team were, “delighted when Evolu came on board as a sponsor of Sweet Louise in 2011, and when Kati told us about the Adolescent launch, we were over the moon. The fact that Evolu wanted proceeds to go directly into improving the quality of life for women with secondary breast cancer is testimony to their values as a company.”

GRAHAM TAYLOR and KATI KASZA

Adolescent will be available exclusively from 1 June, at the very special price of $79.99 (usually $139) for 100ml eau de toilette. PN

CHRISTINA WICKSTEAD and JULIE HART

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NEW ZEALAND FASHION WEEK’S MYKEN AND KURA Myken Stewart, brand Manager for New Zealand Fashion Week, has long worked in Greater Ponsonby in Fashion Week’s Sale Street offices, and up until recently had a Pied a Terre in Westmere. Meet Myken’s eight-year-old Chocolate Labrador Kura... How did Kura get her name? She’s named after the restaurant on Queen Street. I only found out a couple of years later that it vaguely translates as ‘sake warehouse’ – which is quite apt for me, but not my dog. I had three names that I tried out over a week which sounded and felt like chocolate. She responded to Kura best, and that was that! How long have you had Kura? I’ve had her six weeks shy of eight years. I got her from the fish and chip shop on the main road in Blenheim. Was there a reason you chose this particular dog/breed? I grew up on our farm with black labs and they were a big part of our family. Kura was landed on me. I was in Tokyo working on Fashion Week stuff and my brother (who was living in Picton at the time) texted me a photo of himself holding a black and a brown lab and said “one of these is yours.” I said Fashion Week was enough and I couldn’t handle a dog as well. I had a rather unfortunate and manipulative Scottish boyfriend at the time and when I got home I discovered he had booked himself a flight to Blenheim to get the dog - without me. I couldn’t let it happen, so I went too and paid more than half (which was still expensive as she cost $1,000) and I got a prenup on the Kura. We broke up three weeks later, as he was only interested in showing off his girls, and was not the father we needed. Needless to say Kura ended up becoming my best cuddly friend and I had to grow up quickly as I had my first fur child as a single mother! What is Kura’s personality like? Like mine a bit. Into her own thing. Busy. Loves relaxing and cuddling. Knows who she is into, and is not afraid to tell who she isn’t, that she’s not. But generally pretty friendly and often tired from long hours at Fashion Week as she comes to work most days. What do you like to do together? Walk on the beach, and when it’s warm, lots of swimming as well. When my man Jamie (McLaughlin, of Marilyn Seyb) and his dog are away Kura sleeps on the bed and she is very like me and takes up more than her half. What’s Kura’s favourite thing to do? She is a Labrador, so it’s eat, scrounge and sleep. She is very good at sleep talking (like me) and she lies on her back with her legs in the air and snores. She now has a step brother (Jamie’s 6 1/2 year old border collie Frankie) and they LOVE hanging out and going on walks and kissing each other. What’s Kura’s favourite food? Um, anything except orange peel. She loves bones and starts to look homeless if she gets her biscuits an hour later than normal. If I’ve had a late night/early morning I usually feed her when I get home so she doesn’t hassle me for food when I’m trying to sleep in. Does she have any animal friends? She loves Frankie and her island mate Oscar and she is like a pea in a pod when she sees her sister Luna – they go nuts. She doesn’t like blue heelers as a rule, as she was attacked by one when she was young. New Zealand Fashion Week 2012 will take place at the Viaduct Events Centre, from 3 to 9 September. PN

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ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE The monthly jottings of a free-spirited Ponsonby dressmaker of the 1920s, as imagined by Angela Lassig. VERMONT STREET 15 JUNE 1925

Dear Letty

Today I’m working on a black crepe dress and matching coat for one of my older regulars. She orders a new black costume every year…always in the best black crepe that I can buy and always in a similar style. She does entrust me with the latitude to embellish it differently each year though. This year I’ve been required to slightly alter the pattern and inset a panel down the centre -front and centre-back that I am in the middle of decorating with a fine black p silk cord which I’m couchingg down in horizontal bands of zigg zagg pattern. The coat will feature a panel of the same down the centre-back. The work is ut quite fast to do and so stylish when completed. monotonous but ust tell you, even though you will find it hard to believe…Great Oh Letty, I must Aunt Edith of Bath sent me a gift! And it isn’t even my birthday! And what quisite pair of jewelled heels that I intend to have attached to a gift…an exquisite ir of black satin evening pumps just as soon as I can. I only my newest pair em to her in passing in a letter sent last October. I had hoped mentioned them that she might consider them for me for Christmas, knowing that she probably rove of such frivolous accessories! So you can imagine how wouldn’t approve amazed I was when I received them. Her letter says that she saw them in ne of her monthly shopping trips and that she couldn’t resist Harrods on one air. She only wishes that she were young enough to wear them buying me a pair. herself ! This iss so unlike Aunt Edith but I’m not complaining! I can’t wait to wear them o be a very special occasion! - it will have to I was going to take them to Mr Mason [ii] as ne a good job with my repairs. he’s always done re so special, I think I’ll give them to Mr But as these are fixx to my shoes. I was so impressed with his Scott [iii] to fi resurrection off a pair of nearly new boots that suffered from ing and a lost heel after a mishap near the Post a muddy soaking ar. I think I told you about the whole humiliating Office last year. tt not only matched the heel perfectly, but managed affair. Mr Scott also to clean, dry and then polish my sodden boots so that they came back to me looking almost as good as when I purchased them! ng’s post I received a lovely postcard of a quaint In this morning’s Cornish villagee scene sent to me by Sybil Maxwell [iv]. I’m sure that ybil and her sister Josephine in an earlier letter to you? I mentioned Sybil tly arrived in England where they are visiting family They’ve recently before setting out for Europe. They’ve already purchased a brand new car that they are using for their jaunts around the English countryside. Sybil says that she is receiving many compliments sses and suits that I made for her. She even about the dresses wrote that one suit - in celadon and marigold-striped linen with a plain celadon linen jacket - has become her urite! I am very pleased to absolute favourite! know that my clothes have appeal at home! I don’t know how long Sybil ne will be and Josephine uspect it will away, but I suspect ear as I also be at least a year vely winter coat made her a lovely that she won’tt need for at least another few months. I still have enough of the same plaid that il’s coat; in I used for Sybil’s a delicious pale apricot shade crossed with caramel. I intend to make myself a similar coat to Sybil’s which, while of a simple

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construction, looked so effective when trimmed at the collar and cuffs with some caramel coloured fur that Sybil had. I think that I will face my collar with plain caramel coloured wool on which I will couch down some heavy matching twisted silk cord in lovely swirling patterns. I am determined to do the same with the cuffs which will be much deeper than those requested by Sybil. While it is not my habit to make copies of the original designs for which my customers pay me well, Sybil will not be in New Zealand this winter and it is very unlikely that someone of her standing will want to wear her old coat again next winter. I’d better make sure I get enough wear out of my coat this winter though…just in case...as I don’t dare risk an incident! y, last week I bought g the most beautiful china-headed doll - just like Letty, secon yours - from Henry Tatton’s [v] second-hand shop in Ponsonby Road. His is the one almost ne next door to the Britannia Theatre; where you bought the brass jardinière for your mother. Mr Tatton thinks that it is from the middle of the last century! Her body and limb limbs are of cloth stuffed with wool, but her perfect little hands are of porcelain as well as the lower portion of her legs wh which feature hand painted black boots on exquisitely small feet. As her clothes seem to be original but also quite ra raggedy, I have decided to remake them as a little evening project during the winter. I’m hand sewing everything and intend to practise all the stitches on them as a m means of keeping my skills nicely honed. After they’re washed, I’m going to keep her original clothes as they they’re still lovely in spite of their state. I’ve found a sm small wicker basket in which she will live, just as soon as I coax Pusskins to favour another place to curl up in in! Well dearest, I must clos close now and get back to my t dress I need to cut the sewing. After I finish the coat and then run to the haberdashers to find some nice black silk cord work buttons to set it wi be just the thing! off. I think they will Give my love to your mother won’t you and do write soon. With fondest wishes,

Maudie xx [i] Recipe: “Macaroni Pie - Bo Boil some macaroni in wellsalted milk until tender. Drain and cut the macaroni into small pieces, salt and pepper to taste. Put into a pie dish, cover with well-seasoned gravy, sprinkle wi with mixed sweet herbs, add a thin layer oof grated Cheddar cheese, g and bake in a good oven for half an hour. Source: Eveni Evening Post, 10 July 1926 p.15 [ii] JJohn Mason, boot repairer, 128 Ponsonby Road [ William George Scott, [iii] rep boot repairer, 222 Ponsonby Road T [iv] These characters are based o early Auckland weavers, on Syb and Josephine Mulvany Sybil [v] Henry Tatton, Second hand shop, 267 Ponsonby Road

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illustration: 99designs

I’m sitting in a ray of rare sunshine on an otherwise wintry day, hoping that it will endure as I write this long overdue letter. I’ve just eaten the leftovers from last evening’s supper - macaroni [i] pie. It tasted remarkably good heated up with a little more cheese melted over it.


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PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE

IT’S STILL SUMMER ... IN FIJI AFTER 14 YEARS OF MANY WONDERFUL HOLIDAYS for themselves, their family and friends, Freemans Bay residents Gillian and Martin Lekner are putting their freehold Fijian holiday retreat up for sale. The property, on Nananu I Ra island, just north of Viti Levu, is absolute waterfront times two; the house, guest cottage and boatshed are set in a tropical garden on a peninsula, sandwiched between two palm fringed, white sand beaches. Just as they purchased in 1998, but now refurbished, the Lekners are offering a walk in-walk out proposition: all furniture, household effects, plant and recreational gear including, boat, jet-ski, kayaks, fishing gear and more, is included. The front deck is just above the lawn which runs on to the beach; the situation is ideal for families where children can play in the shallows and be seen, heard and supervised at all times. The island is safe and the locals are very friendly. The unspoiled environment suits a totally relaxed holiday, or a more active one with snorkelling, fishing, jet-skiing or kayaking off deserted beaches or the numerous reefs. A favourite daily routine is to watch the sunset and then, at dusk, the fruit bats soaring around the palms. Bonfires, night crabbing and sampling the island’s eccentric collection of swings ensure that the children are active until bedtime. The Lekners say there is some resistance in the family to the sale – particularly the “grandsons’ lobby” - but it’s time to focus on their Coromandel base, where major landscaping and re-planting of New Zealand native tree projects are under way. PN For additional detail or to make an appointment to view (and a long weekend break) call James Lekner M: 021 838 483 or james.lekner@gmail.com www.cloudninefiji.com

Pritesh Patel is a long-time reader, first time emailer to Ponsonby News and tells us, “having returned from a summer holiday in magical India, whilst in a busy market in rural India, I was catching up on the latest news in Ponsonby. The second shot is of a wild, but friendly, peacock in the village of Karadi, Navsari. These birds just wander around at sunset like they own the place. The peacock was a bit shy in asking for a quick browse of our copy of the Ponsonby News but we encouraged him with a few wheat grains. We affectionately named the peacock ‘Dinner’ (a few weeks in the predominately vegetarian country may have had something to do with this). Needless to say we resisted barbecuing our new friend and he left with a full stomach and up to date on the latest news in Ponsonby. Now, surely, that’s the first peacock to have ever read the Ponsonby News?” PN

PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE DEAR READERS Please keep sending us your holiday snaps reading your favourite magazine, we love getting them! Photos need to be in high resolution (300dpi), so please email them to info@ponsonbynews.co.nz without reducing the size.

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TRAVEL BREAKS: THE NEW THERAPY! M

CALL OF THE WILD by Kirstine Dawson, World Journeys Travel Designer There is something about Africa that keeps pulling me back. Sure, you can go into the bush in New Zealand but unless you are camped out by the Zoo the most you will hear is a pesky possum or the odd owl. Nothing can prepare you for your first lion roar, it will send chills down your spine and have you on the edge of your seat in anticipation for what might unfold. A day on safari in Africa begins just before dawn with a gentle tap on the door. A soft voice rouses you awake and the smell of fresh coffee provides the much needed incentive to get up. It’s time to go bush! They say the early bird catches the worm, well the early bird out here discovers much, much more... Africa is at its most exciting at first light, in the cool of the morning is when all the action happens. Driving off-road, all eyes are peeled for what could be around the next corner. Our 4x4 vehicle has its own expert tracker who sits up front, but the thrill of spotting a wild animal has us all on full alert. If you’ve been caught up by David Attenborough’s breathless narrations, wait until you’re actually there and the drama of the wilderness is right there, all around you. A game drive lasts about three hours, enough time to potentially see a great variety of animals – anything from the comical warthog, to a matriarchal elephant with her herd, a lion making a kill, or even the elusive leopard. Back at the lodge there are tales of great sightings over breakfast, then it’s time for siesta, a dip in the pool, or a chat with the rangers who are palpably passionate about the wilderness, and the amazing way each animal has its own niche. With no TV or cellphones, it’s just you and the stillness of nature. After lunch and before dusk we venture out again. The carnivores have also spent the hottest part of the day having a siesta, lolling about under bushes. Dusk is when

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their ears prick up again, and it’s off out in search of the next meal. For an animal lover like myself it is a love/hate experience as, much as I want the beautiful impala to escape the jaws of death, I equally don’t want to see our king size moggie go hungry. Whichever side you are rooting for, it is a scenario that will have you enthralled. African sunsets are to be celebrated, and what better way than with a cool G&T in the bush on the way back to camp. After a sumptuous dinner it is time to sit back with a South African red in front of the ‘bush TV’ or campfire. Flickering firelight and chirruping insects form a great backdrop to stories of the day’s highlights, as you relive each mesmerising encounter of yet another magical day in Africa. PN

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JAY PLATT

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Paper wallets $25 each @ Pylones www.pylones-newzealand.co.nz; Sukie rescued notebooks Large $26.95, Medium $19.95 & Small $15.95 @ ecostore www.ecostore.co.nz; Sugar Ray Dino $49.90 @ Republic www.republichome.com; Royall Bay Rhum After Shave Lotion, Royall Muske Cologne & Royall Lyme All purpose Lotion $129 each @ World Beauty www.worldbrand.co.nz; Fornasetti lacquered metal ‘Viso’ tray $875 @ Design 55 www.design55.co.nz; LED wind up Eco Bug torches $13.50 each @ ecostore www.ecostore.co.nz; Heart Cushion $79 Cross Cushion $79 Made in Heaven cushion $119 @ Republic www.republichome.com; Watch me Clock $143.75 @ Design Denmark www.designdenmark.co.nz

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WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT...

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Alessi ‘Lula’ dog bowl $195 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; Alessi ‘Mio’ cat bowl $175 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; Building block soap $34.50 each @ Pylones www.pylones-newzealand.co.nz; Skincare gift box $65 @ ecostore www.ecostore.co.nz; Box Appetit BPA free Lunch Box $49.95 @ ecostore www.ecostore.co.nz; Large Bento Box I by Miki Astori $475, Small Bento Box III by Miki Astori $340 (cutlery not included) @ Indice www.indice.co.nz; Rubber stamp sets Paris, London & Italy $25.90 each @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; Penguin by Ottmar Horl $450 @ Design 55 www.design55.co.nz; Lunch pot BPA free $49.95 @ ecostore www.ecostore.co.nz STYLING: Jay Platt PHOTOGRAPHY: Danilo Santana David, Fisher Santana. The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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LIZ WHEADON: WINE, GLORIOUS WINE

MARLBOROUGH’S ISABEL ESTATE The History of Isabel Estate goes back a few years and starts with Michael Tiller. Michael was born into a farming family and studied to become a pilot. His first introduction to the Marlborough region was when he was positioned there with Air New Zealand Cargo. Michael spent 10 years flying freight planes for Air New Zealand whilst dreaming of his own vineyard. In 1980 the dream started to come true with the planting of his first chardonnay vines. Michael needed little encouragement but was shown a great amount of support in the early years from Danny Schuster and Daniel le Brun. For many years Michael grew outstanding grapes and was a grower for top wineries including Cloudy Bay. It was in 1995 that this all changed, with Michael and wife Robyn deciding to add winemaking to their successful repertoire. Isabel Estate was born and is named after Michael’s mother, Isabel. In 1995 they exported their first shipment to the UK. From there they have grown to a middle sized winery in Marlborough, one that is still family owned.

JANENE DRAPER - Director, FARRO FRESH FOOD and TREVOR STEWART from FRESH MEATS NZ

Michael has always been determined that great wines are made in the vineyards, when he planted Isabel Estate the row spacing was narrower than others in the region, commenting that he felt it was the width required for a Massey Ferguson between vines not the ideal spacing. Not compromised by the easy option, Michael imported a narrower tractor. It’s not surprising then that all of the production at Isabel is bio dynamic and organic. All the excellent wines produced by Isabel Estate are made solely from grapes they grow, there’s nothing brought in at all. All of this quality has been recognised internationally with the UK magazine Decanter awarding white wine of the year to Isabel’s Sauvignon Blanc 2000. During June, all Glengarry stores are featuring wines from the 2012, Glengarry dozen. A selection of 12 outstanding winemakers, including Isabel’s Spanish born winemaker Carlos. Check out the tasting details online at www.glengarrywines.co.nz/tastings (LIZ WHEADON) PN

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MICHAL HAINES - General Manager, FARRO FRESH FOOD

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY FARRO FRESH FOODS KEEPING IT LOCAL Farro Fresh Food is the brain-child of Aucklanders’ James and Janene Draper. It began in 2006 out of a desire to create a retail space that showcased the very best of New Zealand food. It would also bring together the diverse local food loving community. Farro Fresh is all about creating and sharing good food. “We’re passionate about the quality of ingredients produced in New Zealand,” explains Janene, “and how our local food loving communities have used them to create some of the most unique and exciting products in the world today.”

Locals JORDAN and RITA LUCK shopping for their vegetables at FARRO FRESH FOOD

Farro actively encourages small producers into the market and onto their shelves, and the passion and drive of these producers is the cornerstone of what makes Farro Fresh such an exciting place to shop and also work. Starting with a team of just 12 back in 2006, Farro’s staff now stands at almost 150 food loving individuals who create an environment that is fun, knowledgeable and exciting. They pride themselves on providing fantastic service.

photography: Jo Barrett

They back this up with in-store cooking ideas and free weekly cooking classes in their Fisher & Paykel demo kitchens with local luminaries such as Ray McVinnie, Luca Villari, Sal Grant, Carlos Atkinson, Nadia Lim and Ginny Grant. They also play host to many of our local producers who can be found showing off their products in-store at every opportunity. The entire team at Farro love to cook and they are constantly being inspired by new ingredients, new ideas and exciting recipes. They love to share that inspiration with their shoppers. They also endeavour to stock those hard-to-find ingredients that have you fretting over your recipe books. So if you can’t find it, come and see them and they will do their best to sort you out with what you need. PN FARRO FRESH FOOD baristas, DOMINIC ANDERSON-BROWN and BRIAN THAI

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

FARRO FRESH FOODS, 34 Westmoreland Street, Grey Lynn www.farrofresh.co.nz

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ANY PAGE IN PONSONBY NEWS IS A GOOD PLACE TO BE SEEN

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY ORBIT WELCOMES A NEW CHEF! You don’t just have to wait for a special occasion to experience the Orbit dining experience at SKYCITY and with their brand new head chef there has never been a better reason to visit. Orbit welcomes Jean Christophe Varnier, a French chef with over 25 years experience. Jean Christophe has worked in London, Michelin 1, 2 and 3 star restaurants in Paris, the 6 star cruise liner MS Paul Gauguin and more recently at St Tropez Restaurant in Parnell. With winter fast approaching, there is something magical about the views from the revolving restaurant especially at night. The dinner experience at Orbit is definitely one to remember where twilight hues give way to the lights as darkness approaches. Located in the Sky Tower and 190 metres off the ground you will enjoy 360-degree views of Auckland city. The dining room rotates once every hour, so there is plenty of time to enjoy a spectacular a la carte lunch or dinner whilst being treated to incredible views. Alternatively indulge in the highest high tea in Auckland enjoying contemporary kiwiana style delicacies, a range of exotic teas or espresso coffee. Available Saturday and Sunday 2.30pm to 4.30pm When dining at Orbit, you will also enjoy free Sky Tower admission to the Main Observation level (normally $25 per adult) providing fantastic value for money. PN SKYCITY – ORBIT REVOLVING RESTAURANT T: 09 363 6000 www.skycityauckland.co.nz

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY FRESH BREAD AND WARM SERVICE AT BAKERS DELIGHT PONSONBY It has been six years since Don Boughman and Minca Engelbrecht took over Bakers Delight in Three Lamps and today they are still as excited about providing the Ponsonby community with the freshest bread and most delightful customer service possible. Don is a third generation baker from the United States, and Minca is a bubbly, free spirited South African. Don says, “It is not our machinery that makes our bread so tasty and fresh, it’s the skill and passion of our bakers. Our bread is handcrafted, from scratch, each day, which means all ingredients are put into the mixing bowl the very same day you purchase your loaf of bread.

CAFE O - SPICING UP THE WINTER The long summer has been kind to Café O, with patrons lingering and enjoying the outdoor dining, feasting on the likes of an early morning Sunrise Salad for breakfast or a luscious crisp Peking Duck and Mandarin Salad for lunch. Now that winter is just around the corner, dark and wet weather will not deter the team at Café O. With the introduction of their special soup of the day (which will include the likes of Spicy Pumpkin and Coconut Soup with coriander pesto), they will be sure to warm your cockles.

Some of their breads take extra time and care is needed to produce the individual and special flavours. For example, the wonderfully crusty and chewy Pane Di Casa Loaf takes between 12 to 16 hours before being ready to eat, and their authentic San Francisco Sourdough bread can take up to 24 hours. At Bakers Delight Ponsonby they use no preservatives or vinegars in these long ferment breads, they are all natural. They have healthy options such as the 11-grain Cape Seed bread, the Hi-Fibre Low GI White bread, and the Chia Loaf (a great source of Omega-3ALA). At Bakers Delight, they never sell day old bread. If it’s not sold that day, it’s not sold. They offer support to their local schools and charities by way of donations of their leftover bread each night. PN BAKERS DELIGHT, 336 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 9409

Accompany one of their specialities, the O Burger (with pineapple, crispy bacon and swiss cheese), with a glass of pinot gris - yes, they now have a liquor licence offering a selection of boutique wines to match their modern pacific cuisine. Their catering department has had an exciting, action-packed wedding season, catering for some stunning weddings on Waiheke Island, in Matakana and in Coatesville and looks set to have an action-packed winter catering for cocktail parties, product launches and other corporate and private functions They run very popular team building cooking classes which are great for boosting team morale and generally spicing up the winter months. Think coconut prawns, whole sides of salmon with mango and avocado salsa, passionfruit crème brûlée. Your staff will love getting into the kitchen and having a laugh and enjoying fantastic food and drink. Open seven days a week from 7.30am-3.30pm. The friendly team look forward to seeing you soon! For all general enquires and including the exclusive hire of CAFE O call them on T: 09 360 1852 or visit www.johnoyagawa.com, 34/332 Great North Road. PN

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PONSONBY LITTLE BLACK BOOK: A-Z OF GREATER PONSONBY BARS It’s comforting to know that many of the familiar bars in our neighbourhood are still going strong and there are but a few that have changed owners or renovated. We say, drink well and responsibly while you enjoy yourself. (REBECCA JONES) BARRIO, 44 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 8147 www.barrionz.com A popular local with live session jazz and featuring DJs Bevan Keys, Roger Perry, Uncle Barney and Manuel Bundy. Coopers Pale Ale is on tap. Check out their website or facebook for session times. Summer hours are Tues-Fri from 4pm, Sat from 6pm, Sun and Mon by arrangement. Winter hours are Wed-Fri from 4pm, Sat from 6pm, Sun, Mon and Tues by arrangement. BERESFORD SQUARE WINE BAR, 6 Beresford Square, Newton T: 09 368 4281 www.beresfordwinebar.co.nz This is a cosy wine bar on Beresford Square with affordable tasty food to share, beer on tap, a great selection of European and New Zealand wines plus sangria and sherry. It’s the ideal place to go before or after a show in town and is available for functions. Open Tues-Thurs 4pm-late, Fri 3pm-late and Sat 5pm-late. BONITA, 242 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 5670 www.bonita.co.nz Bonita is a wine and tapas bar with an excellent wine and cocktail list. Bonita’s relaxed atmosphere is the perfect place for a casual drink or tapas indulgence. Open 7 days 4pm-late. CALUZZI BAR AND CABARET, 461 K’ Road. T: 09 357 0778 www.caluzzi.co.nz Legendary Caluzzi Bar and Cabaret offer an unforgettable dining experience with entertainment by New Zealand’s most awarded Drag Artistes. It’s an interactive cabaret show with fabulous food, dazzling costumes, DJ and disco and is a great place to have a social get together. Bookings are essential. CARTEL, 224 Symonds Street, Eden Terrace T: 09 368 4574 www.cartelbar.co.nz facebook and twitter In the basement under the old Post Office is one of Auckland’s best kept secrets. Cartel specialises in single malt whiskey, cocktails, imported and local craft beer and has an extensive wine list for the discerning drinker. This is a late night bar and is specially equipped for an after dinner drink. Personal bottle keeps are available for those with a favourite tipple. Open Wed-Sat 8pm-late. CHAPEL BAR, 147 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 4528 www.chapel.co.nz facebook and twitter A neighbourhood institution in Ponsonby, Chapel embodies the spirit of Auckland’s most iconic, sociable boulevard. A favourite spot for a quiet after work drink, a casual weeknight dinner or a big Friday or Saturday night listening to resident DJ’s. Sunday Sessions are infamous as are their thin crust pizzas and cocktails. Open Mon-Wed 3pm-late and Thurs-Sun 12pm-1pm. COSH BAR, 155 Ponsonby Road T: 09 3601534 www.cosh.co.nz facebook Cosh is a New York style cocktail lounge bar specialising in after dinner cocktails and cocktail shots. Two function rooms are available for private parties. Visit facebook for upcoming events and DJ entertainment. Open Tues-Sun 4pm-late.

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DIDA’S WINE LOUNGE, 54 Jervois Road Herne Bay T: 09 376 2813 www.didas.co.nz Dida’s offers warm wood and leather with cool tunes and great service; a glass of good wine from the extensive Glengarry portfolio and a plate or two of interesting and well-priced tapas. Open 7 days 11.30am-late. DIDA’S WINE LOUNGE, 118 Wellesley Street, Victoria Park T: 09 308 8319 www.didas.co.nz Open throughout the day, Euro-styled food, tapas and raciones, sandwiches and salads as well as cheese and dried meats can be eaten with any of the wines on offer from either the quick list of 30 or from the retail store or cellar with a small service fee. Open Mon-Sat 7am-8pm and Sun 7am-7pm. DNA BAR, 382 Karangahape Road T: 09 377 2313 www.dnabar.co.nz facebook and twitter Freshly renovated, DNA is a friendly gay bar, nightclub and lounge hosting performers, DJs, karaoke and live entertainment. There is a pool table, dance floor and grand piano and it can be hired for private functions. Open Wed-Sat 4pm-4am and Sun 4pm-12am. ELBOW ROOM, 198 Jervois Road T: 09 376 2613 www.elbowroom.co.nz The Elbow Room is a favourite local neighbourhood bar with a discerning wine list, wide range of beers including Peroni, Asahi and Coopers Pale Ale on tap, and an extensive cocktail selection. The bar can be booked for private functions, either exclusively or shared use. Open 7 nights 3.30pm-late. FAMILY BAR, 270 Karangahape Road T: 09 309 0213 www.familybar.co.nz Family Bar is an open minded venue that is inclusive rather than exclusive. There’s a dance floor and a stage that regularly hosts pageants, sing-a-longs and karaoke and Miss Ribena is the resident Drag Queen. THE FAT CONTROLLER, 473 New North Road, Kingsland T: 09 815 1535 facebook Boasting cold beer, hot ribs and friendly service, The Fat Controller is opposite the rail bridge in Kingsland for a quick walk to the game at Eden Park. Open Tues-Sat 5pm-late. GABLES SPEIGHT’S ALE HOUSE, corner Jervois Road & Kelmarna Avenue T: 09 376 4994 www.gablesspeightsalehouse.co.nz facebook The Speight’s range of beer and a gastro style menu make Gables an attractive local to meet friends and family. Social functions can be catered for from 10 to 400. Kids dine free on Mondays with a full paying adult. Quiz night Tuesday 7pm. GALBRAITH’S ALEHOUSE, 2 Mt. Eden Road, Grafton T: 09 379 3557 www.alehouse.co.nz facebook and twitter This fiercely independent free-house opened in 1995 in the Grafton Library building. Besides brewing their own ale and lager they have five guest taps and a large local

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PONSONBY LITTLE BLACK BOOK: A-Z OF GREATER PONSONBY BARS

and imported bottled beer list. Food is served all day, there is an outdoor fireplace in the beer garden and you can watch the beer brewing on site. Open Mon-Sat 12pm-11pm and Sun 12pm-10pm.

Sunday afternoons. K.A music quiz on Monday nights, general quiz on Tuesdays and the whole venue is available for private functions. Open Tues-Sat 11am-late, Sun 12pm-late and Mon 1pm-late

GRAND CENTRAL, 126 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 1260 www.grandcentral.net.nz facebook Ponsonby’s longest serving bar, Grand Central is famous for its live music, late nights and dancing. It’s unpretentious and welcoming with friendly service and the latest license in Ponsonby. A private upstairs function room is available at no charge. Open 7 days 4pm-very late with a 5am license.

LA ZEPPA, 33 Drake Street T: 09 379 8167 www.lazeppa.co.nz facebook & twitter One of Auckland’s favourite rooftop bars with impressive views over Victoria Park and to the sky tower. La Zeppa offers delicious hot and cold tapas to enjoy with friends and a glass of wine and is the perfect venue for social functions from 2 to 200 hundred. Bookings are not required. Open Tues-Thurs 4pm-late and Fri-Sun 3pm-late.

GREY LYNN TAVERN, 521 Great North Road T: 09 376 6521 facebook The Grey Lynn Tavern is a friendly neighbourhood place to have a drink, dance, sing or watch the game on the big screen. TAB facilities and Pokie machines are also available and the bar can be hired for private functions. Open 7 days 11am-late. GYPSY TEA ROOM, 455 Richmond Road T: 09 361 6970 www.gypsytearoom.co.nz Gypsy Tea Room has been attracting people from far and wide for the past nine years. There is a smaller private room for up to 30 people, a tasty bar snack menu, thoughtful wine list, beer including Asahi and Coopers Pale Ale on tap and cocktails for the discerning. This is a great place to meet friends old and new. Open 7 days Mon-Thurs 4pm-11.30pm, Fri and Sat 3pm-2am and Sun 3pm-11.30pm. HERNE BAY LOCAL, 170 Jervois Road T: 09 376 5367 www.hernebaylocal.co.nz facebook & twitter Warm and relaxed it’s the place where locals can enjoy a range of drinks and meals throughout the day like Asian influenced tapas and platters and a bistro style lunch and dinner menu using the best organic meats and fresh produce. Curry night Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday brunch from 11am and Sunday night roast. Open 7 days 11am-late. IPANEMA FOOD AND ART SOCIETY, 2 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 0655 facebook Newly opened, this restaurant and bar serves fine Brazilian cuisine with Brazilian art on display. It’s a place to have fun with friends eating tapas, drinking cocktails and enjoying dinner. Happy hours on Thursday and Friday 5pm-8pm and they like to rock with live music after 10pm on Friday and Saturday nights when the bar becomes a big, loud dancing fiesta. A private function room is available. Open Tues-Sun 3pm-late. JULEP BAR, 152b Ponsonby Road T: 09 378 8186 www.julep.co.nz facebook Julep is tucked in beside SPQR and could have been transplanted from New York City. Long and narrow, it’s a cosy spot for fine drinking from their cocktail list or wine and cellar list. This year Julep is nominated as an Outstanding Bar in the Lewisham Awards. Open Tues-Sat 5pm-late. KINGS ARMS, 59 France Street, Newton T: 09 373 3240 www.kingsarms.co.nz One of the oldest pubs in Auckland, The K.A is a premier live rock ‘n’ roll music venue with live original music four or five nights a week and in the garden bar on

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

LIME BAR, 167 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 7167 Tiny and narrow, Lime is the place for late night whisky, wine and really great cocktails. It’s an easy vibe with music from Sinatra to Springfield and an older, more sophisticated crowd singing along to the music and making it loud. Open Tues-Sat 5pm-late. LOCO BAR AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE, 212 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 0396 The newest incarnation at this Ponsonby Road address, Loco bar has a wide range of drinks for the discerning drinker. Open Tues-Sat 5pm-late. LONGROOM, 114 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 8803 www.longroom.co.nz facebook Longroom is a modern stylish courtyard bar and bistro. There’s a variety of live entertainment and DJs Thursday through Saturday and quality beer, wine and cocktails at great prices. Something new are cocktail carafes for sharing and you can watch the big games this winter on their discreet large screen TVs. Visit their website for upcoming events and promotions. Open Tues-Sun 11am-ate. MALT BAR, 442 Richmond Road T: 09 360 9537 www.maltbar.co.nz facebook A neighbourhood bar and restaurant in the heart of West Lynn, Malt is open for lunch, tapas, dinner and brunch on the weekend. Check out their website for daily specials like $4 dessert Monday, quiz night Tuesday and beer o’clock Sunday. Open Mon-Fri 11am-ate, Sat and Sun 10am-late. MEA CULPA, 3/175 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 4460 www.meaculpabar.com facebook A bar for the serious cocktail drinker, whether it’s a classic or modern creation using seasonal produce, the drinks menu displays imagination and finesse. Passion and love go into every glass and it’s easy to see why they have won so many awards. Mea Culpa is a finalist for the Lewisham Awards in the Best Bar and Best Bartender categories. Open Mon-Wed 5pm-1am, Thurs-Sat 5pm-3am. MOLTEN WINE BAR, 424 Mt. Eden Road, Mt. Eden T: 09 638 7263 www.molten.co.nz Molten Wine Bar offers a comfortable environment with intimate booths and a fully covered and heated courtyard where you can enjoy wine from their award winning wine list; craft beer on tap and imaginative small plates of food. Open Mon-Sat 4pm-late.

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PONSONBY LITTLE BLACK BOOK: A-Z OF GREATER PONSONBY BARS MONDIAL, 549 Great North Road T: 09 376 6682 www.mondialbar.co.nz Mondial is a very relaxed and lively tapas bar with friendly, efficient service. You can order as many or as few dishes as you want and the wine list has a mix of international and New Zealand wines plus dessert wines. Open Tues-Thurs 4pmlate, Fri, Sat and Sun 3pm-late.

THE DOGS BOLLIX, 2 Newton Road T: 09 376 4600 www.dogsbollix.co.nz Honest pub, grub and craic since 1996. The Dogs Bollix has established itself as a live music venue where many New Zealand bands have started on their road to stardom, or not. Available for functions. Open 7 days 11am-late.

NEIGHBOURHOOD BREW BAR, 498 New North Road, Kingsland T: 09 846 3773 www.neighbourhood.co.nz In the heart of Kingsland, Neighbourhood celebrates the craft of beer with the full range of Mac’s. It has a large sun-drenched courtyard with open fires and is a perfect place to enjoy your drinks with friends. DJs playing on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights and Sunday afternoons. Open 7 days 11.30am-1am.

THE DRAKE, 2 Drake Street T: 09 307 3220 www.thedrake.co.nz facebook The Drake is a Monteith’s craft bar with a full range of beer available on tap, a wide range of food and three great function areas for 20 -150 people. Visit their website for a calendar of events from music trivia quiz night to $20 platter and pint night. Open Mon-Fri 11.30am-late, Sat and Public Holidays 12pm-late.

NEW BOND STREET LOUNGE AND BAR , 479 New North Road, Kingsland T: 09 845 3071 www.newbondstreetbar.co.nz facebook New Bond Street Lounge and Bar is a hop, step and jump from Eden Park and a great place to meet friends before or after the game. Quiz night Wednesday and lazy Sunday brunch. Open Tues-Fri 11am-late, Sat and Sun 1pm- late.

THE FRANKLIN TAP HOUSE AND EATERY, 98 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 0098 www.thefranklinbar.co.nz facebook and twitter One of the newest additions to Ponsonby Road this is a stylish and comfortable local pub with a large communal table, intimate booths and an outdoor courtyard for wiling away the afternoon. Open Mon-Thurs 3pm-late, Fri-Sun 12pm-late. The ‘Upstairs Bar’ can host a variety of private functions for up to 100 people. Open Mon-Sun 5pm-late.

PONSONBY POOL HALL, 106 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 2356 www.ponsonbypoolhall.co.nz facebook This is the longest running pool hall in Auckland, with 14 pool tables and a private snooker lounge featuring Rolling Stones memorabilia. There are over 30 bottled beers to enjoy while you play and they’re open everyday but Christmas day. Available to hire for social functions, watch the video on facebook. Open 7 days 11am-1am.

THE GOLDEN DAWN, Corner Ponsonby and Richmond Roads T: 09 376 9929 www.goldendawn.co.nz There is a green door and behind it is this must visit bar with local and imported ‘guest’ beers, cool tunes and super styled service. If you cannot find the green door, they are not there. Open Tues-Thurs 4pm-late and Fri-Sun 3pm-late.

PONSONBY SOCIAL CLUB, 152 Ponsonby Road T: 09 361 2320 www.ponsonbysocialclub.co.nz facebook Just like the RSA but without the asparagus rolls or pokies. Live music & DJs throughout the week, check the website for details. Open 7 nights 5pm-late.

THE KINGSLANDER TAVERN, 470 New North Road, Kingsland T: 09 849 5777 www.thekingslander.co.nz The ultimate in sports bars, The Kingslander has seven plasma and three big screens showing sport all day and night. Quiz night Tuesday, salsa Wednesday, jughead Thursday, sports zone Friday, Saturday and Sunday, live music Friday and Saturday. Open 7 days 12pm-late.

SALE STREET BREWERY, 7 Sale Street T: 09 307 8148 www.salest.co.nz Situated in the heart of the Victoria Quadrant, Sale St. is a uniquely Kiwi megavenue that defines style. Sale St. features a bar, a micro-brewery, bistro dining, live music stage, The Velvet Room private bar and Auckland’s largest deck and garden bar. Open Mon 3pm-late and Tues-Sun 11.30am-late. SNATCH BAR, 171A Ponsonby Road T: 09 361 6170 www.snatchbar.co.nz facebook Snatch Bar is a retro 1950s lounge bar with delicious cocktails, a relaxed atmosphere and great music. Enjoy one of their special cocktails in a comfortable leather sofa as you watch the evening unfold on Ponsonby Road. Open mic comedy on Wednesday from 8pm and visit their facebook page for upcoming events and promotions. Open Tues-Sat 6pm-3am. SPQR, 150 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 1710 www.spqr.co.nz A Ponsonby institution, SPQR has been a prominent fixture along the Ponsonby strip for 20 years. The lively atmosphere and friendly service gives SPQR an authentic, first-rate reputation. The pizza is great for an anytime snack and Veal Marsala is an old favourite. Open 7 days 12pm-late. SQUID ROW GASTRO BAR. 224 Symonds Street, Eden Terrace T: 09 379 9344 www.squidrow.co.nz facebook and twitter This is a surf themed seafood gastro bar in the old Auckland Post Office building. They offer an $8 cocktail hour 4-7pm Wed-Friday and two for one mussel pots on Sundays and can easily accommodate groups and small functions. Open 7 days 12pm-late. THE CAVALIER TAVERN, 68 College Hill T: 09 376 4230 www.thecavalier.co.nz Ray Wilson has been the owner of The Cavalier Tavern for 20 years. Whether you want a bar snack or a three course meal, the restaurant offers a great selection of food. There is a large selection of imported and New Zealand wines and a huge range of tap and bottled beers. Eat inside or outside on the spacious deck. Open Mon-Sat 11am-late & Sun 12pm-late. THE CORNER STORE, 25 Mt. Eden Road, Eden Terrace T: 09 379 5099 www.thecornerstore.co.nz facebook and twitter The Corner Store is a well loved city fringe bar with seriously good cocktails, extensive malt whiskey list and local and imported beers. The newly renovated Storeroom and covered courtyard is a great place to relax by a fire and enjoy something from their inspired small plates menu. Open 7 days 4pm-late.

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THE PONSONBY BELGIAN BEER CAFÉ, 1-3 St Mary’s Road T: 09 376 6092 www.theponsonby.co.nz facebook The Ponsonby Belgian Beer Cafe is a little piece of Europe in the heart of Auckland. Claiming the largest range of specialty Belgian beers in New Zealand, a comprehensive list of wines by the glass and a menu of Belgian and local food which includes their world famous mussels and frites. Open Mon-Fri 11am-12am, Sat and Sun 11am-1am. THE SUPPER CLUB, 2 Beresford Street, Newton T: 09 300 5040 www.supperclub.co.nz The Supper Club is a unique character bar just off K. Road. There is indoor and outdoor seating and it is only open Friday and Saturday nights. This is a superb function facility and can cater for groups up to 100. Open Friday 3pm-9am Saturday and Saturday 10pm-midday Sunday. THE WHISKEY, 210 Ponsonby Road T: 09 361 2666 www.whiskeybars.com facebook and twitter This hip bar plays classic rock and offers intimacy and action seven nights a week. There is a huge range of whiskey to suit all palates and wallets plus you can learn to make cocktails at The Whiskey Cocktail College or simply indulge in one made by the friendly bar staff. Whiskey Live celebrates New Zealand music month every year in May, visit their website or facebook for more information. Open 7 nights 5pm-3am. URGE, 490 K. Road www.urge.co.nz facebook Urge is New Zealand’s longest running gay men’s bar and since 1997 has aimed to create a safe & fun place to dance, drink and cruise. It’s a no attitude masculine space catering for the bear, rugged, masculine leather crowd and admirers. There are all sorts of theme parties, quiz nights and DJs, visit their website for the latest listings. Open Thurs, Fri and Sat 9pm-late and Sun 3pm-7pm. WINEHOT APERO BAR, 605 New North Road, Morningside T: 09 815 9463 www.winehot.co.nz facebook and twitter With French wine, premium imported and local craft beers and a menu of home -made terrine, pate and charcuterie, Winehot is the destination for those who appreciate good food, drinks and service with a stylish French twist. Open Tues -Sat 5pm-late.

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY A LITTLE SLICE OF BRAZILIAN PASSION IN OUR NEIGHBOURHOOD IT IS REMARKABLE WHAT PASSION, PAINT AND HARD WORK CAN DO Number 2 Ponsonby Road has had a makeover by three passionate Brazilians and is now Ipanema Food and Art Society. Ana Paula runs the front of house, her fiancée, Chef Jeronimo Prompt is in the kitchen and artist Ana Mendina has covered the walls with her bright and beautiful paintings. Jeronimo grew up in Porto Alegre in the south of Brazil and Ana Paula in Brasilia. They met when Jeronimo’s family moved there in 2002. After their daughter Isabela was born, they decided to move to New Zealand where Jeronimo’s sister was living with her husband in Tauranga. Ana says, “They talked about how beautiful and safe it was here and we should come and try it, so we came on a working holiday for six months and fell in love.” When they arrived, neither spoke English, Jeronimo started working at an Italian restaurant, took a dictionary to work every day and says, “I learned English in four months having conversation and practising with my workmates. New Zealand has given us everything and taught us a lot. We were at the beginning of our lives when we came here and now eight years later we’ve built our future here. It’s a beautiful place to raise our child; Isabela goes to a wonderful school and in Brazil you work hard for what we have here.” Ana Mendina has spent many years in Amazonia and the inspiration for her art is influenced by the Amazon rain forest and the aborigines who live there. She works with the government to showcase and protect their environment and the image of villages and their people. Ipanema Food and Art Society is more than a restaurant with food and art – to cook you need to be an artist and service is artistic. “The name describes more about the mood of our business, our food and art, drinking, talking and friendship.” “It was a dream and now we feel so proud of ourselves that we tried to make it work and have succeeded in making it our way”, says Jeronimo. “We don’t want it to be an expensive formal place, that’s not who we are, we want everyone to be our main customer so we keep the costs tight and do most things ourselves, then we can all eat and drink”. Jeronimo’s parents live here too and have a company called Brazil Express importing Brazilian food products, a lot of which are used at Ipanema. Jeronimo’s brother-inlaw Alan Ferreira is Ipanema’s Head Chef and often on Friday and Saturday nights Jeronimo and Alan head out of the kitchen to join their band Figa Mandinga on stage. “We like to rock. It’s a big, loud dancing fiesta and we try to make the best vibe possible,” says Ana.

photography: Michael McClintock

The people at Ipanema Food and Art Society have brought us a little bit of Brazil, introducing us to their modern culture and the beauty of their country. “It’s exciting to open a place where people can come and feel like they’re in Rio but really we’re all a part of this wonderful Ponsonby community,” says Ana. “We work with local businesses and I don’t think there is a better way to support our community, if we buy from locals, they make money and we all win,” says Jeronimo. “You don’t have to push to be recognised, we’ve put our soul in here, we cleaned and painted, cried, laughed, ate and drank and people are coming, it feels really amazing.” And Ana says, “We don’t expect too much then all the good things that happen are a bonus. We’re happy to be here and to say thank you to our Kiwi friends, thanks for accepting us and making us feel at home, now we can give you a taste of our home.” (REBECCA JONES) PN

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PHIL PARKER: WHOSE WINE IS IT ANYWAY?

MARLBOROUGH’S TOI TOI WINES Toi Toi Wines are based in the Brookdale vineyard - 28 hectares at the head of Brookby Road, Marlborough. Brookdale is a high end growing region with neighbouring vineyards owned by Seresin, Cloudy Bay, Nobilo and Omaka Springs Estate. photography: Michael McClintock

In 2007, over 55,000 plants (80% Sauvignon Blanc and 20% Pinot Gris) were planted on a vertical shoot positioning (VSP) trellis system. The dominant soil structure is the famed Marlborough alluvial Renwick Soil – a mix of greywacke gravels, sand and silt. Its free draining soils and heat-retaining stones are ideal for the long growing season. Roseworthy trained winemaker, Chris Young has been involved in the wine industry for over 20 years and has experience in many winegrowing countries throughout the world including France, Australia, USA and his native New Zealand. Wines of Marlborough origin are made at Spring Creek Vintners in Marlborough and bottled locally, at Wineworks Marlborough. The Clutha Pinot Noir is also processed and made at Spring Creek Vintners by Chris. Consultant viticulturist Jeff Sinnott, is based in Cromwell Central Otago TOI TOI MARLBOROUGH PINOT GRIS 2011 $17.00 Pale straw colour. Aromas and flavours of pear and quince, with a crisp finish. TOI TOI MARLBOROUGH BROOKVALE RESERVE PINOT GRIS 2010 $22.00 Made from low cropping vines, this wine is more and intense, with honey and spiced pear flavours. TOI TOI MARLBOROUGH UNOAKED CHARDONNAY 2011 $17.00 Something you don’t see much of nowadays – unoaked Chardonnay. They were all the rage about six years ago. This one hits the mark as a light easy drinking wine with apple and stone fruit flavours. TOI TOI RESERVE CENTRAL OTAGO PINOT NOIR 2010 $40.95 With grapes from the Thompson Terrace, this is medium bodied Pinot with classic cherry, black berry fruit and spice characters. TOI TOI MARLBOROUGH LATE HARVEST RIESLING 2009 $17.50 And what better to finish with than a sweet dessert style grown in north Canterbury’s Waipara region. Honey, mandarin and raisiny sweetness with intensity from botrytised fruit. (PHIL PARKER) PN Phil Parker is a wine writer and operates Fine Wine Tours in Auckland. www.insidertouring.co.nz

GOOD FOOD AND FUN TIMES AT MOOCHOWCHOW When some restaurants open they seem to have been a part of our community for years and MooChowChow is one of those. In the fabulous villa on the corner of Hepburn Street and Ponsonby Road that once housed the wonderful Rocco, Mark Wallbank has transformed the inside of the building into an oasis of Asian cool. Mark started his life in the Hawke’s Bay and moved to Wellington to train as a waiter at Bellamy’s at the Beehive before moving into the kitchen to become a chef. His London experience includes names like Peter Gordon, The Ivy and La Caprice and in Australia he has worked at Longrain. On returning to New Zealand he settled in Auckland and worked at Cathedral, Cibo, Otto’s at Metropolis and then opened Rocco with lifelong friend Blair Russell. Together they opened Blake Street Cafe and Magnum which then became Ponsonby Road Bistro. “Che Barrington was in the kitchen at Ponsonby Road Bistro. He had travelled extensively in Asia and had lived in Thailand for a time and he used to feed me little snippets of this wonderful Asian inspired food. I was hooked and the time was right for Rocco to change into something else. Although ‘moo’ means piggy in Thai, it is a wholly made up name but, MooChowChow evokes the style of the restaurant,” says Mark. ”I love the convivial style and informality of sharing food with friends. A la carte can be quite mean in a theoretical way, the sharing aspect means there is no food envy, it’s interactive, it’s lively and it’s fun.” Mark has been at this site for 13 years and remembers he was painting in the front and an old lady poked in her head and said, “It will never work, it’s never worked.” He proved her wrong and says it has worked because of the community. “The locals walk up early before the crowds come. The businesses support us especially at lunch time. They know they can get in quickly and be fed in half an hour and ladies who shop in the neighbourhood can come in for a light lunch and get back out shopping.” He loves having his business here and says, “I’ve watched Ponsonby become gentrified without becoming pretentious, it still feels like Ponsonby and it’s difficult for me to see myself in another part of Auckland because the locals are so supportive. We live in a village and every little village has its own community, this one is very special. I love seeing people having a good time, it gives me a thrill having a restaurant full of people enjoying themselves and when they come back two or three times in a week, it is a great personal experience. I love hospitality; I’ve always loved it since I was a little kid cooking with my mother. Restaurants aren’t just about food though, all the senses are used in creating the balance - the ambience, service, drinks and the theatre of the evening which is then crowned by the food.” “I love to create spaces which I want to go to myself. I’ve created a place that has great atmosphere and ambience, where you can buy affordable food and have it served by friendly staff. Where there is a sense of occasion whether the customer is in jandals or a tux. I want to have a fantastic amazing time and I want people to feel the same way I do. Some people are a little hesitant when they first come in, but within a minute they are relaxed and into it and back again next week. It shouldn’t be a chore to go out to dine, life is too serious sometimes and it really should be a fun, tasty experience.” (REBECCA JONES) PN

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


WHAT’S HOT AT SABATO MEET OUR PRODUCER: SALVAGNO Salvagno is a family-run, artisanal olive oil operation based in Nesente (about 10 minutes from Verona in the north of Italy) with whom we have enjoyed a long relationship, as they are one of our original suppliers. Giovanni, his wife Elena and their two daughters Cristina and Francesca are very much at the heart of this small company. Their frantoio (oil mill) is supplied by Salvagno’s own trees and also those of local farmers, who can bring their olives to be pressed and bottled with their own name on the Salvagno label. The Salvagno family are obviously well-known and liked in their community, judging by the number of people we were introduced to when we visited them last year and in 2010. Giovanni is well-respected in the olive world internationally too, and one of the secrets behind his fantastic oil is that he has invented a modern version of the stonewheel which he feels, with his local varieties, leads to a better end product. So his olives are actually still stoneground before being pressed for oil. Due to the unique microclimate of the area, the mosque (the fly that can affect olive trees) cannot survive. This means that no sprays are used, so Salvagno olives are naturally organic too. His oil is always balanced and non-aggressive in style and has long been extremely popular in our range, and the olives have a loyal following (you’ll find them in the pantries of several top chefs and food writers) – some cured in brine, some pitted and cured in his olive oil – and his delicious olive paste which we also stock. As a treat for Ponsonby News readers, they have a jar of Salvagno olives in brine for the first 10 customers who mention this article in their Mt. Eden showroom. Salvagno olives and oils are available from Sabato, New World Victoria Park, Dida’s Foodstores, Farro Fresh Grey Lynn, Fruitworld Ponsonby and Bhana Brothers. PN SABATO, 57 Normanby Road T: 09 630 8751 www.sabato.co.nz

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SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY PUTTING IT ALL ON THE LINE FOR GOLD Most athletes vying for A place at the Olympics would give their right arm to be there and compete, but for the New Zealand men’s basketball team, that horrible saying could well end up coming true. The International Basketball Federation (FIBA), who are in charge of making the decision on which countries host tournaments around the world, have decided to hold the last chance qualifying tournament in the city of Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. There is no doubt that FIBA’s intention to spread the game around the world is one to be applauded, but this takes playing for your country to a whole new level. photography: Ben Campbell Photography www.bcphotography.co.nz

In the past decade Caracas has been consistently ranked among the top five most dangerous cities in the world and is well known for its high rate of crime, and the fact that while the murder rate is well into the thousands per annum many of them remain unsolved. Wikipedia even goes as far as describing the Central American city like this: “Armed criminal gangs often operate with impunity throughout the urban areas. The poor neighbourhood’s that cover the hills around Caracas are extremely dangerous. U.S. travellers have reported robberies and other crimes committed against them by individuals wearing uniforms and purporting to be police officers or National Guard members. Police investigations into kidnappings have revealed that police officers are often involved. Caracas tops the list of murder capitals of the world.” Certainly not a place I’d be putting on my wish list to go and see and definitely one I’d have to stop and think a little harder about if my employers asked me to go. But for senior tall black Mika Vukona and his troops it’s just part and parcel of securing one of those final three sports on offer. “Yeah it (attending the tournament) was a very difficult topic to bring up with my family, my wife wasn’t too happy at all when she found out where it was going to be held,” said Vukona. “I’m hoping there are loads and loads of security there and we can just go to the courts and back to the hotel, it’s fairly safe to say I won’t be staying to look around after the tournament. All those murders and that, na, it’s just going to be go there, get the job done and get out I’d say” Vukona admitted. Sitting with Vukona discussing the tournament it was almost like preparing for a black ops mission into hostile territory. And I guess in one way it is, there are three spots up for grabs and 12 teams demanding to be one of the chosen few.

Adding to the Tall Blacks woes are how best to prepare for the tournament, with the host venue being such a violent stop, heading there a fortnight earlier for a warm up tournament clearly isn’t an option. And with Australia and China already qualified for the Olympics their being a part of the Kiwis’ plans is not on the cards either. Meaning a lengthy trip to Europe or even playing some American college teams as a last resort. “We had hoped it was going to be somewhere like Russia or at least in Europe,” said Vukona, “now we also have to try and find somewhere to go that’s going to give us enough time to prepare for the tournament.”

Vukona’s Breakers team mate Dillon Boucher has also given up his role as assistant coach. No reasons for this were initially given but knowing the 36 year old it would be easy to read between the lines and suggest the risks for him and his family were just too great.

Not making the Olympics would be a very sad day in sport for New Zealand. Funds would be cut to the already struggling organisation, meaning the chance of getting back to compete with the big playing nations of the world would become an uphill battle. (GEORGE BERRY) PN

SUCCESSFUL VOLUNTEER TURNOUT FOR HARRY DANSEY RESERVE PLANTING Last month’s turnout for the planting of the pathway garden in the Harry Dansey Reserve, between Anglesea and Pratt Streets, was a huge success. Almost 30 people gave their time and energy to beautify the garden with natives and other plants provided by Auckland Council. Supported by Auckland Council Volunteer and Biodiversity Coordinator, David Bowden, and Conservation Volunteer, Clair Hobi, the variety and quality of plants provided the volunteers with a wide selection of foliage and flowering plants to provide year round interest to the pathway and reserve users. The volunteer group also appreciated the attendance of Harry Dansey’s granddaughter, Annette, her husband Arron, and the great grandchild of Harry Dansey. The wonderful turnout of volunteers resulted in the planting being done very quickly and the BBQ and refreshments that followed provided the opportunity for a friendly community get-together and thank you. The organiser, Edreen Sheath is most appreciative to all those who provided their generous and willing support for this project. PN

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

TIME TO POINT THE FINGER IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION

HOW TO FEEL BETTER WHEN YOU TRAVEL AND HIT THE GROUND RUNNING

WHEN A TEAM IS PERFORMING BADLY WE KIWIS ARE FAR TOO QUICK TO point the finger at the coach. Citing poor game plans, not putting the right players on the field, players playing out of position and just about any other excuse we can conjure up to justify the underlying fact that the team isn’t delivering results on the park.

Low cost carriers seem to have spurred on Kiwis’ already large and growing appetite for travel, but one of the major pitfalls for many around heading abroad, even to as close as Australia is how tired you become when you arrive or get home.

This season should have been a champagne year for Auckland’s beloved Blues but all that the 2012 campaign has delivered is heartache and despair. But instead of pointing the finger at Coach Pat Lam, I believe that a few more people within the Auckland and Blues set up should find themselves in the sights of the firing squad. This season has highlighted a far greater issue of corrosion and lack of leadership within the whole Auckland rugby system. In hindsight, the rash decision by the Auckland rugby union to axe ITM cup coach Mark Anscombe after one less than desirable year in charge last season should have been the start of bells ringing that the current system was failing. This decision was a merely a way of ducking for cover and saving their own hide rather than making quality informed decisions for the good of rugby in the city of sails. Pat Lam is one of the most honest guys you’ll ever meet. He’s the type of guy that would never complain and just get on with the job. Maybe that’s a trait he learned while playing for Manu Samoa where resources are scarce, but that should never be an issue coaching a franchise backed by the largest populated area in New Zealand. There should be an abundance of talent coming through. Nurtured and fostered in a way that the coach of the Blues has an array of players with plenty of potential to pick from, a system that is constantly keeping the main squad fighting for their starting jersey. That isn’t the role of the head coach at the Blues but is a role that is as important, if not more so, than the main job itself. This currently isn’t the case, and at this stage I wouldn’t be surprised if there aren’t too many applications for the vacant coaching roles jamming up the Auckland rugby union’s mail box, for this very reason. With the franchise in such a lowly state now is the time for a serious clean out, for the NZRU to get involved and help implement a winning strategy, help breathe life back into the club and see a return to the good old days like back in the 90s. The franchise needs to look further afield, as well as in their own backyard, for coaches and mentors for the top team right down to the development of players with a long term view of getting the franchise back on its feet. Convince stalwarts like Steve McDowell and John Kirwan to come back to the blue and whites and provide a mentor system to those coming through. Take a leaf out of the Crusaders, Highlanders and even Southlands book and put heroes in positions youngsters can aspire to, former players that made the jersey their own and wore it in a time of prosperity. Only those sorts of guys can talk about having pride and passion in the jersey. The essence of emotion in sport has been well documented in how players perform well above their own abilities when inspired to do greater things. So put someone in front of them that can convince the players that they can rise to greater heights. The change in the Blues fortunes far outweigh just one man’s job, and stopping with just a change at head coach is merely a band aid over a gaping wound. (GEORGE BERRY) PN

So when I was recently given the opportunity to sit down with one of New Zealand’s top high performance analysts and coaches – Roddy Siegel I took heed of the opportunity to tap into some of his thoughts and also got some good oil on dispelling some old myths. Siegel, who’s actually an Australian, is now working with High Performance Sport New Zealand and has specialised in travel and the effects it has on the body. And after grafting out his trade in Perth where travel is inevitable, I’m glad he’s now helping Kiwi athletes to get things right. Firstly I asked about international travel and how much that truly affects the body. “We believe that every time zone you travel through equals half a day’s recovery before you’re back to full fitness. So if you head as far as London which is 12 hours difference, then it could take six days to feel back to your best. And that’s doing everything right, if you head out drinking etc when you arrive or train too hard or anything like that then it could take up to a day per time zone.” There are loads of tricks and none of them foolproof he stresses but the trick is to plan the next couple of days for after you arrive. Siegel suggests that “if you can command the body to do what you want it to do and maintain control then you’ll get used to the new environment quicker.” One of Siegel’s favourite tools is a humidity mask, which you can get at some chemists. This helps to insure you stay hydrated. There are also things like melatonin and blue light that can be used to manipulate the environment when you arrive but the best kept secrets seem to be as little as: 1. Packing your own food, the food on most planes is only food that you would eat on a plane. Let’s face it have you ever heard anyone say that was an awesome meal on board? 2. Drink alcohol when you get there rather than on the plane and don’t hold back on the water. It’s often hard not to celebrate your long awaited holiday with a few bruskies or glasses of champagne, but the longer you can, the better you’ll be. 3. Breathe through your nose as much as possible. As blinding as it seems you inhale a significant amount more oxygen when you breathe through your mouth, simply put this means you have a greater chance of sucking in germs. 4. If someone is coughing next to you, ask to be moved. You don’t have to sit beside someone that is possibly sick and if you’re an athlete swap seats with your coach. It’s far better that he or she is ill when you arrive rather than you. But the best thing to think about is try to get the travel over and done with as quickly as possible, maintain a positive frame of mind and you should be fine. And for some reason the jetlag and travel fatigue happen worse to people when travelling west to east, so when you can, keep heading east. (GEORGE BERRY) PN

FREE METAL COLLECTION Tamaki Sports Academy offers mentoring, coaching, and work experience to South Auckland youth who have dropped out of the mainstream school system but show some sporting talent. A major fundraiser for the academy, and an excellent source of work experience for our members, is the free metal collection service we offer. We will pick up any old metal - computers, whiteware, roofing iron, metal piping, venetian blinds, batteries, car panels, cars, metal shelving, filing cabinets, machinery, lawnmowers, engines, and so on. If you do have any metal rubbish to get rid of, we are keen to pick it up for you. It is a win-win for both of us. Thank you to everyone in advance, and to those who have donated metal to us previously. M: 027 510 5890; or ph 09 276 0328 www.facebook.com/#!/TamakiSportsAcademy PN

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

WINTER SKIN SOS WHEN THE TEMPERATURE DROPS IT’S A GOOD idea to bring out the big guns when it comes to skincare – and if you’ve got eczema-prone skin like mine, even boost yourself up with some supplements that can keep your largest organ looking and feeling as hydrated as possible. Back when I started using Lucy Vincent-Marr’s hair and body care range Sans many moons ago, the first product I had in my sights was the Activator 7 Body Oil (I’m a freak for a great body oil, and they are surprisingly hard to find). A beautiful formulation that hydrates and feels gently healing, it helps keep dryness at bay as well as leaving not a trace of grease or residue on my skin post-shower. Ingredients include Vitamin A, Omega 3, 6, 9 and Vitamin E, which means that as well as being a welcome addition to your daily routine it also addresses sun damage, scars and stretch marks. Oh, and did I mention it smells good enough to eat, in a wonderfully unobtrusive way? If you’re going to try one body oil this winter then I highly recommend you give Activator 7 a whirl. Sodashi Body Balance Bath Salts are the order of the day when you’re heading for a soak in the tub, something we all do a lot more in the winter months. These help you detoxify as well as relax, and are composed largely of mineral rich Himalayan Crystal Salts that stimulate circulation and relieve stress and fatigue. You can use them as an exfoliant or pour 1 to 2 tablespoons into your bath for a real multi-sensorial treat. Adding a facial mist to your skincare arsenal is also a great idea when it’s cooler and the heaters are cranking, and the Qsilica brand do a great one called Rehydrate Energising Facial Mist. A hydrating and invigorating mist designed to cool and soothe weary or tired skin, it is infused with Aloe Vera to calm the skin and Mineral Silica to amp up your glow. The whole Qsilica range uses botanical ingredients infused with Colloidal Silica and is free from parabens, sulphates, petroleum based products and other nasties, and you can use this mist all day long and even over your makeup. For extra skin invigoration, store it in the fridge. Sodashi and Antipodes also do great facial mists if all organic is your thing, both of which I highly recommend.

AGE IS JUST AN ATTITUDE AT MORE THAN SKIN THERE’S A LOVELY ITALIAN PROVERB THAT QUOTES “BOTH FINE WINE and fine friends improve with age”. Clearly, good things come with the passing years and while we would all love to mature like a magnificent vino, we can sometimes use a little help in the ‘youth’ department. Well, the secret to ageing gracefully has been revealed by the team at More Than Skin Urban Spa. Their timely June launch of two anti-ageing packages means you need no longer battle single-handedly against the effects (dare we say ravages) of time.

The ‘Aged to Perfection’ package features New Zealand’s own professional beauty range, Joyce Blok Natural Skin Care, and begins with an Anti-Ageing facial… then at the end of your treatment you can purchase a Joyce Blok Anti-Ageing Day Cream SPF15 or Night Cream for half price (a saving of up to $42.50). As exclusive Ponsonby stockist of prestigious French Cosmetic Aromatherapy brand, DECLÉOR, the Urban Spa’s second offer includes a specialist Aroma-facial to help slow the hands of time. Plus, you then have the opportunity to purchase a high-performance skin care cream to maintain your youthful new visage at home.

Simply enjoy a DECLÉOR ‘Anti-Ageing Expert’ facial, including an innovative new professional mask, and you can purchase an Experience de L’Âge Triple Action Light or Rich Day Cream for only $89 (RRP $179). So leave the dark, gloomy cellars for your favourite wines, step out into the light and enjoy timeless beauty with these ageless deals…after all age is really just an attitude right? Call the Ponsonby team today on T: 09 361 2231 for more information. PN

Another popular product come winter for good reason is Dermalogica’s Barrier Repair, a velvety water-less moisturiser from their UltraCalming range that shields against skin stress and helps reduce sensitivity, redness, irritation and inflammation. Use it daily before you hit the streets and notice your skin start to strengthen over time, as well as feel protected from whatever the elements throw at it. One of my favourite skin-loving supplements is Bestow Beauty Oil, which will most definitely put your skin on the fast track to a happily “plump” winter if you add just one yummy tablespoonful of this golden goodness to your cereal each morning. A lack of Essential Fatty Acids - EFAs - in the body is the main cause of skin conditions. If the body’s intake of EFAs is not adequate it will use inferior fats to build the skin cells, and these cells can then be susceptible to toxins and irritants in the environment such as pollen, soaps, foods and various chemical allergens. Flaxseed oil – which is what Bestow is made up of - can help with skin condition because it allows your body to build healthy new skin cells, healing from the inside and strengthening the membranes surrounding the skin cells. This reduces the amount of foreign substances passing into the cell causing irritation, while still allowing skin to absorb nourishment. Conditions such as eczema (my own personal bugbear), acne and psoriasis have been known to respond well to a regular dose of Flaxseed oil, and when you take it in liquid form it’s reportedly much more potent than your average capsule. Clinicians Evening Primrose Oil is another great way to lubricate your skin all year round, take three capsules daily for at least three months and you’ll soon reap the benefits. EPO contains GLA, which helps to down-regulate inflammation in the body and is especially good for moisturising skin. EPO is a form of Omega-6 and works hand in hand with Omega-3, but both need to be balanced in the body for best effects. You could say that having the right balance of Omega’s 3 and 6 effectively moisturises us from the inside out as the are both critical for the healthy cell membrane function. Our cells are under constant attach from free radicals, they are also constantly transporting nutrients and cellular messengers in and waste products out. Most of our biological processes occur in, on or near a cell membrane. Healthy cell membranes mean healthy cells which helps support organ health, and correspondingly - every day health. (HELENE RAVLICH) PN

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING

JULIET FREEMAN – BRINGING THE SPA INTO YOUR HOME WHEN IT WAS FIRST unleashed on the market in 2011 I called the UltraSonic Cleansing Brush something to the effect of “the perfect present for the beauty-minded woman who has everything”, and I wasn’t kidding! A tidy little unit, it gently removes embedded dirt, oil, pollution, make-up and dead skin cells from the face, leaving a smooth and clean canvas for your skincare to absorb and makeup to adhere to. Like the beauty-world-famous Clarisonic, the UltraSonic uses vibrating bristles, which oscillate at a sonic frequency of more than 300 movements per second. This technology works with your skin’s natural elasticity to deeply cleanse and gently exfoliate whilst still remaining incredibly gentle. I have super sensitive skin and have found it to be a joy to use, with no more redness afterwards than a good wipe with a face cloth. It’s also easy to use to your best advantage due to a built-in facial zone that ‘beeps’ to let you know it’s time to move on to your forehead, nose, chin and each cheek.

Over the past eight years, she has worked with pharmaceutical companies and manufacturers to put together ranges to suit brands at all levels of the market, “and I was really involved with the packaging and branding side of things as I believe this is a large part of the marketing process. In my current role as the Director of Marketing at Harmony Home Spa I am always searching for innovative beauty products that make a genuine difference to women’s appearance and wellbeing.” “I also know what it’s like to be a really busy person,” she explains further over a coffee at Zus & Zo, “so I wanted the UltraSonic to work at an optimal level in just one minute, and in the shower if you’re really strapped for time. We always intend to pamper ourselves and use our products properly but just run out of hours in the day, and I wanted to try and make that a little more achievable.” She has also overseen the development of a range of skincare essentials that can be used with the UltraSonic, including a Natural Microdermabrasion Crème that is enriched with the likes of Rosehip, Camomile and Aloe Vera to support your skin’s healing, while stimulating the production of new and healthy skin cells. Because the chemical-free formulation utilises Pure Surgical-grade Corundum Crystals (the same ingredient used by top spas and clinics), you can get salon results at home for a fraction of the cost. “The product really does do the job,” she enthuses, “and it’s anti -inflammatory like the rest of our range as inflammation is one of the fastest ways to age your skin.” There’s also a beautiful extra-mild Detoxifying Cleanser in the range that is gentle enough for all skin types, and many more offerings to come. “I want every woman to be able to have a spa experience at home,” says Juliet, “and it shouldn’t have to cost the earth or take hours out of her day. We have a lot more in the pipeline too,” so watch this space! (HELENE RAVLICH) PN www.harmonyhomespa.co.nz

It is fully rechargeable and waterproof for use in the shower or bath, whilst the interchangeable micro-fibre ‘cleansing’ and ‘abrading’ brush heads are designed for delicate, sensitive and normal skin types, and are bacteria resistant. It’s clinically designed to gently cleanse skin an amazing six times better than manual cleansing - whilst not disturbing your skin’s natural goodness and ensuring that your serums and moisturisers absorb around 60% better – and I for one wouldn’t be without it! It’s also something to get excited about because it was created by a local woman, Juliet Freeman, who is a walking advertisement for seriously beautiful skin (amongst other attributes). After spending much of her adult life watching beauty trends and innovations closely, she started working on the UltraSonic concept a couple of years ago and established Harmony Home Spa.

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING

VARICOSE VEIN PROBLEMS Maybe you’re one of the unlucky 40% or so of the population that suffer from and with varicose veins. Blame your parents or your hormones, but unfortunately, as yet, we have no way to prevent the development of varicose or spider veins. The good news though is that over the past decade we have made huge leaps forward in treatment of varicose veins, especially in the non-surgical treatments. These treatments may involve damaging the faulty veins with laser, or injecting them with a solution, or a combination of both. Excellent results are achieved, but it is a process, taking several months with follow up checks and retreatment as necessary over this time. For the very large varicose veins, there is still surgery, which may be the best option in some cases, or it may be your choice. These days surgery is very accurate, the results are predictable and the recovery quick, with improvement of symptoms and appearance almost immediate. Mr Stan Govender, Vein & Laser’s surgeon, achieves consistently lovely results with minimal scarring. But, for a great outcome you need to take the first step, which is a consultation with Dr Elisabeth De Felice, and find out what can be done for you. More information is available on their website www.veinandlaser.co.nz. PN Please phone VEIN & LASER for an appointment: T: 09 410 0990 or 0800 085 555

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HOROSCOPES

MISS PEARL NECLIS

♊ Gemini (the Twins): 22 May - 21 June

AUCKLAND TO BECOME A FAIR TRADE CITY

♋ Cancer (the Crab): 22 June - 22 July

The Mayor launched Auckland’s status as a Fair Trade City last month, joining a network of 1000 towns and cities around the world.

You need to slow down and stop messing around with your life, getting some responsibility will improve your life. If your friends find you boring that’s their problem your job isn’t to entertain them.

You’re walking up hill without really getting anywhere at the moment, your focus and concentration are lost to you. You will keep going no matter what happens and eventually you will get to where you want to be, but for now you know you’re needed more than ever so try and keep going.

Leo (the Lion): 23 July - 21 August You have been vulnerable for a while now and you’re itching to get back to the way things were. Unfortunately you’re still not back to your full operating capacity and you have to listen to those that know what they are talking about otherwise you’ll find you might be taking two steps forward and one step back for a while to come.

Virgo (the Virgin): 22 August - 23 September I know you feel like jacking it all in sometimes when faced with criticism but it’s not personally aimed at you, sometimes it’s a way of making sure you don’t get too complacent. You’re highly valued by your employers so if it gets too much you should speak up.

Libra (the Scales): 24 September - 23 October You might be feeling like you’re on your own some of the time especially when your decision making comes under question at work. Some people might be giving you the cold shoulder but those in the know will rally round with their support.

Scorpio (the Scorpion): 24 October - 22 November It might not be such a good idea to be off chasing ideas that involve you moving overseas or changing jobs right now. Stay with what you know is familiar for now and that involves dating too.

Sagittarius (the Archer): 23 November - 22 December Some may say that you live a charmed life with the opportunity to do virtually anything you want, but first you have to know what it is you want to achieve. With your upbeat attitude and open mind it shouldn’t be too hard to figure out.

The new status signals Auckland’s commitment to support a fair trading system that will provide more choice to consumers, businesses, producers, farmers, and communities. Already there are more than 300 businesses in Auckland, including supermarkets, cafes and restaurants that purchase and sell Fairtrade Certified products and that number continues to increase. Len Brown says he’s delighted that Auckland is joining the international network of Fair Trade Cities. “We have a great sense of what’s fair in New Zealand, and offering a fair deal to farmers and workers in developing countries is something that more and more businesses and individuals in Auckland are very keen to do.” Len Brown says Auckland Council will play its part through measures such as using Fairtrade Certified coffee and tea at its offices and at meetings. Sam Drumm, campaigner for Fair Trade Auckland, has been instrumental in leading the way to see today’s announcement happen. “I believe we all have a part to play, fair trade is a serious issue and it’s everyone’s responsibility. Lots of things in life aren’t fair, but trade can be if we all work together and make our choices count. “Every year New Zealanders, often without knowing it, are putting millions back into the pockets of producers and farmers in developing countries just by picking up a bunch of bananas, bag of coffee, t-shirts or bar of chocolate that has one simple label on it – Fairtrade. “In fact New Zealand continues to be one of the world’s fastest growing markets for Fairtrade Certified products, with sales reaching $45.4 million last year.” Sam is encouraging all Aucklanders to become conscious consumers and stop when they make a purchase to make sure it’s fair trade. PN

♑ Capricorn (the Goat): 23 December - 20 January

If you have not been feeling your best recently you should listen to your body rather than ignore anything unusual that might have been going on recently. Sometimes changing your way of life can make a huge impact.

Aquarius (the Water Carrier): 21 January - 19 February Occasionally you’re experiencing some self doubt but fortunately these episodes are becoming fewer and far between. What people around you have been noticing however is a new self confidence and vitality about you that is motivational.

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Pisces (the Fish): 20 February - 20 March You shouldn’t deliberately provoke your friends in order to give you some form of entertainment as eventually this will backfire. You might be creating pockets of resentment that you’re not aware of unless you rein in your antics now.

Aries (the Ram): 21 March - 20 April You’re oozing charm and confidence at the moment and everything you seem to do always goes right for you. However don’t become complacent as there is always someone waiting and observing looking for you to make a mistake.

Taurus (the Bull): 21 April - 21 May Your drive and determination comes in handy again this month as you’re able to take control of a situation that has been creating some stress. Don’t take shortcuts over anything this month as short term patch ups just won’t do.

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING

NEWS FROM THE MAKEUP SCHOOL The Makeup School (TMS) is currently interviewing for the next intake of students for their part time Fashion Beauty and Hair Styling Course. This exciting course has been designed for people who want to launch themselves in the fashion/TV and beauty industry but only want to study part time. The course runs every Thursday evening and all day Saturday for 20 weeks and covers everything from natural and fashion makeup and hair styling for editorial work to working within the medium of high definition cameras. “There are so many brilliant opportunities for makeup artist graduates in New Zealand at the moment and they are choosing to pursue such a variety of directions” says one of The Makeup School owners Dianne Ensor. Co owner Gabrielle Jones adds, “We are constantly in contact with our ex students and follow their flourishing careers with great interest. This makes us proud of their achievements and also gives us a sense of satisfaction that we are putting something back into the industry.” Both Gabrielle and Dianne are in a privileged position. They are able to pick projects they feel passionate about and that fit in with their tutoring schedule at TMS. In the last 12 months both have been to Papua New Guinea for two months to film Andrew Adamson’s “Mr. Pip’” and Gabrielle has just finished up working as Makeup/Hair Designer on Peter Webber’s latest film ‘Emperor”. Both these movies had TMS graduates working on them. PN Check out: www.themakeupschool.co.nz for all course information. THE MAKEUP SCHOOL, 46 Brown Street T: 09 376 6660

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

MBFWA: THE MAKEUP REPORT EARLY IN MAY I WAS LUCKY enough to be a guest at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Australia 2012 – AKA MBFWA – and spent a sunshine-soaked week in Sydney seeing a riot of colour and creativity take to the catwalk, as well as a host of killer makeup looks created backstage. It’s hard to pin down the numerous beauty trends that were happening before my eyes – it was certainly a case of “try anything once” – but three shows in particular stood out in my mind for their sheer gorgeousness and total wearability.

photography: Julie Roulston/Sony NEX

A clear crisp morning signalled a fresh start for Lisa Ho’s Spring/Summer 12-13 collection show, which was presented in the glorious surrounds of the Art Gallery of NSW. I was taken backstage to meet M.A.C Australia Senior Artist Linda Jefferyes, whose impeccable work I have long admired from afar. Linda began by telling me that the makeup had a “theatrical, almost Ballet Russes” quality to it, and accordingly created a dark blue smoky eye that was teamed with a nude lip. To add “depth of colour” to the eye, she began by rimming the upper and lower lashes with Indigo eye pencil, smudging that in and then applying Naval shadow over the top. Opulash mascara was used to define the lashes, and the brows left totally natural. Nude lipsticks Blankety and Myth were combined to top off the look and kept the youthful vibes coming from some of the freshest models I’d seen all week. “Sunkissed Moroccan feel, gypsies brushed with luxurious metallics to adorn the skin…” was a quote I saw tacked to a wall backstage at designer Kirrily Johnston’s show, where she presented a collection called The Romanies. It had been handwritten by M.A.C artist Nicole Thompson as a key reference for the beautiful makeup she created in collaboration with Johnston, which was a study in luminous, monochromatic beauty. Pearl and Hush Cream Colour Base were used to highlight the tops of the cheekbones and centre of the lid, with Silver Dusk powder pressed over the top for extra shine and incredible contours. Brows were brushed through with concealer to lighten, whilst lashes were totally mascara free. The lip was Freckletone patted into the lips with the fingers, “and a little on the cheeks as well – meaning it’s super easy to recreate. It was a matter of feeling the bone structure and going with it.” The brief for swimwear label We Are Handsome’s show was “a sexy cross between a 40’s pin-up and 90’s Gwen Stefani”, and the models looked seriously babelicious with bronzed Bondi Beauty tans applied by St Tropez. The natural-look matte tan was polished - using M.A.C.’s Mineralise Skin Finish - only on shoulders and accent points, to provide the perfect base for the swimwear. Skin was “not so fresh and glow-y this time around,” Nicole Thompson told me, “as we wanted a satin finish and more of a ‘mannequin’-type look for the girls. We used Sculpt foundation (my personal fave) and some Face + Body with a little Pearl, Luna and Hush Cream Color Base patted on where needed.” The key was to create a flattering shine with minimal glow, and a little contouring with Root Cream Color Base thrown in for good measure. “It just disappears into the skin really well,” she explained, “rather than a bronzer, which would have looked too much like ‘makeup’ on the skin.” Eyes were kept reasonably minimal but with definition on the top lashes, and a high brow arch was very much in evidence to lend a true 1940’s vibe. “We kept the brows feathery though, so things were still modern.” Nicole delivered a double dose of colour to finish in the form of dual-tone lips. Frosty Fruit Orange on top and Bubble Gum Pink on bottom lips were created using a combination of M.A.C. Chromaline in Genuine Orange and Magenta. A mix of M.A.C. pigments and lipsticks in Cream Colour Base, including Virgin Isle and Pink Shock were then applied. The key to maintaining this bold pop of perfect colour? “Layer, layer, layer. The more layers on the lip the longer it takes to come off,” Thompson told me, “it was exactly like painting a wall!” (HELENE RAVLICH) PN

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CLARE CALDWELL Recently I was asked to give a talk on the merits and applications of Art Therapy within palliative care. My research led me back in time to the mid 19th century and the founder of modern nursing – philosopher, early feminist and crusader for social reform – the “Lady with the Lamp” - Florence Nightingale. Famous for her nightly visits by lamplight to wounded and dying soldiers during the Crimean War (1854-56), she revolutionised their physical and psychological care (and survival) by vastly improving hygiene standards and elevating the minimised role of nursing to a meaningful vocation for women. One hundred years later, another solitary and strong-willed woman was to revolutionise the accepted medical paradigm by becoming the founder of the modern hospice movement. Her name was Dame Cicely Saunders. Hospices in the UK at that time were just sanctuaries provided by religious orders for the dying poor, providing food, clothing, shelter and minimal medical care. Dame Cicely, like her hero Florence Nightingale, was a woman of deep religious faith. Self - proclaimed “advocate of the underdog” and inspired by the spirituality, compassion and vision of her predecessor, Dame Cicely made a decision to devote her life to ensuring people from any social background could die with dignity and free of pain. Prior to this introduction of what became known as “palliative” care, patients who were considered incurable, thus “unfixable”, were often callously discarded by the doctors and public hospital systems.

THE ART OF LIVING

working with loss and bereavement into the mainstream. She found that universally, people facing the different stages of death and dying, be it their own or that of a loved one, often turned to creativity as a way of expressing the inexpressible. Art therapy became a powerful stand alone modality that gave insightful indicators of deep emotional, somatic and psychological processes that people were struggling to put into words. Building on each others gifts, these pioneering women have been my inspiration. Their courage, compassion, expansive intellect, spirituality and vision must continually inspire all of us to improve our care of those who are in need, whatever our chosen therapeutic modality. Clare (Claudie) Caldwell is a Creative Arts Therapist who runs a small private practice from home. She is Voluntary Team Leader of Creative Therapies at Mercy Hospice Auckland, College Hill, where she has worked for the last ten years. She is also a Freelance Artist. PN Enquiries: T: 09 836 3618; M: 021 293 3171; E: clare.e.caldwell@gmail.com

In 1968, at St. Christopher’s Hospice in S.E. London, a new medical mantra emerged: “You matter because you are you. You matter to the last moment of your life, and we will do all we can, not only to help you die peacefully, but also to live until you die.” Hospices world wide began to embrace this new holistic care of the patient that now extended to psycho/social/spiritual needs as well as pain management and symptom relief. Around this time, another pivotal figure in the care of and respect for the dying emerged – Swiss psychiatrist, Elizabeth Kubler-Ross – who brought the concept of

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JOHN APPLETON ON HEALTH

COULD COCONUT OIL BE AN OPTION ST JOHN APPEAL WEEK Ponsonby resident and St John officer Nick Hardley encourages FOR TREATING ALZHEIMERS? people to donate in the upcoming St John Appeal Week 18 - 24 “Tick of a timebomb that waits to claim the identity and dignity of a generation” This is the heading of a feature article in a British newspaper. The article talks about how the incidence of Alzheimer’s and dementia is expected to increase to become a major epidemic and it’s not just in the U.K. In New Zealand there should be as much concern because the costs could exceed our ability to pay.

June. “You never know when you’re going to need us, we rely on the donations of the community to be able to provide the highly specialised equipment and support services that we do - Please give generously!” says Nick. St John Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Nick Hardley has been serving St John for 18 months and so far he’s impressed with the experience.

While there is an international scramble to develop drugs that may limit the impact of this insidious condition for the benefit of the individual and the health system, the news is not good. It seems however that if there is a breakthrough it may come in the form of a simple nutritional intervention. There’s a video clip that’s currently going ‘viral’ on the internet which outlines the story of an American Doctor who achieved significant success treating her husband with coconut oil. Dr Newport has written a case study ‘What if there was a cure for Alzheimer’s Disease And No One Knew and this can be downloaded from the Internet. There are also several ‘YouTube’ clips where Dr Newport is interviewed.

“My biggest coup to date was delivering a baby boy. It was a straightforward birth but a real thrill to support the little fellow into the world - His very first woolly hat came courtesy of me and my crewmate,” says Nick.

The first question that might come to mind for many people is how can a simple saturated fat possibly be effective as a treatment for a serious neurological condition? The theory is based on the fact that an early feature of Alzheimer’s disease is region specific declines in brain glucose metabolism. Unlike other tissues in the body the brain does not efficiently metabolise fats and thus it relies almost exclusively on glucose for energy. Therefore inhibition of glucose metabolism can have a profound effect on the brain. Alzheimer’s could be a type of diabetes of the brain where insulin problems prevent brain cells from accepting glucose.

“The rewards are huge - you get to be there for people and help them when they really need it. They could be having the worst day of their life,” he says.

This is where the coconut oil comes in. Scientists have discovered that there is another substance that could fuel the brain; a substance known as ketones or ketone bodies. Ketones are what your body produces when it converts fat (as opposed to glucose) into energy. The good news is that the Medium Chain Triglycerides (fats) found in coconut oil are an excellent source of Ketone bodies. Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT’s) are not processed in the same manner as Long Chain Trigylcerides (e.g Fish Oil) which must be mixed with bile in order that they may be broken down. MCT’s however go directly to the liver (not requiring bile) which naturally converts the fats into ketones. These are then released immediately into the bloodstream where they are transported to the brain to be used as fuel. I have read that ketones appear to be the preferred source of brain food in patients affected by diabetes or Alzheimer’s. Six months ago a good friend in the U.S. told me that he was planning to try coconut oil with his mother who has Alzheimer’s and hadn’t spoken for two years. Last week he forwarded a copy of a message from his mother’s care centre – “Good news I can’t believe what is happening!!! Your Mom has not spoken in almost two years Rhoda is saying sentences- there is a big change in her”

Nick was inspired to join St John during his high school days as a lifeguard at Mangawhai Heads. After completing a Bachelor of Health Science which equipped him as a paramedic, he spent a couple of years in the UK working at a psychiatric hospital and recently returned to New Zealand to immerse himself in service to St John and the Auckland community.

“While I’m based at the New Lynn St John Station, we may attend callouts anywhere from Pukekohe to Wellsford in any one day. Every situation is different. You have to be flexible in your approach both practically and people-wise, you’re using different equipment, as well as having to manage different approaches for different people,” says Nick. And when asked how he manages the chaos and panic that can be part of a St John callout, Nick replies “My aim is to stay relaxed, calm and level-headed. By taking charge of the situation in this way people tend to follow suit.” But it’s not always easy especially when he’s faced with a grieving family after an unsuccessful attempt to treat a cardiac arrest or similar. “For me one of the biggest challenges is dealing with grieving families. Its really hard when you’ve done all you can and you’re faced with the reality of a family’s loss.” Nick’s advice to anyone considering becoming a St John paramedic; “Take a few steps to see if it’s really for you; do a First Aid course, join as a St John volunteer – This way you’ll get to see if it’s really your thing.” PN For ST JOHN ANNUAL APPEAL enquiries contact: St John Communications Coordinator Nicki Russell on M: 027 290 9764 www.stjohn.org.nz

While to many this is totally new and surprising, ketones have been used successfully to help with Epilepsy. There is a diet known as the ketogenic diet which was pioneered by Dietician Millicent Kelly at Johns Hopkins Hospital some 40 years ago. In 1997 Meryl Streep starred in a television movie “First do no harm” about a boy whose severe epilepsy, unresponsive to medications, with terrible side effects, is controlled by the ketogenic diet. Aspects of the story mirror the movie’s director Jim Abrahams’ own experience with his son Charlie. Anyone interested can watch a brief video of Meryl Streep introducing the ketogenic diet (type Meryl Streep ketogenic diet into Google). Meryl describes her friend’s son Charlie and his life with epilespy. Charlie had suffered thousands of seizures, had been given a vast array of drugs had been hospitalised eight times had MRI’s and CAT scans a surgical procedure and been under the care of five neurologists. When Charlie was put on the ketogenic diet at the Johns Hopkins Hospital he became seizure free – it’s a remarkable story. Why isn’t the story about ketones front page news? It should be but the title of NZ Herald Journalist Paul Little’s recent article “Health industry depends on people being ill” rings a bell for me. (JOHN APPLETON) PN JOHN APPLETON ASSOCIATES T: 09 489 9362 john@johnappleton.co.nz www.johnappleton.co.nz

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PLANET AYURVEDA: ASK+DOCTOR AJIT LIVING, THINKING BEING

BEAUTIFUL BIRTHDAY Phoenix Cosmetics, New Zealand’s own makeup brand developed by Auckland makeup artist Phoenix Renata, recently celebrated their seventh Birthday with celebrations up and down the country. Seven years since Phoenix followed her makeup dream, she now has 10 stores and a makeup school. She releases her yearly collections annually with a spectacular makeup show at New Zealand Fashion Week, and most recently she has opened her first Australian store in Launceston in collaboration with designer Annah Stretton. The majority of Phoenix’s boutiques are all in conjunction with Annah Stretton and are shared spaces. Phoenix’s relationship with Stretton began years ago as mentor /makeup artist and has evolved, with the two businesses proving a good fit and the retail model a good one in the current market. Signature products in Phoenix’s extensive make-up range include custom-blend foundation - a New Zealand first, blended on the spot to match a customer’s exact skin tone - mineral makeup, shimmer powder in a refillable metallic diamante compact, and pink pony hair makeup brushes. All the products are hypoallergenic and not tested on animals. PN

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING ARRANGING A PSYCHIC HOUSE PARTY

Charges for a house party range from $450 for a group setting or $150 for individual readings. Group readings take about an hour and a half.

Worldwide interest in spirituality is at an all time high in 2012 and with the Mayan calendar running out in December 2012, people are naturally curious about the end of the world.

Jane Brebner has been a medium and clairvoyant for the past 16 years, and has been running house parties in Beachlands for the last two years. On average a hostess will host a party every six months and the numbers have grown so that a host who, only a year ago, hosted a party for six people has recently booked two days in a row for 12. Psychic parties are ideal for hen nights, birthdays, indeed any celebrations including corporate, or workplace entertainment. (JANE BREBNER) PN

Last year I was fortunate enough to travel to Cancun in Mexico where I visited the Mayan temple. The guide there told us that in the Mayan tradition, the fact that the calendar runs out is actually a sign of change, rather than the end of the world. This is a similar concept to that which what one would experience when seeing death on a card in a tarot reading where death indicates change not physical death. Lucky for us!

T: 09 832 3421 M: 021 027 09788 E: janebrebner@nzpsychic.com www.nzpsychic.com

Closer to home, the interest in spirituality is also changing. A new trend is seeing groups of women getting together and taking time to de-stress, relax and enjoy each others company by arranging a psychic house party. Here’s how it works. A psychic house party is generally held in the privacy of someone’s home where that person acts as the host or hostess. The party consists of a group of six people (or less) getting together for elevenses, lunch or afternoon tea. During this time each of the clients will have the opportunity for a psychic reading. This can be dealt with in either of two ways: in a group setting where individuals are allowed to ask questions as they sit in a communal living room setting and the reader will read each individual’s energy, work with their question, as well as give other pertinent psychic information to the individual. The second method (which seems to be the most popular) is for each individual to go to a separate room and have a private hour long reading. A house party is a fun and unique way to enjoy a gathering with friends and co-workers and perhaps gain insights into personal issues and queries, in a relaxed and supportive environment. During a reading the reader will carefully read the energy of the client focusing on all areas of life, discussing the course that the client is on and providing highlights of opportunities and challenges in their current and future circumstances, as well as insight on events of interest in the near future.

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LANI LOPEZ: ON HEALTH

HEALTHY LAWS IN MANY CULTURES THERE ARE CENTURIES OF LEARNING AND PRACTICE IN health and healing that we can apply in our daily life. These are summarised in the six laws or principles of natural medicine that guide naturopaths like me in our life and work. The six laws or fundamental principles of natural medicine are: 1) The Healing Power of Nature 2) A Natural Approach 3) Identify and Treat the Cause 4) Self Understanding 5) Prevention 6) Treat the Whole Person Each one can enrich your personal and family’s wellbeing. 1) THE HEALING POWER OF NATURE The body has the ability to heal itself; our job is to support that ability. Your body has numerous tools and actions dedicated to healing. Take a cut or graze as an example. The body rushes to clean, then close and heal the wound. Internal processes are equally effective, centred on our ever vigilant immune system. Natural medicine prioritises supporting the immune system in any challenges it confronts related to environment, age or infection; As I’ve discussed in the last two issues of Ponsonby News, for example with colds and flu.

6) TREATING THE WHOLE PERSON Good health is more than the absence of symptoms or disease. True health and wellbeing occurs when the whole person is cared for. Mental, emotional, physical, environmental and spiritual wellbeing all require care and support; when each is in balance, we are in good health. These are the principles and laws my predecessors, mentors and teachers have given me. I live by them, daily. My work as a naturopath is motivated by an ambition to see these principles more widely understood, practised, and lived for a full life. I hope they can support you in living well too - you deserve to. Lani Lopez BHSc AdvDip NatMed our favourite naturopath, is a clinical nutritionist, author of ‘A to Z of Natural Health a NZ Guide’ and the founder of Lanilopez.com find her on facebook at facebook.com/lanilopezcom or naturopath@lanilopez.com PN

2) A NATURAL APPROACH A gentle, non-invasive approach to healthcare. This involves choosing treatments in their most natural form, carefully avoiding toxins and being sensitive to side-effects, contra-indications and impact on the body’s healthy function. Practitioners taking a natural approach prioritise selecting nutrients and medicines that are easily absorbed by the body. 3) IDENTIFYING AND TREATING THE CAUSE Healing is a thorough process that starts with uncovering the fundamental cause(s) of disease. To be effective and prevent recurrence, any treatment must first address the source of disease. This is often where lifestyle and nutrition are important and effective factors. Our daily decisions and habits support or sabotage our long-term health. 4) SELF UNDERSTANDING Educating patients about their own health and wellbeing is fundamental to the role of every healthcare professional. The doctor/patient practitioner/patient relationship is most effective when it centres on guiding and supporting us, as the patient in overseeing our own wellbeing. We are of course only human and as patients we often struggle to comprehend the information needed to best treat ourselves. So open communication is vital. It is never too late, or too early, to learn about being and living well. Choose healthcare professionals for your care that have a commitment to your understanding and decision-making about your health and wellbeing. If you are not getting this, change your health provider. 5) PREVENTATIVE MEDICINE The cliché is true, ‘prevention is better than cure.’ The focus of wellbeing is to avoid having to treat illness by first doing everything in one’s power to prevent it. This principle is one I believe we all need to take to heart; it would save us pain, discomfort and end so much unnecessary illness and suffering. My naturopathic specialty is formulating health supplements, and while they do assist in overcoming illness, the essential aim is preventing getting sick at all. My immune formula OLE-Up, for example, is a combination of Olive Leaf Extract - supporting our body’s immunity and fortification, Acai Berry - Brazil’s anti-oxidant super food, Turmeric - nourishing and supporting healthy blood circulation and joint comfort and Schisandra - the stress soother. Taken in high doses OLE-Up will attack a cold or flu and speed recovery time. It is most effective taken dailyy to boost the immune system and prevent bugs taking hold in the first place. Look at what you do and don’t do every day that encourages or prevents good health. Consider your environment, food, exercise, stress, medication, supplements, recreation, learning and love-life. The last principle is probably my favourite and I believe that when you are unwell, is the key to accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.

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WANT TO AVOID WINTER BUGS? A good diet with sufficient vitamins and minerals can help keep those winter bugs and blues at bay. Nellie, our nutritionist/naturopath, has experience treating digestive disorders, food allergies and intolerance, women’s health, and optimising thyroid function. So, if want you to improve your mood, lose weight and manage your overall dietary health why don’t you contact Return to Form to book a consult with Nellie. T: 09 551 4460, info@returntoform.com or 334 Ponsonby Road, Three Lamps. PN

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OUR PLACE - THE WORLD HERITAGE COLLECTION Geoff Steven started off as a graphic artist but found photography more to his liking and became very good at it. He’s had many exhibitions and his images are in collections in Australia, Asia, Europe and America. The lure of the silver screen saw him drift away from his first calling and he morphed into a cinematographer then film director and producer and finally a network producer for both TV3 and TVNZ. Twelve years as a TV executive took him further and further away from being behind a camera so when he left TVNZ he looked for a project that would incorporate his two enthusiasms, travel and photography. He’d done all the sort of transient throw away television stuff that was good fun, but now wanted to do something that had more substance. His mind turned to world heritage which he didn’t know a lot about and presumed there were others equally unaware, so when he was in Paris doing some development work for French television he decided to cold call on UNESCO and pitch the idea of doing a contemporary exclusive archive of all the World Heritage sites. Slightly mesmerised by this novel, and a bit audacious approach, the committee he spoke to agreed it was a worthwhile project but no money was available. Geoff’s response “I come from New Zealand and I’m used to not having any money so we have to work out ways of doing this.” For the next two years he negotiated with UNESCO, gained sponsorship in Japan from Panasonic and became an official partner with UNESCO, one of the few around. He now has been fully engaged in doing the first photographic archive of heritage sites in partnership with the UNESCO World Heritage Centre. So far he and his team have shot 360 sites in 85 countries and have an exclusive archive of over 45,000 images. It’s an open ended project because every year more sites are inscribed onto the world heritage list. Presently there are 900+ and Geoff can keep going from his Ponsonby office as long as he is able to raise sponsorship because there’s no monetary support from UNESCO. Geoff has shot 50 sites himself and contracts photographers from here and abroad as well. When creating the archive he has to be sure it’s geographically and politically representative, not Eurocentric. This requires meetings with UNESCO who through the community of nations, choose sites that have universal significance. He believes people can have an emotional bond to a place through photography and if they are aware of a significant site, they want it cared for, which is why the project is called ‘Our Place’. A country might be responsible for a site but holds it on behalf of the culture of the world. Many people came to this realisation when the Taliban blew up the Bamiyan Buddahs. The citizens of the world were appalled and even those who had never seen them felt a sense of loss. ‘Our Place’ has just had a big exhibition in Paris and another last year in the United Nations Pavilion in Shanghai. No matter the two audiences were racially dissimilar because photographs talk across cultural and language barriers. When Geoff approached UNESCO he didn’t know what he couldn’t or shouldn’t do because normally no one just bowls up unannounced to that august body with a proposition in mind so ‘Our Place’ is definitely a Kiwi-can project. He believes we as New Zealanders can do this sort of thing and we should be creating intellectual property that doesn’t have to be crated and sent abroad in a container ship. He can send exhibitions around the world with a simple transfer of digital files. Three years ago Our Place Publishing formed a partnership with David Batemen and produced ‘Places of Wonder & Discovery.’ It features the images Geoff and the team captured and documents the outstanding locations that make up this first book in the ‘Our Place World Heritage Collection’ series. Director of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre, Francesco Bandarin writes in his forward ‘I would like to invite you to relax and enjoy this marvellous work, as you discover some of the most interesting places in the world.’ To view the full selection of the sites photographed by the Our Place team go to www.ourplaceworldheritage.com (DEIRDRE ROELANTS) PN

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TONY DEY: THE HARD TOOTH – THE TRUTH ABOUT DENTISTS, DENTAL CARE AND TEETH

THE HARD TOOTH JUNE EDITION:

CALLING ALL ECO WARRIORS!

Dr Tony Dey of Ponsonby Dentist contributes an edition of the ‘Hard Tooth’ every month for Ponsonby News. In the June edition he talks about ways to avoid visiting the dentist.

Did you know, approximately 252,000 tonnes of plastic waste is disposed of to New Zealand landfills each year. (Based on 8% of 3.156 million tonnes of waste to landfill).

Let’s face it no one really enjoys going to the dentist. Actually there are a few patients who claim they love visiting the dentist; those are the ones we tend to worry about at Ponsonby Dentist. Maybe it’s the smell of varnish or oil of clove as you walk in, the dreaded injection or that horrible vibrating drill thing. Maybe it’s a hangover from the ‘murder house’ or school dental service. Whatever it is here are some tips on keeping people like me out of your mouth. One of my favourite sayings is “only floss the ones you want to keep” and it’s pretty much true. Most decay starts just below the point where neighbouring teeth touch each other ‘the contact point’. This is right between teeth and the only real way of reaching it is with floss. Flossing also helps prevent gum disease. Floss should be used pretty much daily. I do it before I brush using a decent length (30cm) looped around my middle fingers and guided by my index finger and thumb. I floss into each space twice once cleaning the front tooth and once cleaning the back tooth. See diagram. Brushing is obviously also very important, electric brushes are best. Oral B do a few variations all of which are good and Philips have their SoniCare available in New Zealand now which is excellent. The key point with brushing is timing. Try to brush as far away from eating as possible especially after consuming acidic or sugary liquid/food like wine or citrus fruit. The acid combines with the grit in toothpaste to wear teeth at the margins. Mouthwashes are very good they claim to improve the effectiveness of brushing and flossing by 20%. All the commercially available ones are pretty good. I like the Listerine flavours. We have spoken about Toothmousse in the Hard Tooth before. It is a really clever remineralisation cream that also comes as a chewing gum. This is very popular at our practice. Regular trips to your Oral Hygienist and yearly check ups should keep you out of trouble. If you don’t floss you should definitely see the hygienist more often. We have some clients who attend three monthly for cleans. (DR TONY DEY) PN PONSONBY DENTIST, 114 Ponsonby Road, Level 1 – upstairs from The Long Room T: 09 361 2060 www.ponsonbydentist.co.nz

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Each New Zealander consumes approximately 36 kg of plastic packaging per year and recycles 8.64 kg!* Bring in your empty ecostore bottles for them to recycle! They feed the collected plastic bottles through a dedicated regrind machine and send the plastic chips to our bottle manufacturer to be made into new ecostore bottles. They use clear polypropylene labels on their bottles which are on a clear polyester backing material and are fully recyclable – so there’s no need to remove them from the bottle before recycling. RE-USE and save our planet by recycling used bottles; reduce the number of plastics going to landfill! REFILL and save you money! Refill your ecostore dish-wash liquid, laundry liquid, multipurpose cleanser, hand and body wash in their Freemans Bay shop! Other ecostore items are available to purchase in bulk sizes for your convenience. PN Ask them to help you recycle and refill in store at ECOSTORE, 1 Scotland Street T: 09 360 8477 www.ecostore.co.nz * (Source: Plastics New Zealand www.plastics.org.nz/environmental/recycling/nzrecyclingstatistics).

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MANDE WHITE YOGA - OPEN DAY “No matter how inflexible you are, or what level of fitness you are at - just turn up and I will do the rest.” Mande White Mande White has a remarkable teaching ability and creative approach to yoga, movement and health making her one of the most sought after fitness consultants in New Zealand. Her enthusiastic and positive approach to life and fitness is motivational and her knowledge of the human anatomy is outstanding. Mande is an Intermediate Iyengar Teaching Certification and this; along with her many yoga trips to India, Europe and the US has given her depth and understanding of yoga. She maintains a practical and hands-on teaching approach that can be easily incorporated into everyday life. She describes yoga as the best tool you could have to support our increasingly hectic lives. The yoga practice she endorses encompasses all of the things that the average person has going on in their bodies; tight hamstrings, postural problems, back ache and stiff shoulders - all body issues are addressed. Mande’s new Ponsonby studio is bigger and more spacious, and it is set up to help people to access some of the poses that at first seem difficult to access, but with the help of props, new students can be supported in the poses as their yoga develops. If you haven’t tried yoga yet and cringe at the thought of stretching but are feeling stiff, and achy and can’t get anywhere near touching your toes, then Mande’s beginners’ course is a good start. It is informative, physical and fun and you’ll get stronger in ways you never thought possible. Come along to the yoga open day at Mande’s new studio; the perfect space for beginners to advanced levels. Sunday 10 June from 8.30am – 1pm ($5 per class) PN MANDE WHITE, 37 Mackelvie Street Ponsonby www.mandewhite.co.nz

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STEPHEN RAINBOW: SUM OF US

GROW THE ECONOMY BY BACKING GAY MARRIAGE! AS A GAY MAN I AM USED TO SCRUTINY OF MY LIFE, MY SEXUAL PRACTICES, indeed my very validity as a human being. This occurs every time there is a public debate about homosexuality, whether homosexual law reform of 25 years ago or the legislation permitting civil unions in 2006. Now we are about to start the whole process again with the imminent debate about gay marriage (a “debate” that will have an inevitable outcome by the way, at least if New Zealand has any pretence at being a diverse and inclusive society). So is it understandable that I actually couldn’t care less what the odious Conservative Party leader Mr Colin Craig thinks about gay marriage? What business is it of people like him to comment on my aspirations as a gay man to be able to live and love as I choose, including my right to marry another man? I have reached the stage where I can’t help but feel that there is a level of absurdity about this “debate”. Would anyone suggest that there should be a “debate” about the permissibility of older people marrying younger, Asians marrying non-Asians, or Maori marrying Pakeha? And if this issue is about the sanctity of the heterosexual relationship because of its potential for children to be created, what of the rights of the elderly (and sterile) to marry; should this also be the subject of a political “debate”? I have an intensely personal view of this. I lived with a wonderful man for 12 years. When the cancer he was diagnosed with in 2005 spread to his brain in mid-2007 and he had only weeks to live, he woke me up one night (after his constantly rebutting my requests for a civil union) and asked me to “marry” him. Within weeks we had a civil union, but after more than a decade together we actually wanted to get married. Thank goodness for the many brave politicians whose willingness to lead meant we were at least able to have a civil union. So I don’t disagree with the Prime Minister when he says that sorting our economy should be where political energies should be focused. But the “small group of new Zealanders” that he refers to for whom gay marriage is an issue may actually be able to contribute disproportionately to the economic lift New Zealand needs. Imagine if New Zealand’s “gay diaspora” (that has particularly populated some Australian cities) were to return home because all the legal impediments to gay equality-marriage and adoption were finally dispensed with at the very time the Australian Prime Minister is outspoken in her opposition to gay marriage. Might we not turn our allowing gay marriage into an advantage that could attract gay people back to New Zealand, people who would more than likely make a disproportionate contribution to boosting New Zealand’s economy, particularly in those creative and entrepreneurial sectors that we so desperately need to grow and encourage? Do gay people not already make a disproportionate contribution to the sectors that are so critical, in particular to Auckland’s emergence as a truly international city (and therefore to the success of more than a third of the nation’s economy)? Or put more absurdly, if there were no gay people in Auckland would we be more or less likely to become the creative international city that New Zealand so desperately needs if it is to have a bridgehead into the global economy? Richard Florida in his ground - breaking research on the economic role of cities around the world says that gays are the “canaries in the mine” of the creative economy. So should we not therefore be doing everything possible to validate and support gay people and their relationships because we have a critical role in growing the economy, especially in the one place in New Zealand - Auckland (and particularly central Auckland, covered by the Ponsonby News) with the greatest potential to grow our prosperity? I know from the 12 years I spent with my late partner Greg that a loving relationship was a foundation that enabled us to be entrepreneurial and take risks because we enjoyed a shared commitment to the future. If such a relationship happens to be between two people of the same sex should that really be of concern to politicians? And if the people in such a relationship happen to want the choice of marrying, on what basis should we not be allowed that option? Civil unions were a huge step forward, but if marriage is the ultimate form of commitment between two people on what basis should it be denied to one group in society? If there is one reason why gay marriage should be of interest to politicians it may have nothing to do with so-called “moral” issues, but instead might be because in the process of removing the final legal impediment to the equality of gay people we might unequivocally and finally signal that New Zealand values its gay population. In the process of doing this we may have a competitive advantage that has the potential to grow the disproportionate contribution that gay people make to the creative economy that is so critical to Auckland’s - and therefore New Zealand’s future! PN (STEPHEN RAINBOW)

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BILLY HARRIS: KIDS IN THE COMMUNITY KEEP YOUR FINGERS CROSSED FOR DAISY CLEVERLEY The Western Springs College student, just turned 15, has her heart set on representing New Zealand in the under 17 World Cup Azerbaijan in September/ October, and is nervously awaiting the announcement of the final touring party. Observers at the OFC championship in Mangere last April, the tournament for Oceania nations which serves as qualifiers for the World Cup, would be surprised if she doesn’t make the cut, as the skilful midfielder had a solid tournament, playing in all three games, and even scoring three goals to finish as the tournament’s fifth equal top scorer. Her New Zealand coach Paul Temple had this to say after the 9-0 win against Papua New Guinea (New Zealand also beat the Cook Islands 7-0 and New Caledonia 13-1) in which Daisy scored two goals: “Daisy Cleverley and Hannah Carlsen in the centre of midfield have really run the show every time they’ve played. It’s nice for them to get some goals as well,” Temple said, “Daisy and Martine Puketapu are mature beyond their years. Daisy has been an unsung hero for us at this tournament. I think she’s got a very bright future.” If Daisy does earn selection for the finals, it will mark the high point in a short career which is likely to have a few more peaks yet, but it will also present the toughest challenge. In Azerbaijan, New Zealand will be facing opposition far tougher than the cannon fodder they crushed in qualifying, and the scouts will be out in force looking for players with the goods to make it as professionals. That’s very much on Daisy’s footballing bucket list, and to impress in that company Daisy would need to step it up another notch. The progress she’s made to date suggests she’s capable. She took up the sport just nine years ago as a six year old, and quickly used her agility and ball skills to show the boys how it’s done. Within a few years she was helping her Western Springs club win the 10th, 11th and 12th grade Auckland championship for boys and representing Auckland under 13 girls, three times from age 10, at the prestigious Weir Rosebowl tournament, contested by the provinces of the upper North Island.

A JAUNT DOWN MEMORY LANE It’s Mother’s day eve and the Freemans Bay Community Centre is a hive of activity. The hall is literally bursting with model cars, planes and trucks, Scalextric sets, Star Wars and Doctor Who figurines, classic board games, comics and more! It could only be the Auckland City Collectors Fair and Hobbies Expo. Wandering around, my eyes are particularly drawn to a boxed Meccano set (exactly the same as one I received for my ninth birthday) and a motorised, mini ferris wheel made of Meccano. The entire stage is devoted to a model train display, courtesy of the North Shore Model Railway Club, with cute little villages and towns (amazingly detailed) dotted along the line. The collectors fair has been running for over 30 years and continues to grow in popularity. I talk to one of the main organisers, Rochelle Scoones, to get some background. The fair is very much a community event. It’s a rare opportunity for collectors and fans from different genres (for example Star Wars or Dr Who, Hot Wheels or Corgi cars) to gather, renew acquaintances and chat with old friends. In fact, I’m quite struck by the convivial atmosphere. Amongst the crowd are serious collectors, eager to share their passion, and those who are more casual. Rochelle has been a collector for over 25 years and is now seeing a lot of families and a whole new generation of collectors coming to the fairs. For many people, specific items have a very personal connection to their past. And in these uncertain times, a few dollars to purchase an item that helps recapture warm memories is certainly a wise investment. Just seeing a toy from one’s past on display is enough to bring out the inner child, and as Rochelle says “growing old is non-optional but growing up IS optional.” Over 500 people visited the fair and Rochelle tells me there was a large crowd eagerly waiting on the 11am opening. A strategically placed sausage sizzle helped keep the peace until the doors opened. The fair moved to Freemans Bay last year because it outgrew its previous venue. The organisers always gather feedback from participants in order to improve their offering and ensure that the fair is as inclusive as possible. They also change the main display each time, which was the model railway today but has previously included a scale model steam train and radio controlled models. Rochelle assures me that the fair is a labour of love for its organisers, all of whom have a passion for their various fields of interest. The small door charge only meets expenses and venue hire. I have the odd Dalek and Star Trek figurine dotted around the house, but the fair was an eye opener on what’s actually out there. If you have an interest in collectibles, science fiction or just want to relive precious childhood moments, check out the next fair – same venue on 8 September 2012. See the organisers’ website for details: www.aucklandhobbyfair.wordpress.com (RICHARD GRAVENOR) PN

While somehow managing to squeeze softball into her crowded sports timetable and making the Auckland team at first base, as a 13 year old Daisy demonstrated the maturity Paul Temple speaks of by earning selection the Auckland under 20s football team. Last year, aged 14, Daisy made the Auckland team again, but by now her skills were becoming known to a wider audience and she was selected for the national under 17 squad to play a three match series with Australia, in which she made one brief appearance as a substitute. Earlier this year she travelled to Argentina with the team and started in one of the two games. On to the Oceania qualifiers in Mangere where Daisy’s importance to the cause grew still further, becoming if not a starring player in the team, one of the youngest and one valuable enough to start every game. Which brings us to now. Playing in an international tournament in a far away land that most people can’t even spell is an exciting prospect for any young sportsman or woman, and Daisy has done her part to try to make it happen, training nearly every day and jumping on every opportunity to make herself a better player. Now all she can do is wait. (BILLY HARRIS) PN

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FUTURE GENERATION KIDSCAN HELP KEEPS KIWI KIDS IN SCHOOL

PROGRAMME UNDERWAY TO IMPROVE SCIENCE TEACHING IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS

With worsening levels of poverty in New Zealand teachers are finding students searching through rubbish bins for food and taking turns to attend school as they have to share their shoes.

With the quality of science teaching in primary schools in New Zealand under the spotlight, 13 primary school teachers are part way through a teacher fellowship programme to help develop their science teaching skills.

In the frontline providing practical and effective help since 2005, the founder of KidsCan Julie Helson is seeing the poverty problem becoming progressively worse with 270,000 New Zealand children now in families receiving inadequate incomes. Supported by generous sponsors, the KidsCan Charitable Trust provides food, shoes and raincoats for the pupils of low decile schools across New Zealand in order to stop the cycle of poverty leading to more educational failure and deprivation. “Teachers are telling us of catching kids eating out of rubbish bins, and sometimes, the children who do bring their lunch have it stolen by others who have not eaten for more than 24 hours,” says Julie Helson. “A teacher who asked why two brothers were never at school together was told the family could only afford one pair of shoes so they had to take turns to attend.” “There are many kids failing to make the most of our community investment in education, not for want of trying but because they lack the sustenance and warmth needed to learn. And it’s just not their fault.” Since 2005, KidsCan has been meeting the physical and nutritional needs of Kiwi kids at more than 200 schools by supplying food, raincoats and footwear. As a result of this practical support schools report attendance rates have increased, as have their children’s attention spans. “They are learning – they have a better chance,” says Julie Helson. “But the principals of another 109 schools have told KidsCan they also have children who need help to overcome the effects of poverty on their ability to learn.” By supporting KidsCan with a monthly donation of $15, donors give schools the opportunity to provide the needed food and clothing to enable Kiwi kids to help themselves to an education and a better future. “As teachers constantly remind us, being low decile should not be a life sentence,” says Julie Helson. “Our kids are not too stupid to learn, they are just hungry, and this problem can be solved at very little cost for each child we save.” PN

The teachers are spending the first two terms of 2012 as Primary Science Teacher Fellows, under a scheme administered by the Royal Society of New Zealand and funded by the Ministry of Science and Innovation. Science education in primary schools has been under discussion after the Education Review Office released a report at the start of May that shows that only 27 per cent of schools have effective or generally effective science programmes for Years 5 to 8 students. Around 100 teachers have been through the Primary Science Teacher Fellowship programme, since it began in 2009. The programme was started following a report in 2008 from the National Education Monitoring Project, which highlighted a downwards trend in the attitudes of primary aged students towards science. Under the scheme, teachers take leave from their schools to work with researchers at host organisations and learn more about science and its application. “The goal is to make these teachers science curriculum leaders,” says Richard Meylan, Manager – Education at the Royal Society of New Zealand. “One of the conditions of the fellowships is that the principal and school must be fully behind the teachers and willing to make science a focus for the year following the fellowship. “We hope the experiences the teachers have during their fellowships and the commitment the schools make to science will have a long-lasting positive effect on science teaching in these primary schools.” The research topics for this group of teachers include dolphin monitoring, geology and earthquake studies, onion and fern research, conservation projects, dairying and physical exercise in athletes. Host organisations for this group of teachers include organisations such as NIWA, Lincoln University, Department of Conservation, and GNS. PN

To sign up to support a New Zealand child visit www.kidscan.org.nz

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FUTURE GENERATION KADIMAH IS NOW A STATE-INTEGRATED SCHOOL Kadimah School has been welcoming through its doors Primary and Intermediate aged boys and girls, from every part of the community for 40 years. Last year Kadimah became a state-integrated school. Known for its special Jewish character, Kadimah is now able to put its superior education within reach of every family in Auckland. Many Western Bays parents choose Kadimah because it is close to home - and close to CBD and city fringe work. The school offers values led teaching by a stable, passionate staff team and in an extraordinary high-quality fit-out, is an affordable alternative to private schools, many of which are some distance away. With a school roll currently under 200 and classes for children from four to 12 years old, Kadimah should be top of any parent’s short list for their children.

Kadimah School has space available now in preschool and years 3, 5, 6, 7 and 8. If your family are looking for an exceptional all-round preschool, primary and intermediate education, contact the Kadimah Principal, Robert Minahan, for a personal tour. T: 09 373 3072 or email robm@kadimah.school.nz PN

Ask Grey Lynn resident, Rebecca Greenhough, why she sends her children to Kadimah and she answers, “How long have you got?” Rebecca and Justin recently set up Little Engines Montessori Pre School in Grey Lynn and know first hand how challenging it can be to create an optimal learning environment and believe Kadimah gets it right. “Our kids are thriving in the smaller class sizes, we feel so lucky.” Elena Keith, from Ponsonby, likes that Kadimah values educational excellence and extends her children’s learning with music, an ICT room and Hebrew lessons. “Our kids are enjoying a rich learning environment, they’re getting valuable teacher time that in a larger school they might not have,” says Elena. Fashion designer, Roanne Jacobson and her sister Britt Alpe, who also live locally, send their children to the preschool and primary school and appreciate the small class sizes and family feel of the school. Britt says “I love how personal the education is. Our teachers really focus on the children doing their personal best and are genuinely interested in their achievements both academically and socially. It’s such a nurturing environment where even my little shy one gets heard.”

Pictured left to right: ELENA KEITH, BRITT ALPE, ROANNE JACOBSON, and REBECCA GREENHOUGH

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FUTURE GENERATION AUCKLAND GIRLS’ GRAMMAR SCHOOL REACHING ANOTHER MILESTONE WHAT DO ROSSLYN NOONAN, DR MERIMERI PENFOLD, PROFESSOR INNES Asher, Heather Begg, Georgina Te Heu Heu, Dame Dorothy Winstone, Sandra Coney and Zoe Bell all have in common? They all went to Auckland Girls’ Grammar School. Auckland Girls’ prides itself on educating and equipping students for the world - and has been doing so since 1888. AGGS students leave school knowing that they have been offered the best possible opportunities to succeed in whatever path they choose.

MARIST U15 SOFTBALL TEAM The Marist U15 softball team won the Auckland U15 Championship title this season. Following their trip to Queensland, where they remained unbeaten by a selection of top Queensland U15 and U17 sides. Most of the boys have been together since they were five-year old teeballers at Westmere School. PN

Auckland Girls’ Grammar School will be celebrating its 125th anniversary in 2013. Former students are encouraged to visit the school’s website www.aggs.school.nz and join the AGGS Alumnae to connect with other past students and register for the events being planned now. Enrolments for 2013 are now open. Auckland Girls’ invites members of the local community, as well as prospective students, to visit the school with your daughters on our Open Day. PN AUCKLAND GIRLS GRAMMAR SCHOOL, 14 Howe Street, Freemans Bay T: 09 307 4180 E: enrol@aggs.school.nz www.aggs.school.nz

CHILDREN’S BOOK REVIEW

ARTHUR’S DREAM BOAT by Polly Dunbar. (Walker, $29.99) Arthur’s Dream Boat is a magical picture book from the talented writer and illustrator Polly Dunbar. It comes with enchanting imagery, is light on text, and is illustrated with charcoal and watercolour and bursts of colour. Arthur dreams a fantastic dream about a pink and green striped boat with bright spotted sails and a striking figurehead and a golden flag. The next morning he can’t wait to tell his family but no-one is interested, not even the dog. Only when the boat grows larger and larger on his head and he is bouncing over waves will the family finally listen. The story will have children drifting away in their own dream boat, really AMAZING! PN DOROTHY BUTLER CHILDREN’S BOOKSHOP, 1 Jervois Road T: 09 376 7283 www.childrensbookshop.co.nz

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FUTURE GENERATION MAJOR TURNAROUND AT ST PAUL’S COLLEGE ST PAUL’S IN RICHMOND ROAD HAS BEEN THERE FOREVER - WELL NOT quite forever - but since 1903, so there are no residents around about, even the oldest, who remember a time when St Paul’s was not part of our community. In the 1950s Marist Brothers, who run St Paul’s, decided to purchase land at Glen Innes, where they established Sacred Heart College. It was envisioned that St Paul’s Grey Lynn would be disestablished. But the desire and the demand was such that the closure never occurred, and now in 2012, after some pretty difficult years, St Paul’s is going through a resurgence and a growth spurt. Much of the credit for this new lease on life must go to Principal since 2009, Mark Rice. Although Mark is excited about growth, especially from local families, and proud of both sporting and academic success at St Paul’s, he is far too modest to take much credit for it. Mark Rice has an impeccable pedigree for a Marist Principal. He has taught at St Paul’s since 1993, sport, physical education mainly, is an old boy of the school, and what is more his father is also an old boy. Mark, a European in a largely Polynesian school, even has a son now attending, coming in each day with dad from the North Shore. That son knows only too well how successful dad has been coaching the very successful St Paul’s College League team which went nearly 100 games over seven years before defeat last year, and he too dreams of a Warriors callup. But St Paul’s is no longer just about Rugby League. Mark Rice is passionate about academic success, and produced for Ponsonby News a complete list of where 2011’s Year 13s have gone this year. The sporting success is now rubbing off onto academic success. Academic achievement in NCEA 2011 was up significantly: 85.3% of students passed Level 3, compared with 63% (2010), 58% (2009) and 40% (2008). 20% of those students passed with Merit. All measurable results are on an upward trend. Mark Rice is pleased with new teaching staff, especially two new Deputy Principals. “We are a much more robust school now,” he says. “It’s taken a few years but we now have a stable staff and we’re getting the balance right. We have a good cross section of Auckland culture, and are continuing to recruit more local students.” It’s easy to praise the top students, but St Paul’s, in keeping with Marist principles, is dedicated to helping the bottom 20%. As the Marist Creed says, “Love all and love them equally.” Everyone knows Warriors icon Jerome Ropati, an old boy of St Paul’s, but Mark Rice is quick to point out that there are 10 others he could point to, who are just as successful in a variety of other fields. It is clear Mark Rice has put together a good team at St Paul’s, and that they have a carefully framed set of practices and principles which are an important ingredient in the school’s success. These include: Instilling confidence. “If you think you will lose, or fail, then you will. If you believe you can succeed, you will. Never give up - work hard - no excuses.” They have a daily assembly where they promote the school values, faith, perseverance, passion, courage and brotherhood. Forgiveness: Boys mess up. We believe in second chances. Small classes, strong community: Brotherhood is a big thing at St Paul’s. I was impressed with Mark Rice - he is quietly spoken but filled with the values which he instils in the boys - strength of character and a determination to give his boys the best possible education. The culture of the school has changed for the better since Mark took over, but there is no sense of complacency. St Paul’s is a work in progress. If, as Mark hopes, locals embrace St Paul’s for their children’s education in increasing numbers, that will be another bonus for the school. As we toured the newly refurbished classroom block and peeked our heads into the classrooms, I was impressed with the school tone. Boys were natural, polite and quietly organised. St Paul’s College is an asset to our community and is in very safe hands. We look forward to hearing more about success in the classroom, on the sporting field and in many cultural areas. (JOHN ELLIOTT) PN The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS ARCHITECTURAL VISION ACHIEVED Creative Arch is an award winning, multi-disciplined Architectural Design business, founded by Architectural Designer/Licensed Building Practitioner/ Director Mark McLeay in 1998. Based in Freemans Bay, their span of work is as diverse as their clients, ranging from new residential homes as well as alterations, coastal developments, subdivision developments and commercial architectural design projects. Client service is their first priority. Mark says “Our guiding principle is to always understand our client's needs and requirements. We take the time to listen carefully to our clients, gaining a better understanding of them, and their architectural vision.” This understanding was critical in the design of a Grey Lynn property, ensuring the aspirations of the client were achieved. Their essential requirement was to retain the traditional characteristics of the original historic villa and tie in the modern addition with the existing house. Attention to detail and uncompromising aesthetic are at the core of the design, ensuring an award winning project.* Interestingly, the homeowner never intended on living in the house herself. Instead, she was renovating the home for her sister’s family. Mark says, “We were very mindful of the fact that the home was for a Polynesian family. This meant that regular, large family get-togethers were extremely important, so significant spaces were required to allow room for large-scale entertaining”. *In 2009 the Harcourt street house was the winner of the following awards; ADNZ Regional Kitchen, ADNZ Regional Residential Additions & Alterations, ADNZ Regional Residential Interiors and ADNZ Regional Bathroom. PN

CREATIVE ARCH, T: 09 309 6032 www.creativearch.co.nz

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FIONNA HILL

THE PONSONBY GARDENER

GARLIC: A SUPERFOOD

“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian; wine and tarragon make it French; Sour cream makes it Russian; lemon and cinnamon make it Greek; Soy sauce makes it Chinese; garlic makes it good.” Alice May Brock (of Alice’s Restaurant fame) Garlic is one of the oldest cultivated plants in existence since the Egyptians. It wasn’t grown much in Britain during the first part of the 19th century because of anti French feeling...the poms were the losers. I use it in most of my savoury cooking. It’s a superfood; garlic has properties that can help improve many common sicknesses; it promotes heart health, has anti cancer and antibacterial effects. It’s traditionally planted on the shortest day in New Zealand and harvested on the longest. In the garden garlic is a good companion plant warding off unwanted insects as it is strong smelling and will keep off pests generally. The first time I planted it, I forced whole bulbs into the ground – don’t try that - bulbs must be divided. Divide the head of garlic into cloves; use healthy cloves; make sure that every clove is firm and undamaged and don’t peel them - peel off the outer covering of the whole bulb but not the layers around individual cloves. The larger outer cloves will produce a cluster of large bulbs whereas the small inner cloves may produce only a single bulb. Garlic likes full sun and fertile well cultivated soil. Prepare the soil before you plant, adding plenty of compost, sheep pellets and a dressing of blood and bone. Push each clove down into the soil three to five centimetres deep, with the pointed end facing upwards. Mark the rows - the garlic should be up within four weeks. Don’t put your garlic near peas and beans (except in a cassoulet), though they can follow in rotation in the garden. Garlic is especially good near roses and fruit trees. Keep the cloves watered and free of weeds. It can be grown in pots or window boxes too. Throughout the season feed with a liquid fertiliser. Avoid using bulbs from the supermarket to plant....garlic imported from China has been treated with a chemicals to increase its shelf life by halting its growth. They’re unlikely to sprout anyway. And also it has been bleached and treated with pesticides. I read in ‘The Australian’ that all imported food like this is treated with methyl bromide, a fumigant used to control some pests, and which is also a fire extinguishing agent, a refrigerant and a solvent; unsurprisingly it is listed as toxic to humans and animals! And for some folklore - apparently garlic renders witches powerless - that will be useful. It also has a reputation for being an aphrodisiac...Circe fell in love with Odysseus after he ate it and despite her plan to turn him into a pig. They must have kept their mouths closed? In folklore we’re told to hang garlic by the kitchen door to keep fairies away from the butter churn. Another useful tip. A necklace of garlic keeps vampires away.... likely to keep everyone else away too. And we’re told that if you hold garlic in the palm of your hand it will cure toothache. I’d rather stick with a speedy trip to the dentist. Elephant garlic is not true garlic but a variant of the species to which leeks belong but its flavour is more like garlic than leeks. If you have no garlic to last you over the winter try pickling some now to last until the harvest in six months time. I keep a huge jar on the bench all the time.

RENOVATE YOUR HOME PERFECT WITH THREE KIDS AND A DOG THE QUAINT LITTLE THREE-BEDROOM bungalow had become a nightmare to live in. Not only were the owners feeling crowded but the original quirks of owning a character home, like the lack of storage and separate living spaces, had become a nuisance. They craved indoor-outdoor flow and large open plan living spaces for perfect entertaining. They loved their quirky little bungalow and the idea of selling and buying the perfect home for their needs appeared to be a daunting process. They decided to explore their options with extending and renovating their existing home. Close friend’s highly recommended renovation specialists Haven Building Concepts after having their villa renovated the previous year. They set up a consultation with Ray Sale to gain an idea of what changes were feasible. They were impressed with his credentials and professionalism and after receiving his quote they were excited to get the project underway. They anticipated a highly stressful five months living on site as their extensive renovation took place, however they found the team to be professional and considerate in realising they still had to maintain a normal routine. The outcome of the renovation and the experience they had with Haven Building Concepts went beyond expectation. Many of their anticipated worries were set at ease with Ray’s project management systems. They are now living happily in their newly renovated five-bedroom, three bathroom bungalow that, thanks to HBC, still has much of its original charm. PN HAVEN BUILDING CONCEPTS, T: 09 912 8628 www.havenbuildingconcepts.co.nz

STRATEGIC ASSETS NOT FOR SALE The Mayor has reaffirmed that Auckland will not be selling off its strategic assets – the port and its airport shares. “Auckland Council is keeping rates to an overall 3.6 per cent rise, having driven $1.7 billion out of the Long-term Plan,” says Len Brown. “One of the biggest pressures we face is the costs around the amalgamation of Auckland Council, and that is a cost imposed on Auckland by the government. Our core strategic assets will not be sold. Generations of Aucklanders have invested in them and they want them retained in public ownership. They bring in tens of millions of dollars a year, taking pressure off rates.” “Past assets sales have delivered very poor results. We do not intend going down that path. We do face a major challenge to put in place the infrastructure needed to accommodate Auckland’s population growth. The government is the recipient of transport-related revenues – fuel taxes, etc – and needs to step up and pay its share of projects such as the City Rail Link.” “The best way to get Auckland’s roading system working properly and make this city more liveable is to get people out of cars and into trains, buses and ferries. That will not happen without investment, and I will continue to work to urge the government to contribute its share, so Aucklanders see a fair return on the fuel taxes they pay. What Auckland Council is considering is the sale of non-strategic assets such as property, which could provide as much as $400 million dollars in revenue for ratepayers.” PN

PICKLED GARLIC About 1 kg of garlic 1 tablespoon coriander seeds, lightly crushed 20 peppercorns 2 to 3 dried chilies Sprig of tarragon 1 tablespoon sea salt Wine or cider vinegar to cover Break the garlic bulbs into cloves. Fill a glass jar with unpeeled garlic cloves (or peel them if you wish). Cover with all the other ingredients. Wait at least two weeks to use. I’ve had some in a jar for a year and still dip into them - they’re even better now. And I re-use the liquid. (FIONNA HILL) PN

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS TIMELESS OPTIONS GOOD CHOICES FOR TILE SELECTION WHILE MOST PEOPLE HAVE A SPECIFIC BUDGET WHEN PURCHASING TILES, budget should be only one of the considerations. Often budget overrules common sense in your flooring choice and in the long run will cost more than if factors such as colour and size were taken in to account. COLOUR - finding the right tile design depends on the size of your area and the amount of natural lighting. If you have a high ceiling with lots of natural light, look at tiles in contemporary earthy or grey tones. For ceilings of average height, consider a light or warm tone to give the feeling of space. Darker colours add warmth to a room and hide dirt well as do dark grouts. However dark colours can take some light out of rooms so it is not recommended for smaller, darker areas. Natural stone look tiles have neutral colours and create timeless looks. They go well with any style of furnishing. Heritage Tiles carries a large variety of different stone-look styles from around the world. SIZE - a common mistake people make in tile selection is using small tiles when tiling a small space. In truth, that is the worst thing you can do! Using small tiles means more grout lines which adds more visual clutter and makes the space look even smaller. Instead, you should go for a larger tile size in a light colour which when laid, have less grout lines and will make the area look larger. PN For all HERITAGE TILES locations and for more information go to www.tiles.co.nz

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS INTEGRITY, PROFESSIONALISM AND GUARANTEED QUALITY WORKMANSHIP IT CAN BE CHALLENGING CHOOSING the right painting contractor and no more so than when you need the confidence to know that the job will be top quality, on time and on budget. HDL - the painting professionals have been one of Auckland’s leading painting and wallpapering companies since 1980 with Master Painters Awards and recommendations from many happy customers. They pride themselves on having a long established and well deserved reputation for excellence, skill, integrity and professionalism in both the residential and commercial sectors. One of their highest priorities is friendly and VIC DE BETTENCOR of HDL efficient customer service and they constantly strive for excellence in this area. Some team members have been with HDL for more than 25 years. The teams are all skilled craftsmen, polite, friendly, know what is expected and they always complete all work in a neat and professional manner. HDL provides written six year guarantees. HDL is one of Resene Eco Decorators and they will complete your decorating projects giving you the confidence that they are committed to sustainable work principles in all their work processes. They have rigorous quality and health and safety and they choose and use only top quality painting materials. This ensures a high-quality job that will last the distance - guaranteed www.hdl.co.nz/our-guarantees. PN For more information please view their website at www.hdl.co.nz

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ASK AN ARCHITECT: PAUL LEUSCHKE Each month Grey Lynn resident and architect Paul Leuschke of Leuschke Kahn answers readers’ property related questions. Email yours to jane@leuschkekahn.co.nz

Q:

My neighbours are currently planning renovations to their villa and they have asked me to sign and confirm that I agree with the position their surveyor has put the boundary pegs in on our shared boundary line. Should I agree? Does this change the size and boundary of my property too?

In historic, inner city suburbs like Ponsonby this is a really common situation. Many of the sections here were created long before a standardised system of land surveying was established in New Zealand. The government brought in the Compulsory Registration of Titles Act (1924) to expedite the conversion from the old Deeds system to certificates of title under the Torrens system and at this time if the underlying survey was of poor quality or the dimensions, size or description was ambiguous then a disclaimer was written on the Certificate of Title stating that the Title was “Limited as to Parcels”.

A:

If your title is “Limited as to Parcels” it means the actual area and dimensions on your title are not known. Most of the council’s development controls are based on the area and boundaries of the property so it is necessary to provide accurate survey information to the council for them to assess whether the proposed renovation complies with their development control rules. Your neighbour’s site is most likely to be “Limited as to Parcels” and they now need an accurate survey done to remove the limitations to get consent for their renovations to be approved by the Auckland Council. The removal of the limitations disclaimer is effected by having a Licensed Cadastral Surveyor undertake a “Land Transfer – Removal of Limitations Survey” which accurately determines the position of the boundaries and area of the site. This survey looks at the site, surrounding sites, and most importantly evidence such as old fences and walls, buildings and other structures that predate the issue of the title. On these sites the position of long term undisputed use and occupation of land (that predates the first issue of title) may more clearly indicate where the site boundary actually is, rather than the original information on the deed plans as the reliability of this information is uncertain. Once the surveyor has this information they will place the pegs at the principal corners of the site and prepare a “Title” and “Survey” plan along with the required supporting information and submit this to Land Information New Zealand (LINZ).

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If your neighbour changes their title to remove its limitations it will not affect your title but it is your right to choose not to sign. If you don’t the surveyor may still lodge their plans with LINZ and if LINZ is satisfied with the work, they will approve the survey and accept it into their records. Your neighbour’s solicitor will then complete the legal work for the issue of a new certificate of title that is no longer “Limited as to Parcels” for their site. The Registrar General of Land will then serve a notice to you and all the other adjoining neighbours giving you the opportunity to lodge a caveat against the new certificate of title and then engage your own Licensed Cadastral Surveyor to review the neighbours work and they may possibly calculate an alternative boundary definition. We reviewed your question with a Licensed Cadastral Surveyor who advised us that the survey is always conducted in a completely impartial manner irrespective of which neighbour engages them to do the work. Their work is then rigorously reviewed by LINZ. In his 20 plus years of experience surveying, he has only encountered two instances where neighbours have objected to the issue of a new title and in both of these cases the objections arose due to existing feuds between the neighbours as opposed to the surveyors work. In regards to your question on whether the size and boundaries of your property will change - if your property is also “Limited as to Parcels” then the size and boundaries are not currently known. If in future you need to have the limitations removed from your title and your neighbour has already been through this process, then it may mean your surveyor has less work to do as survey work has already been completed to establish the boundary between your properties. If you are purchasing a property that is ‘Limited as to Parcels’ and you are planning to renovate it bear in mind this sort of survey can take two or three months to complete and process, and it will be an additional cost. The size of the property may vary from what is stated on the title and your boundaries may not be where your existing fenceline is, however this is just one of the interesting quirks of owning one of Auckland’s historic properties. (PAUL LEUSCHKE) www.leuschkekahn.co.nz PN

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS COSY UP THIS WINTER WITH REPUBLIC HOME

HOMEBASE - CREATING UNIQUE AND SPECIAL INTERIORS

Republic Home is your design lovers’ habitat, with original, quirky and unique items for your home. The only one of its kind you’ll find in town with an ever changing selection of hand-picked furniture and homewares from around the globe.

Homebase is a group of designers who are passionate about design. Providing a high level of service, using their artistic flair and vast experience they transform spaces that combine pleasing aesthetics, atmosphere and functionality.

From one-off vintage and retro pieces to industrial and contemporary styles, they will help you create original living spaces.

INTERIOR DESIGN: This service ranges from one-off consultations to complete redesigns. They specialise in working on private homes to commercial spaces. They collaborate closely with their clients to create unique and special interiors.

A hot cuppa, your favourite arm chair, knitted throw and a good book are all the comforts of a winters’ night. With winter well and truly on the way, come and check out their new range of beautiful throws, rugs, ottomans, and gorgeous range of cushions and candles to warm your living space and banish those winter blues. They have an exciting new range of recycled teak furniture and retro styled furniture just landed. New season fashion for winter and jewellery ranges are arriving regularly. For your daily inspiration fix, pop into the store to see what is new at Republic. They look forward to seeing you in store!

EVENT STYLING, EXHIBITION STAND DESIGN, MAGAZINE ADVERTISING, STYLING AND ART DIRECTION: Creating a concept, or working with their clients’ brief, they bring together their skills in styling, set design, lighting and props, producing imaginative and spectacular results. HOME STAGING: This helps smart sellers get more for their property. They style homes to sell ‘lifestyle’ and achieve the highest market price.

Opening hours: 9am - 5pm Monday to Saturday and 9.30am - 4.30pm Sundays. PN

Homebase will help you achieve a look which surpasses your expectations whether you are selling your home or renovating your existing home or commercial space. PN

REPUBLIC HOME, 3 Pompallier Terrace T: 09 361 1137 www.republichome.com

HOMEBASE, 399 New North Road, Kingsland T: 09 849 7999 www.homebase.co.nz

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS TIME TO WRAP UP AND FEEL BEAUTIFUL IN YOUR HOME Kathryn Enchmarch Soft Furnishings moved to Grey Lynn to share part of the beautiful space at Artedomus, Brasell-Ojala and B&O Casa in 2009 and has never looked back. Leaving the wilderness of Muriwai Beach daily to travel to work in the city, Kathryn enjoys having a one-on-one relationship with her clients. The integrated showroom provides a lovely environment and a creative hub to work within. With 14 years of experience in the soft furnishing industry, Kathryn specialises in a wide range of soft furnishing treatments from cushions, throws, curtains and headboards. She offers a full service to her clients with experience in all stages of production from fabric sourcing, through to design, construction and installation. A recognised talent for her meticulous and highly personalised approach to business, Kathryn places great emphasis on exceeding expectations by developing successful working partnerships with both clients and suppliers to achieve

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a fantastic end result. Her exceptional sense of design, crafting experience, and knowledge of the current trends in the industry positions her as an expert in her field. Kathryn continues to work with many award-winning architects and interior designers as she has done for many years. Specialising in both home furnishings and commercial projects her clients include District Dining, Queenies Tearooms, Matakana Cinemas, PoderiCrisci, Karen Walker and Jennifer Ward-Lealand. PN KATHRYN ENCHMARCH SOFT FURNISHING SPECIALIST, Level 1 302 Great North Road M: 021 579 040 www.kathrynenchmarch.co.nz

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS HELPING AUCKLAND HOMES GO SOLAR FROM LAST MONTH AUCKLAND RESIDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO TAKE PART IN a renewable energy scheme that will help them save on power bills. In an effort to create a more sustainable, resilient and liveable city, Mayor Len Brown has launched the Auckland Solar Project today at the home of Point Chevalier couple Ruth MacClure and Tony Morpeth. “The project aims to install more than 250 solar hot water heating systems in homes and businesses across Auckland this year,” says Len Brown. Alongside the environmental benefits, the system can save the average household $500 on their annual power bill.” Ruth MacClure and Tony Morpeth had solar heating panels installed in their home last August as a case study for the project and say the system has taken between 20 and 30 per cent off their power bill. Auckland Council has streamlined the consenting process and employed a leading solar energy expert to provide specifications for best -practice technology suited to Auckland’s environmental conditions. There is significant quality variation in solar water heating technology. This scheme aligns best practice technology with a range of financial options that make installation affordable while still saving money on the monthly bill. The pilot scheme was endorsed earlier this year by the council’s Environment and Sustainability Forum, and will be managed by Auckland-based company, Solar Group. “Solar Group offered a solution to the entire project so we could sit back while it was being installed and then watch the savings kick in,” says Mr Morpeth.

KATHRYN ENCHMARCH

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The scheme is designed to make things easy for home and business owners, with Solar Group taking care of everything from installation to the consent application. Visit www.aucklandsolar.co.nz for more information. PN

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photography: Julie Roulston

ANDREW EGGLETON - MY FAVOURITE ROOM

Andrew Eggleton splits his time between Auckland and Bali. After a career that has seen him wear the many hats of TV presenter, actor, MC, model and executive producer, he’s recently taken a new step and started his ‘naughty new baby’ clothing label, ‘Cowboy Civilians’ www.cowboycivilians.com Andrew lives in Westmere in a grand villa, which was house of the year in 1926! He lives with one of his best friends and his younger brother. “I’ve lived in Ponsonby for most of my time in Auckland” he says. “It seems like I have lived everywhere around this city, including Waiheke Island, Northcote, Devonport and out near Henderson, but the Ponsonby area is where I keep coming back to for the like -minded people and community feel.” Andrew’s favourite room was the dining room ‘back in the day’, although these days it’s the lounge. It serves as a bar, dining room, film and sports viewing room, “creative think tank for many things that come to nothing, and a general space to hang and place art.”

Ponsonby News asked Andrew to name his favourite things in the room. “I have a fascination with skulls and the multi-coloured Damien Hirst edition on the bar is a personal favourite, for now. I love the photo by Maria Shannon of the hand holding a pint of Guinness above the wine cabinet. The wine bottles around the top of the room all tell a story, whether a celebration, poignant memory or simply a bottle we wanted to remember for next time. The old Super 8 camera still works and I filmed a friend’s wedding on it recently. The records on the wall are spray painted with famous musicians by an artist in Christchurch - my brother gave these to me.” PN

FRY’S VEGETARIAN COCKTAIL SAUSAGE ROLLS...PERFECT FOR HOME ENTERTAINING There’s nothing more ‘Kiwi’ than a good ol’ get together. Family barbecues, parties, impromptu gatherings, unexpected guests… no matter what the occasion, everyone loves sausage rolls! Now, Fry’s Vegetarian introduce a new Kiwi classic. Introducing Fry’s Vegetarian Cocktail Sausage Rolls. As you bite into the crisp puff pastry, your tastebuds will come to life with Fry’s famous vegetarian sausage! Seasoned with wholegrain mustard, and perhaps dipped into your favourite tomato sauce, Fry’s Vegetarian Cocktail Sausage Rolls are sure to be a hit at your next cocktail party, family get together or even as a quick snack. These amazingly delicious sausage rolls will impress even the hardiest meat eaters, and because Fry’s Vegetarian Cocktail Sausage Rolls are completely vegan, filled with high protein and contain no cholesterol, these are a treat that you can enjoy guilt free! Go on…you’re allowed more than one! FRY’S VEGETARIAN COCKTAIL SAUSAGE ROLLS: RRP $9.49 (12 sausage rolls) STOCKISTS: Fry’s Vegetarian products are a frozen product and can be found in the freezer section at selected Foodstuffs, Progressive, Four Square, Huckleberry Farms and specialty food stores nationwide. To locate your nearest stockist or for further information visit www.vegedelights.com PN

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THE HISTORICAL BOROUGH OF PONSONBY AND GREY LYNN

STREET NAMES: IVANHOE STREET & TAY STREET Some admirer of Sir Walter Scott’s novels must have had a hand in naming these two Grey Lynn streets. “The Fair Maid of Perth” is an historical novel set in 1396 and the convoluted actions take place in the city of Perth and up and down Scotland’s beautiful River Tay. Ivanhoe is set in 1194 and is the story of a Saxon noble family at odds with the Normans. Robin Hood and his ‘merry men’ also feature in the tale. ‘The Fair Maid of Perth’ is a work from his later period and is regarded as one of the best of his historical novels. Catherine Glover is the fair maid and she has three suitors vying for her favours. There’s Henry Smith, an armourer and tough guy who loves nothing better than a scrap. Her Highland admirer is Conachar of Clan Quhele, the last son of its chief who was slain in battle. The third is Duke of Rothsay whose intentions towards Catherine are far from honourable. These three symbolise the two themes of violence versus peace. Catherine is a pacifist, so much so she almost aspires to sanctity and deserves to be brought down a peg or two. The Duke of Rothsay is son and heir of Robert III and has Catherine in his power when clan wars are raging. He tries to seduce her but she rejects him, and how’s this for his response? “Thou art too noble-minded to be the toy of passing pleasure.” Phew! The Duke is eventually imprisoned in the Falkland Palace by his uncle, the ambitious Duke of Albany and dies of fever and starvation. Meanwhile Clan Quhele and Clan Chattan are busy trying to annihilate each other. Conachar is a timid soul and totally unfit for clan warfare and Henry, believing Catherine has agreed to marry Conachar joins Clan Chattan. During the battle Conachar sees Henry “standing within a sword’s point of him”. His courage fails him so in despair he leaps to his death from a cliff into the Tay. At the story’s end Catherine and Henry are united, she realising Henry’s courage was preferable to Conachar’s deficiency and he resolving to only draw his broadsword against Scotland’s enemies.

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Ivanhoe was written during a struggle for the emancipation of Jews in England and there are many references to the injustice they suffered. The story is peopled with a multitude of characters but the main ones are Wilfred of Ivanhoe, Lady Rowena who is a ward of Ivanhoe’s father, Cedric; moneylender Isaac of York and his beautiful and noble daughter, Rebecca; and the evil Knight Templars, Front-de-Boeuf and De Bois -Guilbert. The book is full of rich imagery giving the reader an authentic impression of the times. Glittering armour, gloomy dungeons, moats, huge dining halls, massive castle walls, clanging steel, hissing arrows and blood soaked knights. Critics have dismissed Ivanhoe as a boys’ book which denies its complexity and historical value for the graphic picture it paints of all that was wrong with England under the brutal and oppressive Normans. Ivanhoe is at odds with his father because of his allegiance to the Norman king, Richard 1 of England. He wants to marry Lady Rowena, Cedric wants to marry her off to a Saxon noble. Front-de-Boeuf intends to torture Isaac and De Bois-Guilbert lusts after Rebecca. A major climax of the novel is the siege and burning of Torquilstone Castle where a great Saxon noble and his seven sons were slaughtered by Front-de Bouef’s father. This symbolises the conquest of Saxon culture by the Normans and it’s fitting that a wretched Saxon crone, Ulrica takes revenge by setting fire to the castle. The heroes escape unharmed and the villains perish. Scott also has Robin Hood governing his ‘merry men’ in the forest, managing finances, handing out rewards and generally running a miniature utopian society that was very much at variance with the existing state of affairs in England at the time. PN I read Ivanhoe when quite young and wished Ivanhoe had married Rebecca rather than Rowena. Apparently I’m not alone in this opinion but given the actuality of the times, their union would have been impossible.(DEIRDRE ROELANTS)

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS RENOVATING? Now’s your chance to include all of those storage options you always wished you had with our extensive range of custom -designed products using top quality materials and the latest designs and colours. Most old homes are severely lacking sufficient or suitable spaces to accommodate the trappings of modern life, but if you’re planning a renovation project then you have the perfect opportunity to call on Innovative Interiors expertise to solve all of your storage dilemmas. They can transform those cavernous old wardrobes by utilising the space with efficient, stylish shelving and drawers to hold anything from the short to the tall, the large to “the smalls”. They’ll create a walk-in dressing room for you so full of fabulous features you’ll wonder how you ever lived without it! Let them design the latest in entertainment units, book-shelving, and wine storage for your home and their qualified tradesmen will build it and install it to the highest standard. They can even make your laundry a room you’ll want to spend more time in with features and fittings to make ‘doing the washing’ so much easier. Want to eliminate clutter in your garage? – Innovative Interiors has the answer! They work closely with their clients (including many of Auckland’s leading interior designers and architects) to provide creative storage solutions that delight the most discerning home owner. Their experienced design team is happy to provide valuable input to your renovation project so contact them to arrange a consultation at your place or theirs. PN INNOVATIVE INTERIORS Unit 4, 93 Ellice Road, Glenfield T: 09 443-1928 E: Auckland@innnovative-interiors.co.nz www.innovative-interiors.co.nz

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS STRONG INTEREST IN AUCKLAND’S TRANSPORT FUTURE Hundreds of groups and individuals have taken the opportunity to have a say on Auckland’s transport future. A total of 930 have made written submissions and 128 verbal ones on the Auckland Regional Land Transport Programme (RLTP). The RLTP 2012-2015 lists all the planned transport activities for the next three years and is used to prioritise applications for government funding through the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA). A lot of interest was shown in the City Rail Link with 180 submissions. The large number of submissions hasn’t surprised the Mayor, “Aucklanders want us to get on and build projects like the City Rail Link which they know are needed to unclog our roads and unleash the potential of all of Auckland,” says Len Brown. “They understand that these big projects can’t be left for taxpayers and ratepayers to fund, that’s why we are investigating a host of alternative funding proposals. We’ll be releasing the details of that shortly.” Rail electrification and the new electric trains also received a lot of feedback, with some submitters pushing for an extension of electrification to Pukekohe at an early stage. There was also strong interest in public transport services with 250 submissions. Many were requesting specific improvements or adjustments to services in their local area. There was support for extending public transport to newly developing areas like Flat Bush and Orewa West and for extensions to the ferry network in the Upper Waitemata and Manukau Harbours. The AMETI project (see note) in the east of the city received 46 submissions. Comments were also received in favour of the proposed development of an east-west connection between AMETI and Onehunga.

A total of 153 submissions commented on walking and cycling, most calling for a higher level of expenditure. The completion of the regional cycling network and the Auckland Harbour Bridge Pathway project were identified by submitters as needing more money. The Pathway project involves building a cycleway and pathway under the southbound Harbour Bridge clip-on lanes. There was also strong interest in an additional Waitemata Harbour Crossing. A number of submitters expressed a preference for a tunnel adjacent to the existing bridge. And there was also support for rail to the airport. The RLTP Hearings Panel has made a number of recommendations to Auckland Transport regarding changes to be made to the draft programme, including investigation funding for the east-west connection, the investigation of rail electrification to Pukekohe and a new rail station south of Takanini at Glenora, a park and ride at Drury and reducing the construction period for the Albany Highway project. NOTES: AMETI is a group of transport projects for the eastern suburbs. The aim is to give residents greater choices by improving public transport, walking and cycling facilities and reducing traffic congestions. A major aim is to unlock the economic potential of the area by improving strategic transport links. Groups or individuals may have made submissions of more than one issue. PN

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MAKE YOUR NEW BATHROOM OR KITCHEN TRULY YOURS OWNED AND OPERATED BY GREG CHICHESTER, CHICHESTER DESIGN offers a personalised bathroom and kitchen design service to the greater Auckland area. Chichester Design will help you to visualise your dream bathroom or kitchen, and translate that into a design that will work. They can then project manage the build and installation for you, making sure that every detail is perfected to your requirements, and that the end result is exactly what you want. A good bathroom design should look great, and be easy to live with. A Chichester bathroom design is conceived to fit the client’s needs and lifestyle on a day-to-day basis, and aims to de-clutter and create space, resulting in an easy-to-clean, low maintenance bathroom.

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The kitchen is often referred to as the heart of the home. It’s where families gather, where gourmet cooks find their flare, and where many people spend most of their time when at home. A Chichester kitchen looks great, but also feels completely natural for you when you’re in it – with everything just where it should be. This is because Chichester Design works together with their clients before developing the design, to make sure it fits perfectly with how they are going to use it. Chichester Design uses the best quality products that are guaranteed to last. This is so important in these two high-use areas of the home; you’re investing a lot in a new kitchen or bathroom, and you want to know that your investment is going to go the distance! PN CHICHESTER DESIGN, T: 09 360 3369 www.chichesterdesign.co.nz

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KITCHEN, BATHROOM AND INTERIOR DESIGN ASK ROB@BUILDSPACE.CO.NZ

Q:

A:

We are planning to renovate our kitchen and will be replacing our current Formica bench top with engineered stone. Many of the kitchens we have seen with stone bench tops have sinks with no drain tray which we like the look of but we’re concerned that without a drain tray we will end up with water running everywhere when washing up. Is this a big issue and can you also explain the pros and cons of under mounting vs overmounting the sink?

It seems a shame to cut out bigger hole than necessary from an expensive stone top and until more recently the options for sinks with drain trays has been somewhat limited which has also swayed many people’s choices. There has been a definite shift towards simple sink design with a more square shape and tight radius corners but few options which offer drain trays. Heritage Hardware offer Quadra and Veronar Robiq sinks which combine modern sink design with a wide range of single and double bowls with or without drain trays.

It is very common to have a sink with no drain tray with engineered stone or granite which means you have a smaller hole cut out of your beautiful stone top which is both more attractive and provides for a larger work surface. There are some minor drawbacks in terms of practicality which are generally thought to be outweighed by the aesthetic benefits, but there are a number of options to consider when selecting your sink.

Quadra and Robiq bowls work well with contemporary kitchen design and can be either under mounted or top mounted. Most people prefer the look of an under mount, where the sink is fixed to the underside of the bench top and the cut out in the bench follows the drop of the bowl. The other advantage is when wiping down the bench into the sink there is no lip or join to catch scraps on the way through. The disadvantage with an under mounted sink is it does expose a stone edge which is more vulnerable to chipping. It will take a fairly serious hit with a heavy object to chip a granite or engineered stone edge, but it can happen in everyday use and cannot be easily repaired.

High pressure laminate benchtops such as Formica provide a robust protective covering to the substrate and although waterproof, it is not recommended to leave sitting water on a laminate surface and we would always therefore recommend a sink with a drain tray. Engineered stone and granite are completely waterproof materials which means water sitting on the bench during and after washing up is not a issue and therefore a drain tray is not so necessary. In my view and from my own experience with a sink with no drain tray there is nothing to be concerned about with water running everywhere when washing up. Most dishes are rinsed if needed, in the sink then placed straight in the dishwasher and pots pans and bigger dishes are washed by hand, placed directly on the stone top then towel dried, put away and after a quick wipe of the bench, everything is clean, tidy and dry. Small channels can be cut into stone tops which provide the same function as a drain tray by directing water to the sink, but with a much more subtle look than a stainless steel drain tray. Again in my view, this is unnecessary, but certainly a good compromise worth considering.

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There is also a trend towards larger single sinks rather than the more traditional double or one and half bowl as people are moving away from wanting a waste disposal in favour of multiple bins for recycling. A large single sink complements the simple lines of contemporary kitchen design and makes life easier when it comes to washing large pans or dishes. Heritage Hardware offer a wide range of sinks suitable in addition to the Quadra and Robiq ranges, for information visit www.heritagehardware.co.nz PN BUILDSPACE KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS - Design Build Install T: 0800 455 556 www.buildspace.co.nz info@buildspace.co.nz

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS ABOUT BBUD-IES, CULTURE AND STRAIGHT SHOOTERS After joining Custom Residential five months ago, Patrick’s McCarthy’s feet are firmly under the desk and he’s never felt more in his (professional) element. We asked him about the market he works in and what his thoughts were on current local trends. Patrick reports on three real estate trends: 1) BBUD-ies: Baby Boomer Urban Downsizers. These are the ex-suburbans moving more urban to the vibrant part of the city fringe to access key lifestyle amenities such as shopping and restaurants. They are typically people from places like the eastern suburbs, often baby boomers buying here for a lockup and leave solution allowing them to enjoy the good life. 2) Unrelenting pressure on our area: this hasn’t changed. Demand is still high and has become even higher of late, due to a limited number of properties on the market, combined with interest rates still trending downwards and banks vigorously competing to lend. 3) In response to point 1 and 2 above, we are seeing the market come round to the fact that we need more housing. Developers around the area are reigniting plans that have been kept on ice. This new era of development will be quality over quantity – meeting the BBUD-ies criteria.

On a personal note, we asked Patrick: how’s life at Custom Residential? “It’s great. I am enjoying being part of a dynamic growing company. A big motivator in my move has always been being able to work alongside John Wills and his team. Within Custom Residential, John has put a culture in place that supports his vision of how real estate should be done. This culture is to the benefit of both the agent and their clients.” “I don’t think many people realise how solid the team at Custom is, both in size and quality. For 2012 so far we’ve done around 50 sales, that’s solid and at the same time right on target with our philosophy of doing a far better job for a smaller number of clients. “The other day one of my clients called me a ‘straight shooter’. I think that sums up pretty well why I feel at home at Custom. It’s a ‘straight shooting’ brand. Without a doubt this is the best work environment I have ever experienced.” PN PATRICK MCCARTHY T: 09 361 7256 M: 0272 333 988 E: patrick.mccarthy@customresidential.co.nz www.customresidential.co.nz

CUSTOM RESIDENTIAL $1 RESERVE AUCTION Custom Residential have launched a $1 Reserve Auction on TradeMe to win a Property Advertising Package. Valued at $7,000 this is a great opportunity to secure a comprehensive advertising package to market and sell you property with Custom Residential. The winner can select their favourite sales person to list with and has until 3 November 2012 to launch their property onto the market. To bid, go to TradeMe and type in the code: 478261675. The auction closes Saturday 2 June 4.21pm. Conditions apply: please see full details on TradeMe.

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SUE HATTON UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL Sue Hatton has been in real estate for six years. Specialising in Ponsonby and surrounds, she joined Bayleys Western Bays team just eight months ago, but has already been inducted into the top 10% of Bayleys sales people nationally, and currently ranks eigth in the Auckland region. WHO IS YOUR PARTNER? Sam Cooper.

IF YOU WEREN’T A REAL ESTATE AGENT YOU’D BE? An organic farmer.

WHAT DOES SAM DO? I just shake my head generally at this question. I’m still not sure what a software engineer really does? WHERE DO YOU LIVE? In Ponsonby, with our Border Terrier, Fleetwood.

FAVOURITE PONSONBY CAFE? So many great places I am spoilt, but I really enjoy a quiet break at Oh So! cafe on Crummer Road. Their balsamic creamy mushrooms and chorizo on toast is killer! And Dizengoff has been a favourite for many years for its great service, coffee and consistency.

WHERE DO YOU SPEND YOUR HOLIDAYS? Our last off-shore trip was to Tahiti, and we frequent the Matakana region for short getaways as much as we can.

FAVOURITE PONSONBY RESTAURANT? Pure. Stefan and Nadine, chef/owner operators, and front-of -house extraordinaire Marlena never disappoint!

HOW DO YOU KEEP FIT? Fleetwood is very busy so I walk a lot. I also enjoy a game of badminton (but I don’t enjoy getting beaten by my very fit 70 year old Mum, who is an ace at the game).

FAVOURITE PONSONBY STORE? Wunderkammer Jewellery. Zora the creative source and light behind Wunderkammer Jewellery designs and makes the most incredible pieces!

YOUR BEST FRIEND WOULD SAY OF YOU... She says “Sue has been loyal, directly honest and dependable for over 20 years without fault. Her humour has given me many laughs. To have a great friendship like this is rare and precious.”

YOUR DESERT ISLAND DISTRACTIONS: I love to read, so a stack of books, music via George FM live stream on my iPhone, and Game of Thrones.

YOUR MOTHER WOULD SAY OF YOU... She often tells me she is very proud of my work ethic and achievements, and that I’m her rock. VIRTUES? I have a wicked sense of humour. VICES? I’m a bit of a workaholic, I’m constantly trying to achieve a better balance. WHAT’S YOUR SECRET PASSION? One of these days before I’m too old I would like to live on a large block of land, be self sufficient, grow organic produce and raise animals. A River Cottage dream. WHAT WERE YOU GOING TO BE WHEN YOU GREW UP? I don’t think I ever had a clear vision of what I would be. I was very lucky to grow up in a supportive family where I was taught that a strong work ethic will get you places. HOW DID YOU COME TO BE A REAL ESTATE AGENT? I spent many years in corporate hospitality working mainly in the competitive liquor industry in sales, management and marketing roles. I was craving a career change after 15 years, and applied years of extensive sales training and people experience to real estate.

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ONE THING YOU HAVE LEARNT ABOUT LIFE IS... it really is short, so live life doing what you love - and that laughter really is the best medicine. WHAT WAS YOUR STANDOUT SALE OF THE LAST 12 MONTHS? I’ve worked with so many amazing local people that a standout is hard, but working with a dynamic local couple on the sale of their home on Wanganui Avenue and then finding them a new home on Marine Parade in the same week was a real buzz. YOUR ADVICE TO PONSONBY HOME SELLERS: Don’t get caught up in agency speak about doing things better, or having niche or unique methods. Real estate is about hard work, follow up and an excellent understanding of the sales process - specific to the emotive world of real estate. Choose an agent with a track record of successful sales and references from past clients. Someone who you know will dig deep for the best possible outcome for you. YOUR ADVICE TO PONSONBY HOME BUYERS: When you see what you like be prepared to act. No two properties are the same and whether you have just started to look or you have some research under your belt, we can only sell the home once. In my experience buyers sometimes end up searching in vain for a long time, to replace a property they have missed. PN

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS ACHIEVING AN INTERIORS LOOK FOR GROWN-UPS Gone are the strongly themed bedrooms that encourage regular change and updates as tastes, moods, and seasons change. Gorgi Designer, Kirstin Bailey, says trends have certainly moved back to a tasteful simplicity, creating a more timeless style. You won’t find duvet covers of bold, busy patterns in Gorgi’s range of bed linen. “A compromising duvet cover or cushions can ruin an interior concept, use block colours as your base fabric for the duvet cover and build accessories and cushions that have interest and which you can change easily,” explains Kirstin. “And then accent with accessories and don’t be afraid to mix patterns or textures, such as velvets and linens.”

GORGI Ikebana Collection Bark Linen Duvet Cover Set from $248

For Gorgi’s new Ikebana collection, the base cloth is a rich, earthy ‘bark’ linen with a textured look that works beautifully as a backdrop to other items on top of the bed and in the room. Accent fabrics offer warmth and colour. In designing the Ikebana collection, the Gorgi team collaborated with Resene Paints to develop style direction covering furniture, lighting, accessories and colour matches. The mood board imagery, incorporating style notes for further inspiration, can be downloaded from the website. You need to see Gorgi’s fabric to appreciate the quality - order a free fabric swatch online, and also receive a free Resene test pot voucher.

Members usually receive 10% off every order (you can sign up on the Gorgi homepage), but Gorgi is increasing this to 15% off for Ponsonby News readers until the end of July. Just enter the coupon PBYNEWS at the checkout for the extra discount. PN For more information: www.gorgi.co.nz

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THE BOYS’ BOOK CLUB WHAT WE’RE READING Books us blokes on the Ponsonby News team are reading, or have recently enjoyed. We LOVE reading in the bath, or in bed. A real stress buster!

MARTIN LEACH DIAL M FOR MURDOCH by Tom Watson & Martin Hickman (Allen Lane) I was a temp at News International at Wapping when the Herald of Free Enterprise sank off the Belgian coast. In those days mobile phones were as big as bricks and they were not widely used. Dial M for Murdoch uncovers the inner workings of one of the most powerful companies in the world: how it came to exert a poisonous, secretive influence on public life in Britain, how it used its huge power to bully, intimidate and cover up, and how its exposure has changed the way we look at our politicians, our police service and our press. Rupert Murdoch’s newspapers had been hacking phones and casually destroying people’s lives for years, but it was only after a trivial report about Prince William’s knee in 2005 that detectives stumbled on a criminal conspiracy. A five-year cover-up then concealed and muddied the truth. Dial M for Murdoch gives the first connected account of the extraordinary lengths to which the Murdochs’ News Corporation went to “put the problem in a box” (in James Murdoch’s words), how its efforts to maintain and extend its power were aided by its political and police friends, and how it was finally exposed.

JAY PLATT When I Fell From the Sky by Juliane Koepcke (Nicholas Brealey Publishing) Juliane Koepcke was born a German national in Lima, Peru in 1954 to a world renowned zoologist and equally renowned ornithologist Hans-Wilhelm and Maria. As a child her schooling was in Peru while her parents were stationed hundreds of miles away in the heart of the Amazon Rain Forest. Juliane herself was no stranger to the sweltering Amazon Rain Forest herself. It was this knowledge that would later on save her life. On Christmas Eve 1971 Juliane and her Mother boarded a plane that was to cross the Peruvian Rain Forest when the plane flew into a storm and was destroyed in moments. The plane was miles up when her Mother and everyone was killed, but miraculously one survived. This is the remarkable story of one person’s determination to survive. After being thought dead for eleven days Juliane emerged from the Jungle and was at last reunited with her father. Years after the tragedy Juliane has at last told her story, although a documentary was made by Werner Herzog some years ago called ‘Wings of Hope’ about her escape. This is a remarkable book about someone who has a remarkable story to tell.

JOHN ELLIOTT

A large number of graphs throughout the book show the effects of increasing income inequality in rich countries on almost every bad statistic you can think of, from mental health to infant mortality, from obesity to teenage births, and levels of imprisonment. On all of these measures, and many more, New Zealand comes off very poorly indeed. In Chapter two Wilkinson and Pickett, two British professors of medicine, show in a graph how much richer the richest 20% are than the poorest 20% in a number of so-called rich countries. New Zealand has only Singapore, USA, Portugal, UK, and Australia shown as more unequal than it. And the records show that New Zealand is becoming more and more unequal every year. We should be looking enviously at countries like, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark which are among the most equal in the study. The book does rely heavily on graphs, and I have heard criticism of that, and that it is boring, but those graphs tell the terrible story so very well, and at least one reader who complained to me is a rabid right winger, who clearly just didn’t want to know. The authors begin their story with the now familiar tales of anxiety, depression, breakdown of community and loss of social capital which is bedevilling Western Society. We are many times richer than our parents were, have vast quantities of stuff, but are not happy. We are forever chasing the Joneses, trying to keep up with them. In the meantime, where the income gap has widened most, including in New Zealand, mental illness, life expectancy, infant mortality, obesity, children’s educational performance, teenage births, homicides, imprisonment rates and social mobility, are all affecting society incredibly negatively. As an example, only UK, Portugal, and USA have worse health and social problems than New Zealand. Only the UK has worse child wellbeing than we do. Only Australia, UK and USA have worse mental illness than good old God’s Own. And another disgraceful statistic shows only the USA has a higher infant mortality than New Zealand. All these sorry stories are told through graphs comparing the bad figures with income inequality. The graphs cannot lie, but behind the graphs is a mass of detailed information to back them up. And so this book shows that almost everything in a society is affected not by how wealthy a society is, but how equal it is. While much of this is certainly depressing, Wilkinson and Pickett do provide some answers, with chapters on equality and sustainability, and building the future. It is urgent, provocative but genuinely uplifting. All governments, especially ours, should examine this book’s statistics, and begin implementing new policies aimed at creating a more equal, and hence more healthy, and fairer, society. As Wilkinson and Pickett assert, it will make everyone happier and better off - even the wealthiest among us. PN

The Spirit Level Why Equality is Better for Everyone By Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett (Penguin) Yes, I do read fiction, and lots of it, but this month I am reviewing another non-fiction book out of 2009.

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This is a remarkable new book, the evidence is hard to dispute, and it shows successive New Zealand governments have been heading us in quite the wrong direction. Policies must change.

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS AUTHOR, POET, SAILOR, PRISON REFORMER, AND MELLOW RETIREE PETER WILLIAMS Q.C. - A VERY FULL LIFE After a very pleasant hour with Peter Williams in his Ponsonby home, in front of an early winter fire, I came away with a strong sense that here is a man content with himself and his past, still keen to write about his work, his life, and important social issues, but essentially unashamed of the word “retired.” “I’ll be 80 in a couple of years,” he promised me. Much has been written and said about Peter Williams, particularly his high profile and extraordinarily successful career as one of New Zealand’s leading barristers. His work with the Howard League for Penal Reform is also well known. Williams once wrote: The Howard League is a proud organisation untroubled by profiteering or high rates of remuneration for its leaders. It represents the best of human nature, altruism, and a constructive desire to encourage the human spirit at its best. That voluntary work over 50 years, has painted Williams as a humanitarian of the highest order. One commentator said: Williams detests anything that smacks of racism, superior elites, or any movement that encourages a class system. He cares about the old, the sick, the young, and the underprivileged. He has a love for animals, with Kafka and Ariki, his two large and cuddly canines, greeting me at the door and later offering to help me with my tea and cake! Just last week they had eaten most of a box of chocolates Peter and Heeni had left conveniently on the coffee table. Peter believes in moderation, and dislikes cruelty of all kinds. He says too many New Zealanders have a revolting attitude to crime and punishment. “The older I get the more pacifistic I become,” Williams asserts. That is an endearing part of his ageing mellowness. He was often a bulldog in the court room! Williams is well published, but says he has never pushed his books which have never -the-less sold in good numbers. He is writing another one at the moment - a review of false evidence encountered in some of his trials. A sailor all his life - he once owned the famous A class keeler Fidelis. Peter loves sailing to Great Barrier, where he has land, to fish, read, and contemplate. He worries that young New Zealanders in particular don’t read enough good books, to broaden their outlook on life and the world. We have, become smug, arrogant and selfish, too oriented to success and materialism. “We need to have a national discussion about democratic principles,” says Peter. He agrees that we now spend too much time trying to keep up with the Joneses, instead of valuing community. “I remember when community centres around New Zealand kept young fellas off the street. They offered ping pong, drama, art, choir — something for young and old.” Peter Williams clearly believes that those values have been replaced by selfish individualism, where people know the cost of everything, but the value of nothing. “The New Zealand prison system is complicated, “ Williams says. “It is claustrophobic, locks people up for 23 hours a day, weeks, months, years on end. By the time they

get out they can be quite mad, and when they commit a further crime they are labelled ‘just bad’, instead of driven mad by the prison system.” Williams says it’s the army of merchant bankers who have been the main criminals in New Zealand in the last 30 years. “It’s a hierarchical system, with those at the top sucking up most of the money.” Those financial cowboys wheeling and dealing have led us to destruction, Williams believes. “Boy they need controlling,” sighs what I would call a classic social democrat. But Peter Williams declines to be pigeon holed. I asked him if he’d describe himself as a socialist. “I don’t like labels,” he told me. “But politicians should have ideals, which they should strive towards.” If Williams were Prime Minister he would seek to narrow the gap between rich and poor, looking after all the people who have missed out through ill health, batterings at home, or problems of early childhood. In this role the State must play a part. “The egalitarian state we once were has largely been dismantled,” bemoans Williams. Sounds like good old social democracy, a la Europe, to me. Semple, and the early Labour Party leaders, who Peter Williams much admires, would be proud of him. Let’s hope Peter Williams, still as sharp as a tack, continues to comment on current issues, providing important critical input into some seemingly intractable 21st Century social problems. (JOHN ELLIOTT) PN

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GOT A LEGAL QUESTION? ASK MICHAEL@METROLAW.CO.NZ

PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS

Email Michael with your question and include PONSONBY NEWS in the subject line. Michael Hemphill, a partner of the firm will answer one topical question each month.

Q:

My wife and I have a family trust that holds our home which we set up about five years ago. We are about half way through the gifting process and we understand that because of a law change we can now do a gift of all the remaining debt into the trust. What do we need to consider in making this decision?

A:

Yes, new legislation passed last year abolishes gift duty for dispositions of property made on or after 1 October 2011. This means that you could complete your gifting in one go. This can save you both the expense of having the gifting documents prepared and the time involved in waiting a year for each gift. The asset protection that you get from trusts is improved when there is no longer a debt owed back to you so it means that you can reach this goal sooner. However, there are some issues to consider before making this decision: WINZ and Rest Home Subsidies If you need long-term residential care in a hospital or rest home, you may be able to get a Residential Care Subsidy from the Ministry of Health. However, these subsidies are means tested. As a couple you are only allowed combined assets of $230,000.00. In deciding whether you are entitled to them the Ministry of Social Development (MSD) that administers entitlement to benefits counts back in:

Any gifting over $6,000 per year made in the five years before you apply for a subsidy Any gifts of more than $27,000 per year in any year. This means that any lump sum gift of over $27,000 in any one year may always affect your ability to apply for a subsidy no matter how long ago this gift was done. Creditors If you make substantial gifts at a time when there are outstanding guarantees and /or personal liabilities or if there is any pending or outstanding litigation against you then a lump sum gift could be seen as a disposition to defraud creditors and the transaction may be voidable. Relationship Property There are a number of ways in which a relationship property claim may extend to assets held by a trust. Large dispositions made to a trust during the term of a relationship may give rise to a claim. The best way to deal with any ambiguity around relationship property is to have a formal agreement around these issues. All these issues mean it can be difficult to make a decision about whether a lump sum gift is suitable for you. You should carefully consider the points above and then make an appointment with your lawyer to talk them through. PN METRO LAW, level 2, 36 Williamson Avenue T: 09 929 0808 www.metrolaw.co.nz

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS ANIMALOSOPHY: DR MEGAN ALDERSON

IT SEEMS I HAVE A TELEPATHIC CAT Passing information from feline gaze to primate frontal cortex is no small feat but Ron the Russian has singled me out as the most susceptible human in the household. He is using his telepathic powers to ensure I enact his will. At odds with current scientific consensus, he tells me he now needs a downstairs cat door as relations with our new puppy are faring no better. He remains cold and disdainfully aloof, unwilling to grace us with his presence in the warmth of upstairs. Though the alarm sensors need changing to pet friendly ($$$) and a cat door is logistically difficult his ‘thought insertion’ has prompted me to action. The days are getting shorter, the neighbourhood is getting tougher and he is not getting any younger. I have noticed a few more white hairs (he is a grey cat and can’t get any greyer) and he seems to be sleeping, eating and drinking more. It may be my feminine intuition kicking in, rather than an unexplained mental phenomena, but telepathic or not he really could also do with his annual trip to the vet.

ELIZABETH HOYLE AND BOB BOB IS APPROXIMATELY EIGHT YEARS OLD AS ESTIMATED BY THE VET - although we cannot be sure as he was found in the Matakana mountain area. He was left tied to a fence at an abandoned house. He had a tag with his name, but no other details. He was rescued by a wonderful woman from the area, Gemma Tate who has rescued many animals and has quite a collection. But Bob liked to chase her chickens, so he went to live with friends at Goat Island. They took care of him but were due to travel overseas, and so Bob went to stay with my partner Laurence in Leigh and when Laurence moved to Auckland, Bob came too. He arrived trained, able to respond to commands. And his breed, there are many guesses, he definitely has Jack Russell – but there may be staffie or foxie. He is charming and funny and I was so happy to have him as part of our household, I had forgotten what pleasure animals give. He likes to make friends with other animals, which often leads to friction. At our last house there were some free ranging chooks who would visit. Bobby attempted to befriend them, round them up, but they were taller and tougher, gave him a good peck and he learned to respect them. He has had numerous cat experiences, we have removed six claws from his face. But Grey Lynn cats are tougher than Westies – and he has been chased down the street by a few in our neighbourhood. He just wants to go out all the time. Since we have moved to Grey Lynn he has been to Golden Dawn, SPQR and Il Buco – you can take him anywhere. (ELIZABETH HOYLE) PN

Telepathy or “thought insertion and removal” is yet to be understood. Linked to psychological concepts symptomatic of psychosis and schizophrenia it makes sense the common feline would be experts in this practice. One minute a cuddly bundle of snuggly sweet smelling fur, the next you’re detaching ten claws and a set of canines from a bleeding lower appendage. Finding him, stuffing him in a cage then the distress of the trip makes me wonder whether the trauma (probably more to me than him) is worth it. Is this the reason we look after old dogs better than cats or is it more to do with cats having more subtle and secretive clinical symptoms? There is a lot we have yet to learn about cats and the mystical aura which surrounds them but for the elderly cat’s sake use some ‘thought blockage’ techniques and get them booked in this month for their Grey Paws check. With treatments as simple as a change in diet proven to expand the quality and length of your cat’s life a wellness examination prior to disaster befalling them is well worth the effort. Just try not to think about the cat cage. PN

Check out our Grey Paws service at www.strandvet.co.nz and get a 20% off senior discount (for your pet that is) until the end of June. THE STRAND VETERINARIAN, 114 The Strand T: 09 377 6667 www.thestrandvet.co.nz

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ASK ALEX COUNCIL LISTENS TO GOOD DOG OWNERS Auckland Council has listened to good dog owners who said that more work is needed on the proposed fee structure in order to match it with council’s upcoming policy work for dogs. “Councillors believe that the fees should stay at the current level until the region-wide policy on dogs can be brought into effect,” says Mayor Len Brown. “The new council was caught between a rock and a hard place. The Government arbitrarily cut dog fees to a lower level than most of the previous councils, and the incoming council has been required to set a new fee prior to passing a region-wide policy on dogs. “We have tried to balance the cost to dog owners with the impact on rates and officers put forward proposals that tried to achieve that balance. “I support the need to reward good dog owners and the proposed changes went some way to achieving that. However, I agree with councillors who say that more work is needed. “Cr Casey’s amendment gives us the chance to match the dog licence fees with the upcoming review of the dog policy and I support that.” PN

Each month Dr Alex Melrose answers readers’ pet related issues. Email yours to: alex@vetcare.net.nz

Q:

My girlfriend and I have just got a little brown lop eared rabbit, four months old. He seems to be doing really well. I hear we need to get our new pet some shots. Is this right, do you guys do vaccinations for rabbits, what are they for and what else should we be getting checked? G. OneNet. Herne Bay.

A:

We do vaccinate our pet rabbits against Viral Haemorrhagic Disease. It’s great you’ve gone and got a bunny, until you get close to them you don’t realise how massive their personalities can be and how social they are. Our head nurse Vanessa also has a lop eared rabbit and it is best mates with her ginger tom. The two of them cruise around together and if any of her dogs get too annoying it charges at them, bunting them out of the way! Pretty cool pet dynamics going on there.

Rabbit Viral Hemorrhagic Disease (VHD) is a highly contagious, usually fatal disease caused by a calicivirus. Wild and domesticated European rabbits are both affected. First seen in China in 1984 symptoms of VHD include fever, lethargy, loss of appetite, spasms, and sudden death, up to 90% of affected rabbits may die from the disease which progresses rapidly. The virus is very hardy and can be transmitted easily by contact. We use Cyclap vaccine, which requires a single shot in young rabbits over 10 weeks of age, then yearly boosters to retain immunity. We’ll also check his eyes, ears, teeth, nails and fur and discuss some good tips on ideal nutrition. See you and your bunny soon. (DR ALEX MELROSE, BVSC MRCVS) PN VETCARE GREY LYNN, 408 Great North Road T: 09 361 300 www.vetcare.net.nz

‘ONYA’ THE PERSONALISED DESIGNER PET CUSHION New to the market, the Onya Designer Pet Cushions are created specifically to give your pet that little bit of extra luxury and comfort and are designed and made in New Zealand exclusively by Jill Tuck Limited. Using sumptuous but hard wearing washable velvet and filled with a washable fibre inner, the Onya Pet Cushion comes in a range of luscious colour combinations, all personalised with the name of your pet embroidered across the front. Each Onya Pet Cushion is custom made and available approximately one week from ordering. Show your pet how much you love them. Check out the Jill Tuck website for further information on how to order your dog or cat their very own luxurious cushion. Or call into their new Remuera showroom to choose your favourite colour, or email info@jilltuck.co.nz to request a sample cutting. Remember, Jill Tuck have a huge range of designer cushions for pet owners as well in many styles, colours and sizes. If they don’t have exactly what you are looking for they will custom make it for you and if you are uncertain about what will work in your room they will be happy to provide an in-home consultation. Phone Christine or Georgia for an appointment. PN JILL TUCK LIMITED, 11A MacMurray Road, Remuera (off St Marks Road) T: 09 522 4863 www.jilltuck.co.nz

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A NIGHT-IN WITH TIM WAKELY This month three films based on books hit the right mark all available at Civic Video in Ponsonby. TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY Thomas Alfreason’s critically acclaimed novel based thriller hits our DVD shelves this month. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a mystery espionage film that requires a lot of historical knowledge and brain power to truly understand it. The film focuses on George Smillie (Gary Oldman), a disgraced MI6 agent who returns to the field to investigate his former colleagues. As it is set in the early 1970s this film offers a British perspective of the cold war. A lot of deep thinkers and conspiracy theorists will enjoy the investigative tone of the film. In addition the strong array of actors will also be a draw card for many as they all give phenomenal performances. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a deep analytical film. The film contains a stellar cast that most will enjoy. Although this isn’t really my type of film I do understand its appeal. Overall a great film for those winter nights rather than those party ones.

HUGO Veteran director adds another jewel to his embellished cinematic crown. Martin Scorsese’s film, Hugo, offers viewers an exciting journey into the world of invention and old cinema. Set in post World War 1 France, orphan Hugo ends up getting more than he bargained for. Hugo is full of great moments as the adventure never stops. For all those who love beautifully crafted visual cinema this film is a must watch as there is no ugly moment in it. Sasha Baron Cohen’s portrayal of Augustus is hilarious and the rest of the cast are just as great. With this film, Scorsese confirms his cinematic genius however I couldn’t help but feel that the director, producer, actor used the film to pay homage to an auteur that may have inspired him. What I enjoyed about this film is that the plot kept on evolving throughout. Overall this film is great and highly recommended to all ages and everyone will be fascinated by the storyline.

SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS One of the best novel-to-screen character sequels has come out on DVD this month. Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows contains all of the nuances that most of us enjoyed from the first instalment. This time round Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson rekindle their friendship to outwit academic mastermind Professor Moriarty. In this instalment, the duo receives help from two unlikely figures: a gypsy, Madam Simzam, and Holmes’ overweight brother, Mycroft Holmes. Robert Downey Jr erratic portrayal of the hero gives the film a slightly more humanistic edge than its’ predecessor. Downey and Law, along with Guy Ritchie’s directorial eye breathes life back in to a time that none of us would have been able to imagine, as the film transports the viewer into a world where telegrams are all the rage. You can’t really hate this film as it is a great piece of puff that fills in time well. Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows is a great film to hire if undecided about what film to watch that night. Most will enjoy Holmes and Watson’s humorous friendship, and the strategically placed fight sequences. Lastly, the film is packaged with babes. So it’s a win, win situation. (TIM WAKELY) PN

FOUR NEW TITLES ANNOUNCED FOR THE NZ INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL Auckland, 19 July – 5 August The New Zealand International Film Festival programme is taking shape and we are pleased to announce four new titles that will be showcasing at this year’s event. In particular we are delighted that the Peter Jackson produced documentary West of Memphis will be premiering at the festival ahead of its international release later this year. Also announced is the latest film from director Richard Linklater, Bernie that stars Jack Black, the new documentary Bully from director Lee Hirsch that has been garnering much international attention, plus the enchanting First Position, a documentary that follows the journey of young ballet dancers, competing for the Youth American Grand Prix. You can also view all our current trailers at www.youtube.com/user/NZIntFilmFestival/videos PN

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KIWI WOMEN PUBLISHERS TAKE ON THE WORLD ACCORDING TO SOME, the traditional publishing industry is in distress and is facing serious challenges with the event of digitalisation. The audience hasn’t changed because people are still reading more than ever and it’s imperative that children attain literacy skills as young as possible. Frances McBeath and Sandy Roydhouse both have a wealth of experience in the educational publishing industry and their company ‘Clean Slate Press’ is on a roll. Previously they worked together for Weldon Owen Publishing that produces children’s books for the North American market. Another colleague suggested they set up on their own and after a whole heap of planning they went bravely forth and set up their first office in a garage in Grey Lynn. They spent nine months mapping out a series predominantly for Canada and the US. Both have written many books to sell to schools, and they presented something quite novel, which was taking a critical thinking approach to looking at world history. Within a year they hit gold. On their first sales trip they sold the three series which is unheard of. This amounted to 5,000 copies of the 24 books in each series, a significant coup in anyone’s language. The success was well deserved because they had worked relentlessly hard, arriving home from the whirlwind trip the day before Christmas six years ago. In 2007, after only two years in business, they were presented with a golden opportunity. Shortland Publications had closed down so they approached world-renowned Joy Cowley in the hope of becoming her new educational publisher. Larger publishing houses were knocking on her door as well but she chose Clean Slate Press, wanting to go with a smaller outfit that was passionate about the product. Frances and Sandy find Joy an amazing force of creativity and very generous to work with. First they republished her backlist, which New Zealand teachers were so happy to access again. Some have been around for 27 years but are still relevant. Joy also offered to write 15 new titles for them every year and now they have 90 currently in production and have published about 200 in total. When they worked for Weldon Owen Publishing their books were only selling in North America but when they formed their own company they wanted to aim for the New Zealand market as well. Sandy had worked with Shortland Publishers for a time and had all the knowhow. They now sell books into schools for children’s reading at all levels. This constitutes a quarter of their business. This year they are going into picture books for Trade. Eight stories from Joy Cowley’s most favourite character, Mrs Wishy Washy is in hardback format and will be sold exclusively through the Whitcoulls chain. They also publish many of New Zealand’s best-loved and acclaimed writers such as Justin Brown, Frances Adlam, and Waiheke’s internationally renowned story teller, Tanya Batt. In the past the illustrations in educational publishing weren’t as up to standard as they are today. This is something Clean Slate Press really pushes, using good quality illustrators such as Phillip Webb, Elizabeth Fuller-Fulton, Jenny Cooper and Richard Holt. Frances and Sandy now want to start selling their school titles directly to parents. It’s hard to find books that five year olds can actually read themselves so they are looking at creating more books for children to read at home. The titles can be bought online at www.cleanslatepress.com. Audio-wise they produce CD’s that children can listen to and read along with and they’ve taken some of Joy Cowley’s stories and put them into song format. All in all, given these two women’s energy, expertise and innovation it’s no wonder Clean Slate Press has grown from a two person team to twenty full-time and contract staff, including a team of New Zealand sales representatives. Between 2007 and 2009 the turnover doubled then between 2009 and 2011 it doubled again! For these two working mothers the sky seems to be the limit. (DEIRDRE ROELANTS) PN PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT BLACK ASTERISK NEGOTIATING THE NON-PLACE - Lisa Chandler 15 – 27 June Preview: Thursday 14 June 6.30pm The central theme of Lisa Chandler’s body of work can be seen, as the exhibition title suggest, in the non-place. A term coined by Marc Augé it refers to the transitory spaces, which are defined by city dwellers moving through rather than inhabiting. Some days you can find Lisa lingering at intersections, stations and bus stops in cities, observing moments, which will later make their way onto the canvas. The artist is fascinated with crowded urban environments of the modern city and all that it represents. Acting as a flâneur in the contemporary world, Lisa’s observations comment on the apparent contradictions of the city space. The anonymous figures build up in her large-scale paintings; people are layered, obliterated and reformed across the canvas. The process results in strong and intriguing works, which highlight the relationship between the crowd dynamic and the quiet of the individual; she invites you to share the individual’s sense of freedom. “I like to walk in a city, I believe it is the best method to obtain a “feeling” of the space. I’m interested in the transition of urban dwellers, and the effect they have on urban spaces as they pass through them.” In May of this year Lisa Chandler was invited to the Affective Landscapes Conference hosted by Derby and Portsmouth Universities to speak on urban wandering and the non-place, and its presence in her work.

Fabulous Darling the Elizabeth Hardwick-Smith Memorial Exhibition 7 -13 June Preview: 6 June 6.30pm Fabulous Darling - the Elizabeth Hardwick-Smith Memorial Exhibition is being mounted to celebrate Lizzie and mark the anniversary of her recent passing. Elizabeth Hardwick-Smith died in a road accident in Mexico on 6 June 2011. She was 42 years old. She is sorely and deeply missed by her family and friends. Even though we know the circumstances of her death, it remains a mystery. She was on the other side of the world but she was very present to us in her blog, her emails and phone calls. As far as we could see, she was having the time of her life. Lizzie was experiencing new pleasures. One got the impression that she was doing the things that she had dreamed of for years. Then the blog suddenly ceased. The inbox was empty. The phone was silent. Lizzie had a wide reach. She admired and championed creativity in all spheres and her friends number writers, painters, sculptors, photographers, film-makers and musicians. The artists involved in the show include John Radford, Gavin Chilcott, Emma Bass, Emma Camden, David Murray, Elliot Stewart, Ant Sang and David Lyndon Brown. PN

“NEGOTIATING THE NON-PLACE” 2011, acrylic on canvas, 2000mm x 1500mm

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

BLACK ASTERISK GALLERY, 10 Ponsonby Road M: 021 040 1168 www.blackasterisk.co.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE

ARTSLAB: NEW MEDIA AND LEGAL ISSUES SEMINAR DEPOT SOUND: FILM-MUSIC PRODUCTION For a few months now they have had a high demand for music production work where Depot Sound produces the composition and music content as well as records and mixes it. A current project they are really enjoying is a trailer for ‘The Mannequin Maker’, (working title) a documentary by Rachael Allan about Purfex, New Zealand’s last mannequin factory. This has entailed the production of many songs and scores in the search for material that supports the look and feel of the film whilst also staying true to its nature. Depot Sound have approached this from different angles such as composing music real -time with a band along to the film trailer, to defining genres of music they feel ‘suit’ or accompany the film’s imagery and content. They have also focused on different characters as well as listened to incidental background sounds (such as radio in the factory) that were captured in the film’s various scenes. Building on this idea, and possibly the most engaging technique for them, was to imagine the sorts of music the people in the documentary might listen to themselves, and then to develop music to suit their personalities.

Social media is a term tossed around a lot these days and is used to foster an interactive dialogue between organisations, communities, and individuals. We’re told it’s the way to keep in touch, develop your profile and sell your ideas, service and products. In this ArtsLab seminar Lewis Bostock of Bostock Media, introduces the currently used social media tools and identifies the most effective tools to reach specific audience. Lewis demonstrates in his own inimitably entertaining style how to set up some of the most useful sites and tips to maximise your use of media such as Facebook, Twitter, Linked In, blogs, Youtube and more. Does social media really work? An attendee at the most recent workshop writes: “Thanks to the help of Mr Bostock’s Toolkit our stats are higher than ever online. Online presence has made the studio and its services more known and clients contacting have increased.” Entertainment lawyer David McLaughlin presents invaluable information on issues that invariably affect creatives such as copyright and privacy. For any creative wanting to attract as wide and diverse an audience as possible this workshop is essential, and entertaining. The next New Media and Legal Issues Seminar is Wednesday 13 June and will run from 9.30am to 3.30pm. The cost is $30. All ArtsLab workshops and seminars are held at Kerr Street Artspace, Devonport. To find out more about ArtsLab or to register your attendance, please contact Lynn Lawton on E: pace@depotartspace.co.nz PN www.depotartspace.co.nz

On another note, Depot Sound are now mastering the music they recorded for their last article in Ponsonby News on ‘Mobile Recording’. Check out their websites for band Hospital Sports recorded live at the Devonport Methodist Church! PN www.depotsound.co.nz; www.myspace.com/depotsoundrecording; www.facebook.com

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photography: Camile McCawley

ARTS + CULTURE

JOHN MINTO with megaphone - Aotea Square 2012

FESTIVAL OF PHOTOGRAPHY LOOKING AT AUCKLAND THROUGH THE WINDOWS OF DEVONPORT Until 24 June - Throughout Devonport CAMILLE MCCAWLEY: 365 COMMERCIAL ROAD - SQUATTER SERIES Until 24 June – Side Door Gallery The Depot JULIA DURKIN, ELAINE SMITH: OCCUPY Until 15 June - Outerspace Gallery The Depot CLARE GOODWIN: PICNIC AT WAIAU PA 16 - 30 June - Outerspace Gallery The Depot The history of photography is an interesting one with the first permanent photographic image said to have been produced in 1826 and used primarily as a method to document a place of interest or as a means to record oneself, actions, travels or position in society. Has this act or approach to image-making changed? Auckland Photographic Festival; inside and outside of The Depot. An array of intriguing projects will be taking place that delve into this question, through an abundance of images. These images explore the way we choose to live our lives, the influences of our past, the environment around us as we look at ‘Auckland Through the Windows of Devonport’, to “Occupy” the international movement set up to protest social and economic inequality. Photography is about the art of observation and the act of catching a moment in time to build on our awareness. Now is the time for you to engage in each of the stories and the small universe that every photo presents. As the inspirational photographer Elliott Erwit once said “…it has little to do with the things you see and everything to do with the way you see them.” PN THE DEPOT, 28 Clarence Street, Devonport T: 09 963 2331 www.depotartspace.co.nz

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

TIM SHADBOLT addressing a crowd of protestors for peace. Photographer unknown c.1964 from The Cultural Mapping Project collection, courtesy of the Museum of the Vernacular.

‘MAPPING PEACE’ The Cultural Mapping Project’s exhibition ‘Sum of The Parts’, opening at The Depot in August, is developing rapidly with different people getting involved weekly, daily and sometimes hourly! The ‘Peace Map’ (featured previously in Ponsonby News) is one of the key installations in production for the exhibition and it’s generating a lot of interest. It is a celebration of the many events and individuals who have helped and continue to help define Aotearoa New Zealand as a peaceful nation and is a glimpse of how we might sustain peace in the future. All sorts of information and ephemera are flooding in from around the country for inclusion in the map. Photographer Gil Hanly, artist Margaret Lawlor-Bartlett, architect Tony Watkins and peace activist Ruth Coombes are kindly assisting us with their first-hand knowledge of the peace movement. The Peace Foundation is helping to promote and encourage involvement in the map. The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) has contributed a chronological presentation about women in the peace movement. The Torpedo Bay Navy Museum is contributing work from their exhibition ‘BOMB GONE’, an important exhibit to revisit this year as 8 June will be the 25th anniversary of the New Zealand Nuclear Free Zone, Disarmament, and Arms Control Act legislation. Putting important things like these ‘on the map’ is part of The Cultural Mapping Project’s ongoing investigation into our dynamic and diverse cultural heritage as New Zealanders; our vernacular. PN For more information email erin.forsyth@depotartspace.co.nz or visit www.nzculturalgenealogymapping.wordpress.com

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT MOMENTUM GALLERY ROSS JONES - 'DO NOT DISTURB' 'I visited an open home similar to this while house hunting. The tranquillity of the setting and manicured hedges inspired me to paint a scene wrapped up in the warmth of a hot summer’s day - to find a place to enjoy the peace and calm. The pool offered both a cooling and peaceful vista and the whole back yard seemed idyllic. Not everything in life is perfect but to escape from it and enjoy your own time is sometimes perfect enough' - Soulful words indeed from Ross Jones on his spectacular new piece this month, 'Do Not Disturb'. www.jonesthepainter.com

JASON KELLY - 'AOTEAROA DOLLS'

SHOWING AT WHITESPACE FROM 19 JUNE “I am obviously not a landscape artist!” Locust Jones is an artist possessed. It doesn’t seem like he really wants to create, necessarily; he’s just got the bug. Like my desk, which looks messy although I guarantee it’s organised and I know where everything is, Jones’ works might initially seem chaotic but it’s obvious that each expressive mark was made with intent. As a result, his ink works and drawings have a satisfying sense of vigour and clean, raw honesty: his pencil often jerks, but it’s never hesitant; his words are often bumbling, but never contrived - “it is not intended for people to read it’s intended for my sanity!”. This rawness is matched by Jones’ juicy thick ink outlines and bold colours - all balanced with surprising skill considering the apparent spontaneity of execution. Excerpt of review by Renée Gerlich: Salient Magazine Christchurch born, now residing in Sydney, Locust Jones was listed as one of the 50 top collectible artists in Australia in 2011, he has a Bachelor of Visual Arts from Sydney College of the Arts.

Momentum newcomer Jason Kelly presents the first of his exclusive release of limited edition prints, starting with 'Aotearoa Dolls'. This piece celebrates being happy with ones image - 'There is always imperfection in perfection, not only for women but for blokes also. Its feel and composition giving New Zealand's ownership in themselves no matter what they look like or who they are' - Based in Sumner, CHC, Jason is a well established artist with 10 plus years of exhibiting and published commercial art. www.jasonkellydesign.co.nz

SHANE HANSEN - 'FRIENDLY DUO - MOMENTUM SPECIAL EDITION' The Friendly print selection explores Shane’s inner thoughts and feelings relating to his childhood and how that has affected his adult life. The illustration style is influenced by the old children’s books that Shane was read as a youngster. The imagery portrays child innocence and sensitivity while the central Friendly character is exhibiting the relationship with one’s culture and beliefs. Momentum serve up a treat this month by bringing two of this stunning collection together. This piece is custom all the way - from conception to creation; a doubled up one-off Kiwiana sensation not to be missed. www.shanehansen.co.nz

GREG STRAIGHT - 'REPETITIVE BEATS'

Locust Jones’ graphic illustrations depict a timeline or diary of his concerns about global issues and contemporary international politics. His thought-provoking images are sourced through the media and reinterpreted in his own unique way. PN

Greg Straight bursts with musical energy by cleverly simplifying the forms of music making objects into a rhythmical pattern. 'Repetitive Beats' is a joyously contemporary artwork with a refreshing urban feel. Here we see Greg stepping away from his usual Kiwiana inspired prints to illustrate a complex collection of poptastic musical icons. Boom! www.gregstraight.com PN

WHITESPACE, 12 Crummer Road T: 09 361 6331 www.whitespace.co.nz

MOMENTUM GALLERY, 1/182 Jervois Road T: 09 376 4749 www.momentumgallery.co.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT LETHAM GALLERY BEATRICE CARLSON - VIEW 8 – 24 June, Preview: 7 June 6pm As a part of The Auckland Festival of Photography, Beatrice Carlson’s View, previews this month with energetically charged depictions of our ever-changing point of view. Carlson presents a visual dialogue about the interpretation of an image, from a photograph to a solar plate etching, from one place to another. Then, it becomes a personal point of view; from one subject into another, from one medium onto another.

photography: Jason Hailes

Unique palettes, beautifully framed prints and one of a kind furniture items together make up View this month. You won’t miss the ‘wrapped’ façade of the gallery, so join in the celebration at the exclusive preview.

PETER URLICH and DAVE McCARTNEY

CHEERS TO THE WHISKEY LIVE 2012 In honour of New Zealand Music Month, Ponsonby Road’s bar and music venue THE WHISKEY put together an extraordinary 99 live acts over 25 nights, able to be viewed in the extraordinary intimacy of their 100 capacity venue. Gigs ranged from The Adults to Gin Wigmore to Che Fu to David Dallas - but Ponsonby News loves this picture of Peter Urlich, joined by Dave McCartney on stage during week four’s first night. Big ups to THE WHISKEY owner Andrew Bruce and his team, who we are sure do it mostly for love. PN (JULIE ROULSTON)

FRAME ART GALLERY BY LETHAM GALLERY Letham Gallery presents a picture framing company run by people who have seen it all! Frame Art Gallery by Letham Gallery are specialists in cost effective framing solutions for anything you need framing. Born from a need for competitively priced framing for art collectors, artists and galleries alike, they have combined the knowledge of their artists, the requests of our customers and the requirements of our own so they can cater to your every need. Frame Art Gallery takes advantage of shared premises with no overheads to pass on to you! Call in and see their friendly, knowledgeable, innovative team today or contact them for a quotation. PN LETHAM GALLERY, 35 Jervois Road T: 09 360 5217 www.lethangallery.co.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE PERFORMING AT Q THEATRE TOUCH COMPASS 15TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON RUN, SLIP, SPRING! 27-30 JUNE, 2012 Since 1997, Touch Compass Dance Company’s artistic director, Catherine Chappell has been quietly re-directing the focus of New Zealand dance and theatre audiences to the genre of integrated dance, by creating and presenting professional dance works with a company of disabled and non-disabled dancers. Fifteen years later, not only is the company now considered mainstream, it is also funded at the highest level by Creative New Zealand to create and reflect back the stories of New Zealanders to those in the wider community. To celebrate this remarkable achievement Touch Compass will be performing three exciting dance works at Q Theatre. Two of works ‘Run’ and ‘Spring’ have been created especially for the celebrations; ‘Run’ by UK-based Australian choreographer Marc Brew and ‘Spring’ by Ms Chappell. Ms Chappell has utilised the egalitarian dance form Contact Improvisation, but adding a twist that involves the use of bungee ropes to enable the contact between dancers to also create an aerial component. Rounding off the programme is a work created for the company by internationally acclaimed choreographer, Carol Brown entitled, ‘Slip I’m not falling I’m just hanging on for as long as you hold me.’ Dancer Jesse Johnstone-Steele a founding member of Touch Compass and recipient of a New Zealand Downs Syndrome Association’s National Achievement Award 2011 will be dancing along with six performers in this outstanding dance piece. To book or for more information contact: T: 09 309 9771 E: boxoffice@qtheatre.co.nz Q THEATRE, 305 Queen Street FLYING DANCE STUDIO UNITES DISABLED AND NON DISABLED DANCERS Possibly New Zealand’s first and largest aerial capable, wheelchair accessible dance studio was opened at the end of March this year. The Company renovated a warehouse and added a sprung dance floor that spans 15 metres by 24 metres can accommodate over 30 wheelchair dancers. The studio is an incredibly exciting new development not just for the company and the dancers but also for Auckland where there is a shortage of accessible rehearsal space for integrated dance. PN

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ARTS + CULTURE FESTIVAL OF PHOTOGRAPHY 2012 FESTIVAL TUESDAY CIRCUIT Tuesday 5 June 6pm to 9pm Dash off to an exhibition, and then when you’ve finished being impressed by the depth and breadth of New Zealand photography, just either wait for another car that’ll whisk you off to be impressed again by another exhibition or make tracks of your own to the next venue. Simply turn up at any of the venues and look for the drop off/pick up point. We aim to have a FREE car pick up/drop off every 15 minutes, but if taking a public bus please note that NORMAL FARES APPLY. NUMBER 4 GALLERY, 4 Cross Street, Newton www.photographyfestival.org.nz

JON ADRIE HOEKSTRA - NACHTRECORDER

WHITESPACE - JON ADRIE HOEKSTRA Until 16 June On an arterial road in Münster, Germany, a shop was rented for two months. What happened on the block between midnight and 6 am was photographed and documented. After six weeks, the recordings were presented to the local residents in an exhibition. Additionally, a newspaper was published. Jon Adrie Hoekstra studied at the University of Applied Sciences in Münster, at the International Center of Photography, New York, and at the New York Center for Art and Media Studies. WHITESPACE, 12 Crummer Road T: 09 361 6331 www.whitespace.co.nz

LETHAM GALLERY VIEW Opens: Thursday 7 June 6pm View is about the interpretation of an image, from a photograph to a solarplate etching, from one place to another. It is a personal point of view, from one subject into another, from one medium onto another: solarplate etching, digital print on perspex, giclée print. LETHAM GALLERY, 35 Jervois Road T: 09 360 5217 www.lethangallery.co.nz

SATELLITE - NATURAL LIGHT Opens: Friday 8 June 6pm A collaborative exhibition of personal works by three very different photographers; Leon Rose and Wendy Brandon show their passion for the landscape while, Geoff Hedley is showing his collection of inspiring Macro floral works. SATELLITE GALLERY, Corner St Benedicts Street & Newton Road T: 09 307 6416 www.satellitegallery.co.nz

GEOFF HEDLEY - NATURAL LIGHT

BLACK ASTERICK CONVERGENCE Opens: Thursday 14 June 6.30pm Exploring a theme of convergence, artists Cathy Carter and Denise Batchelor seek to bring the viewer’s imagination and body to a psychologically compelling encounter. Their aim: to embody seeing as experience rather than merely as observation. BLACK ASTERISK GALLERY, 10 Ponsonby Road M: 021 040 1168 www.blackasterisk.co.nz

MELANIE ROGERS - RICHARD ORJIS Opens: Thursday 14 June 11am New works showing by acclaimed photographic artist, Richard Orjis. MELANIE ROGER GALLERY, 226 Jervois Road T: 09 360 1151 www.melanierogergallery.com

KIRSTY GRIFFIN - MIS AMIGOS DE MESTIZO

ARTSTATION - VARIOUS ARTISTS (Small Histories) Saturday 16 June, 2-3pm Small and personal histories are given the same treatment as grand historical events in this photographic exhibition. Where photography not only represents important narratives but also the overlooked, the hardly noticed, and the archived, and captures the history of the everyday. ARTSTATION, 1 Ponsonby Road T 09 376 3221 www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/artstation

TWO ROOMS - DANIEL CROOK Until 7 July Melbourne-based New Zealander, Daniel Crooks breath-taking photographic and digital video works have been exhibited in major international exhibitions. Crooks’ Imaginary Objects series is abstract but engaging, still, but moving. TWO ROOMS, 16 Putiki Street T: 09 360 5900 www.tworooms.co.nz

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photography: Jo Barrett

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SOTO PARTY, ST MARY’S BAY

MONDAY 30 APRIL Ricky Lee owner of the much loved St Mary’s Bay Japanese restaurant SOTO celebrated their fabulous interior decor refurbishment and their amazing new menu. Many well known foodies and local Ponsonby people enjoyed a sit down dinner with tastings from the new menu along with exquisite wines to match. 1. SOTO owner Ricky Lee and Rebecca Jones; 2. Abbe and Damian Vaughn; 3. Chris Swannell and Michael Hooper; 4. Annabelle White and Jeffrey Van Vorsetter; 5. Sarah Wall, Rebecca Jones and Sarah Nicholson; 6. Ai Ishikawa and Shu Yatsuzaki; 7. Andre Taber and Kerry Tyack; 8. Denise L’Estrange-Corbet and Norrie Montgomery

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photography: Jo Barrett

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OPENING NIGHT AT INDEPENDENT SAINTS GALLERY, PONSONBY WEDNESDAY 9 JUNE ‘Walking is Progressive Falling’ works by JIN NAN DENG

1. Kido Deng and Hin Chan; 2. Kido Deng and Nirmala Cooper owner of Independent Saints Gallery; 3. Greg Dyer and Saffron Kingan; 4. Roy and Zina INDEPENDENT SAINTS GALLERY, 56 Brown Street www.independentsaints.org

OUT + ABOUT

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JAMMING WITH JESS Plum Green is Ponsonby’s best kept secret but in a few months time we are going to have to share her with the rest of the world. The charming daughter of a Parisian show girl and a saxophone-playing Jewish intellectual has already released two EPs and is gearing up to release her first album. Plum says that the album is a little bit heavier than her last release but still features her strong folk tones. The up and coming singer has wanted to a live a life filled with music ever since she was a young girl. She first started writing songs at the age of eight after a family friend gave her an organ. Plum then went on to sing for her high school brass band and perform many live shows throughout her teenage years. Her video for the song ‘Hard’ is still regularly played on Juice Music Channel. The new album is funded by Plum and supporters of her music “I put it off but in the end I needed to ask people to help. That’s the reality of recording.” Such is the loyal support of her fan-base that the funding is almost half-way there. Over the years she has accumulated a strong following because of her raw talent and unique stage presence. Plum has done shows all over Auckland, including a couple of performances at Ponsonby venues One2One Café and Crib Bar. She has introduced pre-sales of her album before it is released in the hope of raising money to go towards her band and the other artists who are helping her out in the recording studio. She is also offering t-shirts, stickers, and poster artwork. This young lady is someone that is bound to make an impact on the New Zealand music scene. Her soaring vocals intertwined with playful guitar chords work well to create a strong sound. To see Plum’s funding process or to donate you can go to www.plumgreen.co.nz and follow the link there. PN

Outlets PONSONBY NEWS

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FREEMANS BAY

Glengarry, Cnr Sale and Wellesley Streets Kellands Real Estate, 4 Drake Street New World, Victoria Park Sale St, 7 Sale Street

GREY LYNN

Barfoot & Thompson, 533 Great North Road Barkley Manor, 400 - 402 Great North Road Grey Lynn Community Centre, 520 Richmond Road Grey Lynn Community Library, 474 Great North Road Raw Essentials, 401B Richmond Road Ripe, 172 Richmond Road Sliced,104 Richmond Road Tapac, Motions Road Vetcare, 408 Great North Road

HERNE BAY

Five Loaves & 2 Fish, 206 Jervois Road Icing on the Cake, 188 Jervois Road

KINGSLAND

Atomic, 420c New North Road

MT EDEN

Citta Outlet Store, Corner Enfield & Normanby Road Sabato, 57 Normanby Road

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PONSONBY NEWS is published on the first Friday of each month excluding January. Copies go quickly so be quick to collect yours from any of the following outlets. The issue is also published on our website www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

NEWMARKET

Planet Ayurveda, 41 Gillies Avenue Studio Italia, 96 Carlton Gore Road Taylor Boutique, 1 Teed Street

NEWTON

Benediction Café, 30 St Benedicts Street Design 55, 55 Upper Queen Street

PARNELL

Jane Daniels, 2 Birdwood Cresent Essenze, 285 Parnell Road Parnell Community Centre, 545 Parnell Road

PONSONBY

Artstation, 1 Ponsonby Road Barfoot & Thompson, 184 Ponsonby Road Chapel Bar, 147 Ponsonby Road Fitness Trainer, 36 Jervois Road Leys Institute, 20 St Mary’s Road Mag Nation, 123 Ponsonby Road Ponsonby Community Centre, 20 Ponsonby Terrace Spa Ayurda, 213 Ponsonby Road Whitespace, 12 Crummer Road World, 97 Ponsonby Road

WESTMERE

Glengarry, 164 Garnet Road PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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June'12 - PONSONBY NEWS  

FEBRUARY'12 - PONSONBY NE... PONSONBY - anyone NOT heard of it? We're Auckland's most talked about part of town. This eMag will hit Ponsonb...

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